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  1. Biomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Web Feet K-8, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This annotated subject guide to Web sites and additional resources focuses on biomes. Specifies age levels for resources that include Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, audios, and magazines; includes professional resources; and presents a relevant class activity. (LRW)

  2. Biomes computed from simulated climatologies

    SciTech Connect

    Claussen, M.; Esch, M.

    1994-01-01

    The biome model of Prentice et al. is used to predict global patterns of potential natural plant formations, or biomes, from climatologies simulated by ECHAM, a model used for climate simulations at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie. This study undertaken in order to show the advantage of this biome model in diagnosing the performance of a climate model and assessing effects of past and future climate changes predicted by a climate model. Good overall agreement is found between global patterns of biomes computed from observed and simulated data of present climate. But there are also major discrepancies indicated by a difference in biomes in Australia, in the Kalahari Desert, and in the Middle West of North America. These discrepancies can be traced back to in simulated rainfall as well as summer or winter temperatures. Global patterns of biomes computed from an ice age simulation reveal that North America, Europe, and Siberia should have been covered largely by tundra and taiga, whereas only small differences are for the tropical rain forests. A potential northeast shift of biomes is expected from a simulation with enhanced CO{sub 2} concentration according to the IPCC Scenario A. Little change is seen in the tropical rain forest and the Sahara. Since the biome model used is not capable of predicting chances in vegetation patterns due to a rapid climate change, the latter simulation to be taken as a prediction of chances in conditions favourable for the existence of certain biomes, not as a reduction of a future distribution of biomes. 15 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. North American Biome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The North America biome includes the major ecoregions that make up the land area of Canada, the United States, Mexico, and countries in Central America. The biome is bordered to the north by the Arctic Ocean, to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, to the west and south by the Pacific Ocean, and to the s...

  4. Evolution of the indoor biome.

    PubMed

    Martin, Laura J; Adams, Rachel I; Bateman, Ashley; Bik, Holly M; Hawks, John; Hird, Sarah M; Hughes, David; Kembel, Steven W; Kinney, Kerry; Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis; Levy, Gabriel; McClain, Craig; Meadow, James F; Medina, Raul F; Mhuireach, Gwynne; Moreau, Corrie S; Munshi-South, Jason; Nichols, Lauren M; Palmer, Clare; Popova, Laura; Schal, Coby; Täubel, Martin; Trautwein, Michelle; Ugalde, Juan A; Dunn, Robert R

    2015-04-01

    Few biologists have studied the evolutionary processes at work in indoor environments. Yet indoor environments comprise approximately 0.5% of ice-free land area--an area as large as the subtropical coniferous forest biome. Here we review the emerging subfield of 'indoor biome' studies. After defining the indoor biome and tracing its deep history, we discuss some of its evolutionary dimensions. We restrict our examples to the species found in human houses--a subset of the environments constituting the indoor biome--and offer preliminary hypotheses to advance the study of indoor evolution. Studies of the indoor biome are situated at the intersection of evolutionary ecology, anthropology, architecture, and human ecology and are well suited for citizen science projects, public outreach, and large-scale international collaborations. PMID:25770744

  5. Disturbance maintains alternative biome states.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Vinícius de L; Hirota, Marina; Oliveira, Rafael S; Pausas, Juli G

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms controlling the distribution of biomes remains a challenge. Although tropical biome distribution has traditionally been explained by climate and soil, contrasting vegetation types often occur as mosaics with sharp boundaries under very similar environmental conditions. While evidence suggests that these biomes are alternative states, empirical broad-scale support to this hypothesis is still lacking. Using community-level field data and a novel resource-niche overlap approach, we show that, for a wide range of environmental conditions, fire feedbacks maintain savannas and forests as alternative biome states in both the Neotropics and the Afrotropics. In addition, wooded grasslands and savannas occurred as alternative grassy states in the Afrotropics, depending on the relative importance of fire and herbivory feedbacks. These results are consistent with landscape scale evidence and suggest that disturbance is a general factor driving and maintaining alternative biome states and vegetation mosaics in the tropics. PMID:26493189

  6. TOWARD A RULE-BASED BIOME MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current projections of the response of the biosphere to global climatic change indicate as much as 50% to 90% spatial displacement of extratropical biomes. he mechanism of spatial shift could be dominated by either 1) competitive displacement of northern biomes by southern biomes...

  7. Biosphere 2's Marsh Biome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Jennifer; Goodridge, Kelven

    1997-01-01

    The Marsh Biome, which was modeled after the mangroves and marshes of southwest Florida, has an area of 441.2 sq m separated into three hydrologically independent sections: the Freshwater, Oligohaline and Salt Marshes. The divisions are made based on their salinity (approximately 0, 4, and 34 ppt. respectively), but they also contain different biological communities. The Freshwater and Oligohaline Marshes are mostly filled with various grasses and several trees, while the Salt Marsh houses regions of red, black, and white mangroves (Rhizophora mangle, Avicennia germinans, and Languncularia racemosa respectively). Overall, there are an estimated 80 species of plants within the biome. Water in the Salt Marsh follows a meandering stream from the algal turf scrubbers (apparatuses that clean the water of its nutrients and heavy metals while increasing dissolved oxygen levels) which have an outlet in the Salt Marsh section near sites 4 and 5 to the Fringing Red Mangrove section. The sections of the Salt Marsh are separated by walls of concrete with openings to allow the stream to flow through. Throughout this study, conducted through the months of June and July, many conditions within the biome remained fairly constant. The temperature was within a degree or two of 25 C, mostly depending on whether the sample site was in direct sunlight or shaded. The pH throughout the Salt Marsh was 8.0 +/- 0.2, and the lower salinity waters only dropped below this soon after rains. The water rdepth and dissolved oxygen varied, however, between sites.

  8. 47 CFR 13.10 - Licensee address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Licensee address. 13.10 Section 13.10 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMERCIAL RADIO OPERATORS General § 13.10 Licensee address. In accordance with § 1.923 of this chapter all applications must specify an address where...

  9. 25 CFR 307.13 - Licensee's responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Licensee's responsibility. 307.13 Section 307.13 Indians INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NAVAJO ALL-WOOL WOVEN FABRICS; USE OF GOVERNMENT CERTIFICATE OF GENUINENESS § 307.13 Licensee's responsibility. Certificates may be attached only to products which are in the ownership...

  10. 25 CFR 307.13 - Licensee's responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Licensee's responsibility. 307.13 Section 307.13 Indians INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NAVAJO ALL-WOOL WOVEN FABRICS; USE OF GOVERNMENT CERTIFICATE OF GENUINENESS § 307.13 Licensee's responsibility. Certificates may be attached only to products which are in the ownership...

  11. 25 CFR 307.13 - Licensee's responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Licensee's responsibility. 307.13 Section 307.13 Indians INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NAVAJO ALL-WOOL WOVEN FABRICS; USE OF GOVERNMENT CERTIFICATE OF GENUINENESS § 307.13 Licensee's responsibility. Certificates may be attached only to products which are in the ownership...

  12. 25 CFR 307.13 - Licensee's responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Licensee's responsibility. 307.13 Section 307.13 Indians INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NAVAJO ALL-WOOL WOVEN FABRICS; USE OF GOVERNMENT CERTIFICATE OF GENUINENESS § 307.13 Licensee's responsibility. Certificates may be attached only to products which are in the ownership...

  13. 25 CFR 307.13 - Licensee's responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Licensee's responsibility. 307.13 Section 307.13 Indians INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NAVAJO ALL-WOOL WOVEN FABRICS; USE OF GOVERNMENT CERTIFICATE OF GENUINENESS § 307.13 Licensee's responsibility. Certificates may be attached only to products which are in the ownership...

  14. Biome Context and Lotic Ecosystem Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodds, W. K.; Rüegg, J.; Sheehan, K.; Song, C.; Ballantyne, F.; Baker, C.; Bowden, W. B.; Farrell, K.; Flinn, M. B.; Garcia, E.; Harms, T.; Jones, J.; Koenig, L.; Kominoski, J. S.; McDowell, W. H.; McMaster, D.; Parker, S.; Trentman, M. T.; Whiles, M.; Wollheim, W. M.; Argerich, A.; Penaluna, B.

    2015-12-01

    The stream biome gradient concept suggests that the biome in which a stream is embedded influences stream community structure and key ecosystem functions including primary production, community respiration, and nutrient uptake. We measured these key processes with whole-stream reach methods and smaller-scale incubations in numerous locations within stream networks across two years as part of a project on scaling ecosystem rates. Measurements were repeated across 7 biomes (tropical forest, tropical savanna, temperate deciduous forest, temperate rain forest, tallgrass prairie, boreal forest, and tundra). We found strong effects of light on primary production within and among biomes as a function of variable canopy among reaches and biomes. Community respiration and ammonium uptake were decoupled from light relative to gross primary production. Ammonium uptake rarely exhibited saturation with elevated concentrations, regardless of background concentrations or biome. We hypothesize that even though biomes exhibit major differences in gross primary production, the overall variation in community respiration and ammonium uptake is similar across biomes because respiration and uptake depend on carbon irrespective if it is derived from allochthonous or autochthonous inputs. Respiration and uptake are expected to vary depending upon factors not as tightly connected to the biome a stream is embedded in.

  15. Toward a rule-based biome model

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, R.P.; King, G.A.; Koerper, G.

    1991-01-01

    Current projections of the response of the biosphere to global climatic change indicate as much as 50% to 90% spatial displacement of extratropical biomes. The mechanism of spatial shift could be dominated by either (1) competitive displacement of northern biomes by southern biomes, or (2) drought-induced dieback of areas susceptible to change. The current suite of global biosphere models cannot distinguish between these two processes, thus determining the need for a mechanistically based biome model. The model is in an early stage of development and will require several enhancements, including explicit simulation of potential evapotranspiration, extension to boreal and tropical biomes, a shift from steady-state to transient dynamics, and validation on other continents.

  16. 10 CFR 26.125 - Licensee testing facility personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Licensee testing facility personnel. 26.125 Section 26.125 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.125 Licensee testing facility personnel. (a) Each licensee testing facility shall have one or more...

  17. 10 CFR 26.125 - Licensee testing facility personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Licensee testing facility personnel. 26.125 Section 26.125 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.125 Licensee testing facility personnel. (a) Each licensee testing facility shall have one or more...

  18. 10 CFR 26.125 - Licensee testing facility personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Licensee testing facility personnel. 26.125 Section 26.125 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.125 Licensee testing facility personnel. (a) Each licensee testing facility shall have one or more...

  19. 10 CFR 26.125 - Licensee testing facility personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Licensee testing facility personnel. 26.125 Section 26.125 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.125 Licensee testing facility personnel. (a) Each licensee testing facility shall have one or more...

  20. 10 CFR 26.125 - Licensee testing facility personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Licensee testing facility personnel. 26.125 Section 26.125 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Licensee Testing Facilities § 26.125 Licensee testing facility personnel. (a) Each licensee testing facility shall have one or more...

  1. Thresholds for boreal biome transitions.

    PubMed

    Scheffer, Marten; Hirota, Marina; Holmgren, Milena; Van Nes, Egbert H; Chapin, F Stuart

    2012-12-26

    Although the boreal region is warming twice as fast as the global average, the way in which the vast boreal forests and tundras may respond is poorly understood. Using satellite data, we reveal marked alternative modes in the frequency distributions of boreal tree cover. At the northern end and at the dry continental southern extremes, treeless tundra and steppe, respectively, are the only possible states. However, over a broad intermediate temperature range, these treeless states coexist with boreal forest (∼75% tree cover) and with two more open woodland states (∼20% and ∼45% tree cover). Intermediate tree covers (e.g., ∼10%, ∼30%, and ∼60% tree cover) between these distinct states are relatively rare, suggesting that they may represent unstable states where the system dwells only transiently. Mechanisms for such instabilities remain to be unraveled, but our results have important implications for the anticipated response of these ecosystems to climatic change. The data reveal that boreal forest shows no gradual decline in tree cover toward its limits. Instead, our analysis suggests that it becomes less resilient in the sense that it may more easily shift into a sparse woodland or treeless state. Similarly, the relative scarcity of the intermediate ∼10% tree cover suggests that tundra may shift relatively abruptly to a more abundant tree cover. If our inferences are correct, climate change may invoke massive nonlinear shifts in boreal biomes. PMID:23236159

  2. Thresholds for boreal biome transitions

    PubMed Central

    Scheffer, Marten; Hirota, Marina; Holmgren, Milena; Van Nes, Egbert H.; Chapin, F. Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Although the boreal region is warming twice as fast as the global average, the way in which the vast boreal forests and tundras may respond is poorly understood. Using satellite data, we reveal marked alternative modes in the frequency distributions of boreal tree cover. At the northern end and at the dry continental southern extremes, treeless tundra and steppe, respectively, are the only possible states. However, over a broad intermediate temperature range, these treeless states coexist with boreal forest (∼75% tree cover) and with two more open woodland states (∼20% and ∼45% tree cover). Intermediate tree covers (e.g., ∼10%, ∼30%, and ∼60% tree cover) between these distinct states are relatively rare, suggesting that they may represent unstable states where the system dwells only transiently. Mechanisms for such instabilities remain to be unraveled, but our results have important implications for the anticipated response of these ecosystems to climatic change. The data reveal that boreal forest shows no gradual decline in tree cover toward its limits. Instead, our analysis suggests that it becomes less resilient in the sense that it may more easily shift into a sparse woodland or treeless state. Similarly, the relative scarcity of the intermediate ∼10% tree cover suggests that tundra may shift relatively abruptly to a more abundant tree cover. If our inferences are correct, climate change may invoke massive nonlinear shifts in boreal biomes. PMID:23236159

  3. CLIMATE CONSTRAINTS AND ISSUES OF SCALE CONTROLLING REGIONAL BIOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The prosepct of climate change threatens to cause large changes in regional biomes. hese effects could be in the form of qualitative changes within biomes, as well as spatial changes in the boundaries of biomes. he boundaries, or ecotones, between biomes have been suggested as po...

  4. Holocene biome shifts in the East Asian monsoon margin region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallmeyer, Anne; Claussen, Martin; Ni, Jian; Wang, Yongbo; Cao, Xianyong; Herzschuh, Ulrike

    2013-04-01

    East Asia is affected by three major atmospheric circulation systems determining the regional climate and vegetation distribution: The moisture advected by the Indian and East Asian monsoon support the growing of forest in large parts of Eastern China. The influence of the monsoon gets weaker further on the continent yielding a transition of forest to steppe and of steppe to desert in Central East Asia (e.g. Inner Mongolia) where the dry westerly winds prevail. Particularly in these transition zones, vegetation is supposed to be very sensitive to climate change and strong feedbacks are expected in case of climate and vegetation shifts due to large environmental changes (Feng et al., 2006). During mid-Holocene, cyclic variations in the Earth's orbit around the sun led to an enhancement of the Asian monsoon system probably causing strong shifts in the biome distribution. According to reconstructions, the steppe-forest margin moved to the northwest by about 500km (Yu et al., 2000) and the desert area in China and Inner Mongolia was substantially reduced compared to today (Feng et al., 2006). However, in the complex environment of Asia, the locally limited reconstructions may not portray the general vegetation change. To get a systematic overview on the spatial pattern of biome shifts in the Asian monsoon - westerly wind transition zone since mid-Holocene, we use the diagnostic vegetation model BIOME4 and force this model with climate anomalies from different transient Holocene climate simulations performed in coupled atmosphere-ocean-vegetation models. The main aims of this study are to a) get a consistent ensemble of possible changes in biome distribution since the mid-Holocene b) test the robustness of the simulated vegetation changes and quantify the differences between the models, and c) allow for a better comparison of simulated and reconstructed vegetation changes. Preliminary results confirm the general trend seen in the reconstructions. The simulations reveal

  5. The underestimated biodiversity of tropical grassy biomes.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Brett P; Andersen, Alan N; Parr, Catherine L

    2016-09-19

    For decades, there has been enormous scientific interest in tropical savannahs and grasslands, fuelled by the recognition that they are a dynamic and potentially unstable biome, requiring periodic disturbance for their maintenance. However, that scientific interest has not translated into widespread appreciation of, and concern about threats to, their biodiversity. In terms of biodiversity, grassy biomes are considered poor cousins of the other dominant biome of the tropics-forests. Simple notions of grassy biomes being species-poor cannot be supported; for some key taxa, such as vascular plants, this may be valid, but for others it is not. Here, we use an analysis of existing data to demonstrate that high-rainfall tropical grassy biomes (TGBs) have vertebrate species richness comparable with that of forests, despite having lower plant diversity. The Neotropics stand out in terms of both overall vertebrate species richness and number of range-restricted vertebrate species in TGBs. Given high rates of land-cover conversion in Neotropical grassy biomes, they should be a high priority for conservation and greater inclusion in protected areas. Fire needs to be actively maintained in these systems, and in many cases re-introduced after decades of inappropriate fire exclusion. The relative intactness of TGBs in Africa and Australia make them the least vulnerable to biodiversity loss in the immediate future. We argue that, like forests, TGBs should be recognized as a critical-but increasingly threatened-store of global biodiversity.This article is part of the themed issue 'Tropical grassy biomes: linking ecology, human use and conservation'. PMID:27502382

  6. 9 CFR 166.13 - Licensee responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Licensee responsibilities. 166.13 Section 166.13 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION General Provisions § 166.13...

  7. 9 CFR 166.13 - Licensee responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Licensee responsibilities. 166.13 Section 166.13 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION General Provisions § 166.13...

  8. 9 CFR 166.13 - Licensee responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Licensee responsibilities. 166.13 Section 166.13 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION General Provisions § 166.13...

  9. 9 CFR 166.13 - Licensee responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Licensee responsibilities. 166.13 Section 166.13 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION General Provisions § 166.13...

  10. 9 CFR 166.13 - Licensee responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Licensee responsibilities. 166.13 Section 166.13 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION General Provisions § 166.13...

  11. 44 CFR 352.4 - Licensee certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Licensee certification. 352.4 Section 352.4 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PREPAREDNESS COMMERCIAL NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS: EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS...

  12. 44 CFR 352.4 - Licensee certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Licensee certification. 352.4 Section 352.4 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PREPAREDNESS COMMERCIAL NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS: EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS...

  13. 44 CFR 352.4 - Licensee certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Licensee certification. 352.4 Section 352.4 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PREPAREDNESS COMMERCIAL NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS: EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS...

  14. 47 CFR 97.103 - Station licensee responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Station Operation Standards § 97.103 Station licensee responsibilities. (a... Rules. When the control operator is a different amateur operator than the station licensee, both...

  15. 47 CFR 97.103 - Station licensee responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Station Operation Standards § 97.103 Station licensee responsibilities. (a... Rules. When the control operator is a different amateur operator than the station licensee, both...

  16. 47 CFR 97.103 - Station licensee responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Station Operation Standards § 97.103 Station licensee responsibilities. (a... Rules. When the control operator is a different amateur operator than the station licensee, both...

  17. 47 CFR 97.103 - Station licensee responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Station Operation Standards § 97.103 Station licensee responsibilities. (a... Rules. When the control operator is a different amateur operator than the station licensee, both...

  18. 47 CFR 97.103 - Station licensee responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Station Operation Standards § 97.103 Station licensee responsibilities. (a... Rules. When the control operator is a different amateur operator than the station licensee, both...

  19. 47 CFR 101.1409 - Treatment of incumbent licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... GHz Band § 101.1409 Treatment of incumbent licensees. Terrestrial private operational fixed point-to... operations in the 12.2-12.7 GHz band. Incumbent public safety terrestrial point-to-point licensees may...

  20. 47 CFR 101.1409 - Treatment of incumbent licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... GHz Band § 101.1409 Treatment of incumbent licensees. Terrestrial private operational fixed point-to... operations in the 12.2-12.7 GHz band. Incumbent public safety terrestrial point-to-point licensees may...

  1. 47 CFR 3.76 - Licensee's liability for payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Licensee's liability for payment. 3.76 Section... ACCOUNTING AUTHORITIES IN MARITIME AND MARITIME MOBILE-SATELLITE RADIO SERVICES Enforcement § 3.76 Licensee's liability for payment. The U.S. ship station licensee bears ultimate responsibility for final payment of...

  2. 47 CFR 3.76 - Licensee's liability for payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Licensee's liability for payment. 3.76 Section... ACCOUNTING AUTHORITIES IN MARITIME AND MARITIME MOBILE-SATELLITE RADIO SERVICES Enforcement § 3.76 Licensee's liability for payment. The U.S. ship station licensee bears ultimate responsibility for final payment of...

  3. 10 CFR 72.160 - Licensee and certificate holder inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Licensee and certificate holder inspection. 72.160 Section 72.160 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT... WASTE Quality Assurance § 72.160 Licensee and certificate holder inspection. The licensee, applicant...

  4. Toward a rule-based biome model (journal article)

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, R.P.; King, G.A.; Koerper, G.

    1992-01-01

    The current projections of the response of the biosphere to global climatic change indicate as much as 50% to 90% spatial displacement of extratropical biomes. The mechanism of spatial shift could be dominated by either (1) competitive displacement of northern biomes by southern biomes, or (2) drought-induced dieback of areas susceptible to change. The current suite of global biosphere models cannot distinguish between these two processes, thus determining the need for a mechanistically based biome model.

  5. Biome Is Where the Art Is

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gooden, Kelly

    2005-01-01

    The author is surprised every year when fifth-grade students react to the study of biomes as if they've never given any thought to the differences across parts of the world. Sure, they've all heard of the tropical rain forest and the desert, but it seems as though they think the rest of the world is just some undefined area with climate, animals,…

  6. 13 CFR 107.200 - Adequate capital for Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Adequate capital for Licensees... INVESTMENT COMPANIES Qualifying for an SBIC License Capitalizing An Sbic § 107.200 Adequate capital for... Licensee, and to receive Leverage. (a) You must have enough Regulatory Capital to provide...

  7. 13 CFR 107.200 - Adequate capital for Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate capital for Licensees... INVESTMENT COMPANIES Qualifying for an SBIC License Capitalizing An Sbic § 107.200 Adequate capital for... Licensee, and to receive Leverage. (a) You must have enough Regulatory Capital to provide...

  8. 47 CFR 73.1216 - Licensee-conducted contests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Licensee-conducted contests. 73.1216 Section 73.1216 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1216 Licensee-conducted contests....

  9. 10 CFR 50.73 - Licensee event report system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Licensee event report system. 50.73 Section 50.73 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Inspections, Records, Reports, Notifications § 50.73 Licensee event report system. (a) Reportable events.(1) The holder of an operating license under this...

  10. 13 CFR 107.520 - Management Expenses of a Licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Management Expenses of a Licensee. 107.520 Section 107.520 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee Management and Compensation § 107.520...

  11. 27 CFR 478.94 - Sales or deliveries between licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sales or deliveries between licensees. 478.94 Section 478.94 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL... AMMUNITION Conduct of Business § 478.94 Sales or deliveries between licensees. A licensed importer,...

  12. 10 CFR 72.160 - Licensee and certificate holder inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Licensee and certificate holder inspection. 72.160 Section 72.160 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND REACTOR-RELATED GREATER THAN CLASS C WASTE Quality Assurance § 72.160 Licensee...

  13. 13 CFR 107.520 - Management Expenses of a Licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Management Expenses of a Licensee. 107.520 Section 107.520 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee Management and Compensation § 107.520...

  14. 13 CFR 107.501 - Identification as a Licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Identification as a Licensee. 107... INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee General Requirements § 107.501 Identification as a... under the Small Business Investment Act of 1958, as amended.”...

  15. 13 CFR 107.501 - Identification as a Licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Identification as a Licensee. 107... INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee General Requirements § 107.501 Identification as a... under the Small Business Investment Act of 1958, as amended.”...

  16. 13 CFR 107.501 - Identification as a Licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Identification as a Licensee. 107... INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee General Requirements § 107.501 Identification as a... under the Small Business Investment Act of 1958, as amended.”...

  17. 13 CFR 107.501 - Identification as a Licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Identification as a Licensee. 107... INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee General Requirements § 107.501 Identification as a... under the Small Business Investment Act of 1958, as amended.”...

  18. 13 CFR 107.501 - Identification as a Licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Identification as a Licensee. 107... INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee General Requirements § 107.501 Identification as a... under the Small Business Investment Act of 1958, as amended.”...

  19. Financial Statistics of Public Television Licensees: Fiscal Year 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, S. Young; Pedone, Ronald J.

    Basic financial statistics of public television licensees in the United States, Puerto Rico, Guam, and American Samoa for the 1971 fiscal year are listed. Data are given for 133 licensees which control 207 television stations. Information is compiled which relates to the allocation and disbursement of funds, income, direct operating costs, and…

  20. Microbes to Biomes at Berkeley Lab

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-28

    Microbes are the Earth's most abundant and diverse form of life. Berkeley Lab's Microbes to Biomes initiative -- which will take advantage of research expertise at the Joint Genome Institute, Advanced Light Source, Molecular Foundry, and the new computational science facility -- is designed to explore and reveal the interactions of microbes with one another and with their environment. Microbes power our planet’s biogeochemical cycles, provide nutrients to our plants, purify our water and are integral components in keeping the human body free of disease and may hold the key to the Earth’s future.

  1. Airborne remote sensing of forest biomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sader, Steven A.

    1987-01-01

    Airborne sensor data of forest biomes obtained using an SAR, a laser profiler, an IR MSS, and a TM simulator are presented and examined. The SAR was utilized to investigate forest canopy structures in Mississippi and Costa Rica; the IR MSS measured forest canopy temperatures in Oregon and Puerto Rico; the TM simulator was employed in a tropical forest in Puerto Rico; and the laser profiler studied forest canopy characteristics in Costa Rica. The advantages and disadvantages of airborne systems are discussed. It is noted that the airborne sensors provide measurements applicable to forest monitoring programs.

  2. Observations concerning licensee practices in error propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Lumb, R.F.; Messinger, M.; Tingey, F.H.

    1983-07-01

    This paper describes some of NUSAC's observations concerning licensee error propagation practice. NUSAC's findings are based on the results of work performed for the NRC whereby NUSAC visited seven nuclear fuel fabrication facilities, four processing low enriched uranium (LEU) and three processing high enriched uranium (HEU), in order to develop a detailed evaluation of the processing of material accounting data by those facilities. Discussed is the diversity that was found to exist across the industry in material accounting data accumulation; in error propagation methodology, for both inventory difference (ID) and shipper/receiver difference (SRD); as well as in measurement error modeling and estimation. Problems that have been identified are, in general, common to the industry. The significance of nonmeasurement effects on the variance of ID is discussed. This paper will also outline a four-phase program that can be implemented to improve the existing situation.

  3. 13 CFR 107.460 - Restrictions on Common Control or ownership of two (or more) Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Changes in Ownership, Control, or Structure of Licensee..., or owners of two (or more) Licensees which have no Leverage. Change in Structure of Licensee...

  4. The effects of variable biome distribution on global climate

    SciTech Connect

    Noever, D.A.; Brittain, A.; Matsos, H.C.; Baskaran, S.; Obenhuber, D.

    1996-12-31

    In projecting climatic adjustments to anthropogenically elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide, most global climate models fix biome distribution to current geographic conditions. The authors develop a model that examines the albedo-related effects of biome distribution on global temperature. The model was tested on historical biome changes since 1860 and the results fit both the observed trend and order of magnitude change in global temperature. Once backtested in this way on historical data, the model is then used to generate an optimized future biome distribution which minimizes projected greenhouse effects on global temperature. Because of the complexity of this combinatorial search an artificial intelligence method, the genetic algorithm, was employed. The genetic algorithm assigns various biome distributions to the planet, then adjusts their percentage area and albedo effects to regulate or moderate temperature changes.

  5. Climate-biomes, pedo-biomes and pyro-biomes: which world view explains the tropical forest - savanna boundary in South America?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langan, Liam; Higgins, Steven; Scheiter, Simon

    2015-04-01

    Elucidating the drivers of broad vegetation formations improves our understanding of earth system functioning. The biome, defined primarily by the dominance of a particular growth strategy, is commonly employed to group vegetation into similar units. Predicting tropical forest and savanna biome boundaries in South America has proven difficult. Process based DGVMs (Dynamic global vegetation models) are our best tool to simulate vegetation patterns, make predictions for future changes and test theory, however, many DGVMs fail to accurately simulate the spatial distribution or indeed presence of the South American savanna biome which can result in large differences in modelled ecosystem structural properties. Evidence suggests fire plays a significant role in mediating these forest and savanna biome boundaries, however, fire alone does not appear to be sufficient to predict these boundaries in South America using DGVMs hinting at the presence of one or more missing environmental factors. We hypothesise that soil depth, which affects plant available water by determining maximum storage potential and influences temporal availability, may be one of these missing environmental factors. To test our hypothesis we use a novel vegetation model, the aDGVM2. This model has been specifically designed to allow plant trait strategies, constrained by trade-offs between traits, evolve based on the abiotic and biotic conditions where the resulting community trait suites are emergent properties of model dynamics. Furthermore it considers root biomass in multiple soil layers and therefore allows the consideration of alternative rooting strategies, which in turn allows us to explore in more detail the role of soil hydraulic factors in controlling biome boundary distributions. We find that changes in soil depth, interacting with fire, affect the relative dominance of tree and grass strategies and thus the presence and spatial distribution of forest and savanna biomes in South America

  6. 9 CFR 2.7 - Annual report by licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., dealers, exhibitors, retail pet stores, and persons for use as pets, by the licensee during the preceding..., exhibitors, retail pet stores, and persons for use as pets, during the preceding business year (calendar...

  7. 9 CFR 2.7 - Annual report by licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., dealers, exhibitors, retail pet stores, and persons for use as pets, by the licensee during the preceding..., exhibitors, retail pet stores, and persons for use as pets, during the preceding business year (calendar...

  8. 9 CFR 2.7 - Annual report by licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., dealers, exhibitors, retail pet stores, and persons for use as pets, by the licensee during the preceding..., exhibitors, retail pet stores, and persons for use as pets, during the preceding business year (calendar...

  9. 9 CFR 2.7 - Annual report by licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., dealers, exhibitors, retail pet stores, and persons for use as pets, by the licensee during the preceding..., exhibitors, retail pet stores, and persons for use as pets, during the preceding business year (calendar...

  10. 9 CFR 2.7 - Annual report by licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., dealers, exhibitors, retail pet stores, and persons for use as pets, by the licensee during the preceding..., exhibitors, retail pet stores, and persons for use as pets, during the preceding business year (calendar...

  11. Global middle Pliocene biome reconstruction: A data/model synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haywood, Alan M.; Valdes, Paul J.; Francis, Jane E.; Sellwood, Bruce W.

    2002-12-01

    The middle Pliocene warm interval (ca. 3 Ma BP) has been extensively studied. However, our knowledge concerning the global distribution of middle Pliocene biomes remains far from complete. This paper presents the results from a "first attempt" at simulating the distribution of different mid-Pliocene biomes using an advanced numerical general circulation climate model (Hadley Centre Atmospheric Model Version 3) and the BIOME 4 vegetation model. The modeling indicates that during the middle Pliocene the geographical coverage of tundra type biomes may have been significantly reduced compared with the present day in the Northern Hemisphere. High-latitude forests expand in the place of tundra forms of vegetation. Total area covered by forest increases for the Pliocene case compared with the present day. Arid deserts become less prevalent in the Pliocene scenario and are replaced by tropical xerophytic shrublands and savanna-type vegetation. These results compare favorably with geological data in general and with the U.S. Geological Survey's PRISM2 middle Pliocene vegetation reconstruction, although data/model inconsistencies are apparent. Although some of these inconsistencies relate to the weaknesses of the climate and biome model employed, others identify deficiencies in the extant geological data set or the interpretation of this data. This modeled biome reconstruction will serve as a useful vehicle for aiding in future comparisons between geological data on middle Pliocene biomes and model predictions.

  12. Using an Exploratory Internet Activity & Trivia Game to Teach Students about Biomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Matthew L.

    2009-01-01

    Students in life science classes need an introduction to biomes, including an introduction to the concept, key biotic and abiotic features of biomes, and geographic locations of biomes. In this activity, students in seventh- and eighth-grade science classes used a directed exploratory Internet activity to learn about biomes. The author tested…

  13. Dynamic vegetation modeling of tropical biomes during Heinrich events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handiani, Dian Noor; Paul, André; Dupont, Lydie M.

    2010-05-01

    Heinrich events are thought to be associated with a slowdown of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), which in turn would lead to a cooling of the North Atlantic Ocean and a warming of the South Atlantic Ocean (the "bipolar seesaw" hypothesis). The accompanying abrupt climate changes occurred not only in the ocean but also on the continents. Changes were strongest in the Northern Hemisphere but were registered in the tropics as well. Pollen data from Angola and Brazil showed that climate changes during Heinrich events affected vegetation patterns very differently in eastern South America and western Africa. To understand the differential response in the terrestrial tropics, we studied the vegetation changes during Heinrich events by using a dynamic global vegetation model (TRIFFID) as part of the University of Victoria (UVic) Earth System-Climate Model (ESCM). The model results show a bipolar seesaw pattern in temperature and precipitation during a near-collapse of the AMOC. The succession in plant-functional types (PFTs) showed changes from forest to shrubs to desert, including spreading desert in northwest Africa, retreating broadleaf trees in West Africa and northern South America, but advancing broadleaf trees in Brazil. The pattern is explained by a southward shift of the tropical rainbelt resulting in a strong decrease in precipitation over northwest and West Africa as well as in northern South America, but an increase in precipitation in eastern Brazil. To facilitate the comparison between modeled vegetation results with pollen data, we diagnosed the distribution of biomes from the PFT coverage and the simulated model climate. The biome distribution was computed for Heinrich event 1 and the Last Glacial Maximum as well as for pre-industrial conditions. We used a classification of biomes in terms of "mega-biomes", which were defined following a scheme originally proposed by BIOME 6000 (v 4.2). The biome distribution of the Sahel region

  14. Generality of leaf trait relationships: A test across six biomes

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, P.B.; Ellsworth, D.S.; Walters, M.B.; Vose, J.M.; Gresham, C.; Volin, J.C.; Bowman, W.D. |

    1999-09-01

    Convergence in interspecific leaf trait relationships across diverse taxonomic groups and biomes would have important evolutionary and ecological implications. Such convergence has been hypothesized to result from trade-offs that limit the combination of plant traits for any species. Here the authors address this issue by testing for biome differences in the slope and intercept of interspecific relationships among leaf traits: longevity, net photosynthetic capacity (A{sub max}), leaf diffusive conductance (G{sub S}), specific leaf area (SLA), and nitrogen (N) status, for more than 100 species in six distinct biomes of the Americas. The six biomes were: alpine tundra-subalpine forest ecotone, cold temperate forest-prairie ecotone, montane cool temperate forest, desert shrubland, subtropical forest, and tropical rain forest. Despite large differences in climate and evolutionary history, in all biomes mass-based leaf N (N{sub mass}), SLA, G{sub S}, and A{sub max} were positively related to one another and decreased with increasing leaf life span. The relationships between pairs of leaf traits exhibited similar slopes among biomes, suggesting a predictable set of scaling relationships among key leaf morphological, chemical, and metabolic traits that are replicated globally among terrestrial ecosystems regardless of biome or vegetation type. However, the intercept (i.e., the overall elevation of regression lines) of relationships between pairs of leaf traits usually differed among biomes. With increasing aridity across sites, species had greater A{sub max} for a given level of G{sub S} and lower SLA for any given leaf life span. Using principal components analysis, most variation among species was explained by an axis related to mass-based leaf traits (A{sub max}, N, and SLA) while a second axis reflected climate, G{sub S}, and other area-based leaf traits.

