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  1. Carex Oklahomensis (Cyperaceae) New to Alabama, Georgia, and Louisiana, and Additional Records for Mississippi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carex oklahomensis is reported new for Alabama, Georgia, and Louisiana, and new records are presented for Mississippi. Habitat and species associates are presented for each new distribution point accompanied by speculation as to the origin of these populations....

  2. Effects of Section 404 permitting on freshwater wetlands in Louisiana, Alabama, and Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Sifneos, J.C.; Cake, E.W.; Kentula, M.E.

    1992-01-01

    Information was compiled on permits issued under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act for alteration of freshwater wetlands from January 1982-August 1987 in Louisiana, Alabama, and Mississippi. The location, area, wetland type, and other data describing the impacted and compensatory (i.e., created, restored, and preserved) wetlands were compiled and analyzed. Trends in Louisiana, the state with the most permits issued, were emphasized, and a synopsis of the results from Alabama and Mississippi is presented for comparison. The objective of the study was to uncover patterns and trends in Section 404 permitting in the three states to document the effects of the permit decisions. Only the information contained in the permit record was compiled and analyzed. No judgment was made concerning compliance with the terms of the permits or whether the compensatory wetland replaced the ecological functions of the wetland destroyed. The Section 404 permitting program could be evaluated more effectively if record-keeping was standardized. The accuracy and thoroughness of the report was affected by poor record-keeping and inconcise permit language. Requirements for follow-up monitoring and increasing the specificity of the information contained in the permits would provide information on the impacts to wetlands and their functions to be considered in future permit decisions.

  3. Carbon monoxide poisoning after hurricane Katrina--Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi, August-September 2005.

    PubMed

    2005-10-01

    Hurricane Katrina made landfall on August 29, 2005, on the Gulf Coast of the United States, causing loss of life, widespread property damage, and power outages. After hurricanes, some residents use portable generators and other gasoline-powered appliances for electrical power and cleanup. These devices produce carbon monoxide (CO), and improper use can cause CO poisoning. During August 29-September 24, a total of 51 cases of CO poisoning were reported by hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) facilities in Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi. This report describes these cases and the rapidly implemented reporting system that identified them. CO poisoning can be prevented by reducing exposure to CO through appropriate placement and ventilation of gasoline-powered engines.

  4. Geologic and hydrologic summary of salt domes in Gulf Coast region of Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, R. Ernest; Eargle, Dolan H.; Davis, Beth O.

    1973-01-01

    There are 263 known or suspected onshore salt domes in the Texas-Louisiana-Mississippi-Alabama portion of the Gulf Coast geosyncline. The top of the salt in 148 of them is probably deeper than desirable for a waste repository site, and 79 of those that are shallow enough are probably unavailable for a site because of present use by industry for gas storage or production of oil, salt, or sulfur. In this report we have compiled the available geologic and hydrologic background data pertinent to the evaluation of the remaining 36 known or suspected salt domes as potential sites for waste storage. There are three parts to this compilations: 1) summaries of the geology and hydrology of the salt-dome province as a whole; 2) summaries of the physiography, climate, geology, and hydrology of each of the five salt-dome basins that occur within the province; and 3) an appendix of background data for each of the 36 potentially acceptable domes. The distribution of salt domes in the province is genetically related to areas of relative subsidence that formed basins or depocenters within the Gulf Coast geosyncline. In some cases, as in northeast Texas and south Louisiana, the locations of individual domes or groups of domes are related to deep movement of salt along axial trends. The salt domes in the interior salt-dome subprovince are probably more structurally stable than those of the coastal subprovince because salt diapirism is inferred to have ceased around Miocene time in the interior but may still be active in parts of the coastal subprovince. Although the size and shape of many domes is unknown or can only be roughly approximated, each of the five basins in the province appears to contain potentially acceptable domes of adequate size for a repository. We recognize no pattern to the distribution of salt-dome size. Caprock thicknesses vary greatly within each salt-dome basin,and we recognize no pattern to the variations. Among the potentially acceptable domes, the depths to

  5. Post-Hurricane Isaac coastal oblique aerial photographs collected along the Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana barrier islands, September 2–3, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, Karen L. M.; Karen A. Westphal,

    2016-04-21

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), as part of the National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards project, conducts baseline and storm-response photography missions to document and understand the changes in vulnerability of the Nation's coasts to extreme storms (Morgan, 2009). On September 2-3, 2012, the USGS conducted an oblique aerial photographic survey along the Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana barrier islands aboard a Cessna 172 (aircraft) at an altitude of 500 feet (ft) and approximately 1,000 ft offshore. This mission was flown to collect post-Hurricane Isaac data for assessing incremental changes in the beach and nearshore area since the last survey, flown in September 2008 (central Louisiana barrier islands) and June 2011 (Dauphin Island, Alabama, to Breton Island, Louisiana), and the data can be used in the assessment of future coastal change.The photographs provided in this report are Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) images. ExifTool was used to add the following to the header of each photo: time of collection, Global Positioning System (GPS) latitude, GPS longitude, keywords, credit, artist (photographer), caption, copyright, and contact information. The photograph locations are an estimate of the position of the aircraft at the time the photograph was taken and do not indicate the location of any feature in the images (see the Navigation Data page). These photographs document the state of the barrier islands and other coastal features at the time of the survey. Pages containing thumbnail images of the photographs, referred to as contact sheets, were created in 5-minute segments of flight time. These segments can be found on the Photos and Maps page. Photographs can be opened directly with any JPEG-compatible image viewer by clicking on a thumbnail on the contact sheet.In addition to the photographs, a Google Earth Keyhole Markup Language (KML) file is provided and can be used to view the images by clicking on the marker and then clicking on

  6. Post-Hurricane Isaac coastal oblique aerial photographs collected along the Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana barrier islands, September 2–3, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, Karen L. M.; Karen A. Westphal

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), as part of the National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards project, conducts baseline and storm-response photography missions to document and understand the changes in vulnerability of the Nation's coasts to extreme storms (Morgan, 2009). On September 2-3, 2012, the USGS conducted an oblique aerial photographic survey along the Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana barrier islands aboard a Cessna 172 (aircraft) at an altitude of 500 feet (ft) and approximately 1,000 ft offshore. This mission was flown to collect post-Hurricane Isaac data for assessing incremental changes in the beach and nearshore area since the last survey, flown in September 2008 (central Louisiana barrier islands) and June 2011 (Dauphin Island, Alabama, to Breton Island, Louisiana), and the data can be used in the assessment of future coastal change.The photographs provided in this report are Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) images. ExifTool was used to add the following to the header of each photo: time of collection, Global Positioning System (GPS) latitude, GPS longitude, keywords, credit, artist (photographer), caption, copyright, and contact information. The photograph locations are an estimate of the position of the aircraft at the time the photograph was taken and do not indicate the location of any feature in the images (see the Navigation Data page). These photographs document the state of the barrier islands and other coastal features at the time of the survey. Pages containing thumbnail images of the photographs, referred to as contact sheets, were created in 5-minute segments of flight time. These segments can be found on the Photos and Maps page. Photographs can be opened directly with any JPEG-compatible image viewer by clicking on a thumbnail on the contact sheet.In addition to the photographs, a Google Earth Keyhole Markup Language (KML) file is provided and can be used to view the images by clicking on the marker and then clicking on

  7. Shallow coal exploration drill-hole data--Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valentine, Brett J.; Dennen, Kristin O.

    2012-01-01

    Coal exploration drill-hole data from over 24,000 wells in 10 States are discussed by State in the chapters of this report, and the data are provided in an accompanying spreadsheet. The drill holes were drilled between 1962 and 1984 by Phillips Coal Company, a division of Phillips Petroleum Company (Phillips). The data were donated to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 2001 by the North American Coal Corporation, which purchased the Phillips assets as part of a larger dataset. Under the terms of the agreement with North American Coal Corporation, the data were deemed proprietary until February 2011, a period of 10 years after the donation (Appendix of Chapter A). Now that the required period of confidentiality has passed, the data have been digitized from tabulated data files to create unified and spatially consistent coal exploration drill-hole maps and reports for the States of Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas. The data are made publically available by this report.

  8. Post-Hurricane Ike coastal oblique aerial photographs collected along the Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana barrier islands and the north Texas coast, September 14-15, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, Karen L. M.; Krohn, M. Dennis; Guy, Kristy K.

    2016-04-28

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), as part of the National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards project, conducts baseline and storm-response photography missions to document and understand the changes in vulnerability of the Nation's coasts to extreme storms (Morgan, 2009). On September 14-15, 2008, the USGS conducted an oblique aerial photographic survey along the Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana barrier islands and the north Texas coast, aboard a Beechcraft Super King Air 200 (aircraft) at an altitude of 500 feet (ft) and approximately 1,200 ft offshore. This mission was flown to collect post-Hurricane Ike data for assessing incremental changes in the beach and nearshore area since the last survey, flown on September 9-10, 2008, and the data can be used in the assessment of future coastal change.The photographs provided in this report are Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) images. ExifTool was used to add the following to the header of each photo: time of collection, Global Positioning System (GPS) latitude, GPS longitude, keywords, credit, artist (photographer), caption, copyright, and contact information. The photograph locations are an estimate of the position of the aircraft at the time the photograph was taken and do not indicate the location of any feature in the images (see the Navigation Data page). These photographs document the state of the barrier islands and other coastal features at the time of the survey. Pages containing thumbnail images of the photographs, referred to as contact sheets, were created in 5-minute segments of flight time. These segments can be found on the Photos and Maps page. Photographs can be opened directly with any JPEG-compatible image viewer by clicking on a thumbnail on the contact sheet.In addition to the photographs, a Google Earth Keyhole Markup Language (KML) file is provided and can be used to view the images by clicking on the marker and then clicking on either the thumbnail or the link above the thumbnail

  9. Post-Hurricane Ike coastal oblique aerial photographs collected along the Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana barrier islands and the north Texas coast, September 14-15, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, Karen L. M.; Krohn, M. Dennis; Guy, Kristy K.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), as part of the National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards project, conducts baseline and storm-response photography missions to document and understand the changes in vulnerability of the Nation's coasts to extreme storms (Morgan, 2009). On September 14-15, 2008, the USGS conducted an oblique aerial photographic survey along the Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana barrier islands and the north Texas coast, aboard a Beechcraft Super King Air 200 (aircraft) at an altitude of 500 feet (ft) and approximately 1,200 ft offshore. This mission was flown to collect post-Hurricane Ike data for assessing incremental changes in the beach and nearshore area since the last survey, flown on September 9-10, 2008, and the data can be used in the assessment of future coastal change.The photographs provided in this report are Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) images. ExifTool was used to add the following to the header of each photo: time of collection, Global Positioning System (GPS) latitude, GPS longitude, keywords, credit, artist (photographer), caption, copyright, and contact information. The photograph locations are an estimate of the position of the aircraft at the time the photograph was taken and do not indicate the location of any feature in the images (see the Navigation Data page). These photographs document the state of the barrier islands and other coastal features at the time of the survey. Pages containing thumbnail images of the photographs, referred to as contact sheets, were created in 5-minute segments of flight time. These segments can be found on the Photos and Maps page. Photographs can be opened directly with any JPEG-compatible image viewer by clicking on a thumbnail on the contact sheet.In addition to the photographs, a Google Earth Keyhole Markup Language (KML) file is provided and can be used to view the images by clicking on the marker and then clicking on either the thumbnail or the link above the thumbnail

  10. Archive of Digitized Analog Boomer and Minisparker Seismic Reflection Data Collected from the Alabama-Mississippi-Louisiana Shelf During Cruises Onboard the R/V Carancahua and R/V Gyre, April and July, 1981

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, Jordan M.; Harrison, Arnell S.; Wiese, Dana S.; Flocks, James G.

    2009-01-01

    In April and July of 1981, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted geophysical surveys to investigate the shallow geologic framework of the Alabama-Mississippi-Louisiana Shelf in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Work was conducted onboard the Texas A&M University R/V Carancahua and the R/V Gyre to develop a geologic understanding of the study area and to locate potential hazards related to offshore oil and gas production. While the R/V Carancahua only collected boomer data, the R/V Gyre used a 400-Joule minisparker, 3.5-kilohertz (kHz) subbottom profiler, 12-kHz precision depth recorder, and two air guns. The authors selected the minisparker data set because, unlike with the boomer data, it provided the most complete record. This report is part of a series to digitally archive the legacy analog data collected from the Mississippi-Alabama SHelf (MASH). The MASH data rescue project is a cooperative effort by the USGS and the Minerals Management Service (MMS). This report serves as an archive of high-resolution scanned Tagged Image File Format (TIFF) and Graphics Interchange Format (GIF) images of the original boomer and minisparker paper records, navigation files, trackline maps, Geographic Information System (GIS) files, cruise logs, and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata.

  11. The Impact of Hurricane Katrina on Technology and Media Infrastructures in Louisiana and Mississippi School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Robert; Nauman, Anne; Fulwiler, John

    2007-01-01

    Perhaps one of the worst disasters in United States history, Hurricane Katrina is expected to have a lasting impact on the economies of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida with losses in the billions of dollars. Given that the economic foundation of the approximately 600 schools and libraries affected was far from ideal before the…

  12. Floods of April 1979, Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edelen, G.W.; Wilson, K.V.; Harkins, J.R.; Miller, J.F.; Chin, E.H.

    1986-01-01

    A major storm April 11-13, 1979, following a series of storms in March and April, brought large amounts of rainfall over southeastern United States. Heaviest rain fell over north-central Mississippi and Alabama. A maximum of 21.5 inches was observed at Louisville, 14 SE, Mississippi. Floods in Mississippi and Alabama were the maximum of record at 60 streamflow gaging stations in the Coosa, Alabama, Tombigbee, Chickasawhay, Pearl, and Big Black River basins. On the Pearl River, peak discharges at main stem gaging stations generally approached or exceeded those of the great flood of 1874, and recurrence intervals generally were greater than 100 years. Nine lives were reported lost. Estimated damages totaled nearly $400 million. Seventeen thousand people were driven from their homes in Jackson, Mississippi. This report presents analyses of the meterological settings of the storms, summaries of flood stages and discharges at 221 streamflow gaging stations, stages and contents of 10 reservoirs, flood-crest stages and hydrograph data consisting of gage height, discharge, and accumulated runoff at selected times, at 46 gaging stations, groundwater fluctuations in 11 observation wells, and water salinity and temperature at 22 sites along the Intracoastal Waterway in Mobile Bay. (USGS)

  13. Mississippi/Alabama Pinnacle Trend Ecosystem Monitoring Final Synthesis Report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; Texas A&M University, Geochemical and Environmental Research Group

    2001-01-01

    This Final Synthesis Report summarizes a four-year program to characterize and monitor carbonate mounds on the Mississippi/Alabama outer continental shelf (OCS). The study area is shown in Fig.ES.1. The study was conducted by Continental Shelf Associates, Inc. and the Geochemical and Environmental Research Group (GERG) of Texas A&M University (TAMU), for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Biological Resources Division.

  14. Floods of April 1983 in southern Mississippi and southeastern Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlson, Darrell D.; Firda, Gary D.

    1983-01-01

    Extreme flooding occurred in April 1983 in southern Mississippi and southeastern Louisiana. The floods resulted from a near-stationary cold front, which moved slowly across Louisiana and Mississippi. Flood heights and discharges of many streams exceeded previously known maximums of record, and for many the recurrence interval of peak discharge exceeded 100 years. On Black Creek, near Brooklyn, Miss., the previous maximum stage (since 1961) was exceeded by 4.26 ft, and the April 7 peak discharge of 42,500 cu ft/sec was about two times the previous maximum discharge. This flood exceeded the 100-yr event. In southeastern Louisiana, the area with the most severe flooding was in the Bogue Chitto basin. At the Franklinton, LA, Station, the April 7 peak discharge of 125,000 cu ft/sec was more than two times the previous maximum discharge. In April 1900 the stage at this site was 29.6 ft, 4.9 ft higher than the April 1981 peak. An extreme event also occurred on the Tchefuncta River near Franklinton, LA. The previous maximum stage (since 1949) was exceeded by 3.75 ft, and the April 6 discharge of 26 ,900 cu ft/sec is more than three times the previous maximum. This discharge also exceeded the 100-yr event. Combined flood damages for both States totaled in the hundred of millions of dollars. (Lantz-PTT)

  15. Depositional history of Louisiana-Mississippi outer continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kindinger, J.L.; Miller, R.J.; Stelting, C.E.

    1982-01-01

    A geological study was undertaken in 1981 in the Louisiana-Mississippi outer continental shelf for the Bureau of Land Management. The study included a high-resolution seismic reflection survey, surficial sediment sampling and surface current drifter sampling. Approximately 7100 sq km of the Louisiana-Mississippi shelf and upper slope were surveyed. The sea floor of the entire area is relatively smooth except for occasional areas of uplift produced by diapiric intrusion along the upper slope. Characteristics of the topography and subsurface shelf sediments are the result of depositional sequences due to delta outbuilding over transgressive sediments with intervening periods of erosion during low sea level stands. Little evidence of structural deformation such as faults, diapirs, and shallow gas is present on the shelf and only a few minor faults and scarps are found on the slope. Minisparker seismic records in combination with air gun (40 and 5 cu in) and 3.5-kHz subbottom profile records reveal that seven major stages of shelf development have occurred since the middle Pleistocene. The shelf development has been controlled by the rise and fall of sea level. These stages are defined by four major unconformities, several depositions of transgressive sediments, sequences of river channeling and progradational delta deposits. Surficial sediment sample and seismic records indicate tat the last major depositional event was the progradation of the St. Bernard Delta lobe. This delta lobe covered the northwestern and central regions. Surficial sediments in most of the study area are the product of the reworking of the San Bernard Delta lobe and previous progradations.

  16. 40 CFR 81.68 - Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi Interstate Air Quality...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (Florida)-Southern Mississippi Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.68 Section 81.68 Protection of...-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Gulfport (Mississippi) Interstate Air Quality Control Region has...

  17. 40 CFR 81.68 - Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi Interstate Air Quality...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (Florida)-Southern Mississippi Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.68 Section 81.68 Protection of...-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Gulfport (Mississippi) Interstate Air Quality Control Region has...

  18. 40 CFR 81.68 - Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi Interstate Air Quality...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (Florida)-Southern Mississippi Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.68 Section 81.68 Protection of...-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Gulfport (Mississippi) Interstate Air Quality Control Region has...

  19. 40 CFR 81.68 - Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi Interstate Air Quality...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (Florida)-Southern Mississippi Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.68 Section 81.68 Protection of...-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Gulfport (Mississippi) Interstate Air Quality Control Region has...

  20. 40 CFR 81.68 - Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi Interstate Air Quality...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (Florida)-Southern Mississippi Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.68 Section 81.68 Protection of...-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Gulfport (Mississippi) Interstate Air Quality Control Region has...

  1. Maastrichtian ammonites chiefly from the Prairie Bluff Chalk in Alabama and Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cobban, W.A.; Kennedy, W.J.

    1995-01-01

    The Prairie Bluff Chalk of Alabama and Mississippi yields a diverse ammonite fauna of Maastrichtian age. Twenty-eight species, of which three are new, are recorded. The bulk of the fauna can be referred to a Discoscaphites conradi assemblage zone, but some elements in the fauna are significantly older. -Authors

  2. Nutritional Status of New Orleans, Mississippi and Alabama Head Start Children. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jack L.

    Three purposes guided compilation of this final report on the nutritional status of New Orleans, Mississippi, and Alabama Head Start children: (1) to evaluate the causes of anemia through detailed studies of urban New Orleans preschool children and their mothers, (2) to study the effect of dietary supplementation of school feeding programs upon…

  3. Leadership Frame Preferences of Elected and Appointed School District Superintendents in Alabama, Florida, and Mississippi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landry, Cheri Lynne

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the leadership orientation frames of school district superintendents in Alabama, Florida, and Mississippi, which are the only three states in the United States with both elected and appointed school district superintendents. The theoretical framework for this study was developed by Bolman and Deal's (1997) four frame…

  4. 33 CFR 334.782 - SUPSHIP Gulf Coast, Pascagoula, Mississippi, Detachment Mobile, Alabama at AUSTAL, USA, Mobile...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... area would encompass all navigable waters of the United States, as defined at 33 CFR part 329..., Mississippi, Detachment Mobile, Alabama at AUSTAL, USA, Mobile, Alabama; restricted area. 334.782 Section 334... DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.782 SUPSHIP Gulf Coast, Pascagoula,...

  5. Paleoenvironmental analysis of the lower Oligocene Mint Spring and Marianna Formations across Mississippi and southwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Pettway, W.C.; Dunn, D.A. )

    1990-09-01

    Examination of calcareous nannoplankton floras from the Mint Spring Formation and the Marianna Limestone indicates that these formations are diachronous along their outcrop belt in Mississippi and southwest Alabama. In east-central Mississippi and Alabama, these strata correlate to the Ericsonia subdisticha Zone (NP21), while in west-central Mississippi they contain nannofossils of the younger Helicopontosphaera reticulata Zone (NP22). Quantitative species abundance data for samples from 12 outcrops were subjected to R-mode and Q-mode factor analysis, and to discriminant analysis. These multivariate techniques reveal that the Mint Spring Formation was deposited in a shallow-water, nearshore inner-shelf environment, while normal pelagic sedimentation resulted in the Marianna Limestone being deposited as a carbonate shelf across east-central Mississippi and southwest Alabama. In west-central Mississippi, these strata were less affected by the transgression of northern Gulf waters in the early Oligocene, as indicated by higher abundances of shallow-water species within these formations. Based on discriminant analysis, the Mint Spring Formation and the Marianna Limestone reflect similar paleoenvironments in western Mississippi, with the uppermost Mint Spring samples near the formational contact containing nannofossil species assemblages that are indistinguishable from the nannofossil assemblages from the lowermost Marianna samples immediately above the contact. Both these units were deposited during the first half of sea-level cycle TA4.4, and based on relatively constant species abundances throughout the extent of both formations, the Mint Spring Formation and the Marianna Limestone appear to have been deposited as part of a single continuous transgression.

