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Sample records for al riesgo ambiental

  1. Interdiffusion of Al-Ni system enhanced by ultrasonic vibration at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingyu; Ji, Hongjun; Wang, Chunqing; Bang, Han Sur; Bang, Hee Seon

    2006-12-01

    At ambient temperature, Al-1%Si wire of 25 microm diameter was bonded successfully onto the Au/Ni/Cu pad by ultrasonic wedge bonding technology. Physical process of the bond formation and the interface joining essence were investigated. It is found that the wire was softened by ultrasonic vibration, at the same time, pressure was loaded on the wire and plastic flow was generated in the bonding wire, which promoted the diffusion for Ni into Al. Ultrasonic vibration enhanced the interdiffusion that resulted from the inner defects such as dislocations, vacancies, voids and so on, which ascribed to short circuit diffusion.

  2. Low cycle fatigue behavior of polycrystalline Ni3Al alloys at ambient and elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Graham; Antolovich, Stephen D.

    1994-11-01

    The low cycle fatigue (LCF) resistance of polycrystalline Ni3Al has been evaluated at ambient, intermediate (300 °C), and elevated (600 °C) temperatures using strain rates of 10-2/s and 10-4/s. Testing was conducted on a binary and a Cr-containing alloy of similar stoichiometry and B content (hypostoichiometric, 200 wppm B). Test results were combined with electron microscope investigations in order to evaluate microstructural changes during LCF. At ambient and intermediate temperatures, the cyclic constitutive response of both alloys was similar, and the LCF behavior was virtually rate independent. Under these conditions, the alloys rapidly hardened and then gradually softened for the remainder of the life. Initial hardening resulted from the accumulation of dislocation debris within the deformed microstructure, whereas softening was related to localized disordering. For these experimental conditions, crack initiation resulted within persistent slip bands (PSBs). At the elevated temperature, diffusion-assisted deformation resulted in a rate-dependent constitutive response and crack-initiation characteristics. At the high strain rate (10-2/s), continuous cyclic hardening resulted from the accumulation of dislocation debris. At the low strain rate (10-4/s), the diffusion of dislocation debris to grain boundaries resulted in cyclic softening. The elevated temperature LCF resistance was determined by the effect of the constitutive response on the driving force for environmental embrittlement. Chromium additions were observed to enhance LCF performance only under conditions where crack initiation was environmentally driven.

  3. Effects of Annealing Ambient on the Characteristics of LaAlO3 Films Grown by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lu; Liu, Hong-Xia; Wang, Xing; Fei, Chen-Xi; Feng, Xing-Yao; Wang, Yong-Te

    2017-12-01

    We investigated the effects of different annealing ambients on the physical and electrical properties of LaAlO3 films grown by atomic layer deposition. Post-grown rapid thermal annealing (RTA) was carried out at 600 °C for 1 min in vacuum, N2, and O2, respectively. It was found that the chemical bonding states at the interfacial layers (ILs) between LaAlO3 films and Si substrate were affected by the different annealing ambients. The formation of IL was enhanced during the RTA process, resulting in the decrease of accumulation capacitance, especially in O2 ambient. Furthermore, based on the capacitance-voltage characteristics of LaAlO3/Si MIS capacitors, positive V FB shifting tendency could be observed, indicating the decrease of positive oxide charges. Meanwhile, both trapped charge density and interface trap density showed decreased trends after annealing treatments. In addition, RTA process in various gaseous ambients can reduce the gate leakage current due to the enhancement of valence band offset and the reduction of defects in the LaAlO3/Si structure in varying degrees.

  4. Effects of Annealing Ambient on the Characteristics of LaAlO3 Films Grown by Atomic Layer Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lu; Liu, Hong-xia; Wang, Xing; Fei, Chen-xi; Feng, Xing-yao; Wang, Yong-te

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the effects of different annealing ambients on the physical and electrical properties of LaAlO3 films grown by atomic layer deposition. Post-grown rapid thermal annealing (RTA) was carried out at 600 °C for 1 min in vacuum, N2, and O2, respectively. It was found that the chemical bonding states at the interfacial layers (ILs) between LaAlO3 films and Si substrate were affected by the different annealing ambients. The formation of IL was enhanced during the RTA process, resulting in the decrease of accumulation capacitance, especially in O2 ambient. Furthermore, based on the capacitance-voltage characteristics of LaAlO3/Si MIS capacitors, positive V FB shifting tendency could be observed, indicating the decrease of positive oxide charges. Meanwhile, both trapped charge density and interface trap density showed decreased trends after annealing treatments. In addition, RTA process in various gaseous ambients can reduce the gate leakage current due to the enhancement of valence band offset and the reduction of defects in the LaAlO3/Si structure in varying degrees.

  5. Type of wear for the pair Ti6Al4V/PCTFE in ambient air and in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozet, J.-L.

    1993-04-01

    The pair Ti6Al4V/polychlorotrifluoroethylene (PCTFE) on a pin-on-disk tribometer in ambient air and liquid nitrogen with the contact pressure and sliding speed ranging from 3 to 9 MPa and 0.03 to 0.05 m/s, respectively, is evaluated within the framework of a high pressure valves for cryogenic rocket engines project. Results show that an abrasion wear process, which is closely connected with a tribochemical wear process producing fluorides and an abrasive form of carbon, exists when PCTFE is continuously rubbed against Ti6Al4V in ambient air, liquid nitrogen, and gaseous argon. Degradations detected on the Ti6Al4V surface are found to be unacceptable in most cases, but in the real cryotechnic valves this type of wear was not observed. The latter is attributed to the great dwell time between actuations and the low speed of the reciprocating movements which considerably limit the heating.

  6. Observation of Etch-Pits and LAGB Configurations During Ambient Creep of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Jalaj; Singh, A. K.; Raman, S. Ganesh Sundara; Kumar, Vikas

    2016-06-01

    The present work describes the microstructural features of alloy Ti-6Al-4V during constant stress creep at ambient temperature. Samples tested at 800 and 900 MPa stress levels exhibit the presence of etch-pits and/or voids. The ambient creep strain increases with an increase in applied stress due to higher strain rate sensitivity at higher stresses. A high density of low-angle grain boundaries is noticed in and around etch-pits in the creep-tested specimens due to occurrence of slip. The inverse pole figure obtained by EBSD indicates prismatic texture as the main deformation component in the creep-tested specimens.

  7. Ambient carbon dioxide capture by different dimensional AlN nanostructures: A comparative DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Nurazar, Roghaye; Nematollahi, Parisa

    2016-08-01

    Strong binding of an isolated carbon dioxide molecule over three different aluminium nitride (AlN) nanostructures (nanocage, nanotube and nanosheet) is verified using density functional calculations. Equilibrium geometries, electronic properties, adsorption energies and thermodynamic stability of each adsorbed configuration are also identified. Optimized configurations are shown at least one corresponding physisorption and chemisorption of CO2 molecule over different AlN nanostructures. Also, the effect of chirality on the adsorption of CO2 molecule is studied over two different finite-sized zigzag (6,0) and armchair (4,4) AlN nanotubes. It is found that the electronic properties of the Al12N12 nanocage are more sensitive to the CO2 molecule than other AlN nanostructures. This indicates the significant potential of Al12N12 nanocage toward the CO2 adsorption, fixation and catalytic applications in contrast to other AlN nanostructures.

  8. The ambient hydration of the aluminophosphate JDF-2 to AlPO-53(A): insights from NMR crystallography.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Daniel M; Walton, Richard I; Wimperis, Stephen; Ashbrook, Sharon E

    2017-03-01

    The aluminophosphate (AlPO) JDF-2 is prepared hydrothermally with methylammonium hydroxide (MAH(+)·HO(-), MAH(+) = CH3NH3(+)), giving rise to a microporous AEN-type framework with occluded MAH(+) cations and extra-framework (Al-bound) HO(-) anions. Despite the presence of these species within its pores, JDF-2 can hydrate upon exposure to atmospheric moisture to give AlPO-53(A), an isostructural material whose crystal structure contains one molecule of H2O per formula unit. This hydration can be reversed by mild heating (such as the frictional heating from magic angle spinning). Previous work has shown good agreement between the NMR parameters obtained experimentally and those calculated from the (optimized) crystal structure of JDF-2. However, several discrepancies are apparent between the experimental NMR parameters for AlPO-53(A) and those calculated from the (optimized) crystal structure (e.g. four (13)C resonances are observed, rather than the expected two). The unexpected resonances appear and disappear reversibly with the respective addition and removal of H2O, so clearly arise from AlPO-53(A). We investigate the ambient hydration of JDF-2 using quantitative (31)P MAS NMR to follow the transformation over the course of ∼3 months. The structures of JDF-2 and AlPO-53(A) are also investigated using a combination of multinuclear solid-state NMR spectroscopy to characterize the samples, and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations to evaluate a range of possible structural models in terms of calculated NMR parameters and energetics. The published structure of JDF-2 is shown to be a good representation of the dehydrated material, but modification of the published structure of AlPO-53(A) is required to provide calculated NMR parameters that are in better agreement with experiment. This modification includes reorientation of all the MAH(+) cations and partial occupancy of the H2O sites.

  9. Asociación de la adherencia a la dieta mediterránea al inicio del embarazo y riesgo de gastrosquisis en la descendencia: un estudio de casos-controles

    PubMed Central

    Cánovas-Conesa, A.; Gomariz-Peñalver, V.; Sánchez-Sauco, M.F.; Vega, D.C. Jaimes; Ortega-García, J.A.; García, M.J. Aranda; Marín, J.L. Delgado; Ascanio, A. Trujillo; Hernández, F. López; Jimenez, J.I. Ruiz; de Paco Matallana, C.; Soldin, O.P.; Solís, M. Sánchez

    2016-01-01

    Resumen Objetivos El objetivo de este estudio fue estudiar la asociación de la adherencia a la dieta mediterránea materna al inicio del embarazo y el riesgo de gastrosquisis en la descendencia. Métodos Estudio de casos-control. 11 casos incidentes de gastrosquisis en la Región de Murcia de 2007 a 2012 y 34 controles concurrentes. Cuestionario validado de Frecuencia Alimentaria (CFA) sobre la dieta periconcepcional de 98 ítems realizado ‘cara a cara’ en el momento del diagnóstico. Factores confundidores: tabaquismo, expositión a cannabis/marihuana, edad materna y paterna, índice de masa corporal, ingresos económicos y nivel de estudios. Estudio descriptivo y regresión logística multivariable. Resultados Las madres de niños con gastrosquisis son más jóvenes (20,8 años; IC 95% 17,3–24,2) y su dieta tiene un menor aporte calórico, de grasas saturadas y monoinsaturadas y de proteínas que los controles. Odds Ratio (OR) en el modelo multivariable controlado por los factores confundidores: edad materna (años) 0,70 (IC95% 0,51–0,96); ácidos grasos monoinsaturados (oleico, g) 0,79 (IC95% 0,65–0,97) y consumo de vegetales (raciones/semana) 0,70 (IC95% 0,48–1,00). Conclusiones Una dieta materna rica en ácido oleico y productos vegetales podría contribuir a prevenir el riesgo de oclusión vascular de las arterias onfalomesentéricas, disminuyendo el riesgo de gastrosquisis. PMID:23833926

  10. Comparative Study of the Oxidation of NiAl(100) by Molecular Oxygen and Water Vapor Using Ambient-Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qianqian; Qin, Hailang; Boscoboinik, Jorge Anibal; Zhou, Guangwen

    2016-11-08

    The oxidation behavior of NiAl(100) by molecular oxygen and water vapor under a near-ambient pressure of 0.2 Torr is monitored using ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. O2 exposure leads to the selective oxidation of Al at temperatures ranging from 40 to 500 °C. By contrast, H2O exposure results in the selective oxidation of Al at 40 and 200 °C, and increasing the oxidation temperature above 300 °C leads to simultaneous formation of both Al and Ni oxides. These results demonstrate that the O2 oxidation forms a nearly stoichiometric Al2O3 structure that provides improved protection to the metallic substrate by barring the outward diffusion of metals. By contrast, the H2O oxidation results in the formation of a defective oxide layer that allows outward diffusion of Ni at elevated temperatures for simultaneous NiO formation.

  11. Ambient and elevated temperature fracture and cyclic-fatigue properties in a series of Al-containing silicon carbides

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Rong

    2004-01-01

    A series of in situ toughened, Al, B and C containing, silicon carbide ceramics (ABC-SiC) has been examined with Al contents varying from 3 to 7 wt%. With increasing Al additions, the grain morphology in the as-processed microstructures varied from elongated to bimodal to equiaxed, with a change in the nature of the grain-boundary film from amorphous to partially crystalline to fully crystalline. Fracture toughness and cyclic fatigue tests on these microstructures revealed that although the 7 wt.% Al containing material (7ABC) was extremely brittle, the 3 and particularly 5 wt.% Al materials (3ABC and 5ABC, respectively) displayed excellent crack-growth resistance at both ambient (25°C) and elevated (1300 C) temperatures. Indeed, no evidence of creep damage, in the form of grain-boundary cavitation, was seen at temperatures at 1300°C or below. The enhanced toughness of the higher Al-containing materials was associated with extensive crack bridging from both interlocking grains (in 3ABC) and uncracked ligaments (in 5ABC); in contrast, the 7ABC SiC showed no such bridging, concomitant with a marked reduction in the volume fraction of elongated grains. Mechanistically, cyclic fatigue-crack growth in 3ABC and 5ABC SiC involved the progressive degradation of such bridging ligaments in the crack wake, with the difference in the degree of elastic vs. frictional bridging affecting the slope, i.e., Paris law exponent, of the crack-growth curve. In addition an investigation of fracture resistance in non-transforming ceramics toughened by grain bridging mechanism is presented using linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM). Linear superposition theorems are used for the superposition of crack opening displacements, as well as stress intensity factors, resulting from the external tractions and the internal compressive bridging stresses. Specifically weight functions are used to relate the CODs, stress intensity factors, and tractions and the bridging stress. Expressions are

  12. Indium out-diffusion in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs stacks during anneal at different ambient conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Krylov, Igor; Winter, Roy; Ritter, Dan; Eizenberg, Moshe

    2014-06-16

    Indium out-diffusion during anneal enhances leakage currents in metal/dielectric/InGaAs gate stacks. In this work, we study the influence of ambient conditions during anneal on indium out-diffusion in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs structures, prior to the gate metal deposition. Using X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and time of flight secondary ions mass spectrometry, we observed much lower indium concentrations in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer following vacuum and O{sub 2} anneals compared to forming gas or nitrogen anneals. The electrical characteristics of the Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InGaAs gate stack following these pre-metallization anneals as well as after subsequent post metallization anneals are presented. Possible explanations for the role of the annealing ambient conditions on indium out-diffusion are presented.

  13. Palladium nanoparticles dispersed on the hollow aluminosilicate microsphere@hierarchical γ-AlOOH as an excellent catalyst for the hydrogenation of nitroarenes under ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Meng; Cui, Xueliang; Dong, Chunxu; Dong, Zhengping

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a novel catalyst has been prepared through supporting Pd nanoparticles (NPs) on the surface of boehmite (γ-AlOOH) based hollow aluminosilicate microspheres (HAM@γ-AlOOH). The prepared Pd/HAM@γ-AlOOH catalyst has high catalytic activity for the hydrogenation of nitroarenes to their corresponding amino derivatives with high yields at ambient conditions. The high catalytic efficiency is attributed to the large pore size of the flower-like hierarchical flakes structure of HAM@γ-AlOOH, that gives Pd NPs on the support surface easy accessibility. Moreover, the Pd/HAM@γ-AlOOH catalyst can also be easily recycled at least five times without obvious decrease of catalytic activity. This work may provide a useful method for the fabrication of supported noble metal NP-based catalysts on the surface of mesoporous hierarchical structure materials with easy accessibility and superior activity.

  14. Highly Flexible and Transparent Ag Nanowire Electrode Encapsulated with Ultra-Thin Al2O3: Thermal, Ambient, and Mechanical Stabilities

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Byungil; An, Youngseo; Lee, Hyangsook; Lee, Eunha; Becker, Stefan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Hyoungsub

    2017-01-01

    There is an increasing demand in the flexible electronics industry for highly robust flexible/transparent conductors that can withstand high temperatures and corrosive environments. In this work, outstanding thermal and ambient stability is demonstrated for a highly transparent Ag nanowire electrode with a low electrical resistivity, by encapsulating it with an ultra-thin Al2O3 film (around 5.3 nm) via low-temperature (100 °C) atomic layer deposition. The Al2O3-encapsulated Ag nanowire (Al2O3/Ag) electrodes are stable even after annealing at 380 °C for 100 min and maintain their electrical and optical properties. The Al2O3 encapsulation layer also effectively blocks the permeation of H2O molecules and thereby enhances the ambient stability to greater than 1,080 h in an atmosphere with a relative humidity of 85% at 85 °C. Results from the cyclic bending test of up to 500,000 cycles (under an effective strain of 2.5%) confirm that the Al2O3/Ag nanowire electrode has a superior mechanical reliability to that of the conventional indium tin oxide film electrode. Moreover, the Al2O3 encapsulation significantly improves the mechanical durability of the Ag nanowire electrode, as confirmed by performing wiping tests using isopropyl alcohol. PMID:28128218

  15. Highly Flexible and Transparent Ag Nanowire Electrode Encapsulated with Ultra-Thin Al2O3: Thermal, Ambient, and Mechanical Stabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Byungil; An, Youngseo; Lee, Hyangsook; Lee, Eunha; Becker, Stefan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Hyoungsub

    2017-01-01

    There is an increasing demand in the flexible electronics industry for highly robust flexible/transparent conductors that can withstand high temperatures and corrosive environments. In this work, outstanding thermal and ambient stability is demonstrated for a highly transparent Ag nanowire electrode with a low electrical resistivity, by encapsulating it with an ultra-thin Al2O3 film (around 5.3 nm) via low-temperature (100 °C) atomic layer deposition. The Al2O3-encapsulated Ag nanowire (Al2O3/Ag) electrodes are stable even after annealing at 380 °C for 100 min and maintain their electrical and optical properties. The Al2O3 encapsulation layer also effectively blocks the permeation of H2O molecules and thereby enhances the ambient stability to greater than 1,080 h in an atmosphere with a relative humidity of 85% at 85 °C. Results from the cyclic bending test of up to 500,000 cycles (under an effective strain of 2.5%) confirm that the Al2O3/Ag nanowire electrode has a superior mechanical reliability to that of the conventional indium tin oxide film electrode. Moreover, the Al2O3 encapsulation significantly improves the mechanical durability of the Ag nanowire electrode, as confirmed by performing wiping tests using isopropyl alcohol.

  16. Comparative study of the oxidation of NiAl(100) by molecular oxygen and water vapor using ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Qianqian; Qin, Hailang; Boscoboinik, Jorge Anibal; ...

    2016-10-11

    The oxidation behavior of NiAl(100) by molecular oxygen and water vapor under a near-ambient pressure of 0.2 Torr is monitored using ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. O2 exposure leads to the selective oxidation of Al at temperatures ranging from 40 to 500 °C. By contrast, H2O exposure results in the selective oxidation of Al at 40 and 200 °C, and increasing the oxidation temperature above 300 °C leads to simultaneous formation of both Al and Ni oxides. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that the O2 oxidation forms a nearly stoichiometric Al2O3 structure that provides improved protection to the metallic substrate by barringmore » the outward diffusion of metals. By contrast, the H2O oxidation results in the formation of a defective oxide layer that allows outward diffusion of Ni at elevated temperatures for simultaneous NiO formation.« less

  17. Comparative study of the oxidation of NiAl(100) by molecular oxygen and water vapor using ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qianqian; Qin, Hailang; Boscoboinik, Jorge Anibal; Zhou, Guangwen

    2016-10-11

    The oxidation behavior of NiAl(100) by molecular oxygen and water vapor under a near-ambient pressure of 0.2 Torr is monitored using ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. O2 exposure leads to the selective oxidation of Al at temperatures ranging from 40 to 500 °C. By contrast, H2O exposure results in the selective oxidation of Al at 40 and 200 °C, and increasing the oxidation temperature above 300 °C leads to simultaneous formation of both Al and Ni oxides. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that the O2 oxidation forms a nearly stoichiometric Al2O3 structure that provides improved protection to the metallic substrate by barring the outward diffusion of metals. By contrast, the H2O oxidation results in the formation of a defective oxide layer that allows outward diffusion of Ni at elevated temperatures for simultaneous NiO formation.

  18. Effect of aging under ambient conditions on the optical properties of Al-doped ZnO thin films deposited by direct current sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barhoumi, A.; Leroy, G.; Duponchel, B.; Gest, J.; Guermazi, S.

    2017-01-01

    Transparent and conductive Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films were deposited on a glass substrate by direct current sputtering. In a previous study, we noted the influence of time on structural and electrical characteristics of films. In the present paper, the effect of a two-year aging under ambient conditions on the optical properties was investigated. A global improvement of the optical properties of AZO thin films was observed. The optical transmittance spectra revealed a high transmittance more than 90% in the Vis-NIR regions and a high absorption in the ultraviolet range. It is assumed that the crystallinity segregation leads to the decrease of optical scattering. The results from the optical measurements showed a reorganization of the structure leading to the degradation of the structural homogeneity. Nevertheless, the evolution of the figure of merit shows that Al-doped ZnO is a good candidate for the manufacturing and the commercialization of transparent conducting oxide devices.

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of AlCl3 Impregnated Molybdenum Oxide as Heterogeneous Nano-Catalyst for the Friedel-Crafts Acylation Reaction in Ambient Condition.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Arvind H; Chinnappan, Amutha; Hiremath, Vishwanath; Seo, Jeong Gil

    2015-10-01

    Aluminum trichloride (AlCl3) impregnated molybdenum oxide heterogeneous nano-catalyst was prepared by using simple impregnation method. The prepared heterogeneous catalyst was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, FT-IR spectroscopy, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, SEM imaging, and EDX mapping. The catalytic activity of this protocol was evaluated as heterogeneous catalyst for the Friedel-Crafts acylation reaction at room temperature. The impregnated MoO4(AlCl2)2 catalyst showed tremendous catalytic activity in Friedel-Crafts acylation reaction under solvent-free and mild reaction condition. As a result, 84.0% yield of acyl product with 100% consumption of reactants in 18 h reaction time at room temperature was achieved. The effects of different solvents system with MoO4(AlCl2)2 catalyst in acylation reaction was also investigated. By using optimized reaction condition various acylated derivatives were prepared. In addition, the catalyst was separated by simple filtration process after the reaction and reused several times. Therefore, heterogeneous MoO4(AlCl2)2 catalyst was found environmentally benign catalyst, very convenient, high yielding, and clean method for the Friedel-Crafts acylation reaction under solvent-free and ambient reaction condition.

  20. ZnO:Al Doping Level and Hydrogen Growth Ambient Effects on CIGS Solar Cell Performance: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Duenow, J. N.; Gessert, T. A.; Wood, D. M.; Egaas, B.; Noufi, R.; Coutts,T. J.

    2008-05-01

    Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) photovoltaic (PV) cells require a highly conducting and transparent electrode for optimum device performance. ZnO:Al films grown from targets containing 2.0 wt.% Al2O3 are commonly used for this purpose. Maximum carrier mobilities of these films grown at room temperature are ~20-25 cm2V-1s-1. Therefore, relatively high carrier concentrations are required to achieve the desired conductivity, which leads to free carrier absorption in the near infrared (IR). Lightly doped films (0.05 - 0.2 wt.% Al2O3), which show less IR absorption, reach mobility values greater than 50 cm2V-1s-1 when deposited in H2 partial pressure. We incorporate these lightly doped ZnO:Al layers into CIGS PV cells produced at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Preliminary results show quantum efficiency values of these cells rival those of a past world-record cell produced at NREL that used 2.0 wt.% Al-doped ZnO films. The highest cell efficiency obtained in this trial was 18.1%.

  1. Cyclic deformation of NI/sub 3/(Al,Nb) single crystals at ambient and elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Bonda, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    Cyclic tests were performed on Ni/sub 3/(Al,Nb) (..gamma..' phase) single crystals by using a servo-hydraulic machine under fully reversed plastic strain control at a frequency of 0.1-0.2 Hz at room temperature, 400/sup 0/C and 700/sup 0/C. Since the monotonic behavior is orientation dependent, three orientations were studied. Asymmetry in tensile and compressive stresses was observed in the cyclic hardening curves of specimens tested at these temperatures and they were discussed with regard to the model suggested by Paider et al for monotonic behavior. The stress levels in the cyclic stress-strain curves (CSSC) at room temperature depended on orientation and cyclic history. No CSSCs were established at 400/sup 0/C and 700/sup 0/C. The deformation in cyclic tests at small plastic strain amplitudes was found to be different from that in monotonic tests in the microplastic regions in which the deformation is believed to be carried by a small density of edge dislocations. But in cyclic deformation, to and from motion of dislocations trap the edge dislocations into dipoles and therefore screw dislocations will be forced to participate in the deformation. Cracks on the surfaces of specimens tested at room temperature and 400/sup 0/C were found to be of stage I type, whereas at 700/sup 0/C, they were of stage II type.

  2. Microtexture Analysis and Modeling of Ambient Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue Damages in Ti-6Al-4V Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Jalaj; Singh, A. K.; Raman, S. Ganesh Sundara; Kumar, Vikas

    2017-02-01

    In the present investigation, microtexture analysis using electron back-scattered diffraction technique has been performed to study fatigue- and creep-fatigue damages and associated deformation structures in Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Special emphasis has been given to low-angle grain boundary configuration and its possible application as a damage indicator. Damage is mostly present in the form of voids as investigated through scanning electron microscopy. Stored deformation energies have been evaluated for the strain-controlled fatigue-, the stress-controlled fatigue-, and the creep-fatigue-tested samples. Stored deformation energies have also been analyzed vis-à-vis total damage energies to quantify the contribution of damages to various samples. A relation between the stored deformation energy and the applied strain amplitude has been proposed in this study.

  3. Comparison of heterojunction device parameters for pure and doped ZnO thin films with IIIA (Al or In) elements grown on silicon at room ambient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Ahmet; Cansizoglu, Hilal; Mamtaz, Hasina H.; Mayet, Ahmed S.; Islam, M. Saif

    2016-09-01

    In this work, pure and IIIA element doped ZnO thin films were grown on p type silicon (Si) with (100) orientated surface by sol-gel method, and were characterized for comparing their electrical characteristics. The heterojunction parameters were obtained from the current-voltage (I-V) and capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics at room temperature. The ideality factor (n), saturation current (Io) and junction resistance of ZnO/p-Si heterojunction for both pure and doped (with Al or In) cases were determined by using different methods at room ambient. Other electrical parameters such as Fermi energy level (EF), barrier height (ΦB), acceptor concentration (Na), built-in potential (Φi) and voltage dependence of surface states (Nss) profile were obtained from the C-V measurements. The results reveal that doping ZnO with IIIA (Al or In) elements to fabricate n-ZnO/p-Si heterojunction can result in high performance diode characteristics.

  4. Chondrules of the Very First Generation in Bencubbin/CH-like Meteorites QUE94411 and Hammadah Al Hamra 237: Condensation Origin at High Ambient Nebular Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krot, Alexander N.; Meibom, Anders; Russell, Sara S.; Young, Edward; Alexander, Conel M.; McKeegan, Kevin D.; Lofgren, Gary; Cuzzi, Jeff; Zipfel, Jutta; Keil, Klaus

    2000-01-01

    Chondrules in QUE94411 and HH 237 formed at high ambient T prior to condensation of Fe,Ni-metal following a large scale thermal event that resulted in complete vaporization of a solar nebula region. These chondrules escaped subsequent remelting.

  5. Measured In Situ Atmospheric Ambient Aerosol Size-Distributions, Particle Concentrations, and Turbulence Data for RSA TA-6 Test Range, Redstone Arsenal, AL, April-May 2015

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Concentrations, and Turbulence Data for RSA TA-6 Test Range, Redstone Arsenal , AL, April–May 2015 by Kristan Gurton, Stephanie Cunningham, and...Aerosol Size-Distributions, Particle Concentrations, and Turbulence Data for RSA TA-6 Test Range, Redstone Arsenal , AL, April–May 2015 by Kristan...Redstone Arsenal , AL Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. ii REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188

  6. Effect of outdoor exposure at ambient and elevated temperatures on fatigue life of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy sheet in the annealed and the solution treated and aged condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, E. P.

    1974-01-01

    Specimens of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy sheet in the annealed and the solution-treated and aged heat-treatment condition were exposed outdoors at ambient and 560 K (550 F) temperatures to determine the effect of outdoor exposure on fatigue life. Effects of exposure were determined by comparing fatigue lives of exposed specimens to those of unexpected specimens. Two procedures for fatigue testing the exposed specimens were evaluated: (1) fatigue tests conducted outdoors by applying 1200 load cycles per week until failure occurred and (2) conventional fatigue tests (continuous cycling until failure occurred) conducted indoors after outdoor exposure under static load. The exposure period ranged from 9 to 28 months for the outdoor fatigue-test group and was 24 months for the static-load group. All fatigue tests were constant-amplitude bending of specimens containing a drilled hole (stress concentration factor of 1.6). The results of the tests indicate that the fatigue lives of solution-treated and aged specimens were significantly reduced by the outdoor exposure at 560 K but not by the exposure at ambient temperature. Fatigue lives of the annealed specimens were essentially unaffected by the outdoor exposure at either temperature. The two test procedures - outdoor fatigue test and indoor fatigue test after outdoor exposure - led to the same conclusions about exposure effects.

  7. A mechanistic understanding of plagioclase dissolution based on Al occupancy and T-O bond length: from geologic carbon sequestration to ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Min, Yujia; Jun, Young-Shin

    2013-11-14

    A quantitative description of how the bulk properties of aluminosilicates affect their dissolution kinetics is important in helping people understand the regulation of atmospheric CO2 concentration by silicate weathering and predict the fate and transport of geologically sequestered CO2 through brine-rock interactions. In this study, we employed a structure model based on the C1 space group to illustrate how differences in crystallographic properties of aluminosilicates, such as T-O (Tetrahedral site-Oxygen) bond length and Al/Si ordering, can result in quantifiable variations in mineral dissolution rates. The dissolution rates of plagioclases were measured under representative geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) conditions (90 °C, 100 atm of CO2, 1.0 M NaCl, and pH ∼ 3.1), and used to validate the model. We found that the logarithm of the characteristic time of the breakdown of Al-O-Si linkages in plagioclases follows a good linear relation with the mineral's aluminum content (nAl). The Si release rates of plagioclases can be calculated based on an assumption of dissolution congruency or on the regularity of Al/Si distribution in the constituent tetrahedra of the mineral. We further extended the application of our approach to scenarios where dissolution incongruency arises because of different linkage reactivities in the solid matrix, and compared the model predictions with published data. The application of our results enables a significant reduction of experimental work for determining the dissolution rates of structurally related aluminosilicates, given a reaction environment.

  8. Uso de Sustancias en Mujeres con Desventaja Social: Riesgo para el Contagio de VIH/SIDA

    PubMed Central

    Cianelli, R.; Ferrer, L; Bernales, M.; Miner, S.; Irarrázabal, L.; Molina, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Antecedentes La caracterización epidemiológica en Chile apunta a feminización, pauperización y heterosexualización de la epidemia del VIH, lo que implica un mayor riesgo para las mujeres en desventaja social. Si a esto se suma la utilización de sustancias, la vulnerabilidad de este grupo frente al VIH/SIDA aumenta. Objetivo Describir el uso de sustancias en mujeres con desventaja social e identificar factores de riesgo de contagio de VIH, asociados a este consumo. Material y Método 52 mujeres fueron entrevistadas como parte del proyecto “Testeando una intervención en prevención de VIH/SIDA en mujeres chilenas” GRANT # RO1 TW 006977. Se describen variables sociodemográficas y de consumo de sustancias a través de estadísticas descriptivas y se analiza la relación entre variables a través de pruebas de correlación. Resultados Los resultados indican un perfil sociodemográfico que sitúa a las mujeres en situación de vulnerabilidad frente al contagio de VIH/SIDA, con alto índice de uso de sustancias que acentúa el riesgo. Conclusiones Los hallazgos apuntan a la necesidad de considerar intervenciones que se enfoquen en la prevención de VIH en mujeres, abordando los riesgos asociados al consumo de sustancias. PMID:21197380

  9. La EPA propone normas más rigurosas para las personas que aplican los plaguicidas de más alto riesgo

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    La EPA emitió una propuesta para la revisión de la norma para la Certificación de Aplicadores de Plaguicidas. La norma ayudará a mantener nuestras comunidades seguras, salvaguardar el medio ambiente y reducir el riesgo a los que aplican los plaguicidas.

  10. DIABETES MELLITUS COMO FACTOR DE RIESGO DE DEMENCIA EN LA POBLACIÓN ADULTA MAYOR MEXICANA

    PubMed Central

    Silvia, Mejía-Arango; Clemente, y Zúñiga-Gil

    2012-01-01

    Introduccion La diabetes mellitus y las demencias constituyen dos problemas crecientes de salud entre la población adulta mayor del mundo y en particular de los paises en desarrollo. Hacen falta estudios longitudinales sobre el papel de la diabetes como factor de riesgo para demencia. Objetivo Determinar el riesgo de demencia en sujetos Mexicanos con diabetes mellitus tipo 2. Materiales y Metodos Los sujetos diabéticos libres de demencia pertenecientes al Estudio Nacional de Salud y Envejecimiento en México fueron evaluados a los dos años de la línea de base. Se estudió el papel de los factores sociodemográficos, de otras comorbilidades y del tipo de tratamiento en la conversión a demencia. Resultados Durante la línea de base 749 sujetos (13.8%) tuvieron diabetes. El riesgo de desarrollar demencia en estos individuos fue el doble (RR, 2.08 IC 95%, 1.59–2.73). Se encontró un riesgo mayor en individuos de 80 años y más (RR 2.44 IC 95%, 1.46–4.08), en los hombres (RR, 2.25 IC 95%, 1.46–3.49) y en sujetos con nivel educativo menor de 7 años. El estar bajo tratamiento con insulina incrementó el riesgo de demencia (RR, 2.83, IC 95%, 1.58–5.06). Las otras comorbilidades que aumentaron el riesgo de demencia en los pacientes diabéticos fueron la hipertensión (RR, 2.75, IC 95%, 1.86–4.06) y la depresión (RR, 3.78, 95% IC 2.37–6.04). Conclusión Los sujetos con diabetes mellitus tienen un riesgo mayor de desarrollar demencia, La baja escolaridad y otras comorbilidades altamente prevalentes en la población Mexicana contribuyen a la asociación diabetes-demencia. PMID:21948010

  11. DUCHAS VAGINALES Y OTROS RIESGOS DE VAGINOSIS BACTERIANA

    PubMed Central

    Chávez, Natividad; Molina, Helfer; Sánchez, Jorge; Gelaye, Bizu; Sánchez, Sixto E.

    2010-01-01

    Vaginosis bacteriana (VB) es una infección caracterizada por el cambio en la microflora de la vagina, asociándose a resultados adversos del embarazo y a la adquisición de infecciones de transmisión sexual (ITS), incluyendo el VIH. En este estudio se buscó la asociación entre el uso de duchas vaginales y otros factores de riesgos con VB. Se usó un diseño observacional descriptivo transversal prospectivo, en 1,252 mujeres que asistieron al servicio de planificación familiar de tres hospitales nacionales (Dos de Mayo, Arzobispo Loayza, San Bartolomé) y el Instituto Materno Perinatal, durante el año 1997. Se utilizó un cuestionario estructurado donde se registraron variables socio demográficas y características del estilo de vida de las participantes. VB fue diagnosticada mediante el puntaje de Nugent. Se empleó análisis de regresión logística para calcular odds ratio (OR) e intervalos de confianza al 95%. La edad promedio de las participantes fue 25.1 ± 4,7 años, el 23.4% tenían más de 11 años de educación. La prevalencía de VB fue 20,1%. Las mujeres que practicaban duchas vaginales tuvieron 2.28 veces (OR = 2.28, IC 95% [1.0–5.0]) mayor probabilidad de tener VB comparado con aquellas que no lo practicaban. Tener dos o más parejas sexuales estuvo asociado con 2.0 veces (OR =2.0, IC 95% [1.2–3.5]) mayor probabilidad de adquirir VB comparado con aquellas que habían tenido solo una pareja sexual. Las participantes que iniciaron una relación sexual a una edad temprana tuvieron 1.4 veces (OR=1.4, IC 95% [1.0 –1.9]) mayor probabilidad de adquirir VB. El uso de duchas vaginales es un factor de riesgo de VB. Los programas destinados a la salud de la mujer deben abordar las repercusiones perjudiciales para la salud asociados con las duchas vaginales. PMID:21132048

  12. The future is 'ambient'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugmayr, Artur

    2006-02-01

    The research field of ambient media starts to spread rapidly and first applications for consumer homes are on the way. Ambient media is the logical continuation of research around media. Media has been evolving from old media (e.g. print media), to integrated presentation in one form (multimedia - or new media), to generating a synthetic world (virtual reality), to the natural environment is the user-interface (ambient media), and will be evolving towards real/synthetic undistinguishable media (bio-media or bio-multimedia). After the IT bubble was bursting, multimedia was lacking a vision of potential future scenarios and applications. Within this research paper the potentials, applications, and market available solutions of mobile ambient multimedia are studied. The different features of ambient mobile multimedia are manifold and include wearable computers, adaptive software, context awareness, ubiquitous computers, middleware, and wireless networks. The paper especially focuses on algorithms and methods that can be utilized to realize modern mobile ambient systems.

  13. Dependence of single-bubble sonoluminescence on ambient pressure

    PubMed

    Dan; Cheeke; Kondic

    2000-03-01

    Kondic et al.'s theory makes several specific predictions on the dependence of single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) on ambient pressure. We have carried out experiments to verify these predictions for air bubbles in a water-glycerine mixture at about 17.5 kHz. The results show an increase in SBSL with reduced ambient pressure down to a critical value below which SBSL is extinguished. The results are all in good agreement with Kondic et al.'s theory and are also compatible with the dissociation hypothesis of Lohse et al.

  14. Ambient Tropospheric Particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM) is a complex mixture of solid and liquid particles suspended in ambient air (also known as the atmospheric aerosol). Ambient PM arises from a wide-range of sources and/or processes, and consists of particles of different shapes, sizes, and com...

  15. All inorganic ambient temperature rechargeable lithium battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, H. C.; Dey, A. N.; Schlaikjer, C.; Foster, D.; Kallianidis, M.

    Research and development was carried out on ambient-temperature rechargeable lithium batteries with inorganic SO2 electrolytes. The following solutes in SO2 were studied: tetrachloroaluminates, LiAlCl4, Li2B10Cl10, and LiGaCl4. Copper chloride (CuCl2) was used as one of the electrode materials.

  16. Ambient Dried Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Steven M.; Paik, Jong-Ah

    2013-01-01

    A method has been developed for creating aerogel using normal pressure and ambient temperatures. All spacecraft, satellites, and landers require the use of thermal insulation due to the extreme environments encountered in space and on extraterrestrial bodies. Ambient dried aerogels introduce the possibility of using aerogel as thermal insulation in a wide variety of instances where supercritically dried aerogels cannot be used. More specifically, thermoelectric devices can use ambient dried aerogel, where the advantages are in situ production using the cast-in ability of an aerogel. Previously, aerogels required supercritical conditions (high temperature and high pressure) to be dried. Ambient dried aerogels can be dried at room temperature and pressure. This allows many materials, such as plastics and certain metal alloys that cannot survive supercritical conditions, to be directly immersed in liquid aerogel precursor and then encapsulated in the final, dried aerogel. Additionally, the metalized Mylar films that could not survive the previous methods of making aerogels can survive the ambient drying technique, thus making multilayer insulation (MLI) materials possible. This results in lighter insulation material as well. Because this innovation does not require high-temperature or high-pressure drying, ambient dried aerogels are much less expensive to produce. The equipment needed to conduct supercritical drying costs many tens of thousands of dollars, and has associated running expenses for power, pressurized gasses, and maintenance. The ambient drying process also expands the size of the pieces of aerogel that can be made because a high-temperature, high-pressure system typically has internal dimensions of up to 30 cm in diameter and 60 cm in height. In the case of this innovation, the only limitation on the size of the aerogels produced would be in the ability of the solvent in the wet gel to escape from the gel network.

  17. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A. T.

    2015-07-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry emerged as a new scientific discipline only about ten years ago. A considerable body of information has been reported since that time. Keeping the sensitivity, performance and informativity of classical mass spectrometry methods, the new approach made it possible to eliminate laborious sample preparation procedures and triggered the development of miniaturized instruments to work directly in the field. The review concerns the theoretical foundations and design of ambient ionization methods. Their advantages and drawbacks, as well as prospects for application in chemistry, biology, medicine, environmetal analysis, etc., are discussed. The bibliography includes 194 references.

  18. NIF Ambient Vibration Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, C.R.; Hoehler, M.S., S.C. Sommer

    1999-11-29

    LLNL has an ongoing research and development project that includes developing data acquisition systems with remote wireless communication for monitoring the vibrations of large civil engineering structures. In order to establish the capability of performing remote sensing over an extended period of time, the researchers needed to apply this technology to a real structure. The construction of the National Ignition Facility provided an opportunity to test the data acquisition system on a large structure to monitor whether the facility is remaining within the strict ambient vibration guidelines. This document will briefly discuss the NIF ambient vibration requirements and summarize the vibration measurements performed during the Spring and Summer of 1999. In addition, a brief description of the sensors and the data acquisition systems will be provided in Appendix B.

  19. Imaging with ambient noise

    SciTech Connect

    Snieder, Roel; Wapenaar, Kees

    2010-09-15

    Recent developments in seismology, ultrasonics, and underwater acoustics have led to a radical change in the way scientists think about ambient noise--the diffuse waves generated by pressure fluctuations in the atmosphere, the scattering of water waves in the ocean, and any number of other sources that pervade our world. Because diffuse waves consist of the superposition of waves propagating in all directions, they appear to be chaotic and random. That appearance notwithstanding, diffuse waves carry information about the medium through which they propagate.

  20. Ambient ion soft landing.

    PubMed

    Badu-Tawiah, Abraham K; Wu, Chunping; Cooks, R Graham

    2011-04-01

    Ambient ion soft landing, a process in which polyatomic ions are deposited from air onto a surface at a specified location under atmospheric pressure, is described. Ions generated by electrospray ionization are passed pneumatically through a heated metal drying tube, their ion polarity is selected using ion deflectors, and the dry selected ions are soft-landed onto a selected surface. Unlike the corresponding vacuum soft-landing experiment, where ions are mass-selected and soft-landed within a mass spectrometer, here the ions to be deposited are selected through the choice of a compound that gives predominantly one ionic species upon ambient ionization; no mass analysis is performed during the soft landing experiment. The desired dry ions, after electrical separation from neutrals and counterions, are deposited on a surface. Characterization of the landed material was achieved by dissolution and analysis using mass spectrometry or spectrofluorimetry. The treated surface was also characterized using fluorescence microscopy, which allowed surfaces patterned with fluorescent compounds to be imaged. The pure dry ions were used as reagents in heterogeneous ion/surface reactions including the reaction of pyrylium cations with d-lysine to form the N-substituted pyridinium cation. The charged microdroplets associated with incompletely dried ions could be selected for soft landing or surface reaction by choice of the temperature of a drying tube inserted between the ion source and the electrical ion deflectors.

  1. National Ambient Radiation Database

    SciTech Connect

    Dziuban, J.; Sears, R.

    2003-02-25

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently developed a searchable database and website for the Environmental Radiation Ambient Monitoring System (ERAMS) data. This site contains nationwide radiation monitoring data for air particulates, precipitation, drinking water, surface water and pasteurized milk. This site provides location-specific as well as national information on environmental radioactivity across several media. It provides high quality data for assessing public exposure and environmental impacts resulting from nuclear emergencies and provides baseline data during routine conditions. The database and website are accessible at www.epa.gov/enviro/. This site contains (1) a query for the general public which is easy to use--limits the amount of information provided, but includes the ability to graph the data with risk benchmarks and (2) a query for a more technical user which allows access to all of the data in the database, (3) background information on ER AMS.

  2. Ambient Noise in Shallow Water: A Survey of the Unclassified Literature.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-01

    hypothesis which would explain this observation is that the source of noise near the low 7. ..7.. ~~u-~m".. .- - p -~~* - %R -vi w - AlJ’ Wf % --’,Wkz...Shallow water ambient noise surprisingly flat (white) for high wind speed, in contrast to typical ambient noise spectra. p The difference is explained...taken * .. . . . . .. p .-... . . ..-.. :; ..- ..- ... ; .. ’...’~~. ... ".. .. ’.-.-...... . ..... - .... ...... ..... . .. . - 18 Shallow water ambient

  3. Diagnosing ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... that a person diagnosed with ALS seek a second opinion from an ALS "expert" - someone who diagnoses and treats many ALS patients and has training in this medical specialty. The ALS Association maintains a list of recognized experts in the field of ALS. See ALS Association Certified Centers of ...

  4. Carbone_et_al_2016_ambient_data

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This data set has two sets of gaseous elemental mercury data. The first column contains all Hg related data some of which may have been affected by the upslope events such as the emissions from the nearby volcano. The next column contain values that were flagged and excluded as being affected by the nearby volcanic events. The flagging method used to eliminate these values was developed using an episode identification scheme using SO2 data. For the years of 2002 through 2004, hourly SO2 data were used to llag the upslope values. For the years of 2005-2009, 5 minute SO2 values were used to flag upslope events.While SO2 and O3 data were collected by EPA as part of this study, the CO2 data were downloaded from NOAA data website along with the flag related information provided below. (http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/dv/data/index.php?parameter_name=Carbon%2BDioxide&showall=1&site=MLO)This dataset is associated with the following publication:Carbone, F., M. Landis, C.N. Gencarelli, A. Naccarato, F. Sprovieri, F. De Simone, I.M. Hedgecock, and N. Pirrone. Sea surface temperature variation linked to elemental mercury concentrations measured on Mauna Loa. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS. American Geophysical Union, Washington, DC, USA, online, (2016).

  5. ALS Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... toward a world without ALS! Walk to Defeat ALS® Walk to Defeat ALS® draws people of all ... We need your help. I Will Advocate National ALS Registry The National ALS Registry is a congressionally ...

  6. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging under ambient light

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yinxin; Liao, Chien-Sheng; Hong, Weili; Huang, Kai-Chih; Yang, Huaidong; Jin, Guofan; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate ambient light coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (AL-CARS) microscopy that allows CARS imaging to be operated under environment light for field use. CARS signal is modulated at megahertz frequency and detected by a photodiode equipped with a lab-built resonant amplifier, then extracted through a lock-in amplifier. Filters in both spectral domain and frequency domain effectively blocked room light contamination of the CARS image. In situ hyperspectral CARS imaging of tumor tissue under ambient light is demonstrated. PMID:27519113

  7. Ambient pressure photoemission spectroscopy of metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baikie, Iain D.; Grain, Angela C.; Sutherland, James; Law, Jamie

    2014-12-01

    We describe a novel photoemission technique utilizing a traditional Kelvin probe as a detector of electrons/atmospheric ions ejected from metallic surfaces (Au, Ag, Cu, Fe, Ni, Ti, Zn, Al) illuminated by a deep ultra-violet (DUV) source under ambient pressure. To surmount the limitation of electron scattering in air the incident photon energy is rastered rather than applying a variable retarding electric field as is used with UPS. This arrangement can be applied in several operational modes: using the DUV source to determine the photoemission threshold (Φ) with 30-50 meV resolution and also the Kelvin probe, under dark conditions, to measure contact potential difference (CPD) between the Kelvin probe tip and the metallic sample with an accuracy of 1-3 meV. We have studied the relationship between the photoelectric threshold and CPD of metal surfaces cleaned in ambient conditions. Inclusion of a second spectroscopic visible source was used to confirm a semiconducting oxide, possibly Cu2O, via surface photovoltage measurements with the KP. This dual detection system can be easily extended to controlled gas conditions, relative humidity control and sample heating/cooling.

  8. Ambient Noise Tomography at Bezymianny Volcano, Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuler, A. E.; Ekström, G.; West, M.; Senyukov, S.

    2008-12-01

    Bezymianny Volcano is an active stratovolcano located in the Kluychevskoy volcanic group on the Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Russia. Since its dramatic sector collapse eruption in 1956, the volcano's activity has been characterized by nearly twice annual plinian eruptions accompanying ongoing lava-dome growth. Its frequent eruptions and similarity to Mt. St. Helens have made it the target of a multifaceted geologic and geophysical project supported by the NSF Partners in Research and Education (PIRE) program. Since mid- 2006, the volcano has been monitored by a broadband seismic array that is currently composed of 8 stations within 10 kilometers of the active dome. In this project, we use continuous data from these stations to investigate the static and dynamic structure of the volcano. Using methods similar to those used by Brenguier et al. (2007, 2008), we estimate the Green's function for each pair of stations by cross-correlating day-long time series of ambient noise. Paths with high signal-to-noise ratios can be used to estimate group velocity dispersion curves. From these measurements, we work towards constructing the first velocity model of this volcano. Furthermore, we begin to test whether measurements of ambient noise can be used to monitor changes inside the volcano prior to eruptive activity. These problems will continue to be addressed as more data becomes available in future field seasons.

  9. Passivation of Exfoliated Black Phosphorus Transistors Against Ambient Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Spencer; Wood, Joshua; Jariwala, Deep; Chen, Kan-Sheng; Cho, Eunkyung; Sangwan, Vinod; Liu, Xiaolong; Lauhon, Lincoln; Marks, Tobin; Hersam, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Unencapsulated exfoliated black phosphorus field-effect transistors are found to rapidly degrade upon exposure to ambient conditions, causing large increases in threshold voltage after only 6 h in ambient, followed by a ~ 103 decrease in FET on/off ratio and mobility after 48 h. Careful investigation into the cause of this degradation suggests that H2O irreversibly reacts with unprotected, exfoliated BP to form oxidized phosphorus species, as observed by AFM, TEM, XPS, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and electrostatic force microscopy. This interpretation is further supported by the observation that BP degradation occurs more rapidly on hydrophobic octadecyltrichlorosilane self-assembled monolayers as opposed to hydrophilic SiO2, implicating an edge-based intercalation of O2 saturated H2O in BP as the cause of degradation. Atomic layer deposited AlOx overlayers were found to suppress ambient degradation, allowing encapsulated BP FETs to maintain high on/off ratios of ~ 103 and mobilities of ~ 100 cm2/(Vs) for over one month in ambient, demonstrating the effective passivation of BP flakes against ambient degradation. Research supported by the Materials Research Science and Engineering Center of Northwestern University (NSF DMR-1121262), the Office of Naval Research (N00014- 14-1-0669), and the Keck Foundation.

  10. Los plaguicidas y la contaminacion del medio ambiente Venezolano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stickel, L.F.; Stickel, W.H.

    1972-01-01

    RESUMEN DE RECOMENDACIONES Recomendaciones para el Programa de Investigacion: 1. Establecer un sistema de muestreo biologico para detectar los niveles tendencias de los productos quimicos toxicos en un peque?o numero de si tios representativos. 2. Mantener continua vigilancia de la contaminacion ambiental, mediante la seleccion acertadamente dirigida de las zonas afectadas y de las fuentes de contaminacion. 3. Realizar estudios acerca de las poblaciones de animales silvestres, y del exito de los procesos reproductivos de las especies o grupos clayes de animales que se consideran mas gravemente afectados. 4. Preparar recomendaciones para una accion gubernamental de proteccion al hombre, a la fauna silvestre y al medio ambiente. Recomendaciones para la Accion Administrativa: 1. Establecer limites a la tolerancia de los residuos de plaguicidas en los alimentos. Constituye una medida clave para disminuir la contaminacion ambiental. 2. Establecer normas de calidad del agua para las corrientes, represas, la gos y otros cuerpos. Es la segunda medida clave para reducir la contaminacion del ambiente 3. Exigir un tratamiento adecuado de los efluentes industriales, especialmente antes de que se construyan las nuevas plantas. 4. Exigir a los agricultores que en el uso de plaguicidas sigan los consejos tecnicos autorizados y negar a los vendedores el derecho a recomendar productos por su cuenta. 5. Tomar medidas para recoger y eliminar los recipientes y sobrantes de los plaguicidas.

  11. ALS - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - ALS ... The following organizations are good resources for information on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis : Muscular Dystrophy Association -- www.mda.org/disease/amyotrophic-lateral-sclerosis National Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) ...

  12. Ambient curing fire resistant foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamermesh, C. L.; Hogenson, P. A.; Tung, C. Y.; Sawko, P. M.; Riccitiello, S. R.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of development of an ambient curing foam is described. The thermal stability and flame spread index of the foams were found to be comparable to those of the high-temperature cured polyimide foams by Monsanto two-foot tunnel test and NASA T-3 Fire test. Adaptation of the material to spray in place applications is described

  13. Low ambient oxygen prevents atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ju-Gyeong; Sung, Ho Joong; Amar, Marcelo J; Pryor, Milton; Remaley, Alan T; Allen, Michele D; Noguchi, Audrey C; Springer, Danielle A; Kwon, Jaeyul; Chen, Jichun; Park, Ji-hoon; Wang, Ping-yuan; Hwang, Paul M

    2016-03-01

    Large population studies have shown that living at higher altitudes, which lowers ambient oxygen exposure, is associated with reduced cardiovascular disease mortality. However, hypoxia has also been reported to promote atherosclerosis by worsening lipid metabolism and inflammation. We sought to address these disparate reports by reducing the ambient oxygen exposure of ApoE-/- mice. We observed that long-term adaptation to 10% O2 (equivalent to oxygen content at ∼5000 m), compared to 21% O2 (room air at sea level), resulted in a marked decrease in aortic atherosclerosis in ApoE-/- mice. This effect was associated with increased expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10), known to be anti-atherogenic and regulated by hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1α (HIF-1α). Supporting these observations, ApoE-/- mice that were deficient in IL-10 (IL10-/- ApoE-/- double knockout) failed to show reduced atherosclerosis in 10% oxygen. Our study reveals a specific mechanism that can help explain the decreased prevalence of ischemic heart disease in populations living at high altitudes and identifies ambient oxygen exposure as a potential factor that could be modulated to alter pathogenesis. Key messages: Chronic low ambient oxygen exposure decreases atherosclerosis in mice. Anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 levels are increased by low ambient O2. This is consistent with the established role of HIF-1α in IL10 transactivation. Absence of IL-10 results in the loss of the anti-atherosclerosis effect of low O2. This mechanism may contribute to decreased atherosclerosis at high altitudes.

  14. Structural lubricity under ambient conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cihan, Ebru; İpek, Semran; Durgun, Engin; Baykara, Mehmet Z.

    2016-01-01

    Despite its fundamental importance, physical mechanisms that govern friction are poorly understood. While a state of ultra-low friction, termed structural lubricity, is expected for any clean, atomically flat interface consisting of two different materials with incommensurate structures, some associated predictions could only be quantitatively confirmed under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions so far. Here, we report structurally lubric sliding under ambient conditions at mesoscopic (∼4,000–130,000 nm2) interfaces formed by gold islands on graphite. Ab initio calculations reveal that the gold–graphite interface is expected to remain largely free from contaminant molecules, leading to structurally lubric sliding. The experiments reported here demonstrate the potential for practical lubrication schemes for micro- and nano-electromechanical systems, which would mainly rely on an atomic-scale structural mismatch between the slider and substrate components, via the utilization of material systems featuring clean, atomically flat interfaces under ambient conditions. PMID:27350035

  15. Ambient pressure fuel cell system

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    2000-01-01

    An ambient pressure fuel cell system is provided with a fuel cell stack formed from a plurality of fuel cells having membrane/electrode assemblies (MEAs) that are hydrated with liquid water and bipolar plates with anode and cathode sides for distributing hydrogen fuel gas and water to a first side of each one of the MEAs and air with reactant oxygen gas to a second side of each one of the MEAs. A pump supplies liquid water to the fuel cells. A recirculating system may be used to return unused hydrogen fuel gas to the stack. A near-ambient pressure blower blows air through the fuel cell stack in excess of reaction stoichiometric amounts to react with the hydrogen fuel gas.

  16. Structural lubricity under ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cihan, Ebru; Ipek, Semran; Durgun, Engin; Baykara, Mehmet Z.

    2016-06-01

    Despite its fundamental importance, physical mechanisms that govern friction are poorly understood. While a state of ultra-low friction, termed structural lubricity, is expected for any clean, atomically flat interface consisting of two different materials with incommensurate structures, some associated predictions could only be quantitatively confirmed under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions so far. Here, we report structurally lubric sliding under ambient conditions at mesoscopic (~4,000-130,000 nm2) interfaces formed by gold islands on graphite. Ab initio calculations reveal that the gold-graphite interface is expected to remain largely free from contaminant molecules, leading to structurally lubric sliding. The experiments reported here demonstrate the potential for practical lubrication schemes for micro- and nano-electromechanical systems, which would mainly rely on an atomic-scale structural mismatch between the slider and substrate components, via the utilization of material systems featuring clean, atomically flat interfaces under ambient conditions.

  17. Correction: Ambient temperature deposition of gallium nitride/gallium oxynitride from a deep eutectic electrolyte, under potential control.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sujoy; Sampath, S

    2016-05-28

    Correction for 'Ambient temperature deposition of gallium nitride/gallium oxynitride from a deep eutectic electrolyte, under potential control' by Sujoy Sarkar et al., Chem. Commun., 2016, 52, 6407-6410.

  18. New Codes for Ambient Seismic Noise Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duret, F.; Mooney, W. D.; Detweiler, S.

    2007-12-01

    In order to determine a velocity model of the crust, scientists generally use earthquakes recorded by seismic stations. However earthquakes do not occur continuously and most are too weak to be useful. When no event is recorded, a waveform is generally considered to be noise. This noise, however, is not useless and carries a wealth of information. Thus, ambient seismic noise analysis is an inverse method of investigating the Earth's interior. Until recently, this technique was quite difficult to apply, as it requires significant computing capacities. In early 2007, however, a team led by Gregory Benson and Mike Ritzwoller from UC Boulder published a paper describing a new method for extracting group and phase velocities from those waveforms. The analysis consisting of recovering Green functions between a pair of stations, is composed of four steps: 1) single station data preparation, 2) cross-correlation and stacking, 3) quality control and data selection and 4) dispersion measurements. At the USGS, we developed a set of ready-to-use computing codes for analyzing waveforms to run the ambient noise analysis of Benson et al. (2007). Our main contribution to the analysis technique was to fully automate the process. The computation codes were written in Fortran 90 and the automation scripts were written in Perl. Furthermore, some operations were run with SAC. Our choices of programming language offer an opportunity to adapt our codes to the major platforms. The codes were developed under Linux but are meant to be adapted to Mac OS X and Windows platforms. The codes have been tested on Southern California data and our results compare nicely with those from the UC Boulder team. Next, we plan to apply our codes to Indonesian data, so that we might take advantage of newly upgraded seismic stations in that region.

