Science.gov

Sample records for al-bi immiscible alloy

  1. Liquid-liquid phase equilibrium and core-shell structure formation in immiscible Al-Bi-Sn alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingyang; Jia, Peng; Sun, Xiaofei; Geng, Haoran; Zuo, Min; Zhao, Degang

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the liquid-phase separation of ternary immiscible Al45Bi19.8Sn35.2 and Al60Bi14.4Sn25.6 melts was studied with resistivity and thermal analysis methods at different temperature. The resistivity-temperature curves appear abrupt and anomalously change with rising temperature, corresponding to the anomalous and low peak of melting process in DSC curves, indicative of the occurrence of the liquid-phase separation. The anomalous behavior of the resistivity temperature dependence is attributable to concentration-concentration fluctuations. The effect of composition and melt temperature on the liquid-phase separation and core-shell structure formation in immiscible Al-Bi-Sn alloys was studied. The liquid-phase separation and formation of the core-shell structure in immiscible Al-Bi-Sn alloys are readily acquired when the alloy compositions fall into liquid miscibility gap. What's more, the cross-sectional structure changes from irregular, dispersed to core-type shapes under the actions of Marangoni motion with increasing melt temperature. This study provides some clues for the preparation of core-shell microspheres of immiscible Al-Bi-Sn alloys via liquid-phase separation.

  2. In situ investigation of spinodal decomposition in hypermonotectic Al Bi and Al Bi Zn alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffer, P. L.; Mathiesen, R. H.; Arnberg, L.; Di Sabatino, M.; Snigirev, A.

    2008-05-01

    Spinodal decomposition of hypermonotectic Al-6 wt.%Bi, Al-8 wt.%Bi and Al-6 wt.%Bi-8 wt.%Zn alloys has been investigated using synchrotron radiography. In the case of the 6 and 8 wt.%Bi binary alloys undercoolings of 70 and 110 K, respectively, were required to initiate the L→L1+L2 reaction, which appeared to occur very close to the monotectic reaction temperature. The nucleated L2 droplets were set in collective size-dependent motion by forces coupled to external fields (gravity and imposed temperature gradient) as well as forces arising due to internal fluctuations of the system. With experimental conditions similar to those realized during strip casting of the same materials, it was found that the size-dependant droplet velocity field combined with Stokes drag at the L1-L2 interfaces as well as attractive and repulsive diffusion-coupling between adjacent L2 droplets, yield complex meso- to microscale hydrodynamics. The hydrodynamics are the dominating mechanisms for L2 droplet coagulation, and are accordingly decisive for the final size distribution and geometrical dispersion of the soft Bi-rich component in the cast material. A different decomposition mode was observed in the Al-6 wt.%Bi-8 wt.%Zn ternary alloy, with the L2 droplets undergoing an immiscible-miscible-immiscible transition. In contrast to what was found for the binaries, L2 domains formed at relatively small undercoolings, and very little droplet motion was observed, as all L2 domains nucleated and remained on the crucible walls until they encroached on the monotectic front. At small distances from the monotectic front a Zn-rich solute boundary layer preceding the α-Al, caused the L2 domains to dissolve as Bi-Zn-Al regains complete miscibility upon reaching a critical Zn-concentration. In the shallow mush region behind the monotectic reaction, a high Zn solid solubility and a relatively fast diffusion of Zn in α-Al combine to cause a rapid diminishing Zn concentration in the mush liquid

  3. Studies on immiscible alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, G.

    1976-01-01

    To illustrate the behavior of immiscible liquids of different densities in zero-gravity and to determine the rate of coalescence like droplets, a demonstration experiment was performed on the Skylab 4 mission. Dispersions of oil-in-water and of water-in-oil were prepared by the astronauts and their appearance photographed over a time span of 10 hours. The experiment indicated that all emulsions were stable over this period and that the coalescent rate was at least 3 times 10 to the 5th power times smaller on Skylab than on earth. The recorded melting of a cylindrical piece of ice on Skylab 3 is used to study the mode of heat transfer for the latent heat of melting in low-gravity.

  4. Coupled growth in immiscible alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, J. Barry; Hayes, Larry C.; Arikawa, Y.; O'Dell, S.; Cheney, A.

    1996-07-01

    This paper discusses the flight experiment 'Coupled Growth in Hypermonotectics' schedules to fly aboard the life and microgravity spacelab mission during the summer of 1996. The experiment is designed to directionally solidify samples in immiscible alloy systems in an attempt to obtain an improved understanding of the physics controlling the solidification process. This paper specifically addresses some of the unique difficulties concerning ampoule design for these experiments. As an example, an ampoule material must be utilized that is not wet by the minor immiscible liquid phase. In addition, a means must be provided to accommodate thermal contraction and solidification shrinkage during processing in order to avoid free surface formation on the melt. An attempt has also been made to control thermal end effects in order to obtain a relatively constant growth rate during processing. The final design results in an ampoule assembly that contains insulating segments, dummy samples, moving pistons and a high temperature spring assembly. The details of this design and the results of ground based testing will be discussed.

  5. In situ synchrotron study of liquid phase separation process in Al-10 wt.% Bi immiscible alloys by radiography and small angle X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, W. Q.; Zhang, S. G.; Li, J. G.

    2016-03-01

    Liquid phase separation process of immiscible alloys has been repeatedly tuned to create special structure for developing materials with unique properties. However, the fundamental understanding of the liquid phase separation process is still under debate due to the characteristics of immiscible alloys in opacity and high temperature environment of alloy melt. Here, the liquid phase separation process in solidifying Al-Bi immiscible alloys was investigated by synchrotron radiography and small angle X-ray scattering. We provide the first direct evidence of surface segregation prior to liquid decomposition and present that the time dependence on the number of Bi droplets follows Logistic curve. The liquid decomposition results from a nucleation and growth process rather than spinodal decomposition mechanism because of the positive deviation from Porod's law. We also found that the nanometer-sized Bi-rich droplets in Al matrix melt present mass fractal characteristics.

  6. Containerless low gravity processing of glass forming and immiscible alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, J. Barry; Briggs, Craig; Robinson, M. B.

    1990-01-01

    Under normal one-g conditions immiscible alloys segregate extensively during solidification due to sedimentation of the more dense of the immiscible liquid phases. Immiscible (hypermonotectic) gold-rhodium alloys were processed in the 100 meter drop tube under low gravity, containerless conditions to determine the feasibility of producing dispersed structures. Three alloy compositions were utilized. Alloys containing 10 percent by volume of the gold-rich hypermonotectic phase exhibited a tendency for the gold-rich liquid to wet the outer surface of the samples. This wetting tendency led to extensive segregation in several cases. Alloys containing 80 and 90 percent by volume of the gold-rich phase possessed completely different microstructures from the 10 percent samples when processed under low-g, containerless conditions. Several samples exhibited microstructures consisting of well dispersed 2 to 3 microns diameter rhodium-rich spheres in a gold-rich matrix.

  7. The immiscibility of InAlN ternary alloy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guijuan; Xu, Xiaoqing; Li, Huijie; Wei, Hongyuan; Han, Dongyue; Ji, Zesheng; Meng, Yulin; Wang, Lianshan; Yang, Shaoyan

    2016-01-01

    We have used two models based on the valence force field and the regular solution model to study the immiscibility of InAlN ternary alloy, and have got the spinodal and binodal curves of InAlN. Analyzing the spinodal decomposition curves, we obtain the appropriate concentration region for the epitaxial growth of the InN-AlN pseudobinary alloy. At a temperature most common for the epitaxial growth of InAlN (1000 K), the solubility of InN is about 10%. Then we introduce the mismatch strain item into the Gibbs free energy, and the effect of different substrates is taken into consideration. Considering Si, Al2O3, InN, GaN, AlN as a substrate respectively, it is found that all the five systems are stabilized with the upper critical solution temperature largely reduced. Finally, InN and GaN are potential substrates for In-rich InAlN, while AlN and GaN substrates are recommended in the Al-rich region. Si and Al2O3 may be ideal substrates for thin InAlN film. PMID:27221345

  8. Effects of crucible wetting during solidification of immiscible Pb-Zn alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Groh, H. C., III; Probst, H. B.

    1989-01-01

    Many industrial uses for liquid phase miscibility gap alloys are proposed. However, the commercial production of these alloys into useful ingots with a reasonable amount of homogeneity is arduous because of their immiscibility in the liquid state. In the low-g environment of space gravitational settling forces are abated, thus solidification of an immiscible alloy with a uniform distribution of phases becomes feasible. Elimination of gravitational settling and coalescence processes in low-g also makes possible the study of other separation and coarsening mechanisms. Even with gravitational separation forces reduced, many low-g experiments have resulted in severely segregated structures. The segregation in many cases was due to preferential wetting of the crucible by one of the immiscible liquids. The objective was to analyze the wetting behavior of Pb-Zn alloys on various crucible materials in an effort to identify a crucible in which the fluid flow induced by preferential wetting is minimized. It is proposed that by choosing the crucible for a particular alloy so that the difference in surface energy between the solid and two liquid phases is minimized, the effects of preferential wetting can be diminished and possibly avoided. Qualitative experiments were conducted and have shown the competitive wetting behavior of the immiscible Pb-Zn system and 13 different crucible materials.

  9. Three orthogonal ultrasounds fabricate uniform ternary Al-Sn-Cu immiscible alloy

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, W.; Wang, B. J.; Liu, H. M.; Hu, L.; Wei, B.

    2016-01-01

    The production of Al based monotectic alloys with uniform microstructure is usually difficult due to the large density difference between the two immiscible liquid phases, which limits the application of such alloys. Here, we apply three orthogonal ultrasounds during the liquid phase separation process of ternary Al71.9Sn20.4Cu7.7 immiscible alloy. A uniform microstructure consisting of fine secondary (Sn) phase dispersed on Al-rich matrix is fabricated in the whole alloy sample with a large size of 30 × 30 × 100 mm. The numerical calculation results indicate that the coupled effect of three ultrasounds promotes the sound pressure level and consequently enlarges the cavitation zone within the alloy melt. The strong shockwaves produced by cavitation prevent the (Sn) droplets from coalescence, and keep them suspended in the parent Al-rich liquid phase. This accounts for the formation of homogeneous composite structures. Thus the introduction of three orthogonal ultrasounds is an effective way to suppress the macrosegregation caused by liquid phase separation and produce bulk immiscible alloys with uniform structures. PMID:27841283

  10. Three orthogonal ultrasounds fabricate uniform ternary Al-Sn-Cu immiscible alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, W.; Wang, B. J.; Liu, H. M.; Hu, L.; Wei, B.

    2016-11-01

    The production of Al based monotectic alloys with uniform microstructure is usually difficult due to the large density difference between the two immiscible liquid phases, which limits the application of such alloys. Here, we apply three orthogonal ultrasounds during the liquid phase separation process of ternary Al71.9Sn20.4Cu7.7 immiscible alloy. A uniform microstructure consisting of fine secondary (Sn) phase dispersed on Al-rich matrix is fabricated in the whole alloy sample with a large size of 30 × 30 × 100 mm. The numerical calculation results indicate that the coupled effect of three ultrasounds promotes the sound pressure level and consequently enlarges the cavitation zone within the alloy melt. The strong shockwaves produced by cavitation prevent the (Sn) droplets from coalescence, and keep them suspended in the parent Al-rich liquid phase. This accounts for the formation of homogeneous composite structures. Thus the introduction of three orthogonal ultrasounds is an effective way to suppress the macrosegregation caused by liquid phase separation and produce bulk immiscible alloys with uniform structures.

  11. Three orthogonal ultrasounds fabricate uniform ternary Al-Sn-Cu immiscible alloy.

    PubMed

    Zhai, W; Wang, B J; Liu, H M; Hu, L; Wei, B

    2016-11-14

    The production of Al based monotectic alloys with uniform microstructure is usually difficult due to the large density difference between the two immiscible liquid phases, which limits the application of such alloys. Here, we apply three orthogonal ultrasounds during the liquid phase separation process of ternary Al71.9Sn20.4Cu7.7 immiscible alloy. A uniform microstructure consisting of fine secondary (Sn) phase dispersed on Al-rich matrix is fabricated in the whole alloy sample with a large size of 30 × 30 × 100 mm. The numerical calculation results indicate that the coupled effect of three ultrasounds promotes the sound pressure level and consequently enlarges the cavitation zone within the alloy melt. The strong shockwaves produced by cavitation prevent the (Sn) droplets from coalescence, and keep them suspended in the parent Al-rich liquid phase. This accounts for the formation of homogeneous composite structures. Thus the introduction of three orthogonal ultrasounds is an effective way to suppress the macrosegregation caused by liquid phase separation and produce bulk immiscible alloys with uniform structures.

  12. A chemical approach toward low temperature alloying of immiscible iron and molybdenum metals

    SciTech Connect

    Nazir, Rabia; Ahmed, Sohail; Mazhar, Muhammad; Akhtar, Muhammad Javed; Siddique, Muhammad; Khan, Nawazish Ali; Shah, Muhammad Raza; Nadeem, Muhammad

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Low temperature pyrolysis of [Fe(bipy){sub 3}]Cl{sub 2} and [Mo(bipy)Cl{sub 4}] homogeneous powder. • Easy low temperature alloying of immiscible metals like Fe and Mo. • Uniform sized Fe–Mo nanoalloy with particle size of 48–68 nm. • Characterization by EDXRF, AFM, XRPD, magnetometery, {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer and impedance. • Alloy behaves as almost superparamagnetic obeying simple –R(CPE)– circuit. - Abstract: The present research is based on a low temperature operated feasible method for the synthesis of immiscible iron and molybdenum metals’ nanoalloy for technological applications. The nanoalloy has been synthesized by pyrolysis of homogeneous powder precipitated, from a common solvent, of the two complexes, trisbipyridineiron(II)chloride, [Fe(bipy){sub 3}]Cl{sub 2}, and bipyridinemolybedenum(IV) chloride, [Mo(bipy)Cl{sub 4}], followed by heating at 500 °C in an inert atmosphere of flowing argon gas. The resulting nanoalloy has been characterized by using EDXRF, AFM, XRD, magnetometery, {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer and impedance spectroscopies. These results showed that under provided experimental conditions iron and molybdenum metals, with known miscibility barrier, alloy together to give (1:1) single phase material having particle size in the range of 48–66 nm. The magnetism of iron is considerably reduced after alloy formation and shows its trend toward superparamagnetism. The designed chemical synthetic procedure is equally feasible for the fabrication of other immiscible metals.

  13. Solid-Solution Alloying of Immiscible Ru and Cu with Enhanced CO Oxidation Activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bo; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Syo; Nishida, Yoshihide; Sato, Katsutoshi; Nagaoka, Katsutoshi; Kawaguchi, Shogo; Kubota, Yoshiki; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2017-03-24

    We report on novel solid-solution alloy nanoparticles (NPs) of Ru and Cu that are completely immiscible even above melting point in bulk phase. Powder X-ray diffraction, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray measurements demonstrated that Ru and Cu atoms were homogeneously distributed in the alloy NPs. Ru0.5Cu0.5 NPs demonstrated higher CO oxidation activity than fcc-Ru NPs, which are known as one of the best monometallic CO oxidation catalysts.

  14. Complex nanoprecipitate structures induced by irradiation in immiscible alloy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Shipeng; Bellon, P.; Averback, R. S.

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the fundamentals of compositional patterning induced by energetic particle irradiation in model A-B substitutional binary alloys using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The study focuses on a type of nanostructure that was recently observed in dilute Cu-Fe and Cu-V alloys, where precipitates form within precipitates, a morphology that we term “cherry-pit” structures. The simulations show that the domain of stability of these cherry-pit structures depends on the thermodynamic and kinetic asymmetry between the A and B elements. In particular, both lower solubilities and diffusivities of A in B compared to those of B in A favor the stabilization of these cherry-pit structures for A-rich average compositions. The simulation results are rationalized by extending the analytic model introduced by Frost and Russell for irradiation-induced compositional patterning so as to include the possible formation of pits within precipitates. The simulations indicate also that the pits are dynamical structures that undergo nearly periodic cycles of nucleation, growth, and absorption by the matrix.

  15. Liquid immiscibility and core-shell morphology formation in ternary Al–Bi–Sn alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, R.; Zhang, J.F.; Zhang, S.G. Li, J.G.

    2013-07-15

    The effects of composition on liquid immiscibility, macroscopic morphology, microstructure and phase transformation in ternary Al–Bi–Sn alloys were investigated. Three types of morphology, the core-shell type, the stochastic droplet type and uniform dispersion type, of Al–Bi–Sn particles prepared by a jet breakup process were distinguished, and the relationships between which were discussed. The phase transformation behaviors of the Al–Bi–Sn alloys were studied by thermal analysis, in agreement with the microstructural observation and microanalysis. The liquid immiscibility and formation of the core-shell morphology in Al–Bi–Sn alloys are easily achieved when the composition lies in the liquid miscibility gap. The particles exhibit a high melting point Al-rich core with a low melting point Sn–Bi-rich solder shell, showing promise for application as high-density electronic packaging materials. - Highlights: • The liquid demixing, morphology and microstructure in Al–Bi–Sn alloys were studied. • Three types of morphology were classified and discussed. • The conditions for formation of the core-shell morphology were obtained. • The phase transition behaviors agree with the microstructure characterization. • The Al/Sn–Bi core-shell particles show promise for use in electronic packaging.

  16. Characterizing the Use of Ultrasonic Energy in Promoting Uniform Composite Growth in Immiscible Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Fedoseyev, A. I.

    2000-01-01

    The results of experimental investigation and mathematical modeling for immiscible alloys subjected to ultrasonic influence are presented. It is known that in inoculated light alloy melts, ultrasonic treatment creates a new type of cast structure with extremely fine grains of uniform composition. This effect is produced across a wide range of freezing rates and technologies. However, it has not been demonstrated that the process can be successfully applied during controlled directional solidification processing. In this work we present the results from a set of directional solidification experiments and suggest describing the droplet size versus ultrasonic frequency and amplitude using an energy approach, followed with a more detailed analysis through numerical modeling of the ultrasonic field.

  17. Zener Pinning of Grain Boundaries and Structural Stability of Immiscible Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koju, R. K.; Darling, K. A.; Kecskes, L. J.; Mishin, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Immiscible Cu-Ta alloys produced by mechanical alloying are currently the subject of intensive research due to their mechanical strength combined with extraordinary structural stability at high temperatures. Previous experimental and simulation studies suggested that grain boundaries (GBs) in Cu-Ta alloys are stabilized by Ta nano-clusters coherent with the Cu matrix. To better understand the stabilization effect of Ta, we performed atomistic computer simulations of GB-cluster interactions in Cu-Ta alloys with various compositions and GB velocities. The study focuses on a single plane GB driven by an applied shear stress due to the shear-coupling effect. The results of the simulations are in close quantitative agreement with the Zener model of GB pinning. This agreement and the large magnitude of the unpinning stress confirm that the structural stability of these alloys is due to the drastically decreased GB mobility rather than a reduction in GB energy. For comparison, we simulated GB motion in a random solid solution. While the latter also reduces the GB mobility, the effect is not as strong as in the presence of Ta clusters. GB motion in the random solution itself induces precipitation of Ta clusters due to short-circuit diffusion of Ta in GBs, suggesting a possible mechanism of cluster formation inside the grains.

  18. The microstructure and electrical transport properties of immiscible copper-niobium alloy thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Rajarshi; Bose, Sangita; Ayyub, Pushan; Genc, Arda

    2008-02-01

    Mutually immiscible in the solid state, copper and niobium exhibit a relatively strong clustering (phase separating) tendency in the liquid state and can therefore only be alloyed in a highly metastable form: for example, by vapor quenching. We have deposited metastable Cu-Nb alloy thin films with nominal compositions ranging from 5 to 90 at. % Nb by magnetron cosputtering. The microstructure of these films depends strongly on the composition and ranges from coarse-grained solid solutions for Cu-rich and Nb-rich compositions to phase-separated amorphous mixtures when the two elements are in comparable amounts. The crystalline Cu- or Nb-rich compositions exhibit positive temperature coefficients of resistivity (TCR) with the Cu-90 at. % Nb film exhibiting a superconducting transition with (T{sub C}){sub onset}{approx}4.5 K. The amorphous films show high room temperature resistivity, a negative TCR, and composition dependent superconducting transitions. We investigate the relation between the microstructure, phase stability, and the electrical transport properties.

  19. A Study of Undercooling Behavior Of Immiscible Metal Alloys in the Absence of Crucible-Induced Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Michael B.; Rathz, Thomas J.; Li, Delin; Workman, Gary

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the question: Would eliminating the crucible eliminate the wall-induced nucleation of one of the liquid phases in an immiscible alloy and result in undercooling of the liquid into the metastable region thereby producing significant differences in the separation process and the microstructure upon solidification. Another primary objective of this research is to study systems with a metastable miscibility gap and to directly determine the metastable liquid miscibility gap by undercooling experiments. Nucleation and growth of droplets in these undercooled metallic liquid-liquid mixtures is also being studied. Results of this investigation indicate that containerless processing of immiscibles may not promote the undercooling of the single-phase liquid into the metastable region. Although no recalescence event was observed for this liquid-liquid transition, undercooling did occur across the miscibility gap for the solidification of the Ti phase that eventually separated.

  20. Growth of normally-immiscible materials (NIMs), binary alloys, and metallic fibers by hyperbaric laser chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, J. L.; Black, M. R.; Chavez, C. A.; Maskaly, K. R.; Espinoza, M.; Boman, M.; Landstrom, L.

    2008-06-01

    This work demonstrates that two or more elements of negligible solubility (and no known phase diagram) can be co-deposited in fiber form by hyperbaric-pressure laser chemical vapor deposition (HP-LCVD). For the first time, Hg-W alloys were grown as fibers from mixtures of tungsten hexafluoride, mercury vapor, and hydrogen. This new class of materials is termed normally-immiscible materials (NIMs), and includes not only immiscible materials, but also those elemental combinations that have liquid states at exclusive temperatures. This work also demonstrates that a wide variety of other binary and ternary alloys, intermetallics, and mixtures can be grown as fibers, e.g. silicon-tungsten, aluminum-silicon, boron-carbon-silicon, and titanium-carbon-nitride. In addition, pure metallic fibers of aluminum, titanium, and tungsten were deposited, demonstrating that materials of high thermal conductivity can indeed be grown in three-dimensions, provided sufficient vapor pressures are employed. A wide variety of fiber properties and microstructures resulted depending on process conditions; for example, single crystals, fine-grained alloys, and glassy metals could be deposited.

  1. Structures of immiscible Al-In alloys solidified under microgravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potard, C.

    1981-01-01

    Four samples of the immiscible Al-In system having monotectic and hypermonotectic compositions were solidified under microgravity during the NASA-SPAR IX flight of January 20th, 1981. The experimental thermal and physico-chemical conditions actually achieved have been analysed. Radiographic and metallographic observations of the samples show a non-regular dispersed primary phase inside the monotectic matrix. These observations are commented on the basis of capillarity and solidification aspects.

  2. Self-organization of Cu-based immiscible alloys under irradiation: An atom-probe tomography study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumphy, Brad D.

    The stability of materials subjected to prolonged irradiation has been a topic of renewed interest in recent years due to the projected growth of nuclear power as an alternative energy source. The irradiating particles impart energy into the material, thereby causing atomic displacements to occur. These displacements result in the creation of point defects and the random ballistic mixing of the atoms. Consequently, the material is driven away from its equilibrium structure. The supersaturation of defects can lead to the degradation of mechanical properties, but a high density of internal interfaces, which act as defect sinks, will suppress the supersaturation and long-range transport of defects. The microstructural evolution of the material is controlled by the ballistic mixing as well as the mobility of the point defects. In immiscible alloys, these two processes compete against one another, as the ballistic mixing acts to solutionize the alloy components, and the thermal diffusion of the large number of defects acts to phase separate the components. The work presented in this dissertation examines the effect of heavy-ion irradiation on immiscible, binary Cu-based alloys. Dilute alloys of Cu-Fe, Cu-V, and V-Cu have been subjected to irradiation, and atom-probe tomography has been utilized in order to better understand the complex nature of the response of these simple model systems to an irradiation environment. The results show that a steady-state, nano-scale patterning structure, with a high density of unsaturable defect sinks, can be maintained under prolonged irradiation. Additionally, precipitation from a supersaturated solid solution is shown to be a function of both the thermal diffusion and the ballistic mixing. Solvent-rich secondary precipitates, termed "cherry-pits," are observed inside of the solute-rich primary precipitates. Through a combination of simulation work and analyzing multiple alloys experimentally, it was determined that this cherry

  3. Synthesis of 3D nanostructured metal alloy of immiscible materials induced by megahertz-repetition femtosecond laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we have proposed a concept for the generation of three-dimensional (3D) nanostructured metal alloys of immiscible materials induced by megahertz-frequency ultrafast laser pulses. A mixture of two microparticle materials (aluminum and nickel oxide) and nickel oxide microparticles coated onto an aluminum foil have been used in this study. After laser irradiation, three different types of nanostructure composites have been observed: aluminum embedded in nickel nuclei, agglomerated chain of aluminum and nickel nanoparticles, and finally, aluminum nanoparticles grown on nickel microparticles. In comparison with current nanofabrication methods which are used only for one-dimensional nanofabrication, this technique enables us to fabricate 3D nanostructured metal alloys of two or more nanoparticle materials with varied composite concentrations under various predetermined conditions. This technique can lead to promising solutions for the fabrication of 3D nanostructured metal alloys in applications such as fuel-cell energy generation and development of custom-designed, functionally graded biomaterials and biocomposites. PMID:22999219

  4. Structural, thermal and magnetic investigations on immiscible Ag-Co nanocrystalline alloy with addition of Mn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, B. N.; Chabri, S.; Sardar, G.; Nath, D. N.; Chattopadhyay, P. P.

    2016-08-01

    50Ag-50Co (at%) and 40Ag-40Co-20Mn (at%) alloys prepared by ball milling up to 50 h and subsequent isothermal annealing at the temperature range of 350-650 °C for 1 h has been investigated systematically. Mn promotes early formation of the nanostructures and solid solutions of the alloys by ball milling. In contrast, annealing at 350 °C of Ag-Co alloy resulted the dissolution of hcp Co. Annealing above 350 °C decomposes the metastable Ag-Co alloy into the polycrystalline and segregated Ag and fcc Co. Enthalpy of mixing of both the alloy has increased with increase in milling time. Both the nanocrystalline alloys prepared by ball milling and annealing have been revealed the ferromagnetic behavior. The most significant improvement of magnetic properties is yielded in as-milled Ag-Co-Mn alloy obtained after annealing at 550 °C for 1 h.

  5. Study on solidification of immisible alloys (M-10)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamio, Akihiko

    1993-01-01

    Alloying of immiscible alloys under microgravity is of interest in metallurgical processes. Several experiments investigating the alloying of immiscible alloys, such as Al-In, Al-Bi, Zn-Bi, and Zn-Pb, were done in space. Homogeneous distribution of small L2 particles in the matrix, such as an emulsion structure, was expected in the space-solidifed alloys. However, the alloys demonstrated an extremely segregated structure. To date insufficient information was obtained to explain these unexpected results. Our experiment was proposed to clarify the solidification manner of immiscible alloys and to obtain fundamental information concerning structural control of the alloys. In space, density differences between the two liquids separated in immiscible regions can be neglected, so that no sedimentation of L(sub 2) phase will take place. When the growth of the alloys is interrupted and this status is frozen by an adequate rapid cooling procedure, it will provide much information concerning decomposing homogeneous liquid and the interaction between the monotectic growth front morphology and the distribution of L(sub 2) phase. It is anticipated that the results will be useful for elucidating the monotectic solidification manner and it will be instructive to explain the segregated structures obtained in the past space experiments.

  6. Hydrogen-storage properties of solid-solution alloys of immiscible neighboring elements with Pd.

    PubMed

    Kusada, Kohei; Yamauchi, Miho; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Kubota, Yoshiki

    2010-11-17

    Rh and Ag are the elements neighboring Pd, which is well known as a hydrogen-storage metal. Although Rh and Ag do not possess hydrogen-storage properties, can Ag-Rh alloys actually store hydrogen? Ag-Rh solid-solution alloys have not been explored in the past because they do not mix with each other at the atomic level, even in the liquid phase. We have used the chemical reduction method to obtain such Ag-Rh alloys, and XRD and STEM-EDX give clear evidence that the alloys mixed at the atomic level. From the measurements of hydrogen pressure-composition isotherms and solid-state (2)H NMR, we have revealed that Ag-Rh solid-solution alloys absorb hydrogen, and the total amount of hydrogen absorbed reached a maximum at the ratio of Ag:Rh = 50:50, where the electronic structure is expected to be similar to that of Pd.

  7. Mechanism and Kinetics of Mechanical Alloying in an Immiscible Fe-Mg System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelsukov, E. P.; Dorofeev, G. A.; Ulyanov, A. L.

    2005-07-01

    Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Auger spectroscopy, secondary ion mass-spectrometry and chemical analysis were used to study mechanical alloying of Fe and Mg powder mixture with the atomic ratio of 93:7. It has been shown that the process of mechanical alloying involves the formation of nanostructure in α-Fe particles, penetration and segregation of Mg atoms along the α-Fe grain boundaries, formation of the α-Fe(Mg) supersaturated solid solution.

  8. Experimental development of processes to produce homogenized alloys of immiscible metals, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reger, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental drop tower package was designed and built for use in a drop tower. This effort consisted of a thermal analysis, container/heater fabrication, and assembly of an expulsion device for rapid quenching of heated specimens during low gravity conditions. Six gallium bismuth specimens with compositions in the immiscibility region (50 a/o of each element) were processed in the experimental package: four during low gravity conditions and two under a one gravity environment. One of the one gravity processed specimens did not have telemetry data and was subsequently deleted for analysis since the processing conditions were not known. Metallurgical, Hall effect, resistivity, and superconductivity examinations were performed on the five specimens. Examination of the specimens showed that the gallium was dispersed in the bismuth. The low gravity processed specimens showed a relatively uniform distribution of gallium, with particle sizes of 1 micrometer or less, in contrast to the one gravity control specimen. Comparison of the cooling rates of the dropped specimens versus microstructure indicated that low cooling rates are more desirable.

  9. The solidification under zero gravity conditions of binary alloys exhibiting solid state immiscibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, A. A.; Anantatmula, R. P.; Horylev, R. J.; Gupta, S. P.; Vatne, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    The solidification behavior of gold-silicon alloys containing up to 25 at. % silicon was studied, and a mathematical model of gravity segregation during solidification was developed. A background of knowledge is provided which can be used in the design of zero gravity solidification experiments to be carried out in the 300-ft drop tower, in Aerobee rockets and in future space missions. Such experiments are needed to develop the basic scientific knowledge required for the design of economically viable space manufacturing processes. Some preliminary zero gravity experiments were carried out on a gold-25 at. % silicon alloy using the drop tower facility.

  10. Influence of electric current pulses on the solidification of Cu-Bi-Sn immiscible alloys.

    PubMed

    Hongxiang, Jiang; Jie, He; Jiuzhou, Zhao

    2015-07-31

    Continuous solidification experiments were carried out with Cu-Bi-Sn alloys under the effects of Electric Current Pulses (ECPs). A model describing the microstructure evolution was developed. The formation of the microstructure in the continuously solidified alloys was calculated. The calculations demonstrated that ECPs mainly affect the solidification process through changing the energy barrier for the nucleation of the minority phase droplets (MPDs). When the matrix liquid has a lower electric conductivity compared to the MPD, the ECPs lead to a decrease in the energy barrier for the nucleation of the MPDs which then promote the formation of a finely dispersed microstructure. When the matrix liquid has a higher electric conductivity compared to the MPD, the ECPs cause an increase in the energy barrier for the nucleation and lead to the formation of a phase segregated microstructure.

  11. Influence of electric current pulses on the solidification of Cu-Bi-Sn immiscible alloys

    PubMed Central

    Hongxiang, Jiang; Jie, He; Jiuzhou, Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Continuous solidification experiments were carried out with Cu-Bi-Sn alloys under the effects of Electric Current Pulses (ECPs). A model describing the microstructure evolution was developed. The formation of the microstructure in the continuously solidified alloys was calculated. The calculations demonstrated that ECPs mainly affect the solidification process through changing the energy barrier for the nucleation of the minority phase droplets (MPDs). When the matrix liquid has a lower electric conductivity compared to the MPD, the ECPs lead to a decrease in the energy barrier for the nucleation of the MPDs which then promote the formation of a finely dispersed microstructure. When the matrix liquid has a higher electric conductivity compared to the MPD, the ECPs cause an increase in the energy barrier for the nucleation and lead to the formation of a phase segregated microstructure. PMID:26228180

  12. Solid solution alloy nanoparticles of immiscible Pd and Ru elements neighboring on Rh: changeover of the thermodynamic behavior for hydrogen storage and enhanced CO-oxidizing ability.

    PubMed

    Kusada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Ikeda, Ryuichi; Kubota, Yoshiki; Takata, Masaki; Toh, Shoichi; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Syo; Sumi, Naoya; Sato, Katsutoshi; Nagaoka, Katsutoshi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2014-02-05

    Pd(x)Ru(1-x) solid solution alloy nanoparticles were successfully synthesized over the whole composition range through a chemical reduction method, although Ru and Pd are immiscible at the atomic level in the bulk state. From the XRD measurement, it was found that the dominant structure of Pd(x)Ru(1-x) changes from fcc to hcp with increasing Ru content. The structures of Pd(x)Ru(1-x) nanoparticles in the Pd composition range of 30-70% consisted of both solid solution fcc and hcp structures, and both phases coexist in a single particle. In addition, the reaction of hydrogen with the Pd(x)Ru(1-x) nanoparticles changed from exothermic to endothermic as the Ru content increased. Furthermore, the prepared Pd(x)Ru(1-x) nanoparticles demonstrated enhanced CO-oxidizing catalytic activity; Pd0.5Ru0.5 nanoparticles exhibit the highest catalytic activity. This activity is much higher than that of the practically used CO-oxidizing catalyst Ru and that of the neighboring Rh, between Ru and Pd.

  13. Study on processing immiscible materials in zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reger, J. L.; Mendelson, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to evaluate mixing immiscible metal combinations under several process conditions. Under one-gravity, these included thermal processing, thermal plus electromagnetic mixing, and thermal plus acoustic mixing. The same process methods were applied during free fall on the MSFC drop tower facility. The design is included of drop tower apparatus to provide the electromagnetic and acoustic mixing equipment, and a thermal model was prepared to design the specimen and cooling procedure. Materials systems studied were Ca-La, Cd-Ga and Al-Bi; evaluation of the processed samples included the morphology and electronic property measurements. The morphology was developed using optical and scanning electron microscopy and microprobe analyses. Electronic property characterization of the superconducting transition temperatures were made using an impedance change-tuned coil method.

  14. Diffusion in Immiscible Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pond, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this program is to measure the diffusion coefficients for molten Pb in Zn in the immiscible liquid-phase region. Diffusion couples of pure Pb and Zn were prepared using a shear cell. These have been placed in graphite crucibles and encapsulated in stainless steel cartridges and are awaiting the next Materials Experiment Assembly (MEA) flight opportunity. In flight, one couple will be soaked for 40 minutes at 440 deg C (just above the monotectic temperature) and the second couple will be soaked for 40 minutes 820 deg C (just above the consolute temperature). After the soak both samples will be rapidly quenched by flowing He to minimize redistribution of the immiscible phases. Post flight compositional analysis will be accomplished using X-ray fluorescence in the scanning electron microscopy.

  15. Physical properties of immiscible polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, J. Milton

    1987-01-01

    The demixing of immiscible polymers in low gravity is discussed. Applications of knowledge gained in this research will provide a better understanding of the role of phase segregation in determining the properties of polymer blends made from immiscible polymers. Knowledge will also be gained regarding the purification of biological materials by partitioning between the two liquid phases formed by solution of the polymers polyethylene glycol and dextran in water. Testing of new apparatus for space flight, extension of affinity phase partitioning, refinement of polymer chemistry, and demixing of isopycnic polymer phases in a one gravity environment are discussed.

  16. Synthesis of new metastable nanoalloys of immiscible metals with a pulse laser technique

    PubMed Central

    Swiatkowska-Warkocka, Zaneta; Pyatenko, Alexander; Krok, Franciszek; Jany, Benedykt R.; Marszalek, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The generation of nanoalloys of immiscible metals is still a challenge using conventional methods. However, because these materials are currently attracting much attention, alternative methods are needed. In this article, we demonstrate a simple but powerful strategy for the generation of a new metastable alloy of immiscible metals. Au1−xNix 3D structures with 56 at% of nickel in gold were successfully manufactured by the pulsed laser irradiation of colloidal nanoparticles. This technology can be used for preparing different metastable alloys of immiscible metals. We hypothesise that this technique leads to the formation of alloy particles through the agglomerations of nanoparticles, very fast heating, and fast cooling/solidification. Thus, we expect that our approach will be applicable to a wide range of inorganic solids, yielding even new metastable solids that fail to be stable in the bulk systems, and therefore do not exist in Nature. PMID:25952016

  17. Josephson effect in Al/Bi2Se3/Al coplanar hybrid devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galletti, L.; Charpentier, S.; Lucignano, P.; Massarotti, D.; Arpaia, R.; Tafuri, F.; Bauch, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Tagliacozzo, A.; Kadowaki, K.; Lombardi, F.

    2014-08-01

    The edge states of Topological Insulators (TI) are protected against backscattering, thanks to the topological properties arising from their band structure. Coupling a TI to a superconductor (S) can induce unconventional effects, including the creation of Majorana bound states (MBS). The fabrication of coplanar hybrid devices is a fundamental step to pave the way to the understanding of proximity effects in topologically non-trivial systems, and to a large variety of experiments aimed at the possible detection of MBS. We discuss the feasibility and some relevant properties of Al-Bi2Se3-Al coplanar proximity devices. Special attention is devoted to the design of the junction, aimed at enhancing the coupling between the electrodes and the TI.

  18. Effects of crucible wetting during solidification of immiscible Pb-Zn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degroh, Henry C., III; Probst, Hubert B.

    1988-01-01

    Many industrial uses for liquid phase miscibility gap alloys are proposed. However, the commercial production of these alloys into useful ingots with a reasonable amount of homogeneity is arduous because of their immiscibility in the liquid state. In the low-g environment of space gravitational settling forces are abated, thus solidification of an immiscible alloys with a uniform distribution of phases becomes feasible. Elimination of gravitational settling and coalescence processes in low-g also makes possible the study of other separation and coarsening mechanisms. Even with gravitational separation forces reduced, many low-g experiments have resulted in severely segregated structures. The segregation in many cases was due to preferential wetting of the crucible by one of the immiscible liquids. The objective was to analyze the wetting behavior of Pb-Zn alloys on various crucible materials in an effort to identify a crucible in which the fluid flow induced by preferential wetting is minimized. It is proposed that by choosing the crucible for a particular alloy so that the difference in surface energy between the solid and two liqud phases is minimized, the effects of preferential wetting can be diminished and possibly avoided. Qualitative experiments were conducted and have shown the competitive wetting behavior of the immiscible Pb-Zn system and 13 different crucible materials.

  19. Flow regimes during immiscible displacement

    DOE PAGES

    Armstrong, Ryan T.; Mcclure, James; Berrill, Mark A.; ...

    2017-02-01

    Fractional ow of immiscible phases occurs at the pore scale where grain surfaces and phases interfaces obstruct phase mobility. However, the larger scale behavior is described by a saturation-dependent phenomenological relationship called relative permeability. As a consequence, pore-scale parameters, such as phase topology and/ or geometry, and details of the flow regime cannot be directly related to Darcy-scale flow parameters. It is well understood that relative permeability is not a unique relationship of wetting-phase saturation and rather depends on the experimental conditions at which it is measured. Herein we use fast X-ray microcomputed tomography to image pore-scale phase arrangements duringmore » fractional flow and then forward simulate the flow regimes using the lattice-Boltzmann method to better understand the underlying pore-scale flow regimes and their influence on Darcy-scale parameters. We find that relative permeability is highly dependent on capillary number and that the Corey model fits the observed trends. At the pore scale, while phase topologies are continuously changing on the scale of individual pores, the Euler characteristic of the nonwetting phase (NWP) averaged over a sufficiently large field of view can describe the bulk topological characteristics; the Euler characteristic decreases with increasing capillary number resulting in an increase in relative permeability. Lastly, we quantify the fraction of NWP that flows through disconnected ganglion dynamics and demonstrate that this can be a significant fraction of the NWP flux for intermediate wetting-phase saturation. Furthermore, rate dependencies occur in our homogenous sample (without capillary end effect) and the underlying cause is attributed to ganglion flow that can significantly influence phase topology during the fractional flow of immiscible phases.« less

  20. Electrified Microscopic and Conventional Interfaces between Two Immiscible Electrolyte Solutions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-24

    2 INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRIFIED LIQUID / LIQUID INTERFACES Interfaces between two immiscible solutions containing ionic species are of interest to a wide...if necessary and identify by block number) PELD I GPOUP SUB GROUP MICRODOMAINS, MICELES, LIQUID - LIQUID ELECTROCHEMISTRY, IMMISCIBLE ELECTROLYTES...between immiscible phases bridges the field of heterogeneous electrode electrochemistry and that of homogeneous solution chemistry. Early work on liquid

  1. SPAR 5 experiment no. 74-30 agglomeration in immiscible liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelles, S.; Markworth, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of gravity, cooling rate, and composition on the macro-and microstructure of liquid phase immiscible alloys were researched. Aluminum indium alloys of compositions 30, 40, 70, and 90 weight percent indium were processed aboard two sounding rocket flights, SPAR 2 and SPAR 5. Radiographic and metallographic examination of the SPAR 2 flight and ground base samples showed the expected separation at lg of the ground base alloys into indium rich and aluminum rich layers. The flight alloys produced an aluminum rich core surrounding by indium rich metal. The results obtained from the SPAR 5 40 and 70 weight percent indium alloys were essentially identical to those from SPAR 2. The 30 and 90 weight percent indium alloys also showed massive separation into configuration similar to the 40 and 70 weight percent indium alloys. The 90 weight percent indium alloy showed additional evidence that surface tension induced droplet migration had occurred in this alloy which could at least in part account for the observed structures.

  2. Can Nanorods Emulsify Immiscible Polymer Blends?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hore, Michael J. A.

    2005-03-01

    The addition of nanoscale rods to immiscible binary polymer blends has a pronounced effect on the dynamics of phase separation. The results of computer simulations of the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) model in three dimensions (3D) indicate that when nanorods prefer one of two components in an immiscible binary polymer blend, the rate of phase separation decreases when the volume fraction of nanorods is increased, or as the aspect ratio (L/D) of the rods is increased. Interestingly, anisotropic nanoparticles have a much more pronounced effect on phase separation dynamics in the system when compared to the effects of spherical nanoparticles, which, generically, do not alter the characteristics of the kinetics in the system. In particular, it may be the case that at high volume fractions -- or alternatively, low volume fractions and large aspect ratio of nanorods -- the system may undergo micro-phase separation only, indicating that the nanorods may be excellent emulsifying agents.

  3. Measuring Interfacial Tension Between Immiscible Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser; Balasubramaniam, R.; Delsignore, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Glass capillary tube technique measures interfacial tension between two immiscible liquids. Yields useful data over fairly wide range of interfacial tensions, both for pairs of liquids having equal densities and pairs of liquids having unequal densities. Data on interfacial tensions important in diverse industrial chemical applications, including enhanced extraction of oil; printing; processing foods; and manufacture of paper, emulsions, foams, aerosols, detergents, gel encapsulants, coating materials, fertilizers, pesticides, and cosmetics.

  4. Phase separation kinetics in immiscible liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Lee H.; Sadoway, Donald R.

    1987-01-01

    The kinetics of phase separation in the succinonitrile-water system are being investigated. Experiments involve initial physical mixing of the two immiscible liquids at a temperature above the consolute, decreasing the temperature into the miscibility gap, followed by iamging of the resultant microstructure as it evolves with time. Refractive index differences allow documentation of the changing microstructures by noninvasive optical techniques without the need to quench the liquid structures for analysis.

  5. Phase separation kinetics in immiscible liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoway, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    The kinetics of phase separation in the succinonitrile-water system are being investigated. Experiments involve initial physical mixing of the two immiscible liquids at a temperature above the consolute, decreasing the temperature into the miscibility gap, followed by imaging of the resultant microstructure as it evolves with time. Refractive index differences allow documentation of the changing microstructures by noninvasive optical techniques without the need to quench the liquid structures for analysis.

  6. Evaporative Mass Transfer Behavior of a Complex Immiscible Liquid

    PubMed Central

    McColl, Colleen M.; Johnson, Gwynn R.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    A series of laboratory experiments was conducted with a multiple-component immiscible liquid, collected from the Picillo Farm Superfund Site in Rhode Island, to examine liquid-vapor mass-transfer behavior. The immiscible liquid, which comprises solvents, oils, pesticides, PCBs, paint sludges, explosives, and other compounds, was characterized using gas chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to determine mole fractions of selected constituents. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate equilibrium phase-partitioning behavior. Two sets of air-stripping column studies were conducted to examine the mass-transfer dynamics of five selected target compounds present in the immiscible-liquid mixture. One set of column experiments was designed to represent a system with free-phase immiscible liquid present; the other was designed to represent a system with a residual phase of immiscible liquid. Initial elution behavior of all target components generally appeared to be ideal for both systems, as the initial vapor-phase concentrations were similar to vapor-phase concentrations measured for the batch experiment and those estimated using Raoult’s law (incorporating the immiscible-liquid composition data). Later-stage removal of 1,2-dichlorobenzene appeared to be rate limited for the columns containing free-phase immiscible liquid and no porous medium. Conversely, evaporative mass transfer appeared to be ideal throughout the experiment conducted with immiscible liquid distributed relatively uniformly as a residual phase within a sandy porous medium. PMID:18614196

  7. Immiscible phase incorporation during directional solidification of hypermonotectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, J. Barry; Merrick, Roger A.

    1993-01-01

    Solidification processes in immiscible samples were investigated by directly observing the events taking place at the solid-liquid interface during directional solidification. Visualization of these events was made possible through the use of a transparent metal analog system and a temperature gradient stage assembly fitted to an optical microscope. The immiscible transparent analog system utilized was the succinonitrile-glycerol system. This system has been shown to exhibit the same morphological transitions as observed in metallic alloys of monotectic composition. Both monotectic and hypermonotectic composition samples were directionally solidified in order to gain an improved understanding of the manner in which the excess hypermonotectic liquid is incorporated into the solidifying structure. The processing conditions utilized prevented sedimentation of the excess hypermonotectic liquid by directionally solidifying the samples in very thin (13 microns), horizontally oriented cells. High thermal gradient to growth rate ratios (G/R) were used in an effort to prevent constitutional supercooling and the subsequent formation of L(sub 2) droplets in advance of the solidification front during the growth of fibrous composite structures. Results demonstrated that hypermonotectic composites could be produced in samples up to two weight percent off of the monotectic composition by using a G/R ratio greater than or equal to 4.6 x 10(exp 4) C(s)/mm(sup 2) to avoid constitutional supercooling. For hypermonotectic samples processed with G/R ratios below 4.6 x 10(exp 4) C(s)/mm(sup 2), constitutional supercooling occurred and resulted in slight interfacial instability. For these samples, two methods of incorporation of the hypermonotectic liquid were observed and are reported. The correlation between the phase spacing, lambda, and the growth rate, R, was examined and was found to obey a relationship generally associated with a diffusion controlled coupled growth process. For

  8. Alloy nanoparticle synthesis using ionizing radiation

    DOEpatents

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Powers, Dana A.; Zhang, Zhenyuan

    2011-08-16

    A method of forming stable nanoparticles comprising substantially uniform alloys of metals. A high dose of ionizing radiation is used to generate high concentrations of solvated electrons and optionally radical reducing species that rapidly reduce a mixture of metal ion source species to form alloy nanoparticles. The method can make uniform alloy nanoparticles from normally immiscible metals by overcoming the thermodynamic limitations that would preferentially produce core-shell nanoparticles.

  9. Binary Polymer Brushes of Strongly Immiscible Polymers.

    PubMed

    Chu, Elza; Babar, Tashnia; Bruist, Michael F; Sidorenko, Alexander

    2015-06-17

    The phenomenon of microphase separation is an example of self-assembly in soft matter and has been observed in block copolymers (BCPs) and similar materials (i.e., supramolecular assemblies (SMAs) and homo/block copolymer blends (HBCs)). In this study, we use microphase separation to construct responsive polymer brushes that collapse to generate periodic surfaces. This is achieved by a chemical reaction between the minor block (10%, poly(4-vinylpyridine)) of the block copolymer and a substrate. The major block of polystyrene (PS) forms mosaic-like arrays of grafted patches that are 10-20 nm in size. Depending on the nature of the assembly (SMA, HBC, or neat BCP) and annealing method (exposure to vapors of different solvents or heating above the glass transition temperature), a range of "mosaic" brushes with different parameters can be obtained. Successive grafting of a secondary polymer (polyacrylamide, PAAm) results in the fabrication of binary polymer brushes (BPBs). Upon being exposed to specific selective solvents, BPBs may adopt different conformations. The surface tension and adhesion of the binary brush are governed by the polymer occupying the top stratum. The "mosaic" brush approach allows for a combination of strongly immiscible polymers in one brush. This facilitates substantial contrast in the surface properties upon switching, previously only possible for substrates composed of predetermined nanostructures. We also demonstrate a possible application of such PS/PAAm brushes in a tunable bioadhesion-bioadhesive (PS on top) or nonbioadhesive (PAAm on top) surface as revealed by Escherichia coli bacterial seeding.

  10. Welding immiscible polymers with a supercritical fluid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaochu; Sanchez, Isaac C

    2007-11-20

    Polymer adhesion between two immiscible polymers is usually poor because there is little interpenetration of one polymer into the other at the interface. Increasing the width of the interfacial zone can enhance adhesion and mechanical properties. In principle, this can be accomplished by exposing heterogeneous polymer materials to a high-pressure fluid. The fluid can act as a common solvent and promote interpenetration. It also increases chain mobility at the interface, which helps to promote "welding" of the two polymers. A combination of the gradient theory of inhomogeneous systems and the Sanchez-Lacombe equation of state was used to investigate this phenomenon, especially the effect of the high compressibility of supercritical (SC) fluid on the compatibilization of two incompatible polymers. We calculate the interfacial density profile, interfacial thickness, and interfacial tension between the two polymers with and without the SC fluid. We find that the interfacial tension is decreased and the interfacial thickness is increased with high-pressure SC fluid for the ternary systems we have investigated. As the critical point is approached and the SC compressibility becomes large, no enhancement or deleterious effects on compatibilization were observed.

  11. Experiments on liquid immiscibility along tholeiitic liquid lines of descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlier, Bernard; Grove, Timothy L.

    2012-07-01

    Crystallization experiments have been conducted on compositions along tholeiitic liquid lines of descent to define the compositional space for the development of silicate liquid immiscibility. Starting materials have 46-56 wt% SiO2, 11.7-17.7 wt% FeOtot, and Mg-number between 0.29 and 0.36. These melts fall on the basaltic trends relevant for Mull, Iceland, Snake River Plain lavas and for the Sept Iles layered intrusion, where large-scale liquid immiscibility has been recognized. At one atmosphere under anhydrous conditions, immiscibility develops below 1,000-1,020°C in all of these compositionally diverse lavas. Extreme iron enrichment is not necessary; immiscibility also develops during iron depletion and silica enrichment. Variations in melt composition control the development of silicate liquid immiscibility along the tholeiitic trend. Elevation of Na2O + K2O + P2O5 + TiO2 promotes the development of two immiscible liquids. Increasing melt CaO and Al2O3 stabilizes a single-liquid field. New data and published phase equilibria show that anhydrous, low-pressure fractional crystallization is the most favorable condition for unmixing during differentiation. Pressure inhibits immiscibility because it expands the stability field of high-Ca clinopyroxene, which reduces the proportion of plagioclase in the crystallizing assemblage, thus enhancing early iron depletion. Magma mixing between primitive basalt and Fe-Ti-P-rich ferrobasalts can serve to elevate phosphorous and alkali contents and thereby promote unmixing. Water might decrease the temperature and size of the two-liquid field, potentially shifting the binodal (solvus) below the liquidus, leading the system to evolve as a single-melt phase.

  12. Semiempirical Analysis of Surface Alloy Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John; Ibanez-Meier, Rodrigo

    1995-01-01

    The BFS method for alloys is applied to the study of surface alloy formation. This method was previously used to examine the experimental STM observation of surface alloying of Au on Ni(110) for low Au coverages by means of a numerical simulation. In this work, we extend the study to include other cases of surface alloying for immiscible as well as miscible metals. All binary combinations of Ni, Au, Cu, and Al are considered and the simulation results are compared to experiment when data is available. The driving mechanisms of surface alloy formation are then discussed in terms of the BFS method and the available results.

  13. Method of removing an immiscible lubricant from a refrigeration system and apparatus for same

    DOEpatents

    Spauschus, Hans O.; Starr, Thomas L.

    1999-01-01

    A method of separating an immiscible lubricant from a liquid refrigerant in a refrigerating system including a compressor, a condenser, an expansion device and an evaporator, wherein the expansion device is connected to the condenser by a liquid refrigerant flow line for liquid refrigerant and immiscible lubricant. The method comprising slowing the rate of flow of the liquid refrigerant and immiscible lubricant between the condenser and the expansion device such that the liquid refrigerant and the immiscible lubricant separate based upon differences in density. The method also comprises collecting the separated immiscible lubricant in a collection chamber in fluid communication with the separated immiscible lubricant. Apparatus for performing the method is also disclosed.

  14. Effect of wettability on adverse mobility immiscible floods

    SciTech Connect

    Vives, M.T.; Chang, Y.C.; Mohanty, K.K.

    1995-12-31

    Many immiscible displacements in reservoirs occur at adverse mobility. Effect of wettability on these displacements is not well understood and often ignored in reservoir simulation. Recent macroscopic theories of viscous fingering treat adverse immiscible flows similar to miscible flows, the mixing in the fingered region being controlled by a Todd-Longstaff-type functional form. The wettability of the medium is taken into account only through the use of appropriate relative permeabilities. The goal of this paper is to understand the macroscopic bypassing in adverse mobility immiscible floods. Immiscible displacements are conducted in a quarter 5-spot model in both drainage and imbibition modes at similar effective mobility ratios and viscous-to-gravity numbers. The level of bypassing and gravity override is visualized and measured. Tertiary water-alternating-gas (WAG) displacements are also conducted at various WAG ratios and viscosity ratios. Fractional flow analysis and numerical simulation are used to understand these displacements. Experiments show that macroscopic viscous fingering is present in adverse viscosity immiscible displacements where no saturation shock is expected from 1-D fractional flow theory. Bypassing due to both fingering and gravity override is higher in the drainage mode than in the imbibition mode, with other key parameters being the same. Optimum WAG ratio in water-wet rock is a function of oil/solvent viscosity ratio. The macroscopic flow theory needs to include capillarity and viscous fingering to match these experimental findings.

  15. Liquid immiscibility in model bilayer lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veatch, Sarah L.

    There is growing evidence that cell plasma membranes are laterally organized into "raft" regions in which particular lipids and proteins are concentrated. These domains have sub-micron dimensions and have been implicated in vital cell functions. Similar liquid domains are observed in model bilayer membrane mixtures that mimick cellular lipid compositions. In model membranes, domains can be large (microns) and can readily form in the absence of proteins. This thesis presents studies of liquid immiscibility in model membrane systems using two experimental methods. By fluorescence microscopy, this thesis documents that miscibility transitions occur in a wide variety of ternary lipid mixtures containing high melting temperature (saturated) lipids, low melting temperature (usually unsaturated) lipids, and cholesterol. I have constructed detailed miscibility phase diagrams for three separate ternary lipid mixtures (DOPC/DPPC/Chol, DOPC/PSM/Chol, and POPC/PSM/Chol). Phase separation is also observed in membranes of lipids extracted from human erythrocytes. NMR experiments probe lipid order and verify the coexistence of a saturated lipid and cholesterol rich liquid ordered (Lo) phase with a more disordered, unsaturated lipid rich liquid crystalline (Lalpha) phase at low temperatures. These experiments also find multiple thermodynamic transitions and lipid organization on different length-scales. This complexity is revealed because fluorescence microscopy and NMR probe lipid order at different length-scales (>1mum vs. ˜100nm). NMR detects small domains (˜80nm) at temperatures just below the miscibility transition, even though micron-scale domains are observed by fluorescent microscopy. NMR does detect large-scale ("100nm) demixing, but at a lower temperature. In addition, it has long been known that >10nm length-scale structure is present in many lipid mixtures containing cholesterol and at least one additional lipid species, though it is shown here that only a subset of

  16. Mixing of immiscible polymers using nanoporous coordination templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Takashi; Kaseda, Tetsuya; Sasaki, Yotaro; Inukai, Munehiro; Toriyama, Takaaki; Takahara, Atsushi; Jinnai, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2015-07-01

    The establishment of methodologies for the mixing of immiscible substances is highly desirable to facilitate the development of fundamental science and materials technology. Herein we describe a new protocol for the compatibilization of immiscible polymers at the molecular level using porous coordination polymers (PCPs) as removable templates. In this process, the typical immiscible polymer pair of polystyrene (PSt) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was prepared via the successive homopolymerizations of their monomers in a PCP to distribute the polymers inside the PCP particles. Subsequent dissolution of the PCP frameworks in a chelator solution affords a PSt/PMMA blend that is homogeneous in the range of several nanometers. Due to the unusual compatibilization, the thermal properties of the polymer blend are remarkably improved compared with the conventional solvent-cast blend. This method is also applicable to the compatibilization of PSt and polyacrylonitrile, which have very different solubility parameters.

  17. Hydrogenation with monolith reactor under conditions of immiscible liquid phases

    DOEpatents

    Nordquist, Andrew Francis; Wilhelm, Frederick Carl; Waller, Francis Joseph; Machado, Reinaldo Mario

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to an improved for the hydrogenation of an immiscible mixture of an organic reactant in water. The immiscible mixture can result from the generation of water by the hydrogenation reaction itself or, by the addition of, water to the reactant prior to contact with the catalyst. The improvement resides in effecting the hydrogenation reaction in a monolith catalytic reactor from 100 to 800 cpi, at a superficial velocity of from 0.1 to 2 m/second in the absence of a cosolvent for the immiscible mixture. In a preferred embodiment, the hydrogenation is carried out using a monolith support which has a polymer network/carbon coating onto which a transition metal is deposited.

  18. Process for blending coal with water immiscible liquid

    DOEpatents

    Heavin, Leonard J.; King, Edward E.; Milliron, Dennis L.

    1982-10-26

    A continuous process for blending coal with a water immiscible liquid produces a uniform, pumpable slurry. Pulverized raw feed coal and preferably a coal derived, water immiscible liquid are continuously fed to a blending zone (12 and 18) in which coal particles and liquid are intimately admixed and advanced in substantially plug flow to form a first slurry. The first slurry is withdrawn from the blending zone (12 and 18) and fed to a mixing zone (24) where it is mixed with a hot slurry to form the pumpable slurry. A portion of the pumpable slurry is continuously recycled to the blending zone (12 and 18) for mixing with the feed coal.

  19. Ultrathin-skinned asymmetric membranes by immiscible solvents treatment

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, D.T.; Babcock, W.C.

    1989-11-28

    Improved semipermeable asymmetric fluid separation membranes useful in gas, vapor and liquid separations are disclosed. The membranes are prepared by substantially filling the pores of asymmetric cellulosic semipermeable membranes having a finely porous layer on one side thereof with a water immiscible organic liquid, followed by contacting the finely porous layer with water.

  20. Measurement of interfacial tension of immiscible liquid pairs in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Michael C.; Neilson, George F.; Baertlein, Carl; Subramanian, R. Shankar; Trinh, Eugene H.

    1994-01-01

    A discussion is given of a containerless microgravity experiment aimed at measuring the interfacial tension of immiscible liquid pairs using a compound drop rotation method. The reasons for the failure to execute such experiments in microgravity are described. Also, the results of post-flight analyses used to confirm our arguments are presented.

  1. Investigation of immiscible systems and potential applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markworth, A. J.; Oldfield, W.; Duga, J.; Gelles, S. H.

    1975-01-01

    The droplet coalescence kinetics at 0 g and 1 g were considered for two systems which contained liquid droplets in a host liquid. One of these (Al-In) typified a system containing a liquid phase miscibility gap and the order (oil-water) a mixture of two essentially insoluble liquids. A number of coalescence mechanisms potentially prominent at low g in this system were analyzed and explanations are presented for the observed unusual stability of the emulsion. Ground base experiments were conducted on the coalescence of In droplets in and Al-In alloy during cooling through the miscibility gap at different cooling rates. These were in qualitative agreement with the computer simulation. Potential applications for systems with liquid phase miscibility gaps were explored. Possibilities included superconductors, electrical contact materials, superplastic materials, catalysts, magnetic materials, and others. The role of space processing in their production was also analyzed.