  6. Heterostegina zone - A shallow Anahuac (Late Oligocene-Early Miocene) oil frontier in southern Louisiana and Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Krutak, P.R. ); Beron, P. Jr. )

    1990-09-01

    The Heterostegina zone ({approximately}23.6-23.0 ma, N4a-Globorotalia kugleri zone) is recognized throughout the Gulf Coast as an excellent correlative datum and erratic but prolific producer of hydrocarbons. Its late Oligocene-early Miocene chronozone represents the maximum development of Neogene reefs in the Caribbean/West Atlantic biogeographic province. Although many of the western Gulf Coast Heterostegina reservoirs consist of reefal limestones that grew atop piercement salt domes, eastern Heterostegina equivalents in Louisiana (St. Martin Parish), southern Mississippi, and Alabama (Mobile Bay area) comprise a rimmed accretionary carbonate shelf. The existence of this shelf is confirmed by seismic data as well as by a core from the Sapphire Petroleum Company {number sign}1 State well (MS-85-4-OS) located south of Ship Island, Mississippi. Petrographic study of 17 ft of Anahua-cage core (5,660-5,677 ft) recovered from the Sapphire well has delineated three carbonate paleoenvironments-in ascending order: ( 1) shallow-water, windward algal thickets (5,671.0-5,677.0 ft); (2) bryozoan-mollusc-foraminiferal-algal limestones deposited below fairweather wave base (5,664.2-5,671.0 ft); and (3) foraminiferal-algal-rhodolitic limestone laid down above fairweather wave base (5,660.0-5664.2 ft).

  7. Annotated bibliography of the Black Warrior basin area, northern Alabama - northern Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Ward-McLemore, E.

    1983-01-01

    This bibliography contains 1964 records related to the geology of the Black Warrior basin of northern Alabama and northern Mississippi. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: coal, petroleum, and natural gas deposits; mineralogy; lithology; paleontology; petrology; stratigraphy; tectonics; bauxite; iron ores; geologic correlations; earthquakes; fossils; gold deposits; geological surveys; hydrology; and water resources. The subject index provides listings of records related to each county and the geologic ages covered by this area. Some of the items (54) are themselves bibliographies.

  8. Geohydrologic summary of the Pearl River basin, Mississippi and Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lang, Joseph W.

    1972-01-01

    little or no treatment for most uses. The water is a soft, sodium bicarbonate type and therefore has a low to moderate dissolved-solids content. Mineral content increases generally downdip in an aquifer. Excessive iron, common in shallow aquifers, is objectionable for some water uses. Water from the streams, except in salty tidal reaches, is less mineralized than ground water; in 10 sites the median dissolved-solids content in streamflow was 50 milligrams per liter or less. Moderately intensive ground-water development has been made in the Bogalusa area, Louisiana; at the Mississippi Test Facility, Hancock County, Miss. ; and in the Jackson area, Mississippi. Wells with pumping rates of 500 to 1,000 gallons per minute each are common throughout the Pearl River basin, and some deep wells flow more than 3,000 gallons per minute in the coastal lowland areas. Probably 20 million gallons per day of artesian water flows uncontrolled from wells in the southern part of the basin. Ground-water levels, except in the higher altitudes, are within 60 feet of the surface, and flowing wells are common in the valleys and in the coastal Pine Meadows. Decline of water level is a problem in only a few small areas. Saline water as a resource is available for development from aquifers and streams near the coast and from aquifers at considerable depth in most of the Pearl River basin. Pollution is a problem in oil fields and in reaches of some streams below sewage and other waste-disposal points. The basin estuary contains water of variable quality but has potential for certain water-use developments that will require special planning and management.

  9. Ground Water Atlas of the United States: Segment 5, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Renken, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    The States of Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi, which are located adjacent to each other and north of the Gulf of Mexico, compose Segment 5 of this Atlas. The three-State area encompasses an area of nearly 149,000 square miles. These States are drained by numerous rivers and streams, such as the Atchafalaya, the Teche, the Vermilion, the Calcasieu, the Mermentau, the Sabine, the Tombigbee, the Pascagoula, the Wolf, and the Pearl Rivers, that drain directly to the Gulf of Mexico. The Yazoo, the Big Black, the Arkansas, the St. Francis, the Red, and the White Rivers are tributaries of the Mississippi River, which is the largest of the rivers that drain the three States. Although surface water is the largest source of freshwater to public supply, domestic and commercial, industrial, mining, thermoelectric power and agricultural users, ground water also is important and accounts for 38 percent of total water use in Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi. Precipitation is the ultimate source of water that recharges the ma-jor aquifers in Segment 5. Average annual rainfall (1951-80) amounts range from about 40 to about 68 inches (fig. 1). Temporal (seasonal) and spatial variations in precipitation are evident in the three-State area. Average annual rainfall is greatest (60 inches per year or more) in southern Louisiana and southern Mississippi and diminishes in Arkansas and in northwestern Louisiana. Precipitation is greatest during January and May in Arkansas. May to September represent the wettest months in southeastern Louisiana and southern Mississippi. March and April are the wettest months in northern Mississippi. Average annual (1951-80) runoff ranges from less than 12 inches in western Louisiana and northwestern Arkansas to more than 20 inches in southern and northern Mississippi and in central and western Arkansas (fig. 2). Comparison of precipitation and runoff maps shows that less than one-half of the annual precipitation leaves the area as stream runoff

  10. Exposure of late Pleistocene Mississippi River meander-belt facies at Mt. Pleasant, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Autin, W.J.; Davison, A.T.; Miller, B.J.; Day, W.J.; Schumacher, B.A.

    1988-09-01

    Exposure of a sedimentary sequence along a Mississippi River bluff at Mt. Pleasant, Louisiana, provides insight into the construction of the Prairie Terraces. This site serves as a type section for a late Pleistocene meander belt of the Mississippi River, and stratigraphic features have been traced beneath the Prairie Terraces in southeastern Louisiana. A 23.35-m measured section reveals upper units of Peoria loess and mixed loess. The described meander-belt facies are of a probable Wisconsin age and are here named the Mt. Pleasant Bluff alloformation. This age designation is based on position in the stratigraphic section, degree of preservation of sedimentary facies, character and degree of development of the upper paleosol, preservation of constructional topography beneath the loess, and correlation of this sequence to nearby sites with Wisconsin-age radiocarbon dates.

  11. Phytophthora species recovered from irrigation reservoirs in Mississippi and Alabama nurseries and pathogenicity of three new species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    From a survey of containment ponds for Phytophthora spp. at one nursery each in Alabama and Mississippi, eight species and one taxon were recovered with P. gonapodyides dominant in cooler months and P. hydropathica in warmer months, accounting for 39.6% and 46.6% overall recovery, respectively. Amo...

  12. Phytophthora species recovered from irrigation reservoirs in Mississippi and Alabama nurseries and pathogenicity of three new species.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    From a survey of containment ponds for Phytophthora spp. at one nursery each in Alabama and Mississippi, eight species and one taxon were recovered with P. gonapodyides dominant in cooler months and P. hydropathica in warmer months, accounting for 39.6% and 46.6% overall recovery, respectively. Amo...

  13. Impact of Mississippi River freshwater reintroduction on enhancing marsh accretionary processes in a Louisiana estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLaune, R. D.; Jugsujinda, A.; Peterson, G. W.; Patrick, W. H.

    2003-11-01

    To counteract extensive wetland loss a series of diversion projects have been implemented to introduce freshwater and sediment from the Mississippi River into Louisiana coastal wetlands. To keep pace with increases in water level due to subsidence Louisiana coastal marshes must vertically accrete through the accumulation of both organic matter and mineral sediment. The impact of Mississippi River freshwater diversion on enhancing vertical marsh accretion (mineral and organic matter accumulation) was examined in Breton Sound estuary, a coastal wetland experiencing marsh deterioration as result of subsidence and salt water intrusion. Using 137Cs dating and artificial marker horizons, increases in the rate of vertical marsh accretion were measured at marsh sites along a spatial gradient which has been receiving diverted water from the Mississippi River (Caernarvon diversion) since 1991. Vertical accretion and accumulation of mineral sediment organic matter and nutrients in the marsh soil profile, increased at marsh sites receiving freshwater and sediment input. Iron and manganese content of the marsh surface sediment were shown to be an excellent signature of riverine sediment deposition. Soil extractable phosphorus was higher and extractable sodium was lower at sites nearest freshwater and sediment input. Results demonstrated that freshwater diversion through sediment input and lowering of salinity will enhance marsh accretion and stability, slowing or reversing the rate of wetland loss.

  14. Katrina Effect on Mathematics Achievement in Mississippi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, John; Lewis, Mark; Gross, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina caused severe physical damage to the Gulf Coast states of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. Homes and businesses were destroyed. Natural habitats were annihilated, and many Americans were displaced for days, weeks, and even years. This study investigated the within-subject effects and contrasts of poverty, rurality, and…

  15. Seabed erodibility variations on the Louisiana continental shelf before and after the 2011 Mississippi River flood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, K.; Corbett, D. R.; Walsh, J. P.; Young, D.; Briggs, K. B.; Cartwright, G. M.; Friedrichs, C. T.; Harris, C. K.; Mickey, R. C.; Mitra, S.

    2014-08-01

    Erodibility is critical to the sediment resuspension process but has not been measured systematically in large river-dominated muddy continental shelves before. During early summer of 2011, the Mississippi River experienced a major flood event. This flood provided a unique opportunity to examine how shelf seabed erodibility responded to a large river flood, and the ultimate fate of flood deposition is important to geological and biogeochemical processes (e.g., stratal formation, carbon sequestration). A total of 106 sediment cores were collected on the Louisiana shelf during five cruises in 2010 and 2011, and a new dataset was used to evaluate the response of the seabed to the recent conditions. The localized flood deposit was mainly within tens of kilometers of river sources, and little sediment accumulated on the middle Louisiana shelf. Seabed erodibility was measured using a dual-core Gust Erosion Microcosm System. The erodibility of sediment collected in April 2011 exceeded that for August 2010 and August 2011. The springtime increase in erodibility seemed to be related to the recent presence of energetic waves that mobilized the seabed. Erodibility was highest on the inner shelf southwest of Atchafalaya Bay, intermediate on the middle shelf, lowest in the Mississippi Canyon, and highly variable on the Mississippi subaqueous delta. These spatial patterns were influenced by proximity to river sources, flood-deposit thicknesses, intensity of wave-driven bed stresses, and bioturbation. The flood-deposit thickness itself, however, was not sufficient to explain all the spatial variations of erodibility after the peak of the Mississippi flood. Comparing values to published data, the depth-varying erodibility on the Louisiana shelf was close to the "low erodibility" level for the York River of Virginia, and similar to the data collected from Baltimore Harbor in Maryland and the main stem of upper Chesapeake Bay. Our findings promote understanding of the resuspension

  16. Sporomorphs from the Jackson Group (upper Eocene) and adjacent strata of Mississippi and western Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frederiksen, Norman O.

    1980-01-01

    This palynological study is based on 71 outcrop and core samples of the Jackson Group and adjacent strata from the type area of the group in western Mississippi and also from eastern Mississippi and western Alabama. The Jackson Group consists entirely of marine strata in the region of study. It includes the fossiliferous greensands of the Moodys Branch Formation at the base and the calcareous Yazoo Clay at the top. One hundred seventy-four sporomorph (spore and pollen) types are known from the Jackson Group and adjacent strata in the area of study; all but four of them were observed by the writer. The 174 types are assigned to 74 form genera, 37 modern genera, and 25 new species. Eleven species of pollen grains appear to have accurately determined restricted stratigraphic ranges within the sequence studied. Parsonsidites conspicuus Frederiksen and Ericipites aff. E. ericius (Potonie) Potonie have first occurrences (range bottoms) at the base of the Jackson Group. Aglaoreidia pristina Fowler has its first occurrence near the top of the Jackson. Eight species have last occurrences at or just below the top of the Jackson Group. These are Casuarinidites cf. C. granilabratus (Stanley) Srivastava, Chrysophyllum brevisulcatum (Frederiksen) n. comb., Cupanieidites orthoteichus Cookson and Pike, Symplocos gemroota n. sp., Nudopollis terminalis (Pflug and Thomson) Elsik, Sabal cf. S. granopollenites Rouse, Caprifoliipites tantulus n. sp., and Nypa echinata (Muller) n. comb. From the upper part of the Claiborne Group up through most of the Jackson, the dominant sporomorph types are Cupuliferdipollenites spp., Momipites coryloides Wodehouse, Cupuliferoidaepollenites liblarensis (Thomson) Potonie, Momipites micTofoveolatus (Stanley) Nichols, Quercoidites microhenricii (Potonie) Potonie, and Araliaceoipollenites granulatus (Potonie) n. comb. All these were probably produced by trees of the Juglandaceae and Fagaceae. Relative frequencies of each of these pollen types fluctuate

  17. Jurassic sequence stratigraphy in the Mississippi interior salt basin of Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A. Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa ); Tew, B.H.; Mink, R.M. )

    1990-09-01

    Three depositional sequences associated with cycles of eustatic sea-level change and coastal onlap can be identified in the Mississippi Interior Salt basin of Alabama. In the Mississippi Interior Salt basin, the lower depositional sequence is bounded by a basal unconformity and an upper Type 2 unconformity in the Callovian. This sequence includes Louann evaporites, Pine Hill anhydrites and shales, and Norphlet eolian sandstones. The middle depositional sequence reflects relative sea-level rise in the late Callovian. This sequence includes Norphlet marine sandstones and lower Smackover packstones and mudstones, middle Smackover mudstones and upper Smackover grainstones and anhydrites. The sequence has an upper Type 2 unconformity indicating relative sea-level fall in the Oxfordian. The upper depositional sequence reflects relative sea-level rise in the late Oxfordian. This sequence includes lower Haynesville evaporites and clastics (transgressive deposits), middle Haynesville carbonate mudstones and shales (condensed section), and upper Haynesville updip continental sandstones and downdip shales, limestones, and anhydrites (progradational highstand regressive deposits). The sequence has an upper Type 1 unconformity indicating abrupt sea-level fall in the late Kimmeridgian. In these depositional sequences, progradational highstand regressive deposits are the principal petroleum reservoirs. Condensed section deposits have the potential to be source rocks if subjected to proper burial conditions; however, only the lower and middle Smackover mudstones were deposited and buried under conditions favorable for hydrocarbon generation and preservation. An understanding of sequence stratigraphy can serve as an aid to identifying potential hydrocarbon exploration targets.

  18. Sediment discharge into a subsiding Louisiana deltaic estuary through a Mississippi River diversion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snedden, G.A.; Cable, J.E.; Swarzenski, C.; Swenson, E.

    2007-01-01

    Wetlands of the Mississippi River deltaic plain in southeast Louisiana have been hydrologically isolated from the Mississippi River by containment levees for nearly a century. The ensuing lack of fluvial sediment inputs, combined with natural submergence processes, has contributed to high coastal land loss rates. Controlled river diversions have since been constructed to reconnect the marshes of the deltaic plain with the river. This study examines the impact of a pulsed diversion management plan on sediment discharge into the Breton Sound estuary, in which duplicate 185 m3 s-1-diversions lasting two weeks each were conducted in the spring of 2002 and 2003. Sediment delivery during each pulse was highly variable (11,300-43,800 metric tons), and was greatest during rising limbs of Mississippi River flood events. Overland flow, a necessary transport mechanism for river sediments to reach the subsiding backmarsh regions, was induced only when diversion discharge exceeded 100 m3 s-1. These results indicate that timing and magnitude of diversion events are both important factors governing marsh sediment deposition in the receiving basins of river diversions. Though the diversion serves as the primary source of river sediments to the estuary, the inputs observed here were several orders of magnitude less than historical sediment discharge through crevasses and uncontrolled diversions in the region, and are insufficient to offset present rates of relative sea level rise. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Sediment capture in flood plains of the Mississippi River: A case study in Cat Island National Wildlife Refuge, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M.; Bentley, S. J., Sr.

    2015-03-01

    To plan restoration of the Mississippi River Delta, it is imperative to know how much sediment the Mississippi River currently provides. Recent research has demonstrated that between Tarbert Landing and St Francisville on the Mississippi, as much as 67 million metric tons (Mt) per year is lost from river transport, of which ~16 Mt is muddy suspended sediment. So where does this sediment go? Two pathways for loss have been proposed: riverbed storage, and overbank deposition in regions that lack manmade levées. Cat Island National Wildlife Refuge, on the unleveed Mississippi River east bank near St Francisville, Louisiana, consists of undisturbed bottomland forest that is inundated most years by river flooding. To determine fluvial sediment accumulation rates (SAR) from flooding, pushcores 40-50 cm long were collected then dated by Pb-210 and Cs-137 geochronology. Preliminary data suggests that muddy sediment accumulation is 10-13% of muddy suspended sediment lost from river transport along this river reach.

  20. Intertidal variation in foraminiferal species diversity: Mississippi-Louisiana salt marshes

    SciTech Connect

    Lariccia, M.P.; Krutak, P.R.

    1983-03-01

    Salt marshes are tide-stressed environments where ecologic variables exert strong selective control upon the distribution, type, and abundance of organisms. Ecologic conditions range from marine to terrestrial; hence gradational and/or abrupt environmental changes across marshes produce similar gradients in communities of organisms and their biotopes. Salt marshes are one of the present-day sites of peat accumulation. They represent a potential millieu for lignite and coal formation. Recognition of microenvironments within such marshes will provide coal explorationists and paleontologists with another tool for predicting the location of subsurface peats, lignites, and coals. Twenty-eight modern bottom samples were collected for analysis for foraminiferal populations (total = live + dead) in the Hancock County, Mississippi, and Pearl River, Louisiana, marshes during May and June 1981. After extracting a minimum of 300 specimens/sample, foraminiferal species diversity patterns among the 14 doubly sampled stations were studied.

  1. Movements of wild pigs in Louisiana and Mississippi, 2011-13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartley, Stephen B.; Goatcher, Buddy L.; Sapkota, Sijan

    2015-01-01

    The prolific breeding capability, behavioral adaptation, and adverse environmental impacts of invasive wild pigs (Sus scrofa) have increased efforts towards managing their populations and understanding their movements. Currently, little is known about wild pig populations and movements in Louisiana and Mississippi. From 2011 to 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey investigated spatial and temporal movements of wild pigs in both marsh and nonmarsh physiographic regions. Twenty-one Global Positioning System satellite telemetry tracking collars were installed on adult wild pigs captured with trained dogs and released. Coordinates of their locations were recorded hourly. We collected 16,674 hourly data points including date, time, air temperature, and position during a 3-year study. Solar and lunar attributes, such as sun and moon phases and azimuth angles, were not related significantly to the movements among wild pigs. Movements were significantly correlated negatively with air temperature. Differences in movements between seasons and years were observed. On average, movements of boars were significantly greater than those of sows. Average home range, determined by using a minimum convex polygon as a proxy, was 911 hectares for boars, whereas average home range for sows was 116 hectares. Wild pigs in marsh habitat traveled lesser distances relative to those from more arid, nonmarsh habitats. Overall, results of this study indicate that wild pigs in Louisiana and Mississippi have small home ranges. These small home ranges suggest that natural movements have not been a major factor in the recent broad-scale range expansion observed in this species in the United States.

  2. Carboniferous clastic-wedge stratigraphy, sedimentology, and foreland basin evolution: Black Warrior basin, Alabama and Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    Carboniferous clastic-wedge stratigraphy and sedimentology in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama and Mississippi indicate deposition in an evolving foreland basin flanking the Appalachian-Ouachita fold-thrust belt. The strata reflect specific responses to foreland basin subsidence, orogenic activity, sediment supply, and dispersal systems. Definition of the regional stratigraphy of the clastic wedge provides for interpretation of the foreland basin subsidence history by enabling quantitative reconstruction of regional compaction and subsidence profiles. Comparison of the interpreted subsidence history with model profiles of foreland basin subsidence (predicted from loading and flexure of continental lithosphere) allows evaluation of mechanical models in terms of observed clastic-wedge sedimentology and stratigraphy. Mechanical modeling of foreland basin subsidence predicts formation of a flexural bulge that migrates cratonward ahead of the subsiding foreland basin during loading. In the Black Warrior basin, local stratigraphic thins, pinch-outs, and areas of marine-reworked sediments suggest migration of the flexural bulge. Comparison of flexural bulge migration with thermal maturation history allows evaluation of timing of stratigraphic trapping mechanisms with respect to onset of hydrocarbon generation.

  3. Constraining rates and trends of historical wetland loss, Mississippi River Delta Plain, south-central Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bernier, Julie C.; Morton, Robert A.; Barras, John A.