  19. Estimaciones de Prevalencia del VIH por Género y Grupo de Riesgo en Tijuana, México: 2006

    PubMed Central

    Iñiguez-Stevens, Esmeralda; Brouwer, Kimberly C.; Hogg, Robert S.; Patterson, Thomas L.; Lozada, Remedios; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Elder, John P.; Viani, Rolando M.; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2010-01-01

    OBJETIVO Estimar la prevalencia del VIH en adultos de 15-49 años de edad en Tijuana, México - en la población general y en subgrupos de riesgo en el 2006. METODOS Se obtuvieron datos demográficos del censo Mexicano del 2005, y la prevalencia del VIH se obtuvo de la literatura. Se construyó un modelo de prevalencia del VIH para la población general y de acuerdo al género. El análisis de sensibilidad consistió en estimar errores estándar del promedio-ponderado de la prevalencia del VIH y tomar derivados parciales con respecto a cada parámetro. RESULTADOS La prevalencia del VIH es 0.54%(N = 4,347) (Rango: 0.22%–0.86%, (N = 1,750–6,944)). Esto sugiere que 0.85%(Rango: 0.39%–1.31%) de los hombres y 0.22%(Rango: 0.04%–0.40%) de las mujeres podrían ser VIH-positivos. Los hombres que tienen sexo con hombres (HSH), las trabajadoras sexuales usuarias de drogas inyectables (MTS-UDI), MTS-noUDI, mujeres UDI, y los hombres UDI contribuyeron las proporciones más elevadas de personas infectadas por el VIH. CONCLUSIONES El número de adultos VIH-positivos entre subgrupos de riesgo en la población de Tijuana es considerable, marcando la necesidad de enforcar las intervenciones de prevención en sus necesidades específicas. El presente modelo estima que hasta 1 en cada 116 adultos podrían ser VIH-positivos. PMID:19685824

  20. Nonlinear Elasticity in a Deforming Ambient Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavari, Arash; Ozakin, Arkadas; Sadik, Souhayl

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we formulate a nonlinear elasticity theory in which the ambient space is evolving. For a continuum moving in an evolving ambient space, we model time dependency of the metric by a time-dependent embedding of the ambient space in a larger manifold with a fixed background metric. We derive both the tangential and the normal governing equations. We then reduce the standard energy balance written in the larger ambient space to that in the evolving ambient space. We consider quasi-static deformations of the ambient space and show that a quasi-static deformation of the ambient space results in stresses, in general. We linearize the nonlinear theory about a reference motion and show that variation of the spatial metric corresponds to an effective field of body forces.

  1. Ambient Temperature Rechargeable Lithium Battery.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    AD-AI O297 EIC LA BS INC NEWTON MA F/6 10/3 AMB IENT TEMPERATURE RECHARGEABLE LITHIUM BATTERAU AG(MARHMU)L TI ARI AK IC07 UNCLASSIFIED C-655DEE TB6...036FL -T Research and Development Technical Report -N DELET-TR-81-0378-F AMBIENT TEMPERATURE RECHARGEABLE LITHIUM BATTERY K. M. Abraham D. L. Natwig...WORDS (Cenimne an revee filf Of ~"#amp Pu l41"lfr bg’ 61WA amober) Rechargeable lithium battery, CrO.5VO.5S2 positive electrode, 2Me-THF/LiAsF6, cell

  2. Photoelectron Spectroscopy under Ambient Pressure and Temperature Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ogletree, D. Frank; Bluhm, Hendrik; Hebenstreit, Eleonore B.; Salmeron, Miquel

    2009-02-27

    We describe the development and applications of novel instrumentation for photoemission spectroscopy of solid or liquid surfaces in the presence of gases under ambient conditions or pressure and temperature. The new instrument overcomes the strong scattering of electrons in gases by the use of an aperture close to the surface followed by a differentially-pumped electrostatic lens system. In addition to the scattering problem, experiments in the presence of condensed water or other liquids require the development of special sample holders to provide localized cooling. We discuss the first two generations of Ambient Pressure PhotoEmission Spectroscopy (APPES) instruments developed at synchrotron light sources (ALS in Berkeley and BESSY in Berlin), with special focus on the Berkeley instruments. Applications to environmental science and catalytic chemical research are illustrated in two examples.

  3. Turbine airfoil with ambient cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Jr, Christian X.; Marra, John J.; Marsh, Jan H.

    2016-06-07

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and having at least one ambient air cooling system is disclosed. At least a portion of the cooling system may include one or more cooling channels configured to receive ambient air at about atmospheric pressure. The ambient air cooling system may have a tip static pressure to ambient pressure ratio of at least 0.5, and in at least one embodiment, may include a tip static pressure to ambient pressure ratio of between about 0.5 and about 3.0. The cooling system may also be configured such that an under root slot chamber in the root is large to minimize supply air velocity. One or more cooling channels of the ambient air cooling system may terminate at an outlet at the tip such that the outlet is aligned with inner surfaces forming the at least one cooling channel in the airfoil to facilitate high mass flow.

  4. Deep Water Ambient Noise and Mode Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    Deep Water Ambient Noise and Mode Processing Kathleen E. Wage George Mason University Electrical and Computer Engineering Department 4400...specific objectives of the project are: 1) to characterize the ambient noise in the PhilSea data set using spectral analysis and to compare the results...to those for other deep water data sets; 2) to analyze the acoustic modes in the ambient noise and moored source data sets acquired in the PhilSea

  5. Below-Ambient and Cryogenic Thermal Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Thermal insulation systems operating in below-ambient temperature conditions are inherently susceptible to moisture intrusion and vapor drive toward the cold side. The subsequent effects may include condensation, icing, cracking, corrosion, and other problems. Methods and apparatus for real-world thermal performance testing of below-ambient systems have been developed based on cryogenic boiloff calorimetry. New ASTM International standards on cryogenic testing and their extension to future standards for below-ambient testing of pipe insulation are reviewed.

  6. Clinical Application of Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li-Hua; Hsieh, Hua-Yi; Hsu, Cheng-Chih

    2017-01-01

    Ambient ionization allows mass spectrometry analysis directly on the sample surface under atmospheric pressure with almost zero sample pretreatment. Since the development of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) in 2004, many other ambient ionization techniques were developed. Due to their simplicity and low operation cost, rapid and on-site clinical mass spectrometry analysis becomes real. In this review, we will highlight some of the most widely used ambient ionization mass spectrometry approaches and their applications in clinical study. PMID:28337399

  7. Crustal Structure of the PARANÁ Basin from Ambient Noise Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collaço, B.; Assumpcao, M.; Rosa, M. L.; Sanchez, G.

    2013-12-01

    Previous surface-wave tomography in South America (SA) (e.g., Feng et al., 2004; 2007) mapped the main large-scale features of the continent, such as the high lithospheric velocities in cratonic areas and low velocities in the Patagonian province. However, more detailed features such as the Paraná Basin, have not been mapped with good resolution because of poor path coverage, i.e. classic surface- wave tomography has low resolution in low-seismicity areas, like Brazil and the Eastern Argentina. Crustal structure in Southern Brazil is poorly known. Most paths used by Feng et al. (2007) in this region are roughly parallel, which prevents good spatial resolution in tomographic inversions. This work is part of a major project that will increase knowledge of crustal structure in Southern Brazil and Eastern Argentina and is being carried out by IAG-USP (Brazil) in collaboration with UNLP and INPRES (Argentina). To improve resolution for the Paraná Basin we used inter-station dispersion curves derived from correlation of ambient noise for new stations deployed with the implementation of the Brazilian Seismic Network (Pirchiner et al. 2011). This technique, known as ambient noise tomography (ANT), was first applied by Shapiro et al. (2005) and is now expanding rapidly, especially in areas with high density of seismic stations (e.g. Bensen et al. 2007, Lin et al. 2008, Moschetti et al. 2010). ANT is a well-established method to estimate short period (< 20s) and intermediate periods (20 - 50s) surface wave speeds both in regional or continental scales (Lin et al. 2008). ANT data processing in this work was similar to the one described by Bensen et al. 2007, in four major steps with addition of a data inversion step. Group velocities between pairs of stations were derived from correlation of two years of ambient noise in the period range 5 to 60 s. The dispersion curves measurements were made using a modified version of PGSWMFA (PGplot Surface Wave Multiple Filter Analysis

  8. Providing Context for Ambient Particulate Matter and Estimates of Attributable Mortality.

    PubMed

    McClellan, Roger O

    2016-09-01

    Four papers on fine particulate matter (PM2.5 ) by Anenberg et al., Fann et al., Shin et al., and Smith contribute to a growing body of literature on estimated epidemiological associations between ambient PM2.5 concentrations and increases in health responses relative to baseline notes. This article provides context for the four articles, including a historical review of provisions of the U.S. Clean Air Act as amended in 1970, requiring the setting of National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for criteria pollutants such as particulate matter (PM). The substantial improvements in both air quality for PM and population health as measured by decreased mortality rates are illustrated. The most recent revision of the NAAQS for PM2.5 in 2013 by the Environmental Protection Agency distinguished between (1) uncertainties in characterizing PM2.5 as having a causal association with various health endpoints, and as all-cause mortality, and (2) uncertainties in concentration--excess health response relationships at low ambient PM2.5 concentrations below the majority of annual concentrations studied in the United States in the past. In future reviews, and potential revisions, of the NAAQS for PM2.5 , it will be even more important to distinguish between uncertainties in (1) characterizing the causal associations between ambient PM2.5 concentrations and specific health outcomes, such as all-source mortality, irrespective of the concentrations, (2) characterizing the potency of major constituents of PM2.5 , and (3) uncertainties in the association between ambient PM2.5 concentrations and specific health outcomes at various ambient PM2.5 concentrations. The latter uncertainties are of special concern as ambient PM2.5 concentrations and health morbidity and mortality rates approach background or baseline rates.

  9. Ni{sub 3}Al aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.

    1993-10-01

    This paper provides a brief review of the recent progress in research and development of Ni{sub 3}Al and its alloys. Emphasis has been placed on understanding low ductility and brittle fracture of Ni{sub 3}Al alloys at ambient and elevated temperatures. Recent studies have resulted in identifying both intrinsic and extrinsic factors governing the fracture behavior of Ni{sub 3}Al alloys. Parallel efforts on alloy design using physical metallurgy principles have led to properties for structural use. Industrial interest in these alloys is high, and examples of industrial involvement in processing and utilization of these alloys are briefly mentioned.

  10. INTERPOLATING VANCOUVER'S DAILY AMBIENT PM 10 FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this article we develop a spatial predictive distribution for the ambient space- time response field of daily ambient PM10 in Vancouver, Canada. Observed responses have a consistent temporal pattern from one monitoring site to the next. We exploit this feature of the field b...

  11. 40 CFR 1033.505 - Ambient conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 1033.505 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS... presumed that combustion air will be drawn from the ambient air. Thus, the ambient temperature limits of this paragraph (a) apply for intake air upstream of the engine. If you do not draw combustion air...

  12. 40 CFR 1033.505 - Ambient conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 1033.505 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS... presumed that combustion air will be drawn from the ambient air. Thus, the ambient temperature limits of this paragraph (a) apply for intake air upstream of the engine. If you do not draw combustion air...

  13. 40 CFR 1033.505 - Ambient conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 1033.505 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS... presumed that combustion air will be drawn from the ambient air. Thus, the ambient temperature limits of this paragraph (a) apply for intake air upstream of the engine. If you do not draw combustion air...

  14. 40 CFR 1033.505 - Ambient conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 1033.505 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS... presumed that combustion air will be drawn from the ambient air. Thus, the ambient temperature limits of this paragraph (a) apply for intake air upstream of the engine. If you do not draw combustion air...

  15. 40 CFR 1033.505 - Ambient conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 1033.505 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS... presumed that combustion air will be drawn from the ambient air. Thus, the ambient temperature limits of this paragraph (a) apply for intake air upstream of the engine. If you do not draw combustion air...

  16. Ambient air contamination: Characterization and detection techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nulton, C. P.; Silvus, H. S.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques to characterize and detect sources of ambient air contamination are described. Chemical techniques to identify indoor contaminants are outlined, they include gas chromatography, or colorimetric detection. Organics generated from indoor materials at ambient conditions and upon combustion are characterized. Piezoelectric quartz crystals are used as precision frequency determining elements in electronic oscillators.

  17. Do ambient urban odors evoke basic emotions?

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Sandra T.; Lingg, Elisabeth; Heuberger, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Fragrances, such as plant odors, have been shown to evoke autonomic response patterns associated with Ekman's (Ekman et al., 1983) basic emotions happiness, surprise, anger, fear, sadness, and disgust. Inducing positive emotions by odors in highly frequented public spaces could serve to improve the quality of life in urban environments. Thus, the present study evaluated the potency of ambient odors connoted with an urban environment to evoke basic emotions on an autonomic and cognitive response level. Synthetic mixtures representing the odors of disinfectant, candles/bees wax, summer air, burnt smell, vomit and musty smell as well as odorless water as a control were presented five times in random order to 30 healthy, non-smoking human subjects with intact sense of smell. Skin temperature, skin conductance, breathing rate, forearm muscle activity, blink rate, and heart rate were recorded simultaneously. Subjects rated the odors in terms of pleasantness, intensity and familiarity and gave verbal labels to each odor as well as cognitive associations with the basic emotions. The results showed that the amplitude of the skin conductance response (SCR) varied as a function of odor presentation. Burnt smell and vomit elicited significantly higher electrodermal responses than summer air. Also, a negative correlation was revealed between the amplitude of the SCR and hedonic odor valence indicating that the magnitude of the electrodermal response increased with odor unpleasantness. The analysis of the cognitive associations between odors and basic emotions showed that candles/bees wax and summer air were specifically associated with happiness whereas burnt smell and vomit were uniquely associated with disgust. Our findings suggest that city odors may evoke specific cognitive associations of basic emotions and that autonomic activity elicited by such odors is related to odor hedonics. PMID:24860522

  18. Ambient clumsiness in virtual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzanka, Silvia; Behar, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental pursuit of Virtual Reality is the experience of a seamless connection between the user's body and actions within the simulation. Virtual worlds often mediate the relationship between the physical and virtual body through creating an idealized representation of the self in an idealized space. This paper argues that the very ubiquity of the medium of virtual environments, such as the massively popular Second Life, has now made them mundane, and that idealized representations are no longer appropriate. In our artwork we introduce the attribute of clumsiness to Second Life by creating and distributing scripts that cause users' avatars to exhibit unpredictable stumbling, tripping, and momentary poor coordination, thus subtly and unexpectedly intervening with, rather than amplifying, a user's intent. These behaviors are publicly distributed, and manifest only occasionally - rather than intentional, conscious actions, they are involuntary and ambient. We suggest that the physical human body is itself an imperfect interface, and that the continued blurring of distinctions between the physical body and virtual representations calls for the introduction of these mundane, clumsy elements.

  19. AL Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Definition of the disease AL amyloidosis results from extra-cellular deposition of fibril-forming monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) light chains (LC) (most commonly of lambda isotype) usually secreted by a small plasma cell clone. Most patients have evidence of isolated monoclonal gammopathy or smoldering myeloma, and the occurrence of AL amyloidosis in patients with symptomatic multiple myeloma or other B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders is unusual. The key event in the development of AL amyloidosis is the change in the secondary or tertiary structure of an abnormal monoclonal LC, which results in instable conformation. This conformational change is responsible for abnormal folding of the LC, rich in β leaves, which assemble into monomers that stack together to form amyloid fibrils. Epidemiology AL amyloidosis is the most common type of systemic amyloidois in developed countries with an estimated incidence of 9 cases/million inhabitant/year. The average age of diagnosed patients is 65 years and less than 10% of patients are under 50. Clinical description The clinical presentation is protean, because of the wide number of tissues or organs that may be affected. The most common presenting symptoms are asthenia and dyspnoea, which are poorly specific and may account for delayed diagnosis. Renal manifestations are the most frequent, affecting two thirds of patients at presentation. They are characterized by heavy proteinuria, with nephrotic syndrome and impaired renal function in half of the patients. Heart involvement, which is present at diagnosis in more than 50% of patients, leading to restrictive cardiopathy, is the most serious complication and engages prognosis. Diagnostic methods The diagnosis relies on pathological examination of an involved site showing Congo red-positive amyloid deposits, with typical apple-green birefringence under polarized light, that stain positive with an anti-LC antibody by immunohistochemistry and/or immunofluorescence. Due to the

  20. Large rectification magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic Al/Ge/Al heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-Huan; Grünberg, Peter; Li, Qiang; Ye, Sheng-Tao; Tian, Yu-Feng; Yan, Shi-Shen; Lin, Zhao-Jun; Kang, Shi-Shou; Chen, Yan-Xue; Liu, Guo-Lei; Mei, Liang-Mo

    2015-09-01

    Magnetoresistance and rectification are two fundamental physical properties of heterojunctions and respectively have wide applications in spintronics devices. Being different from the well known various magnetoresistance effects, here we report a brand new large magnetoresistance that can be regarded as rectification magnetoresistance: the application of a pure small sinusoidal alternating-current to the nonmagnetic Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions can generate a significant direct-current voltage, and this rectification voltage strongly varies with the external magnetic field. We find that the rectification magnetoresistance in Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions is as large as 250% at room temperature, which is greatly enhanced as compared with the conventional magnetoresistance of 70%. The findings of rectification magnetoresistance open the way to the new nonmagnetic Ge-based spintronics devices of large rectification magnetoresistance at ambient temperature under the alternating-current due to the simultaneous implementation of the rectification and magnetoresistance in the same devices.

  1. Large rectification magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic Al/Ge/Al heterojunctions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-huan; Grünberg, Peter; Li, Qiang; Ye, Sheng-tao; Tian, Yu-feng; Yan, Shi-shen; Lin, Zhao-jun; Kang, Shi-shou; Chen, Yan-xue; Liu, Guo-lei; Mei, Liang-mo

    2015-01-01

    Magnetoresistance and rectification are two fundamental physical properties of heterojunctions and respectively have wide applications in spintronics devices. Being different from the well known various magnetoresistance effects, here we report a brand new large magnetoresistance that can be regarded as rectification magnetoresistance: the application of a pure small sinusoidal alternating-current to the nonmagnetic Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions can generate a significant direct-current voltage, and this rectification voltage strongly varies with the external magnetic field. We find that the rectification magnetoresistance in Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions is as large as 250% at room temperature, which is greatly enhanced as compared with the conventional magnetoresistance of 70%. The findings of rectification magnetoresistance open the way to the new nonmagnetic Ge-based spintronics devices of large rectification magnetoresistance at ambient temperature under the alternating-current due to the simultaneous implementation of the rectification and magnetoresistance in the same devices. PMID:26387967

  2. Al-Al2O3-Pd junction hydrogen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, K.; Takinami, N.; Chiba, Y.; Ohshima, S.; Kambe, S.

    1994-07-01

    Al-Al2O3-Pd MIM (metal insulator metal) junctions fabricated on a glass substrate were tested as hydrogen sensors. The I-V (current versus voltage) characteristics of the junctions were measured at room temperature in a vacuum of 10-5 Torr and in H2 gas of 10-2-100 Torr. A significant increase in the current was observed upon introduction of H2 gas. This phenomenon is believed to occur due to the work function lowering of the hydrogen-absorbed Pd top electrode. The rise time was on the order of minutes, while the recovery time when hydrogen was purged was more than 20 h. However, when the junction was placed in an oxidizing ambient such as air, the recovery time was drastically reduced to the order of minutes, indicating that the device is operative as a hydrogen sensor in the atmospheric ambient. Hydrogen adsorption and desorption behavior of the Pd film was also investigated using a Pd coated quartz microbalance, and the results explained the current response of the Pd MIM junction to hydrogen in the presence of oxygen.

  3. Ambient pressure and single-bubble sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondic, Ljubinko; Yuan, Chi; Chan, C. K.

    1998-01-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the influence of ambient pressure on single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL). By combining simulations of gas dynamics, mass diffusion theory, and stability analysis we find a narrow region of the parameter space where stable SBSL is possible. In particular, the theory predicts a 200% increase in SL radiation if ambient pressure is decreased only 5%. The results are compared with preliminary experimental data, and a good agreement is found. Variation of ambient pressure provides a simple and interesting test for the validity of various SL theories, diffusive or nondiffusive mass flow ideas, and stability analyses.

  4. 4-D Transdimensional Tomography of Iceland Using Ambient Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, D.; Tkalcic, H.; Young, M.

    2012-12-01

    Located at the east of Greenland and immediately south of Arctic Circle, Iceland is the largest volcanic island in the world and represents a unique region of particular interest to geosciences. Various seismological imaging techniques have been deployed to shed light on composition and thickness of the Icelandic crust with serious geodynamic repercussions (for a recent review, see Foulger (2010)). Due to an abundance of active volcanoes, Iceland can be considered a natural laboratory for studying volcanic earthquakes with anomalous seismic radiation (e.g. Tkalcic et al., 2009; Fichtner and Tkalcic, 2010). Temporal changes in the velocity field due to volcanic processes effect seismic waveforms and are important to consider in the context of seismic sources, whose understanding relies on complete understanding of Earth structure. Apart from reflection and refraction studies and teleseismic signals, ambient noise tomography has been recently utilised to image shallow subsurface of Iceland (Gudmundson et al., 2007). The confluence of North Atlantic and Arctic oceans delivers a strong and relatively evenly distributed noise field, therefore making Iceland an ideal place for an ambient noise study. We initially attempt to confirm previous results of Gudmundson et al. (2007) using conventional surface wave tomography derived from Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion, with fast marching method as a method of choice for forward modelling (Rawlinson and Sambridge, 2005). We perform cross-correlation over several three-month time intervals of ambient noise obtained from the HOTSPOT experiment (Foulger et al., 2001) distributed across Iceland and we discuss seasonal variation observed in cross-correlograms. To extend conventional methods of imaging, trans-dimensional and hierarchical Bayesian sampling methods are used to produce a multidimensional posterior probability distribution of seismic velocity field. We use a trans-dimensional Bayesian inverse method, as it has an

  5. Ambient air quality in Slovak Republic

    SciTech Connect

    Violova, A.; Cremonini, M.G.; Lombardo, P.; Stenhouse, I.A.; Kocan, A.

    1998-07-01

    The National Government of the Slovak Republic is committed to develop an integrated strategy that will take into account global, regional and local aspects of the national emissions of pollutants. Priority is given to ambient air quality, with particular reference to human health protection. Only limited information on ambient air concentrations of hazardous air pollutants (HAP) was available in Slovakia. A comprehensive ambient air quality project has been recently funded by the European Union Phare Programme. The project was performed under the technical supervision of the Slovak Ministry of the Environment and aimed at monitoring the ambient air quality with respect to Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) and heavy metals (HMs), identifying and evaluating main potential pollution sources, and defining general strategies to reduce impacts.

  6. Timelapse: Webb's Ambient Optical Assembly Stand

    NASA Video Gallery

    The clean room at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., has received a giant structural steel frame called "AOAS," the Ambient Optical Assembly Stand that will be used to assemble t...

  7. SPS emissions and comparison with ambient loadings

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, E.; Brubaker, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of propulsion injections into the atmosphere due to Satellite Power System (SPS) transportation vehicles, and relates the magnitudes of these injections to the ambient burdens of the different chemical species. The significance of the different injections is discussed in terms of a dimensionless perturbation factor, the magnitude of which is a measure of the expected concentration change relative to the existing ambient concentration.

  8. Forensic applications of ambient ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ifa, Demian R; Jackson, Ayanna U; Paglia, Giuseppe; Cooks, R Graham

    2009-08-01

    This review highlights and critically assesses forensic applications in the developing field of ambient ionization mass spectrometry. Ambient ionization methods permit the ionization of samples outside the mass spectrometer in the ordinary atmosphere, with minimal sample preparation. Several ambient ionization methods have been created since 2004 and they utilize different mechanisms to create ions for mass-spectrometric analysis. Forensic applications of these techniques--to the analysis of toxic industrial compounds, chemical warfare agents, illicit drugs and formulations, explosives, foodstuff, inks, fingerprints, and skin--are reviewed. The minimal sample pretreatment needed is illustrated with examples of analysis from complex matrices (e.g., food) on various substrates (e.g., paper). The low limits of detection achieved by most of the ambient ionization methods for compounds of forensic interest readily offer qualitative confirmation of chemical identity; in some cases quantitative data are also available. The forensic applications of ambient ionization methods are a growing research field and there are still many types of applications which remain to be explored, particularly those involving on-site analysis. Aspects of ambient ionization currently undergoing rapid development include molecular imaging and increased detection specificity through simultaneous chemical reaction and ionization by addition of appropriate chemical reagents.

  9. 40 CFR 51.190 - Ambient air quality monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ambient air quality monitoring... PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Ambient Air Quality Surveillance § 51.190 Ambient air quality monitoring requirements. The requirements for monitoring ambient...

  10. 40 CFR 51.190 - Ambient air quality monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ambient air quality monitoring... PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Ambient Air Quality Surveillance § 51.190 Ambient air quality monitoring requirements. The requirements for monitoring ambient...

  11. 40 CFR 51.190 - Ambient air quality monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ambient air quality monitoring... PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Ambient Air Quality Surveillance § 51.190 Ambient air quality monitoring requirements. The requirements for monitoring ambient...

  12. 40 CFR 51.190 - Ambient air quality monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ambient air quality monitoring... PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Ambient Air Quality Surveillance § 51.190 Ambient air quality monitoring requirements. The requirements for monitoring ambient...

  13. 40 CFR 51.190 - Ambient air quality monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ambient air quality monitoring... PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Ambient Air Quality Surveillance § 51.190 Ambient air quality monitoring requirements. The requirements for monitoring ambient...

  14. Yellowstone Attenuation Tomography from Ambient Seismic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doungkaew, N.; Seats, K.; Lawrence, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this study is to create a tomographic attenuation image for the Yellowstone region by analyzing ambient seismic noise. An attenuation image generated from ambient noise should provide more information about the structure and properties beneath Yellowstone, especially the caldera, which is known to be active. I applied the method of Lawrence & Prieto [2011] to examine lateral variations in the attenuation structure of Yellowstone. Ambient noise data were collected from broadband seismic stations located around Yellowstone National Park from 1999-2013. Noise correlation functions derived from cross correlations of the ambient noise at two stations were used to calculate a distance dependent decay (an attenuation coefficient) at each period and distance. An inversion was then performed to isolate and localize the spatial attenuation coefficients within the study area. I observe high amplitude decay of the ambient noise at the Yellowstone caldera, most likely due to elevated temperature and crustal melts caused by volcanism, geothermal heat flow, and hydrothermal activity such as geysers.

  15. Care services ecosystem for ambient assisted living

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarinha-Matos, Luis M.; Rosas, Joao; Ines Oliveira, Ana; Ferrada, Filipa

    2015-08-01

    Effective provision of care and assistance services in ambient assisted living requires the involvement and collaboration of multiple stakeholders. To support such collaboration, the development of an ecosystem of products and services for active ageing plays an important role. This article introduces a conceptual architecture that supports such care ecosystem. In order to facilitate understanding and better interrelate concepts, a 3-layered model is adopted: Infrastructure layer, Care and assistance services layer and Ambient Assisted Living ecosystem layer. A holistic perspective of ambient assisted living, namely considering four important life settings is adopted: (1) independent living; (2) health and care in life; (3) occupation in life and (4) recreation in life. The proposed architecture is designed in the context of a national Portuguese project and in accordance with the findings of a large European road mapping initiative on ICT and ageing.

  16. Dynamics of dense granular flows of small-and-large-grain mixtures in an ambient fluid.

    PubMed

    Meruane, C; Tamburrino, A; Roche, O

    2012-08-01

    Dense grain flows in nature consist of a mixture of solid constituents that are immersed in an ambient fluid. In order to obtain a good representation of these flows, the interaction mechanisms between the different constituents of the mixture should be considered. In this article, we study the dynamics of a dense granular flow composed of a binary mixture of small and large grains immersed in an ambient fluid. In this context, we extend the two-phase approach proposed by Meruane et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 648, 381 (2010)] to the case of flowing dense binary mixtures of solid particles, by including in the momentum equations a constitutive relation that describes the interaction mechanisms between the solid constituents in a dense regime. These coupled equations are solved numerically and validated by comparing the numerical results with experimental measurements of the front speed of gravitational granular flows resulting from the collapse, in ambient air or water, of two-dimensional granular columns that consisted of mixtures of small and large spherical particles of equal mass density. Our results suggest that the model equations include the essential features that describe the dynamics of grains flows of binary mixtures in an ambient fluid. In particular, it is shown that segregation of small and large grains can increase the front speed because of the volumetric expansion of the flow. This increase in flow speed is damped by the interaction forces with the ambient fluid, and this behavior is more pronounced in water than in air.

  17. Ambient noise analysis of underwater acoustic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Mark A.; Orlin, Pete; Schulte, Annette; Newcomb, Joal

    2003-04-01

    The Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center (LADC) deployed three Environmental Acoustic Recording System (EARS) buoys in the northern Gulf of Mexico during the summers of 2001 and 2002. The buoys recorded frequencies up to 5859 Hz continuously for 36 days in 2001 and for 72 days in 2002. The acoustic signals recorded include sperm whale vocalizations, seismic airguns, and shipping traffic. The variability of the ambient noise is analyzed using spectrograms, time series, and statistical measurements. Variations in ambient noise before, during, and after tropical storm/hurricane passage are also investigated.

  18. Ambient taxes when polluters have multiple choices

    SciTech Connect

    Horan, R.D.; Shortle, J.S.; Abler, D.G.

    1998-09-01

    Economic research on environmental policy design has largely been concerned with the merits of emissions-based economic incentives (e.g., emissions charges, emissions reduction subsidies, transferable discharge permits). Ambient-based tax-subsidy schemes have drawn considerable interest in nonpoint pollution literature as alternatives to emissions-based instruments. Expanding especially on Segerson`s seminal article, this article examines the optimal design and budget-balancing properties of ambient tax-subsidy schemes under more realistic assumptions about the dimensions of firms` choice sets than prior research.

  19. Anode for rechargeable ambient temperature lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Chen-Kuo (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Attia, Alan I. (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An ambient room temperature, high density, rechargeable lithium battery includes a Li(x)Mg2Si negative anode which intercalates lithium to form a single crystalline phase when x is up to 1.0 and an amorphous phase when x is from 1 to 2.0. The electrode has good reversibility and mechanical strength after cycling.

  20. Ocean Remote Sensing Using Ambient Noise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Ocean Remote Sensing Using Ambient Noise Michael G...frequency sound propagation in the ocean , and the effects of environmental variability on signal stability and coherence. We seek to understand the...fundamental limits to signal processing imposed by ocean variability to enable advanced signal processing techniques, including matched field processing

  1. Projection screen having reduced ambient light scattering

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.

    2010-05-11

    An apparatus and method for improving the contrast between incident projected light and ambient light reflected from a projection screen are described. The efficiency of the projection screen for reflection of the projected light remains high, while permitting the projection screen to be utilized in a brightly lighted room. Light power requirements from the projection system utilized may be reduced.

  2. EXPOSURE TO CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICLES (CAPS): REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiologic studies support a participation of fine particulate matter (PM) with a diameter of 0.1 to 2.5 microm in the effects of air pollution particles on human health. The ambient fine particle concentrator is a recently developed technology that can enrich the mass of ambi...

  3. RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT MODELS UNDER AMBIENT CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    S. Magnuson

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this model report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) radionuclide transport model, which evaluates, by means of three-dimensional numerical models, the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the UZ, under ambient conditions, from the repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

  4. Airborne laser-spark for ambient desorption/ionisation.

    PubMed

    Bierstedt, Andreas; Riedel, Jens

    2016-01-01

    A novel direct sampling ionisation scheme for ambient mass spectrometry is presented. Desorption and ionisation are achieved by a quasi-continuous laser induced plasma in air. Since there are no solid or liquid electrodes involved the ion source does not suffer from chemical interferences or fatigue originating from erosive burning or from electrode consumption. The overall plasma maintains electro-neutrality, minimising charge effects and accompanying long term drift of the charged particles trajectories. In the airborne plasma approach the ambient air not only serves as the plasma medium but at the same time also slows down the nascent ions via collisional cooling. Ionisation of the analyte molecules does not occur in the plasma itself but is induced by interaction with nascent ionic fragments, electrons and/or far ultraviolet photons in the plasma vicinity. At each individual air-spark an audible shockwave is formed, providing new reactive species, which expands concentrically and, thus, prevents direct contact of the analyte with the hot region inside the plasma itself. As a consequence the interaction volume between plasma and analyte does not exceed the threshold temperature for thermal dissociation or fragmentation. Experimentally this indirect ionisation scheme is demonstrated to be widely unspecific to the chemical nature of the analyte and to hardly result in any fragmentation of the studied molecules. A vast ensemble of different test analytes including polar and non-polar hydrocarbons, sugars, low mass active ingredients of pharmaceuticals as well as natural biomolecules in food samples directly out of their complex matrices could be shown to yield easily accessible yet meaningful spectra. Since the plasma medium is humid air, the chemical reaction mechanism of the ionisation is likely to be similar to other ambient ionisation techniques. Wir stellen hier eine neue Ionisationsmethode für die Umgebungsionisation (ambient ionisation) vor. Sowohl die

  5. Medio ambiente y cáncer pediátrico en la Región de Murcia (España): integrando la historia clínica medioambiental en un sistema de información geográfica

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-García, J.A.; López-Hernández, F.A.; Sobrino-Najul, E.; Febo, I.; Fuster-Soler, J.L.

    2016-01-01

    Introducción Medio Ambiente y Cáncer Pediátrico (CP) en la Región de Murcia (RM) es un proyecto de investigación, cuya principal meta es el desarrollo de una cuidadosa historia ambiental pediátrica (HAP) y el uso de sistemas de información geográfica (SIG) para crear mapas de incidencia y analizar la distribución geográfica del CP en la RM. El objetivo es presentar la metodología, el estudio descriptivo y los primeros resultados sobre la incidencia espacial y temporal del CP en la RM (España). Material y métodos Estudio descriptivo y de georreferenciación de todos los casos de CP menores de 15 años, diagnosticados entre el 1 de enero de 1998 y el 31 de diciembre de 2009. Se han asociado a cada caso tres direcciones postales, durante el embarazo, en el período posnatal y en el momento del diagnóstico. También se han utilizado las siguientes variables: sexo, fechas de nacimiento y diagnóstico y el diagnóstico patológico. Resultados No se observa un incremento en la tendencia de la incidencia del CP. La tasa cruda de incidencia fue de 14,3 casos por 100.000 niños menores de 15 años. La razón de incidencia estandarizada es más elevada en el noroeste de la RM. El 30% tienen un domicilio previo al diagnóstico distinto al del embarazo. Conclusiones La integración de la información temporal y espacial de la HAP en un SIG permitirá la identificación y el estudio de conglomerados espacio-temporales a través de un sistema de vigilancia medioambiental que ayude a ponderar la importancia de los factores de riesgo asociados. PMID:21315667

  6. Materials data handbook. Titanium 6Al-4V

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. F.; Whittick, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the materials property information for Titanium 6Al-4V alloy is presented. The scope of the information includes physical and mechanical properties at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures. Information on material procurement, metallurgy of the alloy, corrosion, environmental effects, fabrication, and bonding is developed.

  7. Prevalencia y factores de riesgo para infecciones del tracto urinario de inicio en la comunidad causadas por Escherichia coli productor de betalactamasas de espectro extendido en Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Victor M.; Maya, Juan J.; Correa, Adriana; Perenguez, Marcela; Muñoz, Juan S.; Motoa, Gabriel; Pallares, Christian J.; Rosso, Fernando; Matta, Lorena; Celis, Yamile; Garzon, Martha; Villegas, y María V.

    2016-01-01

    RESUMEN Introducción Las infecciones del tracto urinario (ITU) son frecuentes en la comunidad. Sin embargo, la información de aislamientos resistentes en este contexto es limitada en Latinoamérica. Este estudio tiene como objetivo determinar la prevalencia y los factores de riesgo asociados con ITU de inicio en la comunidad (ITU-IC) causadas por Escherichia coli productor de betalactamasas de espectro extendido (BLEE) en Colombia. Materiales y métodos Entre agosto y diciembre de 2011 se realizó un estudio de casos y controles en 3 instituciones de salud de tercer nivel en Colombia. Se invitó a participar a todos los pacientes admitidos a urgencias con diagnóstico probable de ITU-IC, y se les pidió una muestra de orina. En los aislamien-tos de E. coli se realizaron pruebas confirmatorias para BLEE, susceptibilidad antibiótica, caracterización molecular (PCR en tiempo real para genes bla, repetitive element palindromic PCR [rep-PCR], multilocus sequence typing [MLST] y factores de virulencia por PCR). Se obtuvo información clínica y epidemiológica, y posteriormente se realizó el análisis estadístico. Resultados De los 2.124 pacientes seleccionados, 629 tuvieron un urocultivo positivo, en 431 de estos se aisló E. coli, 54 fueron positivos para BLEE y 29 correspondieron a CTX-M-15. La mayoría de los aislamientos de E. coli productor de BLEE fueron sensibles a ertapenem, fosfomicina y amikacina. La ITU complicada se asoció fuertemente con infecciones por E. coli productor de BLEE (OR = 3,89; IC 95%: 1,10–13,89; p = 0,03). E. coli productor de CTX-M-15 mostró 10 electroferotipos diferentes; de estos, el 65% correspondieron al ST131. La mayoría de estos aislamientos tuvieron 8 de los 9 factores de virulencia analizados. Discusión E. coli portador del gen blaCTX-M-15 asociado al ST131 sigue siendo frecuente en Colombia. La presencia de ITU-IC complicada aumenta el riesgo de tener E. coli productor de BLEE, lo cual debe tenerse en cuenta para ofrecer

  8. What Is ALS?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javits, actor David Niven, “Sesame Street” creator Jon Stone, boxing champion Ezzard Charles, NBA Hall of Fame ... Help for People with ALS and Caregivers Read stories from families living with ALS Forms of ALS ...

  9. Ambient tectonic stress as fragile geological feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleep, Norman H.

    2014-09-01

    seismic waves produce frictional failure within shallow pervasively cracked rocks. Distributed failure preferentially relaxes ambient tectonic stresses, providing a fragility measure of past strong shaking. Relaxation of the regional fault-normal compression appears to have occurred within granite from 768 m down to ˜1000-1600 m depth at the Pilot Hole near Parkfield, California. Subsequent movements on the main fault have imposed strike-slip stress within the relaxed region. Peak ground velocities of ˜2 m s-1 are inferred for infrequent (few 1000 yr recurrence) past earthquakes from stress relaxation within the granite and from the variation of S wave velocity with depth in the overlying sandstone. Conversely, frequent strong shaking in slowly deforming regions relaxes shallow ambient tectonic stress. This situation is expected beneath Whittier Narrows, where strong Love waves from numerous San Andreas events repeatedly produced nonlinear behavior.

  10. Ambient-temperature co-oxidation catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T.; Schryer, David R.; Brown, Kenneth G.; Kielin, Erik J.

    1991-01-01

    Oxidation catalysts which operate at ambient temperature were developed for the recombination of carbon monoxide (CO) and oxygen (O2) dissociation products which are formed during carbon dioxide (CO2) laser operation. Recombination of these products to regenerate CO2 allows continuous operation of CO2 lasers in a closed cycle mode. Development of these catalyst materials provides enabling technology for the operation of such lasers from space platforms or in ground based facilities without constant gas consumption required for continuous open cycle operation. Such catalysts also have other applications in various areas outside the laser community for removal of CO from other closed environments such as indoor air and as an ambient temperature catalytic converter for control of auto emissions.

  11. Thermal explosion in oscillating ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novozhilov, Vasily

    2016-07-01

    Thermal explosion problem for a medium with oscillating ambient temperature at its boundaries is considered. This is a new problem in thermal explosion theory, not previously considered in a distributed system formulation, but important for combustion and fire science. It describes autoignition of wide range of fires (such as but not limited to piles of biosolids and other organic matter; storages of munitions, explosives, propellants) subjected to temperature variations, such as seasonal or day/night variation. The problem is considered in formulation adopted in classical studies of thermal explosion. Critical conditions are determined by frequency and amplitude of ambient temperature oscillations, as well as by a number of other parameters. Effects of all the parameters on critical conditions are quantified. Results are presented for the case of planar symmetry. Development of thermal explosion in time is also considered, and a new type of unsteady thermal explosion development is discovered where thermal runaway occurs after several periods of temperature oscillations within the medium.

  12. Ambient Intelligence Research Landscapes: Introduction and Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streitz, Norbert

    This paper starts out by introducing the "Landscapes" category at the Joint International Conference on Ambient Intelligence (AmI-2010) and provides an overview over the two sessions. The main part of the paper presents a framework for the role of Ambient Intelligence in the development of the cities of the future. This includes the integration of real and virtual worlds resulting in Hybrid Cities and their transformation into Smart Cities. In the context, it is argued that the technological development has to be monitored by guidelines and goals for maintaining and improving the quality of life leading to what is called Humane Cities, addressing, e.g., social awareness and privacy, trust and identity. The paper closes with proposals for a future research agenda.

  13. Improved Ambient Pressure Pyroelectric Ion Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beegle, Luther W.; Kim, Hugh I.; Kanik, Isik; Ryu, Ernest K.; Beckett, Brett

    2011-01-01

    The detection of volatile vapors of unknown species in a complex field environment is required in many different applications. Mass spectroscopic techniques require subsystems including an ionization unit and sample transport mechanism. All of these subsystems must have low mass, small volume, low power, and be rugged. A volatile molecular detector, an ambient pressure pyroelectric ion source (APPIS) that met these requirements, was recently reported by Caltech researchers to be used in in situ environments.

  14. Ambient temperature sodium-sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Manthiram, Arumugam; Yu, Xingwen

    2015-05-13

    Ambient- or room-temperature sodium-sulfur batteries (RT Na-S) are gaining much attention as a low-cost option for large-scale electrical energy storage applications. However, their adoption is hampered by severe challenges. This concept paper summarizes first the operating principles, history, recent progress, and challenges of RT Na-S battery technology, and then suggests future directions towards enhancing performance in order for it to be a viable technology.

  15. Mass Spectrometry Imaging under Ambient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chunping; Dill, Allison L.; Eberlin, Livia S.; Cooks, R. Graham; Ifa, Demian R.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has emerged as an important tool in the last decade and it is beginning to show potential to provide new information in many fields owing to its unique ability to acquire molecularly specific images and to provide multiplexed information, without the need for labeling or staining. In MSI, the chemical identity of molecules present on a surface is investigated as a function of spatial distribution. In addition to now standard methods involving MSI in vacuum, recently developed ambient ionization techniques allow MSI to be performed under atmospheric pressure on untreated samples outside the mass spectrometer. Here we review recent developments and applications of MSI emphasizing the ambient ionization techniques of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI), laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI), probe electrospray ionization (PESI), desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization (DAPPI), femtosecond laser desorption ionization (fs-LDI), laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS), infrared laser ablation metastable-induced chemical ionization (IR-LAMICI), liquid microjunction surface sampling probe mass spectrometry (LMJ-SSP MS), nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI), and plasma sources such as the low temperature plasma (LTP) probe and laser ablation coupled to flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (LA-FAPA). Included are discussions of some of the features of ambient MSI including the ability to implement chemical reactions with the goal of providing high abundance ions characteristic of specific compounds of interest and the use of tandem mass spectrometry to either map the distribution of targeted molecules with high specificity or to provide additional MS information in the structural identification of compounds. We also describe the role of bioinformatics in acquiring and interpreting the chemical and spatial information obtained through MSI, especially in biological applications for tissue

  16. Characterizing and Classifying Acoustical Ambient Sound Profiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    of sound . The value for the speed of sound varies depending on the medium which the sound wave travels through as well as the temperature and...Characterizing and Classifying Acoustical Ambient Sound Profiles THESIS MARCH 2015 Paul T. Gaski, Second Lieutenant, USAF AFIT-ENS-MS-15-M-122... SOUND PROFILES THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Operational Sciences Graduate School of Engineering and Management Air Force Institute of

  17. Electric Power From Ambient Energy Sources

    SciTech Connect

    DeSteese, John G.; Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.

    2000-10-03

    This report summarizes research on opportunities to produce electric power from ambient sources as an alternative to using portable battery packs or hydrocarbon-fueled systems in remote areas. The work was an activity in the Advanced Concepts Project conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Office of Research and Development in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nonproliferation and National Security.

  18. Work function measurements in gas ambient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Wilford N.; Johnson, Kendall B.

    1994-09-01

    A simple, practical method for making work function measurements in gas ambient is presented. The method makes use of a Kelvin probe that has been calibrated using a clean solution surface of an electrochemical half-cell. We find that the outer potential of a typical half-cell solution is constant and reproducible, much more so even than gold in air. It is suggested that the concept and definition of work function be extended to electrochemical half-cells.

  19. Quantification of furandiones in ambient aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Naiema, Ibrahim M.; Roppo, Hannah M.; Stone, Elizabeth A.

    2017-03-01

    Furandiones are products of the photooxidation of anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC), like toluene, and contribute to secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Because few molecular tracers of anthropogenic SOA are used to assess this source in ambient aerosol, developing a quantification method for furandiones holds a great importance. In this study, we developed a direct and highly sensitive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the quantitative analysis of furandiones in fine particulate matter that is mainly free from interference by structurally-related dicarboxylic acids. Our application of this method in Iowa City, IA provides the first ambient measurements of four furandiones: 2,5-furandione, 3-methyl-2,5-furandione, dihydro-2,5-furandione, and dihydro-3-methyl-2,5-furandione. Furandiones were detected in all collected samples with a daily average concentration of 9.1 ± 3.8 ng m-3. The developed method allows for the accurate measurement of the furandiones concentrations in ambient aerosol, which will support future evaluation of these compounds as tracers for anthropogenic SOA and assessment of their potential health impacts.

  20. Exercise and outdoor ambient air pollution

    PubMed Central

    Carlisle, A; Sharp, N

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—To establish by literature survey: (a) levels at which air pollutants are considered damaging to human health and to exercisers in particular; (b) the current ambient levels experienced in the United Kingdom; (c) whether athletes are especially at risk. Methods—Six major urban air pollutants were examined: carbon monoxide (CO); nitrogen oxides (NOX); ozone (O3); particulate matter (PM10); sulphur dioxide (SO2); volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Results—CO is detrimental to athletic performance. NO2 is of concern to human health, but outdoor levels are low. O3 poses a potentially serious risk to exercising athletes. Decrements in lung function result from exposure, and there is evidence that athletic performance may be affected. Detrimental effects may occur at low ambient levels, but there is no scientific consensus on this matter. PM10 is causing concern in the scientific community. Blood lead accumulation during exercise indicates that personal exposure to toxic compounds associated with PM10 may be magnified. Generally, outdoor ambient levels of SO2 are too low to cause a problem to the athlete, except the asthmatic athlete. The few studies on exposure of exercisers to VOCs are reviewed. Conclusions—Athletes and exercisers should avoid exercising by the road side even though levels of the more noxious air pollutants have been controlled in the United Kingdom. O3 is particularly damaging to athletes; it reaches its highest concentrations on hot bright days in rural areas. Key Words: exercise; air pollution PMID:11477012

  1. Desarrollo curricular, conciencia ambiental y tecnologia para estudiantes de intermedia: Una investigacion en accion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Ramos, Teresita

    Se llevó a cabo una investigación en acción con los propósitos de 1) documentar las relaciones de las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación en las clases de ciencias de escuela intermedia como elemento de apoyo cuando se aborda el tema ambiental y sus conceptos pertinentes, a partir de las observaciones de la investigadora, así como las entrevistas y diarios reflexivos de los estudiantes de una escuela intermedia en la zona metropolitana, y luego 2) diseñar una unidad instruccional sobre el tema ambiental que integre actividades tecnologías para el curso de ciencias de la escuela intermedia según el modelo PROCIC y las observaciones que hayan iniciado los estudiantes participantes. Finalmente, se plantearon las implicaciones educativas para el currículo del Programa de Ciencias al instrumentar este modelo de unidad mediante PROCIC, e integrado la tecnología y el tema ambiental. Los hallazgos se analizaron y se categorizaron de acuerdo con las preguntas de investigación. El hallazgo principal de la investigación aborda las cuatro relaciones centrales en las que se articula la utilización de las tecnologías y sus aplicaciones en la clase de ciencias. Estas cuatro relaciones que recogen la posición de los estudiantes son: 1) Perspectiva de los estudiantes hacia la tecnología. 2) Participación de los estudiantes en los aspectos docentes. 3) Aprendizaje estudiantil sobre el ambiente, y 4) Conciencia ambiental en relación con la vida diaria. Estas relaciones ponen de manifiesto,cómo se plantea en las implicaciones, la necesidad de más investigación en acción en la sala de clases, la importancia—como tema transversal—de la conciencia ambiental mediante la tecnología al construir conocimientos significativos dentro y fuera de la escuela, asó como, valorar la investigación y la dialogicidad en la sala de clases como actividades que obligan al reexamen de la práctica didáctica en su formas curriculares de objetivos, recursos

  2. Abu al-Layth al-Libi

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Introduction In the tradition of post-9/11 senior Arab militant figures operating in Khurasan (the Afghanistan-Pakistan region), there is little doubt as to...the standing of Libyan jihadi commander Abu al-Layth al-Libi. If Usama bin Ladin and Ayman al-Zawahiri came to be the most prominent Arab -Afghan...Libi, a longtime leader of the Libyan Islamic Fighting Group (LIFG), who rapidly established himself as the champion of the Arab -Afghan milieu after

  3. Persistent photoconductivity in ZnO nanowires: Influence of oxygen and argon ambient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madel, M.; Huber, F.; Mueller, R.; Amann, B.; Dickel, M.; Xie, Y.; Thonke, K.

    2017-03-01

    ZnO nanowires typically show persistent photoconductivity (PPC), which depends in their temporal behaviour on the ambient. We investigate ZnO nanowires in oxygen and argon ambient and analyze the PPC both on the short and on the long time scale to sort out the underlying mechanisms. Wavelength dependent excitation shows the energy barrier for the PPC to be around 150 meV below the band gap of ZnO, independent of the ambient atmosphere. In photocurrent measurements at constant wavelength, a log-logistic dependence of the conductivity on the partial oxygen pressure is observed. The experimental results are compared to a model of Bonasewicz et al. [J. Electrochem. Soc. 133, 2270 (1986)] and can be explained by oxygen adsorption processes occurring on the surface of the ZnO nanowires. From temperature dependent measurements of the decay times in oxygen and argon ambient, the related activation energies for the fast and slow decay processes are determined. Comparing our results to theoretical calculations of energy levels of intrinsic defects [Janotti and Van de Walle, Phys. Status Solidi B 248, 799 (2011)], we find oxygen vacancies to be related to the fast decay processes, whereas adsorption and desorption processes of oxygen on the ZnO nanowire surface account for the slow part.

  4. Object detectability at increased ambient lighting conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, Benjamin J.; Chawla, Amarpreet S.; Delong, David M.; Hashimoto, Noriyuki; Samei, Ehsan

    2008-06-15

    Under typical dark conditions encountered in diagnostic reading rooms, a reader's pupils will contract and dilate as the visual focus intermittently shifts between the high luminance display and the darker background wall, resulting in increased visual fatigue and the degradation of diagnostic performance. A controlled increase of ambient lighting may, however, reduce the severity of these pupillary adjustments by minimizing the difference between the luminance level to which the eyes adapt while viewing an image (L{sub adp}) and the luminance level of diffusely reflected light from the area surrounding the display (L{sub s}). Although ambient lighting in reading rooms has conventionally been kept at a minimum to maintain the perceived contrast of film images, proper Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) calibration of modern medical-grade liquid crystal displays can compensate for minor lighting increases with very little loss of image contrast. This paper describes two psychophysical studies developed to evaluate and refine optimum reading room ambient lighting conditions through the use of observational tasks intended to simulate real clinical practices. The first study utilized the biologic contrast response of the human visual system to determine a range of representative L{sub adp} values for typical medical images. Readers identified low contrast horizontal objects in circular foregrounds of uniform luminance (5, 12, 20, and 30 cd/m{sup 2}) embedded within digitized mammograms. The second study examined the effect of increased ambient lighting on the detection of subtle objects embedded in circular foregrounds of uniform luminance (5, 12, and 35 cd/m{sup 2}) centered within a constant background of 12 cd/m{sup 2} luminance. The images were displayed under a dark room condition (1 lux) and an increased ambient lighting level (50 lux) such that the luminance level of the diffusely reflected light from the background wall was approximately

  5. Object detectability at increased ambient lighting conditions.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Benjamin J; Chawla, Amarpreet S; Delong, David M; Hashimoto, Noriyuki; Samei, Ehsan

    2008-06-01

    Under typical dark conditions encountered in diagnostic reading rooms, a reader's pupils will contract and dilate as the visual focus intermittently shifts between the high luminance display and the darker background wall, resulting in increased visual fatigue and the degradation of diagnostic performance. A controlled increase of ambient lighting may, however, reduce the severity of these pupillary adjustments by minimizing the difference between the luminance level to which the eyes adapt while viewing an image (L(adp)) and the luminance level of diffusely reflected light from the area surrounding the display (L(s)). Although ambient lighting in reading rooms has conventionally been kept at a minimum to maintain the perceived contrast of film images, proper Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) calibration of modern medical-grade liquid crystal displays can compensate for minor lighting increases with very little loss of image contrast. This paper describes two psychophysical studies developed to evaluate and refine optimum reading room ambient lighting conditions through the use of observational tasks intended to simulate real clinical practices. The first study utilized the biologic contrast response of the human visual system to determine a range of representative L(adp) values for typical medical images. Readers identified low contrast horizontal objects in circular foregrounds of uniform luminance (5, 12, 20, and 30 cd/m2) embedded within digitized mammograms. The second study examined the effect of increased ambient lighting on the detection of subtle objects embedded in circular foregrounds of uniform luminance (5, 12, and 35 cd/m2) centered within a constant background of 12 cd/m2 luminance. The images were displayed under a dark room condition (1 lux) and an increased ambient lighting level (50 lux) such that the luminance level of the diffusely reflected light from the background wall was approximately equal to the image L(adp) value of

  6. Crustal Structure of the Paraná Basin from Ambient Noise Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collaco, B.; Rosa, M.; Sanchez, G.; Assumpcao, M.

    2013-05-01

    Previous surface-wave tomography in South America (e.g., Feng et al., 2004; 2007) mapped the main large-scale features of the continent, such as the high lithospheric velocities in cratonic areas and low velocities in the Patagonian province. However, more detailed features such as the Chaco and Paraná Basins have not been mapped with good resolution because of poor path coverage. This work is part of a major project to increase knowledge of crustal structure in Southern Brazil and Eastern Argentina, carried out by IAG-USP (Brazil) in collaboration with UNLP and INPRES (Argentina). To improve resolution for the Paraná Basin we used inter-station dispersion curves derived from correlation of ambient noise for new stations deployed with the implementation of the Brazilian Seismic Network (Pirchiner et al. 2011). Ambient noise tomography (ANT), was first applied by Shapiro et al. (2005) and is now expanding rapidly, especially in areas with high density of seismic stations (e.g. Bensen et al. 2007, Lin et al. 2008, Moschetti et al. 2010). ANT is a well-established method to estimate short period (< 20s) and intermediate periods (20 - 50s) surface wave speeds both in regional or continental scales (Lin et al. 2008). The ambient noise data was processed as described by Bensen et al. 2007, in four major steps, with addition of a final data inversion step. Group velocities between pairs of stations were derived from correlation of ambient noise in the period range 5 to 60 s. We used nearly two years of continuous data from INPRES broadband stations, LPA station in La Plata, CPUP in Paraguay, and the recently deployed Brazilian stations in southern Brazil. The dispersion curves were measured with a modified version of PGSWMFA (PGplot Surface Wave Multiple Filter Analysis) code, designed by Chuck Ammon (St. Louis University) and successfully applied by Pasyanos et al. (2001). Our modified version is no more event based and is working now with station pairs. For the

  7. Micosis fungoide e inhibidores del TNFα: ¿riesgo o beneficio?

    PubMed

    Maroñas-Jiménez, Lidia; Burillo-Martínez, Sara; Tous-Romero, Fátima; Rodríguez-Peralto, Jose Luis; Ortiz de Frutos, Javier; Ortiz-Romero, Pablo Luis

    2016-05-15

    The growing use of anti-TNF drugs during the last years has reopened the discussion about the possible increased risk of developing non-Hodgkin lymphoma in patients with such type of treatments. We present our clinical experience and critical opinion about the current situation of such issue regarding cutaneous T-cell lymphomas.El creciente uso de fármacos anti-TNF durante los últimos años ha reabierto el debate sobre el posible aumento de riesgo de linfomas no Hodgkin en los pacientes con este tipo de tratamientos. Presentamos nuestra experiencia clínica y opinión critica sobre la situación actual de este tema en relación a los linfomas cutáneos de células T.

  8. Antimicrobial Applications of Ambient--Air Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovich, Matthew John

    The emerging field of plasma biotechology studies the applications of the plasma phase of matter to biological systems. "Ambient-condition" plasmas created at or near room temperature and atmospheric pressure are especially promising for biomedical applications because of their convenience, safety to patients, and compatibility with existing medical technology. Plasmas can be created from many different gases; plasma made from air contains a number of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, or RONS, involved in various biological processes, including immune activity, signaling, and gene expression. Therefore, ambient-condition air plasma is of particular interest for biological applications. To understand and predict the effects of treating biological systems with ambient-air plasma, it is necessary to characterize and measure the chemical species that these plasmas produce. Understanding both gaseous chemistry and the chemistry in plasma-treated aqueous solution is important because many biological systems exist in aqueous media. Existing literature about ambient-air plasma hypothesizes the critical role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species; a major aim of this dissertation is to better quantify RONS by produced ambient-air plasma and understand how RONS chemistry changes in response to different plasma processing conditions. Measurements imply that both gaseous and aqueous chemistry are highly sensitive to operating conditions. In particular, chemical species in air treated by plasma exist in either a low-power ozone-dominated mode or a high-power nitrogen oxide-dominated mode, with an unstable transition region at intermediate discharge power and treatment time. Ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2, or NOx) are mutually exclusive in this system and that the transition region corresponds to the transition from ozone- to nitrogen oxides-mode. Aqueous chemistry agrees well with to air plasma chemistry, and a similar transition in liquid-phase composition

  9. Ambient Experience in Restitutive Treatment of Aphasia

    PubMed Central

    McClung, Jill S.; Rothi, Leslie J. Gonzalez; Nadeau, Stephen E.