  2. Novel Directional Solidification Processing of Hypermonotectic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William; Fedoseyev, Alex

    2002-01-01

    A model has been developed that determines the size of Liquid (sub 11) droplets generated during application of ultrasonic energy (as a function of amplitude) to immiscible alloys. The initial results are in accordance with experimental results based on Succinonitrile - Glycerol "alloys" and pure tin dispersions. Future work will take into account the importance of other effects, e.g., thermo-vibrational convection, sound attenuation, viscosity variations, and compositional changes.

  3. Lattice Boltzmann equation method for multiple immiscible continuum fluids.

    PubMed

    Spencer, T J; Halliday, I; Care, C M

    2010-12-01

    This paper generalizes the two-component algorithm of Sec. , extending it, in Sec. , to describe N>2 mutually immiscible fluids in the isothermal continuum regime. Each fluid has an independent interfacial tension. While retaining all its computational advantages, we remove entirely the empiricism associated with contact behavior in our previous multiple immiscible fluid models [M. M. Dupin, Phys. Rev. E 73, 055701(R) (2006); Med. Eng. Phys. 28, 13 (2006)] while solidifying the physical foundations. Moreover, the model relies upon a fluid-fluid segregation which is simpler, computationally faster, more free of artifacts (i.e., the interfacial microcurrent), and upon an interface-inducing force distribution which is analytic. The method is completely symmetric between any numbers of immiscible fluids and stable over a wide range of directly input interfacial tension. We present data on the steady-state properties of multiple interface model, which are in good agreement with theory [R. E. Johnson and S. S. Sadhal, Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech. 17, 289 (1985)], specifically on the shapes of multidrop systems. Section is an analysis of the kinetic and continuum-scale descriptions of the underlying two-component lattice Boltzmann model for immiscible fluids, extendable to more than two immiscible fluids. This extension requires (i) the use of a more local kinetic equation perturbation which is (ii) free from a reliance on measured interfacial curvature. It should be noted that viewed simply as a two-component method, the continuum algorithm is inferior to our previous methods, reported by Lishchuk [Phys. Rev. E 67, 036701 (2003)] and Halliday [Phys. Rev. E 76, 026708 (2007)]. Greater stability and parameter range is achieved in multiple drop simulations by using the forced multi-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann method developed, along with (for completeness) a forced exactly incompressible Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook lattice Boltzmann model, in the Appendix. These appended schemes

  4. Novel Directional Solidification Processing of Hypermonotectic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.

    1999-01-01

    Gravity driven separation precludes uniform microstructural development during controlled directional solidification (DS) processing of hypermonotectic alloys. It is well established that liquid/liquid suspensions, in which the respective components are immiscible and have significant density differences, can be established and maintained by utilizing ultrasound. A historical introduction to this work is presented with the intent of establishing the basis for applying the phenomena to promote microstructural uniformity during controlled directional solidification processing of immiscible mixtures. Experimental work based on transparent organics, as well as salt systems, will be presented in view of the processing parameters.

  5. Covalent Fusion of layered Incompatible Gels in Immiscible Solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Santidan; Singh, Awaneesh; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Balazs, Anna C.

    We carry out dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations to model a two layered stackable gel where the gels are incompatible and are present in immiscible solvent. The bottom layer of the gel is created first and then a solution of new initiators, monomers and cross-linkers is introduced on top of it. These components then undergo polymerization and form the second gel layer. We study all possible combinations of free radical polymerization (FRP) and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) mechanisms with the two layers of the gel. For example, the bottom layer gel is created via ATRP, whereas the top layer gel follows FRP. Our focus is to do a systematic study of all these combinations and find out the factors responsible for combining two incompatible gels in immiscible solvents.

  6. Research aimed at immiscible CO/sub 2/ flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, F.T.H.; Burchfield, T.E.

    1987-04-27

    The National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (Niper) is conducting reserach to develop improved methods for oil recovery by immiscible CO/sub 2/ displacement. The research includes fundamental studies of displacement mechanisms and coreflooding tests for development of an optimal injection method. Heavy oils are the major target of this research. For heavier crudes (API gravity below 25/sup 0/), high viscosity is a major constraint in oil recovery and pipeline transportation. Therefore, reducing oil viscosity becomes critical. Methods currently being used for viscous oil recovery include thermal methods (steamflooding and in situ combustion) and CO/sub 2/ methods. Steamflooding has been widely applied. The number of immiscible CO/sub 2/ projects is small but increasing.

  7. Immiscible fluid: Heat of fusion heat storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edie, D. D.; Melsheimer, S. S.; Mullins, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    Both heat and mass transfer in direct contact aqueous crystallizing systems were studied as part of a program desig- ned to evaluate the feasibility of direct contact heat transfer in phase change storage using aqueous salt system. Major research areas, discussed include (1) crystal growth velocity study on selected salts; (2) selection of salt solutions; (3) selection of immiscible fluids; (4) studies of heat transfer and system geometry; and (5) system demonstration.

  8. Lattice Boltzmann equation method for multiple immiscible continuum fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, T. J.; Halliday, I.; Care, C. M.

    2010-12-01

    This paper generalizes the two-component algorithm of Sec. , extending it, in Sec. , to describe N>2 mutually immiscible fluids in the isothermal continuum regime. Each fluid has an independent interfacial tension. While retaining all its computational advantages, we remove entirely the empiricism associated with contact behavior in our previous multiple immiscible fluid models [M. M. Dupin , Phys. Rev. E 73, 055701(R) (2006)10.1103/PhysRevE.73.055701; Med. Eng. Phys. 28, 13 (2006)10.1016/j.medengphy.2005.04.015] while solidifying the physical foundations. Moreover, the model relies upon a fluid-fluid segregation which is simpler, computationally faster, more free of artifacts (i.e., the interfacial microcurrent), and upon an interface-inducing force distribution which is analytic. The method is completely symmetric between any numbers of immiscible fluids and stable over a wide range of directly input interfacial tension. We present data on the steady-state properties of multiple interface model, which are in good agreement with theory [R. E. Johnson and S. S. Sadhal, Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech. 17, 289 (1985)10.1146/annurev.fl.17.010185.001445], specifically on the shapes of multidrop systems. Section is an analysis of the kinetic and continuum-scale descriptions of the underlying two-component lattice Boltzmann model for immiscible fluids, extendable to more than two immiscible fluids. This extension requires (i) the use of a more local kinetic equation perturbation which is (ii) free from a reliance on measured interfacial curvature. It should be noted that viewed simply as a two-component method, the continuum algorithm is inferior to our previous methods, reported by Lishchuk [Phys. Rev. E 67, 036701 (2003)]10.1103/PhysRevE.76.036701 and Halliday [Phys. Rev. E 76, 026708 (2007)]10.1103/PhysRevE.76.026708. Greater stability and parameter range is achieved in multiple drop simulations by using the forced multi-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann method developed

  9. Method of removing an immiscible lubricant from a refrigeration system and apparatus for same

    SciTech Connect

    Spauschus, H.O.; Starr, T.L.

    1999-03-30

    A method is described for separating an immiscible lubricant from a liquid refrigerant in a refrigerating system including a compressor, a condenser, an expansion device and an evaporator, wherein the expansion device is connected to the condenser by a liquid refrigerant flow line for liquid refrigerant and immiscible lubricant. The method comprising slowing the rate of flow of the liquid refrigerant and immiscible lubricant between the condenser and the expansion device such that the liquid refrigerant and the immiscible lubricant separate based upon differences in density. The method also comprises collecting the separated immiscible lubricant in a collection chamber in fluid communication with the separated immiscible lubricant. Apparatus for performing the method is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  10. Structural properties of bismuth-bearing semiconductor alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berding, M. A.; Sher, A.; Chen, A.-B.; Miller, W. E.

    1988-01-01

    The structural properties of bismuth-bearing III-V semiconductor alloys InPBi, InAsBi, and InSbBi were studied theoretically. Bond energies, bond lengths, and strain coefficients were calculated for pure AlBi, GaBi, and InBi compounds and their alloys, and predictions were made for the mixing enthalpies, miscibility gaps, and critical metastable-to-stable material transition temperatures. Miscibility calculations indicate that InSbBi will be the most miscible, and the InPBi will be the the most difficult to mix. However, calculations of the hardness of the Bi compounds indicate that, once formed, the InPBi alloy will be harder than the other Bi alloys and substantially harder than the currently favored narrow-gap semiconductor HgCdTe.

  11. Coalescence of Immiscible Liquid Metal Drop on Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Li, Jie; Wang, Long; Duan, Yunrui; Li, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the wetting and coalescence of liquid Al and Pb drops on four carbon-based substrates. We highlight the importance of the microstructure and surface topography of substrates in the coalescence process. Our results show that the effect of substrate on coalescence is achieved by changing the wettability of the Pb metal. Additionally, we determine the critical distance between nonadjacent Al and Pb films required for coalescence. These findings improve our understanding of the coalescence of immiscible liquid metals at the atomistic level. PMID:27667589

  12. Immiscible solvents enabled nanostructure formation for efficient polymer photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Hyun; Michael Yang, Yang; You, Jingbi; Richard, Eric; Li, Gang

    2014-07-25

    Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) fabricated via solution processing are an attractive way to realize low cost solar energy harvesting. Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) devices are the most successful design, but their morphology is less controllable. In this manuscript, we describe a simple approach to realize 'ordered' BHJ morphology using two immiscible solvents with different boiling point and a quasi-bilayer approach. Tunable fine structures were demonstrated in poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-Phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) model systems, and the devices with optimized fine structure showed a 33% efficiency enhancement compared to those with a planar bilayer structure.

  13. Oil ganglion dynamics during immiscible displacement: model formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Payatakes, A.C.; Ng, K.M.; Flumerfelt, R.W.

    1980-05-01

    A model is formulated in order to study the transient behavior of oil ganglion populations during immiscible displacement in oil recovery processes. The model is composed of 3 components: a suitable model for granular porous media; a stochastic simulation method capable of predicting the expected fate (mobilization, breakup, stranding) of solitary oil ganglia moving through granular porous media; and 2 coupled ganglion population balance equations, one applying to moving ganglia and the other to stranded ones. The porous medium model consists of a regular network of randomly sized unit cells of the constricted tube type. 32 references.

  14. The rotating movement of three immiscible fluids - A benchmark problem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bakker, M.; Oude, Essink G.H.P.; Langevin, C.D.

    2004-01-01

    A benchmark problem involving the rotating movement of three immiscible fluids is proposed for verifying the density-dependent flow component of groundwater flow codes. The problem consists of a two-dimensional strip in the vertical plane filled with three fluids of different densities separated by interfaces. Initially, the interfaces between the fluids make a 45??angle with the horizontal. Over time, the fluids rotate to the stable position whereby the interfaces are horizontal; all flow is caused by density differences. Two cases of the problem are presented, one resulting in a symmetric flow field and one resulting in an asymmetric flow field. An exact analytical solution for the initial flow field is presented by application of the vortex theory and complex variables. Numerical results are obtained using three variable-density groundwater flow codes (SWI, MOCDENS3D, and SEAWAT). Initial horizontal velocities of the interfaces, as simulated by the three codes, compare well with the exact solution. The three codes are used to simulate the positions of the interfaces at two times; the three codes produce nearly identical results. The agreement between the results is evidence that the specific rotational behavior predicted by the models is correct. It also shows that the proposed problem may be used to benchmark variable-density codes. It is concluded that the three models can be used to model accurately the movement of interfaces between immiscible fluids, and have little or no numerical dispersion. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Domain walls and bubble droplets in immiscible binary Bose gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatrella, G.; Malomed, Boris A.; Salerno, Mario

    2014-10-01

    The existence and stability of domain walls (DWs) and bubble-droplet (BD) states in binary mixtures of quasi-one-dimensional ultracold Bose gases with inter- and intraspecies repulsive interactions is considered. Previously, DWs were studied by means of coupled systems of Gross-Pitaevskii equations (GPEs) with cubic terms, which model immiscible binary Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). We address immiscible BECs with two- and three-body repulsive interactions, as well as binary Tonks-Girardeau (TG) gases, using systems of GPEs with cubic and quintic nonlinearities for the binary BEC, and coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations with quintic terms for the TG gases. Exact DW solutions are found for the symmetric BEC mixture, with equal intraspecies scattering lengths. Stable asymmetric DWs in the BEC mixtures with dissimilar interactions in the two components, as well as of symmetric and asymmetric DWs in the binary TG gas, are found by means of numerical and approximate analytical methods. In the BEC system, DWs can be easily put in motion by phase imprinting. Combining a DW and anti-DW on a ring, we construct BD states for both the BEC and TG models. These consist of a dark soliton in one component (the "bubble"), and a bright soliton (the "droplet") in the other. In the BEC system, these composite states are mobile, too.

  16. BHR equations re-derived with immiscible particle effects

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarzkopf, John Dennis; Horwitz, Jeremy A.

    2015-05-01

    Compressible and variable density turbulent flows with dispersed phase effects are found in many applications ranging from combustion to cloud formation. These types of flows are among the most challenging to simulate. While the exact equations governing a system of particles and fluid are known, computational resources limit the scale and detail that can be simulated in this type of problem. Therefore, a common method is to simulate averaged versions of the flow equations, which still capture salient physics and is relatively less computationally expensive. Besnard developed such a model for variable density miscible turbulence, where ensemble-averaging was applied to the flow equations to yield a set of filtered equations. Besnard further derived transport equations for the Reynolds stresses, the turbulent mass flux, and the density-specific volume covariance, to help close the filtered momentum and continuity equations. We re-derive the exact BHR closure equations which include integral terms owing to immiscible effects. Physical interpretations of the additional terms are proposed along with simple models. The goal of this work is to extend the BHR model to allow for the simulation of turbulent flows where an immiscible dispersed phase is non-trivially coupled with the carrier phase.

  17. Ferrobasalt-rhyolite immiscibility in tholeiitic volcanic and plutonic series (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlier, B.; Namur, O.; Kamenetsky, V. S.; Grove, T. L.

    2013-12-01

    One atmosphere experiments show that silicate liquid immiscibility develops between Fe-rich and Si-rich melts below 1000-1020°C in compositionally diverse lavas that represent classical tholeiitic trends, such as Mull, Iceland, Snake River Plain and Sept Iles. Extreme iron enrichment along the evolution trend is not necessary; immiscibility also develops during iron depletion and silica enrichment after Fe-Ti oxide saturation. Natural liquid lines of descent for major tholeiitic series also approach or intersect the experimentally-defined compositional space of immiscibility. The importance of ferrobasalt-rhyolite unmixing in both volcanic and plutonic environments is supported by worldwide occurrence of immiscible globules in the mesostasis of erupted basalts, and by unmixed melt inclusions in cumulus phases of major layered intrusions such as Sept Iles, Skaergaard and Sudbury. A clear case of liquid immiscibility is also recorded in intrusive tholeiitic gabbros from the Siberian Large Igneous Province and is evidenced by textures and compositions of millimeter-sized silicate melt pools trapped in native iron. An important implication of immiscibility in natural ferrobasaltic provinces is the development of a compositional gap characterized by the absence of intermediate compositions, a major feature observed in many tholeiitic provinces and referred to as the Daly gap. The compositions of experimental silica-rich immiscible melts coincide with those of natural rhyolites with high FeOtot and low Al2O3, which suggests a potential role for large-scale immiscibility in the petrogenesis of late-stage ferroan silicic melts. No evidence for the paired ferrobasaltic melt is observed in volcanic provinces, probably because of its uneruptable characteristics. Instead, Fe-Ti×P-rich gabbros crystallized at depth and are the cumulate products of immiscible Fe-rich melts in plutonic settings, a feature clearly evidenced in the Sept Iles intrusion. The production of

  18. Application of the boundary integral method to immiscible displacement problems

    SciTech Connect

    Masukawa, J.; Horne, R.N.

    1988-08-01

    This paper presents an application of the boundary integral method (BIM) to fluid displacement problems to demonstrate its usefulness in reservoir simulation. A method for solving two-dimensional (2D), piston-like displacement for incompressible fluids with good accuracy has been developed. Several typical example problems with repeated five-spot patterns were solved for various mobility ratios. The solutions were compared with the analytical solutions to demonstrate accuracy. Singularity programming was found to be a major advantage in handling flow in the vicinity of wells. The BIM was found to be an excellent way to solve immiscible displacement problems. Unlike analytic methods, it can accommodate complex boundary shapes and does not suffer from numerical dispersion at the front.

  19. Flow behaviour of negatively buoyant jets in immiscible ambient fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, A.; Phillips, J. C.; Mier-Torrecilla, M.; Idelsohn, S. R.; Oñate, E.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigate experimentally the injection of a negatively buoyant jet into a homogenous immiscible ambient fluid. Experiments are carried out by injecting a jet of dyed fresh water through a nozzle in the base of a cylindrical tank containing rapeseed oil. The fountain inlet flow rate and nozzle diameter were varied to cover a wide range of Richardson Ri (8 × 10-4 < Ri < 1.98), Reynolds Re (467 < Re < 5,928) and Weber We (2.40 < We < 308.56) numbers. Based on the Re, Ri and We values for the experiments, we have determined a regime map to define how these values may control the occurrence of the observed flow types. Whereas Ri plays a stronger role when determining the maximum penetration height, the effect of the Reynolds number is stronger predicting the flow behaviour for a specific nozzle diameter and injection velocity.

  20. A novel coarsening mechanism of droplets in immiscible fluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Ryotaro; Tanaka, Hajime

    2015-06-01

    In our daily lives, after shaking a salad dressing, we see the coarsening of oil droplets suspended in vinegar. Such a demixing process is observed everywhere in nature and also of technological importance. For a case of high droplet density, domain coarsening proceeds with inter-droplet collisions and the resulting coalescence. This phenomenon has been explained primarily by the so-called Brownian-coagulation mechanism: stochastic thermal forces exerted by molecules induce random motion of individual droplets, causing accidental collisions and subsequent interface-tension-driven coalescence. Contrary to this, here we demonstrate that the droplet motion is not random, but hydrodynamically driven by the composition Marangoni force due to an interfacial tension gradient produced in each droplet as a consequence of composition correlation among droplets. This alters our physical understanding of droplet coarsening in immiscible liquid mixtures on a fundamental level.

  1. Purification of cell subpopulations via immiscible filtration assisted by surface tension (IFAST).

    PubMed

    Berry, Scott M; Strotman, Lindsay N; Kueck, Jessica D; Alarid, Elaine T; Beebe, David J

    2011-12-01

    The selective isolation of a sub-population of cells from a larger, mixed population is a critical preparatory process to many biomedical assays. Here, we present a new cell isolation platform with a unique set of advantages over existing devices. Our technology, termed Immiscible Filtration Assisted by Surface Tension, exploits physical phenomena associated with the microscale to establish fluidic barriers composed of immiscible liquids. By attaching magnetically-responsive particles to a target cell population via immunocapture, we can selectively transport this population across the immiscible barrier and into a separate aqueous solution. The high interfacial energy associated with the immiscible phase / aqueous phase boundaries prevents unwanted cells or other contaminants from inadvertently crossing the immiscible phase. We have demonstrated, using fluorescent particles, stromal cells, and whole blood as "background", that we can successfully isolate ~70% of a target breast cancer cell population with an average purity of >80%. Increased purity was obtained by coupling two immiscible barriers in series, a modification that only slightly increases operational complexity. Furthermore, several samples can be processed in parallel batches in a near-instantaneous manner without the requirement of any washing, which can cause dilution (negative selection) or significant uncontrolled loss (positive selection) of target cells. Finally, cells were observed to remain viable and proliferative following traverse through the immiscible phase, indicating that this process is suitable for a variety of downstream assays, including those requiring intact living cells.

  2. Containerless processing of hypermonotectic and glass forming alloys using the Marshall Space Flight Center 100 meter drop tube facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, J. B.

    1986-01-01

    Two separate projects were carried out to study alloys whose solidification structures can be strongly influenced by the presence of a container during melting and solidifications. One project involved containerless solidification of hypermonotectic Au35Rh65 alloys. This alloy exhibits liquid immiscibility over a temperature range. It has been suggested that containerless melting might be one solution to the problem of sedimentation in the dispersions of immiscible liquid phases. However, surface tension driven flows could also lead to accumulation of the minority liquid phase at the external surface of a containerlessly melted alloy. The research underway is a first step in determining the influence of containerless, microgravity processing on immiscible alloys. Nickel-niobium alloys were studied using the drop tube facility. One alloy in this system, a Ni60Nb40 alloy, is a good candidate for the formation of a bulk metallic glass. Amorphous alloys of this composition were produced using thin film and mechanical alloying techniques. However, theory indicates that if heterogeneous nucleation can be avoided, it should be possible to produce an amorphous structure in this system using a moderate cooling rate from the melt. The containerless melting and solidification capabilities of the drop tube faciltiy provide ideal conditions for a study of this type. To date, several Ni60Nb40 samples have been levitated, melted and cooled during 4.6 seconds of free fall in the 100 meter drop tube. Structures obtained are discussed.

  3. Particle Swarm Transport through Immiscible Fluid Layers in a Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teasdale, N. D.; Boomsma, E.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2011-12-01

    Immiscible fluids occur either naturally (e.g. oil & water) or from anthropogenic processes (e.g. liquid CO2 & water) in the subsurface and complicate the transport of natural or engineered micro- or nano-scale particles. In this study, we examined the effect of immiscible fluids on the formation and evolution of particle swarms in a fracture. A particle swarm is a collection of colloidal-size particles in a dilute suspension that exhibits cohesive behavior. Swarms fall under gravity with a velocity that is greater than the settling velocity of a single particle. Thus a particle swarm of colloidal contaminants can potentially travel farther and faster in a fracture than expected for a dispersion or emulsion of colloidal particles. We investigated the formation, evolution, and break-up of colloidal swarms under gravity in a uniform aperture fracture as hydrophobic/hydrophyllic particle swarms move across an oil-water interface. A uniform aperture fracture was fabricated from two transparent acrylic rectangular prisms (100 mm x 50 mm x 100 mm) that are separated by 1, 2.5, 5, 10 or 50 mm. The fracture was placed, vertically, inside a glass tank containing a layer of pure silicone oil (polydimethylsiloxane) on distilled water. Along the length of the fracture, 30 mm was filled with oil and 70 mm with water. Experiments were conducted using silicone oils with viscosities of 5, 10, 100, or 1000 cSt. Particle swarms (5 μl) were comprised of a 1% concentration (by mass) of 25 micron glass beads (hydrophilic) suspended in a water drop, or a 1% concentration (by mass) of 3 micron polystyrene fluorescent beads (hydrophobic) suspended in a water drop. The swarm behavior was imaged using an optical fluorescent imaging system composed of a CCD camera and by green (525 nm) LED arrays for illumination. Swarms were spherical and remained coherent as they fell through the oil because of the immiscibility of oil and water. However, as a swarm approached the oil-water interface, it

  4. Capillary pinning of immiscible gravity currents in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, B.; MacMinn, C. W.; Huppert, H. E.; Juanes, R.

    2013-12-01

    Gravity currents in porous media have attracted interest recently in the context of geological carbon dioxide (CO2) storage, where supercritical CO2 is captured from the flue gas of power plants and injected underground into deep saline aquifers. Capillarity can be important in the spreading and migration of the buoyant CO2 after injection because the typical pore size is very small (~10-100 microns), but the impact of capillarity on these flows is not well understood. Here, we study the impact of capillarity on the buoyant spreading of a finite gravity current of non-wetting fluid into a dense, wetting fluid in a vertically confined, horizontal aquifer. We show via simple, table-top experiments using glass bead packs that capillary pressure hysteresis pins a portion of the fluid-fluid interface. The horizontal extent of the pinned portion of the interface grows over time and this is responsible for ultimately stopping the spreading of the buoyant current after a finite distance. In addition, capillarity blunts the leading edge of the buoyant current. We demonstrate through micromodel experiments that the characteristic height of the nose of the current is controlled by the pore throat size distribution and the balance between capillarity and gravity. We develop a theoretical model that captures the evolution of immiscible gravity currents and predicts the maximum migration distance. Our work suggests that capillary pinning and capillary blunting exert an important control on finite-release gravity currents in the context of CO2 sequestration in deep saline aquifers. Gravity driven flow of a buoyant, nonwetting fluid (air) over a dense, wetting fluid (propylene glycol). Starting with a vertical interface between the fluids, the flow first undergoes a lock-exchange process. The process models a finite release problem after the dense fluid hits the left boundary. In contrast to finite release of a miscible current that spreads indefinitely, spreading of an immiscible

  5. Phase Change Effects on Immiscible Flow Displacements in Radial Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadlouydarab, Majid; Azaiez, Jalel; Chen, Zhangxin

    2014-11-01

    We report a systematic simulation of immiscible fluid-fluid displacements in radial injection in the presence of phase change. Due to the presence of two fluid-fluid interfaces in the system, a special treatment has been adopted. To track the leading interface position, two highly accurate methods including Level Set and Immersed Interface Method were used, while for locating the trailing interface an energy equation was adopted assuming the existence of a constant thin condensate layer. Dimensional analysis led to three important dimensionless groups including capillary number (Ca), Jacob number (Ja) and viscosity ratios (M) of the three fluids. Simulation results indicate significant influences of these parameters on the development of the instability and the interfacial morphology of fingers. Increasing Ca or M tends to amplify the interfacial instability, fingertip splitting, and results in longer fingers. In contrast, increasing Ja has stabilizing effects due to an increase of the thickness of the condensate layer. On the other hand at lower viscosity ratios as well as lower Ca, because of compensation effects of the phase change, both leading and trailing interfaces are found to be less unstable. Moreover accumulated condensate and oil saturation depletion curves show increasing and decreasing trends, respectively, when the Ca increases. Although viscosity ratio and Ja have similar effects on the accumulated condensate, they do not show any effect on the oil depletion saturation.

  6. Immiscibility in the Nickel Ferrite-Zinc Ferrite Spinel Binary

    SciTech Connect

    SE Ziemniak; AR Gaddipati; PC Sander; SB Rice

    2006-06-21

    Immiscibility in the trevorite (NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) - franklinite (ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) spinel binary is investigated by reacting 1:1:2 molar ratio mixtures of NiO, ZnO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} in a molten salt solvent at temperatures in the range 400-1000 C. Single phase stability is demonstrated down to about 730 C (the estimated consolute solution temperature, T{sub cs}). A miscibility gap/solvus exists below Tcs. The solvus becomes increasingly asymmetric at lower temperatures and extrapolates to n - values = 0.15, 0.8 at 300 C. A thermodynamic analysis, which accounts for changes in configurational and magnetic ordering entropies during cation mixing, predicts solvus phase compositions at room temperature in reasonable agreement with those determined by extrapolation of experimental results. The delay between disappearance of magnetic ordering above T{sub C} = 590 C (for NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) and disappearance of a miscibility gap at T{sub cs} is explained by the persistence of long-range ordering correlations in a quasi-paramagnetic region above T{sub C}.

  7. Wettability controls slow immiscible displacement through local interfacial instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Michael; Brinkmann, Martin; Seemann, Ralf; Hiller, Thomas; Sanchez de La Lama, Marta; Herminghaus, Stephan

    2016-11-01

    Immiscible fluid displacement with average front velocities in the capillary-dominated regime is studied in a transparent Hele-Shaw cell with cylindrical posts. Employing various combinations of fluids and wall materials allows us to cover a range of advancing contact angles 46∘≤θa≤180∘ of the invading fluid in our experiments. In parallel, we study the displacement process in particle-based simulations that account for wall wettability. Considering the same arrangement of posts in experiments and simulation, we find a consistent crossover between stable interfacial displacement at θa≲80∘ and capillary fingering at high contact angles θa≳120∘ . The position of the crossover is quantified through the evolution of the interface length and the final saturation of the displaced fluid. A statistical analysis of the local displacement processes demonstrates that the shape evolution of the fluid front is governed by local instabilities as proposed by Cieplak and Robbins for a quasistatic interfacial displacement [Cieplak and Robbins, Phys. Rev. Lett. 60, 2042 (1988), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.60.2042]. The regime of stable front advances coincides with a corresponding region of contact angles where cooperative interfacial instabilities prevail. Capillary fingering, however, is observed only for large θa, where noncooperative instabilities dominate the invasion process.

  8. Nanodroplets of immiscible fluid pairs adopt nonspherical shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilemski, Gerald; Hrahsheh, Fawaz

    2015-03-01

    To help understand recent experimental results for nonane/water condensation [Pathak, et al. J. Chem. Phys. 140, 224318 (2014)], the structure of water/nonane nanodroplets was investigated using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of SPC/E water and a unified atom model of nonane. Because nonane and water are essentially immiscible fluids that only partially wet each other, one might expect unusual nanodroplet structures to arise. Indeed, nonspherical, phase-separated Russian Doll (RD) structures were found to occur for these nanodroplets over the entire temperature range studied in the MD simulations, 220K - 300K. An idealized, but realistic lens-on-sphere model for the observed RD structures consists of a spherical nonane lens that partially wets a spherical water droplet. This model was used to analyze the experimental small angle x-ray scattering measurements. The simulated contact angle of nonane on water was found to be quite sensitive to the value of the Lennard-Jones energy parameter ɛOC for the cross-interaction between oxygen and carbon atoms. The standard geometric mean approximation for ɛOCyielded contact angles in the range 70o- 80o, while a 19% increase in ɛOCreduced the simulated contact angle close to the experimental value of 33.6o at 295 K. Supported by NSF Grant No. CBET-1033387.

  9. Finite-Element Analysis of Multiphase Immiscible Flow Through Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuppusamy, T.; Sheng, J.; Parker, J. C.; Lenhard, R. J.

    1987-04-01

    A finite-element model is developed for multiphase flow through soil involving three immiscible fluids: namely, air, water, and a nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL). A variational method is employed for the finite-element formulation corresponding to the coupled differential equations governing flow in a three-fluid phase porous medium system with constant air phase pressure. Constitutive relationships for fluid conductivities and saturations as functions of fluid pressures, which are derived in a companion paper by J. C. Parker et al. (this issue) and which may be calibrated from two-phase laboratory measurements, are employed in the finite-element program. The solution procedure uses backward time integration with iteration by a modified Picard method to handle the nonlinear properties. Laboratory experiments involving water displacement from soil columns by p cymene (a benzene-derivative hydrocarbon) under constant pressure were simulated by the finite-element program to validate the numerical model and formulation for constitutive properties. Transient water outflow predicted using independently measured saturation-capillary head data agreed with observed outflow data within the limits of precision of the predictions as estimated by a first-order Taylor series approximation considering parameter uncertainty due to experimental reproducability and constitutive model accuracy. Two-dimensional simulations are presented for a hypothetical field case involving introduction of NAPL near the soil surface due to leakage from an underground storage tank. Subsequent transport of NAPL in the variably saturated vadose and groundwater zones is analyzed.

  10. Cylindrical waves at the interface of viscous immiscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Ratul; Farsoiya, Palas Kumar

    2016-11-01

    We conduct Navier-Stokes simulations of cylindrical, axisymmetric standing gravity waves at the interface of radially unbounded, immiscible viscous fluids. The fluid motion generated by these oscillations are studied. Results from the numerical solutions are compared to the analytical solution of an integro-differential equation representing the amplitude of motion of the interface. Standing waves are initiated at the interface as zeroth order Bessel's mode at rest i.e. h (r , 0) =H0 1 + ɛJ0 (kr) where H0 is the undisturbed fluid depth in the simulation, chosen to be large enough for deep water approximation to hold. For small initial amplitudes (compared to 2 πk-1), we obtain good agreement with the analytical solution at early times. As we increase initial amplitude, the time period of the first oscillation is found to increase. Diffusion of vorticity from the interface is studied as a function of initial amplitude. We compare our results to the analytical solution obtained from the corresponding planar problem (Prosperetti, 1981). We will discuss these results in the framework of the viscous Cauchy-Poisson (initial-value) problem between two fluids, and also compare our results to the viscous, single fluid case (Miles, 1968). We thank IRCC, IIT Bombay for financial support.

  11. Double dumbbell shaped AgNi alloy by pulsed electrodeposition

    SciTech Connect

    Dhanapal, K.; Vasumathi, M.; Santhi, Kalavathy; Narayanan, V. Stephen, A.

    2014-01-28

    Silver-Nickel is the well-known thermally immiscible system that makes them quite complex for the formation of alloy. This kind of alloy can be attained from electrodeposition method. In the present work, AgNi alloy was synthesized by pulsed electrodeposition in a single bath two electrode system with the use of anodic alumina membrane. The prepared AgNi alloy and pure Ag were characterized with X-ray Diffraction (XRD) for structural confirmation, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) for morphological, and magnetic properties by Vibrating Sample Magnetometer, respectively. The X-ray Diffraction study shows the formation of cubic structure for pure Ag. SEM analysis reveals the double dumbbell morphology for AgNi alloy and spherically agglomeration for pure silver. Hysteresis behaviour from VSM measurement indicates that the AgNi alloy have good ferro-magnetic properties.

  12. Experimentally Determined Interfacial Area Between Immiscible Fluids in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Niessner, J; Hassanizadeh, S.M; Smith, Duane

    2008-01-01

    When multiple fluids flow through a porous medium, the interaction between the fluid interfaces can be of great importance. While this is widely recognized in practical applications, numerical models often disregard interactios between discrete fluid phases due to the computational complexity. And rightly so, for this level of detail is well beyond most extended Darcy Law relationships. A new model of two-phase flow including the interfacial area has been proposed by Hassarizadeh and Gray based upon thermodynamic principles. A version of this general equation set has been implemented by Nessner and Hassarizadeh. Many of the interfacial parameters required by this equation set have never been determined from experiments. The work presented here is a description of how the interfacial area, capillary pressure, interfacial velocity and interfacial permeability from two-phase flow experiments in porous media experiments can be used to determine the required parameters. This work, while on-going, has shown the possibility of digitizing images within translucent porous media and identifying the location and behavior of interfaces under dynamic conditions. Using the described methods experimentally derived interfacial functions to be used in larger scale simulations are currently being developed. In summary, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) by mapping a pore-throat geometry onto an image of immiscible fluid flow, the saturation of fluids and the individual interfaces between the fluids can be identified; (2) the resulting saturation profiles of the low velocity drainage flows used in this study are well described by an invasion percolation fractal scaling; (3) the interfacial area between fluids has been observed to increase in a linear fashion during the initial invasion of the non-wetting fluid; and (4) the average capillary pressure within the entire cell and representative elemental volumes were observed to plateau after a small portion of the volume was

  13. Modeling of collision and coalescence of droplets during microgravity processing of Zn-Bi immiscible alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. H.; Rogers, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    A population balance model is presented for the coarsening of the dispersed phase of liquid-liquid two-phase mixtures in microgravity due to gravity sedimentation and Marangoni migration, which lead to the collision and coalescence of droplets. The model is used to predict the evolution of the size distribution of the dispersed phase in a liquid-phase miscibility gap system, Zn-Bi, which has been used in a number of experimental microgravity processing studies in which significant phase segregation has been observed. The analysis shows that increasing the temperature gradient, gravity level, volume fraction of the dispersed phase, initial average drop radius, initial standard deviation of droplet radii, or the temperature coefficient of the interfacial tension leads to an increase in the rate of droplet growth due to collision and coalescence. Comparison of the distribution evolutions for unimodal and bimodal initial distributions shows that the latter yield significantly more rapid droplet growth. Finally, it is shown that droplet growth can be dramatically reduced with antiparallel orientation of the gravity vector and the temperature gradient, provided that the relative magnitude of these two vectors is properly chosen.

  14. Immiscible silicate liquid partition coefficients: implications for crystal-melt element partitioning and basalt petrogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veksler, Ilya V.; Dorfman, Alexander M.; Danyushevsky, Leonid V.; Jakobsen, Jakob K.; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2006-12-01

    This study investigates partitioning of elements between immiscible aluminosilicate and borosilicate liquids using three synthetic mixtures doped with 32 trace elements. In order to get a good spatial separation of immiscible liquids, we employed a high-temperature centrifuge. Experiments were performed at 1,050-1,150°C, 1 atm, in sealed Fe and Pt containers. Quenched products were analysed by electron microprobe and LA ICP-MS. Nernst partition coefficients ( D’s) between the Fe-rich and Si-rich aluminosilicate immiscible liquids are the highest for Zn (3.3) and Fe (2.6) and the lowest for Rb and K (0.4-0.5). The plots of D values against ionic potential Z/r in all the compositions show a convex upward trend, which is typical also for element partitioning between immiscible silicate and salt melts. The results bear upon the speciation and structural position of elements in multicomponent silicate liquids. The ferrobasalt-rhyolite liquid immiscibility is observed in evolved basaltic magmas, and may play an important role in large gabbroic intrusions, such as Skaergaard, and during the generation of unusual lavas, such as ferropicrites.

  15. Experimental liquid line of descent and liquid immiscibility for basalt 70017. [lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, M. J.; Hess, P. C.; Daniel, G. H.

    1974-01-01

    The paper describes one possible liquid line of descent produced for a high-titanium mare basalt composition through an arbitrarily chosen series of partial equilibrium and fractional crystallization experiments on basalt 70017. The liquid line of descent leading to immiscibility at 994 C is characterized by enrichment of FeO, K2O, SiO2, and MnO and depletion of MgO and TiO2 in the residual liquids. The composition of the residual liquid at the onset of immiscibility is ferrobasaltic, and the initial appearance of immiscible liquids in the form of silica-rich spherules is in the vicinity of plagioclase-liquid contacts. The integrated bulk composition of the areas of finely exsolved liquids indicates that the trend of the liquid line of descent is at a small angle to the tie lines joining the two liquids.

  16. Identification of Gravity-Related Effects on Crystal Growth From Melts With an Immiscibility Gap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassemi, M.; Sayir, A.; Farmer, S.

    1999-01-01

    This work involves an experimental-numerical approach to study the effects of natural and Marangoni convections on solidification of single crystals from a silicate melt with a liquid-liquid immiscibility gap. Industrial use of crystals grown from silicate melts is becoming increasingly important in electronic, optical, and high temperature structural applications. Even the simplest silicate systems like Al203-SiO2 have had, and will continue to have, a significant role in the development of traditional and advanced ceramics. A unique feature of crystals grown from the silicate systems is their outstanding linear electro-optic properties. They also exhibit exceptionally high optical rotativity. As a result, these crystals are attractive materials for dielectric, optical, and microwave applications. Experimental work in our laboratory has indicated that directional solidification of a single crystal mullite appears to be preceded by liquid-liquid phase separation in the melt. Disruption of the immiscible state results in crystallization of a two phase structure. There is also evidence that mixing in the melt caused by density-driven convection can significantly affect the stability of the immiscible liquid layers and result in poly-crystalline growth. On earth, the immiscible state has only been observed for small diameter crystals grown in float zone systems where natural convection is almost negligible. Therefore, it is anticipated that growth of large single crystals from silicate melts would benefit from microgravity conditions because of the reduction of the natural convective mixing. The main objective of this research is to determine the effects of transport processes on the phase separation in the melt during growth of a single crystal while addressing the following issues: (1) When do the immiscible layers form and are they real?; (2) What are the main physical characteristics of the immiscible liquids?; and (3) How mixing by natural or Marangoni convection

  17. Why are blue zhamanshinites blue? Liquid immiscibility in an impact melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael E.; Koeberl, Christian

    1991-01-01

    A study of the cause of the coloration of blue zhamanshinites, which are glassy impact melt rocks from the Zhamanshin crater in the USSR are reported. It is found that the blue color results from Rayleigh scattering from spherical, 100 nm-diameter inclusions of a separate Ca-Fe-Mg-P-rich silicate glass. These observations can best be explained by the operation of liquid immiscibility in the zhamanshinite melt, and suggest that liquid immiscibility may have a more general role in impactite evolution.

  18. Characterizing the Use of Ultrasonic Energy in Promoting Uniform Microstructural Dispersions in Immiscible Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Fedoseyev, A. I.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Gravity driven separation and preferential wetting precludes uniform microstructural distributions during solidification processing of immiscible, liquid-liquid mixtures. Historically, it is, however, established that liquid/liquid suspensions can be established and maintained by utilizing ultrasound. Following a brief introduction the results of experiments on immiscible mixtures subjected to ultrasonic energy during solidification processing will be compared and evaluated in view of a recently developed mathematical model. The presentation continues by discussion of scaling the model to commercial viability and concludes with the implications of such processing in a microgravity environment.

  19. Characterizing the Use of Ultrasonic Energy in Promoting Uniform Microstructural Dispersions in Immiscible Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Fedoseyev, A. I.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Gravity driven separation and preferential wetting precludes uniform microstructural distributions during solidification processing of immiscible, liquid-liquid mixtures. Historically, it is, however, established that liquid/liquid suspensions can be established and maintained by utilizing ultrasound. Following a brief introduction the results of experiments on immiscible mixtures subjected to ultrasonic energy during solidification processing will be compared and evaluated in view of a recently developed mathematical model. The presentation continues by discussion of scaling the model to commercial viability and concludes with the implications of such processing in a microgravity environment.

  20. Compositional and kinetic controls on liquid immiscibility in ferrobasalt-rhyolite volcanic and plutonic series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlier, Bernard; Namur, Olivier; Grove, Timothy L.

    2013-07-01

    We present major element compositions of basalts and their differentiation products for some major tholeiitic series. The dry, low-pressure liquid lines of descent are shown to approach or intersect the experimentally-defined compositional space of silicate liquid immiscibility. Ferrobasalt-rhyolite unmixing along tholeiitic trends in both volcanic and plutonic environments is supported by worldwide occurrence of immiscible globules in the mesostasis of erupted basalts, unmixed melt inclusions in cumulus phases of major layered intrusions such as Skaergaard and Sept Iles, and oxide-rich ferrogabbros closely associated with plagiogranites in the lower oceanic crust. Liquid immiscibility is promoted by low-pressure, anhydrous fractional crystallization that drives the low Al2O3, high FeO liquids into the two-liquid field. Kinetic controls can be important in the development of two-liquid separation. The undercooling that occurs at the slow cooling rates of plutonic environments promotes early development of liquid immiscibility at higher temperature. In contrast rapid cooling in erupted lavas leads to large undercoolings and liquid immiscibility develops at significantly lower temperatures. Unmixing leads to the development of a compositional gap characterized by the absence of intermediate compositions, a feature of many tholeiitic provinces. The compositions of experimental unmixed silica-rich melts coincide with those of natural rhyolites and plagiogranites with high FeOtot and low Al2O3, suggesting the potential role of large-scale separation of immiscible Si-rich liquid in the petrogenesis of late-stage residual melts. No trace of the paired ferrobasaltic melt is found in volcanic environments because of its uneruptable characteristics. Instead, Fe-Ti ± P-rich gabbros are the cumulate products of immiscible Fe-rich melts in plutonic settings. The immiscibility process may be difficult to identify because both melts crystallize the same phases with the same

  1. Solidification Processing of Immiscible Liquids in the Presence of Applied Ultrasonic Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Shinwood; Grugel, R. N.

    2000-01-01

    Uniform microstructural development during solidification of immiscible liquids on Earth is hampered by inherent density differences between the phases. Microgravity processing minimizes settling but segregation still occurs due to gravity independent wetting and coalescence phenomena. Experiments with the transparent organic, metal analogue, succinonitrile-glycerol system were conducted in conjunction with applied ultrasonic energy. The processing parameters associated with this technique have been evaluated in view of optimizing dispersion uniformity. Experimental results to evaluate microstructural phase distributions, based on other liquid-liquid immiscibility systems, will also be presented.

  2. The nature and barium partitioning between immiscible melts - A comparison of experimental and natural systems with reference to lunar granite petrogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, C. R.; Taylor, L. A.

    1989-01-01

    Elemental partitioning between immiscible melts has been studied using experimental liquid-liquid Kds and those determined by analysis of immiscible glasses in basalt mesostases in order to investigate lunar granite petrogenesis. Experimental data show that Ba is partitioned into the basic immiscible melt, while probe analysis results show that Ba is partitioned into the granitic immiscible melt. It is concluded that lunar granite of significant size can only occur in a plutonic or deep hypabyssal environment.

  3. Novel Directional Solidification of Hypermonotectic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Fedoseyev, A. I.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    There are many metal alloy systems that separate into two different liquids upon cooling from a higher temperature. Uniform microstructural development during solidification of these immiscible liquids on Earth is hampered by inherent density differences between the phases. Microgravity processing minimizes settling but segregation still occurs due to gravity independent wetting and coalescence phenomena. Experiments with the transparent organic, metal analogue, succinonitrile-glycerol system were conducted in conjunction with applied ultrasonic energy. The processing parameters associated with this technique have been evaluated in view of optimizing dispersion uniformity. Characterization of the experimental results in terms of an initial modeling effort will also be presented.

  4. Novel Directional Solidification of Hypermonotectic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Fedoseyev, A. I.

    2000-01-01

    There are many metal alloy systems that separate into two different liquids upon cooling from a higher temperature. Uniform microstructural development during solidification of these immiscible liquids on Earth is hampered by inherent density differences between the phases. Microgravity processing minimizes settling but segregation still occurs due to gravity independent wetting and coalescence phenomena. Experiments with the transparent organic, metal analogue, succinonitrile-glycerol system were conducted in conjunction with applied ultrasonic energy. The processing parameters associated with this technique have been evaluated in view of optimizing dispersion uniformity. Characterization of the experimental results in terms of an initial modeling effort will also be presented.

  5. Morphology Evolution of Polypropylene in Immiscible Polymer Blends for Fabrication of Nanofibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immiscible blends of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) and isotactic polypropylenes (iPPs) with different melting index were extruded through a two-strand rod die. The extrudates were hot-drawn at the die exit at different draw ratios by controlling the drawing speed. The morphologies of iPP fibers e...

  6. Morphological development of polypropylene in immiscible blends with cellulose acetate butyrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isotactic polypropylenes (iPP) with different melt flow indexes were melt blended with cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) and then prepared into microspheres or nanofibers following a novel process of producing well dispersed CAB/iPP immiscible blends and subsequent removal of the CAB matrix. The morp...

  7. Immiscible iron- and silica-rich melts in basalt petrogenesis documented in the Skaergaard intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsen, J. K.; Veksler, I. V.; Tegner, C.; Brooks, C. K.

    2005-11-01

    Silicate liquid immiscibility in basalt petrogenesis is a contentious issue. Immiscible iron- and silica-rich liquids were reported in melt inclusions of lunar basalt and in groundmass glasses of terrestrial volcanics. In fully crystallized plutonic rocks, however, silicate liquid immiscibility has yet to be proven. Here we report the first finding of natural, immiscible iron- and silica-rich melts in a plutonic environment documented in the Skaergaard intrusion, East Greenland. Primary melt inclusions (now finely crystallized) in apatite are either dark or light colored. The predominant dark colored type contains 30.9 ± 4.2 wt% FeOt and 40.7 ± 3.6 wt% SiO2, whereas the light colored type contains 8.6 ± 5.9 wt% FeOt and 65.6 ± 7.3 wt% SiO2. Similar light colored melt inclusions in olivine and fine-grained dark and light colored interstitial pockets also give evidence of crystallization from emulsion of silica and iron-rich liquids. On the outcrop scale, silica-rich (melanogranophyre) pods and layers in iron-rich ferrodiorite of the Upper Zone of the Skaergaard intrusion witness segregation of the two liquids. These findings demand that silicate immiscibility is considered in basalt petrogenesis. Some granitic rocks may represent unmixed silica-rich melt, whereas the dense, iron-rich melt is likely to sink in the crust and could mix with hot mantle-derived magma to form unusual rocks, like ferropicrites, otherwise interpreted as products of heterogeneous mantle sources.

  8. Study of Magnetic Alloys: Critical Phenomena.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    MAGNETIC ALLOYS, TRANSPORT PROPERTIES), ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE, SEEBECK EFFECT , MAGNETIC PROPERTIES, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, COBALT ALLOYS, GADOLINIUM ALLOYS, GOLD ALLOYS, IRON ALLOYS, NICKEL ALLOYS, PALLADIUM ALLOYS, PLATINUM ALLOYS, RHODIUM ALLOYS

  9. On the remarkable thermal stability of nanocrystalline cobalt via alloying

    PubMed Central

    Bachmaier, A.; Motz, C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured Co materials are produced by severe plastic deformation via alloying with small amounts of C and larger amounts of Cu. The thermal stability of the different nanostructured Co materials is studied through isothermal annealing at different temperatures for various times and compared to the stability of severe plastically deformed high-purity nanocrystalline Co. The microstructural changes taking place during annealing are evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and microhardness measurements. In the present work it is shown that the least stable nanostructured material is the single-phase high purity Co. Alloying with C improves the thermal stability to a certain extent. A remarkable thermal stability is achieved by alloying Co with Cu resulting in stabilized nanostructures even after annealing for long times at high temperatures. The essential reason for the enhanced thermal stability is to be found in the immiscibility of both components of the alloy. PMID:25892849

  10. Early Silicate Liquid Immiscibility in the Skaergaard Intrusion: Evidence from high Temperature Centrifugation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veksler, I.; Dorfman, A. M.; Borisov, A. A.; Wirth, R.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2007-12-01

    Immiscible droplet textures are common in groundmass glasses and plagioclase-hosted melt inclusions of tholeiitic basalts (Philpotts, 1982). Our experiments on synthetic analogues of natural immiscible basaltic-rhyolitic glasses showed that conventional quenching experiments in 1-atm gas mixing furnaces were in most cases unable to reproduce unmixing yielding instead either turbid, opalescent glasses, or crystallization of tridymite and pyroxenes. In contrast, experiments involving in situ high-temperature centrifugation at 1000g on some of the liquids did yield macroscopic unmixing and phase separation. It appears that experimental reproduction of immiscibility in complex ferrobabsaltic aluminosilicate melts is hampered by nucleation barrier, metastable crystallization, and sluggish phase separation kinetics. Three-four hours of centrifugation were insufficient to complete phase segregation, and resulted in sub-micron immiscible emulsions in quenched glasses. For a model liquid composition of the Middle Zone of the Skaergaard intrusion obtained from experiments by Toplis and Carroll (1995) centrifugation at super-liquidus temperatures of 1110-1120 degrees C, produced a thin, silicic layer (64.5 wt.% SiO2 and 7.4 wt.% FeO) at the top of the main Fe-rich glass (46 wt.% SiO2 and 21 wt.% FeO). Transmission electron microscopy of the quenched products revealed silica-rich immiscible globules of about 20--30 nm in diameter suspended in the Fe-rich glass. The globules are however not a quench feature because they moved during centrifugation over a few millimeters of the sample length and eventually accumulated in the thin (0.2 mm) silicic liquid layer at the top. The divergent compositions of the top and at the bottom were shown in a series of static runs to crystallize very similar crystal assemblages of plagioclase, pyroxene, olivine, and Fe-Ti oxides. In light of our centrifuge experiments, immiscibility in the Skaergaard intrusion may have started already at the

  11. Analyses of temperature-dependent interface states, series resistances, and AC electrical conductivities of Al/p—Si and Al/Bi4Ti3O12/p—Si structures by using the admittance spectroscopy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mert, Yıldırım; Perihan, Durmuş; Şemsettin, Altındal

    2013-10-01

    In this study, Al/p—Si and Al/Bi4Ti3O12/p—Si structures are fabricated and their interface states (Nss), the values of series resistance (Rs), and AC electrical conductivity (σac) are obtained each as a function of temperature using admittance spectroscopy method which includes capacitance—voltage (C—V) and conductance—voltage (G—V) measurements. In addition, the effect of interfacial Bi4Ti3O12 (BTO) layer on the performance of the structure is investigated. The voltage-dependent profiles of Nss and Rs are obtained from the high-low frequency capacitance method and the Nicollian method, respectively. Experimental results show that Nss and Rs, as strong functions of temperature and applied bias voltage, each exhibit a peak, whose position shifts towards the reverse bias region, in the depletion region. Such a peak behavior is attributed to the particular distribution of Nss and the reordering and restructuring of Nss under the effect of temperature. The values of activation energy (Ea), obtained from the slope of the Arrhenius plot, of both structures are obtained to be bias voltage-independent, and the Ea of the metal-ferroelectric-semiconductor (MFS) structure is found to be half that of the metal—semiconductor (MS) structure. Furthermore, other main electrical parameters, such as carrier concentration of acceptor atoms (NA), built-in potential (Vbi), Fermi energy (EF), image force barrier lowering (Δ Φb), and barrier height (Φb), are extracted using reverse bias C-2—V characteristics as a function of temperature.

  12. Plagiogranites as late-stage immiscible liquids in ophiolite and mid-ocean ridge suites - An experimental study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, S.; Rutherford, M. J.

    1979-01-01

    A study of relationships between basic and acidic rocks was made by fractionating primitive basalt at low pressure anhydrous conditions at various fugacities. Fractionally crystallized basalt became increasingly enriched in iron which became silicate liquid immiscible, producing Fe-enriched basaltic and granitic liquids. The latter is similar to plagiogranites found in mid-oceanic rift (MOR) regions, showing that silicate liquid immiscibility could be the petrogenic process which produces plagiogranites in some MOR regions and ophiolites. The major problem in considering plagiogranites as products of silicate liquid immiscibility is absence of any description of the Fe-enriched conjugate liquid in the ophiolite or MOR literature, and the identification of this magma is essential for a definite case of silicate liquid immiscibility.

  13. Macroscopic surface tension in a lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook model of two immiscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, I.; Thompson, S. P.; Care, C. M.

    1998-01-01

    We present a method by which an interface generating algorithm, similar to that of earlier lattice Boltzmann models of immiscible fluids, may be extended to a two component, two-speed two-dimensional (D2), nine-link (Q9) lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook fluid. For two-dimensional, microcurrent-free planar interfaces between the two immiscible fluids we derive expressions for static interfacial tensions and interfacial distributions of the two fluids. Extending our analysis to curved interfaces, we propose a scheme for incorporating the influence of interfacial microcurrents that is based upon general symmetry arguments and is correct to second order in lattice velocity. The analysis demonstrates that the interfacial microcurrents have only second-order influence upon the macroscopic behavior of the model. We find good agreement between our calculations and simulation results based on the microcurrent stream function and surface tension results from the pressure tensor or Laplace law.

  14. Mussel adhesion-employed water-immiscible fluid bioadhesive for urinary fistula sealing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Jeong; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Lim, Seonghye; Choi, Bong-Hyuk; Kang, Seok Ho; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2015-12-01

    Urinary fistulas, abnormal openings of a urinary tract organ, are serious complications and conventional management strategies are not satisfactory. For more effective and non-invasive fistula repair, fluid tissue adhesives or sealants have been suggested. However, conventional products do not provide a suitable solution due to safety problems and poor underwater adhesion under physiological conditions. Herein, we proposed a unique water-immiscible mussel protein-based bioadhesive (WIMBA) exhibiting strong underwater adhesion which was employed by two adhesion strategies of marine organisms; 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (DOPA)-mediated strong adhesion and water-immiscible coacervation. The developed biocompatible WIMBA successfully sealed ex vivo urinary fistulas and provided good durability and high compliance. Thus, WIMBA could be used as a promising sealant for urinary fistula management with further expansion to diverse internal body applications.

  15. Melt immiscibility in Apollo 15 KREEP - Origin of Fe-rich mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollister, L. S.; Crawford, M. L.

    1977-01-01

    Silicate liquid immiscibility (SLI) is investigated in terms of chemistry and occurrence in two KREEP-rich Apollo 15 basalts. The two samples have different cooling histories but the same composition. In the first sample, SLI occurred at the time of 58% crystallization. In the second sample, SLI occurred after 20% had crystallized. It is noted that SLI could be initiated as soon as plagioclase (out of a total composition which also included zircon, FeS, SiO2, whitlockite, and ilmenite) alone had crystallized. Attention is given to Fe-rich immiscible melts, and it is suggested that SLI may play an important role in the formation of the source regions of Fe-rich mare basalts. The analytical technique used for the assays was an energy dispersive analysis system with a resolution of 167 eV.

  16. Effect of using miscible and immiscible healing agent on solid state self-healing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makenan, Siti Mastura; Jamil, Mohd Suzeren Md.

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the effect of using various healing agent which are miscible; poly(bisphenol-A-co-epichlorohydrin), and immiscible; poly(ethylene-co-acetate) and poly(ethylene-co-acrylic acid), on self-healing resin system. The specimens were analysed by Fourier-transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR), Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA), and izod test. Optical image of the sample morphology was observed using optical microscope. Healing efficiencies (HE) were evaluated using izod test. The concept of healing recovery was proved based on the use of miscible and immiscible healing agent. From the results, it can be concluded that the healable resin with miscible healing agent has the highest HE within the third healing cycle.

  17. Numerical Modeling of Immiscible Organic Transport at the Hyde Park Landfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, M.; Sykes, J.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper, a two-dimensional two-phase mathematical model based on Darcy's law and conservation of mass for each liquid is presented. The numerical model is based on a generalized method of weighted residuals in conjunction with the finite element method and linear quadrilateral isoparametric elements. To alleviate numerical problems associated with hyperbolic equations, upstream weighting of the spatial terms in the model has been incorporated. The theoretical and numerical accuracy of the model is verified by comparison of simulation results with those from an existing one-dimensional two-phase flow simulator. The finite element model is used to simulate the migration of an immiscible organic solvent in groundwater, from a chemical waste disposal site located north of Niagara Falls, New York. The effects of uncertainty regarding porous media heterogeneities and anisotropy are examined, and it is concluded that the extent of immiscible contaminant migration is greatly sensitive to these parameters.

  18. Calculation of Liquid-Solid Interfacial Free Energy in Pb-Cu Binary Immiscible System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong-shan; Zhou, Sheng-gang; Cao, Yong

    2016-11-01

    Based on the solid-liquid interfacial free energy theory of the complex Warren binary & pseudo-binary system and through the simplification of it by taking Pb-Cu binary system as an example, the physical model for it in binary immiscible system can be obtained. Next, its thermodynamic formula is derived to obtain a theoretical formula that only contains two parameters, and comparisons are made with regard to γSL calculated values and experimental values of MPE (multiphase equilibrium method) under several kinds of temperatures. As manifested in the outcomes, the improved physical model and theoretical formula will become not only easy to understand but also simple for calculation (the calculated value of γSL depends on two parameters, i.e. temperature and percentage composition of Cu atom). It can be treated as the foundation of application for the γSL calculation of liquid-solid interfacial free energy in other immiscible systems.

  19. Immiscible iron- and silica-rich liquids in the Upper Zone of the Bushveld Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Lennart A.; Wang, Meng; Charlier, Bernard; Namur, Olivier; Roberts, R. James; Veksler, Ilya V.; Cawthorn, R. Grant; Holtz, François

    2016-06-01

    The Bushveld Complex (South Africa) is the largest layered intrusion on Earth and plays a considerable role in our understanding of magmatic differentiation and ore-forming processes. In this study, we present new geochemical data for apatite-hosted multiphase inclusions in gabbroic cumulates from the Bushveld Upper Zone. Inclusions re-homogenized at high-temperature (1060-1100 °C) display a range of compositions in each rock sample, from iron-rich (35 wt.% FeOtot; 28 wt.% SiO2) to silica-rich (5 wt.% FeOtot; 65 wt.% SiO2). This trend is best explained by an immiscible process and trapping of contrasted melts in apatite crystals during progressive cooling along the binodal of a two-liquid field. The coexistence of both Si-rich and Fe-rich immiscible melts in single apatite grains is used to discuss the ability of immiscible melts to segregate from each other, and the implications for mineral and bulk cumulate compositions. We argue that complete separation of immiscible liquids did not occur, resulting in crystallization of similar phases from both melts but in different proportions. However, partial segregation in a crystal mush and the production of contrasting phase proportions from the Fe-rich melt and the Si-rich melt can be responsible for the cyclic evolution from melanocratic (Fe-Ti-P-rich) to leucocratic (plagioclase-rich) gabbros which is commonly observed in the Upper Zone of the Bushveld Complex where it occurs at a vertical scale of 50 to 200 m.

  20. Theoretical and experimental investigation on separation of two immiscible liquids using hydrocyclones

    SciTech Connect

    Bohnet, M.; Harms, G.

    1996-12-31

    For a reliable design of hydrocyclones for the separation of two immiscible liquids the correct calculation of pressure drop and separation efficiency is necessary. To determine the separation process correctly, a possible droplet breakup within the hydrocyclone due to shear forces and/or turbulence has to be considered. It is shown, that the real droplet size distribution which is responsible for the separation process can be calculated depending on fluid flow parameters. 5 figs.

  1. A Textural Record of Silicate Liquid Immiscibility in the Skaergaard Intrusion, East Greenland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stripp, G.; Holness, M.; Veksler, I.; Nielsen, T.; Tegner, C.

