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Sample records for al virus sincitial

  1. Palivizumab outcomes registry data from Spain: Infección Respiratoria Infantil por Virus Respiratorio Sincitial (IRIS) Study Group.

    PubMed

    Carbonell-Estrany, Xavier

    2003-02-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of lower respiratory illness in children <2 years of age. Severe RSV infection requiring hospitalization is linked to gestational age, chronic cardiopulmonary conditions and immunosuppression. The Infección Respiratoria Infantil por Virus Respiratorio Sincitial (IRIS) Study group in Spain conducted two pivotal epidemiologic studies establishing that serious RSV illness among premature infants was responsible for high rehospitalization rates (approximately 13%). RSV lower respiratory tract illness also correlated with prolonged hospital stay and more intensive care unit admissions. In Europe recent availability of palivizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody to RSV, is a major therapeutic advancement directed against prevention of lower respiratory tract infection secondary to this viral pathogen. To ensure proper and optimal usage of palivizumab, the IRIS group, in conjunction with the Spanish Neonatology Group, developed prophylaxis guidelines for neonates. Palivizumab prophylaxis is strongly recommended in premature infants < or =28 weeks gestation or those affected with chronic lung disease. Additionally, palivizumab is recommended for infants with a gestational age of 29 to 32 weeks, without evidence of chronic lung disease and who are <6 months old at the onset of the RSV season. It was thought that slightly older premature infants (33 to 35 weeks gestational age) should be assessed on an individual basis to determine whether prophylaxis is warranted. The IRIS Study Group is currently determining the effectiveness of these recommendations by measuring the incidence of RSV-related hospital admissions in infants born at < or =32 weeks gestational age who are receiving palivizumab prophylaxis.

  2. [Two-nuclear neurons: sincitial fusion or amitotic division].

    PubMed

    Sotnikov, O S; Frumkina, L E; Lactionova, A A; Paramonova, N M; Novakovskaia, S A

    2011-01-01

    In the review the history of research two-nuclear neurons is stated and two hypotheses about mechanisms of their formation are analysed: by sincitial fusion or amytotic divisions. The facts of discrepancy of the former orthodox cellular theory categorically denying possibility sincitial of communications in nervous system and of sincitial fusion neurons are mentioned. As an example results of ultrastructural researches of occurrence sincitium in a cortex of the big brain of rats, in autonomic ganglions, in hypocampus and a cerebellum of adult animals are presented. The video data of the sincitial fusion of live neurons and the mechanism of formation multinuclear neurons in tissue culture are analyzed. Existing data about amytotic a way of formation two-nuclear neurons are critically considered. The conclusion becomes, that the mechanism of formation two-nuclear neurons is cellular fusion. Simultaneously the review confirms our representations about existence in nervous system sincitial interneural communications.

  3. Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Respiratory Syncytial Virus KidsHealth > For Parents > Respiratory Syncytial Virus A A A What's in this article? About ... RSV When to Call the Doctor en español Virus respiratorio sincitial About RSV Respiratory syncytial (sin-SISH- ...

  4. Co-circulation of Dengue and Chikungunya Viruses, Al Hudaydah, Yemen, 2012.

    PubMed

    Rezza, Giovanni; El-Sawaf, Gamal; Faggioni, Giovanni; Vescio, Fenicia; Al Ameri, Ranya; De Santis, Riccardo; Helaly, Ghada; Pomponi, Alice; Metwally, Dalia; Fantini, Massimo; Qadi, Hussein; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Lista, Florigio

    2014-08-01

    We investigated 400 cases of dengue-like illness in persons hospitalized during an outbreak in Al Hudaydah, Yemen, in 2012. Overall, 116 dengue and 49 chikungunya cases were diagnosed. Dengue virus type 2 was the predominant serotype. The co-circulation of these viruses indicates that mosquitoborne infections represent a public health threat in Yemen.

  5. Co-circulation of Dengue and Chikungunya Viruses, Al Hudaydah, Yemen, 2012

    PubMed Central

    El-Sawaf, Gamal; Faggioni, Giovanni; Vescio, Fenicia; Al Ameri, Ranya; De Santis, Riccardo; Helaly, Ghada; Pomponi, Alice; Metwally, Dalia; Fantini, Massimo; Qadi, Hussein; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Lista, Florigio

    2014-01-01

    We investigated 400 cases of dengue-like illness in persons hospitalized during an outbreak in Al Hudaydah, Yemen, in 2012. Overall, 116 dengue and 49 chikungunya cases were diagnosed. Dengue virus type 2 was the predominant serotype. The co-circulation of these viruses indicates that mosquitoborne infections represent a public health threat in Yemen. PMID:25061762

  6. Sheep-to-Human Transmission of Orf Virus during Eid al-Adha Religious Practices, France

    PubMed Central

    Fossati, Christelle; Salez, Nicolas; Cohen-Bacrie, Stephan; Ninove, Laetitia; Michel, Fabrice; Aboukais, Samer; Buttner, Mathias; Zandotti, Christine; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Charrel, Remi N.

    2013-01-01

    Five persons in France were infected with Orf virus after skin wounds were exposed to infected sheep tissues during Eid al-Adha, the Muslim Feast of Sacrifice. Infections were confirmed by electron microscopy, PCR, and sequence analysis. Prevention and control of this underdiagnosed disease can be achieved by educating physicians, slaughterhouse workers, and persons participating in Eid al-Adha. PMID:23260031

  7. Detection of Chikungunya virus in Aedes aegypti during 2011 outbreak in Al Hodayda, Yemen.

    PubMed

    Zayed, Alia; Awash, Abdullah A; Esmail, Mohammed A; Al-Mohamadi, Hani A; Al-Salwai, Mostafa; Al-Jasari, Adel; Medhat, Iman; Morales-Betoulle, Maria E; Mnzava, Abraham

    2012-07-01

    In October 2010, the Ministry of Public Health and Population reported an outbreak of dengue-like acute febrile illness in Al Hodayda governorate. By January 2011, a total of 1542 cases had been recorded from 19 of the 26 districts in the governorate with 104 purportedly associated deaths. In response this event, in January 2011 entomological investigations aimed at identifying the primary vector and the epidemic associated etiological agent were carried out. Based on the reported cases and the progress of the outbreak in the governorate, mosquito collection was undertaken in two of the most recent outbreak areas; Al Khokha district (130km south of Al Hodayda) and Al Muneera district (100km north). Mosquito adults were collected from houses using BG-sentinel™ traps, aspiration of resting mosquitoes and knock-down spraying. Indoor and outdoor containers adjacent to the houses were inspected for larvae. Subsequently mosquito pools were analyzed by RT-PCR for detection of the four dengue virus serotypes (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3, DENV-4), and for Chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Aedes aegypti was the dominant mosquito species collected. Four pools represent 40% of the tested pools, all containing adult female Ae. aegypti, were positive for CHIKV. Three CHIKV isolates were obtained from the RNA positive mosquito pools and identified by rRT-PCR. This finding marks the first record of CHIKV isolated from Ae. aegypti in Yemen. The larval container and Breteau indices in the visited localities surveyed were estimated at 53.8 and 100, respectively. The emergence of this unprecedented CHIKV epidemic in Al Hodayda is adding up another arboviral burden to the already existing vector-borne diseases. Considering the governorate as one focal port in the Red Sea region, the spread of the disease to other areas in Yemen and in neighboring countries is anticipated. Public health education and simple measures to detect and prevent mosquito breeding in water storage containers could prevent

  8. Phylogeny of Dengue and Chikungunya viruses in Al Hudayda governorate, Yemen.

    PubMed

    Ciccozzi, Massimo; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Cella, Eleonora; Giovanetti, Marta; Lai, Alessia; El-Sawaf, Gamal; Faggioni, Giovanni; Vescio, Fenicia; Al Ameri, Ranya; De Santis, Riccardo; Helaly, Ghada; Pomponi, Alice; Metwally, Dalia; Fantini, Massimo; Qadi, Hussein; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Lista, Florigio; Rezza, Giovanni

    2014-10-01

    Yemen, which is located in the southwestern end of the Arabian Peninsula, is one of countries most affected by recurrent epidemics caused by emerging vector-borne viruses. Dengue virus (DENV) outbreaks have been reported with increasing frequency in several governorates since the year 2000, and the Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has been also responsible of large outbreaks and it is now a major public health problem in Yemen. We report the results of the phylogenetic analysis of DENV-2 and CHIKV isolates (NS1 and E1 genes, respectively) detected in an outbreak occurred in Al-Hudayda in 2012. Estimates of the introduction date of CHIKV and DENV-2, and the phylogeographic analysis of DENV-2 are also presented. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the Yemen isolates of DENV belonged to the lineage 2 Cosmopolitan subtype, whereas CHIKV isolates from Yemen belonged to the ECSA genotype. All the CHIKV isolates from Yemen were statistically supported and dated back to the year 2010 (95% HPD: 2009-2011); these sequences showed an alanine in the aminoacid position 226 of the E1 protein. Phylogeographic analysis of DENV-2 virus showed that cluster 1, which included Yemen isolates, dated back to 2003 Burkina Faso strains (95% HPD 1999-2007). The Yemen, cluster dated back to 2011 (95% HPD 2009-2012). Our study sheds light on the global spatiotemporal dynamics of DENV-2 and CHIKV in Yemen. This study reinforces both the need to monitor the spread of CHIKV and DENV, and to apply significant measures for vector control.

  9. Outbreak of viral hemorrhagic fever caused by dengue virus type 3 in Al-Mukalla, Yemen

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Investigations were conducted by the authors to explore an outbreak of viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) reported in 2010 from Al-Mukalla city, the capital of Hadramout in Yemen. Methods From 15–17 June 2010, the outbreak investigation period, specimens were obtained within 7 days after onset of illness of 18 acutely ill patients hospitalized with VHF and 15 household asymptomatic contacts of 6 acute cases. Additionally, 189 stored sera taken from acutely ill patients with suspected VHF hospitalized in the preceding 12 months were obtained from the Ministry of Health of Yemen. Thus, a total of 222 human specimens were collected; 207 specimens from acute cases and 15 specimens from contacts. All samples were tested with RT-PCR for dengue (DENV), Alkhumra (ALKV), Rift Valley Fever (RVFV), Yellow Fever (YFV), and Chikungunya (CHIKV) viruses. Samples were also tested for DENV IgM, IgG, and NS1-antigen. Medical records of patients were reviewed and demographic, clinical, and laboratory data was collected. Results Of 207 patients tested, 181 (87.4%) patients were confirmed to have acute dengue with positive dengue NS1-antigen (97 patients, 46.9%) and/or IgM (163 patients, 78.7%). Of the 181 patients with confirmed dengue, 100 (55.2%) patients were IgG-positive. DENV RNA was detected in 2 (1%) patients with acute symptoms; both samples were molecularly typed as DENV type 3. No other VHF viruses were detected. For the 15 contacts tested, RT-PCR tests for the five viruses were negative, one contact was dengue IgM positive, and another one was dengue IgG positive. Of the 181 confirmed dengue patients, 120 (66.3%) patients were males and the median age was 24 years. The most common manifestations included fever (100%), headache (94.5%), backache (93.4%), malaise (88.4%), arthralgia (85.1%), myalgia (82.3%), bone pain (77.9%), and leukopenia (76.2%). Two (1.1%) patients died. Conclusions DENV-3 was confirmed to be the cause of an outbreak of VHF in Al

  10. Duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) genotype definition: comment on the article by Cha et al.

    PubMed

    Wen, Huiqiang; Han, Lingxia; Zhang, Xiaona; Lian, Chuanjiang; Zhao, Lili; Si, Changde; Chen, Hongyan

    2014-06-04

    Duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) is genetically divided into three different genotypes: the original type DHAV-1, a type recently isolated in Taiwan (DHAV-2), and a recently described type isolated in South Korea and China (DHAV-3). Recently, Cha et al. (2013) concluded that the existence that both DHAV-1 and DHAV-2 had been classified into one branch, with DHAV genotype 3 (DHAV-3) in another, and that the phylogenetic distance unit showed was 0.5, a tremendous value. However, there might be some concerns on the methodology application to define the genotypes of DHAV. Based on 110 genomic and 100 amino acid sequences of DHAV which included all the sequences from Cha et al. (2013) respectively, phylogenetic analysis in the present study showed a distinct and proposed DHAV genotype definition, that both DHAV-2 and DHAV-3 were clustered in one branch while DHAV-1 in another branch only, and that the phylogenetic distance unit of 0.02 was confirmed, which was much smaller than the value 0.5. Taking into account the genotype definition of DHAV, we also conducted the pairwise sequence comparisons (PASC) analysis of 110 genomic sequences, and proposed that the distance genotype definition threshold was 0.045.

  11. [Al

    PubMed

    Purath; Köppe; Schnöckel

    1999-10-04

    A "naked" aluminum atom links two aluminum tetrahedra in the [Al(7){N(SiMe(3))(2)}(6)](-) ion (see picture), which results from the reaction of a metastable AlCl solution with LiN(SiMe(3))(2) and crystallizes with [Li(OEt(2))(3)](+) as cation. This unique structure among molecular metal atom clusters represents a small but characteristic section of cubic close-packed aluminum.

  12. Abortions, stillbirths and deformities in sheep at the Al-Ahsa oasis in eastern Saudi Arabia: isolation of a bluetongue serogroup virus from the affected lambs.

    PubMed

    Housawi, F M T; Abu Elzein, E M E; Ramadan, R O; Gameel, A A; Al-Afaleq, A I; Al-Mousa, J

    2004-12-01

    A wave of abortions, stillbirths and deformities in sheep occurred at the Al-Ahsa oasis in the eastern region of Saudi Arabia in the second half of 1999. The abortions were recorded in August and September and stillbirths and deformities in neonates were observed in October. Adult sheep were clinically normal. A virus was isolated in chicken embryos, adapted to Vero cell culture and further identified as bluetongue (BT) virus. The virus isolated was not neutralised by the Akabane virus. Reference hyperimmune serum against antibodies to BT virus detected in the sera of the dams gave positive results for BT but negative results for both Akabane and bovine viral diarrhoea virus. It was concluded that the outbreak was caused by a virus of the BT serogroup. The authors present the clinico-pathological and epidemiological situation of the disease outbreak.

  13. Viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Lytic bacteriophages, viruses which infect and lyse bacterial cells, can provide a natural method to reduce bacterial pathogens on produce commodities. The use of multi-phage cocktails is most likely to be effective against bacterial pathogens on produce commodities, and minimize the development of...

  14. A conserved binding site within the Tomato golden mosaic virus AL-1629 promoter is necessary for expression of viral genes important for pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tu Jun; Sunter, Garry

    2007-10-10

    We have identified a nine base pair sequence in Tomato golden mosaic virus that is required for binding of nuclear proteins from tobacco and Arabidopsis to viral DNA. The sequence is located within the promoter for a 0.7 kb complementary sense mRNA (AL-1629). Mutation of the binding site results in a two- to six-fold reduction in the accumulation of AL-1629 mRNA, leading to reduced AL2 and AL3 gene expression. Viral sequences located immediately adjacent to the core binding site appear to influence AL2 and AL3 expression, but retain some binding affinity to a soluble host protein(s). The ability of a nuclear protein(s) to bind sequences within the AL-1629 promoter correlates with efficient viral DNA replication, as mutation of these sequences results in reduced viral DNA levels. Analysis of begomo- and curtoviruses indicates extensive conservation of this binding site, which suggests a common mechanism regulating expression of two viral genes involved in replication and suppression of host defense responses.

  15. A conserved binding site within the Tomato Golden Mosaic Virus AL-1629 promoter is necessary for expression of viral genes important for pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Jun; Sunter, Garry

    2010-01-01

    We have identified a nine base pair sequence in Tomato golden mosaic virus that is required for binding of nuclear proteins from tobacco and Arabidopsis to viral DNA. The sequence is located within the promoter for a 0.7 kb complementary sense mRNA (AL-1629). Mutation of the binding site results in a two to six-fold reduction in the accumulation of AL-1629 mRNA, leading to reduced AL2 and AL3 gene expression. Viral sequences located immediately adjacent to the core binding site appear to influence AL2 and AL3 expression, but retain some binding affinity to a soluble host protein(s). The ability of a nuclear protein(s) to bind sequences within the AL-1629 promoter correlates with efficient viral DNA replication, as mutation of these sequences results in reduced viral DNA levels. Analysis of begomo- and curtoviruses indicates extensive conservation of this binding site, which suggests a common mechanism regulating expression of two viral genes involved in replication and suppression of host defense responses. PMID:17532021

  16. Human immunodeficiency virus drug development assisted with AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors and binding-site models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yen-Wen; Lee, Geng-Yen; Chyi, Jen-Inn; Hsu, Chen-Pin; Hsu, You-Ren; Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Huang, Yu-Fen; Sun, Yuh-Chang; Chen, Chih-Chen; Chun Hung, Sheng; Ren, Fan; Andrew Yeh, J.; Wang, Yu-Lin

    2013-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Reverse Transcriptase (RT)-immobilized AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) and binding-site models were used to find out the dissociation constants of the HIV RT-inhibitor complex and the number of the binding sites on RT for the inhibitor, Efavirenz. One binding site on the RT for the inhibitor is predicted and the dissociation constant extracted from the binding-site model is 0.212 nM. The AlGaN/GaN HEMTs and the binding-site-models are demonstrated to be good tools to assist drug developments by elucidating the dissociation constants and the number of binding sites, which can largely reduce the cost and time for drug developments.

  17. Neuro-Immune Mechanisms in Response to Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 125 (HTLV- 1 ) Tax: Induction of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha and...1987), Visna virus (Stowring et al., 1985), Borna virus (Carbone et al., 1991), as well as Human Immunodeficiency virus type- 1 (Tornatore et al., 1994...nick end labeling VEE Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus VSV Vesicular stomatitis virus WEE Western equine encephalitis virus 1 CHAPTER 1

  18. Multifunctional Fe₃O₄ core/Ni-Al layered double hydroxides shell nanospheres as labels for ultrasensitive electrochemical immunoassay of subgroup J of avian leukosis virus.

    PubMed

    Shang, Kun; Zhu, Jianying; Meng, Xiaomeng; Cheng, Ziqiang; Ai, Shiyun

    2012-01-01

    A novel electrochemical immunosensor for ultrasensitive detection of subgroup J of avian leukosis virus (ALVs-J) was designed by using graphene sheets (GS)-layered double hydroxides (LDHs) composites modified electrode with multifunctional Fe(3)O(4) core/Ni-Al LDHs shell (LDHs@Fe(3)O(4)) nanospheres as labels. At first, the GS-LDHs were used for the immunosensor platform for improving the electronic transmission rate as well as increasing the surface area to capture a large amount of primary antibodies (Ab(1)). After that, ferrocene (Fc), secondary antibodies (Ab(2)) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) multifunctional LDHs@Fe(3)O(4) nanospheres were used as labels with high load amount and good biological activity. Subsequently, in presence of H(2)O(2), amplified signals were obtained by an electrochemical sandwich immunoassay protocol. To embody the signal amplification property of the protocol, the analytical properties of various immunosensor platform and labels were compared in detail. Under optimal conditions, the reduction peak currents of the electrochemical immunosensor were proportional to the ALVs-J concentration over the range from 10(2.32) to 10(5.50) TCID(50)/mL with a low detection limit (180 TCID(50)/mL, S/N=3). The resulting immunosensor also displayed a good selectivity, reproducibility and stability.

  19. Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus

    MedlinePlus

    Diseases and Conditions Ebola virus and Marburg virus By Mayo Clinic Staff Ebola virus and Marburg virus are related viruses that cause hemorrhagic ... Africa, where sporadic outbreaks have occurred for decades. Ebola virus and Marburg virus live in animal hosts, ...

  20. Zika Virus.

    PubMed

    FitzSimmons, Jack; Shah, Shailen

    2016-06-29

    To the Editor: Petersen et al. (April 21 issue)(1) provide a detailed review of Zika virus. We have some concern regarding diagnostic criteria for microcephaly in fetuses and newborns exposed to the virus. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendation that microcephaly should be defined as an occipitofrontal circumference below the third percentile, nearly 3% of newborns would be categorized as having microcephaly. In Brazil, where there are 3 million live births per year, the application of this definition would result in nearly 90,000 infants being labeled as having microcephaly - a far greater number than . . .

  1. Ebola Virus Disease Candidate Vaccines Under Evaluation in Clinical Trials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-02

    medical countermeasures. Viruses , 4(10), 2312-2316 (2012). 101. Bradfute SB. Duration of immune responses after Ebola virus vaccination. Lancet Infect Dis...Geisbert JB et al. Vesicular stomatitis virus -based vaccines protect nonhuman primates against aerosol challenge with Ebola and Marburg viruses ...Ebola virus vaccines 1 Ebola Virus Disease Candidate Vaccines Under Evaluation in Clinical Trials Keywords: candidate vaccine; clinical trial

  2. Blueberry virus A

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Leaf yellowing on highbush blueberry ‘Spartan’ prompted Isogai et al. to investigate whether a virus was the causal agent of the disorder. After double-stranded RNA extraction from symptomatic material they identified a single band of 17 Kb, indicative of virus infection. Shotgun cloning and sequenc...

  3. Positive reinforcement for viruses.

    PubMed

    Vigant, Frederic; Jung, Michael; Lee, Benhur

    2010-10-29

    Virus-cell membrane fusion requires a critical transition from positive to negative membrane curvature. St. Vincent et al. (2010), in PNAS, designed a class of antivirals that targets this transition. These rigid amphipathic fusion inhibitors are active against an array of enveloped viruses.

  4. Heartland Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vector-Borne Diseases (DVBD) NCEZID Share Compartir Heartland virus On this Page What is Heartland virus? How ... Do I Need to Know? What is Heartland virus? Heartland virus belongs to a family of viruses ...

  5. Diagnosing ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... that a person diagnosed with ALS seek a second opinion from an ALS "expert" - someone who diagnoses and treats many ALS patients and has training in this medical specialty. The ALS Association maintains a list of recognized experts in the field of ALS. See ALS Association Certified Centers of ...

  6. Identifying risk factors for severe respiratory syncytial virus among infants born after 33 through 35 completed weeks of gestation: different methodologies yield consistent findings.

    PubMed

    Carbonell-Estrany, Xavier; Figueras-Aloy, José; Law, Barbara J

    2004-11-01

    Prematurity is a proven risk factor for severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. Prematurity leads to an increased need for, and duration of, hospital admission, intensive care, mechanical ventilation and supplemental oxygen, as well as increased mortality. The Pediatric Investigators Collaborative Network on Infections in Canada (PICNIC) study was a prospective, multicenter, cohort study conducted in 16 regions across Canada during 2 successive RSV seasons: November 2000-June 2001, and November 2001-June 2002. The study regions were defined to capture all births and all hospital admissions. The FLIP [identify those risk Factors that most Likely may lead to development of RSV-related respiratory Infection and subsequent hospital admission among Premature infants born 33-35 weeks gestational age (GA)] study was a prospective, case-control study comparison of premature infants hospitalized for RSV infection and infants who had not been hospitalized to identify the risk factors that most likely would lead to development of RSV infection and subsequent hospital admission in this population. The overall hospitalization rate for RSV in the PICNIC study was 3.6% for infants of 33-35 weeks GA. In the FLIP study, the severity of RSV infection in the 33- to 35-week GA infants was similar to that in the younger infants of <33-week GA studied previously by the Infeccion Respiratoria Infantil por Virus Respiratorio Sincitial Study Group. Similar risk factors were noted in both studies. RSV is a major cause of hospitalization in preterm infants. There is great variability among hospital admission rates globally, despite the commonality of severe RSV in many countries. Furthermore there are numerous independent risk factors for severe RSV, including socioeconomic and environmental factors, that merit further investigation. There is likely an additive effect when multiple risk factors are present. More research is needed on the various risk factors and their

  7. ALS Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... toward a world without ALS! Walk to Defeat ALS® Walk to Defeat ALS® draws people of all ... We need your help. I Will Advocate National ALS Registry The National ALS Registry is a congressionally ...

  8. VEGF increases blood-brain barrier permeability to Evans blue dye and tetanus toxin fragment C but not adeno-associated virus in ALS mice.

    PubMed

    Ay, Ilknur; Francis, Jonathan W; Brown, Robert H

    2008-10-09

    Entry of most compounds into the CNS is impeded by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Because vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is important in the formation and maintenance of the BBB and is known to modulate BBB permeability in newborn rodents, we tested the hypothesis that VEGF may enhance BBB permeability in adult mice. We examined the effect of VEGF on the CNS distribution of three different agents: a small molecule (Evans blue dye) that is known to bind plasma proteins, an exogenous protein (tetanus toxin fragment C; TTC), and a viral vector (recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 2/5 marked with lacZ; rAAV2/5-lacZ). Pretreatment with VEGF (20 mug; i.v.) increased permeability of the BBB to Evans blue dye and TTC as detected by augmented concentrations of these substances in the cerebrum, brainstem, and spinal cord. By contrast, VEGF did not alter BBB permeability to AAV2/5-lacZ, as defined by beta-galactosidase activity assay. These data demonstrate the potential utility of VEGF for pharmacological modulation of the BBB, and indicate that the increase in BBB permeability mediated by VEGF is limited by the size of the delivered substance.

  9. ECHO virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001340.htm ECHO virus To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Enteric cytopathic human orphan (ECHO) viruses are a group of viruses that can lead ...

  10. Virus Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1961-01-01

    viruses are capable of inducing cancer, it is obvious that virus carcinogenesis cannot be considered in an isolated fashion, without some reference to...intradermal inoculations of vaccinia virus . One of the viruses most widely investigated with respect to quantitative dose- response relationships is the...than the rule. Figure 6 shows the type of deviation most commonly observed with viruses of infectious diseases. VIRUS CARCINOGENESIS 131 It is a

  11. ALS - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - ALS ... The following organizations are good resources for information on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis : Muscular Dystrophy Association -- www.mda.org/disease/amyotrophic-lateral-sclerosis National Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) ...

  12. Neuro-Immune Mechanisms in Response to Venezuelan equine encephalitis Virus Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 125 (HTLV- 1 ) Tax: Induction of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha and Suseptibility to Lysis...et al., 1987), Visna virus (Stowring et al., 1985), Borna virus (Carbone et al., 1991), as well as Human Immunodeficiency virus type- 1 (Tornatore et...INTRODUCTION 1 CHAPTER 2 — ASTROCYTES AS TARGETS FOR VENEZUELAN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS INFECTION Title Page 15 Abstract 16 Introduction 17 Material

  13. Inactivation of Hepatitis A Virus (HAV) by Chlorine and Iodine in Water

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-01

    and Materials A. Viruses , Cell Cultures and Virus Purification ......... 5 1. HAV ............................................... 5 2. Echovirus 1 and...Siegl et al., 1984) and more stable under various environmental conditions (Sobsey et al., 1986) than other viruses and bacteria . Conventional water...to selected indicator viruses and bacteria . However, other studies by this group indicated that HAV was relatively resistant to combined forms of

  14. Entry and Replication of Japanese Encephalitis Virus in Cultured Neurogenic Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    acetylcholine receptor a rabies virus receptor ). Science, 215, 211-221. 214 Longberg-Holm, K. and...At present. little is known about neuronal receptors for various neurotropic viruses . Acetylcholine receptors are suspected to function as receptors ...for rabies virus (Lentz et al., 1982; Burrage et al., 1985). In the search for the neuronal receptors for JE virus , the hybrid cells and

  15. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses in Three Central American Countries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    herpes simplex virus in college students. Pediatr Infect Dis J 1993; 12(4):280–284. Laguna-Torres et al. 12 ª 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd, Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses ...parainfluenza viruses (57; 3.2%), influenza B virus (47; 2.7% of cases), and herpes simplex virus 1 (22; 1.3%). In addition, human metapneumovirus and...the identification of adenovirus- es, influenza A virus, influenza B virus, PIVs (types 1, 2, and 3), and RSV. The D3 DFA Herpes Simplex Virus

  16. Foodborne viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Testing for human pathogenic viruses in foods represents a formidable task requiring the extraction, concentration, and assay of a host of viruses from a wide range of food matrices. The enteric viruses, particularly genogroup I and II (GI and GII) noroviruses and hepatitis A virus, are the princip...

  17. Inventing Viruses.

    PubMed

    Summers, William C

    2014-11-01

    In the nineteenth century, "virus" commonly meant an agent (usually unknown) that caused disease in inoculation experiments. By the 1890s, however, some disease-causing agents were found to pass through filters that retained the common bacteria. Such an agent was called "filterable virus," the best known being the virus that caused tobacco mosaic disease. By the 1920s there were many examples of filterable viruses, but no clear understanding of their nature. However, by the 1930s, the term "filterable virus" was being abandoned in favor of simply "virus," meaning an agent other than bacteria. Visualization of viruses by the electron microscope in the late 1930s finally settled their particulate nature. This article describes the ever-changing concept of "virus" and how virologists talked about viruses. These changes reflected their invention and reinvention of the concept of a virus as it was revised in light of new knowledge, new scientific values and interests, and new hegemonic technologies.

  18. Nucleotide Sequence of the Hantaan Virus S RNA Segment and Expression of Encoded Proteins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-03

    stomatitis virus and influenza virus) has been shown to be important in generating cytotoxic T cells in response to viral infection (Townsend et al...termination-polyadenylation signal common to other negative-strand RNA viruses (Sendai virus: 5’-TAAGAAAA and vesicular stomatitis virus: TATGAAAA...codon also occurs in the two retroviruses, murine leukemia virus and feline leukemia virus, to produce a precursor polyprotein larger than normal 191

  19. Chikungunya Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... is key! Prevent Infection. Use mosquito repellent. Chikungunya Virus Distribution Chikungunya in the U.S. What's New Surveillance ... Clinical Challenge For Travelers CDC Travelers' Health Chikungunya Virus Home Prevention Transmission Symptoms & Treatment Geographic Distribution Chikungunya ...

  20. Zika Virus

    MedlinePlus

    Zika is a virus that is spread mostly by mosquitoes. A pregnant mother can pass it to ... through blood transfusions. There have been outbreaks of Zika virus in the United States, Africa, Southeast Asia, ...

  1. Hepadna viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, W.; Koike, K.; Will, H.

    1987-01-01

    This book examines the molecular biology, disease pathogenesis, epidemiology, and clinical features of hepadna and other viruses with hepatic tropism and outlines future directions and approaches for their management. The volume's six sections provide a review of the various features, mechanisms, and functions of these viruses, ranging from hepadna virus replication and regulation of gene expression to the structure and function of hepadna-virus gene products.

  2. Virus maturation.

    PubMed

    Delgui, Laura R; Rodríguez, José F

    2013-01-01

    The formation of infectious virus particles is a highly complex process involving a series of sophisticated molecular events. In most cases, the assembly of virus structural elements results in the formation of immature virus particles unable to initiate a productive infection. Accordingly, for most viruses the final stage of the assembly pathway entails a set of structural transitions and/or biochemical modifications that transform inert precursor particles into fully infectious agents. In this chapter, we review the most relevant maturation mechanisms involved in the generation of infectious virions for a wide variety of viruses.

  3. Limits in virus filtration capability? Impact of virus quality and spike level on virus removal with xenotropic murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Roush, David J; Myrold, Adam; Burnham, Michael S; And, Joseph V; Hughes, Joseph V

    2015-01-01

    Virus filtration (VF) is a key step in an overall viral clearance process since it has been demonstrated to effectively clear a wide range of mammalian viruses with a log reduction value (LRV) > 4. The potential to achieve higher LRV from virus retentive filters has historically been examined using bacteriophage surrogates, which commonly demonstrated a potential of > 9 LRV when using high titer spikes (e.g. 10(10) PFU/mL). However, as the filter loading increases, one typically experiences significant decreases in performance and LRV. The 9 LRV value is markedly higher than the current expected range of 4-5 LRV when utilizing mammalian retroviruses on virus removal filters (Miesegaes et al., Dev Biol (Basel) 2010;133:3-101). Recent values have been reported in the literature (Stuckey et al., Biotech Progr 2014;30:79-85) of LRV in excess of 6 for PPV and XMuLV although this result appears to be atypical. LRV for VF with therapeutic proteins could be limited by several factors including process limits (flux decay, load matrix), virus spike level and the analytical methods used for virus detection (i.e. the Limits of Quantitation), as well as the virus spike quality. Research was conducted using the Xenotropic-Murine Leukemia Virus (XMuLV) for its direct relevance to the most commonly cited document, the International Conference of Harmonization (ICH) Q5A (International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use, Geneva, Switzerland, 1999) for viral safety evaluations. A unique aspect of this work is the independent evaluation of the impact of retrovirus quality and virus spike level on VF performance and LRV. The VF studies used XMuLV preparations purified by either ultracentrifugation (Ultra 1) or by chromatographic processes that yielded a more highly purified virus stock (Ultra 2). Two monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) with markedly different filtration characteristics and with similar levels of

  4. Molecular Interactions of the Hantaan Virus Nucleocapsid Protein

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-12

    Antoniades et, §J^., 1985/ Avsic- Zupanc et. al., 1989/ Brummer-Korvenkonto et. al., 1980). Several NE viruses have been isolated, the type strain...virus: Comparison to other causative agents of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Virology 176: 114-125. Avsic- Zupanc , T., B. Cizman, A. Gligic, G

  5. Correction: Graillot, B.; et al. Progressive Adaptation of a CpGV Isolate to Codling Moth Populations Resistant to CpGV-M. Viruses 2014, 6, 5135–5144

    PubMed Central

    Graillot, Benoît; Berling, Marie; Blachere-López, Christine; Siegwart, Myriam; Besse, Samantha; López-Ferber, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    In our article “Progressive Adaptation of a CpGV Isolate to Codling Moth Populations Resistant to CpGV-M.” (Viruses 2014, 6, 5135–5144; doi:10.3390/v6125135) [1] we obtained resistance values of the codling moth, Cydia pomonella, RGV laboratory colony [2], when challenged with Cydia pomonella Granulovirus, Mexican Isolate (CpGV-M), that were lower than those previously published [2]. Careful analysis of both the RGV colony and the CpGV-M virus stock used led to the realization that a low level contamination of this virus stock with CpGV-R5 occurred. We have made new tests with a verified stock, and the results are now in agreement with those previously published.

  6. AL Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Definition of the disease AL amyloidosis results from extra-cellular deposition of fibril-forming monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) light chains (LC) (most commonly of lambda isotype) usually secreted by a small plasma cell clone. Most patients have evidence of isolated monoclonal gammopathy or smoldering myeloma, and the occurrence of AL amyloidosis in patients with symptomatic multiple myeloma or other B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders is unusual. The key event in the development of AL amyloidosis is the change in the secondary or tertiary structure of an abnormal monoclonal LC, which results in instable conformation. This conformational change is responsible for abnormal folding of the LC, rich in β leaves, which assemble into monomers that stack together to form amyloid fibrils. Epidemiology AL amyloidosis is the most common type of systemic amyloidois in developed countries with an estimated incidence of 9 cases/million inhabitant/year. The average age of diagnosed patients is 65 years and less than 10% of patients are under 50. Clinical description The clinical presentation is protean, because of the wide number of tissues or organs that may be affected. The most common presenting symptoms are asthenia and dyspnoea, which are poorly specific and may account for delayed diagnosis. Renal manifestations are the most frequent, affecting two thirds of patients at presentation. They are characterized by heavy proteinuria, with nephrotic syndrome and impaired renal function in half of the patients. Heart involvement, which is present at diagnosis in more than 50% of patients, leading to restrictive cardiopathy, is the most serious complication and engages prognosis. Diagnostic methods The diagnosis relies on pathological examination of an involved site showing Congo red-positive amyloid deposits, with typical apple-green birefringence under polarized light, that stain positive with an anti-LC antibody by immunohistochemistry and/or immunofluorescence. Due to the

  7. Processing and transport of environmental virus samples.

    PubMed Central

    Dahling, D R; Wright, B A

    1984-01-01

    Poliovirus-seeded tap water, conditioned with MgCl2 and passed through virus-adsorbing filters, gave better poliovirus recovery than water identically treated but conditioned with AlCl3. Elution of several filter types with beef extract yielded higher recoveries than did elution with glycine. Seeded samples filtered through various filters and stored showed considerable virus loss in 2 days when stored at 4 degrees C, whereas those stored at -70 degrees C gave stable virus recovery up to 4 days. Additionally, the use of antifoam during the elution process reduced foaming and increased virus recovery by 28%. PMID:6331312

  8. Monovalent Virus-Like Particle Vaccine Protects Guinea Pigs and Nonhuman Primates Against Infection with Multiple Marburg Viruses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    Kolesnikova L, Smolina M et al. Ebola virus infection in guinea pigs: presumable role of granulomatous inflammation in pathogenesis . Arch. Virol. 141...Slenczka W. The pathogenesis and epidemiology of the “Marburg- virus ” infection. Ger. Med. Mon. 14(1), 7–10 (1969). 36 Haas R, Maass G. Experimental...isolates. KEYWORDS: antibody • Ebola • filovirus • Marburg • nonhuman primate • protective immunity • vaccine • virus -like particle Marburg virus (MARV

  9. Mycoplasma viruses.

    PubMed

    Maniloff, J

    1988-01-01

    Unlike bacterial viruses that infect cells bounded by a cell wall, mycoplasma viruses have evolved to enter and propagate in mycoplasma cells bounded only by a single lipid-protein cell membrane. In addition, mycoplasmas have the smallest amount of genetic information of any known cells, so their complexity is constrained by a limited genetic coding capacity. As a consequence of these host cell differences, mycoplasma viruses have been found to have a variety of structures and replication strategies which are different from those of the bacterial viruses. This article is a critical review of mycoplasma viruses infecting the genera Acholeplasma, Spiroplasma, and Mycoplasma; included are data on classification, morphology and structure, biological and physical properties, chemical composition, and productive and lysogenic replication cycles.

  10. Method for detecting viruses in aerosols.

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, C; Melnick, J L; Rao, V C; Sox, T E

    1985-01-01

    A simple method with poliovirus as the model was developed for recovering human enteric viruses from aerosols. Filterite filters (pore size, 0.45 micron; Filterite Corp., Timonium, Md.) moistened with glycine buffer (pH 3.5) were used for adsorbing the aerosolized virus. No virus passed the filter, even with air flow rates of 100 liters/min. Virus recovery from the filter was achieved by rapid elution with 800 ml of glycine buffer, pH 10. The virus in the primary eluate was reconcentrated by adjusting the pH to 3.5, adding AlCl3 to 0.0005 M, collecting the virus on a 0.25-micron-pore Filerite disk (diameter, 25 mm) and and eluting with 6 ml of buffer, pH 10. With this method, virus could be detected regularly in aerosols produced by flushing when 3 X 10(8) PFU of poliovirus were present in the toilet bowl. Poliovirus-containing fecal material from two of four infants who had recently received oral polio vaccine also yielded virus in the aerosols when feces containing 2.4 X 10(7) to 4.5 X 10(7) PFU of virus had been added to the toilet bowl. Persons infected with a variety of natural enteric viruses are known to excrete this amount of virus in their daily stools. Images PMID:3004329

  11. Computer viruses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    The worm, Trojan horse, bacterium, and virus are destructive programs that attack information stored in a computer's memory. Virus programs, which propagate by incorporating copies of themselves into other programs, are a growing menace in the late-1980s world of unprotected, networked workstations and personal computers. Limited immunity is offered by memory protection hardware, digitally authenticated object programs,and antibody programs that kill specific viruses. Additional immunity can be gained from the practice of digital hygiene, primarily the refusal to use software from untrusted sources. Full immunity requires attention in a social dimension, the accountability of programmers.

  12. Lassa virus.

    PubMed

    Günther, Stephan; Lenz, Oliver

    2004-01-01

    Lassa virus is a RNA virus belonging to the family of Arenaviridae. It was discovered as the causative agent of a hemorrhagic fever--Lassa fever--about 30 years ago. Lassa fever is endemic in West Africa and is estimated to affect some 100,000 people annually. Great progress in the understanding of the life cycle of arenaviruses, including Lassa virus, has been made in recent years. New insights have been gained in the pathogenesis and molecular epidemiology of Lassa fever, and state-of the-art technologies for diagnosing this life-threatening disease have been developed. The intention of this review is to summarize in particular the recent literature on Lassa virus and Lassa fever. Several aspects ranging from basic research up to clinical practice and laboratory diagnosis are discussed and linked together.

  13. Zika Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Zika Virus Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Men and Zika Zika Cases in Texas What’s your Zika IQ? ...

  14. The discovery of Antarctic RNA viruses: a new game changer.

    PubMed

    Cavicchioli, Ricardo; Erdmann, Susanne

    2015-10-01

    Antarctic ecosystems are dominated by micro-organisms, and viruses play particularly important roles in the food webs. Since the first report in 2009 (López-Bueno et al. ), 'omic'-based studies have greatly enlightened our understanding of Antarctic aquatic microbial diversity and ecosystem function (Wilkins et al. ; Cavicchioli ). This has included the discovery of many new eukaryotic viruses (López-Bueno et al. ), virophage predators of algal viruses (Yau et al. ), bacteria with resistance to phage (Lauro et al. ) and mechanisms of haloarchaeal evasion, defence and adaptation to viruses (Tschitschko et al. ). In this issue of Molecular Ecology, López-Bueno et al. () report the first discovery of RNA viruses from an Antarctic aquatic environment. High sequence coverage enabled genome variation to be assessed for four positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses from the order Picornavirales. By examining the populations present in the water column and in the lake's catchment area, populations of 'quasispecies' were able to be linked to local environmental factors. In view of the importance of viruses in Antarctic ecosystems but lack of data describing them, this study represents a significant advance in the field.

  15. Adaptation and Study of AIDS Viruses in Animal and Cell Culture Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-30

    category one, e.g , Friend Murine -6- Leukemia Virus (FMuLV), Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV), and the Macaque Type D SAIDS retrovirus (SRV) have been...10). One other animal lentivirus, Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV), has had some utility in the study of protective immunity and in screening...et al. (58) transplanted RNA mumps virus infected human HeLa cells, or RNA vesicular stomatitis virus-infected hamster BHK cells into nude mice

  16. Virophages or satellite viruses?

    PubMed

    Krupovic, Mart; Cvirkaite-Krupovic, Virginija

    2011-11-01

    It has been argued that the smaller viruses associated with giant DNA viruses are a new biological entity. However, Mart Krupovic and Virginija Cvirkaite-Krupovic argue here that these smaller viruses should be classified with the satellite viruses.

  17. Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... chimps and fruit bats in Africa. Transmission from animals to humans Experts suspect that both viruses are transmitted to humans through an infected animal's bodily fluids. Examples include: Blood. Butchering or eating ...

  18. Eukaryotic-Like Virus Budding in Archaea.

    PubMed

    Quemin, Emmanuelle R J; Chlanda, Petr; Sachse, Martin; Forterre, Patrick; Prangishvili, David; Krupovic, Mart

    2016-09-13

    , influenza virus, and Ebola virus. The present study is the first to characterize such a phenomenon in archeal cells, showing that membrane budding is not an exclusive feature of eukaryotic viruses. Our results provide significant insights into the biogenesis and architecture of unique, spindle-shaped virions that infect archaea. Furthermore, our findings open doors for future inquiries into (i) the evolution of the virus budding process, (ii) mechanistic details of virus-mediated membrane scission in Archaea, and (iii) elucidation of virus- and host-encoded molecular players responsible for archaeal membrane and surface remodeling. Copyright © 2016 Quemin et al.

  19. Helical virus particles formed from morphological subunits of a membrane containing icosahedral virus.

    PubMed

    Kononchik, Joseph P; Nelson, Steevenson; Hernandez, Raquel; Brown, Dennis T

    2009-03-15

    The classic publication by Caspar and Klug in 1962 [Physical principles in the construction of regular viruses. Cold Spring Harbor Symp. Quant. Biol. 27:1-24.] has formed the basis of much research on virus assembly. Caspar and Klug predicted that a single virus morphological unit could form a two dimensional lattice composed of 6-fold arrays (primitive plane), a family of icosahedra of increasing triangulation numbers (T) and helical arrays of varying length. We have shown that icosahedral viruses of varying T numbers can be produced using Sindbis virus [Ferreira, D. F. et al. 2003. Morphological variants of Sindbis virus produced by a mutation in the capsid protein. Virology 307:54-66]. Other studies have shown that Sindbis glycoproteins can also form a 2-dimensional lattice confirming Caspar and Klug's prediction of the primitive plane as a biologically relevant structure [VonBonsdorff, C. H., and S. C. Harrison. 1978. Sindbis virus glycoproteins form a regular icosahedral surface lattice. J. Virol. 28:578]. In this study we have used mutations in the glycoproteins of membrane containing Sindbis virus to create helical-virus-like particles from the morphological subunits of a virus of icosahedral geometry. The resulting virus particles were examined for subunit organization and were determined to be constructed of only 6-fold rotational arrays of the virus glycoproteins. A model of the tubular virus particles created from the 6-fold rotational arrays of Sindbis virus confirmed the observed structure. These experiments show that a common morphological unit (the Sindbis E1-E2 heterodimer) can produce three different morphological entities of varying dimensions in a membrane-containing virus system.

  20. Computer Viruses. Technology Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponder, Tim, Comp.; Ropog, Marty, Comp.; Keating, Joseph, Comp.

    This document provides general information on computer viruses, how to help protect a computer network from them, measures to take if a computer becomes infected. Highlights include the origins of computer viruses; virus contraction; a description of some common virus types (File Virus, Boot Sector/Partition Table Viruses, Trojan Horses, and…

  1. Foodborne viruses.

    PubMed

    Koopmans, Marion; von Bonsdorff, Carl Henrik; Vinjé, Jan; de Medici, Dario; Monroe, Steve

    2002-06-01

    Foodborne and waterborne viral infections are increasingly recognized as causes of illness in humans. This increase is partly explained by changes in food processing and consumption patterns that lead to the worldwide availability of high-risk food. As a result, vast outbreaks may occur due to contamination of food by a single foodhandler or at a single source. Although there are numerous fecal-orally transmitted viruses, most reports of foodborne transmission describe infections with Norwalk-like caliciviruses (NLV) and hepatitis A virus (HAV), suggesting that these viruses are associated with the greatest risk of foodborne transmission. NLV and HAV can be transmitted from person to person, or indirectly via food, water, or fomites contaminated with virus-containing feces or vomit. People can be infected without showing symptoms. The high frequency of secondary cases of NLV illness and - to a lesser extent - of hepatitis A following a foodborne outbreak results in amplification of the problem. The burden of illness is highest in the elderly, and therefore is likely to increase due to the aging population. For HAV, the burden of illness may increase following hygienic control measures, due to a decreasing population of naturally immune individuals and a concurrent increase in the population at risk. Recent advances in the research of NLV and HAV have led to the development of molecular methods which can be used for molecular tracing of virus strains. These methods can be and have been used for the detection of common source outbreaks. While traditionally certain foods have been implicated in virus outbreaks, it is clear that almost any food item can be involved, provided it has been handled by an infected person. There are no established methods for detection of viruses in foods other than shellfish. Little information is available on disinfection and preventive measures specifically for these viruses. Studies addressing this issue are hampered by the lack of

  2. Aerosol Transmission of Hantaan and Related Viruses to Laboratory Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    5011 Abstract. Hantaan. Seoul. and Puumala viruses were transmitted to 12-16-week-old female Wistar Rattus norvegicits by inhalation. The rodent...et al. showed in- Viruses used were the prototype HTN (strain tercage transmission ofHTN virus between cages 76-118) virus isolated in 1976," SEO...passed among bank voles. Additionally, aerosolized in Vero E-6 cells 8 times. HTN’ and SEO’ viruses were suspected as the Female outbred Wistar Crl:(WR

  3. [Ebola and Marburg viruses: the humans strike back].

    PubMed

    Alazard-Dany, Nathalie; Ottmann Terrangle, Michèle; Volchkov, Viktor

    2006-04-01

    Ebola and Marburg viruses are the causative agents of rapidly progressive hemorrhagic fevers with high mortality rates. Pre- or post-exposure treatments against the diseases are currently not available for human use. In the field, establishment of strict quarantine measures preventing further virus transmission are still the only way to fight the infections. However, our knowledge of Ebola and Marburg viruses has markedly increased as a result of two recent discoveries discussed in this review. Chandran et al. have elucidated the mechanism by which Ebola GP is converted to a fusion-active form. Infectivity of Ebola virus was shown to be dependent on the cleavage of GP by cellular endosomal proteases, cathepsin B and L, thus opening new therapeutic approaches options. As for Jones SM et al., they have successfully vaccinated monkeys with recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus expressing Ebola or Marburg virus surface glycoprotein GP, a promising vaccine approach.

  4. [Influenza virus].