    2006-01-01

    The timing, magnitude, and rate of wetland loss were described for five wetland-loss hotspots in the Terrebonne Basin of the Mississippi River delta plain. Land and water areas were mapped for 34 dates between 1956 and 2004 from historical National Wetlands Inventory (NWI) datasets, aerial photographs, and Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) satellite images. Since 1956, the emergent land area at the five study areas in south-central Louisiana has decreased by about 50%. Comparison of the water-area curve derived from the 29 TM images with water-level records from the nearby Grand Isle, Louisiana tide gauge (NOS #8761724) clearly shows that changes in land and water areas fluctuate in response to variations in regional water levels. The magnitude of water-area fluctuations decreased from the 1980s to the 1990s as former areas of wet marsh within and immediately adjacent to the wetland-loss hotspots became permanently submerged. The most rapid wetland loss occurred during the late 1960s and 1970s. Peak wetland-loss rates during this period were two to four times greater than both the pre-1970s background rates and the most recent wetland-loss rates. These results provide constraints on predicting future delta-plain wetland losses and identify Landsat TM imagery as an important source for analyzing land- and water-area changes across the entire delta plain.

  4. Late Wisconsinan Vegetation and Environment of the Tunica Hills Region, Louisiana/Mississippi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Stephen T.; Givens, Charles R.

    1994-05-01

    Pollen, plant macrofossil, and radiocarbon-dating studies of seven exposures of fluvial sediments in the Tunica Hills region of southeastern Louisiana and southwestern Mississippi provide new information on late Wisconsinan vegetation, flora, and environment of the region. The assemblages date between 25,250 and 17,530 yr B.P. Pollen and macrofossil assemblages are dominated by Picea, which comprises 40-70% of the pollen assemblages. Abies and Larix pollen and macrofossils are absent, in contrast to sites to the north in the central Mississippi Valley. Deciduous hardwoods ( Quercus, Fagus, Fraxinus, Carya, Juglans nigra, Acer, Ulmus) are minor components of both pollen and macrofossil assemblages. Radiocarbon dates of Picea and Quercus wood indicate that these two genera grew contemporaneously in the region. Regional upland forests were dominated by Picea. Picea cones and cone fragments are not typical of any extant North American species, and probably represent either an extinct species or an extinct variety or subspecies of Picea glauca. Late Wisconsinan climate of the region was cooler than present, but not necessarily as cool as implied by P. glauca or other "boreal" taxa.

  5. Satellite tracking and geospatial analysis of feral swine and their habitat use in Louisiana and Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartley, Stephen B.; Spear, Kathryn A.; Goatcher, Buddy L.

    2012-01-01

    Feral swine (Sus scrofa) is an invasive species that was first introduced to the continental United States in the 1500s by European explorers. Also known as feral hogs or feral pigs, the animals typically weigh about 200 pounds (up to 400 pounds), have characteristic tusks up to 3 inches long, are territorial, and live in groups, except for the boars, who are solitary and typically interact with sows only to breed. They have an average litter size of 5-6 piglets and occasionally two litters per year, and because they have few natural predators, survival of their young can be nearly 100 percent. Because of the detrimental impacts of this invasive species---including rooting, damaging agricultural lands, competing for food with and destroying the habitats of native animals, and spreading diseases and parasites---many public lands implement feral swine control programs on an annual basis. This activity is not enough to control or prevent an increase in swine populations, however, because of their distribution beyond the boundaries of public lands. Currently, little is known about feral swine populations, their habitat use and movement patterns, and the resulting habitat destruction in Louisiana and Mississippi. To abate this lack of knowledge, researchers at the U.S. Geological Survey National Wetlands Research Center (NWRC)---in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, and several large landholding companies---are using collars equipped with Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers to track feral swine in Louisiana and Mississippi to examine population movement patterns, document destruction of habitat and wildlife, and help increase and facilitate removal. The NWRC researchers are using the "Judas pig" system of attaching GPS-satellite telemetry collars to select feral swine to (1) track movement patterns on the landscape, (2) document habitat destruction and effects on native wildlife, and (3) improve

  6. Current-wave interaction in the Mississippi-Atchafalaya river plume on the Texas-Louisiana shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Zengrui; Hetland, Robert D.; Zhang, Wenxia; Zhang, Xiaoqian

    2014-12-01

    Wave-current interaction over the Texas-Louisiana shelf, and its effects on the dispersal and mixing of the Mississippi-Atchafalaya river plume, have been investigated using the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) Modeling System. The modeling system is driven by realistic wave and current conditions at the open boundaries and high frequency1-D wind measured from a nearby meteorological station. Skill analysis demonstrates that the model reproduces the wave and salinity fields reasonably well. Waves over the Texas-Louisiana shelf are dominated by locally forced wind seas, and generally propagate in the same direction as the winds. Investigation into the spatial differences in the effect of waves reveals two distinct dynamical regions: the Chenier shelf, the shelf region extending roughly offshore from Sabine Lake to Vermilion Bay, and the Louisiana Bight, the region between the Mississippi Delta and Terrebonne Bay. A variety of model runs are performed, where specific wave processes are either included or excluded, in order to isolate the processes acting in different regions. The Chenier shelf is mainly affected by wave enhanced bottom stress, whereas the Louisiana Bight is mostly affected by the surface wave induced mixing and 3-D wave forces. The wave enhanced bottom stress suppresses cross-shore exchange, and acts to trap more freshwater in the nearshore regions shallower than 50 m over the Chenier shelf. Wave enhanced bottom stress plays only a minor role in the Louisiana Bight, where the surface-trapped Mississippi plume rarely feels the bottom. The surface intensified wave mixing and 3-D wave forces reduce the surface salinity and weaken the stratification in the region associated with the thin recirculating Mississippi plume in the Louisiana Bight. Model results indicate that the surface wave mixing, the 3-D wave forces, and the wave bottom stress exhibit little interaction over the Texas-Louisiana shelf. Finally, we have demonstrated

  7. A Review of Land-Cover Mapping Activities in Coastal Alabama and Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kathryn E.L.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.

    2010-01-01

    -based land-use classifications. Aerial photography is typically selected for smaller landscapes (watershed-basin scale), for greater definition of the land-use categories, and for increased spatial resolution. Disadvantages of using photography include time-consuming digitization, high costs for imagery collection, and lack of seasonal data. Recently, the availability of high-resolution satellite imagery has generated a new category of LULC data product. These new datasets have similar strengths to the aerial-photo-based LULC in that they possess the potential for refined definition of land-use categories and increased spatial resolution but also have the benefit of satellite-based classifications, such as repeatability for change analysis. LULC classification based on high-resolution satellite imagery is still in the early stages of development but merits greater attention because environmental-monitoring and landscape-modeling programs rely heavily on LULC data. This publication summarizes land-use and land-cover mapping activities for Alabama and Mississippi coastal areas within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) Ecosystem Change and Hazard Susceptibility Project boundaries. Existing LULC datasets will be described, as well as imagery data sources and ancillary data that may provide ground-truth or satellite training data for a forthcoming land-cover classification. Finally, potential areas for a high-resolution land-cover classification in the Alabama-Mississippi region will be identified.

  8. Geochemistry of groundwater in Cretaceous sediments of the southeastern coastal plain of eastern Mississippi and western Alabama.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    Geochemical samples of waters along two hydrologic flow paths in four Upper Cretaceous aquifers of northeastern Mississippi and western Alabama indicate similar geochemical evolution of their respective waters. The waters of the Coker, Gordo, and Eutaw- McShan aquifers, noncalcareous sands, increase downgradient in dissolved solids and pH, and are dominated by sodium and bicarbonate ions, which generally result from a calcite dissolution-cation exchange process. Increases in dissolved iron from oxidation reduction reactions followed by decreases in total inorganic carbon from siderite precipitation occur along the flow paths.-from Author

  9. Tracking sedimentation from the historic A.D. 2011 Mississippi River flood in the deltaic wetlands of Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Khan, Nicole S.; Horton, Benjamin P.; McKee, Karen L.; Jerolmack, Douglas; Falcini, Federico; Enache, Mihaela D.; Vane, Christopher H.

    2013-01-01

    Management and restoration of the Mississippi River deltaic plain (southern United States) and associated wetlands require a quantitative understanding of sediment delivery during large flood events, past and present. Here, we investigate the sedimentary fingerprint of the 2011 Mississippi River flood across the Louisiana coast (Atchafalaya Delta, Terrebonne, Barataria, and Mississippi River Delta basins) to assess spatial patterns of sedimentation and to identify key indicators of sediment provenance. The sediment deposited in wetlands during the 2011 flood was distinguished from earlier deposits based on biological characteristics, primarily absence of plant roots and increased presence of centric (planktonic) diatoms indicative of riverine origin. By comparison, the lithological (bulk density, organic matter content, and grain size) and chemical (stable carbon isotopes of bulk organic matter) properties of flood sediments were nearly identical to the underlying deposit. Flood sediment deposition was greatest in wetlands near the Atchafalaya and Mississippi Rivers and accounted for a substantial portion (37% to 85%) of the annual accretion measured at nearby monitoring stations. The amount of sediment delivered to those basins (1.1–1.6 g cm−2) was comparable to that reported previously for hurricane sedimentation along the Louisiana coast (0.8–2.1 g cm−2). Our findings not only provide insight into how large-scale river floods influence wetland sedimentation, they lay the groundwork for identifying previous flood events in the stratigraphic record.

  10. Seismic stratigraphy of the Mississippi-Alabama shelf and upper continental slope

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kindinger, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    The Mississippi-Alabama shelf and upper continental slope contain relatively thin Upper Pleistocene and Holocene deposits. Five stages of shelf evolution can be identified from the early Wisconsinan to present. The stages were controlled by glacioeustatic or relative sea-level changes and are defined by the stratigraphic position of depositional and erosional episodes. The stratigraphy was identified on seismic profiles by means of geomorphic pattern, high-angle clinoform progradational deposits, buried stream entrenchments, planar conformities, and erosional unconformities. The oldest stage (stage 1) of evolution occurred during the early Wisconsinan lowstand; the subaerially exposed shelf was eroded to a smooth seaward-sloping surface. This paleosurface is overlain by a thin (< 10 m) drape of transgressive deposits (stage 2). Stage 3 occurred in three phases as the late Wisconsinan sea retreated: (1) fluvial channel systems eroded across the shelf, (2) deposited a thick (90 m) shelf-margin delta, and (3) contemporaneously deposited sediments on the upper slope. Stage 4 included the rapid Holocene sea-level rise that deposited a relatively thin transgressive facies over parts of the shelf. The last major depositional episode (stage 5) was the progradation of the St. Bernard delta over the northwestern and central parts of the area. A depositional hiatus has occurred since the St. Bernard progradation. These Upper Quaternary shelf and slope deposits provide models for analogous deposits in the geologic record. Primarily, they are examples of cyclic sedimentation caused by changes in sea level and may be useful in describing short-term, sandy depositional episodes in prograding shelf and slope sequences. ?? 1988.

  11. Historical bathymetry and bathymetric change in the Mississippi-Alabama coastal region, 1847-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buster, Noreen A.; Morton, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Land loss and seafloor change around the Mississippi and Alabama (MS-AL) barrier islands are of great concern to the public and to local, state, and federal agencies. The islands provide wildlife protected areas and recreational land, and they serve as a natural first line of defense for the mainland against storm activity (index map on poster). Principal physical conditions that drive morphological seafloor and coastal change in this area include decreased sediment supply, sea-level rise, storms, and human activities (Otvos, 1970; Byrnes and others, 1991; Morton and others, 2004; Morton, 2008). Seafloor responses to the same processes can also affect the entire coastal zone. Sediment eroded from the barrier islands is entrained in the littoral system, where it is redistributed by alongshore currents. Wave and current activity is partially controlled by the profile of the seafloor, and this interdependency along with natural and anthropogenic influences has significant effects on nearshore environments. When a coastal system is altered by human activity such as dredging, as is the case of the MS-AL coastal region, the natural state and processes are altered, and alongshore sediment transport can be disrupted. As a result of deeply dredged channels, adjacent island migration is blocked, nearshore environments downdrift in the littoral system become sediment starved, and sedimentation around the channels is modified. Sediment deposition and erosion are reflected through seafloor evolution. In a rapidly changing coastal environment, understanding historically where and why changes are occurring is essential. To better assess the comprehensive dynamics of the MS-AL coastal zone, a 160-year evaluation of the bathymetry and bathymetric change of the region was conducted.

  12. Regional depositional history of the Miocene-Pleistocene Louisiana Slope, Green Canyon and Mississippi Canyon

    SciTech Connect

    Risch, D.L.; Chowdhury, A.N.; Hannan, A.E.

    1994-09-01

    A regional sequence-stratigraphic analysis was recently completed for the Tertiary slope sediments in Green Canyon, Ewing Bank, and Mississippi Canyon to provide a chronostratigraphic framework for basin reconstructions and predict lithofacies distributions of reservoir and seal rocks. Sixteen third-order sequences of lowstand deep-water deposits were interpreted for the middle Miocene-Pleistocene section. Thirty regional lithofacies maps were made of predominantly lowstand deposits showing the distribution of shale and sand-prone sediments, slumping, channel levee systems, and fan lobes based on distinctive seismic reflection and well log patterns. These maps were combined with isochrons of selected sequences to identify depositional fairways, depocenters, and paleosalt positions that constantly changed through time. Depositional trends were principally north to south but were also observed to be east-west as salt modified the gradient on the gently dipping slope. In some cases, the structural and stratigraphic trends could be projected under allochthonous tabular salt. Miocene channel and fan lobe sands were found concentrated on the middle-lower paleoslope across the study area. The sedimentation rate doubled (0.7 m/1000 yr) in the early-middle Pliocene, which caused large-scale salt movements and trapped sand-prone turbidites along the upper-middle slope. A four-fold decrease in sediment influx during the late Pliocene-early Pleistocene produced a stacked condensed section of four sequences over the eastern Louisiana slope. A return to rapid sedimentation (up to 2.1 m/1000 yr.) during the Pleistocene reactivated salt movements and depocenters in the Green Canyon, Ewing Bank, and Mississippi Trough areas.

  13. Regional depositional history of the miocene-pleistocene Louisiana slope, Green Canyon-Mississippi Canyon

    SciTech Connect

    Risch, D.L.; Choudhury, A.N.; Hannan, A.E.

    1994-12-31

    A regional sequence stratigraphic analysis was recently completed for the Tertiary slope sediments in Green Canyon, Ewing Bank, and Mississippi Canyon to provide a chronostratigraphic framework for basin reconstructions and to predict lithofacies distributions of reservoir and seal rocks. Sixteen third-order sequences of lowstand deepwater deposits were interpreted for the Middle Miocene-Pleistocene section. Thirty regional lithofacies maps were made of predominantly lowstand deposits showing the distribution of shale and sand-prone sediments, slumps, channel/levee systems, and fan lobes based on distinctive seismic reflection and well log patterns. These maps were combined with isochrons of selected sequences to identify depositional fairways, depocenters, and paleosalt positions that constantly changed through time. Depositional trends were principally north-south but were also observed to be east-west as salt modified the gradient on the gently dipping slope. In some cases, the structural and stratigraphic trends could be projected under allochthonous tabular salt. Miocene channel and fan lobe sands were concentrated on the middle-lower paleoslope across the study area. The sedimentation rate doubled to 2.3 m/1000 yr in the early Middle Pliocene, which caused large-scale salt movements and trapped sand-prone turbidities along the upper to middle slope. A four-fold decrease in sediment influx during the Late Pliocene-Early Pleistocene produced a stacked condensed section of four sequences over the eastern Louisiana slope. A return to rapid sedimentation (up to 6.9 m/1,000 yr) during the Late Pleistocene reactivated salt movements and depocenters in the Green Canyon, Ewing Bank, and Mississippi Trough areas.

  14. Mississippi Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The streamers of clouds draped over the Gulf of Mexico in this true-color MODIS image from February 27, 2002, suggest that a cold, dry wind was blowing southward over the United States and began to pick up moisture over the Gulf, causing these strips of clouds. That the clouds didn't pick up until some distance from the coastline allowed MODIS to get a perfect view of the dynamic Gulf Coast environment spanning (left to right) Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida's Western Panhandle. The Mississippi River runs roughly down the center of the image, and is joined in Louisiana by the Red River coming in from the northwest. Over the past 7000 years, the actual delta, where the main river channel empties into the Gulf, has wandered around what we now think of as the Louisiana coast. Considering all the sediment visible in this image, it's not hard to imagine that the river carries about 2.4 billion kilograms of sediment into the Gulf each year. Deposition of some of this sediment has been building up the current delta, called the Birdfoot Delta, for obvious reasons, for about 700 years. The coastal waters are alive with microscopic organisms called phytoplankton, which contain colorful pigments, including chlorophyll, for harvesting sunlight. Beyond the sediment plume off Louisiana, the waters are very dark, which could indicate that a large amount of chlorophyll is present, absorbing lots of sunlight and causing the water to appear dark. Farther south, the waters appear bright blue, which could be a signature of coccolithophores, which use highly reflective calcium carbonate to build scaly coverings for themselves. The brighter offshore waters could also be caused by a blue-green algae called Trichodesmium, an organism that can not only harness carbon dioxide for photosynthesis, but can also take nitrogen from the air and turn it into a form that can be used by living organisms. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  15. Altitude of the freshwater-saltwater interface in a regionally extensive coastal plain aquifer of Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strickland, Donald J.; Mahon, Gary L.

    1986-01-01

    Geophysical well logs from over 150 oil test and water wells in Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia were examined and calculations of the dissolved solids concentration in ground water were made using the spontaneous potential deflection as a measure of ionic activity. The values derived from these calculations were used to prepare a map showing the altitude relative to sea level at which the concentration of dissolved solids in the groundwater reached 10,000 mg/L within a regionally extensive aquifer in Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia. A dissolved solids concentration of 10,000 mg/L is used to delineate the interface between moderately saline and saline water; 10,000 mg/L dissolved solids was designated to delineate the freshwater-saltwater interface. For a finite difference computer flow model being used this interface represents the location where horizontal flow of freshwater is greatly diminished. 10 ,000 mg/L also is the lower limit for dissolved solids concentrations for water in target zones for injection wells. This 10,000 mg/L dissolved solids line is of value as a water quality indicator; although water containing 3,000 to 10,000 mg/L or more of dissolved solids is too saline for agricultural use (upper limit approximately 3,000 mg/L), it may be useful for some industrial purposes. Waters containing dissolved solids concentrations > 10,000 mg/L have little potential for any use involving human activities. (Lantz-PTT)

  16. Backwater and discharge at highway crossings with multiple bridges in Louisiana and Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colson, B.E.; Schneider, V.R.

    1983-01-01

    Data were collected for nine floods in Mississippi and Louisiana at eight stream crossings having two to six separate bridge openings. Discharge through each bridge, water surface profiles, valley cross sections, and bridge geometry were measured. The multiple openings were divided into equivalent single-opening cases by apportioning interior embankments in direct proportion to the area of openings on either side. Using existing procedures for computer discharge, the bias in computed discharge was 2 percent with a root mean square error of 18 percent. Backwater was computed by two current U.S. Geological Survey methods that use the average flow path in the friction loss term for the approach. One method gave a root mean square error of 0.34 ft. with a bias of -0.25 ft., suggesting that the method underestimates backwater. The other method gave a root mean square error of 0.39 ft with a bias of -0.03 ft. The results indicate that the method developed for single-opening highway crossings can be applied to the multiple bridge crossings. (USGS)

  17. The role of the Mississippi River in wetland loss in southeastern Louisiana, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesel, Richard H.

    1989-05-01

    The suspended load of the Lower Mississippi River has decreased almost 80 percent since 1850. The long-term suspended sediment record can be loosely subdivided into three phases: a historic interval prior to 1900, a predam period (1930 1952) and a postdam period (1963 1982). The suspended load decreased 43 percent from the historic to the predam period and 51 percent from the predam to the postdam period. The decreases in suspended load after 1952 coincide with the construction of reservoirs and dams on the Missouri and Arkansas rivers. Earlier decreases may be the result of changes in land use measurement practices. The decrease in suspended load and the elimination of overbank flow by the construction of artificial levees are considered to be major causes of coastal wetland loss in southeastern Louisiana. During the historic period sediment accumulation of the marsh surface was greater than the rate of water level rise. During the pre and postdam periods, the rate of water level rise exceeded sediment accretion on the marsh surface. Although the elimination of overbank sediment clearly exacerbated the wetlands loss, an accelerated rate of water level rise during the past 25 years has been a dominant factor. Based on estimates of available overbank sediment, it is suggested that the most viable management strategy for the wetlands would be the diversion of sediment into selected areas where the land loss is most critical.

  18. Tidal Flux Variation in the Lower Pearl River and Lake Pontchartrain Estuaries of Mississippi and Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turnipseed, D.P.; ,

    2002-01-01

    Three tidal gages were constructed to collect hydraulic and water-quality properties that could be used to compute the tidal flux of the Pearl River and Lake Pontchartrain estuarine systems in Mississippi and Louisiana. The gages record continuous tidal stage, velocity, water temperature, specific conductance, and salinity, and transmit these data via the GOES satellite for output to a USGS real-time Internet portal. A 25-hour tidal study was completed during a maximum slack tide period in September 2001, which measured hydraulic and water-quality properties. These data were correlated with data recorded by the gages. Relations were developed for stage and area, and for an index acoustic velocity signal and average velocity. Continuous tidal inflow/outflow was computed for all three gages. Tidal effects were attenuated using a ninth-order Butterworth low-pass filter. Net inflows were recorded at two of three sites during the tidal study. The data will be used to help calibrate a regional RMA2 flow model.