    2010-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges to language rehabilitation is reconciling the fact that the same therapeutic intervention, provided to different individuals with similar types of stroke-induced aphasia, may result in divergent outcomes. In this paper, the authors reviewed existing literature to identify relevant ambient factors – those outside the control of the clinician – that may potentially influence functional language recovery in aphasia and response to treatment. The goal was to develop a clinical history-taking tool to assist clinicians in gathering information germane to each individual's unique circumstances and environment, elements that may have previously been underestimated, to provide a complete inventory of potentially potent prognostic factors. First, two of the authors, speech–language pathologists experienced in aphasia rehabilitation, identified and categorized factors that seemed likely to influence aphasia outcomes. Then, a wide range of literature was reviewed in an effort to identify factors empirically found to be potent influences on aphasia recovery. Where studies relating these factors to aphasia were not found, relevant research from allied fields that examined recovery from brain injury is reported. Moreover, some factors thought to be potentially potent have yet to be examined. Finally, the ambient factors supported by evidence were categorized as facilitators or barriers to functional improvement, and the Ambient Influences on Outcome Checklist (AOC) was developed, including only those factors shown to be potent in the recovery process. It is hoped that this checklist can be used to more broadly assess potential prognostic influences in aphasia restitution, as well as spawn further research. PMID:21103021

  10. Head wave correlations in ambient noise.

    PubMed

    Gebbie, John; Siderius, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Ambient ocean noise is processed with a vertical line array to reveal coherent time-separated arrivals suggesting the presence of head wave multipath propagation. Head waves, which are critically propagating water waves created by seabed waves traveling parallel to the water-sediment interface, can propagate faster than water-only waves. Such eigenrays are much weaker than water-only eigenrays, and are often completely overshadowed by them. Surface-generated noise is different whereby it amplifies the coherence between head waves and critically propagating water-only waves, which is measured by cross-correlating critically steered beams. This phenomenon is demonstrated both experimentally and with a full wave simulation.

  11. Ambient temperature modelling with soft computing techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Bertini, Ilaria; Ceravolo, Francesco; Citterio, Marco; Di Pietra, Biagio; Margiotta, Francesca; Pizzuti, Stefano; Puglisi, Giovanni; De Felice, Matteo

    2010-07-15

    This paper proposes a hybrid approach based on soft computing techniques in order to estimate monthly and daily ambient temperature. Indeed, we combine the back-propagation (BP) algorithm and the simple Genetic Algorithm (GA) in order to effectively train artificial neural networks (ANN) in such a way that the BP algorithm initialises a few individuals of the GA's population. Experiments concerned monthly temperature estimation of unknown places and daily temperature estimation for thermal load computation. Results have shown remarkable improvements in accuracy compared to traditional methods. (author)

  12. Ambient Noise in an Urbanized Tidal Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, Christopher

    In coastal environments, when topographic and bathymetric constrictions are combined with large tidal amplitudes, strong currents (> 2 m/s) can occur. Because such environments are relatively rare and difficult to study, until recently, they have received little attention from the scientific community. However, in recent years, interest in developing tidal hydrokinetic power projects in these environments has motivated studies to improve this understanding. In order to support an analysis of the acoustic effects of tidal power generation, a multi-year study was conducted at a proposed project site in Puget Sound (WA) are analyzed at a site where peak currents exceeded 3.5 m/s. From these analyses, three noise sources are shown to dominate the observed variability in ambient noise between 0.02-30 kHz: anthropogenic noise from vessel traffic, sediment-generated noise during periods of strong currents, and flow-noise resulting from turbulence advected over the hydrophones. To assess the contribution of vessel traffic noise, one calendar year of Automatic Identification System (AIS) ship-traffic data was paired with hydrophone recordings. The study region included inland waters of the Salish Sea within a 20 km radius of the hydrophone deployment site in northern Admiralty Inlet. The variability in spectra and hourly, daily, and monthly ambient noise statistics for unweighted broadband and M-weighted sound pressure levels is driven largely by vessel traffic. Within the one-year study period, at least one AIS transmitting vessel is present in the study area 90% of the time and over 1,363 unique vessels are recorded. A noise budget for vessels equipped with AIS transponders identifies cargo ships, tugs, and passenger vessels as the largest contributors to noise levels. A simple model to predict received levels at the site based on an incoherent summation of noise from different vessel types yields a cumulative probability density function of broadband sound pressure

  13. Ambient Noise Tomography in the Eastern Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaiz-Rodriguez, M. S.; Niu, F.; Schmitz, M.

    2013-05-01

    We investigate the upper mantle velocity structure beneath the eastern Caribbean with ambient seismic noise data recorded by broadband stations deployed around the region. We first compute the Rayleigh wave Green's functions between each pair of stations by cross-correlating ambient seismic noises. We then estimate fundamental mode group velocities with the FTAN analysis technique. The group velocities are further inverted into 0.5x0.5 degrees rectangular mesh grids. Finally, the dispersion curve of each grid point is linearly inverted into shear wave velocity at different depths. The shear wave variations show a high velocity anomaly in the center of the Venezuela Basin that can be related to a previously unreported igneous body. Two different sections of the mantle wedge related to the Atlantic subduction are identified. One is highly developed under the northern portion of the Lesser Antilles Arc. Another one is which is poorly developed on the southern portion of the arc. The differentiation of the mantle wedge could be attributed to segmentation of the slab produced by the Tiburon Transform Fault Zone. Finally, a low velocity anomaly at 100 km depth could be related to a small hydrous cold plume formed on the northern side of the Atlantic slab.

  14. A Smart Kitchen for Ambient Assisted Living

    PubMed Central

    Blasco, Rubén; Marco, Álvaro; Casas, Roberto; Cirujano, Diego; Picking, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The kitchen environment is one of the scenarios in the home where users can benefit from Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) applications. Moreover, it is the place where old people suffer from most domestic injuries. This paper presents a novel design, implementation and assessment of a Smart Kitchen which provides Ambient Assisted Living services; a smart environment that increases elderly and disabled people's autonomy in their kitchen-related activities through context and user awareness, appropriate user interaction and artificial intelligence. It is based on a modular architecture which integrates a wide variety of home technology (household appliances, sensors, user interfaces, etc.) and associated communication standards and media (power line, radio frequency, infrared and cabled). Its software architecture is based on the Open Services Gateway initiative (OSGi), which allows building a complex system composed of small modules, each one providing the specific functionalities required, and can be easily scaled to meet our needs. The system has been evaluated by a large number of real users (63) and carers (31) in two living labs in Spain and UK. Results show a large potential of system functionalities combined with good usability and physical, sensory and cognitive accessibility. PMID:24445412

  15. Disseminating Ambient Assisted Living in Rural Areas

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Gerhard; Felfernig, Alexander; Fercher, Anton J.; Hitz, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The smart home, ambient intelligence and ambient assisted living have been intensively researched for decades. Although rural areas are an important potential market, because they represent about 80% of the territory of the EU countries and around 125 million inhabitants, there is currently a lack of applicable AAL solutions. This paper discusses the theoretical foundations of AAL in rural areas. This discussion is underlined by the achievements of the empirical field study, Casa Vecchia, which has been carried out over a four-year period in a rural area in Austria. The major goal of Casa Vecchia was to evaluate the feasibility of a specific form of AAL for rural areas: bringing AAL technology to the homes of the elderly, rather than moving seniors to special-equipped care facilities. The Casa Vecchia project thoroughly investigated the possibilities, challenges and drawbacks of AAL related to this specific approach. The findings are promising and somewhat surprising and indicate that further technical, interactional and socio-psychological research is required to make AAL in rural areas reasonable in the future. PMID:25068862

  16. A smart kitchen for ambient assisted living.

    PubMed

    Blasco, Rubén; Marco, Álvaro; Casas, Roberto; Cirujano, Diego; Picking, Richard

    2014-01-17

    The kitchen environment is one of the scenarios in the home where users can benefit from Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) applications. Moreover, it is the place where old people suffer from most domestic injuries. This paper presents a novel design, implementation and assessment of a Smart Kitchen which provides Ambient Assisted Living services; a smart environment that increases elderly and disabled people's autonomy in their kitchen-related activities through context and user awareness, appropriate user interaction and artificial intelligence. It is based on a modular architecture which integrates a wide variety of home technology (household appliances, sensors, user interfaces, etc.) and associated communication standards and media (power line, radio frequency, infrared and cabled). Its software architecture is based on the Open Services Gateway initiative (OSGi), which allows building a complex system composed of small modules, each one providing the specific functionalities required, and can be easily scaled to meet our needs. The system has been evaluated by a large number of real users (63) and carers (31) in two living labs in Spain and UK. Results show a large potential of system functionalities combined with good usability and physical, sensory and cognitive accessibility.

  17. Characterization of Ambient Black Carbon Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R.; Levy, M. E.; Zheng, J.; Molina, L. T.

    2013-12-01

    Because of the strong absorption over a broad range of the electromagnetic spectra, black carbon (BC) is a key short-lived climate forcer, which contributes significantly to climate change by direct radiative forcing and is the second most important component causing global warming after carbon dioxide. The impact of BC on the radiative forcing of the Earth-Atmosphere system is highly dependent of the particle properties. In this presentation, emphasis will be placed on characterizing BC containing aerosols in at the California-Mexico border to obtain a greater understanding of the atmospheric aging and properties of ambient BC aerosols. A comprehensive set of directly measured aerosol properties, including the particle size distribution, effective density, hygroscopicity, volatility, and several optical properties, will be discussed to quantify the mixing state and composition of ambient particles. In Tijuana, Mexico, submicron aerosols are strongly influenced by vehicle emissions; subsequently, the BC concentration in Tijuana is considerably higher than most US cities with an average BC concentration of 2.71 × 2.65 g cm-3. BC accounts for 24.75 % × 9.44 of the total submicron concentration on average, but periodically accounts for over 50%. This high concentration of BC strongly influences many observed aerosol properties such as single scattering albedo, hygroscopicity, effective density, and volatility.

  18. Estimating site amplification factors from ambient noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Steven R.; Gerstoft, Peter; Fehler, Michael C.

    2009-05-01

    We present a methodology to obtain frequency-dependent relative site amplification factors using ambient seismic noise. We treat a seismic network or array as a forced damped harmonic oscillator system where each station responds to a forcing function obtained from frequency-wavenumber beams of the ambient noise field. A network or array beam is necessary to estimate the forcing function. Taken over long time periods, each station responds to the forcing function showing a frequency-dependent resonance peak whose amplitude and spectral width depends upon the elastic and anelastic properties of the underlying medium. Our results are encouraging in that hard rock sites show little variability and have narrower resonance peaks with reduced amplitudes relative to soft rock sites in sedimentary basins. There is much more variability observed at soft rock sites and a tendency for spectral peaks to shift to higher frequencies and become broader as the site amplification increases. This could be due to due to lower densities and/or small-strain nonlinearity at stations having high site amplification.

  19. Thermal explosion in oscillating ambient conditions

    PubMed Central

    Novozhilov, Vasily

    2016-01-01

    Thermal explosion problem for a medium with oscillating ambient temperature at its boundaries is considered. This is a new problem in thermal explosion theory, not previously considered in a distributed system formulation, but important for combustion and fire science. It describes autoignition of wide range of fires (such as but not limited to piles of biosolids and other organic matter; storages of munitions, explosives, propellants) subjected to temperature variations, such as seasonal or day/night variation. The problem is considered in formulation adopted in classical studies of thermal explosion. Critical conditions are determined by frequency and amplitude of ambient temperature oscillations, as well as by a number of other parameters. Effects of all the parameters on critical conditions are quantified. Results are presented for the case of planar symmetry. Development of thermal explosion in time is also considered, and a new type of unsteady thermal explosion development is discovered where thermal runaway occurs after several periods of temperature oscillations within the medium. PMID:27443235

  20. /Cu-Al System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kish, Orel; Froumin, Natalya; Aizenshtein, Michael; Frage, Nachum

    2014-05-01

    Wettability and interfacial interaction of the Ta2O5/Cu-Al system were studied. Pure Cu does not wet the Ta2O5 substrate, and improved spreading is achieved when relatively a high fraction of the active element (~40 at.% Al) was added. The Al2O3 and AlTaO4 phases were observed at the Ta2O5/Cu-Al interface. A thermodynamic evaluation allowed us to suggest that the lack of wetting bellow 40 at.% Al is due to the presence of a native oxide, which covers the drop. The conditions of the native oxide decomposition and the formation of the volatile Al2O suboxide strongly depend on the vacuum level during sessile drop experiments and the composition of the Cu-Al alloy. In our case, Al contents greater than 40% provides thermodynamic conditions for the formation of Al2O (as a result of Al reaction with Al2O3) and the drop spreading. It was suggested that the final contact angle in the Ta2O5/Cu-Al system (50°) is determined by Ta adsorption on the newly formed alumina interlayer.

  1. Epigenetic Alterations Induced by Ambient Particulate Matter in Mouse Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Miousse, Isabelle R.; Chalbot, Marie-Cécile G.; Aykin-Burns, Nükhet; Wang, Xiaoying; Basnakian, Alexei; Kavouras, Ilias G.; Koturbash, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory mortality and morbidity has been associated with exposure to particulate matter (PM). Experimental evidence suggests involvement of cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and inflammation in the development of PM-associated pathological states; however, the exact mechanisms remain unclear. In the current study, we analyzed short-term epigenetic response to PM10 (particles with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm) exposure in mouse ascitic RAW264.7 macrophages (BALB/C Abelson murine leukemia virus-induced tumor). Ambient PM10 was collected using a high volume sampler in Little Rock, AR. Analysis revealed that PM10 was composed mainly of Al and Fe, and the water soluble organic fraction was dominated by aliphatic and carbohydrate fragments and minor quantities of aromatic components. Exposure to PM10 compromised the cellular epigenome at concentrations 10–200 μg/ml. Specifically, epigenetic alterations were evident as changes in the methylation and expression of repetitive element-associated DNA and associated DNA methylation machinery. These results suggest that epigenetic alterations, in concert with cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and inflammation, might contribute to the pathogenesis of PM-associated respiratory diseases. PMID:24535919

  2. Microwave assisted laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy at ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viljanen, Jan; Sun, Zhiwei; Alwahabi, Zeyad T.

    2016-04-01

    Signal enhancements in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) using external microwave power are demonstrated in ambient air. Pulsed microwave at 2.45 GHz and of 1 millisecond duration was delivered via a simple near field applicator (NFA), with which an external electric field is generated and coupled into laser induced plasma. The external microwave power can significantly increase the signal lifetime from a few microseconds to hundreds of microseconds, resulting in a great enhancement on LIBS signals with the use of a long integration time. The dependence of signal enhancement on laser energy and microwave power is experimentally assessed. With the assistance of microwave source, a significant enhancement of ~ 100 was achieved at relatively low laser energy that is only slightly above the ablation threshold. A limit of detection (LOD) of 8.1 ppm was estimated for copper detection in Cu/Al2O3 solid samples. This LOD corresponds to a 93-fold improvement compared with conventional single-pulse LIBS. Additionally, in the microwave assisted LIBS, the self-reversal effect was greatly reduced, which is beneficial in measuring elements of high concentration. Temporal measurements have been performed and the results revealed the evolution of the emission process in microwave-enhanced LIBS. The optimal position of the NFA related to the ablation point has also been investigated.

  3. Molecular dynamics of itraconazole at ambient and high pressure.

    PubMed

    Tarnacka, M; Adrjanowicz, K; Kaminska, E; Kaminski, K; Grzybowska, K; Kolodziejczyk, K; Wlodarczyk, P; Hawelek, L; Garbacz, G; Kocot, A; Paluch, M

    2013-12-21

    Comprehensive molecular dynamics studies of vitrified and cryogrounded itraconazole (Itr) were performed at ambient and elevated pressure. DSC measurements yielded besides melting and glass transition observed during heating and cooling of both samples two further endothermic events at around T = 363 K and T = 346 K. The nature of these transitions was investigated using X-ray diffraction, broadband dielectric spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory calculations. The X-ray measurements indicated that extra ordering in itraconazole is likely to occur. Based on calculations and theory derived by Letz et al. the transition observed at T = 363 K was discussed in the context of formation of the nematic mesophase. In fact, additional FTIR measurements revealed that order parameter variation in Itr shows a typical sequence of liquid crystal phases with axially symmetric orientational order; i.e. a nematic phase in the temperature range 361.7 K to 346.5 K and a smectic A phase below 346.5. Moreover, dielectric measurements demonstrated that except for the structural relaxation process, there is also slower mode above the glass transition temperature in both vitrified and cryogrounded samples. We considered the origin of this mode taking into account DFT calculations, rod like shape of itraconazole and distribution of its dipole moment vectors. For the dielectric data collected at elevated pressure, evolution of the steepness index versus pressure was determined. Finally, the pressure coefficient of the glass transition temperature was evaluated to be equal to 190 K GPa(-1).

  4. Initial Symptoms of ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chapters Certified Centers and Clinics Support Groups About ALS About Us Our Research In Your Community Advocate ... Diagnosis En español Symptoms The initial symptoms of ALS can be quite varied in different people. One ...

  5. Lou Gehrig's Disease (ALS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1930s. People in England and Australia call ALS motor neurone disease (MND). The French refer to it ... about ALS in 1869. Lou Gehrig's disease damages motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. Motor ...

  6. The influence of ambient light on the driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, Karsten D.; Lemmer, Uli

    2008-04-01

    Increasingly, cars are fitted with interior ambient lighting which is switched on while driving. This special kind of interior light emphasizes the interior design of the car, it makes a car look special and gives the buyers a new option to personalize their automobiles. But how does ambient interior light influence the driver? We conducted a series of over 50 tests to study the influence of interior ambient light on contrast perception under different illumination levels, colors and positions of the illuminated areas. Our tests show that in many cases the ambient lighting can improve the visual contrast for seeing objects in the headlamp beam. But the test persons mentioned that the tested brightness looked too bright and that they felt glared. The measured values instead proved that no disability glare exists. Therefore, provided that the drivers can adjust the intensity of the ambient light to avoid glare, the ambient light has no negative effect on the drivers' contrast perception.

  7. The Potential for Ambient Plasma Wave Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilland, James H.; Williams, George J.

    2016-01-01

    A truly robust space exploration program will need to make use of in-situ resources as much as possible to make the endeavor affordable. Most space propulsion concepts are saddled with one fundamental burden; the propellant needed to produce momentum. The most advanced propulsion systems currently in use utilize electric and/or magnetic fields to accelerate ionized propellant. However, significant planetary exploration missions in the coming decades, such as the now canceled Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter, are restricted by propellant mass and propulsion system lifetimes, using even the most optimistic projections of performance. These electric propulsion vehicles are inherently limited in flexibility at their final destination, due to propulsion system wear, propellant requirements, and the relatively low acceleration of the vehicle. A few concepts are able to utilize the environment around them to produce thrust: Solar or magnetic sails and, with certain restrictions, electrodynamic tethers. These concepts focus primarily on using the solar wind or ambient magnetic fields to generate thrust. Technically immature, quasi-propellantless alternatives lack either the sensitivity or the power to provide significant maneuvering. An additional resource to be considered is the ambient plasma and magnetic fields in solar and planetary magnetospheres. These environments, such as those around the Sun or Jupiter, have been shown to host a variety of plasma waves. Plasma wave propulsion takes advantage of an observed astrophysical and terrestrial phenomenon: Alfven waves. These are waves that propagate in the plasma and magnetic fields around and between planets and stars. The generation of Alfven waves in ambient magnetic and plasma fields to generate thrust is proposed as a truly propellantless propulsion system which may enable an entirely new matrix of exploration missions. Alfven waves are well known, transverse electromagnetic waves that propagate in magnetized plasmas at

  8. Ocean Ambient Noise Studies for Shallow and Deep Water Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Ocean Ambient Noise Studies for Shallow and Deep Water...Siderius.php LONG-TERM GOALS The objective of this research is to study the ocean ambient noise field by means of new physics-based processing... ambient -noise field using a vertical line array has been developed by Harrison and Simons [Harrison, 2002]. The advantages of passive bottom-survey

  9. Activation of "synthetic ambient" aerosols - Relation to chemical composition of particles <100 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkart, J.; Hitzenberger, R.; Reischl, G.; Bauer, H.; Leder, K.; Puxbaum, H.

    2012-07-01

    Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are an important fraction of atmospheric aerosols because of their role in cloud formation. Experimental studies focus either on direct field measurements of complex ambient aerosols or laboratory investigations on well defined aerosols produced from single substances or substance mixtures. In this study, we focussed on the ultrafine aerosol because in terms of number concentration, the majority of the CCN are expected to have sizes in this range. A field study was performed from July 2007 to October 2008 to investigate the activation behaviour of the atmospheric aerosol in Vienna (Burkart et al., 2011). Filter samples of the aerosol <0.1 μm aerodynamic equivalent diameter were collected, elutriated and used to generate "synthetic ambient" aerosol in a nebulizer. Chemical analyses of the ultrafine water soluble material were also performed. The CCN properties of the "synthetic ambient" aerosol were obtained using the University of Vienna CCN counter (Giebl et al., 2002; Dusek et al., 2006b) at a nominal supersaturation (SS) of 0.5%. Activation diameters dact ranged from 54.5 nm to 66 nm, were larger than dact of typical single inorganic salts and showed no seasonal pattern in contrast to the fraction of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC), which ranged from 44% in spring to 15% in winter. The average hygroscopicity parameter κ (Petters and Kreidenweis, 2007) obtained from the activation curves ranged from 0.20 to 0.30 (average 0.24), which was significantly lower than κchem calculated from the chemical composition (0.43 ± 0.07).

  10. Characterization of personal exposure concentration of fine particles for adults and children exposed to high ambient concentrations in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Du, Xuan; Kong, Qian; Ge, Weihua; Zhang, Shaojun; Fu, Lixin

    2010-01-01

    In China, the health risk from overexposure to particles is becoming an important public health concern. To investigate daily exposure characteristics to PM2.5 with high ambient concentration in urban area, a personal exposure study was conducted for school children, and office workers in Beijing, China. For all participants (N = 114), the mean personal 24-hr exposure concentration was 102.5, 14.7, 0.093, 0.528, 0.934, 0.174 and 0.703 microg/m3 for PM2.5, black carbon, Mn, Al, Ca, Pb, and Fe. Children's exposure concentrations of PM2.5 were 4-5 times higher than those in related studies. The ambient concentration of PM2.5 (128.5 microg/m3) was significantly higher than the personal exposure concentration (P < 0.05), and exceed the reference concentration (25 microg/m3) of WHO air quality guideline. Good correlation relationships and significant differences were identified between ambient concentration and personal exposure concentration. The relationships indicate that the ambient concentration is the main factor influencing personal exposure concentration, but is not a good indicator of personal exposure concentration. Outdoor activities (commute mode, exposure to heating, workday or weekend travel) influenced personal exposure concentrations significantly, but the magnitude of the influence from indoor activities (exposure to cooking) was masked by the high ambient concentrations.

  11. Ambient Cured Alkali Activated Flyash Masonry Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, K.; Radhakrishna; Sasalatti, Vinod M.

    2016-09-01

    Geopolymers belong to a category of non-conventional and non-Portland cement based cementitious binders which are produced using industrial by products like fly ash and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS). This paper reports on the development of geopolymer mortars for production of masonry units. The geopolymer mortars were prepared by mixing various by products with manufactured sand and a liquid mixture of sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide solutions. After curing at ambient conditions, the masonry units were tested for strength properties such as water absorption, initial rate of absorption, compression, shear- bond, and stress-strain behaviour etc. It was observed that the flexural strength of the blocks is more than 2 MPa and shear bond strength is more than 0.4MPa. It was found that the properties of geopolymer blocks were superior to the traditional masonry units. Hence they can be recommended for structural masonry.

  12. Bacterial decontamination using ambient pressure nonthermal discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Birmingham, J.G.; Hammerstrom, D.J.

    2000-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure nonthermal plasmas can efficiently deactivate bacteria in gases, liquids, and on surfaces, as well as can decompose hazardous chemicals. This paper focuses on the changes to bacterial spores and toxic biochemical compounds, such as mycotoxins, after their treatment in ambient pressure discharges. The ability of nonthermal plasmas to decompose toxic chemicals and deactivate hazardous biological materials has been applied to sterilizing medical instruments, ozonating water, and purifying air. In addition, the fast lysis of bacterial spores and other cells has led us to include plasma devices within pathogen detection instruments, where nucleic acids must be accessed. Decontaminating chemical and biological warfare materials from large, high value targets such as building surfaces, after a terrorist attack, are especially challenging. A large area plasma decontamination technology is described.

  13. Radial anisotropy ambient noise tomography of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordret, Aurélien; Rivet, Diane; Shapiro, Nikolai; Jaxybulatov, Kairly; Landès, Matthieu; Koulakov, Ivan; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The use of ambient seismic noise allows us to perform surface-wave tomography of targets which could hardly be imaged by other means. The frequencies involved (~ 0.5 - 20 s), somewhere in between active seismic and regular teleseismic frequency band, make possible the high resolution imaging of intermediate-size targets like volcanic edifices. Moreover, the joint inversion of Rayleigh and Love waves dispersion curves extracted from noise correlations allows us to invert for crustal radial anisotropy. We present here the two first studies of radial anisotropy on volcanoes by showing results from Lake Toba Caldera, a super-volcano in Indonesia, and from Piton de la Fournaise volcano, a hot-spot effusive volcano on the Réunion Island (Indian Ocean). We will see how radial anisotropy can be used to infer the main fabric within a magmatic system and, consequently, its dominant type of intrusion.

  14. Wireless Sensor Networks for Ambient Assisted Living

    PubMed Central

    Aquino-Santos, Raúl; Martinez-Castro, Diego; Edwards-Block, Arthur; Murillo-Piedrahita, Andrés Felipe

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces wireless sensor networks for Ambient Assisted Living as a proof of concept. Our workgroup has developed an arrhythmia detection algorithm that we evaluate in a closed space using a wireless sensor network to relay the information collected to where the information can be registered, monitored and analyzed to support medical decisions by healthcare providers. The prototype we developed is then evaluated using the TelosB platform. The proposed architecture considers very specific restrictions regarding the use of wireless sensor networks in clinical situations. The seamless integration of the system architecture enables both mobile node and network configuration, thus providing the versatile and robust characteristics necessary for real-time applications in medical situations. Likewise, this system architecture efficiently permits the different components of our proposed platform to interact efficiently within the parameters of this study. PMID:24351665

  15. Ambient tremors in a collisional orogenic belt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chuang, Lindsay Yuling; Chen, Kate Huihsuan; Wech, Aaron G.; Byrne, Timothy; Peng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Deep-seated tectonic tremors have been regarded as an observation tied to interconnected fluids at depth, which have been well documented in worldwide subduction zones and transform faults but not in a collisional mountain belt. In this study we explore the general features of collisional tremors in Taiwan and discuss the possible generation mechanism. In the 4 year data, we find 231 ambient tremor episodes with durations ranging from 5 to 30 min. In addition to a coseismic slip-induced stress change from nearby major earthquake, increased tremor rate is also highly correlated with the active, normal faulting earthquake swarms at the shallower depth. Both the tremor and earthquake swarm activities are confined in a small, area where the high attenuation, high thermal anomaly, the boundary between high and low resistivity, and localized veins on the surfaces distributed, suggesting the involvement of fluids from metamorphic dehydration within the orogen.

  16. Near-ambient solid polymer fuel cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holleck, G. L.

    1993-01-01

    Fuel cells are extremely attractive for extraterrestrial and terrestrial applications because of their high energy conversion efficiency without noise or environmental pollution. Among the various fuel cell systems the advanced polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells based on sulfonated fluoropolymers (e.g., Nafion) are particularly attractive because they are fairly rugged, solid state, quite conductive, of good chemical and thermal stability and show good oxygen reduction kinetics due to the low specific adsorption of the electrolyte on the platinum catalyst. The objective of this program is to develop a solid polymer fuel cell which can efficiently operate at near ambient temperatures without ancillary components for humidification and/or pressurization of the fuel or oxidant gases. During the Phase 1 effort we fabricated novel integral electrode-membrane structures where the dispersed platinum catalyst is precipitated within the Nafion ionomer. This resulted in electrode-membrane units without interfacial barriers permitting unhindered water diffusion from cathode to anode. The integral electrode-membrane structures were tested as fuel cells operating on H2 and O2 or air at 1 to 2 atm and 10 to 50 C without gas humidification. We demonstrated that cells with completely dry membranes could be self started at room temperature and subsequently operated on dry gas for extended time. Typical room temperature low pressure operation with unoptimized electrodes yielded 100 mA/cm(exp 2) at 0.5V and maximum currents over 300 mA/cm(exp 2) with low platinum loadings. Our results clearly demonstrate that operation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells at ambient conditions is feasible. Optimization of the electrode-membrane structure is necessary to assess the full performance potential but we expect significant gains in weight and volume power density for the system. The reduced complexity will make fuel cells also attractive for smaller and portable power supplies and as

  17. Assessment of SRS ambient air monitoring network

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, K.; Jannik, T.

    2016-08-03

    Three methodologies have been used to assess the effectiveness of the existing ambient air monitoring system in place at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC. Effectiveness was measured using two metrics that have been utilized in previous quantification of air-monitoring network performance; frequency of detection (a measurement of how frequently a minimum number of samplers within the network detect an event), and network intensity (a measurement of how consistent each sampler within the network is at detecting events). In addition to determining the effectiveness of the current system, the objective of performing this assessment was to determine what, if any, changes could make the system more effective. Methodologies included 1) the Waite method of determining sampler distribution, 2) the CAP88- PC annual dose model, and 3) a puff/plume transport model used to predict air concentrations at sampler locations. Data collected from air samplers at SRS in 2015 compared with predicted data resulting from the methodologies determined that the frequency of detection for the current system is 79.2% with sampler efficiencies ranging from 5% to 45%, and a mean network intensity of 21.5%. One of the air monitoring stations had an efficiency of less than 10%, and detected releases during just one sampling period of the entire year, adding little to the overall network intensity. By moving or removing this sampler, the mean network intensity increased to about 23%. Further work in increasing the network intensity and simulating accident scenarios to further test the ambient air system at SRS is planned

  18. Imaging Lithospheric Cascadia Structure with Ambient Noise Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porritt, R. W.; Allen, R. M.; Brudzinski, M. R.; Boyarko, D. C.; O'Driscoll, L.; Zhai, Y.; Levander, A.; Humphreys, E.; Pollitz, F. F.

    2010-12-01

    Imaging Cascadia Lithospheric Structure with Ambient Noise Tomography Along strike variation has been observed throughout the Cascadia Subduction Zone in multiple studies with complementary data sets. Body-wave tomography shows a broad zone in the center of the slab with a weak high velocity signal in an atypically quiescent seismic zone (Obrebski and Allen, 2009). Characteristics of primitive basalts found in the arc volcanoes change along strike defining four distinct magma sources or plumbing systems (Schmidt et al, 2007). However, the most striking variation is in the recurrence rate of episodic tremor and slip throughout the region (Brudzinski and Allen, 2007). Determining the detailed velocity structure of the lithosphere will help to unravel what role it plays in controlling the along strike variation of these separate observations. This study improves on previous observations by analysis of a surface wave model from ambient seismic noise cross-correlations with two Flexible Array deployments in addition to regional networks and the Transportable Array. Longer period bands than typically observed in ANT are recovered via improved statistical analysis resulting in robust group and phase velocity maps from 7-92 seconds. Thus structure is well resolved from the surface to approximately 100km in depth allowing for simultaneous interpretation of crust and uppermost mantle structure. Significant variations are observed along strike in this model. The high velocity mafic Siletzia terrain is observed in the lower-mid crust along the Cascadia forearc. This mafic material coincides with the region of long term tremor recurrence interval (~20 months) from Brudzinski and Allen (2007). The southern border of the Siletzia terrain is marked by a clear velocity variation along the expected Gorda-Juan de Fuca plate boundary. In this southern region, the root of the Klamath mountain is clearly compressing the subducting Gorda plate leading to increased vertical stress where

  19. Retrieval of Rayleigh Wave Ellipticity from Ambient Vibration Recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maranò, Stefano; Hobiger, Manuel; Fäh, Donat

    2017-01-01

    The analysis of ambient vibrations is a useful tool in microzonation and geotechnical investigations. Ambient vibrations are composed to a large part of surface waves, both Love and Rayleigh waves. One reason to analyse surface waves is that they carry information about the subsurface. The dispersion curve of Rayleigh waves and Love waves can be retrieved using array processing techniques. The Rayleigh wave ellipticity, including the sense of rotation of the particle motion, can also be retrieved using array techniques. These quantities are used in an inversion procedure aimed at obtaining a structural model of the subsurface. The focus of this work is the retrieval of Rayleigh wave ellipticity. We show applications of the (ML) method presented in Maranó et al. (2012) to a number of sites in Switzerland. The sites examined are chosen to reflect a wide range of soil conditions that are of interest in microzonation studies. Using a synthetic wavefield with known structural model, we compare our results with theoretical ellipticity curves and we show the accuracy of the considered algorithm. The sense of rotation of the particle motion (prograde vs. retrograde) is also estimated. In addition, we show that by modelling the presence of both Love and Rayleigh waves it is possible to mitigate the disruptive influence of Love waves on the estimation of Rayleigh wave ellipticity. Using recordings from several real sites, we show that it is possible to retrieve the ellipticity curve over a broad range of frequencies. Fundamental modes and higher modes are retrieved. Singularities of the ellipticity, corresponding to a change of the sense of rotation from prograde to retrograde (or vice versa), are detected with great accuracy. Knowledge of Rayleigh wave ellipticity, including the sense of rotation, is useful in several ways. The ellipticity angle allows us to pinpoint accurately the frequency of singularities (i.e., peaks and zeros of the H/V representation of the

  20. Adjuvant effects of ambient particulate matter monitored by proteomics of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xuedong; Li, Ning; Wang, Meiying; Boontheung, Pinmanee; Sioutas, Constantinos; Harkema, Jack R; Bramble, Lori A; Nel, Andre E; Loo, Joseph A

    2010-02-01

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) from air pollution is associated with exacerbation of asthma. The immunological basis for the adjuvant effects of PM is still not well understood. The generation of ROS and the resulting oxidative stress has been identified as one of the major mechanisms. Using a new intranasal sensitization model in which ambient PM is used as an adjuvant to enhance allergic inflammation (Li et al., Environ. Health Perspect. 2009, 117, 1116-1123), a proteomics approach was applied to study the adjuvant effects of ambient PM. The enhanced in vivo adjuvant effect of ultrafine particles correlates with a higher in vitro oxidant potential and a higher content of redox-cycling organic chemicals. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid proteins from normal and sensitized mice were resolved by 2-DE, and identified by MS. Polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, complement C3, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, chitinase 3-like protein 3, chitinase 3-like protein 4, and acidic mammalian chitinase demonstrated significantly enhanced up-regulation by UFP with a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon content and a higher oxidant potential. These proteins may be the important specific elements targeted by PM in air pollution through the ability to generate ROS in the immune system, and may be involved in allergen sensitization and asthma pathogenesis.

  1. 40 CFR 52.14 - State ambient air quality standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State ambient air quality standards. 52.14 Section 52.14 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... quality standards. Any ambient air quality standard submitted with a plan which is less stringent than...

  2. 40 CFR 52.14 - State ambient air quality standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false State ambient air quality standards. 52.14 Section 52.14 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... quality standards. Any ambient air quality standard submitted with a plan which is less stringent than...

  3. 77 FR 64244 - Revision to Ambient Nitrogen Dioxide Monitoring Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 58 RIN 2060-AR59 Revision to Ambient Nitrogen Dioxide Monitoring Requirements AGENCY... deadlines established in the national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS) for nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 )...

  4. RADIOCARBON ANALYSIS OF PM 2.5 AMBIENT AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The radiocarbon (14C) content of an ambient aerosol sample can be directly related to the fraction of the sample's total carbon mass contributed by natural (biogenic) sources. Such knowledge is difficult to determine by other means, and important for devising ambient PM contro...

  5. WORKSHOP ON SOURCE EMISSION AND AMBIENT AIR MONITORING OF MERCURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    AN EPA/ORD Workshop on Source Emission and Ambient Air Monitoring of Mercury was held on 9/13-14/99, Bloomington, Minnesota. The purpose of the workshop was to discuss the state-of-the-science in source and ambient air mercury monitoring as well as mercury monitoring research and...

  6. Ultrafine ambient particulate matter enhances cardiac ischemia and reperfusion injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a consistent link between exposure to ambient particulate air pollutant (PM) and the incidence of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The present study was designed to evaluate the cardiac effects of ambient PM. Mice were exposed to 1...

  7. 40 CFR 52.14 - State ambient air quality standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false State ambient air quality standards. 52.14 Section 52.14 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... quality standards. Any ambient air quality standard submitted with a plan which is less stringent than...

  8. 40 CFR 52.14 - State ambient air quality standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false State ambient air quality standards. 52.14 Section 52.14 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... quality standards. Any ambient air quality standard submitted with a plan which is less stringent than...

  9. 40 CFR 52.14 - State ambient air quality standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false State ambient air quality standards. 52.14 Section 52.14 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... quality standards. Any ambient air quality standard submitted with a plan which is less stringent than...

  10. Quantitative estimates of the volatility of ambient organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappa, C. D.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of the sensitivity of organic aerosol (OA, and its components) mass to changes in temperature were recently reported by Huffman et al. (2009) using a tandem thermodenuder-aerosol mass spectrometer (TD-AMS) system in Mexico City and the Los Angeles area. Here, we use these measurements to derive quantitative estimates of aerosol volatility within the framework of absorptive partitioning theory using a kinetic model of aerosol evaporation in the TD. OA volatility distributions (or "basis-sets") are determined using several assumptions as to the enthalpy of vaporization (ΔHvap). We present two definitions of "non-volatile OA," one being a global and one a local definition. Based on these definitions, our analysis indicates that a substantial fraction of the organic aerosol is comprised of non-volatile components that will not evaporate under any atmospheric conditions, on the order of 50-80% when the most realistic ΔHvap assumptions are considered. The sensitivity of the total OA mass to dilution and ambient changes in temperature has been assessed for the various ΔHvap assumptions. The temperature sensitivity is relatively independent of the particular ΔHvap assumptions whereas dilution sensitivity is found to be greatest for the low (ΔHvap = 50 kJ/mol) and lowest for the high (ΔHvap = 150 kJ/mol) assumptions. This difference arises from the high ΔHvap assumptions yielding volatility distributions with a greater fraction of non-volatile material than the low ΔHvap assumptions. If the observations are fit using a 1 or 2-component model the sensitivity of the OA to dilution is unrealistically high. An empirical method introduced by Faulhaber et al. (2009) has also been used to independently estimate a volatility distribution for the ambient OA and is found to give results consistent with the high and variable ΔHvap assumptions. Our results also show that the amount of semivolatile gas-phase organics in equilibrium with the OA could range from ~20

  11. Quantitative estimates of the volatility of ambient organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappa, C. D.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2010-06-01

    Measurements of the sensitivity of organic aerosol (OA, and its components) mass to changes in temperature were recently reported by Huffman et al.~(2009) using a tandem thermodenuder-aerosol mass spectrometer (TD-AMS) system in Mexico City and the Los Angeles area. Here, we use these measurements to derive quantitative estimates of aerosol volatility within the framework of absorptive partitioning theory using a kinetic model of aerosol evaporation in the TD. OA volatility distributions (or "basis-sets") are determined using several assumptions as to the enthalpy of vaporization (ΔHvap). We present two definitions of "non-volatile OA," one being a global and one a local definition. Based on these definitions, our analysis indicates that a substantial fraction of the organic aerosol is comprised of non-volatile components that will not evaporate under any atmospheric conditions; on the order of 50-80% when the most realistic ΔHvap assumptions are considered. The sensitivity of the total OA mass to dilution and ambient changes in temperature has been assessed for the various ΔHvap assumptions. The temperature sensitivity is relatively independent of the particular ΔHvap assumptions whereas dilution sensitivity is found to be greatest for the low (ΔHvap = 50 kJ/mol) and lowest for the high (ΔHvap = 150 kJ/mol) assumptions. This difference arises from the high ΔHvap assumptions yielding volatility distributions with a greater fraction of non-volatile material than the low ΔHvap assumptions. If the observations are fit using a 1 or 2-component model the sensitivity of the OA to dilution is unrealistically high. An empirical method introduced by Faulhaber et al. (2009) has also been used to independently estimate a volatility distribution for the ambient OA and is found to give results consistent with the high and variable ΔHvap assumptions. Our results also show that the amount of semivolatile gas-phase organics in equilibrium with the OA could range from ~20

  12. The State of Ambient Air Quality of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, M. M.; Aburizaiza, O. S.; Khwaja, H. A.; Siddique, A.; Nayebare, S. R.; Zeb, J.; Blake, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient air pollution in major cities of Saudi Arabia is a substantial environmental and health concern. A study was undertaken to assess the air quality of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia by the analysis of respirable particulate matter (PM2.5), black carbon (BC), trace metals (Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Sr, Cd, Sb, and Pb), and water-soluble ions (F-, Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, C2O42-, and NH42+). Sulfur and BC mass concentration ranged 0.99 - 7.39 μg/m3 and 0.70 - 3.09 μg/m3, respectively, while the PM2.5 mass concentration ranged 23 - 186 μg/m3. Maximum BC contribution to PM2.5 was 5.6%. Atmospheric PM2.5 concentrations were well above the 24 h WHO guideline of 20 μg/m3. Air Quality Index (AQI) indicates that there were 8% days of moderate air quality, 28% days of unhealthy air quality for sensitive groups, 55% days of unhealthy air quality, and 9% days of very unhealthy air quality during the study period. Sulfate SO42- dominated the identifiable components. The major contributors to PM2.5 were soil and crustal material; vehicle emissions (black carbon factor); and fuel oil combustion in industries (sulfur factor), according to the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF). This study highlights the importance of focusing control strategies not only on reducing PM concentration, but also on the reduction of toxic components of the PM, to most effectively protect human health and the environment.

  13. Tritium monitoring system for near ambient measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Falter, K.G.; Bauer, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the current status of research on an improved tritium measurement system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the US Navy. Present tritium-in-air monitoring systems installed by the Navy can reliably measure to less than 10 {mu}Ci/m{sup 3}, but medical and safety issues are pushing measurement needs to below 1 {mu}Ci/m{sup 3}, which is equivalent to 1--10 nCi/ml in liquid samples, using calcium metal converter. A significant effort has been expended over the past 10 years by the Navy RADIAC Development Program at ORNL on various schemes to improve the detection of tritium in both air and liquid at near ambient levels. One such scheme includes a liquid flow-through system based on an NE102 sponge scintillator with dual photomultiplier tubes for the tube noise rejection. (This document also contains copies of the slides used for presentation of this paper to the IEEE 1991 Nuclear Science Symposium). 4 refs., 17 figs.

  14. Induced infiltration in aquifers with ambient flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John L.

    1993-10-01

    Well water quality depends on the relative amounts of water drawn from the pumped aquifer and nearby surface water bodies, such as streams, lakes, and wetlands. Although a surface water body may normally gain water from the aquifer, pumping can reverse gradients, causing it to lose water near the well. Surface water then enters the well by induced infiltration. Two-dimensional vertically integrated models of induced infiltration are developed for various combinations of aquifer geometry and sources of recharge. The models, which have applications in wellhead protection, aquifer pollution characterization, and aquifer remediation, are presented graphically. They show that the propensity for and rate of induced infiltration are enhanced by higher pumping rates, proximity of the well to the stream, and the presence of nearby barrier boundaries. The propensity and rate are reduced by the presence of other surface water bodies. Ambient groundwater discharge rate to the surface water body also plays a role, but not its source, whether it is from local vertical recharge, lateral inflow, or both. The results are also largely indifferent to whether the aquifer transmissivity is assumed to be a constant, or a function of water table elevation. Finally, if the well is close enough to the surface water body, say, less than 5% of the aquifer width, then the aquifer acts as if it were semi-infinite.

  15. Development of ambient temperature secondary lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbarao, S.; Shen, D. H.; Dawson, S.; Deligiannis, F.; Taraszkiewicz, J.; Halpert, Gerald

    1987-01-01

    JPL is developing ambient temperature secondary lithium cells for future spacecraft applications. Prior studies on experimental laboratory type Li-TiS2 cells yielded promising results in terms of cycle life and rate capability. To further assess the performance of this cell, 5 Ah engineering model cells were developed. Initially baseline cells were designed and fabricated. Each cell had 15 cathodes and 16 anodes and the ratio of anode to cathode capacity is 6:1. A solution of 1.5 molar LiAsF6 in 2Me-THF was used as the electrolyte. Cells were evaluated for their cycle life at C/1 and C/5 discharge rates and 100 percent depth of discharge. The cells were cycled between voltage limits 1.7 and 2.8 volts. The rate of charge in all cases is C/10. The results obtained indicate that cells can operate at C/10 to C/2 discharge rates and have an initial energy density of 70 Wh/kg. Cells delivered more than 100 cycles at C/2 discharge rate. The details of cell design, the test program, and the results obtained are described.

  16. Ambient air pollution: a cause of COPD?

    PubMed

    Schikowski, Tamara; Mills, Inga C; Anderson, H Ross; Cohen, Aaron; Hansell, Anna; Kauffmann, Francine; Krämer, Ursula; Marcon, Alessandro; Perez, Laura; Sunyer, Jordi; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Künzli, Nino

    2014-01-01

    The role of ambient air pollution in the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is considered to be uncertain. We review the evidence in the light of recent studies. Eight morbidity and six mortality studies were identified. These were heterogeneous in design, characterisation of exposure to air pollution and methods of outcome definition. Six morbidity studies with objectively defined COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity ratio) were cross-sectional analyses. One longitudinal study defined incidence of COPD as the first hospitalisation due to COPD. However, neither mortality nor hospitalisation studies can unambiguously distinguish acute from long-term effects on the development of the underlying pathophysiological changes. Most studies were based on within-community exposure contrasts, which mainly assess traffic-related air pollution. Overall, evidence of chronic effects of air pollution on the prevalence and incidence of COPD among adults was suggestive but not conclusive, despite plausible biological mechanisms and good evidence that air pollution affects lung development in childhood and triggers exacerbations in COPD patients. To fully integrate this evidence in the assessment, the life-time course of COPD should be better defined. Larger studies with longer follow-up periods, specific definitions of COPD phenotypes, and more refined and source-specific exposure assessments are needed.

  17. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 58 - Ambient Air Quality Monitoring Methodology

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ambient Air Quality Monitoring... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) AMBIENT AIR QUALITY SURVEILLANCE Pt. 58, App. C Appendix C to Part 58—Ambient Air Quality Monitoring Methodology 1.0 Purpose 2.0 SLAMS Ambient Air Monitoring Stations 3.0 NCore Ambient...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 58 - Ambient Air Quality Monitoring Methodology

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ambient Air Quality Monitoring... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) AMBIENT AIR QUALITY SURVEILLANCE Pt. 58, App. C Appendix C to Part 58—Ambient Air Quality Monitoring Methodology 1.0 Purpose 2.0 SLAMS Ambient Air Monitoring Stations 3.0 NCore Ambient...

  19. Perchlorate Formation on Mineral Surfaces under Ambient Mars Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrier, B. L.; Kounaves, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    Perchlorate(ClO4-) was first discovered in the northern polar region of mars by the Mars Phoenix Lander in 2008 and was also recently detected by the Mars Science Laboratory in Gale crater, indicating a possible planet-wide distribution [1,2]. The discovery of perchlorate on mars has led to numerous questions regarding its formation pathways, intermediate oxychlorine species that may be present, and their capacity to oxidize organics that may be present in the surface and sub-surface. If perchlorate is formed photochemically in the atmosphere as on earth, it would be expected that the large amount of perchlorate on mars (~0.6% by weight detected by Phoenix) would have been formed mainly in the distant past when volcanic activity on mars was more prevalent and more chlorine was available in the atmosphere, however recent research shows that perchlorate is broken down over time by gamma rays, suggesting an ongoing source of perchlorate production [3]. This suggests an ongoing mechanism for perchlorate formation. Our current research is aimed at understanding different mechanisms for perchlorate formation on mineral surfaces under ambient mars conditions. Experiments are performed in a Mars Simulation Chamber (MSC) capable of reproducing the temperature, pressure, atmospheric composition and UV fluence found on mars. Soil simulants are prepared consisting of SiO2 and various minerals that are known to be present on mars, as well as Cl-, OCl-, ClO2- or ClO3- and exposed in the MSC for varying lengths of time. Samples are subsequently analyzed for perchlorate formation using ion chromatography. To date, perchlorate has been shown to be formed relatively easily under simulated martian conditions from both ClO2- and ClO3- starting materials without invoking an atmospheric source of chlorine. References: [1] Hecht et al, Science, Vol. 325, p. 64-67, 2009 [2] Kerr, Science, Vol. 340, p. 138, 2013 [3] Quinn et al, Astrobiology, Vol. 13(6) p. 515-20, 2013

  20. Elastocaloric effect in CuAlZn and CuAlMn shape memory alloys under compression.

    PubMed

    Qian, Suxin; Geng, Yunlong; Wang, Yi; Pillsbury, Thomas E; Hada, Yoshiharu; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Fujimoto, Kenjiro; Hwang, Yunho; Radermacher, Reinhard; Cui, Jun; Yuki, Yoji; Toyotake, Koutaro; Takeuchi, Ichiro

    2016-08-13

    This paper reports the elastocaloric effect of two Cu-based shape memory alloys: Cu68Al16Zn16 (CuAlZn) and Cu73Al15Mn12 (CuAlMn), under compression at ambient temperature. The compression tests were conducted at two different rates to approach isothermal and adiabatic conditions. Upon unloading at a strain rate of 0.1 s(-1) (adiabatic condition) from 4% strain, the highest adiabatic temperature changes (ΔTad) of 4.0 K for CuAlZn and 3.9 K for CuAlMn were obtained. The maximum stress and hysteresis at each strain were compared. The stress at the maximum recoverable strain of 4.0% for CuAlMn was 120 MPa, which is 70% smaller than that of CuAlZn. A smaller hysteresis for the CuAlMn alloy was also obtained, about 70% less compared with the CuAlZn alloy. The latent heat, determined by differential scanning calorimetry, was 4.3 J g(-1) for the CuAlZn alloy and 5.0 J g(-1) for the CuAlMn alloy. Potential coefficients of performance (COPmat) for these two alloys were calculated based on their physical properties of measured latent heat and hysteresis, and a COPmat of approximately 13.3 for CuAlMn was obtained.This article is part of the themed issue 'Taking the temperature of phase transitions in cool materials'.

  1. X-ray and optical crystallographic parameters investigations of high frequency induction melted Al-(alpha-Al(2)O(3)) alloys.

    PubMed

    Bourbia, A; Draissia, M; Bedboudi, H; Boulkhessaim, S; Debili, M Y

    2010-01-01

    This article deals with the microstructural strengthening mechanisms of aluminium by means of hard alpha-Al(2)O(3) alumina fine particles. A broad of understanding views covering materials preparations, elaboration process, characterization techniques and associated microstructural characteristic parameters measurements is given. In order to investigate the microstructural characteristic parameters and the mechanical strengthening mechanisms of pure aluminium by hard fine particles, a set of Al-(alpha-Al(2)O(3)) alloys samples were made under vacuum by high fusion temperature melting, the high frequency (HF) process, and rapidly solidified under ambient temperature from a mixture of cold-compacted high-pure fine Al and alpha-Al(2)O(3) powders. The as-solidified Al-(alpha-Al(2)O(3)) alloys were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, optical microscopy observations and Vickers microhardness tests in both brut and heat-treated states. It was found that the as-solidified HF Al-(alpha-Al(2)O(3)) alloys with compositions below 4 wt.% (alpha-Al(2)O(3)) are single-phase microstructures of the solid solution FCC Al phase and over two-phase microstructures of the solid solution FCC Al and the Rhombohedral alpha-Al(2)O(3) phases. The optical micrographs reveal the presence of a grain size refinement in these alloys. Vickers microhardness of the as-solidified Al-(alpha-Al(2)O(3)) is increased by means of pure fine alpha-Al(2)O(3) alumina particles. These combined effects of strengthening and grain size refinement observed in the as-solidified Al-(alpha-Al(2)O(3)) alloys are essentially due to a strengthening of Al by the alpha-Al(2)O(3) alumina particles insertion in the (HF) melted and rapidly solidified alloys.

  2. Genetic testing in ALS

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Russell L.; Heverin, Mark; Thorpe, Owen; Abrahams, Sharon; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Hardiman, Orla

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the degree of consensus among clinicians on the clinical use of genetic testing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and the factors that determine decision-making. Methods: ALS researchers worldwide were invited to participate in a detailed online survey to determine their attitudes and practices relating to genetic testing. Results: Responses from 167 clinicians from 21 different countries were analyzed. The majority of respondents (73.3%) do not consider that there is a consensus definition of familial ALS (FALS). Fifty-seven percent consider a family history of frontotemporal dementia and 48.5% the presence of a known ALS genetic mutation as sufficient for a diagnosis of FALS. Most respondents (90.2%) offer genetic testing to patients they define as having FALS and 49.4% to patients with sporadic ALS. Four main genes (SOD1, C9orf72, TARDBP, and FUS) are commonly tested. A total of 55.2% of respondents would seek genetic testing if they had personally received a diagnosis of ALS. Forty-two percent never offer presymptomatic testing to family members of patients with FALS. Responses varied between ALS specialists and nonspecialists and based on the number of new patients seen per year. Conclusions: There is a lack of consensus among clinicians as to the definition of FALS. Substantial variation exists in attitude and practices related to genetic testing of patients and presymptomatic testing of their relatives across geographic regions and between experienced specialists in ALS and nonspecialists. PMID:28159885

  3. Cancrinite-group minerals behavior at non-ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotti, Paolo; Gatta, G. Diego; Kahlenberg, Volker; Merlini, Marco; Alvaro, Matteo; Cámara, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    Cancrinite-group minerals occur in the late stages of alkaline (SiO2)-undersaturated magmatism and in related effusive or contact rocks. So far only few studies have been devoted to the description of the thermo-elastic behavior, phase-stability and P /T -structure evolution (at the atomic scale) of this mineral group. Cancrinite-group minerals have an open-framework structure characterized by the [CAN]-topology. The [CAN]-framework shows large 12-ring channels, parallel to the c crystallographic axis, bound by columns of cages, the so-called can units. While very limited chemical variation is observed in the framework composition (the composition is almost always [Si6Al6O24]) a remarkable chemical variability is reported for the extraframework components in the cancrinite-group minerals. Two subgroups can be identified according to the extraframework content of the can units: the cancrinite- and the davyne-subgroups, showing Na-H2O and Ca-Cl chains, respectively. The channels are stuffed by cations, anions and molecules. We aimed to model the thermo-elastic behavior and the mechanisms of the (P ,T)-induced structure evolution of cancrinite-group minerals, with special interest on the role played by the extraframework population. The study was restricted to the following (CO3)-rich and (SO4)-rich end-members: cancrinite sensu stricto {[(Na,Ca)6(CO3)1.2-1.7][Na2(H2O)2][Al6Si6O24]}, vishnevite {[(Na,Ca,K)6(SO4)][Na2(H2O)2][Al6Si6O24]}, balliranoite {[(Na,Ca)6(CO3)1.2-1.7][Ca2Cl2][Al6Si6O24]} and davyne {[(Na,Ca,K)6((SO4),Cl)][Ca2Cl2][Al6Si6O24]}. Their high-P and low-T (T < 293 K) behavior was investigated by means of in-situ single-crystal X-ray diffraction, using diamond-anvil cells and (N2)-cryosystems, respectively. The high-T behavior of cancrinite has also been studied by means of in-situ single-crystal X-ray diffraction with a resistive heater. Cancrinite minerals share a similar volume compressibility and thermal expansivity at ambient conditions (cancrinite

  4. Ventilatory Control in ALS

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Nicole L.; Van Dyke, J.; Nashold, L.; Satriotomo, I.; Suzuki, M.; Mitchell, G.S.

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal, progressive neurodegenerative disease. ALS selectively causes degeneration in upper and lower (spinal) motor neurons, leading to muscle weakness, paralysis and death by ventilatory failure. Although ventilatory failure is generally the cause of death in ALS, little is known concerning the impact of this disorder on respiratory motor neurons, the consequences of respiratory motor neuron cell death, or the ability of the respiratory control system to “fight back” via mechanisms of compensatory respiratory plasticity. Here we review known effects of ALS on breathing, including possible effects on rhythm generation, respiratory motor neurons, and their target organs: the respiratory muscles. We consider evidence for spontaneous compensatory plasticity, preserving breathing well into disease progression despite dramatic loss of spinal respiratory motor neurons. Finally, we review current and potential therapeutic approaches directed toward preserving the capacity to breathe in ALS patients. PMID:23692930

  5. Wash-out of ambient air contaminations for breath measurements.

    PubMed

    Maurer, F; Wolf, A; Fink, T; Rittershofer, B; Heim, N; Volk, T; Baumbach, J I; Kreuer, S

    2014-06-01

    In breath analysis, ambient air contaminations are ubiquitous and difficult to eliminate. This study was designed to investigate the reduction of ambient air background by a lung wash-out with synthetic air. The reduction of the initial ambient air volatile organic compound (VOC) intensity was investigated in the breath of 20 volunteers inhaling synthetic air via a sealed full face mask in comparison to inhaling ambient air. Over a period of 30 minutes, breath analysis was conducted using ion mobility spectrometry coupled to a multi-capillary column. A total of 68 VOCs were identified for inhaling ambient air or inhaling synthetic air. By treatment with synthetic air, 39 VOCs decreased in intensity, whereas 29 increased in comparison to inhaling ambient air. In total, seven VOCs were significantly reduced (P-value < 0.05). A complete wash-out of VOCs in this setting was not observed, whereby a statistically significant reduction up to 65% as for terpinolene was achieved. Our setting successfully demonstrated a reduction of ambient air contaminations from the airways by a lung wash-out with synthetic air.

  6. Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    G. Moridis; Q. Hu

    2000-03-12

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to evaluate (by means of 2-D semianalytical and 3-D numerical models) the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the unsaturated zone (UZ) under ambient conditions from the potential repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada. This is in accordance with the ''AMR Development Plan U0060, Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (CRWMS M and O 1999a). This AMR supports the UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). This AMR documents the UZ Radionuclide Transport Model (RTM). This model considers: the transport of radionuclides through fractured tuffs; the effects of changes in the intensity and configuration of fracturing from hydrogeologic unit to unit; colloid transport; physical and retardation processes and the effects of perched water. In this AMR they document the capabilities of the UZ RTM, which can describe flow (saturated and/or unsaturated) and transport, and accounts for (a) advection, (b) molecular diffusion, (c) hydrodynamic dispersion (with full 3-D tensorial representation), (d) kinetic or equilibrium physical and/or chemical sorption (linear, Langmuir, Freundlich or combined), (e) first-order linear chemical reaction, (f) radioactive decay and tracking of daughters, (g) colloid filtration (equilibrium, kinetic or combined), and (h) colloid-assisted solute transport. Simulations of transport of radioactive solutes and colloids (incorporating the processes described above) from the repository horizon to the water table are performed to support model development and support studies for Performance Assessment (PA). The input files for these simulations include transport parameters obtained from other AMRs (i.e., CRWMS M and O 1999d, e, f, g, h; 2000a, b, c, d). When not available, the parameter values used are obtained from the literature. The results of the simulations are used to evaluate the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids, and

  7. Ambient intelligence systems for personalized sport training.

    PubMed

    Vales-Alonso, Javier; López-Matencio, Pablo; Gonzalez-Castaño, Francisco J; Navarro-Hellín, Honorio; Baños-Guirao, Pedro J; Pérez-Martínez, Francisco J; Martínez-Álvarez, Rafael P; González-Jiménez, Daniel; Gil-Castiñeira, Felipe; Duro-Fernández, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Several research programs are tackling the use of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) at specific fields, such as e-Health, e-Inclusion or e-Sport. This is the case of the project "Ambient Intelligence Systems Support for Athletes with Specific Profiles", which intends to assist athletes in their training. In this paper, the main developments and outcomes from this project are described. The architecture of the system comprises a WSN deployed in the training area which provides communication with athletes' mobile equipments, performs location tasks, and harvests environmental data (wind speed, temperature, etc.). Athletes are equipped with a monitoring unit which obtains data from their training (pulse, speed, etc.). Besides, a decision engine combines these real-time data together with static information about the training field, and from the athlete, to direct athletes' training to fulfill some specific goal. A prototype is presented in this work for a cross country running scenario, where the objective is to maintain the heart rate (HR) of the runner in a target range. For each track, the environmental conditions (temperature of the next track), the current athlete condition (HR), and the intrinsic difficulty of the track (slopes) influence the performance of the athlete. The decision engine, implemented by means of (m, s)-splines interpolation, estimates the future HR and selects the best track in each fork of the circuit. This method achieves a success ratio in the order of 80%. Indeed, results demonstrate that if environmental information is not take into account to derive training orders, the success ratio is reduced notably.

