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Sample records for alabama lightning mapping

  1. Description and Status of the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, Richard J.; Christian, Hugh J.; Bailey, Jeffrey C.; Buechler, Dennis E.; Hall, John M.; McCaul, Eugene W.; Stano, Geoffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) is a network LMA detectors that detects and maps lightning using VHF radiation (TV Channel 5) in a region centered about Huntsville, Alabama that includes North Alabama, Central Tennessee and parts of Georgia and Mississippi. The North Alabama LMA has been in operation since late 2001, and has been providing real time data to regional National Weather Service (NSF) Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) since mid 2003 through the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) center. Data from this network (as well as other from other LMA systems) are now being used to create proxy Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) data sets for GOES-R risk reduction and algorithm development activities. In addition, since spring 2009 data are provided to the Storm Prediction Center in support of Hazardous Weather Testbed and GOES-R Proving Ground activities during the Spring Program. Description, status and plans will be discussed.

  2. The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA): A Network Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, R. J.; Bailey, J.; Buechler, D.; Goodman, S. J.; McCaul, E. W., Jr.; Hall, J.

    2005-01-01

    The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) is s a 3-D VHF regional lightning detection system that provides on-orbit algorithm validation and instrument performance assessments for the NASA Lightning Imaging Sensor, as well as information on storm kinematics and updraft evolution that offers the potential to improve severe storm warning lead time by up t o 50% and decrease te false alarm r a t e ( for non-tornado producing storms). In support of this latter function, the LMA serves as a principal component of a severe weather test bed to infuse new science and technology into the short-term forecasting of severe and hazardous weather, principally within nearby National Weather Service forecast offices. The LMA, which became operational i n November 2001, consists of VHF receivers deployed across northern Alabama and a base station located at the National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC), which is on t h e campus of the University of Alabama in Huntsville. The LMA system locates the sources of impulsive VHF radio signals s from lightning by accurately measuring the time that the signals aririve at the different receiving stations. Each station's records the magnitude and time of the peak lightning radiation signal in successive 80 ms intervals within a local unused television channel (channel 5, 76-82 MHz in our case ) . Typically hundreds of sources per flash can be reconstructed, which i n t u r n produces accurate 3-dimensional lightning image maps (nominally <50 m error within 150 la. range). The data are transmitted back t o a base station using 2.4 GHz wireless Ethernet data links and directional parabolic grid antennas. There are four repeaters in the network topology and the links have an effective data throughput rate ranging from 600 kbits s -1 t o 1.5 %its s -1. This presentation provides an overview of t h e North Alabama network, the data processing (both real-time and post processing) and network statistics.

  3. Estimates of the Lightning NOx Profile in the Vicinity of the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William J.; Peterson, Harold S.; McCaul, Eugene W.; Blazar, Arastoo

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) is applied to August 2006 North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) data to estimate the (unmixed and otherwise environmentally unmodified) vertical source profile of lightning nitrogen oxides, NOx = NO + NO2. Data from the National Lightning Detection Network (Trademark) (NLDN) is also employed. This is part of a larger effort aimed at building a more realistic lightning NOx emissions inventory for use by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system. Overall, special attention is given to several important lightning variables including: the frequency and geographical distribution of lightning in the vicinity of the NALMA network, lightning type (ground or cloud flash), lightning channel length, channel altitude, channel peak current, and the number of strokes per flash. Laboratory spark chamber results from the literature are used to convert 1-meter channel segments (that are located at a particular known altitude; i.e., air density) to NOx concentration. The resulting lightning NOx source profiles are discussed.

  4. Estimates of the Lightning NOx Profile in the Vicinity of the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William J.; Peterson, Harold

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) is applied to August 2006 North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) data to estimate the raw (i.e., unmixed and otherwise environmentally unmodified) vertical profile of lightning nitrogen oxides, NOx = NO + NO 2 . This is part of a larger effort aimed at building a more realistic lightning NOx emissions inventory for use by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system. Data from the National Lightning Detection Network TM (NLDN) is also employed. Overall, special attention is given to several important lightning variables including: the frequency and geographical distribution of lightning in the vicinity of the LMA network, lightning type (ground or cloud flash), lightning channel length, channel altitude, channel peak current, and the number of strokes per flash. Laboratory spark chamber results from the literature are used to convert 1-meter channel segments (that are located at a particular known altitude; i.e., air density) to NOx concentration. The resulting raw NOx profiles are discussed.

  5. A Comparison of Lightning Flashes as Observed by the Lightning Imaging Sensor and the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bateman, M. G.; Mach, D. M.; McCaul, M. G.; Bailey, J. C.; Christian, H. J.

    2008-01-01

    The Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) aboard the TRMM satellite has been collecting optical lightning data since November 1997. A Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) that senses VHF impulses from lightning was installed in North Alabama in the Fall of 2001. A dataset has been compiled to compare data from both instruments for all times when the LIS was passing over the domain of our LMA. We have algorithms for both instruments to group pixels or point sources into lightning flashes. This study presents the comparison statistics of the flash data output (flash duration, size, and amplitude) from both algorithms. We will present the results of this comparison study and show "point-level" data to explain the differences. AS we head closer to realizing a Global Lightning Mapper (GLM) on GOES-R, better understanding and ground truth of each of these instruments and their respective flash algorithms is needed.

  6. Error Analyses of the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, W. J.; Solokiewicz, R. J.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Goodman, S. J.; Christian, H. J.; Hall, J. M.; Bailey, J. C.; Krider, E. P.; Bateman, M. G.; Boccippio, D. J.

    2003-01-01

    Two approaches are used to characterize how accurately the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) is able to locate lightning VHF sources in space and in time. The first method uses a Monte Carlo computer simulation to estimate source retrieval errors. The simulation applies a VHF source retrieval algorithm that was recently developed at the NASA-MSFC and that is similar, but not identical to, the standard New Mexico Tech retrieval algorithm. The second method uses a purely theoretical technique (i.e., chi-squared Curvature Matrix theory) to estimate retrieval errors. Both methods assume that the LMA system has an overall rms timing error of 50ns, but all other possible errors (e.g., multiple sources per retrieval attempt) are neglected. The detailed spatial distributions of retrieval errors are provided. Given that the two methods are completely independent of one another, it is shown that they provide remarkably similar results, except that the chi-squared theory produces larger altitude error estimates than the (more realistic) Monte Carlo simulation.

  7. A Lightning Channel Retrieval Algorithm for the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A new multi-station VHF time-of-arrival (TOA) antenna network is, at the time of this writing, coming on-line in Northern Alabama. The network, called the Lightning Mapping Array (LMA), employs GPS timing and detects VHF radiation from discrete segments (effectively point emitters) that comprise the channel of lightning strokes within cloud and ground flashes. The network will support on-going ground validation activities of the low Earth orbiting Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) satellite developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. It will also provide for many interesting and detailed studies of the distribution and evolution of thunderstorms and lightning in the Tennessee Valley, and will offer many interesting comparisons with other meteorological/geophysical wets associated with lightning and thunderstorms. In order to take full advantage of these benefits, it is essential that the LMA channel mapping accuracy (in both space and time) be fully characterized and optimized. In this study, a new revised channel mapping retrieval algorithm is introduced. The algorithm is an extension of earlier work provided in Koshak and Solakiewicz (1996) in the analysis of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) system. As in the 1996 study, direct algebraic solutions are obtained by inverting a simple linear system of equations, thereby making computer searches through a multi-dimensional parameter domain of a Chi-Squared function unnecessary. However, the new algorithm is developed completely in spherical Earth-centered coordinates (longitude, latitude, altitude), rather than in the (x, y, z) cartesian coordinates employed in the 1996 study. Hence, no mathematical transformations from (x, y, z) into spherical coordinates are required (such transformations involve more numerical error propagation, more computer program coding, and slightly more CPU computing time). The new algorithm also has a more realistic

  8. The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array: Recent Severe Storm Observations and Future Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, S. J.; Blakeslee, R.; Christian, H.; Koshak, W.; Bailey, J.; Hall, J.; McCaul, E.; Buechler, D.; Darden, C.; Burks, J.

    2004-01-01

    The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array became operational in November 2001 as a principal component of a severe weather test bed to infuse new science and technology into the short-term forecasting of severe and hazardous weather, principally within nearby National Weather Service forecast offices. Since the installation of the LMA, it has measured the total lightning activity of a large number of severe weather events, including three supercell tornado outbreaks, two supercell hailstorm events, and numerous microburst-producing storms and ordinary non-severe thunderstorms. The key components of evolving storm morphology examined are the time rate-of-change (temporal trending) of storm convective and precipitation characteristics that can be diagnosed in real-time using NEXRAD WSR-88D Doppler radar (echo growth and decay, precipitation structures and velocity features, outflow boundaries), LMA (total lightning flash rate and its trend) and National Lightning Detection Network (cloud-to- ground lightning, its polarity and trends). For example, in a transitional season supercell tornado outbreak, peak total flash rates for typical supercells in Tennessee reached 70-100/min, and increases in the total flash rate occurred during storm intensification as much as 20-25 min prior to at least some of the tornadoes. The most intense total flash rate measured during this outbreak (over 800 flashes/min) occurred in a storm in Alabama. In the case of a severe summertime pulse thunderstorm in North Alabama, the peak total flash rate reached 300/min, with a strong increase in total lightning evident some 9 min before damaging winds were observed at the surface. In this paper we provide a sampling of LMA observations and products during severe weather events to illustrate the capability of the system, and discuss the prospects for improving the short-term forecasting of convective weather using total lightning data.

  9. The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array: Recent severe storm observations and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, S. J.; Blakeslee, R.; Christian, H.; Koshak, W.; Bailey, J.; Hall, J.; McCaul, E.; Buechler, D.; Darden, C.; Burks, J.; Bradshaw, T.; Gatlin, P.

    2005-07-01

    The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array became operational in November 2001 as a principal component of a severe weather test bed to infuse new science and technology into the short-term forecasting of severe and hazardous weather, principally within nearby National Weather Service forecast offices. Since the installation of the LMA, it has measured the total lightning activity of a large number of severe weather events, including three supercell tornado outbreaks, two supercell hailstorm events, and numerous microburst-producing storms and ordinary non-severe thunderstorms. The key components of evolving storm morphology examined are the time rate-of-change (temporal trending) of storm convective and precipitation characteristics that can be diagnosed in real-time using NEXRAD WSR-88D Doppler radar (echo growth and decay, precipitation structures and velocity features, outflow boundaries), LMA (total lightning flash rate and its trend) and National Lightning Detection Network (cloud-to-ground lightning, its polarity and trends). For example, in a transitional season supercell tornado outbreak, peak total flash rates for typical supercells in Tennessee reached 70-100 min -1 and increases in the total flash rate occurred during storm intensification as much as 20-25 min prior to at least some of the tornadoes. The most intense total flash rate measured during this outbreak (over 800 flashes min -1) occurred in a storm in Alabama. In the case of a severe summertime pulse thunderstorm in North Alabama, the peak total flash rate reached 300 min -1, with a strong increase in total lightning evident some 9 min before damaging winds were observed at the surface. In this paper, we provide a sampling of LMA observations and products during severe weather events to illustrate the capability of the system, and discuss the prospects for improving the short-term forecasting of convective weather using total lightning data.

  10. The North Alabama Lightning Warning Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buechler, Dennis E.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Stano, G. T.

    2009-01-01

    The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array NALMA has been collecting total lightning data on storms in the Tennessee Valley region since 2001. Forecasters from nearby National Weather Service (NWS) offices have been ingesting this data for display with other AWIPS products. The current lightning product used by the offices is the lightning source density plot. The new product provides a probabalistic, short-term, graphical forecast of the probability of lightning activity occurring at 5 min intervals over the next 30 minutes . One of the uses of the current lightning source density product by the Huntsville National Weather Service Office is to identify areas of potential for cloud-to-ground flashes based on where LMA total lightning is occurring. This product quantifies that observation. The Lightning Warning Product is derived from total lightning observations from the Washington, D.C. (DCLMA) and North Alabama Lightning Mapping Arrays and cloud-to-ground lightning flashes detected by the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). Probability predictions are provided for both intracloud and cloud-to-ground flashes. The gridded product can be displayed on AWIPS workstations in a manner similar to that of the lightning source density product.

  11. The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array: Recent Results and Future Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, S. J.; Blakeslee, R.; Christian, H.; Boccippio, D.; Koshak, W.; Bailey, J.; Hall, J.; Bateman, M.; McCaul, E.; Buechler, D.

    2002-01-01

    The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array became operational in November 2001 as a principal component of a severe weather test bed to infuse new science and technologies into the short-term forecasting of severe and hazardous weather and the warning decision-making process. The LMA project is a collaboration among NASA scientists, National Weather Service (NWS) weather forecast offices (WFOs), emergency managers, and other partners. The time rate-of-change of storm characteristics and life-cycle trending are accomplished in real-time through the second generation Lightning Imaging Sensor Data Applications Display (LISDAD II) system, initially developed in T997 through a collaboration among NASA/MSFC, MIT/Lincoln Lab and the Melbourne, FL WFO. LISDAD II is now a distributed decision support system with a JAVA-based display application that allows anyone, anywhere to track individual storm histories within the Tennessee Valley region of the southeastern U.S. Since the inauguration of the LMA there has been an abundance of severe weather. During 23-24 November 2001, a major tornado outbreak was monitored by LMA in its first data acquisition effort (36 tornadoes in Alabama). Since that time the LMA has collected a vast amount of data on hailstorms and damaging wind events, non-tornadic supercells, and ordinary non-severe thunderstorms. In this paper we provide an overview of LMA observations and discuss future prospects for improving the short-term forecasting of convective weather.

  12. North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA): VHF Source Retrieval Algorithm and Error Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, W. J.; Solakiewicz, R. J.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Goodman, S. J.; Christian, H. J.; Hall, J.; Bailey, J.; Krider, E. P.; Bateman, M. G.; Boccippio, D.

    2003-01-01

    Two approaches are used to characterize how accurately the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) is able to locate lightning VHF sources in space and in time. The first method uses a Monte Carlo computer simulation to estimate source retrieval errors. The simulation applies a VHF source retrieval algorithm that was recently developed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and that is similar, but not identical to, the standard New Mexico Tech retrieval algorithm. The second method uses a purely theoretical technique (i.e., chi-squared Curvature Matrix Theory) to estimate retrieval errors. Both methods assume that the LMA system has an overall rms timing error of 50 ns, but all other possible errors (e.g., multiple sources per retrieval attempt) are neglected. The detailed spatial distributions of retrieval errors are provided. Given that the two methods are completely independent of one another, it is shown that they provide remarkably similar results. However, for many source locations, the Curvature Matrix Theory produces larger altitude error estimates than the (more realistic) Monte Carlo simulation.

  13. The Use of the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) in the Real-Time Operational Warning Environment During the March 2nd, 2012 Severe Weather Outbreak in Northern Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Kristopher; Carcione, Brian; Schultz, Christopher J.; Stano, Geoffrey T.; Carey, Lawrence D.

    2012-01-01

    The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) is a three-dimensional very high frequency (VHF) detection network consisting of 11 sensors spread across north central Alabama and two sensors located in the Atlanta, Georgia region. The primary advantage of this network is that it detects total lightning, or the combination of both cloud-to-ground and intra-cloud lightning, instead of cloud-to-ground lightning alone. This helps to build a complete picture of storm evolution and development, and can serve as a proxy for storm updraft strength, particularly since intra-cloud lightning makes up the majority of all lightning in a typical thunderstorm. While the NALMA data do not directly indicate severe weather, they can indirectly indicate when a storm is strengthening (weakening) due to increases (decreases) in updraft strength, as the updraft is responsible for charging mechanisms within the storm. Data output are VHF radiation sources, which are produced during lightning breakdown processes. These sources are made into 2x2 km source density grids and are ported into the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS) for National Weather Service (NWS) offices in Huntsville, AL, Nashville, TN, Morristown, TN, and Birmingham, AL, in near real-time. An increase in sources, or source densities, correlates to increased lightning activity and trends in updraft magnitude as long as the storm is within about 125 km of the center of the LMA network. Operationally, these data have been used at the Huntsville NWS office since early 2003 through a collaborative effort with NASA s Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center. Since then, total lightning observations have become an essential tool for forecasters during real-time warning operations. One of the operational advantages of the NALMA is the two-minute temporal resolution of the data. This provides forecasters with two to three updates during a typical volume scan of the WSR-88D radar.

  14. Camp Blanding Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee,Richard; Christian, Hugh; Bailey, Jeffrey; Hall, John; Uman, Martin; Jordan, Doug; Krehbiel, Paul; Rison, William; Edens, Harald

    2011-01-01

    A seven station, short base-line Lightning Mapping Array was installed at the Camp Blanding International Center for Lightning Research and Testing (ICLRT) during April 2011. This network will support science investigations of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs) and lightning initiation using rocket triggered lightning at the ICLRT. The network operations and data processing will be carried out through a close collaboration between several organizations, including the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, University of Alabama in Huntsville, University of Florida, and New Mexico Tech. The deployment was sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). The network does not have real-time data dissemination. Description, status and plans will be discussed.

  15. North Alabama Total Lightning Climatology in Support of Lightning Safety Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stano, G. T.; Schultz, C. J.; Koshak, W. J.

    2015-12-01

    The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) was installed in 2001 to observe total lightning (cloud-to-ground and intra-cloud) and study its relationship to convective activity. NALMA has served as ground-truth for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Lightning Imager (TRMM-LIS) and will again for the GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM). Also, NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center (SPoRT) has transitioned these data to National Weather Service Weather Forecast Offices to evaluate the impact in operations since 2003. This study focuses on seasonal and diurnal observations from NALMA's 14 year history. This is initially intended to improve lightning safety at Marshall Space Flight Center, but has other potential applications. Improvements will be made by creating a dataset to investigate temporal, spatial, and seasonal patterns in total lightning over the Tennessee Valley, compare these observations to background environmental parameters and the TRMM-LIS climatology, and investigate applying these data to specific points of interest. Unique characteristics, such as flash extent density and length of flashes can be investigated, which are unavailable from other lightning networks like the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). The NALMA and NLDN data can be combined such that end users can use total lightning to gain lead time on the initial cloud-to-ground flash of a storm and identify if lightning is extending far from the storm's core. This spatial extent can be analyzed to determine how often intra-cloud activity may impinge on a region of interest and how often a cloud-to-ground strike may occur in the region. The seasonal and diurnal lightning maps can aid with planning of various experiments or tests that often require some knowledge about future weather patterns months in advance. The main goal is to develop a protocol to enhance lightning safety everywhere once the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) is on orbit

  16. Lightning mapping system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lennon, C.; Maier, L.

    1991-01-01

    A Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) System is being implemented at KSC in Florida. The first operational use is expected in the late summer of 1991. The system is designed to map the location of in-cloud and cloud-to-ground lightning based on the time of arrival (TOA) of electromagnetic radiation. The system detects very high frequency (VHF) radiation and designed to map the volumetric extent of lightning. The system implements two independent antenna arrays to provide a fast data quality check, as necessary for a real-time warning system. The system performance goals and a comparison with a similar system implemented in the mid-1970's is made.

  17. Kinematic and Microphysical Control of Lightning Flash Rate over Northern Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, Lawrence D.; Bain, Anthony L.; Matthee, Retha; Schultz, Christopher J.; Schultz, Elise V.; Deierling, Wiebke; Petersen, Walter A.

    2015-01-01

    The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) experiment seeks to examine the relationship between deep convection and the production of nitrogen oxides (NO (sub x)) via lightning (LNO (sub x)). A critical step in estimating LNO (sub x) production in a cloud-resolving model (CRM) without explicit lightning is to estimate the flash rate from available model parameters that are statistically and physically correlated. As such, the objective of this study is to develop, improve and evaluate lightning flash rate parameterizations in a variety of meteorological environments and storm types using radar and lightning mapping array (LMA) observations taken over Northern Alabama from 2005-2012, including during DC3. UAH's Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR) and the Weather Surveillance Radar - 1988 Doppler (WSR 88D) located at Hytop (KHTX) comprises the dual-Doppler and polarimetric radar network, which has been in operation since 2004. The northern Alabama LMA (NA LMA) in conjunction with Vaisala's National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) allow for a detailed depiction of total lightning during this period. This study will integrate ARMOR-KHTX dual Doppler/polarimetric radar and NA LMA lightning observations from past and ongoing studies, including the more recent DC3 results, over northern Alabama to form a large data set of 15-20 case days and over 20 individual storms, including both ordinary multicell and supercell convection. Several flash rate parameterizations will be developed and tested, including those based on 1) graupel/small hail volume; 2) graupel/small hail mass, and 3) convective updraft volume. Sensitivity of the flash rate parameterizations to storm intensity, storm morphology and environmental conditions will be explored.

  18. Lightning Behavior and its Dependence on Storm Kinematic and Precipitation Processes in Northern Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Elsie V.; Petersen, W. A,

    2009-01-01

    Numerous case studies and recent modeling studies have found that various metrics of updraft intensity appear to be reasonably well correlated to lightning production in thunderstorms, particularly severe thunderstorms. Indeed, the relationship between updraft and lightning flash rate is hypothesized to be the physical connection between a lightning "jump" signature and manifestations of severe weather such as tornadic activity. This study further examines this connection using a combination of dual Doppler wind retrievals made with the UAH ARMOR dual polarimetric and KHTX WSR 88D Doppler radar pair, together with northern Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) data. The dual Doppler data were used to construct three dimensional wind fields and the retrieved vertical velocity fields were subsequently compared to collocated total lightning flash rates observed by the LMA. Particular attention was paid to the timing of updraft pulses relative to changes in the flash rate, with the goal of assessing impacts on warning decision lead time. Results from the analysis of severe and non severe thunderstorms in Northern Alabama will be presented including the EF 4 tornado producing supercell on 6 February 2008.

  19. Parameters of triggered-lightning flashes in Florida and Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R.J.; Schnetzer, G.H.; Thottappillil, R.; Rakov, V.A.; Uman, M.A.; Goldberg, J.D.

    1993-12-20

    Channel base currents from triggered lightning were measured at the NASA Kennedy Space Center, Florida, during summer 1990 and at Fort McClellan, Alabama, during summer 1991. Additionally, 16-mm cinematic records with 3- or 5-ms resolution were obtained for all flashes, and streak camera records were obtained for three of the Florida flashes. The 17 flashes analyzed contained 69 strokes, all lowering negative charge from cloud to ground. Statistics on interstroke interval, no-current interstroke interval, total stroke duration, total stroke charge, total stroke action integral ({integral}i{sup 2}dt), return stroke current wave front characteristics, time to half peak value, and return stroke peak current are presented. Return stroke current pulses, characterized by rise times of the order of a few microseconds or less and peak values in the range of 4 to 38 kA, were found not to occur until after any preceding current at the bottom of the lightning channel fell below the noise level of less than 2 A. A relatively strong positive correlation was found between return stroke current average rate of rise and current peak. There was essentially no correlation between return stroke current peak and 10-90% rise time or between return stroke peak and the width of the current waveform at half of its peak value. Parameters of the lightning flashes triggered in Florida and Alabama are similar to each other but are different from those of triggered lightning recorded in New Mexico during the 1981 Thunderstorm Research International Program. Continuing currents that follow return stroke current peaks and last for more than 10 ms exhibit a variety of wave shapes that the authors have subdivided into four categories. All such continuing currents appear to start with a current pulse presumably associated with an M component. A brief summary of lightning parameters important for lightning protection, is presented in an appendix. 43 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. The CHUVA Lightning Mapping Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Steven J.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Bailey, Jeffrey C.; Carey, Lawrence D.; Hoeller, Hartmut; Albrecht, Rachel I.; Morales, Carlos; Pinto, Osmar; Saba, Marcelo M.; Naccarato, Kleber; Hembury, Nikki; Nag, Amitabh; Heckman, Stan; Holzworth, Robert H.; Rudlosky, Scott D.; Betz, Hans-Dieter; Said, Ryan; Rauenzahn, Kim

    2011-01-01

    The primary science objective for the CHUVA lightning mapping campaign is to combine measurements of total lightning activity, lightning channel mapping, and detailed information on the locations of cloud charge regions of thunderstorms with the planned observations of the CHUVA (Cloud processes of tHe main precipitation systems in Brazil: A contribUtion to cloud resolVing modeling and to the GPM (GlobAl Precipitation Measurement) field campaign. The lightning campaign takes place during the CHUVA intensive observation period October-December 2011 in the vicinity of S o Luiz do Paraitinga with Brazilian, US, and European government, university and industry participants. Total lightning measurements that can be provided by ground-based regional 2-D and 3-D total lightning mapping networks coincident with overpasses of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) and the SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager) on the Meteosat Second Generation satellite in geostationary earth orbit will be used to generate proxy data sets for the next generation US and European geostationary satellites. Proxy data, which play an important role in the pre-launch mission development and in user readiness preparation, are used to develop and validate algorithms so that they will be ready for operational use quickly following the planned launch of the GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) in 2015 and the Meteosat Third Generation Lightning Imager (LI) in 2017. To date there is no well-characterized total lightning data set coincident with the imagers. Therefore, to take the greatest advantage of this opportunity to collect detailed and comprehensive total lightning data sets, test and validate multi-sensor nowcasting applications for the monitoring, tracking, warning, and prediction of severe and high impact weather, and to advance our knowledge of thunderstorm physics, extensive measurements from lightning mapping networks will be collected

  1. Parameters of triggered-lightning flashes in Florida and Alabama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, R. J.; Schnetzer, G. H.; Thottappillil, R.; Rakov, V. A.; Uman, M. A.; Goldberg, J. D.

    1993-12-01

    Channel base currents from triggered lightning were measured at the NASA Kennedy Space Center, Florida, during summer 1990 and at Fort McClellan, Alabama, during summer 1991. Additionally, 16-mm cinematic records with 3- or 5-ms resolution were obtained for all flashes, and streak camera records were obtained for three of the Florida flashes. The 17 flashes analyzed here contained 69 strokes, all lowering negative charge from cloud to ground. Statistics on interstroke interval, no-current interstroke interval, total stroke duration, total stroke charge, total stroke action integral (∫ i2dt), return stroke current wave front characteristics, time to half peak value, and return stroke peak current are presented. Return stroke current pulses, characterized by rise times of the order of a few microseconds or less and peak values in the range of 4 to 38 kA, were found not to occur until after any preceding current at the bottom of the lightning channel fell below the noise level of less than 2 A. Current pulses associated with M components, characterized by slower rise times (typically tens to hundreds of microseconds) and peak values generally smaller than those of the return stroke pulses, occurred during established channel current flow of some tens to some hundreds of amperes. A relatively strong positive correlation was found between return stroke current average rate of rise and current peak. There was essentially no correlation between return stroke current peak and 10-90% rise time or between return stroke peak and the width of the current waveform at half of its peak value. Parameters of the lightning flashes triggered in Florida and Alabama are similar to each other but are different from those of triggered lightning recorded in New Mexico during the 1981 Thunderstorm Research International Program. Continuing currents that follow return stroke current peaks and last for more than 10 ms exhibit a variety of wave shapes that we have subdivided into four

  2. Lightning mapping sensor study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norwood, V.

    1983-01-01

    A technology assessment to determine how a world-wide, continuous measurement of lightning could be achieved from a geostationary platform is provided. Various approaches to the detector sensors are presented. It was first determined that any existing detector chips would require some degree of modification in order to meet the lightning mapper sensor requirements. The elements of the system were then analyzed, categorized, and graded for study emphasis. The recommended approach for the lightning mapper sensor is to develop a monolithic array in which each detector cell has circuitry that implements a two-step photon-collecting method for a very high dynamic range with good measurement accuracy. The efficiency of the array is compatible with the use of a conventional refractive optics design having an aperture in the neighborhood of 7 to 10 cm.

  3. New insights into lightning processes gained from triggered-lightning experiments in Florida and Alabama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakov, V. A.; Uman, M. A.; Rambo, K. J.; Fernandez, M. I.; Fisher, R. J.; Schnetzer, G. H.; Thottappillil, R.; Eybert-Berard, A.; Berlandis, J. P.; Lalande, P.; Bonamy, A.; Laroche, P.; Bondiou-Clergerie, A.

    1998-06-01

    Analyses of electric and magnetic fields measured at distances from tens to hundreds of meters from the ground strike point of triggered lightning at Camp Blanding, Florida, and at 10 and 20 m at Fort McClellan, Alabama, in conjunction with currents measured at the lightning channel base and with optical observations, allow us to make new inferences on several aspects of the lightning discharge and additionally to verify the recently published "two-wave" mechanism of the lightning M component. At very close ranges (a few tens of meters or less) the time rate of change of the final portion of the dart leader electric field can be comparable to that of the return stroke. The variation of the close dart leader electric field change with distance is somewhat slower than the inverse proportionality predicted by the uniformly charged leader model, perhaps because of a decrease of leader charge density with decreasing height associated with an incomplete development of the corona sheath at the bottom of the channel. There is a positive linear correlation between the leader electric field change at close range and the succeeding return stroke current peak at the channel base. The formation of each step of a dart-stepped leader is associated with a charge of a few millicoulombs and a current of a few kiloamperes. In an altitude-triggered lightning the downward negative leader of the bidirectional leader system and the resulting return stroke serve to provide a relatively low-impedance connection between the upward moving positive leader tip and the ground, the processes that follow likely being similar to those in classical triggered lightning. Lightning appears to be able to reduce, via breakdown processes in the soil and on the ground surface, the grounding impedance which it initially encounters at the strike point, so at the time of channel-base current peak the reduced grounding impedance is always much lower than the equivalent impedance of the channel. At close

  4. Characterization and applications of VLF/LF source locations from lightning using the Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitzer, Phillip M.; Christian, Hugh J.; Stewart, Mike; Burchfield, Jeff; Podgorny, Scott; Corredor, David; Hall, John; Kuznetsov, Evgeny; Franklin, Veronica

    2013-04-01

    Arrays that detect and locate the four-dimensional spacetime positions of radiation sources from lightning have largely utilized sensors sensitive to the very high frequency (VHF) regime with ˜ 15 km baselines or very low frequency/low frequency (VLF/LF) regime with ˜ 100 km baselines. This paper details initial results from the newly developed Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array (HAMMA), consisting of Marx meters (electric field change meters) sensitive to a frequency band ˜ 1 Hz to 400 kHz. The arrival time of HAMMA waveforms due to radiation sources from lightning are used to determine the spacetime position of these sources. The locations are compared with two well-documented and operational arrays, the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) and the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA). The standard deviation of the difference between HAMMA and NLDN locations of return strokes is 305 and 266 m in x and y, respectively, while the standard deviation of the difference between HAMMA and NALMA sources is 237, 226, and 688 m in x, y and z, respectively. We further show that NLDN intracloud locations differ in horizontal distance from the corresponding HAMMA locations by a median value of 479 m. In addition, we use HAMMA source locations to map several lightning flashes in the VLF/LF and show HAMMA sources largely map out the same electrical extent as VHF sources and provide unique insights to the properties of the discharges occurring. Finally, we show that VLF/LF sources can determine the leader polarity in several example flashes but not necessarily whether a flash comes to ground. Copyright 2013 American Geophysical Union. All rights reserved.

  5. Lightning Observations with the Upgraded Lanmguir Lab Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rison, W.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Hunyady, S.; Edens, H. E.; Aulich, G. D.

    2010-12-01

    The Langmuir Lab Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) is located on and around the Magdalena Mountains in central New Mexico. Recently there have been several improvements to the LMA which have dramatically increased its sensitivity. By switching most stations to solar power (which allows us to place them far from buildings and power lines) and reducing the noise of the power supply, the station-generated and local environmental noise has been reduced to levels near the theoretical thermal value. Because of the recent switch to digital television, the LMA is no longer degraded by the anthropogenic noise of distant VHF television transmitters, due to the stations mostly being switched to UHF. The distant interference was a particularly bad problem for the stations located high in the Magdalena Mountains. The combination of lower threshold values and increasing the number of stations to 16 enables lower-power sources to be detected above the local noise levels and hence located by the system. We are now able to observe the positive leaders (which produce a much lower level of VHF radiation than negative leaders) which propagate upward from a triggering rocket. Lightning channels in natural lightning discharges are also much more clearly defined than in the past. Minor discharges (with one or a few LMA-detected sources) between larger lightning flashes are routinely observed. Much more detail is observed from distant lightning discharges. (However, the increased sensitivity does not reduce the vertical and radial errors for lightning observed outside the array.) In addition to the more sensitive LMA, we continue to improve our array of high-resolution electrostatic field change stations, which provides considerable information on lightning-induced charge transfer. We will present examples of observations of natural and triggered lightning, showing the increased detail now available from the recent improvements to the Langmuir Lab LMA.

  6. Storm Physics and Lightning Properties over Northern Alabama during DC3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthee, R.; Carey, L. D.; Bain, A. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) experiment seeks to examine the relationship between deep moist convection (DMC) and the production of nitrogen oxides (NOx) via lightning (LNOx). The focus of this study will be to examine integrated storm microphysics and lightning properties of DMC across northern Alabama (NA) during the DC3 campaign through use of polarimetric radar [UAHuntsville's Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Radar (ARMOR)] and lightning mapping [National Aeronautical and Space Administration's (NASA) north Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NA LMA)] platforms. Specifically, ARMOR and NA LMA are being used to explore the ability of radar inferred microphysical (e.g., ice mass, graupel volume) measurements to parameterize flash rates (F) and flash area for estimation of LNOX production in cloud resolving models. The flash area was calculated by using the 'convex hull' method. This method essentially draws a polygon around all the sources that comprise a flash. From this polygon, the convex hull area that describes the minimum polygon that circumscribes the flash extent is calculated. Two storms have been analyzed so far; one on 21 May 2012 (S1) and another on 11 June 2012 (S2), both of which were aircraft-penetrated during DC3. For S1 and S2, radar reflectivity (Z) estimates of precipitation ice mass (M) within the mixed-phase zone (-10°C to -40°C) were well correlated to the trend of lightning flash rate. However, a useful radar-based F parameterization must provide accurate quantification of rates in addition to proper trends. The difference reflectivity was used to estimate Z associated with ice and then a single Z-M relation was employed to calculate M in the mixed-phase zone. Using this approach it was estimated that S1 produced an order of magnitude greater M, but produced about a third of the total amount of flashes compared to S2. Expectations based on the non-inductive charging (NIC) theory suggest that the M

  7. Graptemys pulchra Baur 1893: Alabama Map Turtle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Godwin, James C.; McCoy, C.J.; Rhodin, A. G. J.; Pritchard, P. C. H.; van Dijk, P. P.; Saumure, R.A.; Buhlmann, K.A.; Iverson, J.B.; Mittermeier, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    The Alabama Map Turtle, Graptemys pulchra (Family Emydidae), is a moderately large riverine species endemic to the Mobile Bay drainage system of Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi. Sexual size dimorphism is pronounced, with adult females (carapace length [CL] to 273 mm) attaining more than twice the size of adult males (CL to 117 mm). The species is an inhabitant of relatively large, swift creeks and rivers, often with wide sandbars. Stream sections open to the sun and with abundant basking sites in the form of logs and brush are preferred. Six to seven clutches of 4–7 eggs are laid each year on river sandbars. Although the species is locally abundant, populations are threatened by habitat destruction, declines in their prey base, commercial collection, and vandalism. It is listed as a Species of Special Concern in Alabama.

  8. The Distribution of Lightning Channel Lengths in Northern Alabama Thunderstorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, H. S.; Koshak, W. J.

    2010-01-01

    Lightning is well known to be a major source of tropospheric NOx, and in most cases is the dominant natural source (Huntreiser et al 1998, Jourdain and Hauglustaine 2001). Production of NOx by a segment of a lightning channel is a function of channel segment energy density and channel segment altitude. A first estimate of NOx production by a lightning flash can be found by multiplying production per segment [typically 104 J/m; Hill (1979)] by the total length of the flash s channel. The purpose of this study is to determine average channel length for lightning flashes near NALMA in 2008, and to compare average channel length of ground flashes to the average channel length of cloud flashes.

  9. First Results From The Washington DC Metropolitan Area Lightning Mapping Demonstration Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, S. J.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Hall, J.; Krehbiel, P.; Rison, B.; Zubrick, S.

    2006-12-01

    An experimental portable lightning mapping array (LMA) operating in the upper VHF TV band (Channels 7-13; 174-216 MHz) was deployed in the Washington DC Metropolitan area during the summer 2006 to locate and monitor the overall lightning activity. The LMA network provides total lightning data to support lightning research as well as proxy data to benefit the development of applications for planned observing systems such as the GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper. The portable LMA hardware is a compactly-housed, easily deployed version of the LMA stations installed North Alabama, Oklahoma, and New Mexico, which operate in the lower VHF TV band (Channels 2-6, 54-88 MHz). Real-time LMA data products are provided to the National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office (WFO) in Sterling, VA to aid in their forecast and warning operations. Forecasters at WFO Sterling have already found the lightning data from the Washington DC demonstration network to be very useful in assessing the development of storm systems. On July 4, 2006, data from the LMA aided forecasters as they monitored an area of convection that later developed into a line of severe storms that moved southward through the Washington DC metropolitan area across the Washington Mall. Additional applications of lightning mapping data in the Baltimore-Washington DC urban environment will be discussed.

  10. The Washington DC Metro Area Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krehbiel, P.; Rison, W.; Edens, H.; O'Connor, N.; Aulich, G.; Thomas, R.; Kieft, S.; Goodman, S.; Blakeslee, R.; Hall, J.; Bailey, J.

    2006-12-01

    During the spring and summer of 2006, a network of eight lightning mapping stations has been set up in the greater DC metropolitan area to monitor the total lightning activity in storms over Virginia, Maryland and the Washington DC area. The network is a joint project between New Mexico Tech, NASA, and NOAA/National Weather Service, with real-time data being provided to the NWS for use in their forecast and warning operations. The network utilizes newly available portable stations developed with support from the National Science Foundation. Cooperating institutions involved in hosting the mapping stations are Howard University, Montgomery County Community College in Rockville MD, NOAA/NWS's Test and Evaluation Site in Sterling, VA, College of Southern Maryland near La Plata MD, the Applied Physics Laboratory of Johns Hopkins University, Northern Virginia Community College in Annandale, VA, the University of Maryland at Baltimore County, and George Mason University (Prince William Campus) in Manassas, VA. The network is experimental in that its stations a) operate in the upper rather than the lower VHF (TV channel 10, 192-198 MHz) to reduce the radio frequency background noise associated with urban environments, and b) are linked to the central processing site via the internet rather than by dedicated wireless communication links. The central processing is done in Huntsville, AL, and updated observations are sent to the National Weather Service every 2 min. The observational data will also be available on a public website. The higher operating frequency results in a decrease in signal strength estimated to be about 15-20 dB, relative to the LMA networks being operated in northern Alabama and central Oklahoma (which operate on TV channels 5 and 3, respectively). This is offset somewhat by decreased background noise levels at many of the stations. The detection threshold levels range from about -95 dBm up to -80 dBm and the peak lightning signals typically extend 15

  11. The Washington DC Metro Area Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krehbiel, Paul; Rison, William; Edens, Harald; OConnor, Nicholas; Aulich, Graydon; Thomas, Ronald; Kieft, Sandra; Goodman, Steven; Blakeslee, Richard; Hall, John; Bailey, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    During the spring and summer of 2006, a network of eight lightning mapping stations has been set up in the greater DC metropolitan area to monitor the total lightning activity in storms over Virginia, Maryland and the Washington DC area. The network is a joint project between New Mexico Tech, NASA, and NOAA/National Weather Service, with real-time data being provided to the NWS for use in their forecast and warning operations. The network utilizes newly available portable stations developed with support from the National Science Foundation. Cooperating institutions involved in hosting mapping stations are Howard University, Montgomery County Community College in Rockville MD, NOAA/NWS's Test and Evaluation Site in Sterling, VA, College of Southern Maryland near La Plata MD, the Applied Physics Laboratory of Johns Hopkins University, Northern Virginia Community College in Annandale, VA, the University of Maryland at Baltimore County, and George Mason University (Prince William Campus) in Manassas, VA. The network is experimental in that its stations a) operate in the upper rather than the lower VHF (TV channel 10, 192-198 MHz) to reduce the radio frequency background noise associated with urban environments, and b) are linked to the central processing site via the internet rather than by dedicated wireless communication links. The central processing is done in Huntsville, AL, and updated observations are sent to the National Weather Service every 2 min. The observational data will also be available on a public website. The higher operating frequency results in a decrease in signal strength estimated to be about 15-20 dB, relative to the LMA networks being operated in northern Alabama and central Oklahoma (which operate on TV channels 5 and 3, respectively). This is offset somewhat by decreased background noise levels at many stations. The receiver threshold levels range from about -95 dBm up to -80 dBm and the peak lightning signals typically extend 15-20 dB above

  12. Washington D.C. Lightning Mapping Array Demonstration Project Risk Reduction for GOES Lightning Mapper Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephan B.; Goodman, Steven; Krehbiel, Paul

    2007-01-01

    A 10-site, ground-based total lightning mapping array (LMA) has been installed in the Washington D.C. metropolitan area in 2006. The total lightning data from DC LMA are being processed in real-time and derived products are being provided to the forecasters of the National Weather Service (NWS) forecast office in Sterling, Virginia. The NWS forecasters are using the products to monitor convective activity along with conventional radar and satellite products. Operational experience with these products is intended to inform decision making in how to best utilize in NWS operations similar data available from the GOES Lightning Mapper. The paper will discuss specifics of the LMA as well as proposed research into use of total lightning data in predicting and warning for cloud-to-ground lightning.

  13. Constraining lightning channel growth dynamics by comparison of time domain electromagnetic simulations to Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, B. E.; Bitzer, P. M.; Burchfield, J.

    2015-12-01

    Major unknowns in lightning research include the mechanism and dynamics of lightning channel extension. Such processes are most simple during the initial growth of the channel, when the channel is relatively short and has not yet branched extensively throughout the cloud. During this initial growth phase, impulsive electromagnetic emissions (preliminary breakdown pulses) can be well-described as produced by current pulses generated as the channel extends, but the overall growth rate, channel geometry, and degree of branching are not known. We approach such issues by examining electric field change measurements made with the Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array (HAMMA) during the first few milliseconds of growth of a lightning discharge. We compare HAMMA observations of electromagnetic emissions and overall field change to models of lightning channel growth and development and attempt to constrain channel growth rate, degree of branching, channel physical properties, and uniformity of thunderstorm electric field. Preliminary comparisons suggest that the lightning channel branches relatively early in the discharge, though more complete and detailed analysis will be presented.

  14. Current Technology of the Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodeheffer, D.; Rison, W.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Edens, H. E.; Thomas, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) is continuing to be developed technology-wise, involving both hardware configurations and software, to further simplify the deployment, operation and sensitivity of networks. This has included developing stations that operate on a complete standalone basis, utilizing battery backed-up solar power and cell phone data modems for connecting into the internet. Solid state disks not requiring cooling are used for onsite data storage, allowing the electronics to be housed in an RF-tight enclosure and the VHF receiving antenna to be co-located immediately above the station electronics, rather than 50 to 100 feet away. The combined changes enable stations to be placed in remote, RF-quiet locations for excellent sensitivity, and to have only a 4'x 4' freestanding footprint on the ground for ease of deployment. Networks that take advantage of the solar/cell modem design are the West Texas LMA (Texas Tech University), the Houston LMA (Texas A&M), and the North Colorado LMA (NMT/CSU), initially utilized in the 2012 DC3 atmospheric chemistry program. A similar network (operated in conjunction with NASA/MSFC) was set up on a temporary basis in Southern France leading up to the HyMeX field program in September and October of 2012. Each of the above networks is remotely monitored via the internet and feeds its data on a minute-by-minute basis back to a central processing computer at NM Tech (or TTU), where it is processed in real time and posted on the web in the two- and ten-minute time intervals. Examples of archived and current realtime data for the North Colorado LMA can be seen at http://lightning.nmt.edu/colma/ and /colma/current/. Finally, based on successful experiences with the above networks, we have developed what is termed the 'Sitetest' network, consisting of 9 or 10 stations each mounted on wooden pallets with lightweight enclosures and simple antenna hardware. The network was initially operated at Kennedy Space Center to test out

  15. First results of the Colombia Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Jesus; Montanyà, Joan; van der Velde, Oscar; Romero, David; Fabró, Ferran; Taborda, John; Aranguren, Daniel; Torres, Horacio

    2016-04-01

    In April 2015 the 3D Lightning Mapping Array (COLMA) network was installed on Santa Marta area (north of Colombia). The COLMA maps VHF radio emissions of lightning leaders in three dimensions by the time-of-arrival technique (Rison et al., 1999). This array has six sensors with base lines between 5 km to 20 km. The COLMA is the first VHF 3D network operating in the tropics and it has been installed in the frame of ASIM (Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor) ESA's mission in order to investigate the electrical characteristics of tropical thunderstorms favorable for the production of Terrestrial Gamma ray Flashes (TGF). In this paper we present COLMA data of several storms. We discuss lightning activity, lightning leader altitudes and thunderstorm charge structures compared to data form our ELMA (Ebro Lightning Mapping Array) at the north-east coast of Spain. The data confirm what we expected, lightning leaders can propagate at higher altitudes compared to mid latitude thunderstorms because the higher vertical development of tropical thunderstorms. A simple inspection of a ten minute period of the 16th of November of 2015 storm shows a tripolar electric charge structure. In that case, the midlevel negative charge region was located between 7 to 9 km. The structure presented a lower positive charge below the midlevel negative and centred at 6.5 km and an upper positive charge region extending from 9 km to slightly more than 15 km. This vertical extension of the upper positive charge where negative leaders evolve is significantly larger compared to the storms at the ELMA area in Spain. COLMA has shown frequent activity of negative leaders reaching altitudes of more than 15 km.

  16. Tennessee Valley Total and Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Climatology Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buechler, Dennis; Blakeslee, R. J.; Hall, J. M.; McCaul, E. W.

    2008-01-01

    The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) has been in operation since 2001 and consists often VHF receivers deployed across northern Alabama. The NALMA locates sources of impulsive VHF radio signals from total lightning by accurately measuring the time that the signals arrive at the different receiving stations. The sources detected are then clustered into flashes by applying spatially and temporally constraints. This study examines the total lightning climatology of the region derived from NALMA and compares it to the cloud-to-ground (CG) climatology derived from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) The presentation compares the total and CG lightning trends for monthly, daily, and hourly periods.

  17. Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array: Detection Efficiency, Mapping Large Sets of Data, and the Beginning of a Total Lightning Climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array (OKLMA) has collected the time and location of very
high frequency (VHF) radiation sources produced by all types of lightning in central Oklahoma since the spring of 2003. The detection efficiency of the OKLMA decreases with distance from the center of the LMA, which causes a false maximum in sources over the network when working with very large data sets. Using five months worth of data and assuming a VHF source detection efficiency of 100% over the network, a map of detection efficiency at different ranges is presented. Two methods of eliminating the bias of source detection over the network are explored: a normalization method based on the decreasing VHF power of detected sources with range and a flash-sorting method. Although both methods yield similar results, the flash sorting method is chosen for future climatology studies because it is more readily understood and is already in use throughout the community in case studies and lightning jump algorithms. The first maps and time series of total lightning over central Oklahoma for a 10-year period are presented.

  18. The Houston Lightning Mapping Array: Installation, Operation, and Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orville, R. E.; Cullen, M. R.; Rodeheffer, D.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.

    2012-12-01

    The Houston Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) was established in April 2012 and is a network of twelve time-of-arrival lightning sensors operating in the VHF around Houston, Texas. The network sensors are built by New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. Built stand-alone units, these LMA sensors use solar panels and cellular data modems for Internet connectivity. This enables the units to be placed in strategic locations at sites to minimize noise and interference by reducing dependence on wired power or communications lines. Twelve sensors are distributed around the Houston and provide total lightning data for the fourth most populated American city. The primary research goals of the network are to investigate the structure of total lightning within thunderstorm development and to examine any potential impact of the urban environment on lightning characteristics. Furthermore, the proximity to the coast and the Gulf of Mexico presents the opportunity to examine the total lightning structure within tropical cyclones that impact the Texas coastline. The availability of real-time LMA data provides a decision support tool for advanced warning of thunderstorm development. We present efforts with the Houston/Galveston Weather Forecast Office and the Spaceflight Meteorology Group at Johnson Space Center to integrate the real-time LMA data into operational display software. The network of 12 sensors has been operating continuously since installation in mid-April with 10 sensors surrounding the Houston area plus one in College Station and one in Galveston. Analysis of recent data will investigate three-dimensional thunderstorm activity.

  19. Mapping lightning in the sky with a mini array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füllekrug, Martin; Liu, Zhongjian; Koh, Kuang; Mezentsev, Andrew; Pedeboy, Stéphane; Soula, Serge; Enno, Sven-Erik; Sugier, Jacqueline; Rycroft, Michael J.

    2016-10-01

    Mini arrays are commonly used for infrasonic and seismic studies. Here we report for the first time the detection and mapping of distant lightning discharges in the sky with a mini array. The array has a baseline to wavelength ratio ˜4.2·10-2 to record very low frequency electromagnetic waves from 2 to 18 kHz. It is found that the mini array detects ˜69 lightning pulses per second from cloud-to-ground and in-cloud discharges, even though the parent thunderstorms are ˜900-1100 km away and a rigorous selection criterion based on the quality of the wavefront across the array is used. In particular, lightning pulses that exhibit a clockwise phase progression are found at larger elevation angles in the sky as the result of a birefringent subionospheric wave propagation attributed to ordinary and extraordinary waves. These results imply that long range lightning detection networks might benefit from an exploration of the wave propagation conditions with mini arrays.

  20. Description and Status of the DC Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, Richard; Rudlosky, Scott D.; Bailey, Jeffrey C.; Hall, John M.; Goodman, Steven J.; Zubrick, Steven; Krehbiel, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The DC Lightning Mapping Array (DC LMA) centered on the Washington, DC metro region has been in operation since 2006. During that time the DC LMA has provided real time data to regional National Weather Service (NSF) Sterling, VA forecast office for operations support and the NOAA Meteorological Development Laboratory (MDL) for new product development and assessment. Data from this network (as well as other from other LMA systems) are now being used to create proxy Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) data sets for GOES-R risk reduction and algorithm development activities. In addition, since spring 2009 data are provided to the Storm Prediction Center in support of Hazardous Weather Testbed and GOES-R Proving Ground activities during the Spring Program. Description, status and plans will be discussed.

  1. Lightning Mapping and the Nowcasting of Severe Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, S.; Darden, C.; Burks, J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a successful research and operational collaboration between NASA scientists and NWS forecasters to improve severe stor m warnings using real-time data from a regional VHF total lightning mapping array (LMA). Key objectives of our research using LMA data ar e: a) Identification of intensifying and weakening storms using the time rate-of-change of total flash rate; b) Improved severe storm poten tial situational awareness; c) Evaluation of the potential of total f lash rate trend to improve severe storm probability of detection (POD ) and lead time; and d) Validation of mesoscale model forecasts of th understorm initiation. The LMA data are distributed for ingest and di splay in the WFO AWIPS decision support system, and archived at each WFO for case studies, event playbacks, and assessments using the NWS Warning Event Simulator. The Huntsville WFO has upgraded severe thund erstorm warnings to verified tornado warnings and avoided a false ala rm on a severe storm through the added information on storm growth, intensification, and decay that can be deduced from the magnitude and temporal trend of total flash rates. We present detailed case studies of the observed relationships between lightning activity and tornadi c storm development as determined by radar reflectivity and velocity fields, and thunderstorms forecast by the Weather Research and Foreca st (WRF) model. From these collaborative studies, forecasters can eva luate the added value of total lightning data within the forecast and warning decision-making process (http://weather.msfc.nasa.gov/sport) .

  2. Lightning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pampe, William R.

    1970-01-01

    Presents basic physical theory for movement of electric charges in clouds, earth, and air during production of lightning and thunder. Amount of electrical energy produced and heating effects during typical thunderstorms is described. Generalized safety practices are given. (JM)

  3. New Mexico Tech Lightning Mapping Array: Real-Time System Monitoring and Data Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rison, W.; Miller, S.; Hunyday, S.

    2003-12-01

    The New Mexico Tech Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) is a VHF time-of-arrival (TOA) lightning mapping system. In a typical deployment it consists of ten to fifteen VHF receivers distributed over a geographical area of about 90~km in diameter. It was designed to be relatively inexpensive by recording TOA data locally at the remote stations, using GPS timing to determining the time of arrival of impulsive VHF radiation from lightning with about 40~ns accuracy. The TOA data is collected after storms by driving to the remote stations and collecting the data on magnetic media for post-processing. During its design phase cost-effective communications links with a high enough bandwidth for real-time processing and display were not available. We initially used low-speed (9600 baud) wireless links to the remote stations for system monitoring and control. With recent advances in wireless communications, it is now cost-effective to implement real-time data processing and display. Each LMA station typically determines the time of the strongest source of VHF radiation in an 80~μ s window, for up to 12,500 TOA sources per second. At its full data rate it can take tens of minutes to process a minute of LMA data. Using software to decrease the data rate so that the TOA data is windowed over a longer interval (say, 400~μ s), it is possible to process this decimated data in real time using an inexpensive PC. While the images generated using this decimated data are not as detailed as post-processed images generated using the full TOA data, they are sufficiently detailed for most operational uses. Using relatively inexpensive IEEE 802.11b wireless Ethernet cards, we can achieve data rates sufficiently high so that we can transmit this decimated data from remote stations to a central location. During the summer of 2003 we have developed a real-time monitoring and data processing/display system, somewhat similar to the monitoring and display system for the North Alabama LMA1. We use

  4. Fractal-Based Lightning Channel Length Estimation from Convex-Hull Flash Areas for DC3 Lightning Mapping Array Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruning, Eric C.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Krehbiel, Paul R.; Rison, William; Carey, Larry D.; Koshak, William; Peterson, Harold; MacGorman, Donald R.

    2013-01-01

    We will use VHF Lightning Mapping Array data to estimate NOx per flash and per unit channel length, including the vertical distribution of channel length. What s the best way to find channel length from VHF sources? This paper presents the rationale for the fractal method, which is closely related to the box-covering method.

  5. Learning from concurrent Lightning Imaging Sensor and Lightning Mapping Array observations in preparation for the MTG-LI mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defer, Eric; Bovalo, Christophe; Coquillat, Sylvain; Pinty, Jean-Pierre; Farges, Thomas; Krehbiel, Paul; Rison, William

    2016-04-01

    The upcoming decade will see the deployment and the operation of French, European and American space-based missions dedicated to the detection and the characterization of the lightning activity on Earth. For instance the Tool for the Analysis of Radiation from lightNIng and Sprites (TARANIS) mission, with an expected launch in 2018, is a CNES mission dedicated to the study of impulsive energy transfers between the atmosphere of the Earth and the space environment. It will carry a package of Micro Cameras and Photometers (MCP) to detect and locate lightning flashes and triggered Transient Luminous Events (TLEs). At the European level, the Meteosat Third Generation Imager (MTG-I) satellites will carry in 2019 the Lightning Imager (LI) aimed at detecting and locating the lightning activity over almost the full disk of Earth as usually observed with Meteosat geostationary infrared/visible imagers. The American community plans to operate a similar instrument on the GOES-R mission for an effective operation in early 2016. In addition NASA will install in 2016 on the International Space Station the spare version of the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) that has proved its capability to optically detect the tropical lightning activity from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft. We will present concurrent observations recorded by the optical space-borne Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) and the ground-based Very High Frequency (VHF) Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) for different types of lightning flashes. The properties of the cloud environment will also be considered in the analysis thanks to coincident observations of the different TRMM cloud sensors. The characteristics of the optical signal will be discussed according to the nature of the parent flash components and the cloud properties. This study should provide some insights not only on the expected optical signal that will be recorded by LI, but also on the definition of the validation strategy of LI, and

  6. Lightning Mapping Array flash detection performance with variable receiver thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, Vanna C.; Bruning, Eric C.

    2016-07-01

    This study characterizes Lightning Mapping Array performance for networks that participated in the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry field program using new Monte Carlo and curvature matrix model simulations. These open-source simulation tools are readily adapted to real-time operations or detailed studies of performance. Each simulation accounted for receiver threshold and location, as well as a reference distribution of source powers and flash sizes based on thunderstorm observations and the mechanics of station triggering. Source and flash detection efficiency were combined with solution bias and variability to predict flash area distortion at long ranges. Location errors and detection efficiency were highly dependent on the station configuration and thresholds, especially at longer ranges, such that performance varied more than expected across different networks and with azimuth within networks. Error characteristics matched prior studies, which led to an increase in flash distortion with range. Predicted flash detection efficiency exceeded 95% within 100 km of all networks.