  15. Diverging responses of tropical Andean biomes under future climate conditions.

    PubMed

    Tovar, Carolina; Arnillas, Carlos Alberto; Cuesta, Francisco; Buytaert, Wouter

    2013-01-01

    Observations and projections for mountain regions show a strong tendency towards upslope displacement of their biomes under future climate conditions. Because of their climatic and topographic heterogeneity, a more complex response is expected for biodiversity hotspots such as tropical mountain regions. This study analyzes potential changes in the distribution of biomes in the Tropical Andes and identifies target areas for conservation. Biome distribution models were developed using logistic regressions. These models were then coupled to an ensemble of 8 global climate models to project future distribution of the Andean biomes and their uncertainties. We analysed projected changes in extent and elevational range and identified regions most prone to change. Our results show a heterogeneous response to climate change. Although the wetter biomes exhibit an upslope displacement of both the upper and the lower boundaries as expected, most dry biomes tend to show downslope expansion. Despite important losses being projected for several biomes, projections suggest that between 74.8% and 83.1% of the current total Tropical Andes will remain stable, depending on the emission scenario and time horizon. Between 3.3% and 7.6% of the study area is projected to change, mostly towards an increase in vertical structure. For the remaining area (13.1%-17.4%), there is no agreement between model projections. These results challenge the common believe that climate change will lead to an upslope displacement of biome boundaries in mountain regions. Instead, our models project diverging responses, including downslope expansion and large areas projected to remain stable. Lastly, a significant part of the area expected to change is already affected by land use changes, which has important implications for management. This, and the inclusion of a comprehensive uncertainty analysis, will help to inform conservation strategies in the Tropical Andes, and to guide similar assessments for other

  16. Future Biome Projections in Alaska and East Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, A.; Saito, K.; Bigelow, N. H.; Walsh, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    We projected Arctic biomes across a region including Alaska and Eastern Russia using the BIOME4 biogeochemical and biogeography vegetation model. BIOME4, which produces an equilibrium vegetation distribution under a given climate condition, was forced by CMIP5/PMIP3 climate data considered in IPCC AR5. We are exploring vegetation and permafrost distributions during the last 21,000 years and future projections (2100 C.E.) to gain an understanding of the effects of climate shifts on this complex subsystem. When forced with the baseline climatology, compiled from the University of Delaware temperature and precipitation climatology and ERA-40 sunshine data, our biome simulations were generally consistent with current vegetation observations in the study region. The biomes in this region are mostly evergreen and deciduous taiga capped by shrub and graminoid tundras to the north. The more noticeable differences were the tree line simulated north of the Brooks Range in Alaska and evergreen taiga in southwest Alaska where we know these biomes do not exist today. The projected changes in climate conditions in the region under a RCP8.5 climate scenario (significant warming upwards of 10°C by some models, an increase in precipitation by as much as 40%, and carbon dioxide concentration reaching approximately 940 ppm) drive shifts in Arctic biomes. The tree line shifts northward while shrub tundra and graminoid tundra regions decrease significantly. An intrusion of cool mixed, deciduous, and conifer forests above 60° north, especially in southwest Alaska, were marked and were not modeled for present day. Across eastern Russia, deciduous taiga begins to overtake evergreen taiga, except along the coastal regions where evergreen taiga remains the favored biome. The implications of vegetation shifts in the Arctic are vast and include effects on snow cover, soil properties, permafrost distribution, and albedo, not to mention impacts on local fauna and people of the Artic.

  17. Diverging Responses of Tropical Andean Biomes under Future Climate Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tovar, Carolina; Arnillas, Carlos Alberto; Cuesta, Francisco; Buytaert, Wouter

    2013-01-01

    Observations and projections for mountain regions show a strong tendency towards upslope displacement of their biomes under future climate conditions. Because of their climatic and topographic heterogeneity, a more complex response is expected for biodiversity hotspots such as tropical mountain regions. This study analyzes potential changes in the distribution of biomes in the Tropical Andes and identifies target areas for conservation. Biome distribution models were developed using logistic regressions. These models were then coupled to an ensemble of 8 global climate models to project future distribution of the Andean biomes and their uncertainties. We analysed projected changes in extent and elevational range and identified regions most prone to change. Our results show a heterogeneous response to climate change. Although the wetter biomes exhibit an upslope displacement of both the upper and the lower boundaries as expected, most dry biomes tend to show downslope expansion. Despite important losses being projected for several biomes, projections suggest that between 74.8% and 83.1% of the current total Tropical Andes will remain stable, depending on the emission scenario and time horizon. Between 3.3% and 7.6% of the study area is projected to change, mostly towards an increase in vertical structure. For the remaining area (13.1%–17.4%), there is no agreement between model projections. These results challenge the common believe that climate change will lead to an upslope displacement of biome boundaries in mountain regions. Instead, our models project diverging responses, including downslope expansion and large areas projected to remain stable. Lastly, a significant part of the area expected to change is already affected by land use changes, which has important implications for management. This, and the inclusion of a comprehensive uncertainty analysis, will help to inform conservation strategies in the Tropical Andes, and to guide similar assessments for

  18. Licensee Event Report (LER) compilation for month of March 1988

    SciTech Connect

    1988-04-01

    This monthly report contains Licensee Event Report (LER) operational information that was processed into the LER data file of the Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) during the one-month period identified on the cover of the document. The LERS, from which this information is derived, are submitted to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by nuclear power plant licensees in accordance with federal regulations. Procedures for LER reporting for revisions to those events occurring prior to 1984 are described in NRC Regulatory Guide 1.16 and NUREG-1061, Instructions for preparation of data entry sheets for licensee event reports. For those events occurring on and after January 1, 1984, LERs are being submitted in accordance with the revised rule contained in Title 10 Part 50.73 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 50.73 - Licensee Event Report System) which was published in the Federal Register (Vol. 48, No. 144) on July 26, 1983. NUREG-1022, Licensee Event Report System - Description of systems and guidelines for reporting, provides supporting guidance and information on the revised LER rule.

  19. Multiband radar characterization of forest biomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, M. Craig; Ulaby, Fawwaz T.

    1990-01-01

    The utility of airborne and orbital SAR in classification, assessment, and monitoring of forest biomes is investigated through analysis of orbital synthetic aperature radar (SAR) and multifrequency and multipolarized airborne SAR imagery relying on image tone and texture. Preliminary airborne SAR experiments and truck-mounted scatterometer observations demonstrated that the three dimensional structural complexity of a forest, and the various scales of temporal dynamics in the microwave dielectric properties of both trees and the underlying substrate would severely limit empirical or semi-empirical approaches. As a consequence, it became necessary to develop a more profound understanding of the electromagnetic properties of a forest scene and their temporal dynamics through controlled experimentation coupled with theoretical development and verification. The concatenation of various models into a physically-based composite model treating the entire forest scene became the major objective of the study as this is the key to development of a series of robust retrieval algorithms for forest biophysical properties. In order to verify the performance of the component elements of the composite model, a series of controlled laboratory and field experiments were undertaken to: (1) develop techniques to measure the microwave dielectric properties of vegetation; (2) relate the microwave dielectric properties of vegetation to more readily measured characteristics such as density and moisture content; (3) calculate the radar cross-section of leaves, and cylinders; (4) improve backscatter models for rough surfaces; and (5) relate attenuation and phase delays during propagation through canopies to canopy properties. These modeling efforts, as validated by the measurements, were incorporated within a larger model known as the Michigan Microwave Canopy Scattering (MIMICS) Model.

  20. Tropical grassy biomes: linking ecology, human use and conservation.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Caroline E R; Parr, Catherine L

    2016-09-19

    Tropical grassy biomes (TGBs) are changing rapidly the world over through a coalescence of high rates of land-use change, global change and altered disturbance regimes that maintain the ecosystem structure and function of these biomes. Our theme issue brings together the latest research examining the characterization, complex ecology, drivers of change, and human use and ecosystem services of TGBs. Recent advances in ecology and evolution have facilitated a new perspective on these biomes. However, there continues to be controversies over their classification and state dynamics that demonstrate critical data and knowledge gaps in our quantitative understanding of these geographically dispersed regions. We highlight an urgent need to improve ecological understanding in order to effectively predict the sensitivity and resilience of TGBs under future scenarios of global change. With human reliance on TGBs increasing and their propensity for change, ecological and evolutionary understanding of these biomes is central to the dual goals of sustaining their ecological integrity and the diverse services these landscapes provide to millions of people.This article is part of the themed issue 'Tropical grassy biomes: linking ecology, human use and conservation'. PMID:27502385

  1. 18 CFR 12.5 - Responsibilities of licensee or applicant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Responsibilities of licensee or applicant. 12.5 Section 12.5 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT SAFETY OF WATER...

  2. 18 CFR 12.5 - Responsibilities of licensee or applicant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Responsibilities of licensee or applicant. 12.5 Section 12.5 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT SAFETY OF WATER...

  3. 18 CFR 12.5 - Responsibilities of licensee or applicant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Responsibilities of licensee or applicant. 12.5 Section 12.5 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT SAFETY OF WATER...

  4. 18 CFR 12.5 - Responsibilities of licensee or applicant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Responsibilities of licensee or applicant. 12.5 Section 12.5 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT SAFETY OF WATER...

  5. 18 CFR 12.5 - Responsibilities of licensee or applicant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Responsibilities of licensee or applicant. 12.5 Section 12.5 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT SAFETY OF WATER...

  6. 44 CFR 352.5 - FEMA action on licensee certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Office for review and copying in accordance with 44 CFR 5.26. (c) FEMA Headquarters shall notify the NRC... certification, the host Regional Administrator shall immediately notify FEMA Headquarters of the licensee certification. Within 5 days the host Regional Administrator shall notify the Governor of an affected State...

  7. 44 CFR 352.5 - FEMA action on licensee certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Office for review and copying in accordance with 44 CFR 5.26. (c) FEMA Headquarters shall notify the NRC... certification, the host Regional Administrator shall immediately notify FEMA Headquarters of the licensee certification. Within 5 days the host Regional Administrator shall notify the Governor of an affected State...

  8. 47 CFR 90.745 - Phase I licensee service areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Phase I licensee service areas. 90.745 Section 90.745 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Regulations Governing Licensing and Use of Frequencies in the 220-222 MHz Band § 90.745 Phase I...

  9. 47 CFR 90.667 - Grandfathering provisions for incumbent licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Grandfathering provisions for incumbent licensees. 90.667 Section 90.667 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Regulations Governing Licensing and Use of Frequencies in the 806-824, 851-869,...

  10. 47 CFR 90.693 - Grandfathering provisions for incumbent licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Grandfathering provisions for incumbent licensees. 90.693 Section 90.693 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Regulations Governing Licensing and Use of Frequencies in the 806-824, 851-869,...

  11. 44 CFR 352.5 - FEMA action on licensee certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Office for review and copying in accordance with 44 CFR 5.26. (c) FEMA Headquarters shall notify the NRC... certification, the host Regional Administrator shall immediately notify FEMA Headquarters of the licensee certification. Within 5 days the host Regional Administrator shall notify the Governor of an affected State...

  12. 44 CFR 352.5 - FEMA action on licensee certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Office for review and copying in accordance with 44 CFR 5.26. (c) FEMA Headquarters shall notify the NRC... certification, the host Regional Administrator shall immediately notify FEMA Headquarters of the licensee certification. Within 5 days the host Regional Administrator shall notify the Governor of an affected State...

  13. 47 CFR 101.1327 - Renewal expectancy for EA licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Renewal expectancy for EA licensees. 101.1327 Section 101.1327 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Multiple Address Systems System Requirements § 101.1327...

  14. 47 CFR 101.1327 - Renewal expectancy for EA licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Renewal expectancy for EA licensees. 101.1327 Section 101.1327 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Multiple Address Systems System Requirements § 101.1327...

  15. 47 CFR 101.1327 - Renewal expectancy for EA licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Renewal expectancy for EA licensees. 101.1327 Section 101.1327 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Multiple Address Systems System Requirements § 101.1327...

  16. 47 CFR 101.1327 - Renewal expectancy for EA licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Renewal expectancy for EA licensees. 101.1327 Section 101.1327 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Multiple Address Systems System Requirements § 101.1327...

  17. 47 CFR 101.1409 - Treatment of incumbent licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-point licensees in the 12.2-12.7 GHz band which were licensed prior to MVDDS or NGSO FSS satellite stations are incumbent point-to-point stations and are not entitled to protection from harmful interference... make minor changes to their stations without losing this protection. This does not relieve...

  18. 47 CFR 101.1409 - Treatment of incumbent licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-point licensees in the 12.2-12.7 GHz band which were licensed prior to MVDDS or NGSO FSS satellite stations are incumbent point-to-point stations and are not entitled to protection from harmful interference... make minor changes to their stations without losing this protection. This does not relieve...

  19. 47 CFR 101.1409 - Treatment of incumbent licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-point licensees in the 12.2-12.7 GHz band which were licensed prior to MVDDS or NGSO FSS satellite stations are incumbent point-to-point stations and are not entitled to protection from harmful interference... make minor changes to their stations without losing this protection. This does not relieve...

  20. 47 CFR 90.667 - Grandfathering provisions for incumbent licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... area shall be defined by its originally-licensed 40 dBu field strength contour. Incumbent licensees are... the Commission so long as their original 40 dBu field strength contour is not expanded. (b) Incumbent... dBu field strength contours of the multiple sites. Incumbents exercising this license...

  1. 27 CFR 478.78 - Operations by licensee after notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Operations by licensee after notice. 478.78 Section 478.78 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO... revocation proceedings are pending before the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, or notice of...

  2. 13 CFR 107.520 - Management Expenses of a Licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) Salaries; (2) Office expenses; (3) Travel; (4) Business development; (5) Office and equipment rental; (6... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Management Expenses of a Licensee. 107.520 Section 107.520 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL...

  3. 13 CFR 107.520 - Management Expenses of a Licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) Salaries; (2) Office expenses; (3) Travel; (4) Business development; (5) Office and equipment rental; (6... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Management Expenses of a Licensee. 107.520 Section 107.520 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL...

  4. 13 CFR 107.520 - Management Expenses of a Licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) Salaries; (2) Office expenses; (3) Travel; (4) Business development; (5) Office and equipment rental; (6... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Management Expenses of a Licensee. 107.520 Section 107.520 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL...

  5. 13 CFR 107.470 - SBA approval of merger, consolidation, or reorganization of Licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Changes in Ownership, Control, or Structure of Licensee; Transfer of License Change in Structure of Licensee § 107.470 SBA approval of...

  6. Information for seasonal models of carbon fluxes in terrestrial biomes

    SciTech Connect

    King, A.W.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    1985-06-01

    This report is a compilation of information that can be used in developing seasonal carbon flux models for several principal terrestrial biome types. The information includes flux data as well as models made either to simulate such data or to deduce fluxes not directly measurable. The report is divided into three sections that examine (1) photosynthetic production, (2) litterfall, and (3) decomposition during a year. The sections on photosynthetic production and decomposition discuss a large number of models that relate the processes to basic abiotic variables in each of several biome types. The information on litterfall, however, is largely empirical phenology data. A fourth section demonstrates the application of this compiled information to a compartment model of seasonal carbon flux in terrestrial biomes. 14 figs., 12 tabs.

  7. 13 CFR 107.865 - Control of a Small Business by a Licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Control of a Small Business by a Licensee. 107.865 Section 107.865 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Financing of Small Businesses by Licensees Structuring Licensee's...

  8. 13 CFR 107.865 - Control of a Small Business by a Licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Control of a Small Business by a Licensee. 107.865 Section 107.865 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Financing of Small Businesses by Licensees Structuring Licensee's...

  9. 13 CFR 107.865 - Control of a Small Business by a Licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Control of a Small Business by a Licensee. 107.865 Section 107.865 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Financing of Small Businesses by Licensees Structuring Licensee's...

  10. 13 CFR 107.865 - Control of a Small Business by a Licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Control of a Small Business by a Licensee. 107.865 Section 107.865 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Financing of Small Businesses by Licensees Structuring Licensee's...

  11. 10 CFR 26.713 - Recordkeeping requirements for licensees and other entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Recordkeeping requirements for licensees and other entities. 26.713 Section 26.713 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements § 26.713 Recordkeeping requirements for licensees and other entities. (a) Each licensee and other entity who is...

  12. 10 CFR 26.713 - Recordkeeping requirements for licensees and other entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Recordkeeping requirements for licensees and other entities. 26.713 Section 26.713 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements § 26.713 Recordkeeping requirements for licensees and other entities. (a) Each licensee and other entity who is...

  13. 10 CFR 26.713 - Recordkeeping requirements for licensees and other entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Recordkeeping requirements for licensees and other entities. 26.713 Section 26.713 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements § 26.713 Recordkeeping requirements for licensees and other entities. (a) Each licensee and other entity who is...

  14. 10 CFR 26.713 - Recordkeeping requirements for licensees and other entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recordkeeping requirements for licensees and other entities. 26.713 Section 26.713 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements § 26.713 Recordkeeping requirements for licensees and other entities. (a) Each licensee and other entity who is...

  15. 13 CFR 107.1230 - Draw-downs by Licensee under SBA's Leverage commitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Draw-downs by Licensee under SBA's... Commitments by Sba to Reserve Leverage for A Licensee § 107.1230 Draw-downs by Licensee under SBA's Leverage... for a draw against SBA's Leverage commitment, you authorize SBA, or any agent or trustee...

  16. 13 CFR 107.1230 - Draw-downs by Licensee under SBA's Leverage commitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Draw-downs by Licensee under SBA's... Commitments by Sba to Reserve Leverage for A Licensee § 107.1230 Draw-downs by Licensee under SBA's Leverage... for a draw against SBA's Leverage commitment, you authorize SBA, or any agent or trustee...

  17. 13 CFR 107.1230 - Draw-downs by Licensee under SBA's Leverage commitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Draw-downs by Licensee under SBA's... Commitments by Sba to Reserve Leverage for A Licensee § 107.1230 Draw-downs by Licensee under SBA's Leverage... for a draw against SBA's Leverage commitment, you authorize SBA, or any agent or trustee...

  18. 13 CFR 107.1150 - Maximum amount of Leverage for a Section 301(c) Licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum amount of Leverage for a Section 301(c) Licensee. 107.1150 Section 107.1150 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES SBA Financial Assistance for Licensees (Leverage) Maximum Amount of Leverage for Which A Licensee...

  19. 13 CFR 107.1150 - Maximum amount of Leverage for a Section 301(c) Licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maximum amount of Leverage for a Section 301(c) Licensee. 107.1150 Section 107.1150 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES SBA Financial Assistance for Licensees (Leverage) Maximum Amount of Leverage for Which A Licensee...

  20. 13 CFR 107.450 - Notification to SBA of pledge of Licensee's shares.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Changes in Ownership, Control, or Structure of Licensee; Transfer of License Changes in Control Or Ownership of Licensee § 107.450 Notification to SBA of pledge of Licensee's... equivalent ownership interests) as collateral for indebtedness; and (2) The shares pledged are at least...

  1. 13 CFR 107.450 - Notification to SBA of pledge of Licensee's shares.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Changes in Ownership, Control, or Structure of Licensee; Transfer of License Changes in Control Or Ownership of Licensee § 107.450 Notification to SBA of pledge of Licensee's... equivalent ownership interests) as collateral for indebtedness; and (2) The shares pledged are at least...

  2. 13 CFR 107.460 - Restrictions on Common Control or ownership of two (or more) Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ownership of two (or more) Licensees. 107.460 Section 107.460 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Changes in Ownership, Control, or Structure of Licensee; Transfer of License Restrictions on Common Control Or Ownership of Two Or More Licensees §...

  3. Characterizing forest carbon stocks at tropical biome and landscape level in Mount Apo National Park, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubas, L. C.

    2012-12-01

    Forest resources sequester and store carbon, and serve as a natural brake on climate change. In the tropics, the largest source of greenhouse emission is from deforestation and forest degradation (Gibbs et al 2007). This paper attempts to compile sixty (60) existing studies on using remote sensing to measure key environmental forest indicators at two levels of scales: biome and landscape level. At the tropical forest biome level, there is not as much remote sensing studies that have been done as compared to other forest biomes. Also, existing studies on tropical Asia is still sparse compared to other tropical regions in Latin America and Africa. Biomass map is also produced for the tropical biome using keyhole macro language (KML) which is projected on Google Earth. The compiled studies showed there are four indicators being measured using remote sensors in tropical forest. These are biomass, landcover classification, deforestation and cloud cover. The landscape level will focus on Mount Apo National Park in the Philippines which is encompassing a total area of 54,974.87 hectares. It is one of the ten priority sites targeted in the World Bank-assisted Biodiversity Conservation Program. This park serves as the major watershed for the three provinces with 19 major rivers emanating from the montane formations. Only a small fraction of the natural forest that once covered the country remains. In spite of different policies that aim to reduce logging recent commercial deforestation, illegal logging and agricultural expansion pose an important threat to the remaining forest areas. In some locations in the country, these hotspots of deforestation overlap with the protected areas (Verburg et al 2006). The study site was clipped using ArcGIS from the forest biomass carbon density map produced by Gibbs and Brown (2007). Characterization on this national park using vegetation density, elevation, slope, land cover and precipitation will be conducted to determine factors that

  4. Convergence across biomes to a common rain-use efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huxman, Travis E.; Smith, Melinda D.; Fay, Philip A.; Knapp, Alan K.; Shaw, M. Rebecca; Loik, Michael E.; Smith, Stanley D.; Tissue, David T.; Zak, John C.; Weltzin, Jake F.; Pockman, William T.; Sala, Osvaldo E.; Haddad, Brent M.; Harte, John; Koch, George W.; Schwinning, Susan; Small, Eric E.; Williams, David G.

    2004-06-01

    Water availability limits plant growth and production in almost all terrestrial ecosystems. However, biomes differ substantially in sensitivity of aboveground net primary production (ANPP) to between-year variation in precipitation. Average rain-use efficiency (RUE; ANPP/precipitation) also varies between biomes, supposedly because of differences in vegetation structure and/or biogeochemical constraints. Here we show that RUE decreases across biomes as mean annual precipitation increases. However, during the driest years at each site, there is convergence to a common maximum RUE (RUEmax) that is typical of arid ecosystems. RUEmax was also identified by experimentally altering the degree of limitation by water and other resources. Thus, in years when water is most limiting, deserts, grasslands and forests all exhibit the same rate of biomass production per unit rainfall, despite differences in physiognomy and site-level RUE. Global climate models predict increased between-year variability in precipitation, more frequent extreme drought events, and changes in temperature. Forecasts of future ecosystem behaviour should take into account this convergent feature of terrestrial biomes.

  5. Convergence across biomes to a common rain-use efficiency.

    PubMed

    Huxman, Travis E; Smith, Melinda D; Fay, Philip A; Knapp, Alan K; Shaw, M Rebecca; Loik, Michael E; Smith, Stanley D; Tissue, David T; Zak, John C; Weltzin, Jake F; Pockman, William T; Sala, Osvaldo E; Haddad, Brent M; Harte, John; Koch, George W; Schwinning, Susan; Small, Eric E; Williams, David G

    2004-06-10

    Water availability limits plant growth and production in almost all terrestrial ecosystems. However, biomes differ substantially in sensitivity of aboveground net primary production (ANPP) to between-year variation in precipitation. Average rain-use efficiency (RUE; ANPP/precipitation) also varies between biomes, supposedly because of differences in vegetation structure and/or biogeochemical constraints. Here we show that RUE decreases across biomes as mean annual precipitation increases. However, during the driest years at each site, there is convergence to a common maximum RUE (RUE(max)) that is typical of arid ecosystems. RUE(max) was also identified by experimentally altering the degree of limitation by water and other resources. Thus, in years when water is most limiting, deserts, grasslands and forests all exhibit the same rate of biomass production per unit rainfall, despite differences in physiognomy and site-level RUE. Global climate models predict increased between-year variability in precipitation, more frequent extreme drought events, and changes in temperature. Forecasts of future ecosystem behaviour should take into account this convergent feature of terrestrial biomes. PMID:15190350

  6. CARBON BALANCE OF FOREST BIOMES IN THE FORMER USSR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sources and sinks of carbon and the sequestration potential of forest biomes in the former Soviet Union (FSU) were assessed under non-equilibrium conditions by considering, 1) net ecosystem productivity (NEP) of different age forest stands and actual forest coverage, 2) carbon fl...

  7. A mechanistic-bioclimatic modeling analysis of the potential impact of climate change on biomes of the Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jian-Sheng; Reynolds, James F; Li, Feng-Min

    2014-08-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) is experiencing high rates of climatic change. We present a novel combined mechanistic-bioclimatic modeling approach to determine how changes in precipitation and temperature on the TP may impact net primary production (NPP) in four major biomes (forest, shrub, grass, desert) and if there exists a maximum rain use efficiency (RUE(MAX)) that represents Huxman et al.'s "boundary that constrain[s] site-level productivity and efficiency." We used a daily mechanistic ecosystem model to generate 40-yr outputs using observed climatic data for scenarios of decreased precipitation (25-100%); increased air temperature (1 degrees - 6 degrees C); simultaneous changes in both precipitation (+/- 50%, +/- 25%) and air temperature (+1 to +6 degrees C) and increased interannual variability (IAV) of precipitation (+1 sigma to +3 sigma, with fixed means, where sigma is SD). We fitted model output from these scenarios to Huxman et al.'s RUE(MAX) bioclimatic model, NPP = alpha + RUE x PPT (where alpha is the intercept, RUE is rain use efficiency, and PPT is annual precipitation). Based on these analyses, we conclude that there is strong support (when not explicit, then trend-wise) for Huxman et al.'s assertion that biomes converge to a common RUE(MAX) during the driest years at a site, thus representing the boundary for highest rain use efficiency; the interactive effects of simultaneously decreasing precipitation and increasing temperature on NPP for the TP is smaller than might be expected from additive, single-factor changes in these drivers; and that increasing IAV of precipitation may ultimately have a larger impact on biomes of the Tibetan Plateau than changing amounts of rainfall and air temperature alone. PMID:25230463

  8. Retrieving Biome Types from Multi-angle Spectral Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schull, M. A.; Xu, L.; Latorre, P.; Samanta, A.; Myneni, R. B.; Knyazikhin, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Many studies have been conducted to demonstrate the ability of multi-angle spectral data to discriminate plant dominant species. Most have employed the use of empirically based techniques, which are site specific, requires some initial training based on characteristics of known leaf and/or canopy spectra and therefore may not be extendable to operational use or adapted to changing/unknown land cover. An ancillary objective of the MISR LAI/FPAR algorithm is classification of global vegetation into biome types. The algorithm is based on the 3D radiative transfer equation. Its performance suggests that is has valid LAI retrievals and correct biome identification in about 20% of the pixels. However with a probability of about 70%, uncertainties in LAI retrievals due to biome misclassification do not exceed uncertainties in the observations. In this poster we present an approach to improve reliability of the distribution of biomes and dominant species from multi angle spectral data. The radiative transfer theory of canopy spectral invariants underlies the approach, which facilitates parameterization of the canopy bidirectional reflectance factor in terms of the leaf spectrum and two spectrally invariant and structurally varying variables - recollision and directional escape probabilities. Theoretical and empirical analyses of ground and airborne data acquired by AVIRIS, AirMISR over two sites in New England and CHRIS/PROBA over BARAX site in Spain suggest that the canopy spectral invariants convey information about canopy structure at both the macro and micro scales. These properties allow for the natural separation of biome classes based on the location of points on the total escape probability vs the proportional escape ratio log-log plane.

  9. The effect of heterogeneous landscape dynamics on ecotone types at two convergent semi-arid biomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Landscapes in biome transition zones consist of a mosaic of patches dominated or codominated by species from adjacent biomes. Shifts in the vegetation composition and dynamics of a biome transition zone depend upon the underlying patch dynamics of the ecotones between these dominant species. Landsca...

  10. User's Guide to Biome Information from the United States International Biological Program (IBP). First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinckley, A. Dexter; Haug, Peter T.

    This publication is a guide to the biome research conducted under the International Biological Program. The guide lists biome researchers by interest and by biome as well as a central list. A site list, map, information sources section reporting abstracts, bibliographies, journals, books, evaluations, and data books are also included. Three…

  11. Implementation of a forest management module into BIOME-BGC and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochheim, H.; Puhlmann, M.; Pohle, D.

    2007-05-01

    The wood export from forest ecosystems by management measures causes nutrient losses, and is consequently accompanied by a substantial impact on the sustainability of forest ecosystems. Thus, for simulation studies on managed forests, the effects of wood export have to be taken into account. The original BIOME-BGC model (Vers. 4.2; Running & Coughlan 1988, Running & Gower 1991, Running & Hunt 1993, Thornton et al. 2002) is designed for the simulation of natural, but not managed terrestrial ecosystems. We developed an approach for a management module within BIOME-BGC with the following features: 1) thinning and clear-cut with the options of varying length of thinning and rotation periods, 2) alternatively use of tables or functions (depending on stand age and stem biomass) for determining the thinning fraction, that can be derived from yield tables, 3) use of age-dependent biomass expansion functions for determining the exported wood fraction during harvest, 4) planting routine with the options of changing tree species and defining biomass of planted trees. The presentation describes the concept of the implemented management module and shows simulation results on the effects of different forest management options (length of thinning or rotation period, harvest intensity, tree species change) on the carbon, nitrogen, and water budgets.

  12. BIOME: A browser-aware search and order system

    SciTech Connect

    Grubb, J.W.; Jennings, S.V.; Yow, T.G.; Daugherty, P.F.

    1996-05-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC), which is associated with NASA`s Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS), provides access to a large number of tabular and imagery datasets used in ecological and environmental research. Because of its large and diverse data holdings, the challenge for the ORNL DAAC is to help users find data of interest from the hundreds of thousands of files available at the DAAC without overwhelming them. Therefore, the ORNL DAAC developed the Biogeochemical Information Ordering Management Environment (BIOME), a search and order system for the World Wide Web (WWW). The WWW provides a new vehicle that allows a wide range of users access to the data. This paper describes the specialized attributes incorporated into BIOME that allow researchers easy access to an otherwise bewildering array of data products.

  13. BIOME: A browser-aware search and order system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grubb, Jon W.; Jennings, Sarah V.; Yow, Teresa G.; Daughterty, Patricia F.

    1996-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC), which is associated with NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS), provides access to a large number of tabular and imagery datasets used in ecological and environmental research. Because of its large and diverse data holdings, the challenge for the ORNL DAAC is to help users find data of interest from the hundreds of thousands of files available at the DAAC without overwhelming them. Therefore, the ORNL DAAC developed the Biogeochemical Information Ordering Management Environment (BIOME), a search and order system for the World Wide Web (WWW). The WWW provides a new vehicle that allows a wide range of users access to the data. This paper describes the specialized attributes incorporated into BIOME that allow researchers easy access to an otherwise bewildering array of data products.

  14. Parameterisation of Biome BGC to assess forest ecosystems in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Sishir; Pietsch, Stephan A.

    2010-05-01

    African forest ecosystems are an important environmental and economic resource. Several studies show that tropical forests are critical to society as economic, environmental and societal resources. Tropical forests are carbon dense and thus play a key role in climate change mitigation. Unfortunately, the response of tropical forests to environmental change is largely unknown owing to insufficient spatially extensive observations. Developing regions like Africa where records of forest management for long periods are unavailable the process-based ecosystem simulation model - BIOME BGC could be a suitable tool to explain forest ecosystem dynamics. This ecosystem simulation model uses descriptive input parameters to establish the physiology, biochemistry, structure, and allocation patterns within vegetation functional types, or biomes. Undocumented parameters for larger-resolution simulations are currently the major limitations to regional modelling in African forest ecosystems. This study was conducted to document input parameters for BIOME-BGC for major natural tropical forests in the Congo basin. Based on available literature and field measurements updated values for turnover and mortality, allometry, carbon to nitrogen ratios, allocation of plant material to labile, cellulose, and lignin pools, tree morphology and other relevant factors were assigned. Daily climate input data for the model applications were generated using the statistical weather generator MarkSim. The forest was inventoried at various sites and soil samples of corresponding stands across Gabon were collected. Carbon and nitrogen in the collected soil samples were determined from soil analysis. The observed tree volume, soil carbon and soil nitrogen were then compared with the simulated model outputs to evaluate the model performance. Furthermore, the simulation using Congo Basin specific parameters and generalised BIOME BGC parameters for tropical evergreen broadleaved tree species were also

  15. Extreme precipitation patterns reduced terrestrial ecosystem production across biomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Moran, S. M.; Nearing, M.; Ponce Campos, G. E.; Huete, A. R.; Buda, A. R.; Bosch, D. D.; Gunter, S. A.; Kitchen, S. G.; McNab, W.; Morgan, J. A.; McClaran, M. P.; Montoya, D. S.; Peters, D. P.; Starks, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    Precipitation regimes are predicted to shift to more extreme patterns that are characterized by more intense rainfall events and longer dry intervals, yet their ecological impacts on vegetation production remain uncertain across biomes in natural climatic conditions. This in situ study investigated the effects of novel climatic conditions on aboveground net primary production (ANPP) by combining a greenness index from satellite measurements and climatic records during 2000 to 2009 from 11 long-term experimental sites in multiple biomes and climates. Results showed that extreme precipitation patterns decreased the sensitivity of ANPP to total annual precipitation (PT), at the regional and decadal scales, leading to a mean 20% decrease in rain-use efficiency across biomes. Relative decreases in ANPP were greatest for arid grassland (16%) and Mediterranean forest (20%), and less for mesic grassland and temperate forest (3%). The co-occurrence of more heavy rainfall events and longer dry intervals caused greater water stress that resulted in reduced vegetation production. A new generalized model was developed to improve predictions of the ANPP response to changes in extreme precipitation patterns by using a function of both PT and an index of precipitation extremes. These findings suggest that extreme precipitation patterns have more substantial and complex effects on vegetation production across biomes, and are as important as total annual precipitation in understanding vegetation processes. With predictions of more extreme weather events, forecasts of ecosystem production should consider these non-linear responses to altered precipitation patterns associated with climate change. Figure. Relation of production across precipitation gradients for 11 sites for two groups (Low: R95p% < 20%, High: R95p% ≥ 20%). See Table 2 for R95p% definitions. The relations were significantly different for the two groups (F2, 106 = 18.51, P < 0.0001).

  16. Deforestation changes land-atmosphere interactions across South American biomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, Alvaro; Katzfey, Jack; Thatcher, Marcus; Syktus, Jozef; Wong, Kenneth; McAlpine, Clive

    2016-04-01

    South American biomes are increasingly affected by land use/land cover change. However, the climatic impacts of this phenomenon are still not well understood. In this paper, we model vegetation-climate interactions with a focus on four main biomes distributed in four key regions: The Atlantic Forest, the Cerrado, the Dry Chaco, and the Chilean Matorral ecosystems. We applied a three member ensemble climate model simulation for the period 1981-2010 (30 years) at 25 km resolution over the focus regions to quantify the changes in the regional climate resulting from historical deforestation. The results of computed modelling experiments show significant changes in surface fluxes, temperature and moisture in all regions. For instance, simulated temperature changes were stronger in the Cerrado and the Chilean Matorral with an increase of between 0.7 and 1.4 °C. Changes in the hydrological cycle revealed high regional variability. The results showed consistent significant decreases in relative humidity and soil moisture, and increases in potential evapotranspiration across biomes, yet without conclusive changes in precipitation. These impacts were more significant during the dry season, which resulted to be drier and warmer after deforestation.

  17. Licensee Event Report sequence coding and search procedure workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Cottrell, W.B.; Gallaher, R.B.

    1981-03-01

    Since mid-1980, the Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has been developing procedures for the systematic review and analysis of Licensee Event Reports (LERs). These procedures generally address several areas of concern, including identification of significant trends and patterns, event sequence of occurrences, component failures, and system and plant effects. The AEOD and NSIC conducted a workshop on the new coding procedure at the American Museum of Science and Energy in Oak Ridge, TN, on November 24, 1980.

  18. FIFE data analysis: Testing BIOME-BGC predictions for grasslands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, E. Raymond, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE) was conducted in a 15 km by 15 km research area located 8 km south of Manhattan, Kansas. The site consists primarily of native tallgrass prairie mixed with gallery oak forests and croplands. The objectives of FIFE are to better understand the role of biology in controlling the interactions between the land and the atmosphere, and to determine the value of remotely sensed data for estimating climatological parameters. The goals of FIFE are twofold: the upscale integration of models, and algorithm development for satellite remote sensing. The specific objectives of the field campaigns carried out in 1987 and 1989 were the simultaneous acquisition of satellite, atmospheric, and surface data; and the understanding of the processes controlling surface energy and mass exchange. Collected data were used to study the dynamics of various ecosystem processes (photosynthesis, evaporation and transpiration, autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration, etc.). Modelling terrestrial ecosystems at scales larger than that of a homogeneous plot led to the development of simple, generalized models of biogeochemical cycles that can be accurately applied to different biomes through the use of remotely sensed data. A model was developed called BIOME-BGC (for BioGeochemical Cycles) from a coniferous forest ecosystem model, FOREST-BGC, where a biome is considered a combination of a life forms in a specified climate. A predominately C4-photosynthetic grassland is probably the most different from a coniferous forest possible, hence the FIFE site was an excellent study area for testing BIOME-BGC. The transition from an essentially one-dimensional calculation to three-dimensional, landscape scale simulations requires the introduction of such factors as meteorology, climatology, and geomorphology. By using remotely sensed geographic information data for important model inputs, process

  19. 13 CFR 107.1150 - Maximum amount of Leverage for a Section 301(c) Licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... profitability based on a conservative investment strategy that limits downside risk. Any such Leverage request... successful investment strategy and demonstrates the Licensee's ability to pay all SBA obligations...