  19. Subsurface Glen Rose reef trend of east Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, G.S.; Watkins, D.B.

    1985-02-01

    Two major episodes of shelf-margin reefing that occurred during the Early Cretaceous (Aptian-Albian-Cenomanian) are represented by the transgressive Hosston-Sligo complex and the regressive Glen Rose-Edwards complex. The Glen Rose-Edwards sequence can be broken up into 3 distinct carbonate buildups: middle Glen Rose, upper Glen Rose, and Edwards. Eustatic sea level rise, subsidence, and reef growth or sediment accumulation were dominant influences on shelf-margin deposition. The respective reef trends thicken eastward from east Texas into central Louisiana and southern Mississippi due to increased rate of subsidence and sea level rise in that direction. Well cores and cuttings indicate that similar lithofacies occur throughout the Lower Cretaceous shelf margin. However, lithologic and diagenetic factors combined to produce extraordinary sections of facies-controlled porosity within the middle Glen Rose reef buildup. Although both hydrodynamic and organic processes were important factors in growth and maintenance of the middle Glen Rose reef buildup, the buildup is best described as an ecologic (organic) reef. A regional meteoric hydrologic system was responsible for extensive secondary moldic porosity in the skeletal-supported and grain-supported sediments. Algal binding within the reef interval contributed to the development of fenestral-moldic porosity. Extensive dolomitization is common and acted to create or destroy porosity.

  20. Seismic depth conversion problems associated with the Mississippi Canyon in the vicinity of Ewing Bank Block 305 field, offshore Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Leveille, G.P. ); Sahai, K.S.; McDaniel, P.G.

    1990-05-01

    Ewing Bank Block 305 field is located on the outermost edge of the continental shelf, approximately 145 km south of New Orleans, Louisiana. The geology of the field is fairly typical of other fields found offshore of Louisiana, except there is a huge, partly filled, Pleistocene submarine canyon that overlies the field. This canyon, which is commonly referred to as the Mississippi Canyon, causes a large seismic depth conversion problem that makes it virtually impossible to correctly map the structure of the field using normally processed marine seismic data The Mississippi Canyon is a large erosional feature that was formed at the mouth of the ancestral Mississippi River during the last glacial sea level lowstand. In the vicinity of the field, the canyon is about 10 km wide and 1 km deep, which is approximately two-thirds the size of the Grand Canyon of the Colorado River, and is filled mostly with Holocene sediments. Because the sediments that fill the canyon are very young, their interval velocities are much lower than the interval velocities of the sediments that form the canyon walls. This creates abrupt near surface lateral velocity variations that distort the geometry of seismic reflectors such that the time geometries seen on seismic lines are not at all indicative of the structure of the subsurface. Using a model-based processing technique and available well control, the authors have been able to solve this difficult depth conversion problem and have gained a better understanding of the geology of this field.

  1. EAARL Coastal Topography-Mississippi and Alabama Barrier Islands, Post-Hurricane Gustav, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonisteel-Cormier, J.M.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Wright, C.W.; Sallenger, A.H.; Brock, J.C.; Nagle, D.B.; Klipp, E.S.; Vivekanandan, Saisudha; Fredericks, Xan; Segura, Martha

    2010-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived bare-earth (BE) and first-surface (FS) topography datasets were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Gulf Coast Network, Lafayette, LA; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Mississippi and Alabama barrier islands, acquired post-Hurricane Gustav (September 2008 hurricane) on September 8, 2008. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multispectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the

  2. Survival of wood duck ducklings and broods in Mississippi and Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, J.B.; Cox, R.R.; Kaminski, R.M.; Leopold, B.D.

    2007-01-01

    Although North American wood ducks (Aix sponsa) are well-studied throughout their range, researchers know little about demographic and environmental factors influencing survival of ducklings and broods, which is necessary information for population management. We studied radiomarked female and duckling wood ducks that used nest boxes and palustrine wetlands at Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge (NNWR) in Mississippi, USA, in 1996-1999, and riverine wetlands of the Tennessee-Tombigbee Rivers and Waterway (TTRW) system in Alabama in 1998-1999. We estimated survival of ducklings and broods and evaluated potentially important predictors of duckling survival, including age and body mass of brood-rearing females, hatch date of ducklings, duckling mass, brood size at nest departure, inter-day travel distance by ducklings, site and habitat use, and daily minimum air temperature and precipitation. At NNWR, survival of 300 radiomarked ducklings ranged from 0.15 (95% CI = 0.04-0.27) to 0.24 (95% CI = 0.13-0.38) and was 0.21 (95% CI = 0.15-0.28) for 1996-1999. Our overall estimate of brood survival was 0.64 (n = 91; 95% CI = 0.54-0.73). At TTRW, survival of 129 radiomarked ducklings was 0.29 in 1998 (95% CI = 0.20-0.41) and 1999 (95% CI = 0.13-0.45) and was 0.29 (95% CI = 0.20-0.40) for 1998-1999. Our overall estimate of brood survival was 0.71 (n = 38; 95% CI = 0.56-0.85). At NNWR, models that included all predictor variables best explained variation in duckling survival. Akaike weight (wi) for the best model was 0.81, suggesting it was superior to other models (<0.01 ??? wi ???0.18). We detected 4 competing models for duckling survival at TTRW. Inter-day distance traveled by ducklings was important as this variable appeared in all 4 models; duckling survival was positively related to this variable. Patterns of habitat-related survival were similar at both study areas. Ducklings in broods that used scrub-shrub habitats disjunct from wetlands containing aggregations of nest

  3. Climate Impact on Groundwater Recharge in Southeastern Louisiana and Southwestern Mississippi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beigi, E.; Tsai, F. T.

    2012-12-01

    Increases of concentrations of CO2 and other greenhouse gases have a significant effect on global climate, precipitation and hydrology, which in turn influences recharge to aquifers. Groundwater recharge study is imperative to the sole source aquifer, for example the Southern Hills aquifer system in southeastern Louisiana and southwestern Mississippi, which provides more than 50 percent of the drinking water consumed in the area overlying the aquifer and has no substitute drinking water source(s). To trace the climate impact and its consequent groundwater availability, this study developed a GIS-based integrated framework to connect climate models to a high-resolution hydrologic model to quantify long-term groundwater recharge. We employed the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP3) model as our hydrologic model to estimate spatial-temporal distribution of potential recharge for a regional scale. HELP3 model was especially suitable for our recharge study due to Louisiana humid climate and the use of a regional-scale water budget approach. Detailed surficial soil property and land cover were obtained from the NRCS and the USGS to derive maps of curve number for the HELP3 model. Wireline well logs and drillers logs were analyzed to determine stratigraphic lithology and the first major sand encountered beneath the soil layer. For a regional scale, we used global circulation model (GCM) downscaled daily precipitation and temperature obtained from USGS CASCaDE Project Climate Data as the forcing input to the HELP3 model. The emission scenarios considered in this study were A2, B1 and A1FI from Parallel Climate Model 1 (PCM) and from the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Lab's GFDL CM2.1 model. We used the computed runoff from USGS WaterWatch along with the HELP3 model to calculate the recharge index (RI) and delineate the recharge index map for individual hydrologic units in terms of Hydrologic Unit Codes (HUCs). The recharge index was defined as the

  4. Dissolved barium behavior in Louisiana Shelf waters affected by the Mississippi/Atchafalaya River mixing zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung, DongJoo; Shiller, Alan M.

    2014-09-01

    In order to better understand the constraints on the use of barium as a coastal paleo-freshwater tracer, we surveyed the dissolved Ba distribution in Louisiana Shelf waters, including the Mississippi (MR) and Atchafalaya (AR) River plumes, during May and November 2008, and June/July 2009, which represent high, low and intermediate river discharges, respectively. Dissolved Ba was found dominantly in the <0.02 μm fraction, with no significant contribution from the 0.02-0.45 μm colloidal size fraction. Although apparent non-conservative surface water Ba behavior was observed during all three sampling periods, there were significant differences among the distribution patterns. River-seawater mixing experiments were supportive of substantial desorptive Ba addition only during the high discharge survey. At other times, input of Ba-enriched shelf bottom water as well as river endmember variability contributed to the apparent non-conservative behavior. During at least two of our surveys (high and intermediate river discharge), shelf bottom waters were significantly enriched in dissolved Ba relative to surface waters. While the cause of this enrichment (e.g., submarine groundwater discharge, dissolution/diffusion from the sediment, and/or an anthropogenic source such as drilling muds) could not be determined, we did observe that bottom Ba enrichment correlated with diminishing dissolved oxygen during summertime shelf bottom water hypoxia. Another interesting observation was Ba depletion in some high-salinity surface waters associated with a diatom bloom during June/July 2009. In addition, different Ba concentrations in the MR and AR appear related to inputs to the AR from the Red River as well as from the wetlands in the Atchafalaya River Basin. Overall, our study of the Ba distribution in Louisiana Shelf waters implies that the seasonal variation of the surface water Ba-salinity relationship could lead to a considerable uncertainty in salinity prediction when using Ba as

  5. Effect of Oil Contamination on Infauna of Louisiana and Mississippi Marshes with Implications for Marsh Functioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, C. A.; Yeager, K. M.; Briggs, K. B.; Keim, J.; Louchouarn, P.; Hatch, R. S.; Schindler, K. J.

    2012-12-01

    Heavy contamination by BP oil apparently affected infaunal marsh foraminifera by reducing their numbers and reducing their depth of habitation, but moderate to light oiling seemed to have little effect. Heavy oiling also reduced the standing stock of macrofauna compared to lightly and moderately oiled sites, which appeared to be stimulated by light oiling. Three sites in the marshes of Louisiana and Mississippi were examined before and after oiling by the Macondo well blowout of 2010: Belle Fontaine and the Rigolets in Mississippi Sound and Bay Jimmy in Barataria Bay, La. The sites were analyzed for standing stock, density, and species composition of the macrofauna, which accomplish most of the bioturbation; the meiofauna as represented by benthic foraminifera; sedimentary variables, including grain size and particulate organic carbon (POC); and the radionuclides 7Be, 234Th and 210Pb to assess short-term mixing and rates of sediment accumulation. Push cores were taken from the mid to lower marsh in the Spartina alterniflora zone and sliced variously. For physical variables, cores were sliced at 0.5-cm and 1-cm intervals to a meter or more. For foraminifera, cores were sliced at 1-cm intervals to 10 cm. For macrofauna, cores were sliced at 0-1-cm and 1-10-cm intervals. The vital stain rose Bengal was applied to both macrofaunal and foraminiferal samples. The degree of oiling was assigned from the shoreline cleanup assessment technique (SCAT) data published by the environmental response management application (ERMA), and cores were subsequently sampled for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Heavy oiling appears to have affected standing stock and depth of habitation of meiofaunal foraminifera. Uncontaminated sites and sites lightly to moderately contaminated by Macondo oil had a depth of habitation deeper than 7 cm with most exceeding 10 cm, the limit of the sampling, with corresponding short-term mixing depths in the range of 0.75-4.5+ cm as defined by 7Be and

  6. Nutrient Mass Balance for the Mobile River Basin in Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harned, D. A.; Harvill, J. S.; McMahon, G.

    2001-12-01

    The source and fate of nutrients in the Mobile River drainage basin are important water-quality concerns in Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi. Land cover in the basin is 74 percent forested, 16 percent agricultural, 2.5 percent developed, and 4 percent wetland. A nutrient mass balance calculated for 18 watersheds in the Mobile River Basin indicates that agricultural non-point nitrogen and phosphorus sources and urban non-point nitrogen sources are the most important factors associated with nutrients in the streams. Nitrogen and phosphorus inputs from atmospheric deposition, crop fertilizer, biological nitrogen fixation, animal waste, and point sources were estimated for each of the 18 drainage basins. Total basin nitrogen inputs ranged from 27 to 93 percent from atmospheric deposition (56 percent mean), 4 to 45 percent from crop fertilizer (25 percent mean), <0.01 to 31 percent from biological nitrogen fixation (8 percent mean), 2 to 14 percent from animal waste (8 percent mean), and 0.2 to 11 percent from point sources (3 percent mean). Total basin phosphorus inputs ranged from 10 to 39 percent from atmospheric deposition (26 percent mean), 7 to 51 percent from crop fertilizer (28 percent mean), 20 to 64 percent from animal waste (41 percent mean), and 0.2 to 11 percent from point sources (3 percent mean). Nutrient outputs for the watersheds were estimated by calculating instream loads and estimating nutrient uptake, or withdrawal, by crops. The difference between the total basin inputs and outputs represents nutrients that are retained or processed within the basin while moving from the point of use to the stream, or in the stream. Nitrogen output, as a percentage of the total basin nitrogen inputs, ranged from 19 to 79 percent for instream loads (35 percent mean) and from 0.01 to 32 percent for crop harvest (10 percent mean). From 53 to 87 percent (75 percent mean) of nitrogen inputs were retained within the 18 basins. Phosphorus output ranged from 9 to 29

  7. Offshore sand-shoal development and evolution of Petit Bois Pass, Mississippi-Alabama Barrier Islands, Mississippi, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flocks, James G.; Kelso, Kyle W.; Twichell, Gregory C.; Buster, Noreen A.; Baehr, John N.; Rosati, Julie D.; Wang, Ping; Roberts, Tiffany M.

    2011-01-01

    Assessment of recently collected geophysical and sediment-core data identifies an extensive shoal field located off Dauphin and Petit Bois Islands. The shoals are the product of Pleistocene fluvial deposition and Holocene marine-transgressive processes, and their position and orientation oblique to the modern shoreline has been stable over the past century. The underlying stratigraphy has also influenced the evolution of the barrier platform and inlets. Buried distributary channels bisect the platform, creating erosion hotspots that breach during intense and repeated storms. Inlet growth inhibits littoral transport, and over time, reduces the down-drift sand supply. These relations demonstrate the role of the antecedent geologic framework on morphologic evolution. This study is part of the USGS Northern Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem Change and Hazard Susceptibility Project and the USACE Mississippi Coastal Improvements Program. These projects produced a wealth of information regarding coastal geology, geomorphology, and physical resources; some of the initial results are presented here.

  8. Dispersal of Mississippi and Atchafalaya sediment on the Texas-Louisiana shelf: Model estimates for the year 1993

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kehui; Harris, Courtney K.; Hetland, Robert D.; Kaihatu, James M.

    2011-10-01

    A three-dimensional coupled hydrodynamic-sediment transport model for the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf was developed using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) and used to represent fluvial sediment transport and deposition for the year 1993. The model included water and sediment discharge from the Mississippi River and Atchafalaya Bay, seabed resuspension, and suspended transport by currents. Input wave properties were provided by the Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN) model so that ROMS could estimate wave-driven bed stresses, critical to shallow-water sediment suspension. The model used temporally variable but spatially uniform winds, spatially variable seabed grain size distributions, and six sediment tracers from rivers and seabed. At the end of the year 1993, much of the modeled fluvial sediment accumulation was localized with deposition focused near sediment sources. Mississippi sediment remained within 20-40 km of the Mississippi Delta. Most Atchafalaya sediment remained landward of the 10-m isobath in the inner-most shelf south of Atchafalaya Bay. Atchafalaya sediment displayed an elongated westward dispersal pattern toward the Chenier Plain, reflecting the importance of wave resuspension and perennially westward depth-averaged currents in the shallow waters (<10 m). Due to relatively high settling velocities assumed for sediment from the Mississippi River as well as the shallowness of the shelf south of Atchafalaya Bay, most sediment traveled only a short distance before initial deposition. Little fluvial sediment could be transported into the vicinity of the "Dead Zone" (low-oxygen area) within a seasonal-annual timeframe. Near the Mississippi Delta and Atchafalaya Bay, alongshore sediment-transport fluxes always exceeded cross-shore fluxes. Estimated cumulative sediment fluxes next to Atchafalaya Bay were episodic and "stepwise-like" compared to the relatively gradual transport around the Mississippi Delta. During a large storm in March 1993

  9. Palynofacies of lignites and associated sediments in the upper paleocene Tuscahoma sand of southwestern Alabama and eastern Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, R.E. )

    1993-09-01

    The Tuscahoma Sand of the Wilcox Group is composed of fine-grained sand, laminated sandy clay, marl and lignite. The Tuscahoma forms a poorly exposed belt from southeastern Alabama and extends northwestward into western Alabama and eastern Mississippi. The sand is assigned to the late Paleocene planktonic foraminiferal Morozovella velascoensis interval zone. Lignites in the Tuscahoma Sand occur as parasequence deposits in the highstand systems tract of a type 2 depositional sequence near the top of the formation. Organic debris associated with these highstand-systems-tract deposits is dominated by land-derived plant tissues. Marine influence is evidenced by the rare occurrence of dinoflagellate cysts, microforminiferal test linings, and the presence of gray, amorphous organic matter. Three palynofacies are recognized within highstand-systems-tract deposits in the upper Tuscahoma Sand based on the occurrence of organic debris. These palynofacies represent freshwater swamp, brackish marsh and marginal- to shallow-water marine depositional environments. Lignites in the Tuscahoma Sand are dominated by an angiosperm pollen assemblage. Gymnosperm pollen is rare, and marine forms are absent. This assemblage reflects deposition under fresh-water swamp conditions. Carbonaceous clay samples vary in the composition of organic debris. However, many are characterized by the occurrence of herbaceous angiosperm pollen. Arborescent angiosperm pollen is common, as are fern spores. Bisaccate conifer pollen is common and dinoflagellate cysts are rare. Fungal elements are abundant and woody tissue commonly is more degraded than in lignite samples. This assemblage represents deposition in coastal, brackish marsh environments. Organic debris in laminated clays, silts, and sands typically have angiosperm and gymnosperm pollen, dinoflagellate cysts, degraded terrestrial plant material, and amorphous organic matter, and represent shallow-marine and marginal-marine deposits.

  10. Organic and Inorganic Matter in Louisiana Coastal Waters: Vermilion, Atchafalaya, Terrebonne, Barataria, and Mississippi Regions.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) spectral absorption, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration, and the particulate fraction of inorganic (PIM) and organic matter (POM) were measured in Louisiana coastal waters at Vermilion, Atchafalaya, Terrebonne, Barataria, and...

  11. Hydrogeology of the Southeastern Coastal Plain aquifer system in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Renken, Robert A.

    1996-01-01

    The Southeastern Coastal Plain aquifer system consists of a thick sequence of unconsolidated to poorly consolidated Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks that extend from Mississippi to South Carolina. Four regional sand and gravel aquifers are separated by three regional confining units of clay, shale, and chalk that do not conform everywhere to stratigraphic boundaries. The change in geologic facies is the most important factor controlling the distribution of transmissivity within the aquifer system.

  12. Geologic Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the Black Warrior Basin Province, Alabama and Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatch, Joseph R.; Pawlewicz, Mark J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Oil and Gas Assessment is to develop geologically based hypotheses regarding the potential for additions to oil and gas reserves in priority areas of the United States. The USGS recently completed an assessment of undiscovered oil and gas potential of the Cambrian-Ordovician carbonate rocks, the Chattanooga and Floyd Shales, and the Pottsville Formation coals in the Black Warrior Basin Province in northeastern Mississippi and northwestern Alabama in the Gulf Coast Region. The Cambrian-Ordovician carbonate rocks, the Chattanooga and Floyd Shales, and the Pottsville Formation coals are important because of their potential for natural gas resources. This assessment is based on geologic principles and uses the total petroleum system concept. The geologic elements of a total petroleum system include hydrocarbon source rocks (source rock maturation, hydrocarbon generation and migration), reservoir rocks (sequence stratigraphy and petrophysical properties), and hydrocarbon traps (trap formation and timing). The USGS used this geologic framework to define two total petroleum systems and three assessment units. All three assessment units were quantitatively assessed for undiscovered oil and gas resources.

  13. Base flow of streams in the outcrop area of southeastern sand aquifer, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stricker, Virginia

    1983-01-01

    The base flow component of streamflow was separated from hydrographs for unregulated streams in the Cretaceous and Tertiary clastic outcrop area of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi. The base flow values are used in estimating recharge to the sand aquifer. Relations developed between mean annual base flow and stream discharge at the 60- and 65-percent streamflow duration point can be used to approximate mean annual base flow in lieu of hydrograph separation methods for base flows above 10 cu ft/s. Base flow recession curves were used to derive estimates of hydraulic diffusivity of the aquifer which was converted to transmissivity using estimated specific yield. These base-flow-derived transmissivities are in general agreement with transmissivities derived from well data. The shape of flow duration curves of streams is affected by the lithology of the Coastal Plain sediments. Steep flow duration curves appear to be associated with basins underlain by clay or chalk where a low percentage of the discharge is base flow while flatter curves appear to be associated with basins underlain by sand and gravel where a high percentage of the discharge is base flow. (USGS)

  14. Relative sea-level rise as indicated by gage data along the Mississippi and Alabama Gulf Coasts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Wilson, Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Global warming, or the increasing of earth's temperatures, leads to rising sea level as polar ice caps and mountain glaciers melt and ocean water undergoes thermal expansion. Tidal records collected by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE), Mobile District, at Gulfport, Biloxi, and Pascagoula, Mississippi, and at Mobile, Alabama, indicate trends of water-surface elevations increasing with time (relative sea-level rise). The trends indicated by the COE data were compared to relative sea-level trends indicated by the National Ocean Survey gages in the Gulf of Mexico. The average global rate of sea level rise has been suggested to approach about 2 mm/yr (0.007 ft/yr). Some leading scientists have suggested rates of sea level rise that are greater than 2 mm/yr, when accounting for effects of greenhouse gas emissions. As the sea level rises and inundates the coastal plain, structures along the existing coast and structures located in the back bays of estuaries will be even more adversely affected by future flooding. Also, if the land surface adjacent to the water also sinks due to soil compaction and other geologic processes (collectively call subsidence), additional land will be inundated. Copyright ASCE 2004.