    PubMed

    Juozapaitis, Mindaugas; Antoniukas, Linas

    2007-01-01

    Every year, especially during the cold season, many people catch an acute respiratory disease, namely flu. It is easy to catch this disease; therefore, it spreads very rapidly and often becomes an epidemic or a global pandemic. Airway inflammation and other body ailments, which form in a very short period, torment the patient several weeks. After that, the symptoms of the disease usually disappear as quickly as they emerged. The great epidemics of flu have rather unique characteristics; therefore, it is possible to identify descriptions of such epidemics in historic sources. Already in the 4th century bc, Hippocrates himself wrote about one of them. It is known now that flu epidemics emerge rather frequently, but there are no regular intervals between those events. The epidemics can differ in their consequences, but usually they cause an increased mortality of elderly people. The great flu epidemics of the last century took millions of human lives. In 1918-19, during "The Spanish" pandemic of flu, there were around 40-50 millions of deaths all over the world; "Pandemic of Asia" in 1957 took up to one million lives, etc. Influenza virus can cause various disorders of the respiratory system: from mild inflammations of upper airways to acute pneumonia that finally results in the patient's death. Scientist Richard E. Shope, who investigated swine flu in 1920, had a suspicion that the cause of this disease might be a virus. Already in 1933, scientists from the National Institute for Medical Research in London - Wilson Smith, Sir Christopher Andrewes, and Sir Patrick Laidlaw - for the first time isolated the virus, which caused human flu. Then scientific community started the exhaustive research of influenza virus, and the great interest in this virus and its unique features is still active even today.

  5. Reproduction of Venezulean Equine Encephalomyelitis Virus at Low Ionic Strength

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-02-28

    AD/A-006 206 REPRODUCTION OF VENEZUELAN EQUINE ENCEPHALOMYELITIS VIRUS AT LOW IONIC STRENGTH T.M. Sokolova, et al Army Medical Research Institute of... Reproduction of Venezuelan equine encephalo- Translation myelitis virus at low ionic strength 6. PERFORM4ING ORG. REPORT NU14BER II!LTT, 0491 7. AUTHOR(a... REPRODUCTION OF VENEZUELAN EQUINE ENCEPHALOMYELITIS VIRUS AT LOW IONIC STRFNGTH Article by T. M. Sokolova, I. B. Tazulakhova, S. S. Grigoryan and F. I. e v

  6. The efficacy of alcelaphine herpesvirus-1 (AlHV-1) immunization with the adjuvants Emulsigen(®) and the monomeric TLR5 ligand FliC in zebu cattle against AlHV-1 malignant catarrhal fever induced by experimental virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Lankester, Felix; Lugelo, Ahmed; Werling, Dirk; Mnyambwa, Nicholas; Keyyu, Julius; Kazwala, Rudovick; Grant, Dawn; Smith, Sarah; Parameswaran, Nevi; Cleaveland, Sarah; Russell, George; Haig, David

    2016-11-15

    Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a fatal disease of cattle that, in East Africa, follows contact with wildebeest excreting alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1). Recently an attenuated vaccine (atAlHV-1) was tested under experimental challenge on Friesian-Holstein (FH) cattle and gave a vaccine efficacy (VE) of approximately 90%. However testing under field conditions on an East African breed, the shorthorn zebu cross (SZC), gave a VE of 56% suggesting that FH and SZC cattle may respond differently to the vaccine. To investigate, a challenge trial was carried out using SZC. Additionally three adjuvant combinations were tested: (i) Emulsigen(®), (ii) bacterial flagellin (FliC) and (iii) Emulsigen(®)+bacterial flagellin. We report 100% seroconversion in all immunized cattle. The group inoculated with atAlHV-1+Emulsigen(®) had significantly higher antibody titres than groups inoculated with FliC, the smallest number of animals that became infected and the fewest fatalities, suggesting this was the most effective combination. A larger study is required to more accurately determine the protective effect of this regime in SZC. There was an apparent inhibition of the antibody response in cattle inoculated with atAlHV-1+FliC, suggesting FliC might induce an immune suppressive mechanism. The VE in SZC (50-60%) was less than that in FH (80-90%). We speculate that this might be due to increased risk of disease in vaccinated SZC (suggesting that the vaccine may be less effective at stimulating an appropriate immune response in this breed) and/or increased survival in unvaccinated SZC (suggesting that these cattle may have a degree of prior immunity against infection with AlHV-1). Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Honeybee viruses in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Antúnez, Karina; D'Alessandro, Bruno; Corbella, Eduardo; Ramallo, Gustavo; Zunino, Pablo

    2006-09-01

    Mortality of honeybees is a serious problem that beekeepers have to face periodically in Uruguay and worldwide. The presence of RNA viruses, in addition to other pathogens may be one of its possible causes. In this work, we detected Chronic bee paralysis virus, Acute bee paralysis virus, Black queen cell virus, Sacbrood virus and Deformed wing virus in samples of Uruguayan honeybees with or without Varroa destructor and Nosema apis. The detection of viruses in different provinces, simultaneous co-infection of colonies by several viruses and the fact that 96% of the samples were infected with one or more virus, indicates they are widely spread in the region.

  8. Abu al-Layth al-Libi

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    jihadi doctrine, al-Libi enrolled himself in the recently erected and highly popular al-Faruq 2 “Al-Sahab Releases ‘Winds of Paradise , Part III...February 2008, http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/7220823.stm. 3 “Al-Sahab Releases ‘Winds of Paradise , Part III,’” Global Terrorism Research Project...5 “Al-Sahab Releases ‘Winds of Paradise , Part III,’” Global Terrorism Research Project. 6 Ibid. The date provided in the video is 1410

  9. CONCENTRATION AND PROCESSING OF WATERBORNE VIRUSES BY POSITIVE CHARGE 1MDS CARTRIDGE FILTERS AND ORGANIC FLOCCULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter describes the most widely used virus adsorption-elution (VIRADEL) method for recovering human enteric viruses from water matrices (Fout et al., 1996). The method takes advantage of postively charged cartridge filters to concentrate viruses from water. The major adv...

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of a Vampire Bat Rabies Virus from French Guiana.

    PubMed

    Lavergne, Anne; Darcissac, Edith; Bourhy, Hervé; Tirera, Sourakhata; de Thoisy, Benoît; Lacoste, Vincent

    2016-04-07

    A rabies virus was detected in a common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus) in French Guiana. Its genomic sequence was obtained and found to be closely related to other hematophagous bat-related viruses that widely circulate in the northern Amazon region. This virus is named AT6. Copyright © 2016 Lavergne et al.

  11. The Geometry of Viruses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Christine L.

    1991-01-01

    Presented is an activity in which students make models of viruses, which allows them to visualize the shape of these microorganisms. Included are some background on viruses, the biology and geometry of viruses, directions for building viruses, a comparison of cells and viruses, and questions for students. (KR)

  12. The Geometry of Viruses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Christine L.

    1991-01-01

    Presented is an activity in which students make models of viruses, which allows them to visualize the shape of these microorganisms. Included are some background on viruses, the biology and geometry of viruses, directions for building viruses, a comparison of cells and viruses, and questions for students. (KR)

  13. What Is ALS?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javits, actor David Niven, “Sesame Street” creator Jon Stone, boxing champion Ezzard Charles, NBA Hall of Fame ... Help for People with ALS and Caregivers Read stories from families living with ALS Forms of ALS ...

  14. Measles virus.

    PubMed

    Naim, Hussein Y

    2015-01-01

    Measles was an inevitable infection during the human development with substantial degree of morbidity and mortality. The severity of measles virus (MV) infection was largely contained by the development of a live attenuated vaccine that was introduced into the vaccination programs. However, all efforts to eradicate the disease failed and continued to annually result in significant deaths. The development of molecular biology techniques allowed the rescue of MV from cDNA that enabled important insights into a variety of aspects of the biology of the virus and its pathogenesis. Subsequently these technologies facilitated the development of novel vaccine candidates that induce immunity against measles and other pathogens. Based on the promising prospective, the use of MV as a recombinant vaccine and a therapeutic vector is addressed.

  15. Plant Virus Metagenomics: Advances in Virus Discovery.

    PubMed

    Roossinck, Marilyn J; Martin, Darren P; Roumagnac, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    In recent years plant viruses have been detected from many environments, including domestic and wild plants and interfaces between these systems-aquatic sources, feces of various animals, and insects. A variety of methods have been employed to study plant virus biodiversity, including enrichment for virus-like particles or virus-specific RNA or DNA, or the extraction of total nucleic acids, followed by next-generation deep sequencing and bioinformatic analyses. All of the methods have some shortcomings, but taken together these studies reveal our surprising lack of knowledge about plant viruses and point to the need for more comprehensive studies. In addition, many new viruses have been discovered, with most virus infections in wild plants appearing asymptomatic, suggesting that virus disease may be a byproduct of domestication. For plant pathologists these studies are providing useful tools to detect viruses, and perhaps to predict future problems that could threaten cultivated plants.

  16. Annulate lamellae in phloem cells of virus-infected Sonchus plants

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    The occurrence of annulate lamellae (AL) in differentiating phloem of Sonchus oleraceus (Compositae) singly infected with sowthistle yellow vein virus (SYVV) and doubly infected with a combination of SYVV and beet yellow stunt virus is documented by electron microscopy. Cell types in which AL were found were immature sieve elements and phloem parenchyma cells. AL were found only in cells that also contained SYVV particles although a direct association between the virus and AL was not apparent. The substructure of the AL and the relationships between the AL and the nuclear envelope and endoplasmic reticulum are similar to those reported in other descriptions of this organelle in the literature. This report appears to be the first one concerning the association of AL with a plant virus disease. PMID:873998

  17. Annulate lamellae in phloem cells of virus-infected Sonchus plants.

    PubMed

    Steinkamp, M P; Hoefert, L L

    1977-07-01

    The occurrence of annulate lamellae (AL) in differentiating phloem of Sonchus oleraceus (Compositae) singly infected with sowthistle yellow vein virus (SYVV) and doubly infected with a combination of SYVV and beet yellow stunt virus is documented by electron microscopy. Cell types in which AL were found were immature sieve elements and phloem parenchyma cells. AL were found only in cells that also contained SYVV particles although a direct association between the virus and AL was not apparent. The substructure of the AL and the relationships between the AL and the nuclear envelope and endoplasmic reticulum are similar to those reported in other descriptions of this organelle in the literature. This report appears to be the first one concerning the association of AL with a plant virus disease.

  18. Zika Virus.

    PubMed

    Musso, Didier; Gubler, Duane J

    2016-07-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arthropod-borne virus (arbovirus) in the genus Flavivirus and the family Flaviviridae. ZIKV was first isolated from a nonhuman primate in 1947 and from mosquitoes in 1948 in Africa, and ZIKV infections in humans were sporadic for half a century before emerging in the Pacific and the Americas. ZIKV is usually transmitted by the bite of infected mosquitoes. The clinical presentation of Zika fever is nonspecific and can be misdiagnosed as other infectious diseases, especially those due to arboviruses such as dengue and chikungunya. ZIKV infection was associated with only mild illness prior to the large French Polynesian outbreak in 2013 and 2014, when severe neurological complications were reported, and the emergence in Brazil of a dramatic increase in severe congenital malformations (microcephaly) suspected to be associated with ZIKV. Laboratory diagnosis of Zika fever relies on virus isolation or detection of ZIKV-specific RNA. Serological diagnosis is complicated by cross-reactivity among members of the Flavivirus genus. The adaptation of ZIKV to an urban cycle involving humans and domestic mosquito vectors in tropical areas where dengue is endemic suggests that the incidence of ZIKV infections may be underestimated. There is a high potential for ZIKV emergence in urban centers in the tropics that are infested with competent mosquito vectors such as Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Zika Virus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arthropod-borne virus (arbovirus) in the genus Flavivirus and the family Flaviviridae. ZIKV was first isolated from a nonhuman primate in 1947 and from mosquitoes in 1948 in Africa, and ZIKV infections in humans were sporadic for half a century before emerging in the Pacific and the Americas. ZIKV is usually transmitted by the bite of infected mosquitoes. The clinical presentation of Zika fever is nonspecific and can be misdiagnosed as other infectious diseases, especially those due to arboviruses such as dengue and chikungunya. ZIKV infection was associated with only mild illness prior to the large French Polynesian outbreak in 2013 and 2014, when severe neurological complications were reported, and the emergence in Brazil of a dramatic increase in severe congenital malformations (microcephaly) suspected to be associated with ZIKV. Laboratory diagnosis of Zika fever relies on virus isolation or detection of ZIKV-specific RNA. Serological diagnosis is complicated by cross-reactivity among members of the Flavivirus genus. The adaptation of ZIKV to an urban cycle involving humans and domestic mosquito vectors in tropical areas where dengue is endemic suggests that the incidence of ZIKV infections may be underestimated. There is a high potential for ZIKV emergence in urban centers in the tropics that are infested with competent mosquito vectors such as Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. PMID:27029595

  20. Ebola Virus Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... sheets Fact files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Ebola virus disease Fact sheet Updated January 2016 Key ... for survivors of Ebola virus disease Symptoms of Ebola virus disease The incubation period, that is, the ...

  1. Influenza (Flu) Viruses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seasonal Avian Swine/Variant Pandemic Other Influenza (Flu) Viruses Language: English (US) Español Recommend on Facebook ... circulate and cause illness. More Information about Flu Viruses Types of Influenza Viruses Influenza A and B ...

  2. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and premature birth: Are you at risk? Zika virus and pregnancy Folic acid Medicine safety and pregnancy ... It's been added to your dashboard . Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common virus that infects the ...

  3. Computer Viruses: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marmion, Dan

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the early history and current proliferation of computer viruses that occur on Macintosh and DOS personal computers, mentions virus detection programs, and offers suggestions for how libraries can protect themselves and their users from damage by computer viruses. (LRW)

  4. SAMPLING VIRUSES FROM SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter describes in detail methods for detecting viruses of bacteria and humans in soil. Methods also are presented for the assay of these viruses. Reference sources are provided for information on viruses of plants.

  5. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus ... Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your ...

  6. Computer Viruses: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marmion, Dan

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the early history and current proliferation of computer viruses that occur on Macintosh and DOS personal computers, mentions virus detection programs, and offers suggestions for how libraries can protect themselves and their users from damage by computer viruses. (LRW)

  7. Hanta virus (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hanta virus is a distant cousin of Ebola virus, but is found worldwide. The virus is spread by human contact with rodent waste. Dangerous respiratory illness develops. Effective treatment is not yet ...

  8. Detection of vaccinia virus DNA, but not infectious virus, in the blood of smallpox vaccine recipients.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jeffrey I; Hohman, Patricia; Preuss, Jeanne C; Li, Li; Fischer, Steven H; Fedorko, Daniel P

    2007-06-06

    The authors of a recent study [Savona MR, Dela Cruz WP, Jones MS, Thornton JA, Xia D, Hadfield TL, et al. Detection of vaccinia DNA in the blood following smallpox vaccination. JAMA 2006; 295:1898-1900] suggested that the duration of deferral for blood donations by smallpox vaccinees should be extended, based on detection of vaccinia virus DNA in five blood samples by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the potential for viremia. We found that 4 of 202 blood specimens (from 3 of 27 smallpox vaccinees) were positive for vaccinia virus DNA by PCR; none were positive for virus by culture. Throat swabs were negative by PCR and culture. Thus, while some blood specimens contained vaccinia virus DNA, infectious virus was not detected. Current guidelines for deferral of blood donation in vaccinees seem appropriate.

  9. Virus Movement Maintains Local Virus Population Diversity

    SciTech Connect

    J. Snyder; B. Wiedenheft; M. Lavin; F. Roberto; J. Spuhler; A. Ortmann; T. Douglas; M. Young

    2007-11-01

    Viruses are the largest reservoir of genetic material on the planet, yet little is known about the population dynamics of any virus within its natural environment. Over a 2-year period, we monitored the diversity of two archaeal viruses found in hot springs within Yellowstone National Park (YNP). Both temporal phylogeny and neutral biodiversity models reveal that virus diversity in these local environments is not being maintained by mutation but rather by high rates of immigration from a globally distributed metacommunity. These results indicate that geographically isolated hot springs are readily able to exchange viruses. The importance of virus movement is supported by the detection of virus particles in air samples collected over YNP hot springs and by their detection in metacommunity sequencing projects conducted in the Sargasso Sea. Rapid rates of virus movement are not expected to be unique to these archaeal viruses but rather a common feature among virus metacommunities. The finding that virus immigration rather than mutation can dominate community structure has significant implications for understanding virus circulation and the role that viruses play in ecology and evolution by providing a reservoir of mobile genetic material.

  10. Virus movement maintains local virus population diversity.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Jamie C; Wiedenheft, Blake; Lavin, Matthew; Roberto, Francisco F; Spuhler, Josh; Ortmann, Alice C; Douglas, Trevor; Young, Mark

    2007-11-27

    Viruses are the largest reservoir of genetic material on the planet, yet little is known about the population dynamics of any virus within its natural environment. Over a 2-year period, we monitored the diversity of two archaeal viruses found in hot springs within Yellowstone National Park (YNP). Both temporal phylogeny and neutral biodiversity models reveal that virus diversity in these local environments is not being maintained by mutation but rather by high rates of immigration from a globally distributed metacommunity. These results indicate that geographically isolated hot springs are readily able to exchange viruses. The importance of virus movement is supported by the detection of virus particles in air samples collected over YNP hot springs and by their detection in metacommunity sequencing projects conducted in the Sargasso Sea. Rapid rates of virus movement are not expected to be unique to these archaeal viruses but rather a common feature among virus metacommunities. The finding that virus immigration rather than mutation can dominate community structure has significant implications for understanding virus circulation and the role that viruses play in ecology and evolution by providing a reservoir of mobile genetic material.

  11. Understanding viruses: Philosophical investigations.

    PubMed

    Pradeu, Thomas; Kostyrka, Gladys; Dupré, John

    2016-10-01

    Viruses have been virtually absent from philosophy of biology. In this editorial introduction, we explain why we think viruses are philosophically important. We focus on six issues (the definition of viruses, the individuality and diachronic identity of a virus, the possibility to classify viruses into species, the question of whether viruses are living, the question of whether viruses are organisms, and finally the biological roles of viruses in ecology and evolution), and we show how they relate to classic questions of philosophy of biology and even general philosophy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of a Hobi-Like Virus Isolated from a Nelore Cow with Gastroenteric Disease in the State of São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cortez, Adriana; Araújo, João Pessoa; Flores, Eduardo Furtado; Ribeiro, Márcio Garcia; Megid, Jane; Paes, Antonio Carlos; de Oliveira Filho, José Paes; Ullmann, Leila Sabrina; Malossi, Camila Dantas; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan

    2017-08-17

    The Hobi-like virus presents antigenic and molecular differences in relation to bovine virus diarrhea virus 1 and 2. The description of the complete genome of the Hobi-like virus SV757/15, isolated from a Nelore cow with gastroenteric disease in Brazil, will help in understanding the evolution and diversity of pestiviruses. Copyright © 2017 Cortez et al.

  13. Therapeutic Efficacy of the Small Molecule GS-5734 against Ebola virus in Rhesus Monkeys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-02

    et al. Euthanasia assessment in ebola virus infected nonhuman primates. Viruses 6, 832 4666-4682, doi:10.3390/v6114666 (2014). 833 834...1 Therapeutic Efficacy of the Small Molecule GS-5734 against Ebola virus in Rhesus 1 Monkeys 2 Travis K. Warren 1 , Robert Jordan 2 , Michael K...National Research Council, 2011. 31 32 Abstract 33 The ongoing 2013-15 Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa ‒ unprecedented in the number of 34

  14. Diversity, Replication, Pathogenicity and Cell Biology of Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    other viruses , most notably infection and the brain was harvested. Brains were homogenized to the Ebola virus glycoprotein (Simmons et al., 2002). 10% (w...at the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), and is directed at working with the intact virus in high...characterization of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus glycoproteins. Bioterrorism and Emerging Infectious Diseases : Antimicrobial, Therapeutics and

  15. Managing Potential Laboratory Exposure to Ebola Virus by Using a Patient Biocontainment Care Unit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    expo- sure to BSL-4 viruses , 8 involved percutaneous injury and 6 involved potential aerosol exposure. Eight persons (5 evaluated for exposure to Lassa ...et al. (8) with permission. †JEB, Japanese encephalitis virus B; Ebola/ Lassa , potential exposure to these viruses . ‡IP, immune plasma from...tal factors on aerosol -induced Lassa virus infection. J Med Virol. 1984;14:295–303. 23. Armstrong LR, Dembry LM, Rainey PM, Russi MB, Khan AS, Fis

  16. Epidemiology and Epizootiological Investigations of Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses in the Central African Republic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    virus isolations we were able to show that five hazardous haemorrhagic fever viruses : Ebola, Marburg, Lassa , Congo-Crimean and Rift-Valley- Fever , were...JOHtJSON & WILLIAMS :unpublished observations 9-IVA’JOFF & al:Hemorragic fever in GABON.I.Incidence of Lassa ,Ebola and Marburg virus in Haut Ogout...AD ...... EPIDEMIOLOGY AND EPIZOOTIOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF HEMORRHAGIC FEVER VIRUSES IN THE CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC Final Report 000 N 0A. J

  17. Tobacco mosaic virus: Proof by synthesis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A linear, non-self-replicating DNA molecule encoding Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) was enzymatically synthesized in vitro from DNA templates made from overlapping oligonucleotides. The molecule was a replica of the alphabetic text rendering of the first TMV genome sequence elucidated by Goelet et al. ...

  18. Crystallization of viruses and virus proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehnke, Paul C.; Harrington, Melissa; Hosur, M. V.; Li, Yunge; Usha, R.; Craig Tucker, R.; Bomu, Wu; Stauffacher, Cynthia V.; Johnson, John E.

    1988-07-01

    Methods for crystallizing six isometric plant and insect viruses are presented. Procedures developed for modifying, purifying and crystallizing coat protein subunits isolated from a virus forming asymmetric, spheroidal particles, stabilized almost exclusively by protein-RNA interactions, are also discussed. The tertiary and quaternary structures of small RNA viruses are compared.

  19. Viruses and Virus Diseases of Rubus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rubus species are propagated vegetatively and are subject to infection by viruses during development, propagation and fruit production stages. Reports of initial detection and symptoms of more than 30 viruses, virus-like diseases and phytoplasmas affecting Rubus spp. have been reviewed more than 20 ...

  20. Sequencing of Ebola Virus Genomes Using Nanopore Technology

    PubMed Central

    Hoenen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Sequencing of virus genomes during disease outbreaks can provide valuable information for diagnostics, epidemiology, and evaluation of potential countermeasures. However, particularly in remote areas logistical and technical challenges can be significant. Nanopore sequencing provides an alternative to classical Sanger and next-generation sequencing methods, and was successfully used under outbreak conditions (Hoenen et al., 2016; Quick et al., 2016). Here we describe a protocol used for sequencing of Ebola virus under outbreak conditions using Nanopore technology, which we successfully implemented at the CDC/NIH diagnostic laboratory (de Wit et al., 2016) located at the ELWA-3 Ebola virus Treatment Unit in Monrovia, Liberia, during the recent Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa. PMID:28180136

  1. The Tobacco Mosaic Virus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulzinski, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    Explains how the tobacco mosaic virus can be used to study virology. Presents facts about the virus, procedures to handle the virus in the laboratory, and four laboratory exercises involving the viruses' survival under inactivating conditions, dilution end point, filterability, and microscopy. (MDH)

  2. The Tobacco Mosaic Virus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulzinski, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    Explains how the tobacco mosaic virus can be used to study virology. Presents facts about the virus, procedures to handle the virus in the laboratory, and four laboratory exercises involving the viruses' survival under inactivating conditions, dilution end point, filterability, and microscopy. (MDH)

  3. Epidemiology and neurological complications of infection by the Zika virus: a new emerging neurotropic virus.

    PubMed

    Carod-Artal, Francisco J

    2016-04-01

    Introduccion. El actual brote epidemico por virus Zika se inicio en 2015 y en la actualidad afecta a 31 paises y territorios en America. Se revisan los aspectos epidemiologicos y clinicos asociados con la infeccion por virus Zika. Desarrollo. Desde 2007, 55 paises de America, Asia, Africa y Oceania han detectado transmision local del virus. La actual epidemia ha afectado a casi 1,5 millones de personas en Brasil. El 80% de los casos son asintomaticos. La enfermedad por virus Zika cursa con fiebre, exantema maculopapular, artralgias y conjuntivitis no purulenta. Los sintomas suelen ser autolimitados y duran una semana. Se ha descrito un aumento de la incidencia de los casos de microcefalia, lesiones retinianas y sindrome de Guillain-Barre asociados con el virus Zika. El sindrome de Guillain-Barre asociado al Zika en la Polinesia es una variante axonal motora pura. El ARN del virus Zika se ha identificado en muestras de tejido cerebral, placenta y liquido amniotico de niños con microcefalia y en perdidas fetales de mujeres infectadas por Zika durante el embarazo. Se recomienda realizar la prueba de reaccion en cadena de la polimerasa mediante transcriptasa inversa para detectar ARN virico y pruebas serologicas (IgM ELISA y anticuerpos neutralizantes) para confirmar una infeccion por Zika. El diagnostico diferencial incluye la infeccion por virus dengue y chikungunya. Conclusiones. Existe un conocimiento limitado sobre los mecanismos patogenicos implicados y las consecuencias a largo plazo de la infeccion por virus Zika en adultos y recien nacidos.

  4. SAR11 viruses and defensive host strains.

    PubMed

    Våge, Selina; Storesund, Julia E; Thingstad, T Frede

    2013-07-25

    Arising from Y. Zhao et al. Nature 494, 357–360 (2013). The recent findings of abundant SAR11 viruses by Zhao et al. are intriguing, and add new insight into the on-going discussion of why SAR11 bacteria are highly successful in the pelagic ocean. On the basis of high SAR11 virus abundance, Zhao et al. claim that SAR11 bacteria are competition specialists. Alternatively, we show here how their findings could be consistent with a dominance of defensive SAR11 strains. Considering their high abundance, understanding why SAR11 bacteria are so successful has important implications for the study of the pelagic ecosystem. There is a Reply to this Brief Communication Arising by Giovannoni, S., Temperton, B. & Zhao, Y. Nature 499, http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature12388 (2013).

  5. /Cu-Al System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kish, Orel; Froumin, Natalya; Aizenshtein, Michael; Frage, Nachum

    2014-05-01

    Wettability and interfacial interaction of the Ta2O5/Cu-Al system were studied. Pure Cu does not wet the Ta2O5 substrate, and improved spreading is achieved when relatively a high fraction of the active element (~40 at.% Al) was added. The Al2O3 and AlTaO4 phases were observed at the Ta2O5/Cu-Al interface. A thermodynamic evaluation allowed us to suggest that the lack of wetting bellow 40 at.% Al is due to the presence of a native oxide, which covers the drop. The conditions of the native oxide decomposition and the formation of the volatile Al2O suboxide strongly depend on the vacuum level during sessile drop experiments and the composition of the Cu-Al alloy. In our case, Al contents greater than 40% provides thermodynamic conditions for the formation of Al2O (as a result of Al reaction with Al2O3) and the drop spreading. It was suggested that the final contact angle in the Ta2O5/Cu-Al system (50°) is determined by Ta adsorption on the newly formed alumina interlayer.

  6. Understanding Ebola Virus Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Judson, Seth; Prescott, Joseph; Munster, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    An unprecedented number of Ebola virus infections among healthcare workers and patients have raised questions about our understanding of Ebola virus transmission. Here, we explore different routes of Ebola virus transmission between people, summarizing the known epidemiological and experimental data. From this data, we expose important gaps in Ebola virus research pertinent to outbreak situations. We further propose experiments and methods of data collection that will enable scientists to fill these voids in our knowledge about the transmission of Ebola virus. PMID:25654239

  7. Understanding ebola virus transmission.

    PubMed

    Judson, Seth; Prescott, Joseph; Munster, Vincent

    2015-02-03

    An unprecedented number of Ebola virus infections among healthcare workers and patients have raised questions about our understanding of Ebola virus transmission. Here, we explore different routes of Ebola virus transmission between people, summarizing the known epidemiological and experimental data. From this data, we expose important gaps in Ebola virus research pertinent to outbreak situations. We further propose experiments and methods of data collection that will enable scientists to fill these voids in our knowledge about the transmission of Ebola virus.

  8. ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... risk factors for veterans include exposure to lead, pesticides, and other environmental toxins. ALS is recognized as ... from scientific studies suggests that both genetics and environment play a role in the development of ALS. ...

  9. Lou Gehrig's Disease (ALS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1930s. People in England and Australia call ALS motor neurone disease (MND). The French refer to it ... about ALS in 1869. Lou Gehrig's disease damages motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. Motor ...

  10. Phylogenetic evidence against evolutionary stasis and natural abiotic reservoirs of influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Worobey, Michael

    2008-04-01

    Zhang et al. (G. Zhang, D. Shoham, D. Gilichinsky, S. Davydov, J. D. Castello, and S. O. Rogers, J. Virol. 80:12229-12235, 2006) have claimed to have recovered influenza A virus RNA from Siberian lake ice, postulating that ice might represent an important abiotic reservoir for the persistence and reemergence of this medically important pathogen. A rigorous phylogenetic analysis of these influenza A virus hemagglutinin gene sequences, however, indicates that they originated from a laboratory reference strain derived from the earliest human influenza A virus isolate, WS/33. Contrary to Zhang et al.'s assertions that the Siberian "ice viruses" are most closely related either to avian influenza virus or to human influenza virus strains from Asia from the 1960s (Zhang et al., J. Virol. 81:2538 [erratum], 2007), they are clearly contaminants from the WS/33 positive control used in their laboratory. There is thus no credible evidence that environmental ice acts as a biologically relevant reservoir for influenza viruses. Several additional cases with findings that seem at odds with the biology of influenza virus, including modern-looking avian influenza virus RNA sequences from an archival goose specimen collected in 1917 (T. G. Fanning, R. D. Slemons, A. H. Reid, T. A. Janczewski, J. Dean, and J. K. Taubenberger, J. Virol. 76:7860-7862, 2002), can also be explained by laboratory contamination or other experimental errors. Many putative examples of evolutionary stasis in influenza A virus appear to be due to laboratory artifacts.

  11. Virus-Vectored Influenza Virus Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Tripp, Ralph A.; Tompkins, S. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Despite the availability of an inactivated vaccine that has been licensed for >50 years, the influenza virus continues to cause morbidity and mortality worldwide. Constant evolution of circulating influenza virus strains and the emergence of new strains diminishes the effectiveness of annual vaccines that rely on a match with circulating influenza strains. Thus, there is a continued need for new, efficacious vaccines conferring cross-clade protection to avoid the need for biannual reformulation of seasonal influenza vaccines. Recombinant virus-vectored vaccines are an appealing alternative to classical inactivated vaccines because virus vectors enable native expression of influenza antigens, even from virulent influenza viruses, while expressed in the context of the vector that can improve immunogenicity. In addition, a vectored vaccine often enables delivery of the vaccine to sites of inductive immunity such as the respiratory tract enabling protection from influenza virus infection. Moreover, the ability to readily manipulate virus vectors to produce novel influenza vaccines may provide the quickest path toward a universal vaccine protecting against all influenza viruses. This review will discuss experimental virus-vectored vaccines for use in humans, comparing them to licensed vaccines and the hurdles faced for licensure of these next-generation influenza virus vaccines. PMID:25105278

  12. Viruses Infecting Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    Marschang, Rachel E.

    2011-01-01

    A large number of viruses have been described in many different reptiles. These viruses include arboviruses that primarily infect mammals or birds as well as viruses that are specific for reptiles. Interest in arboviruses infecting reptiles has mainly focused on the role reptiles may play in the epidemiology of these viruses, especially over winter. Interest in reptile specific viruses has concentrated on both their importance for reptile medicine as well as virus taxonomy and evolution. The impact of many viral infections on reptile health is not known. Koch’s postulates have only been fulfilled for a limited number of reptilian viruses. As diagnostic testing becomes more sensitive, multiple infections with various viruses and other infectious agents are also being detected. In most cases the interactions between these different agents are not known. This review provides an update on viruses described in reptiles, the animal species in which they have been detected, and what is known about their taxonomic positions. PMID:22163336

  13. Viruses infecting reptiles.

    PubMed

    Marschang, Rachel E

    2011-11-01

    A large number of viruses have been described in many different reptiles. These viruses include arboviruses that primarily infect mammals or birds as well as viruses that are specific for reptiles. Interest in arboviruses infecting reptiles has mainly focused on the role reptiles may play in the epidemiology of these viruses, especially over winter. Interest in reptile specific viruses has concentrated on both their importance for reptile medicine as well as virus taxonomy and evolution. The impact of many viral infections on reptile health is not known. Koch's postulates have only been fulfilled for a limited number of reptilian viruses. As diagnostic testing becomes more sensitive, multiple infections with various viruses and other infectious agents are also being detected. In most cases the interactions between these different agents are not known. This review provides an update on viruses described in reptiles, the animal species in which they have been detected, and what is known about their taxonomic positions.

  14. Pathogenesis of Dengue Vaccine Viruses in Mosquitoes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    AD-AI30 52S PATHOGENESIS OF DENGUE VACCINE VIRUSES IN MOSQUITOES i/I (U) VALE UNIV NEW HAVEN CONN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE B J BEATY ET AL. 81 JAN 81 DAMDi...UNCLASSIFIED PATHOGENESIS OF DENGUE VACCINE VIRUSES IN MOSQUITOES Second Annual Report Barry J. Beaty, Ph.D. D T IC ; Thomas H.G. Aitken, Ph.D...REPORT NUMBER 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED PATHOMMSIS CF DENGUE

  15. Human Immune Responses to Dengue Viruses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    A-Al?l 362 HUMAN IMMUNE RESPONSES TO DENGUE YXRUSES(U) MASSACHUSETTS UNIV MEDICAL SCHOOL NORCESTER F A ENNIS SE 83" I ?-2C23 UNCLASSI FIED SE 3IRD?8...SHEET PREVIOUS EDITION MAY BE USED UNTILDTIC FORM 70A OUMNPRESIGSETSTOCK IS EXHAUSTED.DEC 83 AD IHuman Immune Responses to Dengue Viruses Annual Report...edilon may be ued Y01dxffnUICFMCASIAZIlow f~ rolit SUMMARY The purpose of this contract is to analyse the immune responses to dengue virus infections

  16. Pathogenesis of Dengue Vaccine Viruses in Mosquitoes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    AD-R38 519 PATHOGENESIS OF DENGUE VACCINE VIRUSES IN MOSQUITOES i/i (U) YALE UNIV NEW HAVEN CONN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE B J BEATY ET AL. 81 JAN 82 DAMDI...NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS 1963-A i UNCLASSIFIED ":’:" AD 2 0. PATHOGENESIS OF DENGUE VACCINE VIRUSES IN MOSQUITOES Third Annual Report Barry J. Beaty...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 1 7 Y NORDS (rontinue on reverq , side if necessary and identify by hlock numb-) Dengue -2 S-1 vaccine, PR-159 parent; IDenque-1

  17. Sugarcane mild mosaic virus: towards the full characterization of this sugarcane Ampelovirus re-discovered using metagenomics-based approaches

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sugarcane mild mosaic virus (SCMMV) is a closterovirus-like virus that was discovered by Lockhart et al. (1992). SCMMV is provisionally assigned to the genus Ampelovirus, family Closteroviridae (Martelli et al 2002). Since the initial serological and microscopical studies, no new information about S...

  18. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... education Fact Sheet PFS005: Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus AUGUST 2015 • Reasons for Getting Tested • Who Should ... For More Information • Glossary Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that ...

  19. Early Detection of Autism (ASD) by a Non-invasive Quick Measurement of Markedly Reduced Acetylcholine & DHEA and Increased β-Amyloid (1-42), Asbestos (Chrysotile), Titanium Dioxide, Al, Hg & often Coexisting Virus Infections (CMV, HPV 16 and 18), Bacterial Infections etc. in the Brain and Corresponding Safe Individualized Effective Treatment.

    PubMed

    Omura, Yoshiaki; Lu, Dominic; Jones, Marilyn K; Nihrane, Ahdallah; Duvvi, Harsha; Shimotsuura, Yasuhiro; Ohki, Motomu

    2015-01-01

    A brief historical background on Autism & some of the important symptoms associated with Autism are summarized. Using strong Electro Magnetic Field Resonance Phenomenon between 2 identical molecules with identical weight (which received U.S. Patent) non-invasively & rapidly we can detect various molecules including neurotransmitters, bacteria, virus, fungus, metals & abnormal molecules. Simple non- invasive measurement of various molecules through pupils & head of diagnosed or suspected Autism patients indicated that in Autism patients following changes were often found: 1) Acetylcholine is markedly reduced; 2) Alzheimer's disease markers (i.e. β-Amyloid (1-42), Tau Protein, Apolipoprotein (Apo E4)) are markedly increased; 3) Chrysotile Asbestos is increased; 4) Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) is moderately increased; 5) Al is moderately increased; 6) Hg is moderately increased; 7) Dopamine, Serotonin & GABA are significantly reduced (up to about 1/10 of normal); 8) Often viral infections (such as CMV, HHV-6, HPV-16, HPV-18, etc.), and Bacterial infections (such as Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycobacterium TB, Borrelia Burgdorferi, etc.) coexist. Research by others on Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) shows that it is a group of complex neurodevelopmental disorders, with about 70% of ASD patients also suffering from gastro-intestinal problems. While Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized by formation of 1) Amyloid plaques, 2) Neurofibrillary tangles inside of neurons, and 3) Loss of connections between neurons. More than 90% of AD develops in people over the age of 65. These 3 characteristics often progressively worsen over time. Although Autism Spectrum Disorder and Alzheimer's disease are completely different diseases they have some similar biochemical changes. Eight examples of such measurement & analysis are shown for comparison. Most of Autism patients improved significantly by removing the source or preventing intake of Asbestos, TiO2, Al & Hg or enhancing urinary output

  20. Viruses in the sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suttle, Curtis A.

    2005-09-01

    Viruses exist wherever life is found. They are a major cause of mortality, a driver of global geochemical cycles and a reservoir of the greatest genetic diversity on Earth. In the oceans, viruses probably infect all living things, from bacteria to whales. They affect the form of available nutrients and the termination of algal blooms. Viruses can move between marine and terrestrial reservoirs, raising the spectre of emerging pathogens. Our understanding of the effect of viruses on global systems and processes continues to unfold, overthrowing the idea that viruses and virus-mediated processes are sidebars to global processes.

  1. Viruses in the sea.

    PubMed

    Suttle, Curtis A

    2005-09-15

    Viruses exist wherever life is found. They are a major cause of mortality, a driver of global geochemical cycles and a reservoir of the greatest genetic diversity on Earth. In the oceans, viruses probably infect all living things, from bacteria to whales. They affect the form of available nutrients and the termination of algal blooms. Viruses can move between marine and terrestrial reservoirs, raising the spectre of emerging pathogens. Our understanding of the effect of viruses on global systems and processes continues to unfold, overthrowing the idea that viruses and virus-mediated processes are sidebars to global processes.

  2. Pseudacteon decapitating flies: Potential vectors of a fire ant virus?

    SciTech Connect

    Valles, S.M.; Porter, S.D.

    2007-03-15

    Solenopsis invicta virus (SINV-1) is a positive-stranded RNA virus recently found to infect all stages of the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta (Valles et al. 2004; Valles and Strong 2005). SINV-1 and a second genotype have been tentatively assigned to the Dicistroviridae (Mayo 2002). Infected individuals or colonies did not exhibit any immediate, discernible symptoms in the field. However, under stress from introduction into the laboratory, brood death was often observed among infected colonies, ultimately leading to the death of the entire colony (Valles et al. 2004). These characteristics are consistent with other insect-infecting positive-stranded RNA viruses. They often persist as inapparent, asymptomatic infections that, under certain conditions, induce replication within the host, resulting in observable symptoms and often death (Christian and Scotti 1998; Fernandez et al. 2002). The SINV infection rate among colonies was reported to be around 25% in Gainesville, Florida (Valles et al. 2004; Valles and Strong 2005). SINV vertical and horizontal transmission were inferred based on RT-PCR detection of virus genome in eggs and successful colony to colony transfer under lab conditions (Valles et al. 2004). However, the exact mechanisms by which the virus is spread from nest to nest in the field are unknown. Our results indicate that SINV does not replicate within Pseudacteon decapitating flies that parasitize S. invicta. Flies appeared to develop normally from SINV-infected S. invicta workers. Mechanical transmission of SINV to uninfected ants by oviposition appears unlikely.

  3. An Immunoinformatics-Derived DNA Vaccine Encoding Human Class 2 T Cell Epitopes of Ebola Virus, Sudan Virus, and Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus is Immunogenic in HLA Transgenic Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-07

    to 93 include HIV , influenza virus, variola virus, M. tuberculosis, F. tularensis, and H. pylori.20-26 In the 94 study reported here, we used in...Rivera D, Kutzler M, Weiner DB, et al. HIV vaccine 604 development by computer assisted design: the GAIA vaccine. Vaccine 2005; 23:2136-48. 605 21. De

  4. Small-RNA deep sequencing reveals Arctium tomentosum as a natural host of Alstroemeria virus X and a new putative Emaravirus.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yaqi; Tugume, Arthur K; Valkonen, Jari P T

    2012-01-01

    Arctium species (Asteraceae) are distributed worldwide and are used as food and rich sources of secondary metabolites for the pharmaceutical industry, e.g., against avian influenza virus. RNA silencing is an antiviral defense mechanism that detects and destroys virus-derived double-stranded RNA, resulting in accumulation of virus-derived small RNAs (21-24 nucleotides) that can be used for generic detection of viruses by small-RNA deep sequencing (SRDS). SRDS was used to detect viruses in the biennial wild plant species Arctium tomentosum (woolly burdock; family Asteraceae) displaying virus-like symptoms of vein yellowing and leaf mosaic in southern Finland. Assembly of the small-RNA reads resulted in contigs homologous to Alstroemeria virus X (AlsVX), a positive/single-stranded RNA virus of genus Potexvirus (family Alphaflexiviridae), or related to negative/single-stranded RNA viruses of the genus Emaravirus. The coat protein gene of AlsVX was 81% and 89% identical to the two AlsVX isolates from Japan and Norway, respectively. The deduced, partial nucleocapsid protein amino acid sequence of the emara-like virus was only 78% or less identical to reported emaraviruses and showed no variability among the virus isolates characterized. This virus--tentatively named as Woolly burdock yellow vein virus--was exclusively associated with yellow vein and leaf mosaic symptoms in woolly burdock, whereas AlsVX was detected in only one of the 52 plants tested. These results provide novel information about natural virus infections in Acrtium species and reveal woolly burdock as the first natural host of AlsVX besides Alstroemeria (family Alstroemeriaceae). Results also revealed a new virus related to the recently emerged Emaravirus genus and demonstrated applicability of SRDS to detect negative-strand RNA viruses. SRDS potentiates virus surveys of wild plants, a research area underrepresented in plant virology, and helps reveal natural reservoirs of viruses that cause yield losses

  5. Raspberry (Rubus spp.)-Viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There are several important virus diseases of raspberry and black raspberry in the Pacific Northwest. Pollen-borne viruses include Raspberry bushy dwarf virus and Strawberry necrotic shock virus (aka Tobacco streak virus –Rubus isolate or Black raspberry latent virus). Strawberry necrotic shock viru...

  6. Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Viruses Compensate for Microbial Metabolism in Virus-Host Interactions.

    PubMed

    He, Tianliang; Li, Hongyun; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2017-07-11

    that viral genes not only participated in most microbial metabolic pathways but also formed branched pathways in microbial metabolisms. The metabolic compensation of hosts mediated by viruses may help hosts to adapt to extreme environments and may be essential for host survival. Copyright © 2017 He et al.

  7. Partial Deletion of the L-Segment Intergenic Region Produces an Attenuated Machupo Virus that Protects Guinea Pigs Against Lethal Guanarito Virus Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-11

    1 Golden, J.W. et al. Machupo virus live-attenuated vaccine Partial deletion of the L-segment intergenic region produces an attenuated Machupo...had a 35 nucleotide deletion in the L-segment non-coding intergenic region . Contrary to Car91, Car68 produced a lethal infection in guinea pigs with...Keywords: Arenavirus, Machupo virus, Guanarito virus, intergenic region , live-attenuated vaccines, cross-protection 45 TR-17-030 DISTRIBUTION

  8. Complete nucleotide sequence of the new potexvirus "Alstroemeria virus X". Brief report.

    PubMed

    Fuji, S; Shinoda, K; Ikeda, M; Furuya, H; Naito, H; Fukumoto, F

    2005-11-01

    A flexuous virus was isolated in Japan from an alstroemeria plant showing mosaic symptoms. The virus had a broad host range but had systemically latent infectivity in alstroemeria. The virus was assigned to the genus Potexvirus based on morphology and physical properties and on an analysis of the complete nucleotide sequence. The genomic RNA of the virus was 7,009 nucleotides in length, excluding the 3'-terminal poly (A) tail. It contained five open reading frames (ORFs), which was consistent with other members of the genus Potexvirus. Although nucleotide sequences of the ORFs differ from previously reported potexviruses, a phylogenetic analysis placed it phylogenetically close to Narcissus mosaic virus and Scallion virus X. Therefore, we propose that this virus should be designated as Alstroemeria virus X (AlsVX).

  9. Single Assay for Simultaneous Detection and Differential Identification of Human and Avian Influenza Virus Types, Subtypes, and Emergent Variants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    reassortments and mutations emerging within this reservoir may spawn new influenza virus strains as imminent epidemic or pandemic threats to human health...other pathogens include viruses (adenovirus, enterovirus and rhinovirus, coronavirus, herpesvirus, measles virus , metapneumovirus, parainfluenzavirus...Identifying influenza viruses with re -sequencing microarrays. Emerg Infect Dis 12: 638–646. 10. Freed NE, Myers CA, Russell KL, Walter EA, Irvine M, et al

  10. Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Introduce a Vaccine against Ebola Ebola Virus Ecology and Transmission About Ebola Signs and Symptoms Symptoms ... Resources Videos Audio Infographics & Illustrations Factsheets Posters Virus Ecology Graphic File Formats Help: How do I view ...

  11. Quasispecies of dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Kurosu, Takeshi

    2011-12-01

    Pathogenic viruses have RNA genomes that cause acute and chronic infections. These viruses replicate with high mutation rates and exhibit significant genetic diversity, so-called viral quasispecies. Viral quasispecies play an important role in chronic infectious diseases, but little is known about their involvement in acute infectious diseases such as dengue virus (DENV) infection. DENV, the most important human arbovirus, is a causative agent of dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). Accumulating observations suggest that DENV exists as an extremely diverse virus population, but its biological significance is unclear. In other virus diseases, quasispecies affect the therapeutic strategies using drugs and vaccines. Here, I describe the quasispecies of DENV and discuss the possible role of quasispecies in the pathogenesis of and therapeutic strategy against DENV infection in comparison with other viruses such as Hepatitis C virus, human immunodeficiency virus type 1, and poliovirus.

  12. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)

    MedlinePlus

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a very common virus that leads to mild, cold-like symptoms in adults and older healthy children. It can be more serious in young babies, especially those in certain high-risk groups.

  13. West Nile virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... believe West Nile virus is spread when a mosquito bites an infected bird and then bites a ... avoid getting West Nile virus infection after a mosquito bite. People in good health generally do not ...

  14. Hepatitis virus panel

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003558.htm Hepatitis virus panel To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The hepatitis virus panel is a series of blood tests used ...

  15. Human Parainfluenza Viruses

    MedlinePlus

    ... HPIVs Are Not the Same as Influenza (Flu) Viruses People usually get HPIV infections more often in ... hands, and touching objects or surfaces with the viruses on them then touching your mouth, nose, or ...

  16. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes mild, cold-like symptoms in adults and older healthy children. It can cause serious problems in ... tests can tell if your child has the virus. There is no specific treatment. You should give ...

  17. Viruses and cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rigby, P.W.J.; Wilkie, N.M.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 14 selections. Some of the titles are: Immortalising gene(s) encoded by Epstein-Barr Virus; Adenovirus genes involved in transformation. What determines the oncogenic phenotype.; Oncogenesis by mouse mammary tumour virus; and Transforming ras genes.

  18. Live Virus Smallpox Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button The Live Virus Smallpox Vaccine Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... the vaccinia virus. Who should NOT get the smallpox vaccine? People most likely to have side effects ...

  19. Advances in virus research

    SciTech Connect

    Maramorosch, K. ); Murphy, F.A. ); Shatkin, A.J. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains eight chapters. Some of the titles are: Initiation of viral DNA replication; Vaccinia: virus, vector, vaccine; The pre-S region of hepadnavirus envelope proteins; and Archaebacterial viruses.

  20. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, James S.; Heng, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix. PMID:24281093

  1. Tumorigenic DNA viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, G.

    1989-01-01

    The eighth volume of Advances in Viral Oncology focuses on the three major DNA virus groups with a postulated or proven tumorigenic potential: papillomaviruses, animal hepatitis viruses, and the Epstein-Bar virus. In the opening chapters, the contributors analyze the evidence that papillomaviruses and animal hepatitis viruses are involved in tumorigenesis and describe the mechanisms that trigger virus-host cell interactions. A detailed section on the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) - comprising more than half the book - examines the transcription and mRNA processing patterns of the virus genome; the mechanisms by which EBV infects lymphoid and epithelial cells; the immunological aspects of the virus; the actions of EBV in hosts with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome; and the involvement of EBV in the etiology of Burkitt's lymphoma.