  7. Lightning Mapping Array flash detection performance with variable receiver thresholds.

    PubMed

    Chmielewski, Vanna C; Bruning, Eric C

    2016-07-27

    This study characterizes Lightning Mapping Array performance for networks that participated in the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry field program using new Monte Carlo and curvature matrix model simulations. These open-source simulation tools are readily adapted to real-time operations or detailed studies of performance. Each simulation accounted for receiver threshold and location, as well as a reference distribution of source powers and flash sizes based on thunderstorm observations and the mechanics of station triggering. Source and flash detection efficiency were combined with solution bias and variability to predict flash area distortion at long ranges. Location errors and detection efficiency were highly dependent on the station configuration and thresholds, especially at longer ranges, such that performance varied more than expected across different networks and with azimuth within networks. Error characteristics matched prior studies, which led to an increase in flash distortion with range. Predicted flash detection efficiency exceeded 95% within 100 km of all networks.

  8. Ebro Lightning Mapping Array: sprite-producing lightning and ground-to-cloud-to-ground flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Velde, O. A.; Montanyà, J.; Romero, D.; Pineda, N.; Soula, S.

    2012-04-01

    In the summer of 2011 a three-dimensional lightning mapping array (LMA) has been deployed in the Ebro delta and surrounding area in eastern Spain. This area was chosen for its proximity to both summer storms over land and cold season thunderstorms over sea, which often produce transient luminous mesospheric events (mainly sprites and elves). In 2011, six of the twelve VHF band (60-66 MHz) sensors were operational, and more followed in early 2012. The area is also covered by LS8000 interferometer and LINET detection systems which provide complementary data. The first flash analysed occurred at the end of the life of a thunderstorm cluster on July 12th and started as an upward negative leader launched by a windmill, growing into the lower positive charge region 3-4 km altitude above the windmills and at 5-7 km altitude eastward, into stratiform precipitation. Briefly, leaders expanded into the upper positive charge region (8-10 km). A downward negative leader reached the ground in the Ebro delta (visually confirmed and detected by LINET). It was followed by two more return strokes and further eastward expansion. The flash lasted 2 seconds and measured 38 km across. LINET and a SAFIR interferometer system did not detect the beginning of the upward flash. Several other complex flashes with horizontal extents larger than 60 km have been mapped since. Other interesting phenomena were observed as well: emissions detected every 3.15 seconds from some of the wind turbines (corona or short upward leaders), suggestive of the blade rotation, and aircraft flying around 8.5 km altitude through thunderstorm anvils showing up as sharp trails of pulses. From July till December 2011 at least 33 sprites were recorded roughly within 150 km from the Ebro LMA. The initial data show the sprites to occur mainly over the sources emitted during the period between the triggering +CG and the onset of the sprite, from ~6-8 km altitude (-15° to -30°C). This activity can be horizontally

  9. The Sao Paulo Lightning Mapping Array (SPLMA): Prospects to GOES-R GLM and CHUVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, Rachel I.; Carrey, Larry; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Bailey, Jeffrey C.; Goodman, Steven J.; Bruning, Eric C.; Koshak, William; Morales, Carlos A.; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Angelis, Carlos F.; Pinto, Osmar, Jr.; Naccarato, Kleber; Saba, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the characteristics and prospects of a Lightning Mapping Array to be deployed at the city of S o Paulo (SPLMA). This LMA network will provide CHUVA campaign with total lightning, lightning channel mapping and detailed information on the locations of cloud charge regions for the thunderstorms investigated during one of its IOP. The real-time availability of LMA observations will also contribute to and support improved weather situational awareness and mission execution. For GOES-R program it will form the basis of generating unique and valuable proxy data sets for both GLM and ABI sensors in support of several on-going research investigations

  10. High-Speed Video, Mapping and Broadband Electric Field Recordings of Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edens, H. E.; Eack, K.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.; Thomas, R. J.; Winn, W. P.; Hunyady, S. J.

    2008-12-01

    During the summer of 2008 New Mexico Tech's Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) was reconfigured from a compact to a more widely-spaced network around the Langmuir Laboratory for Atmospheric Research. This change increases its three-dimensional location accuracy further away from the center of the array, as well as reducing false correlations caused by local corona and TV-broadcast interference. The LMA operated in a high time-resolution mode which located RF sources from lightning as often as once every 10 microseconds. We also operated a Vision Research Phantom v7.3 high-speed video camera to make recordings of lightning leaders around the mountaintop laboratory, typically at a rate of 6400 frames per second. These recordings are time-tagged by GPS allowing us to accurately compare individual frames with LMA data. In addition to lightning mapping data and video recordings we acquired broadband electric field waveforms from lightning, up to 100 MHz in bandwidth. These instruments are a comprehensive tool for studying lightning leader processes in great detail. In particular, we focus on continuing our studies into the leader behavior of bolt-from-the-blue lightning, where the leader exhibits a transition from impulsive to more continuous RF radiation as it exits the cloud and propagates to ground.

  11. Analysis and prediction of lightning strike distributions associated with synoptic map types over Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Reap, R.M.

    1994-08-01

    The temporal and spatial distributions of lightning activity associated with specific synoptic regimes of low-level wind flow were analyzed as part of an experiment to develop improved statistical thunderstorm forecasts for Florida. The synoptic regimes were identified by means of a linear correlation technique that was used to perform pattern classification or `map typing` of 18- and 30-h sea level pressure forecasts from the National Meteorological Center`s Nested Grid Model (NGM). Lightning location data for the 1987-90 warm seasons were subsequently analyzed on a 12-km grid to determine the thunderstorm distribution for each of the predetermined map types. The analysis revealed organized coastal maxima in lightning activity related to land-sea-breeze convergence zones that form in direct response to the low-level wind flow. Surface effects were also indicated by the persistent minima in lightning activity over Lake Okeechobee and by the lightning maxima found in regions with shoreline curvature favoring localized convergence. Experimental thunderstorm probability equations for Florida were subsequently developed from climatological lightning frequencies and NGM forecast fields. The lightning frequencies were combined with the K stability index to form interactive predictors that take into account the temporal and spatial variations in lightning occurrence for each map type but modulate the climatology in response to the daily large-scale synoptic situation. The statistical forecast equations were developed for each map type in an attempt to simulate the effects of small-scale processes, such as land-sea-breeze convergence zones, on the subsequent development of peninsular-scale convection.

  12. Correlated Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and Radar Observations of the Initial Stages of Florida Triggered Lightning Discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. D.; Pilkey, J.; Uman, M, A.; Jordan, D. M.; Biggerstaff, M. I.; Rison, W.; Blakeslee, R.

    2012-01-01

    We characterize the geometrical and electrical characteristics of the initial stages of nine Florida triggered lightning discharges using a Lightning Mapping Array (LMA), a C-band SMART radar, and measured channel-base currents. We determine initial channel and subsequent branch lengths, average initial channel and branch propagation speeds, and channel-base current at the time of each branch initiation. The channel-base current is found to not change significantly when branching occurs, an unexpected result. The initial stage of Florida triggered lightning typically transitions from vertical to horizontal propagation at altitudes of 3-6 km, near the typical 0 C level of 4-5 km and several kilometers below the expected center of the negative cloud-charge region at 7-8 km. The data presented potentially provide information on thunderstorm electrical and hydrometeor structure and discharge propagation physics. LMA source locations were obtained from VHF sources of positive impulsive currents as small as 10 A, in contrast to expectations found in the literature.

  13. Assessments of Total Lightning Data Utility in Weather Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buechler, Dennis E.; Goodman, Steve; LaCasse, Katherine; Blakeslee, Richard; Darden, Chris

    2005-01-01

    National Weather Service forecasters in Huntsville, Alabama have had access to total lightning data from the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) since 2003. Forecasters can monitor real-time total lightning observations on their AWIPS (Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS) workstations. The lightning data is used to supplement other observations such as radar and satellite data. The lightning data is updated every 2 min, providing more timely evidence of storm growth or decay than is available from 5 min radar scans. Total lightning observations have been used to positively impact warning decisions in a number of instances. A number of approaches are being pursued to assess the usefulness of total lightning measurements to the operational forecasting community in the warning decision process. These approaches, which include both qualitative and quantitative assessment methods, will be discussed. submitted to the American Meteorological Society (AMS) Conference on Meteorological Applications of Lightning Data to be held in San Diego, CA January 9-13,2005. This will be a presentation and an extended abstract will be published on a CD available from the AMS.

  14. The Kinematic and Microphysical Control of Storm Integrated Lightning Flash Extent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, Lawrence D.; Peterson, Harold S.; Schultz, Elise V.; Matthee, Retha; Schultz, Christopher J.; Petersen, Walter A,; Bain, Lamont

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the kinematic and microphysical control of lightning properties, particularly those that may govern the production of nitrogen oxides (NOx) in thunderstorms, such as flash rate, type (intracloud [IC] vs. cloud-to-ground [CG] ) and extent. Data and Methodology: a) NASA MSFC Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) is applied to North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) and Vaisala National Lightning Detection Network(TradeMark) (NLDN) observations following ordinary convective cells through their lifecycle. b) LNOM provides estimates of flash type, channel length distributions, lightning segment altitude distributions (SADs) and lightning NOx production profiles (Koshak et al. 2012). c) LNOM lightning characteristics are compared to the evolution of updraft and precipitation properties inferred from dual-Doppler (DD) and polarimetric radar analyses of UAHuntsville Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR, Cband, polarimetric) and KHTX (S-band, Doppler).

  15. Procedure for locating 10 km UTM grid on Alabama County general highway maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paludan, C. T. N.

    1975-01-01

    Each county highway map has a geographic grid of degrees and tens of minutes in both longitude and latitude in the margins and within the map as intersection crosses. These will be used to locate the universal transverse mercator (UTM) grid at 10 km intervals. Since the maps used may have stretched or shrunk in height and/or width, interpolation should be done between the 10 min intersections when possible. A table of UTM coordinates of 10 min intersections is required and included. In Alabama, all eastings are referred to a false easting of 500,000 m at 87 deg W longitude (central meridian, CM).

  16. An Operational Perspective of Total Lightning Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadler, David J.; Darden, Christopher B.; Stano, Geoffrey; Buechler, Dennis E.

    2009-01-01

    The close and productive collaborations between the NWS Warning and Forecast Office, the Short Term Prediction and Research Transition Center at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the University of Alabama in Huntsville have provided a unique opportunity for science sharing and technology transfer. One significant technology transfer that has provided immediate benefits to NWS forecast and warning operations is the use of data from the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array. This network consists of ten VHF receivers deployed across northern Alabama and a base station located at the National Space Science and Technology Center. Preliminary investigations done at WFO Huntsville, along with other similar total lightning networks across the country, have shown distinct correlations between the time rate-of-change of total lightning and trends in intensity/severity of the parent convective cell. Since May 2003 when WFO HUN began receiving these data - in conjunction with other more traditional remotely sensed data (radar, satellite, and surface observations) -- have improved the situational awareness of the WFO staff. The use of total lightning information, either from current ground based systems or future space borne instrumentation, may substantially contribute to the NWS mission, by enhancing severe weather warning and decision-making processes. Operational use of the data has been maximized at WFO Huntsville through a process that includes forecaster training, product implementation, and post event analysis and assessments. Since receiving these data, over 50 surveys have been completed highlighting the use of total lightning information during significant events across the Tennessee Valley. In addition, around 150 specific cases of interest have been archived for collaborative post storm analysis. From these datasets, detailed trending information from radar and total lightning can be compared to corresponding damage reports. This presentation will emphasize

  17. Triangulations of sprites relative to parent lighting near the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, G.; Cummer, S. A.; Li, J.; Lyons, W. A.; Stanley, M. A.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.; Thomas, R. J.; Weiss, S. A.; Beasley, W. H.; Bruning, E. C.; MacGorman, D. R.; Palivec, K.; Samaras, T. M.

    2012-12-01

    Temporal and spatial development of sprite-producing lightning flashes is examined with coordinated observations over an asymmetric mesoscale convective system on June 29, 2011 near the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array (OK-LMA). About 30 sprites were mutually observed from Bennett, Colorado and Hawley, Texas, allowing us to triangulate sprite formation in comparison with spatial/temporal development of the parent lightning. Complementary measurements of broadband (<1 Hz to ~300 kHz) radio frequency lightning signals are available from several magnetic sensors across the United States. Our analyses indicate that although sprite locations can be significantly offset horizontally (up to 70 km) from the parent ground stroke, they are usually laterally within 30 km of the in-cloud lightning activity during the 100 ms time interval prior to the sprite production. This is true for short-delayed sprites produced within 20 ms after a causative stroke, and long-delayed sprites appearing up to more than 200 ms after the stroke. Multiple sprites appearing as dancing/jumping events can be produced during one single flash either in a single lightning channel, through series of current surges superposed on a long and intense continuing current, or in multiple lightning channels through distinct ground strokes of the flash. The burst of continuous very-low-frequency/low-frequency lightning sferics commonly observed in association with sprites is linked to the horizontal progression of multiple negative leaders through positive charged regions of the cloud, which are typically centered at altitudes ~1-2 km (or more) above the freezing level.

  18. The GOES-R Lightning Mapper Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buechler, Dennis; Christian, Hugh; Goodman, Steve

    2004-01-01

    obtained by the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and have successfully been used in warning decisions. Every 2 minutes, total lightning counts in 2 km by 2 km horizontal, 1 km vertical grids are available to forecasters on an AWIPS (Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System) workstation. Experience with the LMA total lightning data is used to illustrate the potential use of LMS data that would be available to forecasters across the US. This abstract is for submission as a presentation to the National Weather Association Annual Meeting to be held 16-21 October 2004 in Portland, OR. This abstract will be published in the conference proceedings.

  19. High-Speed Electric Field Measurements and Lightning Mapping Observations at Langmuir Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rison, W.; Edens, H. E.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Winn, W. P.; Aulich, G.; Hunyady, S. J.; Thomas, R. J.

    2007-12-01

    During the summer of 2007 we recorded broadband RF radiation waveforms, together with ground-based slow and fast electric field waveforms, from lightning in the vicinity of Langmuir Laboratory in central New Mexico. Three-dimensional observations of the lightning flashes from New Mexico Tech's Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) give context for interpreting the RF and electric field waveforms. In addition, high-speed in-situ vector electric field waveforms were recorded by a newly developed balloon-borne instrument. The broadband RF radiation was received using a Rhode & Schwarz model HE010 active rod antenna with a 100~MHz bandwidth, which was sampled at up to 400~MHz. Log-detected RF waveforms for two side-by-side LMA stations, one operating at 63 MHz (TV channel 3) and the other at 183 MHz (TV channel 9), and ground-based fast and slow electric field waveforms, were digitized at 25~MHz. All ground-based waveforms had a depth of 1~second, and were time-tagged with a GPS receiver. These comprehensive datasets are being used to study various processes associated with lightning flashes --- in particular, to detect high-frequency electrical activity at the onset of a flash. The ground based measurements, in conjunction with the in-situ vector field measurements, will be used to study the transfer of charge during a flash. Measurements of the log-detected RF (which is used by the LMA to map lightning flashes), in conjunction with the broadband RF and electric field waveforms, will help us better understand what types of events are detected and located by the LMA. In this paper we will present the results for a few interesting lightning flashes. ~

  20. Mathematical Inversion of Lightning Data: Techniques and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William

    2003-01-01

    A survey of some interesting mathematical inversion studies dealing with radio, optical, and electrostatic measurements of lightning are presented. A discussion of why NASA is interested in lightning, what specific physical properties of lightning are retrieved, and what mathematical techniques are used to perform the retrievals are discussed. In particular, a relatively new multi-station VHF time-of-arrival (TOA) antenna network is now on-line in Northern Alabama and will be discussed. The network, called the Lightning Mapping Array (LMA), employs GPS timing and detects VHF radiation from discrete segments (effectively point emitters) that comprise the channel of lightning strokes within cloud and ground flashes. The LMA supports on-going ground-validation activities of the low Earth orbiting Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) satellite developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. The LMA also provides detailed studies of the distribution and evolution of thunderstorms and lightning in the Tennessee Valley, and offers interesting comparisons with other meteorological/geophysical datasets. In order to take full advantage of these benefits, it is essential that the LMA channel mapping accuracy (in both space and time) be fully characterized and optimized. A new channel mapping retrieval algorithm is introduced for this purpose. To characterize the spatial distribution of retrieval errors, the algorithm has been applied to analyze literally tens of millions of computer-simulated lightning VHF point sources that have been placed at various ranges, azimuths, and altitudes relative to the LMA network. Statistical results are conveniently summarized in high-resolution, color-coded, error maps.

  1. An Investigation of the Kinematic and Microphysical Control of Lightning Rate, Extent and NOx Production using DC3 Observations and the NASA Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, Lawrence; Koshak, William; Peterson, Harold; Matthee, Retha; Bain, Lamont

    2013-01-01

    The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) experiment seeks to quantify the relationship between storm physics, lightning characteristics and the production of nitrogen oxides via lightning (LNOx). The focus of this study is to investigate the kinematic and microphysical control of lightning properties, particularly those that may govern LNOx production, such as flash rate, type and extent across Alabama during DC3. Prior studies have demonstrated that lightning flash rate and type is correlated to kinematic and microphysical properties in the mixed-phase region of thunderstorms such as updraft volume and graupel mass. More study is required to generalize these relationships in a wide variety of storm modes and meteorological conditions. Less is known about the co-evolving relationship between storm physics, morphology and three-dimensional flash extent, despite its importance for LNOx production. To address this conceptual gap, the NASA Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) is applied to North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) and Vaisala National Lightning Detection Network(TM) (NLDN) observations following ordinary convective cells through their lifecycle. LNOM provides estimates of flash rate, flash type, channel length distributions, lightning segment altitude distributions (SADs) and lightning NOx production profiles. For this study, LNOM is applied in a Lagrangian sense to multicell thunderstorms over Northern Alabama on two days during DC3 (21 May and 11 June 2012) in which aircraft observations of NOx are available for comparison. The LNOM lightning characteristics and LNOX production estimates are compared to the evolution of updraft and precipitation properties inferred from dual-Doppler and polarimetric radar analyses applied to observations from a nearby radar network, including the UAH Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR). Given complex multicell evolution, particular attention is paid to storm morphology, cell

  2. An Investigation of the Kinematic and Microphysical Control of Lightning Rate, Extent and NOX Production using DC3 Observations and the NASA Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, Lawrence; Koshak, William; Peterson, Harold; Matthee, Retha; Bain, Lamont

    2013-01-01

    The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) experiment seeks to quantify the relationship between storm physics, lightning characteristics and the production of nitrogen oxides via lightning (LNOx). The focus of this study is to investigate the kinematic and microphysical control of lightning properties, particularly those that may govern LNOx production, such as flash rate, type and extent across Alabama during DC3. Prior studies have demonstrated that lightning flash rate and type is correlated to kinematic and microphysical properties in the mixed-phase region of thunderstorms such as updraft volume and graupel mass. More study is required to generalize these relationships in a wide variety of storm modes and meteorological conditions. Less is known about the co-evolving relationship between storm physics, morphology and three-dimensional flash extent, despite its importance for LNOx production. To address this conceptual gap, the NASA Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) is applied to North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) and Vaisala National Lightning Detection NetworkTM (NLDN) observations following ordinary convective cells through their lifecycle. LNOM provides estimates of flash rate, flash type, channel length distributions, lightning segment altitude distributions (SADs) and lightning NOx production profiles. For this study, LNOM is applied in a Lagrangian sense to multicell thunderstorms over Northern Alabama on two days during DC3 (21 May and 11 June 2012) in which aircraft observations of NOx are available for comparison. The LNOM lightning characteristics and LNOX production estimates are compared to the evolution of updraft and precipitation properties inferred from dual-Doppler and polarimetric radar analyses applied to observations from a nearby radar network, including the UAH Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR). Given complex multicell evolution, particular attention is paid to storm morphology, cell

  3. An Investigation of the Kinematic and Microphysical Control of Lightning Rate, Extent and NOX Production using DC3 Observations and the NASA Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, L. D.; Koshak, W. J.; Peterson, H. S.; Matthee, R.; Bain, A. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) experiment seeks to quantify the relationship between storm physics, lightning characteristics and the production of nitrogen oxides via lightning (LNOX). The focus of this study is to investigate the kinematic and microphysical control of lightning properties, particularly those that may govern LNOX production, such as flash rate, type and extent across Alabama during DC3. Prior studies have demonstrated that lightning flash rate and type is correlated to kinematic and microphysical properties in the mixed-phase region of thunderstorms such as updraft volume and graupel mass. More study is required to generalize these relationships in a wide variety of storm modes and meteorological conditions. Less is known about the co-evolving relationship between storm physics, morphology and three-dimensional flash extent, despite its importance for LNOX production. To address this conceptual gap, the NASA Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) is applied to North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) and Vaisala National Lightning Detection NetworkTM (NLDN) observations following ordinary convective cells through their lifecycle. LNOM provides estimates of flash rate, flash type, channel length distributions, lightning segment altitude distributions (SADs) and lightning NOX production profiles. For this study, LNOM is applied in a Lagrangian sense to multicell thunderstorms over Northern Alabama on two days during DC3 (21 May and 11 June 2012) in which aircraft observations of NOX are available for comparison. The LNOM lightning characteristics and LNOX production estimates are compared to the evolution of updraft and precipitation properties inferred from dual-Doppler and polarimetric radar analyses applied to observations from a nearby radar network, including the UAH Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR). Given complex multicell evolution, particular attention is paid to storm morphology, cell

  4. Comparison of Ground-Based 3-Dimensional Lightning Mapping Observation with Satellite-Based LIS Observations in Oklahoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Ronald J.; Krehbiel, Paul R.; Rison, William; Hamlin, Timothy; Boccippio, Dennis J.; Goodman, Steven J.; Christian, Hugh J.

    1999-01-01

    3-dimensional lightning mapping observations were obtained in central Oklahoma during June 1998, using New Mexico Tech's Lightning Mapping Array (LMA). The results have been compared with observations of the discharges from space obtained by NASA's Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft. Excellent spatial and temporal correlations were obtained between the two sets of observations. All discharges seen by LIS were mapped by the LMA. Most of the detected optical events were associated with lightning channels that extended into the upper part of the storm. Cloud-to-ground discharges that were confined to mid- and lower-altitudes tended to be detected by LIS at the time of late-stage return strokes. Extensive illumination tended to occur in impulsive bursts toward the end or part way through intracloud discharges and appeared to be produced by energetic K-changes that typically occur at these times.

  5. Colorado Lightning Mapping Array Collaborations through the GOES-R Visiting Scientist Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stano, Geoffrey T.; Szoke, Edward; Rydell, Nezette; Cox, Robert; Mazur, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    For the past two years, the GOES-R Proving Ground has solicited proposals for its Visiting Scientist Program. NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has used this opportunity to support the GOES-R Proving Ground by expanding SPoRT's total lightning collaborations. In 2012, this expanded the evaluation of SPoRT's pseudo-geostationary lightning mapper product to the Aviation Weather Center and Storm Prediction Center. This year, SPoRT has collaborated with the Colorado Lightning Mapping Array (COLMA) and potential end users. In particular, SPoRT is collaborating with the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) and Colorado State University (CSU) to obtain these data in real-time. From there, SPoRT is supporting the transition of these data to the local forecast offices in Boulder, Colorado and Cheyenne, Wyoming as well as to Proving Ground projects (e.g., the Hazardous Weather Testbed's Spring Program and Aviation Weather Center's Summer Experiment). This presentation will focus on the results of this particular Visiting Scientist Program trip. In particular, the COLMA data are being provided to both forecast offices for initial familiarization. Additionally, several forecast issues have been highlighted as important uses for COLMA data in the operational environment. These include the utility of these data for fire weather situations, situational awareness for both severe weather and lightning safety, and formal evaluations to take place in the spring of 2014.

  6. Signatures in Lightning Activity during Tennessee Valley Severe Storms of 5-6 May 2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, Patrick N.; Goodman, Steven J.

    2004-01-01

    During the first week of May 2003, the Tennessee Valley experienced 14 tornadoes. Those that moved across the Tennessee Valley Region of northern Alabama and southern Tennessee provided an opportunity for study us- ing the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA). On 5 May a classic supercell trekked across southern Tennessee spawning several tornadoes producing FO-F3 damage; on 6 May a high precipitation supercell moved across northern Alabama producing several FO-F1 tornadoes. The life cycle of these supercells will be discussed by presenting their electrical and radar evolution.

  7. Preliminary water table map of surficial aquifer, Birmingham-Bessemer, Alabama from ADEM environmental assessment database

    SciTech Connect

    Bearce, D.N.; Neilson, M.J. . Geology Dept.); Carter, S.A. )

    1994-03-01

    The Birmingham-Bessemer metropolitan area lies in the Birmingham-Big Canoe Valley physiographic district of the Alabama Valley and Ridge and is underlain mainly by a lower Paleozoic (Cambrian to Ordovician) sequence of folded and faulted carbonate and minor clastic sedimentary rocks. In the birmingham area, the valley is bounded to the southeast by Red Mountain, a NE-trending cuesta capped by SE-dipping middle Paleozoic shales and sandstones, and to the northwest by Sand Mountain, along the southeast side of which the lower Paleozoic carbonates are thrust-faulted northwestward over upper Paleozoic clastic rocks. The valley is drained by Village and Valley Creeks, which flow generally to the southwest. Previous studies of groundwater in the Birmingham area have dealt with flow within the carbonates and have described both water-table and confined aquifers. This study concentrates on the surficial aquifer, the clay-silt residual soil above carbonate rocks, in the Birmingham-Bessemer metropolitan area. A water table map covering approximately 50 square miles has been prepared from data contained in 66 individual contamination site reports submitted to the Alabama Department of Environmental Management by various geotechnical and environmental firms during the past 10 years. Water table data used in map preparation were collected during all seasons, and at many sites collections were one-time events. All water table data from each site were averaged for this study. Data from several sites show water table fluctuations of as much as 4 feet from summer to winter.

  8. Using Total Lightning Observations to Enhance Lightning Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stano, Geoffrey T.

    2012-01-01

    Lightning is often the underrated threat faced by the public when it comes to dangerous weather phenomena. Typically, larger scale events such as floods, hurricanes, and tornadoes receive the vast majority of attention by both the general population and the media. This comes from the fact that these phenomena are large, longer lasting, can impact a large swath of society at one time, and are dangerous events. The threat of lightning is far more isolated on a case by case basis, although millions of cloud-to-ground lightning strikes hit this United States each year. While attention is given to larger meteorological events, lightning is the second leading cause of weather related deaths in the United States. This information raises the question of what steps can be taken to improve lightning safety. Already, the meteorological community s understanding of lightning has increased over the last 20 years. Lightning safety is now better addressed with the National Weather Service s access to the National Lightning Detection Network data and enhanced wording in their severe weather warnings. Also, local groups and organizations are working to improve public awareness of lightning safety with easy phrases to remember, such as "When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors." The impacts can be seen in the greater array of contingency plans, from airports to sports stadiums, addressing the threat of lightning. Improvements can still be made and newer technologies may offer new tools as we look towards the future. One of these tools is a network of sensors called a lightning mapping array (LMA). Several of these networks exist across the United States. NASA s Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center (SPoRT), part of the Marshall Spaceflight Center, has access to three of these networks from Huntsville, Alabama, the Kennedy Space Center, and Washington D.C. The SPoRT program s mission is to help transition unique products and observations into the operational forecast environment

  9. GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper Performance Specifications and Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Goodman, Steven J.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Koshak, William J.; Petersen, William A.; Boldi, Robert A.; Carey, Lawrence D.; Bateman, Monte G.; Buchler, Dennis E.; McCaul, E. William, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    The Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) is a single channel, near-IR imager/optical transient event detector, used to detect, locate and measure total lightning activity over the full-disk. The next generation NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-R) series will carry a GLM that will provide continuous day and night observations of lightning. The mission objectives for the GLM are to: (1) Provide continuous, full-disk lightning measurements for storm warning and nowcasting, (2) Provide early warning of tornadic activity, and (2) Accumulate a long-term database to track decadal changes of lightning. The GLM owes its heritage to the NASA Lightning Imaging Sensor (1997- present) and the Optical Transient Detector (1995-2000), which were developed for the Earth Observing System and have produced a combined 13 year data record of global lightning activity. GOES-R Risk Reduction Team and Algorithm Working Group Lightning Applications Team have begun to develop the Level 2 algorithms and applications. The science data will consist of lightning "events", "groups", and "flashes". The algorithm is being designed to be an efficient user of the computational resources. This may include parallelization of the code and the concept of sub-dividing the GLM FOV into regions to be processed in parallel. Proxy total lightning data from the NASA Lightning Imaging Sensor on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite and regional test beds (e.g., Lightning Mapping Arrays in North Alabama, Oklahoma, Central Florida, and the Washington DC Metropolitan area) are being used to develop the prelaunch algorithms and applications, and also improve our knowledge of thunderstorm initiation and evolution.

  10. The Kinematic and Microphysical Control of Lightning Rate, Extent and NOX Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, Lawrence; Koshak, William; Peterson, Harold; Matthee, Retha; Bain, A. Lamont

    2014-01-01

    The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) experiment seeks to quantify the relationship between storm physics, lightning characteristics and the production of nitrogen oxides via lightning (LNOx). The focus of this study is to investigate the kinematic and microphysical control of lightning properties, particularly those that may govern LNOx production, such as flash rate, type and extent across Alabama during DC3. Prior studies have demonstrated that lightning flash rate and type is correlated to kinematic and microphysical properties in the mixed-phase region of thunderstorms such as updraft volume and graupel mass. More study is required to generalize these relationships in a wide variety of storm modes and meteorological conditions. Less is known about the co-evolving relationship between storm physics, morphology and three-dimensional flash extent, despite its importance for LNOx production. To address this conceptual gap, the NASA Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) is applied to North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) and Vaisala National Lightning Detection Network(TM) (NLDN) observations following ordinary convective cells through their lifecycle. LNOM provides estimates of flash rate, flash type, channel length distributions, lightning segment altitude distributions (SADs) and lightning NOx production profiles. For this study, LNOM is applied in a Lagrangian sense to multicell thunderstorms over Northern Alabama on two days during DC3 (21 May and 11 June 2012) in which aircraft observations of NOx are available for comparison. The LNOM lightning characteristics and LNOX production estimates are compared to the evolution of updraft and precipitation properties inferred from dual-Doppler and polarimetric radar analyses applied to observations from a nearby radar network, including the UAH Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR). Given complex multicell evolution, particular attention is paid to storm morphology, cell

  11. A Summary of the NASA Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) and Recent Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William; Peterson, Harld

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center introduced the Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) a couple of years ago to combine routine state-of-the-art measurements of lightning with empirical laboratory results of lightning NOx production. The routine measurements included VHF lightning source data [such as from the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA)], and ground flash location, peak current, and stroke multiplicity data from the National Lightning Detection Network(TradeMark) (NLDN). Following these initial runs of LNOM, the model was updated to include several non-return stroke lightning NOx production mechanisms, and provided the impact of lightning NOx on an August 2006 run of CMAQ. In this study, we review the evolution of the LNOM in greater detail and discuss the model?s latest upgrades and applications. Whereas previous applications were limited to five summer months of data for North Alabama thunderstorms, the most recent LNOM analyses cover several years. The latest statistics of ground and cloud flash NOx production are provided.

  12. Sprite-producing Convective Storms within the Colorado Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, W. A.; Cummer, S. A.; Rison, W.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Lang, T. J.; Rutledge, S. A.; Lu, G.; Stanley, M. A.; Ashcraft, T.; Nelson, T. E.

    2012-12-01

    The multi-year, multi-institution effort entitled Physical Origins of Coupling to the Upper Atmosphere from Lightning (PhOCAL), has among its goals to qualitatively understand the meteorology and lightning flash characteristics that produce the unusual and/or very energetic lightning responsible for phenomena such as sprites, halos, elves, blue jets and gigantic jets, collectively known as Transient Luminous Events (TLEs). A key task is to obtain simultaneous video, ideally with a high-speed imager (HSI), of both a TLE and its parent lightning discharge, within the domain of a 3-D Lightning Mapping Array (LMA). While conceptually simple, this task is logistically quite complicated. In 2012, a new 15-station Colorado LMA (COLMA) became operational, covering northeastern Colorado, with the Yucca Ridge Field Station (YRFS) near its western edge. The National Charge Moment Change Network (CMCN), which since 2007 has been documenting sprite-class +CGs (those with impulse change moment changes >100 C km), indicates that a strong gradient of energetic +CGs exists west-to-east through the COLMA, with the most likely region for sprite-producing storms being in the COLMA eastern fringes (western Kansas and Nebraska). Yet, on 8 and 25 June, 2012, intense convective systems formed in the COLMA along and just east of the Front Range, producing severe weather and intense lightning. On the 8th, four sprite parent +CGs were captured at 3000 fps from YRFS with the sprites confirmed by dual (conventional speed) cameras in New Mexico. In a second storm on the 25th, viewing conditions prevented +CG video acquisition, but sprites were logged over the COLMA and detailed reconstructions of the discharges are being made. The parent discharges often began as upward negative leaders propagating into a mid-level positive charge layer at 8-10 km. They often originated within or near the convective core before expanding outward into a stratiform region and involving several hundred square

  13. Assessing Operational Total Lightning Visualization Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stano, Geoffrey T.; Darden, Christopher B.; Nadler, David J.

    2010-01-01

    In May 2003, NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) program successfully provided total lightning data from the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) to the National Weather Service (NWS) office in Huntsville, Alabama. The major accomplishment was providing the observations in real-time to the NWS in the native Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS) decision support system. Within days, the NALMA data were used to issue a tornado warning initiating seven years of ongoing support to the NWS' severe weather and situational awareness operations. With this success, SPoRT now provides real-time NALMA data to five forecast offices as well as working to transition data from total lightning networks at Kennedy Space Center and the White Sands Missile Range to the surrounding NWS offices. The only NALMA product that has been transitioned to SPoRT's partner NWS offices is the source density product, available at a 2 km resolution in 2 min intervals. However, discussions with users of total lightning data from other networks have shown that other products are available, ranging from spatial and temporal variations of the source density product to the creation of a flash extent density. SPoRT and the Huntsville, Alabama NWS are evaluating the utility of these variations as this has not been addressed since the initial transition in 2003. This preliminary analysis will focus on what products will best support the operational warning decision process. Data from 19 April 2009 are analyzed. On this day, severe thunderstorms formed ahead of an approaching cold front. Widespread severe weather was observed, primarily south of the Tennessee River with multiple, weak tornadoes, numerous severe hail reports, and wind. This preliminary analysis is the first step in evaluation which product(s) are best suited for operations. The ultimate goal is selecting a single product for use with all total lightning networks to streamline training and

  14. An Algorithm for Obtaining the Distribution of 1-Meter Lightning Channel Segment Altitudes for Application in Lightning NOx Production Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Harold; Koshak, William J.

    2009-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed to estimate the altitude distribution of one-meter lightning channel segments. The algorithm is required as part of a broader objective that involves improving the lightning NOx emission inventories of both regional air quality and global chemistry/climate models. The algorithm was tested and applied to VHF signals detected by the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA). The accuracy of the algorithm was characterized by comparing algorithm output to the plots of individual discharges whose lengths were computed by hand; VHF source amplitude thresholding and smoothing were applied to optimize results. Several thousands of lightning flashes within 120 km of the NALMA network centroid were gathered from all four seasons, and were analyzed by the algorithm. The mean, standard deviation, and median statistics were obtained for all the flashes, the ground flashes, and the cloud flashes. One-meter channel segment altitude distributions were also obtained for the different seasons.

  15. On the VHF Source Retrieval Errors Associated with Lightning Mapping Arrays (LMAs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, W.

    2016-01-01

    This presentation examines in detail the standard retrieval method: that of retrieving the (x, y, z, t) parameters of a lightning VHF point source from multiple ground-based Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) time-of-arrival (TOA) observations. The solution is found by minimizing a chi-squared function via the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The associated forward problem is examined to illustrate the importance of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Monte Carlo simulated retrievals are used to assess the benefits of changing various LMA network properties. A generalized retrieval method is also introduced that, in addition to TOA data, uses LMA electric field amplitude measurements to retrieve a transient VHF dipole moment source.

  16. Sao Paulo Lightning Mapping Array (SP-LMA): Deployment, Operation and Initial Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, R.; Bailey, J. C.; Carey, L. D.; Rudlosky, S.; Goodman, S. J.; Albrecht, R.; Morales, C. A.; Anseimo, E. M.; Pinto, O.

    2012-01-01

    An 8-10 station Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) network is being deployed in the vicinity of Sao Paulo to create the SP-LMA for total lightning measurements in association with the international CHUVA [Cloud processes of the main precipitation systems in Brazil: A contribution to cloud resolving modeling and to the GPM (Global Precipitation Measurement)] field campaign. Besides supporting CHUVA science/mission objectives and the Sao Luiz do Paraitinga intensive operation period (IOP) in November-December 2011, the SP-LMA will support the generation of unique proxy data for the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) and Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), both sensors on the NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R (GOES-R), presently under development and scheduled for a 2015 launch. The proxy data will be used to develop and validate operational algorithms so that they will be ready for use on "day1" following the launch of GOES-R. A preliminary survey of potential sites in the vicinity of Sao Paulo was conducted in December 2009 and January 2010, followed up by a detailed survey in July 2010, with initial network deployment scheduled for October 2010. However, due to a delay in the Sao Luiz do Paraitinga IOP, the SP-LMA will now be installed in July 2011 and operated for one year. Spacing between stations is on the order of 15-30 km, with the network "diameter" being on the order of 30-40 km, which provides good 3-D lightning mapping 150 km from the network center. Optionally, 1-3 additional stations may be deployed in the vicinity of Sao Jos dos Campos.

  17. Sao Paulo Lightning Mapping Array (SP-LMA): Deployment and Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, J. C.; Carey, L. D.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Albrecht, R.; Morales, C. A.; Pinto, O., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    An 8-10 station Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) network is being deployed in the vicinity of Sao Paulo to create the SP-LMA for total lightning measurements in association with the international CHUVA [Cloud processes of tHe main precipitation systems in Brazil: A contribUtion to cloud resolVing modeling and to the GPM (GlobAl Precipitation Measurement)] field campaign. Besides supporting CHUVA science/mission objectives and the Sao Luz Paraitinga intensive operation period (IOP) in December 2011-January 2012, the SP-LMA will support the generation of unique proxy data for the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) and Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), both sensors on the NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R (GOES-R), presently under development and scheduled for a 2015 launch. The proxy data will be used to develop and validate operational algorithms so that they will be ready for use on "day1" following the launch of GOES-R. A preliminary survey of potential sites in the vicinity of Sao Paulo was conducted in December 2009 and January 2010, followed up by a detailed survey in July 2010, with initial network deployment scheduled for October 2010. However, due to a delay in the Sa Luz Paraitinga IOP, the SP-LMA will now be installed in July 2011 and operated for one year. Spacing between stations is on the order of 15-30 km, with the network "diameter" being on the order of 30-40 km, which provides good 3-D lightning mapping 150 km from the network center. Optionally, 1-3 additional stations may be deployed in the vicinity of Sa Jos dos Campos.

  18. Lightning Jump Algorithm Development for the GOES·R Geostationary Lightning Mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz. E.; Schultz. C.; Chronis, T.; Stough, S.; Carey, L.; Calhoun, K.; Ortega, K.; Stano, G.; Cecil, D.; Bateman, M.; Goodman, S.

    2014-01-01

    Current work on the lightning jump algorithm to be used in GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM)'s data stream is multifaceted due to the intricate interplay between the storm tracking, GLM proxy data, and the performance of the lightning jump itself. This work outlines the progress of the last year, where analysis and performance of the lightning jump algorithm with automated storm tracking and GLM proxy data were assessed using over 700 storms from North Alabama. The cases analyzed coincide with previous semi-objective work performed using total lightning mapping array (LMA) measurements in Schultz et al. (2011). Analysis shows that key components of the algorithm (flash rate and sigma thresholds) have the greatest influence on the performance of the algorithm when validating using severe storm reports. Automated objective analysis using the GLM proxy data has shown probability of detection (POD) values around 60% with false alarm rates (FAR) around 73% using similar methodology to Schultz et al. (2011). However, when applying verification methods similar to those employed by the National Weather Service, POD values increase slightly (69%) and FAR values decrease (63%). The relationship between storm tracking and lightning jump has also been tested in a real-time framework at NSSL. This system includes fully automated tracking by radar alone, real-time LMA and radar observations and the lightning jump. Results indicate that the POD is strong at 65%. However, the FAR is significantly higher than in Schultz et al. (2011) (50-80% depending on various tracking/lightning jump parameters) when using storm reports for verification. Given known issues with Storm Data, the performance of the real-time jump algorithm is also being tested with high density radar and surface observations from the NSSL Severe Hazards Analysis & Verification Experiment (SHAVE).

  19. Electrical Structure Inferred by 3-D Lightning Mapping Observations During STEPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlin, T.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Zhang, Y.; Thomas, R. J.

    2002-12-01

    The Severe Thunderstorm Electrification and Precipitation Study (STEPS) provided numerous examples of storms which electrified anomalously, developing inverted tripole or quadrupole electrical structures. The storms were often supercells and cases where the lightning activity consisted primarily of IC flashes for substantial periods of time, only followed (if at all) much later by the onset of CG activity, were observed on several occasions. Radar comparisons for the tornadic storm of June 29 and the Bird City storm of June 3 during STEPS indicate that the main positive charge was localized in the precipitation core, but the electrification also had a definite horizontally extensive, multilayer structure extending away from the core. In these storms the upper positive charge region developed rapidly and produced intense lightning activity. The upper positive gradually evolved downward in altitude to become the dominant mid-level charge, forming an inverted tripole structure which appears to be stable for long periods of time. By assuming that a given polarity breakdown is moving into regions of opposite polarity charge (with exceptions) the total charge structure can be inferred and mapped based on information gleaned from the individual flashes; this allows use of the LMA data to detail the charge structure of storms. We take this approach to study the evolution of charge structures for storms during STEPS.

  20. Expanding the Operational Use of Total Lightning Ahead of GOES-R

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stano, Geoffrey T.; Wood, Lance; Garner, Tim; Nunez, Roland; Kann, Deirdre; Reynolds, James; Rydell, Nezette; Cox, Rob; Bobb, William R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center (SPoRT) has been transitioning real-time total lightning observations from ground-based lightning mapping arrays since 2003. This initial effort was with the local Weather Forecast Offices (WFO) that could use the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA). These early collaborations established a strong interest in the use of total lightning for WFO operations. In particular the focus started with warning decision support, but has since expanded to include impact-based decision support and lightning safety. SPoRT has used its experience to establish connections with new lightning mapping arrays as they become available. The GOES-R / JPSS Visiting Scientist Program has enabled SPoRT to conduct visits to new partners and expand the number of operational users with access to total lightning observations. In early 2014, SPoRT conducted the most recent visiting scientist trips to meet with forecast offices that will used the Colorado, Houston, and Langmuir Lab (New Mexico) lightning mapping arrays. In addition, SPoRT met with the corresponding Center Weather Service Units (CWSUs) to expand collaborations with the aviation community. These visits were an opportunity to learn about the forecast needs of each office visited as well as to provide on-site training for the use of total lightning, setting the stage for a real-time assessment during May-July 2014. With five lightning mapping arrays covering multiple geographic locations, the 2014 assessment has demonstrated numerous uses of total lightning in varying situations. Several highlights include a much broader use of total lightning for impact-based decision support ranging from airport weather warnings, supporting fire crews, and protecting large outdoor events. The inclusion of the CWSUs has broadened the operational scope of total lightning, demonstrating how these data can support air traffic management, particularly in the Terminal Radar Approach

  1. High-Resolution WRF Forecasts of Lightning Threat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, S. J.; McCaul, E. W., Jr.; LaCasse, K.

    2007-01-01

    Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)lightning and precipitation observations have confirmed the existence of a robust relationship between lightning flash rates and the amount of large precipitating ice hydrometeors in storms. This relationship is exploited, in conjunction with the capabilities of the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model, to forecast the threat of lightning from convective storms using the output fields from the model forecasts. The simulated vertical flux of graupel at -15C is used in this study as a proxy for charge separation processes and their associated lightning risk. Initial experiments using 6-h simulations are conducted for a number of case studies for which three-dimensional lightning validation data from the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array are available. The WRF has been initialized on a 2 km grid using Eta boundary conditions, Doppler radar radial velocity and reflectivity fields, and METAR and ACARS data. An array of subjective and objective statistical metrics is employed to document the utility of the WRF forecasts. The simulation results are also compared to other more traditional means of forecasting convective storms, such as those based on inspection of the convective available potential energy field.

  2. Lightning Mapping and Electric Field Change Observations of a Stationary New Mexico Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.; Hunyady, S. J.; Edens, H. E.; Sonnenfeld, R. G.; Aulich, G. D.

    2010-12-01

    On August 23, 2010 a classic airmass thunderstorm occurred over high plains immediately east of the Langmuir Laboratory mountaintop observatory in central New Mexico. The energetic storm developed around 2:30 pm MDT (2030 UTC) and remained essentially stationary over its complete lifetime of about 2 hours. The complete sequence of lightning was recorded both by the 16-station Langmuir Laboratory Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and by several electrostatic field change stations around and beneath the storm. The LMA and Delta-E data are both of very high quality and sensitivity. In this initial study we report on the lightning-inferred electrical structure of the storm and on estimated charging currents determined from a simple electrodynamic model of the storm. The electric field change measurements, in combination with the detailed 3-D mapping results, can be used to determine the amounts of charge involved in individual strokes and parts of flashes for comparison and improvement of the modeling. The LMA data regularly detected isolated attempted breakdown events at repeated locations at mid- to high altitudes in the storm that were clearly indicative of localized high-field regions. The attempted breakdown events were often exact pre-cursors of the initial breakdown of full-fledged IC flashes typically several seconds up to several tens of seconds later, but also often did not precurse a subsequent discharge. During both IC and CG flashes, numerous recoil-type, fast negative breakdown events were detected along otherwise undetected positive leader channels in the main, mid-level negative charge region. The localized fast events during IC flashes often repeatedly intensified in strength and number prior to upward negative leader K-events, and then temporarily ceased before starting up again prior to the next K-event. Many of the negative CG flashes in the storm produced strokes with long continuing currents (CCs). The overall electric field changes and hence total

  3. Interpretation of field change array data with time domain fractal lightning modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, B. E.; Liang, C.; Bitzer, P. M.; Christian, H. J.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Inan, U. S.

    2011-12-01

    Despite much study, the physical processes involved in lightning and the associated electromagnetic emissions remain a mystery, with much effort thus far devoted to categorizing and describing the emissions. Time domain fractal lightning (TDFL) modeling provides an opportunity to improve on such reporting by connecting the observations to theories of the physics of lightning. Such connection allows meaningful interpretation of the observations in the context of the physics and provides better understanding of the behavior of the lightning channel. We present comparison of time domain fractal lightning modeling with lightning mapping array data and electric field records from the Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array (HAMMA), a network of field change meters with high time resolution capable of reconstructing the geometry and time development of the charge motions in a lightning discharge. These data are used to constrain the TDFL simulations, while the TDFL results are used to interpret the field change data. The role of the evolution of the lightning channel electrical properties, the channel corona sheath, and the geometric development of the channel are examined, and the physical implications of the HAMMA data are studied.

  4. Alabama Ground Operations during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, Lawrence; Blakeslee, Richard; Koshak, William; Bain, Lamont; Rogers, Ryan; Kozlowski, Danielle; Sherrer, Adam; Saari, Matt; Bigelbach, Brandon; Scott, Mariana; Schultz, Elise; Schultz, Chris; Gatlin, Patrick; Wingo, Matt; Phillips, Dustin; Phillips, Chris; Peterson, Harold; Bailey, Jeff; Frederickson, Terryn; Hall, John; Bart, Nicole; Becker, Melissa; Pinkney, Kurtis; Rowe, Scott; Starzec, Mariusz

    2013-01-01

    The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field campaign investigates the impact of deep, midlatitude convective clouds, including their dynamical, physical and lighting processes, on upper tropospheric composition and chemistry. DC3 science operations took place from 14 May to 30 June 2012. The DC3 field campaign utilized instrumented aircraft and ground ]based observations. The NCAR Gulfstream ]V (GV) observed a variety of gas ]phase species, radiation and cloud particle characteristics in the high ]altitude outflow of storms while the NASA DC ]8 characterized the convective inflow. Groundbased radar networks were used to document the kinematic and microphysical characteristics of storms. In order to study the impact of lightning on convective outflow composition, VHF ]based lightning mapping arrays (LMAs) provided detailed three ]dimensional measurements of flashes. Mobile soundings were utilized to characterize the meteorological environment of the convection. Radar, sounding and lightning observations were also used in real ]time to provide forecasting and mission guidance to the aircraft operations. Combined aircraft and ground ]based observations were conducted at three locations, 1) northeastern Colorado, 2) Oklahoma/Texas and 3) northern Alabama, to study different modes of deep convection in a variety of meteorological and chemical environments. The objective of this paper is to summarize the Alabama ground operations and provide a preliminary assessment of the ground ]based observations collected over northern Alabama during DC3. The multi ] Doppler, dual ]polarization radar network consisted of the UAHuntsville Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR), the UAHuntsville Mobile Alabama X ]band (MAX) radar and the Hytop (KHTX) Weather Surveillance Radar 88 Doppler (WSR ]88D). Lightning frequency and structure were observed in near real ]time by the NASA MSFC Northern Alabama LMA (NALMA). Pre ]storm and inflow proximity

  5. Inversion of Acoustic and Electromagnetic Recordings for Mapping Current Flow in Lightning Strikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J.; Johnson, J.; Arechiga, R. O.; Thomas, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    Acoustic recordings can be used to map current-carrying conduits in lightning strikes. Unlike stepped leaders, whose very high frequency (VHF) radio emissions have short (meter-scale) wavelengths and can be located by lightning-mapping arrays, current pulses emit longer (kilometer-scale) waves and cannot be mapped precisely by electromagnetic observations alone. While current pulses are constrained to conductive channels created by stepped leaders, these leaders often branch as they propagate, and most branches fail to carry current. Here, we present a method to use thunder recordings to map current pulses, and we apply it to acoustic and VHF data recorded in 2009 in the Magdalena mountains in central New Mexico, USA. Thunder is produced by rapid heating and expansion of the atmosphere along conductive channels in response to current flow, and therefore can be used to recover the geometry of the current-carrying channel. Toward this goal, we use VHF pulse maps to identify candidate conductive channels where we treat each channel as a superposition of finely-spaced acoustic point sources. We apply ray tracing in variable atmospheric structures to forward model the thunder that our microphone network would record for each candidate channel. Because multiple channels could potentially carry current, a non-linear inversion is performed to determine the acoustic source strength of each channel. For each combination of acoustic source strengths, synthetic thunder is modeled as a superposition of thunder signals produced by each channel, and a power envelope of this stack is then calculated. The inversion iteratively minimizes the misfit between power envelopes of recorded and modeled thunder. Because the atmospheric sound speed structure through which the waves propagate during these events is unknown, we repeat the procedure on many plausible atmospheres to find an optimal fit. We then determine the candidate channel, or channels, that minimizes residuals between

  6. Climatological analyses of LMA data with an open-source lightning flash-clustering algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Brody R.; Bruning, Eric C.; Rutledge, Steven A.; Carey, Lawrence D.; Krehbiel, Paul R.; Rison, William

    2016-07-01

    Approximately 63 million lightning flashes have been identified and analyzed from multiple years of Washington, D. C., northern Alabama, and northeast Colorado lightning mapping array (LMA) data using an open-source flash-clustering algorithm. LMA networks detect radiation produced by lightning breakdown processes, allowing for high-resolution mapping of lightning flashes. Similar to other existing clustering algorithms, the algorithm described herein groups lightning-produced radiation sources by space and time to estimate total flash counts and information about each detected flash. Various flash characteristics and their sensitivity to detection efficiency are investigated to elucidate biases in the algorithm, detail detection efficiencies of various LMAs, and guide future improvements. Furthermore, flash density values in each region are compared to corresponding satellite estimates. While total flash density values produced by the algorithm in Washington, D. C. ( 20 flashes km-2 yr-1), and Alabama ( 35 flashes km-2 yr-1) are within 50% of satellite estimates, LMA-based estimates are approximately a factor of 3 larger (50 flashes km-2 yr-1) than satellite estimates in northeast Colorado. Accordingly, estimates of the ratio of in-cloud to cloud-to-ground flashes near the LMA network ( 20) are approximately a factor of 3 larger than satellite estimates in Colorado. These large differences between estimates may be related to the distinct environment conducive to intense convection, low-altitude flashes, and unique charge structures in northeast Colorado.

  7. MSFC shuttle lightning research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Otha H., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The shuttle mesoscale lightning experiment (MLE), flown on earlier shuttle flights, and most recently flown on the following space transportation systems (STS's), STS-31, -32, -35, -37, -38, -40, -41, and -48, has continued to focus on obtaining additional quantitative measurements of lightning characteristics and to create a data base for use in demonstrating observation simulations for future spaceborne lightning mapping systems. These flights are also providing design criteria data for the design of a proposed shuttle MLE-type lightning research instrument called mesoscale lightning observational sensors (MELOS), which are currently under development here at MSFC.

  8. Inter-Comparison of Lightning Trends from Ground-Based Networks During Severe Weather: Applications Toward GLM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, Lawrence D.; Schultz, Chris J.; Petersen, Walter A.; Rudlosky, Scott D.; Bateman, Monte; Cecil, Daniel J.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Goodman, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    The planned GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) will provide total lightning data on the location and intensity of thunderstorms over a hemispheric spatial domain. Ongoing GOES-R research activities are demonstrating the utility of total flash rate trends for enhancing forecasting skill of severe storms. To date, GLM total lightning proxy trends have been well served by ground-based VHF systems such as the Northern Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA). The NALMA (and other similar networks in Washington DC and Oklahoma) provide high detection efficiency (> 90%) and location accuracy (< 1 km) observations of total lightning within about 150 km from network center. To expand GLM proxy applications for high impact convective weather (e.g., severe, aviation hazards), it is desirable to investigate the utility of additional sources of continuous lightning that can serve as suitable GLM proxy over large spatial scales (order 100 s to 1000 km or more), including typically data denied regions such as the oceans. Potential sources of GLM proxy include ground-based long-range (regional or global) VLF/LF lightning networks such as the relatively new Vaisala Global Lightning Dataset (GLD360) and Weatherbug Total Lightning Network (WTLN). Before using these data in GLM research applications, it is necessary to compare them with LMAs and well-quantified cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning networks, such as Vaisala s National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN), for assessment of total and CG lightning location accuracy, detection efficiency and flash rate trends. Preliminary inter-comparisons from these lightning networks during selected severe weather events will be presented and their implications discussed.

  9. The Kinematic and Microphysical Control of Storm Integrated Lightning Flash Extent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, Lawrence; Koshak, William; Petersen, Harold; Schultz, Elise; Schultz, Chris; Matthee, Retha; Bain, Lamont

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this preliminary study is to investigate the kinematic and microphysical control of lightning properties, particularly those that may govern the production of nitrogen oxides (NOx) in thunderstorms, such as flash rate, type and extent. The mixed-phase region is where the noninductive charging (NIC) process is thought to generate most storm electrification during rebounding collisions between ice particles in the presence of supercooled water. As a result, prior radar-based studies have demonstrated that lightning flash rate is well correlated to kinematic and microphysical properties in the mixed-phase region of thunderstorms such as updraft volume, graupel mass, or ice mass flux. There is also some evidence that lightning type is associated with the convective state. Intracloud (IC) lightning tends to dominate during the updraft accumulation of precipitation ice mass while cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning is more numerous during the downdraft-driven descent of radar echo associated with graupel and hail. More study is required to generalize these relationships, especially regarding lightning type, in a wide variety of storm modes and meteorological conditions. Less is known about the co-evolving relationship between storm kinematics, microphysics, morphology and three-dimensional flash extent, despite its importance for lightning NOx production. To address this conceptual gap, the NASA MSFC Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) is applied to North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) and Vaisala National Lightning Detection NetworkTM (NLDN) observations following ordinary convective cells through their lifecycle. LNOM provides estimates of flash type, channel length distributions, lightning segment altitude distributions (SADs) and lightning NOx production profiles. For this study, LNOM is applied in a Lagrangian sense to well isolated convective cells on 3 April 2007 (single cell and multi-cell hailstorm, non-severe multicell) and 6 July 2007

  10. The Kinematic and Microphysical Control of Storm Integrated Lightning Flash Extent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, L. D.; Koshak, W. J.; Peterson, H. S.; Schultz, E. V.; Matthee, R.; Schultz, C. J.; Petersen, W. A.; Bain, L.