  15. Floods of December 1961 in Mississippi and adjoining states

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shell, James D.

    1962-01-01

    Widespread floods occurred over parts of Mississippi, Louisiana, and Alabama after heavy rains during December 18, 1961. A series of low-pressure systems produced as much as 19 inches of rainfall in some areas. Heavy rainfall, 7 to 11 inches, on December 10 resulted in outstanding floods on small streams in southern Mississippi and southwestern Alabama. Subsequent rains produced multiple floods on small streams and outstanding floods of prolonged duration along the Big Black, upper Pearl, and lower Tombigbee Rivers in Mississippi. At Jackson, Miss., the Pearl River reached the highest stage known. Along the east bank, flood waters topped or breached some of the levee system protecting the Flowood industrial area, but other parts were saved by extensive reinforcement and by emergency operation of the partially completed dam 10 miles upstream. Additional heavy damage to commercial and industrial property was prevented as a result of these measures. Elsewhere, damage was restricted primarily to secondary highways and bridges. Two lives were lost.

  16. Nutrient mass balance and trends, Mobile River Basin, Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harned, D.A.; Atkins, J.B.; Harvill, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    A nutrient mass balance - accounting for nutrient inputs from atmospheric deposition, fertilizer, crop nitrogen fixation, and point source effluents; and nutrient outputs, including crop harvest and storage - was calculated for 18 subbasins in the Mobile River Basin, and trends (1970 to 1997) were evaluated as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Agricultural nonpoint nitrogen and phosphorus sources and urban nonpoint nitrogen sources are the most important factors associated with nutrients in this system. More than 30 percent of nitrogen yield in two basins and phosphorus yield in eight basins can be attributed to urban point source nutrient inputs. The total nitrogen yield (1.3 tons per square mile per year) for the Tombigbee River, which drains a greater percentage of agricultural (row crop) land use, was larger than the total nitrogen yield (0.99 tons per square mile per year) for the Alabama River. Decreasing trends of total nitrogen concentrations in the Tombigbee and Alabama Rivers indicate that a reduction occurred from 1975 to 1997 in the nitrogen contributions to Mobile Bay from the Mobile River. Nitrogen concentrations also decreased (1980 to 1995) in the Black Warrior River, one of the major tributaries to the Tombigbee River. Total phosphorus concentrations increased from 1970 to 1996 at three urban influenced sites on the Etowah River in Georgia. Multiple regression analysis indicates a distinct association between water quality in the streams of the Mobile River drainage basin and agricultural activities in the basin.

  17. Historical changes in the Mississippi-Alabama barrier islands and the roles of extreme storms, sea level, and human activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    An historical analysis of images and documents shows that the Mississippi-Alabama (MS-AL) barrier islands are undergoing rapid land loss and translocation. The barrier island chain formed and grew at a time when there was a surplus of sand in the alongshore sediment transport system, a condition that no longer prevails. The islands, except Cat, display alternating wide and marrow segments. Wide segments generally were products of low rates of inlet migration and spit elongation that resulted in well-defined ridges and swales formed by wave refraction along the inlet margins. In contrast, rapid rates of inlet migration and spit elongation under conditions of surplus sand produced low, narrow, straight barrier segments. Since the mid 1800s, average rates of land loss for all the MS islands accelerated systematically while maintaining consistency from island to island. In contrast, Dauphin Island, off the Alabama coast, gained land during the early 20th century and then began to lose land at rates comparable to those of the MS barriers. There is an inverse relationship between island size and percentage of land reduction for each barrier such that Horn Island lost 24% and Ship Island lost 64% of its area since the mid 1800s. Ship Island is particularly vulnerable to storm-driven land losses because topographic and bathymetric boundary conditions focus wave energy onto the island. The three predominant morphodynamic processes associated with land loss are: (1) unequal lateral transfer of sand related to greater updrift erosion compared to downdrift deposition, (2) barrier narrowing resulting from simultaneous erosion of the Gulf and Soundside shores, and (3) barrier segmentation related to storm breaching. The western three fourths of Dauphin Island are migrating landward as a result of storms that erode the Gulf shore, overwash the island, and deposit sand in Mississippi Sound. Petit Bois, Horn, and Ship Islands have migrated westward as a result of predominant

  18. Baseline coastal oblique aerial photographs collected from Dauphin Island, Alabama, to Breton Island, Louisiana, August 8, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, Karen L.M.; Westphal, Karen A.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducts baseline and storm response photography missions to document and understand the changes in vulnerability of the Nation's coasts to extreme storms. On August 8, 2012, the USGS conducted an oblique aerial photographic survey from Dauphin Island, Alabama, to Breton Island, Louisiana, aboard a Cessna 172 at an altitude of 500 feet (ft) and approximately 1,000 ft offshore. This mission was flown to collect baseline data for assessing incremental changes since the last survey, and the data can be used in the assessment of future coastal change. The images provided here are Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) images. Exiftool was used to add the following to the header of each photo: time of collection, Global Positioning System (GPS) latitude, GPS longitude, keywords, credit, artist (photographer), caption, copyright, and contact information. The photograph locations are an estimate of the position of the aircraft and do not indicate the location of any feature in the images (see the Navigation Data page). These photographs document the configuration of the barrier islands and other coastal features at the time of the survey. Pages containing thumbnail images of the photographs, referred to as contact sheets, were created in 5-minute segments of flight time. These segements can be found on the Photos and Maps page. Photographs can be opened directly with any JPEG-compatible image viewer by clicking on a thumbnail on the contact sheet. Table 1 provides detailed information about the GPS location, name, date, and time each of the 1241 photographs taken along with links to each photograph. The photography is organized into segments, also referred to as contact sheets, and represent approximately 5 minutes of flight time. (Also see the Photos and Maps page). In addition to the photographs, a Google Earth Keyhole Markup Language (KML) file is provided and can be used to view the images by clicking on the marker and then clicking

  19. Baseline coastal oblique aerial photographs collected from Breton Island, Louisiana, to the Alabama-Florida border, July 13, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, Karen L.M.; Westphal, Karen A.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducts baseline and storm response photography missions to document and understand the changes in vulnerability of the Nation's coasts to extreme storms. On July 13, 2013, the USGS conducted an oblique aerial photographic survey from Breton Island, Louisiana, to the Alabama-Florida border, aboard a Cessna 172 flying at an altitude of 500 feet (ft) and approximately 1,000 ft offshore. This mission was flown to collect baseline data for assessing incremental changes since the last survey, and the data can be used in the assessment of future coastal change. The images provided here are Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) images. ExifTtool was used to add the following to the header of each photo: time of collection, Global Positioning System (GPS) latitude, GPS longitude, keywords, credit, artist (photographer), caption, copyright, and contact information. The photograph locations are an estimate of the position of the aircraft and do not indicate the location of any feature in the images (see the Navigation Data page). These photographs document the configuration of the barrier islands and other coastal features at the time of the survey. Pages containing thumbnail images of the photographs, referred to as contact sheets, were created in 5-minute segments of flight time. These segements can be found on the Photos and Maps page. Photographs can be opened directly with any JPEG-compatible image viewer by clicking on a thumbnail on the contact sheet. Table 1 provides detailed information about the GPS location, name, date, and time each of the 1242 photographs taken along with links to each photograph. The photography is organized into segments, also referred to as contact sheets, and represent approximately 5 minutes of flight time. (Also see the Photos and Maps page). In addition to the photographs, a Google Earth Keyhole Markup Language (KML) file is provided and can be used to view the images by clicking on the marker and then

  20. Archive of Digitized Analog Boomer Seismic Reflection Data Collected from the Mississippi-Alabama-Florida Shelf During Cruises Onboard the R/V Kit Jones, June 1990 and July 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, Jordan M.; Harrison, Arnell S.; Wiese, Dana S.; Flocks, James G.

    2009-01-01

    In June of 1990 and July of 1991, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted geophysical surveys to investigate the shallow geologic framework of the Mississippi-Alabama-Florida shelf in the northern Gulf of Mexico, from Mississippi Sound to the Florida Panhandle. Work was done onboard the Mississippi Mineral Resources Institute R/V Kit Jones as part of a project to study coastal erosion and offshore sand resources. This report is part of a series to digitally archive the legacy analog data collected from the Mississippi-Alabama SHelf (MASH). The MASH data rescue project is a cooperative effort by the USGS and the Minerals Management Service (MMS). This report serves as an archive of high-resolution scanned Tagged Image File Format (TIFF) and Graphics Interchange Format (GIF) images of the original boomer paper records, navigation files, trackline maps, Geographic Information System (GIS) files, cruise logs, and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata.

  1. The uses of ERTS-1 imagery in the analysis of landscape change. [agriculture, strip mining forests, urban-suburban growth, and flooding in Tennessee, Kentucky, Mississippi, and Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehder, J. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The analysis of strip mining from ERTS-1 data has resulted in the mapping of landscape changes for the Cumberland Plateau Test Site. Several mapping experiments utilizing ERTS-1 data have been established for the mapping of state-wide land use regions. The first incorporates 12 frames of ERTS-1 imagery for the generalized thematic mapping of forest cover for the state of Tennessee. In another mapping effort, 14 ERTS-1 images have been analyzed for plowed ground signatures to produce a map of agricultural regions for Tennessee, Kentucky, and the northern portions of Mississippi and Alabama. Generalized urban land use categories and transportation networks have been determined from ERTS-1 imagery for the Knoxville Test Site. Finally, through the analysis of ERTS-1 imagery, short-lived phenomena such as the 1973 spring floods on the Mississippi River in western Tennessee, have been detected, monitored, and mapped.

  2. Late Holocene coastal wetlands change, Mississippi Sound, Alabama: Short-term vs. long-term patterns and processes

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, D.J.; Smith, W.E. . Environmental Geology Div.)

    1994-03-01

    Wetlands occupy much of the low-lying mainland coast in Mississippi Sound, Alabama, grading from Spartina salt marsh (48.8 km[sup 2]) to fresh water marshes (13.5 km[sup 2]) to forested wetlands (123.4 km[sup 2]) (Rathbun et al, 1987). These wetlands are undergoing rapid short-term (years to decades) net acreage loss due to headland shoreline erosion. In contrast, long-term (centuries to millennia) change in marsh area is largely due to submergence from Holocene transgression and local subsidence. The Sound overlies drowned Pleistocene-Holocene coastal sediments; existing salt marshes likely developed after inundation of paleomarshes cored at a MHW depth of [minus]3 to [minus]7 m in the mid-Sound (C[sup 14] dates of 4--7,000 Y.B.P.). Geomorphic evidence indicates the primary cause of short-term loss of salt marsh is localized erosion of its seaward edge, rather than submergence. A low (< 1 m) intertidal scarp and narrow sandy beach on open Sound shorelines indicate episodic storm erosion. Linear open Sound shorelines formed by wave modification, in contrast to typically less modified protected shores; nearshore Sound bathymetry shows a gently seaward sloping possible wave-cut terrace. Marsh erosion rates are due to several processes including water energy (background as well as seasonal storms); cohesiveness of marsh sediments; and health of marsh flora. Orientation of the shoreline relative to southerly wind-forced waves during passage of winter cold fronts may be the primary factor. While today's short-term rates of overall vertical coastal inundation are relatively low, the development of new marsh acreage is also negligible. As sediment influx from coastal streams is low, it may be difficult to sustain present marsh acreage should sea level rise accelerate.

  3. Physiography and late Quaternary-Holocene processes of Northeastern Gulf of Mexico outer continental shelf off Mississippi and Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, J.V.; Dartnell, P.; Sulak, K.J.; Calder, B.; Hellequin, L.

    2001-01-01

    High-resolution multibeam mapping of the mid- and outer continental shelf and upper slope off Mississippi and Alabama reveals a complex bathymetry that reflects conditions during the last eustatic rise and the present high stand of sea level. The most prominent bathymetric features are pinnacles and hardgrounds that are scattered throughout the area. These features generally stand <10 m above the surrounding seafloor, cover large areas, and display a variety of morphologies. Almost all the reef pinnacles and hardgrounds have zones of high acoustic backscatter on their summits and on the seafloor immediately adjacent to their southwest walls. In addition, they also have erosional moats on the seafloor to the southwest. Large fields of bedforms are scattered throughout the mapped area. The asymmetries and orientations of the bedforms suggest that they were formed by excursions of the northeast-flowing Loop Current. In contrast, the pervasive ponding of sediment on the northeast sides of bathymetric highs indicates that one of the predominant directions of sediment transport has been to the south and southwest. The shelf break is a zone of numerous landslides of various sizes and complexities. The morphology of several landslide scars indicates that some of the failures occurred recently. One large reef-capped salt dome was mapped in the area, surrounded by a large field of pock-marks. Fields of pockmarks are also scattered on the shelf. The growth and demise of the reefs are related to the fluctuating transgression of eustatic sea level during the last deglaciation. Two episodes of reef drowning are correlated with the increased rates of sea-level rise during documented melt-water pulses; the first occurred from 14.8 to 14.2 ka and the second from 11.8 to 11.2 ka. Rates of sea-level rise exceeded the maximum growth rate of hermatypic corals only during these two intervals since the last glacial maximum and thus drowned the coral communities.

  4. Changes in the freshwater mussel (Bivalvia: Unionidae) fauna of the Bear Creek system of Northwest Alabama and Northeast Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGregor, S.W.; Garner, J.T.

    2003-01-01

    Drastic reductions in diversity and abundance of mussel populations are documented in many systems. Bear Creek, located in northwest Alabama and northeast Mississippi, has seen changes to its fauna, possibly the result of impoundment, channelization, wastewater discharge, and sedimentation from such sources such as strip mining, agriculture, and silviculture. The most obvious influences have been impoundment of the lowermost 32 km of Bear Creek by Pickwick Reservoir of Tennessee River, the construction of four dams within the system, construction of a 29-km-long channel designed to limit flooding, and bank destabilization. Mussels are absent from much of the system and faunal composition has apparently been altered where mussels persist, based on comparison to limited previous studies. The most notable changes are the loss of Cumberlandian species diversity and the apparent increase in Ohioan species diversity. We sampled 40 stations in the Bear Creek system and report 32 mussel species live or fresh dead, including 3 Cumberlandian species, and 2 others weathered dead. Fourteen of these species were not reported in two earlier studies. During this study the most depauperate populations were upstream of Bear Creek km 41.0 and in tributaries. No mussels were collected immediately downstream of dams, and diversity gradually increased downstream from the lowermost main channel dam until 28 species occurred together in a free-flowing reach shortly before entering Pickwick Reservoir. One weathered dead zebra mussel, Dreisenna polymorpha, was also collected, representing a new tributary record. The population of Epioblasma brevidens in Bear Creek is the only population of that species known in the lower Tennessee River system, and the population of Lexingtonia dolabelloides, another new tributary record, is one of only two populations of that species known downstream of Paint Rock River.

  5. The Mississippi CCS Project

    SciTech Connect

    Doug Cathro

    2010-09-30

    The Mississippi CCS Project is a proposed large-scale industrial carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) project which would have demonstrated advanced technologies to capture and sequester carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from industrial sources into underground formations. Specifically, the Mississippi CCS Project was to accelerate commercialization of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage from industrial sources by leveraging synergy between a proposed petcoke to Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) plant that is selected for a Federal Loan Guarantee and would be the largest integrated anthropogenic CO{sub 2} capture, transport, and monitored sequestration program in the U.S. Gulf Coast Region. The Mississippi CCS Project was to promote the expansion of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the Mississippi, Alabama and Louisiana region which would supply greater energy security through increased domestic energy production. The capture, compression, pipeline, injection, and monitoring infrastructure would have continued to sequester CO{sub 2} for many years after the completion of the term of the DOE agreement. The objectives of this project were expected to be fulfilled through two distinct phases. The overall objective of Phase 1 was to develop a fully definitive project basis for a competitive Renewal Application process to proceed into Phase 2 - Design, Construction and Operations. Phase 1 included the studies that establish the engineering design basis for the capture, compression and transportation of CO{sub 2} from the MG SNG Project, and the criteria and specifications for a monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) plan at the Soso oil field in Mississippi. The overall objective of Phase 2, was to execute design, construction and operations of three capital projects: the CO{sub 2} capture and compression equipment, the Mississippi CO{sub 2} Pipeline to Denbury's Free State Pipeline, and an MVA system at the Soso oil field.

  6. Heterogeneity in Mississippi oil reservoirs, Black Warrior basin, Alabama: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Kugler, R.L.; Pashin, J.C.; Irvin, G.D. )

    1993-09-01

    Four Mississippian sandstone units produce oil in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama: (1) Lewis; (2) Carter; (3) Millerella, and (4) Gilmer. Reservoir geometries differ for each producing interval, reflecting variation in depositional style during the evolution of a foreland basin. Widespread strike-elongate bodies of Lewis sandstone with complex internal geometry were deposited during destruction of the Fort Payne-Tuscumbia carbonate ramp and represent inception of the foreland basin and initial forebulge migration. Synorogenic Carter sandstone is part of the first major deltaic foreland basin fill and accounts for more than 80% of oil production in the basin. Millerella sandstone was deposited as transgressive sand patches during the final stages of delta destruction. Gilmer sandstone occurs as imbricate sandstone lenses deposited in a constructive shoal-water delta and is part of the late relaxational basin fill. Interaction of siliciclastic sediment with ancestral and active carbonate ramps was a primary control on facies architecture and reservoir heterogeneity. Patterns of injection and reservoir fluid production, as well as field- to basin-scale depositional, petrological, petrophysical and geostatistical modeling reveal microscopic to megascopic controls on reservoir heterogeneity and hydrocarbon producibility. At a megascopic scale, isolation or continuity of reservoir bodies is a function of depositional topography and the degree of marine reworking of genetically coherent sandstone bodies. These factors result in amalgamated reservoir bodies or in compartments that may remain uncontacted or unconnected during field development. Within producing fields, segmentation of amalgamated sandstone bodies into individual lenses, grain size variations, depositional barriers, and diagenetic baffles further compartmentalize reservoirs, increase tortuosity of fluid flow, and affect sweep efficiency during improved recovery operations.

  7. Carbon storage and late Holocene chronostratigraphy of a Mississippi River deltaic marsh, St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markewich, H. W.

    1998-01-01

    Today, the causes, results, and time scale(s) of climate change, past and potential, are the focus of much research, news coverage, and pundit speculation. Many of the US government scientific agencies have some funds earmarked for research into past and (or) future climate change (National Science and Technology Council, 1997). The Mississippi Basin Carbon Project (MBCP) is part of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) effort in global change research . The project is motivated by the need to increase our understanding of the role of terrestrial carbon in the global carbon cycle, particularly in the temperate latitudes of North America. The global land area between 30 O and 60 O N is thought to be a large sink for atmospheric CO2 (IPCC, 1996). The identity of this sink is unknown, but is in part the soil and sediment that makes up the upper several meters of the Earth's surface. The MBCP focuses on the Mississippi River basin, the third largest river system in the world (fig. 1), that drains an area of 3.3 x 10 6 km 2 (1.27 x 10 6 mi 2 ). The Mississippi River basin includes more than 40 percent of the land surface, and is the home of more than one-third of the population, of the conterminous United States. Because climate, vegetation, and land use vary greatly within the Mississippi River basin, the primary terrestrial sinks for carbon need to be identified and quantified for representative parts of the basin. The primary goal of the MBCP is to quantify the interactive effects of land-use, erosion, sedimentation, and soil development on carbon storage and nutrient cycles within the Mississippi River basin. The project includes spatial analysis of a wide variety of geographic data, estimation of whole-basin and sub-basin carbon and sediment budgets, development and implementation of terrestrial carbon-cycle models, and site-specific field studies of relevant processes. Areas can be studied and compared, and estimates can be made for whole-basin carbon storage and flux.

  8. Archive of Digitized Analog Boomer Seismic Reflection Data Collected from Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, to Mobile Bay, Alabama, During Cruises Onboard the R/V ERDA-1, June and August 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, Jordan M.; Harrison, Arnell S.; Wiese, Dana S.; Flocks, James G.