  2. Virus Assembly and Maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, John E.

    2004-03-01

    We use two techniques to look at three-dimensional virus structure: electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) and X-ray crystallography. Figure 1 is a gallery of virus particles whose structures Timothy Baker, one of my former colleagues at Purdue University, used cryoEM to determine. It illustrates the variety of sizes of icosahedral virus particles. The largest virus particle on this slide is the Herpes simplex virus, around 1200Å in diameter; the smallest we examined was around 250Å in diameter. Viruses bear their genomic information either as positive-sense DNA and RNA, double-strand DNA, double-strand RNA, or negative-strand RNA. Viruses utilize the various structure and function "tactics" seen throughout cell biology to replicate at high levels. Many of the biological principles that we consider general were in fact discovered in the context of viruses ...

  3. Viruses and human cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gallo, R.C.; Haseltine, W.; Klein, G.; Zur Hausen, H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers on the following topics: Immunology and Epidemiology, Biology and Pathogenesis, Models of Pathogenesis and Treatment, Simian and Bovine Retroviruses, Human Papilloma Viruses, EBV and Herpesvirus, and Hepatitis B Virus.

  4. Avian influenza virus and Newcastle disease virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) severely impact poultry egg production. Decreased egg yield and hatchability, as well as misshapen eggs, are often observed during infection with AIV and NDV, even with low-virulence strains or in vaccinated flocks. Data suggest that in...

  5. Nairobi sheep disease virus/Ganjam virus.

    PubMed

    M D, Baron; B, Holzer

    2015-08-01

    Nairobi sheep disease virus (NSDV) is a tick-borne virus which causes a severe disease in sheep and goats, and has been responsible for several outbreaks of disease in East Africa. The virus is also found in the Indian subcontinent, where it is known as Ganjam virus. The virus only spreads through the feeding of competent infected ticks, and is therefore limited in its geographic distribution by the distribution of those ticks, Rhipicephalus appendiculata in Africa and Haemaphysalis intermedia in India. Animals bred in endemic areas do not normally develop disease, and the impact is therefore primarily on animals being moved for trade or breeding purposes. The disease caused by NSDV has similarities to several other ruminant diseases, and laboratory diagnosis is necessary for confirmation. There are published methods for diagnosis based on polymerase chain reaction, for virus growth in cell culture and for other simple diagnostic tests, though none has been commercialised. There is no established vaccine against NSDV, although cell-culture attenuated strains have been developed which show promise and could be put into field trials if it were deemed necessary. The virus is closely related to Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus, and studies on NSDV may therefore be useful in understanding this important human pathogen.

  6. Avian influenza virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) is type A influenza, which is adapted to an avian host. Although avian influenza has been isolated from numerous avian species, the primary natural hosts for the virus are dabbling ducks, shorebirds, and gulls. The virus can be found world-wide in these species and in o...

  7. Blueberry latent spherical virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    ‘Blueray’ tissue was mechanically inoculated onto Chenopodium quinoa indicator plants as part of a study to determine virus presence in blueberries at Iwate University, Japan. Plants developed chlorosis indicative of virus presence and after virus purification and genome characterization it was dete...

  8. Computer Virus Protection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajala, Judith B.

    2004-01-01

    A computer virus is a program--a piece of executable code--that has the unique ability to replicate. Like biological viruses, computer viruses can spread quickly and are often difficult to eradicate. They can attach themselves to just about any type of file, and are spread by replicating and being sent from one individual to another. Simply having…

  9. Avian influenza virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza (AI) is caused by type A influenza virus, a member of the Orthomyxoviridae family. AI viruses are serologically categorized into 16 hemagglutinin (H1-H16) and 9 neuraminidase (N1-N9) subtypes. All subtypes have been identified in birds. Infections by AI viruses have been reported in ...

  10. Computer Virus Protection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajala, Judith B.

    2004-01-01

    A computer virus is a program--a piece of executable code--that has the unique ability to replicate. Like biological viruses, computer viruses can spread quickly and are often difficult to eradicate. They can attach themselves to just about any type of file, and are spread by replicating and being sent from one individual to another. Simply having…

  11. Influenza viruses: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Neumann, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    We provide a brief introduction into the genome organization, life cycle, pathogenicity, and host range of influenza A viruses. We also briefly summarize influenza pandemics and currently available measures to control influenza virus outbreaks, including vaccines and antiviral compounds to influenza viruses.

  12. Comparison of human fecal and serum parvo-like viruses.

    PubMed

    Paver, W K; Clarke, S K

    1976-07-01

    Parvovirus-like particles found in the sera of two blood donors had the size and appearance on electron microscopy of a virus (B19) found in the serum of a blood donor by Cossart et al. (1975), and those of a virus found in the feces of a normal subject. Antibody to these viruses was detected by immune electron microscopy and immunoelectro-osmophoresis in the sera of 50 children aged 10 to 15 years. Of these, 36% had antibody to the fecal virus, 36% had antibody to B19, and 54% had antibody to the two other serum viruses. The results of these tests suggest that serologically the three serum viruses were similar to one another, but that the fecal virus was distinct. The two blood donors had nonspecific symptoms at the time of viremia. Both donors had developed immunoglobulin M antibody to the virus when tested 3.5 and 4.5 weeks later, but no viruses were detected in the feces or urine.

  13. How Ebola and Marburg Viruses Battle the Immune System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    vaccine protects against Zaire Ebola virus. Virology 346, 394–401 (2006). 101. Swenson, D. L. et al. Virus-like particles exhibit potential as a pan...preferred or accidental hosts. The immune system is central in this battle for survival, which is exemplified here by the cases of Ebola and Marburg...towards the capacity to infect a wide range of cells and organs . Coagulopathy Refers to a group of conditions of the blood-clotting system in which

  14. The taxonomy of viruses should include viruses.

    PubMed

    Calisher, Charles H

    2016-05-01

    Having lost sight of its goal, the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses has redoubled its efforts. That goal is to arrive at a consensus regarding virus classification, i.e., proper placement of viruses in a hierarchical taxonomic scheme; not an easy task given the wide variety of recognized viruses. Rather than suggesting a continuation of the bureaucratic machinations of the past, this opinion piece is a call for insertion of common sense in sorting out the avalanche of information already, and soon-to-be, accrued data. In this way information about viruses ideally would be taxonomically correct as well as useful to working virologists and journal editors, rather than being lost, minimized, or ignored.

  15. Isolation of novel triple‐reassortant swine H3N2 influenza viruses possessing the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of a seasonal influenza virus in Vietnam in 2010

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Long Thanh; Hiromoto, Yasuaki; Pham, Vu Phong; Le, Ha Thi Hong; Nguyen, Ha Truc; Le, Vu Tri; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Saito, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Ngo et al. (2012) Isolation of novel triple‐reassortant swine H3N2 influenza viruses possessing the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of a seasonal influenza virus in Vietnam in 2010. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(1), 6–10. Surveillance of swine influenza viruses (SIVs) in 31 pig farms in northern and southern parts of Vietnam was conducted. Six H3N2 influenza A viruses were isolated from a pig farm in southern Vietnam. They were novel genetic reassortants between a triple–reassortant SIV and a human seasonal H3N2 virus. Their hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes were derived from a human virus circulating around 2004–2006 and the remaining genes from a triple‐reassortant SIV that originated in North America. This is the first report describing the isolation of a novel triple‐reassortant SIV in Vietnam. PMID:21668659

  16. Genetic testing in ALS

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Russell L.; Heverin, Mark; Thorpe, Owen; Abrahams, Sharon; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Hardiman, Orla

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the degree of consensus among clinicians on the clinical use of genetic testing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and the factors that determine decision-making. Methods: ALS researchers worldwide were invited to participate in a detailed online survey to determine their attitudes and practices relating to genetic testing. Results: Responses from 167 clinicians from 21 different countries were analyzed. The majority of respondents (73.3%) do not consider that there is a consensus definition of familial ALS (FALS). Fifty-seven percent consider a family history of frontotemporal dementia and 48.5% the presence of a known ALS genetic mutation as sufficient for a diagnosis of FALS. Most respondents (90.2%) offer genetic testing to patients they define as having FALS and 49.4% to patients with sporadic ALS. Four main genes (SOD1, C9orf72, TARDBP, and FUS) are commonly tested. A total of 55.2% of respondents would seek genetic testing if they had personally received a diagnosis of ALS. Forty-two percent never offer presymptomatic testing to family members of patients with FALS. Responses varied between ALS specialists and nonspecialists and based on the number of new patients seen per year. Conclusions: There is a lack of consensus among clinicians as to the definition of FALS. Substantial variation exists in attitude and practices related to genetic testing of patients and presymptomatic testing of their relatives across geographic regions and between experienced specialists in ALS and nonspecialists. PMID:28159885

  17. Blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum)-Virus Diseases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    At least six viruses have been found in highbush blueberry plantings in the Pacific Northwest: Blueberry mosaic virus, Blueberry red ringspot virus, Blueberry scorch virus, Blueberry shock virus, Tobacco ringspot virus, and Tomato ringspot virus. Six other virus and virus-like diseases of highbush b...

  18. Ventilatory Control in ALS

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Nicole L.; Van Dyke, J.; Nashold, L.; Satriotomo, I.; Suzuki, M.; Mitchell, G.S.

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal, progressive neurodegenerative disease. ALS selectively causes degeneration in upper and lower (spinal) motor neurons, leading to muscle weakness, paralysis and death by ventilatory failure. Although ventilatory failure is generally the cause of death in ALS, little is known concerning the impact of this disorder on respiratory motor neurons, the consequences of respiratory motor neuron cell death, or the ability of the respiratory control system to “fight back” via mechanisms of compensatory respiratory plasticity. Here we review known effects of ALS on breathing, including possible effects on rhythm generation, respiratory motor neurons, and their target organs: the respiratory muscles. We consider evidence for spontaneous compensatory plasticity, preserving breathing well into disease progression despite dramatic loss of spinal respiratory motor neurons. Finally, we review current and potential therapeutic approaches directed toward preserving the capacity to breathe in ALS patients. PMID:23692930

  19. Aerosol Stability and Respiratory Infectivity of Lassa Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    diVaIlabLjjo, Cd, /1 ------- t I- 2 Lassa virus , an arenavirus , is endemic in western Africa and causes a severe generalized hemorrhagic disease in human...guinea pigs to infection with Lassa virus (P. B. Jahrling et al., manuscript in preparation) and other arenaviruses (8) when the virus is presented by...Prog. Mod. Viral. 18:111-126. 4. Fabiyi. A. 1976. Lassa fever ( arenaviruses ) as a public health problem. Bull. PAHO. 100335-337. 5. Guyton. A. C. 1947

  20. [Viruses as biological weapons].

    PubMed

    Akçali, Alper

    2005-07-01

    The destruction made by nuclear, biological and chemical weapons used by governments and terrorist groups in the near history is posing anxiety and fear for human being. Rumour about the possible use of these agents leads to the development of serious negative effects on populations. Since there are no vaccine and therapy for most viral agents and cost of production as biological weapons is low, interest rate is rising for viruses. In this review, general characteristics, diagnosis, therapy and protective measures for viral agents such as variola virus, hemorrhagic fever viruses, encephalitis viruses, Hantaviruses and Nipah viruses, those can be used as biological weapon, have been summarized.

  1. Viruses and marine pollution.

    PubMed

    Danovaro, R; Armeni, M; Corinaldesi, C; Mei, M L

    2003-03-01

    This short review summarises the present knowledge on pollutant impacts on marine viruses, virus-host systems and their potential ecological implications. Excess nutrients from sewage and river effluents are a primary cause of marine eutrophication and mucilage formation, often related to the development of large viral assemblages. At the same time, hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyl and pesticides alter ecosystem functioning and can determinate changes in the virus-host interactions, thus increasing the potential of viral infection. All these pollutants might have synergistic effects on the virus-host system and are able to induce prophage, thus increasing the impact of viruses on marine ecosystems.

  2. Viruses of asparagus.

    PubMed

    Tomassoli, Laura; Tiberini, Antonio; Vetten, Heinrich-Josef

    2012-01-01

    The current knowledge on viruses infecting asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) is reviewed. Over half a century, nine virus species belonging to the genera Ilarvirus, Cucumovirus, Nepovirus, Tobamovirus, Potexvirus, and Potyvirus have been found in this crop. The potyvirus Asparagus virus 1 (AV1) and the ilarvirus Asparagus virus 2 (AV2) are widespread and negatively affect the economic life of asparagus crops reducing yield and increasing the susceptibility to biotic and abiotic stress. The main properties and epidemiology of AV1 and AV2 as well as diagnostic techniques for their detection and identification are described. Minor viruses and control are briefly outlined. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Equine influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Landolt, Gabriele A

    2014-12-01

    For decades the horse has been viewed as an isolated or "dead-end" host for influenza A viruses, with equine influenza virus being considered as relatively stable genetically. Although equine influenza viruses are genetically more stable than those of human lineage, they are by no means in evolutionary stasis. Moreover, recent transmission of equine-lineage influenza viruses to dogs also challenges the horse's status as a dead-end host. This article reviews recent developments in the epidemiology and evolution of equine influenza virus. In addition, the clinical presentation of equine influenza infection, diagnostic techniques, and vaccine recommendations are briefly summarized.

  4. Detection of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winton, James; Kurath, Gael; Batts, William

    2007-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is considered to be one of the most important viral pathogens of finfish and is listed as reportable by many nations and international organizations (Office International des Epizooties 2006). Prior to 1988, VHSV was thought to be limited to Europe (Wolf 1988; Smail 1999). Subsequently, it was shown that the virus is endemic among many marine and anadromous fish species in both the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans (Meyers and Winton 1995; Skall et al. 2005). Genetic analysis reveals that isolates of VHSV can be divided into four genotypes that generally correlate with geographic location with the North American isolates generally falling into VHSV Genotype IV (Snow et al. 2004). In 2005-2006, reports from the Great Lakes region indicated that wild fish had experienced disease or, in some cases, very large die-offs from VHSV (Elsayed et al. 2006, Lumsden et al. 2007). The new strain from the Great Lakes, now identified as VHSV Genotype IVb, appears most closely related to isolates of VHSV from mortalities that occurred during 2000-2004 in rivers and near-shore areas of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, Canada (Gagne et al. 2007). The type IVb isolate found in the Great Lakes region is the only strain outside of Europe that has been associated with significant mortality in freshwater species.

  5. Chemotherapy for ’Exotic’ RNA Viruses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    derived more effective against influenza infection in ti - human alpha, beta . and gamma interferons. sue culture as well as mice (W• sonet al., 1982...growing. Compounds, such as Enhancement of natural resistance to influenza glucan , muramyl di- hnd tripeptides, lipoidal virus in lipopolysaccharide...C. L., Peters. C. J.. Jemski. J. V.. Scott. Levin, M, J., Zaia. J. A., Preblud, S. R. & Arbeit. G. H. & DiLuzio. N. R. (1980). Glucan -induced R. A

  6. Pathogenesis of Dengue Vaccine Viruses in Mosquitoes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    1973). Sabin (1948) showed that attenuated dpngiie, passed through mosquitoes, did not revert to pathogenicity frnr man. -7- Thus even if the vaccine ...AD-A138 518 PATHOGENESIS OF DENGUE VACCINE YIRUSES IN MOSQUITOES 1/ (U) YALE UNIV NEW HAVEN CONN SCHOOL OF MEDICINE B J BEATY ET AL. 9i JAN 80 DRND7...34 ’ UNCLASSIFIED 0{) AD 0Pathogenesis of dengue vaccine viruses in mosquitoes -First Annual Report Barry I. Beaty, Ph.D. Thomas H. G

  7. Avian influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Won; Saif, Yehia M

    2009-07-01

    Avian influenza viruses do not typically replicate efficiently in humans, indicating direct transmission of avian influenza virus to humans is unlikely. However, since 1997, several cases of human infections with different subtypes (H5N1, H7N7, and H9N2) of avian influenza viruses have been identified and raised the pandemic potential of avian influenza virus in humans. Although circumstantial evidence of human to human transmission exists, the novel avian-origin influenza viruses isolated from humans lack the ability to transmit efficiently from person-to-person. However, the on-going human infection with avian-origin H5N1 viruses increases the likelihood of the generation of human-adapted avian influenza virus with pandemic potential. Thus, a better understanding of the biological and genetic basis of host restriction of influenza viruses is a critical factor in determining whether the introduction of a novel influenza virus into the human population will result in a pandemic. In this article, we review current knowledge of type A influenza virus in which all avian influenza viruses are categorized.

  8. Virus Evolution Serial

    SciTech Connect

    Vassilevska, Tanya

    2015-01-05

    This is the first code, designed to run on a desktop, which models the intracellular replication and the cell-to-cell infection and demonstrates virus evolution at the molecular level. This code simulates the infection of a population of "idealized biological cells" (represented as objects that do not divide or have metabolism) with "virus" (represented by its genetic sequence), the replication and simultaneous mutation of the virus which leads to evolution of the population of genetically diverse viruses. The code is built to simulate single-stranded RNA viruses. The input for the code is 1. the number of biological cells in the culture, 2. the initial composition of the virus population, 3. the reference genome of the RNA virus, 4. the coordinates of the genome regions and their significance and, 5. parameters determining the dynamics of virus replication, such as the mutation rate. The simulation ends when all cells have been infected or when no more infections occurs after a given number of attempts. The code has the ability to simulate the evolution of the virus in serial passage of cell "cultures", i.e. after the end of a simulation, a new one is immediately scheduled with a new culture of infected cells. The code outputs characteristics of the resulting virus population dynamics and genetic composition of the virus population, such as the top dominant genomes, percentage of a genome with specific characteristics.

  9. Serodiagnosis for Tumor Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Brian J.; Labo, Nazzarena; Miley, Wendell J.; Whitby, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The known human tumor viruses include the DNA viruses Epstein-Barr virus, Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus, Merkel cell polyomavirus, human papillomavirus, and hepatitis B virus. RNA tumor viruses include Human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type-1 and hepatitis C virus. The serological identification of antigens/antibodies in plasma serum is a rapidly progressing field with utility for both scientists and clinicians. Serology is useful for conducting seroepidemiology studies and to inform on the pathogenesis and host immune response to a particular viral agent. Clinically, serology is useful for diagnosing current or past infection and for aiding in clinical management decisions. Serology is useful for screening blood donations for infectious agents and for monitoring the outcome of vaccination against these viruses. Serodiagnosis of human tumor viruses has improved in recent years with increased specificity and sensitivity of the assays, as well as reductions in cost and the ability to assess multiple antibody/antigens in single assays. Serodiagnosis of tumor viruses plays an important role in our understanding of the prevalence and transmission of these viruses and ultimately in the ability to develop treatments/preventions for these globally important diseases. PMID:25843726

  10. Virus transmission via food.

    PubMed

    Cliver, D O

    1997-01-01

    Viruses are transmitted to humans via foods as a result of direct or indirect contamination of the foods with human faeces. Viruses transmitted by a faecal-oral route are not strongly dependent on foods as vehicles of transmission, but viruses are important among agents of foodborne disease. Vehicles are most often molluscs from contaminated waters, but many other foods are contaminated directly by infected persons. The viruses most often foodborne are the hepatitis A virus and the Norwalk-like gastroenteritis viruses. Detection methods for these viruses in foods are very difficult and costly; the methods are not routine. Indicators that would rapidly and reliably suggest the presence of viral contamination of foods are still being sought. Contamination can be prevented by keeping faeces out of food or by treating vehicles such as water in order to inactivate virus that might be carried to food in this way. Virus cannot multiply in food, but can usually be inactivated by adequate heating. Other methods of inactivating viruses within a food are relatively unreliable, but viruses in water and on exposed surfaces can be inactivated with ultraviolet light or with strong oxidizing agents.

  11. An Intranasal Virus-Like Particle Vaccine Broadly Protects Mice from Multiple Subtypes of Influenza A Virus.

    PubMed

    Schwartzman, Louis M; Cathcart, Andrea L; Pujanauski, Lindsey M; Qi, Li; Kash, John C; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2015-07-21

    Influenza virus infections are a global public health problem, with a significant impact of morbidity and mortality from both annual epidemics and pandemics. The current strategy for preventing annual influenza is to develop a new vaccine each year against specific circulating virus strains. Because these vaccines are unlikely to protect against an antigenically divergent strain or a new pandemic virus with a novel hemagglutinin (HA) subtype, there is a critical need for vaccines that protect against all influenza A viruses, a so-called "universal" vaccine. Here we show that mice were broadly protected against challenge with a wide variety of lethal influenza A virus infections (94% aggregate survival following vaccination) with a virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine cocktail. The vaccine consisted of a mixture of VLPs individually displaying H1, H3, H5, or H7 HAs, and vaccinated mice showed significant protection following challenge with influenza viruses expressing 1918 H1, 1957 H2, and avian H5, H6, H7, H10, and H11 hemagglutinin subtypes. These experiments suggest a promising and practical strategy for developing a broadly protective "universal" influenza vaccine. The rapid and unpredictable nature of influenza A virus evolution requires new vaccines to be produced annually to match circulating strains. Human infections with influenza viruses derived from animals can cause outbreaks that may be associated with high mortality, and such strains may also adapt to humans to cause a future pandemic. Thus, there is a large public health need to create broadly protective, or "universal," influenza vaccines that could prevent disease from a wide variety of human and animal influenza A viruses. In this study, a noninfectious virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine was shown to offer significant protection against a variety of influenza A viruses in mice, suggesting a practical strategy to develop a universal influenza vaccine. Copyright © 2015 Schwartzman et al.

  12. Identification of Dezidougou Virus in a DAK AR 41524 Zika Virus Stock.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Susmita; Puri, Vinita; Fedorova, Nadia; Amedeo, Paolo; Stockwell, Timothy B; Shabman, Reed S; Rashid, Sujatha; Pickett, Brett E

    2017-07-27

    We report here the complete genome of a Dezidougou virus (DEZV) isolated from a passaged culture of the Zika virus strain DAK AR 41524. The consensus DEZV sequence we recovered shows 99% nucleotide similarity using BLASTN to a previously reported DEZV (accession no. JQ675604.1). The current sequence has additional repeat regions as well as a deleted repeat region, which we confirmed by Sanger sequencing, that were not present in the originally published sequence, JQ675604.1. Copyright © 2017 Shrivastava et al.

  13. Virus, Oncolytic virus and Human Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guang Bin; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Lifang; Zhao, Kong-Nan

    2016-12-15

    Prostate cancer (PCa), a disease, is characterized by abnormal cell growth in the prostate - a gland in the male reproductive system. PCa is one of the leading causes of cancer death among men of all races. Although older age and a family history of the disease have been recognized as the risk factors of PCa, the cause of this cancer remains unclear. Mounting evidence suggests that infections with various viruses are causally linked to PCa pathogenesis. Published studies have provided strong evidence that at least two viruses (RXMV and HPV) contribute to prostate tumourigenicity and impact on the survival of patients with malignant PCa. Traditional therapies including chemotherapy and radiotherapy are unable to distinguish cancer cells from normal cells, which are a significant drawback and leads to toxicities for PCa patients undergoing treatment. So far, few other options are available for treating patients with advanced PCa. Virotherapy is being developed to be a novel therapy for cancers, which uses oncotropic and oncolytic viruses with their abilities to find and destroy malignant cells in the body. For PCa treatment, oncolytic virotherapy appears to be much more attractive, which uses live viruses to selectively kill cancer cells. Oncolytic viruses can be genetically engineered to induce cancer cell lysis through virus replication and expression of cytotoxic proteins. As oncolytic viruses are a relatively new class of anti-cancer immunotherapy agents, several important barriers still exist on the road to the use of oncolytic viruses for PCa therapy. In this review, we first discuss the controversy of the contribution of virus infection to PCa, and subsequently summarize the development of oncolytic virotherapy for PCa in the past several years.

  14. Distinct Patterns of IFITM-Mediated Restriction of Filoviruses, SARS Coronavirus, and Influenza A Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-06

    Distinct Patterns of IFITM-Mediated Restriction of Filoviruses, SARS Coronavirus, and Influenza A Virus I-Chueh Huang1*, Charles C. Bailey1, Jessica...identified viral restriction factors that inhibit infection mediated by the influenza A virus (IAV) hemagglutinin (HA) protein. Here we show that IFITM...Becker MM, et al. (2011) Distinct Patterns of IFITM-Mediated Restriction of Filoviruses, SARS Coronavirus, and Influenza A Virus. PLoS Pathog 7(1

  15. Genetic Characterization of Zika Virus Strains: Geographic Expansion of the Asian Lineage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-28

    Genetic Characterization of Zika Virus Strains: Geographic Expansion of the Asian Lineage Andrew D. Haddow1*, Amy J. Schuh1, Chadwick Y. Yasuda2...Medical Research Unit, No. 2, Phnom Penh, Cambodia, 3 National Dengue Control Program, Phnom Penh, Cambodia Abstract Background: Zika virus (ZIKV) is a...underreported. Citation: Haddow AD, Schuh AJ, Yasuda CY, Kasper MR, Heang V, et al. (2012) Genetic Characterization of Zika Virus Strains: Geographic

  16. Oligonucleotide Antiviral Therapeutics: Antisense and RNA Interference for Highly Pathogenic RNA Viruses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    disrupt RNA virus gene expression as first demonstrated using Rous sarcoma virus and respira- ory syncytial virus, respectively (Stephenson and Zamecnik...specialized lipo - omes can be used to form a stable nucleic acid-lipid particle SNALP) (Geisbert et al., 2006). SNALP-encapsulated siRNAs gainst EBOV L...Dev. 4 (2), 67–69. tephenson, M.L., Zamecnik, P.C., 1978. Inhibition of Rous sarcoma viral RNA translation by a specific oligodeoxyribonucleotide

  17. Three Complete Genome Sequences of Genotype G Mumps Virus from the 2016 Outbreak in Arkansas, USA.

    PubMed

    Alkam, Duah; Wongsurawat, Thidathip; Jenjaroenpun, Piroon; Connor, Skylar; Hobbs, Charlotte; Wassenaar, Trudy M; Jun, Se-Ran; Nookaew, Intawat; Ussery, David

    2017-08-10

    We present here the complete genome sequences of three mumps virus (MuV) strains isolated from patients who tested positive for the mumps virus during a mumps outbreak in Springdale, AR (USA), in 2016. The virus genomes, sequenced with Oxford Nanopore technology, belong to genotype G and have an average length of 15,342 nucleotides (nt). Copyright © 2017 Alkam et al.

  18. TOTAL CULTURABLE VIRUS QUANTAL ASSAY | Science ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This chapter describes a quantal method for assaying culturable human enteric viruses from water matrices. The assay differs from the plaque assay described in Chapter 10 (December 1987 Revision) in that it is based upon the direct microscopic viewing of cells for virus-induced cytopathic effects. The quantal method can be used to assay viruses concentrated from sewages, effluents and waters using the methods described in Chapters 5, 6 and 14 (February 1999), Dahling and Wright (1986b), Fout et al. (1996) or from sludges and other solids (Chapter 7, September 1989 Revision; Fout, 1999). Develop sensitive techniques to detect and identify emerging human waterborne pathogenic viruses and viruses on the CCL.Determine effectiveness of viral indicators to measure microbial quality in water matrices.Support activities: (a) culture and distribution of mammalian cells for Agency and scientific community research needs, (b) provide operator expertise for research requiring confocal and electron microscopy, (c) glassware cleaning, sterilization and biological waste disposal for the Cincinnati EPA facility, (d) operation of infectious pathogenic suite, (e) maintenance of walk-in constant temperature rooms and (f) provide Giardia cysts.

  19. Replication of biotinylated human immunodeficiency viruses.

    PubMed

    Belshan, Michael; Matthews, John M; Madson, Christian J

    2011-01-01

    Previous work demonstrated recently the adaptation of the Escherichia coli biotin ligase BirA - biotin acceptor sequence (BAS) labeling system to produce human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viruses with biotinylated integrase (NLXIN(B)) and matrix (NLXMA(B)) proteins (Belshan et al., 2009). This report describes the construction of an HIV permissive cell line stably expressing BirA (SupT1.BirA). Consistent with the results in the previous report, NLXMA(B) replicated similar to wild-type levels and expressed biotinylated Gag and MA proteins in the SupT1.BirA cells, whereas the replication of NLXIN(B) was reduced severely. Three additional HIV type 2 (HIV-2) viruses were constructed with the BAS inserted into the vpx and vpr accessory genes. Two BAS insertions were made into the C-terminal half of the Vpx, including one internal insertion, and one at the N-terminus of Vpr. All three viruses were replication competent in the SupT1.BirA cells and their target proteins biotinylated efficiently and incorporated into virions. These results demonstrate the potential utility of the biotinylation system to label and capture HIV protein complexes in the context of replicating virus.

  20. ALS2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Susanne A.; Carr, Lucinda; Deuschl, Guenther; Hopfner, Franziska; Stamelou, Maria; Wood, Nicholas W.; Bhatia, Kailash P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the genetic etiology in 2 consanguineous families who presented a novel phenotype of autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with generalized dystonia. Methods: A combination of homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in the first family and Sanger sequencing of candidate genes in the second family were used. Results: Both families were found to have homozygous loss-of-function mutations in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2 (juvenile) (ALS2) gene. Conclusions: We report generalized dystonia and cerebellar signs in association with ALS2-related disease. We suggest that the ALS2 gene should be screened for mutations in patients who present with a similar phenotype. PMID:24562058

  1. Genome Sequence of Grapevine Virus K, a Novel Vitivirus Infecting Grapevine.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yeonhwa; Song, Myung-Kyu; Choi, Hoseong; Park, Jae-Seong; Lee, Jae-Wung; Lian, Sen; Lee, Bong Choon; Cho, Won Kyong

    2017-09-14

    Here, we report the genome sequence of grapevine virus K (GVK), a novel single-stranded RNA virus identified from a transcriptome of grapevine. The genome of GVK is 7,476 nucleotides in length and encodes 5 open reading frames. GVK is a putative member of the genus Vitivirus in the family Betaflexiviridae. Copyright © 2017 Jo et al.

  2. Genome Sequence of Grapevine Virus T, a Novel Foveavirus Infecting Grapevine.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yeonhwa; Song, Myung-Kyu; Choi, Hoseong; Park, Jae-Seong; Lee, Jae-Wung; Lian, Sen; Lee, Bong Choon; Cho, Won Kyong

    2017-09-14

    Here, we report the genome sequence of grapevine virus T (GVT), a novel single-stranded RNA virus identified from a transcriptome of grapevine. The genome of GVT is 8,701 nucleotides in length and encodes five open reading frames. GVT is a putative member of the genus Foveavirus in the family Betaflexiviridae. Copyright © 2017 Jo et al.

  3. [The great virus comeback].

    PubMed

    Forterre, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Viruses have been considered for a long time as by-products of biological evolution. This view is changing now as a result of several recent discoveries. Viral ecologists have shown that viral particles are the most abundant biological entities on our planet, whereas metagenomic analyses have revealed an unexpected abundance and diversity of viral genes in the biosphere. Comparative genomics have highlighted the uniqueness of viral sequences, in contradiction with the traditional view of viruses as pickpockets of cellular genes. On the contrary, cellular genomes, especially eukaryotic ones, turned out to be full of genes derived from viruses or related elements (plasmids, transposons, retroelements and so on). The discovery of unusual viruses infecting archaea has shown that the viral world is much more diverse than previously thought, ruining the traditional dichotomy between bacteriophages and viruses. Finally, the discovery of giant viruses has blurred the traditional image of viruses as small entities. Furthermore, essential clues on virus history have been obtained in the last ten years. In particular, structural analyses of capsid proteins have uncovered deeply rooted homologies between viruses infecting different cellular domains, suggesting that viruses originated before the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). These studies have shown that several lineages of viruses originated independently, i.e., viruses are polyphyletic. From the time of LUCA, viruses have coevolved with their hosts, and viral lineages can be viewed as lianas wrapping around the trunk, branches and leaves of the tree of life. Although viruses are very diverse, with genomes encoding from one to more than one thousand proteins, they can all be simply defined as organisms producing virions. Virions themselves can be defined as infectious particles made of at least one protein associated with the viral nucleic acid, endowed with the capability to protect the viral genome and ensure its

  4. How the Double Spherules of Infectious Bronchitis Virus Impact Our Understanding of RNA Virus Replicative Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Benjamin W.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Powered by advances in electron tomography, recent studies have extended our understanding of how viruses construct “replication factories” inside infected cells. Their function, however, remains an area of speculation with important implications for human health. It is clear from these studies that whatever their purpose, organelle structure is dynamic (M. Ulasli, M. H. Verheije, C. A. de Haan, and F. Reggiori, Cell. Microbiol. 12:844-861, 2010) and intricate (K. Knoops, M. Kikkert, S. H. Worm, J. C. Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Y. van der Meer, et al., PLOS Biol. 6:e226, 2008). But by concentrating on medically important viruses, these studies have failed to take advantage of the genetic variation inherent in a family of viruses that is as diverse as the archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotes combined (C. Lauber, J. J. Goeman, M. del Carmen Parquet, P. T. Nga, E. J. Snijder, et al., PLOS Pathog. 9:e1003500, 2013). In this climate, Maier et al. (H. J. Maier, P. C. Hawes, E. M. Cottam, J. Mantell, P. Verkade, et al., mBio 4:e00801-13, 2013) explored the replicative structures formed by an avian coronavirus that appears to have diverged at an early point in coronavirus evolution and shed light on controversial aspects of viral biology. PMID:24345746

  5. Assessing Seasonal Risks for the Introduction and Mosquito-borne Spread of Zika Virus in Europe.

    PubMed

    Rocklöv, Joacim; Quam, Mikkel Brandon; Sudre, Bertrand; German, Matthew; Kraemer, Moritz U G; Brady, Oliver; Bogoch, Isaac I; Liu-Helmersson, Jing; Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Semenza, Jan C; Ong, Mark; Aaslav, Kaja Kaasik; Khan, Kamran

    2016-07-01

    The explosive Zika virus epidemic in the Americas is amplifying spread of this emerging pathogen into previously unaffected regions of the world, including Europe (Gulland, 2016), where local populations are immunologically naïve. As summertime approaches in the northern hemisphere, Aedes mosquitoes in Europe may find suitable climatic conditions to acquire and subsequently transmit Zika virus from viremic travellers to local populations. While Aedes albopictus has proven to be a vector for the transmission of dengue and chikungunya viruses in Europe (Delisle et al., 2015; ECDC, n.d.) there is growing experimental and ecological evidence to suggest that it may also be competent for Zika virus(Chouin-Carneiro et al., 2016; Grard et al., 2014; Li et al., 2012; Wong et al., 2013). Here we analyze and overlay the monthly flows of airline travellers arriving into European cities from Zika affected areas across the Americas, the predicted monthly estimates of the basic reproduction number of Zika virus in areas where Aedes mosquito populations reside in Europe (Aedes aegypti in Madeira, Portugal and Ae. albopictus in continental Europe), and human populations living within areas where mosquito-borne transmission of Zika virus may be possible. We highlight specific geographic areas and timing of risk for Zika virus introduction and possible spread within Europe to inform the efficient use of human disease surveillance, vector surveillance and control, and public education resources.

  6. The genome sequence of Dioscorea bacilliform TR virus, a member of the genus Badnavirus infecting Dioscorea spp., sheds light on the possible function of endogenous Dioscorea bacilliform viruses.

    PubMed

    Umber, Marie; Gomez, Rose-Marie; Gélabale, Suzia; Bonheur, Lydiane; Pavis, Claudie; Teycheney, Pierre-Yves

    2017-02-01

    The complete genome sequence of Dioscorea bacilliform TR virus (DBTRV) was determined. The closest relatives of DBTRV are Dioscorea bacilliform AL virus (DBALV) and Dioscorea bacilliform RT virus 1 (DBRTV1). Specific primers were designed and used to determine the prevalence of DBTRV in a yam germplasm collection. It was found that this virus infects Dioscorea alata and D. trifida plants in Guadeloupe and French Guyana. DTRBV was not detected in any of the tested D. cayenensis-rotundata accessions. In silico analysis provided evidence for the presence of DBTRV-like endogenous sequences in the genome of D. cayenensis-rotundata, pointing to a possible role of these sequences in antiviral defense.

  7. Lifestyles of plant viruses

    PubMed Central

    Roossinck, Marilyn J.

    2010-01-01

    The vast majority of well-characterized eukaryotic viruses are those that cause acute or chronic infections in humans and domestic plants and animals. However, asymptomatic persistent viruses have been described in animals, and are thought to be sources for emerging acute viruses. Although not previously described in these terms, there are also many viruses of plants that maintain a persistent lifestyle. They have been largely ignored because they do not generally cause disease. The persistent viruses in plants belong to the family Partitiviridae or the genus Endornavirus. These groups also have members that infect fungi. Phylogenetic analysis of the partitivirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase genes suggests that these viruses have been transmitted between plants and fungi. Additional families of viruses traditionally thought to be fungal viruses are also found frequently in plants, and may represent a similar scenario of persistent lifestyles, and some acute or chronic viruses of crop plants may maintain a persistent lifestyle in wild plants. Persistent, chronic and acute lifestyles of plant viruses are contrasted from both a functional and evolutionary perspective, and the potential role of these lifestyles in host evolution is discussed. PMID:20478885

  8. Postmortem stability of Ebola virus.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Joseph; Bushmaker, Trenton; Fischer, Robert; Miazgowicz, Kerri; Judson, Seth; Munster, Vincent J

    2015-05-01

    The ongoing Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa has highlighted questions regarding stability of the virus and detection of RNA from corpses. We used Ebola virus-infected macaques to model humans who died of Ebola virus disease. Viable virus was isolated <7 days posteuthanasia; viral RNA was detectable for 10 weeks.

  9. RNA Viruses Infecting Pest Insects

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    RNA viruses are viruses whose genetic material is ribonucleic acid (RNA). RNA viruses may be double or single-stranded based on the type of RNA they contain. Single-stranded RNA viruses can be further grouped into negative sense or positive-sense viruses according to the polarity of their RNA. Fur...

  10. Other Viruses and Viruslike Agents

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The diseases reported under 'Virus and Virus-like Agents' in the first volume of this compendium, with the exception of Cherry rasp leaf virus and Rubus chinese seed-borne virus, should be considered oddities since there are no known type isolates available for these reported viruses. Without a po...

  11. Initial Symptoms of ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Combine your passion and commitment to finding a cure for ALS while achieving physical challenges through athletic events Register ... - 1275 K Street NW - Suite 250 - Washington, DC 20005 All content and works posted on this website are owned ...

  12. Genetic Testing for ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some medical centers may require a neurological exam, psychological assessment and counseling before predictive testing. If a person in the family with ALS has a negative genetic test result (no identified genetic mutation), testing family members ...

  13. Lou Gehrig's Disease (ALS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... when it becomes necessary. For instance, a power wheelchair can enable a paralyzed person with ALS to ... done these things despite being confined to a wheelchair for many years, being able to move only ...

  14. Rub al Khali, Arabia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-08-08

    NASA Terra spacecraft shows the Rub al Khali, one of the largest sand deserts in the world, encompassing most of the southern third of the Arabian Peninsula; it includes parts of Oman, United Arab Emirates, and Yemen.

  15. Ag-Al-Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/97.etType="URL"/> 'Systems from Ag-Al-Ca to Au-Pd-Si' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter 'Ag-Al-Ca' with the content:

  16. Viruses within animal genomes.

    PubMed

    De Brognier, A; Willems, L

    2016-04-01

    Viruses and their hosts can co-evolve to reach a fragile equilibrium that allows the survival of both. An excess of pathogenicity in the absence of a reservoir would be detrimental to virus survival. A significant proportion of all animal genomes has been shaped by the insertion of viruses that subsequently became 'fossilised'. Most endogenous viruses have lost the capacity to replicate via an infectious cycle and now replicate passively. The insertion of endogenous viruses has contributed to the evolution of animal genomes, for example in the reproductive biology of mammals. However, spontaneous viral integration still occasionally occurs in a number of virus-host systems. This constitutes a potential risk to host survival but also provides an opportunity for diversification and evolution.

  17. Water system virus detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, A. S.; Wells, A. F.; Tenoso, H. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The performance of a waste water reclamation system is monitored by introducing a non-pathogenic marker virus, bacteriophage F2, into the waste-water prior to treatment and, thereafter, testing the reclaimed water for the presence of the marker virus. A test sample is first concentrated by absorbing any marker virus onto a cellulose acetate filter in the presence of a trivalent cation at low pH and then flushing the filter with a limited quantity of a glycine buffer solution to desorb any marker virus present on the filter. Photo-optical detection of indirect passive immune agglutination by polystyrene beads indicates the performance of the water reclamation system in removing the marker virus. A closed system provides for concentrating any marker virus, initiating and monitoring the passive immune agglutination reaction, and then flushing the system to prepare for another sample.

  18. DNA Virus Replication Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Melanie; Speiseder, Thomas; Dobner, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Viruses employ a variety of strategies to usurp and control cellular activities through the orchestrated recruitment of macromolecules to specific cytoplasmic or nuclear compartments. Formation of such specialized virus-induced cellular microenvironments, which have been termed viroplasms, virus factories, or virus replication centers, complexes, or compartments, depends on molecular interactions between viral and cellular factors that participate in viral genome expression and replication and are in some cases associated with sites of virion assembly. These virus-induced compartments function not only to recruit and concentrate factors required for essential steps of the viral replication cycle but also to control the cellular mechanisms of antiviral defense. In this review, we summarize characteristic features of viral replication compartments from different virus families and discuss similarities in the viral and cellular activities that are associated with their assembly and the functions they facilitate for viral replication. PMID:24257611

  19. Mechanical properties of viruses.

    PubMed

    de Pablo, Pedro J; Mateu, Mauricio G

    2013-01-01

    Structural biology techniques have greatly contributed to unveil the relationships between structure, properties and functions of viruses. In recent years, classic structural approaches are being complemented by single-molecule techniques such as atomic force microscopy and optical tweezers to study physical properties and functions of viral particles that are not accessible to classic structural techniques. Among these features are mechanical properties such as stiffness, intrinsic elasticity, tensile strength and material fatigue. The field of virus mechanics is contributing to materials science by investigating some physical parameters of "soft" biological matter and biological nano-objects. Virus mechanics studies are also starting to unveil the biological implications of physical properties of viruses. Growing evidence indicate that viruses are subjected to internal and external forces, and that they may have adapted to withstand and even use those forces. This chapter describes what is known on the mechanical properties of virus particles, their structural determinants, and possible biological implications, of which several examples are provided.

  20. Constructing computer virus phylogenies

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, L.A.; Goldberg, P.W.; Phillips, C.A.; Sorkin, G.B.

    1996-03-01

    There has been much recent algorithmic work on the problem of reconstructing the evolutionary history of biological species. Computer virus specialists are interested in finding the evolutionary history of computer viruses--a virus is often written using code fragments from one or more other viruses, which are its immediate ancestors. A phylogeny for a collection of computer viruses is a directed acyclic graph whose nodes are the viruses and whose edges map ancestors to descendants and satisfy the property that each code fragment is ``invented`` only once. To provide a simple explanation for the data, we consider the problem of constructing such a phylogeny with a minimal number of edges. In general, this optimization problem cannot be solved in quasi-polynomial time unless NQP=QP; we present positive and negative results for associated approximated problems. When tree solutions exist, they can be constructed and randomly sampled in polynomial time.

  1. Filamentous Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Badham, Matthew D.; Rossman, Jeremy S.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus is a pathogen of global medical importance causing significant health and socio-economic costs every year. Influenza virus is an unusual pathogen in that it is pleomorphic, capable of forming virions ranging in shape from spherical to filamentous. Despite decades of research on the influenza virus, much remains unknown about the formation of filamentous influenza viruses and their role in the viral replication cycle. Here, we discuss what is known about influenza virus assembly and budding, focusing on the viral and host factors that are involved in the determination of viral morphology. Whilst the biological function of the filamentous morphology remains unknown, recent results suggest a role in facilitating viral spread in vivo. We discuss these results and speculate on the consequences of viral morphology during influenza virus infection of the human respiratory tract. PMID:28042529

  2. Viruses of lower vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Essbauer, S; Ahne, W

    2001-08-01

    Viruses of lower vertebrates recently became a field of interest to the public due to increasing epizootics and economic losses of poikilothermic animals. These were reported worldwide from both wildlife and collections of aquatic poikilothermic animals. Several RNA and DNA viruses infecting fish, amphibians and reptiles have been studied intensively during the last 20 years. Many of these viruses induce diseases resulting in important economic losses of lower vertebrates, especially in fish aquaculture. In addition, some of the DNA viruses seem to be emerging pathogens involved in the worldwide decline in wildlife. Irido-, herpes- and polyomavirus infections may be involved in the reduction in the numbers of endangered amphibian and reptile species. In this context the knowledge of several important RNA viruses such as orthomyxo-, paramyxo-, rhabdo-, retro-, corona-, calici-, toga-, picorna-, noda-, reo- and birnaviruses, and DNA viruses such as parvo-, irido-, herpes-, adeno-, polyoma- and poxviruses, is described in this review.

  3. Honey bee viruses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan Ping; Siede, Reinhold

    2007-01-01

    Viruses are significant threats to the health and well-being of the honey bee, Apis mellifera. To alleviate the threats posed by these invasive organisms, a better understanding of bee viral infections will be of crucial importance in developing effective and environmentally benign disease control strategies. Although knowledge of honey bee viruses has been accumulated considerably in the past three decades, a comprehensive review to compile the various aspects of bee viruses at the molecular level has not been reported. This chapter summarizes recent progress in the understanding of the morphology, genome organization, transmission, epidemiology, and pathogenesis of honey bee viruses as well as their interactions with their honey bee hosts. The future prospects of research of honey bee viruses are also discussed in detail. The chapter has been designed to provide researchers in the field with updated information about honey bee viruses and to serve as a starting point for future research.

  4. Viruses in Antarctic lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kepner, R. L. Jr; Wharton, R. A. Jr; Suttle, C. A.; Wharton RA, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Water samples collected from four perennially ice-covered Antarctic lakes during the austral summer of 1996-1997 contained high densities of extracellular viruses. Many of these viruses were found to be morphologically similar to double-stranded DNA viruses that are known to infect algae and protozoa. These constitute the first observations of viruses in perennially ice-covered polar lakes. The abundance of planktonic viruses and data suggesting substantial production potential (relative to bacteria] secondary and photosynthetic primary production) indicate that viral lysis may be a major factor in the regulation of microbial populations in these extreme environments. Furthermore, we suggest that Antarctic lakes may be a reservoir of previously undescribed viruses that possess novel biological and biochemical characteristics.

  5. Viruses in Antarctic lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kepner, R. L. Jr; Wharton, R. A. Jr; Suttle, C. A.; Wharton RA, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Water samples collected from four perennially ice-covered Antarctic lakes during the austral summer of 1996-1997 contained high densities of extracellular viruses. Many of these viruses were found to be morphologically similar to double-stranded DNA viruses that are known to infect algae and protozoa. These constitute the first observations of viruses in perennially ice-covered polar lakes. The abundance of planktonic viruses and data suggesting substantial production potential (relative to bacteria] secondary and photosynthetic primary production) indicate that viral lysis may be a major factor in the regulation of microbial populations in these extreme environments. Furthermore, we suggest that Antarctic lakes may be a reservoir of previously undescribed viruses that possess novel biological and biochemical characteristics.

  6. Frequently Asked Questions about ALS and the ALS Registry

    MedlinePlus

    ... long do people with familial ALS live? Do clusters of ALS possibly exist? (I have been told ... related?) What are the problems with studying possible clusters of ALS? What are motor neuron (nerve cell) ...

  7. Archaeal Haloarcula californiae Icosahedral Virus 1 Highlights Conserved Elements in Icosahedral Membrane-Containing DNA Viruses from Extreme Environments.

    PubMed

    Demina, Tatiana A; Pietilä, Maija K; Svirskaitė, Julija; Ravantti, Janne J; Atanasova, Nina S; Bamford, Dennis H; Oksanen, Hanna M

    2016-07-19

    viruses. Regardless of the enormous viral sequence diversity, all known viruses can be clustered into a few structure-based viral lineages based on their core virion components. Our description of a new halophilic virus-host system adds significant insights into the largely unstudied field of archaeal viruses and, in general, of life under extreme conditions. Comprehensive molecular characterization of HCIV-1 shows that this icosahedral internal membrane-containing virus exhibits conserved elements responsible for virion organization. This places the virus neatly in the PRD1-adenovirus structure-based lineage. HCIV-1 further highlights the limited diversity of virus morphotypes despite the astronomical number of viruses in the biosphere. The observed high conservation in the core virion elements should be considered in addressing such fundamental issues as the origin and evolution of viruses and their interplay with their hosts. Copyright © 2016 Demina et al.