  8. Relationship Between Vortex Meander and Ambient Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.; Hardy, Gordon H.; Meyn, Larry A.

    2006-01-01

    Efforts are currently underway to increase the capacity of airports by use of closely-spaced parallel runways. If such an objective is to be achieved safely and efficiently during both visual and instrument flight conditions, it will be necessary to develop more precise methods for the prediction of the motion and spread of the hazard posed by the lift-generated vortex-wakes of aircraft, and their uncertainties. The purpose of the present study is to relate the motion induced in vortex filaments by turbulence in the ambient flow field to the measured turbulence in the flow field. The problem came about when observations made in the two largest NASA wind tunnels indicated that extended exposure of vortex wakes to the turbulence in the wind tunnel air stream causes the centers of the vortices to meander about with time at a given downstream station where wake measurements are being made. Although such a behavior was expected, the turbulence level based on the maximum amplitude of meander was much less than the root-mean-squared value measured in the free-stream of the wind tunnel by use of hot-film anemometers. An analysis of the time-dependent motion of segments of vortex filaments as they interact with an eddy, indicates that the inertia of the filaments retards their motion enough in the early part of their travel to account for a large part of the difference in the two determinations of turbulence level. Migration of vortex filaments from one turbulent eddy to another (probably with a different orientation), is believed to account for the remainder of the difference. Methods that may possibly be developed for use in the measurement of the magnitude of the more intense eddies in turbulent flow fields and how they should be adjusted to predict vortex meander are then discussed.

  9. Ambient air pollution and population health: overview.

    PubMed

    Krewski, Daniel; Rainham, Daniel

    2007-02-01

    In November 2003 approximately 200 researchers, stakeholders, and policymakers from more than 40 countries gathered to discuss the science and policy implications of air pollution and human health as part of the AIRNET/NERAM Strategies for Clean Air and Health initiative. The purpose of this paper is to review the more than 35 research posters presented at the conference, including exposure, toxicological, and epidemiological studies of air pollution. Collectively, these papers support previous evidence that both short- and long-term exposures to particulate air pollution have adverse population health impacts, including effects on children. Cellular studies also suggest that air pollution can cause mutagenic and oxidative effects, raising concerns about carcinogenicity and cellular regeneration. Studies of biomarkers, such as Clara-cell proteins and lymphocyte damage assessment, provide further evidence of air pollution effects at the cellular level. Other studies have focused on improvements to measurement and sources of air pollution. These studies suggest that particle mass rather than particle composition may be a more useful indicator of potential human health risk. It is well known that emissions from transportation sources are a major contributor to ambient air pollution in large urban centres. Epidemiologic researchers are able to reduce bias due to misclassification and improve exposure assessment models by allocating air pollution exposure according to distance from traffic sources or land-use patterns. The close association between traffic patterns and air pollution concentrations provides a potential basis for the development of transport policies and regulations with population health improvements as a primary objective. The results of the research presented here present opportunities and challenges for the development of policies for improvements to air quality and human health. However, there remains the challenge of how best to achieve these

  10. Ambient Intelligence Systems for Personalized Sport Training

    PubMed Central

    Vales-Alonso, Javier; López-Matencio, Pablo; Gonzalez-Castaño, Francisco J.; Navarro-Hellín, Honorio; Baños-Guirao, Pedro J.; Pérez-Martínez, Francisco J.; Martínez-Álvarez, Rafael P.; González-Jiménez, Daniel; Gil-Castiñeira, Felipe; Duro-Fernández, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Several research programs are tackling the use of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) at specific fields, such as e-Health, e-Inclusion or e-Sport. This is the case of the project “Ambient Intelligence Systems Support for Athletes with Specific Profiles”, which intends to assist athletes in their training. In this paper, the main developments and outcomes from this project are described. The architecture of the system comprises a WSN deployed in the training area which provides communication with athletes’ mobile equipments, performs location tasks, and harvests environmental data (wind speed, temperature, etc.). Athletes are equipped with a monitoring unit which obtains data from their training (pulse, speed, etc.). Besides, a decision engine combines these real-time data together with static information about the training field, and from the athlete, to direct athletes’ training to fulfill some specific goal. A prototype is presented in this work for a cross country running scenario, where the objective is to maintain the heart rate (HR) of the runner in a target range. For each track, the environmental conditions (temperature of the next track), the current athlete condition (HR), and the intrinsic difficulty of the track (slopes) influence the performance of the athlete. The decision engine, implemented by means of (m, s)-splines interpolation, estimates the future HR and selects the best track in each fork of the circuit. This method achieves a success ratio in the order of 80%. Indeed, results demonstrate that if environmental information is not take into account to derive training orders, the success ratio is reduced notably. PMID:22294931

  11. 78 FR 34177 - Implementation of the 2008 National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone: State Implementation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... the 2008 National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone: State Implementation Plan Requirements... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone: State Implementation Plan Requirements AGENCY: Environmental... 2008 ozone national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) (the ``2008 ozone NAAQS'') that...

  12. ALS2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Susanne A.; Carr, Lucinda; Deuschl, Guenther; Hopfner, Franziska; Stamelou, Maria; Wood, Nicholas W.; Bhatia, Kailash P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the genetic etiology in 2 consanguineous families who presented a novel phenotype of autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with generalized dystonia. Methods: A combination of homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in the first family and Sanger sequencing of candidate genes in the second family were used. Results: Both families were found to have homozygous loss-of-function mutations in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2 (juvenile) (ALS2) gene. Conclusions: We report generalized dystonia and cerebellar signs in association with ALS2-related disease. We suggest that the ALS2 gene should be screened for mutations in patients who present with a similar phenotype. PMID:24562058

  13. Secondary organic aerosol formation from photo-oxidation of toluene with NOx and SO2: Chamber simulation with purified air versus urban ambient air as matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wei; Liu, Tengyu; Zhang, Yanli; Situ, Shuping; Hu, Qihou; He, Quanfu; Zhang, Zhou; Lü, Sujun; Bi, Xinhui; Wang, Xuemei; Boreave, Antoinette; George, Christian; Ding, Xiang; Wang, Xinming

    2017-02-01

    Chamber studies on the formation of secondary aerosols are mostly performed with purified air as matrix, it is of wide concern in what extent they might be different from the situations in ambient air, where a variety of gaseous and particulate components preexist. Here we compared the photo-oxidation of "toluene + NOx + SO2" combinations in a smog chamber in real urban ambient air matrix with that in purified air matrix. The secondary organic aerosols (SOA) mass concentrations and yields from toluene in the ambient air matrix, after subtracted ambient air background primary and secondary organic aerosols, were 9.0-34.0 and 5.6-12.9 times, respectively, greater than those in purified air matrix. Both homogeneous and heterogeneous oxidation of SO2 were enhanced in ambient air matrix experiments with observed 2.0-7.5 times higher SO2 degradation rates and 2.6-6.8 times faster sulfate formation than that in purified air matrix, resulting in higher in-situ particle acidity and consequently promoting acid-catalyzed SOA formation. In the ambient air experiments although averaged OH radical levels were elevated probably due to heterogeneous formation of OH on particle surface and/or ozonolysis of alkenes, non-OH oxidation pathways of SO2 became even more dominating. Under the same organic aerosol mass concentration, the SOA yields of toluene in purified air matrix experiments matched very well with the two-product model curve by Ng et al. (2007), yet the yields in ambient air on average was over two times larger. The results however were much near the best fit curve by Hildebrandt et al. (2009) with the volatility basis set (VBS) approach.

  14. [Research on Raman spectra of isooctane at ambient temperature and ambient pressure to 1. 2 GPa].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fei-fei; Zheng, Hai-fei

    2012-03-01

    The experimental study of the Raman spectral character for liquid isooctane (2,2,4-trimethylpentane, ATM) was con ducted by moissanite anvil cell at the pressure of 0-1.2 GPa and the ambient temperature. The results show that the Raman peaks of the C-H stretching vibration shift to higher frenquencies with increasing pressures. The relations between the system pressure and peaks positions is given as following: v2 873 = 0.002 8P+2 873.3; v2 905 = 0.004 8P+2 905.4; v2 935 = 0.002 7P+ 2 935.0; v2 960 = 0.012P+2 960.9. The Raman spectra of isooctane abruptly changed at the pressure about 1.0 GPa and the liquid-solid phase transition was observed by microscope. With the freezing pressure at ambient temperature and the melting temperature available at 1 atm, the authors got the liquid-solid phase diagram of isooctane. According to Clapeyron equation, the authors obtained the differences of volume and entropy for the liquid-solid phase transition of isooctane: deltaV(m) = 4.46 x 10(-6) m3 x mol-1 and deltaS = -30.32 J x K(-1) x mol(-1).

  15. Lou Gehrig's Disease (ALS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... when it becomes necessary. For instance, a power wheelchair can enable a paralyzed person with ALS to ... done these things despite being confined to a wheelchair for many years, being able to move only ...

  16. Genetic Testing for ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Involved Donate Familial Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (FALS) and Genetic Testing By Deborah Hartzfeld, MS, CGC, Certified Genetic ... guarantee a person will develop symptoms of ALS. Genetic Counseling If there is more than one person ...

  17. [Ambient and enclosed space air sampling for determination of contaminants].

    PubMed

    Dorogova, V B

    2010-01-01

    The paper touches upon the issues how to correctly and maximally take single and average daily samples of ambient, residential and public building, and enclosed space air for further tests for the content of hazardous substances. The paper is debated.

  18. Cross-correlations of ambient noise recorded by accelerometers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rábade García, S. E.; Ramirez-Guzman, L.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the ambient noise cross-correlations obtained by using properly corrected accelerometric recordings, and determine velocity structure in central Mexico based on a dispersion analysis. The data used comprise ten months of continuous recordings - from April 2013 to January 2014 - of ambient seismic noise at stations operated by the National Seismological Service of Mexico and the Engineering Strong Ground Motion Network of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). The vertical component of ambient noise was base-line corrected, filtered, and properly integrated before extracting Green's functions (GF), which were compared successfully against GF obtained using recordings from broadband velocity sensors. In order to obtain dispersion curves, we estimated group and phase velocities applying the FTAN analysis technique and obtained s-wave velocity profiles at selected regions. We conclude and highlight that the use of widely deployed accelerographs to conduct regional studies using ambient noise tomography is feasible

  19. *Ambient Particluate Matter Supresses Alveolar Macrophage Cytokine Response to Lipopolysaccharide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reports link ambient particulate matter (PM) exposure with cardiopulmonary mortality and morbidity, including the exacerbation of inflammatory disease and increased hospitalization for lung infections. Alveolar macrophages (AM) play an important defense role against infections v...

  20. AMBIENT PARTICULATE MATTER DECREASED IN HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACHROPHAGE CYTOKINE RELEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure to ambient airborne particulate matter (PM) is associated with cardiopulmonary mortality and morbidity, including increased hospitalizations for lung infection. Normal lung immune responses to bacterial infection include alveolar macrophage cytokine production and...

  1. Draft Final Ambient Air Monitoring Plan July 2015

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This work plan describes the ambient air sampling program for the New Bedford Harbor Superfund Site and presents the locations, sampling strategies, and exposure limits for monitoring remedial activities in the Harbor.

  2. Effect of ambient particulate matter expousre on hemostasis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies have linked levels of particulate matter (PM) in ambient air to cardiovascular mortality and hospitalizations for myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke. Thrombus formation plays a primary role in potentiating acute cardiovascular events, and this study was...

  3. 40 CFR 610.60 - Non-standard ambient conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... dynamometer, in ambient temperatures outside the 60° to 90° range specified in § 610.64 as determined by the... or dynamometer as determined by the Administrator. One test location, at an elevation of no less...

  4. Developing a thermoacoustic sensor adaptive to ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jida; Ang, Woon; Lim, Allan; Yu, Xiaojian; Chen, Jie

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a simple and adaptive thermoacoustic sensor was designed to measure Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (LIPUS). Compared to other thermoacoustic sensor designs, our novelty lies in (i) integrating an ultrasound medium layer during the measurement to simplify the complicated set-up procedures and (ii) taking the effect of ambient temperatures into design consideration. After measuring temperature increases with various ambient temperatures under different ultrasound intensities, a relationship among ultrasound intensities, ambient temperatures and coefficients of temporal temperature changes was calculated. Our improved design has made the sensor easy to operate and its performance more accurate and consistent than the thermoacoustic sensor designs without considering ambient temperatures. In all, our improved design greatly enhances the thermoacoustic sensor in practical ultrasound calibration.

  5. Ag-Al-Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/97.etType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Ag-Al-Ca' with the content:

  6. Ambient lead measurements in Cairo, Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Howes, J.E. Jr.; Labib, M.; Samaha, N.; Sabry, M.; Araby, H.E.

    1999-07-01

    The Cairo Air Improvement Project (CAIP) has established a network of 36 stations to monitor airborne lead levels in the Greater Cairo Area. Data obtained during the first 4 months of the monitoring program indicates that lead levels in ambient air significantly exceed the Government of Egypt's (GOE) Law Number 4 (1994) limit of 1 {micro} g/m{sup 3} (annual mean) in areas downwind of secondary lead smelters and in heavily trafficked areas. The highest mean and single sampling event lead levels were observed in the heavily industrialized areas of Shoubra el-Kheima and Tebbin. At two sites in Shoubra el-Kheima, mean and maximum lead levels were determined to be approximately 20 {micro} g/m{sup 3} and 79 {micro} g/m{sup 3}, respectively. At three sites located in areas of high motor vehicle traffic in the central part of the city, the mean lead level was about 4 {micro} g/m{sup 3} and the maximum levels ranged from approximately 10 x 20 {micro} g/m{sup 3}. Of the remainder of the sites, the mean lead concentrations were 2fd3 {micro} g/m{sup 3} at three sites, 1 P2 {mu} g/m{sup 3} at 16 sites, and below 1 {micro} g/m{sup 3} at eight sites. Lead levels in areas devoted primarily to residential use were generally less than 2 {micro} g/m{sup 3}. The maximum mean monthly PM{sub 10} lead value measured at fugitive emission monitoring sites near lead smelters was approximately 73 {micro} g/m{sup 3}. The maximum lead concentration measured during a single sampling event was 180 {micro} g/m{sup 3}. Generally lower lead levels were observed in December due to regulation action that resulted in some suspension of smelting operations and to approximately 180-degree wind direction shifts that typically occur during this period of the year. The GOE is working vigorously to eliminate the lead problem in Egypt through implementation of the Lead Exposure Action Plan (LEAP). A major component of LEAP is the Lead Smelter Action Plan (LSAP).

  7. The ROSCOE Manual. Volume 15. ambient geomagnetic field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-06-13

    Continue on reverse side it necessary and identify by bloc;, number) ROSCOE\\ ~ Ambient Geomagnetic Model .3 ABSTRACT fC.-ntinue on re.erse side if...necesAary end idrnttlyhr block number) A preliminary model of the ambient geomagnetic field has been adopted for use in ROSCOE. The model fits a locally...presented derivations, flow d’,%rams, Fortran listings, and a test problem and evaluation. The model is found to he both fast and accurate. ream DD I

  8. Postural orientation modifications in autism in response to ambient lenses.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, M; Carmody, D P; Gaydos, A

    1996-01-01

    Autistic children often display abnormal postures, head tilts, and other spatial management dysfunctions. Methods were introduced to measure spatial orientation in tasks in a group of fourteen autistic children in Montreal, Canada. Ambient lenses were found to improve posture, correct head tilts, and improve ball catching abilities. A model of spatial orientation is described and recommendations are made to incorporate ambient lenses in treatment programs.

  9. Assessment of selected metals in the ambient air PM10 in urban sites of Bangkok (Thailand).

    PubMed

    Pongpiachan, Siwatt; Iijima, Akihiro

    2016-02-01

    Estimating the atmospheric concentrations of PM10-bounded selected metals in urban air is crucial for evaluating adverse health impacts. In the current study, a combination of measurements and multivariate statistical tools was used to investigate the influence of anthropogenic activities on variations in the contents of 18 metals (i.e., Al, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Cd, Sb, Ba, La, Ce and Pb) in ambient air. The concentrations of PM10-bounded metals were measured simultaneously at eight air quality observatory sites during a half-year period at heavily trafficked roads and in urban residential zones in Bangkok, Thailand. Although the daily average concentrations of Al, V, Cr, Mn and Fe were almost equivalent to those of other urban cities around the world, the contents of the majority of the selected metals were much lower than the existing ambient air quality guidelines and standard limit values. The sequence of average values of selected metals followed the order of Al > Fe > Zn > Cu > Pb > Mn > Ba > V > Sb > Ni > As > Cr > Cd > Se > Ce > La > Co > Sc. The probability distribution function (PDF) plots showed sharp symmetrical bell-shaped curves in V and Cr, indicating that crustal emissions are the predominant sources of these two elements in PM10. The comparatively low coefficients of divergence (COD) that were found in the majority of samples highlight that site-specific effects are of minor importance. A principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that 37.74, 13.51 and 11.32 % of the total variances represent crustal emissions, vehicular exhausts and the wear and tear of brakes and tires, respectively.

  10. Elasticity of single-crystal SmAlO 3, GdAlO 3 and ScAlO 3 perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Jay D.

    1984-12-01

    The adiabatic single-crystal elastic moduli of SmAlO 3, GdAlO 3 and ScAlO 3, all with the orthorhombic perovskite structure, have been measured by Brillouin spectroscopy under ambient conditions. These 3 compounds display various degrees of crystallographic distortion from the ideal cubic perovskite structure. We find that longitudinal moduli in directions parallel to the axes of a pseudocubic subcell are nearly equal and insensitive to distortions of the crystal structure from cubic symmetry, whereas, the moduli C 11 and C 22, parallel to the orthorhombic axes, display pronounced anisotropy with the exception of ScAlO 3. The shear moduli also correlate with distortion from cubic symmetry, as measured by rotation, or tilt angles, of the AlO 6 octahedra. Our data support the observations of Liebermann et al. that perovskite-structure compounds define consistent elasticity trends relating bulk modulus and molar volume, and sound speed and mean atomic weight. These relationships have been used to estimate bulk and shear moduli for the high-pressure polymorphs of CaSiO 3 and MgSiO 3 with the perovskite structure.

  11. ESTIMATED HOURLY PERSONAL EXPOSURES TO AMBIENT AND NON-AMBIENT PARTICULATE MATTER AMONG SENSITIVE POPULATIONS IN SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies of particulate matter (PM) routinely use concentrations measured with stationary outdoor monitors as surrogates for personal exposure. Despite the frequently reported poor correlations between ambient concentrations and total personal exposure, the epidemi...

  12. Statins: Do They Cause ALS?

    MedlinePlus

    Statins: Do they cause ALS? Do statins cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)? Answers from Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D. ... D. References Sorensen HT, et al. Statins and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: The level of evidence for an association. Journal ...

  13. Rapidly solidified NiAl and FeAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaydosh, D. J.; Crimp, M. A.

    1984-01-01

    Melt spinning was used to produce rapidly solidified ribbons of the B2 intermetallics NiAl and FeAl. Both Fe-40Al and Fe-45Al possessed some bend ductility in the as spun condition. The bend ductility of Fe-40Al, Fe-45Al, and equiatomic NiAl increased with subsequent heat treatment. Heat treatment at approximately 0.85 T (sub m) resulted in significant grain growth in equiatomic FeAl and in all the NiAl compositions. Low bend ductility in both FeAl and NiAl generally coincided with intergranular failure, while increased bend ductility was characterized by increasing amounts of transgranular cleavage fracture.

  14. Experimental Demonstration of Collisionless Particle Acceleration Mechanisms and Entrainment of Ambient Plasma Ions by a Rapidly Expanding Diamagnetic Cavity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonde, J.; Vincena, S. T.; Gekelman, W. N.

    2015-12-01

    The collisionless coupling of an expanding diamagnetic cavity to a magnetized, ambient plasma is studied in a laboratory environment using a laser-produced plasma (LPP). The seed LPP rapidly expands with velocities up to the background Alfvén speed, vexp ≤ vA. The boundary layer of the expansion is characterized with in situ diagnostics as a cylindrical version of the Ferraro-Rosenbluth current sheath. Maintenance of quasi-neutrality in this sheath forms an electric field opposing the cross-field expansion which simultaneously drives the electron current that forms the diamagnetic cavity, decelerates the LPP ions to stagnation, and accelerates ambient ions inward. The field topology across the background magnetic field is identical to that described by Bernhardt, et al. [1] for the AMPTE magnetotail barium releases. The boundary along the magnetic field, however, is shown to contain an electric field with E·B ≠ 0, which is absent in simple fluid models of diamagnetic cavities. The electric fields at this boundary help explain previous observations in the experiment of the ejection of suprathermal electrons and return currents that generated whistler- and Alfvén-wave radiation in the ambient plasma. Magnetic loops and an emissive probe measure the magnetic field and electrostatic potential along 3 dimensions while a laser-induced fluorescence scheme measures the cross-field flow of the ambient argon ions as they penetrate the diamagnetic cavity. Particle orbit solvers employing the measured fields corroborate the flow diagnostic and predict strong outflows of ambient ions with higher charge to mass ratios after diamagnetic cavity collapse. This experiment was conducted in the Large Plasma Device at the Basic Plasma Science Facility and funded by grants from the US Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation. [1] P.A. Bernhardt, R.A. Roussel-Dupre, M.B. Pongratz, J. Geophys. Res. 92, 57777 (1987).

  15. ALS superbend magnet system

    SciTech Connect

    Zbasnik, J.; Wang, S.T.; Chen, J.Y.; DeVries, G.J.; DeMarco, R.; Fahmie, M.; Geyer, A.; Green, M.A.; Harkins, J.; Henderson, T.; Hinkson, J.; Hoyer, E.H.; Krupnick, J.; Marks, S.; Ottens, F.; Paterson, J.A.; Pipersky, P.; Portmann, G.; Robin, D.A.; Schlueter, R.D.; Steier, C.; Taylor, C.E.; Wahrer, R.

    2000-09-15

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is preparing to upgrade the Advanced Light Source (ALS) with three superconducting dipoles (Superbends). In this paper we present the final magnet system design which incorporates R&D test results and addresses the ALS operational concerns of alignment, availability, and economy. The design incorporates conduction-cooled Nb-Ti windings and HTS current leads, epoxy-glass suspension straps, and a Gifford-McMahon cryocooler to supply steady state refrigeration. We also present the current status of fabrication and testing.

  16. Imaging Subsurface Structure of Tehran/Iran region using Ambient Seismic Noise Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirzad Iraj, Taghi; Shmomali, Z. Hossein

    2013-04-01

    Tehran, capital of Iran, is surrounded by many active faults (including Mosha, North Tehran and North and/or South Rey faults), however our knowledge about the 3D velocity structure of the study area is limited. Recent developments in seismology have shown that cross-correlation of a long time ambient seismic noise recorded by pair of stations, contain information about the Green's function between the stations. Thus ambient seismic noise carries valuable information of propagation path which can be extracted. We obtained 2D model of shear wave velocity (Vs) for Tehran/Iran area using seismic ambient noise tomography (ANT) method. In this study, we use continuous vertical component of data recorded by TDMMO (Tehran Disaster Mitigation and Management Organization) and IRSC (Iranian Seismological Center) networks in the Tehran/Iran area. The TDMMO and IRSC networks are equipped with CMG-5TD Guralp sensor and SS-1 Kinemetrics sensor respectively. We use data from 25 stations for 12 months from 2009/Oct. to 2010/Oct. Data processing is similar to that explained in detail by Bensen et al. (2007) including processed daily base data. The mean, trend, and instrument response were removed and the data were decimated to 10 sps. One-bit time-domain normalization was then applied to suppress the influence of instrument irregularities and earthquake signals followed by spectral normalization between 0.1-1.0 Hz (period 1-10 sec). After cross-correlation processing, we implement a new stacking method to stack many cross-correlation functions bases on the highest energy in a time interval which we expect to receive the Rayleigh wave fundamental mode. We then obtained group velocity of Rayleigh wave by using phase match filtering and frequency-time analysis techniques. Finally, we applied iterative inversion method to extract Vs model of shallow structure in the Tehran/Iran area.

  17. Ground motion prediction for the Vienna Basin area using the ambient seismic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schippkus, Sven; Zigone, Dimitri; Bokelmann, Götz; AlpArray Working Group

    2016-04-01

    The Vienna Basin is one of the most seismically active regions in Austria. Because of the population density and sensitive infrastructure, seismic hazard assessment in this area is of critical importance. An important part of seismic hazard analysis is ground motion prediction, which can in principle be done using either empirical studies to derive ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) or using a physics-based approach to simulate ground motion by modelling surface wave propagation. Recently a new method has been presented that is based on the emergence of the inter-station Green's function from ambient noise cross-correlations (Denolle et al. 2013), which provides the impulse response of the Earth from a point source at the surface (from the site of one of the two receivers to the other). These impulse responses are dominated by surface waves, which would, in the case of a real earthquake, cause the major damages. The Green's function can in principle be modified to simulate a double couple dislocation at depth, i.e., a virtual earthquake. Using an adapted pre-processing method, the relative amplitudes of the ambient noise records of different inter-station paths are preserved in the correlation functions, and effects like attenuation and amplification of surface waves in sedimentary basins can be studied. This provides more precise information that will help improve seismic hazard evaluations. Here we present a preliminary study of such ground motion prediction for the Vienna Basin using about two dozen broadband stations from available networks in the area, e.g., stations from the University of Vienna (AlpArray) and Vienna Technical University. References Denolle, M. A., E. M. Dunham, G. A. Prieto, and G. C. Beroza (2013), Ground motion prediction of realistic earthquake sources using the ambient seismic field, J. Geophys. Res. Solid Earth, 118, 2102-2118, doi:10.1029/2012JB009603.

  18. A first principles study of structural stability, electronic structure and mechanical properties of beryllium alanate BeAlH5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhosh, M.; Rajeswarapalanichamy, R.; Priyanga, G. Sudha; Kanagaprabha, S.; Cinthia, A. Jemmy; Iyakutti, K.

    2015-06-01

    Ab initio calculations are performed to investigate the structural stability, electronic structure and mechanical properties of BeAlH5 for monoclinic crystal structures with two different types of space group namely P21 and C2/c. Among the considered structures monoclinic (P21) phase is found to be the most stable at ambient condition. The structural phase transition from monoclinic (P21) to monoclinic (C2/c) phase is observed in BeAlH5. The electronic structure reveals that this compound is insulator. The calculated elastic constants indicate that this material is mechanically stable at ambient condition.

  19. Thermal, solution and reductive decomposition of Cu-Al layered double hydroxides into oxide products

    SciTech Connect

    Britto, Sylvia; Vishnu Kamath, P.

    2009-05-15

    Cu-Al layered double hydroxides (LDHs) with [Cu]/[Al] ratio 2 adopt a structure with monoclinic symmetry while that with the ratio 0.25 adopt a structure with orthorhombic symmetry. The poor thermodynamic stability of the Cu-Al LDHs is due in part to the low enthalpies of formation of Cu(OH){sub 2} and CuCO{sub 3} and in part to the higher solubility of the LDH. Consequently, the Cu-Al LDH can be decomposed thermally (150 deg. C), hydrothermally (150 deg. C) and reductively (ascorbic acid, ambient temperature) to yield a variety of oxide products. Thermal decomposition at low (400 deg. C) temperature yields an X-ray amorphous residue, which reconstructs back to the LDH on soaking in water or standing in the ambient. Solution decomposition under hydrothermal conditions yields tenorite at 150 deg. C itself. Reductive decomposition yields a composite of Cu{sub 2}O and Al(OH){sub 3}, which on alkali-leaching of the latter, leads to the formation of fine particles of Cu{sub 2}O (<1 {mu}m). - Graphical abstract: SEM image of (a) the Cu{sub 2}O-Al(OH){sub 3} composite obtained on reductive decomposition of CuAl{sub 4}-LDH and (b) Cu{sub 2}O obtained on leaching of Al(OH){sub 3} from (a).

  20. Interfacial structures of LaAlO3 films on Si(100) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X. B.; Liu, Z. G.; Shi, G. H.; Ling, H. Q.; Zhou, H. W.; Wang, X. P.; Nguyen, B. Y.

    This paper investigates the interfacial characteristics of LaAlO3 (LAO) and LaAlOxNy (LAON) films deposited directly on silicon substrates by the pulsed-laser deposition technique. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) pictures indicate that an interfacial reaction between LAO and Si often exists. The interfacial layer thickness of LAO films deposited in a nitrogen ambient atmosphere is smaller than that of LAO films deposited in an oxygen ambient atmosphere. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) were used to study the composition of the interfacial layer. The shift of the La 3d photoelectron peak to a higher binding energy compared to LaAlO3, the shift of the Al 2p peak to a higher binding energy compared to LaAlO3, the shift of the Si 2p peak to a lower binding energy compared to SiO2 and the intermediate location of the O 1s peak compared to LaAlO3 and SiO2 indicate the existence of a La-Al-Si-O bonding structure, which was also proved by the AES depth profile of LAO films. It can be concluded that the interfacial layer is not simply SiO2 but a compound of La-Al-Si-O.

  1. Mechanistic Variants in Gas-Phase Metal-Oxide Mediated Activation of Methane at Ambient Conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Jilai; Zhou, Shaodong; Zhang, Jun; Schlangen, Maria; Usharani, Dandamudi; Shaik, Sason; Schwarz, Helmut

    2016-09-07

    The C-H bond activation of methane mediated by a prototypical heteronuclear metal-oxide cluster, [Al2Mg2O5](•+), was investigated by using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) in conjunction with high-level quantum mechanical calculations. Experimentally, hydrogen-atom abstraction from methane by the cluster ion [Al2Mg2O5](•+) takes place at ambient conditions. As to the mechanism, according to our computational findings, both the proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and the conventional hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) are feasible and compete with each other. This is in distinct contrast to the [XYO2](+) (X, Y = Mg, Al, Si) cluster oxide ions which activate methane exclusively via the PCET route (Li, J.; Zhou, S.; Zhang, J.; Schlangen, M.; Weiske, T.; Usharani, D.; Shaik, S.; Schwarz, H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016, 138, 7973-7981). The electronic origins of the mechanistically rather complex reactivity scenarios of the [Al2Mg2O5](•+)/CH4 couple were elucidated. For the PCET mechanism, in which the Lewis acid-base pair [Al(+)-O(-)] of the cluster acts as the active site, a clear correlation has been established between the nature of the transition state, the corresponding barrier height, the Lewis acidity-basicity of the [M(+)-O(-)] unit, as well as the bond order of the M(+)-O(-) bond. Also addressed is the role of the spin and charge distributions of a terminal oxygen radical site in the direct HAT route. The knowledge of the factors that control the reactivity of PCET and HAT pathways not only deepens our mechanistic understanding of metal-oxide mediated C-H bond activation but may also provide guidance for the rational design of catalysts.

  2. Ambient Temperature and Morbidity: A Review of Epidemiological Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaofang; Wolff, Rodney; Yu, Weiwei; Vaneckova, Pavla; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: In this paper, we review the epidemiological evidence on the relationship between ambient temperature and morbidity. We assessed the methodological issues in previous studies and proposed future research directions. Data sources and data extraction: We searched the PubMed database for epidemiological studies on ambient temperature and morbidity of noncommunicable diseases published in refereed English journals before 30 June 2010. Forty relevant studies were identified. Of these, 24 examined the relationship between ambient temperature and morbidity, 15 investigated the short-term effects of heat wave on morbidity, and 1 assessed both temperature and heat wave effects. Data synthesis: Descriptive and time-series studies were the two main research designs used to investigate the temperature–morbidity relationship. Measurements of temperature exposure and health outcomes used in these studies differed widely. The majority of studies reported a significant relationship between ambient temperature and total or cause-specific morbidities. However, there were some inconsistencies in the direction and magnitude of nonlinear lag effects. The lag effect of hot temperature on morbidity was shorter (several days) compared with that of cold temperature (up to a few weeks). The temperature–morbidity relationship may be confounded or modified by sociodemographic factors and air pollution. Conclusions: There is a significant short-term effect of ambient temperature on total and cause-specific morbidities. However, further research is needed to determine an appropriate temperature measure, consider a diverse range of morbidities, and to use consistent methodology to make different studies more comparable. PMID:21824855

  3. Impacts on ambient air quality due to flaring activities in one of Oman's oilfields.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Wahab, Sabah; Ali, Sappurd; Sardar, Sabir; Irfan, Naseem

    2012-01-01

    This work was conducted to assess the impacts on workplace and ambient air quality due to release of sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) into the atmosphere at Al-Noor production station, located in southern desert of Sultanate of Oman. The SO(2) is released because of oxidation of H(2)S to SO(2) on flaring of H(2)S rich off gas at the Al-Noor. In the first phase of the study, CALPUFF modeling system was used to predict the ground level concentrations of SO(2) emissions from the flare stacks. The evaluation of the modeling system was carried out by comparing the predicted results with that of the measured. In the second stage of the study, the estimated results were compared with the air quality standards/guidelines set by Omani regulatory authorities as well as by World Health Organization (WHO). It was concluded on the basis of current study that the sensitive individuals in the workplace of the Al-Noor could experience adverse health effects due to short-term exposure of SO(2).

  4. Industrial CO2 Removal: CO2 Capture from Ambient Air and Geological Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, James J.

    2011-06-08

    This abstract and its accompanying presentation will provide an overview of two distinct industrial processes for removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere as a means of addressing anthropogenic climate change. The first of these is carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) coupled with large scale biomass production (hereafter referred to as bioCCS). The second is CO2 capture from ambient air via industrial systems (hereafter referred to as direct air capture (DAC)). In both systems, the captured CO2 would be injected into deep geologic formations so as to isolate it from the atmosphere. The technical literature is clear that both of these technologies are technically feasible as of today (IPCC, 2005; Keith, 2009; Lackner, 2009; Luckow et al., 2010; Ranjan and Herzog, 2011). What is uncertain is the relative cost of these industrial ambient-air CO2 removal systems when compared to other emissions mitigation measures, the ultimate timing and scale of their deployment, and the resolution of potential site specific constraints that would impact their ultimate commercial deployment.

  5. Fosetyl-al

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Fosetyl - al ; CASRN 39148 - 24 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  6. Al Shanker Remembers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Educator, 2000

    2000-01-01

    In a 1996 interview shortly before his death, Al Shanker, longtime president of the American Federation of Teachers, discussed such topics as: his own educational experiences; how he learned about political fighting in the Boy Scouts; the appeal of socialism; multinational corporations and the nation state; teaching tough students; and John Dewey…

  7. Associations between summertime ambient pollutants and respiratory morbidity in New York City: Comparison of results using ambient concentrations versus predicted exposures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological analyses of air quality often estimate human exposure from ambient monitoring data, potentially leading to exposure misclassification and subsequent bias in estimated health risks. To investigate this, we conducted a case-crossover study of summertime ambient ozon...

  8. Al Partitioning Patterns and Root Growth as Related to Al Sensitivity and Al Tolerance in Wheat.

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, T. D.; Kucukakyuz, K.; Rincon-Zachary, M.

    1997-01-01

    Studies of Al partitioning and accumulation and of the effect of Al on the growth of intact wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) roots of cultivars that show differential Al sensitivity were conducted. The effects of various Al concentrations on root growth and Al accumulation in the tissue were followed for 24 h. At low external Al concentrations, Al accumulation in the root tips was low and root growth was either unaffected or stimulated. Calculations based on regression analysis of growth and Al accumulation in the root tips predicted that 50% root growth inhibition in the Al-tolerant cv Atlas 66 would be attained when the Al concentrations were 105 [mu]M in the nutrient solution and 376.7 [mu]g Al g-1 dry weight in the tissue. In contrast, in the Al-sensitive cv Tam 105, 50% root growth inhibition would be attained when the Al concentrations were 11 [mu]M in the nutrient solution and 546.2 [mu]g Al g-1 dry weight in the tissue. The data support the hypotheses that differential Al sensitivity correlates with differential Al accumulation in the growing root tissue, and that mechanisms of Al tolerance may be based on strategies to exclude Al from the root meristems. PMID:12223623

  9. Impact of combustion products from Space Shuttle launches on ambient air quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbauld, R. K.; Bowers, J. F.; Cramer, H. E.

    1974-01-01

    The present work describes some multilayer diffusion models and a computer program for these models developed to predict the impact of ground clouds formed during Space Shuttle launches on ambient air quality. The diffusion models are based on the Gaussian plume equation for an instantaneous volume source. Cloud growth is estimated on the basis of measurable meteorological parameters: standard deviation of the wind azimuth angle, standard deviation of wind elevation angle, vertical wind-speed shear, vertical wind-direction shear, and depth of the surface mixing layer. Calculations using these models indicate that Space Shuttle launches under a variety of meteorological regimes at Kennedy Space Center and Vandenberg AFB are unlikely to endanger the exposure standards for HCl; similar results have been obtained for CO and Al2O3. However, the possibility that precipitation scavenging of the ground cloud might result in an acidic rain that could damage vegetation has not been investigated.

  10. Galvanic Manufacturing in the Cities of Russia: Potential Source of Ambient Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Golokhvast, Kirill S.; Shvedova, Anna A.

    2014-01-01

    Galvanic manufacturing is widely employed and can be found in nearly every average city in Russia. The release and accumulation of different metals (Me), depending on the technology used can be found in the vicinities of galvanic plants. Under the environmental protection act in Russia, the regulations for galvanic manufacturing do not include the regulations and safety standards for ambient ultrafine and nanosized particulate matter (PM). To assess whether Me nanoparticles (NP) are among environmental pollutants caused by galvanic manufacturing, the level of Me NP were tested in urban snow samples collected around galvanic enterprises in two cities. Employing transmission electronic microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and a laser diffraction particle size analyzer, we found that the size distribution of tested Me NP was within 10–120 nm range. This is the first study to report that Me NP of Fe, Cr, Pb, Al, Ni, Cu, and Zn were detected around galvanic shop settings. PMID:25329582

  11. MOVPE growth of laser structures for high-power applications at different ambient temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugge, F.; Crump, P.; Frevert, C.; Knigge, S.; Wenzel, H.; Erbert, G.; Weyers, M.

    2016-10-01

    Laser structures for different operating temperatures were developed. Higher temperatures need an increase in barrier height to reduce carrier leakage. Best results for an emission wavelength of ≈800 nm were obtained using an asymmetric structure containing an n-InGaP and a p-Al0.5Ga0.5As waveguide. Such structures show 10 W output power for a single laser diode and >100 W for a laser bar at 50 °C ambient temperature and also a good aging behavior. Lower operating temperatures permit lower barrier heights which results in a lower series resistance and therefore higher conversion efficiency at high power. Carrier concentration and mobility for different AlxGa1-xAs compositions were estimated in dependence on temperature. An optimized structure reached 20 W for a single laser diode and 2 kW for a laser bar in QCW mode at -70 °C.

  12. Dynamic superlubricity on insulating and conductive surfaces in ultra-high vacuum and ambient environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnecco, E.; Socoliuc, A.; Maier, S.; Gessler, J.; Glatzel, T.; Baratoff, A.; Meyer, E.

    2009-01-01

    Atomic-scale friction between a sharp tip at the end of a micro-fabricated silicon cantilever and atomically flat surfaces (NaCl, KBr, HOPG and mica) can be significantly reduced by piezo-induced perpendicular mechanical oscillations at specific resonance frequencies of the cantilever in gentle contact with the sample. The reported measurements confirm and extend the applicability of the effect recently demonstrated using electro-capacitive actuation on alkali halide surfaces in ultra-high vacuum (Socoliuc et al 2006 Science 313 208). A controlled reduction of friction is now observed even on a conductive surface and under ambient conditions, which is quite promising for applications to micro-electromechanical devices. The theory previously used to interpret 'dynamic superlubricity' is supported by new measurements showing that the contact can be maintained in that regime and that the initial reduction of friction is linear versus oscillation amplitude. The calibration of the oscillating component of the normal force is also discussed.

  13. Dynamic superlubricity on insulating and conductive surfaces in ultra-high vacuum and ambient environment.

    PubMed

    Gnecco, E; Socoliuc, A; Maier, S; Gessler, J; Glatzel, T; Baratoff, A; Meyer, E

    2009-01-14

    Atomic-scale friction between a sharp tip at the end of a micro-fabricated silicon cantilever and atomically flat surfaces (NaCl, KBr, HOPG and mica) can be significantly reduced by piezo-induced perpendicular mechanical oscillations at specific resonance frequencies of the cantilever in gentle contact with the sample. The reported measurements confirm and extend the applicability of the effect recently demonstrated using electro-capacitive actuation on alkali halide surfaces in ultra-high vacuum (Socoliuc et al 2006 Science 313 208). A controlled reduction of friction is now observed even on a conductive surface and under ambient conditions, which is quite promising for applications to micro-electromechanical devices. The theory previously used to interpret 'dynamic superlubricity' is supported by new measurements showing that the contact can be maintained in that regime and that the initial reduction of friction is linear versus oscillation amplitude. The calibration of the oscillating component of the normal force is also discussed.

  14. Al Sumelat Water Network. Village of Al Sumelat, Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-15

    OFFICE OF THE SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL FOR IRAQ RECONSTRUCTION AL SUMELAT WATER NETWORK VILLAGE OF AL SUMELAT, IRAQ...Sumelat Water Network Village of Al Sumelat, Iraq 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e...Al Sumelat Water Network Village of Al Sumelat, Iraq Synopsis Introduction. This report was previously provided on a limited distribution basis

  15. Ambient Radon-222 Monitoring in Amargosa Valley, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    L.H. Karr; J.J. Tappen; D. Shafer; K.J. Gray

    2008-06-05

    As part of a program to characterize and baseline selected environmental parameters in the region around the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, ambient radon-222 monitoring was conducted in the rural community of Amargosa Valley, the community closest to the proposed repository site. Passive integrating radon monitors and a continuous radon monitoring instrument were deployed adjacent to the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) (http://www.cemp.dri.edu/index.html) station located in the Amargosa Valley Community Center near the library. The CEMP station provided real-time ambient gamma exposure and meteorological data used to correct the integrated radon measurements as well as verify meteorological data collected by the continuous radon monitoring instrument. Additionally, different types of environmental enclosures that housed the monitors and instrument were used to determine if particular designs influenced the ambient radon measurements.

  16. Deliquescent phenomena of ambient aerosols on the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Y.; Zhao, C. S.; Ma, N.; Liu, H. J.; Bian, Y. X.; Tao, J. C.; Hu, Min

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we report that the deliquescent phenomena of ambient aerosols on the North China Plain are frequently observed using a humidified nephelometer system. The deliquescence relative humidity (RH) primarily ranges from 73% to 81%, with an average of 76.8%. The observed deliquescent phenomena of ambient aerosols exhibit distinct diurnal patterns and are highly correlated with ammonium sulfate. The diurnal variations of ammonium and nitrate may play significant roles on occurrences of observed deliquescent phenomena. The frequently observed deliquescent phenomena of ambient aerosols in this paper imply that current parameterization schemes that describe the RH dependence of particle light scattering may result in a significant bias when estimating aerosol effects on climate.

  17. Ambient pyrite in precambrian chert: new evidence and a theory.

    PubMed

    Knoll, A H; Barghoorn, E S

    1974-06-01

    Ambient pyrites of two distinct types were described from middle Precambrian rocks of the Lake Superior area. A new class of this phenomenon is here described from middle Precambrian chert from western Australia. The newly found ambient pyrites are quite minute and characteristically occur in groups forming a "starburst" pattern. All three types of ambient pyrite may be explained in terms of pressure solution initiated by gas evolution from organic material attached to the pyrite. Thermal degradation of the kerogen produces the gases which, due to the impermeability of the encompassing chert, build up the pressures necessary to initiate solution. Pyrite appendages bear a striking resemblance to micro-organisms and, thus, constitute the smallest pseudofossils known.

  18. Designing for Persuasion: Toward Ambient Eco-Visualization for Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tanyoung; Hong, Hwajung; Magerko, Brian

    When people are aware of their lifestyle's ecological consequences, they are more likely to adjust their behavior to reduce their impact. Persuasive design that provides feedback to users without interfering with their primary tasks can increases the awareness of neighboring problems. As a case study of design for persuasion, we designed two ambient displays as desktop widgets. Both represent a users' computer usage time, but in different visual styles. In this paper, we present the results of a comparative study of two ambient displays. We discuss the gradual progress of persuasion supported by the ambient displays and the differences in users' perception affected by the different visualization styles. Finally, Our empirical findings lead to a series of design implications for persuasive media.

  19. Expanding uses of ambient noise for imaging, detection, and communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, John R.; Malod, Laurent

    2002-11-01

    The use of ambient noise to sense the marine environment has a human history of only two decades. Starting with incoherent processing inspired by optical analogies such as Acoustic Daylight (TM), the exploration of the potential for ambient noise to provide useful information about the environment has blossomed into many related areas and diverse algorithms with connections to multistatic active sonar, classic passive sonar, communications, matched field processing and others. This presentation will introduce some recent work in these areas and attempt to draw together how the use of ambient noise, both by mankind and marine animals, is beginning to form a more complete picture of the potential of this exciting area of research. [Work supported by the Defence Science and Technology Agency, Singapore.

  20. Ambient Pyrite in Precambrian Chert: New Evidence and a Theory

    PubMed Central

    Knoll, Andrew H.; Barghoorn, Elso S.

    1974-01-01

    Ambient pyrites of two distinct types were described from middle Precambrian rocks of the Lake Superior area. A new class of this phenomenon is here described from middle Precambrian chert from western Australia. The newly found ambient pyrites are quite minute and characteristically occur in groups forming a “starburst” pattern. All three types of ambient pyrite may be explained in terms of pressure solution initiated by gas evolution from organic material attached to the pyrite. Thermal degradation of the kerogen produces the gases which, due to the impermeability of the encompassing chert, build up the pressures necessary to initiate solution. Pyrite appendages bear a striking resemblance to micro-organisms and, thus, constitute the smallest pseudofossils known. Images PMID:16592159

  1. Source apportionment of ambient volatile organic compounds in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu; Shao, Min; Liu, Ying; Lu, Sihua; Kuster, William; Goldan, Paul; Xie, Shaodong

    2007-06-15

    The ambient air quality standard for ozone is frequently exceeded in Beijing in summer and autumn. Source apportionments of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are precursors of ground-level ozone formation, can be helpful to the further study of tropospheric ozone formation. In this study, ambient concentrations of VOCs were continuously measured with a time resolution of 30 min in August 2005 in Beijing. By using positive matrix factorization (PMF), eight sources for the selected VOC species were extracted. Gasoline-related emissions (the combination of gasoline exhaust and gas vapor), petrochemicals, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) contributed 52, 20, and 11%, respectively, to total ambient VOCs. VOC emissions from natural gas (5%), painting (5%), diesel vehicles (3%), and biogenic emissions (2%) were also identified. The gasoline-related, petrochemical, and biogenic sources were estimated to be the major contributors to ozone formation potentials in Beijing.

  2. Transdimensional Bayesian seismic ambient noise tomography across SE Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, DingChang; Saygin, Erdinc; Cummins, Phil; Ge, Zengxi; Min, Zhaoxu; Cipta, Athanasius; Yang, Runhai

    2017-02-01

    We analyze seismic ambient noise data recorded at a set of permanent and temporary stations across southeastern Tibet to image crustal structure. High-resolution phase velocity maps are presented based on Transdimensional Bayesian seismic ambient noise tomography. Seismic images exhibit more apparent horizontal heterogeneities and show more detailed information compared to previous studies based on traditional ambient noise tomography. As noted from the phase velocity image at 25 s, the rigid high velocity anomalies beneath the Sichuan Basin and the South China Fold System act as a blockage to crustal material expansion, and the distribution of velocity anomalies contributes to the interpretation of a surface clockwise rotation pattern. Our results imply a more complex distributed low-velocity zone rather than two isolated channels beneath SE Tibet.

  3. Uptake of Ambient Organic Gases to Acidic Sulfate Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liggio, J.; Li, S.

    2009-05-01

    The formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere has been an area of significant interest due to its climatic relevance, its effects on air quality and human health. Due largely to the underestimation of SOA by regional and global models, there has been an increasing number of studies focusing on alternate pathways leading to SOA. In this regard, recent work has shown that heterogeneous and liquid phase reactions, often leading to oligomeric material, may be a route to SOA via products of biogenic and anthropogenic origin. Although oligomer formation in chamber studies has been frequently observed, the applicability of these experiments to ambient conditions, and thus the overall importance of oligomerization reactions remain unclear. In the present study, ambient air is drawn into a Teflon smog chamber and exposed to acidic sulfate aerosols which have been formed in situ via the reaction of SO3 with water vapor. The aerosol composition is measured with a High Resolution Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS), and particle size distributions are monitored with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). The use of ambient air and relatively low inorganic particle loading potentially provides clearer insight into the importance of heterogeneous reactions. Results of experiments, with a range of sulfate loadings show that there are several competing processes occurring on different timescales. A significant uptake of ambient organic gases to the particles is observed immediately followed by a slow shift towards higher m/z over a period of several hours indicating that higher molecular weight products (possibly oligomers) are being formed through a reactive process. The results suggest that heterogeneous reactions can occur with ambient organic gases, even in the presence of ammonia, which may have significant implications to the ambient atmosphere where particles may be neutralized after their formation.

  4. Visual attention for a desktop virtual environment with ambient scent

    PubMed Central

    Toet, Alexander; van Schaik, Martin G.

    2013-01-01

    In the current study participants explored a desktop virtual environment (VE) representing a suburban neighborhood with signs of public disorder (neglect, vandalism, and crime), while being exposed to either room air (control group), or subliminal levels of tar (unpleasant; typically associated with burned or waste material) or freshly cut grass (pleasant; typically associated with natural or fresh material) ambient odor. They reported all signs of disorder they noticed during their walk together with their associated emotional response. Based on recent evidence that odors reflexively direct visual attention to (either semantically or affectively) congruent visual objects, we hypothesized that participants would notice more signs of disorder in the presence of ambient tar odor (since this odor may bias attention to unpleasant and negative features), and less signs of disorder in the presence of ambient grass odor (since this odor may bias visual attention toward the vegetation in the environment and away from the signs of disorder). Contrary to our expectations the results provide no indication that the presence of an ambient odor affected the participants’ visual attention for signs of disorder or their emotional response. However, the paradigm used in present study does not allow us to draw any conclusions in this respect. We conclude that a closer affective, semantic, or spatiotemporal link between the contents of a desktop VE and ambient scents may be required to effectively establish diagnostic associations that guide a user’s attention. In the absence of these direct links, ambient scent may be more diagnostic for the physical environment of the observer as a whole than for the particular items in that environment (or, in this case, items represented in the VE). PMID:24324453

  5. Passive radiative cooling below ambient air temperature under direct sunlight.

    PubMed

    Raman, Aaswath P; Anoma, Marc Abou; Zhu, Linxiao; Rephaeli, Eden; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-11-27

    Cooling is a significant end-use of energy globally and a major driver of peak electricity demand. Air conditioning, for example, accounts for nearly fifteen per cent of the primary energy used by buildings in the United States. A passive cooling strategy that cools without any electricity input could therefore have a significant impact on global energy consumption. To achieve cooling one needs to be able to reach and maintain a temperature below that of the ambient air. At night, passive cooling below ambient air temperature has been demonstrated using a technique known as radiative cooling, in which a device exposed to the sky is used to radiate heat to outer space through a transparency window in the atmosphere between 8 and 13 micrometres. Peak cooling demand, however, occurs during the daytime. Daytime radiative cooling to a temperature below ambient of a surface under direct sunlight has not been achieved because sky access during the day results in heating of the radiative cooler by the Sun. Here, we experimentally demonstrate radiative cooling to nearly 5 degrees Celsius below the ambient air temperature under direct sunlight. Using a thermal photonic approach, we introduce an integrated photonic solar reflector and thermal emitter consisting of seven layers of HfO2 and SiO2 that reflects 97 per cent of incident sunlight while emitting strongly and selectively in the atmospheric transparency window. When exposed to direct sunlight exceeding 850 watts per square metre on a rooftop, the photonic radiative cooler cools to 4.9 degrees Celsius below ambient air temperature, and has a cooling power of 40.1 watts per square metre at ambient air temperature. These results demonstrate that a tailored, photonic approach can fundamentally enable new technological possibilities for energy efficiency. Further, the cold darkness of the Universe can be used as a renewable thermodynamic resource, even during the hottest hours of the day.

  6. Visual attention for a desktop virtual environment with ambient scent.

    PubMed

    Toet, Alexander; van Schaik, Martin G

    2013-01-01

    In the current study participants explored a desktop virtual environment (VE) representing a suburban neighborhood with signs of public disorder (neglect, vandalism, and crime), while being exposed to either room air (control group), or subliminal levels of tar (unpleasant; typically associated with burned or waste material) or freshly cut grass (pleasant; typically associated with natural or fresh material) ambient odor. They reported all signs of disorder they noticed during their walk together with their associated emotional response. Based on recent evidence that odors reflexively direct visual attention to (either semantically or affectively) congruent visual objects, we hypothesized that participants would notice more signs of disorder in the presence of ambient tar odor (since this odor may bias attention to unpleasant and negative features), and less signs of disorder in the presence of ambient grass odor (since this odor may bias visual attention toward the vegetation in the environment and away from the signs of disorder). Contrary to our expectations the results provide no indication that the presence of an ambient odor affected the participants' visual attention for signs of disorder or their emotional response. However, the paradigm used in present study does not allow us to draw any conclusions in this respect. We conclude that a closer affective, semantic, or spatiotemporal link between the contents of a desktop VE and ambient scents may be required to effectively establish diagnostic associations that guide a user's attention. In the absence of these direct links, ambient scent may be more diagnostic for the physical environment of the observer as a whole than for the particular items in that environment (or, in this case, items represented in the VE).

  7. AMBIENT PM2.5 SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2000-10-01

    This report summarizes observations and tentative conclusions drawn from evaluations of the data captured to date from the operation of the ambient PM{sub 2.5} speciation sites in a geographical area encompassing southeastern Ohio, western Pennsylvania, and northwestern West Virginia. The overall goal of this program, called the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), is to better understand the relationship between coal-based power system emissions and ambient air quality in the upper Ohio River Valley region through the collection of chemically resolved or speciated data.

  8. Applications of ambient mass spectrometry in high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Ping; Feng, Bao-Sheng; Yang, Jian-Wang; Chang, Cui-Lan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Hu-Wei

    2013-06-07

    The development of rapid screening and identification techniques is of great importance for drug discovery, doping control, forensic identification, food safety and quality control. Ambient mass spectrometry (AMS) allows rapid and direct analysis of various samples in open air with little sample preparation. Recently, its applications in high-throughput screening have been in rapid progress. During the past decade, various ambient ionization techniques have been developed and applied in high-throughput screening. This review discusses typical applications of AMS, including DESI (desorption electrospray ionization), DART (direct analysis in real time), EESI (extractive electrospray ionization), etc., in high-throughput screening (HTS).

  9. Implicit Interaction: A Modality for Ambient Exercise Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, J.; O'Grady, M. J.; O'Hare, G. M. P.

    Ambient Exercise refers to the implicit exercise that people undertake in the course of their everyday duties - a simple example being climbing stairs. Increasing awareness of the potential health benefits of such activities may well contribute to an increase in a person’s well-being. Initially, it is necessary to monitor and quantify such exercise so that personalized fitness plans may be constructed. In this paper, the implicit interaction modality is harnessed to enable the capturing of ambient exercise activity thereby facilitating its subsequent quantification and interpretation. The novelty of the solution proposed lies in its ubiquity and transparency.

  10. REVIEW ARTICLE: Sensor communication technology towards ambient intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delsing, J.; Lindgren, P.

    2005-04-01

    This paper is a review of the fascinating development of sensors and the communication of sensor data. A brief historical introduction is given, followed by a discussion on architectures for sensor networks. Further, realistic specifications on sensor devices suitable for ambient intelligence and ubiquitous computing are given. Based on these specifications, the status and current frontline development are discussed. In total, it is shown that future technology for ambient intelligence based on sensor and actuator devices using standardized Internet communication is within the range of possibilities within five years.

  11. Ambient Metrics for n-Dimensional pp-Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leistner, Thomas; Nurowski, Pawel

    2010-06-01

    We provide an explicit formula for the Fefferman-Graham ambient metric of an n-dimensional conformal pp-wave in those cases where it exists. In even dimensions we calculate the obstruction explicitly. Furthermore, we describe all 4-dimensional pp-waves that are Bach-flat, and give a large class of Bach-flat examples which are conformally Cotton-flat, but not conformally Einstein. Finally, as an application, we use the obtained ambient metric to show that even-dimensional pp-waves have vanishing critical Q-curvature.

  12. The DFKI Competence Center for Ambient Assisted Living

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Jochen; Stahl, Christoph; Röfer, Thomas; Krieg-Brückner, Bernd; Alexandersson, Jan

    The DFKI Competence Center for Ambient Assisted Living (CCAAL) is a cross-project and cross-department virtual organization within the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence coordinating and conducting research and development in the area of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL). Our demonstrators range from multimodal speech dialog systems to fully instrumented environments allowing the development of intelligent assistant systems, for instance an autonomous wheelchair, or the recognition and processing of everyday activities in a smart home. These innovative technologies are then tested, evaluated and demonstrated in DFKI's living labs.