    2008-01-01

    In June and August of 1992, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted geophysical surveys to investigate the shallow geologic framework from Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, to Mobile Bay, Alabama. This work was conducted onboard the Argonne National Laboratory's R/V ERDA-1 as part of the Mississippi/Alabama Pollution Project. This report is part of a series to digitally archive the legacy analog data collected from the Mississippi-Alabama SHelf (MASH). The MASH data rescue project is a cooperative effort by the USGS and the Minerals Management Service (MMS). A standardized naming convention was established to allow for better management of scanned trackline images within the MASH data rescue project. Each cruise received a unique field activity ID based on the year the data were collected, the first two digits of the survey vessel name, and the number of cruises made (to date) by that vessel that year (i.e. 92ER2 represents the second cruise made by the R/V ERDA-1 in 1992.) The new field activity IDs 92ER2 and 92ER4 presented in this report were originally referred to as ERDA 92-2 and ERDA 92-4 at the USGS in St. Petersburg, FL, and 92010 and 92037 at the USGS in Woods Hole, MA. A table showing the naming convention lineage for cruise IDs in the MASH data rescue series is included as a PDF. This report serves as an archive of high resolution scanned Tagged Image File Format (TIFF) and Graphics Interchange Format (GIF) images of the original boomer paper records, navigation files, trackline maps, Geographic Information System (GIS) files, cruise logs, and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata for cruises 92ER2 and 92ER4. The boomer system uses an acoustic energy source called a plate, which consists of capacitors charged to a high voltage and discharged through a transducer in the water. The source is towed on a sled, at sea level, and when discharged emits a short acoustic pulse, or shot, which propagates through the water and sediment column

  9. Formaldehyde levels in FEMA-supplied travel trailers, park models, and mobile homes in Louisiana and Mississippi.

    PubMed

    Murphy, M W; Lando, J F; Kieszak, S M; Sutter, M E; Noonan, G P; Brunkard, J M; McGeehin, M A

    2013-04-01

    In 2006, area physicians reported increases in upper respiratory symptoms in patients living in U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)-supplied trailers following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. One potential etiology to explain their symptoms included formaldehyde; however, formaldehyde levels in these occupied trailers were unknown. The objectives of our study were to identify formaldehyde levels in occupied trailers and to determine factors or characteristics of occupied trailers that could affect formaldehyde levels. A disproportionate random sample of 519 FEMA-supplied trailers was identified in Louisiana and Mississippi in November 2007. We collected and tested an air sample from each trailer for formaldehyde levels and administered a survey. Formaldehyde levels among all trailers in this study ranged from 3 parts per billion (ppb) to 590 ppb, with a geometric mean (GM) of 77 ppb [95% confidence interval (CI): 70-85; range: 3-590 ppb]. There were statistically significant differences in formaldehyde levels between trailer types (P < 0.01). The GM formaldehyde level was 81 ppb (95% CI: 72-92) among travel trailers (N = 360), 57 ppb (95% CI: 49-65) among mobile homes (N = 57), and 44 ppb (95% CI: 38-53) among park models (N = 44). Among travel trailers, formaldehyde levels varied significantly by brand. While formaldehyde levels varied by trailer type, all types tested had some levels ≥ 100 ppb.

  10. Archive of digital Chirp subbottom profile data collected during USGS cruises 09CCT03 and 09CCT04, Mississippi and Alabama Gulf Islands, June and July 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forde, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Flocks, James G.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2011-01-01

    In June and July of 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted geophysical surveys to investigate the geologic controls on island framework from Cat Island, Mississippi, to Dauphin Island, Alabama, as part of a broader USGS study on Coastal Change and Transport (CCT). The surveys were funded through the Northern Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem Change and Hazard Susceptibility Project as part of the Holocene Evolution of the Mississippi-Alabama Region Subtask (http://ngom.er.usgs.gov/task2_2/index.php). This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital Chirp seismic profile data, trackline maps, navigation files, Geographic Information System (GIS) files, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs, and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata. Single-beam and Swath bathymetry data were also collected during these cruises and will be published as a separate archive. Gained (a relative increase in signal amplitude) digital images of the seismic profiles are also provided. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansion of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report.

  11. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Baisn and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Costal Plain: Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1997-March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.

    1997-03-27

    Part I (Inventory of Existing Data and Information Sources) objectives are to provide improved access to information available in the public domain by inventorying data files and records of the major information repositories in the Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain and making these inventories easily accessible in electronic format. The producers in the region maintain that the accessibility of oil and gas information is the single-most important factor to assist them in finding new hydrocarbon discoveries and in improving production from established fields. The principal investigator continues to discuss the project with geologists for Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida. A subcontract has been executed between the University of Alabama and the Geological Survey of Alabama. A subcontract agreement is under review by the Mississippi Office of Geology. The principal investigator continues to discuss the project with a number of faculty members from departments of geology in the region. A listing of theses and dissertations from the University of Alabama, Auburn University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, University of Southern Mississippi, University of Southwestern Louisiana, and Louisiana State University related to the petroleum geology of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin has been compiled. This list is accessible electronically through the Home Page of the Eastern Gulf Region of the Pertroleum Technology Transfer Council (EGRPTTC) (http://egrpttc.geo.ua.edu).

  12. Environmental setting and water-quality issues of the Mobile River Basin, Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Gregory C.; Kidd, Robert E.; Journey, Celeste A.; Zappia, Humbert; Atkins, J. Brian

    2002-01-01

    The Mobile River Basin is one of over 50 river basins and aquifer systems being investigated as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. This basin is the sixth largest river basin in the United States, and fourth largest in terms of streamflow, encompassing parts of Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and Tennessee. Almost two-thirds of the 44,000-square-mile basin is located in Alabama. Extensive water resources of the Mobile River Basin are influenced by an array of natural and cultural factors. These factors impart unique and variable qualities to the streams, rivers, and aquifers providing abundant habitat to sustain the diverse aquatic life in the basin. Data from Federal, State, and local agencies provide a description of the environmental setting of the Mobile River Basin. Environmental data include natural factors such as physiography, geology, soils, climate, hydrology, ecoregions, and aquatic ecology, and human factors such as reservoirs, land use and population change, water use, and water-quality issues. Characterization of the environmental setting is useful for understanding the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of surface and ground water in the Mobile River Basin and the possible implications of that environmental setting for water quality. The Mobile River Basin encompasses parts of five physiographic provinces. Fifty-six percent of the basin lies within the East Gulf section of the Coastal Plain Physiographic Province. The remaining northeastern part of the basin lies, from west to east, within the Cumberland Plateau section of the Appalachian Plateaus Physiographic Province, the Valley and Ridge Physiographic Province, the Piedmont Physiographic Province, and the Blue Ridge Physiographic Province. Based on the 1991 land-use data, about 70 percent of the basin is forested, while agriculture, including livestock (poultry, cattle, and swine), row crops (cotton, corn, soybeans, sorghum, and

  13. Historical changes in the Mississippi-Alabama barrier-island chain and the roles of extreme storms, sea level, and human activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Barrier-island chains worldwide are undergoing substantial changes, and their futures remain uncertain. An historical analysis of a barrier-island chain in the north-central Gulf of Mexico shows that the Mississippi barriers are undergoing rapid systematic land loss and translocation associated with: (1) unequal lateral transfer of sand related to greater updrift erosion compared to downdrift deposition; (2) barrier narrowing resulting from simultaneous erosion of shores along the Gulf and Mississippi Sound; and (3) barrier segmentation related to storm breaching. Dauphin Island, Alabama, is also losing land for some of the same reasons as it gradually migrates landward. The principal causes of land loss are frequent intense storms, a relative rise in sea level, and a sediment-budget deficit. Considering the predicted trends for storms and sea level related to global warming, it is certain that the Mississippi-Alabama (MS-AL) barrier islands will continue to lose land area at a rapid rate unless the trend of at least one causal factor reverses. Historical land-loss trends and engineering records show that progressive increases in land-loss rate correlate with nearly simultaneous deepening of channels dredged across the outer bars of the three tidal inlets maintained for deep-draft shipping. This correlation indicates that channel-maintenance activities along the MS-AL barriers have impacted the sediment budget by disrupting the alongshore sediment transport system and progressively reducing sand supply. Direct management of this causal factor can be accomplished by strategically placing dredged sediment where adjacent barrier-island shores will receive it for island nourishment and rebuilding.

  14. Subtidal sea level variability in a shallow Mississippi River deltaic estuary, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snedden, G.A.; Cable, J.E.; Wiseman, W.J.

    2007-01-01

    The relative roles of river, atmospheric, and tidal forcings on estuarine sea level variability are examined in Breton Sound, a shallow (0.7 m) deltaic estuary situated in an interdistributary basin on the Mississippi River deltaic plain. The deltaic landscape contains vegetated marshes, tidal flats, circuitous channels, and other features that frictionally dissipate waves propagating through the system. Direct forcing by local wind stress over the surface of the estuary is minimal, owing to the lack of significant fetch due to landscape features of the estuary. Atmospheric forcing occurs almost entirely through remote forcing, where alongshore winds facilitate estuary-shelf exchange through coastal Ekman convergence. The highly frictional nature of the deltaic landscape causes the estuary to act as a low-pass filter to remote atmospheric forcing, where high-frequency, coastally-induced fluctuations are significantly damped, and the damping increases with distance from the estuary mouth. During spring, when substantial quantities of controlled Mississippi River inputs (q?? = 62 m3 s-1) are discharged into the estuary, upper estuary subtidal sea levels are forced by a combination of river and remote atmospheric forcings, while river effects are less clear downestuary. During autumn (q?? = 7 m3 s-1) sea level variability throughout the estuary is governed entirely by coastal variations at the marine boundary. A frequency-dependent analytical model, previously used to describe sea level dynamics forced by local wind stress and coastal forcing in deeper, less frictional systems, is applied in the shallow Breton Sound estuary. In contrast to deeper systems where coastally-induced fluctuations exhibit little or no frictional attenuation inside the estuary, these fluctuations in the shallow Breton Sound estuary show strong frequency-dependent amplitude reductions that extend well into the subtidal frequency spectrum. ?? 2007 Estuarine Research Federation.

  15. Distribution and habitat associations of breeding secretive marsh birds in Louisiana's Mississippi alluvial valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valente, J.J.; King, S.L.; Wilson, R.R.

    2011-01-01

    Populations of many North American secretive marsh birds (SMBs) have declined in recent decades, partially as a function of wetland loss. Protecting and restoring appropriate habitat for these species is contingent upon understanding the habitat features they utilize. We investigated breeding distributions of SMBs in northeast Louisiana at 118 wetlands in 2007 and 2008 and modeled species occupancy (??) as a function of habitat variables measured at local (???100 m) and landscape (???1 km) scales. Common Moorhens (Gallinula chloropus), Least Bitterns (Ixobrychus exilis), and Purple Gallinules (Porphyrula martinica) were the most commonly detected species, whereas breeding King Rails (Rallus elegans) and American Coots (Fulica americana) were rare. Local habitat features consistently played a greater role in predicting ?? than landscape features for the three most common species. The proportion of local wetland area dominated by robust emergent vegetation (i.e., Typha spp. and Zizaniopsis miliacea) positively influenced ?? for all species, while other wetland vegetation types tended to have a minimal or negative effect. Our results suggest the habitat characteristics preferred by breeding SMBs differ from those used by migrating shorebirds and wintering waterfowl and management and restoration objectives for those species may be inadequate for enhancing SMB habitat. ?? 2011 US Government.

  16. Church attendee help seeking priorities after Hurricane Katrina in Mississippi and Louisiana: a brief report.

    PubMed

    Aten, Jamie D; Gonzalez, Rose A; Boan, David M; Topping, Sharon; Livingston, William V; Hosey, John M

    2012-01-01

    After a disaster, survivors find themselves seeking many types of help from others in their communities. The purpose of this exploratory study was to assist in mental health service planning by determining the type and priority of support services sought by church attendees after Hurricane Katrina. Surveys were given to church attendees from two Mississippi coast and four New Orleans area churches that were directly affected by Hurricane Katrina participants were asked to review a list of 12 potential sources of help and were asked to rank the items chronologically from whom they had sought help first after Hurricane Katrina. Overall, participants sought out assistance from informal social networks such as family and friends first, followed by governmental and clergy support. This study also showed there may be differences in help-seeking behaviors between church attendees in more urban areas versus church attendees in more rural areas. Moreover, findings highlighted that very few church attendees seek out mental health services during the initial impact phase of a disaster. Since timely engagement with mental health services is important for resolving trauma, strategies that link professional mental health services with clergy and government resources following a disaster could improve the engagement with mental health professionals and improve mental health outcomes. Disaster mental health clinical implications and recommendations are offered for psychologists based on these findings.

  17. Church attendee help seeking priorities after Hurricane Katrina in Mississippi and Louisiana: a brief report.

    PubMed

    Aten, Jamie D; Gonzalez, Rose A; Boan, David M; Topping, Sharon; Livingston, William V; Hosey, John M

    2012-01-01

    After a disaster, survivors find themselves seeking many types of help from others in their communities. The purpose of this exploratory study was to assist in mental health service planning by determining the type and priority of support services sought by church attendees after Hurricane Katrina. Surveys were given to church attendees from two Mississippi coast and four New Orleans area churches that were directly affected by Hurricane Katrina participants were asked to review a list of 12 potential sources of help and were asked to rank the items chronologically from whom they had sought help first after Hurricane Katrina. Overall, participants sought out assistance from informal social networks such as family and friends first, followed by governmental and clergy support. This study also showed there may be differences in help-seeking behaviors between church attendees in more urban areas versus church attendees in more rural areas. Moreover, findings highlighted that very few church attendees seek out mental health services during the initial impact phase of a disaster. Since timely engagement with mental health services is important for resolving trauma, strategies that link professional mental health services with clergy and government resources following a disaster could improve the engagement with mental health professionals and improve mental health outcomes. Disaster mental health clinical implications and recommendations are offered for psychologists based on these findings. PMID:23156958

  18. HYDRODYNAMICS AND SEDIMENT TRANSPORT IN LOWER MISSISSIPPI RIVER MEANDER BENDS (LOUISIANA): IMPLICATIONS FOR LARGE SEDIMENT DIVERSIONS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, M. A.; McCorquodale, A.; Meselhe, E. A.

    2009-12-01

    Field data collection and numerical modeling is being conducted in the lower Mississippi River in the region of a meander bend at Myrtle Grove, LA (river km 96 above Head of Passes) in support of a proposed large water and sediment diversion (1,130-2,830 cms) for coastal wetland restoration. Field studies in October 2008, April and May 2009, at discharges ranging from 11,000-21,000 cms, examined the role of bend dynamics on sediment transport through this reach relative to control sites further downriver and USGS monitoring stations upriver. Suspended loads and grain size character measured by ADCP (velocities and backscatter), isokinetic point sampler (P-63), and optical sensors (LISST, OBS, transmissometer) indicate that during the rising-to-high discharge phase, sand lifting off from the downstream edge of the lateral bar upriver of the bend augments that carried from further upriver, and is entrained in the upper 10-25m of the water column. This excess suspended sand is advected around the bend before concentrations are reduced to background levels over the lateral bar downstream of the bend. Bedload transport rates measured by repeat swath bathymetric mapping of migrating dunes are comparable upstream of the bend, downstream, and in the control sites. However, no bedforms are observed in the bend thalweg (up to 60 m deep) supporting the dominance of suspended sand transport in the bend. Both 1D (HEC-RAS and HEC6-T) and 3D (Flow3D) numerical hydrodynamic and sediment transport modeling is underway to simulate this process and the large-scale eddy present in the bend that generates upriver transport along the inside of the meander bend at all observed discharges. Our preliminary results suggest that the outside of meander bends might be an appropriate site for sediment diversions that draw near-surface water from this sediment-rich layer.

  19. Landsat TM-based analysis of land area and vegetation cover change on six selected Alabama and Mississippi barrier islands (1984-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winstanley, Hunter Clark

    Cat Island, West Ship Island, East Ship Island, Horn Island, Petit Bois Island, and Dauphin Island are located 10-20 kilometers south of the Mississippi and Alabama coastlines. These six barrier islands serve as an important shield to southern areas of Mississippi and Alabama from tropical cyclone (hurricane) impacts such as storm surge and destructive waves. The islands are also home to a delicate ecosystem of many different types of flora and fauna. Over the course of the past three decades, all six islands have been subjected to several hurricane events. This, coupled with the natural state of the erosion, has led to the islands losing total land area and vegetation. This thesis research focuses on quantifying the vegetation loss and total land area loss on Cat Island, West Ship Island, East Ship Island, Horn Island, Petit Bois Island, and Dauphin Island during the time period from 1984 to 2011. A special focus is given to impacts of Hurricanes Georges, Ivan, Katrina, Gustav, and Ike which affected the northern Gulf Coast in 1998, 2004, 2005, and 2008, respectively. This research utilizes Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper Imagery. Supervised classifications and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) analyses are performed on each scene to analyze the total land area and vegetation cover of each island. The results of this research show the total extent of land and vegetation loss on each island from 1984 to 2011, and which islands are most vulnerable to erosion and vegetation loss. The results also reveal how all five hurricanes affected each individual island.

  20. Recognition of two distinctive diagenetic facies trends as aid to hydrocarbon exploration in deeply buried Jurassic Smackover carbonates of southern Alabama and southern Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, D.

    1985-02-01

    Petrological investigations from wells drilled in the southern Mississippi Interior Salt basin and in the northern Gulf Coast Salt basin have revealed regionally predictable diagenetic-facies trends within the deeply buried (19,000-22,500 ft) Smackover Formation. Within deeply buried Smackover trends, calcitic facies and dolomitic facies are recognized. The calcitic facies is areally widespread and exhibits diagenetic intensities ranging from well-preserved grainstones to pervasive neomorphism. Petrographic evidence of multistage cementation, solution compaction, replacement fabrics, and cement-occluded secondary porosity is common. The calcitic facies is characterized by low porosity and low permeability. The dolomitic facies is less abundant, and its distribution can be related to the Jurassic paleotopography. The Wiggins uplift, a prominent basement element extending across southern Alabama and southern Mississippi, exerted significant control on the areal distribution of this facies. Porous and permeable intervals in the deeply buried Smackover are restricted to this facies. The most significant textural parameter of the dolomitic facies is crystal size. Finely crystalline dolostone is normally of low porosity and low permeability, whereas coarsely crystalline dolostone exhibits more-favorable reservoir properties. The distribution of these diagenetic facies has important implications on future hydrocarbon exploration in the deeply buried Smackover Formation.

  1. Public health response to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita--Louisiana, 2005.

    PubMed

    2006-01-20

    On August 24, 2005, Tropical Depression 12 became Tropical Storm Katrina, the 11th named storm of the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season. Late on August 25, Katrina made initial landfall in south Florida as a category 1 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. Katrina strengthened rapidly upon reaching the Gulf of Mexico, attaining category 5 intensity. On August 29, Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast near the Louisiana-Mississippi border as a category 3 hurricane. The effect of earlier category 5 wind speeds on Gulf waters and the massive size of the storm combined to create devastating storm-surge conditions for coastal Mississippi, Louisiana, and Alabama and damage as far east as the Florida panhandle. Storm-induced breeches in the New Orleans levee system resulted in the catastrophic flooding of approximately 80% of that city. Hurricane Katrina was the deadliest hurricane to strike the United States since 1928. Preliminary mortality reports indicate approximately 1,000 Katrina-related deaths in Louisiana, 200 in Mississippi, and 20 in Florida, Alabama, and Georgia. PMID:16424853

  2. Public health response to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita--Louisiana, 2005.

    PubMed

    2006-01-20

    On August 24, 2005, Tropical Depression 12 became Tropical Storm Katrina, the 11th named storm of the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season. Late on August 25, Katrina made initial landfall in south Florida as a category 1 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. Katrina strengthened rapidly upon reaching the Gulf of Mexico, attaining category 5 intensity. On August 29, Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast near the Louisiana-Mississippi border as a category 3 hurricane. The effect of earlier category 5 wind speeds on Gulf waters and the massive size of the storm combined to create devastating storm-surge conditions for coastal Mississippi, Louisiana, and Alabama and damage as far east as the Florida panhandle. Storm-induced breeches in the New Orleans levee system resulted in the catastrophic flooding of approximately 80% of that city. Hurricane Katrina was the deadliest hurricane to strike the United States since 1928. Preliminary mortality reports indicate approximately 1,000 Katrina-related deaths in Louisiana, 200 in Mississippi, and 20 in Florida, Alabama, and Georgia.

  3. Expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas: Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 3, Technical appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The proposed action entails the development of a plan for 250 million barrels of new crude oil storage capacity in two Gulf Coast salt domes to expand the Strategic Petroleum Reserve pursuant to Congressional directive (PL 101--383 and PL 101--512). Storage capacity would be developed by solution-mining the salt which would require about two billion barrels of surface water and would generate about two billion barrels of salt brine. The brine would be disposed of primarily by ocean discharge and alternatively by deep underground injection. Crude oil fill and distribution systems would require new pipelines and terminal facilities. This EIS assesses the impacts of construction and operation for the range of alternatives being considered and focuses on oil and brine spill risk and impacts of brine disposal, water and land use, groundwater contamination, hydrocarbon emissions, and involvement with wetlands and floodplains. This volume contains 20 appendices.

  4. Water-quality, bed-sediment, and discharge data for the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet and adjacent waterways, southeastern Louisiana, August 2008 through December 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, Christopher M.; Mize, Scott V.; Lovelace, John K.

    2012-01-01

    The Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet navigation channel (MRGO) was constructed in the early 1960s to provide a safer and shorter route between the Gulf of Mexico and the Port of New Orleans for deep-draft, ocean-going vessels and to promote the economic development of the Port of New Orleans. In 2006, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers developed a plan to de-authorize the MRGO. The plan called for a rock barrier to be constructed across the MRGO near Bayou La Loutre. In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Louisiana Coastal Area Science and Technology Program began a study to document the impacts of the rock barrier on water-quality and flow before, during, and after its construction. Water-quality, bed-sediment, and discharge data were collected in the MRGO and adjacent water bodies from August 2008 through December 2009.