  8. Zika virus - an overview.

    PubMed

    Zanluca, Camila; Dos Santos, Claudia Nunes Duarte

    2016-05-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is currently one of the most important emerging viruses in the world. Recently, it has caused outbreaks and epidemics, and has been associated with severe clinical manifestations and congenital malformations. However to date, little is known about the pathogenicity of the virus and the consequences of ZIKV infection. In this paper, we provide an overview of the current knowledge on ZIKV. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Zika virus infection.

    PubMed

    Pougnet, Laurence; Thill, Chloé; Pougnet, Richard; Auvinet, Henri; Giacardi, Christophe; Drouillard, Isabelle

    2016-12-01

    A 21-year old woman from New-Caledonia had 40 ̊C fever with vomiting, arthralgia, myalgia, and measles-like rash. Etiological analyses showed primary infection with Zika virus. Because of severe clinical presentation, she was hospitalized in the intensive care unit of the Brest military Hospital. Zika virus is mainly transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. If they settle in Metropolitan France, Zika virus might also spread there.

  10. Thermal Inactivation of Viruses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-10-01

    Hammon. 1966. Studies on Japanese B encephalitis virus vaccines from tissue culture. VI. Development of a hamster kidney tissue culture inactivated... tissue culture passage, storage, temperature and drying on viability of SE polyoma virus. Exper. Biol. and Hed. Proc. of the Soc. for Exper. Biol...studies of heated tissue suspensions containing foot- and-mouth disease virus. Amer. J. Vet. Res. 20:510-521. Dupre’, M. V., and M. Frobisher. 1966

  11. The human oncogenic viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Luderer, A.A.; Weetall, H.H

    1986-01-01

    This book contains eight selections. The titles are: Cytogenetics of the Leukemias and Lymphomas; Cytogenetics of Solid Tumors: Renal Cell Carcinoma, Malignant Melanoma, Retinoblastoma, and Wilms' Tumor; Elucidation of a Normal Function for a Human Proto-Oncogene; Detection of HSV-2 Genes and Gene Products in Cervical Neoplasia; Papillomaviruses in Anogennital Neoplasms; Human Epstein-Barr Virus and Cancer; Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatocellular Carcinoma; and Kaposi's Sarcoma: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Associated Viruses.

  12. Broadband Respiratory Virus Surveillance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    HSV – Herpes Simplex Virus LOD – Limit of Detection PCR – Polymerase Chain Reaction PIV – Parainfluenza viruses 37 PRMS – Pacific Regional Medical...the RVS assay was determined by testing 109 pre-characterized samples collected at TAMC. This included 20 adenovirus, 20 RSV, 20 PIV, 19 Herpes ... Simplex Virus (HSV) and 19 Enterovirus 7 positive as well as 11 HSV negative specimens as determined by the TAMC Department of Pathology’s current gold

  13. Influenza virus resistance to human neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Crowe, James E

    2012-01-01

    The human antibody repertoire has an exceptionally large capacity to recognize new or changing antigens through combinatorial and junctional diversity established at the time of V(D)J recombination and through somatic hypermutation. Influenza viruses exhibit a relentless capacity to escape the human antibody response by altering the amino acids of their surface proteins in hypervariable domains that exhibit a high level of structural plasticity. Both parties in this high-stakes game of shape shifting drive structural evolution of their functional proteins (the B cell receptor/antibody on one side and the viral hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins on the other) using error-prone polymerase systems. It is likely that most of the genetic mutations that occur in these systems are deleterious, resulting in the failure of the B cell or virus with mutations to propagate in the immune repertoire or viral quasispecies. A subset of mutations is tolerated in functional surface proteins that enter the B cell or virus progeny pool. In both cases, selection occurs in the population of mutated and unmutated species. In cases where the functional avidity of the B cell receptor is increased significantly, that clone may be selected for preferential expansion. In contrast, an influenza virus that "escapes" the inhibitory effect of secreted antibodies may represent a high proportion of the progeny virus in that host. The recent paper by O'Donnell et al. [C. D. O'Donnell et al., mBio 3(3):e00120-12, 2012] identifies a mechanism for antibody resistance that does not require escape from binding but rather achieves a greater efficiency in replication.

  14. Water system virus detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, A. S.; Wells, A. F.; Tenoso, H. J.

    1975-01-01

    A monitoring system developed to test the capability of a water recovery system to reject the passage of viruses into the recovered water is described. A nonpathogenic marker virus, bacteriophage F2, is fed into the process stream before the recovery unit and the reclaimed water is assayed for its presence. Detection of the marker virus consists of two major components, concentration and isolation of the marker virus, and detection of the marker virus. The concentration system involves adsorption of virus to cellulose acetate filters in the presence of trivalent cations and low pH with subsequent desorption of the virus using volumes of high pH buffer. The detection of the virus is performed by a passive immune agglutination test utilizing specially prepared polystyrene particles. An engineering preliminary design was performed as a parallel effort to the laboratory development of the marker virus test system. Engineering schematics and drawings of a fully functional laboratory prototype capable of zero-G operation are presented. The instrument consists of reagent pump/metering system, reagent storage containers, a filter concentrator, an incubation/detector system, and an electronic readout and control system.

  15. Viruses infecting marine molluscs.

    PubMed

    Arzul, Isabelle; Corbeil, Serge; Morga, Benjamin; Renault, Tristan

    2017-02-09

    Although a wide range of viruses have been reported in marine molluscs, most of these reports rely on ultrastructural examination and few of these viruses have been fully characterized. The lack of marine mollusc cell lines restricts virus isolation capacities and subsequent characterization works. Our current knowledge is mostly restricted to viruses affecting farmed species such as oysters Crassostrea gigas, abalone Haliotis diversicolor supertexta or the scallop Chlamys farreri. Molecular approaches which are needed to identify virus affiliation have been carried out for a small number of viruses, most of them belonging to the Herpesviridae and birnaviridae families. These last years, the use of New Generation Sequencing approach has allowed increasing the number of sequenced viral genomes and has improved our capacity to investigate the diversity of viruses infecting marine molluscs. This new information has in turn allowed designing more efficient diagnostic tools. Moreover, the development of experimental infection protocols has answered some questions regarding the pathogenesis of these viruses and their interactions with their hosts. Control and management of viral diseases in molluscs mostly involve active surveillance, implementation of effective bio security measures and development of breeding programs. However factors triggering pathogen development and the life cycle and status of the viruses outside their mollusc hosts still need further investigations.

  16. Rabies virus receptors.

    PubMed

    Lafon, Monique

    2005-02-01

    There is convincing in vitro evidence that the muscular form of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), the neuronal cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) bind rabies virus and/or facilitate rabies virus entry into cells. Other components of the cell membrane, such as gangliosides, may also participate in the entry of rabies virus. However, little is known of the role of these molecules in vivo. This review proposes a speculative model that accounts for the role of these different molecules in entry and trafficking of rabies virus into the nervous system.

  17. Viruses in artichoke.

    PubMed

    Gallitelli, Donato; Mascia, Tiziana; Martelli, Giovanni P

    2012-01-01

    Most of the 25 viruses found in globe artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) and cardoon (Cynara cardunculus L.) were recorded from Europe and the Mediterranean basin, where they decrease both the productivity and the quality of the crop. Although, sometimes, these viruses are agents of diseases of different severity, most often their infections are symptomless. These conditions have contributed to spread virus-infected material since farmers multiply traditional artichoke types vegetatively with no effective selection of virus-free plants. This review reports the main properties of these viruses and the techniques used for their detection and identification. ELISA kits are commercially available for most of the viruses addressed in this review but have seldom been used for their detection in artichoke. Conversely, nucleic acid-based diagnostic reagents, some of which are commercially available, have successfully been employed to identify some viruses in artichoke sap. Control measures mainly use virus-free stocks for new plantations. A combined procedure of meristem-tip culture and thermotherapy proved useful for producing virus-free regenerants of the reflowering southern Italian cultivar Brindisino, which kept earliness and typical heads shape. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Epidemiology of ALS.

    PubMed

    Nelson, L M

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder of unknown etiology. ALS onset is rare before age 40 and increases with age thereafter. Men are at higher risk than women (ratio 1.3:1). Other than age and gender, the only indisputable risk factor for ALS is genetic susceptibility, with familial cases occurring in about 10% of most case series. Genetic linkage studies have provided evidence that a mutant form of the gene that codes for Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, an endogenous free radical scavenger, is important in 15-20% of familial cases. Epidemiologic studies have identified associations of sporadic ALS with work in occupations that involve toxicant exposure. Environmental toxicants may act against a background of increased genetic susceptibility; however, genetically acquired biochemical defects have not been identified in sporadic ALS patients. Other epidemiologic theories of disease etiology have emphasized the potential role of physical trauma, electrical shock, and vigorous physical exertion, but evidence regarding these factors is inconsistent.

  19. The Core Protein of Classical Swine Fever Virus Is Dispensable for Virus Propagation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Christiane; Lamp, Benjamin; Heimann, Manuela; König, Matthias; Blome, Sandra; Moennig, Volker; Schüttler, Christian; Thiel, Heinz-Jürgen; Rümenapf, Tillmann

    2012-01-01

    Core protein of Flaviviridae is regarded as essential factor for nucleocapsid formation. Yet, core protein is not encoded by all isolates (GBV- A and GBV- C). Pestiviruses are a genus within the family Flaviviridae that affect cloven-hoofed animals, causing economically important diseases like classical swine fever (CSF) and bovine viral diarrhea (BVD). Recent findings describe the ability of NS3 of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) to compensate for disabling size increase of core protein (Riedel et al., 2010). NS3 is a nonstructural protein possessing protease, helicase and NTPase activity and a key player in virus replication. A role of NS3 in particle morphogenesis has also been described for other members of the Flaviviridae (Patkar et al., 2008; Ma et al., 2008). These findings raise questions about the necessity and function of core protein and the role of NS3 in particle assembly. A reverse genetic system for CSFV was employed to generate poorly growing CSFVs by modification of the core gene. After passaging, rescued viruses had acquired single amino acid substitutions (SAAS) within NS3 helicase subdomain 3. Upon introduction of these SAAS in a nonviable CSFV with deletion of almost the entire core gene (Vp447Δc), virus could be rescued. Further characterization of this virus with regard to its physical properties, morphology and behavior in cell culture did not reveal major differences between wildtype (Vp447) and Vp447Δc. Upon infection of the natural host, Vp447Δc was attenuated. Hence we conclude that core protein is not essential for particle assembly of a core-encoding member of the Flaviviridae, but important for its virulence. This raises questions about capsid structure and necessity, the role of NS3 in particle assembly and the function of core protein in general. PMID:22457622

  20. Statins: Do They Cause ALS?

    MedlinePlus

    Statins: Do they cause ALS? Do statins cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)? Answers from Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D. ... D. References Sorensen HT, et al. Statins and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: The level of evidence for an association. Journal ...

  1. Photoelectron spectroscopy of the aluminum hydride anions: AlH2-, AlH3-, Al2H6-, Al3H9-, and Al4H12-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinxing; Wang, Haopeng; Collins, Evan; Lim, Alane; Ganteför, Gerd; Kiran, Boggavarapu; Schnöckel, Hansgeorg; Eichhorn, Bryan; Bowen, Kit

    2013-03-01

    We report measurements of the negative ion photoelectron spectra of the simple aluminum hydride anions: AlH2-, AlH3-, Al2H6-, Al3H9-, and Al4H12-. From these spectra, we measured the vertical detachment energies of the anions, and we estimated the electron affinities of their neutral counterparts. Our results for AlH2-, AlH3-, and Al2H6- were also compared with previous predictions by theory.

  2. Photoelectron spectroscopy of the aluminum hydride anions: AlH2(-), AlH3(-), Al2H6(-), Al3H9(-), and Al4H12(-).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinxing; Wang, Haopeng; Collins, Evan; Lim, Alane; Ganteför, Gerd; Kiran, Boggavarapu; Schnöckel, Hansgeorg; Eichhorn, Bryan; Bowen, Kit

    2013-03-28

    We report measurements of the negative ion photoelectron spectra of the simple aluminum hydride anions: AlH2(-), AlH3(-), Al2H6(-), Al3H9(-), and Al4H12(-). From these spectra, we measured the vertical detachment energies of the anions, and we estimated the electron affinities of their neutral counterparts. Our results for AlH2(-), AlH3(-), and Al2H6(-) were also compared with previous predictions by theory.

  3. Dengue Virus Genome Uncoating Requires Ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Byk, Laura A; Iglesias, Néstor G; De Maio, Federico A; Gebhard, Leopoldo G; Rossi, Mario; Gamarnik, Andrea V

    2016-06-28

    regarding molecular aspects of the fusion step, but little is known about the events that follow this process, which leads to viral RNA release from the nucleocapsid. Here, we investigated the fate of nucleocapsid components (capsid protein and viral genome) during the infection process and found that capsid is degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. However, in contrast to that observed for other RNA and DNA viruses, dengue virus capsid degradation was not responsible for genome uncoating. Interestingly, we found that dengue virus genome release requires a nondegradative ubiquitination step. These results provide the first insights into dengue virus uncoating and present new opportunities for antiviral intervention. Copyright © 2016 Byk et al.

  4. [Clinical features of Zika virus].

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Gaytán, David Alejandro; Galván-Hernández, Stephanie Anaid

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: el virus Zika se ha introducido al país y amenaza en propagarse, por lo que el personal de salud se enfrentará a la necesidad de identificar la enfermedad dada una definición operacional de caso; en esta revisión se describen las manifestaciones clínicas de casos probables de Zika de los últimos cinco años. Métodos: se realizó una búsqueda en Google Académico y PubMed con la palabra “Zika”. Se conformó una base de datos, se obtuvieron frecuencias simples y se calcularon los límites para proporciones con un alfa del 0.05 por medio de prueba de Wilson. Resultados: se conjuntaron 109 casos probables de fiebre por Zika, las manifestaciones clínicas fueron heterogéneas, con predominio de afectación a nivel musculoesquelético, dermatológico y sistémico. Conclusiones: es necesario continuar la documentación de las manifestaciones clínicas del virus Zika, que se logrará mediante el fortalecimiento de la vigilancia epidemiológica.

  5. Canine distemper virus (CDV) in another big cat: should CDV be renamed carnivore distemper virus?

    PubMed

    Terio, Karen A; Craft, Meggan E

    2013-09-17

    One of the greatest threats to the conservation of wild cat populations may be dogs or, at least, one of their viruses. Canine distemper virus (CDV), a single-stranded RNA virus in the Paramyxoviridae family and genus Morbillivirus, infects and causes disease in a variety of species, not just canids. An outbreak of CDV in wild lions in the Serengeti, Tanzania, in 1994 was a wake-up call for conservationists, as it demonstrated that an infectious disease could swiftly impact a previously healthy felid population. To understand how this virus causes disease in noncanid hosts, researchers have focused on specific mutations in the binding site of the CDV hemagglutinin gene. Now, Seimon et al. provide information on CDV in its latest feline victim, the endangered wild Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) [T. A. Seimon et al., mBio 4(4):e00410-13, 2013, doi:10.1128/mBio.00410-13]. Their findings of CDV strains infecting tigers, in combination with recent information from other felids, paints a different picture, one in which CDV strains from a variety of geographic lineages and with a variety of amino acid residues in the hemagglutinin gene binding site can infect cats and cause disease. Although CDV has been known as a multihost disease since its discovery in domestic dogs in 1905, perhaps it is time to reconsider whether these noncanid species are not just incidental or "spillover" hosts but, rather, a normal part of the complex ecology of this infectious disease.

  6. Nucleotide sequence of the coat protein genes of alstroemeria mosaic virus and amazon lily mosaic virus, a tentative species of genus potyvirus.

    PubMed

    Fuji, S; Terami, F; Furuya, H; Naito, H; Fukumoto, F

    2004-09-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the 3' terminal region of the genomes of Alstroemeria mosaic virus (AlsMV) and the Amazon lily mosaic virus (ALiMV) have been determined. These sequences contain the complete coding region of the viral coat protein (CP) gene followed by a 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR). AlsMV and ALiMV share 74.9% identity in the amino acid sequence of the CP, and 55.6% identity in the nucleotide sequence of the 3'-UTR. Phylogenetic analysis of these CP genes and 3'-UTRs in relation to those of 79 potyvirus species revealed that AlsMV and ALiMV should be assigned to the Potato virus Y (PVY) subgroup. AlsMV and ALiMV were concluded to have arisen independently within the PVY subgroup.

  7. ALS superbend magnet system

    SciTech Connect

    Zbasnik, J.; Wang, S.T.; Chen, J.Y.; DeVries, G.J.; DeMarco, R.; Fahmie, M.; Geyer, A.; Green, M.A.; Harkins, J.; Henderson, T.; Hinkson, J.; Hoyer, E.H.; Krupnick, J.; Marks, S.; Ottens, F.; Paterson, J.A.; Pipersky, P.; Portmann, G.; Robin, D.A.; Schlueter, R.D.; Steier, C.; Taylor, C.E.; Wahrer, R.

    2000-09-15

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is preparing to upgrade the Advanced Light Source (ALS) with three superconducting dipoles (Superbends). In this paper we present the final magnet system design which incorporates R&D test results and addresses the ALS operational concerns of alignment, availability, and economy. The design incorporates conduction-cooled Nb-Ti windings and HTS current leads, epoxy-glass suspension straps, and a Gifford-McMahon cryocooler to supply steady state refrigeration. We also present the current status of fabrication and testing.

  8. Activation thermodynamics of virus adsorption to solids.

    PubMed Central

    Preston, D R; Farrah, S R

    1988-01-01

    The kinetics of bacteriophage MS2, T2, and f2 adsorption to powdered nitrocellulose and disrupted Seitz S1 filters at pH 7 were determined as a function of temperature. Data from these studies were combined with data produced in a previous study on MS2 adsorption to clay by Stagg et al. (Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 33:385-391, 1977). These workers studied the adsorption of MS2 to bentonite clay as a function of temperature. Data from both this previous study and the current one were used to calculate the thermodynamic parameters of virus adsorption. The results show that adsorption of bacteriophages to the solids tested is a physical process (energy of activation, less than 40 kcal [168 J]/mol) rather than a chemical process (energy of activation, greater than 40 kcal/mol). The free energy of activation showed a high negative correlation (r = -0.904, r2 = 0.817) with the percentage of virus adsorption to the solids tested. The energy of activation was highly negatively correlated with the percentage of virus adsorption to nitrocellulose and clay (r = -0.913, r2 = 0.834) but poorly correlated with the percentage of virus adsorption to disrupted Seitz S1 filters (r = -0.348, r2 = 0.121). In general, under conditions in which the percentage of virus adsorption was low, the energy of activation, the free energy of activation, and the entropy of activation were high. Increasing the percentage of virus adsorbed by changing the adsorbing conditions or changing the adsorbing solid decreased the energy of activation, the free energy of activation, and the entropy of activation. PMID:3214152

  9. Modeling the co-transport of viruses and colloids in unsaturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Seetha, N; Mohan Kumar, M S; Majid Hassanizadeh, S

    2015-10-01

    A mathematical model is developed to simulate the co-transport of viruses and colloids in unsaturated porous media under steady-state flow conditions. The virus attachment to the mobile and immobile colloids is described using a linear reversible kinetic model. Colloid transport is assumed to be decoupled from virus transport; that is, we assume that colloids are not affected by the presence of attached viruses on their surface. The governing equations are solved numerically using an alternating three-step operator splitting approach. The model is verified by fitting three sets of experimental data published in the literature: (1) Syngouna and Chrysikopoulos (2013) and (2) Walshe et al. (2010), both on the co-transport of viruses and clay colloids under saturated conditions, and (3) Syngouna and Chrysikopoulos (2015) for the co-transport of viruses and clay colloids under unsaturated conditions. We found a good agreement between observed and fitted breakthrough curves (BTCs) under both saturated and unsaturated conditions. Then, the developed model was used to simulate the co-transport of viruses and colloids in porous media under unsaturated conditions, with the aim of understanding the relative importance of various processes on the co-transport of viruses and colloids in unsaturated porous media. The virus retention in porous media in the presence of colloids is greater during unsaturated conditions as compared to the saturated conditions due to: (1) virus attachment to the air-water interface (AWI), and (2) co-deposition of colloids with attached viruses on its surface to the AWI. A sensitivity analysis of the model to various parameters showed that the virus attachment to AWI is the most sensitive parameter affecting the BTCs of both free viruses and total mobile viruses and has a significant effect on all parts of the BTC. The free and the total mobile viruses BTCs are mainly influenced by parameters describing virus attachment to the AWI, virus interaction

  10. Chikungunya Virus, Southeastern France

    PubMed Central

    Caro, Valérie; Plumet, Sébastien; Thiberge, Jean-Michel; Souarès, Yvan; Failloux, Anna-Bella; Tolou, Hugues J.; Budelot, Michel; Cosserat, Didier; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle; Desprès, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    In September 2010, autochthonous transmission of chikungunya virus was recorded in southeastern France, where the Aedes albopictus mosquito vector is present. Sequence analysis of the viral genomes of imported and autochthonous isolates indicated new features for the potential emergence and spread of the virus in Europe. PMID:21529410

  11. Viruses in reptiles.

    PubMed

    Ariel, Ellen

    2011-09-21

    The etiology of reptilian viral diseases can be attributed to a wide range of viruses occurring across different genera and families. Thirty to forty years ago, studies of viruses in reptiles focused mainly on the zoonotic potential of arboviruses in reptiles and much effort went into surveys and challenge trials of a range of reptiles with eastern and western equine encephalitis as well as Japanese encephalitis viruses. In the past decade, outbreaks of infection with West Nile virus in human populations and in farmed alligators in the USA has seen the research emphasis placed on the issue of reptiles, particularly crocodiles and alligators, being susceptible to, and reservoirs for, this serious zoonotic disease. Although there are many recognised reptilian viruses, the evidence for those being primary pathogens is relatively limited. Transmission studies establishing pathogenicity and cofactors are likewise scarce, possibly due to the relatively low commercial importance of reptiles, difficulties with the availability of animals and permits for statistically sound experiments, difficulties with housing of reptiles in an experimental setting or the inability to propagate some viruses in cell culture to sufficient titres for transmission studies. Viruses as causes of direct loss of threatened species, such as the chelonid fibropapilloma associated herpesvirus and ranaviruses in farmed and wild tortoises and turtles, have re-focused attention back to the characterisation of the viruses as well as diagnosis and pathogenesis in the host itself.

  12. West Nile Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... spread by mosquitoes. Mosquitoes become infected by biting birds that carry the virus. People can get West Nile virus when an infected mosquito bites them. This happens most often in the warm-weather months of spring, summer and early fall. You ...

  13. Diseases caused by viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Corn viruses are important disease agents worldwide that can be difficult to identify and diagnose. Previously undescribed viruses of corn also emerge periodically and their distributions and importance changes over time. The Compendium of Corn Diseases is a valuable tool for pre-diagnosis of diseas...

  14. Rift Valley Fever Virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-transmitted virus or arbovirus that is endemic in sub-Saharan Africa. In the last decade, Rift Valley fever (RVF) outbreaks have resulted in loss of human and animal life, as well as had significant economic impact. The disease in livestock is primarily a...

  15. Equine Arteritis Virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    03. Nidovirales : 03.004. Arteriviridae : 03.004.0. {03.004.0. unknown} : 03.004.0.01. Arterivirus : 03.004.0.01.001. Equine arteritis virus will be published online. The article details the phenotypic and genotypic makeup of equine arteritis virus (EAV), and summarizes its biological properties....

  16. Usutu Virus, Italy, 1996

    PubMed Central

    Bakonyi, Tamás; Rossi, Giacomo; Mani, Paolo; Nowotny, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of archived tissue samples from bird deaths in the Tuscany region of Italy in 1996 identified Usutu virus. Partial sequencing confirmed identity with the 2001 Vienna strain and provided evidence for a much earlier introduction of this virus into Europe than previously assumed. PMID:23347844

  17. Avian influenza virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) is type A influenza that is adapted to avian host species. Although the virus can be isolated from numerous avian species, the natural host reservoir species are dabbling ducks, shorebirds and gulls. Domestic poultry species (poultry being defined as birds that are rais...

  18. Zika Virus Disease.

    PubMed

    Slenczka, Werner

    2016-06-01

    The history of Zika virus disease serves as a paradigm of a typical emerging viral infection. Zika virus disease, a mosquito-borne flavivirus, was first isolated in 1947 in the Zika forest of Uganda. The same virus was also isolated from jungle-dwelling mosquitoes (Aedes [Stegomyia] africanus). In many areas of Africa and South Asia human infections with Zika virus were detected by both serology and virus isolation. About 80% of infections are asymptomatic, and in 20% a mostly mild disease with fever, rash, arthralgia, and conjunctivitis may occur. Fetal infections with malformations were not recorded in Africa or Asia. Zika virus was imported to northern Brazil possibly during the world soccer championship that was hosted by Brazil in June through July 2014. A cluster of severe fetal malformations with microcephaly and ocular defects was noted in 2015 in the northeast of Brazil, and intrauterine infections with Zika virus were confirmed. The dramatic change in Zika virus pathogenicity upon its introduction to Brazil has remained an enigma.

  19. Tobacco ringspot virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV), and its vector, the dagger nematodes (Xiphinema americanum and related species) are widely distributed throughout the world. Cucumber, melon, and watermelon are particularly affected by TRSV. Symptoms can vary with plant age, the strain of the virus, and environment...

  20. Papaya ringspot virus (Potyviridae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Papaya ringspot virus, a member of the family Potyviridae, is single stranded RNA plant virus with a monocistronic genome of about 10,326 nucleotides that is expressed via a large polyprotein subsequently cleaved into functional proteins. It causes severe damage on cucurbit crops such as squash and...

  1. Virus separation using membranes.

    PubMed

    Grein, Tanja A; Michalsky, Ronald; Czermak, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Industrial manufacturing of cell culture-derived viruses or virus-like particles for gene therapy or vaccine production are complex multistep processes. In addition to the bioreactor, such processes require a multitude of downstream unit operations for product separation, concentration, or purification. Similarly, before a biopharmaceutical product can enter the market, removal or inactivation of potential viral contamination has to be demonstrated. Given the complexity of biological solutions and the high standards on composition and purity of biopharmaceuticals, downstream processing is the bottleneck in many biotechnological production trains. Membrane-based filtration can be an economically attractive and efficient technology for virus separation. Viral clearance, for instance, of up to seven orders of magnitude has been reported for state of the art polymeric membranes under best conditions.This chapter summarizes the fundamentals of virus ultrafiltration, diafiltration, or purification with adsorptive membranes. In lieu of an impractical universally applicable protocol for virus filtration, application of these principles is demonstrated with two examples. The chapter provides detailed methods for production, concentration, purification, and removal of a rod-shaped baculovirus (Autographa californica M nucleopolyhedrovirus, about 40 × 300 nm in size, a potential vector for gene therapy, and an industrially important protein expression system) or a spherical parvovirus (minute virus of mice, 22-26 nm in size, a model virus for virus clearance validation studies).

  2. Papaya Ringspot Virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The term papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) was coined by Jensen in 1949, to describe a papaya disease in Hawaii. Later work showed that diseases such as papaya mosaic and watermelon mosaic virus-1 were caused by PRSV. The primary host range of PRSV is papaya and cucurbits, with Chenopium amaranticolor ...

  3. Zika Virus and Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Stagg, Denise; Hurst, Helen M

    2016-01-01

    Recent outbreaks of Zika virus and reports linking infection in pregnant women with microcephaly in newborns have caused concern worldwide. Information has been evolving rapidly. Nurses and other clinicians, especially those who work with women of childbearing age, play a pivotal role in disseminating accurate information and identifying potential cases of Zika virus infection.

  4. Lethal mutagenesis of viruses.

    PubMed

    Perales, Celia; Martín, Verónica; Domingo, Esteban

    2011-11-01

    Lethal mutagenesis aims at extinguishing viruses by increased mutagenesis prompted by virus-specific mutagenic agents, mainly nucleoside analogues. It is derived from the error threshold relationship of quasispecies theory, and it is slowly finding its way towards a clinical application. We summarize the current situation of research in this field of antiviral therapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Zika virus has oncolytic activity against glioblastoma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhe; Gorman, Matthew J; McKenzie, Lisa D; Chai, Jiani N; Hubert, Christopher G; Prager, Briana C; Fernandez, Estefania; Richner, Justin M; Zhang, Rong; Shan, Chao; Tycksen, Eric; Wang, Xiuxing; Shi, Pei-Yong; Diamond, Michael S; Rich, Jeremy N; Chheda, Milan G

    2017-10-02

    Glioblastoma is a highly lethal brain cancer that frequently recurs in proximity to the original resection cavity. We explored the use of oncolytic virus therapy against glioblastoma with Zika virus (ZIKV), a flavivirus that induces cell death and differentiation of neural precursor cells in the developing fetus. ZIKV preferentially infected and killed glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) relative to differentiated tumor progeny or normal neuronal cells. The effects against GSCs were not a general property of neurotropic flaviviruses, as West Nile virus indiscriminately killed both tumor and normal neural cells. ZIKV potently depleted patient-derived GSCs grown in culture and in organoids. Moreover, mice with glioblastoma survived substantially longer and at greater rates when the tumor was inoculated with a mouse-adapted strain of ZIKV. Our results suggest that ZIKV is an oncolytic virus that can preferentially target GSCs; thus, genetically modified strains that further optimize safety could have therapeutic efficacy for adult glioblastoma patients. © 2017 Zhu et al.

  6. Al Shanker Remembers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Educator, 2000

    2000-01-01

    In a 1996 interview shortly before his death, Al Shanker, longtime president of the American Federation of Teachers, discussed such topics as: his own educational experiences; how he learned about political fighting in the Boy Scouts; the appeal of socialism; multinational corporations and the nation state; teaching tough students; and John Dewey…

  7. Fosetyl-al

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) Chemical Assessment Summary U.S . Environmental Protection Agency National Center for Environmental Assessment This IRIS Summary has been removed from the IRIS database and is available for historical reference purposes . ( July 2016 ) Fosetyl - al ; CASRN

  8. Virus excretion in smallpox

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, J. K.; Mitra, A. C.; Mukherjee, M. K.; De, S. K.

    1973-01-01

    Throat swabs of 34 of 328 family contacts of 52 smallpox cases, examined 4-8 days after the onset of the disease in the family, were positive for variola virus. The log titre of virus per swab ranged from 2 to 3.95. A higher proportion of unvaccinated than of vaccinated contacts excreted the virus. Only 4 of the virus-positive contacts developed clinical smallpox; this occurred 5-7 days after their swabs were examined. Excretion of virus in the throats of these contacts, a few of whom were in the incubation period of the disease, suggests the possibility that they could have spread the infection. This possibility, if kept in mind, may help in tracing the source of infection or in determining the incubation period in a few instances when difficulty is experienced. PMID:4359679

  9. Hepatitis B Virus Biology

    PubMed Central

    Seeger, Christoph; Mason, William S.

    2000-01-01

    Hepadnaviruses (hepatitis B viruses) cause transient and chronic infections of the liver. Transient infections run a course of several months, and chronic infections are often lifelong. Chronic infections can lead to liver failure with cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The replication strategy of these viruses has been described in great detail, but virus-host interactions leading to acute and chronic disease are still poorly understood. Studies on how the virus evades the immune response to cause prolonged transient infections with high-titer viremia and lifelong infections with an ongoing inflammation of the liver are still at an early stage, and the role of the virus in liver cancer is still elusive. The state of knowledge in this very active field is therefore reviewed with an emphasis on past accomplishments as well as goals for the future. PMID:10704474

  10. Electron tomography of viruses.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Sriram; Bartesaghi, Alberto; Liu, Jun; Bennett, Adam E; Sougrat, Rachid

    2007-10-01

    Understanding the molecular architectures of enveloped and complex viruses is a challenging frontier in structural biology. In these viruses, the structural and compositional variation from one viral particle to another generally precludes the use of either crystallization or image averaging procedures that have been successfully implemented in the past for highly symmetric viruses. While advances in cryo electron tomography of unstained specimens provide new opportunities for identification and molecular averaging of individual subcomponents such as the surface glycoprotein spikes on purified viruses, electron tomography of stained and plunge-frozen cells is being used to visualize the cellular context of viral entry and replication. Here, we review recent developments in both areas as they relate to our understanding of the biology of heterogeneous and pleiomorphic viruses.

  11. Mayaro virus proteins.

    PubMed

    Mezencio, J M; Rebello, M A

    1993-01-01

    Mayaro virus was grown in BHK-21 cells and purified by centrifugation in a potassium-tartrate gradient (5-50%). The electron microscopy analyses of the purified virus showed an homogeneous population of enveloped particles with 69 +/- 2.3 nm in diameter. Three structural virus proteins were identified and designated p1, p2 and p3. Their average molecular weight were p1, 54 KDa; p2, 50 KDa and p3, 34 KDa. In Mayaro virus infected Aedes albopictus cells and in BHK-21 infected cells we detected six viral proteins, in which three of them are the structural virus proteins and the other three were products from processing of precursors of viral proteins, whose molecular weights are 62 KDa, 64 KDa and 110 KDa. The 34 KDa protein was the first viral protein synthesized at 5 hours post-infection in both cell lines studied.

  12. Molecular characterisation and phylogenetic analysis of Chronic bee paralysis virus, a honey bee virus.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Violaine; Blanchard, Philippe; Chaouch, Soraya; Lallemand, Perrine; Schurr, Frank; Celle, Olivier; Dubois, Eric; Tordo, Noël; Thiéry, Richard; Houlgatte, Rémi; Ribière, Magali

    2008-03-01

    The complete sequences of the two major RNAs of Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) have been determined. RNA 1 (3674nt long) and RNA 2 (2305nt long) are positive single-stranded RNAs that are capped but not polyadenylated. The 3' ends of both RNAs are unreactive to polymerisation or ligation even in denaturing conditions, a feature already observed in alphanodavirus RNAs. The three previously described smaller RNAs [Overton, H.A., Buck, K.W., Bailey, L., et al., 1982. Relationships between the RNA components of Chronic bee-paralysis virus and those of chronic bee-paralysis virus associate. J. Gen. Virol. 63, 171-179], were not detected in this study, supporting the hypothesis that they would correspond to the three RNAs of the Chronic bee paralysis satellite virus (CBPSV). RNA 1 and RNA 2 encoded three and four overlapping open reading frames (ORFs), respectively. The amino acid sequences deduced from the ORF 3 on RNA 1 shared the conserved motifs of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) sequence and presented similarities with members of the Nodaviridae and Tombusviridae families. However, no similarities were found between the other CBPV deduced amino acid sequences and sequences in the NCBI databases, suggesting that CBPV is the prototype of a new family of positive single-stranded RNA viruses.

  13. Varroa destructor Macula-like virus, Lake Sinai virus and other new RNA viruses in wild bumblebee hosts (Bombus pascuorum, Bombus lapidarius and Bombus pratorum).

    PubMed

    Parmentier, Laurian; Smagghe, Guy; de Graaf, Dirk C; Meeus, Ivan

    2016-02-01

    Pollinators such as bumblebees (Bombus spp.) are in decline worldwide which poses a threat not only for ecosystem biodiversity but also to human crop production services. One main cause of pollinator decline may be the infection and transmission of diseases including RNA viruses. Recently, new viruses have been discovered in honeybees, but information on the presence of these in wild bumblebees is largely not available. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of new RNA viruses in Bombus species, and can report for the first time Varroa destructor Macula-like virus (VdMLV) and Lake Sinai virus (LSV) infection in multiple wild bumblebee hosts of Bombus pascuorum, Bombus lapidarius and Bombus pratorum. We sampled in 4 locations in Flanders, Belgium. Besides, we confirmed Slow bee paralysis virus (SBPV) in wild bumblebees, but no positive samples were obtained for Big Sioux river virus (BSRV). Secondly, we screened for the influence of apiaries on the prevalence of these viruses. Our results indicated a location effect for the prevalence of VdMLV in Bombus species, with a higher prevalence in the proximity of honeybee apiaries mainly observed in one location. For LSV, the prevalence was not different in the proximity or at a 1.5 km-distance of apiaries, but we reported a different isolate with similarities to LSV-2 and "LSV-clade A" as described by Ravoet et al. (2015), which was detected both in Apis mellifera and Bombus species. In general, our results indicate the existence of a disease pool of new viruses that seems to be associated to a broad range of Apoidae hosts, including multiple Bombus species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Proton irradiation studies on Al and Al5083 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, P.; Gayathri, N.; Bhattacharya, M.; Gupta, A. Dutta; Sarkar, Apu; Dhar, S.; Mitra, M. K.; Mukherjee, P.

    2017-10-01

    The change in the microstructural parameters and microhardness values in 6.5 MeV proton irradiated pure Al and Al5083 alloy samples have been evaluated using different model based techniques of X-ray diffraction Line Profile Analysis (XRD) and microindendation techniques. The detailed line profile analysis of the XRD data showed that the domain size increases and saturates with irradiation dose both in the case of Al and Al5083 alloy. The corresponding microstrain values did not show any change with irradiation dose in the case of the pure Al but showed an increase at higher irradiation doses in the case of Al5083 alloy. The microindendation results showed that unirradiated Al5083 alloy has higher hardness value compared to that of unirradiated pure Al. The hardness increased marginally with irradiation dose in the case of Al5083, whereas for pure Al, there was no significant change with dose.

  15. Infectious Viral Quantification of Chikungunya Virus-Virus Plaque Assay.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Parveen; Lee, Regina Ching Hua; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2016-01-01

    The plaque assay is an essential method for quantification of infectious virus titer. Cells infected with virus particles are overlaid with a viscous substrate. A suitable incubation period results in the formation of plaques, which can be fixed and stained for visualization. Here, we describe a method for measuring Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) titers via virus plaque assays.

  16. Al Sumelat Water Network. Village of Al Sumelat, Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-15

    OFFICE OF THE SPECIAL INSPECTOR GENERAL FOR IRAQ RECONSTRUCTION AL SUMELAT WATER NETWORK VILLAGE OF AL SUMELAT, IRAQ...Sumelat Water Network Village of Al Sumelat, Iraq 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e...Al Sumelat Water Network Village of Al Sumelat, Iraq Synopsis Introduction. This report was previously provided on a limited distribution basis

  17. Virus discovery and recent insights into virus diversity in arthropods.

    PubMed

    Junglen, Sandra; Drosten, Christian

    2013-08-01

    Recent studies on virus discovery have focused mainly on mammalian and avian viruses. Arbovirology with its long tradition of ecologically oriented investigation is now catching up, with important novel insights into the diversity of arthropod-associated viruses. Recent discoveries include taxonomically outlying viruses within the families Flaviviridae, Togaviridae, and Bunyaviridae, and even novel virus families within the order Nidovirales. However, the current focusing of studies on blood-feeding arthropods has restricted the range of arthropod hosts analyzed for viruses so far. Future investigations should include species from other arthropod taxa than Ixodita, Culicidae and Phlebotominae in order to shed light on the true diversity of arthropod viruses.

  18. Virus-PEDOT Biocomposite Films

    PubMed Central

    Donavan, Keith C.; Arter, Jessica A.

    2012-01-01

    Virus-poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (virus-PEDOT) biocomposite films are prepared by electropolymerizing 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) in aqueous electrolytes containing 12 mM LiClO4 and the bacteriophage M13. The concentration of virus in these solutions, [virus]soln, is varied from 3 nM to 15 nM. A quartz crystal microbalance is used to directly measure the total mass of the biocomposite film during its electrodeposition. In combination with a measurement of the electrodeposition charge, the mass of the virus incorporated into the film is calculated. These data show that concentration of the M13 within the electropolymerized film, [virus]film, increases linearly with [virus]soln. The incorporation of virus particles into the PEDOT film from solution is efficient, resulting in a concentration ratio: [virus]film:[virus]soln ≈450. Virus incorporation into the PEDOT causes roughening of the film topography that is observed using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The electrical conductivity of the virus-PEDOT film, measured perpendicular to the plane of the film using conductive tip AFM, decreases linearly with virus loading, from 270 μS/cm for pure PE-DOT films to 50 μS/cm for films containing 100 μM virus. The presence on the virus surface of displayed affinity peptides did not significantly influence the efficiency of incorporation into virus-PEDOT biocomposite films. PMID:22856875

  19. Realms of the Viruses Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    Viruses have evolved strategies for infecting all taxa, but most viruses are highly specific about their cellular host. In humans, viruses cause diverse diseases, from chronic but benign warts, to acute and deadly hemorrhagic fever. Viruses have entertaining names like Zucchini Yellow Mosaic, Semliki Forest, Coxsackie, and the original terminator,…

  20. Computer Viruses: Pathology and Detection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, John R.; Lamon, William E.

    1992-01-01

    Explains how computer viruses were originally created, how a computer can become infected by a virus, how viruses operate, symptoms that indicate a computer is infected, how to detect and remove viruses, and how to prevent a reinfection. A sidebar lists eight antivirus resources. (four references) (LRW)

  1. A Virus in Turbo Pascal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teleky, Heidi Ann; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Addresses why the authors feel it is not inappropriate to teach about viruses in the how-to, hands-on fashion. Identifies the special features of Turbo Pascal that have to be used for the creation of an effective virus. Defines virus, derives its structure, and from this structure is derived the implemented virus. (PR)

  2. A Virus in Turbo Pascal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teleky, Heidi Ann; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Addresses why the authors feel it is not inappropriate to teach about viruses in the how-to, hands-on fashion. Identifies the special features of Turbo Pascal that have to be used for the creation of an effective virus. Defines virus, derives its structure, and from this structure is derived the implemented virus. (PR)

  3. Realms of the Viruses Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    Viruses have evolved strategies for infecting all taxa, but most viruses are highly specific about their cellular host. In humans, viruses cause diverse diseases, from chronic but benign warts, to acute and deadly hemorrhagic fever. Viruses have entertaining names like Zucchini Yellow Mosaic, Semliki Forest, Coxsackie, and the original terminator,…

  4. Computer Viruses: Pathology and Detection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, John R.; Lamon, William E.

    1992-01-01

    Explains how computer viruses were originally created, how a computer can become infected by a virus, how viruses operate, symptoms that indicate a computer is infected, how to detect and remove viruses, and how to prevent a reinfection. A sidebar lists eight antivirus resources. (four references) (LRW)

  5. ICTV virus taxonomy profile: dicistroviridae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dicistroviridae is a family of small non-enveloped viruses with RNA genomes of approximately 8-10 kilobases in length. All members infect arthropod hosts with some having devastating economic consequences, such as Acute bee paralysis virus, Kashmir bee virus, and Israeli acute paralysis virus towar...

  6. Therapeutics and vaccines against chikungunya virus.

    PubMed

    Ahola, Tero; Couderc, Therese; Courderc, Therese; Ng, Lisa F P; Hallengärd, David; Powers, Ann; Lecuit, Marc; Esteban, Mariano; Merits, Andres; Roques, Pierre; Liljeström, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Currently, there are no licensed vaccines or therapies available against chikungunya virus (CHIKV), and these were subjects discussed during a CHIKV meeting recently organized in Langkawi, Malaysia. In this review, we chart the approaches taken in both areas. Because of a sharp increase in new data in these fields, the present paper is complementary to previous reviews by Weaver et al. in 2012 and Kaur and Chu in 2013 . The most promising antivirals so far discovered are reviewed, with a special focus on the virus-encoded replication proteins as potential targets. Within the vaccines in development, our review emphasizes the various strategies in parallel development that are unique in the vaccine field against a single disease.

  7. Giovannoni et al. reply.

    PubMed

    Giovannoni, Stephen; Temperton, Ben; Zhao, Yanlin

    2013-07-25

    Replying to S. Våge, J. E. Storesund & T. F. Thingstad Nature 499, http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature12387 (2013). In the debate about top-down versus bottom-up control, most would argue that both are important. The most probable scenario is that in the absence of high rates of transport, the equilibrium between these competing processes determines bacterial abundance. In their Brief Communication Arising, Våge and co-workers respond to our Letter, arguing the case for defense specialism. ‘Defence specialism’ is not synonymous with ‘defence’. Because of the prevalence of viruses, it is probable that most bacteria have acquired defences against predation. ‘Defence specialism’ refers to success by defence, in the sense that a cell might allocate a large proportion of its resources to defence and thereby become successful.

  8. Enteric hepatitis viruses

    PubMed Central

    Tahaei, Seyed Mohammad Ebrahim; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis viruses are infectious agents that can infect liver and cause inflammation. The infection triggers immune response against infected cells that leads to the destruction of hepatic cells. This destruction has two consequences: leaking ALT and AST liver enzymes which increases during the course of disease and accumulation of bilirubin- a red pigmented compound released from dead red cells- which causes the yellow coloration of eyes and skin. These viruses transmit through diverse routes i.e. blood transfusion, sexual contacts and consuming water or food contaminated by feces. Enteric hepatitis viruses use the latter route for transmission; hence their outbreaks are more common in underdeveloped countries. There are currently two distinguished enteric hepatitis viruses, hepatitis A and hepatitis E. These viruses belong to different family of viruses and their epidemiological characteristics are different. These infections can be diagnosed by an ELISA for IgM antibody. A vaccine has been developed in last decade of twentieth century for hepatitis A virus, which is administered mostly in the developed world i.e. U.S and Japan. Treatment for these infections is mostly supportive; however, in the case of fulminant hepatitis the liver transplantation might be necessary. PMID:24834192

  9. Respiratory RNA Viruses.

    PubMed

    Hodinka, Richard L

    2016-08-01

    Acute upper and lower respiratory infections are a major public health problem and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. At greatest risk are young children, the elderly, the chronically ill, and those with suppressed or compromised immune systems. Viruses are the predominant cause of respiratory tract illnesses and include RNA viruses such as respiratory syncytial virus, influenza virus, parainfluenza virus, metapneumovirus, rhinovirus, and coronavirus. Laboratory testing is required for a reliable diagnosis of viral respiratory infections, as a clinical diagnosis can be difficult since signs and symptoms are often overlapping and not specific for any one virus. Recent advances in technology have resulted in the development of newer diagnostic assays that offer great promise for rapid and accurate detection of respiratory viral infections. This chapter emphasizes the fundamental characteristics and clinical importance of the various RNA viruses that cause upper and lower respiratory tract diseases in the immunocompromised host. It highlights the laboratory methods that can be used to make a rapid and definitive diagnosis for the greatest impact on the care and management of ill patients, and the prevention and control of hospital-acquired infections and community outbreaks.

  10. Enteric hepatitis viruses.

    PubMed

    Tahaei, Seyed Mohammad Ebrahim; Mohebbi, Seyed Reza; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis viruses are infectious agents that can infect liver and cause inflammation. The infection triggers immune response against infected cells that leads to the destruction of hepatic cells. This destruction has two consequences: leaking ALT and AST liver enzymes which increases during the course of disease and accumulation of bilirubin- a red pigmented compound released from dead red cells- which causes the yellow coloration of eyes and skin. These viruses transmit through diverse routes i.e. blood transfusion, sexual contacts and consuming water or food contaminated by feces. Enteric hepatitis viruses use the latter route for transmission; hence their outbreaks are more common in underdeveloped countries. There are currently two distinguished enteric hepatitis viruses, hepatitis A and hepatitis E. These viruses belong to different family of viruses and their epidemiological characteristics are different. These infections can be diagnosed by an ELISA for IgM antibody. A vaccine has been developed in last decade of twentieth century for hepatitis A virus, which is administered mostly in the developed world i.e. U.S and Japan. Treatment for these infections is mostly supportive; however, in the case of fulminant hepatitis the liver transplantation might be necessary.

  11. Giant viruses infecting algae.

    PubMed

    Van Etten, J L; Meints, R H

    1999-01-01

    Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus (PBCV-1) is the prototype of a family of large, icosahedral, plaque-forming, double-stranded-DNA-containing viruses that replicate in certain unicellular, eukaryotic chlorella-like green algae. DNA sequence analysis of its 330, 742-bp genome leads to the prediction that this phycodnavirus has 376 protein-encoding genes and 10 transfer RNA genes. The predicted gene products of approximately 40% of these genes resemble proteins of known function. The chlorella viruses have other features that distinguish them from most viruses, in addition to their large genome size. These features include the following: (a) The viruses encode multiple DNA methyltransferases and DNA site-specific endonucleases; (b) PBCV-1 encodes at least part, if not the entire machinery to glycosylate its proteins; (c) PBCV-1 has at least two types of introns--a self-splicing intron in a transcription factor-like gene and a splicesomal processed type of intron in its DNA polymerase gene. Unlike the chlorella viruses, large double-stranded-DNA-containing viruses that infect marine, filamentous brown algae have a circular genome and a lysogenic phase in their life cycle.