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this preliminary study is to investigate the kinematic and microphysical control of lightning properties, particularly those that may govern the production of nitrogen oxides (NOx) in thunderstorms, such as flash rate, type and extent. The mixed-phase region is where the noninductive charging (NIC) process is thought to generate most storm electrification during rebounding collisions between ice particles in the presence of supercooled water. As a result, prior radar-based studies have demonstrated that lightning flash rate is well correlated to kinematic and microphysical properties in the mixed-phase region of thunderstorms such as updraft volume, graupel mass, or ice mass flux. There is also some evidence that lightning type is associated with the convective state. Intracloud (IC) lightning tends to dominate during the updraft accumulation of precipitation ice mass while cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning is more numerous during the downdraft-driven descent of radar echo associated with graupel and hail. More study is required to generalize these relationships, especially regarding lightning type, in a wide variety of storm modes and meteorological conditions. Less is known about the co-evolving relationship between storm kinematics, microphysics, morphology and three-dimensional flash extent, despite its importance for lightning NOx production. To address this conceptual gap, the NASA MSFC Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) is applied to North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) and Vaisala National Lightning Detection NetworkTM (NLDN) observations following ordinary convective cells through their lifecycle. LNOM provides estimates of flash type, channel length distributions, lightning segment altitude distributions (SADs) and lightning NOx production profiles. For this study, LNOM is applied in a Lagrangian sense to well isolated convective cells on 3 April 2007 (single cell and multi-cell hailstorm, non-severe multi-cell) and 6 July 2007

  11. A Review of Land-Cover Mapping Activities in Coastal Alabama and Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kathryn E.L.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.

    2010-01-01

    -based land-use classifications. Aerial photography is typically selected for smaller landscapes (watershed-basin scale), for greater definition of the land-use categories, and for increased spatial resolution. Disadvantages of using photography include time-consuming digitization, high costs for imagery collection, and lack of seasonal data. Recently, the availability of high-resolution satellite imagery has generated a new category of LULC data product. These new datasets have similar strengths to the aerial-photo-based LULC in that they possess the potential for refined definition of land-use categories and increased spatial resolution but also have the benefit of satellite-based classifications, such as repeatability for change analysis. LULC classification based on high-resolution satellite imagery is still in the early stages of development but merits greater attention because environmental-monitoring and landscape-modeling programs rely heavily on LULC data. This publication summarizes land-use and land-cover mapping activities for Alabama and Mississippi coastal areas within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) Ecosystem Change and Hazard Susceptibility Project boundaries. Existing LULC datasets will be described, as well as imagery data sources and ancillary data that may provide ground-truth or satellite training data for a forthcoming land-cover classification. Finally, potential areas for a high-resolution land-cover classification in the Alabama-Mississippi region will be identified.

  12. An Integrated 0-1 Hour First-Flash Lightning Nowcasting, Lightning Amount and Lightning Jump Warning Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mecikalski, John; Jewett, Chris; Carey, Larry; Zavodsky, Brad; Stano, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    . 2011) to monitor lightning trends and to anticipate/forecast severe weather (hail > or =2.5 cm, winds > or =25 m/s, tornadoes). The result will be a time-continuous algorithm that uses GOES satellite, radar fields, and HRRR model fields to nowcast first-flash LI and QL, and subsequently monitors lightning trends on a perstorm basis within the LJ algorithm for possible severe weather occurrence out to > or =3 hours. The LI-QL-LJ product will also help prepare the operational forecast community for Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) data expected in late 2015, as these data are monitored for ongoing convective storms. The LI-QL-LJ product will first predict where new lightning is highly probable using GOES imagery of developing cumulus clouds, followed by n analysis of NWS (dual-polarization) radar indicators (reflectivity at the -10 C altitude) of lightning occurrence, to increase confidence that LI is immanent. Once lightning is observed, time-continuous lightning mapping array and Pseudo-GLM observations will be analyzed to assess trends and the severe weather threat as identified by trends in lightning (i.e. LJs). Additionally, 5- and 15-min GOES imagery will then be evaluated on a per-storm basis for overshooting and other cloud-top features known to be associated with severe storms. For the processing framework, the GOES-R 0-1 hour convective initiation algorithm's output will be developed within the Warning Decision Support System - Integrated Information (WDSS-II) tracking tool, and merged with radar and lightning (LMA/Psuedo-GLM) datasets for active storms. The initial focus of system development will be over North Alabama for select lightning-active days in summer 2014, yet will be formed in an expandable manner. The lightning alert tool will also be developed in concert with National Weather Service (NWS) forecasters to meet their needs for real-time, accurate first-flash LI and timing, as well as anticipated lightning trends, amounts, continuation and

  13. A procedure used for a ground truth study of a land use map of North Alabama generated from LANDSAT data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downs, S. W., Jr.; Sharma, G. C.; Bagwell, C.

    1977-01-01

    A land use map of a five county area in North Alabama was generated from LANDSAT data using a supervised classification algorithm. There was good overall agreement between the land use designated and known conditions, but there were also obvious discrepancies. In ground checking the map, two types of errors were encountered - shift and misclassification - and a method was developed to eliminate or greatly reduce the errors. Randomly selected study areas containing 2,525 pixels were analyzed. Overall, 76.3 percent of the pixels were correctly classified. A contingency coefficient of correlation was calculated to be 0.7 which is significant at the alpha = 0.01 level. The land use maps generated by computers from LANDSAT data are useful for overall land use by regional agencies. However, care must be used when making detailed analysis of small areas. The procedure used for conducting the ground truth study together with data from representative study areas is presented.

  14. Exploring the Use of Radar for Physically-Based Nowcasting of Lightning Cessation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Elise V.; Petersen, Walter A.; Carey, Lawrence D.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAHuntsville) are collaborating with the 45th Weather Squadron (45WS) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) to enable improved nowcasting of lightning cessation. This project centers on use of dual-polarimetric radar capabilities, and in particular, the new C-band dual polarimetric weather radar acquired by the 45WS. Special emphasis is placed on the development of a physically-based operational algorithm to predict lightning cessation. While previous studies have developed statistically based lightning cessation algorithms driven primarily by trending in the actual total lightning flash rate, we believe that dual polarimetric radar variables offer the possibility to improve existing algorithms through the inclusion of physically meaningful trends reflecting interactions between in-cloud electric fields and ice-microphysics. Specifically, decades of polarimetric radar research using propagation differential phase has demonstrated the presence of distinct phase and ice crystal alignment signatures in the presence of strong electric fields associated with lightning. One question yet to be addressed is: To what extent can propagation phase-based ice-crystal alignment signatures be used to nowcast the cessation of lightning activity in a given storm? Accordingly, data from the UAHuntsville Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR) along with the NASA-MSFC North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array are used in this study to investigate the radar signatures present before and after lightning cessation. Thus far our case study results suggest that the negative differential phase shift signature weakens and disappears after the analyzed storms ceased lightning production (i.e., after the last lightning flash occurred). This is a key observation because it suggests that while strong electric fields may still have been present, the lightning cessation signature was

  15. Total Lightning Observations of Extreme Weather Events over the Contiguous United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, Lawrence D.; Petersen, Walter A.; Christian, Hugh J.

    2008-01-01

    thunderstorms over CONUS will be presented. When possible, coincident VHF lightning observations from the ground-based Northern Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) are compared to the LIS/OTD optical lightning signatures, providing a validation source for instantaneous space-based optical lightning properties and a means to extend lightning inferences over the life-cycle of extreme weather.

  16. VHF Lightning Mapping Observations of Screening Charge Flashes at Thunderstorm Tops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edens, H. E.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.

    2014-12-01

    Deeply convective thunderstorms occasionally produce series of continual small-scale electrical discharges near the cloud top. Over the past years a number of such cases in normal-polarity thunderstorms have been observed with the Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) deployed near Langmuir Laboratory in south-central New Mexico. The LMA observations show most of the discharges as single-point VHF sources, which can occur at rates of ten or more discharges per second in a localized region near the cloud top. Correlated visual observations of storm tops indicate that the small discharges occur near the cloud boundary of overshooting tops during their upward development, suggesting that the discharges are screening charge flashes between upper positive charge and inferred negative screening charge at the cloud boundary. Some screening charge flashes develop into more extensive breakdown, with negative leaders propagating down several km into the upper positive charge region, while the positive leaders are undetected by the LMA. The more extensive screening charge flashes are characteristic of breakdown associated with blue starters and jets.Screening charge flashes can temporarily become the dominant form of negative breakdown into the upper positive charge region, associated with an almost complete lack of intracloud flashes. We speculate that vigorous overshooting convection at high altitude, where the atmosphere has a higher conductivity, produces a rapid accumulation of negative screening charge at the cloud boundary. The accumulated screening charge causes localized regions of strong electric fields between it and the upper positive charge region before diffusing and mixing in.

  17. A system for mapping sources of VHF and electric field pulses from in-cloud lightning at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, Ewen M.; Medelius, Pedro J.

    1991-01-01

    The literature concerning VHF radiation and wideband electric fields from in-cloud lightning is reviewed. VHF location systems give impressive radio images of lightning in clouds with high spatial and temporal resolution. Using systems based on long and short baseline time-or-arrival and interferometry, workers have detected VHF sources that move at speeds of 10(exp 5) to 10(exp 8) m/s. The more slowly moving sources appear to be associated with channel formation but the physical basis for the higher speeds is not clear. In contrast, wideband electric fields are directly related to physical parameters such as current and tortuosity. A long baseline system is described to measure simultaneously VHF radiation and wideband electric fields at five stations at Kennedy Space Center. All signals are detected over remote, isolated ground planes with fiber optics for data transmission. The modification of this system to map rapidly varying dE/dt pulses is discussed.

  18. Coincident observation of lightning using spaceborne spectrophotometer and ground-level electromagnetic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, T.; Cohen, M.; Lu, G.; Cummer, S. A.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Marshall, T.; Stolzenburg, M.; Karunarathne, S.; Hsu, R.; Su, H.; Chen, A. B.; Takahashi, Y.; Mende, S. B.; Frey, H. U.

    2012-12-01

    The present study aims at assessing a new way to reveal properties of lightning flash, using the spectrophotometric data obtained by FORMOSAT-2/ISUAL which is the first spaceborne multicolor lightning detector. The ISUAL data was analyzed in conjunction with ground-based electromagnetic data obtained by Duke magnetic field sensors, NLDN, North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA), and University of Mississippi (UM) electric field change antennas operated around Kennedy Space Center. We first classified the observed events into cloud-to-ground (CG) and intra-cloud (IC) lightning based on the Duke and NLDN measurements and analyzed ISUAL data to clarify their optical characteristics. It was found that the ISUAL optical waveform of CG lightning was strongly correlated with the current moment waveform, suggesting that it is possible to evaluate the electrical properties of lightning from satellite optical measurement to some extent. The ISUAL data also indicated that the color of CG lightning turned to red at the time of return stroke while the color of IC pulses remained unchanged. Furthermore, in one CG event which was simultaneously detected by ISUAL and LMA, the observed optical emissions slowly turned red as the altitude of optical source gradually decreased. All of these results indicate that the color of lightning flash depends on the source altitude and suggest that spaceborne optical measurement could be a new tool to discriminate CG and IC lightning. In the presentation, we will also show results on the comparison between the ISUAL and UM electric field change data to clarify characteristics of each lightning process such as preliminary breakdown and return stroke.

  19. Coincident Observation of Lightning using Spaceborne Spectrophotometer and Ground-Level Electromagnetic Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adachi, Toru; Cohen, Morris; Li, Jingbo; Cummer, Steve; Blakeslee, Richard; Marshall, THomas; Stolzenberg, Maribeth; Karunarathne, Sumedhe; Hsu, Rue-Ron; Su, Han-Tzong; Chen, Alfred; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Frey, Harald; Mende, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The present study aims at assessing a possible new way to reveal the properties of lightning flash, using spectrophotometric data obtained by FORMOSAT-2/ISUAL which is the first spaceborne multicolor lightning detector. The ISUAL data was analyzed in conjunction with ground ]based electromagnetic data obtained by Duke magnetic field sensors, NLDN, North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA), and Kennedy Space Center (KSC) electric field antennas. We first classified the observed events into cloud ]to ]ground (CG) and intra ]cloud (IC) lightning based on the Duke and NLDN measurements and analyzed ISUAL data to clarify their optical characteristics. It was found that the ISUAL optical waveform of CG lightning was strongly correlated with the current moment waveform, suggesting that it is possible to evaluate the electrical properties of lightning from satellite optical measurement to some extent. The ISUAL data also indicated that the color of CG lightning turned to red at the time of return stroke while the color of IC pulses remained unchanged. Furthermore, in one CG event which was simultaneously detected by ISUAL and LMA, the observed optical emissions slowly turned red as the altitude of optical source gradually decreased. All of these results indicate that the color of lightning flash depends on the source altitude and suggest that spaceborne optical measurement could be a new tool to discriminate CG and IC lightning. In the presentation, we will also show results on the comparison between the ISUAL and KSC electric field data to clarify characteristics of each lightning process such as preliminary breakdown, return stroke, and subsequent upward illumination.

  20. Exploring the Use of Radar for a Physically Based Lightning Cessation Nowcasting Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Elise V.; Petersen, Walter A.; Carey, Lawrence D.

    2011-01-01

    NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAHuntsville) are collaborating with the 45th Weather Squadron (45WS) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) to enable improved nowcasting of lightning cessation. This project centers on use of dual-polarimetric radar capabilities, and in particular, the new C-band dual-polarimetric weather radar acquired by the 45WS. Special emphasis is placed on the development of a physically based operational algorithm to predict lightning cessation. While previous studies have developed statistically based lightning cessation algorithms, we believe that dual-polarimetric radar variables offer the possibility to improve existing algorithms through the inclusion of physically meaningful trends reflecting interactions between in-cloud electric fields and hydrometeors. Specifically, decades of polarimetric radar research using propagation differential phase has demonstrated the presence of distinct phase and ice crystal alignment signatures in the presence of strong electric fields associated with lightning. One question yet to be addressed is: To what extent can these ice-crystal alignment signatures be used to nowcast the cessation of lightning activity in a given storm? Accordingly, data from the UAHuntsville Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR) along with the NASA-MSFC North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array are used in this study to investigate the radar signatures present before and after lightning cessation. Thus far, our case study results suggest that the negative differential phase shift signature weakens and disappears after the analyzed storms ceased lightning production (i.e., after the last lightning flash occurred). This is a key observation because it suggests that while strong electric fields may still have been present, the lightning cessation signature encompassed the period of the polarimetric negative phase shift signature. To the extent

  1. Plotting Lightning-Stroke Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatom, F. B.; Garst, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Data on lightning-stroke locations become easier to correlate with cloudcover maps with aid of new graphical treatment. Geographic region divided by grid into array of cells. Number of lightning strokes in each cell tabulated, and value representing density of lightning strokes assigned to each cell. With contour-plotting routine, computer draws contours of lightning-stroke density for region. Shapes of contours compared directly with shapes of storm cells.

  2. Sao Paulo Lightning Mapping Array (SP-LMA): Network Assessment and Analyses for Intercomparison Studies and GOES-R Proxy Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, R. J.; Bailey, J. C.; Carey, L. D.; Goodman, S. J.; Rudlosky, S. D.; Albrecht, R.; Morales, C. A.; Anselmo, E. M.; Neves, J. R.

    2013-01-01

    A 12 station Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) network was deployed during October 2011in the vicinity of São Paulo, Brazil (SP-LMA) to contribute total lightning measurements to an international field campaign [CHUVA - Cloud processes of tHe main precipitation systems in Brazil: A contribUtion to cloud resolVing modeling and to the GPM (GlobAl Precipitation Measurement)]. The SP-LMA was operational from November 2011 through March 2012. Sensor spacing was on the order of 15-30 km, with a network diameter on the order of 40-50km. The SP-LMA provides good 3-D lightning mapping out to150 km from the network center, with 2-D coverage considerably farther. In addition to supporting CHUVA science/mission objectives, the SP-LMA is supporting the generation of unique proxy data for the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) and Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), on NOAA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R (GOES-R: scheduled for a 2015 launch). These proxy data will be used to develop and validate operational algorithms so that they will be ready to use on "day1" following the GOES-R launch. The SP-LMA data also will be intercompared with lightning observations from other deployed lightning networks to advance our understanding of the capabilities/contributions of each of these networks toward GLM proxy and validation activities. This paper addresses the network assessment and analyses for intercomparison studies and GOES-R proxy activities

  3. Multicolor Photometric Observation of Lightning from Space: Comparison with Radio Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adachi, Toru; Cohen, Morris; Said, Ryan; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Cummer, Steven A.; Li, Jingbo; Lu, Geopeng; Hsu, Rue-Ron; Su, Han-Tzong; Chen, Alfred Bing-Chih; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Frey, Harald U.; Mende, Stephen B.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of spectrophotometric measurements from space in revealing properties of lightning flash. The multicolor optical waveform data obtained by FORMOSAT-2/Imager of Sprites and Upper Atmospheric Lightning (ISUAL) were analyzed in relation to National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN), North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA). As of July 2011, we found six lightning events which were observed by ISUAL and North Alabama LMA. In two of these events, NLDN showed clear positive cloud-to-ground (CG) discharges with peak current of +139.9 kA and +41.6 kA and, around that time, LMA showed continuous intra-cloud (IC) leader activities at 4-6 km altitudes. ISUAL also observed consistent optical waveforms of the IC and CG components and, interestingly, it was found that the blue/red spectral ratio clearly decreased by a factor of 1.5-2.5 at the time of CG discharges. Other four lightning events in which NLDN did not detect any CG discharges were also investigated, but such a feature was not found in any of these cases. These results suggest that the optical color of CG component is more reddish than that of IC component and we explain this as a result of more effective Rayleigh scattering in blue light emissions coming from lower-altitude light source. This finding suggests that spectral measurements could be a new useful technique to characterize ICs and CGs from space. In this talk, we will also present a result from lightning statistical analysis of ISUAL spectrophotometric data and ULF magnetic data.

  4. Sao Paulo Lightning Mapping Array (SP-LMA): Network Assessment and Analyses for Intercomparison Studies and GOES-R Proxy Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, J. C.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Carey, L. D.; Goodman, S. J.; Rudlosky, S. D.; Albrecht, R.; Morales, C. A.; Anselmo, E. M.; Neves, J. R.; Buechler, D. E.

    2014-01-01

    A 12 station Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) network was deployed during October 2011 in the vicinity of Sao Paulo, Brazil (SP-LMA) to contribute total lightning measurements to an international field campaign [CHUVA - Cloud processes of tHe main precipitation systems in Brazil: A contribUtion to cloud resolVing modeling and to the GPM (GlobAl Precipitation Measurement)]. The SP-LMA was operational from November 2011 through March 2012 during the Vale do Paraiba campaign. Sensor spacing was on the order of 15-30 km, with a network diameter on the order of 40-50km. The SP-LMA provides good 3-D lightning mapping out to 150 km from the network center, with 2-D coverage considerably farther. In addition to supporting CHUVA science/mission objectives, the SP-LMA is supporting the generation of unique proxy data for the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) and Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), on NOAA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R (GOES-R: scheduled for a 2015 launch). These proxy data will be used to develop and validate operational algorithms so that they will be ready to use on "day1" following the GOES-R launch. As the CHUVA Vale do Paraiba campaign opportunity was formulated, a broad community-based interest developed for a comprehensive Lightning Location System (LLS) intercomparison and assessment study, leading to the participation and/or deployment of eight other ground-based networks and the space-based Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS). The SP-LMA data is being intercompared with lightning observations from other deployed lightning networks to advance our understanding of the capabilities/contributions of each of these networks toward GLM proxy and validation activities. This paper addresses the network assessment including noise reduction criteria, detection efficiency estimates, and statistical and climatological (both temporal and spatially) analyses for intercomparison studies and GOES-R proxy activities.

  5. Total Lightning as an Indicator of Mesocyclone Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stough, Sarah M.; Carey, Lawrence D.; Schultz, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Apparent relationship between total lightning (in-cloud and cloud to ground) and severe weather suggests its operational utility. Goal of fusion of total lightning with proven tools (i.e., radar lightning algorithms. Preliminary work here investigates circulation from Weather Suveilance Radar- 1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) coupled with total lightning data from Lightning Mapping Arrays.

  6. Use of High-Resolution WRF Simulations to Forecast Lightning Threat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCaul, E. W., Jr.; LaCasse, K.; Goodman, S. J.; Cecil, D. J.

    2008-01-01

    Recent observational studies have confirmed the existence of a robust statistical relationship between lightning flash rates and the amount of large precipitating ice hydrometeors aloft in storms. This relationship is exploited, in conjunction with the capabilities of cloud-resolving forecast models such as WRF, to forecast explicitly the threat of lightning from convective storms using selected output fields from the model forecasts. The simulated vertical flux of graupel at -15C and the shape of the simulated reflectivity profile are tested in this study as proxies for charge separation processes and their associated lightning risk. Our lightning forecast method differs from others in that it is entirely based on high-resolution simulation output, without reliance on any climatological data. short [6-8 h) simulations are conducted for a number of case studies for which three-dmmensional lightning validation data from the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array are available. Experiments indicate that initialization of the WRF model on a 2 km grid using Eta boundary conditions, Doppler radar radial velocity fields, and METAR and ACARS data y&eld satisfactory simulations. __nalyses of the lightning threat fields suggests that both the graupel flux and reflectivity profile approaches, when properly calibrated, can yield reasonable lightning threat forecasts, although an ensemble approach is probably desirable in order to reduce the tendency for misplacement of modeled storms to hurt the accuracy of the forecasts. Our lightning threat forecasts are also compared to other more traditional means of forecasting thunderstorms, such as those based on inspection of the convective available potential energy field.

  7. Exploring Lightning Jump Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chronis, Themis; Carey, Larry D.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Schultz, Elise; Calhoun, Kristin; Goodman, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    This study is concerned with the characteristics of storms exhibiting an abrupt temporal increase in the total lightning flash rate (i.e., lightning jump, LJ). An automated storm tracking method is used to identify storm "clusters" and total lightning activity from three different lightning detection systems over Oklahoma, northern Alabama and Washington, D.C. On average and for different employed thresholds, the clusters that encompass at least one LJ (LJ1) last longer, relate to higher Maximum Expected Size of Hail, Vertical Integrated Liquid and lightning flash rates (area-normalized) than the clusters that did not exhibit any LJ (LJ0). The respective mean values for LJ1 (LJ0) clusters are 80 min (35 min), 14 mm (8 mm), 25 kg per square meter (18 kg per square meter) and 0.05 flash per min per square kilometer (0.01 flash per min per square kilometer). Furthermore, the LJ1 clusters are also characterized by slower decaying autocorrelation functions, a result that implies a less "random" behavior in the temporal flash rate evolution. In addition, the temporal occurrence of the last LJ provides an estimate of the time remaining to the storm's dissipation. Depending of the LJ strength (i.e., varying thresholds), these values typically range between 20-60 min, with stronger jumps indicating more time until storm decay. This study's results support the hypothesis that the LJ is a proxy for the storm's kinematic and microphysical state rather than a coincidental value.

  8. Lightning Protection against Winter Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Hitoshi

    Winter lightning, which occurs along the Sea of Japan coast, often damages transmission lines and distribution lines with the conventional lightning protection. These lines in mountainous areas suffer extensive damage from winter lightning. It is very important to investigate the features of lightning outages in detail to improve the lightning protection measures against winter lightning, therefore observations of lightning strokes to transmission lines and distribution lines as well as measurements of lightning surges on these lines have been carried out. And then the lightning performance of various protection methods has studied by experiments and analyses. Taking into account these studies, the effective methods have been adopted. This paper presents the lightning protection of transmission lines and distribution lines against winter lightning.

  9. Planetary lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Clayton, R. N.; Buseck, P. R.; Hua, X.; Holsapple, K. A.; Esposito, L. W.; Aherns, T. J.; Hecht, J.

    The present state of knowledge concerning lightning on the planets is reviewed. Voyager data have clearly established the presence of lightning discharges at each of the four Jovian planets. In situ data for lightning on Venus are discussed in some detail, including reported quantitative occurrence rates and hypotheses concerning the relationship of Venusian lightning to VLF bursts observed in the Venus atmosphere.

  10. The start of lightning: Evidence of bidirectional lightning initiation.

    PubMed

    Montanyà, Joan; van der Velde, Oscar; Williams, Earle R

    2015-10-16

    Lightning flashes are known to initiate in regions of strong electric fields inside thunderstorms, between layers of positively and negatively charged precipitation particles. For that reason, lightning inception is typically hidden from sight of camera systems used in research. Other technology such as lightning mapping systems based on radio waves can typically detect only some aspects of the lightning initiation process and subsequent development of positive and negative leaders. We report here a serendipitous recording of bidirectional lightning initiation in virgin air under the cloud base at ~11,000 images per second, and the differences in characteristics of opposite polarity leader sections during the earliest stages of the discharge. This case reveals natural lightning initiation, propagation and a return stroke as in negative cloud-to-ground flashes, upon connection to another lightning channel - without any masking by cloud.

  11. The start of lightning: Evidence of bidirectional lightning initiation

    PubMed Central

    Montanyà, Joan; van der Velde, Oscar; Williams, Earle R.

    2015-01-01

    Lightning flashes are known to initiate in regions of strong electric fields inside thunderstorms, between layers of positively and negatively charged precipitation particles. For that reason, lightning inception is typically hidden from sight of camera systems used in research. Other technology such as lightning mapping systems based on radio waves can typically detect only some aspects of the lightning initiation process and subsequent development of positive and negative leaders. We report here a serendipitous recording of bidirectional lightning initiation in virgin air under the cloud base at ~11,000 images per second, and the differences in characteristics of opposite polarity leader sections during the earliest stages of the discharge. This case reveals natural lightning initiation, propagation and a return stroke as in negative cloud-to-ground flashes, upon connection to another lightning channel – without any masking by cloud. PMID:26471123

  12. Lightning Mapping Observations of Volume-Filling Small Discharges in Thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rison, W.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Thomas, R. J.; Rodeheffer, D.

    2013-12-01

    Lightning is usually considered to be a large-scale electrical discharge in the atmosphere. For example, the American Meteorological Society's Glossary of Meteorology defines lightning as "a transient, high-current electric discharge with pathlengths measured in kilometers" (http://glossary.ametsoc.org/wiki/Lightning). There have been several reported examples of short-duration discharges in thunderstorms, which have a duration of a few microseconds to less than a millisecond, and have a small spatial extent These short-duration discharges were located at high altitudes (> 14 km), altitudes consistent with being located between the upper positive charge and the negative screening layer. At these altitudes, the electric field needed to initiate an electrical discharge is much lower than it is at the altitudes of initiation for IC (~8 km) or CG (~5 km) flashes. We have recently reported on short-duration "precursor" discharges with durations of a few microseconds to a few milliseconds, which occur in the high-fields between the mid-level negative and upper positive charge regions. These "precursor" discharges are discrete in both time and space, being separated in time by hundreds of milliseconds to several seconds, and localized in space, usually very close to the initiation location of a subsequent IC discharge. We have recently observed nearly continuous, volume filling short-duration discharges in several thunderstorms. These discharges have durations of much less than a millisecond, spatial extents of less than a few hundred meters, and occur randomly in the volume between the mid-level negative and upper positive charge regions. During an active period, these discharges occur every few milliseconds. The rates of these discharges decreases dramatically to a few per second following an IC discharge, then increases to several hundred per second until the next discharge. In a storm just off the Florida coast, one cell was producing a large number of these small

  13. Lightning injuries.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe Gatewood, Medley; Zane, Richard D

    2004-05-01

    Lightning is persistently one of the leading causes of death caused by environmental or natural disaster. To understand the pathophysiology and treatment of lightning injuries one must first discount the innumerable myths, superstitions, and misconceptions surrounding lightning. The fundamental difference between high voltage electrical injury and lightning is the duration of exposure to current. Reverse triage should be instituted in lightning strike victims because victims in cardiopulmonary arrest might gain the greatest benefit from resuscitation efforts, although there is no good evidence suggesting that lightning strike victims might benefit from longer than usual resuscitation times. Many of the injuries suffered by lightning strike victims are unique to lightning, and long-term sequelae should be anticipated and addressed in the lightning victim.

  14. Alabama-Mississippi Coastal Classification Maps - Perdido Pass to Cat Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Robert A.; Peterson, Russell L.

    2005-01-01

    The primary purpose of the USGS National Assessment of Coastal Change Project is to provide accurate representations of pre-storm ground conditions for areas that are designated high-priority because they have dense populations or valuable resources that are at risk from storm waves. Another purpose of the project is to develop a geomorphic (land feature) coastal classification that, with only minor modification, can be applied to most coastal regions in the United States. A Coastal Classification Map describing local geomorphic features is the first step toward determining the hazard vulnerability of an area. The Coastal Classification Maps of the National Assessment of Coastal Change Project present ground conditions such as beach width, dune elevations, overwash potential, and density of development. In order to complete a hazard vulnerability assessment, that information must be integrated with other information, such as prior storm impacts and beach stability. The Coastal Classification Maps provide much of the basic information for such an assessment and represent a critical component of a storm-impact forecasting capability. The map above shows the areas covered by this web site. Click on any of the location names or outlines to view the Coastal Classification Map for that area.

  15. Use of High-resolution WRF Simulations to Forecast Lightning Threat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCaul, William E.; LaCasse, K.; Goodman, S. J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent observational studies have confirmed the existence of a robust statistical relationship between lightning flash rates and the amount of large precipitating ice hydrometeors in storms. This relationship is exploited, in conjunction with the capabilities of recent forecast models such as WRF, to forecast the threat of lightning from convective storms using the output fields from the model forecasts. The simulated vertical flux of graupel at -15C is used in this study as a proxy for charge separation processes and their associated lightning risk. Six-h simulations are conducted for a number of case studies for which three-dimensional lightning validation data from the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array are available. Experiments indicate that initialization of the WRF model on a 2 km grid using Eta boundary conditions, Doppler radar radial velocity and reflectivity fields, and METAR and ACARS data yield the most realistic simulations. An array of subjective and objective statistical metrics are employed to document the utility of the WRF forecasts. The simulation results are also compared to other more traditional means of forecasting convective storms, such as those based on inspection of the convective available potential energy field.

  16. The Integration of Total Lightning Information Into National Weather Service Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darden, C.; Burks, J.; Bradshaw, T.; Boccippio, D.; Goodman, S.; Blakeslee, R.; McCaul, E.; Buechler, D.; Hall, J.; Bailey, J.

    2003-12-01

    The collocation of a National Weather Service (NWS) Forecast Office with atmospheric scientists from NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) has afforded a unique opportunity for science sharing and technology transfer. One such technology transfer is the utilization of the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) in daily forecast and warning operations. The LMA consists of ten VHF receivers deployed across northern Alabama and a base station located at the National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC) on the UAH campus. Preliminary investigations have shown a strong correlation between the time rate-of-change (trending) of total lightning and changes in intensity/severity of the parent convective cell. It is hoped that through the use of near real-time total lightning information, in conjunction with other remote sensing datasets (radar, satellite, observations), that the forecaster can achieve an even greater level of situational awareness. The primary mission of the NWS is to protect life and property. The utilization of the LMA data may prove to be a vital contributor to this mission by enhancing severe weather warning and decision-making, improving warning lead times, and increasing the probability of detection of severe and hazardous weather. To maximize the use of total lightning information, the LMA data is being ingested in real-time into the NWS Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS) decision support system. The presentation will focus on the collaborative process, technology transfer methodologies and a look to the future. In addition, a brief review of recent LMA case studies will be provided.

  17. On the Optical Emission of Intracloud Lightning Leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, K. N.; Bitzer, P. M.; Christian, H. J., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify and examine the characteristics of intracloud (IC) lightning leaders. IC leaders have been characterized in the literature in terms of the temporal evolution, the most active portion of the IC leader and electric field waveform characteristics. ICs are noted to vary widely in both waveform pulse characteristics and pattern; thus further characterization with supplementary data yields more insight to the physical characteristics of IC discharges. Optical emission by IC lightning has not been extensively studied - individual pulse contributions to optical emission are not well characterized and little has been concluded about overall IC optical emission. To address this we explore IC lightning and leader processes in the context of optical emission. Our study includes VLF measurements from the Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array (HAMMA), VHF measurements from the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) and optical measurements from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS). The data set compiled in this study consists of 345 IC radiation field pulses from 19 IC lightning flashes occuring on Oct. 25th, 2010 within 70km of the center of HAMMA. Waveform characteristics complied include initial half cycle width, rise time, pulse duration, peak amplitude (normalized to 100km) and LIS group associated within 2ms. With this data set we find that large amplitude (>1.0V/m) pulses are consistently associated with a LIS group; however small amplitude pulses (<0.5V/m) constitute 70% of radiation field pulses studied and are not always directly associated with a LIS group. Despite this, a LIS group can be associated with groupings of small amplitude pulses. We seek to understand the cumulative optical emission resulting from small and moderate amplitude pulses; this cumulative emission can exceed the LIS threshold. We compare waveform characteristics of the small amplitude pulses, particularly in terms of the large amplitude pulses which do

  18. Infrasound Observations from Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arechiga, R. O.; Johnson, J. B.; Edens, H. E.; Thomas, R. J.; Jones, K. R.

    2008-12-01

    To provide additional insight into the nature of lightning, we have investigated its infrasound manifestations. An array of three stations in a triangular configuration, with three sensors each, was deployed during the Summer of 2008 (July 24 to July 28) in the Magdalena mountains of New Mexico, to monitor infrasound (below 20 Hz) sources due to lightning. Hyperbolic formulations of time of arrival (TOA) measurements and interferometric techniques were used to locate lightning sources occurring over and outside the network. A comparative analysis of simultaneous Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) data and infrasound measurements operating in the same area was made. The LMA locates the sources of impulsive RF radiation produced by lightning flashes in three spatial dimensions and time, operating in the 60 - 66 MHz television band. The comparison showed strong evidence that lightning does produce infrasound. This work is a continuation of the study of the frequency spectrum of thunder conducted by Holmes et al., who reported measurements of infrasound frequencies. The integration of infrasound measurements with RF source localization by the LMA shows great potential for improved understanding of lightning processes.

  19. Lightning Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Lightning causes an estimated $50 million annually in damages to power lines, transformers and other electric utility equipment. Lightning strikes are not yet predictable, but U.S. East Coast Lightning Detection Network (LDN) is providing utilities and other clients data on lightning characteristics, flash frequency and location, and the general direction in which lightning associated storms are heading. Monitoring stations are equipped with direction finding antennas that detect lightning strikes reaching the ground by measuring fluctuations in the magnetic field. Stations relay strike information to SUNY-Albany-LDN operations center which is manned around the clock. Computers process data, count strikes, spot their locations, and note other characteristics of lightning, LDN's data is beamed to a satellite for broadcast to client's receiving stations. By utilizing real-time lightning strike information, managers are now more able to effectively manage their resources. This reduces outage time for utility customers.

  20. Lightning Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause internal burns than electrical injuries from generated electricity. However, it can kill a person by instantaneously ... water do not attract lightning but easily transmit electricity once they are hit. Electricity from lightning can ...

  1. Land use mapping and change detection using ERTS imagery in Montgomery County, Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilms, R. P.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility of using remotely sensed data from ERTS-1 for mapping land use and detecting land use change was investigated. Land use information was gathered from 1964 air photo mosaics and from 1972 ERTS data. The 1964 data provided the basis for comparison with ERTS-1 imagery. From this comparison, urban sprawl was quite evident for the city of Montgomery. A significant trend from forestland to agricultural was also discovered. The development of main traffic arteries between 1964 and 1972 was a vital factor in the development of some of the urban centers. Even though certain problems in interpreting and correlating land use data from ERTS imagery were encountered, it has been demonstrated that remotely sensed data from ERTS is useful for inventorying land use and detecting land use change.

  2. Electro-optic Lightning Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William J.; Solakiewicz, Richard J.

    1996-01-01

    The design, alignment, calibration, and field deployment of a solid-state lightning detector is described. The primary sensing component of the detector is a potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) electro-optic crystal that is attached in series to a flat plate aluminum antenna; the antenna is exposed to the ambient thundercloud electric field. A semiconductor laser diode (lambda = 685 nm), polarizing optics, and the crystal are arranged in a Pockels cell configuration. Lightning-caused electric field changes are related to small changes in the transmission of laser light through the optical cell. Several hundred lightning electric field change excursions were recorded during five thunderstorms that occurred in the summer of 1998 at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in northern Alabama.

  3. An Analysis of Operational Total Lightning Data During Long-Track Tornadoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carcione, Brian C.; Stano, Geoffrey T.

    2012-01-01

    The 27 April 2011 tornado outbreak brought three distinct waves of tornadic thunderstorms to portions of Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, and Georgia, striking the Tennessee Valley of north Alabama and southern Tennessee particularly hard. A total of 42 tornado paths were surveyed across the fourteen county area covered by the National Weather Service (NWS) forecast office in Huntsville, Alabama. Ten of these tornadoes were on the ground for at least 20 miles, two had total path lengths over 130 miles, and six tornadoes were classified as violent (EF-4 or EF-5 on the Enhanced Fujita Scale). Many of these tornadoes occurred within the domain of the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA), a ground-based total lightning detection network owned and operated by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Since 2003, the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center has supplied data from NALMA in real time to NWS forecast offices in Huntsville, Knoxville/Tri-Cities, Birmingham, and Nashville. Previous research has documented the utility of total lightning information in predicting tornadogenesis, particularly when combined with other remote sensing tools. Basic warning decision-making during events such as 27 April is not the most difficult part of the process; instead, the focus of warning meteorologists shifts to looking for changes in intensity or possible particularly dangerous situations, since doppler radar velocity data often cannot distinguish between weak and strong tornadoes. To that end, this research attempts to determine if any correlation exists between flash densities of the longest-tracked tornadoes over time, and the surveyed wind speeds of the tornadoes. The long-track EF-5 tornado which struck the Hackleburg, Phil Campbell, and Tanner communities in north Alabama was the primary focus of this research due to its intensity and extended life cycle. However, not all tornadoes were available for total lightning analysis due to widespread

  4. Upward Lightning in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, C.; Saba, M. M.; Alves, J.; Warner, T. A.; Albrecht, R. I.; Bie, L. L.

    2012-12-01

    Observations of upward lightning from tall objects have been reported since 1939. Interest in this subject has grown recently, some of it because of the rapid expansion of wind power generation. Also, with the increasing number of tall buildings and towers, there will be a corresponding increase in the number of upward lightning flashes from these structures. Reports from recent field observations are beginning to address the nature of upward lightning initiation, but much still needs to be learned. Examples are studies of upward lightning from towers in winter thunderstorms in Japan (Wang and Takagi, 2010; and Lu et al., 2009) and summer thunderstorms in Europe (Miki et al., 2005; Flache et al., 2008; and Diendorfer et al., 2009; Zhou et al., 2011) and in North America (Mazur and Ruhnke, 2011; Hussein et al., 2011; Warner, 2011, and Warner et al., 2011). Up to January 2012, no upward flash had ever been registered in Brazil. With the help of some video cameras, we recorded 15 upward lightning which started from one of the towers located on Peak Jaraguá in the city of São Paulo. This paper describes the first results of this field campaign. A combination of high-speed video and standard definition video were used to record upward lightning flashes from multiple towers in Sao Paulo, Brazil, a city located in southeastern Brazil with a population over 10 million people, an average elevation of around 800 meters above sea level, and a flash density of 15 flashes/km2/year. Observations of 15 upward flashes made with these assets were analyzed along with BrasilDAT Lightning Detection Network and a lightning mapping array (LMA) and electric field sensors.

  5. Recent Advancements in Lightning Jump Algorithm Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Christopher J.; Petersen, Walter A.; Carey, Lawrence D.

    2010-01-01

    In the past year, the primary objectives were to show the usefulness of total lightning as compared to traditional cloud-to-ground (CG) networks, test the lightning jump algorithm configurations in other regions of the country, increase the number of thunderstorms within our thunderstorm database, and to pinpoint environments that could prove difficult for any lightning jump configuration. A total of 561 thunderstorms have been examined in the past year (409 non-severe, 152 severe) from four regions of the country (North Alabama, Washington D.C., High Plains of CO/KS, and Oklahoma). Results continue to indicate that the 2 lightning jump algorithm configuration holds the most promise in terms of prospective operational lightning jump algorithms, with a probability of detection (POD) at 81%, a false alarm rate (FAR) of 45%, a critical success index (CSI) of 49% and a Heidke Skill Score (HSS) of 0.66. The second best performing algorithm configuration was the Threshold 4 algorithm, which had a POD of 72%, FAR of 51%, a CSI of 41% and an HSS of 0.58. Because a more complex algorithm configuration shows the most promise in terms of prospective operational lightning jump algorithms, accurate thunderstorm cell tracking work must be undertaken to track lightning trends on an individual thunderstorm basis over time. While these numbers for the 2 configuration are impressive, the algorithm does have its weaknesses. Specifically, low-topped and tropical cyclone thunderstorm environments are present issues for the 2 lightning jump algorithm, because of the suppressed vertical depth impact on overall flash counts (i.e., a relative dearth in lightning). For example, in a sample of 120 thunderstorms from northern Alabama that contained 72 missed events by the 2 algorithm 36% of the misses were associated with these two environments (17 storms).

  6. The Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM): Status and Recent Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William; Khan, Maudood; Peterson, Harold

    2011-01-01

    Improvements to the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) are discussed. Recent results from an August 2006 run of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system that employs LNOM lightning NOx (= NO + NO2) estimates are provided. The LNOM analyzes Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) data to estimate the raw (i.e., unmixed and otherwise environmentally unmodified) vertical profile of lightning NOx. The latest LNOM estimates of (a) lightning channel length distributions, (b) lightning 1-m segment altitude distributions, and (c) the vertical profile of NOx are presented. The impact of including LNOM-estimates of lightning NOx on CMAQ output is discussed.

  7. Global optical lightning flash rates determined with the Forte satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Light, T.; Davis, S. M.; Boeck, W. L.; Jacobson, A. R.; Suszcynsky, D. M.

    2003-01-01

    Using FORTE photodiode detector (PDD) observations of lightning, we have determined the geographic distribution of nighttime flash rate density. We estimate the PDD flash detection efficiency to be 62% for total lightning through comparison to lightning observations by the TRMM satellite's Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS), using cases in which FORTE and TRMM viewed the same storm. We present here both seasonal and l,ot,al flash rate maps. We examine some characteristics of the optical emissions of lightning in both high and low flash rate environments, and find that while lightning occurs less frequently over ocean, oceanic lightning flashes are somewhat more powerful, on average, than those over land.

  8. Alabama Public Library Service Annual Report, 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    This annual report highlights the accomplishments of the Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) during 1990. Introductory materials include a map of Alabama's Congressional districts, photographs of the executive board of APLS, and comments from the chairman of the executive board and from APLS' director. Accomplishments are reported under the…

  9. Alabama Public Library Service Annual Report, 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    This annual report highlights the accomplishments of the Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) during 1989. Introductory materials include a map of Alabama's Congressional districts, photographs of the executive board of APLS, and comments from the chairman of the executive board and from APLS' director. The following accomplishments are then…

  10. Ball lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenhoff, Mark

    Ball lightning is alleged by some to be a rare atmospheric phenomenon usually associated with thunderstorms, while others hold that it does not exist. This controversy has continued for centuries. This study comprises a critical evaluation of evidence for the existence of ball lightning. An historical review of the controversy is first presented, giving a chronological account of developments in ball lightning theories and of important observations alleged to be of the phenomenon. Other phenomena which might be mistaken for ball lightning are then subjected to a more detailed study than has hitherto been published, and the means by which such misidentifications could be recognized areestablished. A discussion of psychological and perceptual aspects indicates that descriptions could not always be taken at face value, and that many accounts of alleged ball lightning would be expected to contain substantial inaccuracies. The original intention to evaluate cases of alleged ball lightning already published in scientific journals was abandoned because there was no standardisation of information content, and because the majority of reports contained insufficient information for evaluation. Many reports had been written in a style which indicated an assumption that ball lightning was the cause of the event. Approximately 200 unpublished reports were therefore collected and subjected to evaluation. It was found that the majority of reports of alleged ball lightning could be explained by other means, and there was only a very small residue of reports which could not easily be thus explained. A large proportion of the reports could be attributed to corona discharge effects such as St Elmo's fire, or by familiar effects of conventional linear lightning. The validity of many previously published statistical studies of ball lightning was shown to be doubtful. The thesis concludes with a comparitive discussion of the merits and demerits of some of the diverse physical models

  11. Observations of volcanic Lightning (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Behnke, S. A.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.; Edens, H. E.; McNutt, S. R.

    2010-12-01

    We have made detailed observations of lightning during four volcanic eruptions using lightning mapping array (LMA) stations. In January 2006 we observed several explosive eruptions from Augustine Volcano in Alaska with two LMA stations. While two stations only gave us the direction to the lightning it gave a detailed time history of the lightning in relationship to the eruption as measured by seismic and acoustic instruments. We inferred that there were two phases (explosive and plume) and three types of lightning (small discharges near the vent, larger discharges in the volcanic column, thunderstorm like lightning in the plume). In May 2008 we mapped lightning in the plume of Chaitan (Chile) three weeks after the initial eruption. In 2009 we observed the entire sequence of explosive eruptions of Redoubt Volcano in Alaska with 4 distant stations. This provided good 2-D locations of the electrical activity. In 2010 we mapped much of the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull using 6 LMA stations that provided 3-D locations. All the observations have reinforced the basic conclusions that we found at the Augustine eruption, and let us expand and refine the these ideas.

  12. First Results from the Washington D.C. Metropolitan Area Lighting Map Demonstration Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Steven J.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Hall, John; Krehbiel, Paul; Rison, Bill; Zubrick, Steven

    2007-01-01

    An experimental portable lightning mapping array (LMA) operating in the upper VHF TV band (Channels 7-13; 174-216 MHz) was deployed in the Washington DC Metropolitan area during the summer 2006 to locate and monitor the overall lightning activity. The LMA network provides total lightning data to support lightning research as well as proxy data to benefit the development of applications for planned observing systems such as the GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper. The portable LMA hardware is a compactly-housed, easily deployed version of the LMA stations installed North Alabama, Oklahoma, and New Mexico, which operate in the lower VHF TV band (Channels 2-6,54-88 MHz). Real-time LMA data products are provided to the National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office (WFO) in Sterling, VA to aid in their forecast and warning operations. Forecasters at WFO Sterling have already found the lightning data from the Washington DC demonstration network to be very useful in assessing the development of storm systems. On July 4,2006, data from the LMA aided forecasters as they monitored an area of convection that later developed into a line of severe storms that moved southward through the Washington DC metropolitan area across the Washington Mall. Additional applications of lightning mapping data in the Baltimore-Washington DC urban environment will be discussed.

  13. Lightning Phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Zen

    This paper presents a phenomenological idea about lightning flash to share the back ground understanding for this special issue. Lightning discharges are one of the terrible phenomena, and Benjamin Franklin has led this natural phenomenon to the stage of scientific investigation. Technical aspects like monitoring and location are also summarized in this article.

  14. The Stratiform Region of an MCS on 19 June in TELEX 2004 Observed With Polarimetric and Doppler Radars, Electric Field Soundings, and a Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramig, N.; Macgorman, D.; Rust, D.; Schuur, T.; Bruning, E.; Krehbiel, P.; Rison, W.; Hamlin, T.; Straka, J.; Payne, C.; Apostolakopoulos, I.; Biggerstaff, M. I.; Biermann, N.; Carey, L.

    2005-12-01

    Polarimetric and Doppler radar data, balloon-borne soundings of the electric field, and three-dimensional lightning mapping array data were acquired from a mesoscale convective system (MCS) on 19 June 2004 during the Thunderstorm Electrification and Lightning Experiment (TELEX). A total of 10 partial and complete vertical soundings through the storm were obtained from the flights of four instrumented balloons: two launched in the convective region, one in the transition zone, and one in the stratiform region. Each balloon recorded ascent and descent soundings and the transition zone balloon recorded an additional two partial soundings due to a downdraft. At times, multiple soundings were in progress simultaneously. This study focuses on the stratiform region of the MCS, which was sampled by the last two soundings of balloon three and both soundings of balloon four. A comparison of the electrical structure of the stratiform region of this MCS with that of previously published conceptual models suggests that, during at least part of the MCS's lifetime, its electrical structure was Type A, which is more complex than Type B. The main difference between these classifications is the number of charge regions in the cloud. A one-dimensional analysis with Gauss's law indicates six vertically stacked charge layers that alternated polarity within the stratiform region during balloon four's ascent. The vector electric field pattern verified the 1-D Gauss analysis and showed the electric field structure to be primarily horizontally stratified. The maximum magnitude of the electric field was approximately 105 kV/m. The second stratiform sounding sampled by balloon three began fifty minutes after the first stratiform sounding. It showed a very different electric field profile, consistent with neither Type A nor Type B electrical structure, perhaps because the sounding was far from the front of the MCS. There were only three charge layers as opposed to the four charge layers

  15. The Severe Weather Outbreak of 10 November 2002: Lightning and Radar Analysis of Storms in the Deep South

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buechler, D. E.; McCaul, E. W., Jr.; Goodman, S. J.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Bailey, J. C.; Gatlin, P.

    2004-01-01

    On the afternoon and evening of 10 November 2002, the Midwest and Deep South were struck by a major outbreak of severe storms that produced some 80 tornadoes. In terms of number of tornadoes, this was the largest outbreak in the United States since November 1992. Some 32 of the tornadoes occurred in Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama and Georgia, including several long-track killers. We use the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and other data sources to perform a comprehensive analysis of the structure and evolution of the outbreak. Most of the Southern tornadoes occurred in isolated, fast-moving supercell storms that formed in warm, moist air ahead of a major cold front. Storms tended to form in lines parallel to storm cell motion, resulting in many communities being hit multiple times by severe storms that evening. Supercells in Tennessee produced numerous strong tornadoes with short to medium-length track paths, while the supercells further south produced several very long-track tornadoes. Radar data indicate that the Tennessee storms tended to split frequently, apparently limiting their ability to sustain long-lived tornadoes, while storms further south split at most one time. The differences between these storms appear to be related to the presence of stronger jetstream winds in Tennessee relative to those present in Mississippi, Alabama and Georgia. LMA-derived flash rates associated with most of the supercell storm cores were about 1-2 flashes per second. Rapid increases in lightning rates (or "jumps") occurred prior to tornado touchdown in many instances. Lightning "holes" (lightning-free regions associated with the echo-free vault) occurred in two of the Tennessee supercells. The complexity of the relationship between lightning and storm severity is revealed by the behavior of one Alabama supercell, which produced a peak flash rate of nearly 14 flashes per second, well after the end of its long-track tornado, while interacting and ultimately merging

  16. Lightning trends as a precursor to microbursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buechler, Dennis E.; Goodman, Steven J.; Meyer, Paul J.

    1989-01-01

    The feasibility of using lightning-rate data to aid in the early warning of microburst occurrence in moist environments is illustrated. Convective tendency images were generated for a small microburst-producing storm that developed in northern Alabama on July 20, 1986 during the Cooperative Huntsville Meteorological Experiment. Radar observations were obtained from the NCAR CP2 10-cm dual-polarization Doppler radar, while the measurements of total lightning activity were provided by the National Severe Storm Laboratory, a mobile laboratory that was located under the storm throughout its lifetime. The scenario for the evolution of wet microburst producing thunderstorms is described.

  17. Lightning Imaging via VHF Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Osaka University has been developing interferometric lightning mapping systems for some time, first with narrow band VHF interferometers, and then with broadband digital VHF interferometers (DITF). Recently, a collaboration between New Mexico Tech and Osaka University resulted in the development of the NMT INTF. All of these interferometric lightning mapping systems have added greatly to our understanding of lightning physics. The next generation of digital broadband VHF interferometer is now being developed in Osaka, called the Lightning Imaging via VHF Emission (LIVE) interferometer. LIVE is capable of mapping lightning in real-time with sub-millisecond time resolution, or through post processing with sub-microsecond time resolution. Near-field corrections have been developed, so that sources very close to the array can be located accurately, and so that the baselines can lengthened for improved angular resolution. LIVE is capable of locating lighting over more than a 75 dB range of brightnesses, allowing the system to be extremely sensitive, and the long baselines allow for location uncertainties as low as tens of meters. Presented are observations of lightning recorded in the Kasai area of Japan, as well as the Pengerang region of Malaysia showing the capabilities of the LIVE interferometer.

  18. The LATEST Project: Operational Assessment of Total Lightning Data in the U.S.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Steven

    2004-01-01

    A government, university, and industry alliance has joined forces to transition total lightning observations from ground-based research networks and NASA satellites (LIS/TRMM) to improve the short range prediction of severe weather. This interest builds on the desire of the U.S Weather Research Program to foster a national Nowcasting Test Bed, with this specific transition activity initiated through the NASA short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center in Huntsville, AL. A kick-off national workshop sponsored by the SPoRT Center was held in Huntsville April 1-2 to identify the common goals and objectives of the research and operational community, and to assign roles and responsibilities within the alliance. The workshop agenda, presentations, and summary are available at the SPoRT Center Web site ( h h under the "Meetings" tab. The next national workshop is planned for 2005 in Dallas, TX. The NASA North Alabama regional Lightning Mapping Array &MA) has been operational in the Huntsville area for 3 years, and has continuously sampled a variety of severe weather systems during that period. A gridded version of the LMA total lightning data is currently being supplied to National Weather Service offices in Huntsville, Nashville and Birmingham through the NWS AWES decision support system, for the purposes of assessing the utility of the data in the nowcasting of severe weather such as tornadoes, damaging straight line winds, flash flooding and other weather hazards (lightning induced forest fires, microbursts). While the raw LMA data have been useful to NWS forecasters, even greater utility would be realized if higher-order data products could be supplied through AWIPS along with the gridded data over a larger domain. In 2003-2004 additional LMA systems have been deployed across the southern US. from Florida to New Mexico, providing an opportunity for more than 20 NWS forecast offices to evaluate the incremental value of total lightning data in the

  19. Optical characteristics of lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    A study of the optical characteristics of cloud-to-ground dischargers and how they compare with intracloud flashes was completed. Time resolved optical (7774A) and electric field-change waveforms were measured above clouds from a U2 airplane coincident with ground-based measurements of lightning. The optical pulse trains are studied for within and between flash variability. Specifically, for each flash researchers examine the 10, 50 (full width half maximum), and 90 percent pulse widths; the 10-10, 10-50, 10-90, and 10-peak percent amplitude rise times; the radiances (optical power densities); radiant energy densities; and pulse intervals. The optical pulse characteristics of first strokes, subsequent strokes, the intracloud components of cloud-to-ground flashes and intracloud flashes as viewed from above cloud are shown to exhibit very similar waveshapes, radiances and radiant energy densities. Descriptive statistics on these pulse categories were tabulated for 25 visually confirmed cloud-to-ground flashes (229 optical pulses) and 232 intracloud flashes (3126 optical pulses). A companion study of lightning observations above and below cloud in storms, storm complexes, and mesoscale convective systems has also been completed. Researchers compared the mapping of total lightning activity from above clouds with ground-based measurements and storm evolution. Although the total (IC + CG) lightning activity is the more representative indication of thunderstorm growth and decay, the ground strike data can be used to locate, diagnose, and track storm evolution in a number of instances.

  20. Lightning Detection in a Flash

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    In a joint project with NASA's Kennedy Space Center, Global Atmospherics, Inc. (GAI), participated in the upgrade and commercialization of the Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) System. Under a Space Act Agreement, GAI and Kennedy agreed to the joint development of a new LDAR system that meets the needs of both NASA and private industry. The resulting development was a volumetric lightning mapping system. NASA operates a three- dimensional LDAR system capable of determining the exact location and altitude of in-cloud and cloud-to-cloud lightning. Under the Space Act Agreement, GAI contributed its wealth of experience and resources to update and improve the current lightning mapping system used by NASA. Previously, commercial systems were only capable of locating cloud-to-ground lightning. The resulting innovations allowed GAI to position the LDAR system for commercial applications. The upgraded product has the ability to measure in-cloud and cloud-to-cloud lightning. Notable improvements have also been made in the system's location accuracy and signal detection. The new product, known as LDAR II, is targeted for use by utility providers, aviation companies, airports, and commercial space vehicle launch facilities. Presently, forecasting services, research facilities, and a utility company are using the system.