  5. An operational application of ERTS-1 imagery to the environmental inventory process. [environmental impact statement for Atchafalaya basin of Louisiana and Mississippi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneal, J. D.; Bwins, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A discussion is presented of how The Engineer Agency for Resources Inventories utilized ERTS remotely sensed imagery as a/supplement to airphotos and collateral data for an environmental impact study of the Atchafalaya Basin for the New Orleans engineer district. This single overall inventory permitted a systematic approach and substantial economy for a number of engineering projects for which environmental impact statements would be required. The study area covered approximately 25,000 square miles and included all or part of 36 parishes in Louisiana and 8 counties in Mississippi. It was concluded that as a supplementary source, used in conjunction with airphotos, ERTS had proven itself as a significant means of economy. As a primary source, the Engineer Agency is not yet ready to accept ERTS for their own particular applications.

  6. LANDSAT follow-on experiment: Gulf of Mexico menhaden and thread herring resources investigation. [Mississippi and Louisiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savastano, K. (Principal Investigator); Kemmerer, A. J.; Faller, K.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The most significant achievement realized is the successful mapping of high probability fishing areas from LANDSAT MSS data for two Mississippi Sound missions.

  7. Influences of Relative Sea-Level Rise and Mississippi River Delta Plain Evolution on the Holocene Middle Amite River, Southeastern Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Autin, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    The Holocene geomorphic history of southeastern Louisiana's middle Amite River is recorded in the stratigraphy of three alloformations, identified in decreasing age as the Watson (WAT), Denham Springs (DS), and Magnolia Bridge (MAG). The WAT meander belt formed by at least 9000 yr B.P., when sea level was lower and the Amite River was tributary to a larger ancestral drainage basin. The DS became an active meander belt by at least 3000 yr B.P., in response to relative sea-level rise and eastward progradation of the Mississippi River delta plain. The MAG developed its meander belt, in part, during the European settlement of the drainage basin, and is now attempting to adjust to modern anthropogenic influences. Geomorphic influences on the middle Amite River floodplain have temporal and spatial components that induce regional- and local-scale effects. Regional extrinsic influences caused meander belt avulsion that produced alloformations. However, local influences produced intrinsic geomorphic thresholds that modified channel morphology within a meander belt but did not induce alloformation development. Base-level influences of the relative sea-level rise and the Mississippi River delta plain were so dominant that the effects of possible climate change were not recognized in the Holocene Amite River system.

  8. Potentiometric Surface in the Sparta-Memphis Aquifer of the Mississippi Embayment, Spring 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schrader, T.P.

    2008-01-01

    The most widely used aquifer for industry and public supply in the Mississippi embayment in Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Tennessee is the Sparta-Memphis aquifer. Decades of pumping from the Sparta-Memphis aquifer have affected ground-water levels throughout the Mississippi embayment. Regional assessments of water-level data from the aquifer are important to document regional water-level conditions and to develop a broad view of the effects of ground-water development and management on the sustainability and availability of the region's water supply. This information is useful to identify areas of water-level declines, identify cumulative areal declines that may cross State boundaries, evaluate the effectiveness of ground-water management strategies practiced in different States, and identify areas with substantial data gaps that may preclude effective management of ground-water resources. A ground-water flow model of the northern Mississippi embayment is being developed by the Mississippi Embayment Regional Aquifer Study (MERAS) to aid in answering questions about ground-water availability and sustainability. The MERAS study area covers parts of eight states including Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, and Tennessee and covers approximately 70,000 square miles. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality Office of Land and Water Resources measured water levels in wells completed in the Sparta-Memphis aquifer in the spring of 2007 to assist in the MERAS model calibration and to document regional water-level conditions. Measurements by the USGS and the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality Office of Land and Water Resources were done in cooperation with the Arkansas Natural Resources Commission; the Arkansas Geological Survey; Memphis Light, Gas and Water; Shelby County, Tennessee; and the city of Germantown, Tennessee. In 2005, total water use from the Sparta

  9. Topographic lidar survey of Dauphin Island, Alabama and Chandeleur, Stake, Grand Gosier and Breton Islands, Louisiana, July 12-14, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guy, Kristy K.; Plant, Nathaniel G.

    2014-01-01

    This Data Series Report contains lidar elevation data collected on July 12 and 14, 2013, for Dauphin Island, Alabama, and Chandeleur, Stake, Grand Gosier and Breton Islands, Louisiana. Classified point cloud data—data points described in three dimensions—in lidar data exchange format (LAS) and bare earth digital elevation models (DEMs) in ERDAS Imagine raster format (IMG) are available as downloadable files. Photo Science, Inc., was contracted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to collect and process these data. The lidar data were acquired at a horizontal spacing (or nominal pulse spacing) of 1 meter (m) or less. The USGS surveyed points within the project area from July 14–23, 2013, for use in ground control and accuracy assessment. Photo Science, Inc., calculated a vertical root mean square error (RMSEz) of 0.012 m by comparing 10 surveyed points to an interpolated elevation surface of unclassified lidar data. The USGS also checked the data using 80 surveyed points and unclassified lidar point elevation data and found an RMSEz of 0.073 m. The project specified an RMSEz of 0.0925 m or less. The lidar survey was acquired to document the short- and long-term changes of several different barrier island systems. Specifically, this survey supports detailed studies of Chandeleur and Dauphin Islands that resolve annual changes in beaches, berms and dunes associated with processes driven by storms, sea-level rise, and even human restoration activities. These lidar data are available to Federal, State and local governments, emergency-response officials, resource managers, and the general public.

  10. 77 FR 17037 - Intent To Prepare a Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Louisiana Coastal Area (LCA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... Louisiana Coastal Area (LCA)--Louisiana, Mississippi River Hydrodynamic and Delta Management Study AGENCY... Coastal Area (LCA)--Louisiana, Mississippi River Hydrodynamic and Delta Management restoration study. This... Mississippi River available to restore and sustain delta growth in the Mississippi River Delta and...

  11. Digital surfaces and hydrogeologic data for the Mesozoic through early Tertiary rocks in the Southeastern Coastal Plain in parts of Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, and Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Debra M.; Bellino, Jason C.; Williams, Lester J.

    2012-01-01

    A digital dataset of hydrogeologic data for Mesozoic through early Tertiary rocks in the Southeastern Coastal Plain was developed using data from five U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) reports published between 1951 and 1996. These reports contain maps and data depicting the extent and elevation of the Southeast Coastal Plain stratigraphic and hydrogeologic units in Florida and parts of Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina. The reports are: Professional Paper 1410-B (Renken, 1996), Professional Paper 1088 (Brown and others, 1979), Professional Paper 524-G (Applin and Applin, 1967), Professional Paper 447 (Applin and Applin, 1965), and Circular 91 (Applin, 1951). The digital dataset provides hydrogeologic data for the USGS Energy Resources Program assessment of potential reservoirs for carbon sequestration and for the USGS Groundwater Resource Program assessment of saline aquifers in the southeastern United States. A Geographic Information System (ArcGIS 9.3.1) was used to construct 33 digital (raster) surfaces representing the top or base of key stratigraphic and hydrogeologic units. In addition, the Geographic Information System was used to generate 102 geo-referenced scanned maps from the five reports and a geo-database containing structural and thickness contours, faults, extent polygons, and common features. The dataset also includes point data of well construction and stratigraphic elevations and scanned images of two geologic cross sections and a nomenclature chart.

  12. Geophysical Log Database for the Mississippi Embayment Regional Aquifer Study (MERAS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, Rheannon M.; Clark, Brian R.

    2008-01-01

    The Mississippi Embayment Regional Aquifer Study (MERAS) is an investigation of ground-water availability and sustainability within the Mississippi embayment as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Ground-Water Resources Program. The MERAS area consists of approximately 70,000 square miles and encompasses parts of eight states including Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, and Tennessee. More than 2,600 geophysical logs of test holes and wells within the MERAS area were compiled into a database and were used to develop a digital hydrogeologic framework from land surface to the top of the Midway Group of upper Paleocene age. The purpose of this report is to document, present, and summarize the geophysical log database, as well as to preserve the geophysical logs in a digital image format for online access.

  13. Sources of terrestrially-derived organic carbon in lower Mississippi River and Louisiana shelf sediments: Implications for differential sedimentation and transport at the coastal margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bianchi, T.S.; Mitra, Siddhartha; McKee, B.A.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we examined the temporal and spatial variability of terrestrial organic carbon sources in lower Mississippi River and Louisiana shelf sediments (during 11 cruises over a 22-month period) to further understand the sorting dynamics and selective transport of vascular plant materials within the primary dispersal system of the river. Bulk ??13C values in lower river sediments ranged from -21.90??? to -24.64??? (mean=-23.20??1.09???), these values were generally more depleted than those found in shelf sediments (-22.5??? to -21.2???). The ??8 (??8 = sum of vanillyl, syringyl and cinnamyl phenols produced from the oxidation of 100 mg of organic carbon) values in the lower river ranged from 0.71 to 3.74 (mean = 1.78??0.23). While there was no significant relationship between ??8 and river discharge (p>0.05), the highest value occurred during peak discharge in April 1999-which corresponded to the highest observed C/N value of 17.41. The ??8 values on the shelf ranged from 0.68 to 1.36 (mean = 0.54??0.30) and were significantly lower (p <0.05) than the average value for lower river sediments. The range of S/V (syringyl/vanillyl) and C/V (cinnamyl/vanillyl) ratios on the shelf, 0.11 to 0.95 and 0.01 to 0.08, respectively, were similar to that found in the lower river. These low C/V ratios are indicative a mixture of woody and non-woody carbon sources. Recent work by Goni et al. [Nature 389 (1997) 275; Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 62 (1998) 3055], which did not include sampling transects within the primary dispersal system of the Mississippi River, showed a non-woody vascular plant signature on the Louisiana shelf. This suggests that riverine-derived woody tissues preferentially settle out of the water column, in the lower river and inner shelf, prior to the selective dispersal of C3 versus C4 non-woody materials in other regions the shelf and slope. This works further demonstrates the importance of differential settlement of particles, sampling location within the

  14. Lower Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous source rocks in Louisiana and Mississippi: Implications to Gulf of Mexico crude oil

    SciTech Connect

    Sassen, R. )

    1990-06-01

    The Lower Tertiary Sparta Formation, Wilcox Group, and the Midway Group in southern Louisiana include organic-rich source facies that generate crude oil at relatively high thermal maturities. The Wilcox Group is an important source of Wilcox crude oil, and regional kerogen variations explain two crude oil subfamilies. Wilcox crude oils in downdip areas of southern Louisiana migrated short distances, but long-range lateral migration (about 150 km) best explains Wilcox crude oils far updip from mature source rocks. Crude oils in Oligocene and younger reservoirs in southern Louisiana migrated vertically from deep lower Tertiary source rocks. Some crude oils in Upper Cretaceous Tuscaloosa reservoirs were emplaced by long-range lateral migration from Tuscaloosa source rocks. Given little evidence of upper Tertiary source rocks and the overmaturity problems of Mesozoic source rocks, most crude oils in upper Tertiary and Pleistocene reservoirs of the Gulf continental shelf are best explained by vertical migration from deep lower Tertiary source rocks. Even so, it is simplistic to assume an exclusive lower Tertiary origin. Many Tertiary and Pleistocene crude oils of this study probably include an overprint of high-maturity hydrocarbons from Mesozoic sources. 12 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. NASA Analyzes Deadly Louisiana Flooding

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's IMERG data from Aug. 8 to Aug. 15, 2016 showed over 20 inches (508 mm) of rainfall was estimated in large areas of southeastern Louisiana and extreme southern Mississippi. Even greater rainf...

  16. 76 FR 61686 - Louisiana Public Service Commission v. Entergy Corporation, Entergy Services, Inc., Entergy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Louisiana Public Service Commission v. Entergy Corporation, Entergy Services... Louisiana Public Service Commission (Complainant) filed a complaint against Entergy Corporation, Entergy Services, Inc., Entergy Louisiana, LLC, Entergy Arkansas, Inc., Entergy Mississippi, Inc., Entergy...

  17. 76 FR 58804 - Notice of Complaint; Louisiana Public Service Commission v. Entergy Corporation, Entergy Services...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-22

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Complaint; Louisiana Public Service Commission v. Entergy Corporation, Entergy Services, Inc., Entergy Louisiana, LLC, Entergy Arkansas, Inc., Entergy Mississippi, Inc... September 14, 2011, the Louisiana Public Service Commission (Complainant) filed a formal complaint...

  18. Citronelle Dome: A giant opportunity for multizone carbon storage and enhanced oil recovery in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin of Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Esposito, R.A.; Pashin, J.C.; Walsh, P.M.

    2008-01-01

    The Citronelle Dome is a giant, salt-cored anticline in the eastern Mississippi Interior Salt Basin of southern Alabama that is located near several large-scale, stationary, carbon-emitting sources in the greater Mobile area. The dome forms an elliptical, four-way structural closure containing opportunities for CO2-enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR) and large-capacity saline reservoir CO2 sequestration. The Citronelle oil field, located on the crest of the dome, has produced more than 169 million bbl of 42-46?? API gravity oil from sandstone bodies in the Lower Cretaceous Rodessa Formation. The top seal for the oil accumulation is a thick succession of shale and anhydrite, and the reservoir is underfilled such that oil-water contacts are typically elevated 30-60 m (100-200 ft) above the structural spill point. Approximately 31-34% of the original oil in place has been recovered by primary and secondary methods, and CO2-EOR has the potential to increase reserves by up to 20%. Structural contour maps of the dome demonstrate that the area of structural closure increases upward in section. Sandstone units providing prospective carbon sinks include the Massive and Pilot sands of the lower Tuscaloosa Group, as well as several sandstone units in the upper Tuscaloosa Group and the Eutaw Formation. Many of these sandstone units are characterized by high porosity and permeability with low heterogeneity. The Tuscaloosa-Eutaw interval is capped by up to 610 m (2000 ft) of chalk and marine shale that are proven reservoir seals in nearby oil fields. Therefore, the Citronelle Dome can be considered a major geologic sink where CO2 can be safely stored while realizing the economic benefits associated with CO2-EOR. Copyright ?? 2008. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.

  19. Occurrence and distribution of nutrients, suspended sediment, and pesticides in the Mobile River Basin, Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and Tennessee, 1999-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPherson, Ann K.; Moreland, Richard S.; Atkins, J. Brian

    2003-01-01

    The Mobile River Basin is one of more than 50 river basins and aquifer systems being investigated as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water- Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. This basin is the sixth largest river basin in the United States and the fourth largest in terms of streamflow. The Mobile River Basin encompasses parts of Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and Tennessee, and almost two-thirds of the 44,0000-square-mile basin is located in Alabama. The extensive water resources of the Mobile River Basin are influenced by an array of natural and cultural factors, which impart unique and variable qualities to the streams, rivers, and aquifers and provide abundant habitat to sustain the diverse aquatic life in the basin. From January 1999 to December 2001, a study was conducted of the occurrence and distribution of nutrients, suspended sediment, and pesticides in surface water of the Mobile River Basin. Nine sampling sites were selected on the basis of land use. The nine sites included two streams draining agricultural areas, two urban streams, and five large rivers with mixed land use. Surface-water samples were collected from one to four times each month to characterize the spatial and temporal variation in nutrient and pesticide concentrations. Nutrient and suspended-sediment concentrations were highest in watersheds dominated by urban or agricultural land uses. Forty-two percent of the total phosphorus concentrations at all nine sites exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's recommended maximum concentration of 0.1 milligram per liter. Flow-weighted mean concentrations at the Mobile River Basin sites generally were in the lower to middle percentile ranges compared with data from other NAWQA studies across the Nation. However, flow-weighted mean concentrations of ammonia, total nitrogen, orthophosphate, and total phosphorus at Bogue Chitto Creek, an agricultural watershed, ranked in the upper 20th percentile of agricultural sites sampled

  20. Sediment-preserved diatom assemblages can distinguish a petroleum activity signal separately from the nutrient signal of the Mississippi River in coastal Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Parsons, M L; Turner, R E; Overton, E B

    2014-08-15

    We analyzed the preserved diatom assemblages in dated sediment cores collected from five locations in the Louisiana Bight to test if there was a signature of petroleum extraction activities (hopanes and barium) distinct from the well-documented effects of nutrient loading. The results of a multi-dimensional scaling analysis indicate that the diatom assemblage changes documented throughout the 40 year record could be explained by three variables: barium and hopanes concentrations, and Mississippi River nitrogen loading. The results of a canonical correspondence analysis demonstrated that these signals could be distinguished through correlations with specific diatom species. The abundance of Actinoptychus senarius, for example, was negatively correlated with barium and the Pseudo-nitzschia delicatissima complex was positively correlated with nitrogen loading. These results provide a "proof-of-concept" demonstration that diatom assemblages preserved in the sediments can be used to study the effects of petroleum extraction activities, and that these 'petroleum signals' may be distinguished from other significant influences such as nutrient loading.

  1. Sediment-preserved diatom assemblages can distinguish a petroleum activity signal separately from the nutrient signal of the Mississippi River in coastal Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Parsons, M L; Turner, R E; Overton, E B

    2014-08-15

    We analyzed the preserved diatom assemblages in dated sediment cores collected from five locations in the Louisiana Bight to test if there was a signature of petroleum extraction activities (hopanes and barium) distinct from the well-documented effects of nutrient loading. The results of a multi-dimensional scaling analysis indicate that the diatom assemblage changes documented throughout the 40 year record could be explained by three variables: barium and hopanes concentrations, and Mississippi River nitrogen loading. The results of a canonical correspondence analysis demonstrated that these signals could be distinguished through correlations with specific diatom species. The abundance of Actinoptychus senarius, for example, was negatively correlated with barium and the Pseudo-nitzschia delicatissima complex was positively correlated with nitrogen loading. These results provide a "proof-of-concept" demonstration that diatom assemblages preserved in the sediments can be used to study the effects of petroleum extraction activities, and that these 'petroleum signals' may be distinguished from other significant influences such as nutrient loading. PMID:24986735

  2. Sea level rise in Louisiana and Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, K.; Penland, S. )

    1989-09-01

    Data from two tide-gage networks in Louisiana and the northern Gulf of Mexico were analyzed to determine local and regional trends in relative sea level rise. The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) maintains a network of 83 tide-gage stations throughout coastal Louisiana. Of these, 20 have records for two lunar nodal cycles or more, and some date back to 1933. The authors used the USACE data set to determine the local and regional character of relative sea level rise in Louisiana. The National ocean Survey (NOS) maintains nine tide gage stations throughout the northern Gulf of Mexico in Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida. All of the records of these stations exceed two lunar nodal cycles, and some date back to 1908. The authors used the NOS data set to determine the character of relative sea level rise throughout the northern Gulf of Mexico. This investigation updates and extends the previous systematic regional tide gage analysis (which covered 1908-1983) to 1988.

  3. Sand transport in the lower Mississippi River does not yield to dams: Applications for building deltaic land in Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittrouer, J. A.; Viparelli, E.

    2013-12-01

    The Mississippi Delta is presently undergoing a catastrophic drowning, whereby 5000 km2 of low-lying wetlands have converted to open water. This land loss is primarily the result of: a) relative sea-level rise, occurring due to the combined effect of rapid subsidence associated with subsurface fluids extraction and eustatic rise; b) leveeing and damming of the river and its tributaries, which restricts sediment delivery to and dispersal within the delta; and c) severe excavation of the delta for navigation channels. It has been argued that continued net land loss of the Mississippi Delta is inevitable due to declining measured total (sand and mud) suspended sediment loads over the past 6 decades. However, recent research has documented that the key to delta growth is deposition of sand, which accounts for ~50-70% of modern and ancient (up to 9 m.a.) Mississippi Delta deposits, but comprises only ~20% of the sampled portion of the total load. Here we present new analysis of existing data to show that sand transport has not diminished since dam construction. Furthermore, we produce a numerical model based on the mass balance of bed material loads over the lower 1600 km of the Mississippi River to show that mining of sand from the channel bed continues to replenish downstream sand loads. For example, our model results indicate that it requires approximately 240 years for a reduced sand load to reach the delta apex. Furthermore, our calculations indicate that sand load at the delta apex is reduced by a noticeable amount (17%) only after about 600 years. We also show how channel bed elevations are predicted to change over the lower 1600 km of the river channel due to channel mining. Channel-bed degradation is greatest at the upstream end of the study reach and decreases downstream. After 300 years the wave of significant degradation has just passed ~800 km downstream, or roughly half of our model domain. These results are in contrast to the measurements which concern

  4. Forecasting landscape effects of Mississippi River diversions on elevation and accretion in Louisiana deltaic wetlands under future environmental uncertainty scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongqing; Steyer, Gregory D.; Couvillion, Brady R.; Rybczyk, John M.; Beck, Holly J.; Sleavin, William J.; Meselhe, Ehab A.; Allison, Mead A.; Boustany, Ronald G.; Fischenich, Craig J.; Rivera-Monroy, Victor H.