  20. 44 CFR 352.26 - Arrangements for Federal response in the licensee offsite emergency response plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS: EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS PLANNING Federal Participation § 352.26 Arrangements for... from commercial nuclear power plant licensees to State and local governments and to surrounding...

  1. 44 CFR 352.26 - Arrangements for Federal response in the licensee offsite emergency response plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PREPAREDNESS COMMERCIAL... from commercial nuclear power plant licensees to State and local governments and to surrounding...

  2. Soil Acidobacterial 16S rRNA Gene Sequences Reveal Subgroup Level Differences between Savanna-Like Cerrado and Atlantic Forest Brazilian Biomes

    PubMed Central

    Catão, Elisa C. P.; Lopes, Fabyano A. C.; Araújo, Janaína F.; de Castro, Alinne P.; Barreto, Cristine C.; Bustamante, Mercedes M. C.; Quirino, Betania F.; Krüger, Ricardo H.

    2014-01-01

    16S rRNA sequences from the phylum Acidobacteria have been commonly reported from soil microbial communities, including those from the Brazilian Savanna (Cerrado) and the Atlantic Forest biomes, two biomes that present contrasting characteristics of soil and vegetation. Using 16S rRNA sequences, the present work aimed to study acidobacterial diversity and distribution in soils of Cerrado savanna and two Atlantic forest sites. PCA and phylogenetic reconstruction showed that the acidobacterial communities found in “Mata de galeria” forest soil samples from the Cerrado biome have a tendency to separate from the other Cerrado vegetation microbial communities in the direction of those found in the Atlantic Forest, which is correlated with a high abundance of Acidobacteria subgroup 2 (GP2). Environmental conditions seem to promote a negative correlation between GP2 and subgroup 1 (GP1) abundance. Also GP2 is negatively correlated to pH, but positively correlated to high Al3+ concentrations. The Cerrado soil showed the lowest Acidobacteria richness and diversity indexes of OTUs at the species and subgroups levels when compared to Atlantic Forest soils. These results suggest specificity of acidobacterial subgroups to soils of different biomes and are a starting point to understand their ecological roles, a topic that needs to be further explored. PMID:25309599

  3. A simple estimate of ecosystem respiration across biomes based on MODIS products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaegermeyr, J.; Hostert, P.; Lucht, W.

    2010-12-01

    Beside carbon sequestration by terrestrial photosynthesis, in particular the subsequent carbon release by ecosystem respiration (Reco) is a crucial flux for estimating carbon budgets. Heterotrophic soil decomposition rates (Rh) and autotrophic respiration rates (Ra), which add up to Reco, are highly sensitive to environmental conditions and in some cases they determine net ecosystem productivity. Prior respiration modeling approaches revealed that a precise process-based and bottom-up modeling is important for realistic estimates. On a short timescale, as in the case of satellite environmental monitoring, simplified empirical models are not necessarily less accurate, though. For most major biomes, ecosystem carbon efflux is predominantly driven by air temperature. It can further be limited by water stress, plant activity and substrate quality. Developing simple, empirical and wall-to-wall respiration models from continuous Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land products on a continental scale can enhance our understanding of spatially explicit respiration patterns. We therefore accept model uncertainties by simplifying decay and respiratory processes in that we account for a single static carbon pool and do not include any feedback mechanisms. Preliminary results suggest that the 8-day MODIS 1km land surface temperature product (LST) and the vegetation-water index (NDWI) derived from the 8-day MODIS 500m surface reflectance product are sufficient to largely explain the variability of Reco. Spatial flux variations can be attributed to plant activity variation. We therefore introduce a site-specific, maximum leaf area index (LAI) from the MODIS 1km LAI product as a proxy. A biome-specific model parameterization and validation is performed, based on 8-day composite FLUXNET tower data representing major global biomes. We found that the frequently used temperature model by Loyd and Taylor (1994) does not show superior performance on 8-day ecosystem

  4. USGS: providing scientific understanding of the sagebrush biome

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2005-01-01

    Early explorers wrote about the vast sea of sagebrush that stretched in front of them. Today, the consequences of land-use practices, invasion by exotic plants, and altered disturbance regimes have touched virtually all of these seemingly endless expanses. Increasing human populations in the western United States, the infrastructure necessary to support these populations, and a growing demand for natural resources exert a large influence. Changes within the biome have resulted in its designation as one of the most endangered ecosystems in North America.

  5. 25 CFR 140.15 - License applicable for trading only by original licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false License applicable for trading only by original licensee. 140.15 Section 140.15 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES LICENSED INDIAN TRADERS § 140.15 License applicable for trading only by original licensee....

  6. 9 CFR 2.10 - Licensees whose licenses have been suspended or revoked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Licensees whose licenses have been suspended or revoked. 2.10 Section 2.10 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Licensing § 2.10 Licensees whose...

  7. 13 CFR 107.1920 - Licensee's application for exemption from a regulation in this part 107.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Licensee's application for exemption from a regulation in this part 107. 107.1920 Section 107.1920 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Miscellaneous § 107.1920 Licensee's...

  8. 76 FR 71267 - Standardized and Enhanced Disclosure Requirements for Television Broadcast Licensee Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... Requirements for Television Broadcast Licensee Public Interest Obligations, Report and Order, 73 FR 13452 (2007... Broadcast Licensee Public Interest Obligations, Erratum, 73 FR 30316 (2007). II. Background 2. One of a... FR 62683 (2000) (``NPRM''); In the Matter of Public Interest Obligations of TV Broadcast...

  9. 10 CFR 50.76 - Licensee's change of status; financial qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Licensee's change of status; financial qualifications. 50.76 Section 50.76 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Inspections, Records, Reports, Notifications § 50.76 Licensee's change of...

  10. 10 CFR 50.76 - Licensee's change of status; financial qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Licensee's change of status; financial qualifications. 50.76 Section 50.76 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Inspections, Records, Reports, Notifications § 50.76 Licensee's change of...

  11. 10 CFR 50.76 - Licensee's change of status; financial qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Licensee's change of status; financial qualifications. 50.76 Section 50.76 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Inspections, Records, Reports, Notifications § 50.76 Licensee's change of...

  12. 13 CFR 107.1580 - Special rules for In-Kind Distributions by Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special rules for In-Kind Distributions by Licensees. 107.1580 Section 107.1580 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES SBA Financial Assistance for Licensees (Leverage) Participating Securities Leverage § 107.1580...

  13. 13 CFR 107.470 - SBA approval of merger, consolidation, or reorganization of Licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Changes in Ownership, Control, or Structure of Licensee; Transfer of License Change in Structure of Licensee § 107.470 SBA approval of merger..., change form of organization (corporation or partnership) or reorganize without SBA's prior...

  14. 47 CFR 3.75 - Licensee's failure to make timely payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Licensee's failure to make timely payment. 3.75... OF ACCOUNTING AUTHORITIES IN MARITIME AND MARITIME MOBILE-SATELLITE RADIO SERVICES Enforcement § 3.75 Licensee's failure to make timely payment. Failure to remit proper and timely payment to the Commission...

  15. 47 CFR 3.75 - Licensee's failure to make timely payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Licensee's failure to make timely payment. 3.75... OF ACCOUNTING AUTHORITIES IN MARITIME AND MARITIME MOBILE-SATELLITE RADIO SERVICES Enforcement § 3.75 Licensee's failure to make timely payment. Failure to remit proper and timely payment to the Commission...

  16. 13 CFR 107.590 - Licensee's requirement to maintain active operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Licensee's requirement to maintain active operations. 107.590 Section 107.590 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee Requirement to Conduct...

  17. 13 CFR 107.503 - Licensee's adoption of an approved valuation policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Licensee's adoption of an approved valuation policy. 107.503 Section 107.503 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee General Requirements § 107.503...

  18. 13 CFR 107.585 - Voluntary decrease in Licensee's Regulatory Capital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Voluntary decrease in Licensee's Regulatory Capital. 107.585 Section 107.585 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee Voluntary Decrease in...

  19. 13 CFR 107.510 - SBA approval of Licensee's Investment Adviser/Manager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false SBA approval of Licensee's Investment Adviser/Manager. 107.510 Section 107.510 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee Management...

  20. 47 CFR 27.1031 - Reimbursement obligation of licensees at 1995-2000 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Reimbursement obligation of licensees at 1995-2000 MHz. 27.1031 Section 27.1031 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1915-1920 MHz and 1995-2000 MHz Reimbursement Obligation of Licensees at...

  1. 13 CFR 107.506 - Safeguarding Licensee's assets/Internal controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safeguarding Licensee's assets/Internal controls. 107.506 Section 107.506 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee General Requirements §...

  2. 13 CFR 107.503 - Licensee's adoption of an approved valuation policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Licensee's adoption of an approved valuation policy. 107.503 Section 107.503 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee General Requirements § 107.503...

  3. 13 CFR 107.590 - Licensee's requirement to maintain active operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Licensee's requirement to maintain active operations. 107.590 Section 107.590 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee Requirement to Conduct...

  4. 13 CFR 107.510 - SBA approval of Licensee's Investment Adviser/Manager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false SBA approval of Licensee's Investment Adviser/Manager. 107.510 Section 107.510 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee Management...

  5. 13 CFR 107.590 - Licensee's requirement to maintain active operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Licensee's requirement to maintain active operations. 107.590 Section 107.590 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee Requirement to Conduct...

  6. 13 CFR 107.510 - SBA approval of Licensee's Investment Adviser/Manager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false SBA approval of Licensee's Investment Adviser/Manager. 107.510 Section 107.510 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee Management...

  7. 13 CFR 107.590 - Licensee's requirement to maintain active operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Licensee's requirement to maintain active operations. 107.590 Section 107.590 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee Requirement to Conduct...

  8. 13 CFR 107.503 - Licensee's adoption of an approved valuation policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Licensee's adoption of an approved valuation policy. 107.503 Section 107.503 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee General Requirements § 107.503...

  9. 13 CFR 107.510 - SBA approval of Licensee's Investment Adviser/Manager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false SBA approval of Licensee's Investment Adviser/Manager. 107.510 Section 107.510 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee Management...

  10. 13 CFR 107.585 - Voluntary decrease in Licensee's Regulatory Capital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Voluntary decrease in Licensee's Regulatory Capital. 107.585 Section 107.585 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee Voluntary Decrease in...

  11. 13 CFR 107.510 - SBA approval of Licensee's Investment Adviser/Manager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false SBA approval of Licensee's Investment Adviser/Manager. 107.510 Section 107.510 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee Management...

  12. 13 CFR 107.585 - Voluntary decrease in Licensee's Regulatory Capital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Voluntary decrease in Licensee's Regulatory Capital. 107.585 Section 107.585 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee Voluntary Decrease in...

  13. 13 CFR 107.506 - Safeguarding Licensee's assets/Internal controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Safeguarding Licensee's assets/Internal controls. 107.506 Section 107.506 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee General Requirements §...

  14. 13 CFR 107.590 - Licensee's requirement to maintain active operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Licensee's requirement to maintain active operations. 107.590 Section 107.590 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee Requirement to Conduct...

  15. 13 CFR 107.506 - Safeguarding Licensee's assets/Internal controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Safeguarding Licensee's assets/Internal controls. 107.506 Section 107.506 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee General Requirements §...

  16. 13 CFR 107.585 - Voluntary decrease in Licensee's Regulatory Capital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Voluntary decrease in Licensee's Regulatory Capital. 107.585 Section 107.585 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee Voluntary Decrease in...

  17. 13 CFR 107.585 - Voluntary decrease in Licensee's Regulatory Capital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Voluntary decrease in Licensee's Regulatory Capital. 107.585 Section 107.585 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee Voluntary Decrease in...

  18. 13 CFR 107.550 - Prior approval of secured third-party debt of leveraged Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Prior approval of secured third-party debt of leveraged Licensees. 107.550 Section 107.550 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee Borrowing by...

  19. 13 CFR 107.503 - Licensee's adoption of an approved valuation policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Licensee's adoption of an approved valuation policy. 107.503 Section 107.503 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee General Requirements § 107.503...

  20. 13 CFR 107.550 - Prior approval of secured third-party debt of leveraged Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Prior approval of secured third-party debt of leveraged Licensees. 107.550 Section 107.550 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee Borrowing by...

  1. 13 CFR 107.550 - Prior approval of secured third-party debt of leveraged Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Prior approval of secured third-party debt of leveraged Licensees. 107.550 Section 107.550 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee Borrowing by...

  2. 13 CFR 107.506 - Safeguarding Licensee's assets/Internal controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Safeguarding Licensee's assets/Internal controls. 107.506 Section 107.506 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee General Requirements §...

  3. 13 CFR 107.503 - Licensee's adoption of an approved valuation policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Licensee's adoption of an approved valuation policy. 107.503 Section 107.503 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee General Requirements § 107.503...

  4. 13 CFR 107.550 - Prior approval of secured third-party debt of leveraged Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Prior approval of secured third-party debt of leveraged Licensees. 107.550 Section 107.550 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee Borrowing by...

  5. 13 CFR 107.1220 - Requirement for Licensee to file quarterly financial statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirement for Licensee to file quarterly financial statements. 107.1220 Section 107.1220 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES SBA Financial Assistance for Licensees (Leverage) Conditional Commitments by Sba to...

  6. 13 CFR 107.1570 - Distributions by Licensee-optional Distribution to private investors and SBA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Distributions by Licensee-optional Distribution to private investors and SBA. 107.1570 Section 107.1570 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES SBA Financial Assistance for Licensees (Leverage) Participating Securities...

  7. 13 CFR 107.1560 - Distributions by Licensee-required Distributions to private investors and SBA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Distributions by Licensee-required Distributions to private investors and SBA. 107.1560 Section 107.1560 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES SBA Financial Assistance for Licensees (Leverage) Participating...

  8. 13 CFR 107.230 - Permitted sources of Private Capital for Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... instrumentality, except for: (i) Funds invested by a public pension fund; (ii) Funds obtained from the business...) Funds directly or indirectly invested in any Licensee on or before August 16, 1982 by any Federal agency...) Funds directly or indirectly invested in any Licensee by any Federal agency under a statute that...

  9. 48 CFR 52.227-7 - Patents-Notice of Government Licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Patents-Notice of... Clauses 52.227-7 Patents—Notice of Government Licensee. As prescribed at 27.202-5(b), insert the following provision: Patents—Notice of Government Licensee (APR 1984) The Government is obligated to pay a...

  10. 48 CFR 52.227-7 - Patents-Notice of Government Licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Patents-Notice of... Clauses 52.227-7 Patents—Notice of Government Licensee. As prescribed at 27.202-5(b), insert the following provision: Patents—Notice of Government Licensee (APR 1984) The Government is obligated to pay a...

  11. 48 CFR 52.227-7 - Patents-Notice of Government Licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Patents-Notice of... Clauses 52.227-7 Patents—Notice of Government Licensee. As prescribed at 27.202-5(b), insert the following provision: Patents—Notice of Government Licensee (APR 1984) The Government is obligated to pay a...

  12. 48 CFR 52.227-7 - Patents-Notice of Government Licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Patents-Notice of... Clauses 52.227-7 Patents—Notice of Government Licensee. As prescribed at 27.202-5(b), insert the following provision: Patents—Notice of Government Licensee (APR 1984) The Government is obligated to pay a...

  13. 48 CFR 52.227-7 - Patents-Notice of Government Licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Patents-Notice of... Clauses 52.227-7 Patents—Notice of Government Licensee. As prescribed at 27.202-5(b), insert the following provision: Patents—Notice of Government Licensee (APR 1984) The Government is obligated to pay a...

  14. 13 CFR 107.1520 - How a Licensee computes and allocates Prioritized Payments to SBA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false How a Licensee computes and... (Leverage) Participating Securities Leverage § 107.1520 How a Licensee computes and allocates Prioritized Payments to SBA. This section tells you how to compute Prioritized Payments, Adjustments and Charges...

  15. 13 CFR 107.1510 - How a Licensee computes Earmarked Profit (Loss).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false How a Licensee computes Earmarked... Securities Leverage § 107.1510 How a Licensee computes Earmarked Profit (Loss). Computing your Earmarked... and Charges under § 107.1520 and Profit Participation under § 107.1530. (a) Requirement to...

  16. 13 CFR 107.1510 - How a Licensee computes Earmarked Profit (Loss).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false How a Licensee computes Earmarked... Securities Leverage § 107.1510 How a Licensee computes Earmarked Profit (Loss). Computing your Earmarked... and Charges under § 107.1520 and Profit Participation under § 107.1530. (a) Requirement to...

  17. 13 CFR 107.1520 - How a Licensee computes and allocates Prioritized Payments to SBA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false How a Licensee computes and... (Leverage) Participating Securities Leverage § 107.1520 How a Licensee computes and allocates Prioritized Payments to SBA. This section tells you how to compute Prioritized Payments, Adjustments and Charges...

  18. 13 CFR 107.1520 - How a Licensee computes and allocates Prioritized Payments to SBA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false How a Licensee computes and... (Leverage) Participating Securities Leverage § 107.1520 How a Licensee computes and allocates Prioritized Payments to SBA. This section tells you how to compute Prioritized Payments, Adjustments and Charges...

  19. 13 CFR 107.1520 - How a Licensee computes and allocates Prioritized Payments to SBA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false How a Licensee computes and... (Leverage) Participating Securities Leverage § 107.1520 How a Licensee computes and allocates Prioritized Payments to SBA. This section tells you how to compute Prioritized Payments, Adjustments and Charges...

  20. 13 CFR 107.1520 - How a Licensee computes and allocates Prioritized Payments to SBA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false How a Licensee computes and... (Leverage) Participating Securities Leverage § 107.1520 How a Licensee computes and allocates Prioritized Payments to SBA. This section tells you how to compute Prioritized Payments, Adjustments and Charges...

  1. 13 CFR 107.1540 - Distributions by Licensee-Prioritized Payments and Adjustments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Distributions by Licensee-Prioritized Payments and Adjustments. 107.1540 Section 107.1540 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES SBA Financial Assistance for Licensees...

  2. 13 CFR 107.1840 - Computation of Licensee's Capital Impairment Percentage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computation of Licensee's Capital Impairment Percentage. 107.1840 Section 107.1840 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Licensee's Noncompliance With Terms of Leverage Computation...

  3. 13 CFR 107.1230 - Draw-downs by Licensee under SBA's Leverage commitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Draw-downs by Licensee under SBA's Leverage commitment. 107.1230 Section 107.1230 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES SBA Financial Assistance for Licensees (Leverage)...

  4. 13 CFR 107.410 - Changes in Control of Licensee (through change in ownership or otherwise).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... (through change in ownership or otherwise). 107.410 Section 107.410 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Changes in Ownership, Control, or Structure of Licensee; Transfer of License Changes in Control Or Ownership of Licensee § 107.410 Changes in Control...

  5. 13 CFR 107.410 - Changes in Control of Licensee (through change in ownership or otherwise).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (through change in ownership or otherwise). 107.410 Section 107.410 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Changes in Ownership, Control, or Structure of Licensee; Transfer of License Changes in Control Or Ownership of Licensee § 107.410 Changes in Control...

  6. Climate sensitivity of shrub growth across the tundra biome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers-Smith, Isla H.; Elmendorf, Sarah C.; Beck, Pieter S. A.; Wilmking, Martin; Hallinger, Martin; Blok, Daan; Tape, Ken D.; Rayback, Shelly A.; Macias-Fauria, Marc; Forbes, Bruce C.; Speed, James D. M.; Boulanger-Lapointe, Noémie; Rixen, Christian; Lévesque, Esther; Schmidt, Niels Martin; Baittinger, Claudia; Trant, Andrew J.; Hermanutz, Luise; Collier, Laura Siegwart; Dawes, Melissa A.; Lantz, Trevor C.; Weijers, Stef; Jørgensen, Rasmus Halfdan; Buchwal, Agata; Buras, Allan; Naito, Adam T.; Ravolainen, Virve; Schaepman-Strub, Gabriela; Wheeler, Julia A.; Wipf, Sonja; Guay, Kevin C.; Hik, David S.; Vellend, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Rapid climate warming in the tundra biome has been linked to increasing shrub dominance. Shrub expansion can modify climate by altering surface albedo, energy and water balance, and permafrost, yet the drivers of shrub growth remain poorly understood. Dendroecological data consisting of multi-decadal time series of annual shrub growth provide an underused resource to explore climate-growth relationships. Here, we analyse circumpolar data from 37 Arctic and alpine sites in 9 countries, including 25 species, and ~42,000 annual growth records from 1,821 individuals. Our analyses demonstrate that the sensitivity of shrub growth to climate was: (1) heterogeneous, with European sites showing greater summer temperature sensitivity than North American sites, and (2) higher at sites with greater soil moisture and for taller shrubs (for example, alders and willows) growing at their northern or upper elevational range edges. Across latitude, climate sensitivity of growth was greatest at the boundary between the Low and High Arctic, where permafrost is thawing and most of the global permafrost soil carbon pool is stored. The observed variation in climate-shrub growth relationships should be incorporated into Earth system models to improve future projections of climate change impacts across the tundra biome.

  7. Comparison of North and South American biomes from AVHRR observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goward, Samuel N.; Dye, Dennis; Kerber, Arlene; Kalb, Virginia

    1987-01-01

    Previous analysis of the North American continent with AVHRR-derived vegetation index measurements showed a strong relation between known patterns of vegetation seasonality, productivity and the spectral vegetation index measurements. This study extends that analysis to South America to evaluate the degree to which these findings extend to tropical regions. The results show that the spectral vegetation index measurements provide a general indicator of vegetation activity across the major biomes of the Western Hemisphere of the earth, including tropical regions. The satellite-observed patterns are strongly related to the known climatology of the continents and may offer a means to improve understanding of global bioclimatology. For example, South America is shown to have a longer growing season with much earlier spring green-up than North America. The time integral of the measurements, computed from 12 composited monthly values, produces a value that is related to published net primary productivity data. However, limited net primary production data does not allow complete evaluation of satellite-observed contrasts between North and South American biomes. These results suggest that satellite-derived spectral vegetation index measurements are of great potential value in improving knowledge of the earth's biosphere.

  8. 47 CFR 27.1255 - Relocation Criteria for Broadband Radio Service Licensees in the 2150-2160/62 MHz band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... subscribers, the AWS licensee will determine whether there is an unobstructed signal path (line of sight) to... path (line of sight) to the incumbent licensee's receive station hub using the method prescribed...

  9. 47 CFR 27.1255 - Relocation Criteria for Broadband Radio Service Licensees in the 2150-2160/62 MHz band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... subscribers, the AWS licensee will determine whether there is an unobstructed signal path (line of sight) to... path (line of sight) to the incumbent licensee's receive station hub using the method prescribed...

  10. 47 CFR 27.1255 - Relocation Criteria for Broadband Radio Service Licensees in the 2150-2160/62 MHz band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... subscribers, the AWS licensee will determine whether there is an unobstructed signal path (line of sight) to... path (line of sight) to the incumbent licensee's receive station hub using the method prescribed...

  11. 47 CFR 27.1255 - Relocation Criteria for Broadband Radio Service Licensees in the 2150-2160/62 MHz band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... subscribers, the AWS licensee will determine whether there is an unobstructed signal path (line of sight) to... path (line of sight) to the incumbent licensee's receive station hub using the method prescribed...

  12. 47 CFR 27.1255 - Relocation Criteria for Broadband Radio Service Licensees in the 2150-2160/62 MHz band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... subscribers, the AWS licensee will determine whether there is an unobstructed signal path (line of sight) to... path (line of sight) to the incumbent licensee's receive station hub using the method prescribed...

  13. 13 CFR 107.860 - Financing fees and expense reimbursements a Licensee may receive from a Small Business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... reimbursements a Licensee may receive from a Small Business. 107.860 Section 107.860 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Financing of Small Businesses by Licensees Structuring Licensee's Financing of An Eligible Small Business: Terms and Conditions of......

  14. 13 CFR 107.860 - Financing fees and expense reimbursements a Licensee may receive from a Small Business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... reimbursements a Licensee may receive from a Small Business. 107.860 Section 107.860 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Financing of Small Businesses by Licensees Structuring Licensee's Financing of An Eligible Small Business: Terms and Conditions of......

  15. 13 CFR 107.860 - Financing fees and expense reimbursements a Licensee may receive from a Small Business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... reimbursements a Licensee may receive from a Small Business. 107.860 Section 107.860 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Financing of Small Businesses by Licensees Structuring Licensee's Financing of An Eligible Small Business: Terms and Conditions of......

  16. 13 CFR 107.860 - Financing fees and expense reimbursements a Licensee may receive from a Small Business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... reimbursements a Licensee may receive from a Small Business. 107.860 Section 107.860 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Financing of Small Businesses by Licensees Structuring Licensee's Financing of An Eligible Small Business: Terms and Conditions of......

  17. 13 CFR 107.860 - Financing fees and expense reimbursements a Licensee may receive from a Small Business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... reimbursements a Licensee may receive from a Small Business. 107.860 Section 107.860 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Financing of Small Businesses by Licensees Structuring Licensee's Financing of An Eligible Small Business: Terms and Conditions of......

  18. 18 CFR 141.400 - FERC Form No. 3-Q, Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies. 141.400 Section 141..., licensees, and natural gas companies. (a) Prescription. The quarterly report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies, designated as FERC Form No. 3-Q, is prescribed for the...

  19. 18 CFR 141.400 - FERC Form No. 3-Q, Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies. 141.400 Section 141..., licensees, and natural gas companies. (a) Prescription. The quarterly report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies, designated as FERC Form No. 3-Q, is prescribed for the...

  20. 18 CFR 141.400 - FERC Form No. 3-Q, Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies. 141.400 Section 141..., licensees, and natural gas companies. (a) Prescription. The quarterly report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies, designated as FERC Form No. 3-Q, is prescribed for the...

  1. 18 CFR 141.400 - FERC Form No. 3-Q, Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies. 141.400 Section 141..., licensees, and natural gas companies. (a) Prescription. The quarterly report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies, designated as FERC Form No. 3-Q, is prescribed for the...

  2. 18 CFR 141.400 - FERC Form No. 3-Q, Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies. 141.400 Section 141..., licensees, and natural gas companies. (a) Prescription. The quarterly report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies, designated as FERC Form No. 3-Q, is prescribed for the...

  3. Climate and litter quality differently modulate the effects of soil fauna on litter decomposition across biomes

    PubMed Central

    García-Palacios, Pablo; Maestre, Fernando T.; Kattge, Jens; Wall, Diana H.

    2015-01-01

    Climate and litter quality have been identified as major drivers of litter decomposition at large spatial scales. However, the role played by soil fauna remains largely unknown, despite its importance for litter fragmentation and microbial activity. We synthesized litterbag studies to quantify the effect sizes of soil fauna on litter decomposition rates at the global and biome scales, and to assess how climate, litter quality and soil fauna interact to determine such rates. Soil fauna consistently enhanced litter decomposition at both global and biome scales (average increment ~27%). However, climate and litter quality differently modulated the effects of soil fauna on decomposition rates between biomes, from climate-driven biomes to those where climate effects were mediated by changes in litter quality. Our results advocate for the inclusion of biome-specific soil fauna effects on litter decomposition as a mean to reduce the unexplained variation in large-scale decomposition models. PMID:23763716

  4. Flammable biomes dominated by eucalypts originated at the Cretaceous-Palaeogene boundary.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Michael D; Burrows, Geoffrey E; Cook, Lyn G; Thornhill, Andrew H; Bowman, David M J S

    2011-01-01

    Fire is a major modifier of communities, but the evolutionary origins of its prevalent role in shaping current biomes are uncertain. Australia is among the most fire-prone continents, with most of the landmass occupied by the fire-dependent sclerophyll and savanna biomes. In contrast to biomes with similar climates in other continents, Australia has a tree flora dominated by a single genus, Eucalyptus, and related Myrtaceae. A unique mechanism in Myrtaceae for enduring and recovering from fire damage likely resulted in this dominance. Here, we find a conserved phylogenetic relationship between post-fire resprouting (epicormic) anatomy and biome evolution, dating from 60 to 62 Ma, in the earliest Palaeogene. Thus, fire-dependent communities likely existed 50 million years earlier than previously thought. We predict that epicormic resprouting could make eucalypt forests and woodlands an excellent long-term carbon bank for reducing atmospheric CO(2) compared with biomes with similar fire regimes in other continents. PMID:21326225

  5. Response of vegetation to drought time-scales across global land biomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.; Gouveia, Célia; Julio Camarero, Jesús; Beguería, Santiago; Trigo, Ricardo; López-Moreno, Juan I.; Azorín-Molina, César; Pasho, Edmond; Lorenzo-Lacruz, Jorge; Revuelto, Jesús; Morán-Tejeda, Enrique; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the response of the Earth land biomes to drought by correlating a drought index with three global indicators of vegetation activity and growth: vegetation indices from satellite imagery, tree-ring growth series, and Aboveground Net Primary Production (ANPP) records. Arid and humid biomes are both affected by drought, and we suggest that the persistence of the water deficit (i.e., the drought time-scale) could be playing a key role in determining the sensitivity of land biomes to drought. We found that arid biomes respond to drought at short time-scales; that is, there is a rapid vegetation reaction as soon as water deficits below normal conditions occur. This may be due to the fact that plant species of arid regions have mechanisms allowing them to rapidly adapt to changing water availability. Humid biomes also respond to drought at short time-scales, but in this case the physiological mechanisms likely differ from those operating in arid biomes, as plants usually have a poor adaptability to water shortage. On the contrary, semiarid and subhumid biomes respond to drought at long time-scales, probably because plants are able to withstand water deficits, but they lack the rapid response of arid biomes to drought. These results are consistent among three vegetation parameters analyzed and across different land biomes, showing that the response of vegetation to drought depends on characteristic drought time-scales for each biome. Understanding the dominant time-scales at which drought most influences vegetation might help assessing the resistance and resilience of vegetation and improving our knowledge of vegetation vulnerability to climate change.

  6. Response of vegetation to drought time-scales across global land biomes

    PubMed Central

    Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.; Gouveia, Célia; Camarero, Jesús Julio; Beguería, Santiago; Trigo, Ricardo; López-Moreno, Juan I.; Azorín-Molina, César; Pasho, Edmond; Lorenzo-Lacruz, Jorge; Revuelto, Jesús; Morán-Tejeda, Enrique; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the response of the Earth land biomes to drought by correlating a drought index with three global indicators of vegetation activity and growth: vegetation indices from satellite imagery, tree-ring growth series, and Aboveground Net Primary Production (ANPP) records. Arid and humid biomes are both affected by drought, and we suggest that the persistence of the water deficit (i.e., the drought time-scale) could be playing a key role in determining the sensitivity of land biomes to drought. We found that arid biomes respond to drought at short time-scales; that is, there is a rapid vegetation reaction as soon as water deficits below normal conditions occur. This may be due to the fact that plant species of arid regions have mechanisms allowing them to rapidly adapt to changing water availability. Humid biomes also respond to drought at short time-scales, but in this case the physiological mechanisms likely differ from those operating in arid biomes, as plants usually have a poor adaptability to water shortage. On the contrary, semiarid and subhumid biomes respond to drought at long time-scales, probably because plants are able to withstand water deficits, but they lack the rapid response of arid biomes to drought. These results are consistent among three vegetation parameters analyzed and across different land biomes, showing that the response of vegetation to drought depends on characteristic drought time-scales for each biome. Understanding the dominant time-scales at which drought most influences vegetation might help assessing the resistance and resilience of vegetation and improving our knowledge of vegetation vulnerability to climate change. PMID:23248309

  7. Biogeography of photoautotrophs in the high polar biome

    PubMed Central

    Pointing, Stephen B.; Burkhard Büdel; Convey, Peter; Gillman, Len N.; Körner, Christian; Leuzinger, Sebastian; Vincent, Warwick F.

    2015-01-01

    The global latitudinal gradient in biodiversity weakens in the high polar biome and so an alternative explanation for distribution of Arctic and Antarctic photoautotrophs is required. Here we identify how temporal, microclimate and evolutionary drivers of biogeography are important, rather than the macroclimate features that drive plant diversity patterns elsewhere. High polar ecosystems are biologically unique, with a more central role for bryophytes, lichens and microbial photoautotrophs over that of vascular plants. Constraints on vascular plants arise mainly due to stature and ontogenetic barriers. Conversely non-vascular plant and microbial photoautotroph distribution is correlated with favorable microclimates and the capacity for poikilohydric dormancy. Contemporary distribution also depends on evolutionary history, with adaptive and dispersal traits as well as legacy influencing biogeography. We highlight the relevance of these findings to predicting future impacts on diversity of polar photoautotrophs and to the current status of plants in Arctic and Antarctic conservation policy frameworks. PMID:26442009

  8. Softball Games Bring NCI and Leidos Biomed Employees Together | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    NCI and Leidos Biomed employees took to the fields at Nallin Pond for the third annual slow-pitch softball games on August 26. The series attracted 54 employees who were divided into four teams, Red, Blue, Gray, and White, and they were cheered on by about 40 enthusiastic spectators. In the first set of games, the Gray team defeated the Blue team, 15–8, and the White team pulled out a win against the Red team, 17–15. After a brief rest, the two winning teams and the two losing teams faced each other in a second set of games. On Field 1, the “winners” match-up of the Gray and White teams was a nail biter, with a close score throughout the game. Daylight was a factor, however, and the team captains decided to call the game for safety reasons. With a lead of 15 to 13, the Gray team was declared the overall winner.

  9. Comparative Patterns of Plant Invasions in the Mediterranean Biome

    PubMed Central

    Arianoutsou, Margarita; Delipetrou, Pinelopi; Vilà, Montserrat; Dimitrakopoulos, Panayiotis G.; Celesti-Grapow, Laura; Wardell-Johnson, Grant; Henderson, Lesley; Fuentes, Nicol; Ugarte-Mendes, Eduardo; Rundel, Philip W.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work was to compare and contrast the patterns of alien plant invasions in the world’s five mediterranean-climate regions (MCRs). We expected landscape age and disturbance history to have bearing on levels of invasion. We assembled a database on naturalized alien plant taxa occurring in natural and semi-natural terrestrial habitats of all five regions (specifically Spain, Italy, Greece and Cyprus from the Mediterranean Basin, California, central Chile, the Cape Region of South Africa and Southwestern - SW Australia). We used multivariate (hierarchical clustering and NMDS ordination) trait and habitat analysis to compare characteristics of regions, taxa and habitats across the mediterranean biome. Our database included 1627 naturalized species with an overall low taxonomic similarity among the five MCRs. Herbaceous perennials were the most frequent taxa, with SW Australia exhibiting both the highest numbers of naturalized species and the highest taxonomic similarity (homogenization) among habitats, and the Mediterranean Basin the lowest. Low stress and highly disturbed habitats had the highest frequency of invasion and homogenization in all regions, and high natural stress habitats the lowest, while taxonomic similarity was higher among different habitats in each region than among regions. Our analysis is the first to describe patterns of species characteristics and habitat vulnerability for a single biome. We have shown that a broad niche (i.e. more than one habitat) is typical of naturalized plant species, regardless of their geographical area of origin, leading to potential for high homogenization within each region. Habitats of the Mediterranean Basin are apparently the most resistant to plant invasion, possibly because their landscapes are generally of relatively recent origin, but with a more gradual exposure to human intervention over a longer period. PMID:24244443

  10. NMSS handbook for decommissioning fuel cycle and materials licensees

    SciTech Connect

    Orlando, D.A.; Hogg, R.C.; Ramsey, K.M.

    1997-03-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission amended its regulations to set forth the technical and financial criteria for decommissioning licensed nuclear facilities. These regulations were further amended to establish additional recordkeeping requirements for decommissioning; to establish timeframes and schedules for the decommissioning; and to clarify that financial assurance requirements must be in place during operations and updated when licensed operations cease. Reviews of the Site Decommissioning Management Plan (SDMP) program found that, while the NRC staff was overseeing the decommissioning program at nuclear facilities in a manner that was protective of public health and safety, progress in decommissioning many sites was slow. As a result NRC determined that formal written procedures should be developed to facilitate the timely decommissioning of licensed nuclear facilities. This handbook was developed to aid NRC staff in achieving this goal. It is intended to be used as a reference document to, and in conjunction with, NRC Inspection Manual Chapter (IMC) 2605, ``Decommissioning Inspection Program for Fuel Cycle and Materials Licensees.`` The policies and procedures discussed in this handbook should be used by NRC staff overseeing the decommissioning program at licensed fuel cycle and materials sites; formerly licensed sites for which the licenses were terminated; sites involving source, special nuclear, or byproduct material subject to NRC regulation for which a license was never issued; and sites in the NRC`s SDMP program. NRC staff overseeing the decommissioning program at nuclear reactor facilities subject to regulation under 10 CFR Part 50 are not required to use the procedures discussed in this handbook.