    2008-12-01

    The extent of silicate-liquid immiscibility in differentiated basaltic systems is widely debated despite its great potential importance in controlling the liquid line of descent. While the onset of liquid immiscibility in the bulk magma is likely to occur late in the fractionation history in basaltic systems, the interstitial liquid trapped in the developing crystal mush may reach the miscibility gap earlier in the solidification history. We present previously unreported symplectite textures from the Skaergaard Intrusion. The replacement of cumulus crystal rims by reactive symplectites of olivine or orthopyroxene and plagioclase, together with growth of vermicular ortho- and clinopyroxenes, An-rich plagioclase, Fe-Ti oxides and apatite is common in lower and mid-levels of the Layered Series and very common in the Triple Group and mineralized horizons. In contrast, the Upper Zone of the Layered Series and the Marginal Border Series contain co-existing, non-reacting granophyric and ilmenite-rich symplectites filling interstitial pockets between cumulus grains. We suggest that reactive mafic symplectites grew during chemical disequilibrium caused by the separation of conjugate immiscible interstitial liquids and selective loss of the Si-rich component from the crystal mush. We anticipate that Upper Border Series contains reactive granophyric segregations due to the preferential loss of the dense Fe-rich conjugate liquid. Non-reactive ilmenite-rich intergrowths and associated granophyres formed by in-situ crystallisation of late-stage immiscible interstitial liquids. Reactive mafic symplectite formation and, by inference, the best developed interstitial liquid phase separation, coincides with the mineralized horizons of the Triple Group suggesting a genetic link between the two.

  2. Oxygen isotope partitioning between immiscible silicate melts with H2O, P and S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, Gregory W.; Kyser, T. K.; Clark, Alan H.

    2013-05-01

    Differences between the δ18O values of immiscible Si- and Fe-rich melts in the systems Fe2SiO4-Fe3O4-KAlSi2O6-SiO2, Fe3O4-KAlSi2O6-SiO2, and Fe3O4-Fe2O3-KAlSi2O6-SiO2, with H2O, H2O + P or H2O + S have been determined in isothermal, isobaric experiments at 1100 and 1200 °C and 200 MPa. The Δ18O values for conjugate Fe2SiO4-Fe3O4-KAlSi2O6-SiO2 + H2O and, Fe3O4-KAlSi2O6-SiO2·KAlSi2O6-SiO2 + H2O melts are only 0.4-0.6‰ and do not differ significantly from those for anhydrous melts of similar composition. The Δ18O values for melts with added H2O + P or S are more variable, ranging from 0.0 to 0.8‰. Partitioning of 18O between the immiscible melts is 0.6-1‰ less than the partitioning reported for melt-mineral and mineral-mineral pairs. The partitioning of 18O in the network modifier-bearing immiscible melts is not controlled by the relative degree of polymerization in the melts or fO2. The upper limit of the range of Δ18O values (<1‰), and the variation in the δ18O values of conjugate melts that occurs with the inclusion of network modifying constituents, suggest that in some cases, oxygen isotope ratios might be useful to distinguish lithologies evolved from coexisting immiscible silicate melts, from lithologies that have evolved by crystal fractionation only.

  3. Liquid immiscibility in a CTGS (Ca3TaGa3Si2O14) melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozawa, Jun; Zhao, Hengyu; Koyama, Chihiro; Maeda, Kensaku; Fujiwara, Kozo; Koizumi, Haruhiko; Uda, Satoshi

    2016-11-01

    Although many studies have indicated that Ca3TaGa3Si2O14 (CTGS) grows congruently from a stoichiometric melt when using the Czochralski (Cz) technique, the occurrence of a secondary phase during growth when using the micro-pulling down (μ-PD) technique has been reported. We have examined the detailed growth mechanism of μ-PD grown CTGS as well as its congruency. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) at an elevated temperature up to 1650 °C shows no peaks associated with the presence of a secondary phase, whereas a secondary phase related peak was detected at an elevated temperature up to 1490 °C with the same heating rate. Back-scattered electron images (BEIs) revealed the occurrence of Ca3Ta2Ga4O14 (CTG) as a secondary phase. The secondary phase appears at the very early stage of growth, which is not possible to explain by a eutectic reaction. The experimental results suggest that liquid immiscibility was present in the melt at around 1490 °C during the growth of s-CTGS. Liquid immiscibility produces Si-rich and Si-poor melts, from which different phases with different compositions are solidified. The μ-PD technique poses a more static environment in the melt than that of Cz technique due to low melt convection and the lack of stirring, which enables liquid immiscibility to emerge.

  4. Gas Separation Membranes Derived from High-Performance Immiscible Polymer Blends Compatibilized with Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Panapitiya, Nimanka P; Wijenayake, Sumudu N; Nguyen, Do D; Huang, Yu; Musselman, Inga H; Balkus, Kenneth J; Ferraris, John P

    2015-08-26

    An immiscible polymer blend comprised of high-performance copolyimide 6FDA-DAM:DABA(3:2) (6FDD) and polybenzimidazole (PBI) was compatibilized using 2-methylimidazole (2-MI), a commercially available small molecule. Membranes were fabricated from blends of 6FDD:PBI (50:50) with and without 2-MI for H2/CO2 separations. The membranes demonstrated a matrix-droplet type microstructure as evident with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging where 6FDD is the dispersed phase and PBI is the continuous phase. In addition, membranes with 2-MI demonstrated a uniform microstructure as observed by smaller and more uniformly dispersed 6FDD domains in contrast to 6FDD:PBI (50:50) blend membranes without 2-MI. This compatibilization effect of 2-MI was attributed to interfacial localization of 2-MI that lowers the interfacial energy similar to a surfactant. Upon the incorporation of 2-MI, the H2/CO2 selectivity improved remarkably, compared to the pure blend, and surpassed the Robeson's upper bound. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of a small molecule to compatibilize a high-performance immiscible polymer blend. This approach could afford a novel class of membranes in which immiscible polymer blends can be compatibilized in an economical and convenient fashion.

  5. Alloy materials

    DOEpatents

    Hans Thieme, Cornelis Leo; Thompson, Elliott D.; Fritzemeier, Leslie G.; Cameron, Robert D.; Siegal, Edward J.

    2002-01-01

    An alloy that contains at least two metals and can be used as a substrate for a superconductor is disclosed. The alloy can contain an oxide former. The alloy can have a biaxial or cube texture. The substrate can be used in a multilayer superconductor, which can further include one or more buffer layers disposed between the substrate and the superconductor material. The alloys can be made a by process that involves first rolling the alloy then annealing the alloy. A relatively large volume percentage of the alloy can be formed of grains having a biaxial or cube texture.

  6. Liquid K-Na Alloy Anode Enables Dendrite-Free Potassium Batteries.

    PubMed

    Xue, Leigang; Gao, Hongcai; Zhou, Weidong; Xin, Sen; Park, Kyusung; Li, Yutao; Goodenough, John B

    2016-11-01

    A K-Na liquid alloy allows a dendrite-free high-capacity anode; its immiscibility with an organic liquid electrolyte offers a liquid-liquid anode-electrolyte interface. Working with a sodiated Na2 MnFe(CN)6 cathode, the working cation becomes K(+) to give a potassium battery of long cycle life with an acceptable capacity at high charge/discharge rates.

  7. Processing of New Materials by Additive Manufacturing: Iron-Based Alloys Containing Silver for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niendorf, Thomas; Brenne, Florian; Hoyer, Peter; Schwarze, Dieter; Schaper, Mirko; Grothe, Richard; Wiesener, Markus; Grundmeier, Guido; Maier, Hans Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    In the biomedical sector, production of bioresorbable implants remains challenging due to improper dissolution rates or deficient strength of many candidate alloys. Promising materials for overcoming the prevalent drawbacks are iron-based alloys containing silver. However, due to immiscibility of iron and silver these alloys cannot be manufactured based on conventional processing routes. In this study, iron-manganese-silver alloys were for the first time synthesized by means of additive manufacturing. Based on combined mechanical, microscopic, and electrochemical studies, it is shown that silver particles well distributed in the matrix can be obtained, leading to cathodic sites in the composite material. Eventually, this results in an increased dissolution rate of the alloy. Stress-strain curves showed that the incorporation of silver barely affects the mechanical properties.

  8. Droplet Growth in Undercooled Cu-Co Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Michael B.; Li, Delin; Rathz, Thomas J.; Williams, Gary A.

    1999-01-01

    High undercooling usually leads to the refinement of microstructures, while an opposite tendency occurs in liquid immiscible alloys. In the Cu-Co system, there is a metastable liquid miscibility gap which may allow the study of droplet nucleation and growth by undercooling experiments. In the present work, two alloys of Cu50Co50 and Cu68Co32 (atomic) were undercooled using a melt fluxing technique in which the liquid separation temperature could be directly measured. It was observed that after separation the resultant melts were further undercooled by 315 K prior to solidification. The relationship between the largest droplet radius and undercooling was found to exhibit three regimes: a power law growth, linear growth, and saturation stage. In addition to dendrites and droplet-like morphology reported previously, an interconnected structure was formed for the Cu50Co50 alloy at intermediate undercooling. It played a crucial role in droplet coarsening at high undercooling.

  9. MASS-REMOVAL AND MASS-FLUX-REDUCTION BEHAVIOR FOR IDEALIZED SOURCE ZONES WITH HYDRAULICALLY POORLY-ACCESSIBLE IMMISCIBLE LIQUID

    SciTech Connect

    Brusseau, M. L.; Difilippo, Erica L.; marble, justin C.; Oostrom, Mart

    2008-04-01

    A series of flow-cell experiments was conducted to investigate aqueous dissolution and mass-removal behavior for systems wherein immiscible liquid was non-uniformly distributed in physically heterogeneous source zones. The study focused specifically on characterizing the relationship between mass flux reduction and mass removal for systems for which immiscible liquid is poorly accessible to flowing water. Two idealized scenarios were examined, one wherein immiscible liquid at residual saturation exists within a lower-permeability unit residing in a higher-permeability matrix, and one wherein immiscible liquid at higher saturation (a pool) exists within a higher-permeability unit adjacent to a lower-permeability unit. The results showed that significant reductions in mass flux occurred at relatively moderate mass-removal fractions for all systems. Conversely, minimalmass flux reduction occurred until a relatively large fraction of mass (>80%) was removed for the control experiment, which was designed to exhibit ideal mass removal. In general, mass flux reduction was observed to follow an approximately one-to-one relationship with mass removal. Two methods for estimating mass-flux-reduction/mass-removal behavior, one based on system-indicator parameters (ganglia-to-pool ratio) and the other a simple mass-removal function, were used to evaluate the measured data. The results of this study illustrate the impact of poorly accessible immiscible liquid on mass-removal and mass-flux processes, and the difficulties posed for estimating mass-flux-reduction/mass-removal behavior.

  10. Capillary pinning and blunting of immiscible gravity currents in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Benzhong; MacMinn, Christopher W.; Huppert, Herbert E.; Juanes, Ruben

    2014-09-01

    Gravity-driven flows in the subsurface have attracted recent interest in the context of geological carbon dioxide (CO2) storage, where supercritical CO2 is captured from the flue gas of power plants and injected underground into deep saline aquifers. After injection, the CO2 will spread and migrate as a buoyant gravity current relative to the denser, ambient brine. Although the CO2 and the brine are immiscible, the impact of capillarity on CO2 spreading and migration is poorly understood. We previously studied the early time evolution of an immiscible gravity current, showing that capillary pressure hysteresis pins a portion of the macroscopic fluid-fluid interface and that this can eventually stop the flow. Here we study the full lifetime of such a gravity current. Using tabletop experiments in packings of glass beads, we show that the horizontal extent of the pinned region grows with time and that this is ultimately responsible for limiting the migration of the current to a finite distance. We also find that capillarity blunts the leading edge of the current, which contributes to further limiting the migration distance. Using experiments in etched micromodels, we show that the thickness of the blunted nose is controlled by the distribution of pore-throat sizes and the strength of capillarity relative to buoyancy. We develop a theoretical model that captures the evolution of immiscible gravity currents and predicts the maximum migration distance. By applying this model to representative aquifers, we show that capillary pinning and blunting can exert an important control on gravity currents in the context of geological CO2 storage.

  11. Carbonatitic and granitic melts produced under conditions of primary immiscibility during anatexis in the lower crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrero, Silvio; Wunder, Bernd; Ziemann, Martin A.; Wälle, Markus; O'Brien, Patrick J.

    2016-11-01

    Carbonatites are peculiar magmatic rocks with mantle-related genesis, commonly interpreted as the products of melting of CO2-bearing peridotites, or resulting from the chemical evolution of mantle-derived magmas, either through extreme differentiation or secondary immiscibility. Here we report the first finding of anatectic carbonatites of crustal origin, preserved as calcite-rich polycrystalline inclusions in garnet from low-to-medium pressure migmatites of the Oberpfalz area, SW Bohemian Massif (Central Europe). These inclusions originally trapped a melt of calciocarbonatitic composition with a characteristic enrichment in Ba, Sr and LREE. This interpretation is supported by the results of a detailed microstructural and microchemical investigation, as well as re-melting experiments using a piston cylinder apparatus. Carbonatitic inclusions coexist in the same cluster with crystallized silicate melt inclusions (nanogranites) and COH fluid inclusions, suggesting conditions of primary immiscibility between two melts and a fluid during anatexis. The production of both carbonatitic and granitic melts during the same anatectic event requires a suitable heterogeneous protolith. This may be represented by a sedimentary sequence containing marble lenses of limited extension, similar to the one still visible in the adjacent central Moldanubian Zone. The presence of CO2-rich fluid inclusions suggests furthermore that high CO2 activity during anatexis may be required to stabilize a carbonate-rich melt in a silica-dominated system. This natural occurrence displays a remarkable similarity with experiments on carbonate-silicate melt immiscibility, where CO2 saturation is a condition commonly imposed. In conclusion, this study shows how the investigation of partial melting through melt inclusion studies may unveil unexpected processes whose evidence, while preserved in stiff minerals such as garnet, is completely obliterated in the rest of the rock due to metamorphic re

  12. Melt inclusion evidence of second immiscibility within a magma derived non-silicate phase (Mt Vesuvius)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulignati, P.; Kamenetsky, V.; Marianelli, P.; Sbrana, A.

    2003-04-01

    Processes of melt immiscibility occurring during late magmatic differentiation play important role in the generation of many magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposits and may activate and control the style of volcanic eruptions. The exsolution of a non-silicate, volatile-rich phase from the phonolitic magma occurred at the peripheral parts of the 79AD Vesuvius magma chamber. The results of our work suggest that this immiscible phase can further experience another unmixing event that occurs in essentially "post-magmatic" environment. Heating/cooling experiments were carried out on the cogenetic multiphase (clear daughter crystals + vapour bubble(s) + interstial liquid) inclusions, hosted in K-feldspar of cognate felsic xenoliths, representative of rocks in the peripheral parts of the magma chamber. During heating, solid phases begin to dissolve at about 150^oC and melt completely at 530^oC. These low temperatures of melting argue for a non-silicate composition of daughter minerals, and thus bulk inclusion content. The remaining vapour bubble dissolves at 880^oC. During subsequent cooling, vapour bubble nucleates at 785^oC and increases in size. Unmixing of at least two melt phases occurs instantaneously at 500^oC in all studied inclusions. Globules of one melt float freely in the matrix of another melt, change their shape and size, coalesce and split apart continuously down to 100--150^oC. The movements of globules slow down with decreasing temperature until final solidification at 40--50^oC. The similarity of observed phase transformations inside inclusions suggests their homogeneous trapping at magmatic temperatures. By analogy with results of the study of xenoliths from the Vesuvius 472AD eruption (Fulignati et al., 2001) we interpret unmixed phases as globules of the Na-K chloride melt set in the matrix of Ca-carbonate melt. We infer that immiscibility between low viscosity, highly fugitive non-silicate melts may significantly influence partitioning of metals

  13. Ensemble distribution for immiscible two-phase flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savani, Isha; Bedeaux, Dick; Kjelstrup, Signe; Vassvik, Morten; Sinha, Santanu; Hansen, Alex

    2017-02-01

    We construct an ensemble distribution to describe steady immiscible two-phase flow of two incompressible fluids in a porous medium. The system is found to be ergodic. The distribution is used to compute macroscopic flow parameters. In particular, we find an expression for the overall mobility of the system from the ensemble distribution. The entropy production at the scale of the porous medium is shown to give the expected product of the average flow and its driving force, obtained from a black-box description. We test numerically some of the central theoretical results.

  14. Macroscopic laws for immiscible two-phase flow in porous media: Results From numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothman, Daniel H.

    1990-06-01

    Flow through porous media may be described at either of two length scales. At the scale of a single pore, fluids flow according to the Navier-Stokes equations and the appropriate boundary conditions. At a larger, volume-averaged scale, the flow is usually thought to obey a linear Darcy law relating flow rates to pressure gradients and body forces via phenomenological permeability coefficients. Aside from the value of the permeability coefficient, the slow flow of a single fluid in a porous medium is well-understood within this framework. The situation is considerably different, however, for the simultaneous flow of two or more fluids: not only are the phenomenological coefficients poorly understood, but the form of the macroscopic laws themselves is subject to question. I describe a numerical study of immiscible two-phase flow in an idealized two-dimensional porous medium constructed at the pore scale. Results show that the macroscopic flow is a nonlinear function of the applied forces for sufficiently low levels of forcing, but linear thereafter. The crossover, which is not predicted by conventional models, occurs when viscous forces begin to dominate capillary forces; i.e., at a sufficiently high capillary number. In the linear regime, the flow may be described by the linear phenomenological law ui = ΣjLijfj, where the flow rate ui of the ith fluid is related to the force fj applied to the jth fluid by the matrix of phenomenological coefficients Lij which depends on the relative concentrations of the two fluids. The diagonal terms are proportional to quantities commonly referred to as "relative permeabilities." The cross terms represent viscous coupling between the two fluids; they are conventionally assumed to be negligible and require special experimental procedures to observe in a laboratory. In contrast, in this numerical study the cross terms are straightforward to measure and are found to be of significant size. The cross terms are additionally observed to

  15. A new insight into interfaces of immiscible binary polymer blends from the free volume approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramya, P.; Meghala, D.; Pasang, T.; Raj, J. M.; Chandrashekara, M. N.; Ranganathaiah, C.

    2012-06-01

    The interface width in an immiscible (PVC/PS) polymer blend is determined using hydrodynamic interaction parameter (α) derived from free volume data measured using Positron lifetime spectrometer. CONTIN program has been employed to get the free volume hole size distribution. A new definition of interface width is presented, which originates from the Kirkwood-Riseman theory and friction coefficient as per Stokes equation. Friction at the interface of a binary blend decides how close the surfaces come or stay farther resulting in narrow or broad interface width respectively.

  16. Non-axisymmetric shapes of a rotating drop in an immiscible system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Tagg, R.; Cammack, L.; Croonquist, A. P.

    1982-01-01

    The nonaxisymmetric shapes of a rotating drop in an immiscible system were studied. Five basic families of shapes (axisymmetric, two-lobed, three-lobed, four-lobed, and toroidal) were observed. The sequence (axisymmetric to two-lobed to three-lobed to four-lobed to toroidal) seems to be linked to increasing spin-up velocity. For the axisymmetric case, direct comparisons of experiments with the theory of a free rotating drop were surprisingly good the equatorial area differs from theory by only 30%. Furthermore, the non-axisymmetric shapes are in good qualitative agreement with the theory, although the theory does not address the presence of an outer fluid.

  17. Controlling of immiscible liquids fluid in a capillary reactor - from continuous to segmented flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyushkin, L. B.; Mbwahnche, R. C.; Ryzhov, O. A.

    2016-11-01

    Experimental variation of the droplets form in the flow of immiscible fluids in a capillary with the inner diameter of 0,9 mm is presented. The possibility of the transition from continuous to segmented flow by varying the velocity of precursors and carrier liquids is demonstrated. It is shown that the rate of variation of one precursor in respect to other makes it possible to vary the ratio of mixing components. Simulation results for Ψ-shaped mixer in COMSOL Multiphysics software are also presented.

  18. Instabilities of an immiscible reactive micellar interface in a Hele-Shaw cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niroobakhsh, Zahra; Litman, Matthew; Belmonte, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    We present the case of a micellar reaction involving two immiscible fluids, which results in the growth of a thin viscoelastic layer between them. A Hele-Shaw cell is initially filled with different oils, including oleic acid, which acts as a cosurfactant. The oil is displaced by an aqueous solution of the surfactant cetylpyridinium chloride. A rich variety of viscous fingering patterns are observed, which are different from classic Saffman-Taylor patterns. We discuss how they change with concentration, surfactant injection rate and type of oil. We also measure the viscoelastic properties of this material using an interfacial rheometer.

  19. Solidification Processing of Immiscible Liquids in the Presence of Applied Ultrasonic Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Fedoseyev, A. I.; Kim, S.

    2001-01-01

    Uniform microstructural distribution during solidification of immiscible liquids (e.g., oil and water; aluminum and lead) on Earth is hampered by inherent density differences between the phases. Microgravity processing minimizes settling but segregation still occurs due to gravity independent wetting and coalescence phenomena. Experiments with the transparent organic, metal analogue, succinonitrile-glycerol system were conducted in conjunction with applied ultrasonic energy. The processing parameters associated with this technique have been evaluated in view of optimizing dispersion uniformity. Characterization of the experimental results in terms of a modeling effort will also be presented,

  20. Theoretical and experimental study of metastable solid solutions and phase stability within the immiscible Ag-Mo binary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarakinos, K.; Greczynski, G.; Elofsson, V.; Magnfält, D.; Högberg, H.; Alling, B.

    2016-03-01

    Metastable solid solutions are phases that are synthesized far from thermodynamic equilibrium and offer a versatile route to design materials with tailor-made functionalities. One of the most investigated classes of metastable solid solutions with widespread technological implications is vapor deposited ternary transition metal ceramic thin films (i.e., nitrides, carbides, and borides). The vapor-based synthesis of these ceramic phases involves complex and difficult to control chemical interactions of the vapor species with the growing film surface, which often makes the fundamental understanding of the composition-properties relations a challenging task. Hence, in the present study, we investigate the phase stability within an immiscible binary thin film system that offers a simpler synthesis chemistry, i.e., the Ag-Mo system. We employ magnetron co-sputtering to grow Ag1-xMox thin films over the entire composition range along with x-ray probes to investigate the films structure and bonding properties. Concurrently, we use density functional theory calculations to predict phase stability and determine the effect of chemical composition on the lattice volume and the electronic properties of Ag-Mo solid solutions. Our combined theoretical and experimental data show that Mo-rich films (x ≥ ˜0.54) form bcc Mo-Ag metastable solid solutions. Furthermore, for Ag-rich compositions (x ≤ ˜0.21), our data can be interpreted as Mo not being dissolved in the Ag fcc lattice. All in all, our data show an asymmetry with regards to the mutual solubility of Ag and Mo in the two crystal structures, i.e., Ag has a larger propensity for dissolving in the bcc-Mo lattice as compared to Mo in the fcc-Ag lattice. We explain these findings in light of isostructural short-range clustering that induces energy difference between the two (fcc and bcc) metastable phases. We also suggest that the phase stability can be explained by the larger atomic mobility of Ag atoms as compared to that

  1. Micro- and nano-spheres of low melting point metals and alloys, formed by ultrasonic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Friedman, H; Reich, S; Popovitz-Biro, R; von Huth, P; Halevy, I; Koltypin, Y; Gedanken, A; Porat, Z

    2013-01-01

    Metals and alloys of low melting points (<430 °C) can be melted in hot silicone oil to form two immiscible liquids. Irradiation of the system with ultrasonic energy induces acoustic cavitation in the oil, which disperses the molten metals into microspheres that solidify rapidly upon cooling. This method has been applied to seven pure metals (Ga, In, Sn, Bi, Pb, Zn, Hg) and two eutectic alloys of gold (Au-Ge and Au-Si). The morphology and composition of the resulting microspheres were examined by SEM and EDS. Eutectic Au-Si formed also crystalline Au nanoparticles, which were separated and studied by HRTEM.

  2. Immiscible Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckelmann, Jens; Luning, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    layers of liquids. The setup of both demonstrations is such that one homogeneous layer in a multiphasic mixture separates into two new layers upon shaking. The solvents used are methanol, toluene, petroleum ether or "n"-pentane, silicone oil, perfluoroheptanes,…

  3. The mechanism of Bi nanowire growth from Bi/Co immiscible composite thin films.

    PubMed

    Volobuev, Valentine V; Dziawa, Piotr; Stetsenko, Alexander N; Zubarev, Eugene N; Savitskiy, Boris A; Samburskaya, Tatyana A; Reszka, Anna; Story, Tomasz; Sipatov, Alexander Yu

    2012-11-01

    Single crystalline Bi nanowires were grown by extrusion from Bi/Co thin films. The films were obtained by thermal evaporation in high vacuum. The average diameter, length and density of obtained nanowires were 100 nm, 30 microm and 6.5 x 10(5) cm(-2), respectively. The non-catalyzed self-organized process of whisker formation on the surface of immiscible composite thin film was exploited for nanowire growth. It was shown that the whiskers had formed during and after a thin film deposition. The value of residual stresses in a whole thin film coating as well as in its bismuth component was measured using X-ray diffraction technique. It was revealed that local compressive stresses, that had induced the whisker growth, had been formed by a segregation of Bi layers into Bi globules. A simple model of the whisker formation to minimize free energy in the Bi/Co system was proposed taking into account interfacial and elastic deformation energies. The obtained results can be utilized for growing of nanowires of other low-melting-point metals and semiconductors from immiscible composite thin films.

  4. Visual analysis of immiscible displacement processes in porous media under ultrasound effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, Khosrow; Babadagli, Tayfun

    2011-05-01

    The effect of sonic waves, in particular, ultrasonic radiation, on immiscible displacement in porous media and enhanced oil recovery has been of interest for more than five decades. Attempts were made to investigate the effect through core scale experimental or theoretical models. Visual experiments are useful to scrutinize the reason for improved oil recovery under acoustic waves of different frequency but are not abundant in literature. In this paper, we report observations and analyses as to the effects of ultrasonic energy on immiscible displacement and interaction of the fluid matrix visually in porous media through two-dimensional (2D) sand pack experiments. 2D glass bead models with different wettabilities were saturated with different viscosity oils and water was injected into the models. The experiments were conducted with and without ultrasound. Dynamic water injection experiments were preferred as they had both viscous and capillary forces in effect. The displacement patterns were evaluated both in terms of their shape, size, and the interface characteristics quantitatively and qualitatively to account for the effects of ultrasonic waves on the displacement and the reason for increased oil production under this type of sonic wave. More compact clusters were observed when ultrasonic energy was present in water-wet systems. In the oil-wet cases, more oil was produced after breakthrough when ultrasound was applied and no compact clusters were formed in contrast to the water-wet cases.

  5. Visual analysis of immiscible displacement processes in porous media under ultrasound effect.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Khosrow; Babadagli, Tayfun

    2011-05-01

    The effect of sonic waves, in particular, ultrasonic radiation, on immiscible displacement in porous media and enhanced oil recovery has been of interest for more than five decades. Attempts were made to investigate the effect through core scale experimental or theoretical models. Visual experiments are useful to scrutinize the reason for improved oil recovery under acoustic waves of different frequency but are not abundant in literature. In this paper, we report observations and analyses as to the effects of ultrasonic energy on immiscible displacement and interaction of the fluid matrix visually in porous media through two-dimensional (2D) sand pack experiments. 2D glass bead models with different wettabilities were saturated with different viscosity oils and water was injected into the models. The experiments were conducted with and without ultrasound. Dynamic water injection experiments were preferred as they had both viscous and capillary forces in effect. The displacement patterns were evaluated both in terms of their shape, size, and the interface characteristics quantitatively and qualitatively to account for the effects of ultrasonic waves on the displacement and the reason for increased oil production under this type of sonic wave. More compact clusters were observed when ultrasonic energy was present in water-wet systems. In the oil-wet cases, more oil was produced after breakthrough when ultrasound was applied and no compact clusters were formed in contrast to the water-wet cases.

  6. Adiabatic compressibility of an immiscible molten NaCl-AgI salt mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, V. P.; Tkachev, N. K.; Kulik, N. P.; Peshkina, K. G.

    2016-08-01

    Adiabatic compressibility β of an immiscible 0.5NaCl + 0.5AgI liquid mixture in the immiscibility range is studied experimentally and theoretically using the model of charged hard spheres. The compressibility is calculated by the relationship β = 1/ u 2ρ studied using sound velocity u measured by a pulse method and density ρ determined by hydrostatic weighing. It is shown that the compressibility of the upper phase decreases and that of the lower phase increases when the temperature increases because of the superposition of the effects of the thermal motion of ions and the phase compositions. The temperature dependence of the difference between the compressibilities of the equilibrium phases is described using the empirical equation Δβ = ( T c- T)0.442, which is close to the mean-field theory description. The results of the model calculations adequately reproduce the experimentally observed temperature dependence of the compressibility of the coexisting phases. However, the theoretically predicted critical exponent (1/2) differs from the experimentally determined exponent by 13%. These results are discussed in terms of the nature of chemical bond in silver iodide.

  7. Flow and Reactive Transport of Miscible and Immiscible Solutions in Fractured & Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryerson, F. J.; Ezzedine, S. M.; Antoun, T.

    2012-12-01

    Miscible and immiscible flows are important phenomena encountered in many industrial and engineering applications such as hydrothermal systems, oil and gas reservoirs, salt/water intrusion, geological carbon sequestration etc… Under the influence of gravity, the flow of fluids with sufficiently large density ratios may become unstable leading to instabilities, mixing and in some instances reactions at the interfacial contact between fluids. Flow is governed by a combination of momentum and mass conservation equations that describe the flow of the fluid phase and a convection-diffusion equation describing the change of concentration in the fluid phase. When hydrodynamic instabilities develop it may be difficult to use standard grid-based methods to model miscible/immiscible flow because the domains occupied by fluids evolve constantly with time. In the current study, adaptive mesh refinement finite elements method has been used to solve for flow and transport equations. Furthermore, a particle tracking scheme has also been implemented to track the kinematics of swarm of particles injected into the porous fractured media to quantify surface area, sweeping zones, and their impact on porosity changes. Spatial and temporal moments of the fingering instabilities and the development of reaction zones and the impact of kinetic reaction at the fluid/solution interfaces have also been analyzed. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Experimental study on immiscible jet breakup using refractive index matched oil-water pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Xinzhi; Katz, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    A subsea oil well blowout creates an immiscible crude oil jet. This jet fragments shortly after injection, resulting in generation of a droplet cloud. Detailed understanding of the processes involved is crucial for modeling the fragmentation and for predicting the droplet size distribution. High density of opaque droplets near nozzle limits our ability to visualize and quantify the breakup process. To overcome this challenge, two immiscible fluids: silicone oil and sugar water with the same index of refraction (1.4015) are used as surrogates for crude oil and seawater, respectively. Their ratios of kinematic viscosity (5.64), density (0.83) and interfacial tension are closely matched with those of crude oil and seawater. Distribution of the oil phase is visualized by fluorescent tagging. Both phases are also seeded with particles for simultaneous PIV measurements. The measurements are performed within atomization range of Ohnesorge and Reynolds numbers. Index matching facilitates undistorted view of the phase distribution in illuminated section. Ongoing tests show that the jet surface initially rolls up into Kelvin-Helmholtz rings, followed by development of dispersed phase ligaments further downstream, which then break into droplets. Some of these droplets are re-entrained into the high momentum core, resulting in secondary breakup. As the oil layer and ligaments evolve, they often entrain water, resulting in generation of multiple secondary water droplets encapsulated within the oil droplets. This research is made possible by a Grant from Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative.

  9. Transparent, immiscible, surrogate liquids with matchable refractive indexes: Increased range of density and viscosity ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadillon, Jérémy; Saksena, Rajat; Pearlstein, Arne J.

    2016-12-01

    By replacing the "heavy" silicone oil used in the oil phase of Saksena, Christensen, and Pearlstein ["Surrogate immiscible liquid pairs with refractive indexes matchable over a wide range of density and viscosity ratios," Phys. Fluids 27, 087103 (2015)] by one with a twentyfold higher viscosity, and replacing the "light" silicone oil in that work by one with a viscosity fivefold lower and a density about 10% lower, we have greatly extended the range of viscosity ratio accessible by index-matching the adjustable-composition oil phase to an adjustable-composition 1,2-propanediol + CsBr + H2O aqueous phase and have also extended the range of accessible density ratios. The new system of index-matchable surrogate immiscible liquids is capable of achieving the density and viscosity ratios for liquid/liquid systems consisting of water with the entire range of light or medium crude oils over the temperature range from 40 °F (4.44 °C) to 200 °F (93.3 °C) and can access the density and viscosity ratios for water with some heavy crude oils over part of the same temperature range. It also provides a room-temperature, atmospheric-pressure surrogate for the liquid CO2 + H2O system at 0 °C over almost all of the pressure range of interest in sub-seabed CO2 sequestration.

  10. Ripples on a rising bubble through an immiscible two-liquid interface generate numerous micro droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, T.; Ueda, Y.; Iguchi, M.

    2010-11-01

    The mass transfer between immiscible two liquid phases can be greatly accelerated by bubbling gas through a reactor (Bird R. B., Stewart W. E. and Lightfoot E. N., Transport Phenomena, 2nd edition (John Wiley and Sons) 2002). Therefore, the physical phenomenon occurring during the passage of a rising bubble through an immiscible two-liquid interface is of particular interest. The passage of the bubble through the oil (upper phase)/water (lower phase) interface starts with an upward lifting of the interface, and the bubble attracts a column of the water phase upwards keeping a film of the water phase around itself. In the present study, a particular remark is given to the influence of different interface tensions retracting the water film, after the water film ruptured, which lays on the interface between air and silicone oil. Unlike the previous studies on the rupture of a single liquid film in a gas which is pulled due to the identical surface tension, this system can form concentric ripples on the outer interface of the water film (oil/water interface) around the bubble due to the weak interface tension. Then, numerous micro water droplets break out from the fully grown ripples.

  11. Casting alloys.

    PubMed

    Wataha, John C; Messer, Regina L

    2004-04-01

    Although the role of dental casting alloys has changed in recent years with the development of improved all-ceramic materials and resin-based composites, alloys will likely continue to be critical assets in the treatment of missing and severely damaged teeth. Alloy shave physical, chemical, and biologic properties that exceed other classes of materials. The selection of the appropriate dental casting alloy is paramount to the long-term success of dental prostheses,and the selection process has become complex with the development of many new alloys. However, this selection process is manageable if the practitioner focuses on the appropriate physical and biologic properties, such as tensile strength, modulus of elasticity,corrosion, and biocompatibility, and avoids dwelling on the less important properties of alloy color and short-term cost. The appropriate selection of an alloy helps to ensure a longer-lasting restoration and better oral health for the patient.

  12. Numerical modeling of immiscible two-phase flow in micro-models using a commercial CFD code

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadia, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H.

    2009-01-01

    Off-the-shelf CFD software is being used to analyze everything from flow over airplanes to lab-on-a-chip designs. So, how accurately can two-phase immiscible flow be modeled flowing through some small-scale models of porous media? We evaluate the capability of the CFD code FLUENT{trademark} to model immiscible flow in micro-scale, bench-top stereolithography models. By comparing the flow results to experimental models we show that accurate 3D modeling is possible.

  13. Nanosize-induced drastic drop in equilibrium hydrogen pressure for hydride formation and structural stabilization in Pd-Rh solid-solution alloys.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Morita, Hitoshi; Yamauchi, Miho; Ikeda, Ryuichi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Kubota, Yoshiki; Kato, Kenichi; Takata, Masaki; Toh, Shoichi; Matsumura, Syo

    2012-08-01

    We have synthesized and characterized homogeneous solid-solution alloy nanoparticles of Pd and Rh, which are immiscible with each other in the equilibrium bulk state at around room temperature. The Pd-Rh alloy nanoparticles can absorb hydrogen at ambient pressure and the hydrogen pressure of Pd-Rh alloys for hydrogen storage is dramatically decreased by more than 4 orders of magnitude from the corresponding pressure in the metastable bulk state. The solid-solution state is still maintained in the nanoparticles even after hydrogen absorption/desorption, in contrast to the metastable bulks which are separated into Pd and Rh during the process.

  14. VANADIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Smith, K.F.; Van Thyne, R.J.

    1959-05-12

    This patent deals with vanadium based ternary alloys useful as fuel element jackets. According to the invention the ternary vanadium alloys, prepared in an arc furnace, contain from 2.5 to 15% by weight titanium and from 0.5 to 10% by weight niobium. Characteristics of these alloys are good thermal conductivity, low neutron capture cross section, good corrosion resistance, good welding and fabricating properties, low expansion coefficient, and high strength.

  15. BRAZING ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, R.G.; Gilliland, R.G.; Slaughter, G.M.

    1963-02-26

    A brazing alloy which, in the molten state, is characterized by excellent wettability and flowability, said alloy being capable of forming a corrosion resistant brazed joint wherein at least one component of said joint is graphite and the other component is a corrosion resistant refractory metal, said alloy consisting essentially of 20 to 50 per cent by weight of gold, 20 to 50 per cent by weight of nickel, and 15 to 45 per cent by weight of molybdenum. (AEC)

  16. Design and implementation of immiscible carbon dioxide displacement projects (CO/sub 2/ huff-puff) in south Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, F.S.; Landry, R.W.; Bou-Mikael, S.

    1986-01-01

    The CO/sub 2/ Huff-Puff (Immiscible Carbon Dioxide Displacement) process is described including reservoir mechanics. The planning, design, and implementation of the projects including the equipment specifically designed and constructed for these projects are discussed. Case histories of selected projects are included. The paper contains field operations detailing the problems encountered and subsequentially corrected.

  17. Controlled and high throughput fabrication of poly(trimethylene terephthalate) nanofibers via melt extrusion of immiscible blends

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immiscible blends of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) and poly(trimethylene terephthalate) (PTT) were melt extruded through a two strand rod die. The extrudates were hot-drawn at the die exit at different draw ratios. PTT fibers were obtained by removal of the CAB matrix from the drawn extrudates, a...

  18. Fabrication of Tunable Submicro- or Nano-structured Polyethylene Materials form Immiscible Blends with Cellulose Acetate Butyrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low density polyethylene (LDPE) was prepared into micro- or submicro-spheres or nanofibers via melt blending or extrusion of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB)/LDPE immiscible blends and subsequent removal of the CAB matrix. The sizes of the PE spheres or fibers can be successfully controlled by varyi...

  19. Controlled and high throughput fabrication of poly(trimethylene terphthalate) nanofibers via melt extrusion of immiscible blends

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immiscible blends of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) and poly(trimethylene terephthalate) (PTT) were melt extruded through a two strand rod die. The extrudates were hot-drawn at the die exit at different draw ratios. PTT fibers were obtained by removal of the CAB matrix from the drawn extrudates, a...

  20. Experimental study of liquid immiscibility in the Kiruna-type Vergenoeg iron-fluorine deposit, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Tong; Charlier, Bernard; Namur, Olivier; Schütte, Philip; Schwarz-Schampera, Ulrich; Zhang, Zhaochong; Holtz, Francois

    2017-04-01

    In this study we experimentally assess whether the bulk composition of the Kiruna-type iron-fluorine Vergenoeg deposit, South Africa (17 wt.% SiO2 and 55 wt.% FeOtot) could correspond to an immiscible Fe-rich melt paired with its host rhyolite. Synthetic powder of the host rhyolite was mixed with mafic end-members (ore rocks) in variable proportions. Experimental conditions were 1-2 kbar and 1010 °C, with a range of H2O and F contents in the starting compositions. Pairs of distinct immiscible liquids occur in experiments saturated with fluorite, under relatively dry conditions, and at oxygen fugacity conditions corresponding to FMQ-1.4 to FMQ+1.8 (FMQ = fayalite-magnetite-quartz solid buffer). The Si-rich immiscible liquids contain 60.9-73.0 wt.% SiO2, 9.1-12.5 wt.% FeOtot, 2.4-4.2 wt.% F, and are enriched in Na2O, K2O and Al2O3. The paired Fe-rich immiscible melts have 41.0-49.5 wt.% SiO2, 20.6-36.1 wt.% FeOtot and 4.5-6.0 wt.% F, and are enriched in MgO, CaO and TiO2. Immiscibility does not develop in experiments performed under water-rich (aH2O > 0.2; a = activity) and/or oxidized (>FMQ+1.8) conditions. In all experiments, solid phases are magnetite, ±fayalite, fluorite and tridymite. Our results indicate that the rocks from the Vergenoeg pipe crystallized in a magma chamber hosting two immiscible silicate melts. Crystallization of the pipe from the Fe-rich melt explains its extreme enrichment in Ca, F and Fe compared to the host rhyolitic rocks. However, its low bulk silica content compared to experimental Fe-rich melts indicates that the pipe formed by remobilization of a mafic crystal mush dominated by magnetite and fayalite. Segregation of evolved residual liquids as well as the conjugate immiscible Si-rich melt produced the host rhyolite. The huge amount of fluorine in Vergenoeg ores (∼12 wt.% F) can hardly be explained by simple crystallization of fluorite from the Fe-rich silicate melt (up to 6 wt.% F at fluorite saturation). Instead, we confirm a

  1. Macroscopic Surface Tension in a Lattice Boltzmann BGK Model of Two Immiscible Fluids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S. P.; Halliday, I.; Care, C. M.

    1997-08-01

    We present a method by which an interface generating algorithm, similar to that of earlier lattice Boltzmann models of immisible fluids, may be extended to a two component, two-speed D2Q9 lattice Bhatnagar Gross Krook fluid. For two-dimensional, microcurrent-free planar interfaces between the two immiscible fluids we derive expressions for static interfacial tensions and interfacial distributions of the two fluids. Extending our analysis to curved interfaces we propose a scheme for incorporating the influence of interfacial microcurrents which is based upon general symmetry arguments and is correct to second order in lattice velocity. The analysis demonstrates that the interfacial microcurrents have only second order influence upon the macroscopic behaviour of the model. We find good agreement between our calculations and simulation results based on the microcurrent stream function and surface tension results from the pressure tensor or Laplace law.

  2. Vertical vibration dynamics of acoustically levitated drop containing two immiscible liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Duyang; Zhai, Zhicong; Li, Lin; Lin, Kejun; Li, Xiaoguang; Geng, Xingguo

    2016-09-01

    We have studied the levitation and oscillation dynamics of complex drops containing two immiscible liquids. Two types of drops, core-shell drop and abnormal-shaped drop, have been obtained depending on the levitation procedures. The oscillation dynamics of the drops have been studied using a high speed camera. It has been found that the oscillation of the abnormal-shaped drop has a longer oscillation period and decays much faster than that of the core-shell drop, which cannot be accounted for by the air resistance itself. The acoustic streaming induced by ultrasound may bring an additional force against the motion of the drop due to the Bernoulli effect. This is responsible for the enhanced damping during the oscillation in acoustic levitation.

  3. Fluid-fluid interaction during miscible and immiscible displacement under ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamida, T.; Babadagli, T.

    2007-12-01

    This paper aims at identifying and analyzing the influence of high-frequency, high-intensity ultrasonic radiation at the interface between immiscible (different types of oils and aqueous solutions) and miscible (different types of oil and solvent) fluids. An extensive set of Hele-Shaw type experiments were performed for several viscosity ratios, and interfacial tension. Fractal analysis techniques were applied to quantify the degree of fingering and branching. This provided a rough assessment of the degree of perturbation generated at the interface when the capillary forces along with the viscous forces are effective. Miscible Hele-Shaw experiments were also presented to isolate the effect of viscous forces. We found that ultrasound acts to stabilize the interfacial front, and that such effect is most pronounced at low viscosity ratios.

  4. Heat transfer between stratified immiscible liquid layers driven by gas bubbling across the interface

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.A.; Irvine, T.F. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The modeling of molten core debris in the CORCON and VANESA computer codes as overlying, immiscible liquid layers is discussed as it relates to the transfer of heat and mass between the layers. This initial structure is identified and possible configurations are discussed. The stratified, gas-sparged configuration that is presently employed in CORCON and VANESA is examined and the existing literature for interlayer heat transfer is assessed. An experiment which was designed to measure interlayer heat transfer with gas sparging is described. The results are presented and compared to previously existing models. A dimensionless correlation for stratified, interlayer heat transfer with gas sparging is developed. This relationship is recommended for inclusion in CORCON-MOD2 for heat transfer between stratified, molten liquid layers. 12 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Boiling of the interface between two immiscible liquids below the bulk boiling temperatures of both components.

    PubMed

    Pimenova, Anastasiya V; Goldobin, Denis S

    2014-11-01

    We consider the problem of boiling of the direct contact of two immiscible liquids. An intense vapour formation at such a direct contact is possible below the bulk boiling points of both components, meaning an effective decrease of the boiling temperature of the system. Although the phenomenon is known in science and widely employed in technology, the direct contact boiling process was thoroughly studied (both experimentally and theoretically) only for the case where one of liquids is becoming heated above its bulk boiling point. On the contrary, we address the case where both liquids remain below their bulk boiling points. In this paper we construct the theoretical description of the boiling process and discuss the actualisation of the case we consider for real systems.

  6. Parametric resonance of capillary waves at the interface between two immiscible Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobyakov, D.; Bychkov, V.; Lundh, E.; Bezett, A.; Marklund, M.

    2012-08-01

    We study the parametric resonance of capillary waves on the interface between two immiscible Bose-Einstein condensates pushed towards each other by an oscillating force. Guided by analytical models, we solve numerically the coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations for a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate at zero temperature. We show that, at moderate amplitudes of the driving force, the instability is stabilized due to nonlinear modifications of the oscillation frequency. When the amplitude of the driving force is large enough, we observe a detachment of droplets from the Bose-Einstein condensates, resulting in the generation of quantum vortices (skyrmions). We analytically investigate the vortex dynamics, and conditions of quantized vortex generation.

  7. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics pore-scale simulations of unstable immiscible flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Bandara, Dunusinghe Mudiyanselage Uditha C.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Oostrom, Martinus; Palmer, Bruce J.; Grate, Jay W.; Zhang, Changyong

    2013-12-01

    We have conducted a series of high-resolution numerical experiments using the Pair-Wise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (PF-SPH) multiphase flow model. First, we derived analytical expressions relating parameters in the PF-SPH model to the surface tension and static contact angle. Next, we used the model to study viscous fingering, capillary fingering, and stable displacement of immiscible fluids in porous media for a wide range of capillary numbers and viscosity ratios. We demonstrated that the steady state saturation profiles and the boundaries of viscous fingering, capillary fingering, and stable displacement regions compare favorably with micromodel laboratory experimental results. For displacing fluid with low viscosity, we observed that the displacement pattern changes from viscous fingering to stable displacement with increasing injection rate. When a high viscosity fluid is injected, transition behavior from capillary fingering to stable displacement occurred as the flow rate was increased. These observation also agree with the results of the micromodel laboratory experiments.

  8. Capillary foams: highly stable bubbles formed by synergistic action of particles and immiscible liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, Carson; Zhang, Yi; Behrens, Sven

    2015-03-01

    Liquid foams are a familiar part of everyday life from beer and frothed milk to bubble baths; they also play important roles in enhanced oil recovery, lightweight packaging, and insulation. We report a new class of foams, obtained by frothing a suspension of colloidal particles in the presence of a small amount of an immiscible secondary liquid. A unique aspect of the new foams, termed capillary foams, is that suspended particles mediate spreading of a minority liquid around gas bubbles. The resulting mixed particle/liquid coating can stabilize bubbles against coalescence even when the particles alone cannot. We demonstrate the generality of capillary foams by forming them from a diverse set of particle/liquid combinations and rationalize the results with a simple free energy model. In addition to many applications as liquid foams, capillary foams can serve as precursors for hierarchically-structured solids with porosity on different length scales and with significant application potential.

  9. Droplet freezing, docking, and the exchange of immiscible phase and surfactant around frozen droplets.

    PubMed

    Sgro, Allyson E; Chiu, Daniel T

    2010-07-21

    This paper describes a platform for cooling microfluidic chips so as to freeze aqueous droplets flowing in oil. Using a whole-chip cooling chamber, we can control the ambient temperature surrounding a microfluidic chip and induce cooling and freezing inside the channels. When combined with a droplet generation and droplet docking chip, this platform allows for the facile freezing of droplets immobilized in resistance-based docks. Depending on the design and shape of the docks, the frozen droplets can either be trapped stably in the docks or be released because deformed non-frozen aqueous droplets turn spherical when frozen, and thus can become dislodged from the docks. Additionally, using this chamber and chip combination we are able to exchange immiscible phases and surfactants surrounding the frozen droplets. The materials and methods are inexpensive and easily accessible to microfluidics researchers, making this a simple addition to an existing microfluidic platform.

  10. Solvent-free Fabrication of Tissue Engineering Scaffolds with Immiscible Polymer Blends

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Liang; Jiang, Wei; Li, Wei

    2014-01-01

    A completely organic solvent-free fabrication method is developed for tissue engineering scaffolds by gas foaming of immiscible polylactic acid (PLA) and sucrose blends, followed by water leaching. PLA scaffolds with above 90% porosity and 25–200 μm pore size were fabricated. The pore size and porosity was controlled with process parameters including extrusion temperature and foaming process parameters. Dynamic mechanical analysis showed that the extrusion temperature could be used to control the scaffold strength. Both unfoamed and foamed scaffolds were used to culture glioblastoma (GBM) cells M059K. The results showed that the cells grew better in the foamed PLA scaffolds. The method presented in the paper is versatile and can be used to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds without any residual organic solvents. PMID:24764605

  11. Thermo-Gelation of Surface-Modified Polyethylene Microgels from Fragmentation and Immiscible Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Gerald H.; Shaw, Montgomery T.

    2008-07-01

    Polyethylene microgels were created by swollen-state grinding and ultrasonic fragmentation of bulk crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE) suspended in squalane, and by the extraction of crosslinked-polyethylene micro-domains from an immiscible blend of polyethylene (PE) and polystyrene (PS). Crosslinking of the polyethylene micro-domains in the blend was achieved by exposure to an electron beam. Suspensions of both microgels in squalane exhibit thermal gelation upon cooling where both G' and G″ increase by up to five-orders in magnitude when probed using small-angle oscillatory shear. We propose that this phenomenon is attributed to weak short-range interactions among the particles whereby surface terminal chains on the microgels can co-crystallize forming inter-particle bonds. However, these interactions are mild enough that the systems may be reverted to its original state by applying higher shear stresses at elevated temperatures.

  12. Modeling of Two-Phase Immiscible Flow with Moving Contact Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Alsaud, Moataz; Soulaine, Cyprien; Riaz, Amir; Tchelepi, Hamdi; Stanford University Collaboration; University of Maryland, College Park Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    A new numerical method based on the implicit interface approach on Cartesian grids is proposed for modeling two-phase immiscible flow with moving contact lines. The reinitialization of level-set function by computing the minimum distance to linearly reconstructed interface to obtain signed distance function is extended to include the contact angle boundary condition. The physics of contact line dynamics is implemented using the Cox-Voinov hydrodynamic theory that efficiently captures the effect of the microscopic contact line region. The numerical method is validated through various examples. Parasitic currents are studied in the case of static and constantly advected parabolic interface intersecting the domain boundary with an imposed contact angle. Moving contact line in the viscous dominated regime is studied and verified through comparison with experiments.

  13. The evolution of immiscible silicate and fluoride melts: Implications for REE ore-genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyukova, O.; Williams-Jones, A. E.

    2016-01-01

    The Mid-Proterozoic peralkaline Strange Lake pluton (Québec-Labrador, Canada) exhibits extreme enrichment in high field strength elements (HFSE), including the rare earth elements (REE), particularly in pegmatites. On the basis of a study of melt inclusions, we proposed recently that fluoride-silicate melt immiscibility played an important and perhaps dominant role in concentrating the REE within the pluton. Here we present further evidence for silicate-fluoride immiscibility at Strange Lake from a sample of the hypersolvus granite, which contains an inclusion composed largely of REE and HFSE minerals. The inclusion (∼5 cm in diameter) comprises a narrow rim containing chevkinite-(Ce) and zircon in a fluorite matrix, a core of fluorbritholite-(Ce) and bastnäsite-(Ce) and a transition zone between the rim and the core consisting of a fine-grained intergrowth of bastnäsite-(Ce), gagarinite-(Y) and fluorite. We propose that the inclusion formed as a result of silicate-fluoride immiscibility, which occurred early in the emplacement history of the Strange Lake pluton, and that it represents the fluoride melt. After separation of the two melts, the boundary between them acted as a locus of crystallisation, where crystals formed repeatedly due to heterogeneous (surface catalysed) nucleation. Zircon crystallised shortly after melt phase separation, and was followed by the growth of perthite together with arfvedsonite and quartz. As a result, the silicate melt surrounding the fluoride inclusion became enriched in volatiles that facilitated crystallisation of progressively larger crystals in the inclusion; large crystals of arfvedsonite and perthite were succeeded by even larger crystals of quartz. Massive crystallisation of chevkinite-(Ce) followed, forming the rim of the inclusion. The fluoride melt, which constituted the matrix to the silicate minerals and chevkinite-(Ce), crystallised after chevkinite-(Ce), forming fluorbritholite-(Ce) and fluorite. Aqueous fluid

  14. Dynamics of oil ganglia during immiscible displacement in water-wet porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Payatakes, A.C.

    1982-01-01

    Strong interest in the dynamic behavior of a population of non-wetting ganglia undergoing immiscible displacement has arisen because this problem is central to the understanding of oil-bank formation during enhanced oil recovery by chemical flooding. The same problem arises in the analysis of the relative permeabilities to any pair of wetting and non-wetting phases, when the saturation of the wetting phase exceeds approx. 0.60. Saturation of a phase is defined as the fraction of the void space that is occupied by that phase. Many drainage or imbibition phenomena fall into this category. This work concentrates on the case where the non-wetting phase is oleic (oil-based), the wetting phase is aqueous, and the objective is enhanced oil recovery. Discussions include theoretical modeling of the porous medium; mobilization, fissioning, and stranding of a solitary oil ganglion; and dynamics of oil-ganglion populations. 39 references.

  15. Effect of Particles on Rheology and Morphology of Immiscible PI/PDMS Polymer Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thareja, Prachi; Velankar, Sachin S.

    2008-07-01

    We present the effects of several interfacially-active particles on the rheology of model immiscible polymer blends of polyisoprene (PI) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with a droplet-matrix morphology. The particles are capable of adsorbing at the PI/PDMS interface, and hence addition of these particles is expected to significantly affect the breakup and coalescence of drops and consequently the drop size. Using rheology (specifically, strain recovery upon cessation of shear) as a tool to probe morphological evolution, we show that none of the particles are able to prevent coalescence of the drops, at least at a particle loading of 0.5 vol.%. Remarkably however, some particle types strongly promote coalescence in some blends.

  16. Effect of pressure on cation partitioning between immiscible liquids in the system Ti0 2-SiO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Circone, S.; Agee, C. B.

    1995-03-01

    Liquidus phase relations in the system Si0 2-TiO 2 have been determined at 3.0 GPa to investigate the effect of pressure on the partitioning of Si and Ti between coexisting immiscible liquids. Experiments on oxide mixtures containing 10, 50, 90, and 100 mol% TiO 2 were performed in multi-anvil and piston-cylinder apparatus at 2173-2740 K. At 1 atm, immiscible liquids form because the liquid structures are dissimilar: tetravalent cations occur in primarily fourfold (Si0 2-rich liquid) vs. sixfold (TiO 2-rich liquid) coordination by oxygen. At 3.0 GPa, immiscible liquids also coexist, but the phase relations and liquid compositions are significantly different. The eutectic liquid is now Ti0 2-rich (78.4 vs. 8.1 mol% TiO 2 at 1 atm). Above the liquidus, the coexisting immiscible liquids are enriched in Si0 2. The Si0 2 content of the TiO 2-rich liquid has increased by more than a factor of 3, while the TiO2-content of the SiO 2-rich liquid has decreased by 1/2. The persistence of a wide solvus implies that pressure does not cause liquid structure assimilation. The observed shift in immiscible liquid compositions indicated that pressure has raised the activity of TiO 2 in the liquid dominated by tetravalent cations in fourfold coordination and lowered the activity of SiO 2 in a liquid dominated by tetravalent cations in sixfold coordination. The decrease in TiO 2 content of the SiO 2-rich liquid with pressure is probably related to the positive volume of mixing observed in 1 atm glasses in this composition range. The enhanced solubility of SiO 2 in the TiO 2-rich liquid with pressure may be due to a pressure-induced increase in the coordination state of Si.

  17. Immiscible Hydrocarbon and Aqueous Fluids Under Subduction Zone Conditions and Implications for the Deep Carbon Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, F.; Daniel, I.; Cardon, H.; Montagnac, G.; Sverjensky, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Subducting slabs recycle rocks into the deep Earth releasing fluids which may cause partial melting and possible oxidation of the mantle wedge. Recent theoretical studies1 indicate that at pressures greater than about 3.0 GPa these fluids could contain high concentrations of organic and inorganic C-species with a wide range of C-oxidation states at equilibrium. If so, such fluids could play an important role in the deep carbon cycle, including the formation of diamond. However, direct experimental observations of the speciation in the fluids are needed. We studied 1.0 M aqueous Na-formate and 1.0 M Na-acetate solutions in the diamond anvil cell using Raman spectroscopy at 300 ºC and 3.0 GPa for up to 60 hours. Our preliminary results indicate that formate rapidly decomposed to bicarbonate/carbonate species and methane, with no detectable H2. Acetate decomposed much more slowly. Within the first two hours of heating, crystals of Na2CO3 precipitated in the fluid, and kept growing while immiscible droplets of hydrocarbon appeared and persisted throughout the experiments at elevated temperature and pressure. In the aqueous fluid, acetate and HCO3- were present during the first 6 hours, and then CO32- and acetate after 20 hours of heating. The final HCO3- /CO32- ratio was constant indicating a constant pH. This is the first in situ observation of persistent immiscible fluid hydrocarbons formed from an aqueous precursor at upper mantle pressures. Our results suggest that Earth's subduction zone fluids at high pressures might involve fluid hydrocarbon species as well as inorganic and organic aqueous C-species, which considerably broadens the picture of deep carbon sources, cycles and sinks. [1] Sverjensky et at. (2014), Nat. Geosci. 7, 909-913.

  18. Tracking intercumulus crystallisation at the Skaergaard intrusion using immobile trace elements: Evidence for liquid immiscibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, Madeleine

    2010-05-01

    A key target in the study of a layered intrusion is to constrain the liquid line of descent of the magma. However, the liquid line of descent of the intercumulus liquid is rarely considered, and is often assumed to be equivalent to that of the bulk magma. If the bulk liquid and interstitial liquids follow the same liquid line of descent, then intercumulus zoning profiles should be similar to the cryptic compositional variations seen with stratigraphic height. Because of extensive sub-solidus and diffusional changes that occur in slowly cooled rocks, clues to the composition of the intercumulus liquid can only be obtained using very slowly diffusing trace elements and components; the anorthite content of plagioclase and its Ti concentration are ideal in this respect. For the Skaergaard Intrusion, east Greenland, anorthite content (XAn) decreases monotonically as temperature decreases and the liquid becomes more evolved. The Ti content decreases in both cumulus and intercumulus plagioclase, as a result of falling liquid Ti after Fe-Ti oxides start to crystallise. However, Ti-XAn zoning in intercumulus plagioclase does not match the cryptic variations observed with increasing stratigraphic height, which demonstrates that the cumulus and intercumulus liquid lines of descent are not equivalent. In the intercumulus plagioclase, different trends develop adjacent to fine-grained, mafic and felsic interstitial pockets, which represent the crystallised products of trapped, late-stage immiscible liquids. The zoning trends vary systematically as a function of stratigraphic height and spatial location within the intrusion. The distribution and composition of the reversed plagioclase are used to infer the spatial distribution and differential movement of interstitial immiscible liquids throughout the Layered Series, and processes affecting the intercumulus liquid.

  19. Extreme iron enrichment and liquid immiscibility in mafic intrusions: Experimental evidence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veksler, Ilya V.