  13. Distribution and speciation of ambient selenium in contrasted soils, from mineral to organic rich.

    PubMed

    Tolu, Julie; Thiry, Yves; Bueno, Maïté; Jolivet, Claudy; Potin-Gautier, Martine; Le Hécho, Isabelle

    2014-05-01

    Selenium adsorption onto oxy-hydroxides mainly controls its mobility in volcanic soils, red earths and soils poor in organic matter (OM) while the influence of OM was emphasized in podzol and peat soils. This work aims at deciphering how those solid phases influence ambient Se mobility and speciation under less contrasted conditions in 26 soils spanning extensive ranges of OM (1-32%), Fe/Al oxy-hydroxides (0.3-6.1%) contents and pH (4.0-8.3). The soil collection included agriculture, meadow and forest soils to assess the influence of OM quality as well. Trace concentrations of six ambient Se species (Se(IV), Se(VI) and 4 organo-Se compounds) were analyzed by HPLC-ICP-MS in three extractants (ultrapure water, phosphate and sodium hydroxide) targeting Se associated to different soil phases. The Kd values determined from ultrapure water extraction were higher than those reported in commonly used short-term experiments after Se-spiking. Correlations of ambient Se content and distribution with soil parameters explained this difference by an involvement of slow processes in Se retention in soils. The 26 Kd values determined here for a wide variety of soils thus represent a relevant database for long-term prediction of Se mobility. For soils containing less than 20% OM, ambient Se solubility is primarily controlled by its adsorption onto crystalline oxy-hydroxides. However, OM plays an important role in Se mobility by forming organo-mineral associations that may protect adsorbed Se from leaching and/or create anoxic zones (aggregates) where Se is immobilized after its reduction. Although for the first time, inorganic Se(IV), Se(VI) and organo-Se compounds were simultaneously investigated in a large soil collection, high Se proportions remain unidentified in each soil extract, most probably due to Se incorporation and/or binding to colloidal-sized OM. Variations of environmental factors regulating the extent of OM-mineral associations/aggregation may thus lead to changes

  14. ALS insertion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, E.; Chin, J.; Halbach, K.; Hassenzahl, W. V.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.; Lancaster, H.; Plate, D.

    1991-08-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), the first US third generation synchrotron radiation source, is currently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The low-emittance, 1.5 GeV electron storage ring and the insertion devices are specifically designed to produce high brightness beams in the UV to soft X-Ray range. The planned initial complement of insertion devices includes four 4.6 m long undulators, with period lengths of 3.9 cm, 5.0 cm (2) and 8.0 cm, and a 2.9 m long wiggler of 16 cm period length. Undulator design is well advanced and fabrication has begun on the 5.0 cm and 8.0 cm period length undulators. This paper discusses ALS insertion device requirements; general design philosophy; and design of the magnetic structure, support structure/drive systems, control system and vacuum system.

  15. Influence of sample processing parameters on thermal boundary conductance value in an Al/AlN system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monachon, Christian; Hojeij, Mohamad; Weber, Ludger

    2011-02-01

    The influence of sample processing parameters on the thermal boundary conductance (TBC) between aluminum and aluminum nitride has been investigated by transient thermoreflectance. An evaporated Al layer on the polished substrate yielded a TBC at ambient of roughly 47 MW m-2 K-1. The largest improvement (by a factor of 5) was obtained by plasma-etching of the substrate and subsequent evaporation of the metal layer. Electron microscopy suggests that the differences in TBC were mainly due to the (partial) elimination of the native oxide layer on the substrate. The importance of an adequate model for data extraction on measured TBC is highlighted.

  16. Compression, bend, and tension studies on forged Al67Ti25Cr8 and Al66Ti25Mn(g) L1(2) compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, K. S.; Brown, S. A.; Whittenberger, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    Cast, homogenized, and isothermally forged aluminum-rich L1(2) compounds Al67Ti25Cr8 and Al66Ti25Mn(g) were tested in compression as a function of temperature and as a function of strain rate at elevated temperatures (1000 K and 1100 K). Three-point bend specimens were tested as a function of temperature in the range 300 K to 873 K. Strain gages glued on the tensile side of the ambient and 473 K specimens enabled direct strain measurements. A number of 'buttonhead' tensile specimens were electro-discharge machined, fine polished, and tested between ambient and 1073 K for yield strength and ductility as a function of temperature. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination of fracture surfaces from both the bend and tensile specimens revealed a gradual transition from transgranular cleavage to intergranular failure with increasing temperature.

  17. Implications of a reducing and warm (not hot) Archaean ambient mantle for ancient element cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulbach, Sonja

    2016-04-01

    There is considerable uncertainty regarding the oxygen partial pressure (fO2) and potential temperature (TP) of the ambient convecting mantle throughout Earth's history. Rare Archaean eclogite suites have elemental and isotopic compositions indicative of formation of crustal protoliths in oceanic spreading ridges, hence unaffected by continental sources. These include some eclogite xenoliths derived from cratonic mantle lithosphere and orogenic eclogites marking the exhumation of oceanic crust at Pacific-type margins. Their compositions may retain a memory of the thermal and redox state of the Archaean convecting mantle sources that gave rise to their low-pressure protoliths. Archaean eclogites have TiO2-REE relationships consistent with fractional crystallisation of olivine±plagioclase and cpx during formation of picritic protoliths from a melt that separated from a garnet-free peridotite source, implying intersection of the solidus at ≤2.5 to 3.0 GPa [1]. Low melt fractions (<0.25) inferred from samples with the least fractionated (lowest TiO2) protoliths further argue against deep intersection of the mantle solidus. This suggests a moderately elevated TP ~ 1420-1470 degrees C (lower than some estimates for the ambient convecting mantle at that time [2]), which would support an early onset of plate tectonics [3] and emergence of continents [4], heralding a transition to modern chemical cycles. Moderate TP further indicates that deep recycling of carbon and water, though reduced compared to today, may have been possible in the Archaean [5,6]. Carefully screened eclogites have V/Sc (reflecting the redox state of the ambient mantle during protolith formation [7]) corresponding to ΔFMQ corrected to 1 GPa as low as -1.7 at 3 Ga [1]. Such low oxygen fugacities have consequences for the location of the peridotite solidus and for the types of melts generated during redox melting [5,8]. They also modulate the redox state of volatiles liberated at oceanic spreading

  18. Potential Ambient Energy-Harvesting Sources and Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yildiz, Faruk

    2009-01-01

    Ambient energy harvesting is also known as energy scavenging or power harvesting, and it is the process where energy is obtained from the environment. A variety of techniques are available for energy scavenging, including solar and wind powers, ocean waves, piezoelectricity, thermoelectricity, and physical motions. For example, some systems…

  19. 40 CFR 52.995 - Enhanced ambient air quality monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Enhanced ambient air quality monitoring. 52.995 Section 52.995 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... air quality monitoring. (a) The Governor of the State of Louisiana submitted the...

  20. 40 CFR 52.995 - Enhanced ambient air quality monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Enhanced ambient air quality monitoring. 52.995 Section 52.995 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... air quality monitoring. (a) The Governor of the State of Louisiana submitted the...

  1. Bayesian Ambient Noise Inversion for Geoacoustic Uncertainty Estimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    sequential data: (a) True seabed sound speed profile input to OASES to generate simulated data vs mean model obtained via inversion. (b) Power...Harrison, “High-frequency geoacoustic inversion of ambient noise data using short arrays”, AIP Conference Proc. 728, 22-31 (2004). [7] H. Schmidt, OASES

  2. RADIOCARBON MEASUREMENTS ON PM-2.5 AMBIENT AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radiocarbon (14C) measurements provide an estimate of the fraction of carbon in a sample that is biogenic. The methodology has been extensively used in past wintertime studies to quantify the contribution of wood smoke to ambient aerosol. In summertime such measurements can p...

  3. METHODOLOGY FOR SITING AMBIENT AIR MONITORS AT THE NEIGHBORHOOD SCALE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In siting a monitor to measure compliance with U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standards for particulate matter (PM), there is a need to characterize variations in PM concentration within a neighborhood-scale region in order to achieve monitor siting objectives.

    We p...

  4. Effectiveness of street sweeping and washing for controlling ambient TSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yu-Min; Chou, Chih-Mei; Su, Kuo-Tung; Tseng, Chao-Heng

    Effectiveness of street sweeping and washing (S/W) for controlling ambient "total suspended particles (TSP)" was evaluated by TSP measurements and determining silt load from active traffic streets. A modified regenerative-air vacuum sweeper (RAVS) and a washer were used in this study. The sweeper made a pass followed by the washer. The S/W efficiencies (η,η) were obtained based on the experimental data of silt loading and TSP. It was found that the direct impact of sweeping on ambient TSP emissions was short-lived lasting no more than 3-4 h. When a vacuum sweeper and a washer, respectively, did a good job collecting or cleaning the visible fine particles on roads, the method of S/W tested in this work was effective at removing the sources of the road dust particles. This paper concludes that street sweeping followed by washing was found to offer a measurable reduction in TSP emission potentials. Typically, the reduction efficiency of ambient TSP is up to 30%. Finally, correlated with η (based on silt loading), a useful equation is proposed to estimate the S/W efficiency, η (based on TSP) with a standard error of ±20%. It seems feasible to predict the reduction efficiency of ambient TSP controlled by the regenerative-air vacuum sweeper and washer used in this work for engineering applications. Effects of traffic volume and wind velocity on the S/W efficiencies are also discussed in the paper.

  5. Phosphorescence within benzotellurophenes and color tunable tellurophenes under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    He, Gang; Wiltshire, Benjamin D; Choi, Paul; Savin, Aliaksandr; Sun, Shuai; Mohammadpour, Arash; Ferguson, Michael J; McDonald, Robert; Farsinezhad, Samira; Brown, Alex; Shankar, Karthik; Rivard, Eric

    2015-03-28

    The zirconium-mediated syntheses of pinacolboronate (BPin) appended benzo[b]tellurophenes and two phenyl/BPin substituted tellurophene isomers with different colors of emission have been achieved. These species are new additions to an emerging class of inorganic heterocycles that display visible phosphorescence in the solid state under ambient conditions.

  6. Ocean ambient sound south of Bermuda and Panama Canal traffic.

    PubMed

    Širović, Ana; Hildebrand, John A; McDonald, Mark A

    2016-05-01

    Comparisons of current and historic ocean ambient noise levels are rare, especially in the North Atlantic. Recent (2013-2014) monthly patterns in ocean ambient sound south of Bermuda were compared to those recorded at the same location in 1966. Additionally, trends in ocean traffic, in particular, Panama Canal traffic, over this time were also investigated. One year of ocean ambient noise measurements were collected in 1966 using cabled, omnidirectional hydrophones at the U.S. Navy Tudor Hill Laboratory in Bermuda, and repeat measurements were collected at the same location from June 2013-May 2014 using a High-frequency Acoustic Recording Package. Average monthly pressure spectrum levels at 44 Hz increased 2.8 ± 0.8 dB from 1966 to 2013, indicating an average increase of 0.6 dB/decade. This low level of increase may be due to topographic shielding at this site, limiting it to only southern exposure, and the limit in the number of ship transits through the Panama Canal, which did not change substantially during this time. The impending expansion of the Canal, which will enable the transit of larger ships at twice the current rate, is likely to lead to a substantial increase in ocean ambient sound at this location in the near future.

  7. CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICULATE STUDIES IN HEALTHY AND COMPROMISED RODENTS

    EPA Science Inventory


    CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICULATE STUDIES IN HEALTHY AND COMPROMISED RODENTS. WP Watkinson1, LB Wichers2, JP Nolan1, DW Winsett1, UP Kodavanti1, MCJ Schladweiler1, LC Walsh1, ER Lappi1, D Terrell1, R Slade1, AD Ledbetter1, and DL Costa1. 1USEPA, ORD/NHEERL/ETD/PTB, RTP, NC, US...

  8. Urban-scale variability of ambient particulate matter attributes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freiman, M. T.; Hirshel, N.; Broday, D. M.

    Real-time sampling of ambient particulate matter (PM) in the size range 0.23-10 μm and of carbonaceous matter concentrations has been carried out in a carefully designed field campaign in proximate paired neighborhoods in Haifa, Israel. The paired sites are characterized by a similar population density and neighborhood-wise socioeconomic (deprivation) index but show distinct canopy coverage. The data indicate clear sub-urban (neighborhood) scale variations in any measured PM attribute, such as concentrations, size distribution, and carbonaceous matter content. Mean ambient PM levels were comparatively higher than in other urban studies whereas carbonaceous airborne PM concentrations were lower. On top of the diurnal and seasonal variability and in spite of the significant regional effect of the semi-arid climate, local emissions and removal processes affect the PM concentrations to which people residing in urbanized regions are exposed. Analysis of possible mechanisms that could affect the observed spatial sub-urban PM differences, including local meteorology and emissions, reveal that sub-urban variability of removal processes has a major influence on ambient PM levels. Observations suggest that on top of the regional air masses which affect the city air quality and emissions from local sources, a normally unnoticed removal process, showing urban scale variability, is interception by trees and dense vegetation. In particular, the observed sub-urban variability in ambient PM concentrations is attributed, in part, to local variation of removal processes, among them the neighborhood-wise deposition on available surfaces, including canopy.

  9. Acclimatization of plantlets from in vitro to the ambient environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acclimatizing, hardening-off, or conditioning plantlets from the in vitro to the ambient environment can be a challenge that may result in death or damage to a large percentage of micropropagated plants. When grown in the high humidity, low light environment often encountered in vitro, leaves have a...

  10. ARE MALES MORE SUSCEPTIBLE TO AMBIENT PM THAN FEMALES?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent epidemiologic studies of modern air pollution show statistically significant relationships between fluctuations of daily non-trauma mortality and fluctuations of daily ambient particulate matter (PM) levels at low concentrations. A review of historic smoke-fog (smog)episo...

  11. Seasonal association between ambient ozone and mortality in Zhengzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Lijie; Gu, Jianqin; Liang, Shijie; Fang, Fang; Bai, Weimin; Liu, Xu; Zhao, Tao; Walline, Joseph; Zhang, Shenglong; Cui, Yingjie; Xu, Yaxin; Lin, Hualiang

    2016-12-01

    Different seasonal health effects of ambient ozone (O3) have been reported in previous studies. This might be due to inappropriate adjustment of temperature in different seasons. We used daily data on non-accidental mortality and ambient air pollution in Zhengzhou from January 19, 2013 to June 30, 2015. Season-stratified analyses using generalized additive models were conducted to evaluate the seasonal associations with adjustment of temperature with different lagged days (lag0-1 for warm season, lag0-14 for cold season). We recorded a total of 70,443 non-accidental deaths in Zhengzhou during the study period. Significant associations were observed between ambient O3 and mortality in cold season. Every 10-μg/m3 increment of 24-h O3 of 1-day lagged time was associated with a 1.38% (95% CI 0.60, 2.16%) increase in all cause mortality, 1.35% (95% CI 0.41, 2.30%) increase in cardiovascular mortality, and 1.78% (95% CI 0.43, 3.14%) increase in respiratory mortality. Similar associations were observed when using daily 1- and 8-h maximum concentrations of O3. No significant association was found during warm season. This study suggests a more pronounced ozone-mortality association in cold season in Zhengzhou, and we suggest that different lagged temperatures should be considered when examining the seasonal health effects of ambient ozone.

  12. ORGANOCHLORINE PESTICIDES IN THE AMBIENT AIR OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent and past use of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in Mexico has resulted in concentrations in ambient air that are 1-2 orders of magnitude above levels in the Great Lakes region. Atmospheric transport from Mexico and Central America may be contributing significant amounts ...

  13. Composing in Public: The Ambient Audiences of a Writing Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Although scholars have investigated the ways youths individually enact composing practices and the impact of audience on these practices, this study examines the impact of an audience physically present while composing in a shared, public space--an ambient audience. Blurring the line between traditional notions of audience and collaborator through…

  14. METHODOLOGY OF AMBIENT AIR MONITORING FOR POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the last decade, several studies of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in ambient air in the U.S. specifically investigated (1) the sampling efficiency of two sorbents for PAH in air: XAD-2 and polyurethane foam (PUP); (2) the storage stability of PAH on quartz fiber fil...

  15. Cognitions and 'placebos' in behavioral research on ambient noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harcum, E. R.; Monti, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    Investigation of the effects of noise on visual and psychomotor tasks, with special attention to influences of certain cognitive variables. The results include the finding that 100-dB ambient noise has no effects per se, though cognitive variables in the testing situation affect both performance and ratings of disturbance.

  16. Performance testing and analysis of vertical ambient air vaporizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, A. S.; Singh, V. N.; Shah, M. I.; Acharya, D. V.

    2017-02-01

    Ambient air vaporizers are used to regasify cryogenic liquids at extremely low temperature (below -153°C). Frost formation occurs on it due to large temperature difference between ambient air and cryogenic fluid. Frosting induces additional load on equipment and reduces its heat transfer effectiveness. Hence, mechanical and thermal design of vaporizers account for frosting. An experimental set-up has been designed and effects of flow rate and ground clearance on the performance of ambient air vaporizers are evaluated. The flow rate is increased from the rated capacity of 500 Nm3/h to 640 Nm3/h and ground clearance is reduced from 500 mm to 175 mm. The above variations reduce the time duration for which gaseous nitrogen is delivered at temperature higher than 10.1°C (desired). Hence duty cycle reduces from eight hours to five hours. The other factors affecting performance such as fin configuration, fluid type, fluid pressure, intermittent flow nature and climatic conditions are assumed to be constant over the test duration. The decrement in outlet gas temperature (from 38 °C to 10.1°C) with corresponding increment in frost thickness leads to deterioration of performance of ambient air vaporizers.

  17. A Survey on Ambient Intelligence in Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Acampora, Giovanni; Cook, Diane J.; Rashidi, Parisa; Vasilakos, Athanasios V.

    2013-01-01

    Ambient Intelligence (AmI) is a new paradigm in information technology aimed at empowering people’s capabilities by the means of digital environments that are sensitive, adaptive, and responsive to human needs, habits, gestures, and emotions. This futuristic vision of daily environment will enable innovative human-machine interactions characterized by pervasive, unobtrusive and anticipatory communications. Such innovative interaction paradigms make ambient intelligence technology a suitable candidate for developing various real life solutions, including in the health care domain. This survey will discuss the emergence of ambient intelligence (AmI) techniques in the health care domain, in order to provide the research community with the necessary background. We will examine the infrastructure and technology required for achieving the vision of ambient intelligence, such as smart environments and wearable medical devices. We will summarize of the state of the art artificial intelligence methodologies used for developing AmI system in the health care domain, including various learning techniques (for learning from user interaction), reasoning techniques (for reasoning about users’ goals and intensions) and planning techniques (for planning activities and interactions). We will also discuss how AmI technology might support people affected by various physical or mental disabilities or chronic disease. Finally, we will point to some of the successful case studies in the area and we will look at the current and future challenges to draw upon the possible future research paths. PMID:24431472

  18. A Survey on Ambient Intelligence in Health Care.

    PubMed

    Acampora, Giovanni; Cook, Diane J; Rashidi, Parisa; Vasilakos, Athanasios V

    2013-12-01

    Ambient Intelligence (AmI) is a new paradigm in information technology aimed at empowering people's capabilities by the means of digital environments that are sensitive, adaptive, and responsive to human needs, habits, gestures, and emotions. This futuristic vision of daily environment will enable innovative human-machine interactions characterized by pervasive, unobtrusive and anticipatory communications. Such innovative interaction paradigms make ambient intelligence technology a suitable candidate for developing various real life solutions, including in the health care domain. This survey will discuss the emergence of ambient intelligence (AmI) techniques in the health care domain, in order to provide the research community with the necessary background. We will examine the infrastructure and technology required for achieving the vision of ambient intelligence, such as smart environments and wearable medical devices. We will summarize of the state of the art artificial intelligence methodologies used for developing AmI system in the health care domain, including various learning techniques (for learning from user interaction), reasoning techniques (for reasoning about users' goals and intensions) and planning techniques (for planning activities and interactions). We will also discuss how AmI technology might support people affected by various physical or mental disabilities or chronic disease. Finally, we will point to some of the successful case studies in the area and we will look at the current and future challenges to draw upon the possible future research paths.

  19. Songs as Ambient Language Input in Phonology Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Au, Terry Kit-fong

    2013-01-01

    Children cannot learn to speak a language simply from occasional noninteractive exposure to native speakers' input (e.g., by hearing television dialogues), but can they learn something about its phonology? To answer this question, the present study varied ambient hearing experience for 126 5- to 7-year-old native Cantonese-Chinese speakers…

  20. Entrainment of circadian rhythm by ambient temperature cycles in mice.

    PubMed

    Refinetti, Roberto

    2010-08-01

    Much is known about how environmental light-dark cycles synchronize circadian rhythms in animals. The ability of environmental cycles of ambient temperature to synchronize circadian rhythms has also been investigated extensively but mostly in ectotherms. In the present study, the synchronization of the circadian rhythm of running-wheel activity by environmental cycles of ambient temperature was studied in laboratory mice. Although all mice were successfully entrained by a light-dark cycle, only 60% to 80% of the mice were entrained by temperature cycles (24-32 degrees C or 24-12 degrees C), and attainment of stable entrainment seemed to take longer under temperature cycles than under a light-dark cycle. This suggests that ambient temperature cycles are weaker zeitgebers than light-dark cycles, which is consistent with the results of the few previous studies using mammalian species. Whereas 80% of the mice were entrained by 24-h temperature cycles, only 60% were entrained by 23-h cycles, and none was entrained by 25-h cycles. The results did not clarify whether entrainment by temperature cycles is caused directly by temperature or indirectly through a temperature effect on locomotor activity, but it is clear that the rhythm of running-wheel activity in mice can be entrained by ambient temperature cycles in the nonnoxious range.

  1. High Frequency Acoustic Channel Characterization for Propagation and Ambient Noise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-30

    with Michael Porter and the ONR High Frequency Initiative and the ONR PLUSNet program. REFERENCES M. B. Porter and H. P. Bucker, “Gaussian...Harrison and Michael Porter , “A passive fathometer for determining bottom depth and imaging seabed layering using ambient noise”, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 120

  2. Warmer ambient temperatures depress liver function in a mammalian herbivore

    PubMed Central

    Kurnath, Patrice; Dearing, M. Denise

    2013-01-01

    Diet selection in mammalian herbivores is thought to be mainly influenced by intrinsic factors such as nutrients and plant secondary compounds, yet extrinsic factors like ambient temperature may also play a role. In particular, warmer ambient temperatures could enhance the toxicity of plant defence compounds through decreased liver metabolism of herbivores. Temperature-dependent toxicity has been documented in pharmacology and agriculture science but not in wild mammalian herbivores. Here, we investigated how ambient temperature affects liver metabolism in the desert woodrat, Neotoma lepida. Woodrats (n = 21) were acclimated for 30 days to two ambient temperatures (cool = 21°C, warm = 29°C). In a second experiment, the temperature exposure was reduced to 3.5 h. After temperature treatments, animals were given a hypnotic agent and clearance time of the agent was estimated from the duration of the hypnotic state. The average clearance time of the agent in the long acclimation experiment was 45% longer for animals acclimated to 29°C compared with 21°C. Similarly, after the short exposure experiment, woodrats at 29°C had clearance times 26% longer compared with 21°C. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that liver function is reduced at warmer environmental temperatures and may provide a physiological mechanism through which climate change affects herbivorous mammals. PMID:24046878

  3. Design of Affectively Evocative Smart Ambient Media for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwok, Ron Chi-Wai; Cheng, Shuk Han; Ip, Horace Ho-Shing; Kong, Joseph Siu-Lung

    2011-01-01

    This study proposes a teaching and research initiative, named SAMAL (Smart AMbience for Affective Learning) that will provide a unique ambient mediated environment for integrating cognitive and affective approaches to enhance learning. Also, this study illustrates a design of SAMAL classroom with affectively evocative scenarios for learning de…

  4. Low ambient temperature and neuroendocrine response to hypoglycemia in men.

    PubMed

    Jezová, D; Juránková, E; Kvetnanský, R; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H; Nazar, K; Vigas, M

    1995-12-01

    Nutritional factors, such as an excess or a deficiency of glucose, play an important role in neuroendocrine regulations. Hormonal and metabolic responses to hypoglycemia were examined in healthy non-obese volunteers under conditions of low ambient temperature. Hypoglycemia was induced by intravenous injection of insulin in two randomized trials performed at room temperature and at 4 degrees C. At room temperature, the typical neuroendocrine response to hypoglycemia was established. The increases of ACTH, beta-endorphin, growth hormone and cortisol in response to insulin hypoglycemia failed to be modified by low ambient temperature. Acute cold exposure significantly reduced epinephrine and totally inhibited prolactin response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. In spite of significant changes in epinephrine response to hypoglycemia at low ambient temperature, no striking differences in plasma glucose levels compared to those measured at room temperature were observed. However, under conditions of low temperature the reestablishment of normoglycemia was delayed. No changes in free fatty acids were found under our experimental conditions. The presented data show that low ambient temperature exerts selective effects on some neuroendocrine and metabolic parameters.

  5. An Ambient Awareness Tool for Supporting Supervised Collaborative Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alavi, H. S.; Dillenbourg, P.

    2012-01-01

    We describe an ambient awareness tool, named "Lantern", designed for supporting the learning process in recitation sections, (i.e., when students work in small teams on the exercise sets with the help of tutors). Each team is provided with an interactive lamp that displays their work status: the exercise they are working on, if they have…

  6. VOCS IN AMBIENT AIR NEAR WORLD TRADE CENTER SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Beginning on September 22, 2001 and continuing through February 2002, ambient air samples were collected at three sites within a block of ground zero and at a fourth site on the 16th floor of a building at 290 Broadway. Grab samples were collected in evacuated, electro-polished...

  7. Adaptive Ambient Illumination Based on Color Harmony Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Ayano; Hirai, Keita; Nakaguchi, Toshiya; Tsumura, Norimichi; Miyake, Yoichi

    We investigated the relationship between ambient illumination and psychological effect by applying a modified color harmony model. We verified the proposed model by analyzing correlation between psychological value and modified color harmony score. Experimental results showed the possibility to obtain the best color for illumination using this model.

  8. Brady 1D seismic velocity model ambient noise prelim

    SciTech Connect

    Mellors, Robert J.

    2013-10-25

    Preliminary 1D seismic velocity model derived from ambient noise correlation. 28 Green's functions filtered between 4-10 Hz for Vp, Vs, and Qs were calculated. 1D model estimated for each path. The final model is a median of the individual models. Resolution is best for the top 1 km. Poorly constrained with increasing depth.

  9. A search in strainmeter data for slow slip associated with triggered and ambient tremor near Parkfield, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, E.F.; Gomberg, J.

    2009-01-01

    We test the hypothesis that, as in subduction zones, slow slip facilitates triggered and ambient tremor in the transform boundary setting of California. Our study builds on the study of Peng et al. (2009) of triggered and ambient tremor near Parkfield, California during time intervals surrounding 31, potentially triggering, M ≥ 7.5 teleseismic earthquakes; waves from 10 of these triggered tremor and 29 occurred in periods of ambient tremor activity. We look for transient slow slip during 3-month windows that include 11 of these triggering and nontriggering teleseisms, using continuous strain data recorded on two borehole Gladwin tensor strainmeters (GTSM) located within the distribution of tremor epicenters. We model the GTSM data assuming only tidal and “drift” signals are present and find no detectable slow slip, either ongoing when the teleseismic waves passed or triggered by them. We infer a conservative detection threshold of about 5 nanostrain for abrupt changes and about twice this for slowly evolving signals. This could be lowered slightly by adding analyses of other data types, modeled slow slip signals, and GTSM data calibration. Detection of slow slip also depends on the slipping fault's location and size, which we describe in terms of equivalent earthquake moment magnitude, M. In the best case of the GTSM above a very shallow slipping fault, detectable slip events must exceed M~2, and if the slow slip is beneath the seismogenic zone (below ~15 km depth), even M~5 events are likely to remain hidden.

  10. Resolving Rupture Directivity of Moderate Strike-Slip Earthquakes in Sparse Network with Ambient Noise Location: A Case Study with the 2011 M5.6 Oklahoma Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, X.; Ni, S.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake rupture directivity is essential for improving reliability of shakemap and understanding seismogenic processes by resolving the ruptured fault. Compared with field geological survey and InSAR technique, rupture directivity analysis based on seismological data provides rapid characterization of the rupture finiteness parameters or is almost the only way for resolving ruptured fault for earthquakes weaker than M5. In recent years, ambient seismic noise has been widely used in tomography and as well as earthquake location. Barmin et al. (2011) and Levshin et al. (2012) proposed to locate the epicenter by interpolating the estimated Green's functions (EGFs) determined by cross-correlation of ambient noise to arbitrary hypothetical event locations. This method does not rely on an earth model, but it requires a dense local array. Zhan et al. (2011) and Zeng et al. (2014) used the EGFs between a nearby station and remote stations as calibration for 3D velocity structure and then obtained the centroid location. In contrast, the hypocenter can be determined by P wave onsets. When assuming unilateral rupture, we can resolve the rupture directivity with relative location of the centroid location and hypocenter. We apply this method to the 2011 M5.6 Oklahoma earthquake. One M4.8 foreshock and one M4+ aftershock are chosen as reference event to calibrate the systematic bias of ambient noise location. The resolved rupture plane strikes southwest-northeast, consistent with the spatial distribution of aftershocks (McNamara et al., 2015) and finite fault inversion result (Sun et al., 2014). This method works for unilaterally ruptured strike-slip earthquakes, and more case studies are needed to test its effectiveness.

  11. Diffusivity in Alumina Scales Grown on Al-MAX Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Ti3AlC2, Ti2AlC, and Cr2AlC are oxidation resistant MAX phase compounds distinguished by the formation of protective Al2O3 scales with well controlled kinetics. A modified Wagner treatment was used to obtain interfacial grain boundary diffusivity, deltaD(sub gb,O,int.), from scale growth rates and corresponding grain size. It is based on the p(O2)(exp -1/6) dependency of the double charged oxygen vacancy and oxygen diffusivity, coupled with the effective diffusion constant for short circuit grain boundary paths. Data from the literature for MAX phases was analyzed accordingly, and deltaD(sub gb,O,int.) was found to nearly coincide with the Arrhenius line developed for Zr-doped FeCrAl, where: deltaD(sub gb,O,int.) = 1.8x10(exp -10) exp(-375 kJ/RT) cubic meters/s. Furthermore, this oxidation relation suggests the more general format applicable to bulk samples under ambient conditions: deltaD(sub gb,O) = 7.567x10(exp -8) exp(-544 kJ/RT) p(O2)(exp -1/6) cubic meters/[s x Pa(exp -1/6)]. Data from many other FeCrAl(X) studies were similarly assessed to show general agreement with the relation for deltaD(sub gb,O,int.). This analysis reinforces the view that protective alumina scales grow by similar mechanisms for these Al-MAX phases and oxidation resistant FeCrAl alloys.

  12. Probing atmospheric structure with infrasonic ambient noise interferometry (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, M. M.; Evers, L. G.; Fricke, J.

    2010-12-01

    Ambient noise interferometry attempts to reconstruct the impulse response of a linear system undergoing excitations by a random forcing. The method has proven to be quite general, finding applications in diverse fields such as ultrasonics, helioseismology, regional and global seismology, ocean acoustics, and exploration seismology. Due to the pervasive random forcing of microbaroms, the study of atmospheric infrasound can benefit from approaches developed in the field of interferometry as well. Moreover, continuous noise sources, such as microbaroms, provide a means to quantify the strong time-dependent changes inherent in the structure of the atmosphere. For pairs of infrasonic sensors separated by distances between 1 and 15 km, direct arrivals have been observed in long-time correlations of ambient noise from stations within 3 different networks: the network operated by the Alaska Volcano Observatory, the I53US array, and the Utah 07 experiment. As in seismic ambient noise studies, these interferometric arrivals show dispersive properties characteristic of guided wave propagation. As a result, infrasonic ambient noise interferometry can provide information on the gross structure of the atmospheric boundary layer. At Fourpeaked Volcano, Alaska, a surface-based temperature inversion produced a strong waveguide between two infrasound sensors. The propagation time of the interferometric arrivals shifted over the course of several days in close correspondence with regional temperature trends at nearby meteorological stations. Independent ECMWF data confirms the existence of a temperature inversion during this time period. Analysis of 4 infrasound sensors near Park City, Utah, further demonstrates the ability of infrasonic ambient noise interferometry to retrieve guided waves between stations separated by 5 to 10 km. Among the 4 stations, we observe strong interferometric arrivals on different station pairs at different times, attesting to variable atmospheric

  13. Al+ Optical Clocks for Fundamental Physics and Geodesy

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, James Chin-wen

    2011-07-13

    Laser-cooled trapped atoms have long been recognized as potentially very accurate frequency standards for clocks. Ultimate accuracies of 10-18 to 10-19 appear possible, limited by the time-dilation of trapped ions that move at laser-cooled velocities. The Al+ ion is an attractive candidate for high accuracy, owing to its narrow electronic transition in the optical regime and low sensitivity to ambient field perturbations. Precision spectroscopy on Al+ is enabled by quantum information techniques. With Al+ “quantum-logic” clocks, the current accuracy of 8.6×10-18 has enabled a geo-potential-difference measurement that detected a height change of 37±17 cm due to the gravitational red-shift. We have also observed quantum coherence between two Al+ ions with a record Q-factor of 3.4×1016, and compared the Al+ resonance frequency to that of a single Hg+ ion to place limits on the temporal variation of the fine-structure constant.

  14. Al+ optical clocks for fundamental physics, geodesy, and quantum metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chin-Wen

    2011-05-01

    Laser-cooled trapped atoms have long been recognized as potentially very accurate frequency standards for clocks. Ultimate accuracies of 10-18 to 10-19 appear possible, limited by the time-dilation of trapped ions that move at laser-cooled velocities. The Al+ ion is an attractive candidate for high accuracy, owing to its narrow electronic transition in the optical regime and low sensitivity to ambient field perturbations. Precision spectroscopy on Al+ is enabled by quantum information techniques. With Al+ ``quantum-logic'' clocks, the current accuracy of 8.6 ×10-18 has enabled a geo-potential-difference measurement that detected a height change of 37 +/- 17 cm due to the gravitational red-shift. We have also observed quantum coherence between two Al+ ions with a record Q-factor of 3.4 ×1016, and compared the Al+ resonance frequency to that of a single Hg+ ion to place limits on the temporal variation of the fine-structure constant. This work is done in collaboration with D. B. Hume, M. J. Thorpe, D. J. Wineland, and T. Rosenband. Work supported by ONR, AFOSR, DARPA, NSA, and IARPA.

  15. Frequently Asked Questions about ALS and the ALS Registry

    MedlinePlus

    ... Why is it necessary to provide my Social Security Number (SSN) when registering in the National ALS ... Why is it necessary to provide my Social Security Number (SSN) when registering in the National ALS ...

  16. Insights into electrochemical reactions from ambient pressure photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stoerzinger, Kelsey A; Hong, Wesley T; Crumlin, Ethan J; Bluhm, Hendrik; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2015-11-17

    The understanding of fundamental processes in the bulk and at the interfaces of electrochemical devices is a prerequisite for the development of new technologies with higher efficiency and improved performance. One energy storage scheme of great interest is splitting water to form hydrogen and oxygen gas and converting back to electrical energy by their subsequent recombination with only water as a byproduct. However, kinetic limitations to the rate of oxygen-based electrochemical reactions hamper the efficiency in technologies such as solar fuels, fuel cells, and electrolyzers. For these reactions, the use of metal oxides as electrocatalysts is prevalent due to their stability, low cost, and ability to store oxygen within the lattice. However, due to the inherently convoluted nature of electrochemical and chemical processes in electrochemical systems, it is difficult to isolate and study individual electrochemical processes in a complex system. Therefore, in situ characterization tools are required for observing related physical and chemical processes directly at the places where and while they occur and can help elucidate the mechanisms of charge separation and charge transfer at electrochemical interfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), also known as ESCA (electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis), has been used as a quantitative spectroscopic technique that measures the elemental composition, as well as chemical and electronic state of a material. Building from extensive ex situ characterization of electrochemical systems, initial in situ studies were conducted at or near ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions (≤10(-6) Torr) to probe solid-state electrochemical systems. However, through the integration of differential-pumping stages, XPS can now operate at pressures in the torr range, comprising a technique called ambient pressure XPS (AP-XPS). In this Account, we briefly review the working principles and current status of AP-XPS. We use several recent

  17. Collisionless Coupling between Explosive Debris Plasma and Magnetized Ambient Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, Anton

    2016-10-01

    The explosive expansion of a dense debris plasma cloud into relatively tenuous, magnetized, ambient plasma characterizes a wide variety of astrophysical and space phenomena, including supernova remnants, interplanetary coronal mass ejections, and ionospheric explosions. In these rarified environments, collective electromagnetic processes rather than Coulomb collisions typically mediate the transfer of momentum and energy from the debris plasma to the ambient plasma. In an effort to better understand the detailed physics of collisionless coupling mechanisms in a reproducible laboratory setting, the present research jointly utilizes the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) and the Phoenix laser facility at UCLA to study the super-Alfvénic, quasi-perpendicular expansion of laser-produced carbon (C) and hydrogen (H) debris plasma through preformed, magnetized helium (He) ambient plasma via a variety of diagnostics, including emission spectroscopy, wavelength-filtered imaging, and magnetic field induction probes. Large Doppler shifts detected in a He II ion spectral line directly indicate initial ambient ion acceleration transverse to both the debris plasma flow and the background magnetic field, indicative of a fundamental process known as Larmor coupling. Characterization of the laser-produced debris plasma via a radiation-hydrodynamics code permits an explicit calculation of the laminar electric field in the framework of a ``hybrid'' model (kinetic ions, charge-neutralizing massless fluid electrons), thus allowing for a simulation of the initial response of a distribution of He II test ions. A synthetic Doppler-shifted spectrum constructed from the simulated velocity distribution of the accelerated test ions excellently reproduces the spectroscopic measurements, confirming the role of Larmor coupling in the debris-ambient interaction.

  18. High mortality of Red Sea zooplankton under ambient solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Al-Aidaroos, Ali M; El-Sherbiny, Mohsen M O; Satheesh, Sathianeson; Mantha, Gopikrishna; Agustī, Susana; Carreja, Beatriz; Duarte, Carlos M

    2014-01-01

    High solar radiation along with extreme transparency leads to high penetration of solar radiation in the Red Sea, potentially harmful to biota inhabiting the upper water column, including zooplankton. Here we show, based on experimental assessments of solar radiation dose-mortality curves on eight common taxa, the mortality of zooplankton in the oligotrophic waters of the Red Sea to increase steeply with ambient levels of solar radiation in the Red Sea. Responses curves linking solar radiation doses with zooplankton mortality were evaluated by exposing organisms, enclosed in quartz bottles, allowing all the wavelengths of solar radiation to penetrate, to five different levels of ambient solar radiation (100%, 21.6%, 7.2%, 3.2% and 0% of solar radiation). The maximum mortality rates under ambient solar radiation levels averaged (±standard error of the mean, SEM) 18.4±5.8% h(-1), five-fold greater than the average mortality in the dark for the eight taxa tested. The UV-B radiation required for mortality rates to reach ½ of maximum values averaged (±SEM) 12±5.6 h(-1)% of incident UVB radiation, equivalent to the UV-B dose at 19.2±2.7 m depth in open coastal Red Sea waters. These results confirm that Red Sea zooplankton are highly vulnerable to ambient solar radiation, as a consequence of the combination of high incident radiation and high water transparency allowing deep penetration of damaging UV-B radiation. These results provide evidence of the significance of ambient solar radiation levels as a stressor of marine zooplankton communities in tropical, oligotrophic waters. Because the oligotrophic ocean extends across 70% of the ocean surface, solar radiation can be a globally-significant stressor for the ocean ecosystem, by constraining zooplankton use of the upper levels of the water column and, therefore, the efficiency of food transfer up the food web in the oligotrophic ocean.

  19. Effects of ambient conditions on fuel cell vehicle performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haraldsson, K.; Alvfors, P.

    Ambient conditions have considerable impact on the performance of fuel cell hybrid vehicles. Here, the vehicle fuel consumption, the air compressor power demand, the water management system and the heat loads of a fuel cell hybrid sport utility vehicle (SUV) were studied. The simulation results show that the vehicle fuel consumption increases with 10% when the altitude increases from 0 m up to 3000 m to 4.1 L gasoline equivalents/100 km over the New European Drive Cycle (NEDC). The increase is 19% on the more power demanding highway US06 cycle. The air compressor is the major contributor to this fuel consumption increase. Its load-following strategy makes its power demand increase with increasing altitude. Almost 40% of the net power output of the fuel cell system is consumed by the air compressor at the altitude of 3000 m with this load-following strategy and is thus more apparent in the high-power US06 cycle. Changes in ambient air temperature and relative humidity effect on the fuel cell system performance in terms of the water management rather in vehicle fuel consumption. Ambient air temperature and relative humidity have some impact on the vehicle performance mostly seen in the heat and water management of the fuel cell system. While the heat loads of the fuel cell system components vary significantly with increasing ambient temperature, the relative humidity did not have a great impact on the water balance. Overall, dimensioning the compressor and other system components to meet the fuel cell system requirements at the minimum and maximum expected ambient temperatures, in this case 5 and 40 °C, and high altitude, while simultaneously choosing a correct control strategy are important parameters for efficient vehicle power train management.

  20. High Mortality of Red Sea Zooplankton under Ambient Solar Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Aidaroos, Ali M.; El-Sherbiny, Mohsen M. O.; Satheesh, Sathianeson; Mantha, Gopikrishna; Agustī, Susana; Carreja, Beatriz; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    High solar radiation along with extreme transparency leads to high penetration of solar radiation in the Red Sea, potentially harmful to biota inhabiting the upper water column, including zooplankton. Here we show, based on experimental assessments of solar radiation dose-mortality curves on eight common taxa, the mortality of zooplankton in the oligotrophic waters of the Red Sea to increase steeply with ambient levels of solar radiation in the Red Sea. Responses curves linking solar radiation doses with zooplankton mortality were evaluated by exposing organisms, enclosed in quartz bottles, allowing all the wavelengths of solar radiation to penetrate, to five different levels of ambient solar radiation (100%, 21.6%, 7.2%, 3.2% and 0% of solar radiation). The maximum mortality rates under ambient solar radiation levels averaged (±standard error of the mean, SEM) 18.4±5.8% h−1, five-fold greater than the average mortality in the dark for the eight taxa tested. The UV-B radiation required for mortality rates to reach ½of maximum values averaged (±SEM) 12±5.6 h−1% of incident UVB radiation, equivalent to the UV-B dose at 19.2±2.7 m depth in open coastal Red Sea waters. These results confirm that Red Sea zooplankton are highly vulnerable to ambient solar radiation, as a consequence of the combination of high incident radiation and high water transparency allowing deep penetration of damaging UV-B radiation. These results provide evidence of the significance of ambient solar radiation levels as a stressor of marine zooplankton communities in tropical, oligotrophic waters. Because the oligotrophic ocean extends across 70% of the ocean surface, solar radiation can be a globally-significant stressor for the ocean ecosystem, by constraining zooplankton use of the upper levels of the water column and, therefore, the efficiency of food transfer up the food web in the oligotrophic ocean. PMID:25309996

  1. New ionic liquids based on complexation of dipropylsulfide and AlCl3 for electrochodeposition of aluminum

    DOE PAGES

    Fang, Youxing; Jiang, Xueguang; Dai, Sheng; ...

    2015-01-01

    A new kind of ionic liquid based on complexation of dipropyl sulfide (DPS) and AlCl3 has been prepared. The equivalent concentration of AlCl3 in the ionic liquid is as high as 2.3 M. More importantly, it is highly fluidic and exhibits an ambient ionic conductivity of 1.25 x 10-4 S cm-1. This new ionic liquid can be successfully used as an electrolyte for electrodeposition of aluminum.

  2. Mechanical Properties and Strengthening Mechanisms of Al-15 Pct B4C Composites with Sc and Zr at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jian; Zhang, Zhan; Chen, X.-Grant

    2016-09-01

    The mechanical properties at ambient and elevated temperatures of two Al-15 vol pct B4C composites, S40 with 0.4 wt pct Sc and SZ40 with 0.4 wt pct Sc and 0.24 wt pct Zr, are investigated during long-term thermal annealing. The presence of large B4C particles in the microscale has a moderate but stable strengthening effect on Al-B4C composites at ambient and elevated temperatures, while the precipitation of nanoscale Al3Sc and Al3(Sc, Zr) in the composite matrix provides a predominate contribution to the composite strength, which is varied by tested temperatures. The Al3Sc precipitates in S40 remain coarsening resistant at 523 K (250 °C), whereas the Al3(Sc, Zr) precipitates in SZ40 are thermally stable at 573 K (300 °C) over 2000 hours of annealing. At higher annealing temperatures (573 K (300 °C) for S40 and 623 K (350 °C) for SZ40), both Al3Sc and Al3(Sc, Zr) precipitates become coarsening with prolonged annealing time. The yield strength of S40 and SZ40 at ambient temperature decreases with the increasing precipitate size, which can be explained by the classical precipitate shearing and Orowan bypass mechanisms. At elevated temperatures [523 K to 623 K (250 °C to 350 °C)], considerably lower yield stresses are observed compared to those at ambient temperature, which invokes a dislocation climb mechanism. The predicted yield strengths at elevated temperatures by the combination of dislocation climb and Orowan models are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  3. Al Jazirah, Sudan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Al Jazirah (also Gezira) is one of the 26 states of Sudan. The state lies between the Blue Nile and the White Nile in the east-central region of the country. It is a well populated area suitable for agriculture. The area was at the southern end of Nubia and little is known about its ancient history and only limited archaeological work has been conducted in this area. The region has benefited from the Gezira Scheme, a program to foster cotton farming begun in 1925. At that time the Sennar Dam and numerous irrigation canals were built. Al Jazirah became the Sudan's major agricultural region with more than 2.5 million acres (10,000 km) under cultivation. The initial development project was semi-private, but the government nationalized it in 1950. Cotton production increased in the 1970s but by the 1990s increased wheat production has supplanted a third of the land formerly seeded with cotton.

    The image was acquired December 25, 2006, covers an area of 56 x 36.4 km, and is located near 14.5 degrees north latitude, 33.1 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  4. Epicenter Location of Regional Seismic Events Using Love Wave and Rayleigh Wave Ambient Seismic Noise Green's Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levshin, A. L.; Barmin, M. P.; Moschetti, M. P.; Mendoza, C.; Ritzwoller, M. H.

    2011-12-01

    We describe a novel method to locate regional seismic events based on exploiting Empirical Green's Functions (EGF) that are produced from ambient seismic noise. Elastic EGFs between pairs of seismic stations are determined by cross-correlating long time-series of ambient noise recorded at the two stations. The EGFs principally contain Rayleigh waves on the vertical-vertical cross-correlations and Love waves on the transverse-transverse cross-correlations. Earlier work (Barmin et al., "Epicentral location based on Rayleigh wave empirical Green's functions from ambient seismic noise", Geophys. J. Int., 2011) showed that group time delays observed on Rayleigh wave EGFs can be exploited to locate to within about 1 km moderate sized earthquakes using USArray Transportable Array (TA) stations. The principal advantage of the method is that the ambient noise EGFs are affected by lateral variations in structure similarly to the earthquake signals, so the location is largely unbiased by 3-D structure. However, locations based on Rayleigh waves alone may be biased by more than 1 km if the earthquake depth is unknown but lies between 2 km and 7 km. This presentation is motivated by the fact that group time delays for Love waves are much less affected by earthquake depth than Rayleigh waves; thus exploitation of Love wave EGFs may reduce location bias caused by uncertainty in event depth. The advantage of Love waves to locate seismic events, however, is mitigated by the fact that Love wave EGFs have a smaller SNR than Rayleigh waves. Here, we test the use of Love and Rayleigh wave EGFs between 5- and 15-sec period to locate seismic events based on the USArray TA in the western US. We focus on locating aftershocks of the 2008 M 6.0 Wells earthquake, mining blasts in Wyoming and Montana, and small earthquakes near Norman, OK and Dallas, TX, some of which may be triggered by hydrofracking or injection wells.

  5. AL Amyloidosis and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... for survivors' benefits . Research on AL amyloidosis and herbicides The Health and Medicine Division (formally known as ... to the compounds of interest found in the herbicide Agent Orange and AL amyloidosis." VA made a ...

  6. Van der Waals effects in ab initio water at ambient and supercritical conditions.

    PubMed

    Jonchiere, Romain; Seitsonen, Ari P; Ferlat, Guillaume; Saitta, A Marco; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe

    2011-10-21

    Density functional theory (DFT) within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) is known to poorly reproduce the experimental properties of liquid water. The poor description of the dispersion forces in the exchange correlation functionals is one of the possible causes. Recent studies have demonstrated an improvement in the simulated properties when they are taken into account. We present here a study of the effects on liquid water of the recently proposed semi-empirical correction of Grimme et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 132, 154104 (2010)]. The difference between standard and corrected DFT-GGA simulations is rationalized with a detailed analysis upon modifying an accurate parameterised potential. This allows an estimate of the typical range of dispersion forces in water. We also show that the structure and diffusivity of ambient-like liquid water are sensitive to the fifth neighbor position, thus highlighting the key role played by this neighbor. Our study is extended to water at supercritical conditions, where experimental and theoretical results are much more scarce. We show that the semi-empirical correction by Grimme et al. improves significantly, although somewhat counter-intuitively, both the structural and the dynamical description of supercritical water.

  7. Surface-wave tomography of Ireland and surroundings using ambient noise and teleseismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonadio, Raffaele; Arroucau, Pierre; Lebedev, Sergei; Meier, Thomas; Schaeffer, Andrew; Licciardi, Andrea; Piana Agostinetti, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    Ireland's geology is dominated by northeast-southwest structural trends and suture zones, mostly inferred from geological mapping and a few active source seismic experiments. However, their geometry and extent at depth and their continuity across the Irish Sea are still poorly known. Important questions also remain unanswered regarding the thickness and bulk properties of the sedimentary cover at the regional scale, the deformation and flow of the deep crust during the formation of Ireland, the thickness of Ireland's lithosphere today, and the thermal structure and dynamics of the asthenosphere beneath Ireland. In this work, we take advantage of abundant, newly available broadband data from temporary array deployments and permanent seismic networks in Ireland and Great Britain to produce high-resolution models of seismic velocity structure and anisotropy of the lithosphere. We combine Rayleigh and Love phase velocity measurements from waveform cross-correlation using both ambient noise and teleseismic data in order to produce high-quality dispersion curves for periods ranging from 1 to 300 s. The phase velocity measurement procedures are adapted from Meier et al.[2], Lebedev et al.[1] and Soomro et al.[3] and are automated in order to deal with the large amount of data and ensure consistency and reproducibility. For the nearly 200 stations used in this study, we obtain a very large number of dispersion curves from both ambient noise and teleseimic data. Dispersion measurements are then inverted in a tomographic procedure for surface-wave phase velocity maps in a very broad period range. The maps constrain the 3D seismic-velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle underlying Ireland and the Irish Sea. {9} Lebedev, S., T. Meier, R. D. van der Hilst. Asthenospheric flow and origin of volcanism in the Baikal Rift area, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 249, 415-424, 2006. Meier, T., K. Dietrich, B. Stockhert, H.P. Harjes, One-dimensional models of shear wave velocity for

  8. Al Qaeda as a System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-15

    either as welcome guests or parasites . As welcome guests, Al Qaeda members take sanctuary in sponsor states. Sponsor states provide Al Qaeda with...sponsorship, Al Qaeda takes sanctuary as parasites either overtly or covertly. They take overt sanctuary in countries that publicly claim a policy...39 Yehudit Barsky, “Al Qa’ida, Iran, and Hezbollah: A Continuing Symbiosis ,” The American Jewish Committee Series on Terrorism , February 2004, 2-3

  9. Cardiopulmonary Toxicity Induced by Ambient Particulate Matter (BI City Concentrated Ambient Particle Study)

    SciTech Connect

    Annette Rohr; James Wagner Masako Morishita; Gerald Keeler; Jack Harkema

    2010-06-30

    Alterations in heart rate variability (HRV) have been reported in rodents exposed to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) from different regions of the United States. The goal of this study was to compare alterations in cardiac function induced by CAPs in two distinct regional atmospheres. AirCARE 1, a mobile laboratory with an EPA/Harvard fine particle (particulate matter <2.5 {micro}m; PM{sub 2.5}) concentrator was located in urban Detroit, MI, where the PM mixture is heavily influenced by motor vehicles, and in Steubenville, OH, where PM is derived primarily from long-range transport and transformation of power plant emissions, as well as from local industrial operations. Each city was studied during both winter and summer months, for a total of four sampling periods. Spontaneously hypertensive rats instrumented for electrocardiogram (ECG) telemetry were exposed to CAPs 8 h/day for 13 consecutive days during each sampling period. Heart rate (HR), and indices of HRV (standard deviation of the average normal-to-normal intervals [SDNN]; square root of the mean squared difference of successive normal-to-normal intervals [rMSSD]), were calculated for 30-minute intervals during exposures. A large suite of PM components, including nitrate, sulfate, elemental and organic carbon, and trace elements, were monitored in CAPs and ambient air. In addition, a unique sampler, the Semi-Continuous Elements in Air Sampler (SEAS) was employed to obtain every-30-minute measurements of trace elements. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) methods were applied to estimate source contributions to PM{sub 2.5}. Mixed modeling techniques were employed to determine associations between pollutants/CAPs components and HR and HRV metrics. Mean CAPs concentrations in Detroit were 518 and 357 {micro}g/m{sup 3} (summer and winter, respectively) and 487 and 252 {micro}g/m{sup 3} in Steubenville. In Detroit, significant reductions in SDNN were observed in the summer in association with cement

  10. Response of macaque bronchiolar epithelium to ambient concentrations of ozone.

    PubMed Central

    Harkema, J. R.; Plopper, C. G.; Hyde, D. M.; St George, J. A.; Wilson, D. W.; Dungworth, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    Recently, we reported that exposure to ambient concentrations of ozone, near the U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standard (0.12 ppm), induced significant nasal epithelial lesions in a non-human primate, the bonnet monkey. The present study defines the effects of ambient concentrations of ozone on the surface epithelium lining respiratory bronchioles and on the underlying bronchiolar interstitium in these same monkeys. Bonnet monkeys were exposed to filtered air or to 0.15 or 0.30 ppm ozone 8 hours/day for 6 or 90 days. At the end of exposures, monkeys were anesthetized and killed by exsanguination. Microdissected bronchiolar airways of infusion-fixed lungs were evaluated morphometrically by light microscopy and quantitatively by scanning and transmission electron microscopy for ozone-induced epithelial changes. Hyperplasia of nonciliated, cuboidal epithelial cells and intraluminal accumulation of macrophages characterized ozone-induced lesions in respiratory bronchioles. There were no significant differences in epithelial thickness or cell numbers among ozone-exposed groups. Ozone-exposed epithelium was composed of 80% cuboidal and 20% squamous cells compared with 40% cuboidal and 60% squamous cells in filtered air controls. In addition, the arithmetic mean thickness of the surface epithelium, a measure of tissue mass per unit area of basal lamina, was significantly increased in all of the ozone-exposed groups. The number of cuboidal epithelial cells per surface area of basal lamina was increased above control values by 780% after 6 days exposure to 0.15 ppm, 777% after 90 days to 0.15 ppm, and 996% after 90 days exposure to 0.30 ppm. There was also a significant ozone-induced increase in the thickness of the bronchiolar interstitium that was due to an increase in both cellular and acellular components. These results demonstrate that exposure to low ambient concentrations of ozone, near the current. National Ambient Air Quality Standard, induces pulmonary lesions

  11. 78 FR 34964 - Implementation of the 2008 National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone: State Implementation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... for Ozone: State Implementation Plan Requirements AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... proposed rule ``Implementation of the 2008 National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone: State... proposed rulemaking proposes to implement the 2008 ozone national ambient air quality standards...

  12. The effects of ambient particulate matter on human alveolar machrophage oxidative and inflammatory responses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiologic and occupational studies demonstrate that ambient PM and DEP have deleterious effects on human cardiopulmonary health including exacerbation of pre-existing lung disease and development of respiratory infections. The effects of ambient PM on lung cell responsivenes...

  13. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF OIL FLY ASH AND RELEVANCE TO AMBIENT AIR PARTICULATE MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated increased human morbidity and mortality with elevations in the concentration of ambient air particulate matter (PM). Fugitive fly ash from the combustion of oil and residual fuel oil significantly contributes to the ambient air particle bur...

  14. Plasma-based ambient ionization mass spectrometry in bioanalytical sciences.

    PubMed

    Smoluch, Marek; Mielczarek, Przemyslaw; Silberring, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-based ambient ionization mass spectrometry techniques are gaining growing interest due to their specific features, such as the need for little or no sample preparation, its high analysis speed, and the ambient experimental conditions. Samples can be analyzed in gas, liquid, or solid forms. These techniques allow for a wide range of applications, like warfare agent detection, chemical reaction control, mass spectrometry imaging, polymer identification, and food safety monitoring, as well as applications in biomedical science, e.g., drug and pharmaceutical analysis, medical diagnostics, biochemical analysis, etc. Until now, the main drawback of plasma-based techniques is their quantitative aspect, but a lot of efforts have been done to improve this obstacle.

  15. Ambient Intelligence 2.0: Towards Synergetic Prosperity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarts, Emile; Grotenhuis, Frits

    Ten years of research in Ambient Intelligence have revealed that the original ideas and assertions about the way the concept should develop no longer hold and should be substantially revised. Early scenario's in Ambient Intelligence envisioned a world in which individuals could maximally exploit personalized, context aware, wireless devices thus enabling them to become maximally productive, while living at an unprecedented pace. Environments would become smart and proactive, enriching and enhancing the experience of participants thus supporting maximum leisure possibly even at the risk of alienation. New insights have revealed that these brave new world scenarios are no longer desirable and that people are more in for a balanced approach in which technology should serve people instead of driving them to the max. We call this novel approach Synergetic Prosperity, referring to meaningful digital solutions that balance mind and body, and society and earth thus contributing to a prosperous and sustainable development of mankind.

  16. The Operator Guide: An Ambient Persuasive Interface in the Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschtscherjakov, Alexander; Reitberger, Wolfgang; Pöhr, Florian; Tscheligi, Manfred

    In this paper we introduce the context of a semiconductor factory as a promising area for the application of innovative interaction approaches. In order to increase efficiency ambient persuasive interfaces, which influence the operators' behaviour to perform in an optimized way, could constitute a potential strategy. We present insights gained from qualitative studies conducted in a specific semiconductor factory and provide a description of typical work processes and already deployed interfaces in this context. These findings informed the design of a prototype of an ambient persuasive interface within this realm - the "Operator Guide". Its overall aim is to improve work efficiency, while still maintaining a minimal error rate. We provide a detailed description of the Operator Guide along with an outlook of the next steps within a user-centered design approach.

  17. Damage localization under ambient vibration using changes in flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yong; Spencer, B. F.

    2002-06-01

    In recent years, Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) has emerged as a new research area in civil engineering. Most existing health monitoring methodologies require direct measurement of input excitation for implementation. However, in many cases, there is no easy way to measure these inputs - or alternatively to externally excite the structure. Therefore, SHM methods based on ambient vibration have become important in civil engineering. In this paper, an approach is proposed based on the Damage Location Vector (DLV) method to handle the ambient vibration case. Here, this flexibility-matrix-based damage localization method is combined with a modal expansion technique to eliminate the need to measure the input excitation. As a by-product of this approach, in addition to determining the location of the damage, an estimate of the damage extent also can be determined. Finally, a numerical example analyzing a truss structure with limited sensors and noisy measurement is provided to verify the efficacy of the proposed approach.