  11. 78 FR 60919 - In the Matter of Certain Licensees Authorized To Possess and Transfer Items Containing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... history record checks for individuals when the Licensee's reviewing official is determining access to... check in accordance with the NRC's ``Order Imposing Fingerprinting and Criminal History Records Check... reviewing official under the NRC's ``Order Imposing Fingerprinting and Criminal History Records...

  12. 13 CFR 107.530 - Restrictions on investments of idle funds by leveraged Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... forth in regulations of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as amended (12 CFR 325.103). (2... BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee...

  13. 13 CFR 107.530 - Restrictions on investments of idle funds by leveraged Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... forth in regulations of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as amended (12 CFR 325.103). (2... BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee...

  14. 13 CFR 107.530 - Restrictions on investments of idle funds by leveraged Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... forth in regulations of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as amended (12 CFR 325.103). (2... BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee...

  15. 13 CFR 107.1150 - Maximum amount of Leverage for a Section 301(c) Licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... conservative investment strategy that limits downside risk. Any such Leverage request must be supported by an up-to-date business plan that reflects continuation of the Licensee's successful investment...

  16. 10 CFR 140.21 - Licensee guarantees of payment of deferred premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... premiums. Each licensee required to have and maintain financial protection for each nuclear reactor as... million for each reactor he is licensed to operate: (a) Surety bond, (b) Letter of credit, (c)...

  17. 10 CFR 140.21 - Licensee guarantees of payment of deferred premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... premiums. Each licensee required to have and maintain financial protection for each nuclear reactor as... million for each reactor he is licensed to operate: (a) Surety bond, (b) Letter of credit, (c)...

  18. 13 CFR 107.506 - Safeguarding Licensee's assets/Internal controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .../Internal controls. 107.506 Section 107.506 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION... Safeguarding Licensee's assets/Internal controls. You must adopt a plan to safeguard your assets and monitor... your control procedures....

  19. The diversification of eastern South American open vegetation biomes: Historical biogeography and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werneck, Fernanda P.

    2011-06-01

    The eastern-central South American open vegetation biomes occur across an extensive range of environmental conditions and are organized diagonally including three complexly interacting tropical/sub-tropical biomes. Seasonally Dry Tropical Forests (SDTFs), Cerrado, and Chaco biomes are seasonally stressed by drought, characterized by significant plant and animal endemism, high levels of diversity, and highly endangered. However, these open biomes have been overlooked in biogeographic studies and conservation projects in South America, especially regarding fauna studies. Here I compile and evaluate the biogeographic hypotheses previously proposed for the diversification of these three major open biomes, specifically their distributions located eastern and southern of Andes. My goal is to generate predictions and provide a background for testable hypotheses. I begin by investigating both continental (inter-biome) and regional (within-biome) levels, and I then provide a biogeographical summary for these regions. I also suggest how novel molecular-based historical biogeographic/phylogeographic approaches could contribute to the resolution of long-standing questions, identify potential target fauna groups for development of these lines of study, and describe fertile future research agendas.

  20. Central African biomes and forest succession stages derived from modern pollen data and plant functional types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebamba, J.; Ngomanda, A.; Vincens, A.; Jolly, D.; Favier, C.; Elenga, H.; Bentaleb, I.

    2009-07-01

    New detailed vegetation reconstructions are proposed in Atlantic Central Africa from a modern pollen data set derived from 199 sites (Cameroon, Gabon and Congo) including 131 new sites. In this study, the concept of plant functional classification is improved with new and more detailed plant functional types (PFTs) and new aggregations of pollen taxa. Using the biomisation method, we reconstructed (1) modern potential biomes and (2) potential succession stages of forest regeneration, a new approach in Atlantic Central African vegetation dynamics and ecosystem functioning reconstruction. When compared to local vegetation, potential biomes are correctly reconstructed (97.5% of the sites) and tropical rain forest (TRFO biome) is well identified from tropical seasonal forest (TSFO biome). When the potential biomes are superimposed on the White's vegetation map, only 76.4% of the sites are correctly reconstructed. But using botanical data, correspondence and cluster analyses, the 43 sites from Congo (Mayombe) evidence more affinities with those of central Gabon and so they can also be considered as correctly reconstructed as TRFO biome and White's map should be revised. In terms of potential succession stages of forest regeneration, the mature forest (TMFO) is well differentiated from the secondary forest (TSFE), but inside this latter group, the young and the pioneer stages are not clearly identified due probably to their low sampling representation. Moreover, linked to their progressive and mosaic character, the boundaries between two forest biomes or two forest stages are not clearly detected and need also a more intensive sampling in such transitions.

  1. Reconstructed Arctic biome and soil distributions: implications for the late Quaternary permafrost subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, A.; Saito, K.; Bigelow, N. H.; Walsh, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    As part of a larger project exploring permafrost distribution in the Arctic and Beringia region, we are updating BIOME4 model outputs and pollen maps for 21ka (ka = thousand years ago), 6ka, and 0ka time periods. Vegetation is a key control for permafrost distribution as it can affect the surface conditions controlling permafrost in high latitudes. BIOME4 is a coupled biogeography and biogeochemical model that simulates the global equilibrium distribution of biomes. BIOME4 was initially run with two historical climatologies for the 20th century, one of which is a more current climatology not used in previous BIOME4 runs, to obtain a general 'present day' view of the biome distributions. The updated climatology shows advances in the tree line in northern Alaska, but both climatologies generally agree on evergreen and deciduous taiga/montane forest locations. Using PMIP3/CMIP5 global circulation model climate and soil data as well as prescribed carbon dioxide concentrations, we ran the BIOME4 model for each time period. 21ka reconstructions based on the BIOME4 model output show various types of tundra widespread across the region, as far south as 40°N. This differs from present day where modeled tundra is generally limited to northern areas poleward of 70°N, the southernmost extent being ~60°N. However, when compared to real-world data provided by the updated BIOME 6000 global palaeovegetation map, preliminary 21ka tundra biomes differ in coverage. The model places shrub tundras in the focus region where we know graminoid or steppe type tundra existed. The discrepancy appears to arise from soil moisture content that was not changed in the BIOME4 runs for the different time periods, implying that soil water content may be very important in obtaining correct biome distributions in the Arctic. In particular, the modeling results suggest that moisture may be a critical feature determining the distribution of shrubby vs. herbaceous tundra. We know from lake level

  2. Pollen-based biomes for Beringia 18,000, 6000 and 0 14C yr BP

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, M.E.; Anderson, P.M.; Brubaker, L.B.; Ager, T.A.; Andreev, A.A.; Bigelow, N.H.; Cwynar, L.C.; Eisner, Wendy R.; Harrison, S.P.; Hu, F.-S.; Jolly, D.; Lozhkin, A.V.; MacDonald, G.M.; Mock, C.J.; Ritchie, J.C.; Sher, A.V.; Spear, R.W.; Williams, J.W.; Yu, G.

    2000-01-01

    The objective biomization method developed by Prentice et al. (1996) for Europe was extended using modern pollen samples from Beringia and then applied to fossil pollen data to reconstruct palaeovegetation patterns at 6000 and 18,000 14C yr BP. The predicted modern distribution of tundra, taiga and cool conifer forests in Alaska and north-western Canada generally corresponds well to actual vegetation patterns, although sites in regions characterized today by a mosaic of forest and tundra vegetation tend to be preferentially assigned to tundra. Siberian larch forests are delimited less well, probably due to the extreme under-representation of Larix in pollen spectra. The biome distribution across Beringia at 6000 14C yr BP was broadly similar to today, with little change in the northern forest limit, except for a possible northward-advance in the Mackenzie delta region. The western forest limit in Alaska was probably east of its modern position. At 18,000 14C yr BP the whole of Beringia was covered by tundra. However, the importance of the various plant functional types varied from site to site, supporting the idea that the vegetation cover was a mosaic of different tundra types.

  3. Synergistic impacts of deforestation, climate change and fire on the future biomes distribution in Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampaio, G.; Cardoso, M. F.; Nobre, C. A.; Salazar, L. F.

    2013-05-01

    Several studies indicate future increase of environmental risks for the ecosystems in the Amazon region as a result of climate and land-use change, and their synergistic interactions. Modeling studies (e.g. Oyama and Nobre 2004, Salazar et al. 2007, Malhi et al. 2008) project rapid and irreversible replacement of forests by savannas with large-scale losses of biodiversity and livelihoods for people in the region. This process is referred to as the Amazon Dieback, where accelerated plant mortality due to environmental changes lead to forest collapse and savannas expansion after "tipping points" in climate and land surface changes are achieved. In this study we performed new analyses to quantify how deforestation, climate change and fire may combine to affect the distribution of major biomes in Amazonia. Changes in land use consider deforestation scenarios of 0%, 20%, 40%, and 50% (Sampaio et al., 2007), with and without fires (Cardoso et al., 2008), under the two greenhouse gases scenarios B1 and A2 and three "representative concentration pathways" (RCPs): 2.6, 4.5 and 8.5, for years 2015-2034 and 2040-2059 ("2025" and "2050" time-slices), from IPCC AR4 and CMIP5. The results show that the area affected in scenarios A2 and RCP 8.5 is larger than in the climate scenario B1 and RCP 2.6, and in both cases the effect is progressively higher in time. Most important changes occur in the East and South of the Amazon, with replacement of tropical forest by seasonal forest and savanna. The effect of fire in this region is important in all scenarios. The Northwest Amazon presents the smallest changes in the area of tropical forest, indicating that even for substantial land-use modifications and global climate change, the resulting atmospheric conditions would still support tropical forest in the region. In summary, we conclude that the synergistic combination of deforestation, climate change resulting from global warming, and the potential for higher fire occurrence may lead

  4. Cross-biome comparison of microbial association networks

    PubMed Central

    Faust, Karoline; Lima-Mendez, Gipsi; Lerat, Jean-Sébastien; Sathirapongsasuti, Jarupon F.; Knight, Rob; Huttenhower, Curtis; Lenaerts, Tom; Raes, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Clinical and environmental meta-omics studies are accumulating an ever-growing amount of microbial abundance data over a wide range of ecosystems. With a sufficiently large sample number, these microbial communities can be explored by constructing and analyzing co-occurrence networks, which detect taxon associations from abundance data and can give insights into community structure. Here, we investigate how co-occurrence networks differ across biomes and which other factors influence their properties. For this, we inferred microbial association networks from 20 different 16S rDNA sequencing data sets and observed that soil microbial networks harbor proportionally fewer positive associations and are less densely interconnected than host-associated networks. After excluding sample number, sequencing depth and beta-diversity as possible drivers, we found a negative correlation between community evenness and positive edge percentage. This correlation likely results from a skewed distribution of negative interactions, which take place preferentially between less prevalent taxa. Overall, our results suggest an under-appreciated role of evenness in shaping microbial association networks. PMID:26579106

  5. Evolution of Philodendron (Araceae) species in Neotropical biomes.

    PubMed

    Loss-Oliveira, Leticia; Sakuragui, Cassia; Soares, Maria de Lourdes; Schrago, Carlos G

    2016-01-01

    Philodendron is the second most diverse genus of the Araceae, a tropical monocot family with significant morphological diversity along its wide geographic distribution in the Neotropics. Although evolutionary studies of Philodendron were conducted in recent years, the phylogenetic relationship among its species remains unclear. Additionally, analyses conducted to date suggested the inclusion of all American representatives of a closely-related genus, Homalomena, within the Philodendron clade. A thorough evaluation of the phylogeny and timescale of these lineages is thus necessary to elucidate the tempo and mode of evolution of this large Neotropical genus and to unveil the biogeographic history of Philodendron evolution along the Amazonian and Atlantic rainforests as well as open dry forests of South America. To this end, we have estimated the molecular phylogeny for 68 Philodendron species, which consists of the largest sampling assembled to date aiming the study of the evolutionary affinities. We have also performed ancestral reconstruction of species distribution along biomes. Finally, we contrasted these results with the inferred timescale of Philodendron and Homalomena lineage diversification. Our estimates indicate that American Homalomena is the sister clade to Philodendron. The early diversification of Philodendron took place in the Amazon forest from Early to Middle Miocene, followed by colonization of the Atlantic forest and the savanna-like landscapes, respectively. Based on the age of the last common ancestor of Philodendron, the species of this genus diversified by rapid radiations, leading to its wide extant distribution in the Neotropical region. PMID:27042390

  6. Climate control of terrestrial carbon exchange across biomes and continents

    SciTech Connect

    Ricciuto, Daniel M; Gu, Lianhong

    2010-07-01

    Understanding the relationships between climate and carbon exchange by terrestrial ecosystems is critical to predict future levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide because of the potential accelerating effects of positive climate carbon cycle feedbacks. However, directly observed relationships between climate and terrestrial CO2 exchange with the atmosphere across biomes and continents are lacking. Here we present data describing the relationships between net ecosystem exchange of carbon (NEE) and climate factors as measured using the eddy covariance method at 125 unique sites in various ecosystems over six continents with a total of 559 site-years. We find that NEE observed at eddy covariance sites is (1) a strong function of mean annual temperature at mid- and high-latitudes, (2) a strong function of dryness at mid- and low-latitudes, and (3) a function of both temperature and dryness around the mid-latitudinal belt (45 N). The sensitivity of NEE to mean annual temperature breaks down at ~ 16 C (a threshold value of mean annual temperature), above which no further increase of CO2 uptake with temperature was observed and dryness influence overrules temperature influence.

  7. BIOME: An Ecosystem Remote Sensor Based on Imaging Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, David L.; Hammer, Philip; Smith, William H.; Lawless, James G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Until recent times, optical remote sensing of ecosystem properties from space has been limited to broad band multispectral scanners such as Landsat and AVHRR. While these sensor data can be used to derive important information about ecosystem parameters, they are very limited for measuring key biogeochemical cycling parameters such as the chemical content of plant canopies. Such parameters, for example the lignin and nitrogen contents, are potentially amenable to measurements by very high spectral resolution instruments using a spectroscopic approach. Airborne sensors based on grating imaging spectrometers gave the first promise of such potential but the recent decision not to deploy the space version has left the community without many alternatives. In the past few years, advancements in high performance deep well digital sensor arrays coupled with a patented design for a two-beam interferometer has produced an entirely new design for acquiring imaging spectroscopic data at the signal to noise levels necessary for quantitatively estimating chemical composition (1000:1 at 2 microns). This design has been assembled as a laboratory instrument and the principles demonstrated for acquiring remote scenes. An airborne instrument is in production and spaceborne sensors being proposed. The instrument is extremely promising because of its low cost, lower power requirements, very low weight, simplicity (no moving parts), and high performance. For these reasons, we have called it the first instrument optimized for ecosystem studies as part of a Biological Imaging and Observation Mission to Earth (BIOME).

  8. Evolution of Philodendron (Araceae) species in Neotropical biomes

    PubMed Central

    Loss-Oliveira, Leticia; Sakuragui, Cassia; Soares, Maria de Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Philodendron is the second most diverse genus of the Araceae, a tropical monocot family with significant morphological diversity along its wide geographic distribution in the Neotropics. Although evolutionary studies of Philodendron were conducted in recent years, the phylogenetic relationship among its species remains unclear. Additionally, analyses conducted to date suggested the inclusion of all American representatives of a closely-related genus, Homalomena, within the Philodendron clade. A thorough evaluation of the phylogeny and timescale of these lineages is thus necessary to elucidate the tempo and mode of evolution of this large Neotropical genus and to unveil the biogeographic history of Philodendron evolution along the Amazonian and Atlantic rainforests as well as open dry forests of South America. To this end, we have estimated the molecular phylogeny for 68 Philodendron species, which consists of the largest sampling assembled to date aiming the study of the evolutionary affinities. We have also performed ancestral reconstruction of species distribution along biomes. Finally, we contrasted these results with the inferred timescale of Philodendron and Homalomena lineage diversification. Our estimates indicate that American Homalomena is the sister clade to Philodendron. The early diversification of Philodendron took place in the Amazon forest from Early to Middle Miocene, followed by colonization of the Atlantic forest and the savanna-like landscapes, respectively. Based on the age of the last common ancestor of Philodendron, the species of this genus diversified by rapid radiations, leading to its wide extant distribution in the Neotropical region. PMID:27042390

  9. BIOME: A scientific data archive search-and-order system using browser-aware, dynamic pages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, S. V.; Yow, T. G.; Ng, V. W.

    1997-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) is a data archive and distribution center for the National Air and Space Administration's (NASA) Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). Both the Earth Observing System (EOS) and EOSDIS are components of NASA's contribution to the US Global Change Research Program through its Mission to Planet Earth Program. The ORNL DAAC provides access to data used in ecological and environmental research such as global change, global warming, and terrestrial ecology. Because of its large and diverse data holdings, the challenge for the ORNL DAAC is to help users find data of interest from the hundreds of thousands of files available at the DAAC without overwhelming them. Therefore, the ORNL DAAC has developed the Biogeochemical Information Ordering Management Environment (BIOME), a customized search and order system for the World Wide Web (WWW). BIOME is a public system located at http://www-eosdis. ornl.gov/BIOME/biome.html.

  10. Carbon sources and sinks in forest biomes of the former Soviet Union

    SciTech Connect

    Kolchugina, T.P.; Vinson, T.S.

    1993-06-01

    Net primary productivity (NPP) of Soviet forest biomes has been estimated from an equilibrium analysis at seven percent of the global terrestrial NPP, 20 percent of the world's total forest NPP, and half of boreal and temperate forest NPP. However, an equilibrium analysis does not allow the assessment of the role of forest biomes in carbon sequestration because it is based on the assumption that the annual carbon increment in forest biomes equals the amount of carbon released to the atmosphere through respiration. A non-equilibrium analysis accounts for carbon sequestration during specific stages of forest ecosystem development. Sources and sinks of carbon and the sequestration potential of forest biomes in the former Soviet Union are assessed in the present study under non-equilibrium conditions by considering (1) net ecosystem productivity of different age forest stands and their actual coverage, (2) carbon flux related to forest fires, (3) the rate of peat accumulation, and (4) anthropogenic influences.

  11. Parameter Sensitivity of the Arctic BIOME BGC model for Estimating Evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engstrom, R. N.; Hope, A.

    2005-12-01

    Modeling evapotranspiration (ET) in Arctic coastal plain ecosystems is challenging due to the unique environmental conditions, including non-vascular vegetation, permafrost, and a large standing dead vegetation component. In a previous study, the commonly used ecosystem process model, BIOME BGC, was modified to include representations of these unique Arctic conditions. The modifications resulted in a new model, Arctic BIOME BGC that significantly reduced the random and systematic errors when compared to eddy flux tower measurements. However, the modifications made in Arctic BIOME BGC added complexity and a number of new parameters. In this study the generalized sensitivity analysis methodology was used to examine the Arctic BIOME BGC model sensitivity to the thirteen parameters in the application of estimating daily ET over a four year time period in the Arctic coastal plain. The thirteen parameters investigated represented those which most directly impact model ET estimates and include all of the new ones added in the development of Arctic BIOME BGC. Results indicate that the model was highly sensitive to eight of the thirteen parameters. This suggests that the new process representations added in Arctic BIOME BGC were important for modeling ET in these ecosystems. Two parameters, standing dead leaf area index and snow absorptivity, had unique, identifiable values that corresponded well to observed data. Overall, there were many physically realistic parameter sets that were able to produce acceptable model predictions indicating that parameter equifinality is present within the model.

  12. Biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems of the Caatinga Biome.

    PubMed

    Menezes, R S C; Sampaio, E V S B; Giongo, V; Pérez-Marin, A M

    2012-08-01

    The biogeochemical cycles of C, N, P and water, the impacts of land use in the stocks and flows of these elements and how they can affect the structure and functioning of Caatinga were reviewed. About half of this biome is still covered by native secondary vegetation. Soils are deficient in nutrients, especially N and P. Average concentrations of total soil P and C in the top layer (0-20 cm) are 196 mg kg(-1) and 9.3 g kg(-1), corresponding to C stocks around 23 Mg ha(-1). Aboveground biomass of native vegetation varies from 30 to 50 Mg ha(-1), and average root biomass from 3 to 12 Mg ha(-1). Average annual productivities and biomass accumulation in different land use systems vary from 1 to 7 Mg ha(-1) year(-1). Biological atmospheric N2 fixation is estimated to vary from 3 to 11 kg N ha(-1) year-1 and 21 to 26 kg N ha(-1) year(-1) in mature and secondary Caatinga, respectively. The main processes responsible for nutrient and water losses are fire, soil erosion, runoff and harvest of crops and animal products. Projected climate changes in the future point to higher temperatures and rainfall decreases. In face of the high intrinsic variability, actions to increase sustainability should improve resilience and stability of the ecosystems. Land use systems based on perennial species, as opposed to annual species, may be more stable and resilient, thus more adequate to face future potential increases in climate variability. Long-term studies to investigate the potential of the native biodiversity or adapted exotic species to design sustainable land use systems should be encouraged. PMID:23011295

  13. Declines of biomes and biotas and the future of evolution

    PubMed Central

    Woodruff, David S.

    2001-01-01

    Although panel discussants disagreed whether the biodiversity crisis constitutes a mass extinction event, all agreed that current extinction rates are 50–500 times background and are increasing and that the consequences for the future evolution of life are serious. In response to the on-going rapid decline of biomes and homogenization of biotas, the panelists predicted changes in species geographic ranges, genetic risks of extinction, genetic assimilation, natural selection, mutation rates, the shortening of food chains, the increase in nutrient-enriched niches permitting the ascendancy of microbes, and the differential survival of ecological generalists. Rates of evolutionary processes will change in different groups, and speciation in the larger vertebrates is essentially over. Action taken over the next few decades will determine how impoverished the biosphere will be in 1,000 years when many species will suffer reduced evolvability and require interventionist genetic and ecological management. Whether the biota will continue to provide the dependable ecological services humans take for granted is less clear. The discussants offered recommendations, including two of paramount importance (concerning human populations and education), seven identifying specific scientific activities to better equip us for stewardship of the processes of evolution, and one suggesting that such stewardship is now our responsibility. The ultimate test of evolutionary biology as a science is not whether it solves the riddles of the past but rather whether it enables us to manage the future of the biosphere. Our inability to make clearer predictions about the future of evolution has serious consequences for both biodiversity and humanity. PMID:11344296

  14. Review of emergency radiological instrumentation and analytical methods at NMSS-licensee sites

    SciTech Connect

    Herrington, W.N.; Kathren, R.L.; Kenoyer, J.L.; Jamison, J.D.

    1984-08-01

    This report provides a brief review of emergency radiological monitoring instrumentation capabilities based on visits to Nuclear Materials Safety and Safeguards (NMSS) licensees and on a review of the open literature. Recommendations based on findings are made with regard to instrument design and operation, training, calibration, testing, analytical methods, sampling procedures, and quality assurance. An assessment of currently available instrumentation is made with respect to types of instruments, instrument specifications, future needs of NRC/NMSS licensees as seen by instrument manufacturers an extent to which those needs will be met. 27 references.

  15. Models and the paleo record of biome responses to glacial climate and CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Prentice; Colin, I.; Haxeltine

    1995-06-01

    Continental-scale reconstructions of the distribution of biomes at the last glacial maximum (LGM) indicate big changes, which can primarily be explained by climate. The climate was different from today mainly because of a combination of low concentrations of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases and the presence of large continental ice sheets. Atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) simulations, driven by these factors and linked to simple biome models in {open_quotes}diagnostic{close_quotes} mode, account for the broad outlines of the changes in vegetation patterns, including encroachment of C4 grasslands and savannas on what are now tropical forests. Physiological effects of low CO{sub 2} might also have played a role by altering the partitioning of precipitation to evapotranspiration and runoff, and altering the competitive balance of C3 and C4 plants. Such effects have not been quantified until recently, with the development of integrated biome/biochemistry models like those used in the VEMAP project. In these models, vegetation composition affects the coupled C and H{sub 2}O fluxes, which in turn influence the competitive balance of the constituent plant types. The relative importance of climatic and physiological effects of CO{sub 2} on biome distributions is a key issue for the future. This is gives added impetus to research that aims to exploit the potential of palaeo, data, through global data synthesis projects like BIOME 6000, to provide objective benchmarks against which to test models of the biosphere and climate.

  16. An intercomparison of biogenic emissions estimates from BEIS2 and BIOME: Reconciling the differences

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, J.G.; Emigh, R.A.; Pierce, T.E.

    1996-12-31

    Biogenic emissions play a critical role in urban and regional air quality. For instance, biogenic emissions contribute upwards of 76% of the daily hydrocarbon emissions in the Atlanta, Georgia airshed. The Biogenic Emissions Inventory System-Version 2.0 (BEIS2) and the Biogenic Model for Emissions (BIOME) are two models that compute biogenic emissions estimates. BEIS2 is a FORTRAN-based system, and BIOME is an ARC/INFO{reg_sign} - and SAS{reg_sign}-based system. Although the technical formulations of the models are similar, the models produce different biogenic emissions estimates for what appear to be essentially the same inputs. The goals of our study are the following: (1) Determine why BIOME and BEIS2 produce different emissions estimates; (2) Attempt to understand the impacts that the differences have on the emissions estimates; (3) Reconcile the differences where possible; and (4) Present a framework for the use of BEIS2 and BIOME. In this study, we used the Coastal Oxidant Assessment for Southeast Texas (COAST) biogenics data which were supplied to us courtesy of the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC), and we extracted the BEIS2 data for the same domain. We compared the emissions estimates of the two models using their respective data sets BIOME Using TNRCC data and BEIS2 using BEIS2 data.

  17. A Biome map for Modelling Global Mid-Pliocene Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salzmann, U.; Haywood, A. M.

    2006-12-01

    The importance of vegetation-climate feedbacks was highlighted by several paleo-climate modelling exercises but their role as a boundary condition in Tertiary modelling has not been fully recognised or explored. Several paleo-vegetation datasets and maps have been produced for specific time slabs or regions for the Tertiary, but the vegetation classifications that have been used differ, thus making meaningful comparisons difficult. In order to facilitate further investigations into Tertiary climate and environmental change we are presently implementing the comprehensive GIS database TEVIS (Tertiary Environment and Vegetation Information System). TEVIS integrates marine and terrestrial vegetation data, taken from fossil pollen, leaf or wood, into an internally consistent classification scheme to produce for different time slabs global Tertiary Biome and Mega- Biome maps (Harrison & Prentice, 2003). In the frame of our ongoing 5-year programme we present a first global vegetation map for the mid-Pliocene time slab, a period of sustained global warmth. Data were synthesised from the PRISM data set (Thompson and Fleming 1996) after translating them to the Biome classification scheme and from new literature. The outcomes of the Biome map are compared with modelling results using an advanced numerical general circulation model (HadAM3) and the BIOME 4 vegetation model. Our combined proxy data and modelling approach will provide new palaeoclimate datasets to test models that are used to predict future climate change, and provide a more rigorous picture of climate and environmental changes during the Neogene.

  18. Evolutionary biology and anthropology suggest biome reconstitution as a necessary approach toward dealing with immune disorders

    PubMed Central

    Parker, William; Ollerton, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Industrialized society currently faces a wide range of non-infectious, immune-related pandemics. These pandemics include a variety of autoimmune, inflammatory and allergic diseases that are often associated with common environmental triggers and with genetic predisposition, but that do not occur in developing societies. In this review, we briefly present the idea that these pandemics are due to a limited number of evolutionary mismatches, the most damaging being ‘biome depletion’. This particular mismatch involves the loss of species from the ecosystem of the human body, the human biome, many of which have traditionally been classified as parasites, although some may actually be commensal or even mutualistic. This view, evolved from the ‘hygiene hypothesis’, encompasses a broad ecological and evolutionary perspective that considers host-symbiont relations as plastic, changing through ecological space and evolutionary time. Fortunately, this perspective provides a blueprint, termed ‘biome reconstitution’, for disease treatment and especially for disease prevention. Biome reconstitution includes the controlled and population-wide reintroduction (i.e. domestication) of selected species that have been all but eradicated from the human biome in industrialized society and holds great promise for the elimination of pandemics of allergic, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. PMID:24481190

  19. 47 CFR 22.877 - Unacceptable interference to Part 90 non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from commercial aviation air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-cellular 800 MHz licensees from commercial aviation air-ground systems. 22.877 Section 22.877...-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.877 Unacceptable interference to Part 90 non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from commercial aviation air-ground systems. The...

  20. 47 CFR 22.877 - Unacceptable interference to Part 90 non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from commercial aviation air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-cellular 800 MHz licensees from commercial aviation air-ground systems. 22.877 Section 22.877...-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.877 Unacceptable interference to Part 90 non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from commercial aviation air-ground systems. The...

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-cellular 800 MHz licensees from commercial aviation air-ground systems. 22.877 Section 22.877...-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.877 Unacceptable interference to Part 90 non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from commercial aviation air-ground systems. The...

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-cellular 800 MHz licensees from commercial aviation air-ground systems. 22.877 Section 22.877...-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.877 Unacceptable interference to part 90 non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from commercial aviation air-ground systems. The...

  3. 47 CFR 22.877 - Unacceptable interference to Part 90 non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from commercial aviation air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-cellular 800 MHz licensees from commercial aviation air-ground systems. 22.877 Section 22.877...-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.877 Unacceptable interference to Part 90 non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from commercial aviation air-ground systems. The...

  4. 13 CFR 107.1240 - Funding of Licensee's draw request through sale to short-term investor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Funding of Licensee's draw request...'s draw request through sale to short-term investor. (a) Licensee's authorization of SBA to arrange sale of securities to short-term investor. By submitting a request for a draw of Debenture...

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., Annual report for Nonmajor public utilities and licensees. 141.2 Section 141.2 Conservation of Power and... ACT AND PUBLIC UTILITY REGULATORY POLICIES ACT OF 1978 STATEMENTS AND REPORTS (SCHEDULES) § 141.2 FERC Form No. 1-F, Annual report for Nonmajor public utilities and licensees. (a) Prescription. The form...

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Funding of Licensee's draw request...'s draw request through sale to short-term investor. (a) Licensee's authorization of SBA to arrange sale of securities to short-term investor. By submitting a request for a draw of Debenture...

  7. 13 CFR 107.1240 - Funding of Licensee's draw request through sale to short-term investor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Funding of Licensee's draw request...'s draw request through sale to short-term investor. (a) Licensee's authorization of SBA to arrange sale of securities to short-term investor. By submitting a request for a draw of Debenture...

  8. 43 CFR 2812.4-3 - Agreements and arbitration between permittee and licensee respecting adjustment of road use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... permittee and licensee respecting adjustment of road use. 2812.4-3 Section 2812.4-3 Public Lands: Interior... RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) TRAMROADS AND LOGGING ROADS Over O. and C. and Coos Bay Revested Lands § 2812.4-3 Agreements and arbitration between permittee and licensee respecting adjustment of road use....

  9. 43 CFR 2812.4-3 - Agreements and arbitration between permittee and licensee respecting adjustment of road use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... permittee and licensee respecting adjustment of road use. 2812.4-3 Section 2812.4-3 Public Lands: Interior... RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) TRAMROADS AND LOGGING ROADS Over O. and C. and Coos Bay Revested Lands § 2812.4-3 Agreements and arbitration between permittee and licensee respecting adjustment of road use....

  10. 43 CFR 2812.4-3 - Agreements and arbitration between permittee and licensee respecting adjustment of road use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... permittee and licensee respecting adjustment of road use. 2812.4-3 Section 2812.4-3 Public Lands: Interior... RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) TRAMROADS AND LOGGING ROADS Over O. and C. and Coos Bay Revested Lands § 2812.4-3 Agreements and arbitration between permittee and licensee respecting adjustment of road use....

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

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  12. 47 CFR 101.1523 - Sharing and coordination among non-government licensees and between non-government and government...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sharing and coordination among non-government licensees and between non-government and government services. 101.1523 Section 101.1523 Telecommunication...-government licensees and between non-government and government services. (a) Registration of each link in...

  13. 47 CFR 90.421 - Operation of mobile station units not under the control of the licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... cooperation and coordination with the licensee, and in any vehicle used in the performance, under contract, of...-emergency vehicles that are not performing governmental functions under contract but with which the licensee... licensed in the Industrial/Business Pool may be installed in vehicles of persons furnishing under...

  14. 47 CFR 27.1111 - Relocation of fixed microwave service licensees in the 2110-2150 MHz band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Relocation of fixed microwave service licensees..., 2110-2155 MHz, 2160-2180 MHz Bands Relocation of Incumbents § 27.1111 Relocation of fixed microwave... contain provisions governing the relocation of incumbent fixed microwave service licensees in the...

  15. 47 CFR 27.1111 - Relocation of fixed microwave service licensees in the 2110-2150 MHz band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Relocation of fixed microwave service licensees..., 2110-2155 MHz, 2160-2180 MHz Bands Relocation of Incumbents § 27.1111 Relocation of fixed microwave... contain provisions governing the relocation of incumbent fixed microwave service licensees in the...

  16. 18 CFR 260.300 - FERC Form No. 3-Q, Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies. 260.300 Section 260... ENERGY APPROVED FORMS, NATURAL GAS ACT STATEMENTS AND REPORTS (SCHEDULES) § 260.300 FERC Form No. 3-Q, Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies. (a)...

  17. 18 CFR 260.300 - FERC Form No. 3-Q, Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies. 260.300 Section 260... ENERGY APPROVED FORMS, NATURAL GAS ACT STATEMENTS AND REPORTS (SCHEDULES) § 260.300 FERC Form No. 3-Q, Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies. (a)...

  18. 18 CFR 260.300 - FERC Form No. 3-Q, Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies. 260.300 Section 260... ENERGY APPROVED FORMS, NATURAL GAS ACT STATEMENTS AND REPORTS (SCHEDULES) § 260.300 FERC Form No. 3-Q, Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies. (a)...

  19. 18 CFR 260.300 - FERC Form No. 3-Q, Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies. 260.300 Section 260... ENERGY APPROVED FORMS, NATURAL GAS ACT STATEMENTS AND REPORTS (SCHEDULES) § 260.300 FERC Form No. 3-Q, Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies. (a)...

  20. 18 CFR 260.300 - FERC Form No. 3-Q, Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies. 260.300 Section 260... ENERGY APPROVED FORMS, NATURAL GAS ACT STATEMENTS AND REPORTS (SCHEDULES) § 260.300 FERC Form No. 3-Q, Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies. (a)...

  1. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 544 - Motor Vehicle Rental and Leasing Companies (Including Licensees and Franchisees) Subject to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (Including Licensees and Franchisees) Subject to the Reporting Requirements of Part 544 C Appendix C to Part... SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION INSURER REPORTING REQUIREMENTS Pt. 544, App. C Appendix C to Part 544—Motor Vehicle Rental and Leasing Companies (Including Licensees and...

  2. 47 CFR 101.1523 - Sharing and coordination among non-government licensees and between non-government and government...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Sharing and coordination among non-government licensees and between non-government and government services. 101.1523 Section 101.1523 Telecommunication...-government licensees and between non-government and government services. (a) Registration of each link in...

  3. 47 CFR 101.1523 - Sharing and coordination among non-government licensees and between non-government and government...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Sharing and coordination among non-government licensees and between non-government and government services. 101.1523 Section 101.1523 Telecommunication...-government licensees and between non-government and government services. (a) Registration of each link in...

  4. 47 CFR 101.1523 - Sharing and coordination among non-government licensees and between non-government and government...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sharing and coordination among non-government licensees and between non-government and government services. 101.1523 Section 101.1523 Telecommunication...-government licensees and between non-government and government services. (a) Registration of each link in...

  5. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 544 - Motor Vehicle Rental and Leasing Companies (Including Licensees and Franchisees) Subject to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (Including Licensees and Franchisees) Subject to the Reporting Requirements of Part 544 C Appendix C to Part... SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION INSURER REPORTING REQUIREMENTS Pt. 544, App. C Appendix C to Part 544—Motor Vehicle Rental and Leasing Companies (Including Licensees and...

  6. 13 CFR 107.400 - Changes in ownership of 10 percent or more of Licensee but no change of Control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Changes in Ownership, Control, or Structure of Licensee; Transfer of License Changes in Control Or Ownership of Licensee § 107.400 Changes in... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Changes in ownership of 10...

  7. 13 CFR 107.400 - Changes in ownership of 10 percent or more of Licensee but no change of Control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Changes in Ownership, Control, or Structure of Licensee; Transfer of License Changes in Control Or Ownership of Licensee § 107.400 Changes in... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Changes in ownership of 10...

  8. 47 CFR 27.1111 - Relocation of fixed microwave service licensees in the 2110-2150 MHz band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Relocation of fixed microwave service licensees... fixed microwave service licensees in the 2110-2150 MHz band. Part 22, subpart E and part 101, subpart B of this chapter contain provisions governing the relocation of incumbent fixed microwave...