    2009-07-01

    This paper examines phase equilibria and mass balance constraints on Fe enrichment in tholeiitic liquids in plutonic environments. The peak of Fe enrichment is thought to roughly coincide with magma saturation in Fe-Ti oxides; and olivine starts to react with the liquid at about the same time. This crucial stage of crystallization is examined in detail using a compilation of chemical analyses of 64 experimental charges that comprise liquids (quenched glasses) equilibrated with the liquidus assemblage of olivine, plagioclase, high-Ca pyroxene, and low-Ca pyroxene. Some samples also contain Fe-Ti oxides. It is shown that the 4-phase liquidus assemblage does not constrain a narrow range of liquid compositions. The concentrations of SiO 2 in the selection of experimental glasses vary broadly from 42 to 66 wt.%. Silica content shows strong negative correlations with FeO and CaO/Al 2O 3, and strong positive correlation with alkalis. Extreme Fe enrichment above 22 wt.% FeO is observed only in alkali-free or alkali-poor liquids. Broad compositional variations for the multiply-saturated liquids are attributed to strong non-ideality and complex concentration-activity relationships in ferrobasaltic melts. Liquid immiscibility characteristic of Fe-rich silicate liquids is the ultimate consequence of non-ideality. Petrogenetic implications of phase equilibria and mass balance constraints are discussed for a classical example of the Skaergaard intrusion in East Greenland, where the trend of extreme Fe enrichment has been in contention. It is proposed that seemingly conflicting results of experiments on Skaergaard natural cumulate rocks and model melt compositions can be reconciled if it is assumed that silicate liquid immiscibility in Skaergaard started not at the very end of crystallization but earlier, soon after the start of ilmenite and magnetite crystallization.

  20. Experiments on front roughness and averaged saturation for immiscible displacement in heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiss, V.; Neuweiler, I.; Faerber, A.

    2009-04-01

    For mass transfer during two-phase two-component flow processes in heterogeneous porous media, the fluid-fluid interface of the two-phases have a strong influence. To predict mass transfer it is therefore important to determine the interface properties. An important characterization criterion for displacement of one fluid by another, immiscible one in porous media, is the morphology of the fluid-fluid interface. The interface morphology is investigated intensely since a long time. It is determined by the interplay between capillary, gravity and viscous forces and by the structure of the pore space. The interface morphology influences the modeling of a displacement process on the Darcy scale, where the pore scale is no longer resolved. However, the interface criteria on the pore scale cannot necessarily be transferred to the larger scale. This is in particular true in heterogeneous media, where the structure of material interfaces on the large scale may determine the flow process. Immiscible displacement fronts on a Darcy scale are often sharp and may show instabilities on the larger scale. Pore scale instabilities, on the other hand, may appear as stabilized on the large scale due to large scale structures. We will present observations of displacement fronts in Darcy scale heterogeneous media, where fluid content was measured using optical methods. The front properties were analyzed for different flow regimes and structures. The growth rate of the front roughness shows a different behavior than the spatially averaged fluid content. While the front is in most cases stable after some time, the width of the distribution of the averaged fluid content continues to grow due to pore-scale and macroscopic trapping events.

  1. Magmatic immiscibility and fluid phase evolution in the Mount Genis granite (southeastern Sardinia, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frezzotti, Maria Luce

    1992-01-01

    The Mount Genis granite is one of the post-tectonic intrusives emplaced late in the magmatic history of the Hercynian batholith in Sardinia. Devitrified silicate melt inclusions are present in some (magmatic) rock-forming and miarolitic quartz. These magmatic remnants show initial melting at 680- 720°C. High-temperature observations (700-800°C) revealed the presence in some of the inclusions of mixed hydrosaline melt (L1) and silicate melt (L2), with extremely variable L1/L2 ratios. Electron microprobe analyses indicate L1 to be K-Na dominated chlorides. Inclusions of mixed silicate and hydrosaline melts are interpreted to have been formed by heterogeneous trapping of two immiscible fluid phases (silicate-hydrosaline) after second boiling, most likely during the final crystallization stage. Magma-derived brines (63 eq wt% NaCl) circulated at subsolidus conditions from ≈600°C and were retained in the miarolitic cavities down to about 400°C. Fluid unmixing occurred locally in the miarolitic cavities from 550° to 412°C. At temperatures of ≈400° to 100°C the microgranite was invaded by diluted waters (≈4-5 eq wt% NaCl). A possible model for fluid evolution begins with a hydrosaline melt exsolving from the magma at the late-magmatic stage. The absence of boiling within the volatile (hydrosaline) system shows that brines can occur by direct magmatic immiscibility. The comprehensive hydrothermal evolution suggests a nearly isobaric cooling path, with local boiling episodes in the miaroles, probably in coincidence with invasion of external waters.

  2. Optofluidic restricted imaging, spectroscopy and counting of nanoparticles by evanescent wave using immiscible liquids.

    PubMed

    Liang, L; Zuo, Y F; Wu, W; Zhu, X Q; Yang, Y

    2016-08-21

    Conventional flow cytometry (FC) suffers from the diffraction limit for the detection of nanoparticles smaller than 100 nm, whereas traditional total internal reflection (TIR) microscopy can only detect few samples near the solid-liquid interface mostly in static states. Here we demonstrate a novel on-chip optofluidic technique using evanescent wave sensing for single nanoparticle real time detection by combining hydrodynamic focusing and TIR using immiscible flows. The immiscibility of the high-index sheath flow and the low-index core flow naturally generate a smooth, flat and step-index interface that is ideal for the TIR effect, whose evanescent field can penetrate the full width of the core flow. Hydrodynamic focusing can focus on all the nanoparticles in the extreme centre of the core flow with a width smaller than 1 μm. This technique enables us to illuminate every single sample in the running core flow by the evanescent field, leaving none unaffected. Moreover, it works well for samples much smaller than the diffraction limit. We have successfully demonstrated the scattering imaging and counting of 50 nm and 100 nm Au nanoparticles and also the fluorescence imaging and counting of 200 nm beads. The effective counting speeds are estimated as 1500, 2300 and 2000 particles per second for the three types of nanoparticles, respectively. The optical scattering spectra were also measured to determine the size of individual Au nanoparticles. This provides a new technique to detect nanoparticles and we foresee its application in the detection of molecules for biomedical analyses.

  3. Highly mismatched crystalline and amorphous GaN(1-x)As(x) alloys in the whole composition range

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, K. M.; Novikov, S. V.; Broesler, R.; Demchenko, I. N.; Denlinger, J. D.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Luckert, F.; Martin, R. W.; Walukiewicz, W.; Foxon, C. T.

    2009-08-29

    Alloying is a commonly accepted method to tailor properties of semiconductor materials for specific applications. Only a limited number of semiconductor alloys can be easily synthesized in the full composition range. Such alloys are, in general, formed of component elements that are well matched in terms of ionicity, atom size, and electronegativity. In contrast there is a broad class of potential semiconductor alloys formed of component materials with distinctly different properties. In most instances these mismatched alloys are immiscible under standard growth conditions. Here we report on the properties of GaN1-xAsx, a highly mismatched, immiscible alloy system that was successfully synthesized in the whole composition range using a nonequilibrium low temperature molecular beam epitaxy technique. The alloys are amorphous in the composition range of 0.17alloys with x>0.2, and to the upward movement of the valence band for alloys with x<0.2. The unique features of the band structure offer an opportunity of using GaN1-xAsx alloys for various types of solar power conversion devices.

  4. PILOT EVALUATION OF VANADIUM ALLOYS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ARCS, SHEETS, ROLLING(METALLURGY), HIGH TEMPERATURE, SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH, COMPRESSIVE PROPERTIES, DUCTILITY, CREEP, OXIDATION, COATINGS , SILICIDES , HARDNESS, WELDING, EXTRUSION, TANTALUM ALLOYS, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS....VANADIUM ALLOYS, * NIOBIUM ALLOYS, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, TITANIUM ALLOYS, ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS, CARBON ALLOYS, MELTING, ELECTRIC

  5. Nonswelling alloy

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, S.D.

    1975-12-23

    An aluminum alloy containing one weight percent copper has been found to be resistant to void formation and thus is useful in all nuclear applications which currently use aluminum or other aluminum alloys in reactor positions which are subjected to high neutron doses.

  6. URANIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Seybolt, A.U.

    1958-04-15

    Uranium alloys containing from 0.1 to 10% by weight, but preferably at least 5%, of either zirconium, niobium, or molybdenum exhibit highly desirable nuclear and structural properties which may be improved by heating the alloy to about 900 d C for an extended period of time and then rapidly quenching it.

  7. ZIRCONIUM ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Wilhelm, H.A.; Ames, D.P.

    1959-02-01

    A binary zirconiuin--antimony alloy is presented which is corrosion resistant and hard containing from 0.07% to 1.6% by weight of Sb. The alloys have good corrosion resistance and are useful in building equipment for the chemical industry.

  8. Silicate-natrocarbonatite liquid immiscibility in 1917 eruption combeite-wollastonite nephelinite, Oldoinyo Lengai Volcano, Tanzania: Melt inclusion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharygin, Victor V.; Kamenetsky, Vadim S.; Zaitsev, Anatoly N.; Kamenetsky, Maya B.

    2012-11-01

    Primary silicate-melt and carbonate-salt inclusions occur in the phenocrysts (nepheline, fluorapatite, wollastonite, clinopyroxene) in the 1917 eruption combeite-wollastonite nephelinite at Oldoinyo Lengai. Silicate-melt inclusions in nepheline clearly show liquid immiscibility phenomena expressed in the presence of carbonate globules in silicate glass. The coexistence of inclusions with markedly different proportions of silicate glass + vapor-carbonate globule in the core of nepheline phenocrysts, the presence of carbonate-salt inclusions in fluorapatite and our heating experiments strongly suggest that their entrapment began at temperatures higher than 1130 °C in an intermediate chamber when initial carbonated nephelinite melt was heterogeneous and represented a mixture of immiscible liquids. Silicate-natrocarbonatite melt immiscibility took place at high temperature and immiscible nephelinite and carbonatite liquids coexisted over a wide temperature range from ≥ 1130 °C to 600 °C. Homogenization of a carbonate globule (dissolution of the gas bubble in carbonate melt) at 900-940 °C indicates that after separation from silicate magma the natrocarbonatite represented homogeneous liquid in the 900-1130 °C temperature range, whereas below these temperatures immiscible melts of different composition and fluid phase have separated from it. The bulk composition of homogeneous natrocarbonatite melt may be estimated as ≈ 20% CaF2, 40-60% (Na,K)2CO3 and 20-40% CaCO3 based on the coexistence of nyerereite, calcite and fluorite and the rapid phase transition (carbonate aggregate → carbonate liquid) at 550-570 °C observed in vapor-carbonate globules of nepheline-hosted silicate-melt inclusions and on the Na2CO3-CaCO3-CaF2 phase diagram. Silicate glasses of nepheline-hosted immiscible inclusions drastically differ from host nephelinite in the abundance of major and trace elements. They are high peralkaline ((Na + K)/Al — up to 9.5) and virtually free of water (H2

  9. Magnetic properties of Co-Cu metastable solid solution alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xu; Mashimo, Tsutomu; Huang, Xinsheng; Kagayama, Tomoko; Chiba, Akira; Koyama, Keiichi; Motokawa, Mitsuhiro

    2004-03-01

    Metastable solid solution alloy powders and bulk alloys in the cobalt(Co)-copper(Cu) (10 90 mol % Co) system, which is an almost immiscible system at the ambient state, were prepared by mechanical alloying (MA) and shock compression. All MA-treated powders showed the x-ray diffraction patterns of a single phase of fcc structure. The lattice parameter increases with Cu concentration and is fundamentally on the line with Vegard’s law. The magnetization curves of CoxCu100-x (x=20 80) metastable bulk alloys at room temperature showed ferromagnetism, while the one of Co10Cu90 system showed paramagnetism. The saturation magnetic moment (Ms) curve versus electron numbers per atom at 0 K was found to be similar to the Slater-Pauling curves of other transition-metal binary systems and decreased with increasing Cu concentration and approached zero at about 28.8 electrons per atom. The magnetoresistance ratio at room temperature increased with Cu content in the ferromagnetic region, while the one of the paramagnetic Co10Cu90 alloy was negligibly small.

  10. PLUTONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Chynoweth, W.

    1959-06-16

    The preparation of low-melting-point plutonium alloys is described. In a MgO crucible Pu is placed on top of the lighter alloying metal (Fe, Co, or Ni) and the temperature raised to 1000 or 1200 deg C. Upon cooling, the alloy slug is broke out of the crucible. With 14 at. % Ni the m.p. is 465 deg C; with 9.5 at. % Fe the m.p. is 410 deg C; and with 12.0 at. % Co the m.p. is 405 deg C. (T.R.H.) l6262 l6263 ((((((((Abstract unscannable))))))))

  11. Aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, Linda B. (Inventor); Starke, Edgar A., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates to aluminum alloys, particularly to aluminum-copper-lithium alloys containing at least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium as an essential component, which are suitable for applications in aircraft and aerospace vehicles. At least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium is added as an essential component to an alloy which precipitates a T1 phase (Al2CuLi). This addition enhances the nucleation of the precipitate T1 phase, producing a microstructure which provides excellent strength as indicated by Rockwell hardness values and confirmed by standard tensile tests.

  12. A study of surface tension driven segregation in monotectic alloy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, J. Barry; Andrews, Rosalia N.; Gowens, Terrell F.

    1988-01-01

    The compatibilities of various monotectic alloy systems with several different crucible materials were evaluated. The study was carried out using small candidate alloy samples of compositions that produced fifty volume percent of each liquid phase at the monotectic temperature. Compatibility was based on the evaluation of the wetting tendency of the two immiscible phases with the crucible material in a one-g solidified sample. Three types of wetting phenomena were observed during the evaluation. Type 1 indicates an alloy-crucible combination where the L2 phase preferentially wets the crucible material. Since L2 is usually the minority phase in desirable alloys, this material combination would be difficult to process and is therefore considered incompatible. Type 2 behavior indicates an alloy-crucible combination where the L1 phase preferentially wets the crucible material. This type of combination is considered compatible since surface tension effects should aid in processing the alloy to a useful form. Type 3 indicates any combination that leads to major reactions between the alloy and crucible material, gas entrapment, or separation of the metal from the crucible wall. Additional compatibility evaluations would have to be carried out on combinations of this category. The five alloy systems studied included aluminum-bismuth, copper-lead, aluminum-indium, aluminum-lead and cadmium-gallium. The systems were combined with crucibles of alumina, boron nitride, mullite, quartz, silicon carbide and zirconia.

  13. APPLICATION OF A LUMPED-PROCESS MATHEMATICAL MODEL TO DISSOLUTION OF NON-UNIFORMLY DISTRIBUTED IMMISCIBLE LIQUID IN HETEROGENEOUS POROUS MEDIA

    PubMed Central

    Marble, J. C.; DiFilippo, E. L.; Zhang, Z.; Tick, G. R.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2010-01-01

    The use of a lumped-process mathematical model to simulate the complete dissolution of immiscible liquid non-uniformly distributed in physically heterogeneous porous-media systems was investigated. The study focused specifically on systems wherein immiscible liquid was poorly accessible to flowing water. Two representative, idealized scenarios were examined, one wherein immiscible liquid at residual saturation exists within a lower-permeability unit residing in a higher-permeability matrix, and one wherein immiscible liquid at higher saturation (a pool) exists within a higher-permeability unit adjacent to a lower-permeability unit. As expected, effluent concentrations were significantly less than aqueous solubility due to dilution and by-pass flow effects. The measured data were simulated with two mathematical models, one based on a simple description of the system and one based on a more complex description. The permeability field and the distribution of the immiscible-liquid zones were represented explicitly in the more complex, distributed-process model. The dissolution rate coefficient in this case represents only the impact of local-scale (and smaller) processes on dissolution, and the parameter values were accordingly obtained from the results of experiments conducted with one-dimensional, homogeneously-packed columns. In contrast, the system was conceptualized as a pseudo-homogeneous medium with immiscible liquid uniformly distributed throughout the system for the simpler, lumped-process model. With this approach, all factors that influence immiscible-liquid dissolution are incorporated into the calibrated dissolution rate coefficient, which in such cases serves as a composite or lumped term. The calibrated dissolution rate coefficients obtained from the simulations conducted with the lumped-process model were approximately two to three orders of magnitude smaller than the independently-determined values used for the simulations conducted with the

  14. BRAZING ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, R.G.; Gilliland, R.G.; Slaughter, G.M.

    1962-02-20

    A brazing alloy is described which, in the molten state, is characterized by excellent wettability and flowability and is capable of forming a corrosion-resistant brazed joint. At least one component of said joint is graphite and the other component is a corrosion-resistant refractory metal. The brazing alloy consists essentially of 40 to 90 wt % of gold, 5 to 35 wt% of nickel, and 1 to 45 wt% of tantalum. (AEC)

  15. COATED ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Harman, C.G.; O'Bannon, L.S.

    1958-07-15

    A coating is described for iron group metals and alloys, that is particularly suitable for use with nickel containing alloys. The coating is glassy in nature and consists of a mixture containing an alkali metal oxide, strontium oxide, and silicon oxide. When the glass coated nickel base metal is"fired'' at less than the melting point of the coating, it appears the nlckel diffuses into the vitreous coating, thus providing a closely adherent and protective cladding.

  16. Immiscible phase nucleic acid purification eliminates PCR inhibitors with a single pass of paramagnetic particles through a hydrophobic liquid.

    PubMed

    Sur, Kunal; McFall, Sally M; Yeh, Emilie T; Jangam, Sujit R; Hayden, Mark A; Stroupe, Stephen D; Kelso, David M

    2010-09-01

    Extraction and purification of nucleic acids from complex biological samples for PCR are critical steps because inhibitors must be removed that can affect reaction efficiency and the accuracy of results. This preanalytical processing generally involves capturing nucleic acids on microparticles that are then washed with a series of buffers to desorb and dilute out interfering substances. We have developed a novel purification method that replaces multiple wash steps with a single pass of paramagnetic particles (PMPs) though an immiscible hydrophobic liquid. Only two aqueous solutions are required: a lysis buffer, in which nucleic acids are captured on PMPs, and an elution buffer, in which they are released for amplification. The PMPs containing the nucleic acids are magnetically transported through a channel containing liquid wax that connects the lysis chamber to the elution chamber in a specially designed cartridge. Transporting PMPs through the immiscible phase yielded DNA and RNA as pure as that obtained after extensive wash steps required by comparable purification methods. Our immiscible-phase process has been applied to targets in whole blood, plasma, and urine and will enable the development of faster and simpler purification systems.

  17. The Role of Air-Electrode Structure on the Incorporation of Immiscible PFCs in Nonaqueous Li-O2 Battery.

    PubMed

    Balaish, Moran; Ein-Eli, Yair

    2017-03-22

    Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are considered advantageous additives to nonaqueous Li-O2 battery due to their superior oxygen solubility and diffusivity compared to common battery electrolytes. Up to now, the main focus was concentrated on PFCs-electrolyte investigation; however, no special attention was granted to the role of carbon structure in the PFCs-Li-O2 system. In our current research, immiscible PFCs, rather than miscible fluorinated ethers, were added to activated carbon class air electrode due to their higher susceptibility toward O2(•-) attack and to their ability to shift the reaction from two-phase to an artificial three-phase reaction zone. The results showed superior battery performance upon PFCs addition at lower current density (0.05 mA cm(-2)) but unexpectedly failed to do so at higher current density (0.1 and 0.2 mA cm(-2)), where oxygen transport limitation is best illustrated. The last was a direct result of liquid-liquid displacement phenomenon occurring when the two immiscible liquids were introduced into the porous carbon medium. The investigation and role of carbon structure on the mechanism upon PFCs addition to Li-O2 system are suggested based on electrochemical characterization, wettability behavior studies, and the physical adsorption technique. Finally, we suggest an optimum air-electrode structure enabling the incorporation of immiscible PFCs in a nonaqueous Li-O2 battery.

  18. Control of Selective Ion Transfer across Liquid–Liquid Interfaces: A Rectifying Heterojunction Based on Immiscible Electrolytes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The current rectification displayed by solid-state p–n semiconductor diodes relies on the abundance of electrons and holes near the interface between the p–n junction. In analogy to this electronic device, we propose here the construction of a purely ionic liquid-state electric rectifying heterojunction displaying an excess of monovalent cations and anions near the interface between two immiscible solvents with different dielectric properties. This system does not need any physical membrane or material barrier to show preferential ion transfer but relies on the ionic solvation energy between the two immiscible solvents. We construct a simple device, based on an oil/water interface, displaying an asymmetric behavior of the electric current as a function of the polarity of an applied electric field. This device also exhibits a region of negative differential conductivity, analogous to that observed in brain and heart cells via voltage clamp techniques. Computer simulations and mean field theory calculations for a model of this system show that the application of an external electric field is able to control the bulk concentrations of the ionic species in the immiscible liquids in a manner that is asymmetric with respect to the polarity or direction of the applied electric field. These properties make possible to enhance or suppress selective ion transport at liquid−liquid interfaces with the application of an external electric field or electrostatic potential, mimicking the function of biological ion channels, thus creating opportunities for varied applications. PMID:27924315

  19. Satellite formation during bubble transition through an interface between immiscible liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Erqiang; Al-Otaibi, Shabbab; Vakarelski, Ivan; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2014-11-01

    A bubble can pass through the interface between two immiscible liquids if it is energetically favourable. Once the intermediate film has drained sufficiently, the bubble makes contact with the interface, forming a triple-line and producing strong capillary waves which travel around the bubble and can pinch off a satellite on the opposite side, akin to the coalescence cascade dynamics. We identify the critical Ohnesorge number where such satellites are produced and characterize their sizes. The total transition time scales with the bubble size and differential surface tension, while the satellite pinch-off time scales with the capillary-inertial time of the pool liquid which originally surrounds the bubble. We also use high-speed video imaging to study the contact neck motion. For low viscosity it grows in time with a power-law exponent between 0.44 and 0.50, with a prefactor modified by the net sum of the three interfacial tensions. Increasing the receiving drop viscosity drastically slows down the triple-line motion, when the Ohnesorge number exceeds around 0.08. This differs qualitatively from the coalescence of two miscible drops of different viscosities, where the lower viscosity sets the coalescence speed. We thereby propose a strong resistance from the triple-line.

  20. Heat transfer between immiscible liquids enhanced by gas bubbling. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.A.; Schwarz, C.E.; Klages, J.; Klein, J.

    1982-08-01

    The phenomena of core-concrete interactions impact upon containment integrity of light water reactors (LWR) following postulated complete meltdown of the core by containment pressurization, production of combustible gases, and basemat penetration. Experiments have been performed with non-reactor materials to investigate one aspect of this problem, heat transfer between overlying immiscible liquids whose interface is disturbed by a transverse non-condensable gas flux emanating from below. Hydrodynamic studies have been performed to test a criterion for onset of entrainment due to bubbling through the interface and subsequent heat transfer studies were performed to assess the effect of bubbling on interfacial heat transfer rates, both with and without bubble induced entrainment. Non-entraining interfacial heat transfer data with mercury-water/oil fluid pairs were observed to be bounded from below within a factor of two to three by the Szekeley surface renewal heat transfer model. However heat transfer data for fluid pairs which are found to entrain (water-oil), believed to be characteristic of molten reactor core-concrete conditions, were measured to be up to two orders of magnitude greater than surface renewal predictions and are calculated by a simple entrainment heat transfer model.

  1. Electrochemical behaviour and voltammetric sensitivity at arrays of nanoscale interfaces between immiscible liquids.

    PubMed

    Rimboud, Mickaël; Hart, Robert D; Becker, Thomas; Arrigan, Damien W M

    2011-11-21

    Arrays of nanoscale interfaces between immiscible electrolyte solutions were formed using silicon nitride nanopore array membranes. Nanopores in the range from 75 nm radius down to 17 nm radius were used to form the nano-interfaces. It was found that the liquid organic phase electrolyte solution filled the pores so that inlaid nano-interfaces were formed with the aqueous phase. Cyclic voltammetry at these nano-interface arrays demonstrated steady-state behaviour at the larger interfaces but the voltammetric wave-shape became progressively worse as the interface size decreased. It was found that the ion transfer currents were ca. 50% of those expected based on theoretical calculations, which is attributed to overlap of diffusion zones at adjacent nano-interfaces. Here, the separation between adjacent nano-interfaces was 20-times the interface radius. The analytical sensitivity for ion transfer from the aqueous to the 1,6-dichlorohexane organic phase was estimated from calibration plots of current density versus concentration of aqueous tetraethylammonium cation. The sensitivity was in the range of 65 μA cm(-2) μM(-1) (at 75 nm radius interfaces) to 265 μA cm(-2) μM(-1) (at 17 nm radius interfaces). The sensitivity depended directly on the inverse of the nano-interface radius, implying that smaller interfaces will provide better sensitivity, due to the enhanced flux of analyte arising from convergent diffusion to smaller electrochemical interfaces.

  2. Stable Superwetting Meshes for On-Demand Separation of Immiscible Oil/Water Mixtures and Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingming; Hou, Yuanyuan; Li, Jing; Guo, Zhiguang

    2017-03-27

    Oil-water separation is of great importance for the treatment of oily wastewater, including immiscible light/heavy oil-water mixtures, oil-in-water or water-in-oil emulsions. Recently, interfacial materials (especially filtration membranes) with special wettability have been broadly developed to solve the environmental problems by virtue of their advantages in energy saving, high flux and good selectivity. However, the given wetting property (superhydrophilicity or superhydrophobicity) and pore size and poor stability of filtration membranes limit their widespread applications, which is far from meeting a wide variety of oil polluted water. Here polypyrrole-coated meshes with underwater superoleophobicity and underoil superhydrophobicity as well as controllable pore size were prepared by adopting cyclic voltammetry. It is found that the surface micro-/nanohierarchical structures play a critical role in the formation of underwater superoleophobicity and underoil superhydrophobicity. HCl is advantageous to the construction of highly rough surface rather than H2SO4 and H3PO4. The obtained filtration membranes can be used for the on-demand separation of oil-water mixtures, showing outstanding stability in harsh conditions, such as high temperature (80 ºC), low temperature (0 ºC), salt (0.5 M NaCl) and acid (1 M HCl), except for alkali (1 M NaOH).

  3. Pore-scale modeling of moving contact line problems in immiscible two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucala, Alec; Noble, David; Martinez, Mario

    2016-11-01

    Accurate modeling of moving contact line (MCL) problems is imperative in predicting capillary pressure vs. saturation curves, permeability, and preferential flow paths for a variety of applications, including geological carbon storage (GCS) and enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Here, we present a model for the moving contact line using pore-scale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) which solves the full, time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations using the Galerkin finite-element method. The MCL is modeled as a surface traction force proportional to the surface tension, dependent on the static properties of the immiscible fluid/solid system. We present a variety of verification test cases for simple two- and three-dimensional geometries to validate the current model, including threshold pressure predictions in flows through pore-throats for a variety of wetting angles. Simulations involving more complex geometries are also presented to be used in future simulations for GCS and EOR problems. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. Non-traditional stable isotope behaviors in immiscible silica-melts in a mafic magma chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dan; Bao, Huiming; Liu, Yun

    2015-12-01

    Non-traditional stable isotopes have increasingly been applied to studies of igneous processes including planetary differentiation. Equilibrium isotope fractionation of these elements in silicates is expected to be negligible at magmatic temperatures (δ57Fe difference often less than 0.2 per mil). However, an increasing number of data has revealed a puzzling observation, e.g., the δ57Fe for silicic magmas ranges from 0‰ up to 0.6‰, with the most positive δ57Fe almost exclusively found in A-type granitoids. Several interpretations have been proposed by different research groups, but these have so far failed to explain some aspects of the observations. Here we propose a dynamic, diffusion-induced isotope fractionation model that assumes Si-melts are growing and ascending immiscibly in a Fe-rich bulk magma chamber. Our model offers predictions on the behavior of non-traditional stable isotope such as Fe, Mg, Si, and Li that are consistent with observations from many A-type granitoids, especially those associated with layered intrusions. Diffusion-induced isotope fractionation may be more commonly preserved in magmatic rocks than was originally predicted.

  5. Solution of the equations for one-dimensional, two-phase, immiscible flow by geometric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivan, Boronin; Andrey, Shevlyakov

    2016-12-01

    Buckley-Leverett equations describe non viscous, immiscible, two-phase filtration, which is often of interest in modelling of oil production. For many parameters and initial conditions, the solutions of these equations exhibit non-smooth behaviour, namely discontinuities in form of shock waves. In this paper we obtain a novel method for the solution of Buckley-Leverett equations, which is based on geometry of differential equations. This method is fast, accurate, stable, and describes non-smooth phenomena. The main idea of the method is that classic discontinuous solutions correspond to the continuous surfaces in the space of jets - the so-called multi-valued solutions (Bocharov et al., Symmetries and conservation laws for differential equations of mathematical physics. American Mathematical Society, Providence, 1998). A mapping of multi-valued solutions from the jet space onto the plane of the independent variables is constructed. This mapping is not one-to-one, and its singular points form a curve on the plane of the independent variables, which is called the caustic. The real shock occurs at the points close to the caustic and is determined by the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions.

  6. Non-traditional stable isotope behaviors in immiscible silica-melts in a mafic magma chamber

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dan; Bao, Huiming; Liu, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Non-traditional stable isotopes have increasingly been applied to studies of igneous processes including planetary differentiation. Equilibrium isotope fractionation of these elements in silicates is expected to be negligible at magmatic temperatures (δ57Fe difference often less than 0.2 per mil). However, an increasing number of data has revealed a puzzling observation, e.g., the δ57Fe for silicic magmas ranges from 0‰ up to 0.6‰, with the most positive δ57Fe almost exclusively found in A-type granitoids. Several interpretations have been proposed by different research groups, but these have so far failed to explain some aspects of the observations. Here we propose a dynamic, diffusion-induced isotope fractionation model that assumes Si-melts are growing and ascending immiscibly in a Fe-rich bulk magma chamber. Our model offers predictions on the behavior of non-traditional stable isotope such as Fe, Mg, Si, and Li that are consistent with observations from many A-type granitoids, especially those associated with layered intrusions. Diffusion-induced isotope fractionation may be more commonly preserved in magmatic rocks than was originally predicted. PMID:26620121

  7. Non-traditional stable isotope behaviors in immiscible silica-melts in a mafic magma chamber.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dan; Bao, Huiming; Liu, Yun

    2015-12-01

    Non-traditional stable isotopes have increasingly been applied to studies of igneous processes including planetary differentiation. Equilibrium isotope fractionation of these elements in silicates is expected to be negligible at magmatic temperatures (δ(57)Fe difference often less than 0.2 per mil). However, an increasing number of data has revealed a puzzling observation, e.g., the δ(57)Fe for silicic magmas ranges from 0‰ up to 0.6‰, with the most positive δ(57)Fe almost exclusively found in A-type granitoids. Several interpretations have been proposed by different research groups, but these have so far failed to explain some aspects of the observations. Here we propose a dynamic, diffusion-induced isotope fractionation model that assumes Si-melts are growing and ascending immiscibly in a Fe-rich bulk magma chamber. Our model offers predictions on the behavior of non-traditional stable isotope such as Fe, Mg, Si, and Li that are consistent with observations from many A-type granitoids, especially those associated with layered intrusions. Diffusion-induced isotope fractionation may be more commonly preserved in magmatic rocks than was originally predicted.

  8. Low-frequency dilatational wave propagation through unsaturated porous media containing two immiscible fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, W.-C.; Sposito, G.; Majer, E.

    2007-02-01

    An analytical theory is presented for the low-frequency behavior of dilatational waves propagating through a homogeneous elastic porous medium containing two immiscible fluids. The theory is based on the Berryman-Thigpen-Chin (BTC) model, in which capillary pressure effects are neglected. We show that the BTC model equations in the frequency domain can be transformed, at sufficiently low frequencies, into a dissipative wave equation (telegraph equation) and a propagating wave equation in the time domain. These partial differential equations describe two independent modes of dilatational wave motion that are analogous to the Biot fast and slow compressional waves in a single-fluid system. The equations can be solved analytically under a variety of initial and boundary conditions. The stipulation of 'low frequency' underlying the derivation of our equations in the time domain is shown to require that the excitation frequency of wave motions be much smaller than a critical frequency. This frequency is shown to be the inverse of an intrinsic time scale that depends on an effective kinematic shear viscosity of the interstitial fluids and the intrinsic permeability of the porous medium. Numerical calculations indicate that the critical frequency in both unconsolidated and consolidated materials containing water and a nonaqueous phase liquid ranges typically from kHz to MHz. Thus engineering problems involving the dynamic response of an unsaturated porous medium to low excitation frequencies (e.g. seismic wave stimulation) should be accurately modeled by our equations after suitable initial and boundary conditions are imposed.

  9. Low energy metastable states and immiscibility in (SiC)1-X-(AlN)X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Benjamin; van de Walle, Axel; Davydov, Albert; Vinograd, Victor

    2009-03-01

    A cluster expansion Hamiltonian was fit to VASP/PAW calculated supercell formation energies, δEf, and first principles based phase diagrams (miscibility gaps) were calculated for the wurtzite-structure pseudobinary system SiC1-XAlNX. An unusually wide range of 3 δEf 125 kJ/mole MX (M= Al, Si; X= N, C) was calculated and all supercells with δEf 8 kJ/mole exhibited characteristic (SiC)m(AlN)n crystallography, in which (SiC)m indicates m SiC-double layers to the hexagonal c-axis, and similarly for (AlN)n. The prediction of (SiC)m(AlN)n low-energy metastable states, may explain why one can synthesize SiC1-XAlNX films, or single crystals of arbitrary bulk composition, in spite of the very strong tendency toward immiscibility. Specifically, one expects that metastable films or single crystals will be dominated by a disordered stacking of SiC- and AlN-double layers.

  10. Linear stability analysis of immiscible two-phase flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riaz, Amir

    2005-11-01

    Linear stability analysis of immiscible displacements is carried out for both viscously and gravitationally unstable two-phase flows in porous media with very large adverse viscosity ratios. Capillary dispersion is the proper dissipative mechanism in this case which sets both the preferred length scale and the band width of the spectrum of unstable length scales. The growth rate, the most dangerous and the cutoff wavenumbers, all scale linearly with the capillary number. We show that the instability is governed by fluid properties across the shock rather than those across the full Buckley--Leverett profile. The shock total mobility ratio provides a sufficient condition for the onset of instability; however, it is not an appropriate criterion for predicting the magnitude of the growth rate, particularly for large viscosity ratios. The details of the relative permeability functions are observed to have a significant influence on the stability characteristics. For neutrally buoyant flows the maximum growth rate scales linearly with the viscosity ratio while the most dangerous and the cutoff wavenumbers scale with the square root of the viscosity ratio.

  11. Influence of chemical reaction decreasing interfacial tension on immiscible viscous fingering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuzuki, Reiko; Fujimura, Masanari; Yuichiro, Nagatsu

    2016-11-01

    We have experimentally investigated the effects of chemical reaction on immiscible viscous fingering (VF). In the present study, we use a chemical reaction producing a surfactant leading to a decrease in interfacial tension. In our experiment, a more viscous paraffin oil containing linoleic acid is displaced by a less viscous NaOHaq in a radial Hele-Shaw cell. We have found the influence of the reaction on the VF pattern depends on the displacement flow rate. At low flow rate, the reaction makes the fingers narrower. On the other hand, at intermediate flow rate, the reaction makes the fingers wider. At high flow rate, there is little influence of the reaction. These results can be interpreted as follows; when the reaction rate is much faster than the flow rate, interfacial tension is decreased uniformly over the interface. As a result, more finger-splitting occur and the fingers become narrower. When the reaction rate and flow rate are competing, the interfacial tension gradient is formed along the interface. As a result, Marangoni convection is produced, which leads to wider fingers. When the flow rate is much faster than the reaction rate, little reaction occurs during the formation of VF. As a result, the reaction does not influence on VF pattern.

  12. An overview of instability and fingering during immiscible fluid flow in porous and fractured media

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.; Neuman, S.P.; Taniguchi, M.

    1995-04-01

    Wetting front instability is an important phenomenon affecting fluid flow and contaminant transport in unsaturated soils and rocks. It causes the development of fingers which travel faster than would a uniform front and thus bypass much of the medium. Water saturation and solute concentration in such fingers tend to be higher than in the surrounding medium. During infiltration, fingering may cause unexpectedly rapid arrival of water and solute at the water-table. This notwithstanding, most models of subsurface flow and transport ignore instability and fingering. In this report, we survey the literature to assess the extent to which this may or may not be justified. Our overview covers experiments, theoretical studies, and computer simulations of instability and fingering during immiscible two-phase flow and transport, with emphasis on infiltration into soils and fractured rocks. Our description of instability in an ideal fracture (Hele-Shaw cell) includes an extension of existing theory to fractures and interfaces having arbitrary orientations in space. Our discussion of instability in porous media includes a slight but important correction of existing theory for the case of an inclined interface. We conclude by outlining some potential directions for future research. Among these, we single out the effect of soil and rock heterogeneities on instability and preferential flow as meriting special attention in the context of nuclear waste storage in unsaturated media.

  13. Wetting of a liquid surface by another immiscible liquid in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Gilles; Ross, Guy G.; Andrzejewski, Lukasz

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of interfacial properties is essential to the development of new drugs either on earth or, particularly, in the absence of gravity. Under the reduced gravity conditions of parabolic flights, we have shown that, using an appropriate cell setup in order to control liquid surfaces, a liquid drop can be expanded onto and withdrawn from another immiscible liquid, which permits the measurement of the contact angle of this system. Surface energies of liquids being easily measurable, this technique allows a verification of numerous models used in interface science. During each parabola, 20 s of microgravity measurements permitted the acquisition of video pictures of these drops. Contact angles have been obtained from goniometric analysis of the recorded images. Generally, the drops obtained satisfied the equilibrium state predicted by Neumann's equations. However, unexpected long lasting metastable drops have also been observed on a curved unconfined liquid surface. The existence of a drop-sinking barrier, larger for a curved liquid surface, is proposed to explain this observation.

  14. HIV Viral RNA Extraction in Wax Immiscible Filtration Assisted by Surface Tension (IFAST) Devices

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Scott M.; LaVanway, Alex J.; Pezzi, Hannah M.; Guckenberger, David J.; Anderson, Meghan A.; Loeb, Jennifer M.; Beebe, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The monitoring of viral load is critical for proper management of antiretroviral therapy for HIV-positive patients. Unfortunately, in the developing world, significant economic and geographical barriers exist, limiting access to this test. The complexity of current viral load assays makes them expensive and their access limited to advanced facilities. We attempted to address these limitations by replacing conventional RNA extraction, one of the essential processes in viral load quantitation, with a simplified technique known as immiscible filtration assisted by surface tension (IFAST). Furthermore, these devices were produced via the embossing of wax, enabling local populations to produce and dispose of their own devices with minimal training or infrastructure, potentially reducing the total assay cost. In addition, IFAST can be used to reduce cold chain dependence during transportation. Viral RNA extracted from raw samples stored at 37°C for 1 week exhibited nearly complete degradation. However, IFAST-purified RNA could be stored at 37°C for 1 week without significant loss. These data suggest that RNA isolated at the point of care (eg, in a rural clinic) via IFAST could be shipped to a central laboratory for quantitative RT-PCR without a cold chain. Using this technology, we have demonstrated accurate and repeatable measurements of viral load on samples with as low as 50 copies per milliliter of sample. PMID:24613822

  15. Drop Fragmentation at Impact onto a Bath of an Immiscible Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhuissier, H.; Sun, C.; Prosperetti, A.; Lohse, D.

    2013-06-01

    The impact of a drop onto a deep bath of an immiscible liquid is studied with emphasis on the drop fragmentation into a collection of noncoalescing daughter drops. At impact the drop flattens and spreads at the surface of the crater it transiently opens in the bath and reaches a maximum deformation, which gets larger with increasing impact velocity, before surface tension drives its recession. This recession can promote the fragmentation by two different mechanisms: At moderate impact velocity, the drop recession converges to the axis of symmetry to form a jet which then fragments by a Plateau-Rayleigh mechanism. At higher velocity the edge of the receding drop destabilizes and shapes into radial ligaments which subsequently fragment. For this latter mechanism the number N∝We3 and the size distribution of the daughter drops p(d)∝d-4 as a function of the impact Weber number We are explained on the basis of the observed spreading of the drop. The universality of this model for the fragmentation of receding liquid sheets might be relevant for other configurations.

  16. In situ study of heavy ion irradiation response of immiscible Cu/Fe multilayers

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Youxing; Li, Nan; Bufford, Daniel Charles; ...

    2016-04-09

    By providing active defect sinks that capture and annihilate radiation induced defect clusters immiscible metallic multilayers with incoherent interfaces can effectively reduce defect density in ion irradiated metals. Although it is anticipated that defect density within the layers should vary as a function of distance to the layer interface, there is, to date, little in situ TEM evidence to validate this hypothesis. In our study monolithic Cu films and Cu/Fe multilayers with individual layer thickness, h, of 100 and 5 nm were subjected to in situ Cu ion irradiation at room temperature to nominally 1 displacement-per-atom inside a transmission electronmore » microscope. Rapid formation and propagation of defect clusters were observed in monolithic Cu, whereas fewer defects with smaller dimensions were generated in Cu/Fe multilayers with smaller h. Moreover, in situ video shows that the cumulative defect density in Cu/Fe 100 nm multilayers indeed varies, as a function of distance to the layer interfaces, supporting a long postulated hypothesis.« less

  17. In situ study of heavy ion irradiation response of immiscible Cu/Fe multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Youxing; Li, Nan; Bufford, Daniel Charles; Li, Jin; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Xinghang

    2016-04-09

    By providing active defect sinks that capture and annihilate radiation induced defect clusters immiscible metallic multilayers with incoherent interfaces can effectively reduce defect density in ion irradiated metals. Although it is anticipated that defect density within the layers should vary as a function of distance to the layer interface, there is, to date, little in situ TEM evidence to validate this hypothesis. In our study monolithic Cu films and Cu/Fe multilayers with individual layer thickness, h, of 100 and 5 nm were subjected to in situ Cu ion irradiation at room temperature to nominally 1 displacement-per-atom inside a transmission electron microscope. Rapid formation and propagation of defect clusters were observed in monolithic Cu, whereas fewer defects with smaller dimensions were generated in Cu/Fe multilayers with smaller h. Moreover, in situ video shows that the cumulative defect density in Cu/Fe 100 nm multilayers indeed varies, as a function of distance to the layer interfaces, supporting a long postulated hypothesis.

  18. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of immiscible fluid displacement in porous media: Homogeneous versus heterogeneous pore network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haihu; Zhang, Yonghao; Valocchi, Albert J.

    2015-05-01

    Injection of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) into geological formations is a promising approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. Predicting the amount of CO2 that can be captured and its long-term storage stability in subsurface requires a fundamental understanding of multiphase displacement phenomena at the pore scale. In this paper, the lattice Boltzmann method is employed to simulate the immiscible displacement of a wetting fluid by a non-wetting one in two microfluidic flow cells, one with a homogeneous pore network and the other with a randomly heterogeneous pore network. We have identified three different displacement patterns, namely, stable displacement, capillary fingering, and viscous fingering, all of which are strongly dependent upon the capillary number (Ca), viscosity ratio (M), and the media heterogeneity. The non-wetting fluid saturation (Snw) is found to increase nearly linearly with logCa for each constant M. Increasing M (viscosity ratio of non-wetting fluid to wetting fluid) or decreasing the media heterogeneity can enhance the stability of the displacement process, resulting in an increase in Snw. In either pore networks, the specific interfacial length is linearly proportional to Snw during drainage with equal proportionality constant for all cases excluding those revealing considerable viscous fingering. Our numerical results confirm the previous experimental finding that the steady state specific interfacial length exhibits a linear dependence on Snw for either favorable (M ≥ 1) or unfavorable (M < 1) displacement, and the slope is slightly higher for the unfavorable displacement.

  19. Stability analysis of two immiscible fluids in a shear driven flow: a DNS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Cartagena, Edgardo J.; Bernardini, Matteo; Arenas, Isnardo; Mohammadi, Alireza; Iungo, G. Valerio; Smits, Alexander J.; Leonardi, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    Numerical studies of the flow over either super hydrophobic surfaces or liquid infused surfaces have shown that a large drag reduction (>10%) can be obtained if the flow remains in the Cassie state, thus stability of the interface plays a crucial role to achieve drag reduction. Direct Numerical Simulations of two immiscible fluids have been performed to assess how the stability of the interface depends on the viscosity ratio, thickness and Reynolds number of the two-layer flow. The flow is driven by the motion of one plate at constant velocity while the other plate is at rest. A finite difference code, based on a Runge-Kutta and fractional step method, has been combined to a level set method for tracking the interface between the two fluids. Results agree well with the linear theory until the nonlinear saturation. Once the fluctuations become large, a halving of the wavelength in the streamwise direction is observed for the least stable mode. The interaction between Tollmien-Schlichting waves and interfacial instabilities will be discussed at the meeting. This work was supported under ONR MURI Grants N00014-12-0875 and N00014-12-1-0962, Program Manager Dr. Ki-Han Kim. Numerical simulations were performed on the Texas Advanced Computer Center.

  20. Seismological constraints on core composition from Fe-O-S liquid immiscibility.

    PubMed

    Helffrich, George; Kaneshima, Satoshi

    2004-12-24

    Earth's core is composed primarily of iron (Fe) with about 10% by weight of lighter elements. The lighter elements are progressively enriched in the liquid outer core as the core cools and the inner core crystallizes. Thermodynamic modeling of Fe-O-S liquids shows that immiscible liquids can exist at outer-core pressures (136 to 330 gigapascals) at temperatures below 5200 kelvin and lead to layering in the outer core if the concentrations of the lighter elements are high enough. We found no evidence for layering in the outer core in the travel times and wave forms of P4KP seismic waves that reflect internally in the core. The absence of layers therefore constrains outer-core compositions in the Fe-O-S system to be no richer than 6 +/- 1 weight % (wt %) O and 2 to 15 wt % S. A single core liquid composition of 10.5 +/- 3.5 wt % S and 1.5 +/- 1.5 wt % O is compatible with wave speeds and densities throughout the outer core.

  1. Flow of immiscible ferrofluids in a planar gap in a rotating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sule, Bhumika; Torres-Díaz, Isaac; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2015-07-01

    Analytical solutions are obtained for the steady, fully developed flow of two layers of immiscible ferrofluids of different thicknesses between two parallel plates. Interfacial linear and internal angular momentum balance relations are derived for the case when there is a ferrofluid-ferrofluid interface to obtain the translational and spin velocity profiles in the gap. As expected for the limit of low applied field amplitude, the magnitude of the translational velocity is directly proportional to the frequency of the applied magnetic field and to the square of the magnetic field amplitude. Expressions for the velocity profiles are obtained for the zero spin viscosity and non-zero spin viscosity cases and the effect of applied pressure gradient on the flows is studied. The spin velocity in both ferrofluid phases is in the direction of the rotating magnetic field, except for cases of extreme applied pressure gradients for which the fluid vorticity opposes the spin. We find that for the case of non-zero spin viscosity, flow reversals are predicted using representative ferrofluid property values and field conditions. The unique predictions of the solution with non-zero spin viscosity could be used to experimentally test the existence of couple stresses in ferrofluids and the validity of previously reported values of the so-called spin viscosity.

  2. Getting in shape: molten wax drop deformation and solidification at an immiscible liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Beesabathuni, Shilpa N; Lindberg, Seth E; Caggioni, Marco; Wesner, Chris; Shen, Amy Q

    2015-05-01

    The controlled production of non-spherical shaped particles is important for many applications such as food processing, consumer goods, adsorbents, drug delivery, and optical sensing. In this paper, we investigated the deformation and simultaneous solidification of millimeter size molten wax drops as they impacted an immiscible liquid interface of higher density. By varying initial temperature and viscoelasticity of the molten drop, drop size, impact velocity, viscosity and temperature of the bath fluid, and the interfacial tension between the molten wax and bath fluid, spherical molten wax drops impinged on a cooling water bath and were arrested into non-spherical solidified particles in the form of ellipsoid, mushroom, disc, and flake-like shapes. We constructed cursory phase diagrams for the various particle shapes generated over a range of Weber, Capillary, Reynolds, and Stefan numbers, governed by the interfacial, inertial, viscous, and thermal effects. We solved a simplified heat transfer problem to estimate the time required to initiate the solidification at the interface of a spherical molten wax droplet and cooling aqueous bath after impact. By correlating this time with the molten wax drop deformation history captured from high speed imaging experiments, we elucidate the delicate balance of interfacial, inertial, viscous, and thermal forces that determine the final morphology of wax particles.

  3. Immiscible fluids in mixed wet porous media: the role of wettability correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murison, Julie; Semin, Benoit; Baret, Jean-Christophe; Herminghaus, Stephan; Schroeter, Matthias; Brinkmann, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Various phenomena observed during immiscible displacement in a porous medium can be related to pore wall wettability. Petroleum engineers traditionally quantify the overall wettability of a rock sample in terms of the Ammot-Harvey or USBM index. To establish a link between these gloabl quantities and the pore-scale distribution of surface energies, we developed a series of model porous media. Using a variety of preparation methods, we are able to create dense beds of glass beads with the same average surface energy, differing only in the typical extension of the wetting and non-wetting surface domains. Experimental measurements of capillary pressure saturation curves for repeated imbibition and drainage show that the work dissipated in a complete cycle is monotonically increasing with the correlation length ξ of the surface energies. To test whether capillary hysteresis can be linked to specific features of the front morphology, we visualized the distribution of liquids by means of X-ray microtomography. The Minkowski measures volume, surface area, and Euler number are employed to characterize the interfacial shape. Differences of the front morphology during imbibition and drainage match with trends observed for the hysteresis loop opening.

  4. Flow of immiscible ferrofluids in a planar gap in a rotating magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Sule, Bhumika; Torres-Díaz, Isaac; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2015-07-15

    Analytical solutions are obtained for the steady, fully developed flow of two layers of immiscible ferrofluids of different thicknesses between two parallel plates. Interfacial linear and internal angular momentum balance relations are derived for the case when there is a ferrofluid-ferrofluid interface to obtain the translational and spin velocity profiles in the gap. As expected for the limit of low applied field amplitude, the magnitude of the translational velocity is directly proportional to the frequency of the applied magnetic field and to the square of the magnetic field amplitude. Expressions for the velocity profiles are obtained for the zero spin viscosity and non-zero spin viscosity cases and the effect of applied pressure gradient on the flows is studied. The spin velocity in both ferrofluid phases is in the direction of the rotating magnetic field, except for cases of extreme applied pressure gradients for which the fluid vorticity opposes the spin. We find that for the case of non-zero spin viscosity, flow reversals are predicted using representative ferrofluid property values and field conditions. The unique predictions of the solution with non-zero spin viscosity could be used to experimentally test the existence of couple stresses in ferrofluids and the validity of previously reported values of the so-called spin viscosity.

  5. Immiscible poly(lactic acid)/poly(ε-caprolactone) for temporary implants: Compatibility and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Finotti, Pablo F M; Costa, Lidiane C; Capote, Ticiana S O; Scarel-Caminaga, Raquel M; Chinelatto, Marcelo A

    2017-01-31

    This manuscript focuses on the effect of the addition of a low molecular weight triblock copolymer derived from ε-caprolactone and tetrahydrofuran (CT) on the compatibility and cytotoxicity of immiscible poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) blends. Binary and tertiary PLA/PCL blends were prepared by melt mixing in a twin-screw extruder and their morphological, mechanical and thermal behaviors were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), tensile and Izod impact test, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). SEM micrographs showed the CT copolymer suppressed the coalescence phenomena and maintained the size of dispersed PCL domains at approximately 0.35µm. Bioresorbable PLA/PCL blends containing 5wt% of CT copolymer exhibited a remarkable increase in ductility and improved toughness at room temperature. Although the CT copolymer increased the interfacial adhesion, the DMA results suggest it also acts as a plasticizer exclusively for the PCL phase. The cell viability evaluated by the XTT assay confirmed PLA/PCL blends compatibilized by CT copolymer exerted no cytotoxic effect.

  6. Growth of Au on Ni(110): A Semiempirical Modeling of Surface Alloy Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ibanez-Meier, Rodrigo; Ferrante, John

    1995-01-01

    Recent experiments using scanning tunneling microscopy show evidence for the formation of surface alloys of otherwise immiscible metals. Such is the case for Au deposited in Ni(110), where experiments by Pleth Nielsen el al.indicate that at low Au coverage (less than 0. 5 ML), Au atoms replace Ni atoms in the surface layer forming a surface alloy while the Ni atoms form islands on the surface. In this paper, we present results of a theoretical modeling of this phenomenon using the recently developed Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith method for alloys. We provide results of an extensive analysis of the growth process that strongly support the conclusions drawn from the experiment: at very low coverages, there is a tendency for dimer formation on the overlayer, which later exchange positions with Ni atoms in the surface layer, thus accounting for the large number of substituted dimers. Ni island formation as well as other alternative short-range-order patterns are discussed.

  7. Growth of Au on Ni(110): a BFS Modelling of Surface Alloy Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ibanez-Meier, Rodrigo; Ferrante, John

    1994-01-01

    Recent experiments using scanning tunneling microscopy show evidence for the formation of surface alloys of otherwise immiscible metals. Such is the case for Au deposited in Ni(11), where experiments by Pleth Nielsen et al. indicate that at low Au coverage (less than 0.5 ML), Au atoms replace Ni atoms in the surface layer forming a surface alloy while the Ni atoms form islands on the surface. In this work, we present results of a theoretical modeling of this phenomenon using the recently developed BFS method for alloys. We provide results of an extensive analysis of the growth process which strongly support the conclusions drawn from the experiment; at very low coverages, there is tendency for dimer formation on the overlayer, which later exchange positions with Ni atoms in the surface layer, thus accounting for the large number of substituted dimers. Ni island formations as well as other alternative short range order patterns are discussed.

  8. Development of Low Density Titanium Alloys for Structural Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froes, F. H.; Suryanarayana, C.; Powell, C.; Ward-Close, C. Malcolm; Wilkes, D. M. J.

    1996-01-01

    In this report the results of a program designed to reduce the density of titanium by adding magnesium are presented. Because these two elements are immiscible under conventional ingot metallurgy techniques, two specialized powder metallurgy methods namely, mechanical alloying (MA) and physical vapor deposition (PVD) were implemented. The mechanical alloying experiments were done both at the University of Idaho and at the Defense Research Agency in UK. Since titanium is reactive with interstitial elements, a secondary goal of this research was to correlate solubility extensions with interstitial contamination content, especially oxygen and nitrogen. MA was carried out in SPEX 8000 shaker mils and different milling containers were utilized to control the level of contamination. Results showed that solubilities of Mg in Ti were obtained up to 28 at.% (16.4 wt. %) Mg in Ti for Ti-39.6 at. % (25 wt. %) Mg alloys, which greatly exceed those obtained under equilibrium conditions. This reflects a density reduction of approximately 26 %. Contamination of oxygen and nitrogen seemed to increase the solubility of magnesium in titanium in some cases; however, we were not able to make a clear correlation between contamination levels with solubilities. Work at the DRA has emphasized optimization of present PVD equipment, specifically composition and temperature control. Preliminary PVD data has shown Ti-Mg deposits have successfully been made up to 2 mm thick and that solubility extensions were achieved. The potential for density reduction of titanium by alloying with magnesium has been demonstrated; however, this work has only scratched the surface of the development of such low density alloys. Much research is needed before such alloys could be implemented into industry. Further funding is required in order to optimize the MA/PVD processes including contamination control, determination of optimal alloy compositions, microstructure development, and mechanical property

  9. Analytical study of space processing of immiscible materials for superconductors and electrical contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelles, S. H.; Collings, E. W.; Abbott, W. H.; Maringer, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a study conducted to determine the role space processing or materials research in space plays in the superconductor and electrical contact industries are presented. Visits were made to manufacturers, users, and research organizations connected with these products to provide information about the potential benefits of the space environment and to exchange views on the utilization of space facilities for manufacture, process development, or research. In addition, space experiments were suggested which could result in improved terrestrial processes or products. Notable examples of these are, in the case of superconductors, the development of Nb-bronze alloys (Tsuei alloys) and, in the electrical contact field, the production of Ag-Ni or Ag-metal oxide alloys with controlled microstructure for research and development activities as well as for product development. A preliminary experimental effort to produce and evaluate rapidly cooled Pb-Zn and Cu-Nb-Sn alloys in order to understand the relationship between microstructure and superconducting properties and to simulate the fine structure potentially achievable by space processing was also described.

  10. Deformation and Break-up of Suspension Droplets Sheared in an Immiscible Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desse, Melinda; Hill, Sandra E.; Mitchell, John R.; Wolf, Bettina; Budtova, Tatiana

    2008-07-01

    The deformation and break-up behaviour of suspension droplets immersed in an immiscible fluid has not been widely studied albeit such systems are frequently encountered in every day multiphase products such as foods and cosmetics. Starch is a common thickener used in the food industry. Starch suspensions have shown to offer better flavour perception than polymer thickened solutions; a better understanding of their behaviour under flow would be beneficial in terms of advancement on product formulation. Deformation and break-up of a droplet of swollen-in-water starch granules placed in high viscosity silicon oil was visualised using a counter-rotating parallel-plate shear cell. The silicon oil had a high viscosity to induce shear stresses high enough to deform the droplet; it is also transparent and inert towards the studied system. The starch suspension was prepared to have a volume fraction of 100% swollen granules, i.e. that all water was bound within the swollen starch granules. The shear flow behaviour of this starch suspension is characterised by an apparent yield stress, shear-thinning and first normal stress differences. The rheo-optical experiments were conducted as start-up flow experiments applying shear stresses above the apparent yield stress. A constant shear stress throughout the experiment allows a constant viscosity of the droplet and therefore rules out the shear thinning aspect. Analysis showed droplet break-up at critical Capillary numbers close to those reported for Newtonian fluids. The results demonstrate that the droplet break-up behaviour in a complex emulsion system submitted to shear flow may not be fully described by the rheology of the individual phases alone but may require a microstructure component.

  11. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of immiscible fluid displacement in porous media: Homogeneous versus heterogeneous pore network

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Haihu; Zhang, Yonghao; Valocchi, Albert J.

    2015-05-15

    Injection of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into geological formations is a promising approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. Predicting the amount of CO{sub 2} that can be captured and its long-term storage stability in subsurface requires a fundamental understanding of multiphase displacement phenomena at the pore scale. In this paper, the lattice Boltzmann method is employed to simulate the immiscible displacement of a wetting fluid by a non-wetting one in two microfluidic flow cells, one with a homogeneous pore network and the other with a randomly heterogeneous pore network. We have identified three different displacement patterns, namely, stable displacement, capillary fingering, and viscous fingering, all of which are strongly dependent upon the capillary number (Ca), viscosity ratio (M), and the media heterogeneity. The non-wetting fluid saturation (S{sub nw}) is found to increase nearly linearly with logCa for each constant M. Increasing M (viscosity ratio of non-wetting fluid to wetting fluid) or decreasing the media heterogeneity can enhance the stability of the displacement process, resulting in an increase in S{sub nw}. In either pore networks, the specific interfacial length is linearly proportional to S{sub nw} during drainage with equal proportionality constant for all cases excluding those revealing considerable viscous fingering. Our numerical results confirm the previous experimental finding that the steady state specific interfacial length exhibits a linear dependence on S{sub nw} for either favorable (M ≥ 1) or unfavorable (M < 1) displacement, and the slope is slightly higher for the unfavorable displacement.

  12. The immiscible cholesterol bilayer domain exists as an integral part of phospholipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Raguz, Marija; Mainali, Laxman; Widomska, Justyna; Subczynski, Witold K

    2011-04-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-labeling methods were used to study the organization of cholesterol and phospholipids in membranes formed from Chol/POPS (cholesterol/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine) mixtures, with mixing ratios from 0 to 3. It was confirmed using the discrimination by oxygen transport and polar relaxation agent accessibility methods that the immiscible cholesterol bilayer domain (CBD) was present in all of the suspensions when the mixing ratio exceeded the cholesterol solubility threshold (CST) in the POPS membrane. The behavior of phospholipid molecules was monitored with phospholipid analogue spin labels (n-PCs), and the behavior of cholesterol was monitored with the cholesterol analogue spin labels CSL and ASL. Results indicated that phospholipid and cholesterol mixtures can form a membrane suspension up to a mixing ratio of ~2. Additionally, EPR spectra for n-PC, ASL, and CSL indicated that both phospholipids and cholesterol exist in these suspensions in the lipid-bilayer-like structures. EPR spectral characteristics of n-PCs (spin labels located in the phospholipid cholesterol bilayer, outside the CBD) change with increase in the cholesterol content up to and beyond the CST. These results present strong evidence that the CBD forms an integral part of the phospholipid bilayer when formed from a Chol/POPS mixture up to a mixing ratio of ~2. Interestingly, CSL in cholesterol alone (without phospholipids) when suspended in buffer does not detect formation of bilayer-like structures. A broad, single-line EPR signal is given, similar to that obtained for the dry film of cholesterol before addition of the buffer. This broad, single-line signal is also observed in suspensions formed for Chol/POPS mixtures (as a background signal) when the Chol/POPS ratio is much greater than 3. It is suggested that the EPR spin-labeling approach can discriminate and characterize the fraction of cholesterol that forms the CBD within the

  13. Generation of micro- and nano-droplets containing immiscible solutions in view of optical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastasa, V.; Karapantsios, T.; Samaras, K.; Dafnopatidou, E.; Pradines, V.; Miller, R.; Pascu, M. L.