  12. Influenza virus isolation.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Scott; Walker, David; Webster, Robert G

    2012-01-01

    The isolation of influenza viruses is important for the diagnosis of respiratory diseases in lower animals and humans, for the detection of the infecting agent in surveillance programs, and is an essential element in the development and production of vaccine. Since influenza is caused by a zoonotic virus it is necessary to do surveillance in the reservoir species (aquatic waterfowls), intermediate hosts (quails, pigs), and in affected mammals including humans. Two of the hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes of influenza A viruses (H5 and H7) can evolve into highly pathogenic (HP) strains for gallinaceous poultry; some HP H5 and H7 strains cause lethal infection of humans. In waterfowls, low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) isolates are obtained primarily from the cloaca (or feces); in domestic poultry, the virus is more often recovered from the respiratory tract than from cloacal samples; in mammals, the virus is most often isolated from the respiratory tract, and in cases of high pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) from the blood and internal organs of infected birds. Virus isolation procedures are performed by inoculation of clinical specimens into embryonated eggs (primarily chicken eggs) or onto a variety of primary or continuous tissue culture systems. Successful isolation of influenza virus depends on the quality of the sample and matching the appropriate culture method to the sample type.

  13. ALS insertion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, E.; Chin, J.; Halbach, K.; Hassenzahl, W. V.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.; Lancaster, H.; Plate, D.

    1991-08-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), the first US third generation synchrotron radiation source, is currently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The low-emittance, 1.5 GeV electron storage ring and the insertion devices are specifically designed to produce high brightness beams in the UV to soft X-Ray range. The planned initial complement of insertion devices includes four 4.6 m long undulators, with period lengths of 3.9 cm, 5.0 cm (2) and 8.0 cm, and a 2.9 m long wiggler of 16 cm period length. Undulator design is well advanced and fabrication has begun on the 5.0 cm and 8.0 cm period length undulators. This paper discusses ALS insertion device requirements; general design philosophy; and design of the magnetic structure, support structure/drive systems, control system and vacuum system.

  14. Assessment of the efficacy of membrane filtration processes to remove human enteric viruses and the suitability of bacteriophages and a plant virus as surrogates for those viruses.

    PubMed

    Shirasaki, N; Matsushita, T; Matsui, Y; Murai, K

    2017-05-15

    Here, we evaluated the efficacy of direct microfiltration (MF) and ultrafiltration (UF) to remove three representative human enteric viruses (i.e., adenovirus [AdV] type 40, coxsackievirus [CV] B5, and hepatitis A virus [HAV] IB), and one surrogate of human caliciviruses (i.e., murine norovirus [MNV] type 1). Eight different MF membranes and three different UF membranes were used. We also examined the ability of coagulation pretreatment with high-basicity polyaluminum chloride (PACl) to enhance virus removal by MF. The removal ratios of two bacteriophages (MS2 and φX174) and a plant virus (pepper mild mottle virus; PMMoV) were compared with the removal ratios of the human enteric viruses to assess the suitability of these viruses to be used as surrogates for human enteric viruses. The virus removal ratios obtained with direct MF with membranes with nominal pore sizes of 0.1-0.22 μm differed, depending on the membrane used; adsorptive interactions, particularly hydrophobic interactions between virus particles and the membrane surface, were dominant factors for virus removal. In contrast, direct UF with membranes with nominal molecular weight cutoffs of 1-100 kDa effectively removed viruses through size exclusion, and >4-log10 removal was achieved when a membrane with a nominal molecular weight cutoff of 1 kDa was used. At pH 7 and 8, in-line coagulation-MF with nonsulfated high-basicity PACls containing Al30 species had generally a better virus removal (i.e., >4-log10 virus removal) than the other aluminum-based coagulants, except for φX174. For all of the filtration processes, the removal ratios of AdV, CV, HAV, and MNV were comparable and strongly correlated with each other. The removal ratios of MS2 and PMMoV were comparable or smaller than those of the three human enteric viruses and MNV, and were strongly correlated with those of the three human enteric viruses and MNV. The removal ratios obtained with coagulation-MF for φX174 were markedly smaller than

  15. Ocular tropism of respiratory viruses.

    PubMed

    Belser, Jessica A; Rota, Paul A; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2013-03-01

    Respiratory viruses (including adenovirus, influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus, and rhinovirus) cause a broad spectrum of disease in humans, ranging from mild influenza-like symptoms to acute respiratory failure. While species D adenoviruses and subtype H7 influenza viruses are known to possess an ocular tropism, documented human ocular disease has been reported following infection with all principal respiratory viruses. In this review, we describe the anatomical proximity and cellular receptor distribution between ocular and respiratory tissues. All major respiratory viruses and their association with human ocular disease are discussed. Research utilizing in vitro and in vivo models to study the ability of respiratory viruses to use the eye as a portal of entry as well as a primary site of virus replication is highlighted. Identification of shared receptor-binding preferences, host responses, and laboratory modeling protocols among these viruses provides a needed bridge between clinical and laboratory studies of virus tropism.

  16. Ocular Tropism of Respiratory Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Rota, Paul A.; Tumpey, Terrence M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Respiratory viruses (including adenovirus, influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus, and rhinovirus) cause a broad spectrum of disease in humans, ranging from mild influenza-like symptoms to acute respiratory failure. While species D adenoviruses and subtype H7 influenza viruses are known to possess an ocular tropism, documented human ocular disease has been reported following infection with all principal respiratory viruses. In this review, we describe the anatomical proximity and cellular receptor distribution between ocular and respiratory tissues. All major respiratory viruses and their association with human ocular disease are discussed. Research utilizing in vitro and in vivo models to study the ability of respiratory viruses to use the eye as a portal of entry as well as a primary site of virus replication is highlighted. Identification of shared receptor-binding preferences, host responses, and laboratory modeling protocols among these viruses provides a needed bridge between clinical and laboratory studies of virus tropism. PMID:23471620

  17. Deletion of the vaccinia virus F13L gene results in a highly attenuated virus that mounts a protective immune response against subsequent vaccinia virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Vliegen, Inge; Yang, Guang; Hruby, Dennis; Jordan, Robert; Neyts, Johan

    2012-01-01

    Vaccinia virus F13L encodes the envelope protein p37, which is the target of the anti-pox virus drug ST-246 (Yang et al., 2005) and that is required for production of extracellular vaccinia virus. The F13L (p37)-deleted (and ST-246 resistant) vaccinia virus recombinant (Vac-ΔF13L) produced smaller plaques than the wild-type vaccinia (Western Reserve vaccinia). In addition, Vac-ΔF13L proved, when inoculated either intravenously or intracutaneously in both immunocompetent and immunodeficient (athymic nude or SCID) mice, to be severely attenuated. Intravenous or intracutaneous inoculation of immunocompetent mice with the ΔF13L virus efficiently protected against a subsequent intravenous, intracutaneous or intranasal challenge with vaccinia WR (Western Reserve). This was corroborated by the observation that Vac-ΔF13L induced a humoral immune response against vaccinia following either intravenous or intracutaneous challenge. In conclusion, F13L-deleted vaccinia virus may have the potential to be developed as a smallpox vaccine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Immune Protection of Nonhuman Primates Against Ebola Virus with Single Low-Dose Adenovirus Vectors Encoding Modified GPs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    Immune Protection of Nonhuman Primates against Ebola Virus with Single Low-Dose Adenovirus Vectors Encoding Modified GPs Nancy J. Sullivan 1...Shedlock DJ, Xu L, et al. (2006) Immune protection of nonhuman primates against Ebola virus with single low-dose adenovirus vectors encoding modified...should be addressed. E-mail: gnabel@nih.gov [ These authors contributed equally to this work. A B S T R A C T Background Ebola virus causes a hemorrhagic

  19. Viruses in reptiles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of reptilian viral diseases can be attributed to a wide range of viruses occurring across different genera and families. Thirty to forty years ago, studies of viruses in reptiles focused mainly on the zoonotic potential of arboviruses in reptiles and much effort went into surveys and challenge trials of a range of reptiles with eastern and western equine encephalitis as well as Japanese encephalitis viruses. In the past decade, outbreaks of infection with West Nile virus in human populations and in farmed alligators in the USA has seen the research emphasis placed on the issue of reptiles, particularly crocodiles and alligators, being susceptible to, and reservoirs for, this serious zoonotic disease. Although there are many recognised reptilian viruses, the evidence for those being primary pathogens is relatively limited. Transmission studies establishing pathogenicity and cofactors are likewise scarce, possibly due to the relatively low commercial importance of reptiles, difficulties with the availability of animals and permits for statistically sound experiments, difficulties with housing of reptiles in an experimental setting or the inability to propagate some viruses in cell culture to sufficient titres for transmission studies. Viruses as causes of direct loss of threatened species, such as the chelonid fibropapilloma associated herpesvirus and ranaviruses in farmed and wild tortoises and turtles, have re-focused attention back to the characterisation of the viruses as well as diagnosis and pathogenesis in the host itself. 1. Introduction 2. Methods for working with reptilian viruses 3. Reptilian viruses described by virus families 3.1. Herpesviridae 3.2. Iridoviridae 3.2.1 Ranavirus 3.2.2 Erythrocytic virus 3.2.3 Iridovirus 3.3. Poxviridae 3.4. Adenoviridae 3.5. Papillomaviridae 3.6. Parvoviridae 3.7. Reoviridae 3.8. Retroviridae and inclusion body disease of Boid snakes 3.9. Arboviruses 3.9.1. Flaviviridae 3.9.2. Togaviridae 3.10. Caliciviridae

  20. [Ebola virus disease].

    PubMed

    Nazimek, Katarzyna; Bociaga-Jasik, Monika; Bryniarski, Krzysztof; Gałas, Aleksander; Garlicki, Aleksander; Gawda, Anna; Gawlik, Grzegorz; Gil, Krzysztof; Kosz-Vnenchak, Magdalena; Mrozek-Budzyn, Dorota; Olszanecki, Rafał; Piatek, Anna; Zawilińska, Barbara; Marcinkiewicz, Janusz

    2014-01-01

    Ebola is one of the most virulent zoonotic RNA viruses causing in humans haemorrhagic fever with fatality ratio reaching 90%. During the outbreak of 2014 the number of deaths exceeded 8.000. The "imported" cases reported in Western Europe and USA highlighted the extreme risk of Ebola virus spreading outside the African countries. Thus, haemorrhagic fever outbreak is an international epidemiological problem, also due to the lack of approved prevention and therapeutic strategies. The editorial review article briefly summarizes current knowledge on Ebola virus disease epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis as well as possible prevention and treatment.

  1. Genome of Horsepox Virus

    PubMed Central

    Tulman, E. R.; Delhon, G.; Afonso, C. L.; Lu, Z.; Zsak, L.; Sandybaev, N. T.; Kerembekova, U. Z.; Zaitsev, V. L.; Kutish, G. F.; Rock, D. L.

    2006-01-01

    Here we present the genomic sequence of horsepox virus (HSPV) isolate MNR-76, an orthopoxvirus (OPV) isolated in 1976 from diseased Mongolian horses. The 212-kbp genome contained 7.5-kbp inverted terminal repeats and lacked extensive terminal tandem repetition. HSPV contained 236 open reading frames (ORFs) with similarity to those in other OPVs, with those in the central 100-kbp region most conserved relative to other OPVs. Phylogenetic analysis of the conserved region indicated that HSPV is closely related to sequenced isolates of vaccinia virus (VACV) and rabbitpox virus, clearly grouping together these VACV-like viruses. Fifty-four HSPV ORFs likely represented fragments of 25 orthologous OPV genes, including in the central region the only known fragmented form of an OPV ribonucleotide reductase large subunit gene. In terminal genomic regions, HSPV lacked full-length homologues of genes variably fragmented in other VACV-like viruses but was unique in fragmentation of the homologue of VACV strain Copenhagen B6R, a gene intact in other known VACV-like viruses. Notably, HSPV contained in terminal genomic regions 17 kbp of OPV-like sequence absent in known VACV-like viruses, including fragments of genes intact in other OPVs and approximately 1.4 kb of sequence present only in cowpox virus (CPXV). HSPV also contained seven full-length genes fragmented or missing in other VACV-like viruses, including intact homologues of the CPXV strain GRI-90 D2L/I4R CrmB and D13L CD30-like tumor necrosis factor receptors, D3L/I3R and C1L ankyrin repeat proteins, B19R kelch-like protein, D7L BTB/POZ domain protein, and B22R variola virus B22R-like protein. These results indicated that HSPV contains unique genomic features likely contributing to a unique virulence/host range phenotype. They also indicated that while closely related to known VACV-like viruses, HSPV contains additional, potentially ancestral sequences absent in other VACV-like viruses. PMID:16940536

  2. Virus templated metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Aljabali, Alaa A A; Barclay, J Elaine; Lomonossoff, George P; Evans, David J

    2010-12-01

    Plant viruses are considered as nanobuilding blocks that can be used as synthons or templates for novel materials. Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) particles have been shown to template the fabrication of metallic nanoparticles by an electroless deposition metallization process. Palladium ions were electrostatically bound to the virus capsid and, when reduced, acted as nucleation sites for the subsequent metal deposition from solution. The method, although simple, produced highly monodisperse metallic nanoparticles with a diameter of ca. ≤35 nm. CPMV-templated particles were prepared with cobalt, nickel, iron, platinum, cobalt-platinum and nickel-iron.

  3. Fighting cancer with viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, S. C.; Martins, M. L.; Vilela, M. J.

    2005-01-01

    One of the most promising strategies to treat cancer is attacking it with viruses. Viruses can kill tumor cells specifically or act as carriers that deliver normal genes into cancer cells. A model for virotherapy of cancer is investigated and its predictions are in agreement with results obtained from experimental tumors. Furthermore, the model reveals an oscillatory (periodic or aperiodic) response of tumor cells and virus populations which may make clinical prognosis difficult. These results suggest the need for new in vivo and in vitro experiments aiming to detect this oscillatory response.

  4. Zika Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Shirley, Debbie-Ann T; Nataro, James P

    2017-08-01

    In less than 2 years since entry into the Americas, we have witnessed the emergent spread of Zika virus into large subsets of immunologically naïve human populations and then encountered the devastating effects of microcephaly and brain anomalies that can arise from in utero infection with the virus. Diagnostic evaluation and management of affected infants continues to evolve as our understanding of Zika virus rapidly advances. The development of a safe and effective vaccine holds the potential to attenuate the spread of infection and limit the impact of congenital infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Zika virus in Asia.

    PubMed

    Duong, Veasna; Dussart, Philippe; Buchy, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne virus that was first isolated from a sentinel rhesus monkey in the Zika Forest in Uganda in 1947. In Asia, the virus was isolated in Malaysia from Aedes aegypti mosquitoes in 1966, and the first human infections were reported in 1977 in Central Java, Indonesia. In this review, all reported cases of ZIKV infection in Asia as of September 1, 2016 are summarized and some of the hypotheses that could currently explain the apparently low incidence of Zika cases in Asia are explored.

  6. Zika virus: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Rawal, Gautam; Yadav, Sankalp; Kumar, Raj

    2016-01-01

    The Zika virus has been in the news for quite some time due to the ongoing recent outbreak in the Southern America, which started in December 2015. It has been declared a public health emergency by the World Health Organization in February 2016 owing to its association with the congenital deformities, particularly microcephaly in infants borne to the infected mothers. The rapid spread of the virus throughout the United States of America and subsequently to Asia has raised serious international concerns. Its spread to countries neighboring India is a serious threat to the Indian population. This review article gives an overview about the virus, its diagnosis, clinical features, and the management. PMID:28217576

  7. Some observations on the pathogenicity of a molecular clone of a very virulent strain of Marek’s disease virus containing an insert of long terminal repeat of reticuloendotheliosis virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We recently artificially inserted REV LTR into a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone of a very virulent strain of Marek’s disease (MD) virus (MDV), Md5; the virus was designated rMd5-RM1-LTR (Kim et al., 2011). In the present study, susceptible chickens of ADOL line 15I5 X 71 with and witho...

  8. Complete Genomic Sequence of Dengue Virus Serotype 4 Isolated from Plasma Collected from a Haitian Child in 2014.

    PubMed

    Elbadry, Maha A; White, Sarah K; Loeb, Julia C; Tagliamonte, Massimiliano S; Salemi, Marco; Beau De Rochars, Valery Madsen; Telisma, Taina; Rashid, Mohammed; Morris, J Glenn; Lednicky, John A

    2017-10-05

    While data are limited, there is increasing evidence that infections by dengue viruses are endemic in Haiti. In 2014, an outbreak caused by dengue virus 4 (DENV-4) followed a chikungunya fever outbreak. We present here the complete genome sequence of one isolate grouped within the genotype II South America and Caribbean DENV-4 clades. Copyright © 2017 Elbadry et al.

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Chikungunya Virus Isolated from an Aedes aegypti Mosquito during an Outbreak in Yemen, 2011.

    PubMed

    Fahmy, Nermeen T; Klena, John D; Mohamed, Amr S; Zayed, Alia; Villinski, Jeffrey T

    2015-07-16

    Chikungunya virus is recognized as a serious public health problem. The complete genome was sequenced for a chikungunya virus isolated from the mosquito Aedes aegypti during a 2011 outbreak in Al Hodayda, Yemen, which resulted in significant human fatalities. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that this Yemeni isolate is most closely related to Indian Ocean strains of the east/central/south African genotype.

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Chikungunya Virus Isolated from an Aedes aegypti Mosquito during an Outbreak in Yemen, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Klena, John D.; Mohamed, Amr S.; Zayed, Alia; Villinski, Jeffrey T.

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus is recognized as a serious public health problem. The complete genome was sequenced for a chikungunya virus isolated from the mosquito Aedes aegypti during a 2011 outbreak in Al Hodayda, Yemen, which resulted in significant human fatalities. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that this Yemeni isolate is most closely related to Indian Ocean strains of the east/central/south African genotype. PMID:26184944

  11. Development of high-yield influenza B virus vaccine viruses.

    PubMed

    Ping, Jihui; Lopes, Tiago J S; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-20

    The burden of human infections with influenza A and B viruses is substantial, and the impact of influenza B virus infections can exceed that of influenza A virus infections in some seasons. Over the past few decades, viruses of two influenza B virus lineages (Victoria and Yamagata) have circulated in humans, and both lineages are now represented in influenza vaccines, as recommended by the World Health Organization. Influenza B virus vaccines for humans have been available for more than half a century, yet no systematic efforts have been undertaken to develop high-yield candidates. Therefore, we screened virus libraries possessing random mutations in the six "internal" influenza B viral RNA segments [i.e., those not encoding the major viral antigens, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase NA)] for mutants that confer efficient replication. Candidate viruses that supported high yield in cell culture were tested with the HA and NA genes of eight different viruses of the Victoria and Yamagata lineages. We identified combinations of mutations that increased the titers of candidate vaccine viruses in mammalian cells used for human influenza vaccine virus propagation and in embryonated chicken eggs, the most common propagation system for influenza viruses. These influenza B virus vaccine backbones can be used for improved vaccine virus production.

  12. Development of high-yield influenza B virus vaccine viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Jihui; Lopes, Tiago J. S.; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    The burden of human infections with influenza A and B viruses is substantial, and the impact of influenza B virus infections can exceed that of influenza A virus infections in some seasons. Over the past few decades, viruses of two influenza B virus lineages (Victoria and Yamagata) have circulated in humans, and both lineages are now represented in influenza vaccines, as recommended by the World Health Organization. Influenza B virus vaccines for humans have been available for more than half a century, yet no systematic efforts have been undertaken to develop high-yield candidates. Therefore, we screened virus libraries possessing random mutations in the six “internal” influenza B viral RNA segments [i.e., those not encoding the major viral antigens, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase NA)] for mutants that confer efficient replication. Candidate viruses that supported high yield in cell culture were tested with the HA and NA genes of eight different viruses of the Victoria and Yamagata lineages. We identified combinations of mutations that increased the titers of candidate vaccine viruses in mammalian cells used for human influenza vaccine virus propagation and in embryonated chicken eggs, the most common propagation system for influenza viruses. These influenza B virus vaccine backbones can be used for improved vaccine virus production. PMID:27930325

  13. Molecular biology and pathogenesis of the human T-cell leukaemia/lymphotropic virus Type-1 (HTLV-1).

    PubMed

    Johnson, J M; Harrod, R; Franchini, G

    2001-06-01

    Retroviruses are associated with a variety of diseases, including immunological and neurological disorders, and various forms of cancer. In humans, the Human T-cell Leukaemia/Lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), which belongs to the Oncovirus family, is the aetiological agent of two diverse diseases: Adult T-cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL) (Poiesz et al. 1980; Hinuma et al. 1981; Yoshida et al. 1982), as well as the neurological disorder tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM) (Gessain et al. 1985; Rodgers-Johnson et al. 1985; Osame et al. 1986). HTLV-1 is the only human retrovirus known to be the aetiological agent of cancer. A genetically related virus, HTLV-2, has been identified and isolated (Kalyanaraman et al. 1982). However, there has been no demonstration of a definitive aetiological role for HTLV-2 in human disease to date. Simian T-cell lymphotropic viruses types 1 and 2 (STLV-1 and -2) and bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) have also been classified in same group, Oncoviridae, based upon their similarities in genetic sequence and structure to HTLV-1 and -2 (Burny et al. 1988; Dekaban et al. 1995; Slattery et al. 1999). This article will focus on HTLV-1, reviewing its discovery, molecular biology, and its role in disease pathogenesis.

  14. Simian hemorrhagic fever virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This book chapter describes the taxonomic classification of Simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV). Included are: host, genome, classification, morphology, physicochemical and physical properties, nucleic acid, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, geographic range, phylogenetic properties, biological pro...

  15. How rigid are viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartschuh, R. D.; Wargacki, S. P.; Xiong, H.; Neiswinger, J.; Kisliuk, A.; Sihn, S.; Ward, V.; Vaia, R. A.; Sokolov, A. P.

    2008-08-01

    Viruses have traditionally been studied as pathogens, but in recent years they have been adapted for applications ranging from drug delivery and gene therapy to nanotechnology, photonics, and electronics. Although the structures of many viruses are known, most of their biophysical properties remain largely unexplored. Using Brillouin light scattering, we analyzed the mechanical rigidity, intervirion coupling, and vibrational eigenmodes of Wiseana iridovirus (WIV). We identified phonon modes propagating through the viral assemblies as well as the localized vibrational eigenmode of individual viruses. The measurements indicate a Young’s modulus of ˜7GPa for single virus particles and their assemblies, surprisingly high for “soft” materials. Mechanical modeling confirms that the DNA core dominates the WIV rigidity. The results also indicate a peculiar mechanical coupling during self-assembly of WIV particles.

  16. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... common virus that infects the lungs and breathing passages. Almost all babies get it before the age ... infection that causes swelling in the smallest air passages in the lungs Pneumonia, an infection in one ...

  17. VIRUS instrument enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochaska, T.; Allen, R.; Mondrik, N.; Rheault, J. P.; Sauseda, M.; Boster, E.; James, M.; Rodriguez-Patino, M.; Torres, G.; Ham, J.; Cook, E.; Baker, D.; DePoy, Darren L.; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Hill, G. J.; Perry, D.; Savage, R. D.; Good, J. M.; Vattiat, Brian L.

    2014-08-01

    The Visible Integral-Field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS) instrument will be installed at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope† in the near future. The instrument will be housed in two enclosures that are mounted adjacent to the telescope, via the VIRUS Support Structure (VSS). We have designed the enclosures to support and protect the instrument, to enable servicing of the instrument, and to cool the instrument appropriately while not adversely affecting the dome environment. The system uses simple HVAC air handling techniques in conjunction with thermoelectric and standard glycol heat exchangers to provide efficient heat removal. The enclosures also provide power and data transfer to and from each VIRUS unit, liquid nitrogen cooling to the detectors, and environmental monitoring of the instrument and dome environments. In this paper, we describe the design and fabrication of the VIRUS enclosures and their subsystems.

  18. Viruses causing gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmi, I; Roman, E; Sánchez-Fauquier, A

    2003-04-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is one of the most common diseases in humans worldwide. Viruses are recognized as important causes of this disease, particularly in children. Since the Norwalk virus was identified as a cause of gastroenteritis, the number of viral agents associated with diarrheal disease in humans has steadily increased. Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe diarrhea in children under 5 years of age. Astrovirus, calicivirus and enteric adenovirus are also important etiologic agents of acute gastroenteritis. Other viruses, such as toroviruses, coronaviruses, picobirnaviruses and pestiviruses, are increasingly being identified as causative agents of diarrhea. In recent years, the availability of diagnostic tests, mainly immunoassays or molecular biology techniques, has increased our understanding of this group of viruses. The future development of a safe and highly effective vaccine against rotavirus could prevent, at least, cases of severe diarrhea and reduce mortality from this disease.

  19. The dengue viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Henchal, E A; Putnak, J R

    1990-01-01

    Dengue, a major public health problem throughout subtropical and tropical regions, is an acute infectious disease characterized by biphasic fever, headache, pain in various parts of the body, prostration, rash, lymphadenopathy, and leukopenia. In more severe or complicated dengue, patients present with a severe febrile illness characterized by abnormalities of hemostasis and increased vascular permeability, which in some instances results in a hypovolemic shock. Four distinct serotypes of the dengue virus (dengue-1, dengue-2, dengue-3, and dengue-4) exist, with numerous virus strains found worldwide. Molecular cloning methods have led to a greater understanding of the structure of the RNA genome and definition of virus-specific structural and nonstructural proteins. Progress towards producing safe, effective dengue virus vaccines, a goal for over 45 years, has been made. Images PMID:2224837

  20. Avoiding Computer Viruses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Joyce; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The threat of computer sabotage is a real concern to business teachers and others responsible for academic computer facilities. Teachers can minimize the possibility. Eight suggestions for avoiding computer viruses are given. (JOW)

  1. West Nile Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... strategies visit the MedlinePlus West Nile virus site . Credit: Credit: CDC This is an enlarged view of a ... The End of an Era Acknowledgments References Photo Credits Dr. Joseph Kinyoun: Selected Bibliography NIAID 60th Anniversary ...

  2. Sexually transmitted viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Rapp, F.

    1989-01-01

    Human viruses known to be spread by sexual contact include herpes simplex viruses (HSV), papillomaviruses (HPV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus, and cytomegalovirus. Infections with the first three (HSV, HPV, and HIV) have reached epidemic proportions and pose global health concerns. Most of what we know about these human pathogens has been learned only recently, owing to the advent of DNA technologies and advances in culture techniques. In fact, our awareness of one virally transmitted venereal disease, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, dates to the early 1980s. This paper touches on various aspects of the biology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and, where applicable, oncogenicity of these agents, as well as current treatments and vaccine initiatives. PMID:2549736

  3. Virus Chapter: Iflaviridae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The iflaviruses comprise viruses isolated from arthropod species of agricultural importance. All members of iflaviruses have a genome arrangement similar to the picornaviruses, ootyviruses, and secoviruses. However, phylogenetic analysis using the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase region showed that th...

  4. [Zika, a neurotropic virus?].

    PubMed

    Del Carpio-Orantes, Luis

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the neurotropism potential Zika virus is discussed, by comparison with viruses both RNA and DNA are neurotropic known, also it is said that compared with the new viruses that have affected the Americas, as the chikungunya, Zika has shown great affinity by brain tissue, manifested by a high incidence of acute neurological conditions, such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, among others, as well as the reported incidence of microcephaly that is abnormally high compared with the previous incidence, which, in a stillborn subject necropsied significant alterations demonstrated in brain tissue, identifying viral material and live virus in the fetoplacental complex, and demonstrating the impact both white matter and gray matter as well as basal ganglia, corpus callosum, ventricles and spinal cord, which could explain the microcephaly that concerns him. Although not a direct cause-effect relationship is demonstrated, however current evidence supports that relationship, hoping to be supported scientifically.

  5. Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) using indirect immunofluorescence technique. Biology & Genetics For more than 50 years, NIAID’s commitment ... Nucleotide Polymorphism Phylogenetics & Ontology Proteomics & Protein Analysis Systems Biology Data Portals Software Applications BCBB Mobyle Interface Designer ( ...

  6. West Nile Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... you'll be infected with West Nile virus, mosquito bites can still be an itchy nuisance. The CDC advises people to protect themselves from mosquito bites by using mosquito repellent, especially at times ...

  7. Hepatitis B virus (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis B is also known as serum hepatitis and is spread through blood and sexual contact. It is ... population. This photograph is an electronmicroscopic image of hepatitis B virus particles. (Image courtesy of the Centers for ...

  8. Ebola virus (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Ebola is a deadly disease caused by a virus. The 2014 outbreak has occurred mainly in West Africa. Symptoms often start with fever, severe headache, muscle pain, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and vomiting. Late symptoms ...

  9. What's West Nile Virus?

    MedlinePlus

    ... is caused by a bite from an infected mosquito that's already carrying the virus, but it's important ... the risk of being bitten by an infected mosquito is greatest from July to early September. But ...

  10. N-Desmethylclozapine, Fluoxetine, and Salmeterol Inhibit Postentry Stages of the Dengue Virus Life Cycle.

    PubMed

    Medigeshi, Guruprasad R; Kumar, Rinki; Dhamija, Ekta; Agrawal, Tanvi; Kar, Meenakshi

    2016-11-01

    Around 10,000 people die each year due to severe dengue disease, and two-thirds of the world population lives in a region where dengue disease is endemic. There has been remarkable progress in dengue virus vaccine development; however, there are no licensed antivirals for dengue disease, and none appear to be in clinical trials. We took the approach of repositioning approved drugs for anti-dengue virus activity by screening a library of pharmacologically active compounds. We identified N-desmethylclozapine, fluoxetine hydrochloride, and salmeterol xinafoate as dengue virus inhibitors based on reductions in the numbers of infected cells and viral titers. Dengue virus RNA levels were diminished in inhibitor-treated cells, and this effect was specific to dengue virus, as other flaviviruses, such as Japanese encephalitis virus and West Nile virus, or other RNA viruses, such as respiratory syncytial virus and rotavirus, were not affected by these inhibitors. All three inhibitors specifically inhibited dengue virus replication with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) in the high-nanomolar range. Estimation of negative-strand RNA intermediates and time-of-addition experiments indicated that inhibition was occurring at a postentry stage, most probably at the initiation of viral RNA replication. Finally, we show that inhibition is most likely due to the modulation of the endolysosomal pathway and induction of autophagy. Copyright © 2016 Medigeshi et al.

  11. Development of Methods for Detecting Viruses in Solid Waste Landfill Leachates

    PubMed Central

    Sobsey, Mark D.; Wallis, Craig; Melnick, Joseph L.

    1974-01-01

    Methods were developed for detecting and concentrating enteric viruses in municipal solid waste landfill leachates. Poliovirus added to a leachate was not readily detectable, possibly because the virus was adsorbed to the leachate particulates. The masking effects associated with suspended solids in the leachate were overcome by adding a final 0.1 M sodium (tetra)ethylenediaminetetraacetate concentration to the leachate. A sodium (tetra)ethylenediaminetetraacetate-treated leachate could be clarified by filtration at pH 8.0 without a loss of virus. The clarified and sodium (tetra)ethylenediaminetetraacetate-treated leachate contained interfering materials of an anionic nature which prevented virus adsorption to epoxy-fiber glass filters. This interfering effect was overcome by treating the leachate with an anion-exchange resin. Viruses in the resin-treated leachate were concentrated by adjusting the leachate to pH 3.5, adding AlCl3 to a final 0.005 M concentration, adsorbing the viruses to an epoxy-fiber glass virus adsorbent, and eluting the adsorbed viruses in a small volume. When this method was used to concentrate poliovirus 100-fold in a variety of leachates, the average virus recovery efficiency was 37%. With the methods described in this study, it should be possible to efficiently monitor solid waste disposal site leachates for enteric viruses. PMID:4368581

  12. Development of methods for detecting viruses in solid waste landfill leachates.

    PubMed

    Sobsey, M D; Wallis, C; Melnick, J L

    1974-08-01

    Methods were developed for detecting and concentrating enteric viruses in municipal solid waste landfill leachates. Poliovirus added to a leachate was not readily detectable, possibly because the virus was adsorbed to the leachate particulates. The masking effects associated with suspended solids in the leachate were overcome by adding a final 0.1 M sodium (tetra)ethylenediaminetetraacetate concentration to the leachate. A sodium (tetra)ethylenediaminetetraacetate-treated leachate could be clarified by filtration at pH 8.0 without a loss of virus. The clarified and sodium (tetra)ethylenediaminetetraacetate-treated leachate contained interfering materials of an anionic nature which prevented virus adsorption to epoxy-fiber glass filters. This interfering effect was overcome by treating the leachate with an anion-exchange resin. Viruses in the resin-treated leachate were concentrated by adjusting the leachate to pH 3.5, adding AlCl(3) to a final 0.005 M concentration, adsorbing the viruses to an epoxy-fiber glass virus adsorbent, and eluting the adsorbed viruses in a small volume. When this method was used to concentrate poliovirus 100-fold in a variety of leachates, the average virus recovery efficiency was 37%. With the methods described in this study, it should be possible to efficiently monitor solid waste disposal site leachates for enteric viruses.

  13. Propagation and Characterization of Influenza Virus Stocks That Lack High Levels of Defective Viral Genomes and Hemagglutinin Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jia; Chambers, Benjamin S.; Hensley, Scott E.; López, Carolina B.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus infections are responsible for more than 250,000 deaths annually. Influenza virus isolation, propagation, and characterization protocols are critical for completing reproducible basic research studies and for generating vaccine seed stocks. Detailed protocols for the isolation and identification of influenza virus have been recently reported (Eisfeld et al., 2014). However, there are few standardized protocols focused on the propagation and characterization of viral isolates, and as a result, viruses propagated in different conditions in different laboratories often have distinct in vitro and in vivo characteristics. Here, we focus on influenza A virus propagation and characterization in the laboratory taking into consideration the overall quality and composition of the virus stock to achieve consistency in virus yield, virulence, and immunostimulatory activity. PMID:27047455

  14. Propagation and Characterization of Influenza Virus Stocks That Lack High Levels of Defective Viral Genomes and Hemagglutinin Mutations.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jia; Chambers, Benjamin S; Hensley, Scott E; López, Carolina B

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus infections are responsible for more than 250,000 deaths annually. Influenza virus isolation, propagation, and characterization protocols are critical for completing reproducible basic research studies and for generating vaccine seed stocks. Detailed protocols for the isolation and identification of influenza virus have been recently reported (Eisfeld et al., 2014). However, there are few standardized protocols focused on the propagation and characterization of viral isolates, and as a result, viruses propagated in different conditions in different laboratories often have distinct in vitro and in vivo characteristics. Here, we focus on influenza A virus propagation and characterization in the laboratory taking into consideration the overall quality and composition of the virus stock to achieve consistency in virus yield, virulence, and immunostimulatory activity.

  15. Human Influenza Virus Infections.

    PubMed

    Peteranderl, Christin; Herold, Susanne; Schmoldt, Carole

    2016-08-01

    Seasonal and pandemic influenza are the two faces of respiratory infections caused by influenza viruses in humans. As seasonal influenza occurs on an annual basis, the circulating virus strains are closely monitored and a yearly updated vaccination is provided, especially to identified risk populations. Nonetheless, influenza virus infection may result in pneumonia and acute respiratory failure, frequently complicated by bacterial coinfection. Pandemics are, in contrary, unexpected rare events related to the emergence of a reassorted human-pathogenic influenza A virus (IAV) strains that often causes increased morbidity and spreads extremely rapidly in the immunologically naive human population, with huge clinical and economic impact. Accordingly, particular efforts are made to advance our knowledge on the disease biology and pathology and recent studies have brought new insights into IAV adaptation mechanisms to the human host, as well as into the key players in disease pathogenesis on the host side. Current antiviral strategies are only efficient at the early stages of the disease and are challenged by the genomic instability of the virus, highlighting the need for novel antiviral therapies targeting the pulmonary host response to improve viral clearance, reduce the risk of bacterial coinfection, and prevent or attenuate acute lung injury. This review article summarizes our current knowledge on the molecular basis of influenza infection and disease progression, the key players in pathogenesis driving severe disease and progression to lung failure, as well as available and envisioned prevention and treatment strategies against influenza virus infection. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. Tick-borne viruses*

    PubMed Central

    Work, Telford H.

    1963-01-01

    More than 150 arthropod-borne viruses are now recognized, and over 50 of these are known to produce human infections and disease. Among these viruses are those of the tick-borne Russian spring-summer complex, which is etiologically involved in a wide variety of human diseases of varying severity. The eight antigenically different members of this complex so far known are Russian spring-summer encephalitis, louping-ill, Central European encephalitis, Omsk haemorrhagic fever, Kyasanur Forest disease, Langat, Negishi and Powassan viruses. In his review of the problems posed by these viruses and of research on them, the author points out that, while this complex is distributed around the globe in the temperate zone of the northern hemisphere, the only serious tick-borne virus disease known in the tropics is Kyasanur Forest disease. It is probable, however, that there are other, unrecognized tick-borne viruses in the tropical areas of Asia, Africa and America of importance to human health, and that these will be brought to light as virological studies of diseases of now obscure etiology are pursued. PMID:14043753

  17. Control of cucurbit viruses.

    PubMed

    Lecoq, Hervé; Katis, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    More than 70 well-characterized virus species transmitted by a diversity of vectors may infect cucurbit crops worldwide. Twenty of those cause severe epidemics in major production areas, occasionally leading to complete crop failures. Cucurbit viruses' control is based on three major axes: (i) planting healthy seeds or seedlings in a clean environment, (ii) interfering with vectors activity, and (iii) using resistant cultivars. Seed disinfection and seed or seedling quality controls guarantee growers on the sanitary status of their planting material. Removal of virus or vector sources in the crop environment can significantly delay the onset of viral epidemics. Insecticide or oil application may reduce virus spread in some situations. Diverse cultural practices interfere with or prevent vector reaching the crop. Resistance can be obtained by grafting for soil-borne viruses, by cross-protection, or generally by conventional breeding or genetic engineering. The diversity of the actions that may be taken to limit virus spread in cucurbit crops and their limits will be discussed. The ultimate goal is to provide farmers with technical packages that combine these methods within an integrated disease management program and are adapted to different countries and cropping systems.

  18. [West Nile virus infection].

    PubMed

    Pérez Ruiz, Mercedes; Gámez, Sara Sanbonmatsu; Clavero, Miguel Angel Jiménez

    2011-12-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is an arbovirus usually transmitted by mosquitoes. The main reservoirs are birds, although the virus may infect several vertebrate species, such as horses and humans. Up to 80% of human infections are asymptomatic. The most frequent clinical presentation is febrile illness, and neuroinvasive disease can occur in less than 1% of cases. Spain is considered a high-risk area for the emergence of WNV due to its climate and the passage of migratory birds from Africa (where the virus is endemic). These birds nest surrounding wetlands where populations of possible vectors for the virus are abundant. Diagnosis of human neurological infections can be made by detection of IgM in serum and/or cerebrospinal fluid samples, demonstration of a four-fold increase in IgG antibodies between acute-phase and convalescent-phase serum samples, or by detection of viral genome by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (especially useful in transplant recipients). Since WNV is a biosafety level 3 agent, techniques that involve cell culture are restricted to laboratories with this level of biosafety, such as reference laboratories. The National Program for the Surveillance of WNV Encephalitis allows the detection of virus circulation among birds and vectors in areas especially favorable for the virus, such as wetlands, and provides information for evaluation of the risk of disease in horses and humans.

  19. Inactivation of rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guanghui; Selden, David; Fooks, Anthony R; Banyard, Ashley

    2017-05-01

    Rabies virus is a notifiable pathogen that must be handled in high containment facilities where national and international guidelines apply. For the effective inactivation of rabies virus, a number of reagents were tested. Virkon S (1%) solution caused more than 4log reduction of rabies virus in culture medium supplemented with 10% foetal calf serum within 1min. Isopropyl alcohol (70%) treatment resulted in >3log reduction of rabies virus within 20s when applied at a ratio of 19:1, making it a suitable agent for surface decontamination whereas 70% ethanol was ineffective. Rabies virus (from 10(2.33) to 10(3)ffu/ml) was also inactivated when cell cultures were fixed with 3% or 4% paraformaldehyde for 30min. Regardless of inactivation procedure, when taking inactivated virus preparations out of a biological containment envelope, proof of inocuity must be demonstrated to cover any possible error/deviation from procedure. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Isoelectric points of viruses.

    PubMed

    Michen, B; Graule, T

    2010-08-01

    Viruses as well as other (bio-)colloids possess a pH-dependent surface charge in polar media such as water. This electrostatic charge determines the mobility of the soft particle in an electric field and thus governs its colloidal behaviour which plays a major role in virus sorption processes. The pH value at which the net surface charge switches its sign is referred to as the isoelectric point (abbreviations: pI or IEP) and is a characteristic parameter of the virion in equilibrium with its environmental water chemistry. Here, we review the IEP measurements of viruses that replicate in hosts of kingdom plantae, bacteria and animalia. IEPs of viruses are found in pH range from 1.9 to 8.4; most frequently, they are measured in a band of 3.5 < IEP < 7. However, the data appear to be scattered widely within single virus species. This discrepancy is discussed and should be considered when IEP values are used to account for virus sorption processes.

  1. Virus templated metallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljabali, Alaa A. A.; Barclay, J. Elaine; Lomonossoff, George P.; Evans, David J.

    2010-12-01

    Plant viruses are considered as nanobuilding blocks that can be used as synthons or templates for novel materials. Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) particles have been shown to template the fabrication of metallic nanoparticles by an electroless deposition metallization process. Palladium ions were electrostatically bound to the virus capsid and, when reduced, acted as nucleation sites for the subsequent metal deposition from solution. The method, although simple, produced highly monodisperse metallic nanoparticles with a diameter of ca. <=35 nm. CPMV-templated particles were prepared with cobalt, nickel, iron, platinum, cobalt-platinum and nickel-iron.Plant viruses are considered as nanobuilding blocks that can be used as synthons or templates for novel materials. Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) particles have been shown to template the fabrication of metallic nanoparticles by an electroless deposition metallization process. Palladium ions were electrostatically bound to the virus capsid and, when reduced, acted as nucleation sites for the subsequent metal deposition from solution. The method, although simple, produced highly monodisperse metallic nanoparticles with a diameter of ca. <=35 nm. CPMV-templated particles were prepared with cobalt, nickel, iron, platinum, cobalt-platinum and nickel-iron. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional experimental detail, agarose gel electrophoresis results, energy dispersive X-ray spectra, ζ-potential measurements, dynamic light scattering data, nanoparticle tracking analysis and an atomic force microscopy image of Ni-CPMV. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00525h

  2. Transmission of influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2015-05-01

    Influenza A viruses cause respiratory infections that range from asymptomatic to deadly in humans. Widespread outbreaks (pandemics) are attributable to 'novel' viruses that possess a viral hemagglutinin (HA) gene to which humans lack immunity. After a pandemic, these novel viruses form stable virus lineages in humans and circulate until they are replaced by other novel viruses. The factors and mechanisms that facilitate virus transmission among hosts and the establishment of novel lineages are not completely understood, but the HA and basic polymerase 2 (PB2) proteins are thought to play essential roles in these processes by enabling avian influenza viruses to infect mammals and replicate efficiently in their new host. Here, we summarize our current knowledge of the contributions of HA, PB2, and other viral components to virus transmission and the formation of new virus lineages.

  3. Transmission of Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A viruses cause respiratory infections that range from asymptomatic to deadly in humans. Widespread outbreaks (pandemics) are attributable to ‘novel’ viruses that possess a viral hemagglutinin (HA) gene to which humans lack immunity. After a pandemic, these novel viruses form stable virus lineages in humans and circulate until they are replaced by other novel viruses. The factors and mechanisms that facilitate virus transmission among hosts and the establishment of novel lineages are not completely understood, but the HA and basic polymerase 2 (PB2) proteins are thought to play essential roles in these processes by enabling avian influenza viruses to infect mammals and replicate efficiently in their new host. Here, we summarize our current knowledge of the contributions of HA, PB2, and other viral components to virus transmission and the formation of new virus lineages. PMID:25812763

  4. Evolutionary ecology of virus emergence.

    PubMed

    Dennehy, John J

    2017-02-01

    The cross-species transmission of viruses into new host populations, termed virus emergence, is a significant issue in public health, agriculture, wildlife management, and related fields. Virus emergence requires overlap between host populations, alterations in virus genetics to permit infection of new hosts, and adaptation to novel hosts such that between-host transmission is sustainable, all of which are the purview of the fields of ecology and evolution. A firm understanding of the ecology of viruses and how they evolve is required for understanding how and why viruses emerge. In this paper, I address the evolutionary mechanisms of virus emergence and how they relate to virus ecology. I argue that, while virus acquisition of the ability to infect new hosts is not difficult, limited evolutionary trajectories to sustained virus between-host transmission and the combined effects of mutational meltdown, bottlenecking, demographic stochasticity, density dependence, and genetic erosion in ecological sinks limit most emergence events to dead-end spillover infections. Despite the relative rarity of pandemic emerging viruses, the potential of viruses to search evolutionary space and find means to spread epidemically and the consequences of pandemic viruses that do emerge necessitate sustained attention to virus research, surveillance, prophylaxis, and treatment. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  5. Smaller Fleas: Viruses of Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, Paul; Abedon, Stephen T.

    2012-01-01

    Life forms can be roughly differentiated into those that are microscopic versus those that are not as well as those that are multicellular and those that, instead, are unicellular. Cellular organisms seem generally able to host viruses, and this propensity carries over to those that are both microscopic and less than truly multicellular. These viruses of microorganisms, or VoMs, in fact exist as the world's most abundant somewhat autonomous genetic entities and include the viruses of domain Bacteria (bacteriophages), the viruses of domain Archaea (archaeal viruses), the viruses of protists, the viruses of microscopic fungi such as yeasts (mycoviruses), and even the viruses of other viruses (satellite viruses). In this paper we provide an introduction to the concept of viruses of microorganisms, a.k.a., viruses of microbes. We provide broad discussion particularly of VoM diversity. VoM diversity currently spans, in total, at least three-dozen virus families. This is roughly ten families per category—bacterial, archaeal, fungal, and protist—with some virus families infecting more than one of these microorganism major taxa. Such estimations, however, will vary with further discovery and taxon assignment and also are dependent upon what forms of life one includes among microorganisms. PMID:24278736

  6. Al Jazirah, Sudan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Al Jazirah (also Gezira) is one of the 26 states of Sudan. The state lies between the Blue Nile and the White Nile in the east-central region of the country. It is a well populated area suitable for agriculture. The area was at the southern end of Nubia and little is known about its ancient history and only limited archaeological work has been conducted in this area. The region has benefited from the Gezira Scheme, a program to foster cotton farming begun in 1925. At that time the Sennar Dam and numerous irrigation canals were built. Al Jazirah became the Sudan's major agricultural region with more than 2.5 million acres (10,000 km) under cultivation. The initial development project was semi-private, but the government nationalized it in 1950. Cotton production increased in the 1970s but by the 1990s increased wheat production has supplanted a third of the land formerly seeded with cotton.

    The image was acquired December 25, 2006, covers an area of 56 x 36.4 km, and is located near 14.5 degrees north latitude, 33.1 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  7. Al Jazirah, Sudan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Al Jazirah (also Gezira) is one of the 26 states of Sudan. The state lies between the Blue Nile and the White Nile in the east-central region of the country. It is a well populated area suitable for agriculture. The area was at the southern end of Nubia and little is known about its ancient history and only limited archaeological work has been conducted in this area. The region has benefited from the Gezira Scheme, a program to foster cotton farming begun in 1925. At that time the Sennar Dam and numerous irrigation canals were built. Al Jazirah became the Sudan's major agricultural region with more than 2.5 million acres (10,000 km) under cultivation. The initial development project was semi-private, but the government nationalized it in 1950. Cotton production increased in the 1970s but by the 1990s increased wheat production has supplanted a third of the land formerly seeded with cotton.

    The image was acquired December 25, 2006, covers an area of 56 x 36.4 km, and is located near 14.5 degrees north latitude, 33.1 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  8. AL Amyloidosis and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... for survivors' benefits . Research on AL amyloidosis and herbicides The Health and Medicine Division (formally known as ... to the compounds of interest found in the herbicide Agent Orange and AL amyloidosis." VA made a ...

  9. Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Avian Swine/Variant Pandemic Other Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans Language: English (US) Español ... with Avian Influenza A Viruses Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans Although avian influenza A viruses ...

  10. FAQ: General Questions about West Nile Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Related Links Mosquito Surveillance Software General Questions About West Nile Virus Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... numbers of West Nile virus cases? What is West Nile virus? West Nile virus is an arthropod- ...