  1. Time domain simulations of preliminary breakdown pulses in natural lightning.

    PubMed

    Carlson, B E; Liang, C; Bitzer, P; Christian, H

    2015-06-16

    Lightning discharge is a complicated process with relevant physical scales spanning many orders of magnitude. In an effort to understand the electrodynamics of lightning and connect physical properties of the channel to observed behavior, we construct a simulation of charge and current flow on a narrow conducting channel embedded in three-dimensional space with the time domain electric field integral equation, the method of moments, and the thin-wire approximation. The method includes approximate treatment of resistance evolution due to lightning channel heating and the corona sheath of charge surrounding the lightning channel. Focusing our attention on preliminary breakdown in natural lightning by simulating stepwise channel extension with a simplified geometry, our simulation reproduces the broad features observed in data collected with the Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array. Some deviations in pulse shape details are evident, suggesting future work focusing on the detailed properties of the stepping mechanism.

  2. Time domain simulations of preliminary breakdown pulses in natural lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, B. E.; Liang, C.; Bitzer, P.; Christian, H.

    2015-06-01

    Lightning discharge is a complicated process with relevant physical scales spanning many orders of magnitude. In an effort to understand the electrodynamics of lightning and connect physical properties of the channel to observed behavior, we construct a simulation of charge and current flow on a narrow conducting channel embedded in three-dimensional space with the time domain electric field integral equation, the method of moments, and the thin-wire approximation. The method includes approximate treatment of resistance evolution due to lightning channel heating and the corona sheath of charge surrounding the lightning channel. Focusing our attention on preliminary breakdown in natural lightning by simulating stepwise channel extension with a simplified geometry, our simulation reproduces the broad features observed in data collected with the Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array. Some deviations in pulse shape details are evident, suggesting future work focusing on the detailed properties of the stepping mechanism.

  3. Infrasonic Observations from Triggered Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arechiga, R. O.; Johnson, J. B.; Edens, H. E.; Rison, W.; Thomas, R. J.; Eack, K.; Eastvedt, E. M.

    2009-12-01

    We measured acoustic signals during both triggered and natural lightning. A comparative analysis of simultaneous data from the Lightning Mapping Array (LMA), acoustic measurements and digital high-speed photography operating in the same area was made. Acoustic emissions, providing quantitative estimates of acoustic power and spectral content, will complement coincident investigations, such as X-ray emissions. Most cloud-to-ground lightning flashes lower negative charge to ground, but flashes that lower positive charge to ground are often unusually destructive and are less understood. The New Mexico Tech Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) locates the sources of impulsive RF radiation produced by lightning flashes in three spatial dimensions and time, operating in the 60 - 66 MHz television band. However, positive breakdown is rarely detected by the LMA and positive leader channels are outlined only by recoil events. Positive cloud-to-ground (CG) channels are usually not mapped (or partially mapped because they may have recoil events). Acoustic and electric field instruments are a good complement to the LMA, since they can detect both negative and positive leaders. An array of five stations was deployed during the Summer of 2009 (July 20 to August 13) in the Magdalena mountains of New Mexico, to monitor infrasound (below 20 Hz) and audio range sources due to natural and triggered lightning. The stations were located at close (57 m), medium (303 and 537 m) and far (1403 and 2556 m) distances surrounding the triggering site. Each station consisted of five sensors, one infrasonic and one in the audio range at the center, and three infrasonic in a triangular configuration. This research will provide a more complete picture, and provide further insight into the nature of lightning.

  4. Where are the lightning hotspots on Earth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, R. I.; Goodman, S. J.; Buechler, D. E.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Christian, H. J., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    The first lightning observations from space date from the early 1960s and more than a dozen spacecraft orbiting the Earth have flown instruments that recorded lightning signals from thunderstorms over the past 45 years. In this respect, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS), having just completed its mission (1997-2015), provides the longest and best total (intracloud and cloud-to-ground) lightning data base over the tropics.We present a 16 year (1998-2013) reprocessed data set to create very high resolution (0.1°) TRMM LIS total lightning climatology. This detailed very high resolution climatology is used to identify the Earth's lightning hotspots and other regional features. Earlier studies located the lightning hotspot within the Congo Basin in Africa, but our very high resolution lightning climatology found that the highest lightning flash rate on Earth actually occurs in Venezuela over Lake Maracaibo, with a distinct maximum during the night. The higher resolution dataset clearly shows that similar phenomenon also occurs over other inland lakes with similar conditions, i.e., locally forced convergent flow over a warm lake surface which drives deep nocturnal convection. Although Africa does not have the top lightning hotspot, it comes in a close second and it is the continent with the highest number of lightning hotspots, followed by Asia, South America, North America, and Oceania. We also present climatological maps for local hour and month of lightning maxima, along with a ranking of the highest five hundred lightning maxima, focusing discussion on each continent's 10 highest lightning maxima. Most of the highest continental maxima are located near major mountain ranges, revealing the importance of local topography in thunderstorm development. These results are especially relevant in anticipation of the upcoming availability of continuous total lightning observations from the Geostationary Lightning Mapping (GLM

  5. An Integrated 0-1 Hour First-Flash Lightning Nowcasting, Lightning Amount and Lightning Jump Warning Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mecikalski, John; Jewett, Chris; Carey, Larry; Zavodsky, Brad; Stano, Geoffrey; Chronis, Themis

    2015-01-01

    Using satellite-based methods that provide accurate 0-1 hour convective initiation (CI) nowcasts, and rely on proven success coupling satellite and radar fields in the Corridor Integrated Weather System (CIWS; operated and developed at MIT-Lincoln Laboratory), to subsequently monitor for first-flash lightning initiation (LI) and later period lightning trends as storms evolve. Enhance IR-based methods within the GOES-R CI Algorithm (that must meet specific thresholds for a given cumulus cloud before the cloud is considered to have an increased likelihood of producing lightning next 90 min) that forecast LI. Integrate GOES-R CI and LI fields with radar thresholds (e.g., first greater than or equal to 40 dBZ echo at the -10 C altitude) and NWP model data within the WDSS-II system for LI-events from new convective storms. Track ongoing lightning using Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and pseudo-Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) data to assess per-storm lightning trends (e.g., as tied to lightning jumps) and outline threat regions. Evaluate the ability to produce LI nowcasts through a "lightning threat" product, and obtain feedback from National Weather Service forecasters on its value as a decision support tool.

  6. Lightning: Nature's Probe of Severe Weather for Research and Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Lightning, the energetic and broadband electrical discharge produced by thunderstorms, provides a natural remote sensing signal for the study of severe storms and related phenomena on global, regional and local scales. Using this strong signal- one of nature's own probes of severe weather -lightning measurements prove to be straightforward and take advantage of a variety of measurement techniques that have advanced considerably in recent years. We briefly review some of the leading lightning detection systems including satellite-based optical detectors such as the Lightning Imaging Sensor, and ground-based radio frequency systems such as Vaisala's National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN), long range lightning detection systems, and the Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) networks. In addition, we examine some of the exciting new research results and operational capabilities (e.g., shortened tornado warning lead times) derived from these observations. Finally we look forward to the next measurement advance - lightning observations from geostationary orbit.

  7. Lightning Current Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Lightning Current Detector (LCD) was developed to monitor the magnitude of lightning strikes. Information it supplies is useful in evaluating lightning protection designs for such systems as telephone cables, radio broadcast towers, power transmission equipment and oil well towers.

  8. TVA's experience with the SUNYA lightning detection network

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J.; Driggans, R. )

    1990-10-01

    Since 1987 the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has had access to real-time data on cloud-to-ground lightning strikes in its service area through the Lightning Detection Network (LDN) operated by the State University of New York at Albany (SUNYA). Lightning data are displayed in real-time on personal computer workstations connected to SUNYA via satellite link and are recorded for later analysis. TVA is using these data to analyze transmission line outages (real-time and historical), provide warning of approaching lightning to line crews, develop ground flash density maps to replace isokeraunic maps previously used in designing transmission lines for lightning protection, and to learn more about lightning and its effect on TVA's transmission system. Lightning flashes that cause particular line outages have been identified and their current and multiplicity characteristics studied. This information may be used to allow more cost-effective transmission line design in the future.

  9. Lightning Science: Five Ways Lightning Strikes People

    MedlinePlus

    ... person alive until more advanced medical care arrives. Direct Strike A person struck directly by lightning becomes ... of the main lightning discharge channel. Most often, direct strikes occur to victims who are in open ...

  10. Lightning superbolts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    A rare type of lightning bolt previously not thought to occur in flatlands has been identified in Oklahoma prairie storms and could pose a danger to structures not built to withstand it. Researchers at NOAA say the discovery could indicate that buildings or power plants designed on the assumption that such destructive bolts do not occur in flatland might not be safe. The positive charge cloud-to-ground flashes once were thought to strike only when triggered by a tall structure or mountaintop, or, on rare occasions, at the end of a storm.‘Most storms never produce this kind of lightning. In a few storms, there may be one positive bolt, just as the storm is dissipating—sort of the last gasp of the storm,’ according to David Rust of the National Severe Storms Laboratory. Rust added that the triggered bolts often are very high current, making them especially destructive. ‘We know these bolts don't occur in garden variety storms. We are trying to find if the occurrence of this kind of lightning is linked with storm severity,’ Rust said

  11. An Overview of the Lightning - Atmospheric Chemistry Aspects of the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickering, K. E.; Barth, M. C.; Koshak, W.; Bucsela, E. J.; Allen, D. J.; Weinheimer, A.; Ryerson, T.; Huntrieser, H.; Bruning, E.; MacGorman, D.; Krehbiel, P.; Thomas, R.; Carey, L.

    2012-01-01

    Some of the major goals of the DC3 experiment are to determine the contribution of lightning to NO(x) in the anvils of observed thunderstorms, examine the relationship of lightning NO(x) production to flash rates and to lightning channel lengths, and estimate the relative production per flash for cloud-to-ground flashes and intracloud flashes. In addition, the effects of lightning NO(x) production on photochemistry downwind of thunderstorms is also being examined. The talk will survey the observation types that were conducted during DC3 relevant to these goals and provide an overview of the analysis and modeling techniques which are being used to achieve them. NO(x) was observed on three research aircraft during DC3 (the NCAR G-V, the NASA DC-8, and the DLR Falcon) in flights through storm anvils in three study regions (NE Colorado, Central Oklahoma to West Texas, and northern Alabama) where lightning mapping arrays (LMAs) and radar coverage were available. Initial comparisons of the aircraft NOx observations in storm anvils relative to flash rates have been conducted, which will be followed with calculations of the flux of NO(x) through the anvils, which when combined with observed flash rates can be used to estimate storm-average lightning NOx production per flash. The WRF-Chem model will be run for cloud-resolved simulations of selected observed storms during DC3. Detailed lightning information from the LMAs (flash rates and flash lengths as a function of time and vertical distributions of flash channel segments) will be input to the model along with assumptions concerning NO(x) production per CG flash and per IC flash. These assumptions will be tested through comparisons with the aircraft NOx data from anvil traverses. A specially designed retrieval method for lightning NO2 column amounts from the OMI instrument on NASA fs Aura satellite has been utilized to estimate NO2 over the region affected by selected DC3 storms. Combined with NO(x) to NO2 ratios from the

  12. Satellite Proving Ground for the GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Steven J.; Gurka, James; Bruning, E. C.; Blakeslee, J. R.; Rabin, Robert; Buechler, D.

    2009-01-01

    The key mission of the Satellite Proving Ground is to demonstrate new satellite observing data, products and capabilities in the operational environment to be ready on Day 1 to use the GOES-R suite of measurements. Algorithms, tools, and techniques must be tested, validated, and assessed by end users for their utility before they are finalized and incorporated into forecast operations. The GOES-R Proving Ground for the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) focuses on evaluating how the infusion of the new technology, algorithms, decision aids, or tailored products integrate with other available tools (weather radar and ground strike networks; nowcasting systems, mesoscale analysis, and numerical weather prediction models) in the hands of the forecaster responsible for issuing forecasts and warning products. Additionally, the testing concept fosters operation and development staff interactions which will improve training materials and support documentation development. Real-time proxy total lightning data from regional VHF lightning mapping arrays (LMA) in Northern Alabama, Central Oklahoma, Cape Canaveral Florida, and the Washington, DC Greater Metropolitan Area are the cornerstone for the GLM Proving Ground. The proxy data will simulate the 8 km Event, Group and Flash data that will be generated by GLM. Tailored products such as total flash density at 1-2 minute intervals will be provided for display in AWIPS-2 to select NWS forecast offices and national centers such as the Storm Prediction Center. Additional temporal / spatial combinations are being investigated in coordination with operational needs and case-study proxy data and prototype visualizations may also be generated from the NASA heritage Lightning Imaging Sensor and Optical Transient Detector data. End users will provide feedback on the utility of products in their operational environment, identify use cases and spatial/temporal scales of interest, and provide feedback to the developers for adjusted or

  13. How Lightning Works Inside Thunderstorms: A Half-Century of Lightning Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krehbiel, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    Lightning is a fascinating and intriguing natural phenomenon, but the most interesting parts of lightning discharges are inside storms where they are obscured from view by the storm cloud. Although clouds are essentially opaque at optical frequencies, they are fully transparent at radio frequencies (RF). This, coupled with the fact that lightning produces prodigious RF emissions, has allowed us to image and study lightning inside storms using various RF and lower-frequency remote sensing techniques. As in all other scientific disciplines, the technology for conducting the studies has evolved to an incredible extent over the past 50 years. During this time, we have gone from having very little or no knowledge of how lightning operates inside storms, to being able to 'see' its detailed structure and development with an increasing degree of spatial and temporal resolution. In addition to studying the discharge processes themselves, lightning mapping observations provide valuable information on the electrical charge structure of storms, and on the mechanisms by which storms become strongly electrified. In this presentation we briefly review highlights of previous observations, focussing primarily on the long string of remote-sensing studies I have been involved in. We begin with the study of lightning charge centers of cloud-to-ground discharges in central New Mexico in the late 1960s and continue up to the present day with interferometric and 3-dimensional time-of-arrival VHF mapping observations of lightning in normally- and anomalously electrified storms. A particularly important aspect of the investigations has been comparative studies of lightning in different climatological regimes. We conclude with observations being obtained by a high-speed broadband VHF interferometer, which show in unprecedented detail how individual lightning discharges develop inside storms. From combined interferometer and 3-D mapping data, we are beginning to unlock nature's secrets

  14. Lightning safety guidelines.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Christoph; Cooper, Mary Ann; Holle, Ronald L

    2002-06-01

    On average, lightning causes more casualties annually in the United States than any other storm-related phenomenon except floods. Although 90% of those injured survive, they may have permanent sequelae and disability. Many of these people incur injuries or are killed by lightning because of misinformation and inappropriate behavior during thunderstorms. A few simple precautions can reduce lightning injury risk. To standardize recommended actions during thunderstorms, the Lightning Safety Group (LSG), composed of lightning experts from many lightning-related backgrounds, met at the American Meteorological Society meeting Phoenix, AZ, in January 1998 to collectively address personal lightning safety. This paper is a summary of the recommendations developed by the LSG.

  15. Hybridization of two megacephalic map turtles (testudines: emydidae: Graptemys) in the Choctawhatchee River drainage of Alabama and Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godwin, James; Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Ennen, Joshua R.; Kreiser, Brian R.; Folt, Brian; Lechowicz, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Map turtles of the genus Graptemys are highly aquatic and rarely undergo terrestrial movements, and limited dispersal among drainages has been hypothesized to drive drainage-specific endemism and high species richness of this group in the southeastern United States. Until recently, two members of the megacephalic “pulchra clade,” Graptemys barbouri andGraptemys ernsti, were presumed to be allopatric with a gap in both species' ranges in the Choctawhatchee River drainage. In this paper, we analyzed variation in morphology (head and shell patterns) and genetics (mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite loci) from G. barbouri, G. ernsti, and Graptemys sp. collected from the Choctawhatchee River drainage, and we document the syntopic occurrence of those species and back-crossed individuals of mixed ancestry in the Choctawhatchee River drainage. Our results provide a first counter-example to the pattern of drainage-specific endemism in megacephalic Graptemys. Geologic events associated with Pliocene and Pleistocene sea level fluctuations and the existence of paleo-river systems appear to have allowed the invasion of the Choctawhatchee system by these species, and the subsequent introgression likely predates any potential human-mediated introduction.

  16. Luminous electrical phenomena in Huntsville, Alabama, tornadoes on April 3, 1974

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, O. H., Jr.; Vonnegut, B.

    1976-01-01

    Unusual lightning and varicolored luminous phenomena were observed on the evening of April 3, 1974, when severe tornadoes passed through Madison County, Alabama. Photographs and eyewitness accounts of this electrical activity are related to the trajectories of the tornadoes and the damage areas they produced.

  17. 1994 Triggered lightning test program: Measured responses of a reinforced concrete building under direct lightning attachments, Volume 2: Test data

    SciTech Connect

    Schnetzer, G.H.; Chael, J.; Davis, R.

    1995-08-01

    A rocket-triggered lightning test was carried out during the summer of 1994 on a specially designed steel reinforced concrete test building located at Ft. McClellan, Alabama. Currents, voltages, and magnetic fields were measured at 24 instrumented locations during 42 return strokes triggered to designated points on the structure and its lightning protection system. Detailed descriptions of the test structure, measurements, and test procedures are given in Volume 1 of this report. The present volume contains plots of the complete set of test data.

  18. Maps showing mines, quarries, oil and gas activity, and sample localities in and near the Sipsey Wilderness and additions, Lawrence and Winston Counties, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Mory, P.C.; Behum, P.T.; Ross, R.B. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    This report presents the results of a mineral survey of the Sipsey Wilderness and additions, William B. Bankhead National Forest, Lawrence and Winston Counties, Alabama. The survey includes: limestone quarrying, coal mining, and oil and gas activity. 7 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  19. Assimilation of Long-Range Lightning Data over the Pacific

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-30

    In the squall- line case, the data assimilation methods were able to correct the position of a squall line over Hawaii, which was forecast 150 km...showed a 10-mb error in the storm central pressure, whereas the error was reduced significantly when using lightning data assimilation methods . Tropical...Comparison of Lightning Data Assimilation Methods . Latent heating vs. FDDA Latent Heating FDDA Lightning observations mapped to rainfall

  20. The NASA Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM): Application to Air Quality Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William; Peterson, Harold; Khan, Maudood; Biazar, Arastoo; Wang, Lihua

    2011-01-01

    Recent improvements to the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) and its application to the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system are discussed. The LNOM analyzes Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and National Lightning Detection Network(TradeMark)(NLDN) data to estimate the raw (i.e., unmixed and otherwise environmentally unmodified) vertical profile of lightning NO(x) (= NO + NO2). The latest LNOM estimates of lightning channel length distributions, lightning 1-m segment altitude distributions, and the vertical profile of lightning NO(x) are presented. The primary improvement to the LNOM is the inclusion of non-return stroke lightning NOx production due to: (1) hot core stepped and dart leaders, (2) stepped leader corona sheath, K-changes, continuing currents, and M-components. The impact of including LNOM-estimates of lightning NO(x) for an August 2006 run of CMAQ is discussed.

  1. The NASA Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM): Recent Updates and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William; Peterson, Harold; Biazar, Arastoo; Khan, Maudood; Wang, Lihua; Park, Yee-Hun

    2011-01-01

    Improvements to the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) and its application to the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system are presented. The LNOM analyzes Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and National Lightning Detection Network(tm) (NLDN) data to estimate the raw (i.e., unmixed and otherwise environmentally unmodified) vertical profile of lightning NOx (= NO + NO2). Lightning channel length distributions and lightning 10-m segment altitude distributions are also provided. In addition to NOx production from lightning return strokes, the LNOM now includes non-return stroke lightning NOx production due to: hot core stepped and dart leaders, stepped leader corona sheath, K-changes, continuing currents, and M-components. The impact of including LNOM-estimates of lightning NOx for an August 2006 run of CMAQ is discussed.

  2. Updated Lightning Safety Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vavrek, R. James; Holle, Ronald L.; Lopez, Raul E.

    1999-01-01

    Summarizes the recommendations of the Lightning Safety Group (LSG), which was first convened during the 1998 American Meteorological Society Conference. Findings outline appropriate actions under various circumstances when lightning threatens. (WRM)

  3. The Lightning Discharge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orville, Richard E.

    1976-01-01

    Correspondence of Benjamin Franklin provides authenticity to a historical account of early work in the field of lightning. Present-day theories concerning the formation and propagation of lightning are expressed and photographic evidence provided. (CP)

  4. Lightning Physics and Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orville, Richard E.

    2004-03-01

    Lightning Physics and Effects is not a lightning book; it is a lightning encyclopedia. Rarely in the history of science has one contribution covered a subject with such depth and thoroughness as to set the enduring standard for years, perhaps even decades, to come. This contribution covers all aspects of lightning, including lightning physics, lightning protection, and the interaction of lightning with a variety of objects and systems as well as the environment. The style of writing is well within the ability of the technical non-expert and anyone interested in lightning and its effects. Potential readers will include physicists; engineers working in the power industry, communications, computer, and aviation industries; atmospheric scientists; geophysicists; meteorologists; atmospheric chemists; foresters; ecologists; physicians working in the area of electrical trauma; and, lastly, architects. This comprehensive reference volume contains over 300 illustrations, 70 tables with quantitative information, and over 6000 reference and bibliography entries.

  5. The 1991 International Aerospace and Ground Conference on Lightning and Static Electricity, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The proceedings of the conference are reported. The conference focussed on lightning protection, detection, and forecasting. The conference was divided into 26 sessions based on research in lightning, static electricity, modeling, and mapping. These sessions spanned the spectrum from basic science to engineering, concentrating on lightning prediction and detection and on safety for ground facilities, aircraft, and aerospace vehicles.

  6. Toward Application of Lightning Observations to Weather Forecasts and Warnings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macgorman, D. R.

    2002-12-01

    Once lightning mapping systems became fast enough to locate lightning in real or near-real time, it became possible to consider applications of lightning data to weather operations. The first system to be used routinely in such a way was the LLP direction-finder network deployed around 1980 by the Bureau of Land Management to help detect range and forest fires started by cloud-to-ground lightning. In 1987, a federal interagency group collaborated with the State University of New York at Albany to put together a trial National Lightning Detection Network for a three-year evaluation of possible applications to weather operations. During this trial, the National Weather Service determined that the lightning ground-strike data are useful for detecting the presence, configuration, and evolution of storms and storm systems, and so subsequently procured lightning strike mapping data for federal use that has continued to the present. Research since then has suggested that detection of positive cloud-to-ground lightning may also be useful, when combined with radar data, to help identify some severe storms, though the conditions under which this is possible are still being investigated. Furthermore, cloud-to-ground flash data can be assimilated into forecast models to improve the initial conditions, and hence the forecasts, of the models. More recently technology has advanced to the point that mapping all types of lightning is feasible. Because typically more than 70% of the lightning flashes produced by a storm do not strike ground, such technologies, at a minimum, would increase sampling rates to identify thunderstorms more quickly and reliably. However, different types of lightning also provide different information about storms. Cloud-to-ground lightning tends to indicate the formation and descent of precipitation, while cloud flash rates appear to be associated more closely with updraft and graupel evolution. Research is underway to determine and quantify these

  7. Lightning safety of animals.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Chandima

    2012-11-01

    This paper addresses a concurrent multidisciplinary problem: animal safety against lightning hazards. In regions where lightning is prevalent, either seasonally or throughout the year, a considerable number of wild, captive and tame animals are injured due to lightning generated effects. The paper discusses all possible injury mechanisms, focusing mainly on animals with commercial value. A large number of cases from several countries have been analyzed. Economically and practically viable engineering solutions are proposed to address the issues related to the lightning threats discussed.

  8. Thunderclouds and Lightning Conductors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, P. F.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the historical background of the development of lightning conductors, describes the nature of thunderclouds and the lightning flash, and provides a calculation of the electric field under a thundercloud. Also discussed are point discharge currents and the attraction theory of the lightning conductor. (JR)

  9. Lightning NOx Statistics Derived by NASA Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) Data Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William; Peterson, Harold

    2013-01-01

    What is the LNOM? The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) [Koshak et al., 2009, 2010, 2011; Koshak and Peterson 2011, 2013] analyzes VHF Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and National Lightning Detection Network(TradeMark) (NLDN) data to estimate the lightning nitrogen oxides (LNOx) produced by individual flashes. Figure 1 provides an overview of LNOM functionality. Benefits of LNOM: (1) Does away with unrealistic "vertical stick" lightning channel models for estimating LNOx; (2) Uses ground-based VHF data that maps out the true channel in space and time to < 100 m accuracy; (3) Therefore, true channel segment height (ambient air density) is used to compute LNOx; (4) True channel length is used! (typically tens of kilometers since channel has many branches and "wiggles"); (5) Distinction between ground and cloud flashes are made; (6) For ground flashes, actual peak current from NLDN used to compute NOx from lightning return stroke; (7) NOx computed for several other lightning discharge processes (based on Cooray et al., 2009 theory): (a) Hot core of stepped leaders and dart leaders, (b) Corona sheath of stepped leader, (c) K-change, (d) Continuing Currents, and (e) M-components; and (8) LNOM statistics (see later) can be used to parameterize LNOx production for regional air quality models (like CMAQ), and for global chemical transport models (like GEOS-Chem).

  10. 1994 Triggered Lightning Test Program: Measured responses of a reinforced concrete building under direct lightning attachments

    SciTech Connect

    Schnetzer, G.H.; Chael, J.; Davis, R.; Fisher, R.J.; Magnotti, P.J.

    1995-08-01

    A rocket-triggered lightning test was carried out during the summer of 1994 on a specially designed steel reinforced concrete test building located at Ft. McClellan, Alabama. Currents, voltages, and magnetic fields were measured at 24 instrumented locations during 42 return strokes triggered to designated points on the structure and its lightning protection systems. As was found during an earlier similar lightning test of an earth covered munitions storage building, the buried power service conduits carried a much larger fraction of incident stroke current away from the building than did the intended grounding elements of the lightning protection system. Electrical breakdown and subsequent arcing occurred repeatedly to create dominant current paths to earth that were not accounted for in pretest linear modeling. Potential hazard level transient voltages, surprisingly more resistive than inductive in nature, were recorded throughout the structure. Also surprisingly, strikes to a single grounded protection mast system resulted in internal environments that were generally comparable to those occurring during strikes to roof-mounted air terminals. A description of the test structure, experimental procedures, and a full set of the resultant data are presented in this two-volume report.

  11. A Lightning Safety Primer for Camps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attarian, Aram

    1992-01-01

    Provides the following information about lightning, which is necessary for camp administrators and staff: (1) warning signs of lightning; (2) dangers of lightning; (3) types of lightning injuries; (4) prevention of lightning injury; and (5) helpful training tips. (KS)

  12. Volcanic Lightning in Eruptions of Sakurajima Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edens, Harald; Thomas, Ronald; Behnke, Sonja; McNutt, Stephen; Smith, Cassandra; Farrell, Alexandra; Van Eaton, Alexa; Cimarelli, Corrado; Cigala, Valeria; Eack, Ken; Aulich, Graydon; Michel, Christopher; Miki, Daisuke; Iguchi, Masato

    2016-04-01

    In May 2015 a field program was undertaken to study volcanic lightning at the Sakurajima volcano in southern Japan. One of the main goals of the study was to gain a better understanding of small electrical discharges in volcanic eruptions, expanding on our earlier studies of volcanic lightning at Augustine and Redoubt volcanoes in Alaska, USA, and Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland. In typical volcanic eruptions, electrical activity occurs at the onset of an eruption as a near-continual production of VHF emissions at or near to the volcanic vent. These emissions can occur at rates of up to tens of thousands of emissions per second, and are referred to as continuous RF. As the ash cloud expands, small-scale lightning flashes of several hundred meters length begin to occur while the continuous RF ceases. Later on during the eruption larger-scale lightning flashes may occur within the ash cloud that are reminiscent of regular atmospheric lightning. Whereas volcanic lightning flashes are readily observed and reasonably well understood, the nature and morphology of the events producing continuous RF are unknown. During the 2015 field program we deployed a comprehensive set of instrumentation, including a 10-station 3-D Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) that operated in 10 μs high time resolution mode, slow and fast ΔE antennas, a VHF flat-plate antenna operating in the 20-80 MHz band, log-RF waveforms within the 60-66 MHz band, an infra-red video camera, a high-sensitivity Watec video camera, two high-speed video cameras, and still cameras. We give an overview of the Sakurajima field program and present preliminary results using correlated LMA, waveforms, photographs and video recordings of volcanic lightning at Sakurajima volcano.

  13. Initial Comparison of the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) with Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ushio, Tomoo; Driscoll, Kevin; Heckman, Stan; Boccippio, Dennis; Koshak, William; Christian, Hugh

    1999-01-01

    The mapping of the lightning optical pulses detected by the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) is compared with the radiation sources by Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) and the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) for three thunderstorms observed during and overpasses on 15 August 1998. The comparison involves 122 flashes including 42 ground and 80 cloud flashes. For ground flash, the LIS recorded the subsequent strokes and changes inside the cloud. For cloud flashes, LIS recorded those with higher sources in altitude and larger number of sources. The discrepancies between the LIS and LDAR flash locations are about 4.3 km for cloud flashes and 12.2 km for ground flashes. The reason for these differences remain a mystery.

  14. Polar Lightning on Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Images taken by the New Horizons Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) of Jupiter's night side showed lightning strikes. Each 'strike' is probably the cumulative brightness of multiple strikes. This is the first lightning seen at high latitudes on Jupiter; it demonstrates that convection is not confined to lower latitudes, implying an internal driving heat source. Their power is consistent with previous lightning measurements at Jupiter's lower latitudes, equivalent to extremely bright terrestrial 'super bolts.'

  15. Time domain simulations of preliminary breakdown pulses in natural lightning

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, B E; Liang, C; Bitzer, P; Christian, H

    2015-01-01

    Lightning discharge is a complicated process with relevant physical scales spanning many orders of magnitude. In an effort to understand the electrodynamics of lightning and connect physical properties of the channel to observed behavior, we construct a simulation of charge and current flow on a narrow conducting channel embedded in three-dimensional space with the time domain electric field integral equation, the method of moments, and the thin-wire approximation. The method includes approximate treatment of resistance evolution due to lightning channel heating and the corona sheath of charge surrounding the lightning channel. Focusing our attention on preliminary breakdown in natural lightning by simulating stepwise channel extension with a simplified geometry, our simulation reproduces the broad features observed in data collected with the Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array. Some deviations in pulse shape details are evident, suggesting future work focusing on the detailed properties of the stepping mechanism. Key Points Preliminary breakdown pulses can be reproduced by simulated channel extension Channel heating and corona sheath formation are crucial to proper pulse shape Extension processes and channel orientation significantly affect observations PMID:26664815

  16. Lightning and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, E.

    2012-12-01

    Lightning is of interest in the domain of climate change for several reasons: (1) thunderstorms are extreme forms of moist convection, and lightning flash rate is a sensitive measure of that extremity, (2) thunderstorms are deep conduits for delivering water substance from the boundary layer to the upper troposphere and stratosphere, and (3) global lightning can be monitored continuously and inexpensively within a natural framework (the Earth-ionosphere waveguide and Schumann resonances). Lightning and temperature, and lightning and upper tropospheric water vapor, are positively correlated on weather-related time scales (diurnal, semiannual, and annual) with a lightning temperature sensitivity of order 10% per oC. Lightning also follows temperature variations on the ENSO time scale, both locally and globally. The response of lightning in some of its extreme forms (exceptional flash rates and the prevalence of sprite-producing mesoscale lightning, for example) to temperature variations will be addressed. Consistently obtained records of lightning activity on longer time scales are scarce as stable detection networks are uncommon. As a consequence, thunder day data have been used to extend the lightning record for climate studies, with evidence for increases over decades in urban areas. Global records of lightning following Schumann resonance intensity and from space-based optical sensors (OTD and LIS) are consistent with the record of ionospheric potential representing the global electrical circuit in showing flat behavior over the few decades. This flatness is not well understood, though the majority of all lightning flashes are found in the tropics, the most closely regulated portion of the atmosphere. Other analysis of frequency variations of Schumann resonances in recent decades shows increased lightning in the northern hemisphere, where the global warming is most pronounced. The quantity more fundamental than temperature for lightning control is cloud buoyancy

  17. Global distribution of winter lightning: a threat to wind turbines and aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanyà, Joan; Fabró, Ferran; van der Velde, Oscar; March, Víctor; Rolfe Williams, Earle; Pineda, Nicolau; Romero, David; Solà, Glòria; Freijo, Modesto

    2016-06-01

    Lightning is one of the major threats to multi-megawatt wind turbines and a concern for modern aircraft due to the use of lightweight composite materials. Both wind turbines and aircraft can initiate lightning, and very favorable conditions for lightning initiation occur in winter thunderstorms. Moreover, winter thunderstorms are characterized by a relatively high production of very energetic lightning. This paper reviews the different types of lightning interactions and summarizes the well-known winter thunderstorm areas. Until now comprehensive maps of global distribution of winter lightning prevalence to be used for risk assessment have been unavailable. In this paper we present the global winter lightning activity for a period of 5 years. Using lightning location data and meteorological re-analysis data, six maps are created: annual winter lightning stroke density, seasonal variation of the winter lightning and the annual number of winter thunderstorm days. In the Northern Hemisphere, the maps confirmed Japan to be one of the most active regions but other areas such as the Mediterranean and the USA are active as well. In the Southern Hemisphere, Uruguay and surrounding area, the southwestern Indian Ocean and the Tasman Sea experience the highest activity. The maps provided here can be used in the development of a risk assessment.

  18. [Neurological diseases after lightning strike : Lightning strikes twice].

    PubMed

    Gruhn, K M; Knossalla, Frauke; Schwenkreis, Peter; Hamsen, Uwe; Schildhauer, Thomas A; Tegenthoff, Martin; Sczesny-Kaiser, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Lightning strikes rarely occur but 85 % of patients have lightning-related neurological complications. This report provides an overview about different modes of energy transfer and neurological conditions related to lightning strikes. Moreover, two case reports demonstrate the importance of interdisciplinary treatment and the spectrum of neurological complications after lightning strikes.

  19. Back to the Basics: Birmingham, Alabama, Measurement and Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handley, Lawrence R.; Lockwood, Catherine M.; Handley, Nathan

    2005-01-01

    "Back to the Basics: Birmingham, Alabama" is the fourth in a series of workshops that focus on teaching foundational map reading and spatial differentiation skills. It is the second published exercise from the Back to the Basics series developed by the Wetland Education through Maps and Aerial Photography (WETMAAP) Program (see…

  20. An Optical Lightning Simulator in an Electrified Cloud-Resolving Model to Prepare the Future Space Lightning Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovalo, Christophe; Defer, Eric; Pinty, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Mexico). This site has been chosen for two main reasons: presence of a Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and high frequency of TRMM overpasses. With a complete set of simulations, the electrical scheme is compared to LMA data while the lightning optical simulator is validated thanks to LIS data. First, we will present the electrification and lightning schemes. The principles of the optical lightning simulator will then be presented. Examples of simulation will then be discussed with a particular attention on the ice water content along the path of the optical signal.

  1. Homonegativity among Alabama Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satcher, Jamie; Leggett, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Members of the Alabama Counseling Association were surveyed to examine the extent to which they demonstrate homonegativity (prejudicial attitudes toward homosexuality). The majority of the counselors did not appear to approach homosexuality from traditional prejudices, although almost one-third believed homosexuality to be immoral. The counselors…

  2. Alabama and SREB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) is a nonprofit organization that works collaboratively with Alabama and 15 other member states to improve education at every level--from pre-K to postdoctoral study--through many effective programs and initiatives. SREB's "Challenge to Lead Goals for Education", which call for the region to…

  3. Academic Standards in Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    A+ Education Partnership, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Education policymakers and educators in Alabama are committed to improving the state's public education system to ensure that students gain the knowledge and skills they need to graduate from high school ready for real life. The state is on the path to implementing higher academic standards--the College and Career Ready Standards--which lay a…

  4. Alabama Water Use, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutson, Susan S.; Littlepage, Thomas M.; Harper, Michael J.; Tinney, James O.

    2009-01-01

    Water is one of Alabama's most precious natural resources. It is a vital component of human existence and essential to the overall quality of life. Wise stewardship of this valuable resource depends on a continuing assessment of water availability and water use. Population growth in many parts of the State has resulted in increased competition for available water resources. This competition includes offstream uses, such as residential, agricultural, and industrial, and instream uses for maintenance of species habitat and diversity, navigation, power generation, recreation, and water quality. Accurate water-use information is required for sound management decisions within this competitive framework and is necessary for a more comprehensive understanding of the link between water use, water supply, and overall water availability. A study of water use during 2005 was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs, Office of Water Resources, Water Management Branch (ADECA-OWR), to provide water-use data for local and State water managers. The results of the study about the amount of water used, how it was used, and where it was used in Alabama have been published in 'Estimated use of water in Alabama in 2005' by Hutson and others, 2009, and is accessible on the Web at http://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2009/5163 and available upon request as a CD-ROM through USGS and ADECA-OWR.

  5. Alabama's Decree of Difficulty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evelyn, Jamilah

    1998-01-01

    Nearly 30 years after the official end of de jure segregation, Alabama is struggling to level educational opportunities for both black and white citizens. Critics say this goal will be difficult to reach unless the state hires and retains more black faculty. Only recently, because of a court decree, are state black institutions getting equal…

  6. Lightning injury: a review.

    PubMed

    Ritenour, Amber E; Morton, Melinda J; McManus, John G; Barillo, David J; Cancio, Leopoldo C

    2008-08-01

    Lightning is an uncommon but potentially devastating cause of injury in patients presenting to burn centers. These injuries feature unusual symptoms, high mortality, and significant long-term morbidity. This paper will review the epidemiology, physics, clinical presentation, management principles, and prevention of lightning injuries.

  7. Lightning Often Strikes Twice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Contrary to popular misconception, lightning often strikes the same place twice. Certain conditions are just ripe for a bolt of electricity to come zapping down; and a lightning strike is powerful enough to do a lot of damage wherever it hits. NASA created the Accurate Location of Lightning Strikes technology to determine the ground strike point of lightning and prevent electrical damage in the immediate vicinity of the Space Shuttle launch pads at Kennedy Space Center. The area surrounding the launch pads is enmeshed in a network of electrical wires and components, and electronic equipment is highly susceptible to lightning strike damage. The accurate knowledge of the striking point is important so that crews can determine which equipment or system needs to be retested following a strike. Accurate to within a few yards, this technology can locate a lightning strike in the perimeter of the launch pad. As an added bonus, the engineers, then knowing where the lightning struck, can adjust the variables that may be attracting the lightning, to create a zone that will be less susceptible to future strikes.

  8. Lightning-Transient Recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grumm, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    Battery-powered system operates for more than one year. Recorder digitizes and records up to 146 current samples at selected intervals during lightning stroke. System continues to store time tags of lightning strokes even if transient current memory is full.

  9. Birth of ball lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowke, J. J.; Smith, D.; Nelson, K. E.; Crompton, R. W.; Murphy, A. B.

    2012-10-01

    Many observations of ball lightning report a ball of light, about 10 cm in diameter, moving at about walking speed, lasting up to 20 s and frequently existing inside of houses and even aeroplanes. The present paper reports detailed observations of the initiation or birth of ball lightning. In two cases, navigation crew of aircraft saw ball lightning form at the windscreen inside the cockpit of their planes. In the first case, the ball lightning occurred during a thunderstorm, with much lightning activity outside of the plane. In the second case, large "horns" of electrical corona were seen outside of the plane at the surface of the radome, just prior to the formation of the ball lightning. A third case reports ball lightning formed inside of a house, during a thunderstorm, at a closed glass window. It is proposed, based on two-dimensional calculations of electron and ion transport, that ball lightning in these cases is driven and formed by atmospheric ions impinging and collecting on the insulating surface of the glass or Perspex windows. This surface charge can produce electric fields inside of the cockpit or room sufficient to sustain an electric discharge. Charges of opposite sign to those outside of the window accumulate on the inside surface of the glass, leaving a ball of net charge moving inside of the cockpit or room to produce a pulsed discharge on a microsecond time scale.

  10. Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) for the International Space Station (ISS): Mission Description and Science Goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, R. J.; Christian, H. J.; Stewart, M. F.; Mach, D. M.; Bateman, M.; Walker, T. D.; Buechler, D.; Koshak, W. J.; OBrien, S.; Wilson, T.; Colley, E. C.; Abbott, T.; Carter, J.; Pavelitz, S.; Coker, C.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, the University of Alabama in Huntsville, and their partners have developed and demonstrated space-based lightning observations as an effective remote sensing tool for Earth science research and applications. The Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) continues to provide global observations of total lightning after 17 years on-orbit. In April 2013, a space-qualified LIS built as the flight spare for TRMM, was selected for flight as a science mission on the International Space Station. The ISS LIS (or I-LIS as Hugh Christian prefers) will be flown as a hosted payload on the Department of Defense Space Test Program (STP) H5 mission, which has a January 2016 baseline launch date aboard a SpaceX launch vehicle for a 2-4 year or longer mission. The LIS measures the amount, rate, and radiant energy of global lightning. More specifically, it measures lightning during both day and night, with storm scale resolution, millisecond timing, and high, uniform detection efficiency, without any land-ocean bias. Lightning is a direct and most impressive response to intense atmospheric convection. It has been found that the characteristics of lightning that LIS measures can be quantitatively coupled to both thunderstorm and other geophysical processes. Therefore, the ISS LIS lightning observations will provide important gap-filling inputs to pressing Earth system science issues across a broad range of disciplines, including weather, climate, atmospheric chemistry, and lightning physics. A unique contribution from the ISS platform will be the availability of real-time lightning, especially valuable for operational applications over data sparse regions such as the oceans. The ISS platform will also uniquely enable LIS to provide simultaneous and complementary observations with other payloads such as the European Space Agency's Atmosphere-Space Interaction Monitor (ASIM) that will be exploring

  11. Acoustic trauma caused by lightning.

    PubMed

    Mora-Magaña, I; Collado-Corona, M A; Toral-Martiñòn, R; Cano, A

    1996-03-01

    Lesions produced by exposure to noise are frequent in everyday life. Injuries may be found in all systems of the human body, from the digestive to the endocrine, from the cardiovascular to the nervous system. Many organs may be damaged, the ear being one of them. It is known that noise produced by factories, airports, musical instruments and even toys can cause auditory loss. Noises in nature can also cause acoustic trauma. This report is the case history of acoustic trauma caused by lightning. The patient was studied with CAT scan, electroencephalogram, and brain mapping, impedance audiometry with tympanogram and acoustic reflex, audiometry and evoked otoacoustics emissions: distortion products and transients.

  12. Augmenting Satellite Precipitation Estimation with Lightning Information

    SciTech Connect

    Mahrooghy, Majid; Anantharaj, Valentine G; Younan, Nicolas H.; Petersen, Walter A.; Hsu, Kuo-Lin; Behrangi, Ali; Aanstoos, James

    2013-01-01

    We have used lightning information to augment the Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Imagery using an Artificial Neural Network - Cloud Classification System (PERSIANN-CCS). Co-located lightning data are used to segregate cloud patches, segmented from GOES-12 infrared data, into either electrified (EL) or non-electrified (NEL) patches. A set of features is extracted separately for the EL and NEL cloud patches. The features for the EL cloud patches include new features based on the lightning information. The cloud patches are classified and clustered using self-organizing maps (SOM). Then brightness temperature and rain rate (T-R) relationships are derived for the different clusters. Rain rates are estimated for the cloud patches based on their representative T-R relationship. The Equitable Threat Score (ETS) for daily precipitation estimates is improved by almost 12% for the winter season. In the summer, no significant improvements in ETS are noted.

  13. Investigating the relationship between turbulence and lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, T. J.; Guy, N.; Bruning, E. C.; Berkseth, S.

    2015-12-01

    Thunderstorms commonly produce turbulent airflows, which can have important implications for cloud structure and evolution, the transport of chemical species, and the safety of aircraft. Recent studies have indicated that turbulence also may control lightning characteristics, such as flash rate and size. Moreover, there are indications that the onset of lightning may be related to rapid intensification of turbulence within a growing convective storm. This observation is consistent with the known good empirical correlation between eddy dissipation rate (EDR, a measure of the strength of turbulence) and updraft strength. An algorithm to estimate EDR for in-cloud turbulence from Doppler radar data has been incorporated into open source software developed at NASA. This software (called the Python Turbulence Detection Algorithm, or PyTDA), which can be applied to data from almost any Doppler radar, is in the process of being validated against in situ measurements , as well as compared with other turbulence algorithms. Early validation results will be reported in this presentation. Then, the application of the turbulence retrievals to specific thunderstorm case studies, which have available Doppler radar and lightning mapping array (LMA) data, will be reported. Specific inquiries that will be addressed will include relationships between lightning onset and turbulence, relationships between flash rate/size and turbulence, the ability of turbulence retrievals to serve as proxies for updraft strength/location, and the implications of all these relationships for satellite-based lightning observations.

  14. Analysis of ELF Radio Atmospherics Radiated by Rocket-Triggered Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupree, N. A.; Moore, R. C.; Pilkey, J. T.; Uman, M. A.; Jordan, D. M.; Caicedo, J. A.; Hare, B.; Ngin, T. K.

    2014-12-01

    Experimental observations of ELF radio atmospherics produced by rocket-triggered lightning flashes are used to analyze Earth-ionosphere waveguide excitation and propagation characteristics. Rocket-triggered lightning experiments are performed at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing (ICLRT) located at Camp Blanding, Florida. Long-distance ELF observations are performed in California, Greenland, and Antarctica. The lightning current waveforms directly measured at the base of the lightning channel (at the ICLRT) along with pertinent Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) data are used together with the Long Wavelength Propagation Capability (LWPC) code to predict the radio atmospheric (sferic) waveform observed at the receiver locations under various ionospheric conditions. We identify fitted exponential electron density profiles that accurately describe the observed propagation delays, phase delays, and signal amplitudes. The ability to infer ionospheric characteristics using distant ELF observations greatly enhances ionospheric remote sensing capabilities, especially in regard to interpreting observations of transient luminous events (TLEs) and other ionospheric effects associated with lightning.

  15. Lightning in aeronautics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lago, F.

    2014-11-01

    It is generally accepted that a civilian aircraft is struck, on average, once or twice per year. This number tends to indicate that a lightning strike risk is far from being marginal and so requires that aircraft manufacturers have to demonstrate that their aircraft is protected against lightning. The first generation of aircrafts, which were manufactured mainly in aluminium alloy and had electromechanical and pneumatic controls, had a natural immunity to the effects of lightning. Nowadays, aircraft structures are made primarily with composite materials and flight controls are mostly electronic. This aspect of the "more composite and more electric" aircraft demands to aircraft manufacturers to pay a particular attention to the lightning protection and to its certification by testing and/or analysis. It is therefore essential to take this risk into account when designing the aircraft. Nevertheless, it is currently impossible to reproduce the entire lightning phenomenon in testing laboratories and the best way to analyse the lightning protection is to reproduce its effects. In this context, a number of standards and guides are produced by standards committees to help laboratories and aircraft manufacturers to perform realistic tests. Although the environment of a laboratory is quite different from those of a storm cloud, the rules of aircraft design, the know-how of aircraft manufacturers, the existence of international work leading to a better understanding of the lightning phenomenon and standards more precise, permit, today, to consider the risk as properly controlled.

  16. Lightning Technology: Proceedings of a Technical Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Several facets of lightning technology are considered including phenomenology, measurement, detection, protection, interaction, and testing. Lightning electromagnetics, protection of ground systems, and simulated lightning testing are emphasized. The lightning-instrumented F-106 aircraft is described.

  17. Advances in lightning research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooray, Vernon; Rachidi, Farhad

    2017-02-01

    This is the part II of a special issue dedicated to lightning research, consisting of papers presented at the 32nd International Conference on Lightning Protection (ICLP), held in Shanghai, China, in 2014, and several contributions invited by the guest editors to complement the subject matter of the papers selected from the ICLP. The papers from the ICLP were selected by the session chairmen of the ICLP and passed through the rigorous review process of the Journal of Solar Terrestrial and Atmospheric Physics (JASTP). The papers presented in this special issue contain subject matter pertinent to all aspects of lightning research both theoretical and experimental.

  18. Note on lightning temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alanakyan, Yu. R.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, some features of the dynamics of a lightning channel that emerges after the leader-streamer process, are theoretically studied. It is shown that the dynamic pinch effect in the channel becomes possible if a discharge current before the main (quasi-steady) stage of a lightning discharge increases rapidly. The ensuing magnetic compression of the channel increases plasma temperature to several million degrees leading to a soft x-ray flash within the highly ionized plasma. The relation between the plasma temperature and the channel radius during the main stage of a lightning discharge is derived.

  19. Note on lightning temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Alanakyan, Yu. R.

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, some features of the dynamics of a lightning channel that emerges after the leader-streamer process, are theoretically studied. It is shown that the dynamic pinch effect in the channel becomes possible if a discharge current before the main (quasi-steady) stage of a lightning discharge increases rapidly. The ensuing magnetic compression of the channel increases plasma temperature to several million degrees leading to a soft x-ray flash within the highly ionized plasma. The relation between the plasma temperature and the channel radius during the main stage of a lightning discharge is derived.

  20. Comparison of Simulations of Preliminary Breakdown to Observations from the Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, B. E.; Liang, C.; Bitzer, P. M.; Christian, H. J., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Preliminary breakdown pulses in electric field change records are thought to be produced by sudden extensions of the lightning channel. We present detailed time domain electrodynamic simulations of extension of an existing lightning leader channel due to heating processes and compare the results to observations of a natural cloud-to-ground lightning discharge made with the Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array (HAMMA) at a variety of locations near the discharge. Varying the geometry and parameters of the simulations in an attempt to reproduce the data allows us to constrain the directionality and physical properties of the channel. We simulate a variety of leader step phenomena, including uniform heating over the entire step, connection with a space leader, and dart leader propagation onto a preconditioned channel. Results support the notion of impulsive channel extension as the mechanism for preliminary breakdown and shed light on the mechanics of the process.

  1. Installation Restoration Program. Preliminary Assessment: Alabama Army National Guard, Dannelly Field Municipal Airport, Montgomery, Alabama

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-01

    Soil Survey of Mo tqomery County, Alabama ( Burgess et al, 1960). Montgomery County has a humid, mild, almost subtropical climate. The average annual...Surficial slopes range from 1 to 3 percent ( Burgess et al, 1960). 111-6i I Figure 111.3 SCDTIR Source: Burgess et al, 1960 Soils Map of the Base and Dannelly...has characteristics similar to natural clay soils in adjacent areas ( Burgess et al, 1960). D. Hydrology 1. Surface Water The Base is located within

  2. Lightning Protection for Explosive Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, M

    2001-12-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory funds construction of lightning protection systems to protect explosive processing and storage facilities. This paper provides an intuitive understanding of the lighting risks and types of lightning protection available. Managers can use this information to decide if limited funds should be spent constructing a lightning protection system for their own facilities. This paper answers the following questions: (1) Why do you need lightning protection systems? (2) How do lightning protection systems work? and (3) Why are there no documented cases of lightning problems at existing explosive facilities?

  3. The Sandia Lightning Simulator.

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Leonard E.; Caldwell, Michele

    2005-01-01

    The Sandia Lightning Simulator at Sandia National Laboratories can provide up to 200 kA for a simulated single lightning stroke, 100 kA for a subsequent stroke, and hundreds of Amperes of continuing current. It has recently been recommissioned after a decade of inactivity and the single-stroke capability demonstrated. The simulator capabilities, basic design components, upgrades, and diagnostic capabilities are discussed in this paper.

  4. Lightning effects on aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Direct and indirect effects of lightning on aircraft were examined in relation to aircraft design. Specific trends in design leading to more frequent lightning strikes were individually investigated. These trends included the increasing use of miniaturized, solid state components in aircraft electronics and electric power systems. A second trend studied was the increasing use of reinforced plastics and other nonconducting materials in place of aluminum skins, a practice that reduces the electromagnetic shielding furnished by a conductive skin.

  5. Lightning Initiation and Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-22

    of in-cloud and cloud-to-ground lightning on the regions of the atmosphere (a) between thundercloud tops and the ionosphere and (b) in the ionosphere ...resolution 8 channel telescopic photometer array (presently under construction by Dr. Moore) (e) Additions to ionospheric high-speed photometer arrays...24 (e) Observed sub-microsecond properties of elves from correlated triggered and natural lightning measurements at close range (f) Ionospheric

  6. The Physics of Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakov, V. A.

    2013-11-01

    An overview of the physics of cloud-to-ground lightning is given, including its initiation, propagation, and attachment to ground. Discharges artificially initiated (triggered) from natural thunderclouds using the rocket-and-wire technique are discussed with a view toward studying properties of natural lightning. Both conventional and runaway breakdown mechanisms of lightning initiation in thunderclouds are reviewed, as is the role of the lower positive charge region in facilitating different types of lightning. New observations of negative-leader stepping and its attachment to ground are compared to similar processes in long laboratory sparks. The mechanism and parameters of compact intracloud lightning discharges that are thought to be the most intense natural producers of HF-VHF (3-300 MHz) radiation on Earth are reviewed. The M-component mode of charge transfer to ground and its difference from the leader/return-stroke mode are discussed. Lightning interaction with the ionosphere and the production of energetic radiation (X-rays and gamma radiation) by cloud-to-ground leaders are considered.

  7. The physics of lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, Joseph R.; Uman, Martin A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite being one of the most familiar and widely recognized natural phenomena, lightning remains relatively poorly understood. Even the most basic questions of how lightning is initiated inside thunderclouds and how it then propagates for many tens of kilometers have only begun to be addressed. In the past, progress was hampered by the unpredictable and transient nature of lightning and the difficulties in making direct measurements inside thunderstorms, but advances in instrumentation, remote sensing methods, and rocket-triggered lightning experiments are now providing new insights into the physics of lightning. Furthermore, the recent discoveries of intense bursts of X-rays and gamma-rays associated with thunderstorms and lightning illustrate that new and interesting physics is still being discovered in our atmosphere. The study of lightning and related phenomena involves the synthesis of many branches of physics, from atmospheric physics to plasma physics to quantum electrodynamics, and provides a plethora of challenging unsolved problems. In this review, we provide an introduction to the physics of lightning with the goal of providing interested researchers a useful resource for starting work in this fascinating field. By what physical mechanism or mechanisms is lightning initiated in the thundercloud? What is the maximum cloud electric field magnitude and over what volume of the cloud? What, if any, high energy processes (runaway electrons, X-rays, gamma rays) are involved in lightning initiation and how? What is the role of various forms of ice and water in lightning initiation? What physical mechanisms govern the propagation of the different types of lightning leaders (negative stepped, first positive, negative dart, negative dart-stepped, negative dart-chaotic) between cloud and ground and the leaders inside the cloud? What is the physical mechanism of leader attachment to elevated objects on the ground and to the flat ground? What are the characteristics

  8. Situational Lightning Climatologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William; Crawford, Winifred

    2010-01-01

    Research has revealed distinct spatial and temporal distributions of lightning occurrence that are strongly influenced by large-scale atmospheric flow regimes. It was believed there were two flow systems, but it has been discovered that actually there are seven distinct flow regimes. The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) has recalculated the lightning climatologies for the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), and the eight airfields in the National Weather Service in Melbourne (NWS MLB) County Warning Area (CWA) using individual lightning strike data to improve the accuracy of the climatologies. The software determines the location of each CG lightning strike with 5-, 10-, 20-, and 30-nmi (.9.3-, 18.5-, 37-, 55.6-km) radii from each airfield. Each CG lightning strike is binned at 1-, 3-, and 6-hour intervals at each specified radius. The software merges the CG lightning strike time intervals and distance with each wind flow regime and creates probability statistics for each time interval, radii, and flow regime, and stratifies them by month and warm season. The AMU also updated the graphical user interface (GUI) with the new data.

  9. User's Guide - WRF Lightning Assimilation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document describes how to run WRF with the lightning assimilation technique described in Heath et al. (2016). The assimilation method uses gridded lightning data to trigger and suppress sub-grid deep convection in Kain-Fritsch.