    2010-08-01

    The multiple resistances to treatment, developed by bacteria and malignant tumors require finding alternatives to the existing medicines and treatment procedures. One of them is strengthening the effects of cytostatics by improving the delivery method. Such a method is represented by the use of medicines as micro/nano-droplets. This method can reduce the substance consumption by generating drug micro-droplets incorporated in substances that can favour a faster localization, than the classical mode of medicine administration, to the tumor tissues. This paper contains the results concerning the generation and study of micro/nano-droplets and the generation of micro-droplets with an inner core (medicine) and a thin layer covering it. We have measured the surface tension at water/air interface and water/oil interface for a medicine (Vancomycin) and we have generated and measured droplets of medicine containing a layer of Vitamin A by using a double capillary system. The micro/nano-droplets may be produced by mixing of two immiscible solutions in particular conditions (high rotating speed and/or high pressure difference). For this we have studied the generation of emulsions of vitamin A diluted in sunflower oil and a solution of a surfactant Tween 80 in distilled water. The concentration of surfactant in water was typically 4*10-5M. We have studied in a batch stirred tank system the dependence of the droplet dimensions in emulsion, function of the mixing rotation speed, agitation time and components ratio. The droplet diameters were measured using a Malvern light scattering instrument type Mastersizer Hydro 2000M. We have obtained droplets with diameters smaller than 100 nm; the diameters distribution exhibited a peak at 65 nm.

  14. A multi-flowpath model for the interpretation of immiscible displacement experiments in heterogeneous soil columns.

    PubMed

    Aggelopoulos, C A; Tsakiroglou, C D

    2009-04-01

    This work focuses on the phenomenon of the immiscible two-phase flow of water and oil in saturated heterogeneous soil columns. The goal is to develop a fast and reliable method for quantifying soil heterogeneities for incorporation into the relevant capillary pressure and relative permeability functions. Such data are commonly used as input data in simulators of contaminant transport in the subsurface. Rate-controlled drainage experiments are performed on undisturbed soil columns and the transient response of the axial distribution of water saturation is determined from electrical measurements. The transient responses of the axial distribution of water saturation and total pressure drop are fitted with the multi-flowpath model (MFPM) where the pore space is regarded as a system of parallel paths of different permeability. The MFPM enables us to quantify soil heterogeneity at two scales: the micro-scale parameters describe on average the effects of pore network heterogeneities on the two-phase flow pattern; the macro-scale parameters indicate the variability of permeability at the scale of interconnected pore networks. The capillary pressure curve is consistent with that measured with mercury intrusion porosimetry over the low pressure range. The oil relative permeability increases sharply at a very low oil saturation (<10(-3)) and tends to a high end value. The water relative permeability decreases abruptly at a low oil saturation (~0.1), whereas the irreducible wetting phase saturation is quite high. The foregoing characteristics of the two-phase flow properties are associated with critical (preferential) flowpaths that comprise a very small percentage of the total pore volume, control the overall hydraulic conductivity, and are consistent with the very broad range of pore-length scales usually probed in soil porous matrix.

  15. Simulation of three-dimensional flow of immiscible fluids within and below the unsaturated zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faust, Charles R.; Guswa, John H.; Mercer, James W.

    1989-12-01

    This paper presents a two-phase flow model based on a three-dimensional, finite-difference formulation. As three-dimensional simulations can require substantial computer effort, a numerical technique that takes advantage of vector and parallel processing computer architecture is developed. The model is posed in terms of water saturation and nonwetting fluid pressure. It uses three-phase capillary pressure and relative permeability relationships to permit simulation within or below the unsaturated zone. A modified formulation of slice successive overtaxation (an iterative matrix solution technique) is introduced. This technique is designed to use parallel processing capabilities of new computers. The model is applied to immiscible fluid flow at two chemical waste landfills near Niagara Falls, New York. At both sites, denser than water, nonaqueous liquids (NAPLs) are present in the groundwater regimes in relatively large quantities. The model applications address several technical concerns at the two sites, including the effectiveness of clay as a geologic barrier to NAPL migration owing to capillary pressure forces, the three-dimensional aspects of dense NAPL flow, and the sensitivity of NAPL recovery in pumping wells due to various hydrogeologic and fluid properties. The results of the applications show that (1) even under a downward hydraulic gradient, natural differences in capillary pressure relationships for different lithologies can prevent downward migration of NAPL, (2) without any lithologic-capillary barrier, an upward hydraulic gradient induced by a de watering system can prevent downward migration of NAPL, (3) NAPL recovery at wells is sensitive to relative permeability, a relationship that requires field calibration in many settings, and (4) the three-dimensional aspects of two-phase flow and hydrogeologic heterogeneity require explicit treatment in many settings.

  16. Interfacial tension measurement of immiscible liq uids using a capillary tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, N.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Delsignore, D.

    1992-01-01

    The interfacial tension of immiscible liquids is an important thermophysical property that is useful in the behavior of liquids both in microgravity (Martinez et al. (1987) and Karri and Mathur (1988)) and in enhanced oil recovery processes under normal gravity (Slattery (1974)). Many techniques are available for its measurement, such as the ring method, drop weight method, spinning drop method, and capillary height method (Adamson (1960) and Miller and Neogi (1985)). Karri and Mathur mention that many of the techniques use equations that contain a density difference term and are inappropriate for equal density liquids. They reported a new method that is suitable for both equal and unequal density liquids. In their method, a capillary tube forms one of the legs of a U-tube. The interfacial tension is related to the heights of the liquids in the cups of the U-tube above the interface in the capillary. Our interest in this area arose from a need to measure small interfacial tension (around 1 mN/m) for a vegetable oil/silicon oil system that was used in a thermocapillary drop migration experiment (Rashidnia and Balasubramaniam (1991)). In our attempts to duplicate the method proposed by Karri and Mathur, we found it quite difficult to anchor the interface inside the capillary tube; small differences of the liquid heights in the cups drove the interface out of the capillary. We present an alternative method using a capillary tube to measure the interfacial tensions of liquids of equal or unequal density. The method is based on the combined capillary rises of both liquids in the tube.

  17. Modeling of Immiscible, Two-Phase Flows in a Natural Rock Fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H

    2009-01-01

    One potential method of geologically sequestering carbon dioxide (CO2) is to inject the gas into brine-filled, subsurface formations. Within these low-permeability rocks, fractures exist that can act as natural fluid conduits. Understanding how a less viscous fluid moves when injected into an initially saturated rock fracture is important for the prediction of CO2 transport within fractured rocks. Our study examined experimentally and numerically the motion of immiscible fluids as they were transported through models of a fracture in Berea sandstone. The natural fracture geometry was initially scanned using micro-computerized tomography (CT) at a fine volume-pixel (voxel) resolution by Karpyn et al. [1]. This CT scanned fracture was converted into a numerical mesh for two-phase flow calculations using the finite-volume solver FLUENT® and the volume-of-fluid method. Additionally, a translucent experimental model was constructed using stereolithography. The numerical model was shown to agree well with experiments for the case of a constant rate injection of air into the initially water-saturated fracture. The invading air moved intermittently, quickly invading large-aperture regions of the fracture. Relative permeability curves were developed to describe the fluid motion. These permeability curves can be used in reservoir-scale discrete fracture models for predictions of fluid motion within fractured geological formations. The numerical model was then changed to better mimic the subsurface conditions at which CO2 will move into brine saturated fractures. The different fluid properties of the modeled subsurface fluids were shown to increase the amount of volume the less-viscous invading gas would occupy while traversing the fracture.

  18. Effects of shear during the cooling on the rheology and morphology of immiscible polymer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammani, S.; Moulai-Mostefa, N.; Benyahia, L.; Tassin, J. F.

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this work was the generation of a microfibrillar structure in immiscible polymer blends using a new technique. The blend polymer model is the emulsion formed by a mixture of polypropylene (PP) with polystyrene (PS) in the proportion of PP10/PS90. In the first case the pellets of polystyrene and polypropylene were blended on the twin-screw mini extruder in the classical manner with different shear rates. In the second case, the same blend was prepared in the same way followed by a dynamic cooling at different shear rates. The phase morphologies of PP in the blend were determined by Scanning Electron Microscopy on two directions (transversal and longitudinal direction to the flow). In the two cases, the dispersed phase size decreased with the increase of the shear rate in the extruder. An anomaly was registered in the classical method at 200 rpm, where the size of the dispersed phase increases with the increase of the shear rate. The dynamic cooling technique recorded smaller diameters (4 to 5 times) of the dispersed phase compared to the conventional technique. In addition, the reappearance of the microfilaments at 200rpm was observed. The rheological properties were determined by RS100 (Thermo Scientific Haake). Using this new technique, it was noticed that he elastic modulus increases with one decade compared to the classical method and the complex viscosity decreases with the increase of the shear rate. An anomaly was registered in the classical technique, where the dynamic viscosity at 200rpm increases with increasing the shear rate in the extruder.

  19. Physical formulation and numerical algorithm for simulating N immiscible incompressible fluids involving general order parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, S.

    2015-02-15

    We present a family of physical formulations, and a numerical algorithm, based on a class of general order parameters for simulating the motion of a mixture of N (N⩾2) immiscible incompressible fluids with given densities, dynamic viscosities, and pairwise surface tensions. The N-phase formulations stem from a phase field model we developed in a recent work based on the conservations of mass/momentum, and the second law of thermodynamics. The introduction of general order parameters leads to an extremely strongly-coupled system of (N−1) phase field equations. On the other hand, the general form enables one to compute the N-phase mixing energy density coefficients in an explicit fashion in terms of the pairwise surface tensions. We show that the increased complexity in the form of the phase field equations associated with general order parameters in actuality does not cause essential computational difficulties. Our numerical algorithm reformulates the (N−1) strongly-coupled phase field equations for general order parameters into 2(N−1) Helmholtz-type equations that are completely de-coupled from one another. This leads to a computational complexity comparable to that for the simplified phase field equations associated with certain special choice of the order parameters. We demonstrate the capabilities of the method developed herein using several test problems involving multiple fluid phases and large contrasts in densities and viscosities among the multitude of fluids. In particular, by comparing simulation results with the Langmuir–de Gennes theory of floating liquid lenses we show that the method using general order parameters produces physically accurate results for multiple fluid phases.

  20. Dynamics of rigid microparticles at the interface of co-flowing immiscible liquids in a microchannel.

    PubMed

    Jayaprakash, K S; Banerjee, U; Sen, A K

    2017-05-01

    We report the dynamical migration behavior of rigid polystyrene microparticles at an interface of co-flowing streams of primary CP1 (aqueous) and secondary CP2 (oils) immiscible phases at low Reynolds numbers (Re) in a microchannel. The microparticles initially suspended in the CP1 either continue to flow in the bulk CP1 or migrate across the interface into CP2, when the stream width of the CP1 approaches the diameter of the microparticles. Experiments were performed with different secondary phases and it is found that the migration criterion depends on the sign of the spreading parameter S and the presence of surfactant at the interface. To substantiate the migration criterion, experiments were also carried out by suspending the microparticles in CP2 (oil phase). Our study reveals that in case of aqueous-silicone oil combination, the microparticles get attached to the interface since S<0 and the three phase contact angle, θ>90°. For complete detachment of microparticles from the interface into the secondary phase, additional energy ΔG is needed. We discuss the role of interfacial perturbation, which causes detachment of microparticles from the interface. In case of mineral and olive oils, the surfactants present at the interface prevents attachment of the microparticles to the interface due to the repulsive disjoining pressure. Finally, using a aqueous-silicone oil system, we demonstrate size based sorting of microparticles of size 25μm and 15μm respectively from that of 15μm and 10μm and study the variation of separation efficiency η with the ratio of the width of the aqueous stream to the diameter of the microparticles ρ.

  1. Can a Difference in Molecular Weights Cause an Eruption in a Driven Flow of Self-Organizing Immiscible System?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. REPORT DATE IDD-MM-YYYY) 23-01-2008 2 . REPORT TYPE Journal...immiscible system? R.B. Pandey12a and J.F. Gettrust1 1 Naval Research Laboratory, Stennis Space Center, MS 39529, USA 2 Department of Physics and...Published online 23 January 2008 - © EDP Sciences, Societa Italiana di Fisica , Springer-Verlag 2008 Abstract. Driven flow of a non-equilibrium non

  2. Rayleigh-Taylor instability for immiscible fluids of arbitrary viscosities: a magnetic levitation investigation and theoretical model.

    PubMed

    Carlès, Pierre; Huang, Zhibin; Carbone, Giovanni; Rosenblatt, Charles

    2006-03-17

    A magnetic field gradient was used to draw down a low density paramagnetic fluid below a more dense fluid in a Hele-Shaw cell. On turning off the field a Rayleigh-Taylor instability was observed in situ, and the growth of the most unstable wave vector was measured versus time. A theory for the instability that permits different viscosities for two immiscible fluids was developed, and good agreement was found with the experimental results. The technique of magnetic levitation promises to broaden significantly the accessible parameter space of gravitational interfacial instability experiments.

  3. Effect of viscosity ratio on the self-sustained instabilities in planar immiscible jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammisola, Outi; Loiseau, Jean-Christophe; Brandt, Luca

    2017-03-01

    tension, although dissipative, can induce a velocity field near the interface that extracts energy from the flow through a viscous mechanism. This study highlights the rich dynamics of immiscible planar uniform-density jets, where different self-sustained and convective mechanisms compete and the nature of the instability depends on the exact parameter values.

  4. Quaternary extrusive calciocarbonatite volcanism on Brava Island (Cape Verde): A nephelinite-carbonatite immiscibility product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourão, Cyntia; Mata, João; Doucelance, Régis; Madeira, José; da Silveira, António Brum; Silva, Luís C.; Moreira, Manuel

    2010-02-01

    .512792-0.512816, respectively) determined in extrusive calciocarbonatitic rocks are clearly different from those obtained in intrusive rocks (0.703340-0.703356 and 0.512910-0.512912, respectively), which demonstrates that the studied rocks were ultimately the product of a source distinct from those that produced the older intrusive carbonatites. Brava extrusive carbonatites yield isotope signatures that are clearly distinct from all other Cape Verde carbonatites, but akin to the Southern Cape Verde silicate rocks. We propose that the extrusive carbonatites resulted from an immiscibility process that also produced conjugate melts of nephelinitic composition.

  5. Time dependence of the mechanical properties of an immiscible polymer blend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Jennifer Krystyna

    Lifetime of a 35/65 PS/HDPE immiscible polymer blend, IMPB, railroad crosstie was investigated. Predictive techniques were developed to predict creep and stress relaxation behavior from short-term compressive stress-strain experiments, and predicted values were compared with experimental results. The weathering effect on the IMPB mechanical properties and the environmental benefits of replacing chemically treated wood crossties with IMPB crossties were investigated. Creep and stress relaxation experiments were performed under conditions simulating the maximum lateral load acting on a crosstie on a Class 1 railroad, and spike pull out experiments were performed using cut spikes. Cyclic uniaxial compressive creep experiments left nearly no residual strain remaining in the IMPB samples. Experimental results suggest the track gage will not widen more than 1/8 of an inch when IMPB crossties are utilized. Thus, creep and track gage widening do not limit the lifetime of IMPB crossties in track. Uniaxial compressive stress relaxation experiments and spike pull out experiments conducted at various time intervals from the day of installation were performed to illustrate the similarity of a spike pull out force versus time from the day of installation curve and a stress relaxation curve. The force decreases exponentially with time, in both cases. Research determined that spike killing due to biological attack is irrelevant, and there is no evidence of spike killing on any IMPB crossties currently in track. Predicted creep strain and stress relaxation were in good agreement with experimental data. A correlation is drawn between predicted long-term creep behavior for the IMPB and experimental creep behavior of polyethylene over 25 years. Theories developed for this work were determined reasonable and provide an alternative to performing long-term experiments. Natural and accelerated weathering experiments indicated no degradation in IMPB mechanical properties. Accelerated

  6. Ag-Pt alloy nanoparticles with the compositions in the miscibility gap

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Zhenmeng; Yang Hong

    2008-07-15

    Silver platinum binary alloys with compositions between about Ag{sub 2}Pt{sub 98} and Ag{sub 95}Pt{sub 5} at <{approx} 400 deg. C have largely not been observed in bulk due to the large immiscibility between these two metals. We present in this paper that Ag-Pt alloy nanostructures can be made in a broad composition range. The formation of Ag-Pt nanostructures is studied by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX). Our results indicate that lattice parameter changes almost linearly with composition in these Ag-Pt nanomaterials. In another word, lattice parameter and composition relationship follows the Vegard's law, which is a strong indication for the formation of metal alloys. Our transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study shows that the silver-rich Ag-Pt alloy nanostructures have spherical shape, while the platinum-rich ones possess wire-like morphology. The stability and crystal phase are investigated by annealing the alloy nanostructures directly or on carbon supports. - Graphical abstract: While platinum and silver cannot form a solid solution with the composition between about Ag{sub 2}Pt{sub 98} and Ag{sub 95}Pt{sub 5} at 400 deg. C or below in bulk form, alloy particles and wires can be made within this miscibility gap at the nanometer scale.

  7. Chaos-assisted formation of immiscible matter-wave solitons and self-stabilization in the binary discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, D. V.; Uleysky, M. Yu.

    2017-02-01

    Binary discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation is used to describe dynamics of two-species Bose-Einstein condensate loaded into an optical lattice. Linear inter-species coupling leads to Rabi transitions between the species. In the regime of strong nonlinearity, a wavepacket corresponding to condensate separates into localized and ballistic fractions. Localized fraction is predominantly formed by immiscible solitons consisted of only one species. Immiscible solitons are formed from initially non-separated states after transient chaotic regime. We calculate the finite-time Lyapunov exponent as a rate of wavepacket divergence in the Hilbert space. Appearance of immiscible solitons to spontaneous self-stabilization of the wavepacket. It is found that onset of chaos is accompanied by fast variations of interaction energy and energy of inter-site tunneling. Crossover to self-stabilization is accompanied by reduction of condensate density due to emittance of ballistically propagating waves.

  8. Alloy softening in binary molybdenum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of alloy additions of Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt on the hardness of Mo. Special emphasis was placed on alloy softening in these binary Mo alloys. Results showed that alloy softening was produced by those elements having an excess of s+d electrons compared to Mo, while those elements having an equal number or fewer s+d electrons than Mo failed to produce alloy softening. Alloy softening and hardening can be correlated with the difference in number of s+d electrons of the solute element and Mo.

  9. Lead-free bearing alloys for engine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratke, Lorenz; Ågren, John; Ludwig, Andreas; Tonn, Babette; Gránásy, László; Mathiesen, Ragnvald; Arnberg, Lars; Anger, Gerd; Reifenhäuser, Bernd; Lauer, Michael; Garen, Rune; Gust, Edgar

    2005-10-01

    Recent developments to reduce the fuel consumption, emission and air pollution, size and weight of engines for automotive, truck, ship propulsion and electrical power generation lead to temperature and load conditions within the engines that cannot be borne by conventional bearings. Presently, only costly multilayer bearings with electroplated or sputtered surface coatings can cope with the load/speed combinations required. Ecological considerations in recent years led to a ban by the European Commission on the use of lead in cars a problem for the standard bronze-lead bearing material. This MAP project is therefore developing an aluminium-based lead-free bearing material with sufficient hardness, wear and friction properties and good corrosion resistance. Only alloys made of components immiscible in the molten state can meet the demanding requirements. Space experimentation plays a crucial role in optimising the cast microstructure for such applications.

  10. Composition and size dependence of hydrogen interaction with carbon supported bulk-immiscible Pd-Rh nanoalloys.

    PubMed

    Oumellal, Yassine; Provost, Karine; Ghimbeu, Camelia Matei; de Yuso, Alicia Martinez; Zlotea, Claudia

    2016-11-18

    In-depth clarification of hydrogen interaction with noble metal nanoparticles and nanoalloys is essential for further development and design of efficient catalysts and hydrogen storage nanomaterials. This issue becomes even more challenging for nanoalloys of bulk-immiscible metals. The hydrogen interaction with bulk-immiscible Pd-Rh nanoalloys (3-6 nm) supported on mesoporous carbon is studied by both laboratory and large scale facility techniques. X-ray diffraction (XRD) reveals a single phase fcc structure for all nanoparticles confirming the formation of nanoalloys in the whole composition range. In situ extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) experiments suggest segregated local structures into Pd-rich surface and Rh-rich core coexisting within the nanoparticles. Hydrogen sorption can be tuned by chemical composition: Pd-rich nanoparticles form a hydride phase, whereas Rh-rich phases do not absorb hydrogen under ambient temperature and pressure conditions. The thermodynamics of hydride formation can be tailored by the composition without affecting hydrogen capacity at full hydrogenation. Furthermore, for hydrogen absorbing nanoalloys, in situ EXAFS reveals a preferential occupation of hydrogen for the interstitial sites around Pd atoms. To our knowledge, this is the first study providing insights into the hydrogen interaction mechanism with Pd-Rh nanoalloys that can guide the design of catalysts for hydrogenation reactions and the development of nanomaterials for hydrogen storage.

  11. Surface Modification Methods to Control Wettability in Immiscible Fluid Displacement Experimental Model Systems Relevant to Geological Carbon Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grate, J. W.; Warner, M. G.; Oostrom, M.; Zhang, C.; Wietsma, T. W.; Pittman, J. W.; Dehoff, K. J.

    2011-12-01

    Wettability is a critical parameter influencing immiscible fluid displacements relevant to geological carbon sequestration. Fully water-wet clean silica surfaces can be modified with silanes to alter the wettability, with the majority of such efforts to date related to conversions of water-wet to oil-wet systems. While a sizable literature exist on contact angles obtained on silanized surfaces, these are by and large air-water contact angle data, not the oil-water contact angles needed. We have investigated a large range of silanes to modify silica surfaces over a range of wettabilities, measuring both air-water and oil-water contact angles. We have identified surface modifications to produce intermediate wet surfaces. We have found a linear correlation between air-water contact angles and oil-water contact angles, enabling literature data on air-water contact angles to be interpreted in terms of likely oil-water contact angles. In addition, we have found that while glass and silica surfaces modified by the same chemistry give the same contact angles in terms of air water contact angles, the surfaces are not as similar in terms of oil-water contact angles. These studies are being carried out in conjunction with immiscible displacements of water by liquid and supercritical CO2 in microfabricated pore network micromodels in silicon with oxidized silica surfaces and glass cover plates.

  12. Composition and size dependence of hydrogen interaction with carbon supported bulk-immiscible Pd-Rh nanoalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oumellal, Yassine; Provost, Karine; Matei Ghimbeu, Camelia; Martinez de Yuso, Alicia; Zlotea, Claudia

    2016-11-01

    In-depth clarification of hydrogen interaction with noble metal nanoparticles and nanoalloys is essential for further development and design of efficient catalysts and hydrogen storage nanomaterials. This issue becomes even more challenging for nanoalloys of bulk-immiscible metals. The hydrogen interaction with bulk-immiscible Pd-Rh nanoalloys (3-6 nm) supported on mesoporous carbon is studied by both laboratory and large scale facility techniques. X-ray diffraction (XRD) reveals a single phase fcc structure for all nanoparticles confirming the formation of nanoalloys in the whole composition range. In situ extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) experiments suggest segregated local structures into Pd-rich surface and Rh-rich core coexisting within the nanoparticles. Hydrogen sorption can be tuned by chemical composition: Pd-rich nanoparticles form a hydride phase, whereas Rh-rich phases do not absorb hydrogen under ambient temperature and pressure conditions. The thermodynamics of hydride formation can be tailored by the composition without affecting hydrogen capacity at full hydrogenation. Furthermore, for hydrogen absorbing nanoalloys, in situ EXAFS reveals a preferential occupation of hydrogen for the interstitial sites around Pd atoms. To our knowledge, this is the first study providing insights into the hydrogen interaction mechanism with Pd-Rh nanoalloys that can guide the design of catalysts for hydrogenation reactions and the development of nanomaterials for hydrogen storage.

  13. Tailoring the interface of an immiscible polymer blend by a mutually miscible homopolymer grafted onto graphene oxide: outstanding mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Kar, Goutam Prasanna; Biswas, Sourav; Bose, Suryasarathi

    2015-01-21

    A unique strategy was adopted here to improve the compatibility between the components of an immiscible polymer blend and strengthen the interface. PMMA, a mutually miscible polymer to both PVDF and ABS, improved the compatibility between the phases by localizing at the blends interface. This was supported by the core-shell formation with PMMA as the shell and ABS as the core as observed from the SEM micrographs. This phenomenon was strongly contingent on the concentration of PMMA in the blends. This strategy was further extended to localize graphene oxide (GO) sheets at the blends interface by chemically coupling it to PMMA (PMMA-g-GO). A dramatic increment of ca. 84% in the Young's modulus and ca. 124% in the yield strength was observed in the presence of PMMA-g-GO with respect to the neat blends. A simultaneous increment in both the strength and the modulus was observed in the presence of PMMA-g-GO whereas, only addition of GO resulted in a moderate improvement in the yield strength. This study reveals that a mutually miscible polymer can render compatibility between the immiscible pair and can improve the stress transfer at the interface.

  14. Rare earth element selenochemistry of immiscible liquids and zircon at Apollo 14 - An ion probe study of evolved rocks on the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Gregory A.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Crozaz, Ghislaine

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented of trace-element analyses of three lunar zircons. The major-element and REE compositions were determined using electron microprobes, and a correction was made for zircon for Zr-Si-O molecular interferences in the La to Pr mass region. The three zircons were found to exhibit similar REE abundances and patterns. Results of the analyses confirm earlier studies (Hess et al., 1975; Watson, 1976; Neal and Taylor, 1989) on the partitioning behavior of trace elements in immiscible liquid-liquid pairs. The results also support the postulated importance of silicate liquid immiscibility in the differentiation of the upper mantle and crust of the moon.

  15. Tin-carbon clusters and the onset of microscopic level immiscibility: Experimental and computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, J.; Landau, A.; Zemel, E.; Kolodney, E.

    2015-09-01

    We report the experimental observation and computational analysis of the binary tin-carbon gas phase species. These novel ionic compounds are generated by impact of C60 - anions on a clean tin target at some kiloelectronvolts kinetic energies. Positive SnmCn+ (m = 1-12, 1 ≤ n ≤ 8) ions were detected mass spectrometrically following ejection from the surface. Impact induced shattering of the C60 - ion followed by sub-surface penetration of the resulting atomic carbon flux forces efficient mixing between target and projectile atoms even though the two elements (Sn/C) are completely immiscible in the bulk. This approach of C60 - ion beam induced synthesis can be considered as an effective way for producing novel metal-carbon species of the so-called non-carbide forming elements, thus exploring the possible onset of molecular level miscibility in these systems. Sn2C2+ was found to be the most abundant carbide cluster ion. Its instantaneous formation kinetics and its measured kinetic energy distribution while exiting the surface demonstrate a single impact formation/emission event (on the sub-ps time scale). Optimal geometries were calculated for both neutral and positively charged species using Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics for identifying global minima, followed by density functional theory (DFT) structure optimization and energy calculations at the coupled cluster singles, doubles and perturbative triples [CCSD(T)] level. The calculated structures reflect two distinct binding tendencies. The carbon rich species exhibit polyynic/cummulenic nature (tin end capped carbon chains) while the more stoichiometrically balanced species have larger contributions of metal-metal bonding, sometimes resulting in distinct tin and carbon moieties attached to each other (segregated structures). The Sn2Cn (n = 3-8) and Sn2Cn+ (n = 2-8) are polyynic/cummulenic while all neutral SnmCn structures (m = 3-4) could be described as small tin clusters (dimer, trimer, and tetramer

  16. Tin-carbon clusters and the onset of microscopic level immiscibility: Experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, J; Landau, A; Zemel, E; Kolodney, E

    2015-09-21

    We report the experimental observation and computational analysis of the binary tin-carbon gas phase species. These novel ionic compounds are generated by impact of C60(-) anions on a clean tin target at some kiloelectronvolts kinetic energies. Positive Sn(m)C(n)(+) (m = 1-12, 1 ≤ n ≤ 8) ions were detected mass spectrometrically following ejection from the surface. Impact induced shattering of the C60(-) ion followed by sub-surface penetration of the resulting atomic carbon flux forces efficient mixing between target and projectile atoms even though the two elements (Sn/C) are completely immiscible in the bulk. This approach of C60(-) ion beam induced synthesis can be considered as an effective way for producing novel metal-carbon species of the so-called non-carbide forming elements, thus exploring the possible onset of molecular level miscibility in these systems. Sn2C2(+) was found to be the most abundant carbide cluster ion. Its instantaneous formation kinetics and its measured kinetic energy distribution while exiting the surface demonstrate a single impact formation/emission event (on the sub-ps time scale). Optimal geometries were calculated for both neutral and positively charged species using Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics for identifying global minima, followed by density functional theory (DFT) structure optimization and energy calculations at the coupled cluster singles, doubles and perturbative triples [CCSD(T)] level. The calculated structures reflect two distinct binding tendencies. The carbon rich species exhibit polyynic/cummulenic nature (tin end capped carbon chains) while the more stoichiometrically balanced species have larger contributions of metal-metal bonding, sometimes resulting in distinct tin and carbon moieties attached to each other (segregated structures). The Sn2C(n) (n = 3-8) and Sn2C(n)(+) (n = 2-8) are polyynic/cummulenic while all neutral Sn(m)C(n) structures (m = 3-4) could be described as small tin clusters (dimer

  17. Enhanced-Solubilization of a Multi-Component Immiscible Liquid Source Zone within an Intermediate-scale Flow Cell System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvell, J. R.; Tick, G. R.

    2011-12-01

    Complex multi-component immiscible liquid mixtures can significantly limit the effectiveness of groundwater remediation. The use of enhanced-flushing technologies has emerged as a promising technique for the remediation of sites contaminated with immiscible liquids. A series of two dimensional (2-D) flow cell experiments was conducted to quantify the effectiveness of two different flushing agents on the removal of a uniformly distributed multi-component immiscible liquid source zone. A 39.5 x 20.2 cm flow-cell was packed with 20/30-mesh sand and emplaced with a 15 x 3 cm rectangular source zone within the center of the flow cell. The source zone was established with a 10% NAPL saturation (Sn) consisting of equal 1:1:1 mole mixture of tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE), and cis-1,2-dichloroethene (DCE). The solubilization agents investigated included 5 wt% solution of a complexing sugar, hydroxypropyl-$betacyclodextrin (HPCD), and a 5 wt% solution of a surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The results of these experiments indicate that the addition of a chemical flushing agent greatly reduces the time needed to remove each component compared to flushing with water alone (i.e. pump and treat). Elution curve (concentration-time) analysis from both total extraction and at the down-gradient end of the source zone showed that SDS removed all three components from the source zone approximately 10 times faster than HPCD. For the extraction port SDS showed slightly more ideal removal in terms of mass flux behavior, removing more mass initially before a significant reduction in mass flux was observed. Although SDS was superior when evaluated on a recovery basis, HPCD outperformed SDS for all components when compared based on contaminant-mass to reagent-mass and moles of contaminant to moles of reagent removed for the source zone port. These findings suggest that the selection of a particular flushing agent should be evaluated carefully prior to remediation as

  18. Chemical projectile-target interaction and liquid immiscibility in impact glass from the Wabar craters, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Christopher; Hecht, Lutz; Ebert, Matthias; Wirth, Richard

    2013-11-01

    Impact glasses are usually strongly affected by secondary alteration and chemical weathering. Thus, in order to understand relevant formation processes, detailed petrographic studies on unweathered impact glasses are necessary as preserved heterogeneities in quenched impact glasses may serve as a tool to better understand their genesis. Here, we report on petrography and microchemistry of impact glasses from the Wabar impact craters (Saudi Arabia) that, with an age of ∼300 years, are among the youngest terrestrial impact craters. The fact that parts of the IIIAB iron meteorite have survived impact and subsequent weathering is granting Wabar a special role among the presently 184 confirmed terrestrial impact structures. Electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) obtained on the black impact melt/glass variety at Wabar suggest that meteoritic Fe was selectively mixed with high-silica target melt at high temperatures due to selective oxidation, resulting in high Fe/Ni ratios for the black melt (37 on average, individual values range from 13 to 449) and low Fe/Ni ratios for projectile droplets ("FeNi spheres" with a Fe/Ni ratio of 3 on average; Fe/Ni ratio for the meteorite is ∼12). The black melt shows emulsion textures that are the result of silicate liquid immiscibility. Liquid-liquid phase-separation resulted in the formation of a poorly polymerized, ultrabasic melt (Lfe) rich in divalent cations like Fe2+, Ca2+, or Mg2+, that is dispersed in a highly polymerized, high-silica melt (Lsi) matrix. The typical Wabar black melt emulsion displays a spheres-in-a-matrix texture of ∼10-20% Lfe homogeneously dispersed in the form of two sets of spheres and droplets (10-30 nm and 0.1-0.4 μm in diameter) in ∼80-90% Lsi matrix, plus occasionally disseminated FeNi spheres. Around large (>10 μm) FeNi spheres, however, the typical emulsion texture changes to ∼21% Lsi dispersed in ∼79% Lfe. This change of texture is interpreted as

  19. Metal alloy identifier

    DOEpatents

    Riley, William D.; Brown, Jr., Robert D.

    1987-01-01

    To identify the composition of a metal alloy, sparks generated from the alloy are optically observed and spectrographically analyzed. The spectrographic data, in the form of a full-spectrum plot of intensity versus wavelength, provide the "signature" of the metal alloy. This signature can be compared with similar plots for alloys of known composition to establish the unknown composition by a positive match with a known alloy. An alternative method is to form intensity ratios for pairs of predetermined wavelengths within the observed spectrum and to then compare the values of such ratios with similar values for known alloy compositions, thereby to positively identify the unknown alloy composition.

  20. FIELD TEST OF CYCLODEXTRIN FOR ENHANCED IN-SITU FLUSHING OF MULTIPLE-COMPONENT IMMISCIBLE ORGANIC LIQUID CONTAMINATION: PROJECT OVERVIEW AND INITIAL RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this paper is to present an overview and the initial results of a pilot-scale experiment designated to test the use of cyclodextrin for enhanced in-situ flushing of an aquifer contaminated by immiscible liquid. This is the first field test of this technology, terme...

  1. Elemental Solubility Tendency for the Phases of Uranium by Classical Models Used to Predict Alloy Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Van Blackwood; Travis Koenig; Saleem Drera; Brajenda Mishra; Davis Olson; Doug Porter; Robert Mariani

    2012-03-01

    Traditional alloy theory models, specifically Darken-Gurry and Miedema’s analyses, that characterize solutes in solid solvents relative to physical properties of the elements have been used to assist in predicting alloy behavior. These models will be applied relative to the three solid phases of uranium: alpha (orthorhombic), beta (tetragonal), and gamma (bcc). These phases have different solubilities for specific alloy additions as a function of temperature. The Darken-Gurry and Miedema models, with modifications based on concepts of Waber, Gschneider, and Brewer will be used to predict the behavior of four types of solutes: 1) Transition metals that are used for various purposes associated with the containment as alloy additions in the uranium fuel 2) Transuranic elements in the uranium 3) Rare earth fission products (lanthanides) 4) Transition metals and other fission products Using these solute map criteria, elemental behavior will be predicted as highly soluble, marginally soluble, or immiscible (compound formers) and will be used to compare solute effects during uranium phase transformations. The overlapping of these solute maps are convenient first approximation tools for predicting alloy behavior.

  2. Silicate liquid immiscibility in magmas and in the system K2O-FeO-AI2O3-SiO2: an example of serendipity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roedder, E.

    1978-01-01

    The concept of silicate liquid immiscibility was invoked early in the history of petrology to explain certain pairs of compositionally divergent rocks, but. as a result of papers by Greig (Am. J. Sci. 13, 1-44, 133-154) and Bowen (The Evolution of the Igneous Rocks), it fell into disfavor for many years. The discovery of immiscibility in geologically reasonable temperature ranges and compositions in experimental work on the system K2O-FeO-Al2O3-SiO2, and of evidence for immiscibility in a variety of lunar and terrestrial rocks, has reinstated the process. Phase equilibria in the high-silica corner of the tetrahedron representing the system K2O- FeO-Al2O3-SiO2 are presented, in the form of constant FeO sections through the tetrahedron, at 10% increments. Those sections, showing the tentative relationships of the primary phase volumes, are based on 5631 quenching runs on 519 compositions, made in metallic iron containers in pure nitrogen. Thirteen crystalline compounds are involved, of which at least six show two or more crystal modifica-tions. Two separate phase volumes, in each of which two immiscible liquids, one iron-rich and the other iron-poor, are present at the liquidus. One of these volumes is entirely within the quaternary system, astride the 1:1 K2O:Al2O3 plane. No quaternary compounds as such have been found, but evidence does point toward at least partial quaternary solid solution, with rapidly lowering liquidus temperatures, from K2O??Al2O3?? 2SiO2 ('potash nepheline', kalsilite. kaliophilite) to the isostructural compound K2O??FeO??3SiO2, and from K2O??Al2O3??4SiO2 (leucite) to the isostructural compound K2O??FeO??5SiO2, Both of these series apparently involve substitution, in tetrahedral coordination. of a ferrous iron and a silicon ion for two aluminum ions. Some of the 'impurities' found in analyses of the natural phases may reflect these substitutions. As a result of the geometry of the immiscibility volume located entirely within the quaternary

  3. Microconfined shear deformation of a droplet in an equiviscous non-newtonian immiscible fluid: experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Minale, Mario; Caserta, Sergio; Guido, Stefano

    2010-01-05

    In this work, the microconfined shear deformation of a droplet in an equiviscous non-Newtonian immiscible fluid is investigated by modeling and experiments. A phenomenological model based on the assumption of ellipsoidal shape and taking into account wall effects is proposed for systems made of non-Newtonian second-order fluids. The model, without any adjustable parameters, is tested by comparison with experiments under simple shear flow performed in a sliding plate apparatus, where the ratio between the distance between the confining walls and the droplet radius can be varied. The agreement between model predictions and experimental data is good both in steady state shear and in transient drop retraction upon cessation of flow. The results obtained in this work are relevant for microfluidics applications where non-Newtonian fluids are used.

  4. Apparatus and method for pumping hot, erosive slurry of coal solids in coal derived, water immiscible liquid

    DOEpatents

    Ackerman, Carl D.

    1983-03-29

    An apparatus for and method of pumping hot, erosive slurry of coal solids in a coal derived, water immiscible liquid to higher pressure involves the use of a motive fluid which is miscible with the liquid of the slurry. The apparatus includes a pump 12, a remote check valve 14 and a chamber 16 between and in fluid communication with the pump 12 and check valve 14 through conduits 18,20. Pump 12 exerts pressure on the motive fluid and thereby on the slurry through a concentration gradient of coal solids within chamber 16 to alternately discharge slurry under pressure from the outlet port of check valve 14 and draw slurry in through the inlet port of check valve 14.

  5. Spin-dipole oscillation and polarizability of a binary Bose-Einstein condensate near the miscible-immiscible phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bienaimé, Tom; Fava, Eleonora; Colzi, Giacomo; Mordini, Carmelo; Serafini, Simone; Qu, Chunlei; Stringari, Sandro; Lamporesi, Giacomo; Ferrari, Gabriele

    2016-12-01

    We report on the measurement of the spin-dipole (SD) polarizability and of the frequency of the SD oscillation of a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate of sodium atoms occupying the |3 2S1 /2,F =1 ,mF=±1 > hyperfine states. This binary spin mixture presents the important properties of being, at the same time, fully miscible and rid of the limit set by buoyancy. It is also characterized by a huge enhancement of the SD polarizability and by the consequent softening of the frequency of the SD oscillation, due to the vicinity to the transition to the immiscible phase. The experimental data are successfully compared with the predictions of theory.

  6. Three-dimensional simulations of pressure-driven displacement flow of two immiscible liquids using a multiphase Lattice Boltzmann approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redapangu, Prasanna R.; Sahu, Kirti Chandra; Vanka, S. P.

    2013-11-01

    A three-dimensional multiphase lattice Boltzmann approach is used to study the pressure-driven displacement flow of two immiscible liquids of different densities and viscosities in an inclined square duct. A three-dimensional-fifteen-velocity (D3Q15) lattice model is used. The simulations are performed on a graphics processing unit (GPU) based machine. The effects of channel inclination, viscosity and density contrasts are investigated. The contours of the density and the average viscosity profiles in different planes are plotted and compared with two dimensional simulations. We demonstrate that the flow dynamics in three-dimensional channel is quite different as compared to that of two-dimensional channel. In particular, we found that the flow is relatively more coherent in three-dimensional channel than that in two-dimensional channel. A new screw-type instability is seen in the three-dimensional channel which cannot be observed in two-dimensional simulations.

  7. Development of an immiscible polymer/polymer/nanoparticle system in order to study the location of nanoparticles at polymer/polymer interface by quantitative optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansen, Luis Henrique B.; Canto, Leonardo B.; Canevarolo, Sebastião V.

    2015-12-01

    In the past ten years, stabilization of the phase morphology of immiscible polymer blends during melt compounding went through a new perspective by the use of inorganic nanoparticles as compatibilizers. Following the ideas of Ramsden and Pickering, the stabilization of the minor phase in immiscible polymer blends could be achieved with solid nanoparticles located at the interface of the phases, lowering the interfacial tension and acting as a physical barrier to droplet coalescence. In this work, the location of the silica nanoparticle in an immiscible polymer blend is studied using quantitative optical microscopy, measuring the total light scattering, i.e. turbidity, created by the use of hydrophilic and hydrophobic silica nanoparticles (hi-silica and hb-silica, respectively) in an immiscible polymer blend. The light scattering at the polymer/polymer interface is minimized choosing a PS/PC immiscible blend which has minimal difference in their refractive indices. On the other hand, the considerable difference in the refractive index of the chosen polymers and nanosilica would highlight the scattering effect of the silica nanoparticles if located at the polymer/polymer interface. The transmitted light intensity from neat PS/PC blends and some PS/PC/hl-silica systems were similar, showing only a small change in the range of the glass transition temperatures of the two polymers, which is an indication that the silica nanoparticles are dispersed inside the two polymer phases. However, the transmitted light intensity is greatly changed in the system PS/PC/hb-silica, containing the hydrophobic silica, which according to the wetting parameter should have the silica nanoparticles located mainly at the polymer/polymer interface.

  8. Effect of Various Enhanced-Solubilization Agents on Multi-Component Immiscible Liquid Dissolution and Mass Flux in Homogeneous Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tick, G. R.; Slavic, D.

    2010-12-01

    Complex multi-component immiscible liquid mixtures can significantly limit the effectiveness of groundwater remediation. The use of enhanced-flushing technologies has emerged as a promising technique for the remediation of sites contaminated with immiscible liquids. An important aspect for the effective remediation of these sites depends on the physical heterogeneity of the subsurface, the related distribution of immiscible liquid present within porous media, and the composition of the immiscible liquid mixture. A series of column experiments was conducted to quantify the effectiveness of four different flushing agents on the removal of a uniformly distributed multi-component immiscible liquid consisting of equal mole fractions of tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE), and cis-1,2-dichloroethene (DCE) in homogeneous quartz sand. The solubilization agents investigated included: two complexing sugars, hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPCD) and methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD); one surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS); and one cosolvent, ethanol (ETOH). The effectiveness of the flushing agents was evaluated by comparing elution profiles, flushing efficiencies, mass flux behavior, and dissolution ideality (i.e. Raoult’s law prediction) of each component. The results of these experiments indicate that the addition of a chemical flushing agent greatly reduces the time needed to remove each component compared to flushing with water alone (i.e. pump and treat). Although the stronger solubilization-power agents (i.e. SDS and ETOH) showed quicker removal in general, each solubilization agent exhibited unique removal limitations based upon different removal efficiency analyses. For instance, TCE and DCE exhibited relatively ideal dissolution while PCE showed significant nonideal dissolution behavior during flushing with MCD. These findings suggest that the selection of a particular flushing agent should be evaluated carefully prior to remediation as the mass flux and

  9. Carbonate-silicate immiscibility and extremely peralkaline silicate glasses from Nasira cone and recent eruptions at Oldoinyo Lengai Volcano, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Roger H.; Dawson, J. Barry

    2012-11-01

    Phenocrysts of garnet, pyroxene and nepheline in peralkaline nephelinite from the Nasira parasitic cones at Oldoinyo Lengai contain quenched immiscible silicate (peralkalinity = 2-13) and Na-Ca-carbonate melts. Their bulk compositions further define the limits of liquid immiscibility for peralkaline carbonated nephelinite magmas and confirm this process was operative at Oldoinyo Lengai during older stages of activity. Groundmass glasses in Nasira nephelinites are peralkaline (peralkalinity = 5.5-9.5) but less evolved than melt inclusion glasses (peralkalinity = 8-13) in nepheline phenocrysts, implying that these magmas are hybrids formed by magma mixing. Groundmass glass in diverse peralkaline combeite nephelinite ash clasts with and without melilite and/or wollastonite formed in the January-June 2008 eruptions of Oldoinyo Lengai are also exceptionally peralkaline. Two trends in their compositions are evident: (1) increasing peralkalinity from 6 to 10 with SiO2 decreasing from 42 to 33 wt.%; (2) increasing peralkalinity from 6 to 16 with SiO2 decreasing from 45 to 40 wt.%. All recent glasses are considered to be more evolved than groundmass glass in Nasira combeite nephelinite. These data indicate that several varieties of nephelinite exist at Oldoinyo Lengai. Their parental magmas are considered to have been initially enriched in alkalis during partial melting of their metasomatized asthenospheric sources and further by subsequent assimilation, or re-solution, of previously exsolved natrocarbonatite melt in the magma chamber(s) underlying Oldoinyo Lengai. On this basis, none of the bulk compositions of peralkaline stage II lavas at Oldoinyo Lengai, including Nasira, are considered to represent those of liquids as their compositions are determined by rheological factors (phenocryst accumulation; cumulate disruption) and assimilation processes. The formation of combeite is considered to be a consequence of natrocarbonatite melt assimilation.

  10. Ab initio calculations of elastic properties of bcc Fe-Mg and Fe-Cr random alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hualei; Johansson, Börje; Vitos, Levente

    2009-06-01

    Using the ab initio exact muffin-tin orbitals method in combination with the coherent-potential approximation, we have calculated the elastic parameters of ferromagnetic Fe1-mMgm (0≤m≤0.1) and Fe1-cCrc (0≤c≤0.2) random alloys in the body-centered cubic (bcc) crystallographic phase. Results obtained for Fe1-cCrc demonstrate that the employed theoretical approach accurately describes the experimentally observed composition dependence of the polycrystalline elastic moduli of Fe-rich alloys encompassing maximum ˜10% Cr. The elastic parameters of Fe-Cr alloys are found to exhibit anomalous composition dependence around 5% Cr. The immiscibility between Fe and Mg at ambient conditions is well reproduced by the present theory. The calculated lattice parameter for the Fe-Mg regular solid solution increases by ˜1.95% when 10% Mg is introduced in Fe, which corresponds approximately to 11% decrease in the average alloy density, in perfect agreement with the experimental finding. At the same time, we find that all of the elastic parameters of bcc Fe-Mg alloys decrease almost linearly with increasing Mg content. The present results show a much stronger alloying effect for Mg on the elastic properties of α-Fe than that for Cr. Our results call for further experimental studies on the mechanical properties of the Fe-Mg system.

  11. Density functional theory study of the effects of alloying additions on sulfur adsorption on nickel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyi, Oleksandr I.; Chen, Zhong; Kulish, Vadym V.; Bai, Kewu; Wu, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Reactions of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) with Nickel/Ytrria-doped zirconia (Ni/YDZ) anode materials might cause degradation of the performance of solid oxide fuel cells when S containing fuels are used. In this paper, we employ density functional theory to investigate S adsorption on metal (M)-doped and undoped Ni(0 0 1) and Ni(1 1 1) surfaces. Based on the performed calculations, we analyze the effects of 12 alloying additions (Ag, Au, Al, Bi, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Sn, Sb, V, and Zn) on the temperature of transition between clean (S atoms do not adsorb on the surfaces) and contaminated (S atoms can adsorb on the surfaces spontaneously) M-doped Ni surfaces for different concentrations of H2S in the fuel. Predicted results are consistent with many experimental studies relevant to S poisoning of both Ni/YDZ and M-doped Ni/YDZ anode materials. This study is important to understand S poisoning phenomena and to develop new S tolerant anode materials.

  12. SUPERCONDUCTING VANADIUM BASE ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Cleary, H.J.

    1958-10-21

    A new vanadium-base alloy which possesses remarkable superconducting properties is presented. The alloy consists of approximately one atomic percent of palladium, the balance being vanadium. The alloy is stated to be useful in a cryotron in digital computer circuits.

  13. Weldability of intermetallic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Ordered intermetallic alloys are a unique class of material that have potential for structural applications at elevated temperatures. The paper describes the welding and weldability of these alloys. The alloys studied were nickel aluminide (Ni[sub 3]Al), titanium aluminide (Ti[sub 3]Al), and iron aluminide.

  14. DELTA PHASE PLUTONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Cramer, E.M.; Ellinger, F.H.; Land. C.C.

    1960-03-22

    Delta-phase plutonium alloys were developed suitable for use as reactor fuels. The alloys consist of from 1 to 4 at.% zinc and the balance plutonium. The alloys have good neutronic, corrosion, and fabrication characteristics snd possess good dimensional characteristics throughout an operating temperature range from 300 to 490 deg C.

  15. PLUTONIUM-THORIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Schonfeld, F.W.

    1959-09-15

    New plutonium-base binary alloys useful as liquid reactor fuel are described. The alloys consist of 50 to 98 at.% thorium with the remainder plutonium. The stated advantages of these alloys over unalloyed plutonium for reactor fuel use are easy fabrication, phase stability, and the accompanying advantuge of providing a means for converting Th/sup 232/ into U/sup 233/.

  16. Separation in Binary Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Facemire, B. R.; Kaukler, W. F.; Witherow, W. K.; Fanning, U.

    1986-01-01

    Studies of monotectic alloys and alloy analogs reviewed. Report surveys research on liquid/liquid and solid/liquid separation in binary monotectic alloys. Emphasizes separation processes in low gravity, such as in outer space or in free fall in drop towers. Advances in methods of controlling separation in experiments highlighted.

  17. Substrats poreux biodegradables prepares a partir de phases co-continues dans les melanges de polymeres immiscibles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarazin, Pierre

    2003-06-01

    In this thesis a novel approach to preparing biodegradable materials with highly structured and interconnected porosity is proposed. The method involves the controlled preparation of immiscible co-continuous polymer blends using melt-processing technology followed by a bulk solvent extraction step of one of the phases (the porogen phase). A co-continuous structure is defined as the state when each phase of the blend is fully interconnected through a continuous pathway. This method allows for the preparation of porous materials with highly controlled pore size, pore volume and pore shape which can then be transformed and shaped in various forms useful for biomedical applications. Various properties of the skin of the polymeric articles (closed-cell, open-cell, modification of the pore size) can be controlled. Initially, the study on the immiscible binary and compatibilized poly(L-lactide)/polystyrene blends (PLLA/PS) after extraction of the PS phase demonstrated that highly percolated blends exist from 40--75%PS and 40--60%PS for the binary and compatibilized blends, respectively. It is demonstrated that both the pore size and extent of co-continuity can be controlled through composition and interfacial modification. The subsequent part of our work treats of the preparation of porous PLLA from a blend of two biodegradable polymers and the performance of such porous materials. This portion of the work uses only polymer materials which have been medically approved for internal use. In this case, small amounts of the porogen phase can be tolerated in the final porous substrate. Co-continuous blends comprised of poly(L-lactide)/Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) PLLA/PCL, were prepared via melt processing. A wide range of phase sizes for the co-continuous blend is generated through a combination of concentration control and quiescent annealing. As the PLLA phase can not be dissolved selectively in PLLA/PS blends, the co-continuity range was evaluated indirectly. To precisely

  18. Immiscible silicate liquids and phosphoran olivine in Netschaëvo IIE silicate: Analogue for planetesimal core-mantle boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Roosbroek, Nadia; Hamann, Christopher; McKibbin, Seann; Greshake, Ansgar; Wirth, Richard; Pittarello, Lidia; Hecht, Lutz; Claeys, Philippe; Debaille, Vinciane

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated a piece of the Netschaëvo IIE iron meteorite containing a silicate inclusion by means of electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Netschaëvo contains chondrule-bearing clasts and impact melt rock clasts were also recently found. The examined inclusion belongs to the latter and is characterized by a porphyritic texture dominated by clusters of coarse-grained olivine and pyroxene, set in a fine-grained groundmass that consists of new crystals of olivine and a hyaline matrix. This matrix material has a quasi-basaltic composition in the inner part of the inclusion, whereas the edge of the inclusion has a lower SiO2 concentration and is enriched in MgO, P2O5, CaO, and FeO. Close to the metal host, the inclusion also contains euhedral Mg-chromite crystals and small (<2 μm), Si-rich globules. A TEM foil was cut from this glassy, silico-phosphate material. It shows that the material consists of elongated olivine crystallites containing up to 14 wt% P2O5, amorphous material, and interstitial Cl-apatite crystals. The Si-rich silicate glass globules show a second population of Fe-rich silicate glass droplets, indicating they formed by silicate liquid immiscibility. Together with the presence of phosphoran olivine and quenched Cl-apatite, these textures suggest rapid cooling and quenching as a consequence of an impact event. Moreover, the enrichment of phosphorus in the silicate inclusion close to the metal host (phosphoran olivine and Cl-apatite) indicates that phosphorus re-partitioned from the metal into the silicate phase upon cooling. This probably also took place in pallasite meteorites that contain late-crystallizing phases rich in phosphorus. Accordingly, our findings suggest that oxidation of phosphorus might be a general process in core-mantle environments, bearing on our understanding of planetesimal evolution. Thus, the Netschaëvo sample serves as a natural planetesimal core-mantle boundary experiment

  19. Crustal contamination and sulfide immiscibility history of the Permian Huangshannan magmatic Ni-Cu sulfide deposit, East Tianshan, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Ya-Jing; Qin, Ke-Zhang; Tang, Dong-Mei; Feng, Hong-Ye; Xue, Sheng-Chao

    2016-11-01

    The Huangshannan mafic-ultramafic intrusion is a Permian Ni-Cu sulfide-bearing intrusion in the southern margin of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt. The intrusion consists of an ultramafic unit, which is composed of lherzolite and olivine websterite, and a mafic unit, which is composed of olivine gabbronorite, gabbronorite and leuco-gabbronorite. This intrusion was formed by two separate pulses of magma: a more primitive magma for the early ultramafic unit and a more evolved magma for the late mafic unit. U-Pb isotope geochronology of zircon from the mafic unit yields an age of 278 ± 2 Ma. According to its olivine and Cr-rich spinel compositions, the estimated parental magma of lherzolite for the Huangshannan intrusion has 12.4 wt.% MgO, indicating picritic affinity. Fractional crystallization modeling results and the presence of rounded sulfide inclusions in an olivine crystal (Fo 86.7) indicate that sulfide immiscibility was achieved at the beginning of olivine fractionation. Co-magmatic zircon crystals from gabbronorite have a δ18O value close to 6.5‰, which is 1.2‰ higher than the typical mantle value and suggests significant crustal contamination (∼20%). The positive εHf(t) values of co-magmatic zircon (which vary from +9.2 to +15.3) and positive whole rock εNd(t) values (which vary from +4.7 to +7.8) also indicate that the parental magma was derived from a depleted mantle source and contaminated by 5-20% juvenile arc crust and then by ∼5% upper crustal materials. However, modeling results of sulfur content at sulfide saturation reveal that such a large amount of crustal contamination is not sufficient to trigger sulfide saturation in the parental magma, which strongly suggests that external sulfur addition, probably during contamination, has played a critical role in causing sulfide immiscibility. Furthermore, the arc magmatism geochemical signatures of the Huangshannan intrusion, such as significant Nb and Ta depletion relative to La and low Ca

  20. Using Three-Phase Flow of Immiscible Liquids to Prevent Coalescence of Droplets in Microfluidic Channels: Criteria to Identify theThird Liquid and Validation with Protein Crystallizations

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.; Li, L; Reyes, S; Adamson, D; Ismagilov, R

    2007-01-01

    This manuscript describes the effect of interfacial tensions on three-phase liquid-liquid-liquid flow in microfluidic channels and the use of this flow to prevent microfluidic plugs from coalescing. One problem in using microfluidic plugs as microreactors is the coalescence of adjacent plugs caused by the relative motion of plugs during flow. Here, coalescence of reagent plugs was eliminated by using plugs of a third immiscible liquid as spacers to separate adjacent reagent plugs. This work tested the requirements of interfacial tensions for plugs of a third liquid to be effective spacers. Two candidates satisfying the requirements were identified, and one of these liquids was used in the crystallization of protein human Tdp1 to demonstrate its compatibility with protein crystallization in plugs. This method for identifying immiscible liquids for use as a spacer will also be useful for applications involving manipulation of large arrays of droplets in microfluidic channels.

  1. Rhenium alloying of tungsten heavy alloys

    SciTech Connect

    German, R.M.; Bose, A.; Jerman, G.

    1989-01-01

    Alloying experiments were performed using rhenium additions to a classic 90 mass % tungsten heavy alloy. The mixed-powder system was liquid phase sintered to full density at 1500 C in 60 min The rhenium-modified alloys exhibited a smaller grain size, higher hardness, higher strength, and lower ductility than the unalloyed system. For an alloy with a composition of 84W-6Re-8Ni-2Fe, the sintered density was 17, 4 Mg/m{sup 3} with a yield strength of 815 MPa, tensile strength of 1180 MPa, and elongation to failure of 13%. This property combination results from the aggregate effects of grain size reduction and solid solution hardening due to rhenium. In the unalloyed system these properties require post-sintering swaging and aging; thus, alloying with rhenium is most attractive for applications where net shaping is desired, such as by powder injection molding.

  2. Ultrahigh coercivity and core-shell microstructure achieved in oriented Nd-Fe-B thin films diffusion-processed with Dy-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tongbo; Zhou, Xiaoqian; Yu, Dedong; Fu, Yanqing; Li, Guojian; Cui, Weibin; Wang, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Ultrahigh ambient coercivities of 4 T were achieved in Nd-Fe-B benchmark thin film with coercivity of 1.06 T by diffusion-processing with Dy, Dy70Cu30 and Dy80Ag20 alloy layer. High texture and good squareness were obtained. In triple-junction regions, Dy element was found to be immiscible with Nd element. Microstructure observation indicated the typical gradient elementary distribution. Unambiguous core/shell microstructure was characterized by transition electron microscopy. Due to the enhanced ambient coercivity, the coercivity temperature stability was also substantially increased.

  3. A novel numerical approach for the solution of the problem of two-phase, immiscible flow in porous media: Application to LNAPL and DNAPL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, Amgad; Sun, Shuyu; El Amin, Mohamed F.

    2012-05-01

    The flow of two immiscible fluids in porous media is ubiquitous particularly in petroleum exploration and extraction. The displacement of one fluid by another immiscible with it represents a very important aspect in what is called enhanced oil recovery. Another example is related to the long-term sequestration of carbon dioxide, CO2, in deep geologic formations. In this technique, supercritical CO2 is introduced into deep saline aquifer where it displaces the hosting fluid. Furthermore, very important classes of contaminants that are very slightly soluble in water and represent a huge concern if they get introduced to groundwater could basically be assumed immiscible. These are called light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPL) and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL). All these applications necessitate that efficient algorithms be developed for the numerical solution of these problems. In this work we introduce the use of shifting matrices to numerically solving the problem of two-phase immiscible flows in the subsurface. We implement the cell-center finite difference method which discretizes the governing set of partial differential equations in conservative manner. Unlike traditional solution methodologies, which are based on performing the discretization on a generic cell and solve for all the cells within a loop, in this technique, the cell center information for all the cells are obtained all at once without loops using matrix oriented operations. This technique is significantly faster than the traditional looping algorithms, particularly for larger systems when coding using languages that require repeating interpretation each time a loop is called like Mat Lab, Python and the like. We apply this technique to the transport of LNAPL and DNAPL into a rectangular domain.