  9. 47 CFR 27.1111 - Relocation of fixed microwave service licensees in the 2110-2150 MHz band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Relocation of fixed microwave service licensees..., 2110-2155 MHz, 2160-2180 MHz Bands Relocation of Incumbents § 27.1111 Relocation of fixed microwave... contain provisions governing the relocation of incumbent fixed microwave service licensees in the...

  10. A Seafloor Microbial Biome Hosted within Incipient Ferromanganese Crusts

    SciTech Connect

    Templeton, Alexis S.; Knowles, A. S.; Eldridge, D. L.; Arey, Bruce W.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Webb, Samuel M.; Bailey, B. E.; Tebo, Bradley M.; Staudigel, Hubert

    2009-11-15

    Unsedimented volcanic rocks exposed on the seafloor at ridge systems and Seamounts host complex, abundant and diverse microbial communities that are relatively cosmopolitan in distribution (Lysnes, Thorseth et al. 2004; Mason, Stingl et al. 2007; Santelli, Orcutt et al. 2008). The most commonly held hypothesis is that the energy released by the hydration, dissolution and oxidative alteration of volcanic glasses in seawater drives the formation of an ocean crust biosphere (Thorseth, Furnes et al. 1992; Fisk, Giovannoni et al. 1998; Furnes and Staudigel 1999). The combined thermodynamically favorable weathering reactions could theoretically support anywhere from 105 to 109 cells/gram of rock depending upon the metabolisms utilized and cellular growth rates and turnover (Bach and Edwards 2003; Santelli, Orcutt et al. 2008). Yet microbially-mediated basalt alteration and energy conservation has not been directly demonstrated on the seafloor. By using synchrotron-based x-ray microprobe mapping, x-ray absorption spectroscopy and high-resolution scanning and transmission electron microscopy observations of young volcanic glasses recovered from the outer flanks of Loihi Seamount, we intended to identify the initial rates and mechanisms of microbial basalt colonization and bioalteration. Instead, here we show that microbial biofilms are intimately associated with ferromanganese crusts precipitating onto basalt surfaces from cold seawater. Thus we hypothesize that microbial communities colonizing seafloor rocks are established and sustained by external inputs of potential energy sources, such as dissolved and particulate Fe(II), Mn(II) and organic matter, rather than rock dissolution.

  11. Site-specific seasonal models of carbon fluxes in terrestrial biomes

    SciTech Connect

    King, A.W.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    A set of site-specific computer simulation models of seasonal terrestrial carbon exchange has been assembled from open-literature sources. This collection is designed to facilitate the development of biome-level models for each of the principal terrestrial vegetation biomes on earth, for their integration into a global model of seasonal CO/sub 2/ variation in the atmosphere. The models are described in sufficient detail that their underlying assumptions can be compared. Descriptions include the following aspects of each model: (1) the compartments; (2) the carbon fluxes between compartments; and (3) the climatic variables that drive the carbon fluxes. In particular, the functional forms of the dependencies of respiration and photosynthesis on the driving variables are described. The methods by which these models will be extrapolated to biome-level models are also discussed.

  12. Drivers of greening trend across vertically distributed biomes in temperate arid Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Ji; Liu, Hongyan; Yin, Yi; He, Siyuan

    2007-04-01

    This study investigates vegetation responses to climate changes by analyzing 19 years (1982-2000) of both climatic data and growing season Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) for vertically distributed desert, steppe, forest and meadow, in the middle part of the northern slope of Tianshan Mountains. Vegetation activity exhibited greening trend in all biomes, owing mainly to reduction of water stress caused by increasing precipitation, although warming trend negated that effect because of temperature-induced drought. Precipitation acted as a remarkable driving force of plant growth in each biome through the whole growing season (spring, summer, autumn), its effect could always persist into the next season, however, the sensitivity decreased across biomes with increasing precipitation. Warming-induced snow melt played a positive role in boosting plant growth during spring in steppe, forest and meadow. Except that, warming produced negative effects.

  13. 78 FR 51213 - In the Matter of Certain Licensees Requesting Unescorted Access to Radioactive Material; Order...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-20

    ... investigation as an employee of a manufacturing and distribution licensee'' (70 FR 72130). Starting in December...- required background investigation'' (72 FR 70901). However, the NRC did not require background... October 15, 2007. The E-Filing Final Rule was issued on August 28, 2007, (72 FR 49139). The...

  14. 43 CFR 3591.1 - General obligations of lessees, licensees and permittees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false General obligations of lessees, licensees and permittees. 3591.1 Section 3591.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) SOLID MINERALS (OTHER THAN COAL) EXPLORATION AND...

  15. Broadcast and Production Statistics of Public Television Licensees: Fiscal Year 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, S. Young; Pedone, Ronald J.

    Statistics on brodcast and production hours of public television stations and licensees in the United States, Puerto Rico, and American Samoa for fiscal year 1971 are compiled. The major objective is to provide the public boadcasting community--including legislators, administrators, and researchers, as well as the communications industry as a…

  16. 47 CFR 27.1021 - Reimbursement obligation of licensees at 1915-1920 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., Inc. for relocating and clearing incumbent Fixed Microwave Service (FS) licensees from the 1910-1930... this spectrum cover, collectively, at least forty (40) percent of the nation's population, the amount... result of the first auction for this spectrum cover, collectively, less than forty (40) percent of...

  17. 47 CFR 97.31 - Cancellation on account of the licensee's death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cancellation on account of the licensee's death. 97.31 Section 97.31 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.31 Cancellation on account of...

  18. 47 CFR 97.31 - Cancellation on account of the licensee's death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cancellation on account of the licensee's death. 97.31 Section 97.31 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.31 Cancellation on account of...

  19. 47 CFR 97.31 - Cancellation on account of the licensee's death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cancellation on account of the licensee's death. 97.31 Section 97.31 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.31 Cancellation on account of...

  20. 47 CFR 97.31 - Cancellation on account of the licensee's death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cancellation on account of the licensee's death. 97.31 Section 97.31 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.31 Cancellation on account of...

  1. 47 CFR 27.1031 - Reimbursement obligation of licensees at 1995-2000 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... this spectrum cover, collectively, at least forty (40) percent of the nation's population, the amount..., less than forty (40) percent of the nation's population, then the amount that the licensee of an individual Upper H Block license must reimburse Sprint shall be calculated by dividing the population of...

  2. 47 CFR 27.1021 - Reimbursement obligation of licensees at 1915-1920 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... this spectrum cover, collectively, at least forty (40) percent of the nation's population, the amount... nation's population, then the pro rata amount that the licensee of an individual Lower H Block license must reimburse UTAM, Inc. shall be calculated by dividing the population of the individual EA by...

  3. 13 CFR 107.230 - Permitted sources of Private Capital for Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Licensee, plus unfunded binding commitments by Institutional Investors (including commitments evidenced by... section. (4) Any portion of a commitment from an Institutional Investor with a net worth of less than $10 million that exceeds 10 percent of such Institutional Investor's net worth and is not backed by a...

  4. 47 CFR 90.656 - Responsibilities of base station licensees of Specialized Mobile Radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Responsibilities of base station licensees of Specialized Mobile Radio systems. 90.656 Section 90.656 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Regulations Governing Licensing and Use of Frequencies in...

  5. 10 CFR 50.76 - Licensee's change of status; financial qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Licensee's change of status; financial qualifications. 50.76 Section 50.76 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND... license) for a nuclear power reactor, no later than seventy-five (75) days prior to ceasing to be...

  6. 43 CFR 2812.8-2 - Remedies for violations by licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Remedies for violations by licensee. 2812.8-2 Section 2812.8-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) TRAMROADS AND...

  7. 43 CFR 2812.8-2 - Remedies for violations by licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Remedies for violations by licensee. 2812.8-2 Section 2812.8-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) TRAMROADS AND...

  8. 43 CFR 2812.8-2 - Remedies for violations by licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Remedies for violations by licensee. 2812.8-2 Section 2812.8-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) TRAMROADS AND...

  9. 43 CFR 2812.8-2 - Remedies for violations by licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Remedies for violations by licensee. 2812.8-2 Section 2812.8-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) TRAMROADS AND...

  10. 47 CFR 90.727 - Extended implementation schedules for Phase I licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Extended implementation schedules for Phase I licensees. 90.727 Section 90.727 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Regulations Governing Licensing and Use of Frequencies in the 220-222 MHz Band...

  11. 78 FR 41314 - Review of Foreign Ownership Policies for Common Carrier and Aeronautical Radio Licensees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-10

    ... trade policy. DATES: Effective August 9, 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Susan O'Connell or James... station licensee. In the First Report and Order in this docket (77 FR 50628, August 22, 2012) the... consistent with national security, law enforcement, foreign policy, and trade policy concerns. Under the...

  12. 47 CFR 25.140 - Qualifications of fixed-satellite space station licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Qualifications of fixed-satellite space station... CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Applications and Licenses Space Stations § 25.140 Qualifications of fixed-satellite space station licensees. (a) New fixed-satellites shall comply with...

  13. 47 CFR 25.140 - Qualifications of fixed-satellite space station licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Qualifications of fixed-satellite space station... CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Applications and Licenses Space Stations § 25.140 Qualifications of fixed-satellite space station licensees. (a) New fixed-satellites shall comply with...

  14. 47 CFR 25.140 - Qualifications of Fixed-Satellite space station licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Qualifications of Fixed-Satellite space station... CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Applications and Licenses Space Stations § 25.140 Qualifications of Fixed-Satellite space station licensees. (a) (b) Each applicant for a space station...

  15. 10 CFR 170.41 - Failure by applicant or licensee to pay prescribed fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Failure by applicant or licensee to pay prescribed fees. 170.41 Section 170.41 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FEES FOR FACILITIES, MATERIALS, IMPORT AND EXPORT LICENSES, AND OTHER REGULATORY SERVICES UNDER THE ATOMIC ENERGY ACT OF 1954, AS...

  16. 10 CFR 170.41 - Failure by applicant or licensee to pay prescribed fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Failure by applicant or licensee to pay prescribed fees. 170.41 Section 170.41 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FEES FOR FACILITIES, MATERIALS, IMPORT AND EXPORT LICENSES, AND OTHER REGULATORY SERVICES UNDER THE ATOMIC ENERGY ACT OF 1954, AS...

  17. 10 CFR 26.715 - Recordkeeping requirements for collection sites, licensee testing facilities, and laboratories...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Recordkeeping requirements for collection sites, licensee testing facilities, and laboratories certified by the Department of Health and Human Services. 26.715 Section 26.715 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements § 26.715...

  18. 10 CFR 26.715 - Recordkeeping requirements for collection sites, licensee testing facilities, and laboratories...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... testing facilities, and laboratories certified by the Department of Health and Human Services. 26.715... laboratories certified by the Department of Health and Human Services. (a) Collection sites providing services... NRC or by any licensee or other entity for whom services are being provided. (b) Documentation...

  19. 10 CFR 26.715 - Recordkeeping requirements for collection sites, licensee testing facilities, and laboratories...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... testing facilities, and laboratories certified by the Department of Health and Human Services. 26.715... laboratories certified by the Department of Health and Human Services. (a) Collection sites providing services... NRC or by any licensee or other entity for whom services are being provided. (b) Documentation...

  20. 47 CFR 101.309 - Requirement that licensees respond to official communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirement that licensees respond to official communications. 101.309 Section 101.309 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Miscellaneous Common Carrier Provisions §...

  1. 47 CFR 101.309 - Requirement that licensees respond to official communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Requirement that licensees respond to official communications. 101.309 Section 101.309 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Miscellaneous Common Carrier Provisions §...

  2. 18 CFR 11.6 - Exemption of State and municipal licensees and exemptees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exemption of State and municipal licensees and exemptees. 11.6 Section 11.6 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT ANNUAL...

  3. 10 CFR 140.21 - Licensee guarantees of payment of deferred premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Licensee guarantees of payment of deferred premiums. 140.21 Section 140.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL PROTECTION REQUIREMENTS... million for each reactor he is licensed to operate: (a) Surety bond, (b) Letter of credit, (c)...

  4. 10 CFR 140.21 - Licensee guarantees of payment of deferred premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Licensee guarantees of payment of deferred premiums. 140.21 Section 140.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL PROTECTION REQUIREMENTS... million for each reactor he is licensed to operate: (a) Surety bond, (b) Letter of credit, (c)...

  5. 76 FR 72144 - Standardized and Enhanced Disclosure Requirements for Television Broadcast Licensee Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-22

    ..., Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, 65 FR 62683 (2000) (``NPRM''); In the Matter of Public Interest Obligations of TV Broadcast Licensees, Notice of Inquiry, 65 FR 4211 (1999)(``NOI''). \\3\\ In the Matter of..., Report and Order, 73 FR 13452 (2007) (``Report and Order''); In the Matter of Standardized and...

  6. Managing the University Patent Portfolio and Making It Attractive to Licensees: A Commonsense Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garabedian, Todd E.; Galletta, Elizabeth A.

    2005-01-01

    Building an attractive patent and technology portfolio for potential licensees requires involvement and diligence by the technology transfer office and the inventors. Steps outlined in this article, such as proper treatment of IP to assure rights are not lost, preventing premature disclosures, assuring proper ownership and inventorship of…

  7. 13 CFR 107.530 - Restrictions on investments of idle funds by leveraged Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as amended (12 CFR 325.103). (2) Exception: You may... BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee Cash... United States, which mature within 15 months from the date of the investment; or (2)...

  8. 13 CFR 107.530 - Restrictions on investments of idle funds by leveraged Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as amended (12 CFR 325.103). (2) Exception: You may... BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Managing the Operations of a Licensee Cash... United States, which mature within 15 months from the date of the investment; or (2)...

  9. 13 CFR 107.160 - Special rules for Licensees formed as limited partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... liability company (LLC), or any combination of individuals, corporations, partnerships, or LLCs. (b) Entity General Partner of Licensee. A general partner which is a corporation, limited liability company or... disciplinary provisions of sections 313 and 314 of the Act and by the conflict-of-interest rules under...

  10. 13 CFR 107.160 - Special rules for Licensees formed as limited partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... liability company (LLC), or any combination of individuals, corporations, partnerships, or LLCs. (b) Entity General Partner of Licensee. A general partner which is a corporation, limited liability company or... disciplinary provisions of sections 313 and 314 of the Act and by the conflict-of-interest rules under...

  11. 13 CFR 107.160 - Special rules for Licensees formed as limited partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... liability company (LLC), or any combination of individuals, corporations, partnerships, or LLCs. (b) Entity General Partner of Licensee. A general partner which is a corporation, limited liability company or... disciplinary provisions of sections 313 and 314 of the Act and by the conflict-of-interest rules under...

  12. 13 CFR 107.160 - Special rules for Licensees formed as limited partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... liability company (LLC), or any combination of individuals, corporations, partnerships, or LLCs. (b) Entity General Partner of Licensee. A general partner which is a corporation, limited liability company or... disciplinary provisions of sections 313 and 314 of the Act and by the conflict-of-interest rules under...

  13. 13 CFR 107.160 - Special rules for Licensees formed as limited partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... liability company (LLC), or any combination of individuals, corporations, partnerships, or LLCs. (b) Entity General Partner of Licensee. A general partner which is a corporation, limited liability company or... disciplinary provisions of sections 313 and 314 of the Act and by the conflict-of-interest rules under...

  14. 47 CFR 90.656 - Responsibilities of base station licensees of Specialized Mobile Radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Specialized Mobile Radio systems. 90.656 Section 90.656 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Regulations Governing... Bands § 90.656 Responsibilities of base station licensees of Specialized Mobile Radio systems. (a)...

  15. 47 CFR 90.656 - Responsibilities of base station licensees of Specialized Mobile Radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Specialized Mobile Radio systems. 90.656 Section 90.656 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Regulations Governing... Bands § 90.656 Responsibilities of base station licensees of Specialized Mobile Radio systems. (a)...

  16. 47 CFR 90.656 - Responsibilities of base station licensees of Specialized Mobile Radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Specialized Mobile Radio systems. 90.656 Section 90.656 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Regulations Governing... Bands § 90.656 Responsibilities of base station licensees of Specialized Mobile Radio systems. (a)...

  17. 47 CFR 90.656 - Responsibilities of base station licensees of Specialized Mobile Radio systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Specialized Mobile Radio systems. 90.656 Section 90.656 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Regulations Governing... Bands § 90.656 Responsibilities of base station licensees of Specialized Mobile Radio systems. (a)...

  18. 47 CFR 101.309 - Requirement that licensees respond to official communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Requirement that licensees respond to official communications. 101.309 Section 101.309 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Miscellaneous Common Carrier Provisions §...

  19. 47 CFR 101.309 - Requirement that licensees respond to official communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Requirement that licensees respond to official communications. 101.309 Section 101.309 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Miscellaneous Common Carrier Provisions §...

  20. 47 CFR 101.309 - Requirement that licensees respond to official communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Requirement that licensees respond to official communications. 101.309 Section 101.309 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Miscellaneous Common Carrier Provisions §...

  1. 10 CFR 170.41 - Failure by applicant or licensee to pay prescribed fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Failure by applicant or licensee to pay prescribed fees. 170.41 Section 170.41 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FEES FOR FACILITIES, MATERIALS, IMPORT AND EXPORT LICENSES, AND OTHER REGULATORY SERVICES UNDER THE ATOMIC ENERGY ACT OF 1954, AS...

  2. 10 CFR 170.41 - Failure by applicant or licensee to pay prescribed fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Failure by applicant or licensee to pay prescribed fees. 170.41 Section 170.41 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FEES FOR FACILITIES, MATERIALS, IMPORT AND EXPORT LICENSES, AND OTHER REGULATORY SERVICES UNDER THE ATOMIC ENERGY ACT OF 1954, AS...

  3. 10 CFR 170.41 - Failure by applicant or licensee to pay prescribed fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Failure by applicant or licensee to pay prescribed fees. 170.41 Section 170.41 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FEES FOR FACILITIES, MATERIALS, IMPORT AND EXPORT LICENSES, AND OTHER REGULATORY SERVICES UNDER THE ATOMIC ENERGY ACT OF 1954, AS...

  4. Observing and Quantifying Ecological Disturbance Impacts on Semi-arid Biomes in the Southwestern US.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, M. E.; Krofcheck, D. J.; Morillas, L.; Fox, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    The magnitude of carbon fluxes through arid and semi-arid ecosystems is considered modest, but integrated over the ~40% of the global land surface covered by these ecosystems, the total carbon stored is almost twice that in temperate forest ecosystems. In the semi-arid Southwestern U.S., drought and rising temperatures have triggered insect outbreaks, fire and widespread mortality in the past 5 years, all of which are predicted to increase in the next century. Understanding how resilient carbon pools and fluxes in these biomes are to these disturbances constitutes a large uncertainty in our ability to understand both carbon and energy flux dynamics in this region. We use an 8 year record (2007-2014) of continuous measurements of net ecosystem exchange of carbon (NEE) and its components (gross primary productivity (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Re), and evapotranspiration (ET) made over the New Mexico Elevation Gradient (NMEG) network of flux tower sites (desert grassland, creosote shrubland, juniper savanna, piñon-juniper woodland, ponderosa pine and subalpine mixed conifer) to quantify the biome-specific responses of carbon and water dynamics to these disturbances. In particular, we focus on biome-specific responses across the NMEG biomes to the extended drought in this region from 2011-2014, and to the widespread mortality observed in piñon-juniper woodlands following the turn of the century drought (1999-2002) and multi-year recent drought. Finally, we compare functional responses of land-surface fluxes to recent catastrophic fires (grassland, subalpine conifer biomes), and insect outbreaks (subalpine conifer and piñon-juniper woodland biomes). We discuss the results in terms of which disturbances have contributed to and are likely to trigger the largest changes in carbon sequestration in this region in response to predicted climate change scenarios.

  5. BiomeNet: A Bayesian Model for Inference of Metabolic Divergence among Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Chipman, Hugh; Gu, Hong; Bielawski, Joseph P.

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomics yields enormous numbers of microbial sequences that can be assigned a metabolic function. Using such data to infer community-level metabolic divergence is hindered by the lack of a suitable statistical framework. Here, we describe a novel hierarchical Bayesian model, called BiomeNet (Bayesian inference of metabolic networks), for inferring differential prevalence of metabolic subnetworks among microbial communities. To infer the structure of community-level metabolic interactions, BiomeNet applies a mixed-membership modelling framework to enzyme abundance information. The basic idea is that the mixture components of the model (metabolic reactions, subnetworks, and networks) are shared across all groups (microbiome samples), but the mixture proportions vary from group to group. Through this framework, the model can capture nested structures within the data. BiomeNet is unique in modeling each metagenome sample as a mixture of complex metabolic systems (metabosystems). The metabosystems are composed of mixtures of tightly connected metabolic subnetworks. BiomeNet differs from other unsupervised methods by allowing researchers to discriminate groups of samples through the metabolic patterns it discovers in the data, and by providing a framework for interpreting them. We describe a collapsed Gibbs sampler for inference of the mixture weights under BiomeNet, and we use simulation to validate the inference algorithm. Application of BiomeNet to human gut metagenomes revealed a metabosystem with greater prevalence among inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. Based on the discriminatory subnetworks for this metabosystem, we inferred that the community is likely to be closely associated with the human gut epithelium, resistant to dietary interventions, and interfere with human uptake of an antioxidant connected to IBD. Because this metabosystem has a greater capacity to exploit host-associated glycans, we speculate that IBD-associated communities might arise

  6. 47 CFR 25.139 - NGSO FSS coordination and information sharing between MVDDS licensees in the 12.2 GHz to 12.7 GHz...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ....2 GHz to 12.7 GHz band. (a) NGSO FSS licensees shall maintain a subscriber database in a format that... database to enable the MVDDS licensee to determine whether the proposed MVDDS transmitting site meets...

  7. 47 CFR 25.139 - NGSO FSS coordination and information sharing between MVDDS licensees in the 12.2 GHz to 12.7 GHz...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....2 GHz to 12.7 GHz band. (a) NGSO FSS licensees shall maintain a subscriber database in a format that... database to enable the MVDDS licensee to determine whether the proposed MVDDS transmitting site meets...

  8. 47 CFR 25.139 - NGSO FSS coordination and information sharing between MVDDS licensees in the 12.2 GHz to 12.7 GHz...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....2 GHz to 12.7 GHz band. (a) NGSO FSS licensees shall maintain a subscriber database in a format that... database to enable the MVDDS licensee to determine whether the proposed MVDDS transmitting site meets...

  9. 47 CFR 25.139 - NGSO FSS coordination and information sharing between MVDDS licensees in the 12.2 GHz to 12.7 GHz...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ....2 GHz to 12.7 GHz band. (a) NGSO FSS licensees shall maintain a subscriber database in a format that... database to enable the MVDDS licensee to determine whether the proposed MVDDS transmitting site meets...

  10. 47 CFR 25.139 - NGSO FSS coordination and information sharing between MVDDS licensees in the 12.2 GHz to 12.7 GHz...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ....2 GHz to 12.7 GHz band. (a) NGSO FSS licensees shall maintain a subscriber database in a format that... database to enable the MVDDS licensee to determine whether the proposed MVDDS transmitting site meets...

  11. BOREAS RSS-8 BIOME-BGC Model Simulations at Tower Flux Sites in 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Kimball, John

    2000-01-01

    BIOME-BGC is a general ecosystem process model designed to simulate biogeochemical and hydrologic processes across multiple scales (Running and Hunt, 1993). In this investigation, BIOME-BGC was used to estimate daily water and carbon budgets for the BOREAS tower flux sites for 1994. Carbon variables estimated by the model include gross primary production (i.e., net photosynthesis), maintenance and heterotrophic respiration, net primary production, and net ecosystem carbon exchange. Hydrologic variables estimated by the model include snowcover, evaporation, transpiration, evapotranspiration, soil moisture, and outflow. The information provided by the investigation includes input initialization and model output files for various sites in tabular ASCII format.

  12. 47 CFR 27.1111 - Relocation of fixed microwave service licensees in the 2110-2150 and 2160-2200 MHz bands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Relocation of fixed microwave service licensees... Incumbents § 27.1111 Relocation of fixed microwave service licensees in the 2110-2150 and 2160-2200 MHz bands... of incumbent fixed microwave service licensees in the 2110-2150 MHz and 2160-2200 MHz...

  13. Animal movement and establishment of vaccinia virus Cantagalo strain in Amazon biome, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Quixabeira-Santos, Jociane Cristina; Medaglia, Maria Luiza G; Pescador, Caroline A; Damaso, Clarissa R

    2011-04-01

    To understand the emergence of vaccinia virus Cantagalo strain in the Amazon biome of Brazil, during 2008-2010 we conducted a molecular and epidemiologic survey of poxvirus outbreaks. Data indicate that animal movement was the major cause of virus dissemination within Rondonia State, leading to the establishment and spread of this pathogen. PMID:21470472

  14. Biome-specific scaling of ocean productivity, temperature, and carbon export efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britten, Gregory L.; Primeau, François W.

    2016-05-01

    Mass conservation and metabolic theory place constraints on how marine export production (EP) scales with net primary productivity (NPP) and sea surface temperature (SST); however, little is empirically known about how these relationships vary across ecologically distinct ocean biomes. Here we compiled in situ observations of EP, NPP, and SST and used statistical model selection theory to demonstrate significant biome-specific scaling relationships among these variables. Multiple statistically similar models yield a threefold variation in the globally integrated carbon flux (~4-12 Pg C yr-1) when applied to climatological satellite-derived NPP and SST. Simulated NPP and SST input variables from a 4×CO2 climate model experiment further show that biome-specific scaling alters the predicted response of EP to simulated increases of atmospheric CO2. These results highlight the need to better understand distinct pathways of carbon export across unique ecological biomes and may help guide proposed efforts for in situ observations of the ocean carbon cycle.

  15. Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome and rodent reservoirs in the savanna-like biome of Brazil's southeastern region.

    PubMed

    Limongi, J E; Oliveira, R C; Guterres, A; Costa Neto, S F; Fernandes, J; Vicente, L H B; Coelho, M G; Ramos, V N; Ferreira, M S; Bonvicino, C R; D'Andrea, P S; Lemos, E R S

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes the diversity of rodent fauna in an area endemic for hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in Brazil, the population dynamics and the relationship of rodents with hantavirus in the Cerrado (savanna-like) biome. Additionally, an analysis is made of the partial S segment sequences of the hantaviruses obtained from serologically confirmed human HCPS cases and from rodent specimens. Rodents were collected during four campaigns. Human serum samples were collected from suspected cases of HCPS at hospitals in the state of Minas Gerais. The samples antibody-reactive by ELISA were processed by RT-PCR. The PCR product was amplified and sequenced. Hantavirus was detected only in Necromys lasiurus, the wild rodent species most prevalent in the Cerrado biome (min-max: 50-83·7%). All the six human serum samples were hantavirus seropositive and five showed amplified PCR products. The analysis of the nucleotide sequences showed the circulation of a single genotype, the Araraquara hantavirus. The environmental changes that have occurred in the Cerrado biome in recent decades have favoured N. lasiurus in interspecific competition of habitats, thus increasing the risk of contact between humans and rodent species infected with hantavirus. Our data corroborate the definition of N. lasiurus as the main hantavirus reservoir in the Cerrado biome. PMID:26541807

  16. Long term biosustainability in a high energy, low diversity crustal biome

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L-H.; Wang, P-L.; Rumble, D.; Lippmann-Pipke, J.; SherwoodLollar, B.; Boice, E.; Pratt, L.; Brodie, E.; Hazen, T.C.; Andersen,G.L.; DeSantis, T.; Moser, D.P.; Kershaw, D.; Onstott, T.

    2006-10-01

    Geochemical, microbiological, and molecular analyses of alkaline saline groundwater at 2.8 kilometers depth in Archaean metabasalt revealed a microbial biome dominated by a single phylotype affiliated with thermophilic sulfate reducers belonging to Firmicutes. These sulfate reducers were sustained by geologically produced sulfate and hydrogen at concentrations sufficient to maintain activities for millions of years with no apparent reliance on photosynthetically derived substrates.

  17. Assessing the Urban Heat Island Effect Across Biomes in the Continental USA Using Landsat and MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhoff, Marc L.; Bounoua, L.; Zhang, Ping; Wolfe, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Impervious surface area (ISA) from the Landsat TM and land surface temperature (LST) from MODIS averaged over three annual cycles (2003-2005) are used in a spatial analysis to assess the urban heat island (UHI) skin temperature amplitude and its relationship to development intensity, size, and ecological setting for 38 of the most populous cities in the continental United States. Development intensity zones based on %ISA are defined across urban gradients and used to stratify sampling of LST and NDVI. We find that ecological context significantly influences the amplitude of summer daytime UHI (urban - rural temperature difference) with the largest 8 C (average) for cities built in mixed forest biomes. For all cities ISA is the primary driver for increase in temperature explaining 70% of the total variance. Annually, urban areas are warmer than the non-urban fringe by 2.9 C, except in biomes with arid and semiarid climates. The average amplitude of the UHI is asymmetric with a 4.3 C difference in summer and 1.3 C in winter. In desert environments, UHI's point to a possible heat sink effect. Results show that the urban heat island amplitude increases with city size and is seasonally asymmetric for a large number of cities across most biomes. The implications are that for urban areas developed within forested ecosystems the summertime UHI can be quite high relative to the wintertime UHI suggesting that the residential energy consumption required for summer cooling is likely to increase with urban growth within those biomes.

  18. The Biome Project: Developing a Legitimate Parallel Curriculum for Physical Education and Life Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastie, Peter Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the outcomes of a parallel curriculum project between life sciences and physical education. Throughout a 6-week period, students in grades two through five became members of teams that represented different animal species and biomes, and concurrently participated in a season of gymnastics skills and…

  19. Vegetation productivity responds to sub-annual climate conditions across semiarid biomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the Southwestern United States (SW), the current prolonged warm drought is similar to the predicted future climate change scenarios for the region. This study aimed to determine patterns in vegetation response to the early 21st century drought across multiple biomes. We hypothesized that differen...

  20. Isolation and phylogenetic relationships of bat trypanosomes from different biomes in Mato Grosso, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Marcili, Arlei; da Costa, Andrea P; Soares, Herbert S; Acosta, Igor da C L; de Lima, Julia T R; Minervino, Antonio H H; Melo, Andréia T L; Aguiar, Daniel M; Pacheco, Richard C; Gennari, Solange M

    2013-12-01

    In the order Chiroptera, more than 30 trypanosome species belonging to the subgenera Herpetosoma, Schizotrypanum, Megatrypanum, and Trypanozoon have been described. The species Trypanosoma cruzi , Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei, and Trypanosoma dionisii are the most common in bats and belong to the Schizotrypanum subgenus. Bats from 2 different biomes, Pantanal and Amazonia/Cerrado in the state of Mato Grosso, Brazil, were evaluated according to the presence of trypanosome parasites by means of hemoculture and PCR in primary samples (blood samples). A total of 211 bats from 20 different species were caught and the trypanosome prevalence, evaluated through hemoculture, was 9.0% (19), 15.5% (13), and 4.8% (6) in the municipalities of Confresa (Amazonia/Cerrado biome) and Poconé (Pantanal biome). Among the 123 primary samples obtained from the bats, only 3 (2.4%) were positive. Phylogenetic analysis using trypanosomatid barcoding (V7V8 region of SSU rDNA) identified all the isolates and primary samples as T. c. marinkellei. The sequences of the isolates were segregated according to the bat host genus or species and suggest that co-evolutionary patterns exist between hosts and parasites. Further studies in different Brazilian regions and biomes need to be conducted in order to gain real understanding of the diversity of trypanosomes in bats. PMID:23859496

  1. BIOME: A scientific data archive search-and-order system using browser-aware, dynamic pages.

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, S.V.; Yow, T.G.; Ng, V.W.

    1997-08-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) is a data archive and distribution center for the National Air and Space Administration`s (NASA) Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). Both the Earth Observing System (EOS) and EOSDIS are components of NASA`s contribution to the US Global Change Research Program through its Mission to Planet Earth Program. The ORNL DAAC provides access to data used in ecological and environmental research such as global change, global warming, and terrestrial ecology. Because of its large and diverse data holdings, the challenge for the ORNL DAAC is to help users find data of interest from the hundreds of thousands of files available at the DAAC without overwhelming them. Therefore, the ORNL DAAC has developed the Biogeochemical Information Ordering Management Environment (BIOME), a customized search and order system for the World Wide Web (WWW). BIOME is a public system located at http://www-eosdis.ornl.gov/BIOME/biome.html.

  2. CARBON SOURCES AND SINKS IN THE FOREST BIOMES OF THE FORMER SOVIET UNION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Net primary productivity (NPP) of Soviet forest biomes hall been estimated from an equilibrium analysis at seven percent of the global terrestrial NPP, 20 percent of the world's total forest NPP, and half of boreal and temperate forest NPP. owever, an equilibrium analysis does no...

  3. Environmental Literacy through Relationships: Connecting Biomes and Society in a Sustainable City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haverkos, Kimberly; Bautista, Nazan

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors share a project developed and implemented in an eighth-grade science classroom in which students apply what they have learned about biomes to create sustainable cities. This project promotes environmental literacy through helping students understand the interrelated elements of sustainable environmental systems and how…

  4. Late Quaternary and future biome simulations for Alaska and Eastern Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, Amy S.

    Arctic biomes across a region including Alaska and Eastern Russia were investigated using the BIOME4 biogeochemical and biogeography vegetation model. This study investigated past (the last 21,000 years), present, and future vegetation distributions in the study area, using climate forcing from five CMIP5 models (CCSM4, GISS-E2-R, MIROC-ESM, MPI-ESM, and MRI-CGCM3). The present-day BIOME4 simulations were generally consistent with current vegetation observations in the study region characterized by evergreen and deciduous taiga and shrub tundras. Paleoclimatological simulations were compared with pollen data samples collected in the study region. Pre-industrial biome simulations are generally similar to the modern reconstruction but differ by having more shrub tundra in both Russia and Alaska to the north, as well as less deciduous taiga in Alaska. Pre-industrial simulations were in good agreement with the pollen data. Mid-Holocene simulations place shrub tundras along the Arctic coast, and in some cases along the eastern coast of Russia. Simulations for the Mid-Holocene are in good agreement with pollen-based distributions of biomes. Simulations for the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) show that the Bering Land Bridge was covered almost entirely by cushion forb, lichen and moss tundra, shrub tundra, and graminoid tundra. Three out of the five models' climate data produce evergreen and deciduous taiga in what is now southwestern Alaska, however the pollen data does not support this. The distributions of cushion forb, lichen, and moss tundra and graminoid tundra differ noticeably between models, while shrub tundra distributions are generally similar. Future simulations of BIOME4 based on the RCP8.5 climate scenario indicate a northward shift of the treeline and a significant areal decrease of shrub tundra and graminoid tundra regions in the 21st century. Intrusions of cool mixed, deciduous, and conifer forests above 60°N, especially in southwest Alaska, were notable

  5. Comparing projections of future changes in runoff from hydrological and biome models in ISI-MIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davie, J. C. S.; Falloon, P. D.; Kahana, R.; Dankers, R.; Betts, R.; Portmann, F. T.; Wisser, D.; Clark, D. B.; Ito, A.; Masaki, Y.; Nishina, K.; Fekete, B.; Tessler, Z.; Wada, Y.; Liu, X.; Tang, Q.; Hagemann, S.; Stacke, T.; Pavlick, R.; Schaphoff, S.; Gosling, S. N.; Franssen, W.; Arnell, N.

    2013-10-01

    Future changes in runoff can have important implications for water resources and flooding. In this study, runoff projections from ISI-MIP (Inter-sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project) simulations forced with HadGEM2-ES bias-corrected climate data under the Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 have been analysed for differences between impact models. Projections of change from a baseline period (1981-2010) to the future (2070-2099) from 12 impacts models which contributed to the hydrological and biomes sectors of ISI-MIP were studied. The biome models differed from the hydrological models by the inclusion of CO2 impacts and most also included a dynamic vegetation distribution. The biome and hydrological models agreed on the sign of runoff change for most regions of the world. However, in West Africa, the hydrological models projected drying, and the biome models a moistening. The biome models tended to produce larger increases and smaller decreases in regionally averaged runoff than the hydrological models, although there is large inter-model spread. The timing of runoff change was similar, but there were differences in magnitude, particularly at peak runoff. The impact of vegetation distribution change was much smaller than the projected change over time, while elevated CO2 had an effect as large as the magnitude of change over time projected by some models in some regions. The effect of CO2 on runoff was not consistent across the models, with two models showing increases and two decreases. There was also more spread in projections from the runs with elevated CO2 than with constant CO2. The biome models which gave increased runoff from elevated CO2 were also those which differed most from the hydrological models. Spatially, regions with most difference between model types tended to be projected to have most effect from elevated CO2, and seasonal differences were also similar, so elevated CO2 can partly explain the differences between hydrological and

  6. Space-based observations of fire NOx emission coefficients: a global biome-scale comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mebust, A. K.; Cohen, R. C.