  11. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Integration Preference Is Similar to That of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Crise, Bruce; Li, Yuan; Yuan, Chiuchin; Morcock, David R.; Whitby, Denise; Munroe, David J.; Arthur, Larry O.; Wu, Xiaolin

    2005-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) is a useful model for studying human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pathogenesis and vaccine efficacy. As with all other retroviruses, integration is a necessary step in the replication cycle of SIV. The location of the retrovirus integration site is known to impact on viral gene expression, establishment of viral latency, and other aspects of the replication cycle of a retrovirus. In this study, 148 SIV provirus integration sites were sequenced and mapped in the human genome. Our analysis showed that SIV integration, like that of HIV type 1 (HIV-1), exhibited a strong preference for actively transcribed regions in the genome (A. R. Schroder et al., Cell 110:521-529, 2002) and no preference for the CpG islands or transcription start sites, in contrast to observations for murine leukemia virus (X. Wu et al., Science 300:1749-1751, 2003). The parallel integration target site preferences of SIV and HIV-1 suggest that these lentiviruses may share similar mechanisms for target site selection and that SIV serves as an accurate model of HIV-1 with respect to integration. PMID:16160146

  12. Al Qaeda as a System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-15

    either as welcome guests or parasites . As welcome guests, Al Qaeda members take sanctuary in sponsor states. Sponsor states provide Al Qaeda with...sponsorship, Al Qaeda takes sanctuary as parasites either overtly or covertly. They take overt sanctuary in countries that publicly claim a policy...39 Yehudit Barsky, “Al Qa’ida, Iran, and Hezbollah: A Continuing Symbiosis ,” The American Jewish Committee Series on Terrorism , February 2004, 2-3

  13. Mechanical inoculation of plant viruses.

    PubMed

    Hull, Roger

    2009-05-01

    This technique is for the mechanical inoculation of viruses to plants. It is used to diagnose a virus by its reactions in a variety of plant species, to test the infectivity of virus samples using local lesion hosts, and to propagate viruses. The virus preparation is rubbed onto the surface of the leaf in such a way as to break the surface cells without causing too much mechanical damage. The preparation of the virus sample, its application to the leaf, and the care of the plants before and after inoculation are described.

  14. [Zika virus infection during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Picone, O; Vauloup-Fellous, C; D'Ortenzio, E; Huissoud, C; Carles, G; Benachi, A; Faye, A; Luton, D; Paty, M-C; Ayoubi, J-M; Yazdanpanah, Y; Mandelbrot, L; Matheron, S

    2016-05-01

    A Zika virus epidemic is currently ongoing in the Americas. This virus is linked to congenital infections with potential severe neurodevelopmental dysfunction. However, incidence of fetal infection and whether this virus is responsible of other fetal complications are still unknown. National and international public health authorities recommend caution and several prevention measures. Declaration of Zika virus infection is now mandatory in France. Given the available knowledge on Zika virus, we suggest here a review of the current recommendations for management of pregnancy in case of suspicious or infection by Zika virus in a pregnant woman.

  15. Recombinant vaccinia virus/Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) virus protects mice from peripheral VEE virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Kinney, R M; Esposito, J J; Mathews, J H; Johnson, B J; Roehrig, J T; Barrett, A D; Trent, D W

    1988-12-01

    Mice immunized with recombinant vaccinia virus (VACC) expressing Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) virus capsid protein and glycoproteins E1 and E2 or with attenuated VEE TC-83 virus vaccine developed VEE-specific neutralizing antibody and survived intraperitoneal challenge with virulent VEE virus strains including Trinidad donkey (subtype 1AB), P676 (subtype 1C), 3880 (subtype 1D), and Everglades (subtype 2). However, unlike immunization with TC-83 virus, immunization with the recombinant VACC/VEE virus did not protect mice from intranasal challenge with VEE Trinidad donkey virus. These results suggest that recombinant VACC/VEE virus is a vaccine candidate for equines and humans at risk of mosquito-transmitted VEE disease but not for laboratory workers at risk of accidental exposure to aerosol infection with VEE virus.

  16. Al(+)-ligand binding energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sodupe, M.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Ab initio calculations are used to optimize the structure and determine the binding energies of Al(+) to a series of ligands. For Al(+)-CN, the bonding was found to have a large covalent component. For the remaining ligands, the bonding is shown to be electrostatic in origin. The results obtained for Al(+) are compared with those previously reported for Mg(+).

  17. Serological Survey of Arthropod-Borne Viruses,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CULICIDAE, *COLOMBIA, SERODIAGNOSIS, ARBOVIRUSES, ARBOVIRUSES, IMMUNITY, ANTIGENS, ANTIBODIES, VENEZUELAN EQUINE ENCEPHALOMYELITIS VIRUS , ARTHROPODA, EPIDEMIOLOGY, ENTOMOLOGY, POPULATION, SAINT LOUIS ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS .

  18. Virus trafficking – learning from single-virus tracking

    PubMed Central

    Brandenburg, Boerries; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2009-01-01

    What could be a better way to study virus trafficking than ‘miniaturizing oneself’ and ‘taking a ride with the virus particle’ on its journey into the cell? Single-virus tracking in living cells potentially provides us with the means to visualize the virus journey. This approach allows us to follow the fate of individual virus particles and monitor dynamic interactions between viruses and cellular structures, revealing previously unobservable infection steps. The entry, trafficking and egress mechanisms of various animal viruses have been elucidated using this method. The combination of single-virus trafficking with systems approaches and state-of-the-art imaging technologies should prove exciting in the future. PMID:17304249

  19. Viruses, definitions and reality.

    PubMed

    Herrero-Uribe, Libia

    2011-09-01

    Viruses are known to be abundant, ubiquitous, and to play a very important role in the health and evolution of life organisms. However, most biologists have considered them as entities separate from the realm of life and acting merely as mechanical artifacts that can exchange genes between different organisms. This article reviews some definitions of life organisms to determine if viruses adjust to them, and additionally, considers new discoveries to challenge the present definition of viruses. Definitions of life organisms have been revised in order to validate how viruses fit into them. Viral factories are discussed since these mini-organelles are a good example of the complexity of viral infection, not as a mechanical usurpation of cell structures, but as a driving force leading to the reorganization and modification of cell structures by viral and cell enzymes. New discoveries such as the Mimivirus, its virophage and viruses that produce filamentous tails when outside of their host cell, have stimulated the scientific community to analyze the current definition of viruses. One way to be free for innovation is to learn from life, without rigid mental structures or tied to the past, in order to understand in an integrated view the new discoveries that will be unfolded in future research. Life processes must be looked from the complexity and trans-disciplinarity perspective that includes and accepts the temporality of the active processes of life organisms, their interdependency and interrelation among them and their environment. New insights must be found to redefine life organisms, especially viruses, which still are defined using the same concepts and knowledge of the fifties.

  20. Influence of Salts on Virus Adsorption to Microporous Filters†

    PubMed Central

    Lukasik, Jerzy; Scott, Troy M.; Andryshak, Diane; Farrah, Samuel R.

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the direct and indirect effects of mono-, di-, and trivalent salts (NaCl, MgCl2, and AlCl3) on the adsorption of several viruses (MS2, PRD-1, φX174, and poliovirus 1) to microporous filters at different pH values. The filters studied included Millipore HA (nitrocellulose), Filterite (fiberglass), Whatman (cellulose), and 1MDS (charged-modified fiber) filters. Each of these filters except the Whatman cellulose filters has been used in virus removal and recovery procedures. The direct effects of added salts were considered to be the effects associated with the presence of the soluble salts. The indirect effects of the added salts were considered to be (i) changes in the pH values of solutions and (ii) the formation of insoluble precipitates that could adsorb viruses and be removed by filtration. When direct effects alone were considered, the salts used in this study promoted virus adsorption, interfered with virus adsorption, or had little or no effect on virus adsorption, depending on the filter, the virus, and the salt. Although we were able to confirm previous reports that the addition of aluminum chloride to water enhances virus adsorption to microporous filters, we found that the enhanced adsorption was associated with indirect effects rather than direct effects. The increase in viral adsorption observed when aluminum chloride was added to water was related to the decrease in the pH of the water. Similar results could be obtained by adding HCl. The increased adsorption of viruses in water at pH 7 following addition of aluminum chloride was probably due to flocculation of aluminum, since removal of flocs by filtration greatly reduced the enhancement observed. The only direct effect of aluminum chloride on virus adsorption that we observed was interference with adsorption to microporous filters. Under conditions under which hydrophobic interactions were minimal, aluminum chloride interfered with virus adsorption to Millipore, Filterite, and 1MDS

  1. Influenza and other respiratory viruses in three Central American countries

    PubMed Central

    Laguna‐Torres, Victor A.; Sánchez‐Largaespada, José F.; Lorenzana, Ivette; Forshey, Brett; Aguilar, Patricia; Jimenez, Mirna; Parrales, Eduardo; Rodriguez, Francisco; García, Josefina; Jimenez, Ileana; Rivera, Maribel; Perez, Juan; Sovero, Merly; Rios, Jane; Gamero, María E.; Halsey, Eric S.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

    2010-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Laguna‐Torres et al. (2011) Influenza and other respiratory viruses in three Central American countries. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(2), 123–134. Background  Despite the disease burden imposed by respiratory diseases on children in Central America, there is a paucity of data describing the etiologic agents of the disease. Aims  To analyze viral etiologic agents associated with influenza‐like illness (ILI) in participants reporting to one outpatient health center, one pediatric hospital, and three general hospitals in El Salvador, Honduras, and Nicaragua Material & Methods  Between August 2006 and April 2009, pharyngeal swabs were collected from outpatients and inpatients. Patient specimens were inoculated onto cultured cell monolayers, and viral antigens were detected by indirect and direct immunofluorescence staining. Results  A total of 1,756 patients were enrolled, of whom 1,195 (68.3%) were under the age of 5; and 183 (10.4%) required hospitalization. One or more viral agents were identified in 434 (24.7%) cases, of which 17 (3.9%) were dual infections. The most common viruses isolated were influenza A virus (130; 7.4% of cases), respiratory syncytial virus (122; 6.9%), adenoviruses (63; 3.6%), parainfluenza viruses (57; 3.2%), influenza B virus (47; 2.7% of cases), and herpes simplex virus 1 (22; 1.3%). In addition, human metapneumovirus and enteroviruses (coxsackie and echovirus) were isolated from patient specimens. Discussion  When compared to the rest of the population, viruses were isolated from a significantly higher percentage of patients age 5 or younger. The prevalence of influenza A virus or influenza B virus infections was similar between the younger and older age groups. RSV was the most commonly detected pathogen in infants age 5 and younger and was significantly associated with pneumonia (p < 0.0001) and hospitalization (p < 0.0001). Conclusion  Genetic analysis of influenza

  2. Recombinant Vaccinia Virus: Immunization against Multiple Pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkus, Marion E.; Piccini, Antonia; Lipinskas, Bernard R.; Paoletti, Enzo

    1985-09-01

    The coding sequences for the hepatitis B virus surface antigen, the herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D, and the influenza virus hemagglutinin were inserted into a single vaccinia virus genome. Rabbits inoculated intravenously or intradermally with this polyvalent vaccinia virus recombinant produced antibodies reactive to all three authentic foreign antigens. In addition, the feasibility of multiple rounds of vaccination with recombinant vaccinia virus was demonstrated.

  3. Doppelthydrophile Blockcopolymere als Mineralisationstemplate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasparova, Pavla

    2002-07-01

    Die vorliegende Arbeit beschäftigt sich mit der Synthese und den Eigenschaften von doppelthydrophilen Blockcopolymeren und ihrer Anwendung in einem biomimetischen Mineralisationsprozeß von Calciumcarbonat und Bariumsulfat. Doppelthydrophile Blockcopolymere bestehen aus einem hydrophilen Block, der nicht mit Mineralien wechselwirkt und einem zweiten Polyelektrolyt-Block, der stark mit Mineraloberflächen wechselwirkt. Diese Blockcopolymere wurden durch ringöffnende Polymerisation von N-carboxyanhydriden (NCA's) und a-methoxy-ω-amino[poly(ethylene glycol)] PEG-NH2 als Initiator hergestellt. Die hergestellten Blockcopolymere wurden als effektive Wachstumsmodifikatoren für die Kristallisation von Calciumcarbonat und Bariumsulfat Mineralien eingesetzt. Die so erhaltenen Mineralpartikel (Kugeln, Hantel, eiförmige Partikel) wurden durch Lichtmikroskopie in Lösung, SEM und TEM charakterisiert. Röntgenweitwinkelstreuung (WAXS) wurde verwendet, um die Modifikation von Calciumcarbonat zu ermitteln und die Größe der Calciumcarbonat- und Bariumsulfat-Nanopartikel zu ermitteln. This work describes the synthesis and characterization of double hydrophilic block copolymers and their use in a biomimetic mineralization process of Calcium Carbonate and Barium Sulfate. Double hydrophilic block copolymers consist of a hydrophilic block that does not interact with minerals and another hydrophilic polyelectrolyte block that strongly interacts with mineral surfaces. These polymers were synthesised via ring opening polymerisation of N-carboxyanhydride (NCA), and the first hydrophilic block a-methoxy-ω-amino[poly(ethylene glycol)] PEG-NH2 was used as an initiator. The prepared block copolymers were used as effective crystal growth modifiers to control the crystallization of Calcium Carbonate and Barium Sulfate minerals. The resulting mineral particles (spheres, dumbbells, egg-like particles) were characterised by light microscopy in solution, by SEM, and by TEM. X-Ray scattering

  4. Submicron Nb-Al/Al oxide-Nb tunnel junctions sandwiched between Al films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, D.; Rothermel, H.; Gundlach, K. H.; Zimmermann, R.

    1996-02-01

    A process has been developed to embed Nb-Al/Al oxide-Nb junctions in planar structures of Al films. The submicron junctions are defined by photoresist lines. Motivation for this effort is a possible application of Nb junctions confined between normal conducting Al films as mixers above 700 GHz where Nb films loose their superconductive properties and tuning circuits made out of Nb therefore exhibit losses. First mixer results at 816 GHz are presented.

  5. Mouse Saliva Inhibits Transit of Influenza Virus to the Lower Respiratory Tract by Efficiently Blocking Influenza Virus Neuraminidase Activity.

    PubMed

    Gilbertson, Brad; Ng, Wy Ching; Crawford, Simon; McKimm-Breschkin, Jenny L; Brown, Lorena E

    2017-07-15

    possible mechanism through which the species may not experience severe influenza virus infection in the wild. We show that the murine salivary inhibitor targets the outer surface of the influenza virus neuraminidase, possibly occluding entry to the enzymatic site rather than binding within the active site like commercially available neuraminidase inhibitors. This knowledge sheds light on how the natural inhibitors of particular species combat infection. Copyright © 2017 Gilbertson et al.

  6. Identification of duck plague virus by polymerase chain reaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, W.R.; Brown, Sean E.; Nashold, S.W.; Knudson, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    indefinido y al gen para la proteina de la DNA polimerasa en otros virus herpes. Se encontraron tres o cuatro grupos de iniciadores especificos para el virus vacunal y para el 100% (7/7) de los a??slamientos de campo, pero no amplificaron el DNA del virus de hepatitis por cuerpos de inclusi??n de grullas. Se analiz?? la especificidad de un primer juego de iniciadores con moldes del genoma de otros virus herpes aviares, incluyendo el ?!guila dorada, ?!guila de cabeza blanca, lechuza de cuernos grandes, lechuza blanca, halc??n peregrino, palomas, aves psit?!cidas y pollos (virus de laringotraqueitis infecciosa), pero no se produjeron los productos finales. Por lo tanto, esta prueba de reacci??n en cadena por la polimerasa es altamente especifica para el DNA del virus. Dos grupos de iniciadores fueron capaces de detectar un fragmento de DNA de la cepa vacunal equivalente a cinco copias del genoma. Adem?!s, se determin?? que la proporci??n de la dosis infecciosa en cultivo celular y copias del genoma del virus vacunal de c??lulas de embri??n de pato infectadas era de 10 a 100 respectivamente, haciendo la prueba de la reacci??n en cadena por la polimerasa 20 veces m?!s sensible que el cultivo celular para detectar el virus. La velocidad, sensibilidad y especificidad de la prueba de la reacci??n en cadena por la polimerasa suministra una herramienta de investigaci??n y de diagn??stico altamente mejorada para el estudio de la epizootiolog?-a del virus.

  7. [Viruses in drinking water].

    PubMed

    Botzenhart, K

    2007-03-01

    Viruses in drinking water can cause infectious diseases. In the past, hepatitis A and E were the most frequently observed drinking- water-borne viral infections, but in recent years several small- and large-scale norovirus epidemics have been described, even in Europe. All virus species spread via drinking water are of fecal origin. They are regularly identified in waste water even after conventional multi-stage water treatment. The approved disinfection methods can cope with these viruses if they are not integrated in larger particles. For this reason particle separation is particularly important in water treatment. Virological tests are not reliable enough to ensure that drinking water is sufficiently virus-free. The examination of 100 mL of water for E. coli and coliform bacteria is not adequate proof either. If potentially contaminated raw water is used, consumer safety must be ensured by calculating the performance of water treatment plants on a case-by-case basis. Such a calculation takes into account the virus load of the raw water, the efficiency of the physical and chemical particle elimination steps and the effect of disinfection. Those factors which determine the effectiveness of disinfection, namely concentration and exposure time or UV radiation strength, must be adjusted according to the risk of viral infection, and calculated settings must be adhered to, even if favorable E. coli levels may make them seem excessive.

  8. Engineered plant virus resistance.

    PubMed

    Galvez, Leny C; Banerjee, Joydeep; Pinar, Hasan; Mitra, Amitava

    2014-11-01

    Virus diseases are among the key limiting factors that cause significant yield loss and continuously threaten crop production. Resistant cultivars coupled with pesticide application are commonly used to circumvent these threats. One of the limitations of the reliance on resistant cultivars is the inevitable breakdown of resistance due to the multitude of variable virus populations. Similarly, chemical applications to control virus transmitting insect vectors are costly to the farmers, cause adverse health and environmental consequences, and often result in the emergence of resistant vector strains. Thus, exploiting strategies that provide durable and broad-spectrum resistance over diverse environments are of paramount importance. The development of plant gene transfer systems has allowed for the introgression of alien genes into plant genomes for novel disease control strategies, thus providing a mechanism for broadening the genetic resources available to plant breeders. Genetic engineering offers various options for introducing transgenic virus resistance into crop plants to provide a wide range of resistance to viral pathogens. This review examines the current strategies of developing virus resistant transgenic plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Growth and Optical Properties of Al rich AlN/AlGaN Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahtamouni, T. M. Al; Nepal, N.; Nakarmi, M. L.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2006-03-01

    Al rich AlGaN alloys are promising materials for the applications in the optoelectronic devices such as deep ultraviolet (UV) emitters and detectors in the spectral range down to 200 nm. AlGaN based UV emitters (λ<340nm) has applications in bio-chemical agent detection and medical research/ health care. To realize deep UV emission (λ< 280 nm) Al rich AlGaN based quantum wells (QWs) are required. We report here the growth of AlN/AlxGa1-xNQWs (x>0.65) on AlN/sapphire templates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Deep UV photoluminescence (PL) was employed to study the optical properties of the QWs. Well width (Al composition) dependence was studied by varying the QW thickness (Al composition) with fixed x ˜ 0.65 (well width at 3 nm). Optical properties of these QWs such as the effects of alloy fluctuation, temperature, strain and piezoelectric field, carrier and exciton localizations on the quantum efficiency have been studied. Carrier and exciton dynamics were probed. Implications of our findings on the applications of Al rich AlN/AlGaN QWs for UV emitters and detectors will also be discussed.

  10. Studies of 27Al NMR in SrAl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niki, Haruo; Higa, Nonoka; Kuroshima, Hiroko; Toji, Tatsuki; Morishima, Mach; Minei, Motofumi; Yogi, Mamoru; Nakamura, Ai; Hedo, Masato; Nakama, Takao; Ōnuki, Yoshichika; Harima, Hisatomo

    A charge density wave (CDW) transition at TCDW = 243 K and a structural phase (SP) transition at approximately 100 K occur in SrAl4 with the BaAl4-type body center tetragonal structure, which is the divalent and non-4f electron reference compound of EuAl4. To understand the behaviors of the CDW and SP transitions, the 27Al NMR measurements using a single crystal and a powder sample of SrAl4 have been carried out. The line width below TCDW is modulated by an electrical quadruple interaction between 27Al nucleus and CDW charge modulation. The incommensurate CDW state below TCDW changes into a different structure below TSP. The temperature dependences of Knight shifts of 27Al(I) and 27Al(II) show the different behaviors. The temperature variation of 27Al(I) Knight shift shows anomalies at the CDW and SP transition temperatures, revealing the shift to negative side below TCDW, which is attributable to the core polarization of the d-electrons. However, 27Al(II) Knight shift keeps almost constant except for the small shift due to the SP transition. The 1/T1T of 27Al(I) indicates the obvious changes due to the CDW and SP transitions, while that of 27Al(II) takes a constant value. The density of state at the Fermi level at Al(I) site below 60 K would be about 0.9 times less than that above TCDW.

  11. Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease): Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) About Ebola Questions & Answers 2014- ...

  12. Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease): Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) About Ebola Questions & Answers 2014- ...

  13. Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease): Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) About Ebola Questions & Answers 2014- ...

  14. Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease): Transmission

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) About Ebola Questions & Answers 2014- ...

  15. Production of virus resistant plants

    DOEpatents

    Dougherty, W.G.; Lindbo, J.A.

    1996-12-10

    A method of suppressing virus gene expression in plants using untranslatable plus sense RNA is disclosed. The method is useful for the production of plants that are resistant to virus infection. 9 figs.

  16. Emerging issues in virus taxonomy.

    PubMed

    van Regenmortel, Marc H V; Mahy, Brian W J

    2004-01-01

    Viruses occupy a unique position in biology. Although they possess some of the properties of living systems such as having a genome, they are actually nonliving infectious entities and should not be considered microorganisms. A clear distinction should be drawn between the terms virus, virion, and virus species. Species is the most fundamental taxonomic category used in all biological classification. In 1991, the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) decided that the category of virus species should be used in virus classification together with the categories of genus and family. More than 50 ICTV study groups were given the task of demarcating the 1,550 viral species that were recognized in the 7th ICTV report, which was published in 2000. We briefly describe the changes in virus classification that were introduced in that report. We also discuss recent proposals to introduce a nonlatinized binomial nomenclature for virus species.

  17. Special Issue: Honey Bee Viruses.

    PubMed

    Gisder, Sebastian; Genersch, Elke

    2015-10-01

    Pollination of flowering plants is an important ecosystem service provided by wild insect pollinators and managed honey bees. Hence, losses and declines of pollinating insect species threaten human food security and are of major concern not only for apiculture or agriculture but for human society in general. Honey bee colony losses and bumblebee declines have attracted intensive research interest over the last decade and although the problem is far from being solved we now know that viruses are among the key players of many of these bee losses and bumblebee declines. With this special issue on bee viruses we, therefore, aimed to collect high quality original papers reflecting the current state of bee virus research. To this end, we focused on newly discovered viruses (Lake Sinai viruses, bee macula-like virus), or a so far neglected virus species (Apis mellifera filamentous virus), and cutting edge technologies (mass spectrometry, RNAi approach) applied in the field.

  18. Epstein-Barr virus test

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003513.htm Epstein-Barr virus antibody test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Epstein-Barr virus antibody test is a blood test to detect ...

  19. Chlorella viruses isolated in China

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Burbank, D.E.; Van Etten, J.L. )

    1988-09-01

    Plaque-forming viruses of the unicellular, eukaryotic, exsymbiotic, Chlorella-like green algae strain NC64A, which are common in the United States, were also present in fresh water collected in the People's Republic of China. Seven of the Chinese viruses were examined in detail and compared with the Chlorella viruses previously isolated in the United States. Like the American viruses, the Chinese viruses were large polyhedra and sensitive to chloroform. They contained numerous structural proteins and large double-stranded DNA genomes of at least 300 kilobase pairs. Each of the DNAs from the Chinese viruses contained 5-methyldeoxycytosine, which varied from 12.6 to 46.7% of the deoxycytosine, and N{sup 6}-methyldeoxyadenosine, which varied from 2.2 to 28.3% of the deoxyadenosine. Four of the Chinese virus DNAs hybridized extensively with {sup 32}P-labeled DNA from the American virus PBCV-1, and three hybridized poorly.

  20. Sialic Acid Receptors of Viruses.

    PubMed

    Matrosovich, Mikhail; Herrler, Georg; Klenk, Hans Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Sialic acid linked to glycoproteins and gangliosides is used by many viruses as a receptor for cell entry. These viruses include important human and animal pathogens, such as influenza, parainfluenza, mumps, corona, noro, rota, and DNA tumor viruses. Attachment to sialic acid is mediated by receptor binding proteins that are constituents of viral envelopes or exposed at the surface of non-enveloped viruses. Some of these viruses are also equipped with a neuraminidase or a sialyl-O-acetyl-esterase. These receptor-destroying enzymes promote virus release from infected cells and neutralize sialic acid-containing soluble proteins interfering with cell surface binding of the virus. Variations in the receptor specificity are important determinants for host range, tissue tropism, pathogenicity, and transmissibility of these viruses.

  1. Emerging Issues in Virus Taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Mahy, Brian W.J.

    2004-01-01

    Viruses occupy a unique position in biology. Although they possess some of the properties of living systems such as having a genome, they are actually nonliving infectious entities and should not be considered microorganisms. A clear distinction should be drawn between the terms virus, virion, and virus species. Species is the most fundamental taxonomic category used in all biological classification. In 1991, the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) decided that the category of virus species should be used in virus classification together with the categories of genus and family. More than 50 ICTV study groups were given the task of demarcating the 1,550 viral species that were recognized in the 7th ICTV report, which was published in 2000. We briefly describe the changes in virus classification that were introduced in that report. We also discuss recent proposals to introduce a nonlatinized binomial nomenclature for virus species. PMID:15078590

  2. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... incisions made in the mother’s abdomen and uterus. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): A virus that attacks certain cells of the body’s immune system and causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Immune System: ...

  3. Special Issue: Honey Bee Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Gisder, Sebastian; Genersch, Elke

    2015-01-01

    Pollination of flowering plants is an important ecosystem service provided by wild insect pollinators and managed honey bees. Hence, losses and declines of pollinating insect species threaten human food security and are of major concern not only for apiculture or agriculture but for human society in general. Honey bee colony losses and bumblebee declines have attracted intensive research interest over the last decade and although the problem is far from being solved we now know that viruses are among the key players of many of these bee losses and bumblebee declines. With this special issue on bee viruses we, therefore, aimed to collect high quality original papers reflecting the current state of bee virus research. To this end, we focused on newly discovered viruses (Lake Sinai viruses, bee macula-like virus), or a so far neglected virus species (Apis mellifera filamentous virus), and cutting edge technologies (mass spectrometry, RNAi approach) applied in the field. PMID:26702462

  4. Detection of airborne polyoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    McGarrity, G. J.; Dion, A. S.

    1978-01-01

    Polyoma virus was recovered from the air of an animal laboratory housing mice infected with the virus. Air samples were obtained by means of a high volume air sampler and further concentrated by high speed centrifugation. Total concentration of the air samples was 7.5 x 10(7). Assay for polyoma virus was by mouse antibody production tests. Airborne polyoma virus was detected in four of six samples. PMID:211163

  5. A Virus-Like Particle System Identifies the Endonuclease Domain of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    Devignot, Stephanie; Bergeron, Eric; Nichol, Stuart; Mirazimi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV; genus Nairovirus) is an extremely pathogenic member of the Bunyaviridae family. Since handling of the virus requires a biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) facility, little is known about pathomechanisms and host interactions. Here, we describe the establishment of a transcriptionally competent virus-like particle (tc-VLP) system for CCHFV. Recombinant polymerase (L), nucleocapsid protein (N) and a reporter minigenome expressed in human HuH-7 cells resulted in formation of transcriptionally active nucleocapsids that could be packaged by coexpressed CCHFV glycoproteins into tc-VLPs. The tc-VLPs resembled authentic virus particles in their protein composition and neutralization sensitivity to anti-CCHFV antibodies and could recapitulate all steps of the viral replication cycle. Particle attachment, entry, and primary transcription were modeled by infection of naive cells. The subsequent steps of genome replication, secondary transcription, and particle assembly and release can be obtained upon passaging the tc-VLPs on cells expressing CCHFV structural proteins. The utility of the VLP system was demonstrated by showing that the endonuclease domain of L is located around amino acid D693, as was predicted in silico by B. Morin et al. (PLoS Pathog 6:e1001038, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1001038). The tc-VLP system will greatly facilitate studies and diagnostics of CCHFV under non-BSL-4 conditions. IMPORTANCE Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is an extremely virulent pathogen of humans. Since the virus can be handled only at the highest biosafety level, research is restricted to a few specialized laboratories. We developed a plasmid-based system to produce virus-like particles with the ability to infect cells and transcribe a reporter genome. Due to the absence of viral genes, the virus-like particles are unable to spread or cause disease, thus allowing study of aspects of CCHFV biology under relaxed

  6. Zika Virus Research Models.

    PubMed

    Kublin, Jessica L; Whitney, James B

    2017-08-12

    The 2015 Brazilian Zika virus outbreak sparked a rapid response to control the spread of the virus. What was first understood to be a mild self-resolving infection is now linked to significant neurological defects in both neonates, and adults. The WHO declared the 2016 Zika epidemic a public health emergency and issued an unprecedented recommendation to women in affected regions to delay pregnancy until the risks surrounding Zika virus could be understood, or the epidemic contained. Since that time, considerable effort has been dedicated to understanding Zika transmission and pathogenesis to aid the development of drugs and vaccines. Several models have emerged to study several facets of Zika biology; this review details the various model systems. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Virus resistance in orchids.

    PubMed

    Koh, Kah Wee; Lu, Hsiang-Chia; Chan, Ming-Tsair

    2014-11-01

    Orchid plants, Phalaenopsis and Dendrobium in particular, are commercially valuable ornamental plants sold worldwide. Unfortunately, orchid plants are highly susceptible to viral infection by Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV) and Odotoglossum ringspot virus (ORSV), posing a major threat and serious economic loss to the orchid industry worldwide. A major challenge is to generate an effective method to overcome plant viral infection. With the development of optimized orchid transformation biotechnological techniques and the establishment of concepts of pathogen-derived resistance (PDR), the generation of plants resistant to viral infection has been achieved. The PDR concept involves introducing genes that is(are) derived from the virus into the host plant to induce RNA- or protein-mediated resistance. We here review the fundamental mechanism of the PDR concept, and illustrate its application in protecting against viral infection of orchid plants.

  8. Usutu virus, Belgium, 2016.

    PubMed

    Garigliany, M; Linden, A; Gilliau, G; Levy, E; Sarlet, M; Franssen, M; Benzarti, E; Derouaux, A; Francis, F; Desmecht, D

    2017-03-01

    During late summer 2016, in a northwest European region extending over Belgium, the Netherlands and the eastern border of the German state of North Rhine Westphalia, an outbreak of wild bird deaths occurred similar to those reported on the continent since 1996. Dead birds were necropsied and examined by complementary methods. Pathologic and immunohistological investigations strongly suggested an infection by Usutu virus. Subsequently, genomic segments of the said virus were detected, the virus was isolated and its complete genome was sequenced. The strain, designated Usutu-LIEGE, is a close phylogenetic relative of those isolated in Germany which form a distinct group within the USUV phylogeny, the so-called Europe_3 lineage. Should this outbreak recapitulate the characteristics of those in southwest Germany in 2011 and in/around Vienna (Austria) in 2001, it is expected that specific avian populations in the affected area will face a significant reduction in size for a few years.

  9. Herpes zoster virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Woolery, William Alan

    2008-10-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is the etiologic agent of varicella and herpes zoster (HZ) in humans. Herpes zoster is the result of reactivation of VZV within certain sensory ganglia. The burden of illness from HZ and post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) is high. Herpes-zoster vaccine contains live attenuated varicella-zoster virus in an amount approximately 14 times greater than that found in the varicella virus vaccine. Herpes zoster vaccine is approved for the prevention of shingles in appropriate persons aged 60 and older. The vaccine is administered in a single subcutaneous dose. Reported side effects are mild and generally limited to localized injection site findings. Herpes-zoster vaccine reportedly decreases the occurrence of herpes zoster by approximately 50 percent and prevents the development of PHN by two thirds. The vaccine appears to be minimally effective in those individuals over the age of 80 and is not recommended in this age group.

  10. Viruses in water

    PubMed Central

    Melnick, Joseph L.; Gerba, Charles P.; Wallis, Craig

    1978-01-01

    Attention is drawn in this paper to the increasing problem of viral contamination of water and shellfish, particularly since growing demands for available water resources by a rising world population and expanding industry will make the recycling of wastewater almost inevitable in the future. The problem of eliminating viruses pathogenic for man from water is considered in the light of present water treatment procedures, which are often inadequate for that purpose. Man may be exposed to waterborne viruses through the consumption of contaminated water, shellfish, or crops, as a result of recreational activities involving water, or from aerosols following the spraying of crops with liquid wastes. Physical and chemical methods of eliminating viruses from water are discussed. PMID:310357

  11. 5′-Terminal Nucleotide Noncoding Sequences of Retroviruses: Relatedness of Two Old World Primate Type C Viruses and Avian Spleen Necrosis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lovinger, Gerald G.; Mark, George; Todaro, George J.; Schochetman, Gerald

    1981-01-01

    Computer-assisted comparison of the 5′-terminal regions of mammalian type C viruses serves as a useful model of evolutionary divergence of noncoding nucleic acid sequences. It has led to the concept that regions of conserved nucleic acid sequences, the slowly divergent sequences, contain signals of translational, transcriptional, or integrative significance. Interspersed among the conserved regions are rapidly divergent sequences in which base changes, insertions, and deletions are especially prevalent. In the present study, CPC-1, a type C virus isolated from Colobus polykomos, was shown to be related to another Old World type C monkey virus, endogenous stump-tailed monkey virus, MAC-1, by analysis of their 5′-terminal nucleotide sequences. The 5′-terminal regions of CPC-1 and MAC-1 showed a 76% nucleotide correspondence and were of similar lengths, 132 and 127 nucleotides, respectively. Previous strong-stop analyses of other type C viruses have defined two subgroups: (i) Rauscher murine leukemia virus and gibbon ape leukemia virus and (ii) baboon endogenous virus and endogenous cat virus RD114. Based on the present sequence analysis of their 5′-terminal sequences, CPC-1 and MAC-1 formed a third subgroup. Computer-assisted comparison of the 5′-terminal sequences of CPC-1 and MAC-1 to the previously reported sequence of avian spleen necrosis virus (SNV) (Shimotohno et al., Nature [London] 285:550-554, 1980) showed SNV to be a member of that subgroup of mammalian type C viruses. Consistent with the inclusion of SNV in this subgroup of mammalian type C viruses, SNV was distantly related to other mammalian type C viruses. Interestingly, the SNV 5′-terminal sequences showed no significant evolutionary relationship by these criteria to the avian leukemia and sarcoma viruses. CPC-1, MAC-1, and SNV contained conserved regulatory signals in similar positions in their 5′-terminal RNA sequences analogous to those observed in other mammalian type C retroviruses

  12. Canine Distemper Virus (CDV) in Another Big Cat: Should CDV Be Renamed Carnivore Distemper Virus?

    PubMed Central

    Terio, Karen A.; Craft, Meggan E.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT One of the greatest threats to the conservation of wild cat populations may be dogs or, at least, one of their viruses. Canine distemper virus (CDV), a single-stranded RNA virus in the Paramyxoviridae family and genus Morbillivirus, infects and causes disease in a variety of species, not just canids. An outbreak of CDV in wild lions in the Serengeti, Tanzania, in 1994 was a wake-up call for conservationists, as it demonstrated that an infectious disease could swiftly impact a previously healthy felid population. To understand how this virus causes disease in noncanid hosts, researchers have focused on specific mutations in the binding site of the CDV hemagglutinin gene. Now, Seimon et al. provide information on CDV in its latest feline victim, the endangered wild Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) [T. A. Seimon et al., mBio 4(4):e00410-13, 2013, doi:10.1128/mBio.00410-13]. Their findings of CDV strains infecting tigers, in combination with recent information from other felids, paints a different picture, one in which CDV strains from a variety of geographic lineages and with a variety of amino acid residues in the hemagglutinin gene binding site can infect cats and cause disease. Although CDV has been known as a multihost disease since its discovery in domestic dogs in 1905, perhaps it is time to reconsider whether these noncanid species are not just incidental or “spillover” hosts but, rather, a normal part of the complex ecology of this infectious disease. PMID:24045642

  13. Hendra virus and Nipah virus animal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Broder, Christopher C; Weir, Dawn L; Reid, Peter A

    2016-06-24

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are zoonotic viruses that emerged in the mid to late 1990s causing disease outbreaks in livestock and people. HeV appeared in Queensland, Australia in 1994 causing a severe respiratory disease in horses along with a human case fatality. NiV emerged a few years later in Malaysia and Singapore in 1998-1999 causing a large outbreak of encephalitis with high mortality in people and also respiratory disease in pigs which served as amplifying hosts. The key pathological elements of HeV and NiV infection in several species of mammals, and also in people, are a severe systemic and often fatal neurologic and/or respiratory disease. In people, both HeV and NiV are also capable of causing relapsed encephalitis following recovery from an acute infection. The known reservoir hosts of HeV and NiV are several species of pteropid fruit bats. Spillovers of HeV into horses continue to occur in Australia and NiV has caused outbreaks in people in Bangladesh and India nearly annually since 2001, making HeV and NiV important transboundary biological threats. NiV in particular possesses several features that underscore its potential as a pandemic threat, including its ability to infect humans directly from natural reservoirs or indirectly from other susceptible animals, along with a capacity of limited human-to-human transmission. Several HeV and NiV animal challenge models have been developed which have facilitated an understanding of pathogenesis and allowed for the successful development of both active and passive immunization countermeasures.

  14. Hendra Virus and Nipah Virus Animal Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Weir, Dawn L.; Reid, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are zoonotic viruses that emerged in the mid to late 1990s causing disease outbreaks in livestock and people. HeV appeared in Queensland, Australia in 1994 causing a severe respiratory disease in horses along with a human case fatality. NiV emerged a few years later in Malaysia and Singapore in 1998-99 causing a large outbreak of encephalitis with high mortality in people and also respiratory disease in pigs which served as amplifying hosts. The key pathological elements of HeV and NiV infection in several species of mammals, and also in people, are a severe systemic and often fatal neurologic and/or respiratory disease. In people, both HeV and NiV are also capable of causing relapsed encephalitis following recovery from an acute infection. The known reservoir hosts of HeV and NiV are several species of pteropid fruit bats. Spillovers of HeV into horses continue to occur in Australia and NiV has caused outbreaks in people in Bangladesh and India nearly annually since 2001, making HeV and NiV important transboundary biological threats. NiV in particular possesses several features that underscore its potential as a pandemic threat, including its ability to infect humans directly from natural reservoirs or indirectly from other susceptible animals, along with a capacity of limited human-to-human transmission. Several HeV and NiV animal challenge models have been developed which have facilitated an understanding of pathogenesis and allowed for the successful development of both active and passive immunization countermeasures. PMID:27154393

  15. Viability of Teschen Disease Virus

    PubMed Central

    Gray, D. P.; Girard, Andre

    1963-01-01

    A portion of spinal cord taken from a pig infected with the Konratice strain of Teschen Disease virus was found to be infectious for swine after an eleven year period of storage at dry ice temperature. The virus was recovered in tissue culture from the brains of two experimentally infected pigs, titrated, and a serum-virus neutralization test performed. PMID:17649419

  16. Viability of Teschen Disease Virus.

    PubMed

    Gray, D P; Girard, A

    1963-01-01

    A portion of spinal cord taken from a pig infected with the Konratice strain of Teschen Disease virus was found to be infectious for swine after an eleven year period of storage at dry ice temperature. The virus was recovered in tissue culture from the brains of two experimentally infected pigs, titrated, and a serum-virus neutralization test performed.

  17. Protecting Your Computer from Viruses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Descy, Don E.

    2006-01-01

    A computer virus is defined as a software program capable of reproducing itself and usually capable of causing great harm to files or other programs on the same computer. The existence of computer viruses--or the necessity of avoiding viruses--is part of using a computer. With the advent of the Internet, the door was opened wide for these…

  18. Computer Bytes, Viruses and Vaccines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmore, Teddy B.

    1989-01-01

    Presents a history of computer viruses, explains various types of viruses and how they affect software or computer operating systems, and describes examples of specific viruses. Available vaccines are explained, and precautions for protecting programs and disks are given. (nine references) (LRW)

  19. An introduction to computer viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.R.

    1992-03-01

    This report on computer viruses is based upon a thesis written for the Master of Science degree in Computer Science from the University of Tennessee in December 1989 by David R. Brown. This thesis is entitled An Analysis of Computer Virus Construction, Proliferation, and Control and is available through the University of Tennessee Library. This paper contains an overview of the computer virus arena that can help the reader to evaluate the threat that computer viruses pose. The extent of this threat can only be determined by evaluating many different factors. These factors include the relative ease with which a computer virus can be written, the motivation involved in writing a computer virus, the damage and overhead incurred by infected systems, and the legal implications of computer viruses, among others. Based upon the research, the development of a computer virus seems to require more persistence than technical expertise. This is a frightening proclamation to the computing community. The education of computer professionals to the dangers that viruses pose to the welfare of the computing industry as a whole is stressed as a means of inhibiting the current proliferation of computer virus programs. Recommendations are made to assist computer users in preventing infection by computer viruses. These recommendations support solid general computer security practices as a means of combating computer viruses.

  20. Detection of Lassa virus, Mali.

    PubMed

    Safronetz, David; Lopez, Job E; Sogoba, Nafomon; Traore', Sékou F; Raffel, Sandra J; Fischer, Elizabeth R; Ebihara, Hideki; Branco, Luis; Garry, Robert F; Schwan, Tom G; Feldmann, Heinz

    2010-07-01

    To determine whether Lassa virus was circulating in southern Mali, we tested samples from small mammals from 3 villages, including Soromba, where in 2009 a British citizen probably contracted a lethal Lassa virus infection. We report the isolation and genetic characterization of Lassa virus from an area previously unknown for Lassa fever.

  1. Mosquitoborne Viruses, Czech Republic, 2002

    PubMed Central

    Zeman, Petr; Halouzka, Jiří; Juřicová, Zina; Šťovíčková, Eva; Bálková, Helena; Šikutová, Silvie; Rudolf, Ivo

    2005-01-01

    Specimens from residents (n = 497) of an area affected by the 2002 flood were examined serologically for mosquitoborne viruses. Antibodies were detected against Tahyna (16%), Sindbis (1%), and Batai (0.2%) viruses, but not West Nile virus. An examination of paired serum samples showed 1 Tahyna bunyavirus (California group) infection. PMID:15705333

  2. Protecting Your Computer from Viruses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Descy, Don E.

    2006-01-01

    A computer virus is defined as a software program capable of reproducing itself and usually capable of causing great harm to files or other programs on the same computer. The existence of computer viruses--or the necessity of avoiding viruses--is part of using a computer. With the advent of the Internet, the door was opened wide for these…

  3. Nematode-borne plant viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There are 30 plant-parasitic nematode species that are known to transmit 14 plant viruses. Nematode-transmitted viruses affect a range of agriculturally important crops including grape, cherry, potato, and tomato. The nematodes that transmit viruses are found in two families, Longidoridae and Tric...

  4. Computer Bytes, Viruses and Vaccines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmore, Teddy B.

    1989-01-01

    Presents a history of computer viruses, explains various types of viruses and how they affect software or computer operating systems, and describes examples of specific viruses. Available vaccines are explained, and precautions for protecting programs and disks are given. (nine references) (LRW)

  5. Ipomoviruses: Squash vein yellowing virus, Cucumber vein yellowing virus, Cassava brown streak virus, and Ugandan cassava brown streak virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ipomoviruses including Squash vein yellowing virus, Cucumber vein yellowing virus and Cassava brown streak virus are currently causing significant economic impact on crop production in several regions of the world. Only recently have results of detailed characterization of their whitefly transmissi...

  6. Avian influenza virus RNA extraction

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The efficient extraction and purification of viral RNA is critical for down-stream molecular applications whether it is the sensitive and specific detection of virus in clinical samples, virus gene cloning and expression, or quantification of avian influenza (AI) virus by molecular methods from expe...

  7. An introduction to computer viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.R.

    1992-03-01

    This report on computer viruses is based upon a thesis written for the Master of Science degree in Computer Science from the University of Tennessee in December 1989 by David R. Brown. This thesis is entitled An Analysis of Computer Virus Construction, Proliferation, and Control and is available through the University of Tennessee Library. This paper contains an overview of the computer virus arena that can help the reader to evaluate the threat that computer viruses pose. The extent of this threat can only be determined by evaluating many different factors. These factors include the relative ease with which a computer virus can be written, the motivation involved in writing a computer virus, the damage and overhead incurred by infected systems, and the legal implications of computer viruses, among others. Based upon the research, the development of a computer virus seems to require more persistence than technical expertise. This is a frightening proclamation to the computing community. The education of computer professionals to the dangers that viruses pose to the welfare of the computing industry as a whole is stressed as a means of inhibiting the current proliferation of computer virus programs. Recommendations are made to assist computer users in preventing infection by computer viruses. These recommendations support solid general computer security practices as a means of combating computer viruses.

  8. Surveillance of feral cats for influenza A virus in North Central Florida

    PubMed Central

    Gordy, James T.; Jones, Cheryl A.; Rue, Joanne; Crawford, Patti Cynda; Levy, Julie K.; Stallknecht, David E.; Tripp, Ralph A.; Tompkins, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Gordy JT et al. (2012) Surveillance of feral cats for influenza A virus in North Central Florida. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(5), 341–347. Background  Transmission of highly pathogenic avian influenza and the recent pandemic H1N1 viruses to domestic cats and other felids creates concern because of the morbidity and mortality associated with human infections as well as disease in the infected animals. Experimental infections have demonstrated transmission of influenza viruses in cats. Objectives  An epidemiologic survey of feral cats was conducted to determine their exposure to influenza A virus. Methods  Feral cat sera and oropharyngeal and rectal swabs were collected from November 2008 through July 2010 in Alachua County, FL and were tested for evidence of influenza A virus infection by virus isolation, PCR, and serological assay. Results and conclusions  No virus was isolated from any of 927 cats examined using MDCK cell or embryonated chicken egg culture methods, nor was viral RNA detected by RT‐PCR in 200 samples tested. However, 0.43% of cats tested antibody positive for influenza A by commercial ELISA. These results suggest feral cats in this region are at minimal risk for influenza A virus infection. PMID:22212818

  9. Targeting the Vaccinia Virus L1 Protein to the Cell Surface Enhances Production of Neutralizing Antibodies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-28

    vaccine can protect mice and non-humanprimates from lethal challengewith VACV ormon- keypox virus, respectively [21–23]. Fogg et al. demonstrated...23. 24] Fogg C, Lustig S, Whitbeck JC, Eisenberg RJ, Cohen GH, Moss B. Protective immunity to vaccinia virus induced by vaccination with multiple...Allison TJ, Fogg C, Moss B, Garboczi DN. The 1.51-Angstrom structure of the orthopoxvirus L1 protein, a target of potent neutralizing anti- bodies

  10. Neutralizing Antibody Fails to Impact the Course of Ebola Virus Infection in Monkeys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-19

    of Ebola virus-infected cynomolgus monkeys with immunoglobulin from hyperimmune horses. Arch Virol 11: 135–140. 13. Jahrling PB, Geisbert TW, Geisbert...JB, Swearengen JR, Bray M, et al. (1999) Evaluation of immune globulin and recombinant interferon-alpha2b for treatment of experimental Ebola virus...40: 270–273. 18. Kudoyarova-Zubavichene NM, Sergeyev NN, Chepurnov AA, Netesov SV (1999) Preparation and use of hyperimmune serum for prophylaxis and

  11. Gene Expression Profiling of Nonhuman Primates Exposed to Aerosolized Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    Alphavirus of the family Togaviridae. VEEV is endemic throughout Central and South America, circulating in rodent and/or avian hosts and a mosquito...helpful for the prevention and emergency preparedness against an intentional aerosol ex- posure of the virus. VEEV will readily replicate in humans, as...host responses to other alphaviruses . Johnston et al. (2001), for example, investigated the infection of the Old World alpha- virus Sindbis in murine

  12. Viruses as living processes.

    PubMed

    Dupré, John; Guttinger, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    The view that life is composed of distinct entities with well-defined boundaries has been undermined in recent years by the realisation of the near omnipresence of symbiosis. What had seemed to be intrinsically stable entities have turned out to be systems stabilised only by the interactions between a complex set of underlying processes (Dupré, 2012). This has not only presented severe problems for our traditional understanding of biological individuality but has also led some to claim that we need to switch to a process ontology to be able adequately to understand biological systems. A large group of biological entities, however, has been excluded from these discussions, namely viruses. Viruses are usually portrayed as stable and distinct individuals that do not fit the more integrated and collaborative picture of nature implied by symbiosis. In this paper we will contest this view. We will first discuss recent findings in virology that show that viruses can be 'nice' and collaborate with their hosts, meaning that they form part of integrated biological systems and processes. We further offer various reasons why viruses should be seen as processes rather than things, or substances. Based on these two claims we will argue that, far from serving as a counterexample to it, viruses actually enable a deeper understanding of the fundamentally interconnected and collaborative nature of nature. We conclude with some reflections on the debate as to whether viruses should be seen as living, and argue that there are good reasons for an affirmative answer to this question. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Ecology of prokaryotic viruses.