  10. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about…

  11. Alabama Education News. Volume 28, Number 9

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about…

  12. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about…

  13. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about…

  14. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about…

  15. Alabama Education News. Volume 29, Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about…

  16. Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about…

  17. Alabama Education News. Volume 33, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about…

  18. Alabama Education News. Volume 29, Number 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about…

  19. Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about…

  20. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about…

  1. Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama," as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about…

  2. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about…

  3. Alabama Education News. Volume 27, Number 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about…

  4. Alabama Education News. Volume 28, Number 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama," as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about…

  5. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about…

  6. Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about…

  7. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about…

  8. Lightning medicine in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Ryan; Trengrove, Estelle; Jandrell, Ian R; Saayman, Gert

    2012-06-06

    South Africa has a rich history of lightning research; however, research on the clinical and pathological effects and features of lightning-related injury (keraunomedicine or lightning medicine) remains neglected locally. By providing an overview of keraunomedicine and focussing on South African perspectives, we hope to raise awareness and propose that a concerted and co-ordinated attempt be made to report and collate data regarding lightning strike victims in South Africa.

  9. Flood of April 13, 1980, Mobile, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hannum, Curtis H.; Nelson, George H.

    1980-01-01

    This report presents basic data collected during the flood of April 13, 1980, in Mobile, Alabama. The data consists of high-water marks, accumulative rainfall, peak discharge at local gaging stations, hydrographs of discharge and rainfall, and photographs at various locations taken during and immediately after the flood. The report presented in map-series and lists data that are readily usable by local planners and developers. During th afternoon of April 13, 1980, the National Weather Service at Mobile recorded a total of 10.4 inches of rainfall. Immediately after the flood approximately 60 to 70 percent of the roads in the Mobile area were impassable. (USGS)

  10. Faraday Cage Protects Against Lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jafferis, W.; Hasbrouck, R. T.; Johnson, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    Faraday cage protects electronic and electronically actuated equipment from lightning. Follows standard lightning-protection principles. Whether lightning strikes cage or cables running to equipment, current canceled or minimized in equipment and discharged into ground. Applicable to protection of scientific instruments, computers, radio transmitters and receivers, and power-switching equipment.

  11. VLF wave intensity in the plasmasphere due to tropospheric lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colman, J. J.; Starks, M. J.

    2013-07-01

    climatology of VLF (very low frequency) wave intensity from lightning in the plasmasphere is constructed. Starting from Optical Transient Detector/Lightning Imaging Sensor (OTD/LIS) lightning data representing 1995-2005, a climatology of strikes is assembled with 1° × 1° latitude-longitude spatial resolution, averaged into 2 h bins for each month of the year. Assuming a linear relationship between optical flash rate and VLF power flux, and that the VLF amplitude drops off as one over distance, a proxy for VLF power is developed. A typical lightning spectrum is applied and the values are scaled by appropriate transionospheric absorptions for each time and place. These values are mapped along geomagnetic field lines in order to compare them to E-field spectral densities measured by the DEMETER satellite between 2005 and 2009. An overview of the DEMETER survey mode data is presented which leads to the best scaling of the lightning VLF climatology in LEO (low earth orbit). The resulting data set represents a monthly, 2-hour, solar minimum climatology of VLF wave intensity from lightning in LEO. Finally, the E-field spectral densities are converted to Poynting flux, mapped to the plasmasphere, and converted to B-field spectral densities. Good overall agreement is found with previous observations and estimates. This new climatology is expected to have a significant impact on calculations of pitch-angle diffusion for relativistic electrons in the inner radiation belt.

  12. Lightning and radar observations of hurricane Rita landfall

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Bradley G; Suszcynsky, David M; Hamlin, Timothy E; Jeffery, C A; Wiens, Kyle C; Orville, R E

    2009-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) owns and operates an array of Very-Low Frequency (VLF) sensors that measure the Radio-Frequency (RF) waveforms emitted by Cloud-to-Ground (CG) and InCloud (IC) lightning. This array, the Los Alamos Sferic Array (LASA), has approximately 15 sensors concentrated in the Great Plains and Florida, which detect electric field changes in a bandwidth from 200 Hz to 500 kHz (Smith et al., 2002). Recently, LANL has begun development of a new dual-band RF sensor array that includes the Very-High Frequency (VHF) band as well as the VLF. Whereas VLF lightning emissions can be used to deduce physical parameters such as lightning type and peak current, VHF emissions can be used to perform precise 3d mapping of individual radiation sources, which can number in the thousands for a typical CG flash. These new dual-band sensors will be used to monitor lightning activity in hurricanes in an effort to better predict intensification cycles. Although the new LANL dual-band array is not yet operational, we have begun initial work utilizing both VLF and VHF lightning data to monitor hurricane evolution. In this paper, we present the temporal evolution of Rita's landfall using VLF and VHF lightning data, and also WSR-88D radar. At landfall, Rita's northern eyewall experienced strong updrafts and significant lightning activity that appear to mark a transition between oceanic hurricane dynamics and continental thunderstorm dynamics. In section 2, we give a brief overview of Hurricane Rita, including its development as a hurricane and its lightning history. In the following section, we present WSR-88D data of Rita's landfall, including reflectivity images and temporal variation. In section 4, we present both VHF and VLF lightning data, overplotted on radar reflectivity images. Finally, we discuss our observations, including a comparison to previous studies and a brief conclusion.

  13. Examination of Height of Transmission Line and Lightning Striking Distance concerning Lightning Shielding Effect Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Sekioka, Shozo; Yokoyama, Shigeru

    We examined the lightning frequency reported by Eriksson and the lightning current distribution shown in IEC 62305-1. The lightning striking coefficient is assumed to be related to height of structures. The lightning current distribution to ground which was applicable to the electro-geometric model is estimated. Using the assumption of lightning striking distance coefficient and the estimated lightning current distribution, we calculated the lightning frequency and the lightning current distribution, concerning lightning shielding effect in transmission lines. The calculation results of the lightning frequency and the lightning current distributions were compared with the observation results, and agree satisfactorily with them.

  14. Natural and artificially initiated lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uman, Martin A.; Krider, E. Philip

    1989-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the development status of theories and experimental results concerning both natural and artificially triggered lightning, with a view to prospective research efforts able to deepen understanding of these phenomena. Over the last decade, great progress has been made in methods for identifying and locating natural cloud-to-ground lightning; nationwide lightning-sensor networks employing wideband magnetic direction-finding technology to yield lightning locations in real time are currently operational in the U.S., France, Japan, and Sweden. Triggered lightning, which is the primary atmospheric electricity hazard to aircraft and launch vehicles, research must be done on meteorological and electrical environments associated with the threat.

  15. Lightning activity on Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, W. J.; Bar-Nun, A.; Scarf, F. L.; Look, A. F.; Hunt, G. E.

    1982-01-01

    Photographic observations of the nightside of Jupiter by the Voyager 1 spacecraft show the presence of extensive lightning activity. Detection of whistlers by the plasma wave analyzer confirms the optical observations and implies that many flashes were not recorded by the Voyager camera because the intensity of the flashes was below the threshold sensitivity of the camera. Measurements of the optical energy radiated per flash indicate that the observed flashes had energies similar to that for terrestrial superbolts. The best estimate of the lightning energy dissipation rate of 0.0004 W/sq m was derived from a consideration of the optical and radiofrequency measurements. The ratio of the energy dissipated by lightning compared to the convective energy flux is estimated to be between 0.000027 and 0.00005. The terrestrial value is 0.0001.

  16. Hurricane Frederic tidal floods of September 12-13, 1979, along the Gulf Coast, Coden-Bellefontaine quadrangles, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohman, Larry R.; Scott, John C.

    1980-01-01

    Floodmark elevations and approximate areas flooded by Hurricane Frederic tides of September 12-13, 1979, along coastal areas of Mobile Bay between Bellefontaine and Point Judith, Alabama, are shown on a topographic map. Storm-tide frequency and records of annual maximum tides at Mobile, Alabama, since 1772, are presented. Offshore winds reached about 160 miles per hour. A wind-velocity of about 145 miles per hour was recorded near Dauphin Island, Alabama. Most of the waterfront improvements in Mobile Bay were either destroyed or heavily damaged. The town of Bayou La Batre, Alabama, was extensively flooded. (USGS)

  17. Produce documents and media information. [on lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alzmann, Melanie A.; Miller, G.A.

    1994-01-01

    Lightning data and information were collected from the United States, Germany, France, Brazil, China, and Australia for the dual purposes of compiling a global lightning data base and producing publications on the Marshall Space Flight Center's lightning program. Research covers the history of lightning, the characteristics of a storm, types of lightningdischarges, observations from airplanes and spacecraft, the future fole of planes and spacecraft in lightning studies, lightning detection networks, and the relationships between lightning and rainfall. Descriptions of the Optical Transient Dectector, the Lightning Imaging Sensor, and the Lightning Mapper Sensor are included.

  18. California encephalitis in Alabama.

    PubMed

    Mancao, M Y; Law, I M; Roberson-Trammell, K

    1996-10-01

    Arthropod-borne virus (arbovirus) infections in humans are primarily central nervous system infections, but other clinical manifestations include febrile illness and fever with hemorrhagic diathesis. In the genus Bunyavirus there are several viruses that cause disease in humans, especially in North America; these include LaCrosse, Jamestown Canyon, trivittatus, and snowshoe hare viruses. The disease seen mainly in children is California encephalitis (usually of the LaCrosse subtype); this infection is widespread in the United States but is most prevalent in the upper Midwest, especially in rural areas. We present the first reported case of California encephalitis in rural Alabama; the patient was a 7-year-old boy who came to us with fever and seizures in the summer of 1994. This report stresses the importance of including California encephalitis in the differential diagnosis when children have fever and altered sensorium after exposure to mosquitoes during summer months.

  19. The Goes-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Steven J.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Koshak, William J.; Mach, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-R) is the next series to follow the existing GOES system currently operating over the Western Hemisphere. Superior spacecraft and instrument technology will support expanded detection of environmental phenomena, resulting in more timely and accurate forecasts and warnings. Advancements over current GOES capabilities include a new capability for total lightning detection (cloud and cloud-to-ground flashes) from the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), and improved storm diagnostic capability with the Advanced Baseline Imager. The GLM will map total lightning activity (in-cloud and cloud-to-ground lighting flashes) continuously day and night with near-uniform spatial resolution of 8 km with a product refresh rate of less than 20 sec over the Americas and adjacent oceanic regions. This will aid in forecasting severe storms and tornado activity, and convective weather impacts on aviation safety and efficiency. In parallel with the instrument development, a GOES-R Risk Reduction Team and Algorithm Working Group Lightning Applications Team have begun to develop the Level 2 algorithms, cal/val performance monitoring tools, and new applications. Proxy total lightning data from the NASA Lightning Imaging Sensor on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite and regional test beds are being used to develop the pre-launch algorithms and applications, and also improve our knowledge of thunderstorm initiation and evolution. In this paper we will report on new Nowcasting and storm warning applications being developed and evaluated at various NOAA Testbeds.

  20. The Origin of Lightning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weewish Tree, 1979

    1979-01-01

    A heavenly source gives an orphaned Cherokee boy 12 silver arrows and directs him to kill the chief of the cruel Manitos (spirits). When the boy fails in his mission, the angry Manitos turn him into lightning, condemning him to flash like his silver arrows across the skies forever. (DS)

  1. Lightning Injury: A Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    depression . Of course, these effects may cause significant vocational and interpersonal difficulty [63], and early neuropsychiatric inter- vention is... tinnitus , basilar skull fracture, and burns to the external auditory canal [69]. A wide variety of eye injuries can be caused by lightning strike. The

  2. Lightning control by lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-03-01

    Powerful lightning strikes pose a significant threat to buildings and people, but imagine if it were possible to control and direct them with a laser beam. Nature Photonics spoke to Jérôme Kasparian, a researcher from the University of Geneva and co-ordinator of the Teramobile project, about the idea.

  3. Lightning protection of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, F. A.; Plumer, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The current knowledge concerning potential lightning effects on aircraft and the means that are available to designers and operators to protect against these effects are summarized. The increased use of nonmetallic materials in the structure of aircraft and the constant trend toward using electronic equipment to handle flight-critical control and navigation functions have served as impetus for this study.

  4. New Mission to Measure Global Lightning from the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakeslee, R. J.; Christian, H. J., Jr.; Mach, D. M.; Buechler, D. E.; Koshak, W. J.; Walker, T. D.; Bateman, M. G.; Stewart, M. F.; O'Brien, S.; Wilson, T. O.; Pavelitz, S. D.; Coker, C.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past 20 years, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, the University of Alabama in Huntsville, and their partners developed and demonstrated the effectiveness and value of space-based lightning observations as a remote sensing tool for Earth science research and applications, and, in the process, established a robust global lightning climatology. The observations included measurements from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) that acquired global observations of total lightning (i.e., intracloud and cloud-to-ground discharges) from November 1997 to April 2015 between 38° N/S latitudes, and its Optical Transient Detector predecessor that acquired observation from May 1995 to April 2000 over 75° N/S latitudes. In February 2016, as an exciting follow-on to these prior missions, a space-qualified LIS built as a flight-spare for TRMM will be delivered to the International Space Station (ISS) for a 2 year or longer mission, flown as a hosted payload on the Department of Defense Space Test Program-Houston 5 (STP-H5) mission. The LIS on ISS will continue observations of the amount, rate, and radiant energy of total lightning over the Earth. More specifically, LIS measures lightning during both day and night, with storm scale resolution (~4 km), millisecond timing, and high, uniform detection efficiency, without any land-ocean bias. Lightning is a direct and most impressive response to intense atmospheric convection. ISS LIS lightning observations will continue to provide important gap-filling inputs to pressing Earth system science issues across a broad range of disciplines. This mission will also extend TRMM time series observations, expand the latitudinal coverage to 54° latitude, provide real-time lightning data to operational users, espically over data sparse oceanic regions, and enable cross-sensor observations and calibrations that includes the new GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) and the Meteosat

  5. Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) for the International Space Station (ISS): Mission Description and Science Goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, R. J.; Christian, H. J.; Mach, D. M.; Buechler, D. E.; Koshak, W. J.; Walker, T. D.; Bateman, M.; Stewart, M. F.; O'Brien, S.; Wilson, T.; Pavelitz, S.; Coker, C.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, the University of Alabama in Huntsville, and their partners have developed and demonstrated space-based lightning observations as an effective remote sensing tool for Earth science research and applications. The Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) continues to acquire global observations of total (i.e., intracloud and cloud-to-ground) lightning after 17 years on-orbit. However, TRMM is now low on fuel, so this mission will soon be completed. As a follow on to this mission, a space-qualified LIS built as the flight spare for TRMM has been selected for flight as a science mission on the International Space Station (ISS). The ISS LIS will be flown as a hosted payload on the Department of Defense Space Test Program (STP) H5 mission, which has a January 2016 baseline launch date aboard a SpaceX launch vehicle for a 2-4 year or longer mission. The LIS measures the amount, rate, and radiant energy of total lightning over the Earth. More specifically, it measures lightning during both day and night, with storm scale resolution (approx. 4 km), millisecond timing, and high, uniform detection efficiency, without any land-ocean bias. Lightning is a direct and most impressive response to intense atmospheric convection. It has been found that lightning measured by LIS can be quantitatively related to thunderstorm and other geophysical processes. Therefore, the ISS LIS lightning observations will continue to provide important gap-filling inputs to pressing Earth system science issues across a broad range of disciplines, including weather, climate, atmospheric chemistry, and lightning physics. A unique contribution from the ISS platform will be the availability of real-time lightning data, especially valuable for operational applications over data sparse regions such as the oceans. The ISS platform will also uniquely enable LIS to provide simultaneous and complementary observations

  6. Science of Ball Lightning (Fire Ball)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuki, Yoshi-Hiko

    1989-08-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Organizing Committee * Preface * Ball Lightning -- The Continuing Challenge * Hungarian Ball Lightning Observations in 1987 * Nature of Ball Lightning in Japan * Phenomenological and Psychological Analysis of 150 Austrian Ball Lightning Reports * Physical Problems and Physical Properties of Ball Lightning * Statistical Analysis of the Ball Lightning Properties * A Fluid-Dynamical Model for Ball Lightning and Bead Lightning * The Lifetime of Hill's Vortex * Electrical and Radiative Properties of Ball Lightning * The Candle Flame as a Model of Ball Lightning * A Model for Ball Lightning * The High-Temperature Physico-Chemical Processes in the Lightning Storm Atmosphere (A Physico-Chemical Model of Ball Lightning) * New Approach to Ball Lightning * A Calculation of Electric Field of Ball Lightning * The Physical Explanation to the UFO over Xinjiang, Northern West China * Electric Reconnection, Critical Ionization Velocity, Ponderomotive Force, and Their Applications to Triggered and Ball Lightning * The PLASMAK™ Configuration and Ball Lightning * Experimental Research on Ball Lightning * Performance of High-Voltage Test Facility Designed for Investigation of Ball Lightning * List of Participants

  7. A simple lightning parameterization for calculating global lightning distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Colin; Rind, David

    1992-01-01

    A simple parameterization has been developed to simulate global lightning distributions. Convective cloud top height is used as the variable in the parameterization, with different formulations for continental and marine thunderstorms. The parameterization has been validated using two lightning data sets: one global and one regional. In both cases the simulated lightning distributions and frequencies are in very good agreement with the observed lightning data. This parameterization could be used for global studies of lightning climatology; the earth's electric circuit; in general circulation models for modeling global lightning activity, atmospheric NO(x) concentrations, and perhaps forest fire distributions for both the present and future climate; and, possibly, even as a short-term forecasting aid.

  8. Lightning hazard region over the maritime continent observed from satellite and climate change threat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilhamsyah, Y.; Koesmaryono, Y.; Hidayat, R.; Murjaya, J.; Nurjaya, I. W.; Rizwan

    2017-02-01

    Climate change would lead to such hydrometeorological disaster as: flash-flood, landslide, hailstone, lightning, and twister become more likely to happen in the future. In terms of lightning event, one research question arise of where lightning would be mostly to strike over the Maritime Continent (MC)?. The objective of the research is to investigate region with high-density of lightning activity over MC by mapping climatological features of lightning flashes derived from onboard NASA-TRMM Satellite, i.e. Optical Transient Detector/Lightning Imaging Sensor (OTD/LIS). Based on data retrieved since 1995-2013, it is seasonally observed that during transition season March to May, region with high vulnerability of lightning flashes cover the entire Sumatra Island, the Malacca Strait, and Peninsular Malaysia as well as Java Island. High-frequent of lightning activity over the Malacca Strait is unique since it is the only sea-region in the world where lightning flashes are denser. As previously mentioned that strong lightning activity over the strait is driven by mesoscale convective system of Sumatra Squalls due to convergences of land breeze between Sumatra and Peninsular Malaysia. Lightning activity over the strait is continuously observed throughout season despite the intensity reduced. Java Island, most populated island, receive high-density of lightning flashes during rainy season (December to February) but small part in the northwestern of Java Island, e.g., Bogor and surrounding areas, the density of lightning flashes are high throughout season. Northern and southern parts of Kalimantan and Central part of Sulawesi are also prone to lightning activity particularly during transition season March to May and September to November. In the eastern part of MC, Papua receive denser lightning flashes during September to November. It is found that lightning activity are mostly concentrated over land instead of ocean which is in accordance with diurnal convective

  9. Attempts to Create Ball Lightning with Triggered Lightning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    or to meteors . Since ball lightning and meteors are both referred to in the literature from that time period as "fireballs", it is not surprising...that some reports of the effects of fireballs that actually refer to meteors have been misinterpreted as being due to ball lightning. Ball lightning...212 ms after the full ignition of the triggering wire. However, the primary silicon particle shower did not begin until around 520 ms after the

  10. Lightning and Radar Observations of the 29 May 2004 Tornadic HP Supercell during TELEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macgorman, D. R.; Kuhlman, K. M.

    2006-12-01

    On 29 May 2004, a tornadic heavy-precipitation (HP) supercell storm moved through central Oklahoma and through the Thunderstorm Electrification and Lightning Experiment (TELEX) domain. Three dimensional lightning location data from the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array (OK-LMA) depict the evolution of the storm, including convective surges, overshooting tops, and the formation and dissipation of lightning weak holes. In addition to the OK-LMA, the storm was also observed by two C-band mobile radars (SMART-R radars) providing three-minute volume scans and by the KOUN polarimetric S-band radar. Analysis of a lightning weak hole showed that it was co-located horizontally with a core of strong updrafts and with a bounded weak echo region. The majority of the cloud-to-ground lightning detected in the storm by the National Lightning Detection Network lowered negative charge to ground. However, during genesis of the strongest tornado, the dominant polarity of ground flashes near the reflectivity core of the storm evolved to positive. Also at approximately this time, negative ground strikes began occurring under the anvil, tens of kilometers from the reflectivity core, as lightning activity surged roughly 100 km into the anvil. Observations from these platforms provide insight into HP supercell evolution and structure and into relationships of lightning with other properties of the storm.

  11. Development of Tactical Lightning Avoidance Product for Terminal Weather Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, E.; Yoshida, S.; Adachi, T.; Kusunoki, K.; Ushio, T.

    2015-12-01

    Aircraft initiated or intercepted lightning is one of significant issues for civilian flight operation in Japan. It is much less possible than the past that lightning strikes cause fatal aircraft accidents thanks to both of certifications of aircraft design for lightning strikes and many of weather supports for aircraft operation. However, hundreds of lightning strikes to aircrafts have still been reported in each recent year in Japan, and airlines have been forced to delay or cancel most of those flights and to cost several hundred millions of yen for repair. Especially, lightning discharges during winter in the coastal area of the Sea of Japan frequently cause heavy damages on aircrafts due to their large charge transfer. It is important in actual aircraft operation that observed meteorological parameters are converted to decision-making information. Otherwise, pilots, controllers, or operators need to learn meteorology as much as weather experts, and to owe hard work load to interpret observed meteorological data to their risk. Ideally, it is desired to automatically provide them with predicted operation risk, for example, delay time, possibility of flight cancellation, and repair cost caused by lightning.Our research group has just started development of tactical lightning avoidance product, where a risk index of an aircraft operation due to lightning is calculated mainly from three novel observation devices: The phased array weather radar has potential to detect thunderstorms in their early stage due to the high volume scan rate of 10 - 30 sec. A lightning mapping system, such as Broadband Observation network for Lightning and Thunderstorm, indicates electrical structure inside clouds in concert with a co-located radar data. Aircraft sounding and real-time data downlink, especially high-frequency data provided by Secondary Surveillance Radar mode S, gives in-situ measurements of wind and temperature. Especially the in-situ temperature data can indicate

  12. Soil Sampling Techniques For Alabama Grain Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, A. N.; Shaw, J. N.; Mask, P. L.; Touchton, J. T.; Rickman, D.

    2003-01-01

    Characterizing the spatial variability of nutrients facilitates precision soil sampling. Questions exist regarding the best technique for directed soil sampling based on a priori knowledge of soil and crop patterns. The objective of this study was to evaluate zone delineation techniques for Alabama grain fields to determine which method best minimized the soil test variability. Site one (25.8 ha) and site three (20.0 ha) were located in the Tennessee Valley region, and site two (24.2 ha) was located in the Coastal Plain region of Alabama. Tennessee Valley soils ranged from well drained Rhodic and Typic Paleudults to somewhat poorly drained Aquic Paleudults and Fluventic Dystrudepts. Coastal Plain s o i l s ranged from coarse-loamy Rhodic Kandiudults to loamy Arenic Kandiudults. Soils were sampled by grid soil sampling methods (grid sizes of 0.40 ha and 1 ha) consisting of: 1) twenty composited cores collected randomly throughout each grid (grid-cell sampling) and, 2) six composited cores collected randomly from a -3x3 m area at the center of each grid (grid-point sampling). Zones were established from 1) an Order 1 Soil Survey, 2) corn (Zea mays L.) yield maps, and 3) airborne remote sensing images. All soil properties were moderately to strongly spatially dependent as per semivariogram analyses. Differences in grid-point and grid-cell soil test values suggested grid-point sampling does not accurately represent grid values. Zones created by soil survey, yield data, and remote sensing images displayed lower coefficient of variations (8CV) for soil test values than overall field values, suggesting these techniques group soil test variability. However, few differences were observed between the three zone delineation techniques. Results suggest directed sampling using zone delineation techniques outlined in this paper would result in more efficient soil sampling for these Alabama grain fields.

  13. Identifying the occurrence of lightning and transient luminous events by nadir spectrophotometric observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Toru; Sato, Mitsuteru; Ushio, Tomoo; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Suzuki, Makoto; Kikuchi, Masayuki; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Inan, Umran S.; Linscott, Ivan; Hobara, Yasuhide; Frey, Harald U.; Mende, Stephen B.; Chen, Alfred B.; Hsu, Rue-Ron; Kusunoki, Kenichi

    2016-07-01

    We propose a new technique to identify the occurrence of lightning and transient luminous events (TLEs) using multicolor photometric data obtained by space borne nadir measurements. We estimate the spectral characteristics of lightning and TLEs by converting the optical data obtained by the ISUAL limb experiment to the GLIMS nadir geometry. We find that the estimated spectral shapes of TLE-accompanied lightning are clearly different from those of pure lightning. The obtained results show that (1) the intensity of FUV signals and (2) the ratio of 337/red (609-753 nm) spectral irradiance are useful to identify the occurrence of TLEs. The occurrence probabilities of TLEs are 10%, 40%, 80%, in the case of lightning events having the 337/red spectral irradiance ratio of 0.95, 2.95, 14.79, respectively. By using the 60% criterion of the 337/red ratio and the existence of FUV emissions, we classify the 1039 GLIMS-observed lightning events into 828 pure lightning and 211 TLE-accompanied lightning. Since the GLIMS trigger level is adjusted to observe extremely-bright events, the occurrence probability of TLEs obtained here most probably reflects the characteristics of energetic lightning. The estimated global map is consistent with previously determined distributions: the highest activities of lightning and TLEs are found over the North/South American continents, African continent, and Asian maritime regions. While the absolute occurrence number of pure lightning and TLE-accompanied lightning are found to maximize in the equatorial region, the occurrence probability of TLEs possibly increase somewhat in the mid-latitude region. Since the occurrence probabilities of TLEs are higher over the ocean than over land, it is likely that the GLIMS-observed TLEs are due primarily to elves which tends to occur more frequently over the ocean.

  14. Lightning climatology of exoplanets and brown dwarfs guided by Solar system data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodosán, G.; Helling, Ch.; Asensio-Torres, R.; Vorgul, I.; Rimmer, P. B.

    2016-10-01

    Clouds form on extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs where lightning could occur. Lightning is a tracer of atmospheric convection, cloud formation and ionization processes as known from the Solar system, and may be significant for the formation of prebiotic molecules. We study lightning climatology for the different atmospheric environments of Earth, Venus, Jupiter and Saturn. We present lightning distribution maps for Earth, Jupiter and Saturn, and flash densities for these planets and Venus, based on optical and/or radio measurements from the World Wide Lightning Location Network and Sferics Timing and Ranging Network radio networks, the Lightning Imaging Sensor/Optical Transient Detector satellite instruments, the Galileo, Cassini, New Horizons and Venus Express spacecraft. We also present flash densities calculated for several phases of two volcano eruptions, Eyjafjallajökull's (2010) and Mt Redoubt's (2009). We estimate lightning rates for sample, transiting and directly imaged extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs. Based on the large variety of exoplanets, six categories are suggested for which we use the lightning occurrence information from the Solar system. We examine lightning energy distributions for Earth, Jupiter and Saturn. We discuss how strong stellar activity may support lightning activity. We provide a lower limit of the total number of flashes that might occur on transiting planets during their full transit as input for future studies. We find that volcanically very active planets might show the largest lightning flash densities. When applying flash densities of the large Saturnian storm from 2010/11, we find that the exoplanet HD 189733b would produce high lightning occurrence even during its short transit.

  15. Oceanic Lightning versus Continental Lightning: VLF Peak Current Discrepancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupree, N. A., Jr.; Moore, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    Recent analysis of the Vaisala global lightning data set GLD360 suggests that oceanic lightning tends to exhibit larger peak currents than continental lightning (lightning occurring over land). The GLD360 peak current measurement is derived from distant measurements of the electromagnetic fields emanated during the lightning flash. Because the GLD360 peak current measurement is a derived quantity, it is not clear whether the actual peak currents of oceanic lightning tend to be larger, or whether the resulting electromagnetic field strengths tend to be larger. In this paper, we present simulations of VLF signal propagation in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide to demonstrate that the peak field values for oceanic lightning can be significantly stronger than for continental lightning. Modeling simulations are performed using the Long Wave Propagation Capability (LWPC) code to directly evaluate the effect of ground conductivity on VLF signal propagation in the 5-15 kHz band. LWPC is an inherently narrowband propagation code that has been modified to predict the broadband response of the Earth-Ionosphere waveguide to an impulsive lightning flash while preserving the ability of LWPC to account for an inhomogeneous waveguide. Furthermore, we evaluate the effect of return stroke speed on these results.

  16. The GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) and the Global Observing System for Total Lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Steven J.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Koshak, W.; Buechler, D.; Carey, L.; Chronis, T.; Mach, D.; Bateman, M.; Peterson, H.; McCaul, E. W., Jr.; Stano, G. T.; Bitzer, P. M.; Rudlosky, S. D.; Cummins, K. L.

    2014-01-01

    for the existing GOES system currently operating over the Western Hemisphere. New and improved instrument technology will support expanded detection of environmental phenomena, resulting in more timely and accurate forecasts and warnings. Advancements over current GOES include a new capability for total lightning detection (cloud and cloud-to-ground flashes) from the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), and improved temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution for the next generation Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI). The GLM will map total lightning continuously day and night with near-uniform spatial resolution of 8 km with a product latency of less than 20 sec over the Americas and adjacent oceanic regions. This will aid in forecasting severe storms and tornado activity, and convective weather impacts on aviation safety and efficiency among a number of potential applications. The GLM will help address the National Weather Service requirement for total lightning observations globally to support warning decision-making and forecast services. Science and application development along with pre-operational product demonstrations and evaluations at NWS national centers, forecast offices, and NOAA testbeds will prepare the forecasters to use GLM as soon as possible after the planned launch and check-out of GOES-R in 2016. New applications will use GLM alone, in combination with the ABI, or integrated (fused) with other available tools (weather radar and ground strike networks, nowcasting systems, mesoscale analysis, and numerical weather prediction models) in the hands of the forecaster responsible for issuing more timely and accurate forecasts and warnings.

  17. The 13 years of TRMM Lightning Imaging Sensor: From Individual Flash Characteristics to Decadal Tendencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, R. I.; Goodman, S. J.; Petersen, W. A.; Buechler, D. E.; Bruning, E. C.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Christian, H. J.

    2011-01-01

    How often lightning strikes the Earth has been the object of interest and research for decades. Several authors estimated different global flash rates using ground-based instruments, but it has been the satellite era that enabled us to monitor lightning thunderstorm activity on the time and place that lightning exactly occurs. Launched into space as a component of NASA s Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite, in November 1997, the Lighting Imaging Sensor (LIS) is still operating. LIS detects total lightning (i.e., intracloud and cloud-to-ground) from space in a low-earth orbit (35deg orbit). LIS has collected lightning measurements for 13 years (1998-2010) and here we present a fully revised and current total lightning climatology over the tropics. Our analysis includes the individual flash characteristics (number of events and groups, total radiance, area footprint, etc.), composite climatological maps, and trends for the observed total lightning during these 13 years. We have identified differences in the energetics of the flashes and/or the optical scattering properties of the storms cells due to cell-relative variations in microphysics and kinematics (i.e., convective or stratiform rainfall). On the climatological total lightning maps we found a dependency on the scale of analysis (resolution) in identifying the lightning maximums in the tropics. The analysis of total lightning trends observed by LIS from 1998 to 2010 in different temporal (annual and seasonal) and spatial (large and regional) scales, showed no systematic trends in the median to lower-end of the distributions, but most places in the tropics presented a decrease in the highest total lightning flash rates (higher-end of the distributions).

  18. Industrial accidents triggered by lightning.

    PubMed

    Renni, Elisabetta; Krausmann, Elisabeth; Cozzani, Valerio

    2010-12-15

    Natural disasters can cause major accidents in chemical facilities where they can lead to the release of hazardous materials which in turn can result in fires, explosions or toxic dispersion. Lightning strikes are the most frequent cause of major accidents triggered by natural events. In order to contribute towards the development of a quantitative approach for assessing lightning risk at industrial facilities, lightning-triggered accident case histories were retrieved from the major industrial accident databases and analysed to extract information on types of vulnerable equipment, failure dynamics and damage states, as well as on the final consequences of the event. The most vulnerable category of equipment is storage tanks. Lightning damage is incurred by immediate ignition, electrical and electronic systems failure or structural damage with subsequent release. Toxic releases and tank fires tend to be the most common scenarios associated with lightning strikes. Oil, diesel and gasoline are the substances most frequently released during lightning-triggered Natech accidents.

  19. ASTP simulated lightning test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blount, R. L.; Gadbois, R. D.; Suiter, D. L.; Zill, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    A simulated lightning test was conducted on the backup spacecraft for the Apollo Soyuz Test Project mission (CSM-119) to determine the susceptibility of the Apollo spacecraft to damage from the indirect effects of lightning. It is demonstrated that induced lightning effects from low-level injected currents can be scaled linearly to those which are obtained in a full threat lightning stroke. Test results indicate that: (1) many of the power and signal critical circuits would fail if subjected to full-threat lightning, (2) pyrotechnic circuits are safe for full-threat lightning, and (3) common-mode voltages exceeded the failure criteria level for all but three of the circuits tested.

  20. Libraries in Alabama: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/alabama.html Libraries in Alabama To use the sharing features on ... JavaScript. Birmingham American Sports Medicine Institute Sports Medicine LIBRARY 833 St. Vincent's Drive Suite 205 Birmingham, AL ...

  1. Magnetic Anomaly Caused By Lightning On Archaeological Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verrier, V.; Mathe, P. E.; Rochette, P.; Jones, G.

    Recent developments in archeological surveying have seen the emergence of mag- netic methods, commonly involving near surface measurements of low field magnetic susceptibility. However, these technics remain inefficient to detect either deep buried features or material which susceptibility constrast with the enclosing material is too low. An alternate way to assess site location and archeological features in these cases is provided by the mapping of total magnetic field or field gradient anomalies, due to the induced or remanent magnetizations of the material. REFERENCES : Verrier, V., Rochette, P., Richard, P. and Lojou, J.Y., Paleomagnetic expertise of ground lightning impacts, in 25th Int. Conf. Lightning Protection, Rhodos, p. 166-169, 2000. When remanence dominate, the archeological signal may be complicated by the su- perimposition of an anomaly due to lightning. Locally, the electric discharge generates a strong pulse of magnetic field. The materials around an impact acquired a lightning induced remanent magnetization (LIRM) which endures as long as the materials are not removed. In order to characterize the LIRM signature, some studies were realised on struck sites where the impact point is known. In each case, the LIRM hypothesis was tested on discrete samples collected around the impact, on which the lightning magnetic field intensity was determined (Verrier, 2000). The typical LIRM anomaly was also mapped with the G-858 MagMapper. It consists in a relatively strong dipole associated with maxima that are usually not aligned SN, clearly distinguishable from the archeological signature.

  2. Lightning protection of distribution lines

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, T.E. ); Short, T.A. ); Anderson, J.G. , Pittsfield, MA )

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports a study of distribution line lightning performance, using computer simulations of lightning overvoltages. The results of previous investigations are extended with a detailed model of induced voltages from nearby strokes, coupled into a realistic power system model. The paper also considers the energy duty of distribution-class surge arresters exposed to direct strokes. The principal result is that widely separated pole-top arresters can effectively protect a distribution line from induced-voltage flashovers. This means that nearby lightning strokes need not be a significant lightning performance problem for most distribution lines.

  3. Lightning mapper sensor design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, L. R.; Poon, C. W.; Shelton, J. C.; Laverty, N. P.; Cook, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    World-wide continuous measurement of lightning location, intensity, and time during both day and night is to be provided by the Lightning Mapper (LITMAP) instrument. A technology assessment to determine if the LITMAP requirements can be met using existing sensor and electronic technologies is presented. The baseline concept discussed in this report is a compromise among a number of opposing requirements (e.g., ground resolution versus array size; large field of view versus narrow bandpass filter). The concept provides coverage for more than 80 percent of the lightning events as based on recent above-cloud NASA/U2 lightning measurements.

  4. Theoretical design of lightning panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emetere, M. E.; Olawole, O. F.; Sanni, S. E.

    2016-02-01

    The light trapping device (LTD) was theoretically designed to suggests the best way of harvesting the energy derived from natural lightning. The Maxwell's equation was expanded using a virtual experimentation via a MATLAB environment. Several parameters like lightning flash and temperature distribution were consider to investigate the ability of the theoretical lightning panel to convert electricity efficiently. The results of the lighting strike angle on the surface of the LTD shows the maximum power expected per time. The results of the microscopic thermal distribution shows that if the LTD casing controls the transmission of the heat energy, then the thermal energy storage (TES) can be introduced to the lightning farm.

  5. LSZ-850 lightning sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Ernest W.

    1988-04-01

    The design and summary of test results of a new Honeywell Wideband Lightning Sensor System (LSZ-850) is presented. The unique method for identifying, direction-finding and ranging to a lightning stroke is discussed. The LSZ-850 Lightning Sensor System senses electrostatic and electromagnetic disturbances caused by lightning discharge activity. When a discharge occurs, the system carefully analyzes the lightning discharge and creates the proper symbol for display on the radar indicator. The system's computer determines the rate of lightning in a fixed geographical area and then displays the centroid of that area with the unique lightning rate symbol. Wide bandwidth, extensive signal processing and lightning stroke recognition algorithms are used. Tests on a number of lightning storms at distances to 100 nm indicate the angular resolution to be better than plus or minus 10 degrees, and may be in the range of less than 3 degrees with little or no systematic dependence on the number of active thunderstorm cells which are at different angles. Test results are presented which show the accuracy of the system in locating severe weather.

  6. Ball lightning risk to aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doe, R.; Keul, A.

    2009-04-01

    Lightning is a rare but regular phenomenon for air traffic. Aircraft are designed to withstand lightning strikes. Research on lightning and aircraft can be called detailed and effective. In the last 57 years, 18 reported lightning aviation disasters with a fatality figure of at least 714 persons occurred. For comparison, the last JACDEC ten-year average fatality figure was 857. The majority encountered lightning in the climb, descent, approach and/or landing phase. Ball lightning, a metastable, rare lightning type, is also seen from and even within aircraft, but former research only reported individual incidents and did not generate a more detailed picture to ascertain whether it constitutes a significant threat to passenger and aircraft safety. Lacking established incident report channels, observations were often only passed on as "air-travel lore". In an effort to change this unsatisfactory condition, the authors have collected a first international dataset of 38 documented ball lightning aircraft incidents from 1938 to 2001 involving 13 reports over Europe, 13 over USA/Canada, and 7 over Russia. 18 (47%) reported ball lightning outside the aircraft, 18 (47%) inside, 2 cases lacked data. 8 objects caused minor damage, 8 major damage (total: 42%), only one a crash. No damage was reported in 18 cases. 3 objects caused minor crew injury. In most cases, ball lightning lasted several seconds. 11 (29%) incidents ended with an explosion of the object. A cloud-aircraft lightning flash was seen in only 9 cases (24%) of the data set. From the detailed accounts of air personnel in the last 70 years, it is evident that ball lightning is rarely, but consistently observed in connection with aircraft and can also occur inside the airframe. Reports often came from multiple professional witnesses and in several cases, damages were investigated by civil or military authorities. Although ball lightning is no main air traffic risk, the authors suggest that incident and accident

  7. Alabama Education Quick Facts, 2015-2016

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    This brochure presents state statistics for Alabama: School Personnel 2015-16; Student Assessment 2014-15; Alabama State Board of Education members; Financial Data FY2015; Graduation Rates 2013-14/2014-15; Alabama Public Schools 2015-16; Public School Size and Enrollment 2015-16; Graduation Requirements 2015-16; Career and Technical Education…

  8. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alabama River. 117.101 Section 117.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.101 Alabama River. (a) The...

  9. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alabama River. 117.101 Section 117.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.101 Alabama River. (a) The...

  10. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alabama River. 117.101 Section 117.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.101 Alabama River. (a) The...

  11. Alabama's Education Report Card, 2011-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Educational progress has been moving in the right direction for several years in Alabama. Now, with the implementation of Alabama's own Plan 2020, an even higher level of accountability for students, teachers, administrators, support systems, and schools/school systems, Alabama is poised to experience unprecedented growth. Add to that, the Alabama…

  12. FNAS lightning detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, George P.; Alzmann, Melanie A.

    1993-01-01

    A review of past and future investigations into lightning detection from space was incorporated into a brochure. Following the collection of background information, a meeting was held to discuss the format and contents of the proposed documentation. An initial outline was produced and decided upon. Photographs to be included in the brochure were selected. Quotations with respect to printing the document were requested. In the period between 28 March and June 1993, work continued on compiling the text. Towards the end of this contract, a review of the brochure was undertaken by the technical monitor. Photographs were being revised and additional areas of lightning research were being considered for inclusion into the brochure. Included is a copy of the draft (and photographs) which is still being edited by the technical monitor at the time of this report.

  13. RF radiation from lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    Radiation from lightning in the RF band from 3-300 MHz were monitored. Radiation in this frequency range is of interest as a potential vehicle for monitoring severe storms and for studying the lightning itself. Simultaneous measurements were made of RF radiation and fast and slow field changes. Continuous analogue recordings with a system having 300 kHz of bandwidth were made together with digital records of selected events (principally return strokes) at greater temporal resolution. The data reveal patterns in the RF radiation for the entire flash which are characteristic of flash type and independent of the frequency of observation. Individual events within the flash also have characteristic RF patterns. Strong radiation occurs during the first return strokes, but delayed about 20 micron sec with respect to the begining of the return stroke; whereas, RF radiation from subsequent return strokes tends to be associated with cloud processes preceding the flash with comparatively little radiation occurring during the return stroke itself.

  14. Advanced lightning location interferometer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-25

    In January, 1994, New Mexico Institute for Mining and Technology (NM Tech) was commissioned by Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL) to develop a three-axis interferometric lightning mapping system to be used in determining the source of certain frequency-dispersed pulse pairs which had been detected by spaceborne sensors. The existing NM Tech VHF Lightning Interferometer was a two axis system operating at 274 MHz with 6 MHz bandwidth. The third axis was to be added to refine estimates of the elevation angle to distant RF sources in that band. The system was to be initially deployed in support of an Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC) effort planned for the Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral AFS area in June-July of 1994. The project was, however, postponed until September of 1994. The interferometer was set up and operated at KSC near the Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) central station. The initial setup was in two-axis configuration, and the third (vertical) axis was added at about mid-project. Though the storms were reduced in frequency and severity over what one would expect in mid-summer, several good data sets were obtained and delivered to AFTAC.

  15. Lightning Scaling Laws Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boccippio, D. J.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Scaling laws relating storm electrical generator power (and hence lightning flash rate) to charge transport velocity and storm geometry were originally posed by Vonnegut (1963). These laws were later simplified to yield simple parameterizations for lightning based upon cloud top height, with separate parameterizations derived over land and ocean. It is demonstrated that the most recent ocean parameterization: (1) yields predictions of storm updraft velocity which appear inconsistent with observation, and (2) is formally inconsistent with the theory from which it purports to derive. Revised formulations consistent with Vonnegut's original framework are presented. These demonstrate that Vonnegut's theory is, to first order, consistent with observation. The implications of assuming that flash rate is set by the electrical generator power, rather than the electrical generator current, are examined. The two approaches yield significantly different predictions about the dependence of charge transfer per flash on storm dimensions, which should be empirically testable. The two approaches also differ significantly in their explanation of regional variability in lightning observations.

  16. Three Dimensional Lightning Launch Commit Criteria Visualization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., III

    2014-01-01

    Lightning occurrence too close to a NASA LSP or future SLS program launch vehicle in flight would have disastrous results. The sensitive electronics on the vehicle could be damaged to the point of causing an anomalous flight path and ultimate destruction of the vehicle and payload.According to 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Lightning Launch Commit Criteria (LLCC), a vehicle cannot launch if lightning is within 10 NM of its pre-determined flight path. The 45 WS Launch Weather Officers (LWOs) evaluate this LLCC for their launch customers to ensure the safety of the vehicle in flight. Currently, the LWOs conduct a subjective analysis of the distance between lightning and the flight path using data from different display systems. A 3-D display in which the lightning data and flight path are together would greatly reduce the ambiguity in evaluating this LLCC. It would give the LWOs and launch directors more confidence in whether a GO or NO GO for launch should be issued. When lightning appears close to the path, the LWOs likely err on the side of conservatism and deem the lightning to be within 10 NM. This would cause a costly delay or scrub. If the LWOs can determine with a strong level of certainty that the lightning is beyond 10 NM, launch availability would increase without compromising safety of the vehicle, payload or, in the future, astronauts.The AMU was tasked to conduct a market research of commercial, government, and open source software that might be able to ingest and display the 3-D lightning data from the KSC Lightning Mapping Array (LMA), the 45th Space Wing Weather Surveillance Radar (WSR), the National Weather Service in Melbourne Weather Surveillance Radar 1988 Doppler (WSR-88D), and the vehicle flight path data so that all can be visualized together. To accomplish this, the AMU conducted Internet searches for potential software candidates and interviewed software developers.None of the available off-the-shelf software had a 3-D capability that could

  17. The role of cosmics rays in lightning initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindy, Nathan Carl

    Lightning Mapping Array, it was found that at >90% confidence level, that lightning initiations within 1 km of the cosmic ray detector array were preceded by the passage of an EAS through the thunderstorm.

  18. Near-field Interferometric Imaging of Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, M.; Wu, T.; Akiyama, Y.; Kawasaki, Z.; Ushio, T.

    2015-12-01

    In the past, lightning interferometric mapping systems assumed that a source is very far from the measurement location. The assumption greatly simplifies the mathematics needed to locate the source, but the resulting source positions are limited to two spatial dimensions (azimuth and elevation). For short baseline systems, this assumption is very good because the source is almost always much farther away than the diameter of the array, making three-dimensional location all but impossible. By removing the far-field assumption, if the array is large enough it is possible to locate the source in three spatial dimensions using purely interferometric techniques. The purely interferometric method is quite different from the more typical time-of-arrival method. Instead of measuring arrival times or time differences of the radiation arriving at each station, a volume is imaged over a some integration period and then searched for a source. It is not necessary to know that a source exists in the integration period for the interferometric imaging technique to produce a well defined solution. Interferometric imaging can locate sources buried in noise, can locate both continuous and impulsive emission, and is capable of locating multiple simultaneously radiating sources. If the waveforms are corrected for propagation delay to the search volume, the integration period can be made arbitrarily small (limited only by the frequencies being observed), allowing the progression of lightning to be examined in detail. Near-field interferometry works equally well on a wide range of different signal types, from the LF to VHF bands in radio, or even on acoustic emissions from lightning. Near-field imaging can be used to correct the angular locations of short baseline systems when a source is very close to the array, or to produce full three-dimensional maps of lightning with long baseline arrays. Presented here are preliminary results of applying near-field interferometric imaging to the

  19. Forecasting Lightning Threat using Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCaul, Eugene W., Jr.; Goodman, Steven J.; LaCasse, Katherine M.; Cecil, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Two new approaches are proposed and developed for making time and space dependent, quantitative short-term forecasts of lightning threat, and a blend of these approaches is devised that capitalizes on the strengths of each. The new methods are distinctive in that they are based entirely on the ice-phase hydrometeor fields generated by regional cloud-resolving numerical simulations, such as those produced by the WRF model. These methods are justified by established observational evidence linking aspects of the precipitating ice hydrometeor fields to total flash rates. The methods are straightforward and easy to implement, and offer an effective near-term alternative to the incorporation of complex and costly cloud electrification schemes into numerical models. One method is based on upward fluxes of precipitating ice hydrometeors in the mixed phase region at the-15 C level, while the second method is based on the vertically integrated amounts of ice hydrometeors in each model grid column. Each method can be calibrated by comparing domain-wide statistics of the peak values of simulated flash rate proxy fields against domain-wide peak total lightning flash rate density data from observations. Tests show that the first method is able to capture much of the temporal variability of the lightning threat, while the second method does a better job of depicting the areal coverage of the threat. Our blended solution is designed to retain most of the temporal sensitivity of the first method, while adding the improved spatial coverage of the second. Exploratory tests for selected North Alabama cases show that, because WRF can distinguish the general character of most convective events, our methods show promise as a means of generating quantitatively realistic fields of lightning threat. However, because the models tend to have more difficulty in predicting the instantaneous placement of storms, forecasts of the detailed location of the lightning threat based on single

  20. Lightning Detection Efficiency Analysis Process: Modeling Based on Empirical Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rompala, John T.

    2005-01-01

    A ground based lightning detection system employs a grid of sensors, which record and evaluate the electromagnetic signal produced by a lightning strike. Several detectors gather information on that signal s strength, time of arrival, and behavior over time. By coordinating the information from several detectors, an event solution can be generated. That solution includes the signal s point of origin, strength and polarity. Determination of the location of the lightning strike uses algorithms based on long used techniques of triangulation. Determination of the event s original signal strength relies on the behavior of the generated magnetic field over distance and time. In general the signal from the event undergoes geometric dispersion and environmental attenuation as it progresses. Our knowledge of that radial behavior together with the strength of the signal received by detecting sites permits an extrapolation and evaluation of the original strength of the lightning strike. It also limits the detection efficiency (DE) of the network. For expansive grids and with a sparse density of detectors, the DE varies widely over the area served. This limits the utility of the network in gathering information on regional lightning strike density and applying it to meteorological studies. A network of this type is a grid of four detectors in the Rondonian region of Brazil. The service area extends over a million square kilometers. Much of that area is covered by rain forests. Thus knowledge of lightning strike characteristics over the expanse is of particular value. I have been developing a process that determines the DE over the region [3]. In turn, this provides a way to produce lightning strike density maps, corrected for DE, over the entire region of interest. This report offers a survey of that development to date and a record of present activity.

  1. Lightning Jump Algorithm and Relation to Thunderstorm Cell Tracking, GLM Proxy and Other Meteorological Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Christopher J.; Carey, Lawrence D.; Cecil, Daniel J.; Bateman, Monte

    2012-01-01

    The lightning jump algorithm has a robust history in correlating upward trends in lightning to severe and hazardous weather occurrence. The algorithm uses the correlation between the physical principles that govern an updraft's ability to produce microphysical and kinematic conditions conducive for electrification and its role in the development of severe weather conditions. Recent work has demonstrated that the lightning jump algorithm concept holds significant promise in the operational realm, aiding in the identification of thunderstorms that have potential to produce severe or hazardous weather. However, a large amount of work still needs to be completed in spite of these positive results. The total lightning jump algorithm is not a stand-alone concept that can be used independent of other meteorological measurements, parameters, and techniques. For example, the algorithm is highly dependent upon thunderstorm tracking to build lightning histories on convective cells. Current tracking methods show that thunderstorm cell tracking is most reliable and cell histories are most accurate when radar information is incorporated with lightning data. In the absence of radar data, the cell tracking is a bit less reliable but the value added by the lightning information is much greater. For optimal application, the algorithm should be integrated with other measurements that assess storm scale properties (e.g., satellite, radar). Therefore, the recent focus of this research effort has been assessing the lightning jump's relation to thunderstorm tracking, meteorological parameters, and its potential uses in operational meteorology. Furthermore, the algorithm must be tailored for the optically-based GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), as what has been observed using Very High Frequency Lightning Mapping Array (VHF LMA) measurements will not exactly translate to what will be observed by GLM due to resolution and other instrument differences. Herein, we present some of

  2. The GOES-R GeoStationary Lightning Mapper (GLM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Steven J.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Koshak, William J.; Mach, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-R) is the next series to follow the existing GOES system currently operating over the Western Hemisphere. Superior spacecraft and instrument technology will support expanded detection of environmental phenomena, resulting in more timely and accurate forecasts and warnings. Advancements over current GOES capabilities include a new capability for total lightning detection (cloud and cloud-to-ground flashes) from the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), and improved capability for the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI). The Geostationary Lighting Mapper (GLM) will map total lightning activity (in-cloud and cloud-to-ground lighting flashes) continuously day and night with near-uniform spatial resolution of 8 km with a product refresh rate of less than 20 sec over the Americas and adjacent oceanic regions. This will aid in forecasting severe storms and tornado activity, and convective weather impacts on aviation safety and efficiency among a number of potential applications. In parallel with the instrument development (a prototype and 4 flight models), a GOES-R Risk Reduction Team and Algorithm Working Group Lightning Applications Team have begun to develop the Level 2 algorithms (environmental data records), cal/val performance monitoring tools, and new applications using GLM alone, in combination with the ABI, merged with ground-based sensors, and decision aids augmented by numerical weather prediction model forecasts. Proxy total lightning data from the NASA Lightning Imaging Sensor on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite and regional test beds are being used to develop the pre-launch algorithms and applications, and also improve our knowledge of thunderstorm initiation and evolution. An international field campaign planned for 2011-2012 will produce concurrent observations from a VHF lightning mapping array, Meteosat multi-band imagery, Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Lightning

  3. 14 CFR 25.581 - Lightning protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Lightning protection. 25.581 Section 25.581... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Lightning Protection § 25.581 Lightning protection. (a) The airplane must be protected against catastrophic effects from lightning. (b) For...

  4. 14 CFR 25.581 - Lightning protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lightning protection. 25.581 Section 25.581... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Lightning Protection § 25.581 Lightning protection. (a) The airplane must be protected against catastrophic effects from lightning. (b) For...

  5. 14 CFR 25.581 - Lightning protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Lightning protection. 25.581 Section 25.581... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Lightning Protection § 25.581 Lightning protection. (a) The airplane must be protected against catastrophic effects from lightning. (b) For...

  6. 14 CFR 25.581 - Lightning protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Lightning protection. 25.581 Section 25.581... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Lightning Protection § 25.581 Lightning protection. (a) The airplane must be protected against catastrophic effects from lightning. (b) For...

  7. 14 CFR 25.581 - Lightning protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Lightning protection. 25.581 Section 25.581... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Lightning Protection § 25.581 Lightning protection. (a) The airplane must be protected against catastrophic effects from lightning. (b) For...

  8. The close lightning electromagnetic environment: Dart-leader electric field change versus distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, David E.; Rakov, Vladimir A.; Uman, Martin A.; Schnetzer, George H.; Rambo, Keith J.; Stapleton, Michael V.; Fisher, Richard J.

    2001-07-01

    Net electric field changes due to dart leaders in triggered lightning from experiments conducted in 1997, 1998, and 1999 at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing at Camp Blanding, Florida, are analyzed and compared with similar data obtained in 1993 at Camp Blanding and at Fort McClellan, Alabama. In 1997-1999 the fields were measured at 2-10 stations with distances from the lightning channel ranging from 10 to 621 m, while in 1993 the fields were measured at three distances, 30, 50, and 110 m, in Florida and at two distances, about 10 and 20 m, in Alabama. With a few exceptions, the 1997-1999 data indicate that the distance dependence of the leader electric field change is close to an inverse proportionality (r-1), in contrast to the 1993 data in which a somewhat weaker distance dependence was observed. The typically observed r-1 dependence is consistent with a uniform distribution of leader charge along the bottom kilometer or so of the channel.

  9. Research on Winter Lightning in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Masaru

    Winter lightning in Japan is known for such characteristics as frequent occurrence of upward lightning and of positive ground flashes. On the engineering side, higher frequencies of troubles at transmission lines or wind turbines in winter due to lightning than those in summer have been experienced in the winter thunderstorm area of Japan, despite the much smaller number of lightning strokes in winter observed by lightning location systems (LLS). Such frequent troubles by lightning in the cold season are unique in Japan, which have promoted intensive research on winter lightning in Japan since 1980s.