    2014-03-01

    Biomass burning represents both a significant and highly variable source of NOx to the atmosphere. This variability stems from both the episodic nature of fires, and from fire conditions such as the modified combustion efficiency of the fire, the nitrogen content of the fuel and possibly other factors that have not been identified or evaluated by comparison with observations. Satellite instruments offer an opportunity to observe emissions from wildfires, providing a large suite of measurements which allow us to study mean behavior and variability on the regional scale in a statistically rigorous manner. Here we use space-based measurements of fire radiative power from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer in combination with NO2 tropospheric column densities from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument to measure mean emission coefficients (ECs in g NO MJ-1) from fires for global biomes, and across a wide range of smaller-scale ecoregions, defined as spatially-distinct clusters of fires with similar fuel type. Mean ECs for all biomes fall between 0.250-0.362 g NO MJ-1, a range that is smaller than found in previous studies of biome-scale emission factors. The majority of ecoregion ECs fall within or near this range, implying that under most conditions, mean fire emissions of NOx per unit energy are similar between different regions regardless of fuel type or spatial variability. In contrast to these similarities, we find that about 24% of individual ecoregion ECs deviate significantly (with 95% confidence) from the mean EC for the associated biome, and a similar number of ecoregion ECs falls outside the range of all mean biome ECs, implying that there are some regions where fuel type-specific global emission parameterizations fail to capture local fire NOx emissions.

  7. Forgotten forests - issues and prospects in biome mapping using Seasonally Dry Tropical Forests as a case study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background South America is one of the most species diverse continents in the world. Within South America diversity is not distributed evenly at both local and continental scales and this has led to the recognition of various areas with unique species assemblages. Several schemes currently exist which divide the continental-level diversity into large species assemblages referred to as biomes. Here we review five currently available biome maps for South America, including the WWF Ecoregions, the Americas basemap, the Land Cover Map of South America, Morrone's Biogeographic regions of Latin America, and the Ecological Systems Map. The comparison is performed through a case study on the Seasonally Dry Tropical Forest (SDTF) biome using herbarium data of habitat specialist species. Results Current biome maps of South America perform poorly in depicting SDTF distribution. The poor performance of the maps can be attributed to two main factors: (1) poor spatial resolution, and (2) poor biome delimitation. Poor spatial resolution strongly limits the use of some of the maps in GIS applications, especially for areas with heterogeneous landscape such as the Andes. Whilst the Land Cover Map did not suffer from poor spatial resolution, it showed poor delimitation of biomes. The results highlight that delimiting structurally heterogeneous vegetation is difficult based on remote sensed data alone. A new refined working map of South American SDTF biome is proposed, derived using the Biome Distribution Modelling (BDM) approach where georeferenced herbarium data is used in conjunction with bioclimatic data. Conclusions Georeferenced specimen data play potentially an important role in biome mapping. Our study shows that herbarium data could be used as a way of ground-truthing biome maps in silico. The results also illustrate that herbarium data can be used to model vegetation maps through predictive modelling. The BDM approach is a promising new method in biome mapping, and could be

  8. Summary of inspection findings of licensee inservice testing programs at United States commercial nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlop, A.; Colaccino, J.

    1996-12-01

    Periodic inspections of pump and valve inservice testing (IST) programs in United States commercial nuclear power plants are performed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regional Inspectors to verify licensee regulatory compliance and licensee commitments. IST inspections are conducted using NRC Inspection Procedure 73756, {open_quotes}Inservice Testing of Pumps and Valves{close_quotes} (IP 73756), which was updated on July 27, 1995. A large number of IST inspections have also been conducted using Temporary Instruction 2515/114, {open_quotes}Inspection Requirements for Generic Letter 89-04, Acceptable Inservice Testing Programs{close_quotes} (TI-2515/114), which was issued January 15, 1992. A majority of U.S. commercial nuclear power plants have had an IST inspection to either IP 73756 or TI 2515/114. This paper is intended to summarize the significant and recurring findings from a number of these inspections since January of 1990.

  9. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved material licensees. Semiannual progress report, July--December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during the period and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to material licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  10. NRC staff review of licensee responses to pressure-locking and thermal-binding issue

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbun, H.J.

    1996-12-01

    Commercial nuclear power plant operating experience has indicated that pressure locking and thermal binding represent potential common mode failure mechanisms that can cause safety-related power-operated gate valves to fail in the closed position, thus rendering redundant safety-related systems incapable of performing their safety functions. In Generic Letter (GL) 95-07, {open_quotes}Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves,{close_quotes} the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff requested that nuclear power plant licensees take certain actions to ensure that valves susceptible to pressure locking or thermal binding are capable of performing their safety functions within the current licensing bases of the facility. The NRC staff has received summary information from licensees in response to GL 95-07 describing actions they have taken to prevent the occurrence of pressure locking and thermal binding. The NRC staff has developed a systematic process to help ensure uniform and consistent review of licensee submittals in response to GL 95-07.

  11. A regulatory analysis on emergency preparedness for fuel cycle and other radioactive material licensees: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    The question this Regulatory Analysis sought to answer is: should the NRC impose additional emergency preparedness requirements on certain fuel cycle and other radioactive material licensees for dealing with accidents that might have offsite releases of radioactive material. To answer the question, we analyzed potential accidents for 15 types of fuel cycle and other radioactive material licensees. An appropriate plan would: (1) identify accidents for which protective actions should be taken by people offsite; (2) list the licensee's responsibilities for each type of accident, including notification of local authorities (fire and police generally); and (3) give sample messages for local authorities including protective action recommendations. This approach more closely follows the approach used for research reactors than for power reactors. The low potential offsite doses (acute fatalities and injuries not possible except possibly for UF/sub 6/ releases), the small areas where actions would be warranted, the small number of people involved, and the fact that the local police and fire departments would be doing essentially the same things they normally do, are all factors that tend to make a simple plan adequate. This report discusses the potentially hazardous accidents, and the likely effects of these accidents in terms of personnel danger.

  12. 9 CFR 2.9 - Officers, agents, and employees of licensees whose licenses have been suspended or revoked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Licensing... person who has been or is an officer, agent, or employee of a licensee whose license has been...

  13. Remote Sensing of the Urban Heat Island Effect Across Biomes in the Continental USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhoff, Marc L.; Zhang, Ping; Wolfe, Robert E.; Bounoua, Lahouari

    2010-01-01

    Impervious surface area (ISA) from the Landsat TM-based NLCD 2001 dataset and land surface temperature (LST) from MODIS averaged over three annual cycles (2003-2005) are used in a spatial analysis to assess the urban heat island (UHI) skin temperature amplitude and its relationship to development intensity, size, and ecological setting for 38 of the most populous cities in the continental United States. Development intensity zones based on %ISA are defined for each urban area emanating outward from the urban core to the nonurban rural areas nearby and used to stratify sampling for land surface temperatures and NDVI. Sampling is further constrained by biome and elevation to insure objective intercomparisons between zones and between cities in different biomes permitting the definition of hierarchically ordered zones that are consistent across urban areas in different ecological setting and across scales. We find that ecological context significantly influences the amplitude of summer daytime UHI (urban-rural temperature difference) the largest (8 C average) observed for cities built in biomes dominated by temperate broadleaf and mixed forest. For all cities combined, ISA is the primary driver for increase in temperature explaining 70% of the total variance in LST. On a yearly average, urban areas are substantially warmer than the non-urban fringe by 2.9 C, except for urban areas in biomes with arid and semiarid climates. The average amplitude of the UHI is remarkably asymmetric with a 4.3 C temperature difference in summer and only 1.3 C in winter. In desert environments, the LST's response to ISA presents an uncharacteristic "U-shaped" horizontal gradient decreasing from the urban core to the outskirts of the city and then increasing again in the suburban to the rural zones. UHI's calculated for these cities point to a possible heat sink effect. These observational results show that the urban heat island amplitude both increases with city size and is seasonally

  14. Comparison of MODIS-Data With Selected Model Parameters and Measured Flux-Data for two Biome Types (Broadleaf-Deciduous and Needle-Leaf Forest)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, M.; Knohl, A.; Zhao, M.; Churkina, G.; Gloor, M.

    2002-12-01

    MODIS-data were available for 2001 for the following cites: Hainich (broadleaf deciduous; beechforest) and Tharandt (needleleaf; spruceforest) both Germany, Sor\\o (broadleaf decidious; beechforest) Denmark and Hyytiälä (needleleaf; pineforest) Finland. The extracted MODIS-data were 5 x 5 km2 cutoffs with center at the fluxtower cites. For modelling of LAI and NPP we used the mechanistic model Biome-BGC (Running and Coughlan, 1988, Running and Gower,1991, Running 1994) with general ecophysiological parameterization schemes (White et al, 2000). Long term climate records were generated by MT-CLIM (Thornton et al, 2000). The modeled and measured NEE were in good agreement (R2 between 0.71 - 0.89). The modeled annual variation of LAI was close to the measured LAI for Hainich, for the other cites maximum LAI were close to modeled maximum. We will investigate how the MODIS parameters LAI, GPP and PSN cover measured and modeled parameters for the selected cites and biome types. This will give valuable information on how the parameters may be used for model evaluation (fluxes) or as model initialisation (LAI). References:\\Running, S.W. and Coughlan, J.C.,1988, A general model of forest processes for regional applications. Ecological Modeling, 42, pp. 125 - 124.\\Running, S.W. and Gower, S.T., 1991, FOREST BGC, A general model of forest ecosystem processes for regional applications. II Dynamic carbon allocation and nitrogen budgets. Tree Physiol., 9, pp. 147 - 160.\\Running, S.W., 1994, Testing forest BGC ecosystem process simulations across a climatic gradient in Oregon. Ecol. Appl., 4, pp. 238 - 247.\\Thornton et al.,2000,Simultaneous estimation of daily solar radiation and humidity from observed temperature and precipitation: an application over complex terrain in Austria. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 4, pp. 255 - 271.

  15. Accounting for age Structure in Ponderosa Pine Ecosystem Analyses: Integrating Management, Disturbance Histories and Observations with the BIOME-BGC Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbard, K. A.; Law, B.; Thornton, P.

    2003-12-01

    Disturbance and management regimes in forested ecosystems have been recently highlighted as important factors contributing to quantification of carbon stocks and fluxes. Disturbance events, such as stand-replacing fires and current management regimes that emphasize understory and tree thinning are primary suspects influencing ecosystem processes, including net ecosystem productivity (NEP) in forests of the Pacific Northwest. Several recent analyses have compared simulated to measured component stocks and fluxes of carbon in Ponderosa Pine (Pinus ponderosa var. Laws) at 12 sites ranging from 9 to 300 years in central Oregon (Law et al. 2001, Law et al. 2003) using the BIOME-BGC model. Major emphases on ecosystem model developments include improving allocation logic, integrating ecosystem processes with disturbance such as fire and including nitrogen in biogeochemical cycling. In Law et al. (2001, 2003), field observations prompted BIOME-BGC improvements including dynamic allocation of carbon to fine root mass through the life of a stand. A sequence of simulations was also designed to represent both management and disturbance histories for each site, however, current age structure of each sites wasn't addressed. Age structure, or cohort management has largely been ignored by ecosystem models, however, some studies have sought to incorporate stand age with disturbance and management (e.g. Hibbard et al. 2003). In this analyses, we regressed tree ages against height (R2 = 0.67) to develop a proportional distribution of age structure for each site. To preserve the integrity of the comparison between Law et al. (2003) and this study, we maintained the same timing of harvest, however, based on the distribution of age structures, we manipulated the amount of removal. Harvest by Law et al. (2003) was set at stand-replacement (99%) levels to simulate clear-cutting and reflecting the average top 10% of the age in each plot. For the young sites, we set removal at 73%, 51% and

  16. Estimation of Carbon Flux of Forest Ecosystem over Qilian Mountains by BIOME-BGC Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Min; Tian, Xin; Li, Zengyuan; Chen, Erxue; Li, Chunmei

    2014-11-01

    The gross primary production (GPP) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) are important indicators for carbon fluxes. This study aims at evaluating the forest GPP and NEE over the Qilian Mountains using meteorological, remotely sensed and other ancillary data at large scale. To realize this, the widely used ecological-process-based model, Biome-BGC, and remote-sensing-based model, MODIS GPP algorithm, were selected for the simulation of the forest carbon fluxes. The combination of these two models was based on calibrating the Biome-BGC by the optimized MODIS GPP algorithm. The simulated GPP and NEE values were evaluated against the eddy covariance observed GPPs and NEEs, and the well agreements have been reached, with R2=0.76, 0.67 respectively.

  17. Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae, a spotted fever group agent infecting Amblyomma parvum ticks in two Brazilian biomes

    PubMed Central

    Nieri-Bastos, Fernanda Aparecida; Lopes, Marcos Gomes; Cançado, Paulo Henrique Duarte; Rossa, Giselle Ayres Razera; Faccini, João Luiz Horácio; Gennari, Solange Maria; Labruna, Marcelo Bahia

    2014-01-01

    Adult ticks of the species Amblyomma parvum were collected from the vegetation in the Pantanal biome (state of Mato Grosso do Sul) and from horses in the Cerrado biome (state of Piauí) in Brazil. The ticks were individually tested for rickettsial infection via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting three rickettsial genes, gltA, ompA and ompB. Overall, 63.5% (40/63) and 66.7% (2/3) of A. parvum ticks from Pantanal and Cerrado, respectively, contained rickettsial DNA, which were all confirmed by DNA sequencing to be 100% identical to the corresponding fragments of the gltA, ompA and ompB genes of Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae. This report is the first to describe Ca. R. andeanae in Brazil. PMID:24714968

  18. Equilibrium analysis of carbon pools and fluxes of forest biomes in the former Soviet Union

    SciTech Connect

    Kolchugina, T.P.; Vinson, T.S.

    1993-01-01

    Forests are an important component of the biosphere and sequestration of carbon in boreal forests may represent one of the few realistic alternatives to ameliorate changes in atmospheric chemistry. The former Soviet Union has the greatest expanse of boreal forests in the world; however, the role of these forests in the terrestrial carbon cycle is not fully understood because the carbon budget of the Soviet forest sector has not been established. In recognition of the need to determine the role of these forests in the global carbon cycle, the carbon budget of forest biomes in the former Soviet Union was assessed based on an equilibrium analysis of carbon cycle pools and fluxes. Net primary productivity was used to identify the rate of carbon turnover in the forest biomes.

  19. A hierarchical analysis of terrestrial ecosystem model Biome-BGC: Equilibrium analysis and model calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, Peter E; Wang, Weile; Law, Beverly E.; Nemani, Ramakrishna R

    2009-01-01

    The increasing complexity of ecosystem models represents a major difficulty in tuning model parameters and analyzing simulated results. To address this problem, this study develops a hierarchical scheme that simplifies the Biome-BGC model into three functionally cascaded tiers and analyzes them sequentially. The first-tier model focuses on leaf-level ecophysiological processes; it simulates evapotranspiration and photosynthesis with prescribed leaf area index (LAI). The restriction on LAI is then lifted in the following two model tiers, which analyze how carbon and nitrogen is cycled at the whole-plant level (the second tier) and in all litter/soil pools (the third tier) to dynamically support the prescribed canopy. In particular, this study analyzes the steady state of these two model tiers by a set of equilibrium equations that are derived from Biome-BGC algorithms and are based on the principle of mass balance. Instead of spinning-up the model for thousands of climate years, these equations are able to estimate carbon/nitrogen stocks and fluxes of the target (steady-state) ecosystem directly from the results obtained by the first-tier model. The model hierarchy is examined with model experiments at four AmeriFlux sites. The results indicate that the proposed scheme can effectively calibrate Biome-BGC to simulate observed fluxes of evapotranspiration and photosynthesis; and the carbon/nitrogen stocks estimated by the equilibrium analysis approach are highly consistent with the results of model simulations. Therefore, the scheme developed in this study may serve as a practical guide to calibrate/analyze Biome-BGC; it also provides an efficient way to solve the problem of model spin-up, especially for applications over large regions. The same methodology may help analyze other similar ecosystem models as well.

  20. Ecological consequences of the expansion of N2-fixing plants in cold biomes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hiltbrunner, Erika; Aerts, Rien; Bühlmann, Tobias; Huss-Danell, Kerstin; Magnusson, Borgthor; Myrold, David D.; Reed, Sasha C.; Sigurdsson, Bjarni D.; Körner, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Research in warm-climate biomes has shown that invasion by symbiotic dinitrogen (N2)-fixing plants can transform ecosystems in ways analogous to the transformations observed as a consequence of anthropogenic, atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition: declines in biodiversity, soil acidification, and alterations to carbon and nutrient cycling, including increased N losses through nitrate leaching and emissions of the powerful greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). Here, we used literature review and case study approaches to assess the evidence for similar transformations in cold-climate ecosystems of the boreal, subarctic and upper montane-temperate life zones. Our assessment focuses on the plant genera Lupinus and Alnus, which have become invasive largely as a consequence of deliberate introductions and/or reduced land management. These cold biomes are commonly located in remote areas with low anthropogenic N inputs, and the environmental impacts of N2-fixer invasion appear to be as severe as those from anthropogenic N deposition in highly N polluted areas. Hence, inputs of N from N2 fixation can affect ecosystems as dramatically or even more strongly than N inputs from atmospheric deposition, and biomes in cold climates represent no exception with regard to the risk of being invaded by N2-fixing species. In particular, the cold biomes studied here show both a strong potential to be transformed by N2-fixing plants and a rapid subsequent saturation in the ecosystem’s capacity to retain N. Therefore, analogous to increases in N deposition, N2-fixing plant invasions must be deemed significant threats to biodiversity and to environmental quality.

  1. Software quality assurance and software safety in the Biomed Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, R.P.; Chu, W.T.; Ludewigt, B.A.; Marks, K.M.; Nyman, M.A.; Renner, T.R.; Stradtner, R.

    1989-10-31

    The Biomed Control System is a hardware/software system used for the delivery, measurement and monitoring of heavy-ion beams in the patient treatment and biology experiment rooms in the Bevalac at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This paper describes some aspects of this system including historical background philosophy, configuration management, hardware features that facilitate software testing, software testing procedures, the release of new software quality assurance, safety and operator monitoring. 3 refs.

  2. Shifting Environmental Ranges and Biome Potential According to the Whittaker Relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, R.; Garonna, I.; Schaepman, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Robert H. Whittaker classified biome types mainly as a function of Mean Annual Temperature (MAT) and Mean Annual Precipitation (MAP), resulting in the well-known Whittaker plot1. This relationship is still being used to map biomes globally2. The same inputs (MAT and MAP), augmented with a radiation proxy, are used in the resource-balance perspective for modeling large-scale vegetation productivity as a function of abiotic factors3. These two approaches, used in a temporally dynamic manner, provided us indicators of shifts in growth-limiting factors4 and associated environmental ranges of vegetation, which, in turn, are key indicators for the study of global change and biodiversity5. We present a study in which we used the Whittaker relationship and CRU TS 3.22 climatic data to map regions that showed variable biome potential. These regions are likely to indicate ecotones - i.e. interactions zones between biomes - that have been subject to abiotic change and where a change in the vegetation system can be anticipated. At the same time, we used remotely sensed data (GIMMS v3g 1982-2012) to study gradients in vegetation dynamics in these zones. Preliminary results show strongest environmental shifts in northern ecotones, e.g. on the tundra - boreal boundary, and associated changes in climatic growth-limiting factors4. [1] Whittaker RH (1975) Communities and Ecosystems, Macmillan, 385p.[2] Ricklefs RE (2008) The Economy of Nature, W. H. Freeman, 620p.[3] Field CB, Randerson JT, Malmström CM (1995) Global net primary production: Combining ecology and remote sensing. Remote Sensing of Environment, 51, 74-88.[4] Schenkel D, Garonna I, De Jong R, Schaepman ME (this conference) Linking Land Surface Phenology and Growth Limiting Factor Shifts over the Past 30 Years.[5] University of Zurich Research Priority Program on Global Change and Biodiversity, http://www.gcb.uzh.ch

  3. Quantifying the resilience of carbon dynamics in semi-arid biomes in the Southwestern U.S. to drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, M. E.; Krofcheck, D. J.; Maurer, G.

    2015-12-01

    Semi-arid biomes in many parts of the Southwestern U.S. have experienced a range of precipitation over the last decade, ranging from wetter than average years 2006-2010 (relative to the 40-year PRISM mean), extreme drought years (2010-2011) and slightly dry-average precipitation years (2013-2015). While annual carbon uptake in semi-arid biomes of the Southwestern US is relatively low, compared to more temperate ecosystems, collectively these biomes store a significant amount of carbon on a regional scale. It is therefore of great interest to understand what impact this range in precipitation variability has on inter- and intra- annual variability in regional carbon dynamics. We use an 9 year record from 2007-2015 of continuous measurements of net ecosystem exchange of carbon (NEE) and its components (gross primary productivity (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Re), made across a network of flux towers along an elevation/aridity gradient in New Mexico, the New Mexico Elevation Gradient (NMEG), to quantify biome-specific responses of carbon dynamics to climate variability over this time period. Biomes include a desert grassland, creosote shrubland, juniper savanna, piñon-juniper woodland, and ponderosa pine and subalpine mixed conifer forests. We compared daily, seasonal and annual NEP, GPP and Re means between pre-drought (2007-2010), drought (2011-2012), and post-drought years (2013-2015). All biomes sequestered less carbon in the drought years, compared to the pre-drought years (~30-40, 270 and 60 g C/m2 less in low and middle elevation biomes, ponderosa pine, and mixed conifer forest, respectively), as GPP in all biomes was more sensitive to the drought than Re. In the post-drought years, GPP was still only 80-90% what it was in the pre-drought years. Re, however, in all biomes except for the creosote shrubland, was 5-15% higher in the post-drought years compared to pre-drought. As a result, carbon sequestration in these biomes was 20-75% lower in the post

  4. Modeling evapotranspiration in Arctic coastal plain ecosystems using a modified BIOME-BGC model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engstrom, Ryan; Hope, Allen; Kwon, Hyojung; Harazono, Yoshinobu; Mano, Masayoshi; Oechel, Walter

    2006-06-01

    Modeling evapotranspiration (ET) in Arctic coastal plain ecosystems is challenging owing to the unique conditions present in this environment, including permafrost, nonvascular vegetation, and a large standing dead vegetation component. In this study the ecosystem process model, BIOME-BGC, was adapted to represent these unique conditions in Arctic ecosystems by including a new water storage and evaporation routine that accounts for nonvascular vegetation and the effects of permafrost, adding ground heat flux as an input, and representing ground shading by dead vegetation. The new Arctic version and the original BIOME-BGC models are compared to observed ET from two eddy flux towers in Barrow, Alaska over four summer seasons (1999-2002). The two towers are located less than 1 km apart, yet represent contrasting moisture conditions. One is located in a drained thaw lake, marsh area, while the other is located in a drier, upland area characterized by mesic tundra. Results indicate that the original BIOME-BGC model substantially underestimated ET, while the Arctic version slightly overestimated ET at both sites. The new Arctic model version worked particularly well at the wet tower because the model was able to capture energy limitations better than water limitations. Errors in the simulation of snowmelt date led to errors in the ET estimates at both sites. Finally, the substantial differences in soil moisture led to substantially different ET rates between the sites that were difficult to simulate and indicates that soil moisture heterogeneity is a strong controller on ET in these ecosystems.

  5. Water and CO2 Exchange for Different Land Use in Pampa Biome in Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberti, D. R.; de Moraes, O. L. L.; Diaz, M.; Tatsch, J. D.; Acevedo, O. C.; Zimermann, H. R.; Rubert, G. C.; Acosta, R.; Campos Velho, H. F.

    2015-12-01

    The Pampa is the newest and most unknown Brazilian Biome. It is located in the Southern portion of the country, as well as part of Argentina and the entire Uruguay, and is formed principally by natural grasslands that have been used for centuries for grazing livestock. In recent decades it has gone through a process of intense land use change and degradation, with the replacement of natural vegetation by rice paddy crops, soybean and exotic forests. Recent studies show that the Pampa has only 36% of its original vegetation in Brazil. Research on carbon and greenhouse gas emissions in Pampa Biome are recent. It is known that the Pampa natural areas contain high stocks of soil organic carbon, and therefore their conservation is relevant for climate change mitigation. However, the net exchange of carbon and water between the surface and the atmosphere are unknown. To fill this gap, a flux tower network, SULFLUX - www.ufsm.br/sulfux, was created. Currently, SULFLUX comprises three flux towers in the Pampa biome, two of them being over natural vegetation and the other one over a rice paddy. The flux towers are nearly 100 km apart from each other. We examine the effects of climate on carbon fluxes of through the year 2014. Analysis of temporal variability in water and CO2 fluxes are examined at daily to annual scales. Overall, regional variability in climatic drivers, land use and soil proprieties appears to have a greater effect on evapotranspiration than on net carbon exchange.

  6. iBIOMES Lite: Summarizing Biomolecular Simulation Data in Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    As the amount of data generated by biomolecular simulations dramatically increases, new tools need to be developed to help manage this data at the individual investigator or small research group level. In this paper, we introduce iBIOMES Lite, a lightweight tool for biomolecular simulation data indexing and summarization. The main goal of iBIOMES Lite is to provide a simple interface to summarize computational experiments in a setting where the user might have limited privileges and limited access to IT resources. A command-line interface allows the user to summarize, publish, and search local simulation data sets. Published data sets are accessible via static hypertext markup language (HTML) pages that summarize the simulation protocols and also display data analysis graphically. The publication process is customized via extensible markup language (XML) descriptors while the HTML summary template is customized through extensible stylesheet language (XSL). iBIOMES Lite was tested on different platforms and at several national computing centers using various data sets generated through classical and quantum molecular dynamics, quantum chemistry, and QM/MM. The associated parsers currently support AMBER, GROMACS, Gaussian, and NWChem data set publication. The code is available at https://github.com/jcvthibault/ibiomes. PMID:24830957

  7. Convergence in the temperature response of leaf respiration across biomes and plant functional types.

    PubMed

    Heskel, Mary A; O'Sullivan, Odhran S; Reich, Peter B; Tjoelker, Mark G; Weerasinghe, Lasantha K; Penillard, Aurore; Egerton, John J G; Creek, Danielle; Bloomfield, Keith J; Xiang, Jen; Sinca, Felipe; Stangl, Zsofia R; Martinez-de la Torre, Alberto; Griffin, Kevin L; Huntingford, Chris; Hurry, Vaughan; Meir, Patrick; Turnbull, Matthew H; Atkin, Owen K

    2016-04-01

    Plant respiration constitutes a massive carbon flux to the atmosphere, and a major control on the evolution of the global carbon cycle. It therefore has the potential to modulate levels of climate change due to the human burning of fossil fuels. Neither current physiological nor terrestrial biosphere models adequately describe its short-term temperature response, and even minor differences in the shape of the response curve can significantly impact estimates of ecosystem carbon release and/or storage. Given this, it is critical to establish whether there are predictable patterns in the shape of the respiration-temperature response curve, and thus in the intrinsic temperature sensitivity of respiration across the globe. Analyzing measurements in a comprehensive database for 231 species spanning 7 biomes, we demonstrate that temperature-dependent increases in leaf respiration do not follow a commonly used exponential function. Instead, we find a decelerating function as leaves warm, reflecting a declining sensitivity to higher temperatures that is remarkably uniform across all biomes and plant functional types. Such convergence in the temperature sensitivity of leaf respiration suggests that there are universally applicable controls on the temperature response of plant energy metabolism, such that a single new function can predict the temperature dependence of leaf respiration for global vegetation. This simple function enables straightforward description of plant respiration in the land-surface components of coupled earth system models. Our cross-biome analyses shows significant implications for such fluxes in cold climates, generally projecting lower values compared with previous estimates. PMID:27001849

  8. Modelling the impacts of reoccurring fires in tropical savannahs using Biome-BGC.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Charlotte; Petritsch, Richard; Pietsch, Stephan

    2010-05-01

    Fires are a dominant feature of tropical savannahs and have occurred throughout history by natural as well as human-induced means. These fires have a profound influence on the landscape in terms of flux dynamics and vegetative species composition. This study attempts to understand the impacts of fire regimes on flux dynamics and vegetation composition in savannahs using the Biome-BGC model. The Batéké Plateau, Gabon - an area of savannah grasslands in the Congo basin, serves as a case-study. To achieve model validation for savannahs, data sets from stands with differing levels of past burning are used. It is hypothesised that the field measurements from those stands with lower-levels of past burning will correlate with the Biome-BGC model output, meaning that the model is validated for the savannah excluding fire regimes. However, in reality, fire is frequent in the savannah. Data on past fire events are available from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to provide the fire regimes of the model. As the field data-driven measurements of the burnt stands are influenced by fire in the savannah, this will therefore result in a Biome-BGC model validated for the impacts of fire on savannah ecology. The validated model can then be used to predict the savannah's flux dynamics under the fire scenarios expected with climate and/or human impact change.

  9. iBIOMES Lite: summarizing biomolecular simulation data in limited settings.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Julien C; Cheatham, Thomas E; Facelli, Julio C

    2014-06-23

    As the amount of data generated by biomolecular simulations dramatically increases, new tools need to be developed to help manage this data at the individual investigator or small research group level. In this paper, we introduce iBIOMES Lite, a lightweight tool for biomolecular simulation data indexing and summarization. The main goal of iBIOMES Lite is to provide a simple interface to summarize computational experiments in a setting where the user might have limited privileges and limited access to IT resources. A command-line interface allows the user to summarize, publish, and search local simulation data sets. Published data sets are accessible via static hypertext markup language (HTML) pages that summarize the simulation protocols and also display data analysis graphically. The publication process is customized via extensible markup language (XML) descriptors while the HTML summary template is customized through extensible stylesheet language (XSL). iBIOMES Lite was tested on different platforms and at several national computing centers using various data sets generated through classical and quantum molecular dynamics, quantum chemistry, and QM/MM. The associated parsers currently support AMBER, GROMACS, Gaussian, and NWChem data set publication. The code is available at https://github.com/jcvthibault/ibiomes . PMID:24830957

  10. A quantitative assessment of a terrestrial biosphere model's data needs across North American biomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietze, Michael C.; Serbin, Shawn P.; Davidson, Carl; Desai, Ankur R.; Feng, Xiaohui; Kelly, Ryan; Kooper, Rob; LeBauer, David; Mantooth, Joshua; McHenry, Kenton; Wang, Dan

    2014-03-01

    Terrestrial biosphere models are designed to synthesize our current understanding of how ecosystems function, test competing hypotheses of ecosystem function against observations, and predict responses to novel conditions such as those expected under climate change. Reducing uncertainties in such models can improve both basic scientific understanding and our predictive capacity, but rarely are ecosystem models employed in the design of field campaigns. We provide a synthesis of carbon cycle uncertainty analyses conducted using the Predictive Ecosystem Analyzer ecoinformatics workflow with the Ecosystem Demography model v2. This work is a synthesis of multiple projects, using Bayesian data assimilation techniques to incorporate field data and trait databases across temperate forests, grasslands, agriculture, short rotation forestry, boreal forests, and tundra. We report on a number of data needs that span a wide array of diverse biomes, such as the need for better constraint on growth respiration, mortality, stomatal conductance, and water uptake. We also identify data needs that are biome specific, such as photosynthetic quantum efficiency at high latitudes. We recommend that future data collection efforts balance the bias of past measurements toward aboveground processes in temperate biomes with the sensitivities of different processes as represented by ecosystem models. ©2014. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  11. The future distribution of the savannah biome: model-based and biogeographic contingency.

    PubMed

    Moncrieff, Glenn R; Scheiter, Simon; Langan, Liam; Trabucco, Antonio; Higgins, Steven I

    2016-09-19

    The extent of the savannah biome is expected to be profoundly altered by climatic change and increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Contrasting projections are given when using different modelling approaches to estimate future distributions. Furthermore, biogeographic variation within savannahs in plant function and structure is expected to lead to divergent responses to global change. Hence the use of a single model with a single savannah tree type will likely lead to biased projections. Here we compare and contrast projections of South American, African and Australian savannah distributions from the physiologically based Thornley transport resistance statistical distribution model (TTR-SDM)-and three versions of a dynamic vegetation model (DVM) designed and parametrized separately for specific continents. We show that attempting to extrapolate any continent-specific model globally biases projections. By 2070, all DVMs generally project a decrease in the extent of savannahs at their boundary with forests, whereas the TTR-SDM projects a decrease in savannahs at their boundary with aridlands and grasslands. This difference is driven by forest and woodland expansion in response to rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations in DVMs, unaccounted for by the TTR-SDM. We suggest that the most suitable models of the savannah biome for future development are individual-based dynamic vegetation models designed for specific biogeographic regions.This article is part of the themed issue 'Tropical grassy biomes: linking ecology, human use and conservation'. PMID:27502376

  12. Seasonal patterns of horse fly richness and abundance in the Pampa biome of southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Rodrigo Ferreira; Krolow, Tiago Kütter

    2015-12-01

    Fluctuations in seasonal patterns of horse fly populations were examined in rainforests of tropical South America, where the climate is seasonal. These patterns were evaluated with robust analytical models rather than identifying the main factors that influenced the fluctuations. We examined the seasonality of populations of horse flies in fields and lowland areas of the Pampa biome of southern Brazil with generalized linear models. We also investigated the diversity of these flies and the sampling effort of Malaise traps in this biome over two years. All of the 29 species had clear seasonality with regard to occurrence and abundance, but only seven species were identified as being influenced by temperature and humidity. The sampling was sufficient and the estimated diversity was 10% more than observed. Seasonal trends were synchronized across species and the populations were most abundant between September and March and nearly zero in other months. While previous studies demonstrated that seasonal patterns in population fluctuations are correlated with climatic conditions in horse fly assemblages in South America rainforests, we show a clear effect of each factor on richness and abundance and the seasonality in the prevalence of horse fly assemblages in localities of the Pampa biome. PMID:26611972

  13. Beyond the climate envelope: using trait filtering models to predict biome boundaries from plant physiology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, R.; Hoffmann, W. A.; Muszala, S.

    2014-12-01

    The introduction of second-generation dynamic vegetation models - which simulate the distribution of light resources between plant types along the vertical canopy profile, and therefore facilitate the representation of plant competition explicitly - is a large increase in the complexity and fidelity with which the terrestrial biosphere is abstracted into Earth System Models. In this new class of model, biome boundaries are predicted as the emergent properties of plant physiology, and are therefore sensitive to the high-dimensional parameterizations of plant functional traits. These new approaches offer the facility to quantitatively test ecophysiological hypotheses of plant distribution at large scales, a field which remains surprisingly under-developed. Here we describe experiments conducted with the Community Land Model Ecosystem Demography component, CLM(ED), in which we reduce the complexity of the problem by testing how individual plant functional trait changes to control the location of biome boundaries between functional types. Specifically, we investigate which physiological trade-offs determine the boundary between frequently burned savanna and forest biomes, and attempt to distinguish how each strategic life-history trade-off (carbon storage, bark investment, re-sprouting strategy) contributes towards the maintenance of sharp geographical gradients between fire adapted and typically inflammable closed canopy ecosystems. This study forms part of the planning for a model-inspired fire manipulation experiment at the cerrado-forest boundary in South-Eastern Brazil, and the results will be used to guide future data-collection and analysis strategies.