  18. AMBIENT PM2.5 SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-04-30

    This is the third semi-annual technical progress report summarizing observations and tentative conclusions drawn from evaluations of the data captured to date from the operation of the ambient PM{sub 2.5} speciation sites in a geographical area encompassing southeastern Ohio, western Pennsylvania, and northwestern West Virginia. The overall goal of this program, called the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), is to better understand the relationship between coal-based power system emissions and ambient air quality in the upper Ohio River Valley region through the collection of chemically resolved or speciated data. In order to provide a ''stand alone'' document, this report contains updated versions of Section 1 (Introduction) and Section 2 (Experimental) in their entirety from the first report.

  19. Ambient ultraviolet radiation causes mortality in salamander eggs

    SciTech Connect

    Blaustein, A.R.; Edmond, B.; Kiesecker, J.M.

    1995-08-01

    Previous research has shown that amphibian species have differential sensitivity to ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation. In some anuran species, ambient levels of UV-B cause mortality in embryonic stages and hatching success is significantly reduced. Projected increases in UV-B may affect an increasing number of species. The adverse effects of UV-B may eventually be manifested at the population level and may ultimately contribute to population declines. Using field experiments, we investigated the effects of ambient UV-B on salamander (Ambystoma gracile) embryos developing at natural oviposition sites. We show that the hatching success of eggs of A. gracile shielded from UV-B is significantly higher than those not shielded from UV-B. 27 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Annealing ambient controlled deep defect formation in InP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. W.; Dong, Z. Y.; Duan, M. L.; Sun, W. R.; Zeng, Y. P.; Sun, N. F.; Sun, T. N.

    2004-07-01

    Deep defects in annealed InP have been investigated by deep level transient capacitance spectroscopy (DLTS), photo induced current transient spectroscopy (PICTS) and thermally stimulated current spectroscopy (TSC). Both DLTS results of annealed semiconducting InP and PICTS and TSC results of annealed semi-insulating InP indicate that InP annealed in phosphorus ambient has five defects, while InP annealed in iron phosphide ambient has two defects. Such a defect formation phenomenon is explained in terms of defect suppression by the iron atom diffusion process. The correlation of the defects and the nature of the defects in annealed InP are discussed based on the results.

  1. Cognitions and 'placebos' in behavioral research on ambient noise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harcum, E. R.; Monti, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    The study investigated effects of noise on visual and psychomotor tasks, with particular concern for influences of certain cognitive variables. A first experiment, using visual and card-sorting tasks, found no effects of 100 dB ambient noise per se, although cognitive variables in the testing situation affected both performance and ratings of disturbance. In two subsequent experiments some of the subjects were told that a noise was extraneous to their task of reproducing tachistoscopic patterns, and others were told that effects of the noise were being studied. It appears that in the absence of an adequate 'placebo' to control for cognitive factors, deceptive instructions may always be necessary in studies of ambient noise.

  2. Ambient-Light-Canceling Camera Using Subtraction of Frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morookian, John Michael

    2004-01-01

    The ambient-light-canceling camera (ALCC) is a proposed near-infrared electronic camera that would utilize a combination of (1) synchronized illumination during alternate frame periods and (2) subtraction of readouts from consecutive frames to obtain images without a background component of ambient light. The ALCC is intended especially for use in tracking the motion of an eye by the pupil center corneal reflection (PCCR) method. Eye tracking by the PCCR method has shown potential for application in human-computer interaction for people with and without disabilities, and for noninvasive monitoring, detection, and even diagnosis of physiological and neurological deficiencies. In the PCCR method, an eye is illuminated by near-infrared light from a lightemitting diode (LED). Some of the infrared light is reflected from the surface of the cornea. Some of the infrared light enters the eye through the pupil and is reflected from back of the eye out through the pupil a phenomenon commonly observed as the red-eye effect in flash photography. An electronic camera is oriented to image the user's eye. The output of the camera is digitized and processed by algorithms that locate the two reflections. Then from the locations of the centers of the two reflections, the direction of gaze is computed. As described thus far, the PCCR method is susceptible to errors caused by reflections of ambient light. Although a near-infrared band-pass optical filter can be used to discriminate against ambient light, some sources of ambient light have enough in-band power to compete with the LED signal. The mode of operation of the ALCC would complement or supplant spectral filtering by providing more nearly complete cancellation of the effect of ambient light. In the operation of the ALCC, a near-infrared LED would be pulsed on during one camera frame period and off during the next frame period. Thus, the scene would be illuminated by both the LED (signal) light and the ambient (background) light

  3. Ambient pressure photoelectron spectroscopy: Practical considerations and experimental frontiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trotochaud, Lena; Head, Ashley R.; Karslıoğlu, Osman; Kyhl, Line; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2017-02-01

    Over the past several decades, ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) has emerged as a powerful technique for in situ and operando investigations of chemical reactions under relevant ambient atmospheres far from ultra-high vacuum conditions. This review focuses on exemplary cases of APXPS experiments, giving special consideration to experimental techniques, challenges, and limitations specific to distinct condensed matter interfaces. We discuss APXPS experiments on solid/vapor interfaces, including the special case of 2D films of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride on metal substrates with intercalated gas molecules, liquid/vapor interfaces, and liquid/solid interfaces, which are a relatively new class of interfaces being probed by APXPS. We also provide a critical evaluation of the persistent limitations and challenges of APXPS, as well as the current experimental frontiers.

  4. Accelerated and Ambient Abundances in RHESSI Gamma-Ray Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. M.; Shih, A. Y.; Lin, R. P.; Share, G. H.; Murphy, R. J.; Schwartz, R. A.; Tolbert, A. K.

    2005-05-01

    The Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) has detected nuclear gamma-ray line emission from at least eleven solar flares over the past three years. These gamma-ray lines are produced when flare-accelerated ions collide with the ambient solar medium. In this paper, we use gamma-ray line ratios and Doppler profiles to constrain the relative fluxes of accelerated protons, alphas, and heavier nuclei in the brighter RHESSI gamma-ray flares. We also study the relative fluxes of narrow lines to compare our conclusions about ambient solar abundances in the interaction region to earlier work from the Solar Maximum Mission Gamma-Ray Spectrometer. The work at the University of California was supported by NASA contract NAS 5-98033.

  5. Ambient acceleration dependence of single-bubble sonoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Charles R; Roy, Ronald A; Holt, R Glynn

    2011-11-01

    Much of the research performed to study SBSL deals with the influence of external parameters (e.g., the host water temperature, the ambient pressure, the type and amount of dissolved gas in the liquid, to name a few) on the bubble dynamics and light emission. In the current paper, work carried out to study the influence of another external parameter-ambient acceleration-is described. The experiments described here were performed on the NASA KC-135 which provided both periods of reduced gravity (10(-3) g) and increased gravity (1.8 g) by flying repeated parabolic maneuvers. The resulting measurements are compared with the predictions of a numerical model and can be understood in the context of the changing hydrostatic head pressure and buoyant force acting on the bubble.

  6. Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog Input/Output Module Ambient Temperature Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Mark D. McKay

    2011-02-01

    Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog input/output Module Ambient Temperature Testing A series of three ambient temperature tests were conducted for the Water Power Calculator development using the INL Calibration Laboratory’s Tenney Environmental Chamber. The ambient temperature test results demonstrate that the Moore Industries Temperature Input Modules, Analog Input Module and Analog Output Module, ambient temperature response meet or exceed the manufactures specifications

  7. Composition for producing polyurethane resin at ambient temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kamatani, Y.; Nishino, K.; Tanaka, M.; Yamazaki, K.

    1984-06-26

    Disclosed is a composition for polyurethane resins which is ordinarily of two-package type and curable at ambient temperature and which comprises an isocyanate component having oxadiazinetrione ring as a curing agent and a polyol component, having in the molecule, at least one of a tertiary amino group, a quaternary ammonium group and a salt-formed carboxyl group as a main component. The composition has excellent curability and provides cured products excellent in adhesiveness and physical properties.

  8. Propagation and Ambient Noise Studies for Ocean Acoustics Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    using the OASN tool based on the OASES propagation codes [6] with details of the results in publication [3] and summarized in the next sections...reason for this poor performance was investigated through simulation by applying the BF algorithms to CSD matrices produced by OASN (from the OASES ...ambient noise sub- bottom profiling”, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 118 (5), 2913–2923, 2005. 6. H. Schmidt, “ OASES user’s guide and reference manual”, MIT

  9. A Configurable Sensor Network Applied to Ambient Assisted Living

    PubMed Central

    Villacorta, Juan J.; Jiménez, María I.; del Val, Lara; Izquierdo, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The rising older people population has increased the interest in Ambient Assisted Living systems. This article presents a system for monitoring the disabled or older persons developed from an existing surveillance system. The modularity and adaptability characteristics of the system allow an easy adaptation for a different purpose. The proposed system uses a network of sensors capable of motion detection that includes fall warning, identification of persons and a configurable control system which allows its use in different scenarios. PMID:22346668

  10. Low Ambient Temperature and Intracerebral Hemorrhage: The INTERACT2 Study

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Danni; Arima, Hisatomi; Sato, Shoichiro; Gasparrini, Antonio; Heeley, Emma; Delcourt, Candice; Lo, Serigne; Huang, Yining; Wang, Jiguang; Stapf, Christian; Robinson, Thompson; Lavados, Pablo; Chalmers, John; Anderson, Craig S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Rates of acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) increase in winter months but the magnitude of risk is unknown. We aimed to quantify the association of ambient temperature with the risk of ICH in the Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral Haemorrhage Trial (INTERACT2) participants on an hourly timescale. Methods INTERACT2 was an international, open, blinded endpoint, randomized controlled trial of patients with spontaneous ICH (<6h of onset) and elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP, 150–220 mmHg) assigned to intensive (target SBP <140 mmHg) or guideline-recommended (SBP <180 mmHg) BP treatment. We linked individual level hourly temperature to baseline data of 1997 participants, and performed case-crossover analyses using a distributed lag non-linear model with 24h lag period to assess the association of ambient temperature and risk of ICH. Results were presented as overall cumulative odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CI. Results Low ambient temperature (≤10°C) was associated with increased risks of ICH: overall cumulative OR was 1.37 (0.99–1.91) for 10°C, 1.92 (1.31–2.81) for 0°C, 3.13 (1.89–5.19) for -10°C, and 5.76 (2.30–14.42) for -20°C, as compared with a reference temperature of 20°C.There was no clear relation of low temperature beyond three hours after exposure. Results were consistent in sensitivity analyses. Conclusions Exposure to low ambient temperature within several hours increases the risk of ICH. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00716079 PMID:26859491

  11. Analysis of anions in ambient aerosols by microchip capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; MacDonald, David A; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Hering, Susanne V; Collett, Jeffrey L; Henry, Charles S

    2006-11-01

    We describe a microchip capillary electrophoresis method for the analysis of nitrate and sulfate in ambient aerosols. Investigating the chemical composition of ambient aerosol particles is essential for understanding their sources and effects. Significant progress has been made towards developing mass spectrometry-based instrumentation for rapid qualitative analysis of aerosols. Alternative methods for rapid quantification of selected high abundance compounds are needed to augment the capacity for widespread routine analysis. Such methods could provide much higher temporal and spatial resolution than can be achieved currently. Inorganic anions comprise a large percentage of particulate mass, with nitrate and sulfate among the most abundant species. While ion chromatography has proven very useful for analyzing extracts of time-integrated ambient aerosol samples collected on filters and for semi-continuous, on-line particle composition measurements, there is a growing need for development of new compact, inexpensive approaches to routine on-line aerosol ion analysis for deployment in spatially dense, atmospheric measurement networks. Microchip capillary electrophoresis provides the necessary speed and portability to address this need. In this report, on-column contact conductivity detection is used with hydrodynamic injection to create a simple microchip instrument for analysis of nitrate and sulfate. On-column contact conductivity detection was achieved using a Pd decoupler placed upstream from the working electrodes. Microchips containing two Au or Pd working electrodes showed a good linear range (5-500 microM) and low limits-of-detection for sulfate and nitrate, with Au providing the lowest detection limits (1 microM) for both ions. The completed microchip system was used to analyze ambient aerosol filter samples. Nitrate and sulfate concentrations measured by the microchip matched the concentrations measured by ion chromatography.

  12. Surface Wave Attenuation in the Tibetan Plateau from Ambient Noise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-31

    attenuations extracted from our noise-based methods are comparable with those from earthquakes . A preliminary attenuation map of Chinese continent...is obtained based on earthquake data. Internal scattering can be important in contaminating the amplitude of the main arrivals, which need to be...Comparison of amplitude decays obtained from earthquakes (red dots) and ambient noise (blue crosses) at two periods (10 and 20 s

  13. Shear velocity of the Rotokawa geothermal field using ambient noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civilini, F.; Savage, M. K.; Townend, J.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient noise correlation is an increasingly popular seismological technique that uses the ambient seismic noise recorded at two stations to construct an empirical Green's function. Applications of this technique include determining shear velocity structure and attenuation. An advantage of ambient noise is that it does not rely on external sources of seismic energy such as local or teleseismic earthquakes. This method has been used in the geothermal industry to determine the depths at which magmatic processes occur, to distinguish between production and non-production areas, and to observe seismic velocity perturbations associated with fluid extraction. We will present a velocity model for the Rotokawa geothermal field near Taupo, New Zealand, produced from ambient noise cross correlations. Production at Rotokawa is based on the "Rotokawa A" combined cycle power station established in 1997 and the "Nga Awa Purua" triple flash power plant established in 2010. Rotokawa Joint Venture, a partnership between Mighty River Power and Tauhara North No. 2 Trust currently operates 174 MW of generation at Rotokawa. An array of short period seismometers was installed in 2008 and occupies an area of roughly 5 square kilometers around the site. Although both cultural and natural noise sources are recorded at the stations, the instrument separation distance provides a unique challenge for analyzing cross correlations produced by both signal types. The inter-station spacing is on the order of a few kilometers, so waves from cultural sources generally are not coherent from one station to the other, while the wavelength produced by natural noise is greater than the station separation. Velocity models produced from these two source types will be compared to known geological models of the site. Depending on the amount of data needed to adequately construct cross-correlations, a time-dependent model of velocity will be established and compared with geothermal production processes.

  14. Oscillations studied with the smartphone ambient light sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sans, J. A.; Manjón, F. J.; Pereira, A. L. J.; Gomez-Tejedor, J. A.; Monsoriu, J. A.

    2013-11-01

    This paper makes use of a smartphone's ambient light sensor to analyse a system of two coupled springs undergoing either simple or damped oscillatory motion. The period, frequency and stiffness of the spring, together with the damping constant and extinction time, are extracted from light intensity curves obtained using a free Android application. The results demonstrate the instructional value of mobile phone sensors as a tool in the physics laboratory.

  15. Ambient methods and apparatus for rapid laser trace constituent analysis

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Stuart C.; Partin, Judy K.; Grandy, Jon D.; Jeffery, Charles L.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for measuring trace amounts of constituents in samples by using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser induced fluorescence under ambient conditions. The laser induced fluorescence is performed at a selected wavelength corresponding to an absorption state of a selected trace constituent. The intensity value of the emission decay signal which is generated by the trace constituent is compared to calibrated emission intensity decay values to determine the amount of trace constituent present.

  16. The Effects of Ambient Conditions of Cesium Clock Rates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    THE EFFECTS OF AMBIENT CONDITIONS ON CESIUM CLOCK RATES Lee A. Breakiron U.S. Naval Observatory Time Service Department 34th and Massachusetts...information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and...NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Naval Observatory, Time Service Department,34th and

  17. A Study on the Air flow outside Ambient Vaporizer Fin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, G.; Lee, T.; Jeong, H.; Chung, H.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we interpreted Fog's Fluid that appear in the Ambient Vaporizer and predict the point of change Air to Fog. We interpreted using Analysis working fluid was applied to LNG and Air. We predict air flow when there is chill of LNG in the air Temperature and that makes fog. Also, we interpreted based on Summer and Winter criteria in the air temperature respectively. Finally, we can check the speed of the fog when fog excreted.

  18. High Frequency Acoustic Channel Characterization for Propagation and Ambient Noise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-30

    close collaboration with Michael Porter and Paul Hursky (HLS Research) with support from the ONR Ocean Acoustics Program and the ONR PLUSNet Project...Siderius, Chris Harrison and Michael Porter , “A passive fathometer for determining bottom depth and imaging seabed layering using ambient noise”, J...noise processing for estimation of seabed layering”, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., (2007) [submitted, refereed]. [8] Martin Siderius and Michael Porter , “Modeling

  19. High Frequency Acoustic Channel Characterization for Propagation and Ambient Noise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    has done in close collaboration with Michael Porter and Paul Hursky (HLS Research) also supported by ONR. We have also been collaborating with Steve... Michael Porter , “A passive fathometer technique for imaging seabed layering using ambient noise”, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 120, 1315-1323, (September...Siderius and Michael Porter , “Modeling broadband ocean acoustic transmissions with time- varying sea surfaces”, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 124 (1), 137-150

  20. CEAREX Ambient Noise Data Measured Northeast of Svalbard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    system "self noise" level of about 72 dB (re APa 2/Hz) was measured when the hydrophone was disconnected from the rest of the ambient noise...om da ilIy int e r:) cIta . positional i nfr-r mar~ that smoothed all high" -freal-,enocy oscillations. All o2-.scerr and i4ce direotiun-_r_ dat-a wr

  1. Ambient noise interferes with auscultatory blood pressure measurement during exercise.

    PubMed

    Lightfoot, J T; Tuller, B; Williams, D F

    1996-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether the acoustical characteristics of the Korotkoff sounds (K-sounds) were altered during exercise and/or masked by the ambient noise. After signing informed consent, 11 subjects (8 females, 3 males; 27 +/- 2 yr; 166.2 +/- 3.2 cm; 62 +/- 5 kg; means +/- SD) underwent a cycle ergometer exercise test that increased in workload by 30 W every 3 min until volitional fatigue. Heart rate, auscultatory systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and oxygen consumption were monitored 1 and 2 min into each work stage. The auscultatory K-sounds were recorded with a microphone mounted in a stethoscope tube for later frequency (Hz) and sound pressure level (dB SPL) analysis. Frequency and SPL of ambient noise (99 +/- 13 Hz and 64 +/- 1 db at maximum, respectively) increased during the exercise test to magnitudes similar to the SBP and DBP K-sounds (166 Hz, 66 db; and 128 Hz, 69 db, respectively). Additionally, the ambient noise was responsible for a significant damping of the frequency and SPL of the measured blood pressure K-sounds and a rise in the measured frequency of the SBP K-sounds. Furthermore, we observed "inaudible" K-sounds at lower frequencies than adjoining audible K-sounds (100 Hz vs 126 Hz), supporting the known underestimation of SBP by auscultation. The increase in ambient noise during exercise testing dampens and may mask the auscultatory K-sounds, thus making detection of the proper K-sounds during exercise difficult at best. Furthermore, the presence of inaudible K-sounds may further explain the published discrepancies between auscultatory and intraarterial blood pressure measurements during exercise.

  2. Growth and Optical Properties of Al rich AlN/AlGaN Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahtamouni, T. M. Al; Nepal, N.; Nakarmi, M. L.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2006-03-01

    Al rich AlGaN alloys are promising materials for the applications in the optoelectronic devices such as deep ultraviolet (UV) emitters and detectors in the spectral range down to 200 nm. AlGaN based UV emitters (λ<340nm) has applications in bio-chemical agent detection and medical research/ health care. To realize deep UV emission (λ< 280 nm) Al rich AlGaN based quantum wells (QWs) are required. We report here the growth of AlN/AlxGa1-xNQWs (x>0.65) on AlN/sapphire templates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Deep UV photoluminescence (PL) was employed to study the optical properties of the QWs. Well width (Al composition) dependence was studied by varying the QW thickness (Al composition) with fixed x ˜ 0.65 (well width at 3 nm). Optical properties of these QWs such as the effects of alloy fluctuation, temperature, strain and piezoelectric field, carrier and exciton localizations on the quantum efficiency have been studied. Carrier and exciton dynamics were probed. Implications of our findings on the applications of Al rich AlN/AlGaN QWs for UV emitters and detectors will also be discussed.

  3. Studies of 27Al NMR in SrAl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niki, Haruo; Higa, Nonoka; Kuroshima, Hiroko; Toji, Tatsuki; Morishima, Mach; Minei, Motofumi; Yogi, Mamoru; Nakamura, Ai; Hedo, Masato; Nakama, Takao; Ōnuki, Yoshichika; Harima, Hisatomo

    A charge density wave (CDW) transition at TCDW = 243 K and a structural phase (SP) transition at approximately 100 K occur in SrAl4 with the BaAl4-type body center tetragonal structure, which is the divalent and non-4f electron reference compound of EuAl4. To understand the behaviors of the CDW and SP transitions, the 27Al NMR measurements using a single crystal and a powder sample of SrAl4 have been carried out. The line width below TCDW is modulated by an electrical quadruple interaction between 27Al nucleus and CDW charge modulation. The incommensurate CDW state below TCDW changes into a different structure below TSP. The temperature dependences of Knight shifts of 27Al(I) and 27Al(II) show the different behaviors. The temperature variation of 27Al(I) Knight shift shows anomalies at the CDW and SP transition temperatures, revealing the shift to negative side below TCDW, which is attributable to the core polarization of the d-electrons. However, 27Al(II) Knight shift keeps almost constant except for the small shift due to the SP transition. The 1/T1T of 27Al(I) indicates the obvious changes due to the CDW and SP transitions, while that of 27Al(II) takes a constant value. The density of state at the Fermi level at Al(I) site below 60 K would be about 0.9 times less than that above TCDW.

  4. Ambient Seismic Signals Observed in Iceberg?Filled Waters of the Ross Sea, Antarctica.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macayeal, D. R.; Okal, E. A.; Aster, R. C.

    2006-12-01

    A two-year seismometer deployment on various icebergs in the Ross Sea and on the Ross Ice Shelf (PASSCAL project SOUTHBERG) have produced an unusual seismological "tone poem" constituting a sample of ambient conditions in an iceberg-covered, coastal sea of Antarctica. The original motivation of the project was to investigate the source of signals seen as T-phases in the equatorial Pacific [e.g., Talandier et al., 2002]. During the periods of continuous seismometer operation (i.e., during the October - April periods of 2003-4 and 2004-5 when photovoltaic charging systems kept seismometers in operation) on icebergs B15A, C16 and Nascent Iceberg (a site not yet calved from the Ross Ice Shelf), about 1300 events were observed (roughly one event per day). These events are attributed to the icebergs, and are loosely referred to as "iceberg tremor" due to their long duration (many hours) and spectral structure (e.g., characterized by clearly preferential frequencies in the 1-3 Hz range, accompanied by multiple harmonics of a variable-pitch fundamental). The purpose of this presentation is to give a general qualitative overview of the various categories of iceberg tremor, and to describe their relationship to other variables observed (e.g., iceberg drift velocity, iceberg-on-iceberg collision, iceberg-on-seabed scraping). Speculation on the cause or causes of iceberg tremor will be postponed pending further study. Suggestions as to the relationship between the ambient tone poem of iceberg-covered waters and hydro-acoustic and seismic signals seen in the ocean beyond Antarctica will be offered.

  5. CFD simulations of closely spaced jets in shallow flowing ambient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Ishita; Adams, E. Eric

    2016-11-01

    In shallow water bodies, multiple closely spaced jets are often used to discharge industrial effluents such as brine from desalination plants, heated water from thermal power plants and wastewater from wastewater treatment plants. The jets interact with each other due to effects of dynamic pressure and result in jet trajectories and mixing that are significantly different from non-interfering jets. Here, we look at the case of a unidirectional diffuser, which consists of a linear array of jets discharging horizontally in the direction perpendicular to the diffuser. Dilution through such an arrangement of jets depends on various discharge and ambient parameters, such as effluent buoyancy, water depth and ambient current. We present results of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and compare them with experimental observations to examine the effects of shallowness, shoreline separation and ambient currents on the mixing of a unidirectional diffuser. We observe that shallow depth, shoreline proximity and crossflow, all result in increased interaction among the jets and reduced mixing.

  6. Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit

    DOEpatents

    McQuaid, J.H.; Lavietes, A.D.

    1998-05-26

    A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector is disclosed. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radionuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components. 9 figs.

  7. Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit

    DOEpatents

    McQuaid, James H.; Lavietes, Anthony D.

    1998-05-29

    A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radio nuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components.

  8. Acoustic user interfaces for ambient-assisted living technologies.

    PubMed

    Goetze, Stefan; Moritz, Niko; Appell, Jens-E; Meis, Markus; Bartsch, Christian; Bitzer, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    This contribution discusses technologies for acoustic user interaction in ambient-assisted living (AAL) scenarios. Acoustic user interfaces allow for a natural and convenient way to interact with technical systems e.g. via sound or speech presentation or via speech input by means of automatic speech recognition (ASR) as well as by detection and classification of acoustic events. Older persons targeted by AAL technologies especially need more easy-to-use methods to interact with inherently complex supporting technology. As an example we designed and evaluated an application for acoustic user interaction with a multi-media reminder and calendar system. For this purpose, mainly older participants were involved in user studies to continuously evaluate and support the development strictly following a user-centred design process. The results suggest a wide acceptance of acoustic user interfaces by older users either for controlling inherently complex AAL systems by using robust ASR technologies or as a natural and ambient way of presenting information to the user. However, further research is needed to increase the robustness of ASR systems when using hands-free equipment, i.e. to provide a real ambient way of interaction, and to introduce personalised speech and sound presentation schemes accounting for the individual hearing capabilities and sound preferences.

  9. Aircraft electric field measurements: Calibration and ambient field retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William J.; Bailey, Jeff; Christian, Hugh J.; Mach, Douglas M.

    1994-01-01

    An aircraft locally distorts the ambient thundercloud electric field. In order to determine the field in the absence of the aircraft, an aircraft calibration is required. In this work a matrix inversion method is introduced for calibrating an aircraft equipped with four or more electric field sensors and a high-voltage corona point that is capable of charging the aircraft. An analytic, closed form solution for the estimate of a (3 x 3) aircraft calibration matrix is derived, and an absolute calibration experiment is used to improve the relative magnitudes of the elements of this matrix. To demonstrate the calibration procedure, we analyze actual calibration date derived from a Lear jet 28/29 that was equipped with five shutter-type field mill sensors (each with sensitivities of better than 1 V/m) located on the top, bottom, port, starboard, and aft positions. As a test of the calibration method, we analyze computer-simulated calibration data (derived from known aircraft and ambient fields) and explicitly determine the errors involved in deriving the variety of calibration matrices. We extend our formalism to arrive at an analytic solution for the ambient field, and again carry all errors explicitly.

  10. Ambient Concentrations and Mobile Sources of Ammonia in Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorter, J. H.; Herndon, S. C.; Zahniser, M. S.; Wormhoudt, J.; Zavala, M.; Dunlea, E. J.; Molina, L. T.; Molina, M. J.; Kolb, C. E.

    2004-12-01

    Emission of ammonia (NH3) to the atmosphere is a major environmental concern and a potential health hazard. As the dominant gaseous alkaline species in the atmosphere, ammonia plays an important role in the dynamics of the atmospheric environment and on air quality. Ammonia is a major source of secondary PM-2.5 particulates including ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulfates. These important constituents of airborne PM-2.5 can contribute significantly to regional haze and visibility problems. They are also regulated under the U.S. "National Ambient Air Quality Standard for Particulate Matter" as a human health hazard. Models of the formation of these particulates are being developed but they depend on both detailed inventories of NH3 emissions and on comparison of model results with ambient ammonia measurements. A real time tunable infrared laser differential absorption spectroscopy (TILDAS) instrument was deployed on the Aerodyne Research, Inc. Mobile Laboratory in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) in spring 2003. The Quantum Cascade laser (QCL) based instrument collected ammonia concentration data to characterize fleet average and individual vehicle emissions. Ambient concentration data at several stationary sites were also studied. Gas phase ammonia data will be used to elucidate the formation of ammonium particles in Mexico City. Implications of the results on air quality modeling will be discussed.

  11. Ambient Sound-Based Collaborative Localization of Indeterministic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Kamminga, Jacob; Le, Duc; Havinga, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Localization is essential in wireless sensor networks. To our knowledge, no prior work has utilized low-cost devices for collaborative localization based on only ambient sound, without the support of local infrastructure. The reason may be the fact that most low-cost devices are indeterministic and suffer from uncertain input latencies. This uncertainty makes accurate localization challenging. Therefore, we present a collaborative localization algorithm (Cooperative Localization on Android with ambient Sound Sources (CLASS)) that simultaneously localizes the position of indeterministic devices and ambient sound sources without local infrastructure. The CLASS algorithm deals with the uncertainty by splitting the devices into subsets so that outliers can be removed from the time difference of arrival values and localization results. Since Android is indeterministic, we select Android devices to evaluate our approach. The algorithm is evaluated with an outdoor experiment and achieves a mean Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of 2.18 m with a standard deviation of 0.22 m. Estimated directions towards the sound sources have a mean RMSE of 17.5° and a standard deviation of 2.3°. These results show that it is feasible to simultaneously achieve a relative positioning of both devices and sound sources with sufficient accuracy, even when using non-deterministic devices and platforms, such as Android. PMID:27649176

  12. Direct and Convenient Mass Spectrometry Sampling with Ambient Flame Ionization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Pan; Wang, Hao-Yang; Zhang, Jun-Ting; Wu, Meng-Xi; Qi, Wan-Shu; Zhu, Hui; Guo, Yin-Long

    2015-01-01

    Recent innovations in ambient ionization technology for the direct analysis of various samples in their native environment facilitate the development and applications of mass spectrometry in natural science. Presented here is a novel, convenient and flame-based ambient ionization method for mass spectrometric analysis of organic compounds, termed as the ambient flame ionization (AFI) ion source. The key features of AFI ion source were no requirement of (high) voltages, laser beams and spray gases, but just using small size of n-butane flame (height approximately 1 cm, about 500 oC) to accomplish the rapid desorption and ionization for direct analysis of gaseous-, liquid- and solid-phase organic compounds, as well as real-world samples. This method has high sensitivity with a limit of detection of 1 picogram for propyphenazone, which allows consuming trace amount of samples. Compared to previous ionization methods, this ion source device is extremely simple, maintain-free, low-cost, user–friendly so that even an ordinary lighter (with n-butane as fuel) can achieve efficient ionization. A new orientation to mass spectrometry ion source exploitation might emerge from such a convenient, easy and inexpensive AFI ion source. PMID:26582511

  13. Ambient temperature influences birds' decisions to eat toxic prey☆

    PubMed Central

    Chatelain, M.; Halpin, C.G.; Rowe, C.

    2013-01-01

    Aposematic prey warn predators of their toxicity using conspicuous signals. However, predators regularly include aposematic prey in their diets, particularly when they are in a poor energetic state and in need of nutrients. We investigated whether or not an environmental factor, ambient temperature, could change the energetic state of predators and lead to an increased intake of prey that they know to contain toxins. We found that European starlings, Sturnus vulgaris, increased their consumption of mealworm, Tenebrio molitor, prey containing quinine (a mild toxin) when the ambient temperature was reduced below their thermoneutral zone from 20 °C to 6 °C. The birds differed in their sensitivity to changes in ambient temperature, with heavier birds increasing the number of toxic prey they ate more rapidly with decreasing temperature compared to birds with lower body mass. This could have been the result of their requiring more nutrients at lower temperatures or being better able to detoxify quinine. Taken together, our results suggest that conspicuous coloration may be more costly at lower temperatures, and that aposematic prey may need to invest more in chemical defences as temperatures decline. Our study also provides novel insights into what factors affect birds' decisions to eat toxic prey, and demonstrates that selection pressures acting on prey defences can vary with changing temperature across days, seasons, climes, and potentially in response to climate change. PMID:24109148

  14. Freeze concentration of ambient waters for toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    deBruyn, A M; Rasmussen, J B

    2001-08-01

    We have developed a method to concentrate aqueous samples for toxicity testing. This method relies on the phenomenon of freezing exclusion, whereby solutes are rejected from the interstices of a growing ice crystal. Tenfold freeze concentration gave excellent recoveries of inorganic and organic analytes, phenol and ZnSO4 toxicity from spiked natural waters, and toxicity of both pre- and postdischarge municipal wastewater. Simultaneous 10-fold concentration of strong mineral or humic ambient matrices did not substantially modify the expressed toxicity of phenol or ZnSO4, and it did not seem to generate spurious toxicity to the marine bioassay organism used (Vibrio fischeri). Hundredfold freeze concentration permitted the quantification of low levels of ambient toxicity in a wide variety of natural waters using a rapid, inexpensive microbioassay. Precipitation of matrix elements may limit the degree of concentration that can be achieved with highly mineralized or strongly humic waters. This approach is well suited to ambient toxicity testing, because it is nonspecific and has low potential for solvent contamination. Furthermore, the low temperatures involved minimize volatilization and degradation of organic contaminants.

  15. Seismic Gradiometry using Ambient Seismic Noise in an Anisotropic Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ridder, S. A. L.; Curtis, A.

    2017-02-01

    We introduce a wavefield gradiometry technique to estimate both isotropic and anisotropic local medium characteristics from short recordings of seismic signals by inverting a wave equation. The method exploits the information in the spatial gradients of a seismic wavefield that are calculated using dense deployments of seismic arrays. The application of the method uses the surface wave energy in the ambient seismic field. To estimate isotropic and anisotropic medium properties we invert an elliptically anisotropic wave equation. The spatial derivatives of the recorded wavefield are evaluated by calculating finite differences over nearby recordings, which introduces a systematic anisotropic error. A two step approach corrects this error: finite difference stencils are first calibrated, then the output of the wave-equation inversion is corrected using the linearized impulse response to the inverted velocity anomaly. We test the procedure on ambient seismic noise recorded in a large and dense ocean bottom cable array installed over Ekofisk field. The estimated azimuthal anisotropy forms a circular geometry around the production-induced subsidence bowl. This conforms with results from studies employing controlled sources, and with interferometry correlating long records of seismic noise. Yet in this example, the results where obtained using only a few minutes of ambient seismic noise.

  16. The inhomogeneous structure of water at ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Huang, C; Wikfeldt, K T; Tokushima, T; Nordlund, D; Harada, Y; Bergmann, U; Niebuhr, M; Weiss, T M; Horikawa, Y; Leetmaa, M; Ljungberg, M P; Takahashi, O; Lenz, A; Ojamäe, L; Lyubartsev, A P; Shin, S; Pettersson, L G M; Nilsson, A

    2009-09-08

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is used to demonstrate the presence of density fluctuations in ambient water on a physical length-scale of approximately 1 nm; this is retained with decreasing temperature while the magnitude is enhanced. In contrast, the magnitude of fluctuations in a normal liquid, such as CCl(4), exhibits no enhancement with decreasing temperature, as is also the case for water from molecular dynamics simulations under ambient conditions. Based on X-ray emission spectroscopy and X-ray Raman scattering data we propose that the density difference contrast in SAXS is due to fluctuations between tetrahedral-like and hydrogen-bond distorted structures related to, respectively, low and high density water. We combine our experimental observations to propose a model of water as a temperature-dependent, fluctuating equilibrium between the two types of local structures driven by incommensurate requirements for minimizing enthalpy (strong near-tetrahedral hydrogen-bonds) and maximizing entropy (nondirectional H-bonds and disorder). The present results provide experimental evidence that the extreme differences anticipated in the hydrogen-bonding environment in the deeply supercooled regime surprisingly remain in bulk water even at conditions ranging from ambient up to close to the boiling point.

  17. 77 FR 38760 - National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Particulate Matter; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 50, 51, 52, 53, and 58 RIN 2060-AO47 National Ambient Air Quality Standards for... revise the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for particulate matter (PM). This action...: Questions concerning the ``National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Particulate Matter'' proposed...

  18. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited...

  19. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited...

  20. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited...

  1. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited...

  2. 14 CFR 25.1527 - Ambient air temperature and operating altitude.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ambient air temperature and operating... Information Operating Limitations § 25.1527 Ambient air temperature and operating altitude. The extremes of the ambient air temperature and operating altitude for which operation is allowed, as limited...

  3. 75 FR 2935 - Extension of Deadline for Promulgating Designations for the 2008 Ozone National Ambient Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ... Protection Agency 40 CFR Parts 50, 58 and 81 Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards; Final Rule and... Designations for the 2008 Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... promulgating initial area designations for the ozone national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) that...

  4. 78 FR 57631 - Information Collection Request Submitted to OMB for Review and Approval; Comment Request; Ambient...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-19

    ... is given below, including its estimated burden and cost to the public. An Agency may not conduct or... measurements reporting and recordkeeping activities associated with the Ambient Air Quality Surveillance Rule... consist of ambient air concentration measurements for the seven air pollutants with National Ambient...

  5. 77 FR 55832 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of a New Equivalent Method

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... monitoring ambient air quality. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... monitoring agencies under the requirements of 40 CFR part 58, Ambient Air Quality Surveillance. For such..., Ambient Air Quality Monitoring Program'' EPA-454/B-08-003, December, 2008. Provisions...

  6. High pressure studies of A{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} negative thermal expansion materials (A{sub 2}=Al{sub 2}, Fe{sub 2}, FeAl, AlGa)

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Lindsay; Gadient, Jennifer; Gao, Xiaodong; Lind, Cora

    2016-05-15

    High pressure powder X-ray diffraction studies of several A{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} materials (A{sub 2}=Al{sub 2}, Fe{sub 2}, FeAl, and AlGa) were conducted up to 6–7 GPa. All materials adopted a monoclinic structure under ambient conditions, and displayed similar phase transition behavior upon compression. The initial isotropic compressibility first became anisotropic, followed by a small but distinct drop in cell volume. These patterns could be described by a distorted variant of the ambient pressure polymorph. At higher pressures, a distinct high pressure phase formed. Indexing results confirmed that all materials adopted the same high pressure phase. All changes were reversible on decompression, although some hysteresis was observed. The similarity of the high pressure cells to previously reported Ga{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} suggested that this material undergoes the same sequence of transitions as all materials investigated in this paper. It was found that the transition pressures for all phase changes increased with decreasing radius of the A-site cations. - Graphical abstract: Overlay of variable pressure X-ray diffraction data of Al{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} collected in a diamond anvil cell. Both subtle and discontinuous phase transitions are clearly observed. - Highlights: • The high pressure behavior of A{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} (A=Al, Fe, (AlGa), (AlFe)) was studied. • All compounds undergo the same sequence of pressure-induced phase transitions. • The phase transition pressures correlate with the average size of the A-site cation. • All transitions were reversible with hysteresis. • Previously studied Ga{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 12} undergoes the same sequence of transitions.

  7. High-capacity hydrogen storage in Al-adsorbed graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Z. M.; Peeters, F. M.

    2010-05-01

    A high-capacity hydrogen storage medium—Al-adsorbed graphene—is proposed based on density-functional theory calculations. We find that a graphene layer with Al adsorbed on both sides can store hydrogen up to 13.79wt% with average adsorption energy -0.193eV/H2 . Its hydrogen storage capacity is in excess of 6wt% , surpassing U. S. Department of Energy (DOE’s) target. Based on the binding-energy criterion and molecular-dynamics calculations, we find that hydrogen storage can be recycled at near ambient conditions. This high-capacity hydrogen storage is due to the adsorbed Al atoms that act as bridges to link the electron clouds of the H2 molecules and the graphene layer. As a consequence, a two-layer arrangement of H2 molecules is formed on each side of the Al-adsorbed graphene layer. The H2 concentration in the hydrogen storage medium can be measured by the change in the conductivity of the graphene layer.

  8. Development and fracture mechanics data for 6Al-6V-2 Sn titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiftal, C. F.; Beck, E. J.

    1974-01-01

    Fracture mechanics properties of 6Al-6V-2Sn titanium in the annealed, solution-treated, and aged condition are presented. Tensile, fracture toughness, cyclic flaw growth, and sustained-load threshold tests were conducted. Both surface flaw and compact tension-specimen geometries were employed. Temperatures and/or environments used were -65 F (220 K) air, ambient, 300 F (422 K) air, and room-temperature air containing 10 and 100% relative humidity.

  9. Ambient Mass Spectrometry Imaging Using Direct Liquid Extraction Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Lanekoff, Ingela

    2015-11-13

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a powerful analytical technique that enables label-free spatial localization and identification of molecules in complex samples.1-4 MSI applications range from forensics5 to clinical research6 and from understanding microbial communication7-8 to imaging biomolecules in tissues.1, 9-10 Recently, MSI protocols have been reviewed.11 Ambient ionization techniques enable direct analysis of complex samples under atmospheric pressure without special sample pretreatment.3, 12-16 In fact, in ambient ionization mass spectrometry, sample processing (e.g., extraction, dilution, preconcentration, or desorption) occurs during the analysis.17 This substantially speeds up analysis and eliminates any possible effects of sample preparation on the localization of molecules in the sample.3, 8, 12-14, 18-20 Venter and co-workers have classified ambient ionization techniques into three major categories based on the sample processing steps involved: 1) liquid extraction techniques, in which analyte molecules are removed from the sample and extracted into a solvent prior to ionization; 2) desorption techniques capable of generating free ions directly from substrates; and 3) desorption techniques that produce larger particles subsequently captured by an electrospray plume and ionized.17 This review focuses on localized analysis and ambient imaging of complex samples using a subset of ambient ionization methods broadly defined as “liquid extraction techniques” based on the classification introduced by Venter and co-workers.17 Specifically, we include techniques where analyte molecules are desorbed from solid or liquid samples using charged droplet bombardment, liquid extraction, physisorption, chemisorption, mechanical force, laser ablation, or laser capture microdissection. Analyte extraction is followed by soft ionization that generates ions corresponding to intact species. Some of the key advantages of liquid extraction techniques include the ease

  10. Effect of increased ambient lighting on detectability: a psychophysical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawla, Amarpreet S.; Pollard, Benjamin; Samei, Ehsan; Hashimoto, Noriyuki

    2007-03-01

    Last year in this conference, we presented a theoretical analysis of how ambient lighting in dark reading rooms could be moderately increased without compromising the interpretation of images displayed on LCDs. Based on that analysis, in this paper we present results of two psychophysical experiments which were designed to verify those theoretical predictions. The first experiment was designed to test how an increase in ambient lighting affects the detection of subtle objects at different luminance levels, particularly at lower luminance levels. Towards that end, images of targets consisting of low-contrast objects were shown to seven observers, first under a dark room illumination condition of 1 lux and then under a higher room illumination condition of 50 lux. The targets had three base luminance values of 1, 12 and 35 cd/m2 and were embedded in a uniform background. The uniform background was set to 12 cd/m2 which enabled fixing L adp, the visual adaptation luminance value when looking at the display, to 12 cd/m2. This value also matched the luminance value of about 12 cd/m2 reflected off the wall surrounding the LCD at the higher ambient lighting condition. The task of the observers was to detect and classify the displayed objects under the two room lighting conditions. The results indicated that the detection rate in dark area (base luminance of 1 cd/m2) increased by 15% when the ambient illumination is increased from 1 to 50 lux. The increase was not conclusive for targets embedded in higher luminance regions, but there was no evidence to the contrary either. The second experiment was designed to investigate the adaptation luminance value of the eye when viewing typical mammograms. It was found that, for a typical display luminance calibration, this value might lie between 12 and 20 cd/m2. Findings from the two experiments provide justification for a controlled increase of ambient lighting to improve ergonomic viewing conditions in darkly lit reading rooms

  11. Effects of Ambient Air Pollution Exposure on Olfaction: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ajmani, Gaurav S.; Suh, Helen H.; Pinto, Jayant M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Olfactory dysfunction affects millions of people worldwide. This sensory impairment is associated with neurodegenerative disease and significantly decreased quality of life. Exposure to airborne pollutants has been implicated in olfactory decline, likely due to the anatomic susceptibility of the olfactory nerve to the environment. Historically, studies have focused on occupational exposures, but more recent studies have considered effects from exposure to ambient air pollutants. Objectives: To examine all relevant human data evaluating a link between ambient pollution exposure and olfaction and to review supporting animal data in order to examine potential mechanisms for pollution-associated olfactory loss. Methods: We identified and reviewed relevant articles from 1950 to 2015 using PubMed and Web of Science and focusing on human epidemiologic and pathophysiologic studies. Animal studies were included only to support pertinent data on humans. We reviewed findings from these studies evaluating a relationship between environmental pollutant exposure and olfactory function. Results: We identified and reviewed 17 articles, with 1 additional article added from a bibliography search, for a total of 18 human studies. There is evidence in human epidemiologic and pathologic studies that increased exposure to ambient air pollutants is associated with olfactory dysfunction. However, most studies have used proxies for pollution exposure in small samples of convenience. Human pathologic studies, with supporting animal work, have also shown that air pollution can contact the olfactory epithelium, translocate to the olfactory bulb, and migrate to the olfactory cortex. Pollutants can deposit at each location, causing direct damage and disruption of tissue morphology or inducing local inflammation and cellular stress responses. Conclusions: Ambient air pollution may impact human olfactory function. Additional studies are needed to examine air pollution

  12. Ambient to high-temperature fracture toughness and cyclic fatigue behavior in Al-containing silicon carbide ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, R.; Kruzic, J.J.; Zhang, X.F.; De Jonghe, L.C.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2003-08-01

    A series of in situ toughened, A1, B and C containing, silicon carbide ceramics (ABC-SiC) has been examined with A1 contents varying from 3 to 7 wt percent. With increasing A1 additions, the grain morphology in the as-processed microstructures varied from elongated to bimodal to equiaxed, with a change in the nature of the grain-boundary film from amorphous to partially crystalline to fully crystalline.

  13. The Effect of Thermomechanical Processing Parameters on the Ambient Behavior of 10% Volume 6061 AL-Alumina

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    of particulate metal-matrix composites", Materials Science Technology, pp. 1160, Vol. 6, November 1990. 20. Askeland , D. R., The Science of Envineering...processing of particulate metal-matrix composites", Materials Science Technology, Vol. 6, pp. 1157-1166, November 1990. 37. Askeland , Donald R., The...pp. 1160, November 1990. 40. Askeland , Donald R., The Science of Engineering Materials, 2nd Edition, p. 571, PWS Kent Publishers, 1989. 41

  14. CO{sub 2} Capture by Sub-ambient Membrane Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, S.; Hasse, D.; Sanders, E.; Chaubey, T.

    2012-11-30

    The main objective of the project was to develop a CO{sub 2} capture process based on sub-ambient temperature operation of a hollow fiber membrane. The program aims to reach the eventual DOE program goal of > 90% CO{sub 2} capture from existing PC fired power plants with < 35% increase in the cost of electricity. The project involves closed-loop testing of commercial fiber bundles under simulated process conditions to test the mechanical integrity and operability of membrane module structural component under sub ambient temperature. A commercial MEDAL 12” bundle exhibited excellent mechanical integrity for 2 months. However, selectivity was ~25% lower than expected at sub-ambient conditions. This could be attributed to a small feed to permeate leak or bundle non-ideality. To investigate further, and due to compressor flow limitations, the 12” bundle was replaced with a 6” bundle to conduct tests with lower permeate/feed ratios, as originally planned. The commercial 6” bundle was used for both parametric testing as well as long-term stability testing at sub-ambient conditions. Parametric studies were carried out both near the start and end of the long-term test. The parametric studies characterized membrane performance over a broad range of feed conditions: temperature (-25°C to -45°C), pressure (160 psig to 200 psig), and CO{sub 2} feed concentration (18% to 12%). Performance of the membrane bundle was markedly better at lower temperature (-45ºC), higher pressure (200 psig) and higher CO{sub 2} feed concentration (18%). The long-term test was conducted at these experimentally determined “optimum” feed conditions. Membrane performance was stable over 8 months at sub-ambient temperature operation. The experimentally measured high performance of the membrane bundle at sub-ambient operating conditions provides justification for interest in sub-ambient membrane processing of flue gas. In a parallel activity, the impact of contaminants (100 ppm SOx and NOx

  15. Rub' al Khali, Arabia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Rub' al Khali is one of the largest sand deserts in the world, encompassing most of the southern third of the Arabian Peninsula. It includes parts of Oman, United Arab Emirates, and Yemen. The desert covers 650,000 square kilometers, more than the area of France. Largely unexplored until recently, the desert is 1000 km long and 500 km wide. The first documented journeys made by Westerners were those of Bertram Thomas in 1931 and St. John Philby in 1932. With daytime temperatures reaching 55 degrees Celsius, and dunes taller than 330 meters, the desert may be one of the most forbidding places on Earth.

    The image was acquired December 2, 2005, covers an area of 54.8 x 61.9 km, and is located near 20.7 degrees north latitude, 53.6 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  16. Morton et al. Reply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, Douglas C.; Nagol, Jyoteshwar; Carabajal, Claudia C.; Rosette, Jacqueline; Palace, Michael; Cook, Bruce D.; Vermote, Eric F.; Harding, David J.; North, Peter R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple mechanisms could lead to up-regulation of dry-season photosynthesis in Amazon forests, including canopy phenology and illumination geometry. We specifically tested two mechanisms for phenology-driven changes in Amazon forests during dry-season months, and the combined evidence from passive optical and lidar satellite data was incompatible with large net changes in canopy leaf area or leaf reflectance suggested by previous studies. We therefore hypothesized that seasonal changes in the fraction of sunlit and shaded canopies, one aspect of bidirectional reflectance effects in Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, could alter light availability for dry-season photosynthesis and the photosynthetic capacity of Amazon forests without large net changes in canopy composition. Subsequent work supports the hypothesis that seasonal changes in illumination geometry and diffuse light regulate light saturation in Amazon forests. These studies clarify the physical mechanisms that govern light availability in Amazon forests from seasonal variability in direct and diffuse illumination. Previously, in the debate over light limitation of Amazon forest productivity, seasonal changes in the distribution of light within complex Amazon forest canopies were confounded with dry-season increases in total incoming photosynthetically active radiation. In the accompanying Comment, Saleska et al. do not fully account for this confounding effect of forest structure on photosynthetic capacity.

  17. A high-resolution ambient seismic noise model for Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Toni

    2014-05-01

    In the past several years, geological energy technologies receive growing attention and have been initiated in or close to urban areas. Some of these technologies involve injecting fluids into the subsurface (e.g., oil and gas development, waste disposal, and geothermal energy development) and have been found or suspected to cause small to moderate sized earthquakes. These earthquakes, which may have gone unnoticed in the past when they occurred in remote sparsely populated areas, are now posing a considerable risk for the public acceptance of these technologies in urban areas. The permanent termination of the EGS project in Basel, Switzerland after a number of induced ML~3 (minor) earthquakes in 2006 is one prominent example. It is therefore essential to the future development and success of these geological energy technologies to develop strategies for managing induced seismicity and keeping the size of induced earthquake at a level that is acceptable to all stakeholders. Most guidelines and recommendations on induced seismicity published since the 1970ies conclude that an indispensable component of such a strategy is the establishment of seismic monitoring in an early stage of a project. This is because an appropriate seismic monitoring is the only way to detect and locate induced microearthquakes with sufficient certainty to develop an understanding of the seismic and geomechanical response of the reservoir to the geotechnical operation. In addition, seismic monitoring lays the foundation for the establishment of advanced traffic light systems and is therefore an important confidence building measure towards the local population and authorities. Due to this development an increasing number of seismic monitoring networks are being installed in densely populated areas with strongly heterogeneous, and unfavorable ambient noise conditions. This poses a major challenge on the network design process, which aims to find the sensor geometry that optimizes the

  18. Chemical Characterization and Mixing Sate of Ambient PM in Xi'an Winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang

    2015-04-01

    Particulate Matter influences visibility, human health (Anderson and Atkinson, 2007), and climate. The difference of mixing state of chemical species in PM affects the physical properties of PM such as hygroscopic growth (Hersey et al., 2011), Cloud Condensation Nuclei(Stocker et al., 2013) and light properties(Huang et al., 2013). Chongqing is one of the four direct-controlled municipalities in China. The whole Chongqing city is on the edge of Sichuan basin, surrounded by mountains, with the crossing of Yangtze River. As a part of Sichuan basin, Chongqing is currently suffering the heavy air pollution from both gaseous and particulate pollutants(Yang et al., 2011). The study of ambient PM chemical characterization is insufficient. Thus in this study, the study of PM using online aerosol mass spectrometer is reported. The Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer was deployed in the Atmospheric Monitoring Supersite in the south of the city. During the thirty-day campaign, a total of approx. 1 million particle were collected with valid mass spectra. After the ART-2a clustering analysis, the whole dataset were catalogued into 8 groups: EC-traffic, ECOC-coal burning, ECOC-Biomass burning, Aged Biomass burning, OC-combustion, Ca-dust, Si-Dust, Al-Dust and B-dust groups. Among them, the major clusters are from Biomass Burning, Coal burning, traffic, and dust. The secondary species, such as sulfate and nitrate were found internally mixed with above 90% of total collected particles. The secondary organic species, marked by CH3COO and COOH, were observed mainly mixed with combustion and traffic emitted particles. The diurnal analysis of the mainly group suggests that all the primary emitted particles decrease in the afternoon excluded the influence of planetary boundary layer expansion. The aging process was significant in the afternoon due to high temperature and high relative humidity, as well as the strong solar radiation. This study is helpful for understanding the

  19. Ambient Intelligence and Wearable Computing: Sensors on the Body, in the Home, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Diane J.; Song, WenZhan

    2009-01-01

    Ambient intelligence has a history of focusing on technologies that are integrated into a person’s environment. However, ambient intelligence can be found on a person’s body as well. In this thematic issue we examine the role of wearable computing in the field of ambient intelligence. In this article we provide an overview of the field of wearable computing and discuss its relationship to the fields of smart environments and ambient intelligence. In addition, we introduce the papers presented in the thematic issue highlighting a number of research projects which are defining the state of the art in wearable computing and ambient intelligence. PMID:19966926

  20. The theoretical analysis of the Fog removal in the LNG Ambient Vaporizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T.; Lee, D.; Jeong, H.; Chung, H.

    2015-09-01

    The fog removal process is one of the important process in LNG Ambient Vaporizer. In this study we carried out theoretical study of the fog removal process in LNG Ambient Vaporizer. The LNG Ambient Vaporizer in Incheon area was used in our study. The fog temperature and the required energy produced from air fan to remove fog in LNG Ambient Vaporizer were calculated using average temperature of Incheon area in 2012 by Psychometruc Chart method. As a result we can be remove fog in LNG Ambient Vaporizer using Enthalpy[kW] energy in summer season and Enthalpy[kW] in winter season respectively.

  1. Surface passivation of gallium nitride by ultrathin RF-magnetron sputtered Al2O3 gate.

    PubMed

    Quah, Hock Jin; Cheong, Kuan Yew

    2013-08-14

    An ultrathin RF-magnetron sputtered Al2O3 gate on GaN subjected to postdeposition annealing at 800 °C in O2 ambient was systematically investigated. A cross-sectional energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy revealed formation of crystalline Al2O3 gate, which was supported by X-ray diffraction analysis. Various current conduction mechanisms contributing to leakage current of the investigated sample were discussed and correlated with metal-oxide-semiconductor characteristics of this sample.

  2. A study on atomic diffusion behaviours in an Al-Mg compound casting process

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yongning; Chen, Yiqing; Yang, Chunhui

    2015-08-15

    Al and Mg alloys are main lightweight alloys of research interest and they both have superb material properties, i.e., low density and high specific strength, etc. Being different from Al alloys, the corrosion of Mg alloys is much more difficult to control. Therefore to combine merits of these two lightweight alloys as a composite-like structure is an ideal solution through using Al alloys as a protective layer for Mg alloys. Compound casting is a realistic technique to manufacture such a bi-metal structure. In this study, a compound casting technique is employed to fabricate bi-layered samples using Al and Mg and then the samples are analysed using electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA) to determine diffusion behaviours between Al and Mg. The diffusion mechanism and behaviours between Al and Mg are studied numerically at atomic scale using molecular dynamics (MD) and parametric studies are conducted to find out influences of ambient temperature and pressure on the diffusion behaviours between Al and Mg. The results obtained clearly show the effectiveness of the compound casting process to increase the diffusion between Al and Mg and thus create the Al-base protection layer for Mg.

  3. Polyaniline secondary cells with ambient temperature molten salt electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Koura, Nobuyuki; Ejiri, Hirokazu; Takeishi, Kazuyuki )

    1993-03-01

    An Al/polyaniline (PAn) powder secondary cell with an AlCl[sub 3]-1-butylpyridinium chloride (BPC) or an AlCl[sub 3]-1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (EMIC) electrolyte has been investigated. The configuration of the Al/PAn secondary cell with an acidic AlCl[sub 3]-EMIC electrolyte was: open-circuit voltage (OCV) = 1.7 V, discharge capacity = 42 Ah, charge/discharge efficiency = 90%. A 24% increase in the discharge capacity over a BPC system electrolyte is obtained. The difference was attributed to the electrolyte properties, i.e., conductivity and viscosity. In the basic EMIC system bath of 44.4 m/o AlCl[sub 3], the redox potential of PAn was less noble and the reaction current was large. A PAn/PAn secondary cell with the acidic AlCl[sub 3]-EMIC catholyte and the basic anolyte was proposed. The OCV showed 1.0 V and the PAn/PAn secondary cell was promising. A PAn prepared from a nonaqueous BPC system bath was more electrochemically active than that prepared from an aqueous bath. The optimum OCV, discharge capacity, and charge/discharge efficiency of the Al/PAn (from the BPC bath) were 1.6 V, 68 Ah/kg-PAn, and 99%, respectively.

  4. Detailed characterization of a Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) instrument for ambient OH reactivity measurements: experiments vs. modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michoud, Vincent; Locoge, Nadine; Dusanter, Sébastien

    2015-04-01

    The Hydroxyl radical (OH) is the main daytime oxidant in the troposphere, leading to the oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and the formation of harmful pollutants such as ozone (O3) and Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA). While OH plays a key role in tropospheric chemistry, recent studies have highlighted that there are still uncertainties associated with the OH budget, i.e the identification of sources and sinks and the quantification of production and loss rates of this radical. It has been demonstrated that ambient measurements of the total OH loss rate (also called total OH reactivity) can be used to identify and reduce these uncertainties. In this context, the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM), developed by Sinha et al. (ACP, 2008), is a promising technique to measure total OH reactivity in ambient air and has already been used during several field campaigns. This technique relies on monitoring competitive reactions of OH with ambient trace gases and a reference compound (pyrrole) in a sampling reactor to derive ambient OH reactivity. However, this technique requires a complex data processing chain that has yet to be carefully investigated in the laboratory. In this study, we present a detailed characterization of a CRM instrument developed at Mines Douai, France. Experiments have been performed to investigate the dependence of the CRM response on humidity, ambient NOx levels, and the pyrrole-to-OH ratio inside the sampling reactor. Box modelling of the chemistry occurring in the reactor has also been performed to assess our theoretical understanding of the CRM measurement. This work shows that the CRM response is sensitive to both humidity and NOx, which can be accounted for during data processing using parameterizations depending on the pyrrole-to-OH ratio. The agreement observed between laboratory studies and model results suggests a good understanding of the chemistry occurring in the sampling reactor and gives confidence in the CRM

  5. High cycle fatigue behavior of implant Ti-6Al-4V in air and simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-jie; Cui, Shi-ming; He, Chao; Li, Jiu-kai; Wang, Qing-yuan

    2014-01-01

    Ti-6Al-4V implants that function as artificial joints are usually subjected to long-term cyclic loading. To study long-term fatigue behaviors of implant Ti-6Al-4V in vitro and in vivo conditions exceeding 107 cycles, constant stress amplitude fatigue experiments were carried out at ultrasonic frequency (20 kHz) with two different surface conditions (ground and polished) in ambient air and in a simulated body fluid. The initiation mechanisms of fatigue cracks were investigated with scanning electron microscopy. Improvement of fatigue strength is pronounced for polished specimens below 106 cycles in ambient air since fatigue cracks are initiated from surfaces of specimens. While the cycles exceed 106, surface conditions have no effect on fatigue behaviors because the defects located within the specimens become favorable sites for crack initiation. The endurance limit at 108 cycles of polished Ti-6Al-4V specimens decreases by 7% if it is cycled in simulated body fluid instead of ambient air. Fracture surfaces show that fatigue failure is initiated from surfaces in simulated body fluid. Surface improvement has a beneficial effect on fatigue behaviors of Ti-6Al-4V at high stress amplitudes. The fatigue properties of Ti-6Al-4V deteriorate and the mean endurance limits decrease significantly in simulated body fluid.