  10. Developing Lightning Prediction Tools for the CCAFS Dual-Polarimetric Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, W. A.; Carey, L. D.; Deierling, W.; Johnson, E.; Bateman, M.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the University of Alabama Huntsville are collaborating with the 45th Weather Squadron (45WS) to develop improved lightning prediction capabilities for the new C-band dual-polarimetric weather radar being acquired for use by 45WS and launch weather forecasters at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). In particular, these algorithms will focus on lightning onset, cessation and combined lightning-radar applications for convective winds assessment. Research using radar reflectivity (Z) data for prediction of lightning onset has been extensively discussed in the literature and subsequently applied by launch weather forecasters as it pertains to lightning nowcasting. Currently the forecasters apply a relatively straight forward but effective temperature-Z threshold algorithm for assessing the likelihood of lightning onset in a given storm. In addition, a layered VIL above the freezing level product is used as automated guidance for the onset of lightning. Only limited research and field work has been conducted on lightning cessation using Z and vertically-integrated Z for determining cessation. Though not used operationally vertically-integrated Z (basis for VIL) has recently shown promise as a tool for use in nowcasting lightning cessation. The work discussed herein leverages and expands upon these and similar reflectivity-threshold approaches via the application/addition of over two decades of polarimetric radar research focused on distinct multi-parameter radar signatures of ice/mixed-phase initiation and ice-crystal orientation in highly electrified convective clouds. Specifically, our approach is based on numerous previous studies that have observed repeatable patterns in the behavior of the vertical hydrometeor column as it relates to the temporal evolution of differential reflectivity and depolarization (manifested in either LDR or p(sub hv)), development of in-situ mixed and ice phase microphysics, electric fields, and

  11. Spatial and Temporal Distributions of Lightning over Arizona from a Power Utility Perspective.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Raúl E.; Holle, Ronald L.; Watson, Andrew I.; Skindlov, Jon

    1997-06-01

    This study was designed to determine whether a spatially significant and temporally persistent variation in cloud-to-ground lightning frequency exists across the Salt River Project (SRP) region of central Arizona. Cloud-to-ground lightning data for 8 years from the Bureau of Land Management detection network were compiled to develop maps of lightning strike density across Arizona and the SRP region. In space, lightning frequency varied significantly across both of these topographically diverse regions. There was nearly five times more lightning over the high-altitude eastern border of the SRP region than over the lower western desert portion. The spatial pattern was consistent through time, so that more substantial lightning protection is warranted over the eastern SRP region than over the west. However, lightning frequency is highly variable from month to month and year to year on both the state and SRP scales, so that the value of newly installed lightning protection cannot be judged on experiences from a few years.

  12. Alabama Counseling Association Journal, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Gypsy, Ed.; Elliott, Glenda R., Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Communicating ideas and information that will help counselors to implement the counseling role and develop the profession of counseling is the purpose of this journal. The first issue in volume 21 contains the following articles: "Policies and Procedures for Reporting Child Abuse in Alabama: Considerations for Counselors, Teachers, and School…

  13. Antidote: Civic Responsibility. Alabama Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity International, Washington, DC.

    Designed for middle school through high school students, this unit contains eight lesson plans that focus on Alabama state law. The state lessons correspond to lessons in the volume, "Antidote: Civic Responsibility. Drug Avoidance Lessons for Middle School & High School Students." Developed to be presented by educators, law student,…

  14. Hurricane Frederic tidal floods of September 12-13, 1979, along the Gulf Coast, Daphne-Point Clear quadrangles, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, John C.; Bohman, Larry R.

    1980-01-01

    Shown on a topographic map are floodmark elevations and approximate areas flooded by Hurricane Frederic tides of September 12-13, 1979, along the eastern shore of Mobile Bay generally from Daphne, Alabama, southward through Fairhope and Point Clear to Mullet Point, Alabama. Buildings and sewalls were damaged by flooding and tidal waves in the vicinity of Fairhope, Alabama. Most fishing piers along the shore were either destroyed or severely damaged. From Fairhope southward, many homes and other buildings, including the Grand Hotel complex at Great Point Clear, were severely damaged. Storm-tide frequency and records of annual maximum tides at Mobile, Alabama, since 1772, are presented. Offshore winds reached about 160 miles per hour. A wind-velocity of about 145 miles per hour was recorded near Dauphin Island, Alabama. (USGS)

  15. Correlation of satellite lightning observations with ground-based lightning experiments in Florida, Texas and Oklahoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgar, B. C.; Turman, B. N.

    1982-01-01

    Satellite observations of lightning were correlated with ground-based measurements of lightning from data bases obtained at three separate sites. The percentage of ground-based observations of lightning that would be seen by an orbiting satellite was determined.

  16. Lightning return stroke models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Y. T.; Uman, M. A.; Standler, R. B.

    1980-01-01

    We test the two most commonly used lightning return stroke models, Bruce-Golde and transmission line, against subsequent stroke electric and magnetic field wave forms measured simultaneously at near and distant stations and show that these models are inadequate to describe the experimental data. We then propose a new return stroke model that is physically plausible and that yields good approximations to the measured two-station fields. Using the new model, we derive return stroke charge and current statistics for about 100 subsequent strokes.

  17. Lightning Current Parameters of Upward Lightning Flashes Observed at the 200-m Fukui Chimney in Winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, A.; Asakawa, A.; Miki, M.; Shindo, T.

    2003-12-01

    For over twenty years we have been observing the lightning flashes at the 200-m-tall chimney in the Fukui thermal power plant in winter in Japan. The local IKL (thunderstorm days) is about 40 in this area and the lightning flashes at the chimney are recorded about 40 times in a winter season. When the lightning strikes the 5-m lightning rod on top of the chimney, lightning currents are measured by using coaxial shunt-resistors installed at the base of the lightning rod. Lightning progressing features was measured by the 40X40 pin photodiode array system. The system records luminosity changes in the lightning channel by measuring the differences between signals from different photodiodes. At a distance of 630 m from the chimney, a vertical lightning channel of 1000 m is divided by using 40 diode elements. Electromagnetic field changes that accompany lightning flashes are also measured by using several types of antennas. These simultaneous measurements classified the behavior of winter lightning flashes. All recorded lightning flash was the lightning discharge initiated by the upward leader from the chimney. Most lightning (about 90 percent) was the lightning discharge initiated by the upward-moving positively charged leader. The lightning initiated by the upward-moving negatively charged leader was only about 10 percent. Some of the lightning produced the subsequent discharge processes following the upward leader development. There are many differences between the lightning current parameters of upward lightning flashes and the downward lightning flashes. Interestingly, the upward leader currents observed at the chimney are big compared to the downward leader currents estimated by the several methods. We will report the properties of lightning current parameters based on the data collected at the 200-m-tall chimney in winter. These statistical data of lightning current parameters are classified especially from the point of view of lightning discharge types.

  18. Microwave radio emissions of negative cloud-to-ground lightning flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, D.; Beasley, W.

    2014-01-01

    We report preliminary results of a new observational study of microwave-frequency electromagnetic radiation that is emitted by lightning discharge processes. Radiation was observed with a ceramic patch antenna and a digital radio receiver tuned to a center frequency of 1.63 GHz and a bandwidth of 2 MHz. The recorded radiation waveforms are compared with data collected by the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array (OKLMA) lightning mapping system and the co-located Earth Networks Total Lightning Network (ENTLN) broadband electric field antenna. Microwave radiation was observed to occur during preliminary breakdown, negative stepped leader breakdown, negative dart leader breakdown, and return strokes. Characteristic radiation signatures were observed, including trains of individually resolvable impulses during breakdown and brief but intense trains of noise-like bursts during return strokes.

  19. Geology of the Huntsville quadrangle, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, T.H.; Malmberg, G.T.; West, L.R.

    1961-01-01

    The 7 1/2-minute Huntsville quadrangle is in south-central Madison County, Ala., and includes part of the city of Hunstville. The south, north, east, and west boundaries of the quadrangle are about 3 miles north of the Tennessee River, 15 1/2 miles south of the Tennessee line, 8 miles west of the Jackson County line, and 9 miles east of the Limestone County line. The bedrock geology of the Huntsville quadrangle was mapped by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the city of Hunstville and the Geological Survey of Alabama as part of a detailed study of the geology and ground-water resources of Madison County, with special reference to the Huntsville area. G. T. Malmberg began the geologic mapping of the county in July 1953, and completed it in April 1954. T. H. Sanford, Jr., assisted Malmberg in the final phases of the county mapping, which included measuring geologic sections with hand level and steel tape. In November 1958 Sanford, assisted by L. R. West, checked contacts and elevations in the Hunstville quadrangle; made revisions in the contact lines; and wrote the text for this report. The fieldwork for this report was completed in April 1959.

  20. Editorial - Advances in lightning research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-12-01

    This is the part I of a special issue dedicated to lightning research, consisting of papers presented at the 32nd International Conference on Lightning Protection (ICLP), held in Shanghai, China, in 2014, and several contributions invited by the guest editors to complement the subject matter of the papers selected from the ICLP. The papers from the ICLP were selected by the session chairmen of the ICLP and passed through the rigorous review process of the Journal of Solar Terrestrial and Atmospheric Physics (JASTP). The papers presented in this special issue contain subject matter pertinent to all aspects of lightning research both theoretical and experimental.

  1. Back to the basics: Birmingham, Alabama, measurement and scale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Handley, L.R.; Lockwood, C.M.; Handley, N.

    2005-01-01

    Back to the Basics: Birmingham, Alabama is the fourth in a series of workshops that focus on teaching foundational map reading and spatial differentiation skills. It is the second published exercise from the Back to the Basics series developed by the Wetland Education through Maps and Aerial Photography (WETMAAP) Program (see Journal of Geography 103, 5: 226-230). Like its predecessor, the current exercise is modified from the Birmingham Back to the Basics workshop offered during the annual National Council for Geographic Education meeting. The focus of this exercise is on scale and measurement, foundational skills for spatial thinking and analysis. ?? 2005 National Council for Geographic Education.

  2. Lightning climatology over Jakarta, Indonesia, based on long-term surface operational, satellite, and campaign observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Shuichi; Wu, Peiming; Yamanaka, Manabu D.; Hattori, Miki; Hamada, Jun-Ichi; Arbain, Ardhi A.; Lestari, Sopia; Sulistyowati, Reni; Syamsudin, Fadli

    2016-04-01

    Lightning frequency over Indonesian Maritime Continent (MC) is quite high (Petersen and Rutledge 2001, Christian et al. 2003, Takayabu 2006, etc). In particular, Bogor (south of Jakarta, west Jawa) had 322 days of lightning in one year (Guinness Book in 1988). Lightning causes serious damage on nature and society over the MC; forest fore, power outage, inrush/surge currents on many kinds of electronics. Lightning climatology and meso-scale characteristics of thunderstorm over the MC, in particular over Jakarta, where social damage is quite serious, were examined. We made Statistical analysis of lightning and thunderstorm based on TRMM Lightning Image Sensor (LIS) and Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation (GSMaP) together with long-term operational surface observation data (SYNOP) in terms of diurnal, intraseasonal, monsoonal, and interannual variations. In addition, we carried out a campaign observation in February 2015 in Bogor to obtain meso-scale structure and dynamics of thunderstorm over Jakarta to focus on graupel and other ice phase particles inside by using an X-band dual-polarimetric (DP) radar. Recently, Virts et al. (2013a, b) showed comprehensive lightning climatology based on the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN). However, they also reported problems with its detection efficiency (< 10%) and small sampling frequency (< 0.1% of the time fly over tropics) by satellites. Therefore, we firstly examine in situ lightning data based on SYNOP observed by the Indonesian Agency for Meteorology, Climatology, and Geophysics (BMKG) because lightning is quite local and sporadic phenomena. We've started to analyze lightning characteristics over Jakarta region based on SYNOP as the ground truth data and GSMaP. Variability of lightning frequency around Jakarta was affected much by local conditions, e.g., topography (elevation) and proximity to the coastline. We confirmed the lightning frequency and its diurnal variation around Jakarta were much

  3. Global lightning and severe storm monitoring from GPS orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Suszcynsky, D. M.; Jacobson, A. R.; Linford, J; Pongratz, M. B.; Light, T.; Shao, X.

    2004-01-01

    Over the last few decades, there has been a growing interest to develop and deploy an automated and continuously operating satellite-based global lightning mapper [e.g. Christian et al., 1989; Weber et al., 1998; Suszcynsky et al., 2000]. Lightning is a direct consequence of the electrification and breakdown processes that take place during the convective stages of thunderstorm development. Satellite-based lightning mappers are designed to exploit this relationship by using lightning detection as a proxy for remotely identifying, locating and characterizing strong convective activity on a global basis. Global lightning and convection mapping promises to provide users with (1) an enhanced global severe weather monitoring and early warning capability [e.g. Weber et al., 1998] (2) improved ability to optimize aviation flight paths around convective cells, particularly over oceanic and remote regions that are not sufficiently serviced by existing weather radar [e.g. Weber et al., 1998], and (3) access to regional and global proxy data sets that can be used for scientific studies and as input into meteorological forecast and global climatology models. The physical foundation for satellite-based remote sensing of convection by way of lightning detection is provided by the basic interplay between the electrical and convective states of a thundercloud. It is widely believed that convection is a driving mechanism behind the hydrometeor charging and transport that produces charge separation and lightning discharges within thunderclouds [e.g. see chapter 3 in MacGorman and Rust, 1998]. Although cloud electrification and discharge processes are a complex function of the convective dynamics and microphysics of the cloud, the fundamental relationship between convection and electrification is easy to observe. For example, studies have shown that the strength of the convective process within a thundercell can be loosely parameterized (with large variance) by the intensity of the

  4. The kinematic and microphysical control of lightning rate, extent, and NOX production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Lawrence D.; Koshak, William; Peterson, Harold; Mecikalski, Retha M.

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the kinematic and microphysical control of lightning properties, particularly those that may govern the production of nitrogen oxides (NOX = NO + NO2) via lightning (LNOX), such as flash rate, type, and extent. The NASA Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) is applied to lightning observations following multicell thunderstorms through their lifecycle in a Lagrangian sense over Northern Alabama on 21 May 2012 during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) experiment. LNOM provides estimates of flash rate, type, channel length distributions, channel segment altitude distributions (SADs), and LNOX production profiles. The LNOM-derived lightning characteristics and LNOX production are compared to the evolution of radar-inferred updraft and precipitation properties. Intercloud, intracloud (IC) flash SAD comprises a significant fraction of the total (IC + cloud-to-ground [CG]) SAD, while increased CG flash SAD at altitudes >6 km occurs after the simultaneous peaks in several thunderstorm properties (i.e., total [IC + CG] and IC flash rate, graupel volume/mass, convective updraft volume, and maximum updraft speed). At heights <6 km, the CG LNOX production dominates the column-integrated total LNOX production. Unlike the SAD, total LNOX production consists of a more equal contribution from IC and CG flashes for heights >6 km. Graupel volume/mass, updraft volume, and maximum updraft speed are all well correlated to the total flash rate (correlation coefficient, ρ ≥ 0.8) but are less correlated to total flash extent (ρ ≥ 0.6) and total LNOX production (ρ ≥ 0.5). Although LNOM transforms lightning observations into LNOX production values, these values are estimates and are subject to further independent validation.

  5. The Goes-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM): Algorithm and Instrument Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Steven J.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Koshak, William J.; Mach, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-R) is the next series to follow the existing GOES system currently operating over the Western Hemisphere. Superior spacecraft and instrument technology will support expanded detection of environmental phenomena, resulting in more timely and accurate forecasts and warnings. Advancements over current GOES capabilities include a new capability for total lightning detection (cloud and cloud-to-ground flashes) from the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), and improved capability for the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI). The Geostationary Lighting Mapper (GLM) will map total lightning activity (in-cloud and cloud-to-ground lighting flashes) continuously day and night with near-uniform spatial resolution of 8 km with a product refresh rate of less than 20 sec over the Americas and adjacent oceanic regions. This will aid in forecasting severe storms and tornado activity, and convective weather impacts on aviation safety and efficiency. In parallel with the instrument development (a prototype and 4 flight models), a GOES-R Risk Reduction Team and Algorithm Working Group Lightning Applications Team have begun to develop the Level 2 algorithms, cal/val performance monitoring tools, and new applications. Proxy total lightning data from the NASA Lightning Imaging Sensor on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite and regional test beds are being used to develop the pre-launch algorithms and applications, and also improve our knowledge of thunderstorm initiation and evolution. A joint field campaign with Brazilian researchers in 2010-2011 will produce concurrent observations from a VHF lightning mapping array, Meteosat multi-band imagery, Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) overpasses, and related ground and in-situ lightning and meteorological measurements in the vicinity of Sao Paulo. These data will provide a new comprehensive proxy data set for algorithm and

  6. Magnetic tape lightning current detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, K. E.; Jafferis, W.

    1980-01-01

    Development and application tests of a low cost, passive, peak lightning current detector (LCD) found it to provide measurements with accuracies of + or - 5 percent to + or - 10 percent depending on the readout method employed. The LCD uses magnetic audio recording tape to sense the magnitude of the peak magnetic field around a conductor carrying lightning currents. The test results showed that the length of audio tape erased was linearly related to the peak simulated lightning currents in a round conductor. Accuracies of + or - 10 percent were shown for measurements made using a stopwatch readout technique to determine the amount of tape erased by the lightning current. Where more accurate data are desired, the tape is played and the output recorded on a strip chart, oscilloscope, or some other means so that measurements can be made on that recording. Conductor dimensions, tape holder dimensions, and tape formulation must also be considered to obtain a more accurate result.

  7. 2016 T Division Lightning Talks

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, Marilyn Leann; Adams, Luke Clyde; Ferre, Gregoire Robing; Grantcharov, Vesselin; Iaroshenko, Oleksandr; Krishnapriyan, Aditi; Kurtakoti, Prajvala Kishore; Le Thien, Minh Quan; Lim, Jonathan Ng; Low, Thaddeus Song En; Lystrom, Levi Aaron; Ma, Xiaoyu; Nguyen, Hong T.; Pogue, Sabine Silvia; Orandle, Zoe Ann; Reisner, Andrew Ray; Revard, Benjamin Charles; Roy, Julien; Sandor, Csanad; Slavkova, Kalina Polet; Weichman, Kathleen Joy; Wu, Fei; Yang, Yang

    2016-11-29

    These are the slides for all of the 2016 T Division lightning talks. There are 350 pages worth of slides from different presentations, all of which cover different topics within the theoretical division at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  8. Lightning in the Protoplanetary Nebula?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Stanley G.

    1997-01-01

    Lightning in the protoplanetary nebula has been proposed as a mechanism for creating meteoritic chondrules: enigmatic mm-sized silicate spheres formed in the nebula by the brief melting of cold precursors.

  9. Emergency Preparedness and Response - Lightning

    MedlinePlus

    ... hear thunder as a warning. Lightning strikes the earth more than 8 million times per day. The ... Activities Information for Pet Owners FAQs Additional Information Resources for Health Professionals Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports ( ...

  10. Lightning protection of wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodd, C. W.

    1982-01-01

    Possible damages to wind turbine components due to lightning strikes are discussed and means to prevent the damage are presented. A low resistance path to the ground is noted to be essential for any turbine system, including metal paths on nonmetal blades to conduct the strike. Surge arrestors are necessary to protect against overvoltages both from utility lines in normal operation and against lightning damage to control equipment and contactors in the generator. MOS structures are susceptible to static discharge injury, as are other semiconductor devices, and must be protected by the presence of static protection circuitry. It is recommended that the electronics be analyzed for the circuit transient response to a lightning waveform, to induced and dc current injection, that input/output leads be shielded, everything be grounded, and lightning-resistant components be chosen early in the design phase.

  11. Lightning strike protection of composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagné, Martin; Therriault, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Aircraft structures are being redesigned to use fiber-reinforced composites mainly due to their high specific stiffness and strength. One of the main drawbacks from changing from electrically conductive metals to insulating or semi-conducting composites is the higher vulnerability of the aircraft to lightning strike damage. The current protection approach consists of bonding a metal mesh to the surface of the composite structure, but this weight increase negatively impact the fuel efficiency. This review paper presents an overview of the lightning strike problematic, the regulations, the lightning damage to composite, the current protection solutions and other material or technology alternatives. Advanced materials such as polymer-based nanocomposites and carbon nanotube buckypapers are promising candidates for lightweight lightning strike protection technology.

  12. Polarimetric radar characteristics of storms with and without lightning activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattos, Enrique V.; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Williams, Earle R.; Albrecht, Rachel I.

    2016-12-01

    This paper analyzes the cloud microphysics in different layers of storms as a function of three-dimensional total lightning density. A mobile X-band polarimetric radar and very high frequency (VHF) sources from Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) observations during the 2011/2012 Brazil spring-summer were used to determine the microphysical signatures of radar vertical profiles and lightning density. This study quantified the behavior of 5.3 million vertical profiles of the horizontal reflectivity (ZH), differential reflectivity (ZDR), specific differential phase (KDP), and correlation coefficient (ρHV). The principal changes in the polarimetric variables occurred only for VHF source rate density greater than 14 VHF sources per km2 in 4 min. These storms showed an enhanced positive KDP in the mixed 1 layer (from 0 to -15°C) probably associated with supercooled liquid water signatures, whereas regions with negative ZDR and KDP and moderate ZH in the mixed 2 layer (from -15 to -40°C) were possibly associated with the presence of conical graupel. The glaciated (above -40°C) and upper part of the mixed 2 layers showed a significant trend to negative KDP with an increase in lightning density, in agreement with vertical alignment of ice particle by the cloud electric field. A conceptual model that presents the microphysical signatures in storms with and without lightning activity was constructed. The observations documented in this study provide an understanding of how the combinations of polarimetric variables could help to identify storms with different lightning density and vice versa.

  13. Lightning instrumentation for warning and measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtasinski, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    A presentation of instrumentation techniques used at Kennedy Space Center for assessing the hazards of lightning, measure lightning currents, induced voltage effects and assess the probability of lightning strikes to launch structures. The electric field and sferics are measured to determine the lightning hazard from the clouds. Measurements are made on launch structures to determine the magnitude of lightning currents and the induced voltages. Photographs are taken to ascertain the location of lightning strikes. Data is analyzed and presented on operations personnel and the Weather Office for assessment of impact on launch critical electromechanical systems and industrial operations.

  14. Characteristics of Lightning within Electrified Snowfall Events using Total Lightning Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, C. J.; Bruning, E. C.; Lang, T. J.; Kuhlman, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    Lightning within heavy snowfall indicates the presence of heavy snowfall rates. Most studies within the literature examine this phenomenon using ground based networks that are primarily designed for identifying cloud to ground flashes. Thus, very little study of the three dimensional structure of the lightning flashes within heavy snowfall has been accomplished. Herein, total lightning mapping arrays, interferometers and ground based networks like the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) are utilized to document the characteristics of these flashes, including flash size, polarity, flash initiation location and inferred charge structure. A total of six events are examined, resulting in a total of approximately 80 flashes. Both individual case studies and overall population statistics will be used to characterize flashes within this winter environment. Many of these flashes are found to initiate from tall objects like television and radio communication towers, and come to ground in multiple locations along their path, resulting in one LMA derived flash containing multiple NLDN identified flashes. Cloud-to-ground flashes of both polarities are noted within the 80 flash sample. In one case, 3 separate flashes which resulted in ground flashes of both polarities were observed coming out of the same overall charge structure. This structure exhibited a highly sloped nature in the LMA data from east to west, and both +IC and -IC components of flashes were observed by the NLDN in the same region where the flashes initiated. A decrease in flash size is noted with time in at least three of these events due to weaker updraft (compared to their summertime thunderstorm counter parts) and smaller available of supercooled liquid water as inferred through trends in radar observations. These limiting factors are hypothesized to result in slower charging rates, and smaller flash sizes with time. Several flashes also exhibit sloped structures that match reflectivity

  15. Fatal lightning strikes in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Murty, O P; Kian, Chong Kah; Ari Husin, Mohammed Husrul; Nanta Kumar, Ranjeev Kumar; Mohammed Yusuf, Wan Yuhana W

    2009-09-01

    Lightning strike is a natural phenomenon with potentially devastating effects and represents one of the important causes of deaths from environmental phenomena. Almost every organ system may be affected as lightning current passes through the human body taking the shortest pathways between the contact points. A 10 years retrospective study (1996-2005) was conducted at University Hospital Kuala Lumpur (20 cases) also including cases during last 3 years from Hospital Tengku Ampuan Rahimah, Klang (7 cases) from the autopsy reports at Forensic Pathology Units of these 2 hospitals. Both these hospitals are attached to University of Malaya. There were 27 fatal cases of lightning strike with male preponderance(92.59%) and male to female ratio of 12.5:1. Majority of victims of lightning strike were from the age group between 30 and 39 years old. Most of the victims were foreign workers. Indonesians workers contributed to 59.26% of overall cases. Majority of them were construction workers who attributed i.e.11 of 27 cases (40.74%). Most of the victims were brought in dead (37.04%). In majority of the cases the lightning incidence occurred in the evenings, with the frequency of 15 of 27 cases (62.5%). The month of December represented with the highest number of cases (5 cases of 23 cases); 2004 had the highest incidence of lightning strike which was 5 (19.23%). Lightning strike incidence occurred when victims had taken shelter (25.9%) under trees or shades. Lightning strike in open areas occurred in 10 of 27 cases (37.0%). Head and neck were the most commonly affected sites with the incidence of 77.78% and 74% respectively in all the victims. Only 29.63% of the cases presented with ear bleeding.

  16. Lightning in superconductors.

    PubMed

    Vestgården, J I; Shantsev, D V; Galperin, Y M; Johansen, T H

    2012-01-01

    Crucially important for application of type-II superconductor films is the stability of the vortex matter--magnetic flux lines penetrating the material. If some vortices get detached from pinning centres, the energy dissipated by their motion will facilitate further depinning, and may trigger a massive electromagnetic breakdown. Up to now, the time-resolved behaviour of these ultra-fast events was essentially unknown. We report numerical simulation results revealing the detailed dynamics during breakdown as within nanoseconds it develops branching structures in the electromagnetic fields and temperature, with striking resemblance of atmospheric lightning. During a dendritic avalanche the superconductor is locally heated above its critical temperature, while electrical fields rise to several kV/m as the front propagates at instant speeds near up to 100 km/s. The numerical approach provides an efficient framework for understanding the ultra-fast coupled non-local dynamics of electromagnetic fields and dissipation in superconductor films.

  17. Lightning and thermal injuries.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Arthur; Gamelli, Richard L

    2014-01-01

    Electrical burns are classified as either high voltage (1000 volts and higher) or low voltage (<1000 volts). The typical injury with a high-voltage electrical contact is one where subcutaneous fat, muscles, and even bones are injured. Lower voltages may have lesser injuries. The electrical current has the potential to injure via three mechanisms: injury caused by current flow, an arc injury as the current passes from source to an object, and a flame injury caused by ignition of material in the local environment. Different tissues also have different resistance to the conduction of electricity. Voltage, current (amperage), type of current (alternating or direct), path of current flow across the body, duration of contact, and individual susceptibility all determine what final injury will occur. Devitalized tissue must be evaluated and debrided. Ocular cataracts may develop over time following electrical injury. Lightning strikes may conduct millions of volts of electricity, yet the effects can range from minimal cutaneous injuries to significant injury comparable to a high-voltage industrial accident. Lightning strikes commonly result in cardiorespiratory arrest, for which CPR is effective when begun promptly. Neurologic complications from electrical and lightning injuries are highly variable and may present early or late (up to 2 years) after the injury. The prognosis for electricity-related neurologic injuries is generally better than for other types of traumatic causes, suggesting a conservative approach with serial neurologic examinations after an initial CT scan to rule out correctable causes. One of the most common complications of electrical injury is a cardiac dysrhythmia. Because of the potential for large volumes of muscle loss and the release of myoglobin, the presence of heme pigments in the urine must be evaluated promptly. Presence of these products of breakdown of myoglobin and hemoglobin puts the injured at risk for acute renal failure and must be

  18. Space Grant Undergraduate Remote Sensing Research in Urban Growth near Mobile Bay, Alabama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abolins, M. J.; Keen, J.; Wilcox, P.; Sheehan, A.; Dial, S.

    2010-12-01

    During late 2009, four Tennessee Space Grant undergraduate researchers began a remote sensing investigation of urban growth southeast of Mobile Bay, Alabama. They selected the study area in consultation with the Marshall Space Flight Center Earth Science Office, and they share the study area with a multi-institution NASA-funded project exploring the application of remotely sensed data and related models to conservation and restoration along the northern Gulf of Mexico coast. In the first phase of the Space Grant investigation, four undergraduate researchers used a November 7, 2009 Landsat scene to map developed land near Mobile, Alabama. They used supervised and unsupervised classification to map developed land in two areas: 10 miles southeast of Mobile along U.S. Route 98 between Daphne and Fairhope, Alabama, and 25 miles southeast of Mobile near Foley, Alabama. Visual comparison of their map with the circa 2001 National Land Cover Dataset (NLCD) revealed urban growth in both areas. In the year ahead, Space Grant undergraduates will explore ways to improve their map by incorporating ancillary vector data and images. They will also collect reference data on the ground, and then they will use ground-based reference data and air photos to assess map accuracy. As an ultimate goal, the Space Grant undergraduates seek to compare their results with those of the larger multi-institution project. The Space Grant investigation will lead to a better understanding of the potential for undergraduate interaction with a large NASA-funded remote sensing applications project.

  19. Study of High-Energy Particles Correlated with Lightning at Utah's Telescope Array Cosmic Ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belz, John

    2016-03-01

    It is known that x-ray and gamma radiation is emitted by lightning. This phenomenon has been observed by both ground-based and spaced-based detectors. Recently, cosmic ray physicists studying data collected by the 700 square-kilometer Telescope Array Surface Detector (TASD) have observed energetic elementary particles in coincidence with lightning strikes. A subset of these events contain reconstructable ``showers'' which point back to the particles' origin in the Earth's atmosphere. This implies that the energetic radiation may for the first time be traced to its source within the lightning strike. The Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) pioneered at Langmuir Laboratories is the ideal instrument to couple with the TASD in order to perform these studies. These LMA's consist of roughly ten VHF detectors spread over hundreds of square kilometers, and detect impulsive radiation from lightning. The sources of these impulses may be reconstructed and used to create a 3-dimensional GPS-timed reconstruction of a lightning strike. The merger of TA and LMA is also the ideal instrument to search for evidence of a more speculative - but more profound - connection between particle astrophysics and climate: The seeding of lightning strikes by cosmic ray air showers.

  20. Lightning NOx and Impacts on Air Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Lee T.

    2016-01-01

    Lightning generates relatively large but uncertain quantities of nitrogen oxides, critical precursors for ozone and hydroxyl radical (OH), the primary tropospheric oxidants. Lightning nitrogen oxide strongly influences background ozone and OH due to high ozone production efficiencies in the free troposphere, effecting small but non-negligible contributions to surface pollutant concentrations. Lightning globally contributes 3-4 ppbv of simulated annual-mean policy-relevant background (PRB) surface ozone, comprised of local, regional, and hemispheric components, and up to 18 ppbv during individual events. Feedbacks via methane may counter some of these effects on decadal time scales. Lightning contributes approximately 1 percent to annual-mean surface particulate matter, as a direct precursor and by promoting faster oxidation of other precursors. Lightning also ignites wildfires and contributes to nitrogen deposition. Urban pollution influences lightning itself, with implications for regional lightning-nitrogen oxide production and feedbacks on downwind surface pollution. How lightning emissions will change in a warming world remains uncertain.

  1. Measuring Method for Lightning Channel Temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Zhang, J; Chen, L; Xue, Q; Zhu, R

    2016-09-26

    In this paper, we demonstrate the temperature of lightning channel utilizing the theory of lightning spectra and the model of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The impulse current generator platform (ICGS) was used to simulate the lightning discharge channel, and the spectral energy of infrared spectroscopy (930 nm) and the visible spectroscopy (648.2 nm) of the simulated lightning has been calculated. Results indicate that the peaks of luminous intensity of both infrared and visible spectra increase with the lightning current intensity in range of 5-50 kA. Based on the results, the temperature of the lightning channel is derived to be 6140.8-10424 K. Moreover, the temperature of the channel is approximately exponential to the lightning current intensity, which shows good agreement with that of the natural lightning cases.

  2. Measuring Method for Lightning Channel Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Li, X.; Zhang, J.; Chen, L.; Xue, Q.; Zhu, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the temperature of lightning channel utilizing the theory of lightning spectra and the model of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The impulse current generator platform (ICGS) was used to simulate the lightning discharge channel, and the spectral energy of infrared spectroscopy (930 nm) and the visible spectroscopy (648.2 nm) of the simulated lightning has been calculated. Results indicate that the peaks of luminous intensity of both infrared and visible spectra increase with the lightning current intensity in range of 5–50 kA. Based on the results, the temperature of the lightning channel is derived to be 6140.8–10424 K. Moreover, the temperature of the channel is approximately exponential to the lightning current intensity, which shows good agreement with that of the natural lightning cases. PMID:27665937

  3. 49 CFR 176.120 - Lightning protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Class 1 (Explosive) Materials Stowage § 176.120 Lightning protection. A lightning...

  4. Integration of the Total Lightning Jump Algorithm into Current Operational Warning Environment Conceptual Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shultz, Christopher J.; Carey, Lawrence D.; Schultz, Elise V.; Stano, Geoffrey T.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Goodman, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    The presence and rates of total lightning are both correlated to and physically dependent upon storm updraft strength, mixed phase precipitation volume and the size of the charging zone. The updraft modulates the ingredients necessary for electrification within a thunderstorm, while the updraft also plays a critical role in the development of severe and hazardous weather. Therefore utilizing this relationship, the monitoring of lightning rates and jumps provides an additional piece of information on the evolution of a thunderstorm, more often than not, at higher temporal resolution than current operational radar systems. This correlation is the basis for the total lightning jump algorithm that has been developed in recent years. Currently, the lightning jump algorithm is being tested in two separate but important efforts. Schultz et al. (2014; AMS 10th Satellite Symposium) is exploring the transition of the algorithm from its research based formulation to a fully objective algorithm that includes storm tracking, Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) Proxy data and the lightning jump algorithm. Chronis et al. (2014; this conference) provides context for the transition to current operational forecasting using lightning mapping array based products. However, what remains is an end to end physical and dynamical basis for relating lightning rates to severe storm manifestation, so the forecaster has a reason beyond simple correlation to utilize the lightning jump algorithm within their severe storm conceptual models. Therefore, the physical basis for the lightning jump algorithm in relation to severe storm dynamics and microphysics is a key component that must be further explored. Many radar studies have examined flash rates and their relation to updraft strength, updraft volume, precipitation-sized ice mass, etc.; however, relation specifically to lightning jumps is fragmented within the literature. Thus the goal of this study is to use multiple Doppler techniques to

  5. Physical and Dynamical Linkages between Lightning Jumps and Storm Conceptual Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Christopher J.; Carey, Lawrence D.; Schultz, Elise V.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Goodman, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    The presence and rates of total lightning are both correlated to and physically dependent upon storm updraft strength, mixed phase precipitation volume and the size of the charging zone. The updraft modulates the ingredients necessary for electrification within a thunderstorm, while the updraft also plays a critical role in the development of severe and hazardous weather. Therefore utilizing this relationship, the monitoring of lightning rates and jumps provides an additional piece of information on the evolution of a thunderstorm, more often than not, at higher temporal resolution than current operational radar systems. This correlation is the basis for the total lightning jump algorithm that has been developed in recent years. Currently, the lightning jump algorithm is being tested in two separate but important efforts. Schultz et al. (2014; this conference) is exploring the transition of the algorithm from its research based formulation to a fully objective algorithm that includes storm tracking, Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) Proxy data and the lightning jump algorithm. Chronis et al. (2014; this conference) provides context for the transition to current operational forecasting using lightning mapping array based products. However, what remains is an end-to-end physical and dynamical basis for coupling total lightning flash rates to severe storm manifestation, so the forecaster has a reason beyond simple correlation to utilize the lightning jump algorithm within their severe storm conceptual models. Therefore, the physical basis for the lightning jump algorithm in relation to severe storm dynamics and microphysics is a key component that must be further explored. Many radar studies have examined flash rates and their relationship to updraft strength, updraft volume, precipitation-sized ice mass, etc.; however, their relationship specifically to lightning jumps is fragmented within the literature. Thus the goal of this study is to use multiple Doppler and

  6. Physical and Dynamical Linkages Between Lightning Jumps and Storm Conceptual Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Christopher J.; Carey, Lawrence D.; Schultz, Elise V.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Goodman, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    The presence and rates of total lightning are both correlated to and physically dependent upon storm updraft strength, mixed phase precipitation volume and the size of the charging zone. The updraft modulates the ingredients necessary for electrification within a thunderstorm, while the updraft also plays a critical role in the development of severe and hazardous weather. Therefore utilizing this relationship, the monitoring of lightning rates and jumps provides an additional piece of information on the evolution of a thunderstorm, more often than not, at higher temporal resolution than current operational radar systems. This correlation is the basis for the total lightning jump algorithm that has been developed in recent years. Currently, the lightning jump algorithm is being tested in two separate but important efforts. Schultz et al. (2014; this conference) is exploring the transition of the algorithm from its research based formulation to a fully objective algorithm that includes storm tracking, Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) Proxy data and the lightning jump algorithm. Chronis et al. (2014) provides context for the transition to current operational forecasting using lightning mapping array based products. However, what remains is an end-to-end physical and dynamical basis for coupling total lightning flash rates to severe storm manifestation, so the forecaster has a reason beyond simple correlation to utilize the lightning jump algorithm within their severe storm conceptual models. Therefore, the physical basis for the lightning jump algorithm in relation to severe storm dynamics and microphysics is a key component that must be further explored. Many radar studies have examined flash rates and their relationship to updraft strength, updraft volume, precipitation-sized ice mass, etc.; however, their relationship specifically to lightning jumps is fragmented within the literature. Thus the goal of this study is to use multiple Doppler and polarimetric

  7. Coastline development and change in Alabama and the Florida Panhandle

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, G.M.

    1987-09-01

    Although evidence of sea level rise has caused concern about erosion of the coasts, some coastal areas are accreting. As an investigator approaches a study of any particular stretch of coast, it soon becomes apparent that one problem in determining what is happening, or what has happened to a beach, is the problem of deciding upon a time frame. There are daily, seasonal, and much longer term changes that must be dealt with and understood. On the Alabama coast, there is evidence of both deposition and erosion over relatively long time periods, as well as evidence of cyclical changes. Maps over a 150-year period show steady growth of Perdido Key from Florida into Alabama. Aerial photographs over a 50-year period show an eroded portion of Dauphin Island being built up by deposition, and then eroding again. A prime factor that is pertinent, but seldom considered, is the slower movement associated with tectonics or isostatic adjustment. Previous studies cite evidence of modern up-arching of parts of the Gulf coastal plain accompanying the well-documented subsidence of the Mississippi delta area. First-order leveling reports indicated that many of the coastline areas that are the scenes of most extensive erosion are areas in which the land is subsiding. Other areas, which are neutral or possibly rising slightly, are relatively free from erosional problems. This latter point is particularly important in understanding the Gulf Coast of Alabama and the Florida Panhandle.

  8. Alabama SEP Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, Elizabeth M.

    2014-06-30

    Executive Summary In the fall of 2010, the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs (ADECA) launched the Multi-State Model for Catalyzing the National Home Energy Retrofit Market Project (Multi-State Project). This residential energy efficiency pilot program was a collaborative effort among the states of Alabama, Massachusetts, Virginia, and Washington, and was funded by competitive State Energy Program (SEP) awards through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this project was to catalyze the home energy efficiency retrofit market in select areas within the state of Alabama. To achieve this goal, the project addressed a variety of marketplace elements that did not exist, or were underdeveloped, at the outset of the effort. These included establishing minimum standards and credentials for marketplace suppliers, educating and engaging homeowners on the benefits of energy efficiency and addressing real or perceived financial barriers to investments in whole-home energy efficiency, among others. The anticipated effect of the activities would be increased market demand for retrofits, improved audit to retrofit conversion rates and growth in overall community understanding of energy efficiency. The four-state collaborative was created with the intent of accelerating market transformation by allowing each state to learn from their peers, each of whom possessed different starting points, resources, and strategies for achieving the overall objective. The four partner states engaged the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) to oversee a project steering committee and to manage the project evaluation for all four states. The steering committee, comprised of key program partners, met on a regular basis to provide overall project coordination, guidance, and progress assessment. While there were variances in program design among the states, there were several common elements: use of the Energy Performance Score (EPS) platform; an

  9. Multivariate Statistical Inference of Lightning Occurrence, and Using Lightning Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boccippio, Dennis

    2004-01-01

    Two classes of multivariate statistical inference using TRMM Lightning Imaging Sensor, Precipitation Radar, and Microwave Imager observation are studied, using nonlinear classification neural networks as inferential tools. The very large and globally representative data sample provided by TRMM allows both training and validation (without overfitting) of neural networks with many degrees of freedom. In the first study, the flashing / or flashing condition of storm complexes is diagnosed using radar, passive microwave and/or environmental observations as neural network inputs. The diagnostic skill of these simple lightning/no-lightning classifiers can be quite high, over land (above 80% Probability of Detection; below 20% False Alarm Rate). In the second, passive microwave and lightning observations are used to diagnose radar reflectivity vertical structure. A priori diagnosis of hydrometeor vertical structure is highly important for improved rainfall retrieval from either orbital radars (e.g., the future Global Precipitation Mission "mothership") or radiometers (e.g., operational SSM/I and future Global Precipitation Mission passive microwave constellation platforms), we explore the incremental benefit to such diagnosis provided by lightning observations.

  10. 2008-2009 Alabama Education Report Card

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Year after year, the goal of educators, parents, and concerned citizens throughout Alabama is to provide this state's children with the highest level of quality education possible. The future of Alabama's businesses, industries, commerce, labor force, arts, humanities, and countless other areas are determined by the education that is provided to…

  11. Alabama Education Quick Facts: Plan 2020

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This brochure presents state statistics for the following categories; Alabama public schools, 2012-13; Alabama State Board of Education members; financial data, FY 2012; public school size and enrollment, 2012-13 school year; transportation, 2012-13; school meals, 2011-12; school personnel, 2012-13; graduation rates, 2010-11; graduation…

  12. Alabama Education Quick Facts, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This brochure presents state statistics; Alabama public schools 2009-10; Alabama State Board of Education members; financial data; public school size and enrollment, 2009-10 school year; transportation; school meals; school personnel, 2009-2010; graduation requirements; student assessment; additional enrollment; and dropouts in school year 2008-09.

  13. 40 CFR 81.401 - Alabama.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alabama. 81.401 Section 81.401 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.401 Alabama. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal...

  14. Federal Public Library Programs in Alabama, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    The Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) is charged with improving library services throughout the state to ensure that all citizens have access to quality library and information services. Part of this charge includes the responsibility for receiving and administering federal funds to the more than 200 public libraries in Alabama. Federal…

  15. Federal Public Library Programs in Alabama, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    The Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) is charged with improving library services throughout the state to ensure that all citizens have access to quality library and information services. Part of this charge includes the responsibility for receiving and administering federal funds to the more than 200 public libraries in Alabama. Federal…

  16. 76 FR 9642 - Alabama Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ... fees, and several minor editorial changes throughout the document such as changing ``him'' to ``him or... discuss below concern nonsubstantive wording or editorial changes. A. Alabama Code Sec. 9-16-73 Alabama revised its code at Section 9-16-73(a) with several minor editorial changes. There is no...

  17. Alabama Counseling Association Journal, 1998-1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnuson, Sandy, Ed.; Norem, Ken, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document consists of the two issues of the "Alabama Counseling Association Journal" that make up volume 24. Articles in Issue 1 include: (1) "Learning Comes in Many Forms" (Holly Forester-Miller); (2) "Legislative, Legal, and Sociological Aspects of Alabama's Mental Health System" (David Gamble; Jamie S.…

  18. 75 FR 1420 - Alabama Disaster # AL-00025

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alabama Disaster AL-00025 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Alabama dated...

  19. 78 FR 4967 - Alabama Disaster #AL-00046

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alabama Disaster AL-00046 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of ALABAMA dated...

  20. 78 FR 26100 - Alabama Disaster #AL-00050

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alabama Disaster AL-00050 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Alabama dated...

  1. 76 FR 27141 - Alabama Disaster # AL-00036

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alabama Disaster AL-00036 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Alabama...

  2. 77 FR 7227 - Alabama Disaster #AL-00040

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alabama Disaster AL-00040 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Alabama...

  3. 78 FR 22361 - Alabama Disaster #AL-00049

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alabama Disaster AL-00049 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Alabama dated...

  4. Alabama's Education Report Card, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In a more consistent and viable manner than ever before, education in Alabama is moving toward its ultimate goal of providing every student with a quality education, thereby preparing them for work, college, and life after high school. Alabama's graduation rates from 2002 to 2008 increased significantly, tripling the national average increase and…

  5. Alabama Department of Education Quick Facts, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This brochure presents state statistics; Alabama public schools 2007-08; Alabama State Board of Education members; financial data; public school size and enrollment; transportation; school meals; school personnel, 2007-2008; graduation requirements; student assessment; additional enrollment; and dropouts, 2006-07.

  6. Alabama's Education Report Card 2010-11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Public education in Alabama is moving in the right direction and is poised to be a national model for the college and career readiness of its students. Through some of the most challenging financial circumstances, public education in Alabama has continued to show great promise in many areas, including reading, math, and science. The success of…

  7. Lightning Protection for Composite Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, G. O.

    1985-01-01

    Lightning protection system consisting of two layers of aluminum foil separated by layer of dielectric material protects graphite/epoxy composite structures on aircraft. Protective layer is secondarily applied lightning protection system, prime advantage of which is nullification of thermal and right angle effect of lightning arc attachment to graphite/epoxy laminate.

  8. Detection of VHF lightning from GPS orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Suszcynsky, D. M.

    2003-01-01

    Satellite-based VHF' lightning detection is characterized at GPS orbit by using a VHF receiver system recently launched on the GPS SVN 54 satellite. Collected lightning triggers consist of Narrow Bipolar Events (80%) and strong negative return strokes (20%). The results are used to evaluate the performance of a future GPS-satellite-based VHF global lightning monitor.

  9. 14 CFR 420.71 - Lightning protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Lightning protection. 420.71 Section 420.71... TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE TO OPERATE A LAUNCH SITE Responsibilities of a Licensee § 420.71 Lightning protection. (a) Lightning protection. A licensee shall ensure that the public is not exposed to hazards...

  10. 49 CFR 176.120 - Lightning protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lightning protection. 176.120 Section 176.120 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Requirements for Class 1 (Explosive) Materials Stowage § 176.120 Lightning protection. A lightning...

  11. 14 CFR 35.38 - Lightning strike.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Lightning strike. 35.38 Section 35.38... STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Tests and Inspections § 35.38 Lightning strike. The applicant must demonstrate, by... lightning strike without causing a major or hazardous propeller effect. The limit to which the propeller...

  12. 49 CFR 176.120 - Lightning protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lightning protection. 176.120 Section 176.120 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Requirements for Class 1 (Explosive) Materials Stowage § 176.120 Lightning protection. A lightning...

  13. 14 CFR 420.71 - Lightning protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Lightning protection. 420.71 Section 420.71... TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE TO OPERATE A LAUNCH SITE Responsibilities of a Licensee § 420.71 Lightning protection. (a) Lightning protection. A licensee shall ensure that the public is not exposed to hazards...

  14. 49 CFR 176.120 - Lightning protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lightning protection. 176.120 Section 176.120 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Requirements for Class 1 (Explosive) Materials Stowage § 176.120 Lightning protection. A lightning...

  15. 14 CFR 35.38 - Lightning strike.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Lightning strike. 35.38 Section 35.38... STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Tests and Inspections § 35.38 Lightning strike. The applicant must demonstrate, by... lightning strike without causing a major or hazardous propeller effect. The limit to which the propeller...

  16. 14 CFR 35.38 - Lightning strike.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Lightning strike. 35.38 Section 35.38... STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Tests and Inspections § 35.38 Lightning strike. The applicant must demonstrate, by... lightning strike without causing a major or hazardous propeller effect. The limit to which the propeller...

  17. 49 CFR 176.120 - Lightning protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lightning protection. 176.120 Section 176.120 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Requirements for Class 1 (Explosive) Materials Stowage § 176.120 Lightning protection. A lightning...

  18. 14 CFR 35.38 - Lightning strike.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Lightning strike. 35.38 Section 35.38... STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Tests and Inspections § 35.38 Lightning strike. The applicant must demonstrate, by... lightning strike without causing a major or hazardous propeller effect. The limit to which the propeller...

  19. 14 CFR 420.71 - Lightning protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Lightning protection. 420.71 Section 420.71... TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE TO OPERATE A LAUNCH SITE Responsibilities of a Licensee § 420.71 Lightning protection. (a) Lightning protection. A licensee shall ensure that the public is not exposed to hazards...

  20. 14 CFR 420.71 - Lightning protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Lightning protection. 420.71 Section 420.71... TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE TO OPERATE A LAUNCH SITE Responsibilities of a Licensee § 420.71 Lightning protection. (a) Lightning protection. A licensee shall ensure that the public is not exposed to hazards...

  1. Lightning activity and aerosols over the Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proestakis, Emmanouil; Kazadzis, Stelios; Kotroni, Vassiliki; Lagouvardos, Kostas; Kazantzidis, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Lightning activity has received extended scientific attention over the past decades. Several international studies on lightning activity and initiation mechanisms have related the increased aerosol concentrations to lightning enhancement. In the frame of TALOS project, we investigated the effect of aerosols on lightning activity over the Mediterranean Sea. Cloud to ground lightning activity data from ZEUS lightning detection network operated and maintained by the National Observatory of Athens, were used along with atmospheric optical depth (AOD) data retrieved by MODIS, on board Aqua satellite. The analysis covers a period of nine years, spanning from 2005 up to 2013. The results show the importance of aerosols in lightning initiation and enhancement. It is shown that the mean AOD of the days with lightning activity per season is larger than the mean seasonal AOD in 90% of the under study domain. Furthermore, lightning activity increase with increasing aerosol loading was found to be more pronounced during summertime and for atmospheric optical depth values up to 0.4. Additionally, during summertime, the spatial analysis showed that the percentage of days with lightning activity is increasing with increasing aerosol loading. Finally, time series for the period 2005-2013 of the days with lightning activity and AOD differences showed similar temporal behavior. Overall, both the spatial and temporal analysis showed that lightning activity is correlated to aerosol loading and that this characteristic is consistent for all seasons.

  2. Alabama's Appalachian overthrust amid exploratory drilling resurgence

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.D. ); Epsman, M.L.

    1991-06-24

    Oil and gas exploration has been carried out sporadically in the Appalachian overthrust region of Alabama for years, but recently interest in the play has had a major resurgence. The Appalachian overthrust region of Alabama is best exposed in the valley and ridge physiographic province in the northeast part of the state. Resistant ridges of sandstone and chert and valleys of shales and carbonate have been thrust toward the northwest. Seismic data show that this structural style continues under the Cretaceous overlap. The surface and subsurface expression of the Alabama overthrust extends for more than 4,000 sq miles. Oil and gas have been produced for many years from Cambro-Ordovician, Ordovician, Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian rocks in the nearby Black Warrior basin in Alabama and Mississippi and the Cumberland plateau in Tennessee. The same zones are also potential producing horizons in the Alabama overthrust region.

  3. The Anthropogenic/Lightning Effects Around Houston: The Houston Environmental Aerosol Thunderstorm (HEAT) Project - 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orville, R. E.

    2004-12-01

    A major field program will occur in summer 2005 to determine the sources and causes for the enhanced cloud-to-ground lightning over Houston, Texas. This program will be in association with simultaneous experiments supported by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), formally the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC). Recent studies covering the period 1989-2002 document a 60 percent increase of cloud-to-ground lightning in the Houston area as compared to surrounding background values, which is second in flash density only to the Tampa Bay, Florida area. We suggest that the elevated flash densities could result from several factors, including 1) the convergence due to the urban heat island effect and complex sea breeze (thermal hypothesis), and 2) the increasing levels of air pollution from anthropogenic sources producing numerous small cloud droplets and thereby suppressing mean droplet size (aerosol hypothesis). The latter effect would enable more cloud water to reach the mixed phase region where it is involved in the formation of precipitation and the separation of electric charge, leading to an enhancement of lightning. The primary goals of HEAT are to examine the effects of (1) pollution, (2) the urban heat island, and (3) the complex coastline on storms and lightning characteristics in the Houston area. The transport of air pollutants by Houston thunderstorms will be investigated. In particular, the relative amounts of lightning-produced and convectively transported NOx into the upper troposphere will be determined, and a comparison of the different NOx sources in the urban area of Houston will be developed. The HEAT project is based on the observation that there is an enhancement in cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning. Total lightning (intracloud (IC) and CG) will be measured using a lightning mapping system (LDAR II) to observe if there is an enhancement in intracloud lightning as well.

  4. Total Lightning Observations within Electrified Snowfall using Polarimetric Radar, LMA, and NLDN Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Christopher J.; Carey, Lawerence D.; Brunning, Eric C.; Blakeslee, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Four electrified snowfall cases are examined using total lightning measurements from lightning mapping arrays (LMAs), and the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) from Huntsville, AL and Washington D.C. In each of these events, electrical activity was in conjunction with heavy snowfall rates, sometimes exceeding 5-8 cm hr-1. A combination of LMA, and NLDN data also indicate that many of these flashes initiated from tall communications towers and traveled over large horizontal distances. During events near Huntsville, AL, the Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR) C-band polarimetric radar was collecting range height indicators (RHIs) through regions of heavy snowfall. The combination of ARMOR polarimetric radar and VHF LMA observations suggested contiguous layer changes in height between sloping aggregate-dominated layers and horizontally-oriented crystals. These layers may have provided ideal conditions for the development of extensive regions of charge and resultant horizontal propagation of the lightning flashes over large distances.

  5. Preliminary results of the study of lightning location relative to storm structure and dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, W. D.; Taylor, W. L.; Macgorman, D.

    1981-01-01

    Lightning is being studied relative to storm structure using a VHF space-time discharge mapping system, radar, a cloud-to-ground flash locator, acoustic reconstruction of thunder, and other instrumentation. The horizontal discharge processes within the cloud generally propagate at speeds of 10,000-100,000 m/s. Horizontal extents of lightning were found up to 90 km. In an analysis of a limited number of flashes, lightning occurred in or near regions of high cyclonic shear. Positive cloud-to-ground flashes have been observed emanating from several identifiable regions of severe storms. Lightning echoes observed with 10-cm radar generally are 10-25 dB greater than the largest precipitation echo in the storm.

  6. A Method for Retrieving Ground Flash Fraction from Satellite Lightning Imager Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William J.

    2009-01-01

    A general theory for retrieving the fraction of ground flashes in N lightning observed by a satellite-based lightning imager is provided. An "exponential model" is applied as a physically reasonable constraint to describe the measured optical parameter distributions, and population statistics (i.e., mean, variance) are invoked to add additional constraints to the retrieval process. The retrieval itself is expressed in terms of a Bayesian inference, and the Maximum A Posteriori (MAP) solution is obtained. The approach is tested by performing simulated retrievals, and retrieval error statistics are provided. The ability to retrieve ground flash fraction has important benefits to the atmospheric chemistry community. For example, using the method to partition the existing satellite global lightning climatology into separate ground and cloud flash climatologies will improve estimates of lightning nitrogen oxides (NOx) production; this in turn will improve both regional air quality and global chemistry/climate model predictions.

  7. Experimental generation of volcanic lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimarelli, Corrado; Alatorre-Ibargüengoitia, Miguel; Kueppers, Ulrich; Scheu, Bettina; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2014-05-01

    Ash-rich volcanic plumes that are responsible for injecting large quantities of aerosols into the atmosphere are often associated with intense electrical activity. Direct measurement of the electric potential at the crater, where the electric activity in the volcanic plume is first observed, is severely impeded, limiting progress in its investigation. We have achieved volcanic lightning in the laboratory during rapid decompression experiments of gas-particle mixtures under controlled conditions. Upon decompression (from ~100 bar argon pressure to atmospheric pressure), loose particles are vertically accelerated and ejected through a nozzle of 2.8 cm diameter into a large tank filled with air at atmospheric conditions. Because of their impulsive character, our experiments most closely represent the conditions encountered in the gas-thrust region of the plume, when ash is first ejected from the crater. We used sieved natural ash with different grain sizes from Popocatépetl (Mexico), Eyjafjallajökull (Iceland), and Soufrière Hills (Montserrat) volcanoes, as well as micrometric glass beads to constrain the influence of material properties on lightning. We monitored the dynamics of the particle-laden jets with a high-speed camera and the pressure and electric potential at the nozzle using a pressure transducer and two copper ring antennas connected to a high-impedance data acquisition system, respectively. We find that lightning is controlled by the dynamics of the particle-laden jet and by the abundance of fine particles. Two main conditions are required to generate lightning: 1) self-electrification of the particles and 2) clustering of the particles driven by the jet fluid dynamics. The relative movement of clusters of charged particles within the plume generates the gradient in electrical potential, which is necessary for lightning. In this manner it is the gas-particle dynamics together with the evolving particle-density distribution within different regions of

  8. Tropic lightning: myth or menace?

    PubMed

    McCarthy, John

    2014-11-01

    Lightning is one of the leading causes of death related to environmental disaster. Of all lightning fatalities documented between 2006 and 2012, leisure activities contributed the largest proportion of deaths, with water-associated, sports, and camping being the most common. Despite the prevalence of these activities throughout the islands, Hawai'i has had zero documented lightning fatalities since weather data tracking was initiated in 1959. There is a common misconception that lightning does not strike the ground in Hawai'i. This myth may contribute to a potentially dangerous false sense of security, and recognition of warning signs and risk factor modification remain the most important prevention strategies. Lightning damage occurs on a spectrum, from minor burns to multi-organ dysfunction. After injury, initial treatment should focus on "reverse triage" and immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation when indicated, followed by transfer to a healthcare facility. Definitive treatment entails monitoring and management of potential sequelae, to include cardiovascular, neurologic, dermatologic, ophthalmologic, audiovestibular, and psychiatric complications.