  4. Processing and alloying of tungsten heavy alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, A.; Dowding, R.J.

    1993-12-31

    Tungsten heavy alloys are two-phase metal matrix composites with a unique combination of density, strength, and ductility. They are processed by liquid-phase sintering of mixed elemental powders. The final microstructure consists of a contiguous network of nearly pure tungsten grains embedded in a matrix of a ductile W-Ni-Fe alloy. Due to the unique property combination of the material, they are used extensively as kinetic energy penetrators, radiation shields. counterbalances, and a number of other applications in the defense industry. The properties of these alloys are extremely sensitive to the processing conditions. Porosity levels as low as 1% can drastically degrade the properties of these alloys. During processing, care must be taken to reduce or prevent incomplete densification, hydrogen embrittlement, impurity segregation to the grain boundaries, solidification shrinkage induced porosity, and in situ formation of pores due to the sintering atmosphere. This paper will discuss some of the key processing issues for obtaining tungsten heavy alloys with good properties. High strength tungsten heavy alloys are usually fabricated by swaging and aging the conventional as-sintered material. The influence of this on the shear localization tendency of a W-Ni-Co alloy will also be demonstrated. Recent developments have shown that the addition of certain refractory metals partially replacing tungsten can significantly improve the strength of the conventional heavy alloys. This development becomes significant due to the recent interest in near net shaping techniques such as powder injection moldings. The role of suitable alloying additions to the classic W-Ni-Fe based heavy alloys and their processing techniques will also be discussed in this paper.

  5. Extrusion of aluminium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, T.

    1999-01-01

    In recent years the importance of extruded alloys has increased due to the decline in copper extrusion, increased use in structural applications, environmental impact and reduced energy consumption. There have also been huge technical advances. This text provides comprehensive coverage of the metallurgical, mathematical and practical features of the process. The contents include: continuum principles; metallurgical features affecting the extrusion of Al-alloys; extrusion processing; homogenization and extrusion conditions for specific alloys; processing of 6XXX alloys; plant utilization; Appendix A: specification of AA alloys and DIN equivalents; Appendix B: chemical compositions; and Appendix C: typical properties.

  6. High strength alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Phillip James [Oak Ridge, TN; Shingledecker, John Paul [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael Leonard [Knoxville, TN; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; John, Randy Carl [Houston, TX; Kim, Dong Sub [Sugar Land, TX

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  7. High strength alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J.; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2012-06-05

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tublar that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  8. Creep Resistant Zinc Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Frank E. Goodwin

    2002-12-31

    This report covers the development of Hot Chamber Die Castable Zinc Alloys with High Creep Strengths. This project commenced in 2000, with the primary objective of developing a hot chamber zinc die-casting alloy, capable of satisfactory service at 140 C. The core objectives of the development program were to: (1) fill in missing alloy data areas and develop a more complete empirical model of the influence of alloy composition on creep strength and other selected properties, and (2) based on the results from this model, examine promising alloy composition areas, for further development and for meeting the property combination targets, with the view to designing an optimized alloy composition. The target properties identified by ILZRO for an improved creep resistant zinc die-casting alloy were identified as follows: (1) temperature capability of 1470 C; (2) creep stress of 31 MPa (4500 psi); (3) exposure time of 1000 hours; and (4) maximum creep elongation under these conditions of 1%. The project was broadly divided into three tasks: (1) Task 1--General and Modeling, covering Experimental design of a first batch of alloys, alloy preparation and characterization. (2) Task 2--Refinement and Optimization, covering Experimental design of a second batch of alloys. (3) Task 3--Creep Testing and Technology transfer, covering the finalization of testing and the transfer of technology to the Zinc industry should have at least one improved alloy result from this work.

  9. Melt inclusion record of immiscibility between silicate, hydrosaline, and carbonate melts: Applications to skarn genesis at Mount Vesuvius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulignati, Paolo; Kamenetsky, Vadim S.; Marianelli, Paola; Sbrana, Alessandro; Mernagh, Terrence P.

    2001-11-01

    Foid-bearing syenites and endoskarn xenoliths of the A.D. 472 Vesuvius eruption represent the magma chamber carbonate wall-rock interface. Melt inclusions hosted in crystals from these rocks offer a rare opportunity to depict the formation and the composition of metasomatic skarn-forming fluids at the peripheral part of a growing K-alkaline magma chamber disrupted by an explosive eruption. Four principal types of melt inclusions represent highly differentiated phonolite (type 1), hydrosaline melt (type 3), unmixed silicate salt melts (type 2), and a complex chloride-carbonate melt with minor sulfates (type 4). The high-temperature (700 800 °C) magmatic-derived hydrosaline melt is considered to be the main metasomatic agent for the skarn-forming reactions. The interaction between this melt (fluid) and carbonate wall rocks produces a Na-K-Ca carbonate-chloride melt that shows immiscibility between carbonate and chloride constituents at ˜700 °C in 1 atm experiments. This unmixing can be viewed as a possible mechanism for the origin of carbonatites associated with intrusion-related skarn systems.

  10. Dynamic three-phase hollow fiber microextraction based on two immiscible organic solvents with automated movement of the acceptor phase.

    PubMed

    Esrafili, Ali; Yamini, Yadollah; Ghambarian, Mahnaz; Moradi, Morteza

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic three-phase hollow fiber liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction (HF-LLLME) based on two immiscible organic solvents, with automated movement of organic acceptor phase to facilitate mass transfer was introduced for the first time. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were used as model compounds and extracted from water and soil samples. The extraction involved filling an 8 cm length of hollow fiber with 25 μL of organic acceptor solvent using a microsyringe, followed by impregnation of the pores in the fiber wall with n-dodecane. The fiber was then immersed in 20 mL of aqueous sample solution. During extraction, the organic acceptor phase was repeatedly moved in the lumen of the hollow fiber by movement of the syringe plunger controlled by programmable syringe pump. Following this microextraction, 2 μL of organic acceptor phase was injected into gas chromatography-flame ionization detector. This new technique provided up to 554-fold preconcentration of the analytes under the optimized conditions. Good repeatabilities (with RSDs ≤8.4%) were obtained. Detection limits were in the range of 0.2-0.5 μg/L. The utilization of the proposed method for extraction of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from different real samples (such as water and soil samples) also gave good precision and recovery.

  11. Electrically Controllable Microparticle Synthesis and Digital Microfluidic Manipulation by Electric-Field-Induced Droplet Dispensing into Immiscible Fluids.

    PubMed

    Um, Taewoong; Hong, Jiwoo; Im, Do Jin; Lee, Sang Joon; Kang, In Seok

    2016-08-18

    The dispensing of tiny droplets is a basic and crucial process in a myriad of applications, such as DNA/protein microarray, cell cultures, chemical synthesis of microparticles, and digital microfluidics. This work systematically demonstrates droplet dispensing into immiscible fluids through electric charge concentration (ECC) method. It exhibits three main modes (i.e., attaching, uniform, and bursting modes) as a function of flow rates, applied voltages, and gap distances between the nozzle and the oil surface. Through a conventional nozzle with diameter of a few millimeters, charged droplets with volumes ranging from a few μL to a few tens of nL can be uniformly dispensed into the oil chamber without reduction in nozzle size. Based on the features of the proposed method (e.g., formation of droplets with controllable polarity and amount of electric charge in water and oil system), a simple and straightforward method is developed for microparticle synthesis, including preparation of colloidosomes and fabrication of Janus microparticles with anisotropic internal structures. Finally, a combined system consisting of ECC-induced droplet dispensing and electrophoresis of charged droplet (ECD)-driven manipulation systems is constructed. This integrated platform will provide increased utility and flexibility in microfluidic applications because a charged droplet can be delivered toward the intended position by programmable electric control.

  12. Immiscible displacement of oil by water in consolidated porous media due to capillary imbibition under ultrasonic waves.

    PubMed

    Hamida, Tarek; Babadagli, Tayfun

    2007-09-01

    Numerous studies done in the last four decades have demonstrated that acoustic stimulation may enhance recovery in oil reservoirs. This technology is not only technically feasible, but also serves as an economical, environmentally friendly alternative to currently accepted enhanced oil recovery (EOR) method. It requires low capital expenditure, and yields almost immediate improvement without any additional EOR agents. Despite a vast body of empirical and theoretical support, this method lacks sufficient understanding to make meaningful and consistent engineering predictions. This is in part due to the complex nature of the physical processes involved, as well as due to a shortage of fundamental/experimental research. Much of what the authors believe is happening within acoustically stimulated porous media is speculative and theoretical. This paper focuses on the effects of ultrasound on the interfacial forces between immiscible fluids. Capillary (spontaneous) imbibition of an aqueous phase into oil (or air)-saturated Berea sandstone and Indiana limestone samples experiments were conducted. Solutions of water, brine (15,000 and 150,000 ppm NaCl), anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl diphenyloxide disulfonate), nonionic surfactant (alcohol ethoxylate) and polymer (xanthan gum) were prepared as the aqueous phase. Both counter-current and co-current geometries were tested. Due to the intrinsically unforced, gentle nature of the process, and their strong dependence on wettability, interfacial tension, viscosity and density, such experiments provide valuable insight into some of the governing mechanisms behind ultrasonic stimulation.

  13. Immiscible experiments on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability using simultaneous particle image velocimetry and planar laser induced fluorescence concentration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokler, Matthew; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2014-11-01

    Incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments are presented in which two stratified liquids having Atwood number of 0.2 are accelerated in a vertical linear induction motor driven drop tower. A test sled having only vertical freedom of motion contains the experiment tank and visualization equipment. The sled is positioned at the top of the tower within the linear induction motors and accelerated downward causing the initially stable interface to be unstable and allowing the Rayleigh-Taylor instability to develop. Forced and unforced experiments are conducted using an immiscible liquid combination. Forced initial perturbations are produced by vertically oscillating the test sled prior to the start of acceleration. The interface is visualized using a 445 nm laser light source that illuminates a fluorescent dye mixed in one of the fluids and aluminum oxide particles dispersed in both fluids. The laser beam is synchronously swept across the fluorescent fluid, at the frame rate of the camera, exposing a single plane of the interface. The resulting images are recorded using a monochromatic high speed video camera. Time dependent velocity and density fields are obtained from the recorded images allowing for 2D full field measurements of turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent mass transport.

  14. 3D tomographic reconstruction of the internal velocity field of an immiscible drop in a shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerdraon, Paul; Dalziel, Stuart B.; Goldstein, Raymond E.; Landel, Julien R.; Peaudecerf, Francois J.

    2015-11-01

    We study experimentally the internal flow of a drop attached to a flat substrate and immersed in an immiscible shear flow. Transport inside the drop can play a crucial role in cleaning applications. Internal advection can enhance the mass transfer across the drop surface, thus increasing the cleaning rate. We used microlitre water-glycerol drops on a hydrophobic substrate. The drops were spherical and did not deform significantly under the shear flow. An oil phase of relative viscosity 0.01 to 1 was flowed over the drop. Typical Reynolds numbers inside the drops were of the order of 0.1 to 10. Using confocal microscopy, we performed 3D tomographic reconstruction of the flow field in the drop. The in-plane velocity field was measured using micro-PIV, and the third velocity component was computed from incompressibility. To our knowledge, this study gives the first experimental measurement of the three-dimensional internal velocity field of a drop in a shear flow. Numerical simulations and theoretical models published in the past 30 years predict a toroidal internal recirculation flow, for which the entire surface flows streamwise. However, our measurements reveal a qualitatively different picture with a two-lobed recirculation, featuring two stagnation points at the surface and a reverse surface flow closer to the substrate. This finding appears to be independent of Reynolds number and viscosity ratio in the ranges studied; we conjecture that the observed flow is due to the effect of surfactants at the drop surface.

  15. Electrically Controllable Microparticle Synthesis and Digital Microfluidic Manipulation by Electric-Field-Induced Droplet Dispensing into Immiscible Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, Taewoong; Hong, Jiwoo; Im, Do Jin; Lee, Sang Joon; Kang, In Seok

    2016-08-01

    The dispensing of tiny droplets is a basic and crucial process in a myriad of applications, such as DNA/protein microarray, cell cultures, chemical synthesis of microparticles, and digital microfluidics. This work systematically demonstrates droplet dispensing into immiscible fluids through electric charge concentration (ECC) method. It exhibits three main modes (i.e., attaching, uniform, and bursting modes) as a function of flow rates, applied voltages, and gap distances between the nozzle and the oil surface. Through a conventional nozzle with diameter of a few millimeters, charged droplets with volumes ranging from a few μL to a few tens of nL can be uniformly dispensed into the oil chamber without reduction in nozzle size. Based on the features of the proposed method (e.g., formation of droplets with controllable polarity and amount of electric charge in water and oil system), a simple and straightforward method is developed for microparticle synthesis, including preparation of colloidosomes and fabrication of Janus microparticles with anisotropic internal structures. Finally, a combined system consisting of ECC-induced droplet dispensing and electrophoresis of charged droplet (ECD)-driven manipulation systems is constructed. This integrated platform will provide increased utility and flexibility in microfluidic applications because a charged droplet can be delivered toward the intended position by programmable electric control.

  16. Electrically Controllable Microparticle Synthesis and Digital Microfluidic Manipulation by Electric-Field-Induced Droplet Dispensing into Immiscible Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Um, Taewoong; Hong, Jiwoo; Im, Do Jin; Lee, Sang Joon; Kang, In Seok

    2016-01-01

    The dispensing of tiny droplets is a basic and crucial process in a myriad of applications, such as DNA/protein microarray, cell cultures, chemical synthesis of microparticles, and digital microfluidics. This work systematically demonstrates droplet dispensing into immiscible fluids through electric charge concentration (ECC) method. It exhibits three main modes (i.e., attaching, uniform, and bursting modes) as a function of flow rates, applied voltages, and gap distances between the nozzle and the oil surface. Through a conventional nozzle with diameter of a few millimeters, charged droplets with volumes ranging from a few μL to a few tens of nL can be uniformly dispensed into the oil chamber without reduction in nozzle size. Based on the features of the proposed method (e.g., formation of droplets with controllable polarity and amount of electric charge in water and oil system), a simple and straightforward method is developed for microparticle synthesis, including preparation of colloidosomes and fabrication of Janus microparticles with anisotropic internal structures. Finally, a combined system consisting of ECC-induced droplet dispensing and electrophoresis of charged droplet (ECD)-driven manipulation systems is constructed. This integrated platform will provide increased utility and flexibility in microfluidic applications because a charged droplet can be delivered toward the intended position by programmable electric control. PMID:27534580

  17. Surrogate Immiscible Liquid Solution Pairs with Refractive Indexes Matchable Over a Wide Range of Density and Viscosity Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saksena, Rajat; Christensen, Kenneth T.; Pearlstein, Arne J.

    2014-11-01

    Use of laser diagnostics in liquid-liquid flows is limited by refractive index mismatch. This can be avoided using a surrogate pair of immiscible index-matched liquids, with density and viscosity ratios matching those of the original liquid pair. We demonstrate that a wide range of density and viscosity ratios is accessible using aqueous solutions of 1,2-propanediol and CsBr (for which index, density, and viscosity are available), and solutions of light and heavy silicone oils and 1-bromooctane (for which we measured the same properties at 119 compositions). For each liquid phase, polynomials in the composition variables were fitted to index and density and to the logarithm of kinematic viscosity, and the fits were used to determine accessible density and viscosity ratios for each matchable index. Index-matched solution pairs can be prepared with density and viscosity ratios equal to those for water-liquid CO2 at 0oC over a range of pressure, and for water-crude oil and water-trichloroethylene, each over a range of temperature. For representative index-matched solutions, equilibration changes index, density, and viscosity only slightly, and chemical analysis show that no component of either solution has significant interphase solubility. Partially supported by Intl. Inst. for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research.

  18. Sol-Gel synthesis of MgO-SiO2 glass compositions having stable liquid-liquid immiscibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1987-01-01

    MgO-SiO2 glasses containing up to 15 mol % MgO, which could not have been prepared by the conventional glass melting method due to the presence of stable liquid-liquid immiscibility, were synthesized by the sol-gel technique. Clear and transparent gels were obtained from the hydrolysis and polycondensation of silicon tetraethoxide (TEOS) and magnesium nitrate hexahydrate when the water/TEOS mole ratio was four or more. The gelling time decreased with increase in magnesium content, water/TEOS ratio, and reaction temperature. Magnesium nitrate hexahydrate crystallized out of the gels containing 15 and 20 mol % MgO on slow drying. This problem was partially alleviated by drying the gels quickly at higher temperatures. Monolithic gel samples were prepared using glycerol as the drying control additive. The gels were subjected to various thermal treatments and characterized by several methods. No organic groups could be detected in the glasses after heat treatments to approx. 800 C, but trace amounts of hydroxyl groups were still present. No crystalline phase was found from X-ray diffraction in the gel samples to approx. 890 C. At higher temperatures, alpha quartz precipitated out as the crystalline phase in gels containing up to 10 mol % MgO. The overall activation energy for gel formation in 10MgO-90SiO2 (mol %) system for water/TEOS mole ratio of 7.5 was calculated to be 58.7 kJ/mol.

  19. Electrically Controllable Microparticle Synthesis and Digital Microfluidic Manipulation by Electric-Field-Induced Droplet Dispensing into Immiscible Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, Taewoong; Hong, Jiwoo; Kang, In Seok

    2016-11-01

    The dispensing of tiny droplets is a basic and crucial process in a myriad of applications, such as DNA/protein microarray, cell cultures, chemical synthesis of microparticles, and digital microfluidics. This work demonstrates the droplet dispensing into immiscible fluids through electric charge concentration (ECC) method. Three main modes (i.e., attaching, uniform and bursting modes) are exhibited as a function of flow rates, applied voltage and gap distance between the nozzle and the oil surface. Through a conventional nozzle with diameter of a few millimeters, charged droplets with volumes ranging from a few μL to a few tens of nL can be uniformly dispensed into the oil chamber without reduction in nozzle size. Based on the features of the proposed method (e.g., formation of droplets with controllable polarity and amount of electric charge in water and oil system), a simple and straightforward method is developed for microparticle synthesis, including preparation for colloidosomes and fabrication of Janus microparticles with anisotropic internal structures. Finally, a combined system consisting of ECC-induced droplet dispensing and electrophoresis of charged droplet (ECD)-driven manipulation systems is constructed. This work was supported by the BK21Plus Program for advanced education of creative chemical engineers of the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) Grant funded by the Korea government (MSIP).

  20. Effect of alpha-cyclodextrin on drug distribution studied by electrochemistry at interfaces between immiscible electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Deryabina, Maria A; Hansen, Steen H; Østergaard, Jesper; Jensen, Henrik

    2009-05-21

    The description and understanding of noncovalent interactions and distribution of potential new drug compounds in an organism is of paramount importance for the successful development of new drugs. In this work, a new procedure based on electrochemistry at the interface between two immiscible electrolyte solutions (ITIES) for addressing and discriminating between drug compound/ligand interactions in aqueous solution and nonspecific ligand effects on oil-water distribution behavior has been developed. The procedure is demonstrated using five drug compounds with different physical chemical parameters and alpha-cyclodextrin as the aqueous phase ligand. Alpha-cyclodextrin was chosen as an aqueous phase ligand, as it is frequently used in drug formulations to enhance solubility and bioavailability of drug compounds. Supplementary capillary electrophoresis experiments provided more detailed information on alpha-cyclodextrin drug complexation and, in combination with the electrochemical studies, provided information on solvation effects affecting the oil-water distribution of the drug compounds. The use of ligand shift ion partition diagrams for data presentation is a convenient format for the visualization of ligand effects on distribution behavior of related drug compounds.

  1. Gamma titanium aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, M.; Inui, H.; Kishida, K.; Matsumuro, M.; Shirai, Y.

    1995-08-01

    Extensive progress and improvements have been made in the science and technology of gamma titanium aluminide alloys within the last decade. In particular, the understanding of their microstructural characteristics and property/microstructure relationships has been substantially deepened. Based on these achievements, various engineering two-phase gamma alloys have been developed and their mechanical and chemical properties have been assessed. Aircraft and automotive industries arc pursuing their introduction for various structural components. At the same time, recent basic studies on the mechanical properties of two-phase gamma alloys, in particular with a controlled lamellar structure have provided a considerable amount of fundamental information on the deformation and fracture mechanisms of the two-phase gamma alloys. The results of such basic studies are incorporated in the recent alloy and microstructure design of two-phase gamma alloys. In this paper, such recent advances in the research and development of the two-phase gamma alloys and industrial involvement are summarized.

  2. Room temperature synthesis of Ni-based alloy nanoparticles by radiolysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Nenoff, Tina Maria; Berry, Donald T.; Lu, Ping; Leung, Kevin; Provencio, Paula Polyak; Stumpf, Roland Rudolph; Huang, Jian Yu; Zhang, Zhenyuan

    2009-09-01

    Room temperature radiolysis, density functional theory, and various nanoscale characterization methods were used to synthesize and fully describe Ni-based alloy nanoparticles (NPs) that were synthesized at room temperature. These complementary methods provide a strong basis in understanding and describing metastable phase regimes of alloy NPs whose reaction formation is determined by kinetic rather than thermodynamic reaction processes. Four series of NPs, (Ag-Ni, Pd-Ni, Co-Ni, and W-Ni) were analyzed and characterized by a variety of methods, including UV-vis, TEM/HRTEM, HAADF-STEM and EFTEM mapping. In the first focus of research, AgNi and PdNi were studied. Different ratios of Ag{sub x}- Ni{sub 1-x} alloy NPs and Pd{sub 0.5}- Ni{sub 0.5} alloy NP were prepared using a high dose rate from gamma irradiation. Images from high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) show that the Ag-Ni NPs are not core-shell structure but are homogeneous alloys in composition. Energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) maps show the homogeneity of the metals in each alloy NP. Of particular interest are the normally immiscible Ag-Ni NPs. All evidence confirmed that homogeneous Ag-Ni and Pd-Ni alloy NPs presented here were successfully synthesized by high dose rate radiolytic methodology. A mechanism is provided to explain the homogeneous formation of the alloy NPs. Furthermore, studies of Pd-Ni NPs by in situ TEM (with heated stage) shows the ability to sinter these NPs at temperatures below 800 C. In the second set of work, CoNi and WNi superalloy NPs were attempted at 50/50 concentration ratios using high dose rates from gamma irradiation. Preliminary results on synthesis and characterization have been completed and are presented. As with the earlier alloy NPs, no evidence of core-shell NP formation occurs. Microscopy results seem to indicate alloying occurred with the CoNi alloys. However, there appears to be incomplete reduction of the Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4} to form the W

  3. Weldability of High Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Maroef, I

    2003-01-22

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of silicon and iron on the weldability of HAYNES HR-160{reg_sign} alloy. HR-I60 alloy is a solid solution strengthened Ni-Co-Cr-Si alloy. The alloy is designed to resist corrosion in sulfidizing and other aggressive high temperature environments. Silicon is added ({approx}2.75%) to promote the formation of a protective oxide scale in environments with low oxygen activity. HR-160 alloy has found applications in waste incinerators, calciners, pulp and paper recovery boilers, coal gasification systems, and fluidized bed combustion systems. HR-160 alloy has been successfully used in a wide range of welded applications. However, the alloy can be susceptible to solidification cracking under conditions of severe restraint. A previous study by DuPont, et al. [1] showed that silicon promoted solidification cracking in the commercial alloy. In earlier work conducted at Haynes, and also from published work by DuPont et al., it was recognized that silicon segregates to the terminal liquid, creating low melting point liquid films on solidification grain boundaries. Solidification cracking has been encountered when using the alloy as a weld overlay on steel, and when joining HR-160 plate in a thickness greater than19 millimeters (0.75 inches) with matching filler metal. The effect of silicon on the weldability of HR-160 alloy has been well documented, but the effect of iron is not well understood. Prior experience at Haynes has indicated that iron may be detrimental to the solidification cracking resistance of the alloy. Iron does not segregate to the terminal solidification product in nickel-base alloys, as does silicon [2], but iron may have an indirect or interactive influence on weldability. A set of alloys covering a range of silicon and iron contents was prepared and characterized to better understand the welding metallurgy of HR-160 alloy.

  4. Advances in the engineering science of immiscible polymer blends: A powder route for delicate polymer precursors and a highly renewable polyamide/terephthalate blend system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giancola, Giorgiana

    Powder processing of thermoplastic polymer composites is an effective way to achieve a high level of component homogenization in raw blends prior to melt processing, thus reducing the thermal and shear stress on the components. Polymer blends can be prepared that would otherwise not be possible due to thermodynamic incompatibility. Evaluation of this concept was conducted by processing PMMA and HDPE micron sized powders which were characterized using DSC and rheology. Optical microscopy and SEM, showed that high-quality, fine domain sized blends can be made by the compression molding process. Silica marker spheres were used to qualitatively assess the level dispersive mixing. EDS chemical analysis was effective in providing image contrast between PMMA and HDPE based on the carbonyl and ester oxygen. EDS image maps, combined with secondary electron images show that compression molding of blended powder precursors produces composites of comparable homogeneity and domain size as extrusion processing. FTIR proved valuable when assessing the intimacy of the constituents at the interface of the immiscible domains. The formation of an in-situ, PMMA nano-network structure resulting from solvent extraction and redeposition using DMF was uniquely found on the surface of these immiscible polymer blends. This work has shown that powder processing of polymers is an effective means to melt processed fragile polymers to high quality blends. Recently, efforts towards the development of sustainable materials have evolved due in part to the increase in price and limited supply of crude oil. Immiscible polymer blending is a paradigm that enables synergistic material performance in certain instances where the composite properties are superior to the sum of the constituents. The addition of PA6,10 to PTT offers an opportunity to increase the bio-based content of PTT while simultaneously maintaining or improving mechanical properties. PA6,10 and PTT are immiscible polymers that can be

  5. Alloy 10: A 1300F Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2000-01-01

    Gas turbine engines for future subsonic transports will probably have higher pressure ratios which will require nickel-base superalloy disks with 13000 to 1400 F temperature capability. Several advanced disk alloys are being developed to fill this need. One of these, Allied Signal's Alloy 10, is a promising candidate for gas turbine engines to be used on smaller, regional aircraft. For this application, compressor/turbine disks must withstand temperatures of 1300 F for several hundred hours over the life of the engine. In this paper, three key properties of Alloy 10--tensile, 0.2% creep, and fatigue crack growth--will be assessed at 1300 F.

  6. Interfacial tension between immiscible melts in the system K2O - FeO - Fe2O3 - Al2O3 - SiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaehn, J.; Veksler, I. V.; Franz, G.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2009-12-01

    Interfacial tension is a very important parameter of the kinetics of phase nucleation, dissolution and growth. Excess surface energy contributes to the energy barrier for phase nucleation, and works as the main driving force for minimization of phase contact surfaces in heterogeneous systems. Immiscible silicate melts have been found to form in a broad range of basaltic, dacitic and rhyolitic magmas (Philpotts, 1982). However, liquid-liquid interfaces remain poorly studied in comparison with crystal-melt and vapor-melt interfaces. Here we present first experimental measurements of interfacial tension between synthetic Fe-rich and silica-rich immiscible melts composed of Fe oxides, K2O, alumina and silica. According to Naslund (1983), the miscibility gap in the 5-oxide system expands with increasing fO2 and becomes widest in air (fO2 = 0.2). Our goal was to estimate the maximal liquid-liquid interfacial tension for the immiscible liquids composed of silica and Fe oxides. Therefore, we have chosen the most contrasting liquid compositions that coexist in air at and above 1465 °C. Silica-rich and Fe-rich conjugate liquids at these conditions contain 73 and 17 wt. % SiO2, and 14 and 80 wt. % FeOt, respectively. These starting compositions were synthesized by fusion of reagent-grade oxides and K2CO3 at 1600 °C. In addition to interfacial tension, we have measured density and surface tension of individual coexisting liquids. All the measurements were done at 1500, 1527 and 1550 °C. Density was measured by the Archimedean method; surface and interfacial tensions were calculated from the maximal pool on a vertical cylinder (a 3-mm Pt rod attached to a high precision balance). We found interfacial tension between the immiscible liquids to decrease with increasing temperature from 16.4±2 mN/m at 1500 °C to 8.2±0.8 mN/m at 1550 °C. These values are approximately 2 orders of magnitude lower than typical interfacial tensions between silicate melts and crystals (Wanamaker

  7. Surface alloying of Mg alloys after surface nanocrystallization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming-Xing; Shi, Yi-Nong; Sun, Haiqing; Kelly, Patrick M

    2008-05-01

    Surface nanocrystallization using a surface mechanical attrition treatment effectively activates the surface of magnesium alloys due to the increase in grain boundary diffusion channels. As a result, the temperature of subsequent surface alloying treatment of pure Mg and AZ91 alloy can be reduced from 430 degrees C to 380 degrees C. Thus, it is possible to combine the surface alloying process with the solution treatment for this type of alloy. After surface alloying, the hardness of the alloyed layer is 3 to 4 times higher than that of the substrate and this may significantly improve the wear resistance of magnesium alloys.

  8. Catalyst Alloys Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xincai

    2014-10-01

    Catalysts are one of the key materials used for diamond formation at high pressures. Several such catalyst products have been developed and applied in China and around the world. The catalyst alloy most widely used in China is Ni70Mn25Co5 developed at Changsha Research Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. In this article, detailed techniques for manufacturing such a typical catalyst alloy will be reviewed. The characteristics of the alloy will be described. Detailed processing of the alloy will be presented, including remelting and casting, hot rolling, annealing, surface treatment, cold rolling, blanking, finishing, packaging, and waste treatment. An example use of the catalyst alloy will also be given. Industrial experience shows that for the catalyst alloy products, a vacuum induction remelt furnace can be used for remelting, a metal mold can be used for casting, hot and cold rolling can be used for forming, and acid pickling can be used for metal surface cleaning.

  9. Multiple (immiscible) melt phases of mafic composition in Chicxulub impact ejecta from northeastern Mexico: New constraints on target lithologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, P.; Stinnesbeck, W.; Kontny, A.; Stüben, D.; Kramar, U.; Harting, M.

    2002-12-01

    Proximal ejecta deposits in sections from NE Mexico (Rancho Nuevo, La Sierrita, El Peñon, El Mimbral) have been investigated by backscattered electron imaging, wave-length dispersive electron microprobe analyses, and cathodoluminiscence, in order to characterize target lithologies, and ejecta mixing, fractionation, and distribution mechanisms. Additional investigations included magnetic properties (Kontny et al, this meeting) and trace element analyses (Harting et al, this meeting). Petrological features of these ejecta deposits are extraordinarily well preserved. They consist of mm-cm sized vesiculated spherical to drop-shaped spherules and angular to filamentous (ejecta-) fragments, as well as carbonate clasts, marl clasts, and rare benthic foraminifera floating in a carbonaceous matrix. Occasionally, spherules and fragments show welding-amalgamation features and enclose other components, thus resulting in a foam-like texture. An origin from the Chicxulub impact is suggested by geographical proximity and morphologically similarity to spherules found in other K-T sites in North to Central America and the Atlantic. The far distribution of such coarse-grained, foamy, and fragile ejecta-clasts as well as welding features suggest ignimbrite-like transport mechanisms or nearby secondary impacts. Several silicic ejecta phases have been observed that occur as distinct phases, even within one ejecta particle with textures indicative of liquid immiscibility: (1) Fe- (25-35 wt%), Mg- (10-15 wt%) rich phases with <25 wt% SiO2, altered to chlorite, (2) K- (5-8 wt.%) and Al- (25-30 wt%) rich hydrated glass with 45-50 wt% SiO2, and (3) rare SiO2- (>60 wt%) rich andesitic glasses. In addition to these silicic phases, abundant carbonate characterizes all studied ejecta deposits. It occurs within spherules and fragments and as clasts and globules, and shows textures indicative of either liquid immiscibility and/or quenching (`feathery calcite'). Quenched carbonates are enriched

  10. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, David S.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Powell, Roger W.

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  11. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, D.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Powell, R.W.

    1985-02-07

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  12. Amorphous metal alloy

    DOEpatents

    Wang, R.; Merz, M.D.

    1980-04-09

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  13. PLUTONIUM-ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Schonfeld, F.W.; Waber, J.T.

    1960-08-30

    A series of nuclear reactor fuel alloys consisting of from about 5 to about 50 at.% zirconium (or higher zirconium alloys such as Zircaloy), balance plutonium, and having the structural composition of a plutonium are described. Zirconium is a satisfactory diluent because it alloys readily with plutonium and has desirable nuclear properties. Additional advantages are corrosion resistance, excellent fabrication propenties, an isotropie structure, and initial softness.

  14. Carbonate-silicate melt immiscibility, REE mineralising fluids, and the evolution of the Lofdal Intrusive Suite, Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodeving, Sarah; Williams-Jones, Anthony E.; Swinden, Scott

    2017-01-01

    The Lofdal Intrusive Suite, Namibia, consists of calcio-carbonatite and silica-undersaturated alkaline intrusive rocks ranging in composition from phono-tephrite to phonolite (and nepheline syenite). The most primitive of these rocks is the phono-tephrite, which, on the basis of its Y/Ho and Nb/Ta ratios, is interpreted to have formed by partial melting of the mantle. Roughly linear trends in major and trace element contents from phono-tephrite to phonolite and nepheline syenite indicate that the latter two rock types evolved from the phono-tephrite by fractional crystallisation. The nepheline syenite, however, has a lower rare earth element (REE) content than the phonolite. The carbonatite has a primitive mantle-normalised REE profile roughly parallel to that of the silica-undersaturated alkaline igneous rocks, although the absolute REE concentrations are higher. Like the phono-tephrite, it also has a mantle Y/Ho ratio. However, the Nb/Ta and Zr/Hf ratios are significantly higher. Moreover, the carbonatite displays strong negative Ta, Zr and Hf anomalies on spidergrams, whereas the silicate rocks display positive anomalies for these elements. Significantly, this behaviour is predicted by the corresponding carbonatite-silicate melt partition coefficients, as is the behaviour of the REE. Based on these observations, we interpret the carbonatite to represent an immiscible liquid that exsolved from the phono-tephrite or possibly the phonolite melt. The result was a calcio-carbonatite that is enriched in the heavy REE (HREE) relative to most other carbonatites. Fluids released from the corresponding magma are interpreted to have been the source of the REE mineralisation that is currently the target of exploration.

  15. Linear stability analysis of immiscible two-phase flow in porous media with capillary dispersion and density variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riaz, Amir; Tchelepi, Hamdi A.

    2004-12-01

    Linear stability analysis of immiscible displacements is carried out for both viscously and gravitationally unstable two-phase flows in porous media with very large adverse viscosity ratios. Capillary dispersion is the proper dissipative mechanism in this case which sets both the preferred length scale and the band width of the spectrum of unstable length scales. The growth rate, the most dangerous and the cutoff wavenumbers, all scale linearly with the capillary number. We show that the instability is governed by fluid properties across the shock rather than those across the full Buckley-Leverett profile. The shock total mobility ratio provides a sufficient condition for the onset of instability; however, it is not an appropriate criterion for predicting the magnitude of the growth rate, particularly for large viscosity ratios. The details of the relative permeability functions are observed to have a significant influence on the stability characteristics. For neutrally buoyant flows the maximum growth rate scales linearly with the viscosity ratio while the most dangerous and the cutoff wavenumbers scale with the square root of the viscosity ratio. In the case of displacements with density contrast, the maximum growth rate scales with the square of the unstable gravity number while the most dangerous and the cutoff wavenumbers scale with an exponent of 1.2, for all viscosity ratios. A marginal stability curve is computed for stable and unstable regions in the parameter space of the viscosity ratio and the gravity number. It is found that flows with unstable viscosity contrasts are more readily stabilized with buoyancy as compared to the viscous stabilization of gravitationally unstable flows.

  16. Surrogate immiscible liquid pairs with refractive indexes matchable over a wide range of density and viscosity ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saksena, Rajat; Christensen, Kenneth T.; Pearlstein, Arne J.

    2015-08-01

    In liquid-liquid flows, use of optical diagnostics is limited by interphase refractive index mismatch, which leads to optical distortion and complicates data interpretation, and sometimes also by opacity. Both problems can be eliminated using a surrogate pair of immiscible index-matched transparent liquids, whose density and viscosity ratios match corresponding ratios for the original liquid pair. We show that a wide range of density and viscosity ratios is accessible using aqueous solutions of 1,2-propanediol and CsBr (for which index, density, and viscosity are available), and solutions of light and heavy silicone oils and 1-bromooctane (for which we measured the same properties at 119 compositions). For each liquid phase, polynomials in the composition variables, least-squares fitted to index and density and to the logarithm of kinematic viscosity, were used to determine accessible density and viscosity ratios for each matchable index. Index-matched solution pairs can be prepared with density and viscosity ratios equal to those for water-liquid CO2 at 0 °C over a range of pressure (allowing water-liquid CO2 behavior at inconveniently high pressure to be simulated by 1-bar experiments), and for water-crude oil and water-trichloroethylene (avoiding opacity and toxicity problems, respectively), each over a range of temperature. For representative index-matched solutions, equilibration changes index, density, and viscosity only slightly, and mass spectrometry and elemental analysis show that no component of either phase has significant interphase solubility. Finally, procedures are described for iteratively reducing the residual index mismatch in surrogate solution pairs prepared on the basis of approximate polynomial fits to experimental data, and for systematically dealing with nonzero interphase solubility.

  17. NICKEL-BASE ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Inouye, H.; Manly, W.D.; Roche, T.K.

    1960-01-19

    A nickel-base alloy was developed which is particularly useful for the containment of molten fluoride salts in reactors. The alloy is resistant to both salt corrosion and oxidation and may be used at temperatures as high as 1800 deg F. Basically, the alloy consists of 15 to 22 wt.% molybdenum, a small amount of carbon, and 6 to 8 wt.% chromium, the balance being nickel. Up to 4 wt.% of tungsten, tantalum, vanadium, or niobium may be added to strengthen the alloy.

  18. Supersaturated Aluminum Alloy Powders.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-15

    shown in Fig. 18 . It .an be clearly seen that most of the iron is concentrated in the precipitates (Fig. 18 ), X-ray mapping immage for the chromium...At 232°C our alloys are comparable to 2� and 2618 in their tensile properties, and except for alloy #1 which at t i temperature has elongation of...demonstrate better yield strength and UTS than the 2219, 2618 and are comparable to the ALCOA alloy. They show however higher ductility than the ALCOA alloy

  19. Extreme creep resistance in a microstructurally stable nanocrystalline alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, K. A.; Rajagopalan, M.; Komarasamy, M.; Bhatia, M. A.; Hornbuckle, B. C.; Mishra, R. S.; Solanki, K. N.

    2016-09-01

    Nanocrystalline metals, with a mean grain size of less than 100 nanometres, have greater room-temperature strength than their coarse-grained equivalents, in part owing to a large reduction in grain size. However, this high strength generally comes with substantial losses in other mechanical properties, such as creep resistance, which limits their practical utility; for example, creep rates in nanocrystalline copper are about four orders of magnitude higher than those in typical coarse-grained copper. The degradation of creep resistance in nanocrystalline materials is in part due to an increase in the volume fraction of grain boundaries, which lack long-range crystalline order and lead to processes such as diffusional creep, sliding and rotation. Here we show that nanocrystalline copper-tantalum alloys possess an unprecedented combination of properties: high strength combined with extremely high-temperature creep resistance, while maintaining mechanical and thermal stability. Precursory work on this family of immiscible alloys has previously highlighted their thermo-mechanical stability and strength, which has motivated their study under more extreme conditions, such as creep. We find a steady-state creep rate of less than 10-6 per second—six to eight orders of magnitude lower than most nanocrystalline metals—at various temperatures between 0.5 and 0.64 times the melting temperature of the matrix (1,356 kelvin) under an applied stress ranging from 0.85 per cent to 1.2 per cent of the shear modulus. The unusual combination of properties in our nanocrystalline alloy is achieved via a processing route that creates distinct nanoclusters of atoms that pin grain boundaries within the alloy. This pinning improves the kinetic stability of the grains by increasing the energy barrier for grain-boundary sliding and rotation and by inhibiting grain coarsening, under extremely long-term creep conditions. Our processing approach should enable the development of

  20. Extreme creep resistance in a microstructurally stable nanocrystalline alloy.

    PubMed

    Darling, K A; Rajagopalan, M; Komarasamy, M; Bhatia, M A; Hornbuckle, B C; Mishra, R S; Solanki, K N

    2016-09-15

    Nanocrystalline metals, with a mean grain size of less than 100 nanometres, have greater room-temperature strength than their coarse-grained equivalents, in part owing to a large reduction in grain size. However, this high strength generally comes with substantial losses in other mechanical properties, such as creep resistance, which limits their practical utility; for example, creep rates in nanocrystalline copper are about four orders of magnitude higher than those in typical coarse-grained copper. The degradation of creep resistance in nanocrystalline materials is in part due to an increase in the volume fraction of grain boundaries, which lack long-range crystalline order and lead to processes such as diffusional creep, sliding and rotation. Here we show that nanocrystalline copper-tantalum alloys possess an unprecedented combination of properties: high strength combined with extremely high-temperature creep resistance, while maintaining mechanical and thermal stability. Precursory work on this family of immiscible alloys has previously highlighted their thermo-mechanical stability and strength, which has motivated their study under more extreme conditions, such as creep. We find a steady-state creep rate of less than 10(-6) per second-six to eight orders of magnitude lower than most nanocrystalline metals-at various temperatures between 0.5 and 0.64 times the melting temperature of the matrix (1,356 kelvin) under an applied stress ranging from 0.85 per cent to 1.2 per cent of the shear modulus. The unusual combination of properties in our nanocrystalline alloy is achieved via a processing route that creates distinct nanoclusters of atoms that pin grain boundaries within the alloy. This pinning improves the kinetic stability of the grains by increasing the energy barrier for grain-boundary sliding and rotation and by inhibiting grain coarsening, under extremely long-term creep conditions. Our processing approach should enable the development of

  1. Immiscibility between calciocarbonatitic and silicate melts and related wall rock reactions in the upper mantle: a natural case study from Romanian mantle xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalot-Prat, Françoise; Arnold, Michel

    1999-04-01

    This paper presents the textural, mineralogical and chemical study of veinlets cross-cutting peridotite xenoliths from the lithospheric mantle and brought to the surface by alkaline basalts (Persani Mountains, Romania). The veinlets utilized pre-existing zones of weakness in the host rocks or display a random distribution, lining grain boundaries or cross-cutting any mineral, and always forming an interconnected network. They are filled with carbonate patches included in a silicate matrix. Both products are holocrystalline. Carbonate products have alkali-poor calciocarbonatitic to sövitic compositions, while the silicate matrix composition ranges from monzodioritic to monzonitic and alkali feldspar syenitic, depending on the host-sample, i.e., within a rather alkaline silica-saturated series. The mineral phases present in the silicate matrix (F-apatite, armalcolite, chromite, diopside-enstatite series, plagioclase-sanidine series) are usually present in the carbonate zones, where forsterite is also found. Some minerals cross-cut the interface between both types of zones. Only the matrix is different, feldspathic (oligoclase to sanidine) in the former and pure calcite in the latter. Thus, mineralogical and textural relationships between both products are consistent with an origin with equilibrium liquid immiscibility. Mantle minerals cross-cut by veinlets are sometimes resorbed at grain boundaries, and at the contact of the most alkaline silicate and carbonate melts, subhedral diopside/augite formed at the expense of mantle enstatite or olivine. In terms of mineral chemistry, the compositional variations recorded by vein minerals vary along a continuous trend. They generally superpose to those observed from lherzolites to harzburgites, and exhibit the same range of composition as that observed between rims and cores of mantle minerals cross-cut by veinlets. In detail, the Ca-rich pyroxenes of veinlets are Al-poor and Mg-rich; cpx in the carbonate zones are slightly

  2. The use of rheology to elucidate the granulation mechanisms of a miscible and immiscible system during continuous twin-screw melt granulation.

    PubMed

    Monteyne, Tinne; Heeze, Liza; Mortier, Séverine Thérèse F C; Oldörp, Klaus; Nopens, Ingmar; Remon, Jean-Paul; Vervaet, Chris; De Beer, Thomas

    2016-08-20

    Twin-screw hot melt granulation (TS HMG) is a valuable, but still unexplored alternative to granulate temperature and moisture sensitive drugs in a continuous way. Recently, the material behavior of an immiscible drug-binder blend during TS HMG was unraveled by using a rheometer and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Additionally, vibrational spectroscopic techniques proved the link between TS HMG and rheology since equal interactions at molecular level did occur in both processes. This allowed to use a rheometer to gain knowledge of the material behavior during hot melt processing of an immiscible drug-binder blend. However, miscibility of a drug-binder formulation and drug-binder interactions appear to influence the rheological properties and, hence conceivably also the granulation mechanism. The aim of this research was to examine if the TS HMG process of a miscible formulation system is comparable with the mechanism of an immiscible system and to evaluate whether rheology still serves as a useful tool to understand and optimize the hot melt granulation (HMG) process. The executed research (thermal analysis, rheological parameters and spectroscopic data) demonstrated the occurrence of a high and broad tan(δ) curve without a loss peak during the rheological temperature ramp which implies a higher material deformability without movement of the softened single polymer chains. Spectroscopic analysis revealed drug-polymer interactions which constrain the polymer to flow independently. As a result, the binder distribution step, which generally follows the immersion step, was hindered. This insight assisted the understanding of the granule properties. Inhomogeneous granules were produced due to large initial nuclei or adhesion of multiple smaller nuclei. Consequently, a higher granulation temperature was required in order to get the binder more homogeneously distributed within the granules.

  3. Copper-tantalum alloy

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1986-07-15

    A tantalum-copper alloy can be made by preparing a consumable electrode consisting of an elongated copper billet containing at least two spaced apart tantalum rods extending longitudinally the length of the billet. The electrode is placed in a dc arc furnace and melted under conditions which co-melt the copper and tantalum to form the alloy.

  4. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, W.V.

    1983-04-19

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as sources of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  5. Neutron Absorbing Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Shaber, Eric L.; DuPont, John N.; Robino, Charles V.; Williams, David B.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is drawn to new classes of advanced neutron absorbing structural materials for use in spent nuclear fuel applications requiring structural strength, weldability, and long term corrosion resistance. Particularly, an austenitic stainless steel alloy containing gadolinium and less than 5% of a ferrite content is disclosed. Additionally, a nickel-based alloy containing gadolinium and greater than 50% nickel is also disclosed.

  6. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David S.; Scott, Darwin H.

    1985-01-01

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cs are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  7. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, D.S.; Scott, D.H.

    1984-09-28

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cells are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  8. PLUTONIUM-CERIUM ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-01-01

    An alloy is presented for use as a reactor fuel. The binary alloy consists essentially of from about 5 to 90 atomic per cent cerium and the balance being plutonium. A complete phase diagram for the cerium--plutonium system is given.

  9. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Conner, William V.

    1983-01-01

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as sources of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  10. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Conner, W.V.

    1981-10-09

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as souces of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  11. Cesium iodide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Kim, H.E.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1992-12-15

    A transparent, strong CsI alloy is described having additions of monovalent iodides. Although the preferred iodide is AgI, RbI and CuI additions also contribute to an improved polycrystalline CsI alloy with outstanding multispectral infrared transmittance properties. 6 figs.

  12. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of the flow of binary immiscible fluids with different viscosities using the Shan-Chen microscopic interaction model.

    PubMed

    Chin, Jonathan; Boek, Edo S; Coveney, Peter V

    2002-03-15

    We present a lattice Boltzmann study of the flow of a binary fluid where the fluid components have different viscosities. For this purpose, a microscopic interaction model (due to Shan & Chen) is used. The model is validated for Poiseuille flow of layered immiscible binary fluids and the dispersion of a capillary wave. We then study the unstable displacement of a viscous fluid by a less viscous fluid in a two-dimensional channel. Although a finger-like structure was observed in many simulations, it is not clear if this structure was produced due to viscous fingering or due to other effects.

  13. Partitioning of Nb, Mo, Ba, Ce, Pb, Th and U between immiscible carbonate and silicate liquids: Evaluating the effects of P2O5,F, and carbonate composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.; Walker, D.

    1993-01-01

    Previously we have reported carbonate liq./silicate liq. partition coefficients (D) for a standard suite of trace elements (Nb, Mo, Ba, Ce, Pb, Th, and U) and Ra and Pa as well. In brief, we have found that immiscible liquid partitioning is a strong function of temperature. As the critical temperature of the carbonate-silicate solvus is approached, all partition coefficients approach unity. Additionally, for the overwhelming majority of the partitioning elements, InD is a linear function of 'ionic field strength,' z/r, where z is the charge of the partitioned cation and r is its ionic radius.

  14. Alloys in energy development

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, B.R.T.

    1984-02-01

    The development of new and advanced energy systems often requires the tailoring of new alloys or alloy combinations to meet the novel and often stringent requirements of those systems. Longer life at higher temperatures and stresses in aggressive environments is the most common goal. Alloy theory helps in achieving this goal by suggesting uses of multiphase systems and intermediate phases, where solid solutions were traditionally used. However, the use of materials under non-equilibrium conditions is now quite common - as with rapidly solidified metals - and the application of alloy theory must be modified accordingly. Under certain conditions, as in a reactor core, the rate of approach to equilibrium will be modified; sometimes a quasi-equilibrium is established. Thus an alloy may exhibit enhanced general diffusion at the same time as precipitate particles are being dispersed and solute atoms are being carried to vacancy sinks. We are approaching an understanding of these processes and can begin to model these complex systems.

  15. Ultrahigh temperature intermetallic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, M.P.; Zhu, J.H.; Liu, C.T.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Wright, J.L.; Carmichael, C.A.; Walker, L.R.

    1997-12-01

    A new family of Cr-Cr{sub 2}X based alloys with fabricability, mechanical properties, and oxidation resistance superior to previously developed Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb and Cr-Cr{sub 2}Zr based alloys has been identified. The new alloys can be arc-melted/cast without cracking, and exhibit excellent room temperature and high-temperature tensile strengths. Preliminary evaluation of oxidation behavior at 1100 C in air indicates that the new Cr-Cr{sub 2}X based alloys form an adherent chromia-based scale. Under similar conditions, Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb and Cr-Cr{sub 2}Zr based alloys suffer from extensive scale spallation.

  16. Characteristic-based and interface-sharpening algorithm for high-order simulations of immiscible compressible multi-material flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhiwei; Tian, Baolin; Zhang, Yousheng; Gao, Fujie

    2017-03-01

    The present work focuses on the simulation of immiscible compressible multi-material flows with the Mie-Grüneisen-type equation of state governed by the non-conservative five-equation model [1]. Although low-order single fluid schemes have already been adopted to provide some feasible results, the application of high-order schemes (introducing relatively small numerical dissipation) to these flows may lead to results with severe numerical oscillations. Consequently, attempts to apply any interface-sharpening techniques to stop the progressively more severe smearing interfaces for a longer simulation time may result in an overshoot increase and in some cases convergence to a non-physical solution occurs. This study proposes a characteristic-based interface-sharpening algorithm for performing high-order simulations of such flows by deriving a pressure-equilibrium-consistent intermediate state (augmented with approximations of pressure derivatives) for local characteristic variable reconstruction and constructing a general framework for interface sharpening. First, by imposing a weak form of the jump condition for the non-conservative five-equation model, we analytically derive an intermediate state with pressure derivatives treated as additional parameters of the linearization procedure. Based on this intermediate state, any well-established high-order reconstruction technique can be employed to provide the state at each cell edge. Second, by designing another state with only different reconstructed values of the interface function at each cell edge, the advection term in the equation of the interface function is discretized twice using any common algorithm. The difference between the two discretizations is employed consistently for interface compression, yielding a general framework for interface sharpening. Coupled with the fifth-order improved accurate monotonicity-preserving scheme [2] for local characteristic variable reconstruction and the tangent of hyperbola

  17. ASSESSMENT OF THE ABILITY OF STANDARD SLURRY PUMPS TO MIX MISCIBLE AND IMMISCIBLE LIQUIDS IN TANK 50H

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.

    2011-06-15

    Tank 50H is the feed tank for the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). At present, Tank 50H contains two standard slurry pumps and two Quad Volute slurry pumps. Current requirements and mixing operation is to run three pumps for one hour prior to initiating a feed transfer to SPF. Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste would like to move one or both of the Quad Volute pumps from Tank 50H to Tank 51H to replace pumps in Tank 51H that are failing. In addition, one of the standard pumps in Tank 50H exhibits high seal leakage and vibration. SRS Liquid Waste requested Savannah River National (SRNL) to conduct a study to evaluate the feasibility of mixing the contents of Tank 50H with one to three standard slurry pumps. To determine the pump requirements to blend miscible and immiscible liquids in Tank 50H, the author reviewed the pilot-scale blending work performed for the Salt Disposition Integration Project (SDIP) and the technical literature, and applied the results to Tank 50H to determine the number, size, and operating parameters needed to blend the tank contents. The conclusions from this analysis are: (1) A single rotating standard slurry pump (with a 13.6 ft{sup 2}/s U{sub 0}D) will be able to blend miscible liquids (i.e., salt solution) in Tank 50H within 4.4 hours. (2) Two rotating standard slurry pumps will be able to blend miscible liquids in Tank 50H within 3.1 hours. (3) Three rotating standard slurry pumps will be able to blend miscible liquids in Tank 50H within 2.5 hours. (4) A single rotating standard slurry pump (with a 13.6 ft{sup 2}/s U{sub 0}D) will disperse Isopar L{reg_sign} droplets that are less than or equal to 15 micron in diameter. If the droplets are less than 15 micron, they will be dispersed within 4.4 hours. Isopar L{reg_sign} provides a lower bound on the maximum size of droplets that will be dispersed by the slurry pumps in Tank 50H. (5) Two rotating standard slurry pumps will disperse Isopar L{reg_sign} droplets less than 15 micron

  18. THORIUM-SILICON-BERYLLIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Foote, F.G.

    1959-02-10

    Th, Si, anol Bt alloys where Be and Si are each present in anmounts between 0.1 and 3.5% by weight and the total weight per cent of the minor alloying elements is between 1.5 and 4.5% are discussed. These ternary alloys show increased hardness and greater resistant to aqueous corrosion than is found in pure Th, Th-Si alloys, or Th-Be alloys.

  19. Multiscale level-set method for accurate modeling of immiscible two-phase flow with deposited thin films on solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Al-Saud, Moataz O.; Riaz, Amir; Tchelepi, Hamdi A.

    2017-03-01

    We developed a multiscale sharp-interface level-set method for immiscible two-phase flow with a pre-existing thin film on solid surfaces. The lubrication approximation theory is used to model the thin-film equation efficiently. The incompressible Navier-Stokes, level-set, and thin-film evolution equations are coupled sequentially to capture the dynamics occurring at multiple length scales. The Hamilton-Jacobi level-set reinitialization is employed to construct the signed-distance function, which takes into account the deposited thin-film on the solid surface. The proposed multiscale method is validated and shown to match the augmented Young-Laplace equation for a static meniscus in a capillary tube. Viscous bending of the advancing interface over the precursor film is captured by the proposed level-set method and agrees with the Cox-Voinov theory. The advancing bubble surrounded by a wetting film inside a capillary tube is considered, and the predicted film thickness compares well with both theory and experiments. We also demonstrate that the multiscale level-set approach can model immiscible two-phase flow with a capillary number as low as 10-6.

  20. A note on the visualization of wetting film structures and a nonwetting immiscible fluid in a pore network micromodel using a solvatochromic dye

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; Zhang, Changyong; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Warner, Marvin G.; Anheier, Norman C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Orr, Galya; Oostrom, Martinus

    2010-11-23

    Nile Red is demonstrated as a single dye whose solvatochromism enables selective visualization of two immiscible liquid fluids in a micromodel containing a homogeneous array of pillars creating a porous network. Nile Red dissolves in and partitions between hexadecane as a nonwetting fluid and PEG200 as a hydrophilic fluid that wets the silicon oxide surfaces in the micromodel. Both the absorption spectra and fluorescence emission spectra are sensitive to the solvent environment, such that the two phases can be distinguished by the observed color or the fluorescence emission band. Bright field, hyperspectral, epifluorescence, and confocal fluorescence methods were used to image the micromodel after displacing PEG200 in the model with hexadecane. The use of Nile Red with these imaging methods facilitates visualization of phase identity at specific locations; the interfaces between the two immiscible liquid phases; wetting behavior of the wetting phase within the porous structure; and retention of the wetting phase as thin films around pillars and as bridges across the pore throats. The pillars and wetting phase bridges create a network of obstacles defining a tortuous preferential flow path for the nonwetting phase.

  1. Magnesium silicide intermetallic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gh.; Gill, H. S.; Varin, R. A.

    1993-11-01

    Methods of induction melting an ultra-low-density magnesium silicide (Mg2Si) intermetallic and its alloys and the resulting microstructure and microhardness were studied. The highest quality ingots of Mg2Si alloys were obtained by triple melting in a graphite crucible coated with boron nitride to eliminate reactivity, under overpressure of high-purity argon (1.3 X 105 Pa), at a temperature close to but not exceeding 1105 °C ± 5 °C to avoid excessive evaporation of Mg. After establishing the proper induction-melting conditions, the Mg-Si binary alloys and several Mg2Si alloys macroalloyed with 1 at. pct of Al, Ni, Co, Cu, Ag, Zn, Mn, Cr, and Fe were induction melted and, after solidification, investigated by optical microscopy and quantitative X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Both the Mg-rich and Si-rich eutectic in the binary alloys exhibited a small but systematic increase in the Si content as the overall composition of the binary alloy moved closer toward the Mg2Si line compound. The Vickers microhardness (VHN) of the as-solidified Mg-rich and Si-rich eutectics in the Mg-Si binary alloys decreased with increasing Mg (decreasing Si) content in the eutectic. This behavior persisted even after annealing for 75 hours at 0.89 pct of the respective eutectic temperature. The Mg-rich eutectic in the Mg2Si + Al, Ni, Co, Cu, Ag, and Zn alloys contained sections exhibiting a different optical contrast and chemical composition than the rest of the eutectic. Some particles dispersed in the Mg2Si matrix were found in the Mg2Si + Cr, Mn, and Fe alloys. The EDS results are presented and discussed and compared with the VHN data.

  2. The role of liquid-liquid immiscibility and crystal fractionation in the genesis of carbonatite magmas: insights from Kerimasi melt inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmics, Tibor; Zajacz, Zoltán; Mitchell, Roger H.; Szabó, Csaba; Wälle, Markus

    2015-02-01

    We have reconstructed the compositional evolution of the silicate and carbonate melt, and various crystalline phases in the subvolcanic reservoir of Kerimasi Volcano in the East African Rift. Trace element concentrations of silicate and carbonate melt inclusions trapped in nepheline, apatite and magnetite from plutonic afrikandite (clinopyroxene-nepheline-perovskite-magnetite-melilite rock) and calciocarbonatite (calcite-apatite-magnetite-perovskite-monticellite-phlogopite rock) show that liquid immiscibility occurred during the generation of carbonatite magmas from a CO2-rich melilite-nephelinite magma formed at relatively high temperatures (1,100 °C). This carbonatite magma is notably more calcic and less alkaline than that occurring at Oldoinyo Lengai. The CaO-rich (32-41 wt%) nature and alkali-"poor" (at least 7-10 wt% Na2O + K2O) nature of these high-temperature (>1,000 °C) carbonate melts result from strong partitioning of Ca (relative to Mg, Fe and Mn) in the immiscible carbonate and the CaO-rich nature (12-17 wt%) of its silicate parent (e.g., melilite-nephelinite). Evolution of the Kerimasi carbonate magma can result in the formation of natrocarbonatite melts with similar composition to those of Oldoinyo Lengai, but with pronounced depletion in REE and HFSE elements. We suggest that this compositional difference results from the different initial parental magmas, e.g., melilite-nephelinite at Kerimasi and a nephelinite at Oldoinyo Lengai. The difference in parental magma composition led to a significant difference in the fractionating mineral phase assemblage and the element partitioning systematics upon silicate-carbonate melt immiscibility. LA-ICP-MS analysis of coeval silicate and carbonate melt inclusions provides an opportunity to infer carbonate melt/silicate melt partition coefficients for a wide range of elements. These data show that Li, Na, Pb, Ca, Sr, Ba, B, all REE (except Sc), U, V, Nb, Ta, P, Mo, W and S are partitioned into the carbonate

  3. TUNGSTEN BASE ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Schell, D.H.; Sheinberg, H.

    1959-12-15

    A high-density quaternary tungsten-base alloy having high mechanical strength and good machinability composed of about 2 wt.% Ni, 3 wt.% Cu, 5 wt.% Pb, and 90wt.% W is described. This alloy can be formed by the powder metallurgy technique of hot pressing in a graphite die without causing a reaction between charge and the die and without formation of a carbide case on the final compact, thereby enabling re-use of the graphite die. The alloy is formable at hot- pressing temperatures of from about 1200 to about 1350 deg C. In addition, there is little component shrinkage, thereby eliminating the necessity of subsequent extensive surface machining.