  14. Development of the BIOME-BGC model for the simulation of managed Moso bamboo forest ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Mao, Fangjie; Li, Pingheng; Zhou, Guomo; Du, Huaqiang; Xu, Xiaojun; Shi, Yongjun; Mo, Lufeng; Zhou, Yufeng; Tu, Guoqing

    2016-05-01

    Numerical models are the most appropriate instrument for the analysis of the carbon balance of terrestrial ecosystems and their interactions with changing environmental conditions. The process-based model BIOME-BGC is widely used in simulation of carbon balance within vegetation, litter and soil of unmanaged ecosystems. For Moso bamboo forests, however, simulations with BIOME-BGC are inaccurate in terms of the growing season and the carbon allocation, due to the oversimplified representation of phenology. Our aim was to improve the applicability of BIOME-BGC for managed Moso bamboo forest ecosystem by implementing several new modules, including phenology, carbon allocation, and management. Instead of the simple phenology and carbon allocation representations in the original version, a periodic Moso bamboo phenology and carbon allocation module was implemented, which can handle the processes of Moso bamboo shooting and high growth during "on-year" and "off-year". Four management modules (digging bamboo shoots, selective cutting, obtruncation, fertilization) were integrated in order to quantify the functioning of managed ecosystems. The improved model was calibrated and validated using eddy covariance measurement data collected at a managed Moso bamboo forest site (Anji) during 2011-2013 years. As a result of these developments and calibrations, the performance of the model was substantially improved. Regarding the measured and modeled fluxes (gross primary production, total ecosystem respiration, net ecosystem exchange), relative errors were decreased by 42.23%, 103.02% and 18.67%, respectively. PMID:26921563

  15. Intrinsic climate dependency of ecosystem light and water-use-efficiencies across Australian biomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hao; Li, Longhui; Eamus, Derek; Cleverly, James; Huete, Alfredo; Beringer, Jason; Yu, Qiang; van Gorsel, Eva; Hutley, Lindsay

    2014-10-01

    The sensitivity of ecosystem gross primary production (GPP) to availability of water and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) differs among biomes. Here we investigated variations of ecosystem light-use-efficiency (eLUE: GPP/PAR) and water-use-efficiency (eWUE: GPP/evapotranspiration) among seven Australian eddy covariance sites with differing annual precipitation, species composition and temperature. Changes to both eLUE and eWUE were primarily correlated with atmospheric vapor pressure deficit (VPD) at multiple temporal scales across biomes, with minor additional correlations observed with soil moisture and temperature. The effects of leaf area index on eLUE and eWUE were also relatively weak compared to VPD, indicating an intrinsic dependency of eLUE and eWUE on climate. Additionally, eLUE and eWUE were statistically different for biomes between summer and winter, except eWUE for savannas and the grassland. These findings will improve our understanding of how light- and water-use traits in Australian ecosystems may respond to climate change.

  16. Colombian vegetation at the Last Glacial Maximum: a comparison of model- and pollen-based biome reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchant, Robert; Boom, Arnoud; Behling, Hermann; Hooghiemstra, Henry; Melief, Bert; van Geel, Bas; van der Hammen, Thomas; Wille, Michael

    2004-10-01

    Colombian vegetation, at the ecological level of the biome, is reconstructed at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) using two methods. A reconstruction of modern biomes shows that, for the majority of the sites, the pollen data accurately reflect the potential vegetation, even though much of the original vegetation has been transformed by agricultural practices. At 18 000 14C yr BP a generally cool and dry environment is reflected in biome assignments of cold mixed forests, cool evergreen forests and cool grassland/shrub, the latter extending to lower altitudes than presently recorded. Differential responses of the vegetation to climatic shifts are related to changes in moisture sources and the importance of edaphic control on the vegetation. Secondly, biomes at the LGM are also investigated by applying a vegetation model (BIOME-3) set to operate at CO2 levels of 200 ppmV and with climatic data from 12 meteorological stations that encompass a range of environments within Colombia. At lower altitudes it is apparent that moisture is the dominant control on driving vegetation change whereas temperature becomes more important at higher altitudes. The combined reconstruction of biome-scale vegetation dynamics in Colombia allows an understanding of the environmental controls on these to be developed that demonstrates the need to invoke different factors to explain the vegetation change rather than a uniform reduction in temperature or moisture. Copyright

  17. The role of plant functional trade-offs for biodiversity changes and biome shifts under scenarios of global climatic change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reu, B.; Zaehle, S.; Proulx, R.; Bohn, K.; Kleidon, A.; Pavlick, R.; Schmidtlein, S.

    2010-10-01

    The global geographic distribution of biodiversity and biomes is determined by species-specific physiological tolerances to climatic constraints. Current models implement empirical bioclimatic relationships to predict present-day vegetation patterns and to forecast biodiversity changes and biome shifts under climatic change. In this paper, we consider plant functional trade-offs and their interactions with climatic changes to forecast and explain biodiversity changes and biome shifts. The Jena Diversity model (JeDi) simulates plant survival according to essential plant functional trade-offs, including eco-physiological processes such as water uptake, photosynthesis, allocation, reproduction and phenology. We apply JeDi to quantify biodiversity changes and biome shifts between present-day and a range of possible future climates from two scenarios (A2 and B1) and seven global climate models using metrics of plant functional richness and functional identity. Our results show (i) a significant biodiversity loss in the tropics, (ii) an increase in biodiversity at mid and high latitudes, and (iii) a poleward shift of biomes. While these results are consistent with the findings of empirical approaches, we are able to explain them in terms of the plant functional trade-offs involved in the allocation, metabolic and reproduction strategies of plants. We conclude that general aspects of plant physiological tolerances can be derived from plant functional trade-offs, which may provide a useful process- and trait-based alternative to bioclimatic relationships in order to address questions about the causes of biodiversity changes and biome shifts.

  18. Introduction and synthesis: Plant phylogeny and the origin of major biomes.

    PubMed Central

    Pennington, R Toby; Cronk, Quentin C B; Richardson, James A

    2004-01-01

    Phylogenetic trees based upon DNA sequence data, when calibrated with a dimension of time, allow inference of: (i) the pattern of accumulation of lineages through time; (ii) the time of origin of monophyletic groups; (iii) when lineages arrived in different geographical areas; (iv) the time of origin of biome-specific morphologies. This gives a powerful new view of the history of biomes that in many cases is not provided by the incomplete plant fossil record. Dated plant phylogenies for angiosperm families such as Leguminoaceae (Fabaceae), Melastomataceae sensu stricto, Annonaceae and Rhamnaceae indicate that long-distance, transoceanic dispersal has played an important role in shaping their distributions, and that this can obscure any effect of tectonic history, previously assumed to have been the major cause of their biogeographic patterns. Dispersal from other continents has also been important in the assembly of the Amazonian rainforest flora and the Australian flora. Comparison of dated biogeographic patterns of plants and animals suggests that recent long-distance dispersal might be more prevalent in plants, which has major implications for community assembly and coevolution. Dated plant phylogenies also reveal the role of past environmental changes on the evolution of lineages in species-rich biomes, and show that recent Plio-Pleistocene diversification has contributed substantially to their current species richness. Because of the critical role of fossils and morphological characters in assigning ages to nodes in phylogenetic trees, future studies must include careful morphological consideration of fossils and their extant relatives in a phylogenetic context. Ideal study systems will be based upon DNA sequence data from multiple loci and multiple fossil calibrations. This allows cross-validation both of age estimates from different loci, and from different fossil calibrations. For a more complete view of biome history, future studies should emphasize full

  19. Pollen-based biome reconstructions for Latin America at 0, 6000 and 18 000 radiocarbon years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marchant, R.; Harrison, S.P.; Hooghiemstra, H.; Markgraf, Vera; Van Boxel, J. H.; Ager, T.; Almeida, L.; Anderson, R.; Baied, C.; Behling, H.; Berrio, J.C.; Burbridge, R.; Bjorck, S.; Byrne, R.; Bush, M.B.; Cleef, A.M.; Duivenvoorden, J.F.; Flenley, J.R.; De Oliveira, P.; Van Geel, B.; Graf, K.J.; Gosling, W.D.; Harbele, S.; Van Der Hammen, T.; Hansen, B.C.S.; Horn, S.P.; Islebe, G.A.; Kuhry, P.; Ledru, M.-P.; Mayle, F.E.; Leyden, B.W.; Lozano-Garcia, S.; Melief, A.B.M.; Moreno, P.; Moar, N.T.; Prieto, A.; Van Reenen, G. B.; Salgado-Labouriau, M. L.; Schasignbitz, F.; Schreve-Brinkman, E. J.; Wille, M.

    2009-01-01

    The biomisation method is used to reconstruct Latin American vegetation at 6000±500 and 18 000±1000 radiocarbon years before present (14C yr BP) from pollen data. Tests using modern pollen data from 381 samples derived from 287 locations broadly reproduce potential natural vegetation. The strong temperature gradient associated with the Andes is recorded by a transition from high altitude cool grass/shrubland and cool mixed forest to mid-altitude cool temperate rain forest, to tropical dry, seasonal and rain forest at low altitudes. Reconstructed biomes from a number of sites do not match the potential vegetation due to local factors such as human impact, methodological artefacts and mechanisms of pollen representivity of the parent vegetation.

    At 6000±500 14C yr BP 255 samples are analysed from 127 sites. Differences between the modern and the 6000±500 14C yr BP reconstruction are comparatively small. Patterns of change relative to the modern reconstruction are mainly to biomes characteristic of drier climate in the north of the region with a slight more mesic shift in the south. Cool temperate rain forest remains dominant in western South America. In northwestern South America a number of sites record transitions from tropical seasonal forest to tropical dry forest and tropical rain forest to tropical seasonal forest. Sites in Central America also show a change in biome assignment to more mesic vegetation, indicative of greater plant available moisture, e.g. on the Yucat??n peninsula sites record warm evergreen forest, replacing tropical dry forest and warm mixed forest presently recorded.

    At 18 000±1000 14C yr BP 61 samples from 34 sites record vegetation that reflects a generally cool and dry environment. Cool grass/shrubland prevalent in southeast Brazil, Amazonian sites record tropical dry forest, warm temperate rain forest and tropical seasonal forest. Southernmost South America is dominated by cool grass/shrubland, a single site

  20. Pollen-based biome reconstructions for Latin America at 0, 6000 and 18 000 radiocarbon years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marchant, R.; Harrison, S.P.; Hooghiemstra, H.; Markgraf, Vera; Van Boxel, J. H.; Ager, T.; Almeida, L.; Anderson, R.; Baied, C.; Behling, H.; Berrio, J.C.; Burbridge, R.; Bjorck, S.; Byrne, R.; Bush, M.B.; Cleef, A.M.; Duivenvoorden, J.F.; Flenley, J.R.; De Oliveira, P.; Van Geel, B.; Graf, K.J.; Gosling, W.D.; Harbele, S.; Van Der Hammen, T.; Hansen, B.C.S.; Horn, S.P.; Islebe, G.A.; Kuhry, P.; Ledru, M.

    2009-01-01

    The biomisation method is used to reconstruct Latin American vegetation at 6000±500 and 18 000±1000 radiocarbon years before present (14C yr BP) from pollen data. Tests using modern pollen data from 381 samples derived from 287 locations broadly reproduce potential natural vegetation. The strong temperature gradient associated with the Andes is recorded by a transition from high altitude cool grass/shrubland and cool mixed forest to mid-altitude cool temperate rain forest, to tropical dry, seasonal and rain forest at low altitudes. Reconstructed biomes from a number of sites do not match the potential vegetation due to local factors such as human impact, methodological artefacts and mechanisms of pollen representivity of the parent vegetation. At 6000±500 14C yr BP 255 samples are analysed from 127 sites. Differences between the modern and the 6000±500 14C yr BP reconstruction are comparatively small. Patterns of change relative to the modern reconstruction are mainly to biomes characteristic of drier climate in the north of the region with a slight more mesic shift in the south. Cool temperate rain forest remains dominant in western South America. In northwestern South America a number of sites record transitions from tropical seasonal forest to tropical dry forest and tropical rain forest to tropical seasonal forest. Sites in Central America also show a change in biome assignment to more mesic vegetation, indicative of greater plant available moisture, e.g. on the Yucat??n peninsula sites record warm evergreen forest, replacing tropical dry forest and warm mixed forest presently recorded. At 18 000±1000 14C yr BP 61 samples from 34 sites record vegetation that reflects a generally cool and dry environment. Cool grass/shrubland prevalent in southeast Brazil, Amazonian sites record tropical dry forest, warm temperate rain forest and tropical seasonal forest. Southernmost South America is dominated by cool grass/shrubland, a single site retains cool temperate

  1. Licensee contractor and vendor inspection status report. Quarterly progress report, April 1996--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The federal government and nuclear industry have established a system for the inspection of commercial nuclear facilities to provide for multiple levels of inspection and verification. The Vendor Inspection System (VIS) of the Special Inspection Branch reviews and inspects the quality and suitability of vendor products, licensee-vendor interface, environmental qualification of equipment, and review of equipment problems found during operation and their corrective action. This report contains copies of all vendor inspection reports issued during the calendar year for which it is published.

  2. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved material licensees. Quarterly progress report, April 1995--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April-June 1995) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to material licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  3. Audit Report on "The Department's Management of Nuclear Materials Provided to Domestic Licensees"

    SciTech Connect

    2009-02-01

    The objective if to determine whether the Department of Energy (Department) was adequately managing its nuclear materials provided to domestic licensees. The audit was performed from February 2007 to September 2008 at Department Headquarters in Washington, DC, and Germantown, MD; the Oak Ridge Office and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, TN. In addition, we visited or obtained data from 40 different non-Departmental facilities in various states. To accomplish the audit objective, we: (1) Reviewed Departmental and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements for the control and accountability of nuclear materials; (2) Analyzed a Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System (NMMSS) report with ending inventory balances for Department-owned nuclear materials dated September 30, 2007, to determine the amount and types of nuclear materials located at non-Department domestic facilities; (3) Held discussions with Department and NRC personnel that used NMMSS information to determine their roles and responsibilities related to the control and accountability over nuclear materials; (4) Selected a judgmental sample of 40 non-Department domestic facilities; (5) Met with licensee officials and sent confirmations to determine whether their actual inventories of Department-owned nuclear materials were consistent with inventories reported in the NMMSS; and, (6) Analyzed historical information related to the 2004 NMMSS inventory rebaselining initiative to determine the quantity of Department-owned nuclear materials that were written off from the domestic licensees inventory balances. This performance audit was conducted in accordance with generally accepted Government auditing standards. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain sufficient, appropriate evidence to provide a reasonable basis for our findings and conclusions based on our audit objective. We believe that the evidence obtained provides a reasonable basis for our

  4. Electronic information exchange between NRC and licensees using Internet E-mail

    SciTech Connect

    Roe, J.W.; Carpenter, C.E. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    One of the goals established in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Strategic Information Technology Plan was the development of high-performance computer networks that would allow users to have E-mail and document transfer capabilities with NRC staff, certain U.S. Department of Energy laboratories, and with outside users over the public Internet network. Subsequently, individual Internet E-mail accounts have been established for project managers in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR), which allow informal communications with licensees that have access to the Internet.

  5. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved reactor licensees. Semiannual progress report, July 1996--December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during the period (July-December 1996) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to reactor licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication.

  6. Late Quaternary and Future Biome Simulations for Alaska and Eastern Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, Amy; Walsh, John; Saito, Kazuyuki; Bigelow, Nancy

    2015-04-01

    We simulated Arctic biomes across a region including Alaska and Eastern Russia using the BIOME4 biogeochemical and biogeography vegetation model. BIOME4, which produces an equilibrium vegetation distribution under a given climate condition, was forced by CMIP5/PMIP3 climate data. We are exploring vegetation and permafrost distributions during the last 21,000 years and future projections (2100 C.E.) to gain an understanding of the effects of climate shifts on this complex subsystem. When forced with the baseline modern climatology, compiled from the University of Delaware temperature and precipitation climatology and ERA-40 sunshine data, our biome simulations were generally consistent with current vegetation observations in the study region. Much of the study area was simulated to have evergreen and deciduous taiga and shrub tundras. Paleoclimatological simulations were compared with pollen data samples taken through the study region. Simulations for the Last Glacial Maximum show the Bering Land Bridge covered almost entirely by cushion forb, lichen, and moss tundra, shrub tundra, and graminoid tundra. Three out of the five models' climate data produce evergreen and deciduous taiga in what is now southwestern Alaska. The distributions of cushion forb, lichen, and moss tundra and graminoid tundra differ noticeably between models, however, shrub tundra distributions are generally in agreement. Simulations for the Mid-Holocene are in better agreement on pollen-based distributions of biomes. Shrub tundra is simulated along the Arctic coast, and in some cases along the eastern coast of Russia. All models show evergreen taiga along the southern coast of Russia as well as covering the southern half of present-day Alaska. Deciduous taiga is simulated in the interior regions of eastern Russia and Alaska, though the distributions in Alaska differ between models. Pre-Industrial biome simulations were very similar to Mid-Holocene simulations. Differences include more shrub

  7. A reconstruction of Atlantic Central African biomes and forest succession stages derived from modern pollen data and plant functional types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebamba, J.; Ngomanda, A.; Vincens, A.; Jolly, D.; Favier, C.; Elenga, H.; Bentaleb, I.

    2009-01-01

    New detailed vegetation reconstructions are proposed in Atlantic Central Africa from a modern pollen data set derived from 199 sites (Cameroon, Gabon and Congo) including 131 new sites. In this study, the concept of plant functional classification is improved with new and more detailed plant functional types (PFTs) and new aggregations of pollen taxa. Using the biomisation method, we reconstructed (1) modern potential biomes and (2) potential succession stages of forest regeneration, a new approach in Atlantic Central African vegetation dynamics and ecosystem functioning reconstruction. When compared to local vegetation, potential biomes are correctly reconstructed (97.5% of the sites) and tropical evergreen to semi-evergreen forest (TRFO biome) is well identified from semi-deciduous forest (TSFO biome). When the potential biomes are superimposed on the White's vegetation map, only 76.4% of the sites are correctly reconstructed. But using botanical data, correspondence and cluster analyses, the 43 sites from Congo (Mayombe) evidence more affinities with those of central Gabon and so they can also be considered as correctly reconstructed as TRFO biome and White's map must be revised. In terms of potential succession stages of forest regeneration, the mature forest (TMFO) is well differentiated from the secondary forest (TSFE), but inside this latter group, the young and the pioneer stages are not clearly identified due probably to their low sampling representation. Moreover, linked to their progressive and mosaic character, the boundaries between two forest biomes or two forest stages are not clearly detected and need also a more intensive sampling in such transitions.

  8. Identification of Priority Conservation Areas and Potential Corridors for Jaguars in the Caatinga Biome, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Morato, Ronaldo Gonçalves; Ferraz, Katia Maria Paschoaletto Micchi de Barros; de Paula, Rogério Cunha; de Campos, Cláudia Bueno

    2014-01-01

    The jaguar, Panthera onca, is a top predator with the extant population found within the Brazilian Caatinga biome now known to be on the brink of extinction. Designing new conservation units and potential corridors are therefore crucial for the long-term survival of the species within the Caatinga biome. Thus, our aims were: 1) to recognize suitable areas for jaguar occurrence, 2) to delineate areas for jaguar conservation (PJCUs), 3) to design corridors among priority areas, and 4) to prioritize PJCUs. A total of 62 points records of jaguar occurrence and 10 potential predictors were analyzed in a GIS environment. A predictive distributional map was obtained using Species Distribution Modeling (SDM) as performed by the Maximum Entropy (Maxent) algorithm. Areas equal to or higher than the median suitability value of 0.595 were selected as of high suitability for jaguar occurrence and named as Priority Jaguar Conservation Units (PJCU). Ten PJCUs with sizes varying from 23.6 km2 to 4,311.0 km2 were identified. Afterwards, we combined the response curve, as generated by SDM, and expert opinions to create a permeability matrix and to identify least cost corridors and buffer zones between each PJCU pair. Connectivity corridors and buffer zone for jaguar movement included an area of 8.884,26 km2 and the total corridor length is about 160.94 km. Prioritizing criteria indicated the PJCU representing c.a. 68.61% of the total PJCU area (PJCU # 1) as of high priority for conservation and connectivity with others PJCUs (PJCUs # 4, 5 and 7) desirable for the long term survival of the species. In conclusion, by using the jaguar as a focal species and combining SDM and expert opinion we were able to create a valid framework for practical conservation actions at the Caatinga biome. The same approach could be used for the conservation of other carnivores. PMID:24709817

  9. Continuous flux of dissolved black carbon from a vanished tropical forest biome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, T.; Rezende, C. E.; Manecki, M.; Niggemann, J.; Coelho Ovalle, A. R.; Bernardes, M. C.

    2012-04-01

    Humans have extensively used fire as a tool to shape Earth's vegetation. One of the biggest events in this context was the destruction of Brazilian's Atlantic forest, once among the largest tropical forest biomes on Earth. We estimate that the slash-and-burn practice produced 200 to 500 million tons of black carbon from the 1850' to 1973. The fate of this charred organic matter is unknown. Here we show continuous runoff of dissolved black carbon from the cleared forest biome, more than 35 years after the widespread burning of the forest ended. During the 11-year observation period (1997-2008) of this study, on average 0.04 to 0.08 tons of dissolved black carbon were annually exported per square kilometer land. We estimate an annual runoff of 48,000 to 97,000 tons dissolved black carbon from the former Atlantic forest biome. Dissolved black carbon was mobilized by water percolating through the soil during the rainy season. During base flow conditions, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) did not contain black carbon, whereas at peak flow up to 6% of DOC was combustion-derived. If runoff was the only removal mechanism of black carbon from soils, even the highly condensed and presumably refractory component of black carbon would have a half-life of only 440 to 2300 years in the soil. In areas with higher precipitation, stronger runoff and consequently a shorter half-life can be expected. In the deep ocean, dissolved black carbon is virtually inert on this time scale. The disappearance of the Atlantic forest provides a worst-case scenario for tropical forests worldwide, most of which are cleared at increasing rate. Because of the comparably fast mobilization of dissolved black carbon from soils and its resistivity in the deep ocean, an increase of black carbon production on land may alter the size of the global pool of >12 Pg carbon of thermally altered DOC in the ocean on the long term.

  10. Sex-biased parasitism is not universal: evidence from rodent-flea associations from three biomes.

    PubMed

    Kiffner, Christian; Stanko, Michal; Morand, Serge; Khokhlova, Irina S; Shenbrot, Georgy I; Laudisoit, Anne; Leirs, Herwig; Hawlena, Hadas; Krasnov, Boris R

    2013-11-01

    The distribution of parasites among individual hosts is characterised by high variability that is believed to be a result of variations in host traits. To find general patterns of host traits affecting parasite abundance, we studied flea infestation of nine rodent species from three different biomes (temperate zone of central Europe, desert of Middle East and tropics of East Africa). We tested for independent and interactive effects of host sex and body mass on the number of fleas harboured by an individual host while accounting for spatial clustering of host and parasite sampling and temporal variation. We found no consistent patterns of the effect of host sex and body mass on flea abundance either among species within a biome or among biomes. We found evidence for sex-biased flea infestation in just five host species (Apodemus agrarius, Myodes glareolus, Microtus arvalis, Gerbillus andersoni, Mastomys natalensis). In six rodent species, we found an effect of body mass on flea abundance (all species mentioned above and Meriones crassus). This effect was positive in five species and negative in one species (Microtus arvalis). In M. glareolus, G. andersoni, M. natalensis, and M. arvalis, the relationship between body mass and flea abundance was mediated by host sex. This was manifested in steeper change in flea abundance with increasing body mass in male than female individuals (M. glareolus, G. andersoni, M. natalensis), whereas the opposite pattern was found in M. arvalis. Our findings suggest that sex and body mass are common determinants of parasite infestation in mammalian hosts, but neither of them follows universal rules. This implies that the effect of host individual characteristics on mechanisms responsible for flea acquisition may be manifested differently in different host species. PMID:23636459

  11. Reactivity continuum modeling of leaf, root, and wood decomposition across biomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, Birgit; Tranvik, Lars J.

    2015-07-01

    Large carbon dioxide amounts are released to the atmosphere during organic matter decomposition. Yet the large-scale and long-term regulation of this critical process in global carbon cycling by litter chemistry and climate remains poorly understood. We used reactivity continuum (RC) modeling to analyze the decadal data set of the "Long-term Intersite Decomposition Experiment," in which fine litter and wood decomposition was studied in eight biome types (224 time series). In 32 and 46% of all sites the litter content of the acid-unhydrolyzable residue (AUR, formerly referred to as lignin) and the AUR/nitrogen ratio, respectively, retarded initial decomposition rates. This initial rate-retarding effect generally disappeared within the first year of decomposition, and rate-stimulating effects of nutrients and a rate-retarding effect of the carbon/nitrogen ratio became more prevalent. For needles and leaves/grasses, the influence of climate on decomposition decreased over time. For fine roots, the climatic influence was initially smaller but increased toward later-stage decomposition. The climate decomposition index was the strongest climatic predictor of decomposition. The similar variability in initial decomposition rates across litter categories as across biome types suggested that future changes in decomposition may be dominated by warming-induced changes in plant community composition. In general, the RC model parameters successfully predicted independent decomposition data for the different litter-biome combinations (196 time series). We argue that parameterization of large-scale decomposition models with RC model parameters, as opposed to the currently common discrete multiexponential models, could significantly improve their mechanistic foundation and predictive accuracy across climate zones and litter categories.

  12. Skin Biomes.

    PubMed

    Fyhrquist, N; Salava, A; Auvinen, P; Lauerma, A

    2016-05-01

    The cutaneous microbiome has been investigated broadly in recent years and some traditional perspectives are beginning to change. A diverse microbiome exists on human skin and has a potential to influence pathogenic microbes and modulate the course of skin disorders, e.g. atopic dermatitis. In addition to the known dysfunctions in barrier function of the skin and immunologic disturbances, evidence is rising that frequent skin disorders, e.g. atopic dermatitis, might be connected to a dysbiosis of the microbial community and changes in the skin microbiome. As a future perspective, examining the skin microbiome could be seen as a potential new diagnostic and therapeutic target in inflammatory skin disorders. PMID:27056560

  13. NEE and GPP dynamic evolution at two biomes in the upper Spanish plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, María Luisa; Pardo, Nuria; Pérez, Isidro Alberto; García, Maria de los Angeles

    2014-05-01

    In order to assess the ability of dominant biomes to act as a CO2 sink, two eddy correlation stations close to each other in central Spain have been concurrently operational since March 2008 until the present. The land use of the first station, AC, is a rapeseed rotating crop consisting of annual rotation of non-irrigated rapeseed, barley, peas, rye, and sunflower, respectively. The land use of the second, CIBA, is a mixture of open shrubs/crops, with open shrubs being markedly dominant. The period of measurements covered variable general meteorological conditions. 2009 and 2012 were dominated by drought, whereas 2010 was the rainiest year. Annual rainfall during 2008 and 2009 was close to the historical averaged annual means. This paper presents the dynamic evolution of NEE-8d and GPP-8d observed at the AC station over five years and compares the results with those concurrently observed at the CIBA station. GGP 8-d estimates at both stations were determined using a Light Use Efficiency Model, LUE. Input data for the LUE model were the FPAR 8-d products supplied by MODIS, PAR in situ measurements, and a scalar f, varying between 0 and 1, to take account of the reduction in maximum PAR conversion efficiency, ɛ0, under limiting environmental conditions. f values were assumed to be dependent on air temperature and evaporative fraction, EF, which was considered a proxy of soil moisture. ɛ0, a key parameter, which depends on land use types, was derived through the results of a linear regression fit between the GPP 8-d eddy covariance composites observed and the LUE concurrent 8-d model estimates. Over the five-year study period, both biomes behaved as CO2 sinks. However, the ratio of the NEE-8d total accumulated at AC and CIBA, respectively, was close to a factor two, revealing the effectiveness of the studied crops as CO2 sinks. On an annual basis, accumulated NEE-8d exhibited major variability in both biomes. At CIBA, the results were largely dominated by the

  14. Sensitivity Analysis of Biome-Bgc Model for Dry Tropical Forests of Vindhyan Highlands, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M.; Raghubanshi, A. S.

    2011-08-01

    A process-based model BIOME-BGC was run for sensitivity analysis to see the effect of ecophysiological parameters on net primary production (NPP) of dry tropical forest of India. The sensitivity test reveals that the forest NPP was highly sensitive to the following ecophysiological parameters: Canopy light extinction coefficient (k), Canopy average specific leaf area (SLA), New stem C : New leaf C (SC:LC), Maximum stomatal conductance (gs,max), C:N of fine roots (C:Nfr), All-sided to projected leaf area ratio and Canopy water interception coefficient (Wint). Therefore, these parameters need more precision and attention during estimation and observation in the field studies.

  15. Application of BIOME-BGC to Managed Forest Ecosystems in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietsch, S. A.; Petritsch, R.; Hasenauer, H.

    2007-05-01

    European forests have been severely modified by humans resulting in a reduction of forest covered land area, a change in tree species distribution and the deterioration of forest soils. One option to assess forest management impacts on the cycling of carbon, nitrogen and water is the use of BGC-Models. Such models are considered as diagnostic tools for studying sustainability of forest ecosystems and have been used for climate change impact studies on forest growth and carbon sequestration issues. In our efforts to develop an appropriate diagnostic tool to assess the dynamics of carbon, nitrogen, water and energy flux for sustainable forest ecosystem management and climate change studies, we have selected BIOME-BGC. The main reason was that the general model structure is flexible enough to integrate large scale, regional as well as forest stand level information. During the last years we worked on the following extensions: (1) Tested and extended algorithms to interpolate daily climate input data as they are needed to run the model for any location within the country; (2) We developed a set of species specific parameters for all major tree species in Central Europe: Norway spruce (two variants highland and lowlands), Scots pine, Stone pine, larch, common beech and oak forests. These parameters sets are important since in BIOME-BGC vegetation is distinguished in biomes or plant functional types but the impacts of forest management (e.g. changes in stand density) may differ substantially among the tree species assigned to a single biome. (3) We extended the model to cover the full variation ranging from conditions including temperature extremes at the timberline to periodic ground water access or flooding in lowlands. (4) We adapted the spinup procedure to ensure unbiased predictions on forest status in the absence of past and present management impacts. (5) Explicitly addressed the effects of past and present forest management as they may differ by species and

  16. Mapping fire events in the transition of Amazon and Cerrado biome using remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes Daldegan, G.; Roberts, D. A.; Peterson, S.; Ribeiro, F.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract to AGU Fire is considered one of the determinant factors that have shaped Cerrado biome, the Brazilian Savanna, considered the most biodiverse savanna in the world. At the same time, fire has not acted a major role during the evolution of the Amazon Forest due to the strong capacity it has to resist burning. Recently, with the expansion of the agricultural activities in the central Brazil, about 49% of the Cerrado has been converted to other uses and as deforestation vector runs towards the Amazon Forest it modifies the natural moist microclimate in the edges of the forest, increasing the likelihood of wildfires. Every year these ecosystems suffer with several fire events responsible for large burned areas, causing losses of biomass, biodiversity, soil nutrients, and releasing tons of CO2 that help climate change. The occurrence of fires has a direct relationship with the climate of the central portion of the south american continent, charaterized by a two seasons regime, wet and dry, each one lasting around 6 months. In this region is located the ecotone of these two majors Brazilians ecosystems. In the Cerrado biome fire is often used to manage pasture, stimulating the regrowth of natural grasses used as pasture and also to open new areas for agriculture. There are researches showing that people have been traditionally using fire as a lower cost way to manage their lands for different purposes. In the Amazon forest the cycle of deforestation started around the 60's with incentives from the federal government to populate the region in the middle of the last century, and most recently by the progress of the commodities prices, such as soybean and sugar-cane, that has occupied vast areas of the Cerrado and is marching towards the forest. In the Amazon, fire is frequently used to further open the areas that were previously logged selectively and then converted to agricultural uses.Given the ecological importance of the Amazon Forest and Cerrado biome and the

  17. A brief botanical survey into Kumbira forest, an isolated patch of Guineo-Congolian biome

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Francisco M. P.; Goyder, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Kumbira forest is a discrete patch of moist forest of Guineo-Congolian biome in Western Angola central scarp and runs through Cuanza Norte and Cuanza Sul province. The project aimed to document the floristic diversity of the Angolan escarpment, a combination of general walk-over survey, plant specimen collection and sight observation was used to aid the characterization of the vegetation. Over 100 plant specimens in flower or fruit were collected within four identified vegetation types. The list of species includes two new records of Guineo-Congolian species in Angola, one new record for the country and one potential new species. PMID:27489484

  18. Birth of a biome: insights into the assembly and maintenance of the Australian arid zone biota.

    PubMed

    Byrne, M; Yeates, D K; Joseph, L; Kearney, M; Bowler, J; Williams, M A J; Cooper, S; Donnellan, S C; Keogh, J S; Leys, R; Melville, J; Murphy, D J; Porch, N; Wyrwoll, K-H

    2008-10-01

    The integration of phylogenetics, phylogeography and palaeoenvironmental studies is providing major insights into the historical forces that have shaped the Earth's biomes. Yet our present view is biased towards arctic and temperate/tropical forest regions, with very little focus on the extensive arid regions of the planet. The Australian arid zone is one of the largest desert landform systems in the world, with a unique, diverse and relatively well-studied biota. With foci on palaeoenvironmental and molecular data, we here review what is known about the assembly and maintenance of this biome in the context of its physical history, and in comparison with other mesic biomes. Aridification of Australia began in the Mid-Miocene, around 15 million years, but fully arid landforms in central Australia appeared much later, around 1-4 million years. Dated molecular phylogenies of diverse taxa show the deepest divergences of arid-adapted taxa from the Mid-Miocene, consistent with the onset of desiccation. There is evidence of arid-adapted taxa evolving from mesic-adapted ancestors, and also of speciation within the arid zone. There is no evidence for an increase in speciation rate during the Pleistocene, and most arid-zone species lineages date to the Pliocene or earlier. The last 0.8 million years have seen major fluctuations of the arid zone, with large areas covered by mobile sand dunes during glacial maxima. Some large, vagile taxa show patterns of recent expansion and migration throughout the arid zone, in parallel with the ice sheet-imposed range shifts in Northern Hemisphere taxa. Yet other taxa show high lineage diversity and strong phylogeographical structure, indicating persistence in multiple localised refugia over several glacial maxima. Similar to the Northern Hemisphere, Pleistocene range shifts have produced suture zones, creating the opportunity for diversification and speciation through hybridisation, polyploidy and parthenogenesis. This review highlights

  19. A brief botanical survey into Kumbira forest, an isolated patch of Guineo-Congolian biome.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Francisco M P; Goyder, David J

    2016-01-01

    Kumbira forest is a discrete patch of moist forest of Guineo-Congolian biome in Western Angola central scarp and runs through Cuanza Norte and Cuanza Sul province. The project aimed to document the floristic diversity of the Angolan escarpment, a combination of general walk-over survey, plant specimen collection and sight observation was used to aid the characterization of the vegetation. Over 100 plant specimens in flower or fruit were collected within four identified vegetation types. The list of species includes two new records of Guineo-Congolian species in Angola, one new record for the country and one potential new species. PMID:27489484

  20. Comparing global models of terrestrial net primary productivity (NPP): Global pattern and differentiation by major biomes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kicklighter, D.W.; Bondeau, A.; Schloss, A.L.; Kaduk, J.; McGuire, A.D.

    1999-01-01

    Annual and seasonal net primary productivity estimates (NPP) of 15 global models across latitudinal zones and biomes are compared. The models simulated NPP for contemporary climate using common, spatially explicit data sets for climate, soil texture, and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Differences among NPP estimates varied over space and time. The largest differences occur during the summer months in boreal forests (50??to 60??N) and during the dry seasons of tropical evergreen forests. Differences in NPP estimates are related to model assumptions about vegetation structure, model parameterizations, and input data sets.

  1. Biome depletion in conjunction with evolutionary mismatches could play a role in the etiology of neurofibromatosis 1.

    PubMed

    Beales, Donna L

    2015-04-01

    Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) arises de novo in a striking 30-50% of cases, pointing toward an environmental etiology, though none has been clearly identified. The Biome Depletion Theory posits that the absence of mutualistic and commensal organisms within the human body coupled with modern lifestyle alterations may have profoundly deleterious effects, inclusive of immunologic derangement that is thought to result in allergy, atopy, and numerous autoimmune diseases. Biome depletion has been implicated as a factor in the etiology of both multiple sclerosis and autism spectrum disorders; biome reconstitution, i.e. replenishment of the biome with certain keynote species, is being used in the treatment of these and other autoimmune states. Neurofibromatosis 1 has been associated with allergy, various autoimmune states, multiple sclerosis, and autism. Recent research has posited that NF1, multiple sclerosis and autism may all arise from disturbances in the neural crest during gestation. This paper hypothesizes that there is indirect evidence that a highly inflammatory uterine state may precipitate epigenetic changes in vulnerable NF-related genes in the course of fetal development. The etiology of NF1 may lie in the absence of immunomodulation by commensal and mutualistic species once ubiquitously present in the environment, as well as through adoption of a modern lifestyle that contributes to chronic inflammation. Replenishment of helminths and other missing organisms to the human biome prior to conception as well as addressing nutritional status, psychological stress, and environmental exposures may prevent the development of NF1. PMID:25665856

  2. 18 CFR 16.19 - Procedures for an existing licensee of a minor hydroelectric power project or of a minor part of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... existing licensee of a minor hydroelectric power project or of a minor part of a hydroelectric power project with a license not subject to sections 14 and 15 of the Federal Power Act. 16.19 Section 16.19....19 Procedures for an existing licensee of a minor hydroelectric power project or of a minor part of...