  9. Modern Protection Against Lightning Strikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C.

    2005-05-01

    The application of science to provide protection against lightning strikes began around 1750 when Benjamin Franklin who invented the lightning rod in an effort to discharge thunderclouds. Instead of preventing lightning as he expected, his rods have been quite successful as strike receptors, intercepting cloud-to ground discharges and conducting them to Earth without damage to the structures on which they are mounted. In the years since Franklin's invention there has been little attention paid to the rod configuration that best serves as a strike receptor but Franklin's original ideas continue to be rediscovered and promoted. Recent measurements of the responses of variously configured rods to nearby strikes indicate that sharp-tipped rods are not the optimum configuration to serve as strike receptors since the ionization of the air around their tips limits the strength of the local electric fields created by an approaching lightning leader. In these experiments, fourteen blunt-tipped rods exposed in strike-reception competitions with nearby sharp-tipped rods were struck by lightning but none of the sharp-tipped rods were struck.

  10. Positive lightning and severe weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, C.; Murphy, B.

    2003-04-01

    In recent years researchers have noticed that severe weather (tornados, hail and damaging winds) are closely related to the amount of positive lightning occurring in thunderstorms. On 4 July 1999, a severe derecho (wind storm) caused extensive damage to forested regions along the United States/Canada border, west of Lake Superior. There were 665,000 acres of forest destroyed in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCAW) in Minnesota and Quetico Provincial Park in Canada, with approximately 12.5 million trees blown down. This storm resulted in additional severe weather before and after the occurrence of the derecho, with continuous cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning occurring for more than 34 hours during its path across North America. At the time of the derecho the percentage of positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) lightning measured by the Canadian Lightning Detection Network (CLDN) was greater than 70% for more than three hours, with peak values reaching 97% positive CG lightning. Such high ratios of +CG are rare, and may be useful indicators for short-term forecasts of severe weather.

  11. Lightning at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbons, W. C.; Boyd, B. F.; Jafferis, W.

    1986-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is situated in an area that experiences one of the world's highest rates of cloud-ground lightning strikes, about 600-2000 strikes per summer. Two lightning detection systems have been implemented, the Launch Pad Lightning Warning System (LPLWS) and the Lightning Location and Protection system (LLP). The LPLWS consists of field mills of eight vertically oriented stator sections mounted 10 in. above ground and alternately covered and uncovered as the rotor turns. Differential voltages between covered and uncovered sections furnish electric field amplitude and polarity data. Ten samples per second are telemetered to a central processing facility. The system is used during launch and landing. The LLP has high and low gain components, the former being two direction finder antennas with 100 m strike position finding accuracy, the latter featuring medium gain antennas for 500 m accuracy in locating strikes. The LLP system is used primarily to warn personnel of strike conditions and to lift warnings to avoid lost work time. Several experimental programs have been initiated for triggering lightning strikes and controlling their locations.

  12. Final Technical Report. Upgrades to Alabama Power Company Hydroelectric Developments

    SciTech Connect

    Crew, James F.; Johnson, Herbie N.

    2015-03-31

    From 2010 to 2014, Alabama Power Company (“Alabama Power”) performed upgrades on four units at three of the hydropower developments it operates in east-central Alabama under licenses issued by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (“FERC”). These three hydropower developments are located on the Coosa River in Coosa, Chilton, and Elmore counties in east-central Alabama.

  13. Artificial lightning data as proxy data for the algorithm development for the geostationary lightning imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finke, U.

    2009-12-01

    The geostationary Meteosat Third Generation (MTG) will carry the Lightning Imager (LI) for the detection and location of the total lightning by optical means. The Lightning Imager will continuously observe the full visible disk and provide lightning data with high uniformity over land and ocean during day and night. Its main operational applications are the nowcasting of severe storms and the warning of lightning strike threat. For the development of the data processor prototype a proxy data set is necessary as a reference data set in order to prove the function of the algorithms under the expected observation conditions. Additionally, a set of proxy data simulating the optical pulses originating from lightning can be used to optimize the performance of the detecting instrument. This contribution presents the methodology and the results of the generation of artificial lightning data. The artificial data set is created by random number generators which produces data obeying the same statistical distribution characteristics as real data. The generator bases on the empirical distribution density functions of the lightning characteristics which were derived from optical lightning observations by low orbit satellites (LIS) and ground based observations of lightning. The resulting artificial data represent optical lightning pulses as seen on the upper cloud surface. They are characterized by their distribution on three scales: the distribution of photons in a single lightning pulse, the distribution of lightning flashes in a single storm and the distribution of storms on the globe. The artificial data are used as input for the data processing and product generating algorithms. The elementary product of the lightning imager are the detected lightning pulses with their time, location and optical energy. These data are the basis for the generation of the various meteorological products such as lightning densities in geographical areas, storm cells with their motion

  14. Recent Lightning Experiments at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing: From Ball Lightning to Gamma Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uman, M. A.

    2008-12-01

    Recent lightning data and the instrumentation used to acquire it at the UF-FIT International Center for Lightning Research and Testing, located on about 1 square kilometer of flat ground at the Camp Blanding Army National Guard Base in north-central Florida, are discussed. The progress of several on-going studies is reviewed: (1) understanding the physics of the "classical" rocket-and-wire triggering of lightning from natural overhead thunderclouds, (2) attempting to generate ball lightning by allowing triggered-lightning to strike various materials and objects (e.g., tree-trunk sections, pools of salt water, silicon powder), (3) measuring the very close (100 m to 1 km) electric and magnetic fields of natural cloud-to-ground lightning, and (4) probing the relationship between lightning processes and the x-rays and gamma-rays associated with them.

  15. Filigree burn of lightning: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Virendra

    2007-04-01

    Lightning is a powerful natural electrostatic discharge produced during a thunderstorm. The electric current passing through the discharge channels is direct with a potential of 1000 million volts or more. Lightning can kill or injure a person by a direct strike, a side-flash, or conduction through another object. Lightning can cause a variety of injuries in the skin and the cardiovascular, neurological and ophthalmic systems. Filigree burn of lightning is a superficial burn and very rare. Two cases of death from lightning which have this rare finding are reported and discussed.

  16. NASA Manned Launch Vehicle Lightning Protection Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCollum, Matthew B.; Jones, Steven R.; Mack, Jonathan D.

    2009-01-01

    Historically, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) relied heavily on lightning avoidance to protect launch vehicles and crew from lightning effects. As NASA transitions from the Space Shuttle to the new Constellation family of launch vehicles and spacecraft, NASA engineers are imposing design and construction standards on the spacecraft and launch vehicles to withstand both the direct and indirect effects of lightning. A review of current Space Shuttle lightning constraints and protection methodology will be presented, as well as a historical review of Space Shuttle lightning requirements and design. The Space Shuttle lightning requirements document, NSTS 07636, Lightning Protection, Test and Analysis Requirements, (originally published as document number JSC 07636, Lightning Protection Criteria Document) was developed in response to the Apollo 12 lightning event and other experiences with NASA and the Department of Defense launch vehicles. This document defined the lightning environment, vehicle protection requirements, and design guidelines for meeting the requirements. The criteria developed in JSC 07636 were a precursor to the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) lightning standards. These SAE standards, along with Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics (RTCA) DO-160, Environmental Conditions and Test Procedures for Airborne Equipment, are the basis for the current Constellation lightning design requirements. The development and derivation of these requirements will be presented. As budget and schedule constraints hampered lightning protection design and verification efforts, the Space Shuttle elements waived the design requirements and relied on lightning avoidance in the form of launch commit criteria (LCC) constraints and a catenary wire system for lightning protection at the launch pads. A better understanding of the lightning environment has highlighted the vulnerability of the protection schemes and associated risk to the vehicle

  17. Lightning Effects in the Payload Changeout Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Garland L.; Fisher, Franklin A.; Collier, Richard S.; Medelius, Pedro J.

    1997-01-01

    Analytical and empirical studies have been performed to provide better understanding of the electromagnetic environment inside the Payload Changeout Room and Orbiter payload bay resulting from lightning strikes to the launch pad lightning protection system. The analytical studies consisted of physical and mathematical modeling of the pad structure and the Payload Changeout Room. Empirical testing was performed using a lightning simulator to simulate controlled (8 kA) lightning strikes to the catenary wire lightning protection system. In addition to the analyses and testing listed above, an analysis of the configuration with the vehicle present was conducted, in lieu of testing, by the Finite Difference, Time Domain method.

  18. Evolution of charge and lightning throughout an observed and simulated supercell storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlman, Kristin Marie

    A high-precipitation tornadic supercell storm was observed by multiple platforms on 29 May 2004 during the Thunderstorm Electrification and Lightning Experiment (TELEX). Observational systems included the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array (LMA), mobile balloon-borne soundings, and two mobile SMART-R (SR) C-Band radars. This dissertation utilizes data from these platforms to relate the spatial distribution and evolution of lightning to storm kinematics and microphysics, especially to regions of microphysical charging and the location and geometry of those charge regions. One example is the relationship of the observed transient lightning hole and of large lightning densities to kinematic properties inferred from dual-Doppler analyses of the SR data. The lightning flashes near the core of this storm, although extraordinarily frequent, tended to have shorter duration and smaller horizontal extent than typical flashes in other storms having less frequent lightning. This is due, at least in part, to many small pockets of charge lying in close proximity to small pockets of the opposite polarity of charge. Thus, each polarity of lightning leader propagates only a relatively short distance before reaching regions of unfavorable electrical potential. In the anvil, however, lightning extended tens of kilometers from the reflectivity cores in roughly horizontal layers, consistent with the charge spreading through the anvil in broad sheets. Previous studies of lightning in anvil clouds have reported that flashes began in or near the storm core and propagated downwind into the anvil, and many flashes followed that pattern in this storm. However, this dissertation presents the first observations of flashes that began in the anvil 30-100 km from the cores of the storms and propagated upwind back toward the cores. It had been thought that flashes could not be initiated far downwind in the anvil, because anvil charge was thought to be produced mainly in the storm's deep updraft and

  19. Upgrade of the U.S. National Lightning Detection Network in 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, A.; Murphy, M. J.; Pifer, A.; Cummins, K. L.; Cramer, J.

    2013-12-01

    , network inter-comparison (against the Lightning Mapping array), and camera studies and selected results will be presented.

  20. Mathematical and physical scaling of triggered lightning

    SciTech Connect

    Ziolkowski, R.W.; Grant, J.B.

    1982-12-01

    As the aircraft industry incorporates current technology in airborne systems, electromagnetic compatibility can decrease. Composite fuselages can be more transparent to EMP, whether nuclear or lightning generated, than metal ones. Solid-state circuitry is sensitive to intense EM fluctuations whereas mechanical controls generally are not. With this increased vulnerability comes increased concern for these dangers. Recently the anxiety over lightning has risen. Answers are sought to such questions as: how do the lightning EM effects couple into the aircraft's interior. Do aircraft trigger lightning, and if so, can the triggering be minimized. An understanding, at least to some extent, of lightning would provide a needed foundation to examine the interaction of aircraft with lightning. A review of the literature on lightning and lightning-aircraft investigations, including triggered lightning, was conducted and is briefly summarized in this paper. In addition to this brief literature review, scaling the lightning event to laboratory size is also discussed. The ability to scale would allow accurate investigation of lightning effects, as well as the triggering phenomena, in scaled experiments.

  1. Lightning hazard reduction at wind farms

    SciTech Connect

    Kithil, R.

    1997-12-31

    The USA wind farm industry (WFI) largely is centered in low-lightning areas of the State of California. While some evidence of lightning incidents is reported here, the problem is not regarded as serious by most participants. The USA WFI now is moving eastward, into higher areas of lightning activity. The European WFI has had many years experience with lightning problems. One 1995 German study estimated that 80% of wind turbine insurance claims paid for damage compensation were caused by lightning strikes. The European and USA WFI have not adopted site criteria, design fundamentals, or certification techniques aimed at lightning safety. Sufficient evidence about lightning at wind farms is available to confirm that serious potential problems exist.

  2. Inflight lightning characteristics measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, F. L.; Thomas, M. E.; Campbell, R. E.; Thomas, R. M.; Zaepfel, K. P.

    1979-01-01

    A research data-gathering system being developed for inflight measurement of direct and nearby lightning strike characteristics is described. Wideband analog recorders used to record the lightning scenario are supplemented with high-sample-rate digital transient recorders with augmented memory capacity for increased time resolution of specific times of interest. The endless-loop data storage technique employed by the transient recorders circumvents problems associated with oscilloscopic techniques and allows unattended operation. System integrity and immunity from induced effects is accomplished by fiber-optics signal-transmission links, shielded system enclosures, and the use of a dynamotor for power system isolation.

  3. Lightning and Life on Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimmer, Paul; Ardaseva, Aleksandra; Hodosan, Gabriella; Helling, Christiane

    2016-07-01

    Miller and Urey performed a ground-breaking experiment, in which they discovered that electric discharges through a low redox ratio gas of methane, ammonia, water vapor and hydrogen produced a variety of amino acids, the building blocks of proteins. Since this experiment, there has been significant interest on the connection between lightning chemistry and the origin of life. Investigation into the atmosphere of the Early Earth has generated a serious challenge for this project, as it has been determined both that Earth's early atmosphere was likely dominated by carbon dioxide and molecular nitrogen with only small amounts of hydrogen, having a very high redox ratio, and that discharges in gases with high redox ratios fail to yield more than trace amounts of biologically relevant products. This challenge has motivated several origin of life researchers to abandon lightning chemistry, and to concentrate on other pathways for prebiotic synthesis. The discovery of over 2000 exoplanets includes a handful of rocky planets within the habitable zones around their host stars. These planets can be viewed as remote laboratories in which efficient lightning driven prebiotic synthesis may take place. This is because many of these rocky exoplanets, called super-Earths, have masses significantly greater than that of Earth. This higher mass would allow them to more retain greater amounts hydrogen within their atmosphere, reducing the redox ratio. Discharges in super-Earth atmospheres can therefore result in a significant yield of amino acids. In this talk, I will discuss new work on what lightning might look like on exoplanets, and on lightning driven chemistry on super-Earths. Using a chemical kinetics model for a super-Earth atmosphere with smaller redox ratios, I will show that in the presence of lightning, the production of the amino acid glycine is enhanced up to a certain point, but with very low redox ratios, the production of glycine is again inhibited. I will conclude

  4. Lightning in Colorado forest fire smoke plumes during summer 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, T. J.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Dolan, B.; Lindsey, D.; Rutledge, S. A.; Rison, W.

    2012-12-01

    May and June 2012 were unusually hot and dry in Colorado, which was suffering from a strong drought. A major consequence of this climatic regime was one of the most destructive forest fire seasons in state history, with hundreds of thousands of acres of forest and grassland consumed by flames, hundreds of homes burned, and several lives lost. Many of these fires occurred within range of the newly installed Colorado Lightning Mapping Array (COLMA), which provides high-resolution observations of discharges over a large portion of the state. The COLMA was installed in advance of the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) project. High-altitude lightning was observed to occur sporadically in the smoke plumes over three major fires that occurred during early summer: Hewlett Gulch, High Park, and Waldo Canyon. Additionally, the Colorado State University CHILL (CSU-CHILL) and Pawnee radars observed the Hewlett Gulch plume electrify with detailed polarimetric and dual-Doppler measurements, and also provided these same measurements for the High Park plume when it was not producing lightning. Meanwhile, local Next Generation Radars (NEXRADs) provided observations of the electrified High Park and Waldo Canyon plumes. All of these plumes also were observed by geostationary meteorological satellites. These observations provide an unprecedented dataset with which to study smoke plume and pyrocumulus electrification. The polarimetric data - low reflectivity, high differential reflectivity, low correlation coefficient, and noisy differential phase - were consistent with the smoke plumes and associated pyrocumulus being filled primarily with irregularly shaped ash particles. Lightning was not observed in the plumes until they reached over 10 km above mean sea level, which was an uncommon occurrence requiring explosive fire growth combined with increased meteorological instability and reduced wind shear. Plume updraft intensification and echo-top growth led the occurrence of

  5. Physical Mechanism of Initial Breakdown Pulses in Lightning Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, C.; Pasko, V. P.

    2014-12-01

    The initial breakdown stage of a lightning flash encompasses its first several to tens of milliseconds and it is characterized by a sequence of pulses typically detected with electric field change sensors on the ground [e.g., Villanueva et al., JGR, 99, D7, 1994]. A typical (referred to as "classical") initial breakdown pulse (IBP) has duration of tens of microseconds and it is one of the largest pulses at the beginning of a lightning flash, but a wide range of pulse durations and amplitudes also occur [e.g., Nag et al., Atmos. Res., 91, 316, 2009]. Recent results by Marshall et al. [JGR, 119, 445, 2014] suggest that IBPs should be observable in all lightning discharges. Complementarily, Stolzenburg et al. [JGR, 118, 2918, 2013] correlated individual IBPs to bursts of light that appear to be illumination of a lightning leader channel and Karunarathne et al. [JGR, 118, 7129, 2013] have determined that as a flash evolves the location of IBP sources inside the cloud coincide with the position of negative leaders as determined by a VHF lightning mapping system. In view of the above listed properties of IBPs, we have developed a new numerical model to investigate the electromagnetic signatures associated with these events and to relate them to the initial lightning leader development. The model is built on a bidirectional (zero-net-charge) lightning leader concept [e.g., Mazur and Ruhnke, JGR, 103, D18, 1998]. We simulate a finite-length finite-conductivity leader elongating in the thunderstorm electric field and we solve a set of integro-differential equations to retrieve the full dynamics of charges and currents induced in it. Our proposed approach is a generalization of the transmission-line [e.g., Nag and Rakov, JGR, 115, D20102, 2010] and electrostatic [e.g., Pasko, GRL, 41, 179, 2014] approximations used for analysis of in-cloud discharge processes. We also allow for different propagation mechanisms at the different polarity leader extremities, i.e., continuous

  6. Stratigraphic and hydrogeologic framework of the Alabama Coastal Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    Tertiary and Cretaceous sand aquifers of the Southeastern United States Coastal Plain comprise a major multlstate aquifer system informally defined as the Southeastern Coastal Plain aquifer system, which is being studied as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's Regional Aquifer System Analysis (RASA) program. The major objectives of each RASA study are to identify, delineate, and map the distribution of permeable clastlc rock, to examine the pattern of ground-water flow within the regional aquifers, and to develop digital computer simulations to understand the flow system. The Coastal Plain aquifers in Alabama are being studied as a part of this system. This report describes the stratlgraphlc framework of the Cretaceous, Tertiary, and Quaternary Systems in Alabama to aid in delineating aquifers and confining units within the thick sequence of sediments that comprises the Southeastern Coastal Plain aquifer system in the State. Stratigraphlc units of Cretaceous and Tertiary age that make up most of the aquifer system in the Coastal Plain of Alabama consist of clastlc deposits of Early Cretaceous age; the Coker and Gordo Formations of the Tuscaloosa Group, Eutaw Formation, and Selma Group of Late Cretaceous age; and the Midway, Wilcox, and Clalborne Groups of Tertiary age. However, stratigraphlc units of late Eocene to Holocene age partially overlie and are hydraulically connected to clastic deposits in southern Alabama. These upper carbonate and clastlc stratlgraphic units also are part of the adjoining Florldan and Gulf Coastal Lowlands aquifer systems. The Coastal Plain aquifer system is underlain by pre-Cretaceous rocks consisting of low-permeabillty sedimentary rocks of Paleozolc, Triassic, and Jurassic age, and a complex of metamorphic and igneous rocks of Precambrian and Paleozolc age similar to those found near the surface in the Piedmont physiographic province. Twelve hydrogeologlc units in the Alabama Coastal Plain are defined--slx aquifers and six confining

  7. LRAT: Lightning Radiative Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phanord, Dieudonne D.

    1993-01-01

    In this report, we extend to cloud physics the work done for single and multiple scattering of electromagnetic waves. We consider the scattering of light, visible or infrared, by a spherical cloud represented by a statistically homogeneous ensemble of configurations of N identical spherical water droplets whose centers are uniformly distributed in its volume V. The ensemble is specified by the average number rho of scatterers in unit volume and by rho f(R) with f(R) as the distribution function for separations R of pairs. The incident light, vector-phi(sub 0) a plane electromagnetic wave with harmonic time dependence, is from outside the cloud. The propagation parameter kappa(sub 0) and the index of refraction eta(sub 0) determine physically the medium outside the distribution of scatterers. We solve the interior problem separately to obtain the bulk parameters for the scatterer equivalent to the ensemble of spherical droplets. With the interior solution or the equivalent medium approach, the multiple scattering problem is reduced to that of an equivalent single scatterer excited from outside illumination. A dispersion relation which determines the bulk propagation parameter K and the bulk index of refraction eta of the cloud is given in terms of the vector equivalent scattering amplitude vector-G and the dyadic scattering amplitude tilde-g of the single object in isolation. Based on this transfer model we will have the ability to consider clouds composed of inhomogeneous distribution of water and/or ice particles and we will be able to take into account particle size distributions within the cloud. We will also be able to study the effects of cloud composition (i.e., particle shape, size, composition, orientation, location) on the polarization of the single or the multiple scattered waves. Finally, this study will provide a new starting point for studying the problem of lightning radiative transfer.

  8. Lightning and Electric Field Structure of a Squall Line During TELEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macgorman, D.; Rust, D.; Bruning, E.; Ramig, N.; Apostolakopoulos, I.; Schuur, T.; Biggerstaff, M.; Straka, J.; Krehbiel, P.; Rison, B.; Hamlin, T.

    2004-12-01

    During the 2004 field program for the Thunderstorm Electrification and Lightning Experiment (TELEX), simultaneous electric field soundings, three-dimensional lightning mapping observations, high-resolution Doppler radar data, polarimetric radar data, and environmental soundings were acquired for several mesoscale convective systems, supercell storms, and non-severe thunderstorms. The overall data set was of particularly high quality for a squall line that produced frequent lightning in southern and central Oklahoma on the morning of 19 June 2004. A total of five balloon-borne electric field soundings were launched into the leading line of convection and into the trailing stratiform region. Two 5-cm wavelength mobile Doppler radars (SMART-R's) provided coordinated volume scans every 3 min throughout the period of operations. Furthermore, all operations were well within range of the 10-cm wavelength polarimetric radar and the three-dimensional lightning mapping array. This presentation will emphasize lightning mapping and electric field observations to characterize the electrical behavior of the convective line and the stratiform region.

  9. A Total Lightning Perspective of the 20 May 2013 Moore, Oklahoma Supercell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stano, Geoffrey T.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Carey, Lawrence D.; MacGorman, Don R.; Calhoun, Kristin M.

    2014-01-01

    In the early afternoon of 20 May 2013, a storm initiated to the west-southwest of Newcastle, Oklahoma. This storm would rapidly intensify into the parent supercell of the tornado that struck the city of Moore, Oklahoma. This article describes what contributions total lightning observations from the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array could provide to operational forecasters had these observations been available in real-time. This effort includes a focus on the GOES-R pseudo-geostationary lightning mapper demonstration product as well as the NASA SPoRT / Meteorological Development Laboratory's total lightning tracking tool. These observations and tools identified several contributions. Two distinct lightning jumps at 1908 and 1928 UTC provided a lead time of 19 minutes ahead of severe hail and 26 minutes ahead of the Moore, Oklahoma tornado's touchdown. These observations provide strong situational awareness to forecasters, as the lightning jumps are related to the rapid strengthening of the storm's updraft and mesocyclone and serve as a precursor to the stretching of the storm vortex ahead severe weather.

  10. Laboratory-produced ball lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golka, Robert K., Jr.

    1994-05-01

    For 25 years I have actively been searching for the true nature of ball lightning and attempting to reproduce it at will in the laboratory. As one might expect, many unidentified lights in the atmosphere have been called ball lightning, including Texas Maffa lights (automobile headlights), flying saucers (UFOs), swamp gas in Ann Arbor, Michigan, etc. For 15 years I thought ball lightning was strictly a high-voltage phenomenon. It was not until 1984 when I was short-circuiting the electrical output of a diesel electric railroad locomotive that I realized that the phenomenon was related more to a high current. Although I am hoping for some other types of ball lightning to emerge such as strictly electrostatic-electromagnetic manifestations, I have been unlucky in finding laboratory provable evidence. Cavity-formed plasmodes can be made by putting a 2-inch burning candle in a home kitchen microwave oven. The plasmodes float around for as long as the microwave energy is present.

  11. Aircraft Lightning Electromagnetic Environment Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, Jay J.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Szatkowski, George N.

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines a NASA project plan for demonstrating a prototype lightning strike measurement system that is suitable for installation onto research aircraft that already operate in thunderstorms. This work builds upon past data from the NASA F106, FAA CV-580, and Transall C-180 flight projects, SAE ARP5412, and the European ILDAS Program. The primary focus is to capture airframe current waveforms during attachment, but may also consider pre and post-attachment current, electric field, and radiated field phenomena. New sensor technologies are being developed for this system, including a fiber-optic Faraday polarization sensor that measures lightning current waveforms from DC to over several Megahertz, and has dynamic range covering hundreds-of-volts to tens-of-thousands-of-volts. A study of the electromagnetic emission spectrum of lightning (including radio wave, microwave, optical, X-Rays and Gamma-Rays), and a compilation of aircraft transfer-function data (including composite aircraft) are included, to aid in the development of other new lightning environment sensors, their placement on-board research aircraft, and triggering of the onboard instrumentation system. The instrumentation system will leverage recent advances in high-speed, high dynamic range, deep memory data acquisition equipment, and fiber-optic interconnect.

  12. Modern concepts of treatment and prevention of lightning injuries.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Farinholt, Heidi-Marie A; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D; Long, William B

    2005-01-01

    Lightning is the second most common cause of weather-related death in the United States. Lightning is a natural atmospheric discharge that occurs between regions of net positive and net negative electric charges. There are several types of lightning, including streak lightning, sheet lightning, ribbon lightning, bead lightning, and ball lightning. Lightning causes injury through five basic mechanisms: direct strike, flash discharge (splash), contact, ground current (step voltage), and blunt trauma. While persons struck by lightning show evidence of multisystem derangement, the most dramatic effects involve the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. Cardiopulmonary arrest is the most common cause of death in lightning victims. Immediate resuscitation of people struck by lightning greatly affects the prognosis. Electrocardiographic changes observed following lightning accidents are probably from primary electric injury or burns of the myocardium without coronary artery occlusion. Lightning induces vasomotor spasm from direct sympathetic stimulation resulting in severe loss of pulses in the extremities. This vasoconstriction may be associated with transient paralysis. Damage to the central nervous system accounts for the second most debilitating group of injuries. Central nervous system injuries from lightning include amnesia and confusion, immediate loss of consciousness, weakness, intracranial injuries, and even brief aphasia. Other organ systems injured by lightning include the eye, ear, gastrointestinal system, skin, and musculoskeletal system. The best treatment of lightning injuries is prevention. The Lightning Safety Guidelines devised by the Lightning Safety Group should be instituted in the United States and other nations to prevent these devastating injuries.

  13. North Alabama water quality assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    TVA has been involved in an extensive investigation of toxics in fish from reservoirs in north Alabama for several years. The initial study (1984) included several species of fish and a broad array of contaminants. Levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in catfish from Wilson Reservoir were of greatest interest. PCB concentrations in 22 of 45 catfish from Wilson equaled or exceeded the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tolerance. Catfish from upper Pickwick Reservoir were not as highly contaminated--only one of 18 individuals exceeded the FDA tolerance and the average was substantially below that level. However, in addition to analysis of the 18 individuals, two composites of three catfish each were analyzed from the same locations. 6 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs.

  14. Jovian Lightning and Moonlit Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Jovian lightning and moonlit clouds. These two images, taken 75 minutes apart, show lightning storms on the night side of Jupiter along with clouds dimly lit by moonlight from Io, Jupiter's closest moon. The images were taken in visible light and are displayed in shades of red. The images used an exposure time of about one minute, and were taken when the spacecraft was on the opposite side of Jupiter from the Earth and Sun. Bright storms are present at two latitudes in the left image, and at three latitudes in the right image. Each storm was made visible by multiple lightning strikes during the exposure. Other Galileo images were deliberately scanned from east to west in order to separate individual flashes. The images show that Jovian and terrestrial lightning storms have similar flash rates, but that Jovian lightning strikes are a few orders of magnitude brighter in visible light.

    The moonlight from Io allows the lightning storms to be correlated with visible cloud features. The latitude bands where the storms are seen seem to coincide with the 'disturbed regions' in daylight images, where short-lived chaotic motions push clouds to high altitudes, much like thunderstorms on Earth. The storms in these images are roughly one to two thousand kilometers across, while individual flashes appear hundreds of kilometer across. The lightning probably originates from the deep water cloud layer and illuminates a large region of the visible ammonia cloud layer from 100 kilometers below it.

    There are several small light and dark patches that are artifacts of data compression. North is at the top of the picture. The images span approximately 50 degrees in latitude and longitude. The lower edges of the images are aligned with the equator. The images were taken on October 5th and 6th, 1997 at a range of 6.6 million kilometers by the Solid State Imaging (SSI) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for

  15. On the Relationship between Observed NLDN Lightning ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lightning-produced nitrogen oxides (NOX=NO+NO2) in the middle and upper troposphere play an essential role in the production of ozone (O3) and influence the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere. Despite much effort in both observing and modeling lightning NOX during the past decade, considerable uncertainties still exist with the quantification of lightning NOX production and distribution in the troposphere. It is even more challenging for regional chemistry and transport models to accurately parameterize lightning NOX production and distribution in time and space. The Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) parameterizes the lightning NO emissions using local scaling factors adjusted by the convective precipitation rate that is predicted by the upstream meteorological model; the adjustment is based on the observed lightning strikes from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). For this parameterization to be valid, the existence of an a priori reasonable relationship between the observed lightning strikes and the modeled convective precipitation rates is needed. In this study, we will present an analysis leveraged on the observed NLDN lightning strikes and CMAQ model simulations over the continental United States for a time period spanning over a decade. Based on the analysis, new parameterization scheme for lightning NOX will be proposed and the results will be evaluated. The proposed scheme will be beneficial to modeling exercises where the obs

  16. In Situ Observations of Lightning-Produced Nitric Oxide in Thunderstorm Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helsdon, J. H.; Detwiler, A. G.; Macgorman, D. R.; Baker, B.; Warner, T. A.

    2003-12-01

    The SD School of Mines & Technology armored T-28 aircraft was deployed to Norman, OK, from 14 May - 10 June 2003 in order to obtain measurements of lightning-produced nitric oxide (NO) mixing ratios in the cores of active thunderstorms (17 - 21 kft altitude range) in conjunction with lightning channel locations determined by the newly-installed NSSL lightning mapping array (LMA). To sample the NO, a TEI 42C-TL NO/NOx analyzer was used, operating in the NO-only mode. The inlet tube for the sampling system was situated above and behind the pilot's canopy along the aircraft axis. Six research and two calibration/test flights were conducted. Electric fields rarely exceeded 50 kV/m in the regions sampled with hydrometeors comprised of aggregates, graupel, and small hail. The TEI instrument often indicated broad regions of elevated NO that may have accumulated from many lightning discharges over a period of time, which were then distributed by convective circulations. A number of instances of narrow NO spikes were observed that we attribute to recent lightning discharges that passed through the sampled region. Peak values were typically from a few to 10s of ppbv. In one instance lightning attached to the T-28's propeller. The NO reading rose to ~180 ppbv in one second, then decayed. Depending on the actual time during which NO generated during this discharge entered the inlet (probably less than one second), and subject to a more refined calibration of the raw instrument reading, we estimate that the peak mixing ratio to have been in the range of 0.5-1 ppmv. With the LMA-derived lightning locations anticipated to be available shortly, we will present a more refined analysis of the overall NO mixing ratio structure within these thunderstorm cores as well as analyses of the NO spikes, focusing on the lightning strike to the aircraft.

  17. Lightning climatology over the eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanaki, Elissavet; Lagouvardos, Kostas; Kotroni, Vassiliki; Argyriou, Athanassios

    2015-04-01

    In the frame of TALOS project, the lightning activity for a 10-year period (2005-2014) over the eastern Mediterranean (16-320E, 34-460N) is analysed. The study is based on the use of cloud-to-ground lightning activity data from ZEUS system, a Very-Low-Frequency Lightning detection network operated by the National Observatory of Athens. The spatial and temporal (seasonal and diurnal) variability of the lightning activity is examined. Lightning is modulated by the diurnal cycle of insolation and the underlying topographic features of the region. CG lightning activity is dominant over land and coastal areas during summer and spring, while during the cold period of the year is dominant over the sea and is significantly stronger over the mainland than over the sea. The maximum of the lightning activity is observed in June and mostly in the afternoon. The CG variability is consistent with the global lightning activity observations. The effect of elevation, terrain slope and vegetation on the distribution of the CG flashes is also investigated. The orography and the terrain slope favour the lightning activity. Throughout the year, the potential of producing CG flashes ("lightning yield") over bareground is low while during the warm period of the year, the forested areas have increased "lightning yield". Additional analysis focuses on the links of CG lightning with indices related with the atmospheric instability such as the Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE). CAPE is known as the driving force for thunderstorm development. The analysis showed that the lightning density increases with increasing values of CAPE.

  18. TRMM-Based Lightning Climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Daniel J.; Buechler, Dennis E.; Blakeslee, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Gridded climatologies of total lightning flash rates seen by the spaceborne Optical Transient Detector (OTD) and Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) have been updated. OTD collected data from May 1995 to March 2000. LIS data (equatorward of about 38 deg) has been added for 1998-2010. Flash counts from each instrument are scaled by the best available estimates of detection efficiency. The long LIS record makes the merged climatology most robust in the tropics and subtropics, while the high latitude data is entirely from OTD. The mean global flash rate from the merged climatology is 46 flashes per second. The peak annual flash rate at 0.5 deg scale is 160 fl/square km/yr in eastern Congo. The peak monthly average flash rate at 2.5 scale is 18 fl/square km/mo, from early April to early May in the Brahmaputra Valley of far eastern India. Lightning decreases in this region during the monsoon season, but increases further north and west. A monthly average peak from early August to early September in northern Pakistan also exceeds any monthly averages from Africa, despite central Africa having the greatest yearly average. Most continental regions away from the equator have an annual cycle with lightning flash rates peaking in late spring or summer. The main exceptions are India and southeast Asia, with springtime peaks in April and May. For landmasses near the equator, flash rates peak near the equinoxes. For many oceanic regions, the peak flash rates occur in autumn. This is particularly noticeable for the Mediterranean and North Atlantic. Landmasses have a strong diurnal cycle of lightning, with flash rates generally peaking between 3-5 pm local solar time. The central United States flash rates peak later, in late evening or early night. Flash rates peak after midnight in northern Argentina. These regions are known for large, intense, long-lived mesoscale convective systems.

  19. Alabama successes spur interest in eastern Gulf

    SciTech Connect

    Redden, J.

    1985-11-01

    The shallow waters of the eastern fringe of the Gulf of Mexico are becoming a world-class offshore gas play. Spurred by the success ratio offshore Alabama, the water off Mississippi and Florida are drawing intense interest as oil companies attempt to extend the prolific Norphlet formation. Sitting at the heart of the recent interest in the eastern Gulf are the state and federal waters off Alabama. Exploration and drilling activity in the area are discussed.

  20. Future Expansion of the Lightning Surveillance System at the Kennedy Space Center and the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mata, C. T.; Wilson, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and the Air Force Eastern Range (ER) use data from two cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning detection networks, the Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS) and the U.S. National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN), and a volumetric mapping array, the lightning detection and ranging II (LDAR II) system: These systems are used to monitor and characterize lightning that is potentially hazardous to launch or ground operations and hardware. These systems are not perfect and both have documented missed lightning events when compared to the existing lightning surveillance system at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B). Because of this finding it is NASA's plan to install a lightning surveillance system around each of the active launch pads sharing site locations and triggering capabilities when possible. This paper shows how the existing lightning surveillance system at LC39B has performed in 2011 as well as the plan for the expansion around all active pads.

  1. An Evaluation of Lightning Flash Rate Parameterizations Based on Observations of Colorado Storms during DC3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basarab, B.; Fuchs, B.; Rutledge, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    Predicting lightning activity in thunderstorms is important in order to accurately quantify the production of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) by lightning (LNOx). Lightning is an important global source of NOx, and since NOx is a chemical precursor to ozone, the climatological impacts of LNOx could be significant. Many cloud-resolving models rely on parameterizations to predict lightning and LNOx since the processes leading to charge separation and lightning discharge are not yet fully understood. This study evaluates predicted flash rates based on existing lightning parameterizations against flash rates observed for Colorado storms during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment (DC3). Evaluating lightning parameterizations against storm observations is a useful way to possibly improve the prediction of flash rates and LNOx in models. Additionally, since convective storms that form in the eastern plains of Colorado can be different thermodynamically and electrically from storms in other regions, it is useful to test existing parameterizations against observations from these storms. We present an analysis of the dynamics, microphysics, and lightning characteristics of two case studies, severe storms that developed on 6 and 7 June 2012. This analysis includes dual-Doppler derived horizontal and vertical velocities, a hydrometeor identification based on polarimetric radar variables using the CSU-CHILL radar, and insight into the charge structure using observations from the northern Colorado Lightning Mapping Array (LMA). Flash rates were inferred from the LMA data using a flash counting algorithm. We have calculated various microphysical and dynamical parameters for these storms that have been used in empirical flash rate parameterizations. In particular, maximum vertical velocity has been used to predict flash rates in some cloud-resolving chemistry simulations. We diagnose flash rates for the 6 and 7 June storms using this parameterization and compare

  2. High current lightning test of space shuttle external tank lightning protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumme, E.; Anderson, A.; Schulte, E. H.

    1977-01-01

    During lift-off, the shuttle launch vehicle (external tank, solid rocket booster and orbiter) may be subjected to a lightning strike. Tests of a proposed lightning protection method for the external tank and development materials which were subjected to simulated lightning strikes are described. Results show that certain of the high resistant paint strips performed remarkably well in diverting the 50 kA lightning strikes.

  3. Variable phase propagation velocity for long-range lightning location system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongjian; Koh, Kuang Liang; Mezentsev, Andrew; Enno, Sven-Erik; Sugier, Jacqueline; Füllekrug, Martin

    2016-11-01

    The electromagnetic wave propagation velocity at low radio frequencies is an important input parameter for lightning location systems that use time of arrival (TOA) method. This velocity is normally fixed at or near the speed of light. However, this study finds that the radio waves from two submarine communication transmitters at 20.9 kHz and 23.4 kHz exhibit phase propagation velocities that are 0.51% slower and 0.64% faster than the speed of light as a result of sky wave contributions and ground effects. Therefore, a novel technique with a variable phase propagation velocity is implemented for the first time in the TOA method and applied to electric field recordings with a long-baseline lightning location system that consists of four radio receivers in western Europe. The lightning locations inferred from variable velocities improve the accuracy of locations inferred from a fixed velocity by 0.89-1.06 km when compared to the lightning locations reported by the UK MetOffice. The normal distributions of the observed phase propagation velocities in small geographic areas are not centered at the speed of light. Consequently, representative velocities can be calculated for many small geographic areas to produce a velocity map over central France where numerous lightning discharges occurred. This map reflects the impact of sky waves and ground effects on the calculation of lightning locations as a result of the network configuration. It is concluded that the use of variable phase propagation velocities mitigates the influence of sky waves and ground effects in long-range lightning location networks.

  4. Relativistic-microwave theory of ball lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, H.-C.

    2016-06-01

    Ball lightning, a fireball sometimes observed during lightnings, has remained unexplained. Here we present a comprehensive theory for the phenomenon: At the tip of a lightning stroke reaching the ground, a relativistic electron bunch can be produced, which in turn excites intense microwave radiation. The latter ionizes the local air and the radiation pressure evacuates the resulting plasma, forming a spherical plasma bubble that stably traps the radiation. This mechanism is verified by particle simulations. The many known properties of ball lightning, such as the occurrence site, relation to the lightning channels, appearance in aircraft, its shape, size, sound, spark, spectrum, motion, as well as the resulting injuries and damages, are also explained. Our theory suggests that ball lighting can be created in the laboratory or triggered during thunderstorms. Our results should be useful for lightning protection and aviation safety, as well as stimulate research interest in the relativistic regime of microwave physics.

  5. Relativistic-microwave theory of ball lightning

    PubMed Central

    Wu, H.-C.

    2016-01-01

    Ball lightning, a fireball sometimes observed during lightnings, has remained unexplained. Here we present a comprehensive theory for the phenomenon: At the tip of a lightning stroke reaching the ground, a relativistic electron bunch can be produced, which in turn excites intense microwave radiation. The latter ionizes the local air and the radiation pressure evacuates the resulting plasma, forming a spherical plasma bubble that stably traps the radiation. This mechanism is verified by particle simulations. The many known properties of ball lightning, such as the occurrence site, relation to the lightning channels, appearance in aircraft, its shape, size, sound, spark, spectrum, motion, as well as the resulting injuries and damages, are also explained. Our theory suggests that ball lighting can be created in the laboratory or triggered during thunderstorms. Our results should be useful for lightning protection and aviation safety, as well as stimulate research interest in the relativistic regime of microwave physics. PMID:27328835

  6. Observations of lightning in the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boeck, William L.; Vaughan, Otha H., Jr.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Vonnegut, Bernard; Brook, Marx; Mckune, John

    1995-01-01

    An examination and analysis of video images of lightning, captured by the payload bay TV cameras of the space shuttle, provided a variety of examples of lightning in the stratosphere above thunderstorms. These images were obtained on several recent shuttle flights while conducting the Mesoscale Lightning Experiment (MLE). The images of stratospheric lightning illustrate the variety of filamentary and broad vertical discharges in the stratosphere that may accompany a lightning flash. A typical event is imaged as a single or multiple filament extending 30 to 40 km above a thunderstorm that is illuminated by a series of lightning strokes. Examples are found in temperate and tropical areas, over the oceans, and over the land.

  7. Relativistic-microwave theory of ball lightning.

    PubMed

    Wu, H-C

    2016-06-22

    Ball lightning, a fireball sometimes observed during lightnings, has remained unexplained. Here we present a comprehensive theory for the phenomenon: At the tip of a lightning stroke reaching the ground, a relativistic electron bunch can be produced, which in turn excites intense microwave radiation. The latter ionizes the local air and the radiation pressure evacuates the resulting plasma, forming a spherical plasma bubble that stably traps the radiation. This mechanism is verified by particle simulations. The many known properties of ball lightning, such as the occurrence site, relation to the lightning channels, appearance in aircraft, its shape, size, sound, spark, spectrum, motion, as well as the resulting injuries and damages, are also explained. Our theory suggests that ball lighting can be created in the laboratory or triggered during thunderstorms. Our results should be useful for lightning protection and aviation safety, as well as stimulate research interest in the relativistic regime of microwave physics.

  8. An "anomalous" triggered lightning flash in Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamerota, W. R.; Uman, M. A.; Hill, J. D.; Pilkey, J.; Ngin, T.; Jordan, D. M.; Mata, C. T.

    2013-04-01

    An "anomalous" rocket-and-wire triggered lightning flash, a flash whose leaders do not follow the triggering wire remnants to ground, is characterized via high-speed video images at 10 and 300 kilo-frames per second, still camera images, 66-72 MHz source locations from a Lightning Mapping Array, channel-base current, and electric field and electric field derivative (dE/dt) measurements. This is the first anomalous flash of about 410 classically triggered flashes in north-central Florida. The flash began with an upward positively charged leader (UPL) initiating from the tip of the upward-moving triggering wire about 280 m above ground level. All but the bottom 17 m of wire exploded (became luminous) 37.6 ms after UPL initiation. A stepped leader initiated, likely from the top of the wire remnants, 282 m above ground level about 1.3 ms after the wire explosion and propagated downward for 2.1 ms, attaching to the top of a grounded utility pole 117 m southwest of the launching facility. The line charge density on the stepped leader is estimated to be of the order of 10-3 C m-1. Contrary to previously reported "anomalous" flashes in France and New Mexico (roughly 16% and 31%, respectively, of their triggered flashes), in our event, there was not a tens of milliseconds current-zero period preceding the stepped leader, there was no observed downward dart leader in the UPL channel prior to the stepped leader to ground, and there was a failed attempt to reestablish current in the exploded-wire channel between the UPL and ground.

  9. Improvements in the detection efficiency model for the Brazilian lightning detection network (BrasilDAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naccarato, K. P.; Pinto, O., Jr.

    2009-02-01

    The detection efficiency (DE) is the most important performance gauge of a lightning detection network (LDN). Moreover, the main motivation for evaluating the DE of a LDN is to separate the geographical variations of the CG lightning parameters from the variations regarding the network performance. A review of previous relative DE techniques and simple methods to correct the cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning flash density maps is presented. In addition, recent improvements in the flash DE model for the Brazilian lightning detection network (BrasilDAT) are discussed. The DE estimated values are based on the sensor individual DE probability functions, which are derived from a large amount of CG stroke data provided by the network considering different distances from the sensor and specific peak current ranges. The new approach provides better results when compared with the previous developments, since the calculation of the sensor DE probability functions neglects the lightning data provided by the minimum number of reporting sensors. Hence it is possible to minimize the unrealistic enhancement of the DE closer to the network boundaries ("border effect") without affecting significantly the performance inside the network. The main result is a more realistic correction of the CG flash density maps, particularly at the outermost network areas, leading to an improvement in the model sensitivity.

  10. Beyond the basics: lightning-strike injuries.

    PubMed

    Mistovich, Joseph J; Krost, William S; Limmer, Daniel D

    2008-03-01

    It is estimated that a lightning flash occurs approximately 8 million times per day throughout the world. Most strikes are benign and cause little damage to property and physical structures; however, when lightning strikes a person or group of people, it is a significant medical and potentially traumatic event that could lead to immediate death or permanent disability. By understanding some basic physics of lightning and pathophysiology of injuries associated with lightning strikes, EMS providers will be better prepared to identify assessment findings, anticipate complications and provide effective emergency care.

  11. Lightning Studies Using VHF Waveform Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moldwin, Mark; Lennon, Carl

    1996-01-01

    Several atmospheric electricity studies were begun utilizing VHF lightning data obtained with the lightning detection and ranging system (LDAR) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The LDAR system uses differences in the time of arrival of electromagnetic noise generated by the lightning process to seven antennas to calculate very accurate three dimensional locations of lightning. New software was developed to obtain the source location of multiple, simultaneous, and spatially separate lightning signatures. Three studies utilizing these data were begun this summer: (1) VHF observations of simultaneous lightning, (2) ground based VHF observations of transionospheric pulse pairs (TIPPs), and (3) properties of intra-cloud recoil streamers. The principal result of each of these studies are: (1) lightning commonly occurs in well separated (2-50 km) regions simultaneously, (2) large amplitude pairs of VHF pulses are commonly observed on the ground but had not been previously identified due to the large number of signals usually observed in the VHF noise of close lightning, and (3) the VHF Q-noise and pulse signatures associated with K-changes within intra-cloud lightning propagate at velocities of more than 10(exp 8) m/s. The interim results of these three studies are reviewed in this brief report.

  12. Application of lightning arrester on transmission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, K.

    1990-05-01

    A lightning arrester on transmission lines is expected to reduce lightning incidents; however, the problems of the application guide to be established such as the method of application, the treating capacity for lightning energy, and the coordination to an arc horn remain as they are. The method of application for a lightning arrester on transmission lines and its effect are examined from the viewpoint of the generating incident on transmission lines by lightning and the operating viewpoint of a lightning arrester for a 77kV system. The double circuit setup of an arrester is the best method to reduce the lightning incidents and the single circuit setup can reduce the incident rate by 40 percent preventing the flashover of the circuit on which the arrester is not set up. For installing an arrester on a short section, the flashover point can transfer to the next steel tower where the arrester is not set up, only when lightning strikes the last steel tower. Inflowing current into an arrester from a direct lightning strike is considerably large and the energy at that time becomes large but this energy can be reduced by the operation of the arrester set up on another steel tower.

  13. Lightning studies using LDAR and LLP data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, Gregory S.

    1993-01-01

    This study intercompared lightning data from LDAR and LLP systems in order to learn more about the spatial relationships between thunderstorm electrical discharges aloft and lightning strikes to the surface. The ultimate goal of the study is to provide information that can be used to improve the process of real-time detection and warning of lightning by weather forecasters who issue lightning advisories. The Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) System provides data on electrical discharges from thunderstorms that includes cloud-ground flashes as well as lightning aloft (within cloud, cloud-to-cloud, and sometimes emanating from cloud to clear air outside or above cloud). The Lightning Location and Protection (LLP) system detects primarily ground strikes from lightning. Thunderstorms typically produce LDAR signals aloft prior to the first ground strike, so that knowledge of preferred positions of ground strikes relative to the LDAR data pattern from a thunderstorm could allow advance estimates of enhanced ground strike threat. Studies described in the report examine the position of LLP-detected ground strikes relative to the LDAR data pattern from the thunderstorms. The report also describes other potential approaches to the use of LDAR data in the detection and forecasting of lightning ground strikes.

  14. Lightning Strike in Pregnancy With Fetal Injury.

    PubMed

    Galster, Kellen; Hodnick, Ryan; Berkeley, Ross P

    2016-06-01

    Injuries from lightning strikes are an infrequent occurrence, and are only rarely noted to involve pregnant victims. Only 13 cases of lightning strike in pregnancy have been previously described in the medical literature, along with 7 additional cases discovered within news media reports. This case report presents a novel case of lightning-associated injury in a patient in the third trimester of pregnancy, resulting in fetal ischemic brain injury and long-term morbidity, and reviews the mechanics of lightning strikes along with common injury patterns of which emergency providers should be aware.

  15. A three-station lightning detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruhnke, L. H.

    1972-01-01

    A three-station network is described which senses magnetic and electric fields of lightning. Directional and distance information derived from the data are used to redundantly determine lightning position. This redundancy is used to correct consistent propagation errors. A comparison is made of the relative accuracy of VLF direction finders with a newer method to determine distance to and location of lightning by the ratio of magnetic-to-electric field as observed at 400 Hz. It was found that VLF direction finders can determine lightning positions with only one-half the accuracy of the method that uses the ratio of magnetic-to-electric field.

  16. Lightning Protection Guidelines for Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodloe, C. C.

    1999-01-01

    This technical memorandum provides lightning protection engineering guidelines and technical procedures used by the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Electromagnetics and Aerospace Environments Branch for aerospace vehicles. The overviews illustrate the technical support available to project managers, chief engineers, and design engineers to ensure that aerospace vehicles managed by MSFC are adequately protected from direct and indirect effects of lightning. Generic descriptions of the lightning environment and vehicle protection technical processes are presented. More specific aerospace vehicle requirements for lightning protection design, performance, and interface characteristics are available upon request to the MSFC Electromagnetics and Aerospace Environments Branch, mail code EL23.

  17. Remote sensing of strippable coal reserves and mine inventory in part of the Warrior Coal Field in Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, T. J.; Copeland, C. W., Jr.; Russell, D. D.; Evans, F. E., Jr.; Sapp, C. D.; Boone, P. A.

    1978-01-01

    Methods by which estimates of the remaining reserves of strippable coal in Alabama could be made were developed. Information acquired from NASA's Earth Resources Office was used to analyze and map existing surface mines in a four-quadrangle area in west central Alabama. Using this information and traditional methods for mapping coal reserves, an estimate of remaining strippable reserves was derived. Techniques for the computer analysis of remotely sensed data and other types of available coal data were developed to produce an estimate of strippable coal reserves for a second four-quadrangle area. Both areas lie in the Warrior coal field, the most prolific and active of Alabama's coal fields. They were chosen because of the amount and type of coal mining in the area, their location relative to urban areas, and the amount and availability of base data necessary for this type of study.

  18. ATM Coastal Topography-Alabama 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Yates, Xan; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Klipp, Emily S.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived first surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Alabama coastline, acquired October 3-4, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative scanning Lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning Lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface, and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of Lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for pre-survey flight line definition, flight path plotting, Lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is routinely used to create maps that

  19. Indirect Lightning Safety Assessment Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, M M; Perkins, M P; Brown, C G; Crull, E W; Streit, R D

    2009-04-24

    Lightning is a safety hazard for high-explosives (HE) and their detonators. In the However, the current flowing from the strike point through the rebar of the building The methodology for estimating the risk from indirect lighting effects will be presented. It has two parts: a method to determine the likelihood of a detonation given a lightning strike, and an approach for estimating the likelihood of a strike. The results of these two parts produce an overall probability of a detonation. The probability calculations are complex for five reasons: (1) lightning strikes are stochastic and relatively rare, (2) the quality of the Faraday cage varies from one facility to the next, (3) RF coupling is inherently a complex subject, (4) performance data for abnormally stressed detonators is scarce, and (5) the arc plasma physics is not well understood. Therefore, a rigorous mathematical analysis would be too complex. Instead, our methodology takes a more practical approach combining rigorous mathematical calculations where possible with empirical data when necessary. Where there is uncertainty, we compensate with conservative approximations. The goal is to determine a conservative estimate of the odds of a detonation. In Section 2, the methodology will be explained. This report will discuss topics at a high-level. The reasons for selecting an approach will be justified. For those interested in technical details, references will be provided. In Section 3, a simple hypothetical example will be given to reinforce the concepts. While the methodology will touch on all the items shown in Figure 1, the focus of this report is the indirect effect, i.e., determining the odds of a detonation from given EM fields. Professor Martin Uman from the University of Florida has been characterizing and defining extreme lightning strikes. Using Professor Uman's research, Dr. Kimball Merewether at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque calculated the EM fields inside a Faraday-cage type

  20. Cloud-to-ground lightning over Mexico and adjacent oceanic regions: a preliminary climatology using the WWLLN dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucieńska, B.; Raga, G. B.; Rodríguez, O.

    2010-11-01

    This work constitutes the first climatological study of lightning over Mexico and adjacent oceanic areas for the period 2005-2009. Spatial and temporal distributions of cloud to ground lightning are presented and the processes that contribute to the lightning variability are analysed. The data are retrieved from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) dataset. The current WWLL network includes 40 stations which cover much of the globe and detect very low frequency radiation ("spherics") associated with lightning. The spatial distribution of the average yearly lightning over the continental region of Mexico shows the influence of orographic forcing in producing convective clouds with high lightning activity. However, a very high number of strikes is also observed in the States of Tabasco and Campeche, which are low-lying areas. This maximum is related to the climatological maximum of precipitation for the country and it may be associated with a region of persistent low-level convergence and convection in the southern portion of the Gulf of Mexico. The maps of correlation between rainfall and lightning provide insight into the microphysical processes occurring within the clouds. The maritime clouds close to the coastline exhibit similar properties to continental clouds as they produce very high lightning activity. The seasonal cycle of lightning registered by WWLLN is consistent with the LIS/OTD dataset for the selected regions. In terms of the annual distribution of cloud-to-ground strikes, July, August and September exhibit the highest number of strikes over continental Mexico. The diurnal cycle indicates that the maximum number of strikes over the continent is observed between 6 and 9 p.m. LT. The surrounding oceanic regions were subdivided into four distinct sectors: Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean, Sub-tropical Pacific and Tropical Pacific. The Gulf of Mexico has the broadest seasonal distribution, since during winter lightning associated with mid

  1. 2. ALABAMA GATES LOOKING SOUTHEAST ALONG LINED CHANNEL, NOTE CHEMICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. ALABAMA GATES LOOKING SOUTHEAST ALONG LINED CHANNEL, NOTE CHEMICAL PURIFICATION TANK IN DISTANCE FOR KEEPING DOWN GROWTH OF ALGAE - Los Angeles Aqueduct, Alabama Gates, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. 77 FR 57022 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Alabama River, AL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-17

    ... governing the Meridian and Bigbee Railroad (MNBR) swing span bridge across the Alabama River at Selma... none was held. B. Basis and Purpose The MNBR swing span bridge crosses the Alabama River at mile...