  4. Electrical Resistivity of Ten Selected Binary Alloy Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    alloys --* Aluminum Alloys --*Copper alloys --*Gold alloys --*Nickel Alloys --*Silver alloys --*Iron alloys --*Palladium alloys ... aluminum -magnesium, and copper-zinc) are given for 27 compositions: 0 (pure element).* For aluminum -copper, aluninu.-eagnes tur, end copper-zinc alloy ...available data and infor- mation. The ten binary alloy systems selected are the systems of aluminum - copper, aluminum -magnesium, copper-gold,

  5. Electroplating on titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Activation process forms adherent electrodeposits of copper, nickel, and chromium on titanium alloy. Good adhesion of electroplated deposits is obtained by using acetic-hydrofluoric acid anodic activation process.

  6. Alloy Selection System

    SciTech Connect

    2001-02-01

    Software will Predict Corrosion Rates to Improve Productivity in the Chemical Industry. Many aspects of equipment design and operation are influenced by the choice of the alloys used to fabricate process equipment.

  7. Semiconductor Alloy Theory.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-14

    ftoc*o~ow7 and Idenify’ by block nam. bor) Electron mobility , Lattice Relaxation, Bond Length, Bond Energy, Mixing Enthalpies, Band Structure, Core...including: (1) generalization of Brooks’ formula for alloy-scattering limited electron mobility to including multiple bands and indirect gaps, (2...calculation of SiGe alloys band structure, electron mobility and core-exciton binding energy and • :linewidth, (3) comprehensive calculation of bond

  8. PLUTONIUM-URANIUM ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.; Schonfeld, F.W.

    1959-09-01

    Pu-U-Fe and Pu-U-Co alloys suitable for use as fuel elements tn fast breeder reactors are described. The advantages of these alloys are ease of fabrication without microcracks, good corrosion restatance, and good resistance to radiation damage. These advantages are secured by limitation of the zeta phase of plutonium in favor of a tetragonal crystal structure of the U/sub 6/Mn type.

  9. Ultrahigh temperature intermetallic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, M.P.; Zhu, J.H.; Liu, C.T.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Wright, J.L.; Carmichael, C.A.

    1998-11-01

    A new family of Cr-Cr{sub 2}Ta intermetallic alloys based on Cr-(6--10)Ta (at.%) is under development for structural use in oxidizing environments in the 1,000-1,300 C (1,832--2,372 F) temperature range. Development objectives relate to high temperature strength and oxidation resistance and room temperature fracture toughness. The 1,200 C (2,192 F) strength goals have been met: yield and fracture strengths of 275 MPa (40 ksi) and 345 MPa (50 ksi), respectively, were achieved. Progress in attaining reasonable fracture toughness of Cr-Cr{sub 2}Ta alloys has been made; current alloys exhibit room-temperature values of about 10--12 MPa{radical}m (1.1 MPa{radical}m = 1 ksi{radical}in.). Oxidation rates of these alloys at 950 C (1,742 F) in air are in the range of those reported for chromia-forming alloys. At 1,100 C (2,012 F) in air, chromia volatility was significant but, nevertheless, no scale spallation and positive weight gains of 1--5 mg/cm{sup 2} have been observed during 120-h, 6-cycle oxidation screening tests. These mechanical and oxidative properties represent substantial improvement over Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb and Cr-Cr{sub 2}Zr alloys previously developed.

  10. Palladium alloys for biomedical devices.

    PubMed

    Wataha, John C; Shor, Kavita

    2010-07-01

    In the biomedical field, palladium has primarily been used as a component of alloys for dental prostheses. However, recent research has shown the utility of palladium alloys for devices such as vascular stents that do not distort magnetic resonance images. Dental palladium alloys may contain minor or major percentages of palladium. As a minor constituent, palladium hardens, strengthens and increases the melting range of alloys. Alloys that contain palladium as the major component also contain copper, gallium and sometimes tin to produce strong alloys with high stiffness and relatively low corrosion rates. All current evidence suggests that palladium alloys are safe, despite fears about harmful effects of low-level corrosion products during biomedical use. Recent evidence suggests that palladium poses fewer biological risks than other elements, such as nickel or silver. Hypersensitivity to palladium alone is rare, but accompanies nickel hypersensitivity 90-100% of the time. The unstable price of palladium continues to influence the use of palladium alloys in biomedicine.

  11. Hot Microfissuring in Nickel Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. G.; Nunes, A.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments in intergranular cracking of nickel alloy near solidus temperature discussed in contractor report. Purpose of investigation development of schedule for welding, casting, forging, or other processing of alloy without causing microfissuring.

  12. Rapid isolation and purification of 1-cyano-2-hydroxy-3-butene (crambene) from Crambe abyssinica seed meal using immiscible solvent extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Niedoborski, T E; Klein, B P; Wallig, M A

    2001-08-01

    1-Cyano-2-hydroxy-3-butene (crambene) is a nitrile found in cruciferous vegetables that causes significant upregulation of quinone reductase and glutathione S-transferases in vivo and in vitro, making it a likely candidate as a cancer chemopreventive compound. To investigate further the putative anticarcinogenic mechanisms of crambene, a compound of the highest possible purity is vital. Therefore, a rapid and effective method of purification of crambene is necessary to continue studies of its beneficial health effects. A rapid method to isolate and purify natural crambene from either Crambe abyssinica (crambe) seed or commercially processed crambe seed meal was developed using immiscible solvent extraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Use of this methodology eliminated the need for time-consuming and relatively inefficient column chromatography, improved extraction efficiency, and resulted in higher purity than previously used methodologies. Elimination of trace amounts of fatty acid residues, unachievable with previous methodologies, also was accomplished.

  13. Radiation effects on the immiscible polymer blend of nylon1010 and high-impact strength polystyrene (II): mechanical properties and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wenfei; Chen, Guangxin; Zhang, Wanxi

    2001-03-01

    The paper studies the morphology and mechanical properties of immiscible binary blends of the nylon 1010 and HIPS through the radiation crosslinking method. In this blend, the HIPS particles were the dispersed phases in the nylon1010 matrix. With increasing of dose, the elastic modulus increased. However, the tensile strength, elongation at break and the energy of fracture increased to a maximum at a dose of 0.34 MGy, then reduced with the increasing of dose. SEM photographs show that the hole sizes are not changed obviously at low dose and at high dose, remnants that cannot be dissolved in formic acid and THF can be observed in the holes and on the surface. TEM photographs showed that radiation destroys the rubber phases in the polymer blend.

  14. Liquid-liquid phase separation of freely falling undercooled ternary Fe-Cu-Sn alloy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, W .L.; Wu, Y. H.; Li, L. H.; Zhai, W.; Zhang, X. M.; Wei, B.

    2015-01-01

    The active modulation and control of the liquid phase separation for high-temperature metallic systems are still challenging the development of advanced immiscible alloys. Here we present an attempt to manipulate the dynamic process of liquid-liquid phase separation for ternary Fe47.5Cu47.5Sn5 alloy. It was firstly dispersed into numerous droplets with 66 ~ 810 μm diameters and then highly undercooled and rapidly solidified under the containerless microgravity condition inside drop tube. 3-D phase field simulation was performed to explore the kinetic evolution of liquid phase separation. Through regulating the combined effects of undercooling level, phase separation time and Marangoni migration, three types of separation patterns were yielded: monotectic cell, core shell and dispersive structures. The two-layer core-shell morphology proved to be the most stable separation configuration owing to its lowest chemical potential. Whereas the monotectic cell and dispersive microstructures were both thermodynamically metastable transition states because of their highly active energy. The Sn solute partition profiles of Fe-rich core and Cu-rich shell in core-shell structures varied only slightly with cooling rate. PMID:26552711

  15. Liquid-liquid phase separation of freely falling undercooled ternary Fe-Cu-Sn alloy.

    PubMed

    Wang, W L; Wu, Y H; Li, L H; Zhai, W; Zhang, X M; Wei, B

    2015-11-10

    The active modulation and control of the liquid phase separation for high-temperature metallic systems are still challenging the development of advanced immiscible alloys. Here we present an attempt to manipulate the dynamic process of liquid-liquid phase separation for ternary Fe47.5Cu47.5Sn5 alloy. It was firstly dispersed into numerous droplets with 66 ~ 810 μm diameters and then highly undercooled and rapidly solidified under the containerless microgravity condition inside drop tube. 3-D phase field simulation was performed to explore the kinetic evolution of liquid phase separation. Through regulating the combined effects of undercooling level, phase separation time and Marangoni migration, three types of separation patterns were yielded: monotectic cell, core shell and dispersive structures. The two-layer core-shell morphology proved to be the most stable separation configuration owing to its lowest chemical potential. Whereas the monotectic cell and dispersive microstructures were both thermodynamically metastable transition states because of their highly active energy. The Sn solute partition profiles of Fe-rich core and Cu-rich shell in core-shell structures varied only slightly with cooling rate.

  16. Selective dissolution in binary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, Carol Rene

    Corrosion is an important issue in the design of engineering alloys. De-alloying is an aspect of alloy corrosion related to the selective dissolution of one or more of the components in an alloy. The work reported herein focuses on the topic of de-alloying specific to single-phase binary noble metal alloy systems. The alloy systems investigated were gold-silver and gold-copper. The onset of a bulk selective dissolution process is typically marked by a critical potential whereby the more reactive component in the alloy begins dissolving from the bulk, leading to the formation of a bi-continuous solid-void morphology. The critical potential was investigated for the entire composition range of gold-silver alloys. The results presented herein include the formulation of an expression for critical potential as a function of both alloy and electrolyte composition. Results of the first investigation of underpotential deposition (UPD) on alloys are also presented herein. These results were implemented as an analytical tool to provide quantitative measurements of the surface evolution of gold during de-alloying. The region below the critical potential was investigated in terms of the compositional evolution of the alloy surface. Below the critical potential, there is a competition between the dissolution of the more reactive alloying constituent (either silver or copper) and surface diffusion of gold that serves to cover dissolution sites and prevent bulk dissolution. By holding the potential at a prescribed value below the critical potential, a time-dependent gold enrichment occurs on the alloy surface leading to passivation. A theoretical model was developed to predict the surface enrichment of gold based on the assumption of layer-by-layer dissolution of the more reactive alloy constituent. The UPD measurements were used to measure the time-dependent surface gold concentration and the results agreed with the predictions of the theoretical model.

  17. Immiscible separation of metalliferous Fe/ Ti-oxide melts from fractionating alkali basalt: P-T-fO2 conditions and two-liquid elemental partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurai, Vratislav; Simon, Klaus; Wiechert, Uwe; Hoefs, Jochen; Konečný, Patrik; Huraiová, Monika; Pironon, Jacques; Lipka, Jozef

    Globules of iron-dominated (59-69 wt% FeOtot) and titanium-dominated (43.5 wt% TiO2) oxide melts have been detected in igneous xenoliths from Pliocene-to-Pleistocene alkali basalts of the Western Carpathians. Fluid inclusion and mineral composition data indicate immiscible separation of the high-iron-oxide melt (HIM) at magmatic temperatures. The HIM separation occurred during clinopyroxene (augite) accumulation in an alkali trachybasalt and continued during crystallization of amphibole (kaersutite) and K-feldspar (anorthoclase), the latter coexisting with trachyte and alkalic rhyolite residual melts. Some HIM was also expelled from sub-alkalic rhyolite (70-77% SiO2), coexisting with An27-45 plagioclase and quartz in granitic (tonalite-trondhjemite) xenoliths. Oxygen fugacities during HIM separation range from -1.4to +0.6log units around the QFM buffer. A close genetic relationship between HIM-hosted xenoliths and mantle-derived basaltic magma is documented by mineral 18O values ranging from 4.9 to 5.9‰ V-SMOW. δD values of gabbroic kaersutite between -61 and -86‰ V-SMOW are in agreement with a presumed primary magmatic water source. Most trace elements, except Li, Rb and Cs, have preferentially partitioned into the HIM. The HIM/Si-melt partition coefficients for transition elements (Sc, V, Cr, Co, Ni) and base metals (Zn, Cu, Mo) are between 2-160, resulting in extreme enrichment in the HIM. La and Ce also concentrate in the silicic melt, whereas Tb-Tm in the HIM. Hence, the immiscible separation causes REE fractionation and produces residual silicic melt enriched in LREE and depleted in HREE. The weak fractionation among Tb-Tm and Yb, Lu can be attributed to recurrent extraction of the HIM from the magmatic system, while flat HREE chondrite-normalized patterns are interpreted to indicate no or little loss of the HIM.

  18. Tissue Response to Base-Metal Dental Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    RESPONSE(BIOLOGY), *CASTING ALLOYS, *BASE METAL, * DENTAL PROSTHESES, TISSUES(BIOLOGY), COMPATIBILITY, NICKEL ALLOYS, BERYLLIUM, DENTISTRY, CANCER, HISTOLOGY, DENTAL IMPLANTOLOGY , COBALT ALLOYS, CHROMIUM ALLOYS.

  19. Finding the Alloy Genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Gus L. W.; Nelson, Lance J.; Zhou, Fei; Ozolins, Vidvuds

    2012-10-01

    First-principles codes can nowadays provide hundreds of high-fidelity enthalpies on thousands of alloy systems with a modest investment of a few tens of millions of CPU hours. But a mere database of enthalpies provides only the starting point for uncovering the ``alloy genome.'' What one needs to fundamentally change alloy discovery and design are complete searches over candidate structures (not just hundreds of known experimental phases) and models that can be used to simulate both kinetics and thermodynamics. Despite more than a decade of effort by many groups, developing robust models for these simulations is still a human-time-intensive endeavor. Compressive sensing solves this problem in dramatic fashion by automatically extracting the ``sparse model'' of an alloy in only minutes. This new paradigm to model building has enabled a new framework that will uncover, automatically and in a general way across the periodic table, the important components of such models and reveal the underlying ``genome'' of alloy physics.

  20. De-alloyed platinum nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Strasser, Peter; Koh, Shirlaine; Mani, Prasanna; Ratndeep, Srivastava

    2011-08-09

    A method of producing de-alloyed nanoparticles. In an embodiment, the method comprises admixing metal precursors, freeze-drying, annealing, and de-alloying the nanoparticles in situ. Further, in an embodiment de-alloyed nanoparticle formed by the method, wherein the nanoparticle further comprises a core-shell arrangement. The nanoparticle is suitable for electrocatalytic processes and devices.

  1. Aluminum alloys with improved strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiasi, R.; Adler, P.

    1975-01-01

    Mechanical strength and stress corrosion of new BAR and 7050 alloys that include Zn instead of Cr have been studied and compared with those of 7075 aluminum alloy. Added mechanical strength of new alloys is attributed to finer grain size of 5 to 8 micrometers, however, susceptibility to stress corrosion attack is increased.

  2. PLUTONIUM-URANIUM-TITANIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-07-28

    A plutonium-uranium alloy suitable for use as the fuel element in a fast breeder reactor is described. The alloy contains from 15 to 60 at.% titanium with the remainder uranium and plutonium in a specific ratio, thereby limiting the undesirable zeta phase and rendering the alloy relatively resistant to corrosion and giving it the essential characteristic of good mechanical workability.

  3. Semiconductor alloys - Structural property engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sher, A.; Van Schilfgaarde, M.; Berding, M.; Chen, A.-B.

    1987-01-01

    Semiconductor alloys have been used for years to tune band gaps and average bond lengths to specific applications. Other selection criteria for alloy composition, and a growth technique designed to modify their structural properties, are presently considered. The alloys Zn(1-y)Cd(y)Te and CdSe(y)Te(1-y) are treated as examples.

  4. Magnesium and magnesium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Avedesian, M.; Baker, H.

    1998-12-31

    This new handbook is the most comprehensive publication of engineering information on commercial magnesium alloys under one cover in the last sixty years. Prepared with the cooperation of the International Magnesium Association, it presents the industrial practices currently used throughout the world, as well as the properties of the products critical to their proper application. Contents include: general characteristics; physical metallurgy; melting, refining, alloying, recycling, and powder production; casting; heat treatment; forging, rolling, and extrusion; semisolid processing; forming; joining; cleaning and finishing; selection, application, and properties of grades and alloys; design considerations; mechanical behavior and wear resistance; fatigue and fracture-mechanics; high-temperature strength and creep; corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking; specification.

  5. Hydrogen in titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wille, G W; Davis, J W

    1981-04-01

    The titanium alloys that offer properties worthy of consideration for fusion reactors are Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-Si (Ti-6242S) and Ti-5Al-6Sn-2Zr-1Mo-Si (Ti-5621S). The Ti-6242S and Ti-5621S are being considered because of their high creep resistance at elevated temperatures of 500/sup 0/C. Also, irradiation tests on these alloys have shown irradiation creep properties comparable to 20% cold worked 316 stainless steel. These alloys would be susceptible to slow strain rate embrittlement if sufficient hydrogen concentrations are obtained. Concentrations greater than 250 to 500 wppm hydrogen and temperatures lower than 100 to 150/sup 0/C are approximate threshold conditions for detrimental effects on tensile properties. Indications are that at the elevated temperature - low hydrogen pressure conditions of the reactors, there would be negligible hydrogen embrittlement.

  6. Surface modification of high temperature iron alloys

    DOEpatents

    Park, J.H.

    1995-06-06

    A method and article of manufacture of a coated iron based alloy are disclosed. The method includes providing an iron based alloy substrate, depositing a silicon containing layer on the alloy surface while maintaining the alloy at a temperature of about 700--1200 C to diffuse silicon into the alloy surface and exposing the alloy surface to an ammonia atmosphere to form a silicon/oxygen/nitrogen containing protective layer on the iron based alloy. 13 figs.

  7. Surface modification of high temperature iron alloys

    DOEpatents

    Park, Jong-Hee

    1995-01-01

    A method and article of manufacture of a coated iron based alloy. The method includes providing an iron based alloy substrate, depositing a silicon containing layer on the alloy surface while maintaining the alloy at a temperature of about 700.degree. C.-1200.degree. C. to diffuse silicon into the alloy surface and exposing the alloy surface to an ammonia atmosphere to form a silicon/oxygen/nitrogen containing protective layer on the iron based alloy.

  8. Successful synthesis and thermal stability of immiscible metal Au-Rh, Au-Ir and Au-Ir-Rh nanoalloys.

    PubMed

    Shubin, Yury; Plusnin, Pavel; Sharafutdinov, Marat; Makotchenko, Evgenia; Korenev, Sergey

    2017-04-06

    We successfully prepared face-centred cubic nanoalloys in systems of Au-Ir, Au-Rh and Au-Ir-Rh, with large bulk miscibility gaps, in one-run reactions under thermal decomposition of specially synthesised single-source precursors, namely, [AuEn2][Ir(NO2)6], [AuEn2][Ir(NO2)6]х[Rh(NO2)6]1-х and [AuEn2][Rh(NO2)6]. The precursors employed contain all desired metals "mixed" at the molecular level, thus providing significant advantages for obtaining alloys. The observations using HR TEM show that the nanoalloy structures are composed of well-dispersed aggregates of crystalline domains with a mean size of 5±3 nm. EDX and XRD measurements confirm the formation of AuIr, AuRh, AuIr0.75Rh0.25, AuIr0.50Rh0.50 and AuIr0.25Rh0.75 metastable solid solutions. In-situ real-time synchrotron XRD was used to study the formation mechanism of nanoalloys. The observed transformations are described by the "conversion chemistry" mechanism characterised by the primary development of particles comprising atoms of only one type, followed by a chemical reaction resulting in the final formation of a nanoalloy. The obtained metastable nanoalloys exhibit essential thermal stability. Exposure to 180 ºC for 30 h does not cause any dealloying process.

  9. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOEpatents

    Lin, X.; Johnson, W.L.

    1998-04-07

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3}K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf){sub a}(Al,Zn){sub b}(Ti,Nb){sub c}(Cu{sub x}Fe{sub y}(Ni,Co){sub z}){sub d} wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d{hor_ellipsis}y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  10. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Xianghong; Johnson, William L.

    1998-01-01

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf).sub.a (Al,Zn).sub.b (Ti,Nb).sub.c (Cu.sub.x Fe.sub.y (Ni,Co).sub.z).sub.d wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d.multidot.y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  11. Microporosity in casting alloys.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A J

    1975-06-01

    Three series of tensile test pieces were produced using a nickel base partial denture casting alloy. For the first series induction heating was employed, for the second a resistance crucible, and for the third an oxy-acetylene torch. Samples from each series were sectioned longitudinally, mounted, polished and examined microscopically for evidence of microporosity.

  12. Superplasticity in aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, T. G.

    1997-12-01

    We have characterized in the Al-Mg system the microstructure and mechanical properties of a cold-rolled Al-6Mg-0.3Sc alloy. The alloy exhibited superplasticity at relatively high strain rates (about 10-2 s-1). At a strain rate of 10-2 s-1 there exists a wide temperature range (475-520`C) within which the tensile elongation is over 1000%. There also exists a wide strain rate range (10-3 - 10-1 s-1) within which the tensile elongation is over 500%. The presence of Sc in the alloy results in a uniform distribution of fine coherent Al3SC precipitates which effectively pin grain and subgrain boundaries during static and continuous recrystallization. As a result, the alloy retains its fine grain size (about 7 micron), even after extensive superplastic deformation (>1000%). During deformation, dislocations Mg with a high Schmidt factor slip across subgrains but are trapped by subgrain boundaries, as a result of the strong pining of Al3Sc. This process leads to the conversion of low-angled subgrain boundaries to high-angled grain boundaries and the subsequent grain boundary sliding, which produces superelasticity. A model is proposed to describe grain boundary sliding accommodated by dislocation glide across grains with a uniform distribution of coherent precipitates. The model predictions is consistent with experimental observations.

  13. Shape Memory Alloy Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention discloses and teaches a unique, remote optically controlled micro actuator particularly suitable for aerospace vehicle applications wherein hot gas, or in the alternative optical energy, is employed as the medium by which shape memory alloy elements are activated. In gas turbine powered aircraft the source of the hot gas may be the turbine engine compressor or turbine sections.

  14. Shape Memory Alloy Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention discloses and teaches a unique, remote optically controlled micro actuator particularly suitable for aerospace vehicle applications wherein hot gas, or in the alternative optical energy, is employed as the medium by which shape memory alloy elements are activated. In gas turbine powered aircraft the source of the hot gas may be the turbine engine compressor or turbine sections.

  15. Mechanical alloying of brittle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R. M.; McDermott, B.; Koch, C. C.

    1988-12-01

    Mechanical alloying by high energy ball milling has been observed in systems with nominally brittle components. The phases formed by mechanical alloying of brittle components include solid solutions (Si + Ge → SiGe solid solution), intermetallic compounds (Mn + Bi → MnBi), and amorphous alloys (NiZr2 + Ni11Zr9 → amorphous Ni50Zr50). A key feature of possible mechanisms for mechanical alloying of brittle components is the temperature of the powders during milling. Experiments and a computer model of the kinetics of mechanical alloying were carried out in order to esti-mate the temperature effect. Temperature rises in typical powder alloys during milling in a SPEX mill were estimated to be ≤350 K using the kinetic parameters determined from the computer model. The tempering response of fresh martensite in an Fe-1.2 wt pct C alloy during milling was consistent with the maximum results of the computer model, yielding temperatures in the pow-ders of ≤575 K i.e., ΔT ≤ 300 K). Thermal activation was required for mechanical alloying of Si and Ge powder. No alloying occurred when the milling vial was cooled by liquid nitrogen. The pos-sible mechanisms responsible for material transfer during mechanical alloying of brittle components are considered.

  16. Grindability of dental magnetic alloys.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Eisei; Kikuchi, Masafumi; Okuno, Osamu; Kimura, Kohei

    2005-06-01

    In this study, the grindability of cast magnetic alloys (Fe-Pt-Nb magnetic alloy and magnetic stainless steel) was evaluated and compared with that of conventional dental casting alloys (Ag-Pd-Au alloy, Type 4 gold alloy, and cobalt-chromium alloy). Grindability was evaluated in terms of grinding rate (i.e., volume of metal removed per minute) and grinding ratio (i.e., volume ratio of metal removed compared to wheel material lost). Solution treated Fe-Pt-Nb magnetic alloy had a significantly higher grinding rate than the aged one at a grinding speed of 750-1500 m x min(-1). At 500 m x min(-1), there were no significant differences in grinding rate between solution treated and aged Fe-Pt-Nb magnetic alloys. At a lower speed of 500 m x min(-1) or 750 m x min(-1), it was found that the grinding rates of aged Fe-Pt-Nb magnetic alloy and stainless steel were higher than those of conventional casting alloys.

  17. Advanced ordered intermetallic alloy deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.; Maziasz, P.J.; Easton, D.S.

    1997-04-01

    The need for high-strength, high-temperature, and light-weight materials for structural applications has generated a great deal of interest in ordered intermetallic alloys, particularly in {gamma}-based titanium aluminides {gamma}-based TiAl alloys offer an attractive mix of low density ({approximately}4g/cm{sup 3}), good creep resistance, and high-temperature strength and oxidation resistance. For rotating or high-speed components. TiAl also has a high damping coefficient which minimizes vibrations and noise. These alloys generally contain two phases. {alpha}{sub 2} (DO{sub 19} structure) and {gamma} (L 1{sub 0}), at temperatures below 1120{degrees}C, the euticoid temperature. The mechanical properties of TiAl-based alloys are sensitive to both alloy compositions and microstructure. Depending on heat-treatment and thermomechanical processing, microstructures with near equiaxed {gamma}, a duplex structure (a mix of the {gamma} and {alpha}{sub 2} phases) can be developed in TiAl alloys containing 45 to 50 at. % Al. The major concern for structural use of TiAl alloys is their low ductility and poor fracture resistance at ambient temperatures. The purpose of this project is to improve the fracture toughness of TiAl-based alloys by controlling alloy composition, microstructure and thermomechanical treatment. This work is expected to lead to the development of TiAl alloys with significantly improved fracture toughness and tensile ductility for structural use.

  18. Carbonatite-silicate immiscible melt inclusion in lamprophyre from Kutch, western India: Implication for plume-lithosphere interaction and initiation of Deccan Trap magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Arijit; Paul, Dalim Kumar; Sen, Gautam; Biswas, Sanjib Kumar

    2014-05-01

    Kutch province of western India has undergone repeated rifting and marine transgression events from late Triassic to the late Cretaceous. Magmatic rocks occur in profusion in Kutch Basin. The southern part is characterized by occurrences of thick flows of tholeiitic basalt of Deccan Trap affinity, central part of Kutch Basin has numerous volcanic plugs of alkali basalt which is also considered as member of Deccan Trap, contain thin, discoidal mantle xenoliths of spinel lherzolite and wehrlite composition. Northern Kutch is dominated by suite of alkaline magmatic rocks similar to magmatic rocks of continental rift zone. The alkaline suite contains alkali pyroxenite, theralite, teschenite, basanite, nepheline syenite and kaersutite bearing lamprophyre (Ray et al., 2006, Das et al., 2007, Paul et al., 2008). The newly discovered east-west trending lamprophyre dyke swarm of northern Kutch (Pachham Island) is camptonite in composition and contains kaersutite phenocrysts in large proportion. These kaersutite phencrysts contain immscible melt/glass phases as melt inclusions. The lamprophyre yields an age of ca. 67 Ma.by Ar-Ar method (Sen et al., 2014 in press) synchronous with alkali basalt of central Kutch. The melt inclusions are fundamentally of two types - calciocarbonatite and alkaline silicate melts. We found sphene within carbonatitic melt and the rare mineral rhonite in silicate melt. Petrographic evidence indicates that carbonatite melt always occurs within alkali silicate melt as immiscible fraction. These carbonatite melts are extremely rich in CaCO3 (upto 95%) which contradicts the experimental results of carbonate melt composition (upto 80% CaCO3) in silicate-carbonate immiscible melt pair by Lee and Wyllie. The abundance of wehrlite xenoliths over lherzolite in alkali basalt, petrographic evidence of orthopyroxene to clinopyroxene transformation in wehrlite xenoliths, occurrence of calcite vein in mantle xenoliths indicate carbonatite metasomatism of spinel

  19. Influence of Viscous and Capillary Forces on Immiscible Fluid Displacement: Pore-Scale Experimental Study in a Water-Wet Micromodel Demonstrating Viscous and Capillary Fingering

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Changyong; Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Grate, Jay W.; Warner, Marvin G.

    2011-08-18

    Unstable immiscible fluid displacement in porous media affects geological carbon sequestration, enhanced oil recovery, and groundwater contamination by nonaqueous phase liquids. Characterization of immiscible displacement processes at the pore-scale is important to better understand macroscopic processes at the continuum-scale. A series of displacement experiments was conducted to investigate the impacts of viscous and capillary forces on displacement stability and fluid saturation distributions in a homogeneous water-wet pore network micromodel with precisely-microfabricated pore structures. Displacements were studied using seven wetting-nonwetting fluid pairs with viscosity ratios M (viscosity of the advancing nonwetting fluid divided by the viscosity of the displaced wetting fluid) ranging four orders of magnitude from logM = -1.95 to 1.88. The micromodel was initially saturated with either polyethylene glycol 200 (PEG200) or water as a wetting fluid, which was then displaced by a nonwetting alkane fluid under different flow rates. Capillary numbers (Ca) ranged over four orders of magnitude for the reported experiments, from logCa = -5.88 to -1.02. Fluorescent microscopy was used to visualize displacement and measure nonwetting fluid saturation distributions. These experiments extend the classical work by Lenormand et al. by using water-wet micromodels, high-precision fabrication, and enhanced image analysis of the saturation distributions. In the micromodel experiments initially saturated with PEG200, a viscous wetting fluid, unstable displacement occurred by viscous fingering over the whole range of imposed capillary numbers. For the experiments initially saturated with water, unstable displacement occurred by capillary fingering at low capillary numbers. When the viscous forces were increased by increasing the injection rate, crossover into stable displacement was observed for the fluid pairs with M > 0. For unstable displacement experiments applying the same

  20. Generalized three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann color-gradient method for immiscible two-phase pore-scale imbibition and drainage in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclaire, Sébastien; Parmigiani, Andrea; Malaspinas, Orestis; Chopard, Bastien; Latt, Jonas

    2017-03-01

    This article presents a three-dimensional numerical framework for the simulation of fluid-fluid immiscible compounds in complex geometries, based on the multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann method to model the fluid dynamics and the color-gradient approach to model multicomponent flow interaction. New lattice weights for the lattices D3Q15, D3Q19, and D3Q27 that improve the Galilean invariance of the color-gradient model as well as for modeling the interfacial tension are derived and provided in the Appendix. The presented method proposes in particular an approach to model the interaction between the fluid compound and the solid, and to maintain a precise contact angle between the two-component interface and the wall. Contrarily to previous approaches proposed in the literature, this method yields accurate solutions even in complex geometries and does not suffer from numerical artifacts like nonphysical mass transfer along the solid wall, which is crucial for modeling imbibition-type problems. The article also proposes an approach to model inflow and outflow boundaries with the color-gradient method by generalizing the regularized boundary conditions. The numerical framework is first validated for three-dimensional (3D) stationary state (Jurin's law) and time-dependent (Washburn's law and capillary waves) problems. Then, the usefulness of the method for practical problems of pore-scale flow imbibition and drainage in porous media is demonstrated. Through the simulation of nonwetting displacement in two-dimensional random porous media networks, we show that the model properly reproduces three main invasion regimes (stable displacement, capillary fingering, and viscous fingering) as well as the saturating zone transition between these regimes. Finally, the ability to simulate immiscible two-component flow imbibition and drainage is validated, with excellent results, by numerical simulations in a Berea sandstone, a frequently used benchmark case used in this

  1. Tungsten carbide laser alloying of a low alloyed steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cojocaru, Mihai; Taca, Mihaela

    1996-10-01

    Laser alloying is a way to change the composition of metal surfaces in order to improve their corrosion-resistance, high-temperature strength and hardness. The results of a structural and phase analysis of a tungsten carbide based surface layer prepared by laser alloying of a low carbon steel substrate are presented. Structure, phase composition and microhardness of surface alloyed layers have been investigated. The surface of the samples exhibited a thin layer with a different chemical and phase composition. An increase in alloyed surface hardness and wear-resistance was observed.

  2. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  3. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  4. DESIGN DATA STUDY FOR COATED COLUMBIUM ALLOYS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ANTIOXIDANTS, * COATINGS , * NIOBIUM ALLOYS, *REFRACTORY COATINGS , *SILICON COATINGS , ALLOYS, ALUMINUM, DEFORMATION, ELASTIC PROPERTIES, HIGH...TEMPERATURE, OXIDATION, PLASTIC PROPERTIES, REENTRY VEHICLES, REFRACTORY MATERIALS, SHEETS, SILICIDES , VACUUM APPARATUS, VAPOR PLATING, ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

  5. Materials data handbook, Inconel alloy 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sessler, J.; Weiss, V.

    1967-01-01

    Materials data handbook on Inconel alloy 718 includes data on the properties of the alloy at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures and other pertinent engineering information required for the design and fabrication of components and equipment utilizing this alloy.

  6. Two phase titanium aluminide alloy

    DOEpatents

    Deevi, Seetharama C.; Liu, C. T.

    2001-01-01

    A two-phase titanic aluminide alloy having a lamellar microstructure with little intercolony structures. The alloy can include fine particles such as boride particles at colony boundaries and/or grain boundary equiaxed structures. The alloy can include alloying additions such as .ltoreq.10 at % W, Nb and/or Mo. The alloy can be free of Cr, V, Mn, Cu and/or Ni and can include, in atomic %, 45 to 55% Ti, 40 to 50% Al, 1 to 5% Nb, 0.3 to 2% W, up to 1% Mo and 0.1 to 0.3% B. In weight %, the alloy can include 57 to 60% Ti, 30 to 32% Al, 4 to 9% Nb, up to 2% Mo, 2 to 8% W and 0.02 to 0.08% B.

  7. TERNARY ALLOY-CONTAINING PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Waber, J.T.

    1960-02-23

    Ternary alloys of uranium and plutonium containing as the third element either molybdenum or zirconium are reported. Such alloys are particularly useful as reactor fuels in fast breeder reactors. The alloy contains from 2 to 25 at.% of molybdenum or zirconium, the balance being a combination of uranium and plutonium in the ratio of from 1 to 9 atoms of uranlum for each atom of plutonium. These alloys are prepared by melting the constituent elements, treating them at an elevated temperature for homogenization, and cooling them to room temperature, the rate of cooling varying with the oomposition and the desired phase structure. The preferred embodiment contains 12 to 25 at.% of molybdenum and is treated by quenching to obtain a body centered cubic crystal structure. The most important advantage of these alloys over prior binary alloys of both plutonium and uranium is the lack of cracking during casting and their ready machinability.

  8. Titanium-tantalum alloy development

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, J.D.; Bingert, J.F.; Dunn, P.S.; Butt, D.P.; Margevicius, R.W.

    1996-04-01

    Research has been underway at Los Alamos National Laboratory for several years to develop an alloy capable of containing toxic materials in the event of a fire involving a nuclear weapon. Due to their high melting point, good oxidation resistance, and low solubility in molten plutonium, alloys based on the Ti-Ta binary system have been developed for this purpose. The course of the alloy development to-date, along with processing and property data, are presented in this overview.

  9. Characterization Techniques for Amorphous Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carow-Watamura, U.; Louzguine, D. V.; Takeuchi, A.

    This document is part of Part 2 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/9getType="URL"/> 'Systems from B-Be-Fe to Co-W-Zr' of Subvolume B 'Physical Properties of Ternary Amorphous Alloys' of Volume 37 'Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains the Chapter '2 Characterization Techniques for Amorphous Alloys' with the content:

  10. Amorphous metal alloy and composite

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Rong; Merz, Martin D.

    1985-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  11. Machine Casting of Ferrous Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    possible today. Extensive work was conducted on casting of semi-solid alloys when highly fluid (’ Rheocasting ’) and when thixotropically gelled...Thixocasting’). In initial phases of the program, copper base alloys and cast iron alloys were prepared with special non-dendritic Rheocast structure by batch...processing. Compatibility studies were carried out to select materials suitable for preparing cast iron with the Rheocast structure. Design

  12. Surface Segregation in Ternary Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Abel, Phillip B.

    2000-01-01

    Surface segregation profiles of binary (Cu-Ni, Au-Ni, Cu-Au) and ternary (Cu-Au-Ni) alloys are determined via Monte Carlo-Metropolis computer simulations using the BFS method for alloys for the calculation of the energetics. The behavior of Cu or Au in Ni is contrasted with their behavior when both are present. The interaction between Cu and Au and its effect on the segregation profiles for Cu-Au-Ni alloys is discussed.

  13. Alloy Interface Interdiffusion Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Garces, Jorge E.; Abel, Phillip B.

    2003-01-01

    With renewed interest in developing nuclear-powered deep space probes, attention will return to improving the metallurgical processing of potential nuclear fuels so that they remain dimensionally stable over the years required for a successful mission. Previous work on fuel alloys at the NASA Glenn Research Center was primarily empirical, with virtually no continuing research. Even when empirical studies are exacting, they often fail to provide enough insight to guide future research efforts. In addition, from a fundamental theoretical standpoint, the actinide metals (which include materials used for nuclear fuels) pose a severe challenge to modern electronic-structure theory. Recent advances in quantum approximate atomistic modeling, coupled with first-principles derivation of needed input parameters, can help researchers develop new alloys for nuclear propulsion.

  14. Shape memory alloy actuator

    DOEpatents

    Varma, Venugopal K.

    2001-01-01

    An actuator for cycling between first and second positions includes a first shaped memory alloy (SMA) leg, a second SMA leg. At least one heating/cooling device is thermally connected to at least one of the legs, each heating/cooling device capable of simultaneously heating one leg while cooling the other leg. The heating/cooling devices can include thermoelectric and/or thermoionic elements.

  15. Duct and cladding alloy

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1983-01-01

    An austenitic alloy having good thermal stability and resistance to sodium corrosion at 700.degree. C. consists essentially of 35-45% nickel 7.5-14% chromium 0.8-3.2% molybdenum 0.3-1.0% silicon 0.2-1.0% manganese 0-0.1% zirconium 2.0-3.5% titanium 1.0-2.0% aluminum 0.02-0.1% carbon 0-0.01% boron and the balance iron.

  16. Nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, John H. (Inventor); Allen, Donald R. (Inventor); Foley, James C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Compositions and methods for obtaining nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys are described. A composition includes an amorphous matrix forming element (e.g., Al or Fe); at least one transition metal element; and at least one crystallizing agent that is insoluble in the resulting amorphous matrix. During devitrification, the crystallizing agent causes the formation of a high density nanocrystal dispersion. The compositions and methods provide advantages in that materials with superior properties are provided.

  17. Electron beam irradiation induced compatibilization of immiscible polyethylene/ethylene vinyl acetate (PE/EVA) blends: Mechanical properties and morphology stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entezam, Mehdi; Aghjeh, Mir Karim Razavi; Ghaffari, Mehdi

    2017-02-01

    Gel content, mechanical properties and morphology of immiscible PE/EVA blends irradiated by high energy electron beam were studied. The results of gel content measurements showed that the capability of cross-linking of the blend samples increased with an increase of the EVA composition. Also, the gel content for most compositions of the blends displayed a positive deviation from the additive rule. The results of mechanical properties showed that the tensile strength and elongation at break of the samples increased and decreased, respectively, with irradiation dose. On the other hand, the mechanical properties of the irradiated blends also depicted a positive deviation from additive rule contrary to the un-irradiated blends. A synergistic effect observed for the mechanical properties improvement of the irradiated blends and it was attributed to the probable formation of the PE-graft-EVA copolymers at the interface of the blends during the irradiation process. A theoretical analysis revealed that irradiation induced synergistic effect was more significant for EVA-rich blends with weaker interfacial interaction as compared to PE-rich blends. The morphological analysis indicated that the blend morphology was not affected obviously, whereas it was stabilized by irradiation.

  18. Liquid carry-over in an injection moulded all-polymer chip system for immiscible phase magnetic bead-based solid-phase extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistrup, Kasper; Skotte Sørensen, Karen; Wolff, Anders; Fougt Hansen, Mikkel

    2015-04-01

    We present an all-polymer, single-use microfluidic chip system produced by injection moulding and bonded by ultrasonic welding. Both techniques are compatible with low-cost industrial mass-production. The chip is produced for magnetic bead-based solid-phase extraction facilitated by immiscible phase filtration and features passive liquid filling and magnetic bead manipulation using an external magnet. In this work, we determine the system compatibility with various surfactants. Moreover, we quantify the volume of liquid co-transported with magnetic bead clusters from Milli-Q water or a lysis-binding buffer for nucleic acid extraction (0.1 (v/v)% Triton X-100 in 5 M guanidine hydrochloride). A linear relationship was found between the liquid carry-over and mass of magnetic beads used. Interestingly, similar average carry-overs of 1.74(8) nL/μg and 1.72(14) nL/μg were found for Milli-Q water and lysis-binding buffer, respectively.

  19. Interface dynamics of immiscible two-phase lattice-gas cellular automata: A model with random dynamic scatterers and quenched disorder in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, R. M.; Montenegro-Filho, R. R.; Coutinho-Filho, M. D.

    2013-09-01

    We use a lattice gas cellular automata model in the presence of random dynamic scattering sites and quenched disorder in the two-phase immiscible model with the aim of producing an interface dynamics similar to that observed in Hele-Shaw cells. The dynamics of the interface is studied as one fluid displaces the other in a clean lattice and in a lattice with quenched disorder. For the clean system, if the fluid with a lower viscosity displaces the other, we show that the model exhibits the Saffman-Taylor instability phenomenon, whose features are in very good agreement with those observed in real (viscous) fluids. In the system with quenched disorder, we obtain estimates for the growth and roughening exponents of the interface width in two cases: viscosity-matched fluids and the case of unstable interface. The first case is shown to be in the same universality class of the random deposition model with surface relaxation. Moreover, while the early-time dynamics of the interface behaves similarly, viscous fingers develop in the second case with the subsequent production of bubbles in the context of a complex dynamics. We also identify the Hurst exponent of the subdiffusive fractional Brownian motion associated with the interface, from which we derive its fractal dimension and the universality classes related to a percolation process.

  20. Low temperature synthesis of CaO-SiO2 glasses having stable liquid-liquid immiscibility by the sol-gel process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, N. P.

    1992-01-01

    Calcium silicate glass compositions lying within the liquid-liquid immiscibility dome of the phase diagram, which could not have been prepared by the conventional melting method, were synthesized by the sol-gel process. Hydrolysis and polycondensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) solutions containing up to 20 mol percent calcium nitrate resulted in the formation of clear and transparent gels. The gel formation time decreased with increase in water: TEOS mole ratio, calcium content, and the reaction temperature. Smaller values of gel times in the presence of calcium nitrate are probably caused by lowering of the ionic charge on the sol particles by the salt present. The gelation activation energy, E(sub gel), was evaluated from temperature dependence of the gel time. Presence of Ca(2+) ions or the water:TEOS mole ratio did not have an appreciable effect on the value of E(sub gel). Presence of glycerol in the solution helped in the formation of crack-free monolithic gel specimens. Chemical and structural changes occurring in the gels, as a function of the heat treatments, have been monitored using DTA, TGA, IR-spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, surface area and pore size distribution measurements.

  1. Late-magmatic immiscibility during batholith formation: assessment of B isotopes and trace elements in tourmaline from the Land's End granite, SW England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drivenes, Kristian; Larsen, Rune B.; Müller, Axel; Sørensen, Bjørn E.; Wiedenbeck, Michael; Raanes, Morten P.

    2015-06-01

    Quartz-tourmaline orbicules are unevenly distributed in the roof segment of the Land's End granite, SW England. This study shows that the orbicules formed from an immiscible hydrous borosilicate melt produced during the late stages of crystallization, and differentiates tourmaline formed by dominantly magmatic and dominantly hydrothermal processes. Trace elements and boron isotope fractionation can be tracked in tourmaline, and create a timeline for crystallization. Tourmaline from the granite matrix has higher V, Cr and Mg content and is isotopically heavier than the later crystallizing inner orbicule tourmaline. Overgrowths of blue tourmaline, occurring together with quartz showing hydrothermal cathodoluminescence textures, crystallized from an aqueous fluid during the very last crystallization, and are significantly higher in Sr and Sn, and isotopically heavier. Tourmaline associated with Sn mineralization is also high in Sr and Sn, but has boron isotopic compositions close to that of the magmatic tourmaline, and is not formed by the same fluids responsible for the blue overgrowths. The ore-forming fluids precipitating tourmaline and cassiterite are likely derived from the same magma source as the granite, but exsolved deeper in the magma chamber, and at a later stage than orbicule formation. Tourmaline from massive quartz-tourmaline rocks is concentrically zoned, with major and trace element compositions indicating crystallization from a similar melt as for the orbicules, but shows a more evolved signature.

  2. Interface dynamics of immiscible two-phase lattice-gas cellular automata: a model with random dynamic scatterers and quenched disorder in two dimensions.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, R M; Montenegro-Filho, R R; Coutinho-Filho, M D

    2013-09-01

    We use a lattice gas cellular automata model in the presence of random dynamic scattering sites and quenched disorder in the two-phase immiscible model with the aim of producing an interface dynamics similar to that observed in Hele-Shaw cells. The dynamics of the interface is studied as one fluid displaces the other in a clean lattice and in a lattice with quenched disorder. For the clean system, if the fluid with a lower viscosity displaces the other, we show that the model exhibits the Saffman-Taylor instability phenomenon, whose features are in very good agreement with those observed in real (viscous) fluids. In the system with quenched disorder, we obtain estimates for the growth and roughening exponents of the interface width in two cases: viscosity-matched fluids and the case of unstable interface. The first case is shown to be in the same universality class of the random deposition model with surface relaxation. Moreover, while the early-time dynamics of the interface behaves similarly, viscous fingers develop in the second case with the subsequent production of bubbles in the context of a complex dynamics. We also identify the Hurst exponent of the subdiffusive fractional Brownian motion associated with the interface, from which we derive its fractal dimension and the universality classes related to a percolation process.

  3. Molecular dynamics study of solubilization of immiscible solutes by a micelle: Free energy of transfer of alkanes from water to the micelle core by thermodynamic integration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, K.; Yoshii, N.; Okazaki, S.

    2010-08-01

    Free energy of transfer, ΔGw→m, from water phase to a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelle core has been calculated for a series of hydrophobic solutes originally immiscible with water by thermodynamic integration method combined with molecular dynamics calculations. The calculated free energy of transfer is in good correspondence to the experiment as well as the theoretical free energy of transfer. The calculated ΔGw→m's are all negative, implying that the alkane molecules are more stable in the micelle than in the water phase. It decreases almost linearly as a function of the number of carbon atoms of the alkanes longer than methane with a decrement of 3.3 kJ mol-1 per one methylene group. The calculated free energy of transfer indicates that, for example, at the micelle concentration of 50 CMC (critical micelle concentration), about only 1 of 6 micelles or 1 of 32 000 micelles does not contain a solute methane or n-octane molecule, respectively.

  4. Multiscale level-set method for accurate modeling of two-phase immiscible flow with deposited thin-films on solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Alsaud, Motaz; Riaz, Amir; Tchelepi, Hamdi; University of Maryland, College Park Collaboration; Stanford University Team

    2016-11-01

    We developed a multiscale sharp interface method based on the level-set for two-phase immiscible flow with pre-existing thin-films on solid surfaces. The lubrication approximation theory is used to model the thin- film equation efficiently. The incompressible Navier-Stokes, level-set, and thin-film evolution equation are coupled sequentially to capture the physics occurring at multiple length scales. The proposed multiscale method is validated through comparison with the augmented Young-Laplace equation that includes the Van der Waals intermolecular force for a static meniscus in a capillary tube. The viscous bending in the advancing interface over precursor film problem is captured by the numerical method and agrees with the Cox-Voinov theory. The problem of a moving-bubble inside a capillary tube is modeled, and the results compare well with both theory and experiments. In addition, the performance of the new approach is assessed by studying the spurious currents for capillary-dominated flows at low capillary numbers. The method is applicable for flows with a capillary number as low as Ca =10-6 .

  5. Thin film fabrication of PMMA/MEH-PPV immiscible blends by corona discharge coating and its application to polymer light emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hee Joon; Park, Youn Jung; Choi, Sang Hun; Hong, Jae-Min; Huh, June; Cho, Jun Han; Kim, Jung Hyun; Park, Cheolmin

    2007-02-13

    We introduce a new and facile process, corona discharge coating (CDC), to fabricate thin polymer films of the immiscible poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) blends. The method is based on utilizing directional electric flow, known as electric wind, of the charged unipolar particles generated by corona discharge between a metallic needle and a bottom plate under high electric field (5-10 kV/cm). The electric flow rapidly spreads out the polymer solution on the bottom plate and subsequently forms a smooth and flat thin film over a large area within a few seconds. The method is found to be effective for fabricating uniform thin polymer films with areas larger than approximately 30 mm2. The thin films obtained by CDC exhibit unique microstructures where well-defined spherical and cylindrical domains of approximately 50 nm in diameter coexist. These nanosized domains are found to be much smaller than those in films made by conventional spin coating, which suggests that CDC is beneficial for fabricating phase-separated thin film structures with significantly increased interfacial areas. The effects of the applied voltage, tip-to-plate distance, and substrates on the film formation as well as the resulting microstructure are investigated. Furthermore, the light emitting performance of a device prepared by CDC is compared with one made by spin coating.

  6. Compatibilization of immiscible poly(lactic acid)/poly(ɛ-caprolactone) blend through electron-beam irradiation with the addition of a compatibilizing agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Boo Young; Han, Do Hung

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compatibilize immiscible poly(lactic acid) (PLA)/poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) blend by using electron-beam radiation method with the addition of a compatibilizing agent. Glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) was chosen as the compatibilizing agent, in the expectation that the GMA plays a role as a monomeric compatibilizer and a reactive agent at the interface between the PLA and the PCL phases. Compatibilization process has been investigated through the melt mixing of the PLA/PCL and the GMA by using a twin-screw extruder and the exposure of the PLA/PCL/GMA mixture to electron-beam radiation at room temperature. The melt mixing process was performed to locate the GMA at the interface, thereby expecting a finer morphology due to the GMA as the monomeric plasticizer. The exposure process was carried out to induce definite interfacial adhesion at the interface through electron-beam initiated cross-copolymerization by the medium of the GMA as the reactive agent. To investigate the results of this compatibilization strategy, the morphological, mechanical, and rheological properties of the blend were analyzed. The morphological study clearly showed the reduced particle size of dispersed PCL domains and significantly improved interfacial adhesion by the electron-beam irradiation with the addition of the GMA. The stress-strain curves of the blends irradiated at less than 20 kGy showed the typical characteristics of ductile materials. The tensile properties of the blend were strongly affected by the dose of irradiation.

  7. Liquid-Phase Synthesis of Ba2V2O7 Phosphor Powders and Films Using Immiscible Biphasic Organic-Aqueous Systems.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mami; Hagiwara, Manabu; Fujihara, Shinobu

    2016-08-15

    A liquid-phase synthesis of inorganic phosphor materials at a moderate temperature was proposed by using immiscible liquid-liquid biphasic systems. A self-activated Ba2V2O7 phosphor was actually synthesized from vanadium alkoxide dissolved in an organic solution and barium acetate in an aqueous solution. A mild hydrolysis reaction of the alkoxide started at the organic-inorganic interface, and an intermediate compound, Ba(VO3)2·H2O, was initially formed. Ba2V2O7 powders were then obtained by the conversion from Ba(VO3)2·H2O promoted in the aqueous solution. Ba2V2O7 films were obtained on surface-modified silica glass substrates through the similar chemical reactions. Factors such as the surface state of substrates, the kind of organic solvents, and the volume of aqueous solutions were examined to improve the film deposition behavior. The resultant Ba2V2O7 materials showed broad-band visible photoluminescence upon irradiation with ultraviolet light based on the charge transfer transition in the VO4(3-) units existing as dimers.

  8. Low temperature synthesis of CaO-SiO2 glasses having stable liquid-liquid immiscibility by sol-gel process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1990-01-01

    Calcium silicate glass compositions lying within the liquid-liquid immiscibility dome of the phase diagram, which could not have been prepared by the conventional melting method, were synthesized by the sol-gel process. Hydrolysis and polycondensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) solutions containing up to 20 mol percent calcium nitrate resulted in the formation of clear and transparent gels. The gel formation time decreased with increase in water:TEOS mole ratio, calcium content, and the reaction temperature. Smaller values of gel times in the presence of calcium nitrate are probably caused by lowering of the ionic charge on the sol particles by the salt present. The gelation activation energy, E(sub gel), was evaluated from temperature dependence of the gel time. Presence of Ca(2+) ions or the water:TEOS mole ratio did not have an appreciable effect on the value of E(sub gel). Presence of glycerol in the solution helped in the formation of crack-free monolithic gel specimens. Chemical and structural changes occurring in the gels, as a function of the heat treatments, have been monitored using DTA, TGA, IR-spectroscopy, x ray diffraction, surface area and pore size distribution measurements.

  9. Cold rolling induced alloying behaviors in metallic multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe

    Phase transformation and atomic scale intermixing induced by deformation are important and fundamental issues in the mechanical alloying processes. Repeated cold rolling and folding experiments were performed on the metallic multilayers in order to study the deformation driven behaviors. Various binary systems such as isomorphous, eutectic and thermodynamically immiscible systems were studied. Moreover, monometallic Pd, Pt and Fe were selected in order to study the deformation driven recrystallization behavior. In Cu/Ni multilayers, the composition of the solid solution is revealed by an oscillation in the composition profile across the multilayers, which is different from the smoothly varying profile due to thermally activated diffusion. During the reaction, Cu mixed into Ni preferentially compared to Ni mixing into Cu, which is also in contrast to the thermal diffusion behavior. During the cold rolling of multilayers of Ni and V, deformation induces phase transformation and an interfacial mixing with suppression of nucleation of intermetallic phases. The results also demonstrate that between pure Ni and V layers a metastable fcc solid solution phase forms in Ni70V30, a metastable bcc solid solution phase forms in Ni30V70 and metastable fcc and bcc solid solution phases form in Ni57V43. Compared to the stored energy due to dislocation and interfaces, the excess chemical free energy from the interfacial mixing is the largest portion of total stored energy from deformation, which represents a form of mechanochemical transduction. The difference in the intermixing behaviors between Cu/Ni and Ni/V systems is due to that the systems have different heat of mixing and interface characters. Deformation of Cu/Fe multilayers yields a smooth and monotonic variation in the composition profile. From the local composition consumption it is revealed that that Fe mixes into Cu preferentially than Cu mixing into Fe. The room temperature deformation driven recrystallization was

  10. Radiation Effects in Refractory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinkle, Steven J.; Wiffen, F. W.

    2004-02-01

    In order to achieve the required low reactor mass per unit electrical power for space reactors, refractory alloys are essential due to their high operating temperature capability that in turn enables high thermal conversion efficiencies. One of the key issues associated with refractory alloys is their performance in a neutron irradiation environment. The available radiation effects data are reviewed for alloys based on Mo, W, Re, Nb and Ta. The largest database is associated with Mo alloys, whereas Re, W and Ta alloys have the least available information. Particular attention is focused on Nb-1Zr, which is a proposed cladding and structural material for the reactor in the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) project. All of the refractory alloys exhibit qualitatively similar temperature-dependent behavior. At low temperatures up to ~0.3TM, where TM is the melting temperature, the dominant effect of radiation is to produce pronounced radiation hardening and concomitant loss of ductility. The radiation hardening also causes a dramatic decrease in the fracture toughness of the refractory alloys. These low temperature radiation effects occur at relatively low damage levels of ~0.1 displacement per atom, dpa (~2×1024 n/m2, E>0.1 MeV). As a consequence, operation at low temperatures in the presence of neutron irradiation must be avoided for all refractory alloys. At intermediate temperatures (0.3 to 0.6 TM), void swelling and irradiation creep are the dominant effects of irradiation. The amount of volumetric swelling associated with void formation in refractory alloys is generally within engineering design limits (<5%) even for high neutron exposures (>>10 dpa). Very little experimental data exist on irradiation creep of refractory alloys, but data for other body centered cubic alloys suggest that the irradiation creep will produce negligible deformation for near-term space reactor applications.

  11. Dependence of the specific features of two PAPVD methods: Impulse Plasma Deposition (IPD) and Pulsed Magnetron Sputtering (PMS) on the structure of Fe-Cu alloy layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowska-Langier, Katarzyna; Chodun, Rafal; Nietubyc, Robert; Minikayev, Roman; Zdunek, Krzysztof

    2013-06-01

    This paper describes the study of the structural properties of the alloy layers prepared by two different, impulsively working PAPVD methods: the Pulsed Magnetron Sputtering (PMS) and the Impulse Plasma Deposition (IPD). The Fe-Cu alloy layers were synthesized. The results of our investigation revealed a nanocrystalline structure of the layers. The differences in the phase composition of the Fe-Cu alloy layers produced by these two methods were observed. The synthesis of the Fe-Cu layers by using the Pulsed Magnetron Sputtering method resulted in obtaining the two-phase, polycrystalline structures (fcc-Cu and bcc-Fe). In this case the clear evidence of mixing between the iron and copper atoms was not observed. The Fe-Cu layers deposited by the Impulse Plasma Deposition method were characterized by the non-equilibrium phase composition - the presence of one-phase supersaturated solid solution (fcc-Cu(Fe) or bcc-Fe(Cu)) was formed in immiscible systems. These results suggest a short-distance diffusion between the neighboring nanoparticles of the two metals (Cu and Fe) occurring during the IPD layers growth.

  12. Creation of Novel Solid-Solution Alloy Nanoparticles on the Basis of Density-of-States Engineering by Interelement Fusion.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kusada, Kohei; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2015-06-16

    Currently 118 known elements are represented in the periodic table. Of these 118 elements, only about 80 elements are stable, nonradioactive, and widely available for our society. From the viewpoint of the "elements strategy", we need to make full use of the 80 elements to bring out their latent ability and create innovative materials. Furthermore, there is a strong demand that the use of rare or toxic elements be reduced or replaced while their important properties are retained. Advanced science and technology could create higher-performance materials even while replacing or reducing minor or harmful elements through the combination of more abundant elements. The properties of elements are correlated directly with their electronic states. In a solid, the magnitude of the density of states (DOS) at the Fermi level affects the physical and chemical properties. In the present age, more attention has been paid to improving the properties of materials by means of alloying elements. In particular, the solid-solution-type alloy is advantageous because the properties can be continuously controlled by tuning the compositions and/or combinations of the constituent elements. However, the majority of bulk alloys are of the phase-separated type under ambient conditions, where constituent elements are immiscible with each other. To overcome the challenge of the bulk-phase metallurgical aspects, we have focused on the nanosize effect and developed methods involving "nonequilibrium synthesis" or "a process of hydrogen absorption/desorption". We propose a new concept of "density-of-states engineering" for the design of materials having the most desirable and suitable properties by means of "interelement fusion". In this Account, we describe novel solid-solution alloys of Pd-Pt, Ag-Rh, and Pd-Ru systems in which the constituent elements are immiscible in the bulk state. The homogeneous solid-solution alloys of Pd and Pt were created from Pd core/Pt shell nanoparticles using a

  13. PLUTONIUM-CERIUM-COPPER ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-05-12

    A low melting point plutonium alloy useful as fuel is a homogeneous liquid metal fueled nuclear reactor is described. Vessels of tungsten or tantalum are useful to contain the alloy which consists essentially of from 10 to 30 atomic per cent copper and the balance plutonium and cerium. with the plutontum not in excess of 50 atomic per cent.

  14. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    DOEpatents

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Martinez, David R.

    1998-01-01

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the Austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states.

  15. Aluminum and its light alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merica, Paul D

    1920-01-01

    Report is a summary of research work which has been done here and abroad on the constitution and mechanical properties of the various alloy systems with aluminum. The mechanical properties and compositions of commercial light alloys for casting, forging, or rolling, obtainable in this country are described.

  16. Equivalent crystal theory of alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John

    1991-01-01

    Equivalent Crystal Theory (ECT) is a new, semi-empirical approach to calculating the energetics of a solid with defects. The theory has successfully reproduced surface energies in metals and semiconductors. The theory of binary alloys to date, both with first-principles and semi-empirical models, has not been very successful in predicting the energetics of alloys. This procedure is used to predict the heats of formation, cohesive energy, and lattice parameter of binary alloys of Cu, Ni, Al, Ag, Au, Pd, and Pt as functions of composition. The procedure accurately reproduces the heats of formation versus composition curves for a variety of binary alloys. The results are then compared with other approaches such as the embedded atom and lattice parameters of alloys from pure metal properties more accurately than Vegard's law is presented.