  6. Deep structure of Llaima Volcano from seismic ambient noise tomography: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, L.; Mikesell, T. D.; Rodd, R.; Lees, J. M.; Johnson, J. B.; Ronan, T.

    2015-12-01

    The ambient seismic noise tomography (ANT) method has become an important tool to image crustal structures and magmatic bodies at volcanoes. The frequency band of ambient noise provides complimentary data and added resolution to the deeper volcanic structures when compared to traditional tomography based on local earthquakes. The Llaima Volcano (38° 41.9' S and 71° 43.8' W) is a stratovolcano of basaltic-andesitic composition. Llaima is located in the South Volcanic Zone (ZVS) of the Andes and is listed as one of the most active volcanoes in South America, with a long documented historical record dating back to 1640. Llaima experienced violent eruptions in 1927 and 1957 (Naranjo and Moreno, 1991), and its last eruptive cycle (2008-2010) is considered the most important after the 1957 eruption. Lacking seismic constraints on the deep structure under Llaima, petrologic data have suggested the presence of magmatic bodies (dikes). These bodies likely play an important role in the eruptive dynamics of Llaima (Bouvet de Maisonneuve, C., et al 2012). Analysis of the 2008-2010 seismicity shows a southern zone (approx. 15 km from the Llaima summit) where there were many Very Long Period events occurring prior to the eruptions. This is in agreement with a deformation zone determined by InSAR analysis (Fournier et al, 2010 and Bathke, 2011), but no geologic model based on geophysical imaging has been created yet. Beginning in 2009, staff from the Chilean Geological Survey (SERNAGEOMIN) started to install a permanent seismic network consisting of nine stations. These nine stations have allowed Chilean seismologists to closely monitor the activity at Llaima, but prevented a high-resolution tomographic imaging study. During the summer of 2015, a temporary seismic network consisting of 26 stations was installed around Llaima. In the work presented here, we analyze continuous waveforms recorded between January and April 2015 from a total of 35 broadband stations (permanent and

  7. Alexandria (Al Iskandariya), Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image of Alexandria was taken by astronauts on board the International Space Station in December 2000 using an Electronic Still Camera. A wider-angle view (STS088-739-90) taken from the Space Shuttle in December 1998 is available for context. Alexandria (Al Iskandariya) occupies a T-shaped peninsula and strip of land separating the Mediterranean from Lake Mariout. Originally the town was built upon a mole (stone breakwater) called Heptastadium, which joined the island of Pharos (see referenced website, below) to the mainland. Since then sedimentary deposits have widened the mole. Since 1905, when the 370,000 Alexandrians lived in an area of about 4 sq km between the two harbors, the city (population 4 million; see referenced website, below) has grown beyond its medieval walls and now occupies an area of about 300 sq km. The Mahmudiya Canal, connecting Alexandria with the Nile, runs to the south of the city and, by a series of locks, enters the harbor of the principal port of Egypt (note ships). The reddish and ochre polygons west of Lake Mariout are salt-evaporation, chemical-storage, and water-treatment ponds within the coastal lagoon. Reference Youssef Halim and Fatma Abou Shouk, 2000, Human impacts on Alexandria's marine environment: UNESCO, Coastal Regions and Small Islands Unit (CSI), Coastal Management Sourcebooks 2 (accessed December 20, 2000) Additional photographs taken by astronauts can be viewed at NASA-JSC's Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth. Image ISS001-ESC-5025 provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center.

  8. Spectroscopic analysis of Al and N diffusion in HfO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Lysaght, P. S.; Price, J.; Kirsch, P. D.; Woicik, J. C.; Weiland, C.; Sahiner, M. A.

    2012-09-15

    X-ray photoelectron core level spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements have been employed to distinguish the effects of Al and N diffusion on the local bonding and microstructure of HfO{sub 2} and its interface with the Si substrate in (001)Si/SiO{sub x}/2 nm HfO{sub 2}/1 nm AlO{sub x} film structures. The diffusion of Al from the thin AlO{sub x} cap layer deposited on both annealed and unannealed HfO{sub 2} has been observed following anneal in N{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} ambient. Both N{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} subsequent anneals were performed to decouple incorporated nitrogen from thermal reactions alone. Causal variations in the HfO{sub 2} microstructure combined with the dependence of Al and N diffusion on initial HfO{sub 2} conditions are presented with respect to anneal temperature and ambient.

  9. Is there a paraneoplastic ALS?

    PubMed

    Corcia, Philippe; Gordon, Paul H; Camdessanche, Jean-Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Our objective was to examine the strength of evidence in support of the paraneoplastic syndrome (PNS) as one cause of ALS and, if the association appears more likely than chance, determine which features of ALS imply concurrent malignancy. We reviewed the literature on concurrent ALS and neoplasia assessing the strength of evidence for the association. Most accounts of ALS and neoplasm are case reports or small uncontrolled series. In order of strength of evidence, three clinical situations that support a paraneoplastic aetiology for ALS are: 1) laboratory evidence of well-characterized onconeuronal antibodies, most often anti-Hu, anti-Yo or anti-Ri; 2) co-occurrence of ALS and a neoplasm known to cause PNS, usually lymphoma or cancer of the breast; and 3) combined ALS and a neoplasm not classically associated with PNS, without detectable onconeuronal antibodies. Clinical features that warrant evaluation of neoplasm include upper motor neuron disease in elderly females, rapid progression, non-motor signs, and young onset. In conclusion, most examples of ALS and neoplasm do not constitute a classically established PNS. Rare instances of elevated onconeuronal antibody titres or typical neoplasm, implies that, albeit rare, the PNS is one of a multitude of causes of ALS.

  10. Impurity Enhancement of Al_2O_3/Al Adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Smith, John R.; Zhang, Wenqing; Evans, Anthony

    2003-03-01

    Our first-principles computations indicate that the clean Al_2O_3/Al interface is relatively weak - weaker than bulk Al. Fracture experiments reveal that the interface is relatively strong with observed failure in bulk Al, however. This paradox is resolved via doping effects of the common impurity C. We have found that only 1/3 of a monolayer of carbon segregated to the interface can increase the work of separation by a factor of 3. The resulting strong interface is consistent with fracture experiments. It arises due to void formation in the interface, which provides low-strain sites for the carbon to segregate to. The degree of void formation is consistent with the relatively high heat of oxide formation of Al.

  11. Impact of ambient conditions on evaporation from porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Neriah, Asaf; Assouline, Shmuel; Shavit, Uri; Weisbrod, Noam

    2014-08-01

    The complexity of soil evaporation, depending on the atmospheric conditions, emphasizes the importance of its quantification under potential changes in ambient air temperature, Ta, and relative humidity, RH. Mass loss, soil matric tension, and meteorological measurements, carried out in a climate-controlled laboratory, were used to study the effect of ambient conditions on the drying rates of a porous medium. A set of evaporation experiments from initially saturated sand columns were carried out under constant Ta of 6, 15, 25, and 35°C and related RH (0.66, 0.83, 1.08, and 1.41 kPa, respectively). The results show that the expected increase of the stage 1 (S1) evaporation rate with Ta but also revealed an exponential-like reduction in the duration of S1, which decreased from 29 to 2.3 days (at Ta of 6 and 35°C, respectively). The evaporation rate, e(t), was equal to the potential evaporation, ep(t), under Ta = 6°C, while it was always smaller than ep(t) under higher Ta. The cumulative evaporation during S1 was higher under Ta = 6°C than under the higher temperatures. Evaporation rates during S2 were practically unaffected by ambient conditions. The results were analyzed using a mass transfer formulation linking e(t) with the vapor pressure deficit through a resistance coefficient r. It was shown that rS1 (the resistance during S1) is constant, indicating that the application of such an approach is straightforward during S1. However, for evaporation from a free water surface and S2, the resistances, rBL and rS2, were temperature-dependent, introducing some complexity for these cases.

  12. Modal parameter extraction from large operating structures using ambient excitation

    SciTech Connect

    James, G.H. III; Carne, T.G.; Mayes, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    A technique called the Natural Excitation Technique or has been developed to response extract response parameters from large operational structure when subjected to random and unmeasured forces such as wind, road noise, aerodynamics, or waves. Six applications of NExT to ambient excitation testing and NExT analysis are surveyed in this paper with a minimum of technical detail. In the first application, NExT was applied to a controlled-yaw Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT). By controlling the yaw degree of freedom an important class of rotating coordinate system effects are reduced. A new shape extraction procedure was applied to this data set with good results. The second application was to a free-yaw HAWT. The complexity of the response has prompted further analytical studies and the development of a specialized visualization package. The third application of NExT was to a parked three-bladed Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) in which traditional modal testing could not excite all modes of interest. The shape extraction process used cross-correlation functions directly in a time-domain shape-fitting routine. The fourth application was to ground transportation systems. Ongoing work to improve driver and passenger comfort in tractor-trailer vehicles and to refine automobile body and tire models will use NExT. NExT has been used to process ambient vibration data for Finite Element Model correlation and is being used to study Structural Health Monitoring with ambient excitation. Shape fitting was performed using amplitude and phase information taken directly from the cross-spectra. The final application is to an offshore structure. This work is on-going, however initial studies have found a high-modal density, high noise content, and sparse data set.

  13. A Methodology to Establish the Morphology of Ambient Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Rafael; Biswas, Pratim

    2007-01-01

    The morphology of ambient particulate matter (PM) is an important characteristic that seldom is measured and reported. A study was performed to determine the viability of a method to establish the distribution of shapes and the fractal dimensions of aggregates of ambient aerosols. Particles of PM with aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 2.5 μm (PM2.5) were captured on different days via size-independent electrostatic precipitation at two sites in St. Louis and examined in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Nonvolatile particles between 0.1 and 2.5 μm were readily identified via SEM. Particle shapes were classified as fibrous, spherical, agglomerated, or “other.” A computer program using the nested-squares algorithm was developed and used to determine the fractal dimensions of the aggregates. More particles were collected at the St. Louis-Midwest Supersite on June 14, 2002, than were collected on the Washington University campus loading dock on May 31, 2002, but the campus samples had a higher percentage of aggregates. On one day of sampling at the Supersite, the aggregate fraction was highest in the morning (14.3% between 7:00 and 9:00 a.m.) and steadily declined during the day (1.3% between 5:00 and 7:00 p.m.). The fractal dimensions of the aerosols were 1.65 in the morning (7:00–:00 a.m.), decreased to 1.49 (11:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m.), and then increased to 1.87 (5:00–7:00 p.m.). The results show that the fractal dimension is not a static value and that ambient aerosols are not perfectly spherical. PMID:15468660

  14. Big Data, Smart Homes and Ambient Assisted Living

    PubMed Central

    Wass, S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives To discuss how current research in the area of smart homes and ambient assisted living will be influenced by the use of big data. Methods A scoping review of literature published in scientific journals and conference proceedings was performed, focusing on smart homes, ambient assisted living and big data over the years 2011-2014. Results The health and social care market has lagged behind other markets when it comes to the introduction of innovative IT solutions and the market faces a number of challenges as the use of big data will increase. First, there is a need for a sustainable and trustful information chain where the needed information can be transferred from all producers to all consumers in a structured way. Second, there is a need for big data strategies and policies to manage the new situation where information is handled and transferred independently of the place of the expertise. Finally, there is a possibility to develop new and innovative business models for a market that supports cloud computing, social media, crowdsourcing etc. Conclusions The interdisciplinary area of big data, smart homes and ambient assisted living is no longer only of interest for IT developers, it is also of interest for decision makers as customers make more informed choices among today’s services. In the future it will be of importance to make information usable for managers and improve decision making, tailor smart home services based on big data, develop new business models, increase competition and identify policies to ensure privacy, security and liability. PMID:25123734

  15. Characteristics and determinants of ambient fungal spores in Hualien, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Hsiao-Man; Rao, Carol Y.; Hsu, Hsiao-Hsien; Chiu, Yueh-Hsiu; Liu, Chi-Ming; Chao, H. Jasmine

    Characteristics and determinants of ambient aeroallergens are of much concern in recent years because of the apparent health impacts of allergens. Yet relatively little is known about the complex behaviors of ambient aeroallergens. To address this issue, we monitored ambient fungal spores in Hualien, Taiwan from 1993-1996 to examine the compositions and temporal variations of fungi, and to evaluate possible determinants. We used a Burkard seven-day volumetric spore trap to collect daily fungal spores. Air pollutants, meteorological factors, and Asian dust events were included in the statistical analyses to predict fungal levels. We found that the most dominant fungal categories were ascospores, followed by Cladosporium and Aspergillus/Penicillium. The majority of the fungal categories had significant diurnal and seasonal variations. Total fungi, Cladosporium, Ganoderma, Arthrinium/Papularia, Cercospora, Periconia, Alternaria, Botrytis, and PM 10 had significantly higher concentrations ( p<0.05) during the period affected by Asian dust events. In multiple regression models, we found that temperature was consistently and positively associated with fungal concentrations. Other factors correlated with fungal concentrations included ozone, particulate matters with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm (PM 10), relative humidity, rainfall, atmospheric pressure, total hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide. Most of the fungal categories had higher levels in 1994 than in 1995-96, probably due to urbanization of the study area. In this study, we demonstrated complicated interrelationships between fungi and air pollution/meteorological factors. In addition, long-range transport of air pollutants contributed significantly to local aeroallergen levels. Future studies should examine the health impacts of aeroallergens, as well as the synergistic/antagonistic effects of weather, and local and global-scale air pollutions.

  16. Promoted Metals Combustion at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Carl D.; Herald, Stephen D.; Davis, S. Eddie

    2005-01-01

    Promoted combustion testing of materials, Test 17 of NASA STD-6001, has been used to assess metal propensity to burn in oxygen rich environments. An igniter is used at the bottom end of a rod to promote ignition, and if combustion is sustained, the burning progresses from the bottom to the top of the rod. The physical mechanisms are very similar to the upward flammability test, Test 1 of NASA STD-6001. The differences are in the normal environmental range of pressures, oxygen content, and sample geometry. Upward flammability testing of organic materials can exhibit a significant transitional region between no burning to complete quasi-state burning. In this transitional region, the burn process exhibits a probabilistic nature. This transitional region has been identified for metals using the promoted combustion testing method at ambient initial temperatures. The work given here is focused on examining the transitional region and the quasi-steady burning region both at conventional ambient testing conditions and at elevated temperatures. A new heated promoted combustion facility and equipment at Marshall Space Flight Center have just been completed to provide the basic data regarding the metals operating temperature limits in contact with oxygen rich atmospheres at high pressures. Initial data have been obtained for Stainless Steel 304L, Stainless Steel 321, Haynes 214, and Inconel 718 at elevated temperatures in 100-percent oxygen atmospheres. These data along with an extended data set at ambient initial temperature test conditions are examined. The pressure boundaries of acceptable, non-burning usage is found to be lowered at elevated temperature.

  17. Bayesian characterization of buildings using seismic interferometry on ambient vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; Mordret, Aurélien; Prieto, Germán A.; Toksöz, M. Nafi; Büyüköztürk, Oral

    2017-02-01

    Continuous monitoring of engineering structures provides a crucial alternative to assess its health condition as well as evaluate its safety throughout the whole service life. To link the field measurements to the characteristics of a building, one option is to characterize and update a model, against the measured data, so that it can best describe the behavior and performance of the structure. In this paper, we present a novel computational strategy for Bayesian probabilistic updating of building models with response functions extracted from ambient noise measurements using seismic interferometry. The intrinsic building impulse response functions (IRFs) can be extracted from ambient excitation by deconvolving the motion recorded at different floors with respect to the measured ambient ground motion. The IRF represents the representative building response to an input delta function at the ground floor. The measurements are firstly divided into multiple windows for deconvolution and the IRFs for each window are then averaged to represent the overall building IRFs. A hierarchical Bayesian framework with Laplace priors is proposed for updating the finite element model. A Markov chain Monte Carlo technique with adaptive random-walk steps is employed to sample the model parameters for uncertainty quantification. An illustrative example is studied to validate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm for temporal monitoring and probabilistic model updating of buildings. The structure considered in this paper is a 21-storey concrete building instrumented with 36 accelerometers at the MIT campus. The methodology described here allows for continuous temporal health monitoring, robust model updating as well as post-earthquake damage detection of buildings.

  18. Addressing Global Mortality from Ambient PM2.5.

    PubMed

    Apte, Joshua S; Marshall, Julian D; Cohen, Aaron J; Brauer, Michael

    2015-07-07

    Ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) has a large and well-documented global burden of disease. Our analysis uses high-resolution (10 km, global-coverage) concentration data and cause-specific integrated exposure-response (IER) functions developed for the Global Burden of Disease 2010 to assess how regional and global improvements in ambient air quality could reduce attributable mortality from PM2.5. Overall, an aggressive global program of PM2.5 mitigation in line with WHO interim guidelines could avoid 750 000 (23%) of the 3.2 million deaths per year currently (ca. 2010) attributable to ambient PM2.5. Modest improvements in PM2.5 in relatively clean regions (North America, Europe) would result in surprisingly large avoided mortality, owing to demographic factors and the nonlinear concentration-response relationship that describes the risk of particulate matter in relation to several important causes of death. In contrast, major improvements in air quality would be required to substantially reduce mortality from PM2.5 in more polluted regions, such as China and India. Moreover, forecasted demographic and epidemiological transitions in India and China imply that to keep PM2.5-attributable mortality rates (deaths per 100 000 people per year) constant, average PM2.5 levels would need to decline by ∼20-30% over the next 15 years merely to offset increases in PM2.5-attributable mortality from aging populations. An effective program to deliver clean air to the world's most polluted regions could avoid several hundred thousand premature deaths each year.

  19. Impact of Ambient Humidity on Child Health: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jinghong; Sun, Yunzong; Lu, Yaogui; Li, Liping

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Changes in relative humidity, along with other meteorological factors, accompany ongoing climate change and play a significant role in weather-related health outcomes, particularly among children. The purpose of this review is to improve our understanding of the relationship between ambient humidity and child health, and to propose directions for future research. Methods A comprehensive search of electronic databases (PubMed, Medline, Web of Science, ScienceDirect, OvidSP and EBSCO host) and review of reference lists, to supplement relevant studies, were conducted in March 2013. All identified records were selected based on explicit inclusion criteria. We extracted data from the included studies using a pre-designed data extraction form, and then performed a quality assessment. Various heterogeneities precluded a formal quantitative meta-analysis, therefore, evidence was compiled using descriptive summaries. Results Out of a total of 3797 identified records, 37 papers were selected for inclusion in this review. Among the 37 studies, 35% were focused on allergic diseases and 32% on respiratory system diseases. Quality assessment revealed 78% of the studies had reporting quality scores above 70%, and all findings demonstrated that ambient humidity generally plays an important role in the incidence and prevalence of climate-sensitive diseases among children. Conclusions With climate change, there is a significant impact of ambient humidity on child health, especially for climate-sensitive infectious diseases, diarrhoeal diseases, respiratory system diseases, and pediatric allergic diseases. However, some inconsistencies in the direction and magnitude of the effects are observed. PMID:25503413

  20. The importance of ambient sound level to characterise anuran habitat.

    PubMed

    Goutte, Sandra; Dubois, Alain; Legendre, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Habitat characterisation is a pivotal step of any animal ecology study. The choice of variables used to describe habitats is crucial and need to be relevant to the ecology and behaviour of the species, in order to reflect biologically meaningful distribution patterns. In many species, acoustic communication is critical to individuals' interactions, and it is expected that ambient acoustic conditions impact their local distribution. Yet, classic animal ecology rarely integrates an acoustic dimension in habitat descriptions. Here we show that ambient sound pressure level (SPL) is a strong predictor of calling site selection in acoustically active frog species. In comparison to six other habitat-related variables (i.e. air and water temperature, depth, width and slope of the stream, substrate), SPL had the most important explanatory power in microhabitat selection for the 34 sampled species. Ambient noise was particularly useful in differentiating two stream-associated guilds: torrents and calmer streams dwelling species. Guild definitions were strongly supported by SPL, whereas slope, which is commonly used in stream-associated habitat, had a weak explanatory power. Moreover, slope measures are non-standardized across studies and are difficult to assess at small scale. We argue that including an acoustic descriptor will improve habitat-species analyses for many acoustically active taxa. SPL integrates habitat topology and temporal information (such as weather and hour of the day, for example) and is a simple and precise measure. We suggest that habitat description in animal ecology should include an acoustic measure such as noise level because it may explain previously misunderstood distribution patterns.

  1. The Importance of Ambient Sound Level to Characterise Anuran Habitat

    PubMed Central

    Goutte, Sandra; Dubois, Alain; Legendre, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Habitat characterisation is a pivotal step of any animal ecology study. The choice of variables used to describe habitats is crucial and need to be relevant to the ecology and behaviour of the species, in order to reflect biologically meaningful distribution patterns. In many species, acoustic communication is critical to individuals’ interactions, and it is expected that ambient acoustic conditions impact their local distribution. Yet, classic animal ecology rarely integrates an acoustic dimension in habitat descriptions. Here we show that ambient sound pressure level (SPL) is a strong predictor of calling site selection in acoustically active frog species. In comparison to six other habitat-related variables (i.e. air and water temperature, depth, width and slope of the stream, substrate), SPL had the most important explanatory power in microhabitat selection for the 34 sampled species. Ambient noise was particularly useful in differentiating two stream-associated guilds: torrents and calmer streams dwelling species. Guild definitions were strongly supported by SPL, whereas slope, which is commonly used in stream-associated habitat, had a weak explanatory power. Moreover, slope measures are non-standardized across studies and are difficult to assess at small scale. We argue that including an acoustic descriptor will improve habitat-species analyses for many acoustically active taxa. SPL integrates habitat topology and temporal information (such as weather and hour of the day, for example) and is a simple and precise measure. We suggest that habitat description in animal ecology should include an acoustic measure such as noise level because it may explain previously misunderstood distribution patterns. PMID:24205070

  2. Mechanisms of lighting enhancement of Al nanoclusters-embedded Al-doped ZnO film in GaN-based light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hsin-Ying; Chou, Ying-Hung; Lee, Ching-Ting

    2010-01-15

    Aluminum (Al)-doped ZnO (AZO) films with embedded Al nanoclusters were proposed and utilized to enhance the light output power and maximum operation current of GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The AZO films were sputtered using ZnO and Al targets in a magnetron cosputtering system. With Al dc power of 7 W and ZnO 100 W ac power, the electron concentration of 4.1x10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}, electron mobility of 16.2 cm{sup 2}/V s, and resistivity of 7.2x10{sup -4} {Omega} cm were obtained for the deposited AZO film annealed at 600 deg. C for 1 min in a N{sub 2} ambient. As verified by a high resolution transmission electron microscopy, the deposited AZO films with embedded Al nanoclusters were clearly observed. A 35% increase in light output power of the GaN-based LEDs with Al nanoclusters-embedded AZO films was realized compared with the conventional LEDs operated at 500 mA. It was verified experimentally that the various characteristics of GaN-based LEDs including the antireflection, light scattering, current spreading, and the light extraction efficiency in light emission could be significantly enhanced with the use of Al nanoclusters-embedded AZO films.

  3. Highly efficient and selective adsorption of In3+ on pristine Zn/Al layered double hydroxide (Zn/Al-LDH) from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnabas, Mary Jenisha; Parambadath, Surendran; Mathew, Aneesh; Park, Sung Soo; Vinu, Ajayan; Ha, Chang-Sik

    2016-01-01

    A pristine Zn/Al-layered double hydroxide (Zn/Al-LDH) showed excellent adsorption ability and selectivity towards In3+ ions from aqueous solutions. The adsorption behaviour as a function of the contact time, solution pH, ionic strength, and amount of adsorbent under ambient conditions revealed a strong dependency on the pH and ionic strength over In3+ intake. The structure and properties of Zn/Al-LDH and In3+ adsorbed Zn/Al-LDH (In-Zn/Al-LDH) were examined carefully by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, N2-sorption/desorption, UV-vis spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The adsorbent had a sufficient number of active sites that were responsible for the In3+ adsorption and quite stable even after the adsorption process. The selective adsorption of In3+ on Zn/Al-LDH was also observed even from a mixture containing competing ions, such as Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cd2+, Pb2+, and Cu2+. The adsorption experiments showed that Zn/Al-LDH is a promising material for the pre-concentration and selective removal of In3+ from large volumes of aqueous solutions.

  4. Ambient Air Sampling During Quantum-dot Spray Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Jankovic, John Timothy; Hollenbeck, Scott M

    2010-01-01

    Ambient air sampling for nano-size particle emissions was performed during spot spray coating operations with a Sono-Tek Exactacoat Benchtop system (ECB). The ECB consisted of the application equipment contained within an exhaust enclosure. The enclosure contained numerous small access openings, including an exhaust hook-up. Door access comprised most of the width and height of the front. The door itself was of the swing-out type. Two types of nanomaterials, Cadmium selenide (Cd-Se) quantum-dots (QDs) and Gold (Au) QDs, nominally 3.3 and 5 nm in diameter respectively, were applied during the evaluation. Median spray drop size was in the 20 to 60 micrometer size range.1 Surface coating tests were of short duration, on the order of one-half second per spray and ten spray applications between door openings. The enclosure was ventilated by connection to a high efficiency particulate aerosol (HEPA) filtered house exhaust system. The exhaust rate was nominally 80 ft3 per minute producing about 5 air changes per minute. Real time air monitoring with a scanning mobility particle size analyzer (SMPS ) with a size detection limit of 7 nm indicated a significant increase in the ambient air concentration upon early door opening. A handheld condensation particle counter (CPC) with a lower size limit of 10 nm did not record changes in the ambient background. This increase in the ambient was not observed when door opening was delayed for 2 minutes (~10 air changes). The ventilated enclosure controlled emissions except for cases of rapid door opening before the overspray could be removed by the exhaust. A time delay sufficient to provide 10 enclosure air changes (a concentration reduction of more than 99.99 %) before door opening prevented the release of aerosol particles in any size.2 Scanning-transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) demonstrated the presence of agglomerates in the surfaces of the spray applied deposition. A filtered air sample of

  5. Amelie: A Recombinant Computing Framework for Ambient Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, Georgios; Markopoulos, Panos; Aarts, Emile

    This paper presents Amelie, a service oriented framework that supports the implementation of awareness systems. Amelie adopts the tenets of Recombinant computing to address an important non-functional requirement for Ambient Intelligence software, namely the heterogeneous combination of services and components. Amelie is founded upon FN-AAR an abstract model of Awareness Systems which enables the immediate expression and implementation of socially salient requirements, such as symmetry and social translucence. We discuss the framework and show how system behaviours can be specified using the Awareness Mark-up Language AML.

  6. Ambient habitat noise and vibration at the Georgia Aquarium.

    PubMed

    Scheifele, P M; Johnson, M T; Kretschmer, L; Clark, J G; Kemper, D; Potty, G

    2012-08-01

    Underwater and in-air noise evaluations were completed in performance pool systems at Georgia Aquarium under normal operating conditions and with performance sound tracks playing. Ambient sound pressure levels at in-pool locations, with corresponding vibration measures from life support system (LSS) pumps, were measured in operating configurations, from shut down to full operation. Results indicate noise levels in the low frequency ranges below 100 Hz were the highest produced by the LSS relative to species hearing thresholds. The LSS had an acoustic impact of about 10 dB at frequencies up to 700 Hz, with a 20 dB re 1 μPa impact above 1000 Hz.

  7. Evaluating alternative refrigerants for high ambient temperature environments

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelaziz, Omar; Shrestha, Som S.

    2016-01-01

    According to the Montreal Protocol, developing countries have started the phase out schedule of the ozone depleting substances, including HCFC refrigerants, in 2015 and expect them to reach 35% reduction in 2020. This commitment to the start the phase out of HCFC refrigerants, especially R-22, in developing countries is seen as an opportunity to introduce lower Global Warming Potential (GWP) refrigerants. Furthermore, this paper summarizes an investigation into the performance of lower GWP refrigerants in high ambient temperature environments, experienced in some of the developed countries, in mini-split air conditioning units.

  8. Surfactant-laden drops rising in a stratified ambient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchette, Francois; Martin, David

    2015-11-01

    We present results of a numerical study of the dynamics of rising drops in the presence of both surfactants and stratification. Our simulations model oil drops rising in the oceans, where naturally occurring or man-made surfactants are present. We study surfactant covered drops in uniform and density-stratified ambients, as well as clean drops entering a dissolved surfactant layer. We quantify the effects of entrainment for various Reynolds and Marangoni numbers. We also report a brief acceleration followed by a significant deceleration as a clean drop enters a surfactant layer, and describe how the adsorption rate affects those dynamics.

  9. Ambient Noise and Surface Wave Dissipation in the Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-21

    9 Ckq0 s I I follows hm the rlgi-hanmd nru A third coordinate system based on the wire wave gauge array was also defined such that the army x-axis...their research followed up in the literatum As we mentioned in our review, the research in wave and ambient noie relationship is relatively sparse. We...I AD-A279 650 AM’BIET NOISE AND SURFACE WAVE DISSIPATION IN THE OCEAN Q) I by S.tais C. Feliardo S. in C invl I Wagm Claude, 1985 Unhiaity of the

  10. Respiratory health effects of ambient air pollution: an update.

    PubMed

    Sava, Francesco; Carlsten, Chris

    2012-12-01

    There is new evidence for ambient air pollution (AAP) leading to an increased incidence of respiratory diseases in adults. Research has demonstrated that co-exposures have the potential to dramatically augment the effects of AAP and lower the threshold of effect of a given pollutant. Interactions between genes related to oxidative stress and AAP seem to significantly alter the effect of AAP on an individual and population basis. A better definition of vulnerable populations may bolster local or regional efforts to remediate AAP. Advances in genetic research tools have the potential to identify candidate genes that can guide further research.

  11. Thermal Modeling of Al-Al and Al-Steel Friction Stir Spot Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrasiak, P.; Shercliff, H. R.; Reilly, A.; McShane, G. J.; Chen, Y. C.; Wang, L.; Robson, J.; Prangnell, P.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a finite element thermal model for similar and dissimilar alloy friction stir spot welding (FSSW). The model is calibrated and validated using instrumented lap joints in Al-Al and Al-Fe automotive sheet alloys. The model successfully predicts the thermal histories for a range of process conditions. The resulting temperature histories are used to predict the growth of intermetallic phases at the interface in Al-Fe welds. Temperature predictions were used to study the evolution of hardness of a precipitation-hardened aluminum alloy during post-weld aging after FSSW.

  12. Philosophieren als Unterrichtsprinzip im Mathematikunterricht

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerwaldt, Diana

    Philosophieren und Mathematik scheinen zunächst gegensätzliche Bereiche zu sein, die sich kaum vereinbaren lassen. Dies trifft für eine Auffassung zu, die Philosophieren als "Gerede" disqualifiziert und Mathematik als eine reine "Formelwissenschaft" begreift. Beide Auffassungen werden den Gegenständen nicht gerecht.

  13. The Evolution of Al Qaeda

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-15

    Al Qaeda is a product of the forces of globalization. Increasing access to global finances , international travel, and sophisticated technology is...evolution. Al Qaeda is a product of the forces of globalization. Increasing access to global finances , international travel, and sophisticated technology...75 Finance

  14. Influence of ambient meteorology on the accuracy of radiation measurements: insights from field and laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald, Sandro M.; Pietsch, Helga; Baumgartner, Dietmar J.; Rieder, Harald E.

    2016-04-01

    A precise knowledge of the surface energy budget, which includes the solar and terrestrial radiation fluxes, is needed to accurately characterize the global energy balance which is largely determining Earth's climate. To this aim national and global monitoring networks for surface radiative fluxes have been established in recent decades. The most prominent among these networks is the so-called Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) operating under the auspices of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) (Ohmura et al., 1998). National monitoring networks such as the Austrian RADiation Monitoring Network (ARAD), which has been established in 2010 by a consortium of the Central Agency of Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG), the University of Graz, the University of Innsbruck, and the University of Natural Resources and Applied Sciences, Vienna (BOKU), orient themselves on BSRN standards (McArthur, 2005). ARAD comprises to date five sites (Wien Hohe Warte, Graz/University, Innsbruck/University, Kanzelhöhe Observatory and Sonnblick (which is also a BSRN site)) and aims to provide long-term monitoring of radiation budget components at highest accuracy and to capture the spatial patterns of radiation climate in Austria (Olefs et al., 2015). Given the accuracy requirement for the local monitoring of radiative fluxes instrument offsets, triggered by meteorological factors and/or instrumentation, pose a major challenge in radiation monitoring. Within this study we investigate effects of ambient meteorology on the accuracy of radiation measurements performed with pyranometers contained in various heating/ventilation systems (HV-systems), all of which used in regular operation within the ARAD network. We focus particularly on instrument offsets observed following precipitation events. To quantify pyranometer responses to precipitation we performed a series of controlled laboratory experiments as well as targeted field campaigns in 2015 and 2016. Our results indicate

  15. Relative velocity changes using ambient seismic noise at Okmok and Redoubt volcanoes, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennington, N. L.; Haney, M. M.; De Angelis, S.; Thurber, C. H.

    2013-12-01

    Okmok and Redoubt are two of the most active volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc. Leading up to its most recent eruption, Okmok, a shield volcano on Umnak Island, showed precursors to volcanic activity only five hours before it erupted explosively in July 2008. Redoubt, a stratovolcano located along the Cook Inlet, displayed several months of precursory activity leading up to its March 2009 eruption. Frequent activity at both volcanoes poses a major hazard due to heavy traffic along the North Pacific air routes. Additionally, Okmok is adjacent to several of the world's most productive fisheries and Redoubt is located only 110 miles SW of Anchorage, the major population center of Alaska. For these reasons, it is imperative that we improve our ability to detect early signs of unrest, which could potentially lead to eruptive activity at these volcanoes. We take advantage of continuous waveforms recorded on seismic networks at Redoubt and Okmok in an attempt to identify seismic precursors to the recent eruptions at both volcanoes. We perform seismic interferometry using ambient noise, following Brenguier et al. (2008), in order to probe the subsurface and determine temporal changes in relative seismic velocity from pre- through post-eruption, for the 2008 Okmok and 2009 Redoubt eruptions. In a preliminary investigation, we analyzed 6 months of noise cross-correlation functions averaged over 10-day intervals leading up to the 2009 eruption at Redoubt. During February 2009, station pairs RSO-DFR and RDN-RSO showed a decrease in seismic velocity of ~0.02%. By the beginning of March, the relative velocity changes returned to background levels. Stations RSO and RDN are located within the summit breach, and station DFR is to the north. Although these results are preliminary, it is interesting to note that the decrease in seismic velocity at both station pairs overlaps with the time period when Grapenthin et al. (2012) hypothesize magma in the mid-to-deep crustal reservoir was

  16. Evaluation of low-contrast perceptibility in dental restorative materials under the influence of ambient light conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, I C; Lemos, A L B; Aguiar, M F

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess how details on dental restorative composites with different radio-opacities are perceived under the influence of ambient light. Methods: Resin composite step wedges (six steps, each 1-mm thick) were custom manufactured from three materials, respectively: (M1) Filtek™ Z350 (3M/ESPE, Saint Paul, MN); (M2) Prisma AP.H™ (Dentsply International Inc., Brazil) and (M3) Glacier® (SDI Limited, Victoria, Australia). Each step of the manufactured wedge received three standardized drillings of different diameters and depths. An aluminium (Al) step wedge with 12 steps (1-mm thick) was used as an internal standard to calculate the radio-opacity as pixel intensity values. Standardized digital images of the set were obtained, and 11 observers independently recorded the images, noting the number of noticeable details (drillings) under 2 dissimilar conditions: in a light environment (light was turned on in the room) and in low-light conditions (light in the room was turned off). The differences between images in terms of the number of details that were observed were statistically compared using ANOVA, Cronbach's alpha coefficient and Wilcoxon and Kruskal–Wallis tests, with a significance level setting of 5% (α = 0.05). Results: The M2 showed higher radio-opacity, the M1 displayed intermediate radio-opacity and the M3 showed lower radio-opacity, respectively; however, all three were without significance (p > 0.05) compared with each other. The differences in radio-opacity resulted in a significant variation (p < 0.05) in the number of noticeable details in the image, which were influenced by characteristics of details, in addition to the ambient-light level. Conclusions: The radio-opacity of materials and ambient light can affect the perception of details in digital radiographic images. PMID:25629721

  17. Individual Particle Analysis of Ambient PM 2.5 Using Advanced Electron Microscopy Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald J. Keeler; Masako Morishita

    2006-12-31

    The overall goal of this project was to demonstrate a combination of advanced electron microscopy techniques that can be effectively used to identify and characterize individual particles and their sources. Specific techniques to be used include high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM), STEM energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), and energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM). A series of ambient PM{sub 2.5} samples were collected in communities in southwestern Detroit, MI (close to multiple combustion sources) and Steubenville, OH (close to several coal fired utility boilers). High-resolution TEM (HRTEM) -imaging showed a series of nano-metal particles including transition metals and elemental composition of individual particles in detail. Submicron and nano-particles with Al, Fe, Ti, Ca, U, V, Cr, Si, Ba, Mn, Ni, K and S were observed and characterized from the samples. Among the identified nano-particles, combinations of Al, Fe, Si, Ca and Ti nano-particles embedded in carbonaceous particles were observed most frequently. These particles showed very similar characteristics of ultrafine coal fly ash particles that were previously reported. By utilizing HAADF-STEM, STEM-EDX, and EF-TEM, this investigation was able to gain information on the size, morphology, structure, and elemental composition of individual nano-particles collected in Detroit and Steubenville. The results showed that the contributions of local combustion sources - including coal fired utilities - to ultrafine particle levels were significant. Although this combination of advanced electron microscopy techniques by itself can not identify source categories, these techniques can be utilized as complementary analytical tools that are capable of providing detailed information on individual particles.

  18. Factors Affecting the Association between Ambient Concentrations and Personal Exposures to Particles and Gases

    PubMed Central

    Sarnat, Stefanie Ebelt; Coull, Brent A.; Schwartz, Joel; Gold, Diane R.; Suh, Helen H.

    2006-01-01

    Results from air pollution exposure assessment studies suggest that ambient fine particles [particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μg (PM2.5)], but not ambient gases, are strong proxies of corresponding personal exposures. For particles, the strength of the personal–ambient association can differ by particle component and level of home ventilation. For gases, however, such as ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and sulfur dioxide (SO2), the impact of home ventilation on personal–ambient associations is untested. We measured 24-hr personal exposures and corresponding ambient concentrations to PM2.5, sulfate (SO42−), elemental carbon, O3, NO2, and SO2 for 10 nonsmoking older adults in Steubenville, Ohio. We found strong associations between ambient particle concentrations and corresponding personal exposures. In contrast, although significant, most associations between ambient gases and their corresponding exposures had low slopes and R2 values; the personal–ambient NO2 association in the fall season was moderate. For both particles and gases, personal–ambient associations were highest for individuals spending most of their time in high- compared with low-ventilated environments. Cross-pollutant models indicated that ambient particle concentrations were much better surrogates for exposure to particles than to gases. With the exception of ambient NO2 in the fall, which showed moderate associations with personal exposures, ambient gases were poor proxies for both gas and particle exposures. In combination, our results suggest that a) ventilation may be an important modifier of the magnitude of effect in time-series health studies, and b) results from time-series health studies based on 24-hr ambient concentrations are more readily interpretable for particles than for gases. PMID:16675415

  19. The Concentrations of Ambient Burkholderia Pseudomallei during Typhoon Season in Endemic Area of Melioidosis in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun-Yuh; Lee, Min Sheng; Ho, Chi-Kung; Mena, Kristina D.; Wang, Peng-Yau; Chen, Pei-Shih

    2014-01-01

    Background Melioidosis is a severe bacterial infection caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei with a high case-fatality rate. Epidemiological and animal studies show the possibility of inhalation transmission. However, no B. pseudomallei concentrations in ambient air have been researched. Here, we developed a method to quantify ambient B. pseudomallei and then measured concentrations of ambient B. pseudomallei during the typhoon season and the non-typhoon season to determine the factors influencing ambient B. pseudomallei levels. Methods We quantified ambient B. pseudomallei by using a filter/real-time qPCR method in the Zoynan Region in Kaohsiung, southern Taiwan. Twenty-four hour samples were collected at a sampling rate of 20 L/min every day from June 11 to December 21, 2012 including during the typhoon season (June to September) and reference season (October to December). Results We successfully developed a filtration/real-time qPCR method to quantify ambient B. pseudomallei. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing concentrations of ambient B. pseudomallei. Ambient B. pseudomallei were only detected during the typhoon season when compared to the reference season. For the typhoons affecting the Zoynan Region, the positive rates of ambient B. pseudomallei were very high at 80% to 100%. During June to December, rainfall was positively correlated with ambient B. pseudomallei with a statistical significance. Sediment at a nearby pond significantly influenced the concentration of ambient B. pseudomallei. During the typhoon month, the typhoon was positively correlated with ambient B. pseudomallei whereas wind speed was reversely correlated with ambient B. pseudomallei. Conclusions Our data suggest the possibility of transmission of B. pseudomallei via inhalation during the typhoon season. PMID:24874950

  20. Factors affecting the association between ambient concentrations and personal exposures to particles and gases.

    PubMed

    Sarnat, Stefanie Ebelt; Coull, Brent A; Schwartz, Joel; Gold, Diane R; Suh, Helen H

    2006-05-01

    Results from air pollution exposure assessment studies suggest that ambient fine particles [particulate matter with aerodynamic diameterambient gases, are strong proxies of corresponding personal exposures. For particles, the strength of the personal-ambient association can differ by particle component and level of home ventilation. For gases, however, such as ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and sulfur dioxide (SO2), the impact of home ventilation on personal-ambient associations is untested. We measured 24-hr personal exposures and corresponding ambient concentrations to PM2.5, sulfate (SO2-(4)), elemental carbon, O3, NO2, and SO2 for 10 nonsmoking older adults in Steubenville, Ohio. We found strong associations between ambient particle concentrations and corresponding personal exposures. In contrast, although significant, most associations between ambient gases and their corresponding exposures had low slopes and R2 values; the personal-ambient NO2 association in the fall season was moderate. For both particles and gases, personal-ambient associations were highest for individuals spending most of their time in high- compared with low-ventilated environments. Cross-pollutant models indicated that ambient particle concentrations were much better surrogates for exposure to particles than to gases. With the exception of ambient NO2 in the fall, which showed moderate associations with personal exposures, ambient gases were poor proxies for both gas and particle exposures. In combination, our results suggest that a) ventilation may be an important modifier of the magnitude of effect in time-series health studies, and b) results from time-series health studies based on 24-hr ambient concentrations are more readily interpretable for particles than for gases.

  1. Characteristics of CeCoIn5/Al/AlOx/Nb and CeCoIn5/Al/AlOx/Al Tunnel Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, C.; Nevirkovets, I.P.; Chernyashevskyy, O.; Hu, R.; Ketterson, J.B.; Sarma, B.K.

    2009-03-03

    We report characteristics of CeCoIn{sub 5}/Al/AlO{sub x}/Nb and CeCoIn{sub 5}/Al/AlO{sub x}/Al tunnel junctions fabricated on the (0 0 1) surface of CeCoIn{sub 5} crystal platelets. The main result of this work is the observation of a low Josephson current (as compared with that expected from the Ambegaokar-Baratoff formula), which is consistent with idea that the order parameter in the heavy-fermion superconductor CeCoIn{sub 5} has unconventional pairing symmetry.

  2. Ambient Seismic Noise Studies of The Colima Volcano Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, C. R.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Colima Volcanic Complex (CVC) located in the western sector of the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt is the most active Mexican volcano. The CVC is part of the active Colima Rift, a regional north south striking extensional structure. We use ambient seismic noise recorded by the Mapping the Riviera Subduction Zone (MARS) and the Colima Volcano Deep Seismic Experiment (CODEX) deployed in western Mexico. We compute the cross-correlations of vertical component continuous records ambient noise data to extracted empirical Greens functions. These functions provide signals compared to direct Rayleigh waves. Then we perform two analyses: dispersion curves and seismic tomography. Using the estimated Green function, the group and phase speeds as a function of period can be measured to obtain detailed images of Rayleigh wave group dispersion curves and therefore velocity structure between station pairs. We also pick the arrival times of Rayleigh waves for a given period to estimated lateral variations in velocity for a given period using 2D tomography. To sampling different depths we perform the inversions for different periods that together provide information on velocity variations with depth. The study aim to better understand the geometry, and the seismic surface wave velocity structure of the CVC and relate it with the volcano structure, the geology setting of the region.

  3. Method for measurement of volatile oxygenated hydrocarbons in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibrock, E.; Slemr, J.

    An automated gas chromatographic method for the quantitative determination of oxygenated (C 2C 5 carbonyls and C 1C 2 alcohols) and some non-oxygenated (C 5C 8) hydrocarbons in ambient air has been developed. The analytical system consists of a gas chromatograph with a cryogenic sampling trap, a precolumn for the separation of water and other interfering compounds, a cryogenic focusing trap and two analytical columns connected in series. Substances are detected either by flame ionization or by a mass spectrometer. Ozone is removed by a potassium iodide scrubber placed upstream the sampling trap. External gas standards generated by a permeation device are used for calibration. The detection limits range between 0.03 and 0.08 ng (depending on the compound), equivalent to 5 to 56 ppt in 1 l of sampled air. The method was tested by an intercomparison with a different gas chromatographic technique for the determination of NMHC. The system has been applied since 1994 for measurements in ambient air. Data obtained during an intensive campaign in summer 1995 at the field station Wank (1778 m a.s.l.) near Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany, are reported and compared with NMHC mixing ratios measured simultaneously in the same air masses.

  4. Ambient noise levels and detection threshold in Norway.

    PubMed

    Demuth, Andrea; Ottemöller, Lars; Keers, Henk

    2016-01-01

    Ambient seismic noise is caused by a number of sources in specific frequency bands. The quantification of ambient noise makes it possible to evaluate station and network performance. We evaluate noise levels in Norway from the 2013 data set of the Norwegian National Seismic Network as well as two temporary deployments. Apart from the station performance, we studied the geographical and temporal variations, and developed a local noise model for Norway. The microseism peaks related to the ocean are significant in Norway. We, therefore, investigated the relationship between oceanic weather conditions and noise levels. We find a correlation of low-frequency noise (0.125-0.25 Hz) with wave heights up to 900 km offshore. High (2-10 Hz) and intermediate (0.5-5 Hz) frequency noise correlates only up to 450 km offshore with wave heights. From a geographic perspective, stations in southern Norway show lower noise levels for low frequencies due to a larger distance to the dominant noise sources in the North Atlantic. Finally, we studied the influence of high-frequency noise levels on earthquake detectability and found that a noise level increase of 10 dB decreases the detectability by 0.5 magnitude units. This method provides a practical way to consider noise variations in detection maps.

  5. An intelligent subsurface buoy design for measuring ocean ambient noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bing; Wang, Lei

    2012-11-01

    A type of ultra-low power subsurface buoy system is designed to measure and record ocean ambient noise data. The buoy utilizes a vector hydrophone (pass band 20Hz-1.2kHz) and a 6-element vertical hydrophone array (pass band 20Hz-2kHz) to measure ocean ambient noise. The acoustic signals are passed through an automatically modified gain, a band pass filter, and an analog-to-digital (A/D) conversion module. They are then stored in high-capacity flash memory. In order to identify the direction of noise source, the vector sensor measuring system has integrated an electric-magnetic compass. The system provides a low-rate underwater acoustic communication system which is used to report the buoy state information and a high-speed USB interface which is used to retrieve the recorded data on deck. The whole system weighs about 125kg and can operate autonomously for more than 72 hours. The system's main architecture and the sea-trial test results are provided in this paper.

  6. Atomic-scale electron microscopy at ambient pressure.

    PubMed

    Creemer, J F; Helveg, S; Hoveling, G H; Ullmann, S; Molenbroek, A M; Sarro, P M; Zandbergen, H W

    2008-08-01

    We demonstrate a novel nanoreactor for performing atomic-resolution environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) of nanostructured materials during exposure to gases at ambient pressures and elevated temperatures. The nanoreactor is a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) and is functionalized with a micrometer-sized gas-flow channel, electron-transparent windows and a heating device. It fits into the tip of a dedicated sample holder that can be used in a normal CM microscope of Philips/FEI Company. The nanoreactor performance was demonstrated by ETEM imaging of a Cu/ZnO catalyst for methanol synthesis during exposure to hydrogen. Specifically, the nanoreactor facilitated the direct observation of Cu nanocrystal growth and mobility on a sub-second time scale during heating to 500 degrees C and exposure to 1.2 bar of H(2). For the same gas reaction environment, ETEM images show atomic lattice fringes in the Cu nanocrystals with spacing of 0.18 nm, attesting the spatial resolution limit of the system. The nanoreactor concept opens up new possibilities for in situ studies of nanomaterials and the ways they interact with their ambient working environment in diverse areas, such as heterogeneous catalysis, electrochemistry, nanofabrication, materials science and biology.

  7. Degradation of ambient carbonyl sulfide by Mycobacterium spp. in soil.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiromi; Saito, Masahiko; Nagahata, Yoshiko; Katayama, Yoko

    2008-01-01

    The ability to degrade carbonyl sulfide (COS) was confirmed in seven bacterial strains that were isolated from soil, without the addition of COS. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that these isolates belonged to the genera Mycobacterium, Williamsia and Cupriavidus. For example, Mycobacterium sp. strain THI401, grown on PYG agar medium, was able to degrade an initial level of 30 parts per million by volume COS within 1 h, while 60 % of the initial COS was decreased by abiotic conversion in 30 h. Considering natural COS flux between soil and the atmosphere, COS degradation by these bacteria was confirmed at an ambient level of 500 parts per trillion by volume (p.p.t.v.), using sterilized soil to cultivate the bacterium. Autoclave sterilization of soil resulted in a small amount of COS emission, while Mycobacterium spp. degraded COS at a faster rate than it was emitted from the soil, and reduced the COS mixing ratio to a level that was lower than the ambient level: THI401 degraded COS from an initial level of 530 p.p.t.v. to a level of 330 p.p.t.v. in 30 h. These results provide experimental evidence of microbial activity in soil as a sink for atmospheric COS.

  8. Ambient and Emission Trends of Toxic Air Contaminants in California.

    PubMed

    Propper, Ralph; Wong, Patrick; Bui, Son; Austin, Jeff; Vance, William; Alvarado, Álvaro; Croes, Bart; Luo, Dongmin

    2015-10-06

    After initiating a toxic air contaminant (TAC) identification and control program in 1984, the California Air Resources Board adopted regulations to reduce TAC emissions from cars, trucks, stationary sources, and consumer products. This study quantifies ambient concentration and emission trends for the period 1990-2012 for seven TACs that are responsible for most of the known cancer risk associated with airborne exposure in California. Of these seven, diesel particulate matter (DPM) is the most important; however DPM is not measured directly. Based on a novel surrogate method, DPM concentrations declined 68%, even though the state's population increased 31%, diesel vehicle-miles-traveled increased 81%, and the gross state product (GSP) increased 74%. Based on monitoring data, concentrations of benzene, 1,3-butadiene, perchloroethylene, and hexavalent chromium declined 88-94%. Also, the ambient and emissions trends for each of these four TACs were similar. Furthermore, these declines generally occurred earlier in California than elsewhere. However, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, which are formed in the air photochemically from volatile organic compounds (VOCs), declined only 20-21%. The collective cancer risk from exposure to these seven reviewed TACs declined 76%. Significant reduction in cancer risk to California residents from implementation of air toxics controls (especially for DPM) is expected to continue.

  9. Ambient temperature and activation of implantable cardioverter defibrillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuinn, L.; Hajat, S.; Wilkinson, P.; Armstrong, B.; Anderson, H. R.; Monk, V.; Harrison, R.

    2013-09-01

    The degree to which weather influences the occurrence of serious cardiac arrhythmias is not fully understood. To investigate, we studied the timing of activation of implanted cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) in relation to daily outdoor temperatures using a fixed stratum case-crossover approach. All patients attending ICD clinics in London between 1995 and 2003 were recruited onto the study. Temperature exposure for each ICD patient was determined by linking each patient's postcode of residence to their nearest temperature monitoring station in London and the South of England. There were 5,038 activations during the study period. Graphical inspection of ICD activation against temperature suggested increased risk at lower but not higher temperatures. For every 1 °C decrease in ambient temperature, risk of ventricular arrhythmias up to 7 days later increased by 1.2 % (95 % CI -0.6 %, 2.9 %). In threshold models, risk of ventricular arrhythmias increased by 11.2 % (0.5 %, 23.1 %) for every 1° decrease in temperature below 2 °C. Patients over the age of 65 exhibited the highest risk. This large study suggests an inverse relationship between ambient outdoor temperature and risk of ventricular arrhythmias. The highest risk was found for patients over the age of 65. This provides evidence about a mechanism for some cases of low-temperature cardiac death, and suggests a possible strategy for reducing risk among selected cardiac patients by encouraging behaviour modification to minimise cold exposure.

  10. Collection of ambient air phenols using an anion exchange membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Nishioka, M.; Burkholder, H.; Reynolds, S.; Burdick, N.; Pleil, J.

    1994-12-31

    The authors have previously demonstrated the feasibility of collecting vapor phase ambient air phenols by reversible chemical reaction with a solid sorbent. The authors report here enhanced detection limits for ambient phenols using an anion exchange membrane that allows high collection efficiency at 10 L/min sampling rate. The membrane consists of 5 {micro}m particles of the anion exchange resin enmeshed in a Teflon microfibril matrix. This membrane is similar to Empore membranes, with the addition of the anion exchange capacity. Sampling is accomplished using a 10.5 cm (diameter) membrane and a General Metal Works PS-1 sampler. A Teflon-coated glass fiber filter, spiked with deutered phenols, and placed ahead of the membrane, is used to deliver these surrogate recovery standards to the membrane during the sampling. Following sampling, membranes are shaken gently in an acidified mixture of methanol and dichloromethane. The extract is derivatized with BSTFA and analyzed using either GC/FID or EI GC/MS. Analytical methodology allows detection at the 0.02 ppbv level for 12 hrs of sampling ({approximately} 0.1 {micro}g/m{sup 3}).

  11. Pediatric asthma and ambient pollutant levels in industrializing nations.

    PubMed

    Jassal, Mandeep S

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases in childhood and its prevalence has been increasing within industrializing nations. The contribution of ambient pollutants to asthma symptomatology has been explored in some countries through epidemiological investigations, molecular analysis and monitoring functional outcomes. The health effects of rising environmental pollution have been of increasing concern in industrializing nations with rising urbanization patterns. This review article provides an overview of the link between pediatric asthma and exposure to rising sources of urban air pollution. It primarily focuses on the asthma-specific effects of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone and particulate matter. Worldwide trends of asthma prevalence are also provided which detail the prominent rise in asthma symptoms in many urban areas of Africa, Latin America and Asia. The molecular and functional correlation of ambient pollutants with asthma-specific airway inflammation in the pediatric population are also highlighted. The final aspect of the review considers the correlation of motor vehicle, industrial and cooking energy sources, ascribed as the major emitters among the pollutants in urban settings, with asthma epidemiology in children.

  12. Flexible thermoelectric generator for ambient assisted living wearable biometric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francioso, L.; De Pascali, C.; Farella, I.; Martucci, C.; Cretì, P.; Siciliano, P.; Perrone, A.

    2011-03-01

    In this work we proposed design, fabrication and functional characterization of a very low cost energy autonomous, maintenance free, flexible and wearable micro thermoelectric generator (μTEG), finalized to power very low consumption electronics ambient assisted living (AAL) applications. The prototype, integrating an array of 100 thin films thermocouples of Sb2Te3 and Bi2Te3, generates, at 40 °C, an open circuit output voltage of 430 mV and an electrical output power up to 32 nW with matched load. In real operation conditions of prototype, which are believed to be very close to a thermal gradient of 15 °C, the device generates an open circuit output voltage of about 160 mV, with an electrical output power up to 4.18 nW. In the first part of work, deposition investigation Sb2Te3 and Bi2Te3 thin films alloys on Kapton HN polyimide foil by RF magnetron co-sputtering technique is discussed. Deposition parameters have been optimized to gain perfect stoichiometric ratio and high thermoelectric power factor; fabricated thermogenerator has been tested at low gradient conditioned to evaluate applications like human skin wearable power generator for ambient assisted living applications.

  13. Long term wireless ambient monitoring of heritage buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huayong; Pozzi, Matteo; Zonta, Daniele; Zanon, Paolo; Ceriotti, Matteo; Mottola, Luca; Picco, Gian Pietro; Murphy, Amy L.; Guna, Stefan; Corrà, Michele

    2010-04-01

    Motivated by the preservation of an artistic treasure, the fresco of the "Cycle of the Months" on the second floor in an historic tower, Torre Aquila, a wireless sensor network (WSN) has been developed and installed for permanent health monitoring. The monitoring scheme covers both static and dynamic evaluation of the tower structural integrity from local to global scale and consists of 17 nodes, including 2 long length fiber optic sensors (FOS), 3 accelerometers and 12 environmental nodes. The system has been working for 1.5 years and has been debugged and updated both as to hardware and software. This paper focuses mainly on the ambient vibration analysis used to investigate the performance of the sensor nodes and structural properties of the tower. Initial ambient vibration monitoring shows that cyclic environmental factors, such as traffic flow, are not the dominant cause of tower vibration; and the vibration levels of the tower in different axes are not large enough to be a critical issue calling for attention under current conditions. It proves that the WSN is an effective tool, capable of providing information relevant to safety assessment of the tower.

  14. Ambient VLF Transmitter Variation Detected at Many Locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginson-Rollins, M. A.; Cohen, M.