    PubMed

    Weinbauer, Markus G

    2004-05-01

    The finding that total viral abundance is higher than total prokaryotic abundance and that a significant fraction of the prokaryotic community is infected with phages in aquatic systems has stimulated research on the ecology of prokaryotic viruses and their role in ecosystems. This review treats the ecology of prokaryotic viruses ('phages') in marine, freshwater and soil systems from a 'virus point of view'. The abundance of viruses varies strongly in different environments and is related to bacterial abundance or activity suggesting that the majority of the viruses found in the environment are typically phages. Data on phage diversity are sparse but indicate that phages are extremely diverse in natural systems. Lytic phages are predators of prokaryotes, whereas lysogenic and chronic infections represent a parasitic interaction. Some forms of lysogeny might be described best as mutualism. The little existing ecological data on phage populations indicate a large variety of environmental niches and survival strategies. The host cell is the main resource for phages and the resource quality, i.e., the metabolic state of the host cell, is a critical factor in all steps of the phage life cycle. Virus-induced mortality of prokaryotes varies strongly on a temporal and spatial scale and shows that phages can be important predators of bacterioplankton. This mortality and the release of cell lysis products into the environment can strongly influence microbial food web processes and biogeochemical cycles. Phages can also affect host diversity, e.g., by 'killing the winner' and keeping in check competitively dominant species or populations. Moreover, they mediate gene transfer between prokaryotes, but this remains largely unknown in the environment. Genomics or proteomics are providing us now with powerful tools in phage ecology, but final testing will have to be performed in the environment.

  14. Occurrence of Deformed wing virus, Chronic bee paralysis virus and mtDNA variants in haplotype K of Varroa destructor mites in Syrian apiaries.

    PubMed

    Elbeaino, Toufic; Daher-Hjaij, Nouraldin; Ismaeil, Faiz; Mando, Jamal; Khaled, Bassem Solaiman; Kubaa, Raied Abou

    2016-05-01

    A small-scale survey was conducted on 64 beehives located in four governorates of Syria in order to assess for the first time the presence of honeybee-infecting viruses and of Varroa destructor mites in the country. RT-PCR assays conducted on 192 honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) using virus-specific primers showed that Deformed wing virus (DWV) was present in 49 (25.5%) of the tested samples and Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) in 2 (1.04%), whereas Acute bee paralysis virus, Sacbrood virus, Black queen cell virus and Kashmir bee virus were absent. Nucleotide sequences of PCR amplicons obtained from DWV and CBPV genomes shared 95-97 and 100% identity with isolates reported in the GenBank, respectively. The phylogenetic tree grouped the Syrian DWV isolates in one cluster, distinct from all those of different origins reported in the database. Furthermore, 19 adult V. destructor females were genetically analyzed by amplifying and sequencing four fragments in cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (cox1), ATP synthase 6 (atp6), cox3 and cytochrome b (cytb) mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genes. Sequences of concatenated V. destructor mtDNA genes (2696 bp) from Syria were similar to the Korean (K) haplotype and were found recurrently in all governorates. In addition, two genetic lineages of haplotype K with slight variations (0.2-0.3%) were present only in Tartous and Al-Qunaitra governorates.

  15. Zika virus: Indian perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mourya, Devendra T.; Shil, Pratip; Sapkal, Gajanan N.; Yadav, Pragya D.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of Zika virus (ZiV), a mosquito borne Flavivirus like dengue (DEN) and chikungunya (CHIK), in Brazil in 2014 and its spread to various countries have led to a global health emergency. Aedes aegypti is the major vector for ZiV. Fast dissemination of this virus in different geographical areas posses a major threat especially to regions where the population lacks herd immunity against the ZiV and there is abundance of Aedes mosquitoes. In this review, we focus on current global scenario, epidemiology, biology, diagnostic challenges and remedial measures for ZiVconsidering the Indian perspective. PMID:27487998

  16. Epidemiology of Zika Virus.

    PubMed

    Younger, David S

    2016-11-01

    Zika virus is an arbovirus belonging to the Flaviviridae family known to cause mild clinical symptoms similar to those of dengue and chikungunya. Zika is transmitted by different species of Aedes mosquitoes. Nonhuman primates and possibly rodents play a role as reservoirs. Direct interhuman transmission has also been reported. Human cases have been reported in Africa and Asia, Easter Island, the insular Pacific region, and Brazil. Its clinical profile is that of a dengue-like febrile illness, but recently associated Guillain-Barre syndrome and microcephaly have appeared. There is neither a vaccine nor prophylactic medications available to prevent Zika virus infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Update on Zika Virus

    PubMed Central

    Toresdahl, Brett G.; Asif, Irfan M.

    2016-01-01

    As public health experts work to contain the outbreak of Zika virus in South America and minimize the devastating prenatal complications, the international sports community prepares for the 2016 Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Athletes have publicly expressed concern regarding the health risks of competition in Zika-endemic areas.33 Ensuring the safety of the athletes during training and competition is the primary role of the team physician. Special consideration is needed for sports teams preparing for travel to areas affected by Zika virus. PMID:27436751

  18. Viruses and viral proteins.

    PubMed

    Verdaguer, Nuria; Ferrero, Diego; Murthy, Mathur R N

    2014-11-01

    For more than 30 years X-ray crystallography has been by far the most powerful approach for determining the structures of viruses and viral proteins at atomic resolution. The information provided by these structures, which covers many important aspects of the viral life cycle such as cell-receptor recognition, viral entry, nucleic acid transfer and genome replication, has extensively enriched our vision of the virus world. Many of the structures available correspond to potential targets for antiviral drugs against important human pathogens. This article provides an overview of the current knowledge of different structural aspects of the above-mentioned processes.

  19. Herpes Virus Amplicon Vectors

    PubMed Central

    de Silva, Suresh; Bowers, William J.

    2009-01-01

    Since its emergence onto the gene therapy scene nearly 25 years ago, the replication-defective Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1 (HSV-1) amplicon has gained significance as a versatile gene transfer platform due to its extensive transgene capacity, widespread cellular tropism, minimal immunogenicity, and its amenability to genetic manipulation. Herein, we detail the recent advances made with respect to the design of the HSV amplicon, its numerous in vitro and in vivo applications, and the current impediments this virus-based gene transfer platform faces as it navigates a challenging path towards future clinical testing. PMID:19956558

  20. Zika virus outside Africa.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Edward B

    2009-09-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a flavivirus related to yellow fever, dengue, West Nile, and Japanese encephalitis viruses. In 2007 ZIKV caused an outbreak of relatively mild disease characterized by rash, arthralgia, and conjunctivitis on Yap Island in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. This was the first time that ZIKV was detected outside of Africa and Asia. The history, transmission dynamics, virology, and clinical manifestations of ZIKV disease are discussed, along with the possibility for diagnostic confusion between ZIKV illness and dengue.The emergence of ZIKV outside of its previously known geographic range should prompt awareness of the potential for ZIKV to spread to other Pacific islands and the Americas.

  1. Viruses and viral proteins

    PubMed Central

    Verdaguer, Nuria; Ferrero, Diego; Murthy, Mathur R. N.

    2014-01-01

    For more than 30 years X-ray crystallography has been by far the most powerful approach for determining the structures of viruses and viral proteins at atomic resolution. The information provided by these structures, which covers many important aspects of the viral life cycle such as cell-receptor recognition, viral entry, nucleic acid transfer and genome replication, has extensively enriched our vision of the virus world. Many of the structures available correspond to potential targets for antiviral drugs against important human pathogens. This article provides an overview of the current knowledge of different structural aspects of the above-mentioned processes. PMID:25485129

  2. [ZIKA--VIRUS INFECTION].

    PubMed

    Velev, V

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes the knowledge of the scientific community for Zika-virus infection. It became popular because of severe congenital damage causes of CNS in newborns whose mothers are infected during pregnancy, as well as the risk of pandemic distribution. Discusses the peculiarities of the biology and ecology of vectors--blood-sucking mosquitoes Aedes; stages in the spread of infection and practical problems which caused during pregnancy. Attention is paid to the recommendations that allow leading national and international medical organizations to deal with the threat Zika-virus infection.

  3. Virus diseases of fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, Stanley W.

    1954-01-01

    The degenerative or non-neoplastic diseases of possible virus origin give the fish-culturist the most concern because of the severe mortalities resulting from infection. Epizootics of this nature have been reported in carp (Cyprinus carpio) and rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) in Europe, in acara (Geophagus brasiliensis) in South America, in kokanee, (Oncorhynchus nerka kennerlyi) and in sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka nerka) in the State of Washington. It has been demonstrated that each epizootic was caused by an infectious filterable agent, probably a virus.

  4. Zika virus: Indian perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mourya, Devendra T; Shil, Pratip; Sapkal, Gajanan N; Yadav, Pragya D

    2016-05-01

    The emergence of Zika virus (ZiV), a mosquito borne Flavivirus like dengue (DEN) and chikungunya (CHIK), in Brazil in 2014 and its spread to various countries have led to a global health emergency. Aedes aegypti is the major vector for ZiV. Fast dissemination of this virus in different geographical areas posses a major threat especially to regions where the population lacks herd immunity against the ZiV and there is abundance of Aedes mosquitoes. In this review, we focus on current global scenario, epidemiology, biology, diagnostic challenges and remedial measures for ZiVconsidering the Indian perspective.

  5. Research on computer virus database management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Guoquan

    2011-12-01

    The growing proliferation of computer viruses becomes the lethal threat and research focus of the security of network information. While new virus is emerging, the number of viruses is growing, virus classification increasing complex. Virus naming because of agencies' capture time differences can not be unified. Although each agency has its own virus database, the communication between each other lacks, or virus information is incomplete, or a small number of sample information. This paper introduces the current construction status of the virus database at home and abroad, analyzes how to standardize and complete description of virus characteristics, and then gives the information integrity, storage security and manageable computer virus database design scheme.

  6. Morton et al. Reply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, Douglas C.; Nagol, Jyoteshwar; Carabajal, Claudia C.; Rosette, Jacqueline; Palace, Michael; Cook, Bruce D.; Vermote, Eric F.; Harding, David J.; North, Peter R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple mechanisms could lead to up-regulation of dry-season photosynthesis in Amazon forests, including canopy phenology and illumination geometry. We specifically tested two mechanisms for phenology-driven changes in Amazon forests during dry-season months, and the combined evidence from passive optical and lidar satellite data was incompatible with large net changes in canopy leaf area or leaf reflectance suggested by previous studies. We therefore hypothesized that seasonal changes in the fraction of sunlit and shaded canopies, one aspect of bidirectional reflectance effects in Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, could alter light availability for dry-season photosynthesis and the photosynthetic capacity of Amazon forests without large net changes in canopy composition. Subsequent work supports the hypothesis that seasonal changes in illumination geometry and diffuse light regulate light saturation in Amazon forests. These studies clarify the physical mechanisms that govern light availability in Amazon forests from seasonal variability in direct and diffuse illumination. Previously, in the debate over light limitation of Amazon forest productivity, seasonal changes in the distribution of light within complex Amazon forest canopies were confounded with dry-season increases in total incoming photosynthetically active radiation. In the accompanying Comment, Saleska et al. do not fully account for this confounding effect of forest structure on photosynthetic capacity.

  7. Morton et al. Reply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, Douglas C.; Nagol, Jyoteshwar; Carabajal, Claudia C.; Rosette, Jacqueline; Palace, Michael; Cook, Bruce D.; Vermote, Eric F.; Harding, David J.; North, Peter R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple mechanisms could lead to up-regulation of dry-season photosynthesis in Amazon forests, including canopy phenology and illumination geometry. We specifically tested two mechanisms for phenology-driven changes in Amazon forests during dry-season months, and the combined evidence from passive optical and lidar satellite data was incompatible with large net changes in canopy leaf area or leaf reflectance suggested by previous studies. We therefore hypothesized that seasonal changes in the fraction of sunlit and shaded canopies, one aspect of bidirectional reflectance effects in Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, could alter light availability for dry-season photosynthesis and the photosynthetic capacity of Amazon forests without large net changes in canopy composition. Subsequent work supports the hypothesis that seasonal changes in illumination geometry and diffuse light regulate light saturation in Amazon forests. These studies clarify the physical mechanisms that govern light availability in Amazon forests from seasonal variability in direct and diffuse illumination. Previously, in the debate over light limitation of Amazon forest productivity, seasonal changes in the distribution of light within complex Amazon forest canopies were confounded with dry-season increases in total incoming photosynthetically active radiation. In the accompanying Comment, Saleska et al. do not fully account for this confounding effect of forest structure on photosynthetic capacity.

  8. Rub' al Khali, Arabia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Rub' al Khali is one of the largest sand deserts in the world, encompassing most of the southern third of the Arabian Peninsula. It includes parts of Oman, United Arab Emirates, and Yemen. The desert covers 650,000 square kilometers, more than the area of France. Largely unexplored until recently, the desert is 1000 km long and 500 km wide. The first documented journeys made by Westerners were those of Bertram Thomas in 1931 and St. John Philby in 1932. With daytime temperatures reaching 55 degrees Celsius, and dunes taller than 330 meters, the desert may be one of the most forbidding places on Earth.

    The image was acquired December 2, 2005, covers an area of 54.8 x 61.9 km, and is located near 20.7 degrees north latitude, 53.6 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  9. Genetic composition of contemporary swine influenza viruses in the West Central region of the United States of America

    PubMed Central

    Evseenko, Vasiliy A.; Boon, Adrianus C. M.; Brockwell‐Staats, Christy; Franks, John; Rubrum, Adam; Daniels, Curt S.; Gramer, Marie R.; Webby, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Evseenko et al. (2011) Genetic composition of contemporary swine influenza viruses in the West Central region of the United States of America. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses DOI: 10.1111/j.1750‐2659.2010.00189.x. Background  Because of continuous circulation in different animal species and humans, influenza viruses have host‐specific phenotypic and genetic features. Reassortment of the genome segments can significantly change virus phenotype, potentially generating virus with pandemic potential. In 2009, a new pandemic influenza virus emerged. Objectives  In this study, we attempted to find precursor viruses or genes of pandemic H1N1 influenza 2009 among 25 swine influenza viruses, isolated in the West Central region of the United States of America (USA), between 2007 and 2009. The Phylogenetically Similar Triple‐Reassortant Internal Genes (PSTRIG) cassette of all the viruses studied here as well as the PSTRIG cassette of pandemic H1N1 viruses have close but equidistant phylogenetic relationships to the early triple‐reassortant swine H3N2 influenza A isolated in the USA in 1998. Methods  Samples (nasal swabs and lung tissue lavage) were taken from swine with or without clinical signs of respiratory disease via farmer‐funded syndromic surveillance. All studied viruses were isolated in Madin–Darby Canine Kidney cell cultures from the above‐mentioned samples according to standard protocols recommended for influenza virus isolation. Sequences were obtained using BigDye Terminator v3.1 Cycle Sequencing kit. Phylogenetic trees were built with MEGA 4.0 software using maximum composite likelihood algorithm and neighbor‐joining method for tree topology reconstruction. Results  Among the 25 viruses studied, we have not found any gene segments of Eurasian origin. Our results suggest that pandemic H1N1 viruses diverged and are not directly descended from swine viruses that have been circulating in USA since 1998

  10. Junín Virus Pathogenesis and Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Ashley; Seregin, Alexey; Huang, Cheng; Kolokoltsova, Olga; Brasier, Allan; Peters, Clarence; Paessler, Slobodan

    2012-01-01

    Junín virus, the etiological agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever, causes significant morbidity and mortality. The virus is spread through the aerosolization of host rodent excreta and endemic to the humid pampas of Argentina. Recently, significant progress has been achieved with the development of new technologies (e.g. reverse genetics) that have expanded knowledge about the pathogenesis and viral replication of Junín virus. We will review the pathogenesis of Junín virus in various animal models and the role of innate and adaptive immunity during infection. We will highlight current research regarding the role of molecular biology of Junín virus in elucidating virus attenuation. We will also summarize current knowledge on Junín virus pathogenesis focusing on the recent development of vaccines and potential therapeutics. PMID:23202466

  11. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) vaccine efficacy and FIV neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, James K.; Pu, Ruiyu; Martin, Marcus M.; Noon-Song, Ezra N.; Zwijnenberg, Raphael; Yamamoto, Janet K.

    2013-01-01

    A HIV-1 tier system has been developed to categorize the various subtype viruses based on their sensitivity to vaccine-induced neutralizing antibodies (NAbs): tier 1 with greatest sensitivity, tier 2 being moderately sensitive, and tier 3 being the least sensitive to NAbs (Mascola et al., J Virol 2005; 79:10103-7). Here, we define an FIV tier system using two related FIV dual-subtype (A+D) vaccines: the commercially available inactivated infected-cell vaccine (Fel-O-Vax® FIV) and its prototype vaccine solely composed of inactivated whole viruses. Both vaccines afforded combined protection rates of 100% against subtype-A tier-1 FIVPet, 89% against subtype-B tier-3 FIVFC1, 61% against recombinant subtype-A/B tier-2 FIVBang, 62% against recombinant subtype-F′/C tier-3 FIVNZ1, and 40% against subtype-A tier-2 FIVUK8 in short-duration (37–41 weeks) studies. In long-duration (76–80 weeks) studies, the commercial vaccine afforded a combined protection rate of at least 46% against the tier-2 and tier-3 viruses. Notably, protection rates observed here are far better than recently reported HIV-1 vaccine trials (Sanou et al., The Open AIDS 2012; 6:246-60). Prototype vaccine protection against two tier-3 and one tier-2 viruses was more effective than commercial vaccine. Such protection did not correlate with the presence of vaccine-induced NAbs to challenge viruses. This is the first large-scale (228 laboratory cats) study characterizing short- and long-duration efficacies of dual-subtype FIV vaccines against heterologous subtype and recombinant viruses, as well as FIV tiers based on in vitro NAb analysis and in vivo passive-transfer studies. These studies demonstrate that not all vaccine protection is mediated by vaccine-induced NAbs. PMID:23800540

  12. Vibrating virus capsids and interactions with short light pulses -- picking up good vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankey, Otto; Benson, Daryn

    2009-10-01

    Viruses are the simplest ``life'' form. They reproduce by borrowing the machinery of their host cell. Viruses consist of an outer coat (capsid) that protects its genomic material inside. They are pathogenic to plants, bacteria, animals, and of course humans. Experimental studies at ASU by Tsen et al. have discovered that ultra-short laser pulses are capable of ``inactivating'' viruses. One potential mechanism is the coupling of light to the soft dynamical modes of the capsid. We describe theoretical modeling of this effect.

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Mumps Virus Isolated from Karnataka State, India.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Sunil R; Raut, Chandrashekhar G; Chowdhury, Deepika T; Hamde, Venkat S

    2017-01-12

    We report the first whole-genome sequence of mumps virus isolated from a two-year-old girl with bilateral parotitis from a Chikkahallivana village in the Davangere district of Karnataka State, India. The genome of the Davangere mumps isolate was 15,384 bp in length and identical to previously published mumps virus (MuV) genomes from India. BLAST results show 99.1% identity with previously sequenced genotype C viruses isolated from the states of Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu, and Uttar Pradesh. Copyright © 2017 Vaidya et al.

  14. ICTV Virus Taxonomy Profile: Flaviviridae.

    PubMed

    Simmonds, Peter; Becher, Paul; Bukh, Jens; Gould, Ernest A; Meyers, Gregor; Monath, Tom; Muerhoff, Scott; Pletnev, Alexander; Rico-Hesse, Rebecca; Smith, Donald B; Stapleton, Jack T; Ictv Report Consortium

    2017-01-01

    The Flaviviridae is a family of small enveloped viruses with RNA genomes of 9000-13 000 bases. Most infect mammals and birds. Many flaviviruses are host-specific and pathogenic, such as hepatitis C virus in the genus Hepacivirus. The majority of known members in the genus Flavivirus are arthropod borne, and many are important human and veterinary pathogens (e.g. yellow fever virus, dengue virus). This is a summary of the current International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) report on the taxonomy of the Flaviviridae, which is available at www.ictv.global/report/flaviviridae.

  15. The games plant viruses play.

    PubMed

    Elena, Santiago F; Bernet, Guillermo P; Carrasco, José L

    2014-10-01

    Mixed virus infections in plants are common in nature. The outcome of such virus-virus interactions ranges from cooperation and coexistence (synergism) to mutual exclusion (antagonism). A priori, the outcome of mixed infections is hard to predict. To date, the analyses of plant virus mixed infections were limited to reports of emerging symptoms and/or to qualitative, at best quantitative, descriptions of the accumulation of both viruses. Here, we show that evolutionary game theory provides an adequate theoretical framework to analyze mixed viral infections and to predict the long-term evolution of the mixed populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The Evolution of Al Qaeda

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-15

    www.carleton.ca/cciss/res_docs/itac/gendron_e.pdf; Internet. 26Muhammad Abd al-salam Faraj, Al-Farīdah al-Ghā’ibah, trans. Johannes J.G. Jansen and... Theo Van Gogh.91 Hoffman also supports the idea proposed by other experts like Benjamin Orbach and Keith Blanchard of the Congressional Research...religious intolerance over cartoons in Danish newspapers, the assassination of Theo Van Goeh, and increasing discontent among disassociated Muslim

  17. Global Surveillance of Emerging Influenza Virus Genotypes by Mass Spectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-30

    implementation or conlusions of the assay. Competing Interests: The authors from Ibis and SAIC are full-time employees at ‘‘for-profit’’ corporations...of a highly pathogenic and potentially pandemic H5N1 influenza virus in eastern Asia. Nature 430: 209–213. 15. Li C, Yu K, Tian G, Yu D, Liu L, et al...Gen Virol 86: 423–433. 17. Smith GJ, Fan XH, Wang J, Li KS, Qin K, et al. (2006) Emergence and predominance of an H5N1 influenza variant in China

  18. Alexandria (Al Iskandariya), Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image of Alexandria was taken by astronauts on board the International Space Station in December 2000 using an Electronic Still Camera. A wider-angle view (STS088-739-90) taken from the Space Shuttle in December 1998 is available for context. Alexandria (Al Iskandariya) occupies a T-shaped peninsula and strip of land separating the Mediterranean from Lake Mariout. Originally the town was built upon a mole (stone breakwater) called Heptastadium, which joined the island of Pharos (see referenced website, below) to the mainland. Since then sedimentary deposits have widened the mole. Since 1905, when the 370,000 Alexandrians lived in an area of about 4 sq km between the two harbors, the city (population 4 million; see referenced website, below) has grown beyond its medieval walls and now occupies an area of about 300 sq km. The Mahmudiya Canal, connecting Alexandria with the Nile, runs to the south of the city and, by a series of locks, enters the harbor of the principal port of Egypt (note ships). The reddish and ochre polygons west of Lake Mariout are salt-evaporation, chemical-storage, and water-treatment ponds within the coastal lagoon. Reference Youssef Halim and Fatma Abou Shouk, 2000, Human impacts on Alexandria's marine environment: UNESCO, Coastal Regions and Small Islands Unit (CSI), Coastal Management Sourcebooks 2 (accessed December 20, 2000) Additional photographs taken by astronauts can be viewed at NASA-JSC's Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth. Image ISS001-ESC-5025 provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center.

  19. Is there a paraneoplastic ALS?

    PubMed

    Corcia, Philippe; Gordon, Paul H; Camdessanche, Jean-Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Our objective was to examine the strength of evidence in support of the paraneoplastic syndrome (PNS) as one cause of ALS and, if the association appears more likely than chance, determine which features of ALS imply concurrent malignancy. We reviewed the literature on concurrent ALS and neoplasia assessing the strength of evidence for the association. Most accounts of ALS and neoplasm are case reports or small uncontrolled series. In order of strength of evidence, three clinical situations that support a paraneoplastic aetiology for ALS are: 1) laboratory evidence of well-characterized onconeuronal antibodies, most often anti-Hu, anti-Yo or anti-Ri; 2) co-occurrence of ALS and a neoplasm known to cause PNS, usually lymphoma or cancer of the breast; and 3) combined ALS and a neoplasm not classically associated with PNS, without detectable onconeuronal antibodies. Clinical features that warrant evaluation of neoplasm include upper motor neuron disease in elderly females, rapid progression, non-motor signs, and young onset. In conclusion, most examples of ALS and neoplasm do not constitute a classically established PNS. Rare instances of elevated onconeuronal antibody titres or typical neoplasm, implies that, albeit rare, the PNS is one of a multitude of causes of ALS.

  20. Understanding ALS: new therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Musarò, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease associated with motor neuron degeneration, muscle atrophy and paralysis. Although numerous pathological mechanisms have been elucidated, ALS remains an invariably fatal disease in the absence of any effective therapy. The heterogeneity of the disease and the failure to develop satisfactory therapeutic protocols reinforce the view that ALS is a multi-factorial and multi-systemic disease. Thus, a better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms and study of the potential pathological relationship between the various cellular processes is required to ensure efficacious therapy. The pathogenic mechanisms associated with ALS are reviewed, and the strengths and limitations of some new therapeutic approaches are discussed.

  1. Influenza viruses: transmission between species.

    PubMed

    Webster, R G; Hinshaw, V S; Bean, W J; Sriram, G

    1980-02-25

    The only direct evidence for transmission of influenza viruses between species comes from studies on swine influenza viruses. Antigenically and genetically identical Hsw1N1 influenza viruses were isolated from pigs and man on the same farm in Wisconsin, U.S.A. The isolation of H3N2 influenza viruses from a wide range of lower animals and birds suggests that influenza viruses of man can spread to the lower orders. Under some conditions the H3N2 viruses can persist for a number of years in some species. The isolation, from aquatic birds, of a large number of influenza A viruses that possess surface proteins antigenically similar to the viruses isolated from man, pigs and horses provides indirect evidence for inter-species transmission. There is now a considerable body of evidence which suggests that influenza viruses of lower animals and birds may play a role in the origin of some of the pandemic strains of influenza A viruses. There is no direct evidence that the influenza viruses in aquatic birds are transmitted to man, but they may serve as a genetic pool from which some genes may be introduced into humans by recombination. Preliminary evidence suggests that the molecular basis of host range and virulence may be related to the RNA segments coding for one of the polymerase proteins (P3) and for the nucleoprotein (NP).

  2. Varicella zoster virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Gershon, Anne A.; Breuer, Judith; Cohen, Jeffrey I.; Cohrs, Randall J.; Gershon, Michael D.; Gilden, Don; Grose, Charles; Hambleton, Sophie; Kennedy, Peter G. E.; Oxman, Michael N.; Seward, Jane F.; Yamanishi, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    Infection with varicella zoster virus (VZV) causes varicella (chickenpox), which can be severe in immunocompromised individuals, infants and adults. Primary infection is followed by latency in ganglionic neurons. During this period, no virus particles are produced and no obvious neuronal damage occurs. Reactivation of the virus leads to virus replication, which causes zoster (shingles) in tissues innervated by the involved neurons, inflammation and cell death — a process that can lead to persistent radicular pain (postherpetic neuralgia). The pathogenesis of postherpetic neuralgia is unknown and it is difficult to treat. Furthermore, other zoster complications can develop, including myelitis, cranial nerve palsies, meningitis, stroke (vasculopathy), retinitis, and gastroenterological infections such as ulcers, pancreatitis and hepatitis. VZV is the only human herpesvirus for which highly effective vaccines are available. After varicella or vaccination, both wild-type and vaccine-type VZV establish latency, and long-term immunity to varicella develops. However, immunity does not protect against reactivation. Thus, two vaccines are used: one to prevent varicella and one to prevent zoster. In this Primer we discuss the pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of VZV infections, with an emphasis on the molecular events that regulate these diseases. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/14×VI1 PMID:27188665

  3. From Shakespeare to Viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung-Hou

    2009-01-01

    Berkeley Lab scientists have created a unique new tool for analyzing and comparing long sets of data, be it the genomes of mammals or viruses, or the works of Shakespeare. The results of the Shakespeare analysis surprised scholars with their accuracy.

  4. Cucurbit chlorotic yellows virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cucurbit chlorotic yellows virus (CCYV) emerged as a threat to cucurbit production in Japan during the early 2000s and has since spread to China and Taiwan, as well as to the Middle East, and parts of Africa. CCYV (genus Crinivirus, family Closteroviridae) causes chlorotic mottle symptoms, intervein...

  5. Viruses: sophisticated biological machines.

    PubMed

    Rossmann, Michael G; Rao, Venigalla B

    2012-01-01

    Virus infection involves coordination of a series of molecular machines, including entry machines, replication machines, assembly machines, and genome packaging machines, leading to the production of infectious virions. This chapter provides an introduction to various viral molecular machines described in this book.

  6. Varicella zoster virus infection.

    PubMed

    Gershon, Anne A; Breuer, Judith; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Cohrs, Randall J; Gershon, Michael D; Gilden, Don; Grose, Charles; Hambleton, Sophie; Kennedy, Peter G E; Oxman, Michael N; Seward, Jane F; Yamanishi, Koichi

    2015-07-02

    Infection with varicella zoster virus (VZV) causes varicella (chickenpox), which can be severe in immunocompromised individuals, infants and adults. Primary infection is followed by latency in ganglionic neurons. During this period, no virus particles are produced and no obvious neuronal damage occurs. Reactivation of the virus leads to virus replication, which causes zoster (shingles) in tissues innervated by the involved neurons, inflammation and cell death - a process that can lead to persistent radicular pain (postherpetic neuralgia). The pathogenesis of postherpetic neuralgia is unknown and it is difficult to treat. Furthermore, other zoster complications can develop, including myelitis, cranial nerve palsies, meningitis, stroke (vasculopathy), retinitis, and gastroenterological infections such as ulcers, pancreatitis and hepatitis. VZV is the only human herpesvirus for which highly effective vaccines are available. After varicella or vaccination, both wild-type and vaccine-type VZV establish latency, and long-term immunity to varicella develops. However, immunity does not protect against reactivation. Thus, two vaccines are used: one to prevent varicella and one to prevent zoster. In this Primer we discuss the pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of VZV infections, with an emphasis on the molecular events that regulate these diseases. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/14xVI1.

  7. Blueberry shock virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Blueberry shock disease first observed in Washington state in 1987 and initially confused with blueberry scorch caused by Blueberry scorch virus (BlScV). However, shock affected plants produced a second flush of leaves after flowering and the plants appeared normal by late summer except for the lac...

  8. Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The bumpy exterior of the turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) protein coat, or capsid, was defined in detail by Dr. Alexander McPherson of the University of California, Irvin using proteins crystallized in space for analysis on Earth. TYMV is an icosahedral virus constructed from 180 copies of the same protein arranged into 12 clusters of five proteins (pentamers), and 20 clusters of six proteins (hexamers). The final TYMV structure led to the unexpected hypothesis that the virus releases its RNA by essentially chemical-mechanical means. Most viruses have fairly flat coats, but in TYNV, the fold in each protein, called the jellyroll, is clustered at the points where the protein pentamers and hexamers join. The jellyrolls are almost standing on end, producing a bumpy surface with knobs at all of the pentamers and hexamers. At the inside surface of the pentamers is a void that is not present at the hexamers. The coating had been seen in early stuties of TYMV, but McPherson's atomic structure shows much more detail. The inside surface is strikingly, and unexpectedly, different than the outside. While the pentamers contain a central void on the inside, the hexameric units contain peptides linked to each other, forming a ring or, more accurately, rings to fill the void. Credit: Dr. Alexander McPherson, University of California, Irvine

  9. Human viruses and cancer.

    PubMed

    Morales-Sánchez, Abigail; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M

    2014-10-23

    The first human tumor virus was discovered in the middle of the last century by Anthony Epstein, Bert Achong and Yvonne Barr in African pediatric patients with Burkitt's lymphoma. To date, seven viruses -EBV, KSHV, high-risk HPV, MCPV, HBV, HCV and HTLV1- have been consistently linked to different types of human cancer, and infections are estimated to account for up to 20% of all cancer cases worldwide. Viral oncogenic mechanisms generally include: generation of genomic instability, increase in the rate of cell proliferation, resistance to apoptosis, alterations in DNA repair mechanisms and cell polarity changes, which often coexist with evasion mechanisms of the antiviral immune response. Viral agents also indirectly contribute to the development of cancer mainly through immunosuppression or chronic inflammation, but also through chronic antigenic stimulation. There is also evidence that viruses can modulate the malignant properties of an established tumor. In the present work, causation criteria for viruses and cancer will be described, as well as the viral agents that comply with these criteria in human tumors, their epidemiological and biological characteristics, the molecular mechanisms by which they induce cellular transformation and their associated cancers.

  10. From Shakespeare to Viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Sung-Hou Kim

    2009-02-09

    Berkeley Lab scientists have created a unique new tool for analyzing and comparing long sets of data, be it the genomes of mammals or viruses, or the works of Shakespeare. The results of the Shakespeare analysis surprised scholars with their accuracy

  11. Cold Facts about Viruses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pea, Celeste; Sterling, Donna R.

    2002-01-01

    Provides ways for students to demonstrate their understanding of scientific concepts and skills. Describes a mini-unit around the cold in which students can relate humans to viruses. Includes activities and a modified simulation that provides questions to guide students. Discusses ways that allows students to apply prior knowledge, take ownership…

  12. The FEFM Virus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cjelli, Dirk

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of human performance technology (HPT) interventions focuses on requests for solutions to problems that involve conflict between the FEFM ("Fix 'em for me") Virus and the WIIFM ("What's in it for me?") Requirement. Building a relationship of mutual trust and confidence with the client and demonstrating responsiveness…

  13. Virus Chapter: Dicistrovidae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Dicistroviridae family comprises viruses infecting both beneficial arthropods such as honey bees and shrimp and insect pests of medical and agricultural importance. During the last five years, advances in sequencing and phylogenetic analysis have led to the discovery and identification of sever...

  14. Cucumber leaf spot virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cucumber leaf spot virus (CLSV) was originally identified from cucumber (Cucumis sativus) in Germany, but has since been found in various parts of Europe, the UK, and the Middle East, including Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Bulgaria, Poland, and Spain. CLSV is known to cause symptoms ranging from chloroti...

  15. Squash vein yellowing virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cucurbits are an important crop of temperate, subtropical and tropical regions of the world. Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV) is a major viral pathogen of cucurbits. This chapter provides an overview of the biology of SqVYV and the disease it causes....

  16. Cucumber vein yellowing virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cucurbits are an important crop of temperate, subtropical and tropical regions of the world. Cucumber vein yellowing virus (CVYV) is a major viral pathogen of cucurbits. This chapter provides an overview of the biology of CVYV and the disease it causes....

  17. Apple mosaic virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Apple mosaic virus (ApMV), a member of the ilarvirus group, naturally infects Betula, Aesculus, Humulus, and several crop genera in the family Rosaceae (Malus, Prunus, Rosa and Rubus). ApMV was first reported in Rubus in several blackberry and raspberry cultivars in the United States and subsequentl...

  18. From Shakespeare to Viruses

    ScienceCinema

    Sung-Hou Kim

    2016-07-12

    Berkeley Lab scientists have created a unique new tool for analyzing and comparing long sets of data, be it the genomes of mammals or viruses, or the works of Shakespeare. The results of the Shakespeare analysis surprised scholars with their accuracy

  19. From Shakespeare to Viruses

    ScienceCinema

    Kim, Sung-Hou

    2016-07-12

    Berkeley Lab scientists have created a unique new tool for analyzing and comparing long sets of data, be it the genomes of mammals or viruses, or the works of Shakespeare. The results of the Shakespeare analysis surprised scholars with their accuracy.

  20. Cold Facts about Viruses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pea, Celeste; Sterling, Donna R.

    2002-01-01

    Provides ways for students to demonstrate their understanding of scientific concepts and skills. Describes a mini-unit around the cold in which students can relate humans to viruses. Includes activities and a modified simulation that provides questions to guide students. Discusses ways that allows students to apply prior knowledge, take ownership…

  1. Human Viruses and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Sánchez, Abigail; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2014-01-01

    The first human tumor virus was discovered in the middle of the last century by Anthony Epstein, Bert Achong and Yvonne Barr in African pediatric patients with Burkitt’s lymphoma. To date, seven viruses -EBV, KSHV, high-risk HPV, MCPV, HBV, HCV and HTLV1- have been consistently linked to different types of human cancer, and infections are estimated to account for up to 20% of all cancer cases worldwide. Viral oncogenic mechanisms generally include: generation of genomic instability, increase in the rate of cell proliferation, resistance to apoptosis, alterations in DNA repair mechanisms and cell polarity changes, which often coexist with evasion mechanisms of the antiviral immune response. Viral agents also indirectly contribute to the development of cancer mainly through immunosuppression or chronic inflammation, but also through chronic antigenic stimulation. There is also evidence that viruses can modulate the malignant properties of an established tumor. In the present work, causation criteria for viruses and cancer will be described, as well as the viral agents that comply with these criteria in human tumors, their epidemiological and biological characteristics, the molecular mechanisms by which they induce cellular transformation and their associated cancers. PMID:25341666

  2. West Nile Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... mosquitoes that probably picked up the virus after feeding on infected birds. Pets and other animals can also become infected ... after it has been washed a couple of times. Don't hang out near puddles or ... etc. If you find a dead bird, don't touch it with your bare hands ...

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Anita

    2016-11-23

    What was the nature of the CPD activity, practice-related feedback and/or event and/or experience in your practice? The CPD article discussed the importance of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing and diagnosing the condition as early as possible, so that antiretroviral treatment can be initiated and patient outcomes improved.

  4. Bat flight and zoonotic viruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Shea, Thomas J.; Cryan, Paul M.; Cunningham, Andrew A.; Fooks, Anthony R.; Hayman, David T.S.; Luis, Angela D.; Peel, Alison J.; Plowright, Raina K.; Wood, James L.N.

    2014-01-01

    Bats are sources of high viral diversity and high-profile zoonotic viruses worldwide. Although apparently not pathogenic in their reservoir hosts, some viruses from bats severely affect other mammals, including humans. Examples include severe acute respiratory syndrome coronaviruses, Ebola and Marburg viruses, and Nipah and Hendra viruses. Factors underlying high viral diversity in bats are the subject of speculation. We hypothesize that flight, a factor common to all bats but to no other mammals, provides an intensive selective force for coexistence with viral parasites through a daily cycle that elevates metabolism and body temperature analogous to the febrile response in other mammals. On an evolutionary scale, this host–virus interaction might have resulted in the large diversity of zoonotic viruses in bats, possibly through bat viruses adapting to be more tolerant of the fever response and less virulent to their natural hosts.

  5. Bat Flight and Zoonotic Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Cryan, Paul M.; Cunningham, Andrew A.; Fooks, Anthony R.; Hayman, David T.S.; Luis, Angela D.; Peel, Alison J.; Plowright, Raina K.; Wood, James L.N.

    2014-01-01

    Bats are sources of high viral diversity and high-profile zoonotic viruses worldwide. Although apparently not pathogenic in their reservoir hosts, some viruses from bats severely affect other mammals, including humans. Examples include severe acute respiratory syndrome coronaviruses, Ebola and Marburg viruses, and Nipah and Hendra viruses. Factors underlying high viral diversity in bats are the subject of speculation. We hypothesize that flight, a factor common to all bats but to no other mammals, provides an intensive selective force for coexistence with viral parasites through a daily cycle that elevates metabolism and body temperature analogous to the febrile response in other mammals. On an evolutionary scale, this host–virus interaction might have resulted in the large diversity of zoonotic viruses in bats, possibly through bat viruses adapting to be more tolerant of the fever response and less virulent to their natural hosts. PMID:24750692

  6. Satellite RNAs and Satellite Viruses.

    PubMed

    Palukaitis, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Satellite RNAs and satellite viruses are extraviral components that can affect either the pathogenicity, the accumulation, or both of their associated viruses while themselves being dependent on the associated viruses as helper viruses for their infection. Most of these satellite RNAs are noncoding RNAs, and in many cases, have been shown to alter the interaction of their helper viruses with their hosts. In only a few cases have the functions of these satellite RNAs in such interactions been studied in detail. In particular, work on the satellite RNAs of Cucumber mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus have provided novel insights into RNAs functioning as noncoding RNAs. These effects are described and potential roles for satellite RNAs in the processes involved in symptom intensification or attenuation are discussed. In most cases, models describing these roles involve some aspect of RNA silencing or its suppression, either directly or indirectly involving the particular satellite RNA.

  7. Avian influenza virus RNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Spackman, Erica; Lee, Scott A

    2014-01-01

    The efficient extraction and purification of viral RNA is critical for down-stream molecular applications whether it is the sensitive and specific detection of virus in clinical samples, virus gene cloning and expression, or quantification of avian influenza (AI) virus by molecular methods from experimentally infected birds. Samples can generally be divided into two types; enriched (e.g. virus stocks) and clinical. Clinical type samples, which may be tissues or swab material, are the most difficult to process due to the complex sample composition and possibly low virus titers. In this chapter two well established procedures for the isolation of AI virus RNA from common clinical specimen types and enriched virus stocks for further molecular applications will be presented.

  8. Animal Models of Zika Virus.

    PubMed

    P Bradley And Claude M Nagamine, Michael

    2017-03-07

    Zika virus has garnered great attention over the last several years, as outbreaks of the disease have emerged throughout the Western Hemisphere. Until quite recently Zika virus was considered a fairly benign virus, with limited clinical severity in both people and animals. The size and scope of the outbreak in the Western Hemisphere has allowed for the identification of severe clinical disease that is associated with Zika virus infection, most notably microcephaly among newborns, and an association with Guillian-Barré syndrome in adults. This recent association with severe clinical disease, of which further analysis strongly suggested causation by Zika virus, has resulted in a massive increase in the amount of both basic and applied research of this virus. Both small and large animal models are being used to uncover the pathogenesis of this emerging disease and to develop vaccine and therapeutic strategies. Here we review the animal-model-based Zika virus research that has been performed to date.

  9. Evidence for the Introduction, Reassortment, and Persistence of Diverse Influenza A Viruses in Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Aeron C; Su, Yvonne C F; Aban, Malet; Peck, Heidi; Lau, Hilda; Baas, Chantal; Deng, Yi-Mo; Spirason, Natalie; Ellström, Patrik; Hernandez, Jorge; Olsen, Bjorn; Barr, Ian G; Vijaykrishna, Dhanasekaran; Gonzalez-Acuna, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    particular concern given that highly pathogenic H5Nx viruses have recently been circulating among wild birds in parts of Canada and the Unites States following the movement of these viruses from Eurasia via migratory birds. The introduction of a highly pathogenic influenza virus in penguin colonies within Antarctica might have devastating consequences. Copyright © 2016 Hurt et al.

  10. Impurity Enhancement of Al_2O_3/Al Adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Smith, John R.; Zhang, Wenqing; Evans, Anthony

    2003-03-01

    Our first-principles computations indicate that the clean Al_2O_3/Al interface is relatively weak - weaker than bulk Al. Fracture experiments reveal that the interface is relatively strong with observed failure in bulk Al, however. This paradox is resolved via doping effects of the common impurity C. We have found that only 1/3 of a monolayer of carbon segregated to the interface can increase the work of separation by a factor of 3. The resulting strong interface is consistent with fracture experiments. It arises due to void formation in the interface, which provides low-strain sites for the carbon to segregate to. The degree of void formation is consistent with the relatively high heat of oxide formation of Al.

  11. Safety evaluation of a recombinant myxoma-RHDV virus inducing horizontal transmissible protection against myxomatosis and rabbit haemorrhagic disease.

    PubMed

    Torres, J M; Ramírez, M A; Morales, M; Bárcena, J; Vázquez, B; Espuña, E; Pagès-Manté, A; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M

    2000-09-15

    We have recently developed a transmissible vaccine to immunize rabbits against myxomatosis and rabbit haemorrhagic disease based on a recombinant myxoma virus (MV) expressing the rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) capsid protein [Bárcena et al. Horizontal transmissible protection against myxomatosis and rabbit haemorragic disease using a recombinant myxoma virus. J. Virol. 2000;74:1114-23]. Administration of the recombinant virus protects rabbits against lethal RHDV and MV challenges. Furthermore, the recombinant virus is capable of horizontal spreading promoting protection of contact animals, thus providing the opportunity to immunize wild rabbit populations. However, potential risks must be extensively evaluated before considering its field use. In this study several safety issues concerning the proposed vaccine have been evaluated under laboratory conditions. Results indicated that vaccine administration is safe even at a 100-fold overdose. No undesirable effects were detected upon administration to immunosuppressed or pregnant rabbits. The recombinant virus maintained its attenuated phenotype after 10 passages in vivo.

  12. Evolution of infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISA virus).

    PubMed

    Plarre, Heidrun; Nylund, Are; Karlsen, Marius; Brevik, Øyvind; Sæther, Per Anton; Vike, Siri

    2012-12-01

    Infectious salmon anaemia virus, ISA virus (genus Isavirus, family Orthomyxoviridae), emerged in Norwegian salmon culture in the mid-80s. The genome consists of eight segments coding for at least 10 proteins. ISA viruses show many of similarities to influenza A viruses but differ in many important aspects such as the number of hosts, the host population structure and the route of transmission. The only known hosts and reservoirs for ISA viruses are salmonids found in countries surrounding the North Atlantic. In this study, four different segments of the genome of about 100 ISA viruses have been sequenced in an attempt to understand the evolution of ISA viruses and how these viruses are maintained in and transmitted between populations of farmed Atlantic salmon. The four gene segments code for the nucleoprotein (NP), the putative acid polymerase (PA), the fusion protein (F) and the haemagglutinin-esterase (HE). Analysis of these four genes showed that the substitution rates of the internal proteins (NP and PA) are lower than those of the two surface proteins (F and HE). All four segments are evolving at a lower rate than similar genes in influenza A viruses. The ISA virus populations consist of avirulent viruses and pathogenic strains with variable virulence in Atlantic salmon. Recombination resulting in inserts close to the proteolytic-cleavage site of the precursor F0 protein and deletions in the stalk region of the HE protein seem to be responsible for the transition from avirulent ISA viruses to pathogenic strains. It is also shown that reassortment is a frequent event among the dominating ISA viruses in farmed Atlantic salmon. The pattern that is obtained after phylogenetic analysis of the four gene segments from ISA viruses suggests that the variation is limited to a few distinct clades and that no major changes have occurred in the ISA virus population in Norway since the first viruses were isolated. Calculation of the time of most recent common ancestor

  13. Squalene-adjuvanted H7N9 virus vaccine induces robust humoral immune response against H7N9 and H7N7 viruses.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia-Ying; Chang, Ching-Yuan; Ma, Hsiu-Hua; Wang, Chiung-Wen; Chen, Yung-Tsung; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; Chang, Ching-Chuan; Chan, Chi-Hsien; Liu, Chung-Cheng; Chen, Juine-Ruey

    2014-07-31

    Recent cases of avian influenza H7N9 have caused great concerns that virus may become transmittable between humans. It is imperative to develop an effective vaccine to fight against the pandemic potential of this H7N9 influenza virus to protect human from the disease. This study aims to investigate an optimized formulation for the development of H7N9 vaccines. Various doses of H7N9 inactivated whole or split-virus antigens (0.5, 1.5, or 3 μg based on hemagglutinin content) combined with squalene-based adjuvant (AddaVAX), aluminum hydroxide Al(OH)3 or without adjuvant were evaluated for the efficacy of H7N9 vaccine regiments in mice. With either H7N9 whole or split-virus based vaccines, AddaVAX-adjuvanted formulations were the most immunogenic in eliciting significant humoral immune response against H7N9 virus and exhibited strong cross-reactive response in hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) and viral-neutralization assays against H7N7 virus as well. In contrast, formulations with Al(OH)3 or without adjuvant were less immunogenic and elicited lower titers of HAI and microneutralization assays against both viruses. Dose-sparing experiments suggested that the formulation with as low as 0.004 μg of split or whole virus vaccine antigens together with 50% AddaVAX provided sufficient sero-protective HAI titers and achieved essential virus-neutralizing antibody titers against H7-subtype influenza viruses in mice. Protection experiments demonstrated that the formulation of 0.004 μg to 0.5 μg of split-virion vaccines with AddaVAX conferred full protection against viral challenge up to 100 LD50 of wild-type H7N9 virus, with 0% survival in placebo group. Taken together, our study demonstrates that squalene-based adjuvant can significantly enhance the protective efficacy of H7N9 virus vaccine and provides a useful strategy to confront the potential pandemic outbreaks of H7N9 virus. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Interfacial characterization of Al-Al thermocompression bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, N.; Carvalho, P. A.; Poppe, E.; Finstad, T. G.