  17. Heat storage in alloy transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenall, C. E.; Gueceri, S. I.; Farkas, D.; Labdon, M. B.; Nagaswami, N.; Pregger, B.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of using metal alloys as thermal energy storage media was determined. The following major elements were studied: (1) identification of congruently transforming alloys and thermochemical property measurements; (2) development of a precise and convenient method for measuring volume change during phase transformation and thermal expansion coefficients; (3) development of a numerical modeling routine for calculating heat flow in cylindrical heat exchangers containing phase change materials; and (4) identification of materials that could be used to contain the metal alloys. Several eutectic alloys and ternary intermetallic phases were determined. A method employing X-ray absorption techniques was developed to determine the coefficients of thermal expansion of both the solid and liquid phases and the volume change during phase transformation from data obtained during one continuous experimental test. The method and apparatus are discussed and the experimental results are presented. The development of the numerical modeling method is presented and results are discussed for both salt and metal alloy phase change media.

  18. Mo-Si alloy development

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.; Heatherly, L.; Wright, J.L.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of this task is to develop new-generation corrosion-resistant Mo-Si intermetallic alloys as hot components in advanced fossil energy conversion and combustion systems. The initial effort is devoted to Mo{sub 5}-Si{sub 3}-base (MSB) alloys containing boron additions. Three MSB alloys based on Mo-10.5Si-1.1B (wt %), weighing 1500 g were prepared by hot pressing of elemental and alloy powders at temperatures to 1600{degrees}C in vacuum. Microporosities and glassy-phase (probably silicate phases) formations are identified as the major concerns for preparation of MSB alloys by powder metallurgy. Suggestions are made to alleviate the problems of material processing.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF PROTECTIVE COATINGS FOR TANTALUM-BASE ALLOYS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PHASE STUDIES, PHYSICAL PROPERTIES, REFRACTORY MATERIALS, SILICIDES , SILICON COATINGS , SILICON COMPOUNDS, TANTALUM, TENSILE PROPERTIES, TITANIUM COMPOUNDS, TUNGSTEN ALLOYS, VANADIUM ALLOYS, VAPOR PLATING, ZINC COATINGS ....TANTALUM ALLOYS, ALLOYS, ALUMINUM COATINGS , ALUMINUM COMPOUNDS, BORON COMPOUNDS, CERAMIC COATINGS , CHROMIUM COMPOUNDS, COATINGS , FLAME SPRAYING...HAFNIUM ALLOYS, HAFNIUM COMPOUNDS, HARDNESS, HEAT RESISTANT ALLOYS, INTERMETALLIC COMPOUNDS, METAMATHEMATICS, NIOBIUM ALLOYS, OSCILLOGRAPHS, OXIDES

  20. Wedlable nickel aluminide alloy

    DOEpatents

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    2002-11-19

    A Ni.sub.3 Al alloy with improved weldability is described. It contains about 6-12 wt % Al, about 6-12 wt % Cr, about 0-3 wt % Mo, about 1.5-6 wt % Zr, about 0-0.02 wt % B and at least one of about 0-0.15 wt % C, about 0-0.20 wt % Si, about 0-0.01 wt % S and about 0-0.30 wt % Fe with the balance being Ni.

  1. Lightweight Disk Alloy Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    2001 (1982). 45. K C. Russell and J. W Eddington , JI Mat. Sci., 6, 20 (1972). 46. M. J. Lequeux, Ph.D. Thesis, Univ. de Paris-Sud (1979). 47. P S ...AD-A237 064 UGHTWEIGHT DISK ALLOY DEVELOPMENT S . M. Russel, C. C. Law and M. J. Blackburn Uted Te lowkles Corpoaton Prat & Whtney Govnment Enes...Space Propulo P. 0. Box 109600 West Palm Beach, FL 33410-9600 P. C. Clapp and D. M. Pease Istitute of Materials Science 9 ELECT Fg AW 11il S E Final

  2. Thermomechanical treatment of alloys

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John F.; Brager, Howard R.; Paxton, Michael M.

    1983-01-01

    An article of an alloy of AISI 316 stainless steel is reduced in size to predetermined dimensions by cold working in repeated steps. Before the last reduction step the article is annealed by heating within a temperature range, specifically between 1010.degree. C. and 1038.degree. C. for a time interval between 90 and 60 seconds depending on the actual temperature. By this treatment the swelling under neutron bombardment by epithermal neutrons is reduced while substantial recrystallization does not occur in actual use for a time interval of at least of the order of 5000 hours.

  3. Stable palladium alloys for diffusion of hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patapoff, M.

    1973-01-01

    Literature search on hydrogen absorption effect on palladium alloys revealed existence of alloy compositions in which alpha--beta transition does not take place. Survey conclusions: 40 percent gold alloy of palladium should be used in place of palladium; alloy must be free of interstitial impurities; and metallic surfaces of tube must be clean.

  4. Interaction Of Hydrogen With Metal Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.; Montano, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes experiments on interaction of hydrogen with number of metal alloys. Discusses relationship between metallurgical and crystallographic aspects of structures of alloys and observed distributions of hydrogen on charging. Also discusses effect of formation of hydrides on resistances of alloys to hydrogen. Describes attempt to correlate structures and compositions of alloys with their abilities to resist embrittlement by hydrogen.

  5. THEORY OF DIFFUSION IN ORDERING ALLOYS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    interstitial atoms through the interstices Diffusion of interstitial atoms in alloys with a body - centered cubic lattice Diffusion of...sites of the alloy The case of an alloy with body - centered cubic lattic structure The case of an alloy with a face-centered cubic lattic

  6. Amorphous phase formation, spinodal decomposition, and fractal growth of nanocrystals in an immiscible Hf-Nb system studied by ion beam mixing and atomistic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, K. P.; He, X.; Liu, B. X.

    2008-04-15

    In the equilibrium immiscible Hf-Nb system characterized by a positive heat of formation, five Hf-Nb metallic glasses with overall compositions of Hf{sub 84}Nb{sub 16}, Hf{sub 65}Nb{sub 35}, Hf{sub 45}Nb{sub 55}, Hf{sub 38}Nb{sub 62}, and Hf{sub 20}Nb{sub 80} are obtained by ion beam mixing with properly designed Hf-Nb multilayered films, suggesting a glass-forming composition range of 16-80 at. % of Nb. For the special case of Hf{sub 45}Nb{sub 55} located at the ridge point on the convex free energy curve, dual-glass phases are formed at a dose of 2x10{sup 15} Xe{sup +}/cm{sup 2}, which results from a spinodal decomposition of the expected Hf{sub 45}Nb{sub 55} amorphous phase. With increasing irradiation dose, fractal growth of nanocrystals (around 20 nm) appears in the major glass phase and the dimension is determined to be from 1.70 to 1.84 within a dose range of (4-7)x10{sup 15} Xe{sup +}/cm{sup 2}. In atomistic modeling, a n-body Hf-Nb potential is first constructed with the aid of ab initio calculations. Applying the constructed potential, molecular dynamics simulations using the hcp and bcc solid solution models, reveals an intrinsic glass-forming range to be within 15-83 at. % of Nb, which is compatible with the ion beam mixing experiments. Moreover, the formation of the metallic glasses and the fractal growth in association with the amorphous spinodal decomposition are also discussed in terms of the atomic collision theory and cluster-diffusion-limited-aggregation model.

  7. Application of Proper Orthogonal Decomposition to the morphological analysis of confined co-axial jets of immiscible liquids with comparable densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalampous, Georgios; Hardalupas, Yannis

    2014-11-01

    The development of a round liquid jet under the influence of a confined coaxial flow of an immiscible liquid of comparable density (central to annular flow density ratio of 8:10) was investigated in the vicinity of the nozzle exit. Two flow regimes were considered; one where the annular flow is faster than the central jet, so the central liquid jet is accelerated and one where the annular flow is slower, so the central liquid jet is decelerated. The central jet was visualised by high speed photography. Three modes of jet development were identified and classified in terms of the Reynolds number, Re, of the central jet which was in the range of 525 < Re < 2725, a modified definition of the Weber number, We, which allows the distinction between accelerating and deceleration flows and was in the range of -22 < We < 67 and the annular to central Momentum Ratio, MR, of the two streams which was in the range of 3.6 < MR < 91. By processing the time resolved jet images using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD), it was possible to reduce the description of jet morphology to a small number of spatial modes, which isolated the most significant morphologies of the jet development. In this way, the temporal and spatial characteristics of the instabilities on the interface were clearly identified which highlights the advantages of POD over direct observation of the images. Relationships between the flow parameters and the interfacial waves were established. The wavelength of the interfacial instability was found to depend on the velocity of the fastest moving stream, which is contrary to findings for fluids with large density differences.

  8. One-step synthesis of layered yttrium hydroxides in immiscible liquid–liquid systems: Intercalation of sterically-bulky hydrophobic organic anions and doping of europium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Mebae; Fujihara, Shinobu

    2014-02-15

    Inorganic–organic layered rare-earth compounds were synthesized on the basis of a biphasic liquid–liquid system in one pot. Layered yttrium hydroxides (LYHs) were chosen as a host material for the intercalation of hydrophobic organic guest anions such as benzoate, sebacate, or laurate. In a typical synthesis, an organic phase dissolving carboxylic acid was placed in contact with an equal amount of an aqueous phase dissolving yttrium nitrate n-hydrate and urea. At elevated temperatures up to 80 °C, urea was hydrolyzed to release hydroxyl anions which were used to form yttrium hydroxide layers. LYHs were then precipitated with the intercalation of carboxylate anions delivered from the organic phase under the distribution law. The structure and the morphology of the LYHs could be modulated by the intercalated anions. Doped with Eu{sup 3+} ions, the LYHs exhibited red photoluminescence which was enhanced by the intercalated anions due to the antenna effect. - Graphical abstract: The Eu{sup 3+}-doped layered yttrium hydroxide exhibits intense red photoluminescence after intercalation of benzoate ions. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Immiscible biphasic liquid systems were introduced to synthesize layered yttrium hydroxides. • The temperature of the biphasic systems does not exceed 80 °C in one step of the synthesis. • Hydrophobic organic anions were intercalated between the hydroxide layers in one pot. • Structure and morphology of the hydroxides were modulated by changing the kind of organic anions. • Eu{sup 3+}-doping led to red luminescence from the hydroxides in association with the intercalated organic anions.

  9. Comparison of Interfacial Partitioning Tracer Test and X-ray Microtomography Measurements of Immiscible Fluid-Fluid Interfacial Areas within the Identical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, K. C.; McDonald, K.; Brusseau, M. L. L.

    2015-12-01

    The interfacial area between immiscible fluids in porous media has been demonstrated to be a critical entity for improved understanding, characterization, and simulation of multiphase flow and mass transport in the subsurface. Two general methods are available for measuring interfacial areas for 3-D porous-media systems, high-resolution microtomographic imaging and interfacial partitioning tracer tests (IPTT). Each method has their associated advantages and disadvantages. A few prior research efforts have conducted comparative analyses of the two methods, which have generally indicated disparities in measured values for natural geomedia. For these studies, however, interfacial areas were measured for separate samples with each method due to method restrictions. Thus, to date, there has been no comparative analysis conducted wherein the two measurement methods were applied to the exact same sample. To address this issue, trichloroethene-water interfacial areas were measured for a system comprising a well-sorted, natural sand (median grain diameter of 0.323 mm) using both X-ray microtomography and IPTTs. The microtomographic imaging was conducted on the same packed columns used to conduct the IPTTs. Columns were imaged before and after the IPTTs to evaluate potential impacts of the tracer tests on fluid configuration. The interfacial areas measured using IPTT were 4-6 times larger than the microtomography results, which is consistent with previous work. This disparity was attributed to the inability of the microtomography method to characterize interfacial area associated with microscopic surface roughness. The results indicate that both methods provide useful measures of interfacial area as long as their limitations are recognized.

  10. Immiscible displacement of oil by water in a microchannel: asymmetric flow behavior and nonlinear stability analysis of core-annular flow.

    PubMed

    Foroughi, Hooman; Abbasi, Alireza; Das, Kausik S; Kawaji, Masahiro

    2012-02-01

    The immiscible displacement of oil by water in a circular microchannel was investigated. A fused silica microchannel with an inner diameter of 250 μm and a length of 7 cm was initially filled with a viscous silicone oil. Only water then was injected into the channel. We describe our flow observations based on the two-dimensional images captured in the middle of the channel. The water finger displaced the oil and left an oil film on the channel wall. While the oil was being displaced at the core, the flow resistance decreased, which resulted in increases in water flow rate and inertia. Eventually, the water finger reached the channel exit and formed a core-annular flow pattern. The wavelength of the waves formed at the oil-water interface also increased with the increase in inertia. The initially symmetric interfacial waves became asymmetric with time. Also, the water core shifted from the center of the channel and left a thinner oil film on one side of the microchannel. Under all flow rates tested in this study, as long as the water was continuously injected, the water core was stable and no breakup into droplets was observed. We also discuss the flow stability based on nonlinear and linear stability analyses performed on the core-annular flow. Compared to the linear analysis, which ignores the inertia effects, the nonlinear analysis, which includes the inertia effects, predicts longer interfacial wavelengths by a factor of 1/sqrt[1-a(o)/2(We(w) + We(o)a(o)(2)/1-a(o)(2))] where We(w) and We(o) are the Weber numbers of the water and the oil phases, respectively, and a(o) is the unperturbed water core radius made dimensionless by the channel radius.

  11. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800.degree. C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800.degree. C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700.degree. C. at a low cost

  12. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800 C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800 C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700 C. at a low cost

  13. Joint properties of cast Fe-Pt magnetic alloy laser welded to gold alloys.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ikuya; Nguyen, Khoi; Benson, P Andrew; Tanaka, Yasuhiro

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the joint properties of a cast Fe-Pt magnetic alloy (Fe-36 at % Pt) laser welded to three gold alloys. The gold alloys used were ADA Type II and Type IV gold alloys, and an Ag-based (Ag-Au) gold alloy. Cast plates (0.5 x 3.0 x 10 mm) were prepared for each alloy. After the cast Fe-Pt plates were heat treated, they were butted against each of the three alloys and then laser welded with Nd:YAG laser at 200 V. Homogeneously welded specimens were also prepared for each alloy. Tensile testing was conducted at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Failure load (N) and elongation (%) were recorded. After tensile testing, the fractured surfaces were examined with the use of SEM. The failure-load values of the group of alloys welded homogeneously were ranked in the order of: Ag-Au alloy > Type IV alloy > Type II alloy > Fe-Pt alloy. The Type IV alloy welded to Fe-Pt alloy had the highest failure-load value among the three alloys tested. The elongation results tended to follow a similar pattern. The results of this study indicated that Type IV gold alloy is a suitable alloy for metal frameworks to which cast Fe-Pt magnetic alloy is laser welded.

  14. High performance alloy electroforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Winkelman, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    Electroformed copper and nickel are used in structural applications for advanced propellant combustion chambers. An improved process has been developed by Bell Aerospace Textron, Inc. wherein electroformed nickel-manganese alloy has demonstrated superior mechanical and thermal stability when compared to previously reported deposits from known nickel plating processes. Solution chemistry and parametric operating procedures are now established and material property data is established for deposition of thick, large complex shapes such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The critical operating variables are those governing the ratio of codeposited nickel and manganese. The deposition uniformity which in turn affects the manganese concentration distribution is affected by solution resistance and geometric effects as well as solution agitation. The manganese concentration in the deposit must be between 2000 and 3000 ppm for optimum physical properties to be realized. The study also includes data regarding deposition procedures for achieving excellent bond strength at an interface with copper, nickel-manganese or INCONEL 718. Applications for this electroformed material include fabrication of complex or re-entry shapes which would be difficult or impossible to form from high strength alloys such as INCONEL 718.

  15. DISPERSION STRENGTHENED NICKEL-BASE ALLOYS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The swaged cone of extruded Nichrome-thoria alloys prepared by the thermal decomposition of thorium nitrate onto alloy powder indicated descreased... swaging of these dispersion-strengthened Nichrome alloys was dependent on the presence of a mild steel jacket on the alloy rod as a result of the canned...extrusion practice. Efforts to cold swage the alloy materials without this jacket were unsuccessful. (Author)

  16. Heat storage in alloy transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenall, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of using metal alloys as thermal energy storage media was investigated. The elements selected as candidate media were limited to aluminum, copper, magnesium, silicon, zinc, calcium, and phosphorus on the basis of low cost and latent heat of transformation. Several new eutectic alloys and ternary intermetallic phases were determined. A new method employing X-ray absorption techniques was developed to determine the coefficients of thermal expansion of both the solid and liquid phases and the volume change during phase transformation. The method and apparatus are discussed and the experimental results are presented for aluminum and two aluminum-eutectic alloys. Candidate materials were evaluated to determine suitable materials for containment of the metal alloys. Graphite was used to contain the alloys during the volume change measurements. Silicon carbide was identified as a promising containment material and surface-coated iron alloys were also evaluated. System considerations that are pertinent if alloy eutectics are used as thermal energy storage media are discussed. Potential applications to solar receivers and industrial furnaces are illustrated schematically.

  17. Mechanically Alloyed High Entropy Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, G.; Adrian, M. M.; Csaki, I.; Popescu, C. A.; Mitrică, D.; Vasile, S.; Carcea, I.

    2016-08-01

    In the last years high entropy alloys have been investigated due to their high hardness, high temperature stability and unusual properties that make these alloys to have significant interest. In comparison with traditional alloys that are based on two or three major elements, this new generation alloys consists at least of 5 principal elements, with the concentration between 5 and 35 at.%. The present paper reports synthesis of high entropy alloys (HEA) and high entropy composites (HEC) synthesized by mechanical alloying (MA). The equiatomic AlCrFeNiMn matrix was used for creating the HEA matrix, starting from elemental powders and as reinforcing material for composites was used pure graphite. The mechanical alloying process was carried out at different duration, in a high energy planetary ball mill, under argon atmosphere. The elemental powders alloying began after '5 hours of milling and was complete after 40 hours. The mechanical alloyed matrix and composite was pressed and heat treated under argon protection. The elemental powers were investigated for physical - technological properties, and by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Phase pressing operation was realized with a hydraulic press and the applied pressure was progressive. The sintering process was carried out at 850°C for 2 h. The X-ray diffraction revealed that the MA process resulted in solid solutions formation and also revealed body- centred cubic (BCC) and face-centred cubic (FCC) structures with average grain size around 40 nm. In addition, nanoscale particles were highlighted by scanning electron microscopy, as well as the homogeneity of the chemical composition of the matrix and composite that was confirmed by EDX microanalysis. It was noted that HEA matrix and HEA composites were processed with a high degree of compaction and with a quite large capacity of mixed powder densification (around 70%).

  18. Modeling dissolution in aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbin, Tracie Lee

    2005-07-01

    Aluminum and its alloys are used in many aspects of modern life, from soda cans and household foil to the automobiles and aircraft in which we travel. Aluminum alloy systems are characterized by good workability that enables these alloys to be economically rolled, extruded, or forged into useful shapes. Mechanical properties such as strength are altered significantly with cold working, annealing, precipitation-hardening, and/or heat-treatments. Heat-treatable aluminum alloys contain one or more soluble constituents such as copper, lithium, magnesium, silicon and zinc that individually, or with other elements, can form phases that strengthen the alloy. Microstructure development is highly dependent on all of the processing steps the alloy experiences. Ultimately, the macroscopic properties of the alloy depend strongly on the microstructure. Therefore, a quantitative understanding of the microstructural changes that occur during thermal and mechanical processing is fundamental to predicting alloy properties. In particular, the microstructure becomes more homogeneous and secondary phases are dissolved during thermal treatments. Robust physical models for the kinetics of particle dissolution are necessary to predict the most efficient thermal treatment. A general dissolution model for multi-component alloys has been developed using the front-tracking method to study the dissolution of precipitates in an aluminum alloy matrix. This technique is applicable to any alloy system, provided thermodynamic and diffusion data are available. Treatment of the precipitate interface is explored using two techniques: the immersed-boundary method and a new technique, termed here the "sharp-interface" method. The sharp-interface technique is based on a variation of the ghost fluid method and eliminates the need for corrective source terms in the characteristic equations. In addition, the sharp-interface method is shown to predict the dissolution behavior of precipitates in aluminum

  19. Nanoporous bimetallic Pt-Au alloy nanocomposites with superior catalytic activity towards electro-oxidation of methanol and formic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhonghua; Wang, Yan; Wang, Xiaoguang

    2011-04-01

    We present a facile route to fabricate novel nanoporous bimetallic Pt-Au alloy nanocomposites by dealloying a rapidly solidified Al75Pt15Au10 precursor under free corrosion conditions. The microstructure of the precursor and the as-dealloyed sample was characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. The Al75Pt15Au10 precursor is composed of a single-phase Al2(Au,Pt) intermetallic compound, and can be fully dealloyed in a 20 wt.% NaOH or 5 wt.% HCl aqueous solution. The dealloying leads to the formation of the nanoporous Pt60Au40 nanocomposites (np-Pt60Au40 NCs) with an fcc structure. The morphology, size and crystal orientation of grains in the precursor can be conserved in the resultant nanoporous alloy. The np-Pt60Au40 NCs consist of two zones with distinct ligament/channel sizes and compositions. The formation mechanism of these np-Pt60Au40 NCs can be rationalized based upon surface diffusion of more noble elements and spinodal decomposition during dealloying. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the np-Pt60Au40 NCs show superior catalytic activity towards the electro-oxidation of methanol and formic acid in the acid media compared to the commercial JM-Pt/C catalyst. This material can find potential applications in catalysis related areas, such as direct methanol or formic acidfuelcells. Our findings demonstrate that dealloying is an effective and simple strategy to realize the alloying of immiscible systems under mild conditions, and to fabricate novel nanostructures with superior performance.We present a facile route to fabricate novel nanoporous bimetallic Pt-Au alloy nanocomposites by dealloying a rapidly solidified Al75Pt15Au10 precursor under free corrosion conditions. The microstructure of the precursor and the as-dealloyed sample was characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron

  20. Alloy design for intrinsically ductile refractory high-entropy alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikh, Saad; Shafeie, Samrand; Hu, Qiang; Ahlström, Johan; Persson, Christer; Veselý, Jaroslav; Zýka, Jiří; Klement, Uta; Guo, Sheng

    2016-10-01

    Refractory high-entropy alloys (RHEAs), comprising group IV (Ti, Zr, Hf), V (V, Nb, Ta), and VI (Cr, Mo, W) refractory elements, can be potentially new generation high-temperature materials. However, most existing RHEAs lack room-temperature ductility, similar to conventional refractory metals and alloys. Here, we propose an alloy design strategy to intrinsically ductilize RHEAs based on the electron theory and more specifically to decrease the number of valence electrons through controlled alloying. A new ductile RHEA, Hf0.5Nb0.5Ta0.5Ti1.5Zr, was developed as a proof of concept, with a fracture stress of close to 1 GPa and an elongation of near 20%. The findings here will shed light on the development of ductile RHEAs for ultrahigh-temperature applications in aerospace and power-generation industries.

  1. Mechanical alloying of biocompatible Co-28Cr-6Mo alloy.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-De Jesús, F; Bolarín-Miró, A M; Torres-Villaseñor, G; Cortés-Escobedo, C A; Betancourt-Cantera, J A

    2010-07-01

    We report on an alternative route for the synthesis of crystalline Co-28Cr-6Mo alloy, which could be used for surgical implants. Co, Cr and Mo elemental powders, mixed in an adequate weight relation according to ISO Standard 58342-4 (ISO, 1996), were used for the mechanical alloying (MA) of nano-structured Co-alloy. The process was carried out at room temperature in a shaker mixer mill using hardened steel balls and vials as milling media, with a 1:8 ball:powder weight ratio. Crystalline structure characterization of milled powders was carried out by X-ray diffraction in order to analyze the phase transformations as a function of milling time. The aim of this work was to evaluate the alloying mechanism involved in the mechanical alloying of Co-28Cr-6Mo alloy. The evolution of the phase transformations with milling time is reported for each mixture. Results showed that the resultant alloy is a Co-alpha solid solution, successfully obtained by mechanical alloying after a total of 10 h of milling time: first Cr and Mo are mechanically prealloyed for 7 h, and then Co is mixed in for 3 h. In addition, different methods of premixing were studied. The particle size of the powders is reduced with increasing milling time, reaching about 5 mum at 10 h; a longer time promotes the formation of aggregates. The morphology and crystal structure of milled powders as a function of milling time were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and XR diffraction.

  2. Nanoporous bimetallic Pt-Au alloy nanocomposites with superior catalytic activity towards electro-oxidation of methanol and formic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhonghua; Wang, Yan; Wang, Xiaoguang

    2011-04-01

    We present a facile route to fabricate novel nanoporous bimetallic Pt-Au alloy nanocomposites by dealloying a rapidly solidified Al(75)Pt(15)Au(10) precursor under free corrosion conditions. The microstructure of the precursor and the as-dealloyed sample was characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. The Al(75)Pt(15)Au(10) precursor is composed of a single-phase Al(2)(Au,Pt) intermetallic compound, and can be fully dealloyed in a 20 wt.% NaOH or 5 wt.% HCl aqueous solution. The dealloying leads to the formation of the nanoporous Pt(60)Au(40) nanocomposites (np-Pt(60)Au(40) NCs) with an fcc structure. The morphology, size and crystal orientation of grains in the precursor can be conserved in the resultant nanoporous alloy. The np-Pt(60)Au(40) NCs consist of two zones with distinct ligament/channel sizes and compositions. The formation mechanism of these np-Pt(60)Au(40) NCs can be rationalized based upon surface diffusion of more noble elements and spinodal decomposition during dealloying. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the np-Pt(60)Au(40) NCs show superior catalytic activity towards the electro-oxidation of methanol and formic acid in the acid media compared to the commercial JM-Pt/C catalyst. This material can find potential applications in catalysis related areas, such as direct methanol or formic acid fuel cells. Our findings demonstrate that dealloying is an effective and simple strategy to realize the alloying of immiscible systems under mild conditions, and to fabricate novel nanostructures with superior performance.

  3. Metallic alloy stability studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firth, G. C.

    1983-01-01

    The dimensional stability of candidate cryogenic wind tunnel model materials was investigated. Flat specimens of candidate materials were fabricated and cryo-cycled to assess relative dimensional stability. Existing 2-dimensional airfoil models as well as models in various stages of manufacture were also cryo-cycled. The tests indicate that 18 Ni maraging steel offers the greatest dimensional stability and that PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel is the most stable of the stainless steels. Dimensional stability is influenced primarily by metallurgical transformations (austenitic to martensitic) and manufacturing-induced stresses. These factors can be minimized by utilization of stable alloys, refinement of existing manufacturing techniques, and incorporation of new manufacturing technologies.

  4. High strength ferritic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, William C.; Smidt, Frederick A.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1977-01-01

    A high-strength ferritic alloy useful for fast reactor duct and cladding applications where an iron base contains from about 9% to about 13% by weight chromium, from about 4% to about 8% by weight molybdenum, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight niobium, from about 0.1% to about 0.3% by weight vanadium, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight silicon, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight manganese, a maximum of about 0.05% by weight nitrogen, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight sulfur, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight phosphorous, and from about 0.04% to about 0.12% by weight carbon.

  5. Manufacturing of High Entropy Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Licavoli, Joseph J.; Gao, Michael C.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2015-07-01

    High entropy alloys (HEAs) have generated interest in recent years due to their unique positioning within the alloy world. By incorporating a number of elements in high proportion they have high configurational entropy, and thus they hold the promise of interesting and useful properties such as enhanced strength and phase stability. The present study investigates the microstructure of two single-phase face-centered cubic (FCC) HEAs, CoCrFeNi and CoCrFeNiMn, with special attention given to melting, homogenization and thermo-mechanical processing. Large-scale ingots were made by vacuum induction melting to avoid the extrinsic factors inherent in small-scale laboratory button samples. A computationally based homogenization heat treatment was applied to both alloys in order to eliminate segregation due to normal ingot solidification. The alloys fabricated well, with typical thermo-mechanical processing parameters being employed.

  6. Technical Seminar "Shape Memory Alloys"

    NASA Video Gallery

    Shape memory alloys are a unique group of materials that remember their original shape and return to that shape after being strained. How could the aerospace, automotive, and energy exploration ind...

  7. Casting Characteristics of Aluminum Die Casting Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The research program investigates the casting characteristics of selected aluminum die casting alloys. Specifically, the alloys' tendencies towards die soldering and sludge formation, and the alloys' fluidity and machinability are evaluated. It was found that: When the Fe and Mn contents of the alloy are low; caution has to be taken against possible die soldering. When the alloy has a high sludge factor, particularly a high level of Fe, measures must be taken to prevent the formation of large hardspots. For this kind of alloy, the Fe content should be kept at its lowest allowable level and the Mn content should be at its highest possible level. If there are problems in die filling, measures other than changing the alloy chemistry need to be considered first. In terms of alloy chemistry, the elements that form high temperature compounds must be kept at their lowest allowable levels. The alloys should not have machining problems when appropriate machining techniques and machining parameters are used.

  8. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    DOEpatents

    Shahinpoor, M.; Martinez, D.R.

    1998-04-07

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states. 16 figs.

  9. Alloy dissolution in argon stirred steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, Darryl Scott

    Alloying is required for the production of all steel products from small castings to large beams. Addition of large quantities of bulk alloys can result in alloy segregation and inconsistent alloy recovery. The objective of this research was to better understand alloy dissolution in liquid steel especially as it relates to Missouri S&Ts' patented continuous steelmaking process. A 45-kilogram capacity ladle with a single porous plug was used to evaluate the effect of four experimental factors on alloy dissolution: alloy species, alloy size or form, argon flow rate, and furnace tap temperature. Four alloys were tested experimentally including Class I low carbon ferromanganese, nickel and tin (as a surrogate for low melting alloys) and Class II ferroniobium. The alloys ranged in size and form from granular to 30 mm diameter lumps. Experimental results were evaluated using a theoretically based numerical model for the steel shell period, alloy mixing (Class I) and alloy dissolution (Class II). A CFD model of the experimental ladle was used to understand steel motion in the ladle and to provide steel velocity magnitudes for the numerical steel shell model. Experiments and modeling confirmed that smaller sized alloys have shorter steel shell periods and homogenize faster than larger particles. Increasing the argon flow rate shortened mixing times and reduced the delay between alloy addition and the first appearance of alloy in the melt. In addition, for every five degree increase in steel bath temperature the steel shell period was shortened by approximately four percent. Class II ferroniobium alloy dissolution was an order of magnitude slower than Class I alloy mixing.

  10. Research and Development on Titanium Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1949-10-31

    svmym lIfe. Th~e rAnge of cOmposila Ivwstpted in the bin"rtniaum-stiver sistems was extended to 5% snw an M~an~Ajmm loy cntprn 0.1 Is beryllium were...extended to 5,0 per cent silverl and titanium- beryllium alloys containing 0.1 to-1.0 per cent berylliuma were inveitiga~ted. None of~ these alloys had...of: 1. Binary titanium-germanium alloys. 2. Binary titanium-nickel alloys. 3, Binary titanium-silver alloys. 4. Binary titanium- beryllium alloys. 5

  11. Choosing An Alloy For Automotive Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Joseph R.

    1988-01-01

    Report describes study of chemical compositions and microstructures of alloys for automotive Stirling engines. Engines offer advantages of high efficiency, low pollution, low noise, and ability to use variety of fuels. Twenty alloys evaluated for resistance to corrosion permeation by hydrogen, and high temperature. Iron-based alloys considered primary candidates because of low cost. Nickel-based alloys second choice in case suitable iron-based alloy could not be found. Cobalt-based alloy included for comparison but not candidate, because it is expensive strategic material.

  12. Ni{sub 3}Al aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.

    1993-10-01

    This paper provides a brief review of the recent progress in research and development of Ni{sub 3}Al and its alloys. Emphasis has been placed on understanding low ductility and brittle fracture of Ni{sub 3}Al alloys at ambient and elevated temperatures. Recent studies have resulted in identifying both intrinsic and extrinsic factors governing the fracture behavior of Ni{sub 3}Al alloys. Parallel efforts on alloy design using physical metallurgy principles have led to properties for structural use. Industrial interest in these alloys is high, and examples of industrial involvement in processing and utilization of these alloys are briefly mentioned.

  13. Melt-melt immiscibility as result of synchronous melting of metapelites and impure marbles at crustal depth in the Moldanubian Zone, Bohemian Massif.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrero, Silvio; O´Brien, Patrick J.; Ziemann, Martin A.; Wunder, Bernd; Hecht, Lutz; Wälle, Markus

    2016-04-01

    the commonly observed preferentially partitioning of REE in carbonatic melts with respect to silicatic melts. The formation of this carbonatic melt under conditions of primary melt-melt immiscibility at relatively shallow crustal levels is a novel finding. Primary carbonatic melts, i.e. carbonatites, are characteristically the product of partial melting of carbonates at mantle depths, or result from differentiation of deep, Ca-rich silicate melt during migration toward the surface. In the present case study, the protolith of these migmatites was likely a heterogeneous (meta)sedimentary sequence, mainly composed of pelitic sediments and including scattered lenses of impure limestones, which underwent synchronous partial melting during the Variscan orogeny.

  14. Alloy hardening and softening in binary molybdenum alloys as related to electron concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of alloy additions of hafnium, tantalum, tungsten, rhenium, osmium, iridium, and platinum on hardness of molybdenum. Special emphasis was placed on alloy softening in these binary molybdenum alloys. Results showed that alloy softening was produced by those elements having an excess of s+d electrons compared to molybdenum, while those elements having an equal number or fewer s+d electrons that molybdenum failed to produce alloy softening. Alloy softening and alloy hardening can be correlated with the difference in number of s+d electrons of the solute element and molybdenum.

  15. High strength forgeable tantalum base alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckman, R. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Increasing tungsten content of tantalum base alloy to 12-15% level will improve high temperature creep properties of existing tantalum base alloys while retaining their excellent fabrication and welding characteristics.

  16. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment. PMID:26563908

  17. Alloys developed for high temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basuki, Eddy Agus; Prajitno, Djoko Hadi; Muhammad, Fadhli

    2017-01-01

    Alloys used for high temperatures applications require combinations of mechanical strength, microstructural stability and corrosion/oxidation resistance. Nickel base superalloys have been traditionally the prime materials utilized for hot section components of aircraft turbine engines. Nevertheless, due to their limited melting temperatures, alloys based on intermetallic compounds, such as TiAl base alloys, have emerged as high temperature materials and intensively developed with the main aim to replace nickel based superalloys. For applications in steam power plants operated at lower temperatures, ferritic high temperature alloys still attract high attention, and therefore, development of these alloys is in progress. This paper highlights the important metallurgical parameters of high temperature alloys and describes few efforts in the development of Fe-Ni-Al based alloys containing B2-(Fe,Ni)Al precipitates, oxide dispersion strengthening (ODS) ferritic steels and titanium aluminide based alloys include important protection system of aluminide coatings.

  18. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.

  19. Materials Data on Al(BiO3)3 (SG:9) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on AlBiCl6 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-04

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on Al(BiO3)3 (SG:123) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Shape memory alloys. Ultralow-fatigue shape memory alloy films.

    PubMed

    Chluba, Christoph; Ge, Wenwei; Lima de Miranda, Rodrigo; Strobel, Julian; Kienle, Lorenz; Quandt, Eckhard; Wuttig, Manfred

    2015-05-29

    Functional shape memory alloys need to operate reversibly and repeatedly. Quantitative measures of reversibility include the relative volume change of the participating phases and compatibility matrices for twinning. But no similar argument is known for repeatability. This is especially crucial for many future applications, such as artificial heart valves or elastocaloric cooling, in which more than 10 million transformation cycles will be required. We report on the discovery of an ultralow-fatigue shape memory alloy film system based on TiNiCu that allows at least 10 million transformation cycles. We found that these films contain Ti2Cu precipitates embedded in the base alloy that serve as sentinels to ensure complete and reproducible transformation in the course of each memory cycle.

  3. Tarnish of dental alloys by oral microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, T K; Vaidyanathan, J; Linke, H A; Schulman, A

    1991-11-01

    Five dental alloys, on exposure to blood and chocolate media with and without inoculated microorganisms, showed varying degrees of tarnish. The results indicated a composition-dependent tarnish behavior of alloys in microorganism-inoculated media, indicating a potential role for the oral microorganisms in inducing clinically observed tarnish of dental alloys. Actinomyces viscosus and periodontal pocket specimens show a similarity in their activity to induce tarnish in base metal-containing dental alloys.

  4. Nickel aluminide alloys with improved weldability

    DOEpatents

    Santella, Michael L.; Goodwin, Gene M.

    1995-05-09

    Weldable nickel aluminide alloys which are essentially free, if not entirely free, of weld hot cracking are provided by employing zirconium concentrations in these alloys of greater than 2.6 wt. % or sufficient to provide a substantial presence of Ni--Zr eutectic phase in the weld so as to prevent weld hot cracking. Weld filler metals formed from these so modified nickel aluminide alloys provide for crack-free welds in previously known nickel aluminide alloys.

  5. Nickel aluminide alloys with improved weldability

    DOEpatents

    Santella, M.L.; Goodwin, G.M.

    1995-05-09

    Weldable nickel aluminide alloys which are essentially free, if not entirely free, of weld hot cracking are provided by employing zirconium concentrations in these alloys of greater than 2.6 wt. % or sufficient to provide a substantial presence of Ni--Zr eutectic phase in the weld so as to prevent weld hot cracking. Weld filler metals formed from these so modified nickel aluminide alloys provide for crack-free welds in previously known nickel aluminide alloys. 5 figs.

  6. HEAT TREATED U-Nb ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    McGeary, R.K.; Justusson, W.M.

    1959-11-24

    A fuel element for a nuclear reactor is described comprising an alloy containing uranium and from 7 to 20 wt.% niobium, the alloy being substantially in the gamma phase and having been produced by working an ingot of the alloy into the desired shape, homogenizing it by annealing it at a temperature in the gamma phase field, and quenching it to retain the gamma phase structure of the alloy.

  7. Contact dermatitis from beryllium in dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Haberman, A L; Pratt, M; Storrs, F J

    1993-03-01

    An increasing number of metals with the potential to cause allergic contact dermatitis have found their way into dental alloys for economic and practical reasons. 2 patients are reported who developed gingivitis adjacent to the Rexillium III alloy in their dental prostheses. Patch testing demonstrated positive reactions to beryllium sulfate, a component of the alloy. Components of dental alloys and the mechanism of the contact dermatitis are discussed.

  8. Self-disintegrating Raney metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Oden, Laurance L.; Russell, James H.

    1979-01-01

    A method of preparing a Raney metal alloy which is capable of self-disintegrating when contacted with water vapor. The self-disintegrating property is imparted to the alloy by incorporating into the alloy from 0.4 to 0.8 weight percent carbon. The alloy is useful in forming powder which can be converted to a Raney metal catalyst with increased surface area and catalytic activity.

  9. HIGH-TEMPERATURE OXIDATION PROTECTIVE COATINGS FOR VANADIUM-BASE ALLOYS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    SILICIDES , SILICON COATINGS , THIN FILM STORAGE DEVICES, TITANIUM ALLOYS, VAPOR PLATING, YTTRIUM COMPOUNDS, ZINC ALLOYS, ZINC COATINGS ....ANTIOXIDANTS, *METAL COATINGS , *REFRACTORY COATINGS , *VANADIUM ALLOYS, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, CERAMIC COATINGS , CHROMIUM ALLOYS, CLADDING, FLAME SPRAYING...HIGH TEMPERATURE, INTERMETALLIC COMPOUNDS, IODINE COMPOUNDS, IRON ALLOYS, MAGNESIUM ALLOYS, NICKEL ALLOYS, NICKEL COMPOUNDS, NIOBIUM ALLOYS, OXIDES

  10. Oxidation of low cobalt alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    Four high temperature alloys: U-700, Mar M-247, Waspaloy and PM/HIP U-700 were modified with various cobalt levels ranging from 0 percent to their nominal commercial levels. The alloys were then tested in cyclic oxidation in static air at temperatures ranging from 1000 to 1150 C at times from 500 to 100 1 hour cycles. Specific weight change with time and X-ray diffraction analyses of the oxidized samples were used to evaluate the alloys. The alloys tend to be either Al2O3/aluminate spinel or Cr2O3/chromite spinel formers depending on the Cr/Al ratio in the alloy. Waspaloy with a ratio of 15:1 is a strong Cr2O3 former while this U-700 with a ratio of 3.33:1 tends to form mostly Cr2O3 while Mar M-247 with a ratio of 1.53:1 is a strong Al2O3 former. The best cyclic oxidation resistance is associated with the Al2O3 formers. The cobalt levels appear to have little effect on the oxidation resistance of the Al2O3/aluminate spinel formers while any tendency to form Cr2O3 is accelerated with increased cobalt levels and leads to increased oxidation attack.

  11. Superconducting compounds and alloys research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, G.

    1975-01-01

    Resistivity measurements as a function of temperature were performed on alloys of the binary material system In sub(1-x) Bi sub x for x varying between 0 and 1. It was found that for all single-phase alloys (the pure elements, alpha-In, and the three intermetallic compounds) at temperatures sufficiently above the Debye-temperature, the resistivity p can be expressed as p = a sub o T(n), where a sub o and n are composition-dependent constants. The same exponential relationship can also be applied for the sub-system In-In2Bi, when the two phases are in compositional equilibrium. Superconductivity measurements on single and two-phase alloys can be explained with respect to the phase diagram. There occur three superconducting phases (alpha-In, In2Bi, and In5Bi3) with different transition temperatures in the alloying system. The magnitude of the transition temperatures for the various intermetallic phases of In-Bi is such that the disappearance or occurrence of a phase in two component alloys can be demonstrated easily by means of superconductivity measurements.

  12. Quasicrystal-reinforced Mg alloys

    PubMed Central

    Kyun Kim, Young; Tae Kim, Won; Hyang Kim, Do

    2014-01-01

    The formation of the icosahedral phase (I-phase) as a secondary solidification phase in Mg–Zn–Y and Mg–Zn–Al base systems provides useful advantages in designing high performance wrought magnesium alloys. The strengthening in two-phase composites (I-phase + α-Mg) can be explained by dispersion hardening due to the presence of I-phase particles and by the strong bonding property at the I-phase/matrix interface. The presence of an additional secondary solidification phase can further enhance formability and mechanical properties. In Mg–Zn–Y alloys, the co-presence of I and Ca2Mg6Zn3 phases by addition of Ca can significantly enhance formability, while in Mg–Zn–Al alloys, the co-presence of the I-phase and Mg2Sn phase leads to the enhancement of mechanical properties. Dynamic and static recrystallization are significantly accelerated by addition of Ca in Mg–Zn–Y alloy, resulting in much smaller grain size and more random texture. The high strength of Mg–Zn–Al–Sn alloys is attributed to the presence of finely distributed Mg2Sn and I-phase particles embedded in the α-Mg matrix. PMID:27877660

  13. PREPARATION OF URANIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    A process is given for preparing uranium--aluminum alloys from a solution of uranium halide in an about equimolar molten alkali metal halide-- aluminum halide mixture and excess aluminum. The uranium halide is reduced and the uranium is alloyed with the excess aluminum. The alloy and salt are separated from each other. (AEC)

  14. High-temperature nickel-brazing alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, A. H.; Thompson, S. R.

    1970-01-01

    Gold-nickel brazing alloy, with 5 percent indium added to depress the melting point, is used for brazing of nickel-clad silver electrical conductors which operate at temperatures to 1200 deg F. Alloy has low resistivity, requires no flux, and is less corrosive than other gold-nickel, gold-copper alloys.

  15. High-niobium titanium aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.C.

    1992-02-18

    This patent describes an aged niobium modified titanium aluminum alloy, the alloy consisting essentially of titanium, aluminum, and niobium in the following atomic ratio: Ti{sub 48-37}Al{sub 46-49}Nb{sub 6-14}, the alloy having been prepared by ingot metallurgy.

  16. Characterizing Semiconductor Alloys for Infrared Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehoczky, B. S. L.; Szofran, F. R.; Martin, B. G.

    1986-01-01

    Report presents results of continuing program aimed at characterizing mercury/cadmium/tellurium alloys and eventually developing improved methods of preparing alloys for use as infrared sensors. Work covered by report includes series of differential thermal analysis (DTA) measurements of alloy compositions with x varied from 9 to 1 in 0.1 increments.

  17. ALLOY FOR USE IN NUCLEAR FISSION

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, F.A.; Wilhelm, H.A.

    1958-03-11

    This patent relates to an alloy composition capable of functioning as a solid homogeneous reactor fuel. The alloy consists of a beryllium moderator, together with at least 0.7% of U/sup 235/, and up to 50% thorium to give increased workability to the alloy.

  18. Post-soldering of nonprecious alloys.

    PubMed

    Saxton, P L

    1980-05-01

    A repeatable post-soldering technique for a nonprecious alloy has been described. With proper metal design, nonprecious alloy crowns can be soldered in a standard vacuum porcelain furnace. Scanning electron micrographs and EDXA confirm that a good union has taken place between the gold solder and nickel alloy.

  19. High strength uranium-tungsten alloy process

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Paul S.; Sheinberg, Haskell; Hogan, Billy M.; Lewis, Homer D.; Dickinson, James M.

    1990-01-01

    Alloys of uranium and tungsten and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 4 wt % to about 35 wt %. Tungsten particles are dispersed throughout the uranium and a small amount of tungsten is dissolved in the uranium.

  20. High strength uranium-tungsten alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Paul S.; Sheinberg, Haskell; Hogan, Billy M.; Lewis, Homer D.; Dickinson, James M.

    1991-01-01

    Alloys of uranium and tungsten and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 4 wt % to about 35 wt %. Tungsten particles are dispersed throughout the uranium and a small amount of tungsten is dissolved in the uranium.

  1. Improved thermal treatment of aluminum alloy 7075

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cocks, F. H.

    1968-01-01

    Newly developed tempering treatment considerably increases the corrosion resistance of 7075-T6 alloy and concomitantly preserves its yield strength. The results of tests on samples of the alloy subjected to the above treatments show that when the overaging period is 12 hours /at 325 degrees F/, the alloy exhibits a yield strength of 73,000 psi.

  2. METHOD OF DISSOLVING REFRACTORY ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Helton, D.M.; Savolainen, J.K.

    1963-04-23

    This patent relates to the dissolution of alloys of uranium with zirconium, thorium, molybdenum, or niobium. The alloy is contacted with an anhydrous solution of mercuric chloride in a low-molecular-weight monohydric alcohol to produce a mercury-containing alcohol slurry. The slurry is then converted to an aqueous system by adding water and driving off the alcohol. The resulting aqueous slurry is electrolyzed in the presence of a mercury cathode to remove the mercury and produce a uranium-bearing aqueous solution. This process is useful for dissolving irradiated nuclear reactor fuels for radiochemical reprocessing by solvent extraction. In addition, zirconium-alloy cladding is selectively removed from uranium dioxide fuel compacts by this means. (AEC)

  3. Variolites - results of liquid immiscibility or mingling?: Evidence from variolitic lava, axial part of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 6oN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkov, E. V.

    2010-12-01

    column of picrobasaltic magma of existed at that time in crust above small shallow magmatic chamber with residual melt of andesite (icelandite) in composition, which was involved in general upwards current. Because ascending of magmas in axial part of the MAR was whirl (Sharkov et al., 2008), alien melt was dispersed on small drops, but, however, had not time to dissolved in host picrite melt. Formation of proper variolites was occurred in process of moving and cooling of such heterogeneous lava on oceanic floor. From this follows that axial parts of low-spreading ridges have very complicate structure, where different melts can coexist. There are no any evidence of liquid immiscibility the variolite origin. The same petrological features are typical for classic Paleoproterozoic variolites of the Yal-Guba, Onega Lake, Karelia. They were firstly described by F.Yu. Levinson-Lessing in 1920th. We conclude that variolite formation are linked with complex magmatic systems where small shallow magma chambers with evolved melt were intersected by streams of new magma portions from deep-seated source. Indispensable condition for variolites is contrasting composition of the magmas which allow to clearly see this phenomenon.

  4. Method for calculating alloy energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1992-01-01

    A semiempirical method for the computation of alloy energies is introduced. It is based on the equivalent-crystal theory of defect-formation energies in elemental solids. The method is both simple and accurate. Heats of formation as a function of composition are computed for some binary alloys of Cu, Ni, Al, Ag, Pd, Pt, and Au using the heats of solution in the dilute limit as experimental input. The separation of heats into strain and chemical components helps in understanding the energetics. In addition, lattice-parameter contractions seen in solid solutions of Ag and Au are accurately predicted. Good agreement with experiment is obtained in all cases.

  5. Alloy 718 for Oilfield Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    deBarbadillo, John J.; Mannan, Sarwan K.

    2012-02-01

    Alloy 718 (UNS N07718) was developed for use in aircraft gas turbine engines, but its unique combination of room-temperature strength and aqueous corrosion resistance made it a candidate for oilfield fasteners, valves, drill tools, and completion equipment. As well environments became more severe, stress corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement failures in production equipment drove the evolution of the composition and microstructure that distinguish today's oilfield-grade 718 from aerospace grades. This paper reviews the development of the grade and its applications and describes some of its unique characteristics, testing, and manufacturing methods as well as newer alloys designed for high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) conditions.

  6. High strength, tough alloy steel

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Gareth; Rao, Bangaru V. N.

    1979-01-01

    A high strength, tough alloy steel is formed by heating the steel to a temperature in the austenite range (1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.) to form a homogeneous austenite phase and then cooling the steel to form a microstructure of uniformly dispersed dislocated martensite separated by continuous thin boundary films of stabilized retained austenite. The steel includes 0.2-0.35 weight % carbon, at least 1% and preferably 3-4.5% chromium, and at least one other substitutional alloying element, preferably manganese or nickel. The austenite film is stable to subsequent heat treatment as by tempering (below 300.degree. C.) and reforms to a stable film after austenite grain refinement.

  7. PROCESS OF DISSOLVING ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Shor, R.S.; Vogler, S.

    1958-01-21

    A process is described for dissolving binary zirconium-uranium alloys where the uranium content is about 2%. In prior dissolution procedures for these alloys, an oxidizing agent was added to prevent the precipitation of uranium tetrafluoride. In the present method complete dissolution is accomplished without the use of the oxidizing agent by using only the stoichiometric amount or slight excess of HF required by the zirconium. The concentration of the acid may range from 2M to 10M and the dissolution is advatageously carried out at a temperature of 80 deg C.

  8. [Microbiological corrosion of aluminum alloys].

    PubMed

    Smirnov, V F; Belov, D V; Sokolova, T N; Kuzina, O V; Kartashov, V R

    2008-01-01

    Biological corrosion of ADO quality aluminum and aluminum-based construction materials (alloys V65, D16, and D16T) was studied. Thirteen microscopic fungus species and six bacterial species proved to be able to attack aluminum and its alloys. It was found that biocorrosion of metals by microscopic fungi and bacteria was mediated by certain exometabolites. Experiments on biocorrosion of the materials by the microscopic fungus Alternaria alternata, the most active biodegrader, demonstrated that the micromycete attack started with the appearance of exudate with pH 8-9 on end faces of the samples.

  9. Protective claddings for high strength chromium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J. F.

    1971-01-01

    The application of a Cr-Y-Hf-Th alloy as a protective cladding for a high strength chromium alloy was investigated for its effectiveness in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of a core alloy. Cladding was accomplished by a combination of hot gas pressure bonding and roll cladding techniques. Based on bend DBTT, the cladding alloy was effective in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of the chromium core alloy for up to 720 ks (200hours) in air at 1422 K (2100 F). A significant increase in the bend DBTT occurred with longer time exposures at 1422 K or short time exposures at 1589 K (2400 F).

  10. Liquid metal ion source and alloy

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Jr., William M.; Utlaut, Mark W.; Behrens, Robert G.; Szklarz, Eugene G.; Storms, Edmund K.; Santandrea, Robert P.; Swanson, Lynwood W.

    1988-10-04

    A liquid metal ion source and alloy, wherein the species to be emitted from the ion source is contained in a congruently vaporizing alloy. In one embodiment, the liquid metal ion source acts as a source of arsenic, and in a source alloy the arsenic is combined with palladium, preferably in a liquid alloy having a range of compositions from about 24 to about 33 atomic percent arsenic. Such an alloy may be readily prepared by a combustion synthesis technique. Liquid metal ion sources thus prepared produce arsenic ions for implantation, have long lifetimes, and are highly stable in operation.

  11. ZIRCONIUM-TITANIUM-BERYLLIUM BRAZING ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Gilliland, R.G.; Patriarca, P.; Slaughter, G.M.; Williams, L.C.

    1962-06-12

    A new and improved ternary alloy is described which is of particular utility in braze-bonding parts made of a refractory metal selected from Group IV, V, and VI of the periodic table and alloys containing said metal as a predominating alloying ingredient. The brazing alloy contains, by weight, 40 to 50 per cent zirconium, 40 to 50 per cent titanium, and the balance beryllium in amounts ranging from 1 to 20 per cent, said alloy having a melting point in the range 950 to 1400 deg C. (AEC)

  12. Alloy softening in binary iron solid solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine softening and hardening behavior in 19 binary iron-alloy systems. Microhardness tests were conducted at four temperatures in the range 77 to 411 K. Alloy softening was exhibited by 17 of the 19 alloy systems. Alloy softening observed in 15 of the alloy systems was attributed to an intrinsic mechanism, believed to be lowering of the Peierls (lattice friction) stress. Softening and hardening rates could be correlated with the atomic radius ratio of solute to iron. Softening observed in two other systems was attributed to an extrinsic mechanism, believed to be associated with scavenging of interstitial impurities.

  13. Nd:YAG laser welding aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, E. Jr.

    1992-02-01

    Autogenous Nd:YAG laser welding wrought 4047, 1100, 3003, 2219, 5052, 5086, 5456, and 6061 and cast A356 aluminum alloys to cast A356 aluminum alloy in restrained annular weld joints was investigated. The welds were 12.7 mm (0.375 in.) and 9.5 mm (0.375 in.) diameter with approximately 0.30 mm (0.012 in.) penetration. This investigation determined 4047 aluminum alloy to be the optimum alloy for autogenous Nd:YAG laser welding to cast A356 aluminum alloy. This report describes the investigation and its results.

  14. Alloy softening in binary iron solid solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to determine whether alloy softening in Fe alloys is dependent on electron concentration and to provide a direct comparison of alloy softening and hardening in several binary Fe alloy systems having the same processing history. Alloy additions to Fe included the elements in the Periods 4-6 and the Groups IV-VIII with the exception of technetium. A total of 19 alloy systems was investigated, and hardness testing was the primary means of evaluation. Testing was carried out at four temperatures over a homologous temperature range of 0.043-0.227 times the absolute melting temperature of unalloyed Fe. Major conclusions are that the atomic radius ratio of solute-to-Fe is the key factor in controlling low-temperature hardness of the binary Fe alloys and that alloy softening rates at 77 K and alloy hardening rates at 411 K are correlated with this atomic radius ratio for 15 of the binary alloy systems. Mechanisms of alloy softening and hardening are proposed.

  15. Environmental fatigue in aluminum-lithium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.

    1992-01-01

    Aluminum-lithium alloys exhibit similar environmental fatigue crack growth characteristics compared to conventional 2000 series alloys and are more resistant to environmental fatigue compared to 7000 series alloys. The superior fatigue crack growth behavior of Al-Li alloys 2090, 2091, 8090, and 8091 is due to crack closure caused by tortuous crack path morphology and crack surface corrosion products. At high R and reduced closure, chemical environment effects are pronounced resulting in accelerated near threshold da/dN. The beneficial effects of crack closure are minimized for small cracks resulting in rapid growth rates. Limited data suggest that the 'chemically small crack' effect, observed in other alloy system, is not pronounced in Al-Li alloys. Modeling of environmental fatigue in Al-Li-Cu alloys related accelerated fatigue crack growth in moist air and salt water to hydrogen embrittlement.

  16. Passive Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B; Payer, J H

    2006-01-10

    Alloy 22 (N06022) was designed to stand the most aggressive industrial applications, including both reducing and oxidizing acids. Even in the most aggressive environments, if the temperature is lower than 150 F (66 C) Alloy 22 would remain in the passive state having particularly low corrosion rates. In multi-ionic solutions that may simulate the behavior of concentrated ground water, even at near boiling temperatures, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 is only a few nanometers per year because the alloy is in the complete passive state. The corrosion rate of passive Alloy 22 decreases as the time increases. Immersion corrosion testing also show that the newer generation of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys may offer a better corrosion resistance than Alloy 22 only in some highly aggressive conditions such as in hot acids.

  17. Passive Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    R.B. Rebak; J.H. Payer

    2006-01-20

    Alloy 22 (NO6022) was designed to stand the most aggressive industrial applications, including both reducing and oxidizing acids. Even in the most aggressive environments, if the temperature is lower than 150 F (66 C) Alloy 22 would remain in the passive state having particularly low corrosion rates. In multi-ionic solutions that may simulate the behavior of concentrated ground water, even at near boiling temperatures, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 is only a few nano-meters per year because the alloy is in the complete passive state. The corrosion rate of passive Alloy 22 decreases as the time increases. Immersion corrosion testing also show that the newer generation of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys may offer a better corrosion resistance than Alloy 22 only in some highly aggressive conditions such as in hot acids.

  18. A Synthetic Pseudo-Rh: NOx Reduction Activity and Electronic Structure of Pd–Ru Solid-solution Alloy Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Katsutoshi; Tomonaga, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Syo; Zulkifli, Nor Diana Binti; Ishimoto, Takayoshi; Koyama, Michihisa; Kusada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Nagaoka, Katsutoshi

    2016-01-01

    Rh is one of the most important noble metals for industrial applications. A major fraction of Rh is used as a catalyst for emission control in automotive catalytic converters because of its unparalleled activity toward NOx reduction. However, Rh is a rare and extremely expensive element; thus, the development of Rh alternative composed of abundant elements is desirable. Pd and Ru are located at the right and left of Rh in the periodic table, respectively, nevertheless this combination of elements is immiscible in the bulk state. Here, we report a Pd–Ru solid-solution-alloy nanoparticle (PdxRu1-x NP) catalyst exhibiting better NOx reduction activity than Rh. Theoretical calculations show that the electronic structure of Pd0.5Ru0.5 is similar to that of Rh, indicating that Pd0.5Ru0.5 can be regarded as a pseudo-Rh. Pd0.5Ru0.5 exhibits better activity than natural Rh, which implies promising applications not only for exhaust-gas cleaning but also for various chemical reactions. PMID:27340099

  19. A Synthetic Pseudo-Rh: NOx Reduction Activity and Electronic Structure of Pd–Ru Solid-solution Alloy Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Katsutoshi; Tomonaga, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Syo; Zulkifli, Nor Diana Binti; Ishimoto, Takayoshi; Koyama, Michihisa; Kusada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Nagaoka, Katsutoshi

    2016-06-01

    Rh is one of the most important noble metals for industrial applications. A major fraction of Rh is used as a catalyst for emission control in automotive catalytic converters because of its unparalleled activity toward NOx reduction. However, Rh is a rare and extremely expensive element; thus, the development of Rh alternative composed of abundant elements is desirable. Pd and Ru are located at the right and left of Rh in the periodic table, respectively, nevertheless this combination of elements is immiscible in the bulk state. Here, we report a Pd–Ru solid-solution-alloy nanoparticle (PdxRu1-x NP) catalyst exhibiting better NOx reduction activity than Rh. Theoretical calculations show that the electronic structure of Pd0.5Ru0.5 is similar to that of Rh, indicating that Pd0.5Ru0.5 can be regarded as a pseudo-Rh. Pd0.5Ru0.5 exhibits better activity than natural Rh, which implies promising applications not only for exhaust-gas cleaning but also for various chemical reactions.

  20. A Synthetic Pseudo-Rh: NOx Reduction Activity and Electronic Structure of Pd-Ru Solid-solution Alloy Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sato, Katsutoshi; Tomonaga, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Syo; Zulkifli, Nor Diana Binti; Ishimoto, Takayoshi; Koyama, Michihisa; Kusada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Nagaoka, Katsutoshi

    2016-06-24

    Rh is one of the most important noble metals for industrial applications. A major fraction of Rh is used as a catalyst for emission control in automotive catalytic converters because of its unparalleled activity toward NOx reduction. However, Rh is a rare and extremely expensive element; thus, the development of Rh alternative composed of abundant elements is desirable. Pd and Ru are located at the right and left of Rh in the periodic table, respectively, nevertheless this combination of elements is immiscible in the bulk state. Here, we report a Pd-Ru solid-solution-alloy nanoparticle (PdxRu1-x NP) catalyst exhibiting better NOx reduction activity than Rh. Theoretical calculations show that the electronic structure of Pd0.5Ru0.5 is similar to that of Rh, indicating that Pd0.5Ru0.5 can be regarded as a pseudo-Rh. Pd0.5Ru0.5 exhibits better activity than natural Rh, which implies promising applications not only for exhaust-gas cleaning but also for various chemical reactions.