    2015-12-01

    Very Low Frequency (3-30 kHz) and Low Frequency (30-300 kHz) radio transmitters are an important means for naval submarine communications. VLF waves travel through the Earth-ionosphere waveguide with low attenuation and penetrate into conducting seawater. These transmitters also serve as a useful diagnostic tool for characterizing the D region of the ionosphere, a region of the ionosphere that is inaccessible to continuous in situ measurement techniques. The temporal variation of these VLF signals are dominated by ionospheric conditions, and their response to localized or global disturbances. However, despite extensive past work on the analysis of these diagnostic signals, little is known about the spatial relationship between ionospheric conditions at multiple locations. We utilize a previously erected global constellation of transmitters and receivers to determine generalized characteristics and trends for ambient daytime conditions of the lower ionosphere. We present the data and analyze them to reveal trends in the amplitude of these transmitters, in an effort to better characterize the ambient ionospheric conditions and their spatial variations on a global scale.

  15. Bioindicator plants for ambient ozone in Central and Eastern Europe.

    PubMed

    Manning, W J; Godzik, B

    2004-07-01

    Sixteen species of native detector plants for ambient ozone have been identified for use in Central and Eastern Europe. They include the forbs Alchemilla sp., Astrantia major, Centuarea nigra, Centauria scabiosa, Impatiens parviflora, Lapsana communis, Rumex acetosa and Senecio subalpinus; the shrubs Corylus avellana, Cornus sanguinea and Sambucus racemosa; the trees Alnus incana, Pinus cembra and Sorbus aucuparia; and the vines Humulus lupulus and Parthenocissus quinquefolia. Sensitivity to ozone and symptoms have been verified under controlled exposure conditions. Under these conditions, symptom incidence, intensity and appearance often changed with time after removal from exposure chambers. Ozone sensitivity for four species: Astrantia major, Centuarea nigra, C. scabiosa and Humulus lupulus are reported here for the first time. The other 12 species have also been confirmed by others in Western Europe. It is recommended that these detector bioindicator species be used in conjunction with ozone monitors and passive samplers so that injury symptoms incidence can be used to give biological significance to monitored ambient ozone data.

  16. Damping estimation using free decays and ambient vibration tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhães, Filipe; Cunha, Álvaro; Caetano, Elsa; Brincker, Rune

    2010-07-01

    This paper studies the quality of modal damping ratios estimates based on ambient and free vibration tests using both numerical simulations and data collected on large Civil Engineering structures where both tests were performed. The simulated data allowed to study the influence of factors like non-proportional damping or proximity of natural frequencies on the quality of the estimates and also to illustrate the influence of the identification algorithms parameters on the accuracy of the results. The analysis of data collected on a cable-stayed bridge, on the suspended roof of a stadium and on a footbridge permitted to compare the results of both testing approaches in real applications where some factors that cannot be realistically included in the numerical simulations can play an important role. The processing of ambient vibration responses is performed with two output-only identification approaches: frequency domain decomposition and stochastic subspace identification methods. The numerically simulated and the measured free decays were analyzed with a simple method based on filters and fitting of exponential decays and also with the use of subspace models.

  17. Structural studies of copper sulfide films: effect of ambient atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Manisha; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Terabe, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Aono, Masakazu

    2008-01-01

    We examined the structural properties of copper sulfide films as a function of the sulfurization time of 70-nm-thick Cu films. Copper sulfide films with various phases such as mixed metallic Cu-chalcocite, chalcocite, roxbyite, and covellite phases were formed with increasing sulfurization time. To evaluate the structural stability of various films, all the films were exposed to the ambient atmosphere for the same amount of time. Although the phase structure and stoichiometry of the films were maintained at a greater depth, the near-surface region of the films was oxidized and covered with overlayers of oxide, hydroxide, and/or sulfate species due to the exposure and reaction with the ambient atmosphere. The oxygen uptake and its reactivity with the copper sulfide film surfaces were enhanced with increasing sulfur content of the films. In addition, the type of divalent state of copper formed on the film surfaces depended on the phase structure, composition, and stoichiometry of the films. PMID:27878008

  18. Ambient and focal visual processing of naturalistic activity.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Michelle L; Zacks, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    When people inspect a picture, they progress through two distinct phases of visual processing: an ambient, or exploratory, phase that emphasizes input from peripheral vision and rapid acquisition of low-frequency information, followed by a focal phase that emphasizes central vision, salient objects, and high-frequency information. Does this qualitative shift occur during dynamic scene viewing? If so, when? One possibility is that shifts to exploratory processing are triggered at subjective event boundaries. This shift would be adaptive, because event boundaries typically occur when activity features change and when activity becomes unpredictable. Here, we used a perceptual event segmentation task, in which people identified boundaries between meaningful units of activity, to test this hypothesis. In two studies, an eye tracker recorded eye movements and pupil size while participants first watched movies of actors engaged in everyday activities and then segmented them into meaningful events. Saccade amplitudes and fixation durations during the initial viewings suggest that event boundaries function much like the onset of a new picture during static picture presentation: Viewers initiate an ambient processing phase and then progress to focal viewing as the event progresses. These studies suggest that this shift in processing mode could play a role in the formation of mental representations of the current environment.

  19. Ambient Weather Model Research and Development: Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Stel Nathan; Wade, John Edward

    1990-08-31

    Ratings for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) transmission lines are based upon the IEEE Standard for Calculation of Bare Overhead Conductor Temperatures and Ampacity under Steady-State Conditions (1985). This steady-state model is very sensitive to the ambient weather conditions of temperature and wind speed. The model does not account for wind yaw, turbulence, or conductor roughness as proposed by Davis (1976) for a real time rating system. The objective of this research has been to determine (1) how conservative the present rating system is for typical ambient weather conditions, (2) develop a probability-based methodology, (3) compile available weather data into a compatible format, and (4) apply the rating methodology to a hypothetical line. The potential benefit from this research is to rate transmission lines statistically which will allow BPA to take advantage of any unknown thermal capacity. The present deterministic weather model is conservative overall and studies suggest a refined model will uncover additional unknown capacity. 14 refs., 40 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Ambient Temperature and Early Delivery of Singleton Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sandie; Liu, Danping; Zhu, Yeyi; Kim, Sung Soo; Sherman, Seth; Mendola, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    Background: Extreme temperature is associated with adverse birth outcomes but it is unclear whether it increases early delivery risk.Background: Extreme temperature is associated with adverse birth outcomes but it is unclear whether it increases early delivery risk. Objectives: We aimed to determine the association between ambient temperature and early delivery.Objectives: We aimed to determine the association between ambient temperature and early delivery. Methods: Medical records from 223,375 singleton deliveries from 12 U.S. sites were linked to local ambient temperature. Exposure to hot (> 90th percentile) or cold (< 10th percentile) using site-specific and window-specific temperature distributions were defined for 3-months preconception, 7-week periods during the first two trimesters, 1 week preceding delivery, and whole pregnancy. Poisson regression with generalized estimating equations calculated the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval for early deliveries associated with hot/cold exposures, adjusting for conception month, humidity, site, sex, maternal demographics, parity, insurance, prepregnancy body mass index, pregnancy complications, and smoking or drinking during pregnancy. Acute temperature associations were estimated separately for warm (May–September) and cold season (October–April) in a case-crossover analysis using conditional logistic regression.Methods: Medical records from 223,375 singleton deliveries from 12 U.S. sites were linked to local ambient temperature. Exposure to hot (> 90th percentile) or cold (< 10th percentile) using site-specific and window-specific temperature distributions were defined for 3-months preconception, 7-week periods during the first two trimesters, 1 week preceding delivery, and whole pregnancy. Poisson regression with generalized estimating equations calculated the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval for early deliveries associated with hot/cold exposures, adjusting for conception month

  1. Ambient Noise Tomography of central Java, with Transdimensional Bayesian Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulhan, Zulfakriza; Saygin, Erdinc; Cummins, Phil; Widiyantoro, Sri; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Luehr, Birger-G.; Bodin, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Delineating the crustal structure of central Java is crucial for understanding its complex tectonic setting. However, seismic imaging of the strong heterogeneity typical of such a tectonically active region can be challenging, particularly in the upper crust where velocity contrasts are strongest and steep body wave ray-paths provide poor resolution. We have applied ambient noise cross correlation of pair stations in central Java, Indonesia by using the MERapi Amphibious EXperiment (MERAMEX) dataset. The data were collected between May to October 2004. We used 120 of 134 temporary seismic stations for about 150 days of observation, which covered central Java. More than 5000 Rayleigh wave Green's function were extracted by cross-correlating the noise simultaneously recorded at available station pairs. We applied a fully nonlinear 2D Bayesian inversion technique to the retrieved travel times. Features in the derived tomographic images correlate well with previous studies, and some shallow structures that were not evident in previous studies are clearly imaged with Ambient Noise Tomography. The Kendeng Basin and several active volcanoes appear with very low group velocities, and anomalies with relatively high velocities can be interpreted in terms of crustal sutures and/or surface geological features.

  2. Joint Effects of Ambient Air Pollutants on Pediatric Asthma ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Background: Because ambient air pollution exposure occurs in the form of mixtures, consideration of joint effects of multiple pollutants may advance our understanding of air pollution health effects. Methods: We assessed the joint effect of selected ambient air pollutant combinations (groups of oxidant, secondary, traffic, power plant, and criteria pollutants constructed using combinations of criteria gases, fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and PM2.5 components) on warm season pediatric asthma emergency department (ED) visits in Atlanta during 1998-2004. Joint effects were assessed using multi-pollutant Poisson generalized linear models controlling for time trends, meteorology and daily non-asthma respiratory ED visit counts. Rate ratios (RR) were calculated for the combined effect of an interquartile-range increment in the concentration of each pollutant. Results: Increases in all of the selected pollutant combinations were associated with increases in pediatric asthma ED visits [e.g., joint effect rate ratio=1.13 (95% confidence interval 1.06-1.21) for criteria pollutants (including ozone, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and PM2.5)]. Joint effect estimates were smaller than estimates calculated based on summing results from single-pollutant models, due to control for confounding. Compared with models without interactions, joint effect estimates from models including first-order pollutant interactions were similar for oxidant a

  3. Ambient Particulate Matter Air Pollution in Mpererwe District, Kampala, Uganda: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Schwander, Stephan; Okello, Clement D.; Freers, Juergen; Chow, Judith C.; Watson, John G.; Corry, Melody; Meng, Qingyu

    2014-01-01

    Air quality in Kampala, the capital of Uganda, has deteriorated significantly in the past two decades. We made spot measurements in Mpererwe district for airborne particulate matter PM2.5 (fine particles) and coarse particles. PM was collected on Teflon-membrane filters and analyzed for mass, 51 elements, 3 anions, and 5 cations. Both fine and coarse particle concentrations were above 100 µg/m3 in all the samples collected. Markers for crustal/soil (e.g., Si and Al) were the most abundant in the PM2.5 fraction, followed by primary combustion products from biomass burning and incinerator emissions (e.g., K and Cl). Over 90% of the measured PM2.5 mass can be explained by crustal species (41% and 59%) and carbonaceous aerosol (33%–55%). Crustal elements dominated the coarse particles collected from Kampala. The results of this pilot study are indicative of unhealthy air and suggest that exposure to ambient air in Kampala may increase the burden of environmentally induced cardiovascular, metabolic, and respiratory diseases including infections. Greater awareness and more extensive research are required to confirm our findings, to identify personal exposure and pollution sources, and to develop air quality management plans and policies to protect public health. PMID:24693293

  4. Catalytic oxidation of low-concentration CO at ambient temperature over supported Pd-Cu catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fagen; Zhang, Haojie; He, Dannong

    2014-01-01

    The CO catalytic oxidation at ambient temperature and high space velocity was studied over the Pd-Cu/MOx (MOx = TiO2 and AI203) catalysts. The higher Brunauer-Emmett-Teller area surface of the A1203 support facilitates the dispersion of Pd2+ species, and the presence of Cu2Cl(OH)3 accelerates the re-oxidation of Pd0 to Pd2+ over the Pd-Cu/Al203 catalyst, which contributed to better performance of CO catalytic oxidation. The poorer activity of the Pd-Cu/TiO2 catalyst was attributed to the lower dispersion of Pd2+ species because of the less surface area and the non-formation of Cu2CI(OH)3 species. The presence of saturated moisture showed a negative effect on CO conversion over the two catalysts. This might be because of the competitive adsorption, the formation of carbonate species and the transformation of Cu2CI(OH)3 to inactive CuCI over the Pd-Cu/AI2O3 catalyst, which facilitates the aggregation of PdO species over the Pd-Cu/TiO2 catalyst under the moisture condition.

  5. Carbon dioxide intercalation in Na-fluorohectorite clay at near-ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossum, Jon Otto; Hemmen, Henrik; Rolseth, Erlend G.; Fonseca, Davi; Lindbo Hansen, Elisabeth; Plivelic, Tomas

    2012-02-01

    A molecular dynamics study by Cygan et al.[1] shows the possibility of intercalation and retention of CO2 in smectite clays at 37 ^oC and 200 bar, which suggests that clay minerals may prove suitable for carbon capture and carbon dioxide sequestration. In this work we show from x-ray diffraction measurements that gaseous CO2 intercalates into the interlayer space of the synthetic smectite clay Na-fluorohectorite. The mean interlayer distance of the clay when CO2 is intercalated is 12.5 å at -20 C and 15 bar. The magnitude of the expansion of the interlayer upon intercalation is indistinguishable from that of the dehydrated-monohydrated intercalation of H2O, but this possibility is ruled out by careful repeating the measurements exposing the clay to nitrogen gas. The dynamics of the CO2 intercalation process displays a higher intercalation rate at increased pressure, and the rate is several orders of magnitude slower than that of water or vapor at ambient pressure and temperature.[4pt] [1] Cygan, R. T.; Romanov, V. N.; Myshakin, E. M. Natural materials for carbon capture; Techincal report SAND2010-7217; Sandia National Laboratories: Albuquerque, New Mexico, November, 2010.

  6. Cryogen free automated gas chromatography for the measurement of ambient volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, J L; Chen, W L; Lin, Y H; Tsai, C H

    2000-10-27

    An automated gas chromatographic system was constructed for measuring ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Preconcentration of the VOCs was performed by using two separated sorbent traps of different combinations with each designated for either low or high boiling VOCs. Both traps and their associated valve systems were integrated as a complete system sharing a common sample inlet. Precise temperature controls for desorption relied on the use of a process controller with proportional-integral-derivative algorithm to throttle the current supply. No additional cryo-focusing stage prior to the column was needed owing to the flash heating capability for desorption. Other than the cryogen free preconcentration and focusing, the separation of VOCs of large volatility difference was also performed without cryogen. The system employed an Al2O3/KCl porous-layer open tubular column for separating C3-C7 compounds; and a DB-1 column for C6-C12. This automated GC system has been deployed in a Taiwan Environmental Protection Agency urban air quality monitoring station of Taiwan for continuous measuring C3-C7 ozone precursors. Excellent correlation between the car exhaust type of compounds measured by our GC system and carbon monoxide measured by a non-dispersive infrared spectrometer was observed, suggesting the automated GC system was robust and reliable.

  7. Ambient Temperature Ultrasonic Bonding of Si-Dice Using Sn-3.5wt.%Ag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Mo; Jung, Jae-Pil; Zhou, Y. Norman; Kim, Jong-Young

    2008-03-01

    Ultrasonic bonding of Si-dice to type FR-4 printed circuit boards (PCB) with Sn-3.5wt.%Ag solder at ambient temperature was investigated. The under-bump metallization (UBM) on the Si-dice comprised Cu/Ni/Al from top to bottom with thicknesses of 0.4 μm, 0.4 μm, and 0.3 μm, respectively. The pads on the PCBs consisted of Au/Ni/Cu with thicknesses of 0.05/5/18 μm, sequentially from top to bottom. Solder was supplied as Sn-3.5wt.%Ag foil rolled to 100 μm thickness, and inserted in the joints. The ultrasonic bonding time was varied from 0.5 s to 3.0 s, and the ultrasonic power was 1400 W. The experimental results showed that reliable joints could be produced between the Si-dice and the PCBs with Sn-3.5wt.%Ag solder. The joint breaking force of “Si-die/solder/FR-4” increased with bonding times up to 2.5 s with a maximum value of 65 N. A bonding time of 3.0 s proved to be excessive, and resulted in cracks along the intermetallic compound between the UBM and solder, which caused a decrease in the bond strength. The intermetallic compound produced by ultrasonic bonding between the UBM and solder was confirmed to be (Cu, Ni)6Sn5.

  8. The effects of electron thermal radiation on laser ablative shock waves from aluminum plasma into ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai Shiva, S.; Leela, Ch.; Prem Kiran, P.; Sijoy, C. D.; Chaturvedi, S.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of electron thermal radiation on 7 ns laser ablative shock waves from aluminum (Al) plasma into an ambient atmospheric air has been numerically investigated using a one-dimensional, three-temperature (electron, ion, and radiation) radiation hydrodynamic code MULTI. The governing equations in Lagrangian form are solved using an implicit scheme for planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometries. The shockwave velocities (Vsw) obtained numerically are compared with our experimental values obtained over the intensity range of 2.0 × 1010 to 1.4 × 1011 W/cm2. It is observed that the numerically obtained Vsw is significantly influenced by the thermal radiation effects which are found to be dominant in the initial stage up to 2 μs depending on the input laser energy. Also, the results are found to be sensitive to the co-ordinate geometry used in the simulation (planar, cylindrical, and spherical). Moreover, it is revealed that shock wave undergoes geometrical transitions from planar to cylindrical nature and from cylindrical to spherical nature with time during its propagation into an ambient atmospheric air. It is also observed that the spatio-temporal evolution of plasma electron and ion parameters such as temperature, specific energy, pressure, electron number density, and mass density were found to be modified significantly due to the effects of electron thermal radiation.

  9. Adsorption and reaction of methanol on supported palladium catalysts: microscopic-level studies from ultrahigh vacuum to ambient pressure conditions.

    PubMed

    Bäumer, Marcus; Libuda, Jörg; Neyman, Konstantin M; Rösch, Notker; Rupprechter, Günther; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2007-07-21

    We investigated the decomposition and (partial) oxidation of methanol on Pd based catalysts in an integrated attempt, simultaneously bridging both the pressure and the materials gap. Combined studies were performed on well-defined Pd model catalysts based on ordered Al(2)O(3) and Fe(3)O(4) thin films, on well-defined particles supported on powders and on Pd single crystals. The interaction of Pd nanoparticles and Pd(111) with CH(3)OH and CH(3)OH/O(2) mixtures was examined from ultrahigh vacuum conditions up to ambient pressures, utilizing a broad range of surface specific vibrational spectroscopies which included IRAS, TR-IRAS, PM-IRAS, SFG, and DRIFTS. Detailed kinetic studies in the low pressure region were performed by molecular beam methods, providing comprehensive insights into the microkinetics of the reaction system. The underlying microscopic processes were studied theoretically on the basis of specially designed 3-D nanocluster models containing approximately 10(2) metal atoms. The efficiency of this novel modelling approach was demonstrated by rationalizing and complementing pertinent experimental results. In order to connect these results to the behavior under ambient conditions, kinetic and spectroscopic investigations were performed in reaction cells and lab reactors. Specifically, we focused on (1) particle size and structure dependent effects in methanol oxidation and decomposition, (2) support effects and their relation to activity and selectivity, (3) the influence of poisons such as carbon, and (4) the role of oxide and surface oxide formation on Pd nanoparticles.

  10. Are Young Children With Cochlear Implants Sensitive to the Statistics of Words in the Ambient Spoken Language?

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Karla K.; Spencer, Linda J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether children with cochlear implants (CIs) are sensitive to statistical characteristics of words in the ambient spoken language, whether that sensitivity changes in expected ways as their spoken lexicon grows, and whether that sensitivity varies with unilateral or bilateral implantation. Method We analyzed archival data collected from the parents of 36 children who received cochlear implantation (20 unilateral, 16 bilateral) before 24 months of age. The parents reported their children's word productions 12 months after implantation using the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventories: Words and Sentences (Fenson et al., 1993). We computed the number of words, out of 292 possible monosyllabic nouns, verbs, and adjectives, that each child was reported to say and calculated the average phonotactic probability, neighborhood density, and word frequency of the reported words. Results Spoken vocabulary size positively correlated with average phonotactic probability and negatively correlated with average neighborhood density, but only in children with bilateral CIs. Conclusion At 12 months postimplantation, children with bilateral CIs demonstrate sensitivity to statistical characteristics of words in the ambient spoken language akin to that reported for children with normal hearing during the early stages of lexical development. Children with unilateral CIs do not. PMID:25677929

  11. Recrystallization and grain growth in NiAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haff, G. R.; Schulson, E. M.

    1982-01-01

    Aluminide intermetallics, because of their strength, microstructural stability, and oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures, represent potential structural materials for use in advanced energy conversion systems. This inherent potential of the intermetallics can currently not be realized in connection with the general brittleness of the materials under ambient conditions. It is pointed out, however, that brittleness is not an inherent characteristic. Single crystals are ductile and polycrystals may be, too, if their grains are fine enough. The present investigation is concerned with an approach for reducing material brittleness, taking into account thermal-mechanically induced grain refinement in NiAl, a B2 aluminide which melts at 1638 C and which retains complete order to its melting point. Attention is given to the kinetics of recrystallization and grain growth of warm-worked, nickel-rich material.

  12. Medical application of 26Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhausen, C.; Gerisch, P.; Heisinger, B.; Hohl, Ch.; Kislinger, G.; Korschinek, G.; Niedermayer, M.; Nolte, E.; Dumitru, M.; Alvarez-Brückmann, M.; Schneider, M.; Ittel, T. H.

    1996-06-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements with 26Al as tracer were performed in order to study the aluminium metabolism and anomalies in the human body and in rats. In particular, the differences between healthy volunteers and patients with renal failure were investigated. The obtained data points of 26Al in blood and urine were described by an open compartment model with three peripheral compartments. It was found that the minimum of peripheral compartments needed to describe 26Al concentrations in blood and urine over a time period of three years is at least three.

  13. Processing, properties, and wear resistance of aluminides. [Fe[sub 3]Al; Al[sub 3]Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, R.N.; Rabin, B.H.; Wright, J.K.

    1993-03-01

    Fully dense alloys based on Fe[sub 3]Al were produced by reaction synthesis from low cost elemental powders using hot pressing, hot isostatic pressing or Ceracon process. The reaction proceeds by outward spreading of a transient liquid phase from the initial aluminum particle site and precipitation of the compound phase from the liquid. Combustion synthesized material has a very fine grain size that is resistant to coarsening at high temperature because of a high density of fine oxides from the prior particle boundaries. The fine grain size results in approximately twice the yield strength in the reaction synthesized material compared to hot extruded pre-alloyed powder. Combustion synthesis has also been successfully applied to joining Fe[sub 3]Al and to forming coatings on carbon steel substrates. Combustion synthesis has been shown to be viable for fabricating trialuminides from elemental powder compacts. Al[sub 3]Ti, Al[sub 73]Ti[sub 24]Cr[sub 3] and Al[sub 67]Ti[sub 25]Cr[sub 8] were examined. Fully dense, homogeneous materials exhibiting an equiaxed grain structure were produced by conducting reaction and homogenization under pressure, or in a furnace at ambient pressure and subsequently densifying the porous preform by hot consolidation. The tetragonal DO[sub 22] structure was the primary reaction product for all compositions. Most of the Cr remained undissolved after reaction and a homogenization heat treatment at 1200C or above was used to put the Cr into solution and form the desired L1[sub 2] phase.

  14. The Kinetics of TiAl3 Formation in Explosively Welded Ti-Al Multilayers During Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foadian, Farzad; Soltanieh, Mansour; Adeli, Mandana; Etminanbakhsh, Majid

    2016-10-01

    Metallic-intermetallic laminate (MIL) composites, including Ti/TiAl3 composite, are promising materials for many applications, namely, in the aerospace industry. One method to produce Ti/TiAl3 laminate composite is to provide close attachment between desired number of titanium and aluminum plates, so that by applying heat and/or pressure, the formation of intermetallic phases between the layers becomes possible. In this work, explosive welding was used to make a strong bond between six alternative Ti and Al layers. The welded samples were annealed at three different temperatures: 903 K, 873 K, and 843 K (630 °C, 600 °C, and 570 °C) in ambient atmosphere, and the variation of the intermetallic layer thickness was used to study the growth kinetics. Microstructural investigations were carried out on the welded and annealed samples using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS). X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique was used to identify the formed intermetallic phases. It was found that at each temperature, two different mechanisms govern the process: reaction controlled and diffusion controlled. The calculated values of activation energies for reaction-controlled and diffusion-controlled mechanisms are 232.1 and 17.4 kJ, respectively.

  15. Thirty years of progress in applications and modeling of ocean ambient noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siderius, Martin; Buckingham, Michael J.

    2012-11-01

    Ambient noise in the ocean is a stochastic process, which traditionally was considered to be a nuisance, since it reduced the detectability of sonar signals of interest. However, over the last thirty years, it has come to be recognized that the ambient noise itself contains useful information about the ocean and ocean processes. To extract the information, various inversion procedures have been developed, based upon which a number of practical applications of the ambient noise have evolved. Since naturally generated ambient noise is always present in the ocean, it has the advantage of being non-invasive and non-damaging to marine life, including marine mammals. In this article, a summary of the commonly encountered ambient noise models is offered, along with the associated inversion procedures, and some of the more recent applications of the ambient noise are highlighted.

  16. Ambient Intelligence Application Based on Environmental Measurements Performed with an Assistant Mobile Robot

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Dani; Teixidó, Mercè; Font, Davinia; Moreno, Javier; Tresanchez, Marcel; Marco, Santiago; Palacín, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes the use of an autonomous assistant mobile robot in order to monitor the environmental conditions of a large indoor area and develop an ambient intelligence application. The mobile robot uses single high performance embedded sensors in order to collect and geo-reference environmental information such as ambient temperature, air velocity and orientation and gas concentration. The data collected with the assistant mobile robot is analyzed in order to detect unusual measurements or discrepancies and develop focused corrective ambient actions. This paper shows an example of the measurements performed in a research facility which have enabled the detection and location of an uncomfortable temperature profile inside an office of the research facility. The ambient intelligent application has been developed by performing some localized ambient measurements that have been analyzed in order to propose some ambient actuations to correct the uncomfortable temperature profile. PMID:24681671

  17. Ambient intelligence application based on environmental measurements performed with an assistant mobile robot.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Dani; Teixidó, Mercè; Font, Davinia; Moreno, Javier; Tresanchez, Marcel; Marco, Santiago; Palacín, Jordi

    2014-03-27

    This paper proposes the use of an autonomous assistant mobile robot in order to monitor the environmental conditions of a large indoor area and develop an ambient intelligence application. The mobile robot uses single high performance embedded sensors in order to collect and geo-reference environmental information such as ambient temperature, air velocity and orientation and gas concentration. The data collected with the assistant mobile robot is analyzed in order to detect unusual measurements or discrepancies and develop focused corrective ambient actions. This paper shows an example of the measurements performed in a research facility which have enabled the detection and location of an uncomfortable temperature profile inside an office of the research facility. The ambient intelligent application has been developed by performing some localized ambient measurements that have been analyzed in order to propose some ambient actuations to correct the uncomfortable temperature profile.

  18. Mobile-centric ambient intelligence in health- and homecare-anticipating ethical and legal challenges.

    PubMed

    Kosta, Eleni; Pitkänen, Olli; Niemelä, Marketta; Kaasinen, Eija

    2010-06-01

    Ambient Intelligence provides the potential for vast and varied applications, bringing with it both promise and peril. The development of Ambient Intelligence applications poses a number of ethical and legal concerns. Mobile devices are increasingly evolving into tools to orientate in and interact with the environment, thus introducing a user-centric approach to Ambient Intelligence. The MINAmI (Micro-Nano integrated platform for transverse Ambient Intelligence applications) FP6 research project aims at creating core technologies for mobile device based Ambient Intelligence services. In this paper we assess five scenarios that demonstrate forthcoming MINAmI-based applications focusing on healthcare, assistive technology, homecare, and everyday life in general. A legal and ethical analysis of the scenarios is conducted, which reveals various conflicting interests. The paper concludes with some thoughts on drafting ethical guidelines for Ambient Intelligence applications.

  19. Thermal expansion and phase transitions of α-AlF{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Morelock, Cody R.; Hancock, Justin C.; Wilkinson, Angus P.

    2014-11-15

    ReO{sub 3}-type materials are of interest for their potential low or negative thermal expansion. Many metal trifluorides MF{sub 3} adopt the cubic form of this structure at elevated temperatures, which rhombohedrally distorts upon cooling. The rhombohedral form displays strong positive volume thermal expansion, but cubic MF{sub 3} display much lower and sometimes negative thermal expansion. The expansion behavior of α-AlF{sub 3} was characterized via synchrotron powder diffraction between 323 and 1177 K. α-AlF{sub 3} is rhombohedral at ambient conditions and displays strongly anisotropic thermal expansion. The volume coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), α{sub V}, at 500 K is ∼86 ppm K{sup −1}, but the linear CTE along the c-axis, α{sub c}, is close to zero. α-AlF{sub 3} becomes cubic on heating to ∼713 K and continues to show positive thermal expansion above the phase transition (α{sub V}(900 K) ∼25 ppm K{sup −1}). - Graphical abstract: α-AlF{sub 3} has a rhombohedrally distorted ReO{sub 3}-type structure at ambient conditions and displays strongly positive volume thermal expansion that is highly anisotropic; the material becomes cubic on heating above ∼713 K and continues to show positive thermal expansion. - Highlights: • ReO{sub 3}-type α-AlF{sub 3} displays strongly anisotropic thermal expansion below 713 K. • α-AlF{sub 3} is cubic above 713 K and maintains positive (isotropic) thermal expansion. • The volume CTE changes from ∼86 to ∼25 ppm K{sup −1} on heating from 500 to 900 K. • The PTE of cubic α-AlF{sub 3} may be due to the presence of local octahedral tilts.

  20. Ambient monitoring of asbestos in selected Italian living areas.

    PubMed

    Gualtieri, Alessandro F; Mangano, Dario; Gualtieri, Magdalena Lassinantti; Ricchi, Anna; Foresti, Elisabetta; Lesci, Giorgio; Roveri, Norberto; Mariotti, Mauro; Pecchini, Giovanni

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents the results of an intensive monitoring activity of the particulate, fall-out and soil of selected living areas in Italy with the aim to detect the asbestos concentration in air and subsequent risk of exposure for the population in ambient living environments, and to assess the nature of the other mineral phases composing the particulate matrix. Some areas were sorted out because of the presence of asbestos containing materials on site whereas others were used as blank spots in the attempt to detect the background environmental concentration of asbestos in air. Because the concentration of asbestos in ambient environments is presumably very low, and it is well known that conventional low-medium flow sampling systems with filters of small diameter (25mm) may collect only a very small fraction of particulate over a short period, for the first time here, an intense monitoring activity was conducted with a high flow sampling system. The high flow system requires the use of large cellulose filters with the advantage that, increasing the amount of collected dust, the probability to collect asbestos fibers increases. Both the protocol of monitoring and analysis are novel and prompted by the need to increase the sensitivity towards the small number of expected fibers. With this goal, the collection of fall-out samples (the particulate falling into a collector filled with distilled water during the monitoring shift) and soil samples was also accomplished. The analytical protocol of the matrix particulate included preliminary X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), optical microscopy and quantitative electron microscopy (SEM and TEM). Correlations with climatic trends and PM10 concentration data were also attempted. The surprising outcome of this work is that, despite the nature of the investigated site, the amount of dispersed asbestos fibers is very low and invariably lower than the theoretical method detection limits of the SEM and TEM techniques for

  1. Seismic and Biological Sources of Ambient Ocean Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Simon Eric

    Sound is the most efficient radiation in the ocean. Sounds of seismic and biological origin contain information regarding the underlying processes that created them. A single hydrophone records summary time-frequency information from the volume within acoustic range. Beamforming using a hydrophone array additionally produces azimuthal estimates of sound sources. A two-dimensional array and acoustic focusing produce an unambiguous two-dimensional `image' of sources. This dissertation describes the application of these techniques in three cases. The first utilizes hydrophone arrays to investigate T-phases (water-borne seismic waves) in the Philippine Sea. Ninety T-phases were recorded over a 12-day period, implying a greater number of seismic events occur than are detected by terrestrial seismic monitoring in the region. Observation of an azimuthally migrating T-phase suggests that reverberation of such sounds from bathymetric features can occur over megameter scales. In the second case, single hydrophone recordings from coral reefs in the Line Islands archipelago reveal that local ambient reef sound is spectrally similar to sounds produced by small, hard-shelled benthic invertebrates in captivity. Time-lapse photography of the reef reveals an increase in benthic invertebrate activity at sundown, consistent with an increase in sound level. The dominant acoustic phenomenon on these reefs may thus originate from the interaction between a large number of small invertebrates and the substrate. Such sounds could be used to take census of hard-shelled benthic invertebrates that are otherwise extremely difficult to survey. A two-dimensional `map' of sound production over a coral reef in the Hawaiian Islands was obtained using two-dimensional hydrophone array in the third case. Heterogeneously distributed bio-acoustic sources were generally co-located with rocky reef areas. Acoustically dominant snapping shrimp were largely restricted to one location within the area surveyed

  2. Influence of ambient pressure on the ablation hole in femtosecond laser drilling Cu.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qinxin; Chen, Anmin; Li, Suyu; Qi, Hongxia; Qi, Ying; Hu, Zhan; Jin, Mingxing

    2015-09-20

    The holes were drilled by femtosecond laser pulse (800 nm, 100 fs) on Cu sheets at different ambient pressures. The pressure range was from 1 Pa to atmospheric pressure. The number of pulses to drill through the target, the stable photodiode signal, and the hole diameter were obtained as functions of ambient pressure. The morphology of the hole was observed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The result showed that the ambient pressure had significant influence on the morphology of the hole.

  3. Seismic interferometry and ambient noise tomography: theoretical background and application in south India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ritima; Rai, S. S.

    2016-10-01

    Seismic interferometry can be used to extract useful information about Earth's subsurface from the ambient noise wave field. It is an important new tool for exploring seismically quiescent areas. The method involves extraction of empirical Green's function from the background ambient vibrations of the Earth, followed by computation of group or phase velocity and tomographic imaging. Here we provide a review of seismic interferometry and ambient noise tomography (ANT) and present an example of the method in south India.

  4. Reply to Gopalswamy et al.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Richardson, I. G.

    2003-01-01

    The comment of Gopalswamy et al. (thereafter GMY) relates to a letter discussing coronal mass ejections (CMEs), interplanetary ejecta and geomagnetic storms. GMY contend that Cane et al. incorrectly identified ejecta (interplanetary CMEs) and hypothesize that this is because Cane et al. fail to understand how to separate ejecta from "shock sheaths" when interpreting solar wind and energetic particle data sets. They (GMY) are wrong be cause the relevant section of the paper was concerned with the propagation time to 1 AU of any potentially geoeffective structures caused by CMEs, i.e. upstream compression regions with or without shocks, or ejecta. In other words, the travel times used by Cane et al. were purposefully and deliberately distinct from ejecta travel times (except for those slow ejecta, approx. 30% of their events, which generated no upstream features), and no error in identification was involved. The confusion of GMY stems from the description did not characterize the observations sufficiently clearly.

  5. In memory of Al Cameron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, John; Truran, James W.

    Al Cameron, who died recently (October 3, 2005) at 80, was one of the giants in astrophysics. His insights were profound and his interests were wide-ranging. Originally trained as a nuclear physicist, he made major contributions in a number of fields, including nuclear reactions in stars, nucleosynthesis, the abundances of the elements in the Solar System, and the origin of the Solar System and the Moon. In 1957, Cameron and, independently, Burbidge, Burbidge, Fowler and Hoyle, wrote seminal papers on nuclear astrophysics. Most of our current ideas concerning ele- ment formation in stars have followed from those two pioneering and historical works. Al also made many contributions in the field of Solar System physics. Particularly noteworthy in this regard was Cameron's work on the formation of the Moon. Al was also a good friend and mentor of young people. Al Cameron will be missed by many in the community both for his scientific contributions and for his friendship.

  6. Al-Co-Fe (030)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/9getType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Al-Co-Fe (030)' with the content:

  7. Al-La-Nb (068)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/97.etType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Al-La-Nb (068)' with the content:

  8. Al-Cu-Zr (050)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/9getType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Al-Cu-Zr (050)' with the content:

  9. Al-La-Ni (069)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/9getType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Al-La-Ni (069)' with the content:

  10. Al-Au-La (010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/9getType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Al-Au-La (010)' with the content:

  11. Al-Ce-V (029)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/97.etType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Al-Ce-V (029)' with the content:

  12. Preparation of high-quality AlN on sapphire by high-temperature face-to-face annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Hideto; Lin, Chia-Hung; Tokoro, Kenta; Hiramatsu, Kazumasa

    2016-12-01

    The annealing of sputtered AlN films with different thicknesses grown on sapphire in nitrogen ambient was investigated. In the annealing, two AlN films on sapphire were overlapped ;face-to-face; to suppress the thermal decomposition of the AlN films. The sputtered AlN films with small grains consisted of columnar structure were initially aligned with (0002) orientation but became slightly inclined with increasing film thickness resulting in the formation of a two-layer structure. After annealing, films became a single crystalline layer regardless of the film thickness, and their crystallinity markedly improved after annealing at 1600-1700 °C. The full widths at half maximum of the (0002)- and (10 1 bar2)-plane X-ray rocking curves were improved to 49 and 287 arcsec, respectively, owing to the annihilation of domain boundaries in the sputtered AlN films, which concurrently increased the compressive stress in the films.

  13. Ambient echolalia in a patient with germinoma around the bilateral ventriculus lateralis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tadashi; Itoh, Shouichi; Arai, Noritoshi; Kouno, Masako; Noguchi, Makoto; Takatsu, Masami; Takeda, Katsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Ambient echolalia is a rare condition with few reported cases. We report the case of a 20-year-old man with a germinoma around the bilateral ventriculus lateralis who exhibited ambient echolalia. Clinical features included instinctive grasp reaction and compulsive manipulation of tools in his right hand. Speech or mental deterioration has been cited as a cause of ambient echolalia, but neither dementia nor aphasia was present. We propose that ambient echolalia in our case could be interpreted as a disinhibition of pre-existing essentially intact motor subroutines due to damage of the medial frontal lobe.

  14. 78 FR 25078 - Information Collection Request Submitted to OMB for Review and Approval; Comment Request; Ambient...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-29

    ... precursors, meteorological variables at a select number of sites and other supporting measurements... research. The State and local agencies and tribal entities with responsibility for reporting ambient...

  15. 75 FR 71033 - Air Quality Designations for the 2008 Lead (Pb) National Ambient Air Quality Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... Agency FR Federal Register FRM Federal Reference Method IQ Intelligence Quotient NAAQS National Ambient... include IQ loss, poor academic achievement, long- term learning disabilities, and an increased risk...

  16. 76 FR 72097 - Air Quality Designations for the 2008 Lead (Pb) National Ambient Air Quality Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-22

    ... IQ Intelligence Quotient NAAQS National Ambient Air Quality Standards NTTAA National Technology... systems (including their brains) arising from Pb exposure may include intelligence quotient (IQ)...

  17. Determination of heavy metals in the ambient atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Suvarapu, Lakshmi Narayana; Baek, Sung-Ok

    2017-01-01

    Heavy metal determination in ambient air is an important task for environmental researchers because of their toxicity to human beings. Some heavy metals (hexavalent chromium (Cr), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd) and nickel (Ni)) have been listed as carcinogens. Furthermore, heavy metals in the atmosphere can accumulate in various plants and animals and enter humans through the food chain. This article reviews the determination of heavy metals in the atmosphere in different areas of the world since 2006. The results showed that most researchers concentrated on toxic metals, such as Cr, Cd, Ni, As and lead. A few studies used plant materials as bio-monitors for the atmospheric levels of heavy metals. Some researchers found higher concentrations of heavy metals surrounding industrial areas compared with residential and/or commercial areas. Most studies reported the major sources of the particulate matter and heavy metals in the atmosphere to be industrial emissions, vehicular emissions and secondary aerosols.

  18. CO oxidation on Pt(111) at near ambient pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Krick Calderón, S.; Grabau, M.; Kress, B.; Papp, C.; Óvári, L.; Steinrück, H.-P.

    2016-01-28

    The oxidation of CO on Pt(111) was investigated simultaneously by near ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and online gas analysis. Different CO:O{sub 2} reaction mixtures at total pressures of up to 1 mbar were used in continuous flow mode to obtain an understanding of the surface chemistry. By temperature-programmed and by isothermal measurements, the onset temperature of the reaction was determined for the different reactant mixtures. Highest turnover frequencies were found for the stoichiometric mixture. At elevated temperatures, the reaction becomes diffusion-limited in both temperature-programmed and isothermal measurements. In the highly active regime, no adsorbates were detected on the surface; it is therefore concluded that the catalyst surface is in a metallic state, within the detection limits of the experiment, under the applied conditions. Minor bulk impurities such as silicon were observed to influence the reaction up to total inhibition by formation of non-platinum oxides.

  19. Ambient air monitoring to support HLW repository site characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Fransioli, P.M.; Dixon, W.R.

    1993-12-31

    Site characterization at the Yucca Mountain site includes an ambient air quality and meteorological monitoring program to provide information for environmental and site characterization issues. The program is designed to provide data for four basic purposes: Atmospheric dispersion calculations to estimate impacts of possible airborne releases of radiological material; Engineering design and extreme weather event characterization; Local climate studies for environmental impact analyses and climate characterization; and, Air quality permits required for site characterization work. The program is compiling a database that will provide the basis for analyses and reporting related to the purposes of the program. Except for reporting particulate matter and limited meteorological data to the State of Nevada for an air quality permit condition, the data have yet to be formally analyzed and reported.

  20. Detection of mutagenicity in mussels and their ambient water

    SciTech Connect

    Kira, Shohei; Hayatsu, Hikoya; Ogata, Masana )

    1989-10-01

    Mussels provide an excellent system for monitoring marine pollutants: the system is often called mussel watch. Investigators have reported the susceptibility of this organism to petroleum hydrocarbons and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. The authors showed the applicability of this organism to monitor oil pollutions by detecting organosulfur compounds in field samples. In the present study, they undertook the mutagen screening of mussel bodies and ambient water, and investigated the correlation between the mussel- and water-mutagenicities. Mutagenic compounds being detected here are those adsorbable to blue cotton or blue rayon and extractable with a methanol-ammonia solution, and the Ames assay was used for the detection of mutagenicity, with Salmonella typhimurium TA98 as the ester strain and with S9-mix for metabolic activation.

  1. Ambient background particulate composition, outdoor natural background: interferents/clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterno, Dorothea

    2012-06-01

    It has proven a very difficult task to discriminate an actual BW threat from the natural occurring ambient particulate aerosol, which includes a significant fraction of particles consisting of mixed mineral and biological material. The interferent particles [clutter] (bio and non bio) concentration varies widely both by location, weather and season and diurnally. Naturally occurring background particulates are composed of fungal and bacterial spores both fragments and components, plant fragments and debris, animal fragments and debris, all of which may be associated with inert dust or combustion material. Some or all of which could also be considered to be an interferent to a biological warfare detector and cause these biodector systems to cause False Alarms by non specific BW bio detectors. I will share analysis of current long term background data sets.

  2. Chemical transformations during ambient air sampling for organic vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Pellizzari, E.D.; Drost, K.J.

    1984-09-01

    Potential chemical transformations of olefins in the presence of ozone and high levels (ppm) of halogens (Cl/sub 2/, Br/sub 2/) were demonstrated when sampling ambient air with a sorbent cartridge. The use of stryene-d/sub 8/ and cyclohexene-d/sub 10/ spiked sampling devices and capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis allowed the detection and identification of several deuteriated oxidation and halogenated products. Dimethylamine-d/sub 6/ was converted in trace quantities (5-10 mg) to dimethylnitrosamine-d/sub 6/ when sampling was conducted in the presence of NO/sub x/. Oxidation reactions were prevented when filters (2.5 cm) employed for removing particulates were impregnated with 5-10 mg of sodium thiosulfate and placed in front of the sorbent cartridge. Halogenation reactions were also consideraly reduced.

  3. Particle size distribution of ambient aerosols in an industrial area.

    PubMed

    Rao, B Padma; Srivastava, A; Yasmin, F; Ray, S; Gupta, N; Chauhan, C; Rao, C V C; Wate, S R

    2012-05-01

    Aerosol samples of PM(10) and PM(2.5) were collected from 38 sampling locations in and around the industrial area. The 24 h average mass concentration of PM(10) and PM(2.5) was 137.5 and 61.5 μg/m(3) respectively during summer, 122 and 97.5 μg/m(3) respectively in winter and 70 and 54 μg/m(3) respectively during post monsoon season. The relative contribution of coarse, fine and ultrafine particle to ambient air was analyzed for its temporal and seasonal variability in an industrialized area. This paper aims to establish baseline between PM(10) and PM(2.5) mass concentration levels.

  4. Determination of ambient air hydrocarbons in 39 US cities

    SciTech Connect

    Seila, R.L.; Lonneman, W.A.

    1988-06-01

    Compliance with the NAAQS for ozone will require the reduction of non-methane organic carbon (NMOC). To this end, speciated hydrocarbons were determined for over 800 ambient air samples from 39 U.S. cities from 1984-1986. Samples were collected in stainless steel spheres on week days from 6 to 9 A.M. during June through September. C2 to C12 hydrocarbons were determined by capillary GC/FID with sample cryogenic preconcentration. The GC retention time identification table consisted of 314 uniquely numbered peaks, of which 97 were specifically named, 214 were identified by type (olefin, paraffin, aromatic). GC-MSD/FID analysis confirmed the identity of 40 peaks and indicated the presence of oxygenated, chlorinated, and fluorinated hydrocarbons in some samples.

  5. Measurement of Radiation Pressure in an Ambient Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Dakang; Garrett, Joseph; Munday, Jeremy

    2015-03-01

    Light has momentum and thus exerts ``radiation pressure'' when it is reflected or absorbed due to the conservation of momentum. Micromechanical transducers and oscillators are suitable for measurement and utilization of radiation pressure due to their high sensitivities. However, other light-induced mechanical deformations such as photothermal effects often obscure accurate measurements of radiation pressure in these systems. In this work, we investigate the radiation pressure and photothermal force on an uncoated silicon nitride microcantilever under illumination by a 660 nm laser in an ambient environment. To magnify the mechanical effects, the cantilever is driven optically from dc across its resonance frequency, and the amplitude and phase of its oscillation are acquired by an optical beam deflection method and a lockin amplifier. We show that radiation pressure and photothermal effects can be distinguished through the cantilever's frequency response. Furthermore, in a radiation pressure dominant regime, our measurement of the radiation force agrees quantitatively with the theoretical calculation.

  6. Challenges and Limitations of Intelligent Ambient Assisted Living Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichert, Reiner

    As a result of changing demographics, residing and being cared for in one's own familiar environment versus in an institutionalised inpatient setting is becoming the more attractive alternative for an ever increasing portion of the population. Despite its tremendous market potential, the AAL (Ambient Assisted Living) branch is still on the cusp of a mainstream breakthrough. A lack of viable business models is considered almost unanimously to be the greatest market obstacle to a broad implementation of innovative AAL systems. This paper highlights possible explanations for this deficit and shows why the AAL community has yet to arrive at joint solutions based on a unified AAL reference platform. Furthermore, this paper describes the enormous potential of AmI and AAL, as the first real opportunity for their success is provided through universAAL and AALOA.

  7. EEG sensitivity to television: effects of ambient lighting.

    PubMed

    Binnie, C D; Darby, C E; De Korte, R A; Veldhuizen, R; Wilkins, A J

    1980-11-01

    The effect of ambient lighting on EEG sensitivity to television has been tested in 16 photosensitive epileptic patients. Those who were not sensitive to 50 Hz IPS responded to TV at a viewing distance of 1 m or less and showed a consistent increase of EEG activation by television when the room was brightly lit. Most of those who were sensitive to 50 Hz IPS were also TV-sensitive at viewing distances greater than 1 m and the effect was most marked with lights off. The results are discussed in the context of previous work showing that some patients with TV epilepsy respond to the raster pattern of the screen and some, at greater distance, to 50 Hz flicker.

  8. Si(100) surfaces in a hydrogen-based process ambient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döscher, Henning; Dobrich, Anja; Brückner, Sebastian; Kleinschmidt, Peter; Hannappel, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    We studied the atomic surface properties of Si(100) during preparation in a (metal-organic) vapor phase epitaxy (VPE) reactor and the impact of the hydrogen ambient. Absorption lines in Fourier-transform infrared spectra were identified as stretch modes of coupled Si-H monohydrides, in agreement with Si-dimers observed by scanning tunneling microscopy. The polarization dependence of the antisymmetric stretch mode distinguished different dimer orientations and verified a clear preference for one of the (2×1)/(1×2) surface reconstruction domains. Tip-induced H-desorption proved the complete saturation of dangling bonds after VPE-preparation. In situ reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy showed the absence of Si-H bonds at elevated annealing temperature.

  9. Hydrogen generation at ambient conditions: application in fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Boddien, Albert; Loges, Björn; Junge, Henrik; Beller, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    The efficient generation of hydrogen from formic acid/amine adducts at ambient temperature is demonstrated. The highest catalytic activity (TOF up to 3630 h(-1) after 20 min) was observed in the presence of in situ generated ruthenium phosphine catalysts. Compared to the previously known methods to generate hydrogen from liquid feedstocks, the systems presented here can be operated at room temperature without the need for any high-temperature reforming processes, and the hydrogen produced can then be directly used in fuel cells. A variety of Ru precursors and phosphine ligands were investigated for the decomposition of formic acid/amine adducts. These catalytic systems are particularly interesting for the generation of H2 for new applications in portable electric devices.

  10. Volcanic gas emissions and their effect on ambient air character

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, A.J.; Elias, T.

    1994-01-01

    This bibliography was assembled to service an agreement between Department of Energy and the USGS to provide a body of references and useful annotations for understanding background gas emissions from Kilauea volcano. The current East Rift Zone (ERZ) eruption of Kilauea releases as much as 500,000 metric tonnes of SO{sub 2} annually, along with lesser amounts of other chemically and radiatively active species including H{sub 2}S, HCl, and HF. Primary degassing locations on Kilauea are located in the summit caldera and along the middle ERZ. The effects of these emissions on ambient air character are a complex function of chemical reactivity, source geometry and effusivity, and local meteorology. Because of this complexity, we organized the bibliography into three main sections: (1) characterizing gases as they leave the edifice; (2) characterizing gases and chemical reaction products away from degassing sources; and (3) Hawaii Island meteorology.

  11. Ambient-stable tetragonal phase in silver nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yugang; Ren, Yang; Liu, Yuzi; Wen, Jianguo; Okasinski, John S; Miller, Dean J

    2012-07-24

    Crystallization of noble metal atoms usually leads to the highly symmetric face-centred cubic phase that represents the thermodynamically stable structure. Introducing defective microstructures into a metal crystal lattice may induce distortions to form non-face-centered cubic phases when the lateral dimensions of objects decrease down to nanometre scale. However, stable non-face-centered cubic phases have not been reported in noble metal nanoparticles. Here we report that a stable body-centred tetragonal phase is observed in silver nanoparticles with fivefold twinning even at ambient conditions. The body-centered tetragonal phase originates from the distortion of cubic silver lattices due to internal strains in the twinned nanoparticles. The lattice distortion in the centre of such a nanoparticle is larger than that in the surfaces, indicating that the nanoparticle is composed of a highly strained core encapsulated in a less-strained sheath that helps stabilize the strained core.

  12. Characterization of ambient air pollution for stochastic health models

    SciTech Connect

    Batterman, S.A.

    1981-08-01

    This research is an analysis of various measures of ambient air pollution useful in cross-sectional epidemiological investigations and rick assessments. The Chestnut Ridge area health effects investigation, which includes a cross-sectional study of respiratory symptoms in young children, is used as a case study. Four large coal-fired electric generating power plants are the dominant pollution sources in this area of western Pennsylvania. The air pollution data base includes four years of sulfur dioxide and five years of total suspended particulate concentrations at seventeen monitors. Some 70 different characterizations of pollution are constructed and tested. These include pollutant concentrations at various percentiles and averaging times, exceedence measures which show the amount of time a specified threshold concentration is exceeded, and several dosage measures which transform non-linear dose-response relationships onto pollutant concentrations.

  13. Modeling Users, Context and Devices for Ambient Assisted Living Environments

    PubMed Central

    Castillejo, Eduardo; Almeida, Aitor; López-de-Ipiña, Diego; Chen, Liming

    2014-01-01

    The participation of users within AAL environments is increasing thanks to the capabilities of the current wearable devices. Furthermore, the significance of considering user's preferences, context conditions and device's capabilities help smart environments to personalize services and resources for them. Being aware of different characteristics of the entities participating in these situations is vital for reaching the main goals of the corresponding systems efficiently. To collect different information from these entities, it is necessary to design several formal models which help designers to organize and give some meaning to the gathered data. In this paper, we analyze several literature solutions for modeling users, context and devices considering different approaches in the Ambient Assisted Living domain. Besides, we remark different ongoing standardization works in this area. We also discuss the used techniques, modeled characteristics and the advantages and drawbacks of each approach to finally draw several conclusions about the reviewed works. PMID:24643006

  14. Moisture swing sorbent for carbon dioxide capture from ambient air.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Lackner, Klaus S; Wright, Allen

    2011-08-01

    An amine-based anion exchange resin dispersed in a flat sheet of polypropylene was prepared in alkaline forms so that it would capture carbon dioxide from air. The resin, with quaternary ammonium cations attached to the polymer structure and hydroxide or carbonate groups as mobile counterions, absorbs carbon dioxide when dry and releases it when wet. In ambient air, the moist resin dries spontaneously and subsequently absorbs carbon dioxide. This constitutes a moisture induced cycle, which stands in contrast to thermal pressure swing based cycles. This paper aims to determine the isothermal performance of the sorbent during such a moisture swing. Equilibrium experiments show that the absorption and desorption process can be described well by a Langmuir isothermal model. The equilibrium partial pressure of carbon dioxide over the resin at a given loading state can be increased by 2 orders of magnitude by wetting the resin.

  15. Flow behaviour of negatively buoyant jets in immiscible ambient fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, A.; Phillips, J. C.; Mier-Torrecilla, M.; Idelsohn, S. R.; Oñate, E.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigate experimentally the injection of a negatively buoyant jet into a homogenous immiscible ambient fluid. Experiments are carried out by injecting a jet of dyed fresh water through a nozzle in the base of a cylindrical tank containing rapeseed oil. The fountain inlet flow rate and nozzle diameter were varied to cover a wide range of Richardson Ri (8 × 10-4 < Ri < 1.98), Reynolds Re (467 < Re < 5,928) and Weber We (2.40 < We < 308.56) numbers. Based on the Re, Ri and We values for the experiments, we have determined a regime map to define how these values may control the occurrence of the observed flow types. Whereas Ri plays a stronger role when determining the maximum penetration height, the effect of the Reynolds number is stronger predicting the flow behaviour for a specific nozzle diameter and injection velocity.

  16. Swimming by microscopic organisms in ambient water flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehl, M. A. R.; Reidenbach, Matthew A.

    2007-11-01

    When microscopic organisms swim in their natural habitats, they are simultaneously transported by ambient currents, waves, and turbulence. Therefore, to understand how swimming affects the movement of very small creatures through the environment, we need to study their behavior in realistic water flow conditions. The purpose of the work described here was to develop a series of integrated field and laboratory measurements at a variety of scales that enable us to record high-resolution videos of the behavior of microscopic organisms exposed to realistic spatio-temporal patterns of (1) water velocities and (2) distributions of chemical cues that affect their behavior. We have been developing these approaches while studying the swimming behavior in flowing water of the microscopic larvae of various bottom-dwelling marine animals. In shallow marine habitats, the oscillatory water motion associated with waves can make dramatic differences to water flow on the scales that affect trajectories of microscopic larvae.

  17. Swimming by microscopic organisms in ambient water flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehl, M. A. R.; Reidenbach, Matthew A.

    When microscopic organisms swim in their natural habitats, they are simultaneously transported by ambient currents, waves, and turbulence. Therefore, to understand how swimming affects the movement of very small creatures through the environment, we need to study their behavior in realistic water flow conditions. The purpose of the work described here was to develop a series of integrated field and laboratory measurements at a variety of scales that enable us to record high-resolution videos of the behavior of microscopic organisms exposed to realistic spatio-temporal patterns of (1) water velocities and (2) distributions of chemical cues that affect their behavior. We have been developing these approaches while studying the swimming behavior in flowing water of the microscopic larvae of various bottom-dwelling marine animals. In shallow marine habitats, the oscillatory water motion associated with waves can make dramatic differences to water flow on the scales that affect trajectories of microscopic larvae.

  18. Effect of analytical techniques on measured ambient NO2 concentrations.

    PubMed

    Goyal, S K; Gavane, A G

    2005-06-01

    A study was carried out with specific reference to NO2 measurements in three countries (designated as A, B and C), which use three different manual methods; viz. Sodium Arsenite, Greiss Saltzman and TGS-ANSA for the determination of NO2 in ambient air. Significant deviation (up to 36 + %) was observed in measured NO, ion concentration when spiked samples were analyzed using these methods. Further, to make the data inter-comparable, exhaustive laboratory studies were carried out on these manual methods. Different concentration levels of NO2 were generated in the laboratory and analyzed by these methods simultaneously. The results were evaluated statistically. An interrelationship among the methods was established as method conversion factors (MCF). This would be useful in relating atmospheric concentration of NO2 among various countries, where different measurement techniques are adopted.

  19. Ambient Occlusion Effects for Combined Volumes and Tubular Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Schott, Mathias; Martin, Tobias; Grosset, A.V. Pascal; Smith, Sean T.; Hansen, Charles D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper details a method for interactive direct volume rendering that computes ambient occlusion effects for visualizations that combine both volumetric and geometric primitives, specifically tube-shaped geometric objects representing streamlines, magnetic field lines or DTI fiber tracts. The algorithm extends the recently presented the directional occlusion shading model to allow the rendering of those geometric shapes in combination with a context providing 3D volume, considering mutual occlusion between structures represented by a volume or geometry. Stream tube geometries are computed using an effective spline-based interpolation and approximation scheme that avoids self-intersection and maintains coherent orientation of the stream tube segments to avoid surface deforming twists. Furthermore, strategies to reduce the geometric and specular aliasing of the stream tubes are discussed. PMID:23559506

  20. Biological versus ambient exposure monitoring of creosote facility workers.

    PubMed

    Borak, Jonathan; Sirianni, Greg; Cohen, Howard; Chemerynski, Susan; Jongeneelen, Frans

    2002-04-01

    Traditional methods for monitoring occupational creosote exposure have focused on inhalation. However, there is evidence that dermal exposure contributes importantly to total systemic dose, as measured by biological monitoring methods. This study was conducted to further characterize the relationships between inhalation and dermal exposures to creosote, and to compare traditional ambient exposure monitoring versus biological monitoring in 36 creosote-exposed wood treatment workers. Full-shift personal air samples were obtained, along with post-shift and next-day urine measurements for 1-hydroxypyrene. There was little or no correlation between airborne measures and urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (r2 = 0.05 to 0.35). More than 90% of 1-hydroxypyrene could be attributed to dermal exposure. These data indicate that traditional monitoring methods may be inappropriate for creosote workers, raising concerns about the adequacy of methods currently mandated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.