    2016-05-28

    Interfaces formed by Al-Al thermocompression bonding were studied by the transmission electron microscopy. Si wafer pairs having patterned bonding frames were bonded using Al films deposited on Si or SiO{sub 2} as intermediate bonding media. A bond force of 36 or 60 kN at bonding temperatures ranging from 400–550 °C was applied for a duration of 60 min. Differences in the bonded interfaces of 200 μm wide sealing frames were investigated. It was observed that the interface had voids for bonding with 36 kN at 400 °C for Al deposited both on Si and on SiO{sub 2}. However, the dicing yield was 33% for Al on Si and 98% for Al on SiO{sub 2}, attesting for the higher quality of the latter bonds. Both a bond force of 60 kN applied at 400 °C and a bond force of 36 kN applied at 550 °C resulted in completely bonded frames with dicing yields of, respectively, 100% and 96%. A high density of long dislocations in the Al grains was observed for the 60 kN case, while the higher temperature resulted in grain boundary rotation away from the original Al-Al interface towards more stable configurations. Possible bonding mechanisms and reasons for the large difference in bonding quality of the Al films deposited on Si or SiO{sub 2} are discussed.

  15. Viruses and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) are chronic degenerative diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), which affect 37 million people worldwide. As the lifespan increases, the NDs are the fourth leading cause of death in the developed countries and becoming increasingly prevalent in developing countries. Despite considerable research, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Although the large majority of studies do not show support for the involvement of pathogenic aetiology in classical NDs, a number of emerging studies show support for possible association of viruses with classical neurodegenerative diseases in humans. Space does not permit for extensive details to be discussed here on non-viral-induced neurodegenerative diseases in humans, as they are well described in literature. Viruses induce alterations and degenerations of neurons both directly and indirectly. Their ability to attack the host immune system, regions of nervous tissue implies that they can interfere with the same pathways involved in classical NDs in humans. Supporting this, many similarities between classical NDs and virus-mediated neurodegeneration (non-classical) have been shown at the anatomic, sub-cellular, genomic and proteomic levels suggesting that viruses can explain neurodegenerative disorders mechanistically. The main objective of this review is to provide readers a detailed snapshot of similarities viral and non-viral neurodegenerative diseases share, so that mechanistic pathways of neurodegeneration in human NDs can be clearly understood. Viruses can guide us to unveil these pathways in human NDs. This will further stimulate the birth of new concepts in the biological research, which is needed for gaining deeper insights into the treatment of human NDs and delineate mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration. PMID:23724961

  16. Giant viruses: conflicts in revisiting the virus concept.

    PubMed

    Forterre, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    The current paradigm on the nature of viruses is based on early work of the 'phage group' (the pro-phage concept) and molecular biologists working on tumour viruses (the proto-oncogene concept). It posits that viruses evolved from either prokaryotic or eukaryotic cellular genes that became infectious via their association with capsid genes. In this view, after their emergence viruses continued to evolve by stealing cellular genes (the escape model). This paradigm has been challenged recently by scientists who propose that viruses pre-dated modern cells. In particular, the discovery of Mimivirus has stimulated a lot of discussions on the nature of viruses. There are two major schools of thought, those who defend the escape model, suggesting that giant viruses are giant pickpockets (chimera), and those who emphasize their uniqueness and ancient origin. Comparative genomics of Mimivirus and related viruses (nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses) have produced a lot of data that have been interpreted according to the prejudices of the authors and thus failed until now to generate a consensus. I briefly review here the history of these debates and how they lead to new proposals, such as the definition of viruses as capsid-encoding organisms or else the recognition of their fundamentally cellular nature, the virocell concept. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Hepatitis E virus coinfection with hepatotropic viruses in Egyptian children.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Maysaa El Sayed; Salama, Osama Saad; Mansour, Fathy Awaad; Hossein, Shaimaa

    2008-06-01

    Major hepatotropic viruses continue to be important causes of acute viral hepatitis in developing countries. This work was carried out to detect the seroprevalence of hepatitis E virus (HEV) markers in children with acute viral hepatitis due to hepatotropic viruses (A, B and C) and non-A, non-B, non-C acute hepatitis, and to ascertain the influence of HEV superinfection in individuals infected with hepatitis viruses (A, B and C). We studied prospectively 162 children with sporadic acute hepatitis who reported to our hospital. Thirteen healthy controls were also included in the study. Laboratory investigations were performed, including complete liver function tests. Complete serological profiles for hepatitis viruses A, B, C and E were evaluated. HEV immunoglobulin G was detected with highest percentage among patients with hepatitis B (56.7%), followed by patients with hepatitis C virus (52.0%), hepatitis A virus (34.1%) and combined hepatitis B and C viruses (30.0%). The detection rate among patients with non-A, non-B, non-C hepatitis was 7.1%. HEV immunoglobulin M was found in 4.5% of hepatitis A virus patients and in 3.3% of hepatitis B patients. The prevalence of HEV immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M correlated with the levels of hepatic aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase in patients with dual markers of infection with hepatitis E and other viruses compared to patients with acute hepatitis due to A and C viruses. HEV serological markers are common among children with acute viral hepatitis, especially from hepatitis C and B viruses. There may be increased sensitivity to HEV coinfection in association with hepatitis B and C infections. Dual infection with HEV and other hepatotropic viruses was associated with greater elevation of aspartate and alanine aminotransferases.

  18. Climate and Conflict: A Comment on Hsiang et al.s Reply to Buhaug et al

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    a wide range of climatic events, from heat waves via excess rainfall to global ENSO cycles; and a wide range of spatial scales, from municipalities...again analytical consistency; The Hsiang et al. (2011) study considers a global ENSO effect whereas the studies in the valid sample investigate a local...some of the studies described in Hsiang et al. (2013). Specifically, Buhaug et al. exclude the effects of ENSO and PDSI when estimating the aggregate

  19. Thermal Modeling of Al-Al and Al-Steel Friction Stir Spot Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrasiak, P.; Shercliff, H. R.; Reilly, A.; McShane, G. J.; Chen, Y. C.; Wang, L.; Robson, J.; Prangnell, P.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a finite element thermal model for similar and dissimilar alloy friction stir spot welding (FSSW). The model is calibrated and validated using instrumented lap joints in Al-Al and Al-Fe automotive sheet alloys. The model successfully predicts the thermal histories for a range of process conditions. The resulting temperature histories are used to predict the growth of intermetallic phases at the interface in Al-Fe welds. Temperature predictions were used to study the evolution of hardness of a precipitation-hardened aluminum alloy during post-weld aging after FSSW.

  20. Explosive destruction of 26Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahl, D.; Yamaguchi, H.; Shimizu, H.; Abe, K.; Beliuskina, O.; Cha, S. M.; Chae, K. Y.; Ge, Z.; Hayakawa, S.; Kwag, M. S.; Kim, D. H.; Moon, J. Y.; Park, S. Y.; Yang, L.

    2017-09-01

    The γ -ray emission associated with the radioactive decay of 26Al is one of the key pieces of observational evidence indicating stellar nucleosynthesis is an ongoing process in our Galaxy, and it was the first such radioactivity to be detected. Despite numerous efforts in stellar modeling, observation, nuclear theory, and nuclear experiment over the past four decades, the precise sites and origin of Galactic ^{26} Al remain elusive. We explore the present experimental knowledge concerning the destruction of ^{26} Al in massive stars. The precise stellar rates of neutron-induced reactions on ^{26} Al, such as (n,p) and (n, α , have among the largest impacts on the total ^{26} Al yield. Meanwhile, reactions involving the short-lived isomeric state of ^{26} Al such as radiative proton capture are highly-uncertain at present. Although we presented on-going experimental work from n_TOF at CERN with an ^{26} Al target, the present proceeding focuses only on the ^{26} Al isomeric radioactive beam production aspect and the first experimental results at CRIB.

  1. Philosophieren als Unterrichtsprinzip im Mathematikunterricht

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerwaldt, Diana

    Philosophieren und Mathematik scheinen zunächst gegensätzliche Bereiche zu sein, die sich kaum vereinbaren lassen. Dies trifft für eine Auffassung zu, die Philosophieren als "Gerede" disqualifiziert und Mathematik als eine reine "Formelwissenschaft" begreift. Beide Auffassungen werden den Gegenständen nicht gerecht.

  2. Contemporary avian influenza A virus subtype H1, H6, H7, H10, and H15 hemagglutinin genes encode a mammalian virulence factor similar to the 1918 pandemic virus H1 hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Qi, Li; Pujanauski, Lindsey M; Davis, A Sally; Schwartzman, Louis M; Chertow, Daniel S; Baxter, David; Scherler, Kelsey; Hartshorn, Kevan L; Slemons, Richard D; Walters, Kathie-Anne; Kash, John C; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2014-11-18

    Zoonotic avian influenza virus infections may lead to epidemics or pandemics. The 1918 pandemic influenza virus has an avian influenza virus-like genome, and its H1 hemagglutinin was identified as a key mammalian virulence factor. A chimeric 1918 virus expressing a contemporary avian H1 hemagglutinin, however, displayed murine pathogenicity indistinguishable from that of the 1918 virus. Here, isogenic chimeric avian influenza viruses were constructed on an avian influenza virus backbone, differing only by hemagglutinin subtype expressed. Viruses expressing the avian H1, H6, H7, H10, and H15 subtypes were pathogenic in mice and cytopathic in normal human bronchial epithelial cells, in contrast to H2-, H3-, H5-, H9-, H11-, H13-, H14-, and H16-expressing viruses. Mouse pathogenicity was associated with pulmonary macrophage and neutrophil recruitment. These data suggest that avian influenza virus hemagglutinins H1, H6, H7, H10, and H15 contain inherent mammalian virulence factors and likely share a key virulence property of the 1918 virus. Consequently, zoonotic infections with avian influenza viruses bearing one of these hemagglutinins may cause enhanced disease in mammals. Influenza viruses from birds can cause outbreaks in humans and may contribute to the development of pandemics. The 1918 pandemic influenza virus has an avian influenza virus-like genome, and its main surface protein, an H1 subtype hemagglutinin, was identified as a key mammalian virulence factor. In a previous study, a 1918 virus expressing an avian H1 gene was as virulent in mice as the reconstructed 1918 virus. Here, a set of avian influenza viruses was constructed, differing only by hemagglutinin subtype. Viruses with the avian H1, H6, H7, H10, and H15 subtypes caused severe disease in mice and damaged human lung cells. Consequently, infections with avian influenza viruses bearing one of these hemagglutinins may cause enhanced disease in mammals, and therefore surveillance for human infections

  3. Dengue virus antibodies enhance Zika virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Lauren M; Carlin, Eric R; Jenkins, Meagan M; Tan, Amanda L; Barcellona, Carolyn M; Nicholson, Cindo O; Michael, Scott F; Isern, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    For decades, human infections with Zika virus (ZIKV), a mosquito-transmitted flavivirus, were sporadic, associated with mild disease, and went underreported since symptoms were similar to other acute febrile diseases. Recent reports of severe disease associated with ZIKV have greatly heightened awareness. It is anticipated that ZIKV will continue to spread in the Americas and globally where competent Aedes mosquito vectors are found. Dengue virus (DENV), the most common mosquito-transmitted human flavivirus, is both well-established and the source of outbreaks in areas of recent ZIKV introduction. DENV and ZIKV are closely related, resulting in substantial antigenic overlap. Through antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE), anti-DENV antibodies can enhance the infectivity of DENV for certain classes of immune cells, causing increased viral production that correlates with severe disease outcomes. Similarly, ZIKV has been shown to undergo ADE in response to antibodies generated by other flaviviruses. We tested the neutralizing and enhancing potential of well-characterized broadly neutralizing human anti-DENV monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs) and human DENV immune sera against ZIKV using neutralization and ADE assays. We show that anti-DENV HMAbs, cross-react, do not neutralize, and greatly enhance ZIKV infection in vitro. DENV immune sera had varying degrees of neutralization against ZIKV and similarly enhanced ZIKV infection. Our results suggest that pre-existing DENV immunity may enhance ZIKV infection in vivo and may lead to increased disease severity. Understanding the interplay between ZIKV and DENV will be critical in informing public health responses and will be particularly valuable for ZIKV and DENV vaccine design and implementation strategies. PMID:28090318

  4. Dengue virus antibodies enhance Zika virus infection.

    PubMed

    Paul, Lauren M; Carlin, Eric R; Jenkins, Meagan M; Tan, Amanda L; Barcellona, Carolyn M; Nicholson, Cindo O; Michael, Scott F; Isern, Sharon

    2016-12-01

    For decades, human infections with Zika virus (ZIKV), a mosquito-transmitted flavivirus, were sporadic, associated with mild disease, and went underreported since symptoms were similar to other acute febrile diseases. Recent reports of severe disease associated with ZIKV have greatly heightened awareness. It is anticipated that ZIKV will continue to spread in the Americas and globally where competent Aedes mosquito vectors are found. Dengue virus (DENV), the most common mosquito-transmitted human flavivirus, is both well-established and the source of outbreaks in areas of recent ZIKV introduction. DENV and ZIKV are closely related, resulting in substantial antigenic overlap. Through antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE), anti-DENV antibodies can enhance the infectivity of DENV for certain classes of immune cells, causing increased viral production that correlates with severe disease outcomes. Similarly, ZIKV has been shown to undergo ADE in response to antibodies generated by other flaviviruses. We tested the neutralizing and enhancing potential of well-characterized broadly neutralizing human anti-DENV monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs) and human DENV immune sera against ZIKV using neutralization and ADE assays. We show that anti-DENV HMAbs, cross-react, do not neutralize, and greatly enhance ZIKV infection in vitro. DENV immune sera had varying degrees of neutralization against ZIKV and similarly enhanced ZIKV infection. Our results suggest that pre-existing DENV immunity may enhance ZIKV infection in vivo and may lead to increased disease severity. Understanding the interplay between ZIKV and DENV will be critical in informing public health responses and will be particularly valuable for ZIKV and DENV vaccine design and implementation strategies.

  5. Effects of chicken anemia virus and infectious bursal disease virus in commercial chickens.

    PubMed

    Toro, H; van Santen, V L; Hoerr, F J; Breedlove, C

    2009-03-01

    The effects of chicken anemia virus (CAV) and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) coinfection in commercial layer-type and meat-type (broiler) chickens with specific maternal immunity were evaluated. In addition, the broiler progeny used had been vaccinated in ovo against IBDV. Layer chickens were inoculated intramuscularly on day 3 of age with CAV and orally on day 7 of age with an IBDV standard strain (APHIS). Broiler chickens were exposed to CAV and/or an IBDV variant strain (AL2) via the drinking water on days 3 and 14 of age. Following CAV and IBDV inoculation neither mortality nor overt clinical disease was observed in any layer or broiler group. In spite of maternal immunity against both IBDV and CAV, mean hematocrits of all layer groups inoculated with CAV (CAV, CAV + APHIS) were lower than uninfected chickens. IBDV APHIS alone or in combination with CAV did not affect the layer weight gain. However, on day 30 of age and concomitantly with maternal antibody decay, bursa lymphocyte depletion became evident in CAV + APHIS-infected layer chickens. These birds (CAV + APHIS) also seroconverted to IBDV on day 35 of age. CAV persisted at low levels in the layer chickens throughout the experimental period in CAV- and CAV+APHIS-infected chickens. Similarly, infected broiler chickens did not show changes in weight gain. Compared to CAV-infected or uninfected controls, CAV+AL2- and AL2-infected broiler chickens showed significant lymphocyte depletion in the bursa as assessed both by bursal indices and histomorphometry. Broilers also seroconverted to IBDV after day 30 of age confirming that bursal lymphocyte depletion was due to IBDV resuming replication. Thymus histomorphometry revealed significant lymphocyte depletion in all infected broiler groups at 30 days of age, but only in CAV+AL2-infected broiler chickens at 41 days of age, suggesting that IBDV infection delayed repopulation of the thymus.

  6. Virus movement within grafted watermelon plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Watermelon production in Florida is impacted by several viruses including whitefly-transmitted Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV), Cucurbit yellow stunting disorder virus and Cucurbit leaf crumple virus, and aphid-transmitted Papaya ringspot virus type W (PRSV-W). While germplasm resistant to some...

  7. Understanding Zika virus.

    PubMed

    Murray, John S

    2017-01-01

    This article describes what pediatric healthcare professionals should know about Zika virus (ZIKV). ZIKV is classified as an arthropod-borne, single-stranded RNA virus of the Flaviviridae family and genus Flavivirus. ZIKV is not new. The virus was first discovered almost 70 years ago in Uganda. The first isolate of the virus was found in rhesus monkeys in the Zika Forrest, hence the nomenclature. The primary route of ZIKV transmission to humans is through the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito-primarily Aedes aegypti. When the mosquito bites individuals infected with the virus, mosquitos then become the vector of transmitting the infection to others. Women can also pass ZIKV to their fetus during pregnancy and at the time of delivery. ZIKV can also be transmitted through sexual activity from an individual who is infected with the virus to his or her partners. It is estimated that approximately 18% of individuals infected with ZIKV will go on to develop symptoms. When symptoms develop, it is usually within 3-12 days, although this may vary. Most often, symptoms are mild and self-limited. The most common symptoms are fever, arthralgia, maculopapular rash, and conjunctivitis lasting up to seven days. Less frequent symptoms include headache, vertigo, myalgia, vomiting, and diarrhea. At present, there is no vaccine available to prevent ZIKV and no specific antiviral treatment. Supportive care consisting of rest, hydration, analgesics, antihistamines, and antipyretics is recommended as needed. Given that there is no vaccine or treatment for ZIKV, considerable efforts must be focused on prevention. One of the most effective ways of preventing ZIKV infection is through avoiding mosquito bites, especially when traveling to or residing in areas where transmission is present. Precautions should include wearing appropriate attire with the objective of having as little skin exposed as possible, use of screens for windows and doors, and use of insect repellent. What is

  8. Molecular Basis for the Selective Inhibition of Respiratory Syncytial Virus RNA Polymerase by 2'-Fluoro-4'-Chloromethyl-Cytidine Triphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Deval, Jerome; Hong, Jin; Wang, Guangyi; Taylor, Josh; Smith, Lucas K.; Fung, Amy; Stevens, Sarah K.; Liu, Hong; Jin, Zhinan; Dyatkina, Natalia; Prhavc, Marija; Stoycheva, Antitsa D.; Serebryany, Vladimir; Liu, Jyanwei; Smith, David B.; Tam, Yuen; Zhang, Qingling; Moore, Martin L.; Fearns, Rachel; Chanda, Sushmita M.; Blatt, Lawrence M.; Symons, Julian A.; Beigelman, Leo

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes severe lower respiratory tract infections, yet no vaccines or effective therapeutics are available. ALS-8176 is a first-in-class nucleoside analog prodrug effective in RSV-infected adult volunteers, and currently under evaluation in hospitalized infants. Here, we report the mechanism of inhibition and selectivity of ALS-8176 and its parent ALS-8112. ALS-8176 inhibited RSV replication in non-human primates, while ALS-8112 inhibited all strains of RSV in vitro and was specific for paramyxoviruses and rhabdoviruses. The antiviral effect of ALS-8112 was mediated by the intracellular formation of its 5'-triphosphate metabolite (ALS-8112-TP) inhibiting the viral RNA polymerase. ALS-8112 selected for resistance-associated mutations within the region of the L gene of RSV encoding the RNA polymerase. In biochemical assays, ALS-8112-TP was efficiently recognized by the recombinant RSV polymerase complex, causing chain termination of RNA synthesis. ALS-8112-TP did not inhibit polymerases from host or viruses unrelated to RSV such as hepatitis C virus (HCV), whereas structurally related molecules displayed dual RSV/HCV inhibition. The combination of molecular modeling and enzymatic analysis showed that both the 2'F and the 4'ClCH2 groups contributed to the selectivity of ALS-8112-TP. The lack of antiviral effect of ALS-8112-TP against HCV polymerase was caused by Asn291 that is well-conserved within positive-strand RNA viruses. This represents the first comparative study employing recombinant RSV and HCV polymerases to define the selectivity of clinically relevant nucleotide analogs. Understanding nucleotide selectivity towards distant viral RNA polymerases could not only be used to repurpose existing drugs against new viral infections, but also to design novel molecules. PMID:26098424

  9. Characteristics of CeCoIn5/Al/AlOx/Nb and CeCoIn5/Al/AlOx/Al Tunnel Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, C.; Nevirkovets, I.P.; Chernyashevskyy, O.; Hu, R.; Ketterson, J.B.; Sarma, B.K.

    2009-03-03

    We report characteristics of CeCoIn{sub 5}/Al/AlO{sub x}/Nb and CeCoIn{sub 5}/Al/AlO{sub x}/Al tunnel junctions fabricated on the (0 0 1) surface of CeCoIn{sub 5} crystal platelets. The main result of this work is the observation of a low Josephson current (as compared with that expected from the Ambegaokar-Baratoff formula), which is consistent with idea that the order parameter in the heavy-fermion superconductor CeCoIn{sub 5} has unconventional pairing symmetry.

  10. Detection of sweet potato viruses in Yunnan and genetic diversity analysis of the common viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two hundred seventy-nine samples with virus-like symptoms collected from 16 regions in Yunnan Province were tested by RT-PCR/PCR using virus-specific primers for 8 sweet potato viruses. Six viruses, Sweet potato chlorotic fleck virus (SPCFV), Sweet Potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV), Sweet potato ...

  11. Archaeal Viruses of the Sulfolobales: Isolation, Infection, and CRISPR Spacer Acquisition.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, Susanne; Garrett, Roger A

    2015-01-01

    Infection of archaea with phylogenetically diverse single viruses, performed in different laboratories, has failed to activate spacer acquisition into host CRISPR loci. The first successful uptake of archaeal de novo spacers was observed on infection of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 with an environmental virus mixture isolated from Yellowstone National Park (Erdmann and Garrett, Mol Microbiol 85:1044-1056, 2012). Experimental studies of isolated genetic elements from this mixture revealed that SMV1 (S ulfolobus Monocauda Virus 1), a tailed spindle-shaped virus, can induce spacer acquisition in CRISPR loci of Sulfolobus species from a second coinfecting conjugative plasmid or virus (Erdmann and Garrett, Mol Microbiol 85:1044-1056, 2012; Erdmann et al. Mol Microbiol 91:900-917, 2014). Here we describe, firstly, the isolation of archaeal virus mixtures from terrestrial hot springs and the techniques used both to infect laboratory strains with these virus mixtures and to obtain purified virus particles. Secondly, we present the experimental conditions required for activating SMV1-induced spacer acquisition in two different Sulfolobus species.

  12. Genotypic Differences in Dengue Virus Neutralization Are Explained by a Single Amino Acid Mutation That Modulates Virus Breathing.

    PubMed

    Dowd, Kimberly A; DeMaso, Christina R; Pierson, Theodore C

    2015-11-03

    antibody response are being actively pursued. We report here the identification of a single amino acid residue in the envelope protein of DENV serotype 1 that results in global changes to virus structure and stability when it is changed. Our results indicate that naturally occurring variation at this particular site among virus strains impacts the ensemble of structures sampled by the virus, a process referred to as virus breathing. The finding that such limited and conservative sequence changes can modulate the landscape available for antibody binding has important implications for both vaccine development and the study of DENV-reactive antibodies. Copyright © 2015 Dowd et al.

  13. Small-RNA Deep Sequencing Reveals Arctium tomentosum as a Natural Host of Alstroemeria virus X and a New Putative Emaravirus

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Yaqi; Tugume, Arthur K.; Valkonen, Jari P. T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Arctium species (Asteraceae) are distributed worldwide and are used as food and rich sources of secondary metabolites for the pharmaceutical industry, e.g., against avian influenza virus. RNA silencing is an antiviral defense mechanism that detects and destroys virus-derived double-stranded RNA, resulting in accumulation of virus-derived small RNAs (21–24 nucleotides) that can be used for generic detection of viruses by small-RNA deep sequencing (SRDS). Methodology/Principal Findings SRDS was used to detect viruses in the biennial wild plant species Arctium tomentosum (woolly burdock; family Asteraceae) displaying virus-like symptoms of vein yellowing and leaf mosaic in southern Finland. Assembly of the small-RNA reads resulted in contigs homologous to Alstroemeria virus X (AlsVX), a positive/single-stranded RNA virus of genus Potexvirus (family Alphaflexiviridae), or related to negative/single-stranded RNA viruses of the genus Emaravirus. The coat protein gene of AlsVX was 81% and 89% identical to the two AlsVX isolates from Japan and Norway, respectively. The deduced, partial nucleocapsid protein amino acid sequence of the emara-like virus was only 78% or less identical to reported emaraviruses and showed no variability among the virus isolates characterized. This virus—tentatively named as Woolly burdock yellow vein virus—was exclusively associated with yellow vein and leaf mosaic symptoms in woolly burdock, whereas AlsVX was detected in only one of the 52 plants tested. Conclusions/Significance These results provide novel information about natural virus infections in Acrtium species and reveal woolly burdock as the first natural host of AlsVX besides Alstroemeria (family Alstroemeriaceae). Results also revealed a new virus related to the recently emerged Emaravirus genus and demonstrated applicability of SRDS to detect negative-strand RNA viruses. SRDS potentiates virus surveys of wild plants, a research area underrepresented in plant virology

  14. Recombinant IgA Is Sufficient To Prevent Influenza Virus Transmission in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Seibert, Christopher W.; Rahmat, Saad; Krause, Jens C.; Eggink, Dirk; Albrecht, Randy A.; Goff, Peter H.; Krammer, Florian; Duty, J. Andrew; Bouvier, Nicole M.; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2013-01-01

    A serum hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) titer of 40 or greater is thought to be associated with reduced influenza virus pathogenesis in humans and is often used as a correlate of protection in influenza vaccine studies. We have previously demonstrated that intramuscular vaccination of guinea pigs with inactivated influenza virus generates HAI titers greater than 300 but does not protect vaccinated animals from becoming infected with influenza virus by transmission from an infected cage mate. Only guinea pigs intranasally inoculated with a live influenza virus or a live attenuated virus vaccine, prior to challenge, were protected from transmission (A. C. Lowen et al., J. Virol. 83:2803–2818, 2009.). Because the serum HAI titer is mostly determined by IgG content, these results led us to speculate that prevention of viral transmission may require IgA antibodies or cellular immune responses. To evaluate this hypothesis, guinea pigs and ferrets were administered a potent, neutralizing mouse IgG monoclonal antibody, 30D1 (Ms 30D1 IgG), against the A/California/04/2009 (H1N1) virus hemagglutinin and exposed to respiratory droplets from animals infected with this virus. Even though HAI titers were greater than 160 1 day postadministration, Ms 30D1 IgG did not prevent airborne transmission to passively immunized recipient animals. In contrast, intramuscular administration of recombinant 30D1 IgA (Ms 30D1 IgA) prevented transmission to 88% of recipient guinea pigs, and Ms 30D1 IgA was detected in animal nasal washes. Ms 30D1 IgG administered intranasally also prevented transmission, suggesting the importance of mucosal immunity in preventing influenza virus transmission. Collectively, our data indicate that IgG antibodies may prevent pathogenesis associated with influenza virus infection but do not protect from virus infection by airborne transmission, while IgA antibodies are more important for preventing transmission of influenza viruses. PMID:23698296

  15. Recombinant IgA is sufficient to prevent influenza virus transmission in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Seibert, Christopher W; Rahmat, Saad; Krause, Jens C; Eggink, Dirk; Albrecht, Randy A; Goff, Peter H; Krammer, Florian; Duty, J Andrew; Bouvier, Nicole M; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Palese, Peter

    2013-07-01

    A serum hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) titer of 40 or greater is thought to be associated with reduced influenza virus pathogenesis in humans and is often used as a correlate of protection in influenza vaccine studies. We have previously demonstrated that intramuscular vaccination of guinea pigs with inactivated influenza virus generates HAI titers greater than 300 but does not protect vaccinated animals from becoming infected with influenza virus by transmission from an infected cage mate. Only guinea pigs intranasally inoculated with a live influenza virus or a live attenuated virus vaccine, prior to challenge, were protected from transmission (A. C. Lowen et al., J. Virol. 83:2803-2818, 2009.). Because the serum HAI titer is mostly determined by IgG content, these results led us to speculate that prevention of viral transmission may require IgA antibodies or cellular immune responses. To evaluate this hypothesis, guinea pigs and ferrets were administered a potent, neutralizing mouse IgG monoclonal antibody, 30D1 (Ms 30D1 IgG), against the A/California/04/2009 (H1N1) virus hemagglutinin and exposed to respiratory droplets from animals infected with this virus. Even though HAI titers were greater than 160 1 day postadministration, Ms 30D1 IgG did not prevent airborne transmission to passively immunized recipient animals. In contrast, intramuscular administration of recombinant 30D1 IgA (Ms 30D1 IgA) prevented transmission to 88% of recipient guinea pigs, and Ms 30D1 IgA was detected in animal nasal washes. Ms 30D1 IgG administered intranasally also prevented transmission, suggesting the importance of mucosal immunity in preventing influenza virus transmission. Collectively, our data indicate that IgG antibodies may prevent pathogenesis associated with influenza virus infection but do not protect from virus infection by airborne transmission, while IgA antibodies are more important for preventing transmission of influenza viruses.

  16. The encephalomyocarditis virus

    PubMed Central

    Carocci, Margot; Bakkali-Kassimi, Labib

    2012-01-01

    The encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) is a small non-enveloped single-strand RNA virus, the causative agent of not only myocarditis and encephalitis, but also neurological diseases, reproductive disorders and diabetes in many mammalian species. EMCV pathogenesis appears to be viral strain- and host-specific, and a better understanding of EMCV virulence factors is increasingly required. Indeed, EMCV is often used as a model for diabetes and viral myocarditis, and is also widely used in immunology as a double-stranded RNA stimulus in the study of Toll-like as well as cytosolic receptors. However, EMCV virulence and properties have often been neglected. Moreover, EMCV is able to infect humans albeit with a low morbidity. Progress on xenografts, such as pig heart transplantation in humans, has raised safety concerns that need to be explored. In this review we will highlight the biology of EMCV and all known and potential virulence factors. PMID:22722247

  17. Hetdex: Virus Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hanshin; Hill, G. J.; DePoy, D. L.; Tuttle, S.; Marshall, J. L.; Vattiat, B. L.; Prochaska, T.; Chonis, T. S.; Allen, R.; HETDEX Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The Visible Integral-field-unit Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS) instrument is made up of 150+ individually compact and identical spectrographs, each fed by a fiber integral-field unit. The instrument provides integral field spectroscopy at wavelengths between 350nm and 550nm of over 33,600 spatial elements per observation, each 1.8 sq. arcsec on the sky, at R 700. The instrument will be fed by a new wide-field corrector (WFC) of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) with increased science field of view as large as 22arcmin diameter and telescope aperture of 10m. This will enable the HETDEX, a large area blind survey of Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies at redshift z < 3.5. The status of VIRUS instrument construction is summarized.

  18. Hepatitis B Virus Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    MacLachlan, Jennifer H.; Cowie, Benjamin C.

    2015-01-01

    The epidemiology of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is geographically diverse, with population prevalence, age and mode of acquisition, and likelihood of progression to chronic infection mutually interdependent. The burden of chronic HBV infection is increasingly being recognized, with cirrhosis and liver cancer attributable to HBV continuing to increase. The outcomes of chronic HBV infection are affected by a range of factors, including viral genotype, the presence of coinfections with other blood-borne viruses, and the impact of other causes of liver disease. The increased recognition of HBV infection as a leading cause of death globally has resulted in the development of new structures and policies at the international level; immediate attention to implementing these strategies is now required. PMID:25934461

  19. Mechanisms of Virus Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Perlmutter, Jason D.; Hagan, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are nanoscale entities containing a nucleic acid genome encased in a protein shell called a capsid, and in some cases surrounded by a lipid bilayer membrane. This review summarizes the physics that govern the processes by which capsids assembles within their host cells and in vitro. We describe the thermodynamics and kinetics for assembly of protein subunits into icosahedral capsid shells, and how these are modified in cases where the capsid assembles around a nucleic acid or on a lipid bilayer. We present experimental and theoretical techniques that have been used to characterize capsid assembly, and we highlight aspects of virus assembly which are likely to receive significant attention in the near future. PMID:25532951

  20. Evolution of oncolytic viruses.

    PubMed

    Sanjuán, Rafael; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2015-08-01

    Owing to their replicative capacity, oncolytic viruses (OVs) can evolve under the action of natural selection. Reversion to virulence and recombination with wild-type strains may compromise OV safety, therefore requiring evolutionary risk assessment studies. On the other hand, evolution can be directed in the laboratory to create more potent and safer OVs. Previous work in the experimental evolution field provides a background for OV directed evolution, and has identified interesting exploitable features. While genetic engineering has greatly advanced the field of oncolytic virotherapy, this approach is sometimes curtailed by the complexity and diversity of virus-host interactions. Directed evolution provides an alternative approach that may help to obtain new OVs without prejudice toward the underlying molecular mechanisms involved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Mechanisms of Virus Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlmutter, Jason D.; Hagan, Michael F.

    2015-04-01

    Viruses are nanoscale entities containing a nucleic acid genome encased in a protein shell called a capsid and in some cases are surrounded by a lipid bilayer membrane. This review summarizes the physics that govern the processes by which capsids assemble within their host cells and in vitro. We describe the thermodynamics and kinetics for the assembly of protein subunits into icosahedral capsid shells and how these are modified in cases in which the capsid assembles around a nucleic acid or on a lipid bilayer. We present experimental and theoretical techniques used to characterize capsid assembly, and we highlight aspects of virus assembly that are likely to receive significant attention in the near future.

  2. West Nile Virus

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Shannan L.; Ross, Ted M.; Evans, Jared D.

    2010-01-01

    Overview Since its isolation in Uganda in 1937, West Nile virus (WNV) has been responsible for thousands of cases of morbidity and mortality in birds, horses, and humans. Historically, epidemics were localized to Europe, Africa, the Middle East, and parts of Asia, and primarily caused a mild febrile illness in humans. However, in the late 1990’s, the virus became more virulent and expanded its geographical range to North America. In humans, the clinical presentation ranges from asymptomatic (approximately 80% of infections) to encephalitis/paralysis and death (less than 1% of infections). There is no FDA-licensed vaccine for human use, and the only recommended treatment is supportive care. Individuals that survive infection often have a long recovery period. This article will review the current literature summarizing the molecular virology, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, immunology, and protective measures against WNV and WNV infections in humans. PMID:20513541

  3. [Ebola virus disease: Update].

    PubMed

    de la Calle-Prieto, Fernando; Arsuaga-Vicente, Marta; Mora-Rillo, Marta; Arnalich-Fernandez, Francisco; Arribas, Jose Ramon

    2016-01-01

    The first known Ebola outbreak occurred in 1976. Since then, 24 limited outbreaks had been reported in Central Africa, but never affecting more than 425 persons. The current outbreak in Western Africa is the largest in history with 28,220 reported cases and 11,291 deaths. The magnitude of the epidemic has caused worldwide alarm. For the first time, evacuated patients were treated outside Africa, and secondary cases have occurred in Spain and the United States. Since the start of the current epidemic, our knowledge about the epidemiology, clinical picture, laboratory findings, and virology of Ebola virus disease has considerably expanded. For the first time, experimental treatment has been tried, and there have been spectacular advances in vaccine development. A review is presented of these advances in the knowledge of Ebola virus disease.

  4. Incursion and spread of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses among wild birds in 2010-11 winter in Japan.

    PubMed

    Soda, Kosuke; Ito, Hiroshi; Usui, Tatsufumi; Nagai, Yasuko; Ozaki, Hiroichi; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Ito, Toshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Many highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) outbreaks occurred in Japan during the 2010-11 winter. H5N1 HPAI viruses were isolated from 63 wild birds including migrating and resident birds, and caused HPAI outbreaks in 24 chicken farms by the end of March. In the present study, all virus strains isolated from wild birds in western Japan together with the viruses in the preceding works were phylogenetically and epidemiologically analyzed. Furthermore, the virus distributions in the raptors that died of H5N1 HPAI virus infection were assessed. The virus isolates in Japan were classified into three groups by phylogenic analysis of their hemagglutinins, supporting the previous report (Sakoda et al., 2012). The viruses in each group were continuously isolated in respective limited areas, indicating that viruses were maintained in local bird populations throughout the outbreak periods. Some viruses were genetically closely related to the Korean isolates around the same periods, suggesting that migratory birds were suspected of contributing to transportation of the viruses across the sea. Viruses were recovered from systemic tissues including digestive organs of the deceased raptors, indicating that they were infected with HPAI viruses by their predatory behavior, eating infected birds or carrion in the environment.

  5. Phage Displayed Peptides to Avian H5N1 Virus Distinguished the Virus from Other Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Chengfeng; Ren, Xiaofeng

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to identify potential ligands and develop a novel diagnostic test to highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus (HPAI), subtype H5N1 viruses using phage display technology. The H5N1 viruses were used as an immobilized target in a biopanning process using a 12-mer phage display random peptide library. After five rounds of panning, three phages expressing peptides HAWDPIPARDPF, AAWHLIVALAPN or ATSHLHVRLPSK had a specific binding activity to H5N1 viruses were isolated. Putative binding motifs to H5N1 viruses were identified by DNA sequencing. In terms of the minimum quantity of viruses, the phage-based ELISA was better than antiserum-based ELISA and a manual, semi-quantitative endpoint RT-PCR for detecting H5N1 viruses. More importantly, the selected phages bearing the specific peptides to H5N1 viruses were capable of differentiating this virus from other avian viruses in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. PMID:21887228

  6. Phage displayed peptides to avian H5N1 virus distinguished the virus from other viruses.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Li, Guangxing; Qin, Chengfeng; Ren, Xiaofeng

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to identify potential ligands and develop a novel diagnostic test to highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus (HPAI), subtype H5N1 viruses using phage display technology. The H5N1 viruses were used as an immobilized target in a biopanning process using a 12-mer phage display random peptide library. After five rounds of panning, three phages expressing peptides HAWDPIPARDPF, AAWHLIVALAPN or ATSHLHVRLPSK had a specific binding activity to H5N1 viruses were isolated. Putative binding motifs to H5N1 viruses were identified by DNA sequencing. In terms of the minimum quantity of viruses, the phage-based ELISA was better than antiserum-based ELISA and a manual, semi-quantitative endpoint RT-PCR for detecting H5N1 viruses. More importantly, the selected phages bearing the specific peptides to H5N1 viruses were capable of differentiating this virus from other avian viruses in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

  7. VIRUS instrument collimator assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Jennifer L.; DePoy, Darren L.; Prochaska, Travis; Allen, Richard D.; Williams, Patrick; Rheault, Jean-Philippe; Li, Ting; Nagasawa, Daniel Q.; Akers, Christopher; Baker, David; Boster, Emily; Campbell, Caitlin; Cook, Erika; Elder, Alison; Gary, Alex; Glover, Joseph; James, Michael; Martin, Emily; Meador, Will; Mondrik, Nicholas; Rodriguez-Patino, Marisela; Villanueva, Steven; Hill, Gary J.; Tuttle, Sarah; Vattiat, Brian; Lee, Hanshin; Chonis, Taylor S.; Dalton, Gavin B.; Tacon, Mike

    2014-07-01

    The Visual Integral-Field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS) instrument is a baseline array 150 identical fiber fed optical spectrographs designed to support observations for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX). The collimator subassemblies of the instrument have been assembled in a production line and are now complete. Here we review the design choices and assembly practices used to produce a suite of identical low-cost spectrographs in a timely fashion using primarily unskilled labor.

  8. Hepatitis C Virus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Arthur

    2016-09-06

    This issue provides a clinical overview of hepatitis C virus, focusing on transmission, prevention, screening, diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  9. Proteorhodopsin genes in giant viruses.

    PubMed

    Yutin, Natalya; Koonin, Eugene V

    2012-10-04

    Viruses with large genomes encode numerous proteins that do not directly participate in virus biogenesis but rather modify key functional systems of infected cells. We report that a distinct group of giant viruses infecting unicellular eukaryotes that includes Organic Lake Phycodnaviruses and Phaeocystis globosa virus encode predicted proteorhodopsins that have not been previously detected in viruses. Search of metagenomic sequence data shows that putative viral proteorhodopsins are extremely abundant in marine environments. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that giant viruses acquired proteorhodopsins via horizontal gene transfer from proteorhodopsin-encoding protists although the actual donor(s) could not be presently identified. The pattern of conservation of the predicted functionally important amino acid residues suggests that viral proteorhodopsin homologs function as sensory rhodopsins. We hypothesize that viral rhodopsins modulate light-dependent signaling, in particular phototaxis, in infected protists.

  10. Medical application of 26Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhausen, C.; Gerisch, P.; Heisinger, B.; Hohl, Ch.; Kislinger, G.; Korschinek, G.; Niedermayer, M.; Nolte, E.; Dumitru, M.; Alvarez-Brückmann, M.; Schneider, M.; Ittel, T. H.

    1996-06-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements with 26Al as tracer were performed in order to study the aluminium metabolism and anomalies in the human body and in rats. In particular, the differences between healthy volunteers and patients with renal failure were investigated. The obtained data points of 26Al in blood and urine were described by an open compartment model with three peripheral compartments. It was found that the minimum of peripheral compartments needed to describe 26Al concentrations in blood and urine over a time period of three years is at least three.

  11. Hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Manns, Michael P; Buti, Maria; Gane, Ed; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel; Razavi, Homie; Terrault, Norah; Younossi, Zobair

    2017-03-02

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a hepatotropic RNA virus that causes progressive liver damage, which might result in liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Globally, between 64 and 103 million people are chronically infected. Major risk factors for this blood-borne virus infection are unsafe injection drug use and unsterile medical procedures (iatrogenic infections) in countries with high HCV prevalence. Diagnostic procedures include serum HCV antibody testing, HCV RNA measurement, viral genotype and subtype determination and, lately, assessment of resistance-associated substitutions. Various direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) have become available, which target three proteins involved in crucial steps of the HCV life cycle: the NS3/4A protease, the NS5A protein and the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase NS5B protein. Combination of two or three of these DAAs can cure (defined as a sustained virological response 12 weeks after treatment) HCV infection in >90% of patients, including populations that have been difficult to treat in the past. As long as a prophylactic vaccine is not available, the HCV pandemic has to be controlled by treatment-as-prevention strategies, effective screening programmes and global access to treatment.

  12. [Ebola virus disease].

    PubMed

    Karwowska, Kornelia

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus disease is a zoonosis causing high mortality epidemics in both human and animal populations. The virus belongs to the Filoviride family. It is composed of a single-strand of RNA. Morbidity foci appear in sub-Saharan Africa. The most probable reservoir are fruit bats, which are local delicacy. The most common route of infection is via mucosa or damaged skin. The spread of disease is rapid due to dietary habits, funeral rites and the insufficient supply of disposable equipment in hospitals. The incubation period of the disease ranges from 2 to 21 days. The beginning is abrupt, dominated by influenza-like symptoms. The disease is staggering with the predominant multi-organ failure and shock. Present-day epidemic symptoms from digestive system in the form of vomiting and diarrhoea are dominant. Currently, the research on vaccine and experimental drug is in progress. The virus is damaged by standard disinfectants used in health care units. Epidemic, which broke out in February 2014, caused by the most dangerous type Zaire, is the greatest of the existing. Morbidity and mortality is underestimated due to numerous unreported cases.

  13. Ebola Virus Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kourtis, Athena P.; Appelgren, Kristie; Chevalier, Michelle S.; McElroy, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus is one of the most deadly pathogens known to infect humans. The current Ebola outbreak in West Africa is unprecedented in magnitude and duration and, as of November 30, 2014, shows no signs of abating. For the first time, cases of Ebola virus disease have been diagnosed in the US, originating from patients who traveled during the incubation period. The outbreak has generated worldwide concern. It is clear that U.S. physicians need to be aware of this disease, know when to consider Ebola and how to care for the patient as well as protect themselves. Children comprise a small percentage of all cases globally, likely because of their lower risk of exposure given social and cultural practices. Limited evidence is available on pediatric disease course and prognosis. In this article, we present an overview of the pathogen, its epidemiology and transmission, clinical and laboratory manifestations, treatment and infection control procedures, with an emphasis on what is known about Ebola virus disease in the pediatric population. PMID:25831417

  14. Presence of bacteria in aqueous solution influences virus adsorption on nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bingzi; Zhang, Jiabao; Jiang, Yan

    2013-11-01

    Virus contamination in wastewater is usually accompanied by the existence of various bacteria. Nanoparticles (NPs) have been shown to efficiently remove virus. In this study, bacterial cells, supernatants, and cultures were harvested separately from three strains at the culture ages of 6 and 24 h, corresponding to the log and stationary phases, respectively. The aim is to investigate how their presence affects virus adsorption on the three Fe and Al oxide NPs (α-Fe2O3, γ-Fe2O3-B, and Al2O3) and how these effects change with bacterial growth phase. Bacteriophage phiX174 was used as a virus model. Results showed that bacterial cells, supernatants, and cultures harvested at 6 h generally reduced virus adsorption by an average of 0.75±0.84, 7.7±9.0, and 10.3±8.6%, respectively, while those harvested at 24 h reduced virus adsorption by an average of 2.1±0.93, 21.5±6.6, and 24.6±6.9%, respectively. Among the NPs, α-Fe2O3 showed more sensitivity to bacteria than the other two, probably because of its relatively higher value of point of zero charge. It was found that cell-induced and supernatant-induced reductions were combined to achieve added results, in which the supernatants contributed much more than the cells, implying that the bacterial exudates might be more crucial in the reduced virus adsorption than the bacterial cells. These results strongly demonstrated that the bacteria-induced reduction in virus adsorption became more significant with culture age. It is suggested that studies conducted in the absence of bacteria may not accurately evaluate the potential of virus removal efficiency of the NPs in bacteria-containing environments.

  15. Potential for Stable Flies and House Flies (Diptera: Muscidae) to Transmit Rift Valley Fever Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    disease and economic disruption. Of particular concern is Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) ( genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae), which has been...countries in Africa (Anyamba et al. 2009). Although most other members of the genus Phlebovirus are associated with sand flies in nature, RVFV has...al. 1998). Laboratory studies indicate that numerous species of mos- quitoes are susceptible to oral infection and are able to transmit RVFV by bite

  16. Selection and Characterization of Drug-Resistant Variants of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (AIDS).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-10-01

    resis- nitis in patients with AIDS. It is also the current drug of choice tance to all other selective reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibi- for acyclovir ...used to-treat acyclovir -resistant herpes simplex 8,18) (Erlich et al., 1989; Birch et at, 11990; Safrin et a!, 1991ib) Beas ccrnthsnieroraatviyndi and...immuriodeficiericy virus: Inhibition by cournermycin Al. Ant ,vral comparing fimcarnel with vidarabine for acyclovir -fesislant mucocu- Chein. Chemather. 1

  17. Recovery of Pathogenic Measles Virus from Cloned cDNA

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Makoto; Takeuchi, Kaoru; Miyajima, Naoko; Kobune, Fumio; Ami, Yasushi; Nagata, Noriyo; Suzaki, Yuriko; Nagai, Yoshiyuki; Tashiro, Masato

    2000-01-01

    Reverse genetics technology so far established for measles virus (MeV) is based on the Edmonston strain, which was isolated several decades ago, has been passaged in nonlymphoid cell lines, and is no longer pathogenic in monkey models. On the other hand, MeVs isolated and passaged in the Epstein-Barr virus-transformed marmoset B-lymphoblastoid cell line B95a would retain their original pathogenicity (F. Kobune et al., J. Virol. 64:700–705, 1990). Here we have developed MeV reverse genetics systems based on the highly pathogenic IC-B strain isolated in B95a cells. Infectious viruses were successfully recovered from the cloned cDNA of IC-B strain by two different approaches. One was simple cotransfection of B95a cells, with three plasmids each encoding the nucleocapsid (N), phospho (P), or large (L) protein, respectively, and their expression was driven by the bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase supplied by coinfecting recombinant vaccinia virus vTF7-3. The second approach was transfection with the L-encoding plasmid of a helper cell line constitutively expressing the MeV N and P proteins and the T7 polymerase (F. Radecke et al., EMBO J. 14:5773–5784, 1995) on which B95a cells were overlaid. Virus clones recovered by both methods possessed RNA genomes identical to that of the parental IC-B strain and were indistinguishable from the IC-B strain with respect to growth phenotypes in vitro and the clinical course and histopathology of experimentally infected cynomolgus monkeys. Thus, the systems developed here could be useful for studying viral gene functions in the context of the natural course of MeV pathogenesis. PMID:10864679

  18. Zika Virus: Know Before You Go

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript on. Feature: Zika Virus Know Before You Go Past Issues / Summer 2016 Table of Contents If ... Virus" Articles Understanding Zika Virus / Know Before You Go Summer 2016 Issue: Volume 11 Number 2 Page ...

  19. Learn about Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Virus (RSV) Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common respiratory virus that can affect people of all ages. In older children and adults, it causes mostly upper respiratory symptoms (colds), but it can cause a serious infection in ...

  20. Variant (Swine Origin) Influenza Viruses in Humans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Other Variant Influenza Viruses: Background and CDC Risk Assessment and Reporting Language: ... Background CDC Assessment Reporting Background On Variant Influenza Viruses Swine flu viruses do not normally infect humans. ...