  3. 18 CFR 16.19 - Procedures for an existing licensee of a minor hydroelectric power project or of a minor part of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... existing licensee of a minor hydroelectric power project or of a minor part of a hydroelectric power project with a license not subject to sections 14 and 15 of the Federal Power Act. 16.19 Section 16.19....19 Procedures for an existing licensee of a minor hydroelectric power project or of a minor part of...

  4. 75 FR 13320 - Florida Power Corporation, et al., Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Generating Plant; Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... March 27, 2009 (74 FR 13967). There will be no change to radioactive effluents that affect radiation... [Part 73, Power Reactor Security Requirements, 74 FR 13926, 13967 (March 27, 2009)]. The licensee... COMMISSION Florida Power Corporation, et al., Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Generating Plant;...

  5. Palaeobotanical studies from tropical Africa: relevance to the evolution of forest, woodland and savannah biomes.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Bonnie F

    2004-01-01

    Fossil plants provide data on climate, community composition and structure, all of which are relevant to the definition and recognition of biomes. Macrofossils reflect local vegetation, whereas pollen assemblages sample a larger area. The earliest solid evidence for angiosperm tropical rainforest in Africa is based primarily on Late Eocene to Late Oligocene (ca. 39-26 Myr ago) pollen assemblages from Cameroon, which are rich in forest families. Plant macrofossil assemblages from elsewhere in interior Africa for this time interval are rare, but new work at Chilga in the northwestern Ethiopian Highlands documents forest communities at 28 Myr ago. Initial results indicate botanical affinities with lowland West African forest. The earliest known woodland community in tropical Africa is dated at 46 Myr ago in northern Tanzania, as documented by leaves and fruits from lake deposits. The community around the lake was dominated by caesalpinioid legumes, but included Acacia, for which this, to my knowledge, is the earliest record. This community is structurally similar to modern miombo, although it is different at the generic level. The grass-dominated savannah biome began to expand in the Middle Miocene (16 Myr ago), and became widespread in the Late Miocene (ca. 8 Myr ago), as documented by pollen and carbon isotopes from both West and East Africa. PMID:15519973

  6. The deforestation story: testing for anthropogenic origins of Africa's flammable grassy biomes.

    PubMed

    Bond, William; Zaloumis, Nicholas P

    2016-06-01

    Africa has the most extensive C4 grassy biomes of any continent. They are highly flammable accounting for greater than 70% of the world's burnt area. Much of Africa's savannas and grasslands occur in climates warm enough and wet enough to support closed forests. The combination of open grassy systems and the frequent fires they support have long been interpreted as anthropogenic artefacts caused by humans igniting frequent fires. True grasslands, it was believed, would be restricted to climates too dry or too cold to support closed woody vegetation. The idea that higher-rainfall savannas are anthropogenic and that fires are of human origin has led to initiatives to 'reforest' Africa's open grassy systems paid for by carbon credits under the assumption that the net effect of converting these system to forests would sequester carbon, reduce greenhouse gases and mitigate global warming. This paper reviews evidence for the antiquity of African grassy ecosystems and for the fires that they sustain. Africa's grassy biomes and the fires that maintain them are ancient and there is no support for the idea that humans caused large-scale deforestation. Indicators of old-growth grasslands are described. These can help distinguish secondary grasslands suitable for reforestation from ancient grasslands that should not be afforested.This article is part of the themed issue 'The interaction of fire and mankind'. PMID:27216527

  7. Above- and Belowground Biomass Allocation in Shrub Biomes across the Northeast Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuanhe; Yang, Lucun; Zhou, Guoying

    2016-01-01

    Biomass partitioning has been explored across various biomes. However, the strategies of allocation in plants still remain contentious. This study investigated allocation patterns of above- and belowground biomass at the community level, using biomass survey from the Tibetan Plateau. We explored above- and belowground biomass by conducting three consecutive sampling campaigns across shrub biomes on the northeast Tibetan Plateau during 2011–2013. We then documented the above-ground biomass (AGB), below-ground biomass (BGB) and root: shoot ratio (R/S) and the relationships between R/S and environment factors using data from 201 plots surveyed from 67 sites. We further examined relationships between above-ground and below-ground biomass across various shrub types. Our results indicated that the median values of AGB, BGB, and R/S in Tibetan shrub were 1102.55, 874.91 g m-2, and 0.85, respectively. R/S showed significant trend with mean annual precipitation (MAP), while decreased with mean annual temperature (MAT). Reduced major axis analysis indicated that the slope of the log-log relationship between above- and belowground biomass revealed a significant difference from 1.0 over space, supporting the optimal hypothesis. Interestingly, the slopes of the allometric relationship between log AGB and log BGB differed significantly between alpine and desert shrub. Our findings supported the optimal theory of above- and belowground biomass partitioning in Tibetan shrub, while the isometric hypothesis for alpine shrub at the community level. PMID:27119379

  8. Assessing Forest NPP: BIOME-BGC Predictions versus BEF Derived Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenauer, H.; Pietsch, S. A.; Petritsch, R.

    2007-05-01

    Forest productivity has always been a major issue within sustainable forest management. While in the past terrestrial forest inventory data have been the major source for assessing forest productivity, recent developments in ecosystem modeling offer an alternative approach using ecosystem models such as Biome-BGC to estimate Net Primary Production (NPP). In this study we compare two terrestrial driven approaches for assessing NPP: (i) estimates from a species specific adaptation of the biogeochemical ecosystem model BIOME-BGC calibrated for Alpine conditions; and (ii) NPP estimates derived from inventory data using biomass expansion factors (BEF). The forest inventory data come from 624 sample plots across Austria and consist of repeated individual tree observations and include growth as well as soil and humus information. These locations are covered with spruce, beech, oak, pine and larch stands, thus addressing the main Austrian forest types. 144 locations were previously used in a validating effort to produce species-specific parameter estimates of the ecosystem model. The remaining 480 sites are from the Austrian National Forest Soil Survey carried out at the Federal Research and Training Centre for Forests, Natural Hazards and Landscape (BFW). By using diameter at breast height (dbh) and height (h) volume and subsequently biomass of individual trees were calculated, aggregated for the whole forest stand and compared with the model output. Regression analyses were performed for both volume and biomass estimates.

  9. Detection of wild animals as carriers of Leptospira by PCR in the Pantanal biome, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Anahi S; Narduche, Lorena; Martins, Gabriel; Schabib Péres, Igor A H F; Zimmermann, Namor P; Juliano, Raquel S; Pellegrin, Aiesca O; Lilenbaum, Walter

    2016-11-01

    Leptospiral infection is widespread in wildlife. In this context, wild ecosystems in tropical countries hold a vast biodiversity, including several species that may act as potential reservoirs of leptospires. The Pantanal biome presents highly favorable environmental conditions for the occurrence of leptospirosis, such as high temperatures, constant flooding, and high biodiversity. The purpose of this study was to detect wild animals as carriers of Leptospira sp. using direct methods (PCR and culture) in the Pantanal biome, Brazil. A total of 35 animals were studied, namely Cerdocyon thous, Nasua nasua, Ozotoceros bezoarticus, and Sus scrofa species. Blood for serology (MAT) and urine for bacteriological culturing and PCR was sampled. The most prevalent serogroups were Javanica and Djasiman. Additionally, 40.6% of these animals presented PCR positive reactions. Seroreactivity associated with the high frequency of leptospiral carriers among the different studied species suggests a high level of exposure of the studied animals to pathogenic Leptospira strains. Our results are still limited and the actual role of the studied animals in the epidemiology of leptospirosis in the Pantanal region remains to be elucidated. PMID:27496621

  10. Antiviral and Antioxidant Activities of Sulfated Galactomannans from Plants of Caatinga Biome

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Márcia Maria Mendes; de Morais, Selene Maia; da Silva, Ana Raquel Araújo; Barroso, Naiara Dutra; Pontes Filho, Tadeu Rocha; Araújo, Fernanda Montenegro de Carvalho; Vieira, Ícaro Gusmão Pinto; Lima, Danielle Malta; Guedes, Maria Izabel Florindo

    2015-01-01

    Dengue represents a serious social and economic public health problem; then trying to contribute to improve its control, the objective of this research was to develop phytoterapics for dengue treatment using natural resources from Caatinga biome. Galactomannans isolated from Adenanthera pavonina L., Caesalpinia ferrea Mart., and Dimorphandra gardneriana Tull were chemically sulfated in order to evaluate the antioxidant, and antiviral activities and the role in the inhibition of virus DENV-2 in Vero cells. A positive correlation between the degree of sulfation, antioxidant and antiviral activities was observed. The sulfated galactomannans showed binding to the virus surface, indicating that they interact with DENV-2. The sulfated galactomannans from C. ferrea showed 96% inhibition of replication of DENV-2 followed by D. gardneriana (94%) and A. pavonina (77%) at 25 µg/mL and all sulfated galactomannans also showed antioxidant activity. This work is the first report of the antioxidant and antiviral effects of sulfated galactomannans against DENV-2. The results are very promising and suggest that these sulfated galactomannans from plants of Caatinga biome act in the early step of viral infection. Thus, sulfated galactomannans may act as an entry inhibitor of DENV-2. PMID:26257815

  11. Aquatic ecosystem responses to Holocene climate change and biome development in boreal, central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Anson W.; Bezrukova, Elena V.; Leng, Melanie J.; Meaney, Miriam; Nunes, Ana; Piotrowska, Natalia; Self, Angela; Shchetnikov, Alexander; Shilland, Ewan; Tarasov, Pavel; Wang, Luo; White, Dustin

    2012-05-01

    Boreal ecosystems are highly vulnerable to climate change, and severe ecological impacts in the near future are virtually certain to occur. We undertook a multiproxy study on an alpine lake (ESM-1) at the modern tree-line in boreal, southern Siberia. Steppe and tundra biomes were extensive in eastern Sayan landscapes during the early Holocene. Boreal forest quickly expanded by 9.1 ka BP, and dominated the landscape until c 0.7 ka BP, when the greatest period of compositional turnover occurred. At this time, alpine meadow landscape expanded and Picea obovata colonised new habitats along river valleys and lake shorelines, because of prevailing cool, moist conditions. During the early Holocene, chironomid assemblages were dominated by cold stenotherms. Diatoms for much of the Holocene were dominated by alkaliphilous, fragilarioid taxa, up until 0.2 ka BP, when epiphytic species expanded, indicative of increased habitat availability. C/N mass ratios ranged between 9.5 and 13.5 (11.1-15.8 C/N atomic ratios), indicative of algal communities dominating organic matter contributions to bottom sediments with small, persistent contributions from vascular plants. However, δ13C values increased steadily from -34.9‰ during the early Holocene (9.3 ka BP) to -24.8‰ by 0.6 ka BP. This large shift in magnitude may be due to a number of factors, including increasing within-lake productivity, increasing disequilibrium between the isotopic balance of the lake with the atmosphere as the lake became isotopically ‘mature’, and declining soil respiration linked to small, but distinct retreat in forest biomes. The influence of climatic variables on landscape vegetation was assessed using redundancy analysis (RDA), a linear, direct ordination technique. Changes in July insolation at 60 °N significantly explained over one-fifth of the variation in species composition, while changes in estimates of northern hemisphere temperature and ice-rafted debris events in the North Atlantic

  12. 18 CFR 2.12 - Calculation of taxes for property of public utilities and licensees constructed or acquired after...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calculation of taxes for property of public utilities and licensees constructed or acquired after January 1, 1970. 2.12 Section 2.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT...

  13. 18 CFR 2.12 - Calculation of taxes for property of public utilities and licensees constructed or acquired after...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calculation of taxes for property of public utilities and licensees constructed or acquired after January 1, 1970. 2.12 Section 2.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT...

  14. 18 CFR 2.12 - Calculation of taxes for property of public utilities and licensees constructed or acquired after...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calculation of taxes for property of public utilities and licensees constructed or acquired after January 1, 1970. 2.12 Section 2.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT...

  15. 10 CFR 19.14 - Presence of representatives of licensees and regulated entities, and workers during inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Presence of representatives of licensees and regulated entities, and workers during inspections. 19.14 Section 19.14 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NOTICES, INSTRUCTIONS AND REPORTS TO WORKERS: INSPECTION AND INVESTIGATIONS § 19.14 Presence of representatives...

  16. 10 CFR 19.14 - Presence of representatives of licensees and regulated entities, and workers during inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Presence of representatives of licensees and regulated entities, and workers during inspections. 19.14 Section 19.14 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NOTICES, INSTRUCTIONS AND REPORTS TO WORKERS: INSPECTION AND INVESTIGATIONS § 19.14 Presence of representatives...

  17. 9 CFR 2.9 - Officers, agents, and employees of licensees whose licenses have been suspended or revoked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Officers, agents, and employees of licensees whose licenses have been suspended or revoked. 2.9 Section 2.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS...

  18. 13 CFR 107.885 - Disposition of assets to Licensee's Associates or to competitors of Portfolio Concern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Disposition of assets to Licensee's Associates or to competitors of Portfolio Concern. 107.885 Section 107.885 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Financing of Small Businesses...

  19. 13 CFR 107.900 - Management fees for services provided to a Small Business by Licensee or its Associate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... provided to a Small Business by Licensee or its Associate. 107.900 Section 107.900 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Financing of Small Businesses by... board of directors of a Small Businesses Financed by you. The fees must not exceed those paid to......

  20. 13 CFR 107.885 - Disposition of assets to Licensee's Associates or to competitors of Portfolio Concern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Disposition of assets to Licensee's Associates or to competitors of Portfolio Concern. 107.885 Section 107.885 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Financing of Small Businesses...

  1. 13 CFR 107.900 - Management fees for services provided to a Small Business by Licensee or its Associate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... provided to a Small Business by Licensee or its Associate. 107.900 Section 107.900 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Financing of Small Businesses by... board of directors of a Small Businesses Financed by you. The fees must not exceed those paid to......

  2. 13 CFR 107.885 - Disposition of assets to Licensee's Associates or to competitors of Portfolio Concern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Disposition of assets to Licensee's Associates or to competitors of Portfolio Concern. 107.885 Section 107.885 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Financing of Small Businesses...

  3. 13 CFR 107.900 - Management fees for services provided to a Small Business by Licensee or its Associate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... provided to a Small Business by Licensee or its Associate. 107.900 Section 107.900 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Financing of Small Businesses by... board of directors of a Small Businesses Financed by you. The fees must not exceed those paid to......

  4. 13 CFR 107.885 - Disposition of assets to Licensee's Associates or to competitors of Portfolio Concern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Disposition of assets to Licensee's Associates or to competitors of Portfolio Concern. 107.885 Section 107.885 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Financing of Small Businesses...

  5. 13 CFR 107.900 - Management fees for services provided to a Small Business by Licensee or its Associate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... provided to a Small Business by Licensee or its Associate. 107.900 Section 107.900 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Financing of Small Businesses by... board of directors of a Small Businesses Financed by you. The fees must not exceed those paid to......

  6. 78 FR 35990 - All Operating Boiling-Water Reactor Licensees With Mark I And Mark II Containments; Docket Nos...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION All Operating Boiling-Water Reactor Licensees With Mark I And Mark II Containments; Docket Nos. (As Shown In Attachment 1), License Nos. (As Shown In Attachment 1), EA-13-109; Order Modifying Licenses With Regard to Reliable Hardened...

  7. 13 CFR 107.420 - Prohibition on exercise of ownership or Control rights in Licensee before SBA approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Prohibition on exercise of... Prohibition on exercise of ownership or Control rights in Licensee before SBA approval. Without prior written... to the proposed new owner(s); (b) Permit the proposed new owner(s) to exercise voting rights...

  8. 13 CFR 107.420 - Prohibition on exercise of ownership or Control rights in Licensee before SBA approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Prohibition on exercise of... Prohibition on exercise of ownership or Control rights in Licensee before SBA approval. Without prior written... to the proposed new owner(s); (b) Permit the proposed new owner(s) to exercise voting rights...

  9. 13 CFR 107.420 - Prohibition on exercise of ownership or Control rights in Licensee before SBA approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Prohibition on exercise of... Prohibition on exercise of ownership or Control rights in Licensee before SBA approval. Without prior written... to the proposed new owner(s); (b) Permit the proposed new owner(s) to exercise voting rights...

  10. 13 CFR 107.420 - Prohibition on exercise of ownership or Control rights in Licensee before SBA approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Prohibition on exercise of... Prohibition on exercise of ownership or Control rights in Licensee before SBA approval. Without prior written... to the proposed new owner(s); (b) Permit the proposed new owner(s) to exercise voting rights...

  11. 13 CFR 107.420 - Prohibition on exercise of ownership or Control rights in Licensee before SBA approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Prohibition on exercise of... Prohibition on exercise of ownership or Control rights in Licensee before SBA approval. Without prior written... to the proposed new owner(s); (b) Permit the proposed new owner(s) to exercise voting rights...

  12. 75 FR 70618 - Distribution of Source Material to Exempt Persons and to General Licensees and Revision of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ...On July 26, 2010, the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or the Commission) published for public comment a proposed rule to amend its regulations to require that the initial distribution of source material to exempt persons or general licensees be explicitly authorized by a specific license. The proposed rule would also modify the existing possession and use requirements of the general......

  13. 18 CFR 131.70 - Form 12 of application by State and municipal licensees for exemption from payment of annual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Form 12 of application by State and municipal licensees for exemption from payment of annual charges. 131.70 Section 131.70 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  14. 18 CFR 131.70 - Form 12 of application by State and municipal licensees for exemption from payment of annual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Form 12 of application by State and municipal licensees for exemption from payment of annual charges. 131.70 Section 131.70 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  15. 18 CFR 131.70 - Form 12 of application by State and municipal licensees for exemption from payment of annual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Form 12 of application by State and municipal licensees for exemption from payment of annual charges. 131.70 Section 131.70 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  16. 18 CFR 131.70 - Form 12 of application by State and municipal licensees for exemption from payment of annual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Form 12 of application by State and municipal licensees for exemption from payment of annual charges. 131.70 Section 131.70 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  17. 18 CFR 131.70 - Form 12 of application by State and municipal licensees for exemption from payment of annual...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Form 12 of application by State and municipal licensees for exemption from payment of annual charges. 131.70 Section 131.70 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  18. 10 CFR 140.92 - Appendix B-Form of indemnity agreement with licensees furnishing insurance policies as proof of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Appendix B-Form of indemnity agreement with licensees furnishing insurance policies as proof of financial protection. 140.92 Section 140.92 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL PROTECTION REQUIREMENTS AND INDEMNITY AGREEMENTS Violations Appendixes to Part 140 § 140.92 Appendix...

  19. 10 CFR 140.107 - Appendix G-Form of indemnity agreement with licensees processing plutonium for use in plutonium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Appendix G-Form of indemnity agreement with licensees processing plutonium for use in plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants and furnishing insurance policies as proof of financial protection. 140.107 Section 140.107 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL...

  20. 10 CFR 140.92 - Appendix B-Form of indemnity agreement with licensees furnishing insurance policies as proof of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appendix B-Form of indemnity agreement with licensees furnishing insurance policies as proof of financial protection. 140.92 Section 140.92 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL PROTECTION REQUIREMENTS AND INDEMNITY AGREEMENTS Violations Appendixes to Part 140 § 140.92 Appendix...

  1. 10 CFR 140.107 - Appendix G-Form of indemnity agreement with licensees processing plutonium for use in plutonium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appendix G-Form of indemnity agreement with licensees processing plutonium for use in plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants and furnishing insurance policies as proof of financial protection. 140.107 Section 140.107 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL...

  2. 13 CFR 107.1550 - Distributions by Licensee-permitted “tax Distributions” to private investors and SBA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Distributions by Licensee-permitted âtax Distributionsâ to private investors and SBA. 107.1550 Section 107.1550 Business Credit and... Distributions” to private investors and SBA. If you have outstanding Participating Securities or...

  3. 10 CFR 171.16 - Annual fees: Materials licensees, holders of certificates of compliance, holders of sealed source...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Annual fees: Materials licensees, holders of certificates of compliance, holders of sealed source and device registrations, holders of quality assurance program approvals, and government agencies licensed by the NRC. 171.16 Section 171.16 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) ANNUAL FEES...

  4. 47 CFR 22.970 - Unacceptable interference to part 90 non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from cellular radiotelephone...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... Except as provided in 47 CFR 90.617(k), unacceptable interference to non-cellular part 90 licensees in... intermodulation rejection ratio; 75 dB adjacent channel rejection ratio; −116 dBm reference sensitivity. (2) Voice... ratio; −116 dBm reference sensitivity....

  5. 47 CFR 22.970 - Unacceptable interference to part 90 non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from cellular radiotelephone...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... Except as provided in 47 CFR 90.617(k), unacceptable interference to non-cellular part 90 licensees in... intermodulation rejection ratio; 75 dB adjacent channel rejection ratio; −116 dBm reference sensitivity. (2) Voice... ratio; −116 dBm reference sensitivity....

  6. 47 CFR 22.970 - Unacceptable interference to part 90 non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from cellular radiotelephone...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... Except as provided in 47 CFR 90.617(k), unacceptable interference to non-cellular part 90 licensees in... intermodulation rejection ratio; 75 dB adjacent channel rejection ratio; −116 dBm reference sensitivity. (2) Voice... ratio; −116 dBm reference sensitivity....

  7. 47 CFR 22.970 - Unacceptable interference to part 90 non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from cellular radiotelephone...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... Except as provided in 47 CFR 90.617(k), unacceptable interference to non-cellular part 90 licensees in... intermodulation rejection ratio; 75 dB adjacent channel rejection ratio; −116 dBm reference sensitivity. (2) Voice... ratio; −116 dBm reference sensitivity....

  8. 47 CFR 22.970 - Unacceptable interference to part 90 non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from cellular radiotelephone...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... Except as provided in 47 CFR 90.617(k), unacceptable interference to non-cellular part 90 licensees in... intermodulation rejection ratio; 75 dB adjacent channel rejection ratio; −116 dBm reference sensitivity. (2) Voice... ratio; −116 dBm reference sensitivity....

  9. 15 CFR 971.801 - Records to be maintained and information to be submitted by licensees and permittees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and in 15 CFR part 970, each licensee and permittee must keep such records, consistent with standard...) In addition to the information specified elsewhere in this part and in 15 CFR part 970, each... requirements (see § 971.503 and 15 CFR 970.602), implementation of any approved monitoring plan (see §...

  10. 15 CFR 971.801 - Records to be maintained and information to be submitted by licensees and permittees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and in 15 CFR part 970, each licensee and permittee must keep such records, consistent with standard...) In addition to the information specified elsewhere in this part and in 15 CFR part 970, each... requirements (see § 971.503 and 15 CFR 970.602), implementation of any approved monitoring plan (see §...

  11. 15 CFR 971.801 - Records to be maintained and information to be submitted by licensees and permittees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and in 15 CFR part 970, each licensee and permittee must keep such records, consistent with standard...) In addition to the information specified elsewhere in this part and in 15 CFR part 970, each... requirements (see § 971.503 and 15 CFR 970.602), implementation of any approved monitoring plan (see §...

  12. 47 CFR 101.95 - Sunset provisions for licensees in the 18.30-19.30 GHz band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Applications and Licenses Policies Governing... spectrum. After the six-month notice period has expired, the FS licensee must turn its license back into... within the six-month period (e.g., because no alternative spectrum or other reasonable option...

  13. 47 CFR 101.95 - Sunset provisions for licensees in the 18.30-19.30 GHz band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Applications and Licenses Policies Governing... spectrum. After the six-month notice period has expired, the FS licensee must turn its license back into... within the six-month period (e.g., because no alternative spectrum or other reasonable option...

  14. 47 CFR 101.95 - Sunset provisions for licensees in the 18.30-19.30 GHz band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Applications and Licenses Policies Governing... spectrum. After the six-month notice period has expired, the FS licensee must turn its license back into... within the six-month period (e.g., because no alternative spectrum or other reasonable option...

  15. 47 CFR 101.95 - Sunset provisions for licensees in the 18.30-19.30 GHz band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sunset provisions for licensees in the 18.30-19.30 GHz band. 101.95 Section 101.95 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Applications and Licenses Policies Governing Fixed Service Relocation from the...

  16. 47 CFR 101.95 - Sunset provisions for licensees in the 18.30-19.30 GHz band.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Sunset provisions for licensees in the 18.30-19.30 GHz band. 101.95 Section 101.95 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Applications and Licenses Policies Governing Fixed Service Relocation from the...

  17. 10 CFR 140.93 - Appendix C-Form of indemnity agreement with licensees furnishing proof of financial protection in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... property, whether real or personal, belonging to such licensee. The lien shall arise at the time payment is... affecting § 140.93, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... property, or loss of use of property, arising out of or resulting from the radioactive, toxic,...

  18. 15 CFR 971.801 - Records to be maintained and information to be submitted by licensees and permittees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and in 15 CFR part 970, each licensee and permittee must keep such records, consistent with standard...) In addition to the information specified elsewhere in this part and in 15 CFR part 970, each... requirements (see § 971.503 and 15 CFR 970.602), implementation of any approved monitoring plan (see §...

  19. 15 CFR 971.801 - Records to be maintained and information to be submitted by licensees and permittees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and in 15 CFR part 970, each licensee and permittee must keep such records, consistent with standard...) In addition to the information specified elsewhere in this part and in 15 CFR part 970, each... requirements (see § 971.503 and 15 CFR 970.602), implementation of any approved monitoring plan (see §...

  20. 13 CFR 107.1550 - Distributions by Licensee-permitted “tax Distributions” to private investors and SBA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Distributions by Licensee-permitted âtax Distributionsâ to private investors and SBA. 107.1550 Section 107.1550 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES SBA Financial Assistance...

  1. 47 CFR 1.768 - Notification by and prior approval for submarine cable landing licensees that are or propose to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... submarine cable landing licensees that are or propose to become affiliated with a foreign carrier. 1.768... Title II of Communications Act § 1.768 Notification by and prior approval for submarine cable landing... the Commission (“licensee”) to land or operate a submarine cable landing in a particular...

  2. 47 CFR 1.768 - Notification by and prior approval for submarine cable landing licensees that are or propose to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... submarine cable landing licensees that are or propose to become affiliated with a foreign carrier. 1.768... Title II of Communications Act § 1.768 Notification by and prior approval for submarine cable landing... the Commission (“licensee”) to land or operate a submarine cable landing in a particular...

  3. 47 CFR 1.768 - Notification by and prior approval for submarine cable landing licensees that are or propose to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... submarine cable landing licensees that are or propose to become affiliated with a foreign carrier. 1.768... Title II of Communications Act § 1.768 Notification by and prior approval for submarine cable landing... the Commission (“licensee”) to land or operate a submarine cable landing in a particular...

  4. 47 CFR 1.768 - Notification by and prior approval for submarine cable landing licensees that are or propose to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... submarine cable landing licensees that are or propose to become affiliated with a foreign carrier. 1.768... Title II of Communications Act § 1.768 Notification by and prior approval for submarine cable landing... the Commission (“licensee”) to land or operate a submarine cable landing in a particular...

  5. 18 CFR 141.1 - FERC Form No. 1, Annual report of Major electric utilities, licensees and others.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false FERC Form No. 1, Annual report of Major electric utilities, licensees and others. 141.1 Section 141.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROVED FORMS, FEDERAL...

  6. 18 CFR 141.1 - FERC Form No. 1, Annual report of Major electric utilities, licensees and others.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false FERC Form No. 1, Annual report of Major electric utilities, licensees and others. 141.1 Section 141.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROVED FORMS, FEDERAL...

  7. 18 CFR 141.1 - FERC Form No. 1, Annual report of Major electric utilities, licensees and others.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false FERC Form No. 1, Annual report of Major electric utilities, licensees and others. 141.1 Section 141.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROVED FORMS, FEDERAL...

  8. 18 CFR 141.1 - FERC Form No. 1, Annual report of Major electric utilities, licensees and others.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false FERC Form No. 1, Annual report of Major electric utilities, licensees and others. 141.1 Section 141.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROVED FORMS, FEDERAL...

  9. 13 CFR 107.1240 - Funding of Licensee's draw request through sale to short-term investor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... through sale to short-term investor. 107.1240 Section 107.1240 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL...'s draw request through sale to short-term investor. (a) Licensee's authorization of SBA to arrange sale of securities to short-term investor. By submitting a request for a draw of Debenture...

  10. 47 CFR 90.421 - Operation of mobile station units not under the control of the licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation of mobile station units not under the... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Operating Requirements § 90.421 Operation of mobile station units not under the control of the licensee. Mobile stations,...

  11. 78 FR 41431 - Licensee Identified in Attachment 1 and All Other Persons Who Seek or Obtain Access to Safeguards...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-10

    ... 10 CFR 73.59, 77 FR 24206 (June 11, 2012), it is unlikely that licensee employees or others are... person who is relieved from that requirement by 10 CFR 73.59 (77 FR 34206 (June 11, 2012), or who has a... NRC E-Filing rule (72 FR 49139, August, 28, 2007). The E-Filing process requires participants...

  12. 78 FR 40770 - In the Matter of Licensee Identified In Attachment 1 and All Other Persons Who Seek or Obtain...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-08

    ... done (see 10 CFR 73.59, 77 FR 34206 (June 11, 2012), it is unlikely that licensee employees or others..., however, for any person who is relieved from that requirement by 10 CFR 73.59 (77 FR 34206 (June 11, 2012... NRC E-Filing rule (72 FR 49139, August, 28, 2007). The E-Filing process requires participants...

  13. Results of regulatory impact survey of industrial and medical materials licensees of the Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Lach, D.; Melber, B.; Brichoux, J.; Hattrup, M.; Conger, R.; Hughes, K.

    1995-06-01

    This report presents the findings of a regulatory impact survey of nuclear materials licensees of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Commissioners of the NRC directed staff to provide the Commission with first hand information from licensees that could be used to improve the overall regulatory program. A self-administered, mail-out survey questionnaire was used to collect data from a sample of licensees who had interaction with the NRC during the previous 12 months. A total of 371 respondents of the 589 who were sent questionnaires returned completed surveys, for a response rate of 63%. The body of the report presents the findings of the survey including a brief introduction to the approach used, followed by survey findings regarding regulations, policies and regulatory guidance; experience with licensing applications, renewals and amendments; inspections; reporting requirements; and enforcement actions. The appendices of the report include a copy of the survey as administered to licensees, a fuller description of the survey design and data collection methods, and detailed graphic material describing survey responses.

  14. 47 CFR 1.9048 - Special provisions relating to spectrum leasing arrangements involving licensees in the Public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special provisions relating to spectrum leasing... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Spectrum Leasing General Policies and Procedures § 1.9048 Special provisions relating to spectrum leasing arrangements involving licensees in...

  15. 47 CFR 1.9048 - Special provisions relating to spectrum leasing arrangements involving licensees in the Public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special provisions relating to spectrum leasing... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Spectrum Leasing General Policies and Procedures § 1.9048 Special provisions relating to spectrum leasing arrangements involving licensees in...

  16. 10 CFR 140.108 - Appendix H-Form of indemnity agreement with licensees possessing plutonium for use in plutonium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... possessing plutonium for use in plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants and furnishing proof of... Appendixes to Part 140 § 140.108 Appendix H—Form of indemnity agreement with licensees possessing plutonium for use in plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants and furnishing proof of...

  17. 10 CFR 140.108 - Appendix H-Form of indemnity agreement with licensees possessing plutonium for use in plutonium...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... possessing plutonium for use in plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants and furnishing proof of... Appendixes to Part 140 § 140.108 Appendix H—Form of indemnity agreement with licensees possessing plutonium for use in plutonium processing and fuel fabrication plants and furnishing proof of...

  18. Structural development and web service based sensitivity analysis of the Biome-BGC MuSo model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidy, Dóra; Balogh, János; Churkina, Galina; Haszpra, László; Horváth, Ferenc; Ittzés, Péter; Ittzés, Dóra; Ma, Shaoxiu; Nagy, Zoltán; Pintér, Krisztina; Barcza, Zoltán

    2014-05-01

    Studying the greenhouse gas exchange, mainly the carbon dioxide sink and source character of ecosystems is still a highly relevant research topic in biogeochemistry. During the past few years research focused on managed ecosystems, because human intervention has an important role in the formation of the land surface through agricultural management, land use change, and other practices. In spite of considerable developments current biogeochemical models still have uncertainties to adequately quantify greenhouse gas exchange processes of managed ecosystem. Therefore, it is an important task to develop and test process-based biogeochemical models. Biome-BGC is a widely used, popular biogeochemical model that simulates the storage and flux of water, carbon, and nitrogen between the ecosystem and the atmosphere, and within the components of the terrestrial ecosystems. Biome-BGC was originally developed by the Numerical Terradynamic Simulation Group (NTSG) of University of Montana (http://www.ntsg.umt.edu/project/biome-bgc), and several other researchers used and modified it in the past. Our research group developed Biome-BGC version 4.1.1 to improve essentially the ability of the model to simulate carbon and water cycle in real managed ecosystems. The modifications included structural improvements of the model (e.g., implementation of multilayer soil module and drought related plant senescence; improved model phenology). Beside these improvements management modules and annually varying options were introduced and implemented (simulate mowing, grazing, planting, harvest, ploughing, application of fertilizers, forest thinning). Dynamic (annually varying) whole plant mortality was also enabled in the model to support more realistic simulation of forest stand development and natural disturbances. In the most recent model version separate pools have been defined for fruit. The model version which contains every former and new development is referred as Biome-BGC MuSo (Biome

  19. Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of the Leaf Area Index of the Caatinga Biome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves Rodrigues Pinheiro, Everton; de Jong van Lier, Quirijn; Metselaar, Klaas

    2015-04-01

    Leaf Area Index (LAI) is an important characteristic of ecosystems with a prominent role in processes such as transpiration, photosynthesis and interception. The Caatinga biome is a unique semiarid ecosystem ocurring in a specific region of Brazil. An important main feature of this biome is the leaf shedding and regenerative capacity of its species. The aim of this study was to quantify both spatial and temporal dynamics of the LAI of the Caatinga biome in the Aiuaba Experimental Basin, an integrally-preserved Caatinga reserve, coordinates 6°42'S; 40°17'W. The research site (12 km2) was divided into three main Soil and Vegatation Associations (SVA). For each SVA the soil type and root depth are respectively, Acrisol -0.8 m, Luvisol - 0.6 m and Regosol - 0.4 m. The LAI was estimated by SEBAL algorithm applied to eleven satellite images from Landsat 5. The values of LAI estimated by SEBAL were correlated to the mean soil water content of the 15 days previous to the satellite image date. Eight images were used to generate a simple regression model, yielding a range of coefficient of determination from 0.89 to 0.92. Three other images were used to validate the equations. The Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency coefficient ranged from 0.76 to 0.94. Using the validated correlations, the LAI was calculated over the time for each of the three SVA, from 2004 to 2012. For SVA1, SVA2 and SVA3, the avarage values of LAI during the rainy season were 0.97, 1.12 and 1.07, respectively. During the dry season, the mean values were 0.15 for SVA1 and 0.11 for SVA2 and SVA3. The vegetation showed abrupt LAI changes, and the average previous 15 days soil water content was a good indicator for this. The study has shown that the maximum LAI was relatively stable over the years, occurring between March and April. The spatial behavior of LAI appeared to be similar, independently of the soil type and root depth.

  20. Remotely Sensed Fire Type Classification of the Brazilian Tropical Moist Forest Biome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Roy, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    Vegetation fires in the Brazilian Tropical Moist Forest Biome can be broadly classified into three types: i) Deforestation fires, lit to aid deforestation by burning of slashed, piled and dried forest biomass, ii) Maintenance fires, lit on agricultural fields or pasture areas to maintain and clear woody material and to rehabilitate degraded pasture areas, iii) Forest fires, associated with escaped anthropogenic fires or, less frequently, caused by lightning. Information on the incidence and spatial distribution of fire types is important as they have widely varying atmospheric emissions and ecological impacts. Satellite remote sensing offers a practical means of monitoring fires over areas as extensive as the Brazilian Tropical Moist Forest Biome which spans almost 4 million square kilometers. To date, fire type has been inferred based on the geographic context and proximity of satellite active fire detections relative to thematic land cover classes, roads, and forest edges, or by empirical consideration of the active fire detection frequency. In this paper a classification methodology is presented that demonstrates a way to classify the fire type of MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) active fire detections. Training and validation fire type data are defined conservatively for MODIS active fire detections using a land cover transition matrix that labels MODIS active fires by consideration of the PRODES 120m land cover for the previous year and the year of fire detection. The training data are used with a random forest classifier and remotely sensed predictor variables including the number of MODIS Aqua and Terra satellite detections, the maximum and median Fire Radiative Power (FRP) [MW km-2], the scaling parameter of the FRP power law distribution, the number of day and night detections, and the fire surrounding "background" surface brightness temperature [K]. In addition, the total rainfall over periods from 1 to 24 months prior to fire