  3. 26. STARBOARD PROFILE OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN) WITH SAILS SET Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. STARBOARD PROFILE OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN) WITH SAILS SET Original 2-3/4'x2-1/4' photograph taken c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  4. Ion Runaway in Lightning Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fülöp, T.; Landreman, M.

    2013-07-01

    Runaway ions can be produced in plasmas with large electric fields, where the accelerating electric force is augmented by the low mean ionic charge due to the imbalance between the number of electrons and ions. Here we derive an expression for the high-energy tail of the ion distribution function in lightning discharges and investigate the energy range that the ions can reach. We also estimate the corresponding energetic proton and neutron production due to fusion reactions.

  5. Optical Spectra of Triggered Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, T. D.; Biagi, C. J.; Hill, J. D.; Jordan, D. M.; Uman, M. A.; Christian, H. J., Jr.

    2009-12-01

    In August 2009, the first optical spectra of triggered lightning flashes were acquired. Data from two triggered lightning flashes were obtained at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing in north-central Florida. The spectrometer that was used has an average dispersion of 260 Å/mm resulting in an average resolution of 5 Å when mated to a Photron (SA1.1) high-speed camera. The spectra captured with this system had a free spectral range of 3800-8000 Å. The spectra were captured at 300,000 frames per second. The spectrometer's vertical field of view was 3 m at an altitude 50 m above the launch tower, intended to view the middle of the triggering wire. Preliminary results show that the copper spectrum dominated the earliest part of the flash and copper lines persisted during the total lifetime of the detectable spectrum. Animations over the lifetime of the stroke from the initial wire illumination to multiple return strokes show the evolution of the spectrum. In addition, coordinated high speed channel base current, electric field and imagery measurements of the exploding wire, downward leaders, and return strokes were recorded. Quantitative analysis of the spectral evolution will be discussed in the context of the overall flash development.

  6. Launch pad lightning protection effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahmann, James R.

    1991-01-01

    Using the striking distance theory that lightning leaders will strike the nearest grounded point on their last jump to earth corresponding to the striking distance, the probability of striking a point on a structure in the presence of other points can be estimated. The lightning strokes are divided into deciles having an average peak current and striking distance. The striking distances are used as radii from the points to generate windows of approach through which the leader must pass to reach a designated point. The projections of the windows on a horizontal plane as they are rotated through all possible angles of approach define an area that can be multiplied by the decile stroke density to arrive at the probability of strokes with the window average striking distance. The sum of all decile probabilities gives the cumulative probability for all strokes. The techniques can be applied to NASA-Kennedy launch pad structures to estimate the lightning protection effectiveness for the crane, gaseous oxygen vent arm, and other points. Streamers from sharp points on the structure provide protection for surfaces having large radii of curvature. The effects of nearby structures can also be estimated.

  7. The ENSO Effect on the Temporal and Spatial Distribution of Global Lightning Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chronis, Themis G.; Goodman, Steven J.; Cecil, Dan; Buechler, Dennis; Pittman, Jasna; Robertson, Franklin R.; Blakeslee, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    The recently reprocessed (1997-2006) OTD/LIS database is used to investigate the global lightning climatology in response to the ENSO cycle. A linear correlation map between lightning anomalies and ENSO (NINO3.4) identifies areas that generally follow patterns similar to precipitation anomalies. We also observed areas where significant lightning/ENSO correlations are found and are not accompanied of significant precipitation/ENSO correlations. An extreme case of the strong decoupling between lightning and precipitation is observed over the Indonesian peninsula (Sumatra) where positive lightning/NINO3.4 correlations are collocated with negative precipitation/NINO3.4 correlations. Evidence of linear relationships between the spatial extent of thunderstorm distribution and the respective NINO3.4 magnitude are presented for different regions on the Earth. Strong coupling is found over areas remote to the main ENSO axis of influence and both during warm and cold ENSO phases. Most of the resulted relationships agree with the tendencies of precipitation related to ENSO empirical maps or documented teleconnection patterns. Over the Australian continent, opposite behavior in terms of thunderstorm activity is noted for warm ENSO phases with NINO3.4 magnitudes with NINO3.4>+l.08 and 0lightning activity during the main warm/cold (El Nino/La Nina) ENSO episodes of the past decade. The observed patterns show no spatial overlapping and identify areas that in their majority are in agreement with empirical precipitation/ENSO maps. The areas that appear during the warm ENSO phase are found over regions that have been identified as anomalous Hadley circulation ENSO-related patterns. The areas that appear during the cold ENSO phase are found predominantly around the west hemisphere equatorial belt and are in their majority identified by anomalous Walker circulation.

  8. [Lightning strikes and lightning injuries in prehospital emergency medicine. Relevance, results, and practical implications].

    PubMed

    Hinkelbein, J; Spelten, O; Wetsch, W A

    2013-01-01

    Up to 32.2% of patients in a burn center suffer from electrical injuries. Of these patients, 2-4% present with lightning injuries. In Germany, approximately 50 people per year are injured by a lightning strike and 3-7 fatally. Typically, people involved in outdoor activities are endangered and affected. A lightning strike usually produces significantly higher energy doses as compared to those in common electrical injuries. Therefore, injury patterns vary significantly. Especially in high voltage injuries and lightning injuries, internal injuries are of special importance. Mortality ranges between 10 and 30% after a lightning strike. Emergency medical treatment is similar to common electrical injuries. Patients with lightning injuries should be transported to a regional or supraregional trauma center. In 15% of all cases multiple people may be injured. Therefore, it is of outstanding importance to create emergency plans and evacuation plans in good time for mass gatherings endangered by possible lightning.

  9. Lightning location with variable radio wave propagation velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongjian; Koh, Kuang Liang; Mezentsev, Andrew; Sugier, Jacqueline; Fullekrug, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Lightning discharges can be located by triangulation of their broadband electromagnetic pulses in long-baseline (~500 km) radio receiver networks. Here we apply the time of arrival difference (TOA) method to electric field recordings with a low frequency radio receiver array consisting of four stations in western Europe. The electromagnetic wave propagation velocity at low radio frequencies is an important input parameter for the TOA calculation and it is normally assumed to be equal to the speed of light. However, the radio wave propagation depends for example on the frequency, ground conductivity and the ionospheric height and small variations can cause location differences from hundreds to thousands of meters, as demonstrated in this study. The radio wave propagation from two VLF transmissions at 20.9 kHz and 23.4 kHz are compared. The results show that the apparent phase velocities are 0.6% slower and 0.5% faster than the speed of light respectively. As a result, a variable velocity is implemented in the TOA method using continuously recorded data on the 8th August 2014, when a mesoscale convective system developed over central France. The lightning locations inferred with a variable wave propagation velocity are more clustered than those using a fixed velocity. The distribution of the lightning velocities in a given geographic area fits a normal distribution that is not centred at the speed of light. As a result, representative velocities can be calculated for smaller regions to generate a velocity map over a larger area of enhanced lightning activity. These results suggest a connection with the ground elevation and/or surface conductivity that might have an impact on the observed wave propagation velocities.

  10. Global frequency and distribution of lightning as observed from space by the Optical Transient Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Hugh J.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Boccippio, Dennis J.; Boeck, William L.; Buechler, Dennis E.; Driscoll, Kevin T.; Goodman, Steven J.; Hall, John M.; Koshak, William J.; Mach, Douglas M.; Stewart, Michael F.

    2003-01-01

    The Optical Transient Detector (OTD) is a space-based instrument specifically designed to detect and locate lightning discharges as it orbits the Earth. This instrument is a scientific payload on the MicroLab-1 satellite that was launched into a 70° inclination low Earth orbit in April 1995. Given the orbital trajectory of the satellite, most regions of the Earth are observed by the OTD instrument more than 400 times during a 1 year period, and the average duration of each observation is 2 min. The OTD instrument optically detects lightning flashes that occur within its 1300 × 1300 km2 field of view during both day and night conditions. A statistical examination of OTD lightning data reveals that nearly 1.4 billion flashes occur annually over the entire Earth. This annual flash count translates to an average of 44 ± 5 lightning flashes (intracloud and cloud-to-ground combined) occurring around the globe every second, which is well below the traditional estimate of 100 fl s-1 that was derived in 1925 from world thunder day records. The range of uncertainty for the OTD global totals represents primarily the uncertainty (and variability) in the flash detection efficiency of the instrument. The OTD measurements have been used to construct lightning climatology maps that demonstrate the geographical and seasonal distribution of lightning activity for the globe. An analysis of this annual lightning distribution confirms that lightning occurs mainly over land areas, with an average land/ocean ratio of ˜10:1. The Congo basin, which stands out year-round, shows a peak mean annual flash density of 80 fl km-2 yr-1 in Rwanda, and includes an area of over 3 million km2 exhibiting flash densities greater than 30 fl km-2 yr-1 (the flash density of central Florida). Lightning is predominant in the northern Atlantic and western Pacific Ocean basins year-round where instability is produced from cold air passing over warm ocean water. Lightning is less frequent in the eastern

  11. 78 FR 56980 - Muscle Shoals Reservation Redevelopment, Colbert County, Alabama

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ... Muscle Shoals Reservation Redevelopment, Colbert County, Alabama AGENCY: Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA... (MSR) in Colbert County, Alabama. The notice of availability (NOA) of the Final Environmental Impact...,036-acre Muscle Shoals/Wilson Dam Reservation in Colbert County, Alabama, in 1933 when...

  12. Electro-Optic Lightning Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William J.; Solakiewica, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    Electric field measurements are fundamental to the study of thunderstorm electrification, thundercloud charge structure, and the determination of the locations and magnitudes of charges deposited by lightning. Continuous field observations can also be used to warn of impending electrical hazards. For example, the USAF Eastern Range (ER) and NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida currently operate a ground-based network of electric field mill sensors to warn against lightning hazards to space vehicle operations/launches. The sensors provide continuous recordings of the ambient field. Others investigators have employed flat-plate electric field antennas to detect changes In the ambient field due to lightning. In each approach, electronic circuitry is used to directly detect and amplify the effects of the ambient field on an exposed metal conductor (antenna plate); in the case of continuous field recordings, the antenna plate is alternately shielded and unshielded by a grounded conductor. In this work effort, an alternate optical method for detecting lightning-caused electric field changes is Introduced. The primary component in the detector is an anisotropic electro-optic crystal of potassium di-hydrogen phosphate (chemically written as KH2PO4 (KDP)). When a voltage Is placed across the electro-optic crystal, the refractive Indices of the crystal change. This change alters the polarization state of a laser light beam that is passed down the crystal optic axis. With suitable application of vertical and horizontal polarizers, a light transmission measurement is related to the applied crystal voltage (which in turn Is related to the lightning caused electric field change). During the past two years, all critical optical components were procured, assembled, and aligned. An optical housing, calibration set-up, and data acquisition system was integrated for breadboard testing. The sensor was deployed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in the summer of 1998 to

  13. Lightning interaction with launch facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, C. T.; Rakov, V. A.

    2009-12-01

    Lightning is a major threat to launch facilities. In 2008 and 2009 there have been a significant number of strikes within 5 nautical miles of Launch Complexes 39A and 39B at the Kennedy Space Center. On several occasions, the Shuttle Space Vehicle (SSV) was at the pad. Fortunately, no accidents or damage to the flight hardware occurred, but these events resulted in many launch delays, one launch scrub, and many hours of retesting. For complex structures, such as launch facilities, the design of the lightning protection system (LPS) cannot be done using the lightning protection standard guidelines. As a result, there are some “unprotected” or “exposed” areas. In order to quantify the lightning threat to these areas, a Monte Carlo statistical tool has been developed. This statistical tool uses two random number generators: a uniform distribution to generate origins of downward propagating leaders and a lognormal distribution to generate returns stroke peak currents. Downward leaders propagate vertically downward and their striking distances are defined by the polarity and peak current. Following the electrogeometrical concept, we assume that the leader attaches to the closest object within its striking distance. The statistical analysis is run for a large number of years using a long term ground flash density that corresponds to the geographical region where the structures being analyzed are located or will be installed. The output of the program is the probability of direct attachment to objects of interest with its corresponding peak current distribution. This tool was used in designing the lightning protection system of Launch Complex 39B at the Kennedy Space Center, FL, for NASA’s Constellation program. The tool allowed the designers to select the position of the towers and to design the catenary wire system to minimize the probability of direct strikes to the spacecraft and associated ground support equipment. This tool can be used to evaluate

  14. Protecting Your Park When Lightning Strikes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frydenlund, Marvin M.

    1987-01-01

    A formula for assessing specific risk of lightning strikes is provided. Recent legal cases are used to illustrate potential liability. Six actions park managers can take to minimize danger from lightning are presented, and commonsense rules which should be publicly posted are listed. (MT)

  15. Basal ganglia hemorrhage related to lightning strike.

    PubMed

    Ozgun, B; Castillo, M

    1995-01-01

    We describe a case of bilateral basal ganglia hemorrhage after a lightning strike to the head documented by a CT scan. Review of the literature shows this to be the most common brain imaging finding that can be attributed to a lightning strike. Several mechanistic theories are discussed, with the most plausible one being related to preferential conduction pathways through the brain.

  16. Lightning strike to the head: case report.

    PubMed

    Steinbaum, S; Harviel, J D; Jaffin, J H; Jordan, M H

    1994-01-01

    A case is presented of a teen-aged athlete who sustained a direct lightning strike to the head while wearing a football helmet. The helmet, the presence of sweat, and aggressive resuscitation were instrumental in his survival and complete recovery. This appears to be the first documentation of a lightning strike to an individual wearing protective headgear.

  17. Intracranial haematoma resulting from lightning stroke.

    PubMed

    Thomas, M; Pillai, M; Krishna Das, K V

    1991-05-01

    Intra-cerebral haemorrhage due to lightning stroke is extremely rare. We report a 45 year old woman who developed intracranial haemorrhage due to a direct lightning stroke. This was proved by CT scan. The haematoma was evacuated surgically, resulting in full neurological recovery of the patient.

  18. Space shuttle program: Lightning protection criteria document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The lightning environment for space shuttle design is defined and requirements that the design must satisfy to insure protection of the vehicle system from direct and indirect effects of lightning are imposed. Specifications, criteria, and guidelines included provide a practical and logical approach to protection problems.

  19. The 1980 direct strike lightning data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, F. L.; Thomas, M. E.

    1981-01-01

    Data waveforms are presented which were obtained utilizing the NASA F-106B aircraft specially instrumented for lightning electromagnetic measurements. The aircraft was operated in a thunderstorm environment to elicit strikes. Concurrently recorded electric and magnetic field and lightning current data were obtained.

  20. When Lightning Strikes a Second Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Kent

    2017-01-01

    The chances of lightning striking twice are infinitesimal, at best. What are the odds, in middle age, of being struck with a jarring bolt of figurative lightning, then a few months later being an eyewitness as the same sizzle in the sky jolts a group of students--those decision-makers of tomorrow? The author describes two experiences that proved…

  1. Magnitude and frequency of floods in Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atkins, J. Brian

    1996-01-01

    Methods of estimating flood magnitudes for recurrence intervals of 2, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, 200, and 500 years are described for rural streams in Alabama that are not affected by regulation or urbanization. Flood-frequency characteristics are presented for 198 gaging stations in Alabama having 10 or more years of record through September 1991, that are used in the regional analysis. Regression relations were developed using generalized least-squares regression techniques to estimate flood magnitude and frequency on ungaged streams as a function of the drainage area of a basin. Sites on gaged streams should be weighted with gaging station data that are presented in the report. Graphical relations of peak discharges to drainage areas are also presented for sites along the Alabama, Black Warrior, Cahaba, Choctawhatchee, Conecub, and Tombigbee Rivers. Equations for estimating flood magnitudes on ungaged urban streams (taken from a previous report) that use drainage area and percentage of impervious cover as independent variables also are given.

  2. GOES Infrared and Reflectance 0-1 hour Lightning Initiation Indicators: Development and Initial Testing within a Convective Nowcasting System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecikalski, J. R.; Harris, R.; MacKenzie, W.; Durkee, P. A.; Iskenderian, H.; Bickmeier, L.; Nielsen, K. E.

    2010-12-01

    Within cumulus cloud fields that develop in conditionally unstable air masses, only a fraction of the cumuli may eventually develop into deep convection. Identifying which of these convective clouds most likely to generate lightning often starts with little more than a qualitative visual satellite analysis. The goal of this study is to identify the observed satellite infrared (IR) signatures associated with growing cumulus clouds prior to the first lightning strike, so-called lightning initiation (LI). This study quantifies the behavior of ten Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-12) IR interest fields in the 1-hour in advance of LI. A total of 172 lightning-producing storms that occurred during the 2009 convective season are manually tracked and studied over four regions: Northern Alabama, Central Oklahoma, the Kennedy Space Center and Washington D.C. Four-dimensional and cloud-to-ground lightning array data provide a total cloud lightning picture (in-cloud, cloud-to-cloud, cloud-to-air, cloud-to-ground) and thus precise LI points for each storm in both time and space. Statistical significance tests are conducted on observed trends for each of the ten LI fields to determine the unique information each field provides in terms of behavior prior to LI. Eight out of ten LI fields exhibited useful information at least 15 min in advance of LI, with 35 min being the average. Statistical tests on these eight fields are compared for separate large geographical areas. IR temperature thresholds are then determined as an outcome, which may be valuable when implementing a LI prediction algorithm into real-time satellite-based systems. The key LI indicators from GOES IR data (as well as 3.9 μm reflectance) will be presented. Beginning in 2010, the feasibility of using the satellite-based LI indicators found in the above analysis to forecast first lightning will be assessed within the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) CoSPA nowcasting system. The goal

  3. RELATIONS BETWEEN LIGHTNING DISCHARGES AND DIFFERENT TYPES OF MUSICAL ATMOSPHERICS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Recording cathode-ray oscillographs were used for the analysis of the lightning discharges whose relations to musical atmospherics were investigated...of the lightning discharges investigated. Through comparative harmonic analyses it was shown that lightning discharges producing musical atmospherics...followed by multiple whistlers. An investigation was made of correlations between lightning discharges and musical atmospherics of unusual and irregular

  4. Lightning injuries in sports and recreation.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Eric M; Howard, Thomas M

    2013-01-01

    The powers of lightning have been worshiped and feared by all known human cultures. While the chance of being struck by lightning is statistically very low, that risk becomes much greater in those who frequently work or play outdoors. Over the past 2 yr, there have been nearly 50 lightning-related deaths reported within the United States, with a majority of them associated with outdoor recreational activities. Recent publications primarily have been case studies, review articles, and a discussion of a sixth method of injury. The challenge in reducing lightning-related injuries in organized sports has been addressed well by both the National Athletic Trainers' Association and the National Collegiate Athletic Association in their guidelines on lightning safety. Challenges remain in educating the general population involved in recreational outdoor activities that do not fall under the guidelines of organized sports.

  5. Mathematical physics approaches to lightning discharge problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyrala, A.

    1985-01-01

    Mathematical physics arguments useful for lightning discharge and generation problems are pursued. A soliton Ansatz for the lightning stroke is treated including a charge generation term which is the ultimate source for the phenomena. Equations are established for a partially ionized plasma inding the effects of pressure, magnetic field, electric field, gravitation, viscosity, and temperature. From these equations is then derived the non-stationary generalized Ohm's Law essential for describing field/current density relationships in the horizon channel of the lightning stroke. The discharge initiation problem is discussed. It is argued that the ionization rate drives both the convective current and electric displacement current to increase exponentially. The statistical distributions of charge in the thundercloud preceding a lightning dischage are considered. The stability of the pre-lightning charge distributions and the use of Boltzmann relaxational equations to determine them are discussed along with a covered impedance path provided by the aircraft.

  6. Lightning strike simulation using coaxial line technique and 3D linear injection current analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flourens, F.; Gauthier, D.; Serafin, D.

    1989-09-01

    The GORFFD code for determining aircraft responses to either a lightning event or to simulated current injection is based on the finite-difference solution of Maxwell's equation, and allows the simulation of complex, 3D metallic and dielectric composite structures. A transfer method is used to analyze the EM environment associated with in-flight measurements. Attention is given to a linear-analysis numerical model in which the lightning channel is simulated as a thin wire that is driven by a current source. Surface E-fields and current mappings are produced for the Transall transport and Mirage fighter aircraft. An experimental method has been devised for verification of these lightning-strike simulations.

  7. Novel Usage for a Cosmic Ray Detector: Study of Lightning at Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belz, John; Okuda, Takeshi

    We describe observations performed at the Telescope Array Observatory in which "bursts" of air shower triggers of the surface detector occur in close temporal and spatial coincidence with lighting. These events appear to be consistent with other observations of high-energy particle showers produced by lightning. Telescope Array has the ability to reconstruct these showers using modified UHECR air shower reconstruction techniques, and thus determine the source of particles in the atmospheric breakdown. We describe new efforts to deploy lightning mapping detectors at the Telescope Array site which will enable further study of this phenomenon, along with enabling us to search for evidence of lightning strikes being "seeded" under certain atmospheric conditions by the passage of a UHECR air shower.

  8. Lightning Charge Transport During a Thunderstorm Near Langmuir Laboratory on 18 August 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslan, B. C.; Hager, W. W.; Sonnenfeld, R. G.; Lu, G.; Winn, W. P.

    2007-12-01

    On 18 August 2004, 19:46 UT, a balloon was launched from Langmuir Laboratory, New Mexico, and was carried about 30 km southeast by the wind, traveling at an altitude that varied between 2500 m up to 4300 m above sea level. An electric field sonde or Esonde measured the electric field during the flight, while simultaneously, New Mexico Tech's Lightning Mapping Array recorded the location of VHF pulses generated during lightning. During the 40 minute balloon flight, 182 flashes occurred within 15 km of the balloon; 41 of these flashes were cloud-to-ground flashes. Using the Esonde data and the LMA data, along with recently developed analysis techniques, we estimate the charge transport associated with the lightning occurring near the balloon. This analysis leads to a picture for how charge flows in the 30 km region observed by the balloon-borne E-field change instrument.

  9. Ground-water program in Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaMoreaux, P.E.

    1955-01-01

    Several recent years of drought have emphasized the importance of Alabama's ground-water supplies, a matter of concern to us all.  So far we have been blessed in Alabama with ample ground-water, although a combination of increased use, waste, pollution, and drought has brought about critical local water shortages.  These problems serve as a fair warning of what lies ahead if we do not take the necessary steps to obtan adequate knowledge of our ground-water resources.

  10. Global lightning activity and climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Price, C.G.

    1993-12-31

    The relationship between global lightning frequencies and global climate change is examined in this thesis. In order to study global impacts of climate change, global climate models or General Circulations Models (GCMs) need to be utilized. Since these models have coarse resolutions many atmospheric phenomena that occur at subgrid scales, such as lightning, need to be parameterized whenever possible. We begin with a simple parameterization used to Simulate total (intracloud and cloud-to-ground) lightning frequencies. The parameterization uses convective cloud top height to approximate lightning frequencies. Then we consider a parameterization for simulating cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning around the globe. This parameterization uses the thickness of the cold cloud sector in thunderstorms (0{degrees}C to cloud top) to calculate the proportion of CG flashes in a particular thunderstorm. We model lightning in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM. We present two climate change scenarios. One for a climate where the solar constant is reduced by 2% (5.9{degrees}C global cooling), and one for a climate with twice the present concentration of CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere (4.2{degrees}C global warming). The results imply a 24%/30% decrease/increase in global lightning frequencies for the cooler/warmer climate. The possibility of using the above findings to monitor future global warming is discussed. The earth`s ionospheric potential, which is regulated by global thunderstorm activity, could supply valuable information regarding global surface temperature fluctuations. Finally, we look at the implications of changes in both lightning frequencies and the hydrological cycle, as a result of global warming, on natural forest fires. In the U.S. the annual mean number of lightning fires could increase by 40% while the area burned may increase by 65% in a 2{times}CO{sub 2} climate. On a global scale the largest increase in lightning fires can be expected in the tropics.

  11. Ground-level observation of a terrestrial gamma ray flash initiated by a triggered lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hare, B. M.; Uman, M. A.; Dwyer, J. R.; Jordan, D. M.; Biggerstaff, M. I.; Caicedo, J. A.; Carvalho, F. L.; Wilkes, R. A.; Kotovsky, D. A.; Gamerota, W. R.; Pilkey, J. T.; Ngin, T. K.; Moore, R. C.; Rassoul, H. K.; Cummer, S. A.; Grove, J. E.; Nag, A.; Betten, D. P.; Bozarth, A.

    2016-06-01

    We report on a terrestrial gamma ray flash (TGF) that occurred on 15 August 2014 coincident with an altitude-triggered lightning at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing (ICLRT) in North Central Florida. The TGF was observed by a ground-level network of gamma ray, close electric field, distant magnetic field, Lightning Mapping Array (LMA), optical, and radar measurements. Simultaneous gamma ray and LMA data indicate that the upward positive leader of the triggered lightning flash induced relativistic runaway electron avalanches when the leader tip was at about 3.5 km altitude, resulting in the observed TGF. Channel luminosity and electric field data show that there was an initial continuous current (ICC) pulse in the lightning channel to ground during the time of the TGF. Modeling of the observed ICC pulse electric fields measured at close range (100-200 m) indicates that the ICC pulse current had both a slow and fast component (full widths at half maximum of 235 μs and 59 μs) and that the fast component was more or less coincident with the TGF, suggesting a physical association between the relativistic runaway electron avalanches and the ICC pulse observed at ground. Our ICC pulse model reproduces moderately well the measured close electric fields at the ICLRT as well as three independent magnetic field measurements made about 250 km away. Radar and LMA data suggest that there was negative charge near the region in which the TGF was initiated.

  12. The Rondonia Lightning Detection Network: Network Description, Science Objectives, Data Processing/Archival Methodology, and First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakelee, Richard

    1999-01-01

    A four station Advanced Lightning Direction Finder (ALDF) network was recently established in the state of Rondonia in western Brazil through a collaboration of U.S. and Brazilian participants from NASA, INPE, INMET, and various universities. The network utilizes ALDF IMPACT (Improved Accuracy from Combined Technology) sensors to provide cloud-to-ground lightning observations (i.e., stroke/flash locations, signal amplitude, and polarity) using both time-of-arrival and magnetic direction finding techniques. The observations are collected, processed and archived at a central site in Brasilia and at the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. Initial, non-quality assured quick-look results are made available in near real-time over the internet. The network will remain deployed for several years to provide ground truth data for the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) on the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) satellite which was launched in November 1997. The measurements will also be used to investigate the relationship between the electrical, microphysical and kinematic properties of tropical convection. In addition, the long-term observations from this network will contribute in establishing a regional lightning climatological data base, supplementing other data bases in Brazil that already exist or may soon be implemented. Analytic inversion algorithms developed at NASA/MSFC are now being applied to the Rondonian ALDF lightning observations to obtain site error corrections and improved location retrievals. The processing methodology and the initial results from an analysis of the first 6 months of network operations will be presented.

  13. The Rondonia Lightning Detection Network: Network Description, Science Objectives, Data Processing/Archival Methodology, and First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, Rich; Bailey, Jeff; Koshak, Bill

    1999-01-01

    A four station Advanced Lightning Direction Finder (ALDF) network was recently established in the state of Rondonia in western Brazil through a collaboration of U.S. and Brazilian participants from NASA, INPE, INMET, and various universities. The network utilizes ALDF IMPACT (Improved Accuracy from Combined Technology) sensors to provide cloud-to-ground lightning observations (i.e., stroke/flash locations, signal amplitude, and polarity) using both time-of-arrival and magnetic direction finding techniques. The observations are collected, processed and archived at a central site in Brasilia and at the NASA/ Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. Initial, non-quality assured quick-look results are made available in near real-time over the internet. The network will remain deployed for several years to provide ground truth data for the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite which was launched in November 1997. The measurements will also be used to investigate the relationship between the electrical, microphysical and kinematic properties of tropical convection. In addition, the long-term observations from this network will contribute in establishing a regional lightning climatological data base, supplementing other data bases in Brazil that already exist or may soon be implemented. Analytic inversion algorithms developed at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) are now being applied to the Rondonian ALDF lightning observations to obtain site error corrections and improved location retrievals. The processing methodology and the initial results from an analysis of the first 6 months of network operations will be presented.

  14. Lightning current waveform measuring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtasinski, R. J.; Fuchs, J. C.; Grove, C. H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus is described for monitoring current waveforms produced by lightning strikes which generate currents in an elongated cable. These currents are converted to voltages and to light waves for being transmitted over an optical cable to a remote location. At the remote location, the waves are reconstructed back into electrical waves for being stored into a memory. The information is stored within the memory with a timing signal so that only different signals need be stored in order to reconstruct the wave form.

  15. Venus Express Contributions to the Study of Planetary Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Hart, R. A.; Zhang, T. L.

    2014-04-01

    Jupiter, and Saturn are expected to generate the electrical potential differences in their clouds sufficient to cause a breakdown in the atmosphere,creating a conducting path for the electric potential to discharge. This high-energy phenomenon creates a hot, high-pressure channel that enables chemical reactions not possible under usual local thermodynamic conditions. Thus it is of some interest to determine if lightning occurs in an atmosphere. While Venus is not usually considered one of the wet planets, lightning has been an object of interest since the Venera landers. It was observed with electromagnetic coils on Venera 11, 12, 13, 14 landers [2]. It was observed with a visible spectrometer on the Venera 9 orbits [1]. It was mapped during solar occultations by the electric antenna on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter [4]. These measurements revealed extensive lightning activity with an electromagnetic energy flux similar to that on Earth. However, the observations were limited in number in the atmosphere and to the nightside from orbit. In order to improve the understanding of Venus lightning, the Venus Express magnetometer was given a 128-Hz sampling rate that could cover much of the ELF frequencies at which lightning could be observed in the weak magnetic fields of the Venus ionosphere [5]. This investigation was immediately successful [3], but mastering the cleaning of the broadband data took several years to accomplish. Furthermore, the high polar latitudes of VEX periapsis were not the ideal locations to conduct the more global survey that was desired. Fortunately, after precessing poleward over the first few years the latitude of periapsis has returned to lower latitudes(Figures 1 and 2) and active electrical storms are now being studied. The charged constituent of the Venus atmosphere need not be water. In fact, we believe it is H2SO4 which polarizes much as water does and which freezes and melts at similar temperatures. If it is H2SO4, we would expect the

  16. An Approach to the Lightning Overvoltage Protection of Medium Voltage Lines in Severe Lightning Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Omidiora, M. A.; Lehtonen, M.

    2008-05-08

    This paper deals with the effect of shield wires on lightning overvoltage reduction and the energy relief of MOV (Metal Oxide Varistor) arresters from direct strokes to distribution lines. The subject of discussion is the enhancement of lightning protection in Finnish distribution networks where lightning is most severe. The true index of lightning severity in these areas is based on the ground flash densities and return stroke data collected from the Finnish meteorological institute. The presented test case is the IEEE 34-node test feeder injected with multiple lightning strokes and simulated with the Alternative Transients Program/Electromagnetic Transients program (ATP/EMTP). The response of the distribution line to lightning strokes was modeled with three different cases: no protection, protection with surge arresters and protection with a combination of shield wire and arresters. Simulations were made to compare the resulting overvoltages on the line for all the analyzed cases.

  17. Simulated and rocket-triggered lightning testing of the Lightning-Invulnerable Device System (LIDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasbrouck, Richard T.

    A Lightning Invulnerable Device System (LIDS) has been developed to protect nuclear explosive test device systems at the U.S. Department of Energy's Nevada Test Site (NTS) against accidental detonation by lightning. In a series of full threat-level tests of a prototype LIDS canister, high-energy storage capacitor banks were used to generate high current rate of rise (di/dt = 200 kA/microsec) and high-peak-current (200 kA), simulated-lightning, transient inputs to the LIDS. Subsequently, researchers participated in the NASA Rocket-Triggered Lightning Program (RTLP). In these experiments, a grounded wire is carried into a highly electrified cloud by a small rocket, causing the canister to be struck by actual lightning. Results indicate that the LIDS provides an extremely effective way to prevent threat-level lightning transients from reaching the safety-critical components within the canister.

  18. Desegregation in Birmingham, Alabama: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bynum, Effie; And Others

    In May 1974, a five member study team from Teachers College, Columbia University spent four and one-half days in Birmingham, Alabama, for the purpose of (1) collecting information that describes the desegregation process as it evolved, (2) interviewing principals, administrators, teachers, students and community leaders relative to their…

  19. University of South Alabama Faculty Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of South Alabama, Mobile.

    Concerned primarily with policies, procedures, regulations, channels of communication, and benefits for the faculty, the 1974 faculty handbook of the University of South Alabama discusses: (1) organization and administration; (2) colleges, divisions, departments, and programs; (3) university facilities and services; (4) student-related…

  20. 76 FR 29810 - Alabama Disaster #AL-00037

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alabama Disaster AL-00037 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for...

  1. 75 FR 474 - Alabama Disaster #AL-00026

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... [Federal Register Volume 75, Number 2 (Tuesday, January 5, 2010)] [Notices] [Pages 474-475] [FR Doc No: E9-31259] SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 11988 and 11989] Alabama Disaster AL-00026 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice...

  2. 75 FR 26814 - Alabama Disaster #AL-00031

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ... [Federal Register Volume 75, Number 91 (Wednesday, May 12, 2010)] [Notices] [Pages 26814-26815] [FR Doc No: 2010-11201] SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12157 and 12158] Alabama Disaster AL-00031 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice...

  3. 75 FR 26813 - Alabama Disaster #AL-00029

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ... [Federal Register Volume 75, Number 91 (Wednesday, May 12, 2010)] [Notices] [Pages 26813-26814] [FR Doc No: 2010-11199] SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12155 and 12156] Alabama Disaster AL-00029 AGENCY: Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of...

  4. The University of Alabama's Integrated Science Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainey, Larry; Mitrook, Kim

    This program, supported by the Center for Communication and Educational Technology at the University of Alabama, incorporates the perspectives of biology, earth/space science, chemistry, and physics into an innovative science curriculum for the middle grades. Students are engaged for 20 minutes 3 times a week by an on-air instructor who is doing…

  5. Chemical Technician Manpower Survey: State of Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Donald; And Others

    The study was undertaken to assess the needs of Alabama's industry for chemical technicians and to determine the kinds and levels of skills required by major employers. Of the 75 organizations responding to the questionnaire with usable data, 62 were private industries, 6 were testing laboratories, and 7 were federal agencies. Generally, the study…

  6. 76 FR 30008 - Alabama Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 901 Alabama Regulatory Program AGENCY: Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, Interior. ACTION: Final rule; approval of amendment. SUMMARY: We, the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSM), are approving an amendment...

  7. 76 FR 9700 - Alabama Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 901 Alabama Regulatory Program AGENCY: Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, Interior. ACTION: Proposed rule; public comment... Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSM), are announcing receipt of a proposed amendment to the...

  8. Alabama Public Library Service, 1987 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    Designed to provide an overview of the range and quality of services provided by the Alabama Public Library Service (APLS), this annual report focuses on the 1987 activities of APLS. A report on the activities of the Library Development Division shows the allocation of state aid and Library Services and Construction Act (LCSA) Titles I and III…

  9. Implementation of Alabama Resources Information System, ARIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, B. E.

    1978-01-01

    Development of ARIS - Alabama Resources Information System is summarized. Development of data bases, system simplification for user access, and making information available to personnel having a need to use ARIS or in the process of developing ARIS type systems are discussed.

  10. RCP Local School Projects in Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Curriculum Project, Atlanta, GA.

    One of 6 state reports generated by the Regional Curriculum Project (funded under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act), the document describes 4 specific projects implemented through the Alabama State Superintendent's Office beginning in 1966. All 4 projects were designed to improve instructional leadership by defining the role(s) of the…

  11. Oak Mountain High School, Shelby County, Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Design Cost Data, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Presents design features of the Oak Mountain High School (Alabama) consisting of an academic side of classrooms, administration, and media center; and an activity side consisting of cafeteria, gymnasium, practice gym, and a theater. The school's floor plan and photos are included. (GR)

  12. Alabama Kids Count 2001 Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Apreill; Bogie, Don

    This Kids Count data book examines statewide trends in well-being for Alabama's children. The statistical portrait is based on 17 indicators in the areas of health, education, safety, and security. The indicators are: (1) infant mortality rate; (2) low weight births; (3) child health index; (4) births to unmarried teens; (5) first grade retention;…

  13. Alabama Kids Count 2002 Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Apreill; Bogie, Don

    This Kids Count data book examines statewide trends in well-being of Alabamas children. The statistical portrait is based on 18 indicators in the areas of child health, education, safety, and security: (1) infant mortality rate; (2) low weight births; (3) child health index; (4) births to unmarried teens; (5) first grade retention; (6) school…

  14. Significance of selected lineaments in Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drahovzal, J. A.; Neathery, T. L.; Wielchowsky, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    Four lineaments in the Alabama Appalachians that appear on ERTS-1 imagery have been geologically analysed. Two of the lineaments appear to have regional geologic significance, showing relationships to structural and stratigraphic frameworks, water and mineral resources, geophysical anomalies, and seismicity. The other two lineaments are of local geologic significance, but, nevertheless, have important environmental implications.

  15. New technology N products in alabama

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because of high fertilizer N prices, growers are interested in using less expensive sources of N and using fertilizer additives to reduce ammonia volatilization losses from urea sources. An experiment on a Lucedale fine sandy loam in Central Alabama (Prattville Research Unit) was conducted in 2007 ...

  16. New technology N products in alabama

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because of high fertilizer N prices, growers are interested in using less expensive sources of N and using fertilizer additives to reduce ammonia volatilization losses from urea sources. An experiment on a Lucedale fine sandy loam in Central Alabama (Prattville Research Unit) was conducted in 2007 t...

  17. Financial Reporting for Alabama Public Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Commission on Higher Education, Montgomery.

    Guidelines for preparing year-end financial reports are provided for Alabama public university staff to insure that reporting formats produce comparable financial reports and to keep up with recent developments in college accounting and financial reporting. The public institutions comply with two publications issued by the American Institute of…

  18. Optical Detection of Lightning from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boccippio, Dennis J.; Christian, Hugh J.

    1998-01-01

    Optical sensors have been developed to detect lightning from space during both day and night. These sensors have been fielded in two existing satellite missions and may be included on a third mission in 2002. Satellite-hosted, optically-based lightning detection offers three unique capabilities: (1) the ability to reliably detect lightning over large, often remote, spatial regions, (2) the ability to sample all (IC and CG) lightning, and (3) the ability to detect lightning with uniform (i.e., not range-dependent) sensitivity or detection efficiency. These represent significant departures from conventional RF-based detection techniques, which typically have strong range dependencies (biases) or range limitations in their detection capabilities. The atmospheric electricity team of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Global Hydrology and Climate Center has implemented a three-step satellite lightning research program which includes three phases: proof-of-concept/climatology, science algorithm development, and operational application. The first instrument in the program, the Optical Transient Detector (OTD), is deployed on a low-earth orbit (LEO) satellite with near-polar inclination, yielding global coverage. The sensor has a 1300 x 1300 sq km field of view (FOV), moderate detection efficiency, moderate localization accuracy, and little data bias. The OTD is a proof-of-concept instrument and its mission is primarily a global lightning climatology. The limited spatial accuracy of this instrument makes it suboptimal for use in case studies, although significant science knowledge has been gained from the instrument as deployed.

  19. Grounding and lightning protection. Volume 5

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, M.D.

    1987-12-31

    Grounding systems protect personnel and equipment by isolating faulted systems and dissipating transient currents. Lightning protection systems minimize the possible consequences of a direct strike by lightning. This volume focuses on design requirements of the grounding system and on present-day concepts used in the design of lightning protection systems. Various types of grounding designs are presented, and their advantages and disadvantages discussed. Safety, of course, is the primary concern of any grounding system. Methods are shown for grounding the non-current-carrying parts of electrical equipment to reduce shock hazards to personnel. Lightning protection systems are installed on tall structures (such as chimneys and cooling towers) to minimize the possibility of structural damage caused by direct lightning strokes. These strokes may carry currents of 200,000 A or more. The volume examines the formation and characteristics of lightning strokes and the way stroke characteristics influence the design of lightning protection systems. Because a large portion of the grounding system is buried in soil or concrete, it is not readily accessible for inspection or repair after its installation. The volume details the careful selection and sizing of materials needed to ensure a long, maintenance-free life for the system. Industry standards and procedures for testing the adequacy of the grounding system are also discussed.

  20. A Simple Lightning Assimilation Technique For Improving ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Convective rainfall is often a large source of error in retrospective modeling applications. In particular, positive rainfall biases commonly exist during summer months due to overactive convective parameterizations. In this study, lightning assimilation was applied in the Kain-Fritsch (KF) convective scheme to improve retrospective simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The assimilation method has a straightforward approach: Force KF deep convection where lightning is observed and, optionally, suppress deep convection where lightning is absent. WRF simulations were made with and without lightning assimilation over the continental United States for July 2012, July 2013, and January 2013. The simulations were evaluated against NCEP stage-IV precipitation data and MADIS near-surface meteorological observations. In general, the use of lightning assimilation considerably improves the simulation of summertime rainfall. For example, the July 2012 monthly-averaged bias of 6-h accumulated rainfall is reduced from 0.54 mm to 0.07 mm and the spatial correlation is increased from 0.21 to 0.43 when lightning assimilation is used. Statistical measures of near-surface meteorological variables also are improved. Consistent improvements also are seen for the July 2013 case. These results suggest that this lightning assimilation technique has the potential to substantially improve simulation of warm-season rainfall in retrospective WRF appli

  1. Hurricane Frederic tidal floods of September 12-13, 1979, along the Gulf Coast, Bridgehead quadrangle, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, John C.; Bohman, Larry R.

    1980-01-01

    Shown on a topographic map are floodmark elevations and approximate areas flooded by Hurricane Frederic tides of September 12-13, 1979, along the Mobile Causeway (U.S. Highway 90) from the Tensaw River to Spanish Fort, Alabama, and the eastern shore of Mobile Bay in the vicinity of Spanish Fort. Most buildings and business establishments along Mobile Causeway were completely destroyed, and the remaining buildings were severly damaged by flooding. Storm-tide frequency and records of annual maximum tides at Mobile, Alabama, since 1772, are presented. Offshore winds reached about 160 miles per hour. A wind-velocity of about 145 miles per hour was recorded near Dauphin Island, Alabama. (USGS)

  2. Lightning strike-induced brachial plexopathy.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Amita N; Kasundra, Gaurav M; Khichar, Subhakaran; Bhushan, Bharat S K

    2014-10-01

    We describe a patient who presented with a history of lightning strike injury. Following the injury, he sustained acute right upper limb weakness with pain. Clinically, the lesion was located to the upper and middle trunk of the right brachial plexus, and the same confirmed with electrophysiological studies. Nerve damage due to lightning injuries is considered very rare, and a plexus damage has been described infrequently, if ever. Thus, the proposed hypothesis that lightning rarely causes neuropathy, as against high-voltage electric current, due to its shorter duration of exposure not causing severe burns which lead to nerve damage, needs to be reconsidered.

  3. Lightning induced brightening in the airglow layer

    SciTech Connect

    Boeck, W.L. ); Vaughan, O.H. Jr.; Blakeslee, R. ); Vonnegut, B. ); Brook, M. )

    1992-01-24

    This report describes a transient luminosity observed at the altitude of the airglow layer (about 95 km) in coincidence with a lightning flash in a tropical oceanic thunderstorm directly beneath it. This event provides new evidence of direct coupling between lightning and ionospheric events. This luminous event in the ionosphere was the only one of its kind observed during an examination of several thousand images of lightning recorded under suitable viewing conditions with Space Shuttle cameras. Several possible mechanisms and interpretations are discussed briefly.

  4. Lightning strike-induced brachial plexopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Amita N.; Kasundra, Gaurav M.; Khichar, Subhakaran; Bhushan, Bharat S. K.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a patient who presented with a history of lightning strike injury. Following the injury, he sustained acute right upper limb weakness with pain. Clinically, the lesion was located to the upper and middle trunk of the right brachial plexus, and the same confirmed with electrophysiological studies. Nerve damage due to lightning injuries is considered very rare, and a plexus damage has been described infrequently, if ever. Thus, the proposed hypothesis that lightning rarely causes neuropathy, as against high-voltage electric current, due to its shorter duration of exposure not causing severe burns which lead to nerve damage, needs to be reconsidered. PMID:25288846

  5. Physeal injury in a lightning strike survivor.

    PubMed

    Lim, J K; Lee, E H; Chhem, R K

    2001-01-01

    Electrical injuries resulting in physeal injury in children are an uncommon but well-recognized clinical entity. Almost all these injuries are sustained from man-made electrical sources. To date, there have been no published cases of growth arrest after lightning strike. The authors report the case of a 12-year-old girl who survived a lightning strike 2 years ago and who presented with asymmetric growth arrest in both legs. The authors discuss the pathophysiology of lightning strike and consider the evidence for direct electrical injury versus ischemic insult to the physis as explanations for the cause of the growth arrest observed in this patient.

  6. New mechanism for lightning initiation

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, R.; Buchwald, M.; Gurevich, A.

    1996-10-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). To distinguish radio-frequency (rf) signals generated by lightning from the electromagnetic pulse produced by a nuclear explosion, it is necessary to understand the fundamental nature of thunderstorm discharges. The recent debate surrounding the origin of transionospheric pulse pairs (TIPPs) detected by the BLACKBEARD experiment aboard the ALEXIS satellite illustrates this point. We have argued that TIPP events could originate from the upward propagating discharges recently identified by optical images taken from the ground, from airplanes, and from the space shuttle. In addition, the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) measurements of x-ray bursts originating from thunderstorms are almost certainly associated with these upward propagating discharges. When taken together, these three measurements point directly to the runaway electron mechanism as the source of the upward discharges. The primary goal of this research effort was to identify the specific role played by the runaway-air-breakdown mechanism in the general area of thunderstorm electricity and in so doing develop lightning models that predict the optical, rf, and x-ray emissions that are observable from space.

  7. Lightning Tracking Tool for Assessment of Total Cloud Lightning within AWIPS II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burks, Jason E.; Stano, Geoffrey T.; Sperow, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Total lightning (intra-cloud and cloud-to-ground) has been widely researched and shown to be a valuable tool to aid real-time warning forecasters in the assessment of severe weather potential of convective storms. The trend of total lightning has been related to the strength of a storm's updraft. Therefore a rapid increase in total lightning signifies the strengthening of the parent thunderstorm. The assessment of severe weather potential occurs in a time limited environment and therefore constrains the use of total lightning. A tool has been developed at NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center to assist in quickly analyzing the total lightning signature of multiple storms. The development of this tool comes as a direct result of forecaster feedback from numerous assessments requesting a real-time display of the time series of total lightning. This tool also takes advantage of the new architecture available within the AWIPS II environment. SPoRT's lightning tracking tool has been tested in the Hazardous Weather Testbed (HWT) Spring Program and significant changes have been made based on the feedback. In addition to the updates in response to the HWT assessment, the lightning tracking tool may also be extended to incorporate other requested displays, such as the intra-cloud to cloud-to-ground ratio as well as incorporate the lightning jump algorithm.

  8. Lightning Characteristics and Lightning Strike Peak Current Probabilities as Related to Aerospace Vehicle Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dale L.; Vaughan, William W.

    1998-01-01

    A summary is presented of basic lightning characteristics/criteria for current and future NASA aerospace vehicles. The paper estimates the probability of occurrence of a 200 kA peak lightning return current, should lightning strike an aerospace vehicle in various operational phases, i.e., roll-out, on-pad, launch, reenter/land, and return-to-launch site. A literature search was conducted for previous work concerning occurrence and measurement of peak lighting currents, modeling, and estimating probabilities of launch vehicles/objects being struck by lightning. This paper presents these results.

  9. Examining In-Cloud Convective Turbulence in Relation to Total Lightning and the 3D Wind Field of Severe Thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Momar, S. A.; Deierling, W.; Williams, J. K.; Hoffman, E. G.

    2014-12-01

    Convectively induced turbulence (CIT) is commonly listed as a cause or factor in weather-related commercial aviation accidents. In-cloud CIT is generated in part by shears between convective updrafts and downdrafts. Total lightning is also dependent on a robust updraft and the resulting storm electrification. The relationship between total lightning and turbulence could prove useful in operational aviation settings with the use of future measurements from the geostationary lightning mapper (GLM) onboard the GOES-R satellite. Providing nearly hemispheric coverage of total lightning, the GLM could help identify CIT in otherwise data-sparse locations. For a severe thunderstorm case on 7 June 2012 in northeast Colorado, in-cloud eddy dissipation rate estimates from the NCAR/NEXRAD Turbulence Detection Algorithm were compared with cloud electrification data from the Colorado Lightning Mapping Array and radar products from the Denver, Colorado WSR-88D. These comparisons showed that high concentrations of very high frequency (VHF) source densities emitted by lightning occurred near and downstream of the storm's convective core. Severe turbulence was also shown to occur near this area, extending near the melting level of the storm and spreading upward and outward. Additionally, increases/decreases in VHF sources and turbulence volumes occurred within a few minutes of each other; although, light turbulence was shown to increase near one storm's dissipation. This may be due to increased shear from the now downdraft dominate storm. The 3D wind field from this case, obtained by either a dual-Doppler or a Variational Doppler Radar Assimilation System (VDRAS) analysis, will also be examined to further study the relationships between total lightning and thunderstorm kinematics. If these results prove to be robust, lightning may serve as a strong indicator of the location of moderate or greater turbulence.

  10. Charge structure analysis of a severe hailstorm with predominantly positive cloud-to-ground lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda, Nicolau; Rigo, Tomeu; Montanyà, Joan; van der Velde, Oscar A.

    2016-09-01

    The present study makes use of cloud-to-ground lightning, three-dimensional mapping from a Lightning Mapping Array and Doppler C-band radar observations to analyze the lightning trends and the underlying electrical charge structure of a large-hail bearing storm that produced important damages on the local agriculture. The analysis reported an extremely active storm, evolving through distinct phases, which stood out from a multicell structure to finally become a supercell. The onset of newer regions of convective development interacting with the main cell made the charge structure to be rather complex during some stages of this long-lived hailstorm. Evidence suggests the presence of regions with the charge layer being inverted from that of normal, non-severe convective storms, producing predominantly positive cloud-to-ground lightning. The analysis also suggests that strong cloud signals were misclassified as low peak current single-stroke negative cloud-to-ground flashes, masking the predominant positive nature of the storm.

  11. Evaluation of lightning-induced tropospheric ozone enhancements observed by ozone lidar and simulated by WRF/Chem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lihua; Follette-Cook, Melanie B.; Newchurch, M. J.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Pour-Biazar, Arastoo; Kuang, Shi; Koshak, William; Peterson, Harold

    2015-08-01

    High spatial- and temporal-resolution ozone lidar profiles, in conjunction with ozonesonde and satellite observations, are well suited to characterize short-term ozone variations due to different physical and chemical processes, such as the impact of lightning-generated NOx (LNOx) on tropospheric ozone. This work presents the hourly variation of tropospheric-ozone profiles measured by an ozone lidar at the University of Alabama in Huntsville, on July 14, 18, and 27, 2011. These ozone lidar data are compared with two WRF/Chem simulations, one with lightning NO (LNO) emissions and the other without. On July 14, 2011, the ozone lidar observed an ozone laminar structure with elevated ozone concentrations of 65∼80 ppbv below 2 km, low ozone (50∼65) ppbv between 2 and 5 km, and high ozone up to 165 ppbv between 5 and 12 km AGL. WRF/Chem simulations, in conjunction with backward trajectory analysis, suggest that lightning events occurring within upwind regions resulted in an ozone enhancement of 28 ppbv at 7.5 km AGL over Huntsville. On July 27, LNO emissions were transported to Huntsville from upwind and account for 75% of NOx and an 8.3 ppbv of ozone enhancement at ∼10 km; the model overestimates ozone between 2.5 and 5 km AGL.

  12. Lightning prevention systems for paper mills

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, R.B. Jr. )

    1989-05-01

    Paper mills are increasingly relying on sensitive electronic equipment to control their operations. However, the sensitivity of these devices has made mills vulnerable to the effects of lightning strokes. An interruption in the power supply or the destruction of delicate microcircuits can have devastating effects on mill productivity. The authors discuss how lightning strokes can be prevented by a Dissipation Array system (DAS). During the past 17 years, the concept has been applied to a host of applications in regions with a high incidence of lightning activity. With nearly 700 systems now installed, more than 4000 system-years of history have been accumulated. Areas as large as 1 km{sup 2} and towers as high as 2000 ft have been protected and completely isolated from lightning strokes. There have been very few failures, and in every case, the cause of the failure was determined and corrected.

  13. A Simple Lightning Flash Polarity Discriminating Counter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devan, K. R. S.; Jayaratne, E. R.

    1990-01-01

    Described are the apparatus and procedures needed for a demonstration of a determination of the polarity of charges carried by individual ground flashes of lightning. Discussed are materials, apparatus construction, and experimental results. (CW)

  14. Unilateral perihilar opacification caused by lightning.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Y; Aihara, T; Takano, H; Nakashima, N; Nozaki, S

    1993-01-01

    The chest radiographs of two children struck by lightning showed right perihilar opacification. The radiographs were taken 2 h and 5 h after the event respectively. To our knowledge no similar cases have been reported.

  15. Correlation of DIAL Ozone Observations with Lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Harold S.; Kuang, Shi; Koshak, William J.; Newchurch, Mike

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to see whether ozone maxima measured by the DIfferential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) instrument in Huntsville, AL may be traced back to lightning events occurring 24- 48 hours beforehand. The methodology is to start with lidar measurements of ozone from DIAL as well as ozonesonde measurements. The HYbrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model is then used to determine the origin of these ozone maxima 24-48 hours prior. Data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) are used to examine the presence/absence of lightning along the trajectory. This type of analysis suggests that lightning-produced NOx may be responsible for some of the ozone maxima over Huntsville.

  16. Correlation of DIAL Ozone Observations with Lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Harold S.; Kuang, Shi; Koshak, William J.; Newchurch, Mike

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to see whether ozone maxima measured by the DIfferential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) instrument in Huntsville, AL may be traced back to lightning events occurring 24-48 hours beforehand. The methodology is to start with lidar measurements of ozone from DIAL. The HYbrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model is then used to determine the origin of these ozone maxima 24-48 hours prior. Data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) are used to examine the presence/absence of lightning along the trajectory. This type of analysis suggests that lightning-produced NOx may be responsible for some of the ozone maxima over Huntsville.

  17. Lightning Safety and Outdoor Sports Activities

    MedlinePlus

    ... by surprise. Based on cases documented by the National Weather Service in recent years, about 30 people are killed ... involved at risk. For organized outdoor activities, the National Weather Service recommends that organizers have a lightning safety plan ...

  18. 14 CFR 420.71 - Lightning protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... operations and withdrawal of the public to public area distance prior to an electrical storm, or for an... prior to an electrical storm. (4) Testing and inspection. Lightning protection systems shall be...

  19. Lightning activity during the 1999 Superior derecho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Colin G.; Murphy, Brian P.

    2002-12-01

    On 4 July 1999, a severe convective windstorm, known as a derecho, caused extensive damage to forested regions along the United States/Canada border, west of Lake Superior. There were 665,000 acres of forest destroyed in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCAW) in Minnesota and Quetico Provincial Park in Canada, with approximately 12.5 million trees blown down. This storm resulted in additional severe weather before and after the occurrence of the derecho, with continuous cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning occurring for more than 34 hours during its path across North America. At the time of the derecho the percentage of positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) lightning measured by the Canadian Lightning Detection Network (CLDN) was greater than 70% for more than three hours, with peak values reaching 97% positive CG lightning. Such high ratios of +CG are rare, and may be useful indicators of severe weather.

  20. Lightning Activity During the 1999 Superior Derecho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, C. G.; Murphy, B. P.

    2002-12-01

    On 4 July 1999, a severe convective windstorm, known as a derecho, caused extensive damage to forested regions along the United States/Canada border, west of Lake Superior. There were 665,000 acres of forest destroyed in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCAW) in Minnesota and Quetico Provincial Park in Canada, with approximately 12.5 million trees blown down. This storm resulted in additional severe weather before and after the occurrence of the derecho, with continuous cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning occurring for more than 34 hours during its path across North America. At the time of the derecho the percentage of positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) lightning measured by the Canadian Lightning Detection Network (CLDN) was greater than 70% for more than three hours, with peak values reaching 97% positive CG lightning. Such high ratios of +CG are rare, and may be useful indicators of severe weather.