    2014-02-01

    Large sediment diversions are proposed and expected to build new wetlands to alleviate the extensive wetland loss (5000 km2) affecting coastal Louisiana during the last 78 years. Current assessment and prediction of the impacts of sediment diversions have focused on the capture and dispersal of both water and sediment on the adjacent river side and the immediate outfall marsh area. However, little is known about the effects of sediment diversions on existing wetland surface elevation and vertical accretion dynamics in the receiving basin at the landscape scale. In this study, we used a spatial wetland surface elevation model developed in support of Louisiana's 2012 Coastal Master Plan to examine such landscape-scale effects of sediment diversions. Multiple sediment diversion projects were incorporated in the model to simulate surface elevation and vertical accretion for the next 50 years (2010-2060) under two environmental (moderate and less optimistic) scenarios. Specifically, we examined landscape-scale surface elevation and vertical accretion trends under diversions with different geographical locations, diverted discharge rates, and geomorphic characteristics of the receiving basin. Model results indicate that small diversions (<283 m3 s-1) tend to have limited effects of reducing landscape-scale elevation loss (<3%) compared to a future without action (FWOA) condition. Large sediment diversions (>1500 m3 s-1) are required to achieve landscape-level benefits to promote surface elevation via vertical accretion to keep pace with rising sea level.

  5. Forecasting landscape effects of Mississippi River diversions on elevation and accretion in Louisiana deltaic wetlands under future environmental uncertainty scenarios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Hongqing; Steyer, Gregory D.; Couvillion, Brady R.; John M. Rybczyk,; Beck, Holly J.; William J. Sleavin,; Ehab A. Meselhe,; Mead A. Allison,; Ronald G. Boustany,; Craig J. Fischenich,; Victor H. Rivera-Monroy,

    2014-01-01

    Large sediment diversions are proposed and expected to build new wetlands to alleviate the extensive wetland loss (5,000 km2) affecting coastal Louisiana during the last 78 years. Current assessment and prediction of the impacts of sediment diversions have focused on the capture and dispersal of both water and sediment on the adjacent river side and the immediate outfall marsh area. However, little is known about the effects of sediment diversions on existing wetland surface elevation and vertical accretion dynamics in the receiving basin at the landscape scale. In this study, we used a spatial wetland surface elevation model developed in support of Louisiana's 2012 Coastal Master Plan to examine such landscape-scale effects of sediment diversions. Multiple sediment diversion projects were incorporated in the model to simulate surface elevation and vertical accretion for the next 50 years (2010-2060) under two environmental (moderate and less optimistic) scenarios. Specifically, we examined landscape-scale surface elevation and vertical accretion trends under diversions with different geographical locations, diverted discharge rates, and geomorphic characteristics of the receiving basin. Model results indicate that small diversions (< 283 m3 s-1) tend to have limited effects of reducing landscape-scale elevation loss (< 3%) compared to a future without action (FWOA) condition. Large sediment diversions (> 1,500 m3 s-1) are required to achieve landscape-level benefits to promote surface elevation via vertical accretion to keep pace with rising sea level.

  6. Concentrations of selected organochlorine compounds in fish tissue in the Mississippi Embayment Study Unit : Arkansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, and Tennessee, 1995-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Femmer, Suzanne R.; Coupe, Richard H.; Justus, B.G.; Kleiss, Barbara A.

    2004-01-01

    Whole fish were collected at 52 sites during 1995-99 to evaluate the occurrence and distribution of selected organochlorine compounds in the Mississippi Embayment Study Unit. Samples were collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment Program. From 5 to 8 fish were collected at each site; the fish were composited, and an aliquot of the tissue was analyzed for 28 organo-chlorine compounds, which included pesticides, pesticide degradates, and polychlorinated biphenyls. The use of these organochlorine compounds has been discontinued or severely restricted within the United States, but the continued detection of these compounds or their degradates in the air, water, soil, and biota in national surveys, coupled with known environmental problems associated with these compounds (such as a long half-life and the propensity to accumulate in living tissue), is cause for continued interest in their environmental fate. At least one organochlorine compound was detected in every fish-tissue sample, and as many as 15 different compounds were detected in some. The most frequently detected com-pounds were the degradates of p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichlo-roethane (p,p'-DDT); p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) was detected in every sample above the method reporting limit, and p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (p,p'-DDD), was detected in 94 percent of the samples. Polychlorinated biphenyl compounds and dieldrin were detected in 83 and 78 percent of fish-tissue samples, respectively. Because these were whole fish samples, the results are not directly comparable to human health standards, which are based on fish fillets. Comparison of these results, however, to the guidelines for the protection of fish-eating wildlife indicates that concentrations of the p,p'-DDT degradates and toxaphene continue to be of environmental concern.

  7. Areal extent of freshwater from an experimental release of Mississippi River Water into Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, May 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCallum, Brian E.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of the release of freshwater from the Mississippi river into the Lake Pontchartrain was evaluated. The study determined the delineation of the areal extent of the freshwater plume in the lake, intensively sampled lake and river water and bed sediment to determine the effects on water quality in the lake, and performed a dye study to determine the mixing characteristics of the lake. Water temperature and specific conductance data were used to differentiate between zones of freshwater, mixing, and saltwater. The direction of the freshwater plume seemed to be affected by the wind direction. It was observed that the general direction of the plume was limited to the southwestern part of Lake Pontchartrain.

  8. Vegetation cover and relationships of habitat-type with elevation on the Mississippi-Alabama Barrier Islands in the initial six years after Hurricane Katrina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funderburk, W.; Carter, G. A.; Anderson, C. P.; Jeter, G. W., Jr.; Otvos, E. G.; Lucas, K. L.; Hopper, N. L.

    2015-12-01

    Quantifying change in vegetation and geomorphic features which occur during and after storm impact is necessary toward understanding barrier island habitat resiliency under continued climate warming and sea level rise. In August, 2005, the Mississippi-Alabama barrier islands, including, from west-to-east, Cat, West Ship, East Ship, Horn, Petit Bois and Dauphin islands, were completely inundated by the tidal surge of Hurricane Katrina. Overwash, scouring, burial under sand, and mechanical damage combined with saltwater flooding and post-storm drought resulted in immediate and long-term vegetation loss. Remotely-sensed data acquired before (2004-2005) and after (2005-2011) Katrina were compared via image classification to determine immediate storm impacts and assess natural re-growth of land area and vegetation. By 2008, merely three years after the storm, total land area of Cat, West Ship, East Ship, Horn, Petit Bois and West Dauphin had recovered to 92, 90, 33, 99, 93 and 91 percent, and total vegetated land area to 85, 101, 85, 94, 83 and 102 percent of pre-Katrina values, respectively. Habitat-type maps developed from field survey, SPOT-5 and radar data were compared with LIDAR-derived elevation models to assess 2010 habitat-type distribution with respect to ground elevation. Although median MSL elevations associated with habitat classes ranged only from 0.5 m to 1.4 m, habitat-type changed distinctively with decimeter-scale changes in elevation. Low marsh, high marsh, estuarine shrubland, slash pine woodland, beach dune, bare sand and beach dune herbland were associated with median elevations of 0.5, 0.9, 1.0, 1.1, 1.2, 1.3 and 1.4 m ± 0.1 m, respectively. The anticipated increases in sea level and tropical storm energy under a continually warming climate will likely inhibit the reformation of higher-elevation habitat-types, such as shrublands and woodlands, in the 21st century.

  9. Organochlorine compounds and trace elements in fish tissue and streambed sediment in the Mobile River Basin, Alabama, Mississippi, and Georgia, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zappia, Humbert

    2002-01-01

    During the summer of 1998, as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program, a survey was conducted to determine which organochlorine compounds and trace elements occur in fish tissues and streambed sediments in the Mobile River Basin, which includes parts of Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia, and Tennessee. The data collected were compared to guidelines related to wildlife, land use, and to 1991 and 1994 National Water-Quality Assessment Program Study-Unit data.Twenty-one sites were sampled in subbasins of the Mobile River Basin. The subbasins ranged in size from about 9 to 22,000 square miles and were dominated by either a single land use or a combination of land uses. The major land-use categories were urban, agriculture, and forest.Organochlorine compounds were widespread spatially in the Mobile River Basin. At least one organochlorine compound was reported at the majority of sampling sites (84 percent) and in a majority of whole-fish (80 percent) and streambed-sediment (52 percent) samples. Multiple organochlorine compounds were reported at 75 percent of the sites where fish tissues were collected and were reported at many of the streambed-sediment sampling sites (45 percent). The majority of concentrations reported, however, were less than 5 micrograms per kilogram in fish-tissue samples and less than 1 microgram per kilogram in streambed-sediment samples.The majority of trace elements analyzed in fish-liver tissue (86 percent) and streambed-sediment (98 percent) samples were reported during this study. Multiple trace elements were reported in all samples and at all sites.Based on comparisons of concentrations of organochlorine compounds and trace elements in fish-tissue and streambed-sediment samples in relation to National Academy of Science and National Academy of Engineering and Canadian tissue guidelines, probable-effects concentrations, and mean probable-effects concentration quotients for streambed sediment, the potential exists for adverse effects

  10. Quality of water in domestic wells in the Chicot and Chicot equivalent aquifer systems, southern Louisiana and southwestern Mississippi, 2000-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tollett, Roland W.; Fendick, Robert B.; Simmons, Lane B.

    2003-01-01

    In 2000-2001, water-quality data were collected from 60 randomly selected domestic wells in the Acadian-Pontchartrain Study Unit, as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The data were collected from wells screened in shallow sands (less than 350 feet below land surface) in two major aquifer systems--the Chicot aquifer system in southwestern Louisiana and the Chicot equivalent aquifer system in southeastern Louisiana and southwestern Mississippi. The Chicot equivalent aquifer system is part of the Southern Hills regional aquifer system, and both the Chicot aquifer system and the Southern Hills regional aquifer systems are designated as sole-source aquifers by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). The well depths ranged from 40 to 340 feet below land surface with a median depth of 120 feet. The ground-water-quality data included 5 physiochemical properties, dissolved solids, 9 major inorganic ions, 24 trace elements, 6 nutrients, dissolved organic carbon, 109 pesticides and degradation products, and 85 volatile organic compounds (VOC's); and a subset of the wells were sampled for radon, chlorofluorocarbons, and stable isotopes. Water from 35 of the 60 domestic wells sampled had pH values less than the USEPA Seconday Maximum Contaminant Level (SMCL) range of 6.5 to 8.5 standard units. Specific conductance ranged from 17 to 1,420 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius. Dissolved-solids concentrations in water from two wells exceeded the SMCL of 500 mg/L (milligrams per liter); the maximum concentration was 858 mg/L. Sodium and calcium were the dominant cations, and bicarbonate and chloride were the dominant anions. One chloride concentration (264 mg/L) exceeded the SMCL of 250 mg/L. One arsenic concentration (55.3 micrograms per liter) exceeded the USEPA Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 10 micrograms per liter. Iron concentrations in water from 22 wells exceeded the SMCL of 300 micrograms per liter; the maximum concentration

  11. Effects of hydrologic modifications on salinity and formation of hypoxia in the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet and adjacent waterways, southeastern Louisiana, 2008 to 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, Christopher M.; Mize, Scott V.

    2014-01-01

    The Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet (MRGO) was constructed between 1958 and 1968 to provide a safer and shorter route between the Gulf of Mexico and the Port of New Orleans for ocean-going vessels. In 2006, the U.S. Congress directed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to develop and implement a plan to deauthorize a portion of the MRGO ship channel from its confluence with the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway to the Gulf of Mexico. In 2009, in accordance with plans submitted to Congress, the USACE built a rock barrier across the MRGO near Hopedale, Louisiana. Following Hurricane Katrina, Congress also authorized the USACE to implement the Hurricane Storm Damage Risk Reduction System (HSDRRS) by building structures in the MRGO and adjacent surface waters, to reduce vulnerability of this area to storm surge. The HSDRRS includes the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway-Lake Borgne Surge Barrier and Gate Complex near mile 58 of the deauthorized portion of the MRGO and the Seabrook Gate Complex on the Inner Harbor Navigation Canal (IHNC). By blocking or limiting tidal exchange in the MRGO, these barriers could affect water quality in the MRGO and nearby waters including Lake Pontchartrain, the IHNC, and Lake Borgne. In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the USACE, began a study to document the effects of the construction activities on salinity and dissolved oxygen in these surface waters. Data were collected from August 2008 through October 2012. Completion of the rock barrier in the vicinity of mile 35 in July 2009 reduced hydrologic circulation and separated the MRGO into two distinct salinity regimes, with substantially fresher conditions prevailing upstream from the rock barrier. The rock barrier also contributed to a zone of hypoxia (dissolved oxygen less than 2 milligrams per liter) that formed along the channel bottom during the warmer summer months in each year of this monitoring; the zone was much more developed downstream from the rock barrier. The most

  12. Chapter 2. Assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources--Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Cotton Valley group, Jurassic Smackover interior salt basins total petroleum system, in the East Texas basin and Louisiana-Mississippi salt basins provinces.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyman, T.S.; Condon, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    The Jurassic Smackover Interior Salt Basins Total Petroleum System is defined for this assessment to include (1) Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation carbonates and calcareous shales and (2) Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous Cotton Valley Group organic-rich shales. The Jurassic Smackover Interior Salt Basins Total Petroleum System includes four conventional Cotton Valley assessment units: Cotton Valley Blanket Sandstone Gas (AU 50490201), Cotton Valley Massive Sandstone Gas (AU 50490202), Cotton Valley Updip Oil and Gas (AU 50490203), and Cotton Valley Hypothetical Updip Oil (AU 50490204). Together, these four assessment units are estimated to contain a mean undiscovered conventional resource of 29.81 million barrels of oil, 605.03 billion cubic feet of gas, and 19.00 million barrels of natural gas liquids. The Cotton Valley Group represents the first major influx of clastic sediment into the ancestral Gulf of Mexico. Major depocenters were located in south-central Mississippi, along the Louisiana-Mississippi border, and in northeast Texas. Reservoir properties and production characteristics were used to identify two Cotton Valley Group sandstone trends across northern Louisiana and east Texas: a high-permeability blanket-sandstone trend and a downdip, low-permeability massive-sandstone trend. Pressure gradients throughout most of both trends are normal, which is characteristic of conventional rather than continuous basin-center gas accumulations. Indications that accumulations in this trend are conventional rather than continuous include (1) gas-water contacts in at least seven fields across the blanket-sandstone trend, (2) relatively high reservoir permeabilities, and (3) high gas-production rates without fracture stimulation. Permeability is sufficiently low in the massive-sandstone trend that gas-water transition zones are vertically extensive and gas-water contacts are poorly defined. The interpreted presence of gas-water contacts within the Cotton Valley

  13. Expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas: Draft environmental impact statement. Volume 2, Chapters 6--13

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The proposed action entails the development of a plan for 250 million barrels of new crude oil storage capacity in two Gulf Coast salt domes to expand the Strategic Petroleum Reserve pursuant to Congressional directive (PL 101--383 and PL 101--512). Storage capacity would be developed by solution-mining the salt which would require about two billion barrels of surface water and would generate about two billion barrels of salt brine. The brine would be disposed of primarily by ocean discharge and alternatively by deep underground injection. Crude oil fill and distribution systems would require new pipelines and terminal facilities. This EIS assesses the impacts of construction and operation for the range of alternatives being considered and focuses on oil and brine spill risk and impacts of brine disposal, water and land use, groundwater contamination, hydrocarbon emissions, and involvement with wetlands and floodplains. This volume focuses on the environmental risks and public occupational health and safety, environmental impacts, regulatory requirements and mitigation methods, the relationship between local short-term use and long-term productivity, and the commitment of resources.

  14. Draft Environmental Impact Statement on the expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas. Volume 1, Chapters 1--5

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The proposed action entails the development of a plan for 250 million barrels of new crude oil storage capacity in two Gulf Coast salt domes to expand the Strategic Petroleum Reserve pursuant to Congressional directive (PL 101--383 and PL 101--512). Storage capacity would be developed by solution-mining the salt which would require about two billion barrels of surface water and would generate about two billion barrels of salt brine. The brine would be disposed of primarily by ocean discharge and alternatively by deep underground injection. Crude oil fill and distribution systems would require new pipelines and terminal facilities. This EIS assesses the impacts of construction and operation for the range of alternatives being considered and focuses on oil and brine spill risk and impacts of brine disposal, water and land use, groundwater contamination, hydrocarbon emissions, and involvement with wetlands and floodplains.

  15. High School Co-Teachers' Definitions and Perceptions of Successful Co-Teaching: A Study in Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Isaac D.

    2011-01-01

    With respect to co-teaching, there is a lack of empirical research at the high school level. Furthermore, few researchers have considered asking high school co-teachers to share their beliefs and perceptions about what makes co-teaching a successful model. To fulfill both the needs of students who are educated in co-taught classrooms and the lofty…

  16. Modern-day tectonic subsidence in coastal Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokka, Roy K.

    2006-04-01

    Subsidence is leading to the slow inundation of communities and wetlands of Louisiana, Mississippi, Texas, and Alabama (United States) by the Gulf of Mexico. The prevailing paradigm considers subsidence to be the result of young sediment compaction and/or consolidation and human activities. This paper describes the results of a test of this theory based on an examination of historic motions of benchmark in the Michoud area of Orleans Parish, Louisiana. This methodology allowed for an assessment of vertical change at different levels over time relative to a precise vertical datum (North American Vertical Datum of 1988, NAVD88). Data do not support the current theory on the origins of subsidence; they demonstrate that tectonic causes dominate in the study area. During 1969 1971 and 1971 1977, tectonism was responsible for -16.9 mm/yr and -7.1 mm/yr of subsidence, respectively. These contributions account for 73% and 50% of the total subsidence during these intervals. The change in deep subsidence is attributed to renewed motion along a large normal fault (Michoud fault). Over the same time intervals, intermediate depth subsidence due to compaction of Pleistocene to middle Miocene strata was constant (-4.6 mm/yr). Similarly, subsidence due to shallow processes, i.e., sediment compaction and groundwater offtake, was -1.5 mm/yr and -2.5 mm/yr. Subsidence associated with petroleum extraction was not a factor due to the lack of local production.

  17. Alabama's Appalachian overthrust amid exploratory drilling resurgence

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.D. ); Epsman, M.L.

    1991-06-24

    Oil and gas exploration has been carried out sporadically in the Appalachian overthrust region of Alabama for years, but recently interest in the play has had a major resurgence. The Appalachian overthrust region of Alabama is best exposed in the valley and ridge physiographic province in the northeast part of the state. Resistant ridges of sandstone and chert and valleys of shales and carbonate have been thrust toward the northwest. Seismic data show that this structural style continues under the Cretaceous overlap. The surface and subsurface expression of the Alabama overthrust extends for more than 4,000 sq miles. Oil and gas have been produced for many years from Cambro-Ordovician, Ordovician, Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian rocks in the nearby Black Warrior basin in Alabama and Mississippi and the Cumberland plateau in Tennessee. The same zones are also potential producing horizons in the Alabama overthrust region.

  18. A new tool to assess groundwater resources in the Mississippi embayment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Brian R.; Freiwald, David A.

    2011-01-01

    What is the Mississippi Embayment? The Mississippi embayment study area encompasses approximately 78,000 square miles in eight States and includes large parts of Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Tennessee, and smaller areas of Alabama, Illinois, Kentucky, and Missouri (fig. 1). The Mississippi embayment is essentially a basin that slopes toward the Gulf of Mexico and is filled with sediments of alternating sand, silt, and clay layers. There are two principal aquifers in the embayment-the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer (alluvial aquifer) and the middle Claiborne aquifer (fig. 1). The shallow alluvial aquifer is the primary source of groundwater for irrigation in the largely agricultural region, while the deeper middle Claiborne aquifer is a primary source of drinking water for many of the 5.2 million people living in the embayment. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting large-scale multidisciplinary regional studies of groundwater availability for the Nation. Studies comprise individual assessments of regional groundwater-flow systems that encompass varied terrains and document a comprehensive regional and national perspective of groundwater resources. Collectively, these studies are the foundation for the national assessment of groundwater availability and are conducted in cooperation with other Federal, State, local governments, and the private sector. Numerical groundwater-flow models are used in these studies to document effects of human activities and climate variability on groundwater levels, changes in aquifer storage, and flow between groundwater and surface-water bodies. As part of the Mississippi Embayment Regional Aquifer Study (MERAS), a numerical model was constructed of 13 layers over 78,000 square miles representing multiple aquifers and confining units for the period of 1870 to 2007. The model is a tool that was used to assess and better understand groundwater resources.

  19. Phytoplankton Communities in Louisiana coastal waters and the continental shelf

    EPA Science Inventory

    Louisiana coastal waters and the adjacent continental shelf receive large freshwater and nutrient inputs from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers, creating favorable conditions for increased phytoplankton productivity. To examine inshore-offshore patterns in phytoplankton comm...

  20. Mississippi Test Facility research projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehurst, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    Research capabilities of Louisiana State University are reported for sustaining a program which complements the Mississippi Test Facility. Projects reported during this period are discussed and include the development of a spectral analyzer, and investigations of plant physiology. Papers published during this period are also listed.

  1. Backwater at bridges and densely wooded flood plains, Tallahala Creek at Waldrup, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colson, B.E.; Ming, C.O.; Arcement, George J.

    1978-01-01

    Floodflow data that will provide a base for evaluating digital models relating to open-channel flow were obtained at 22 sites on streams in Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi. Thirty-five floods were measured. Analysis of the data indicated that backwater and discharges computed by standard indirect methods currently in use would be inaccurate where densely vegetated flood plains are crossed by highway embankments and single-opening bridges. This atlas presents flood information at the site on Tallahala Creek at Waldrup, Miss. Water depths, velocities, and discharges through bridge openings on Tallahala Creek at Waldrup, Miss., for floods of April 14, 1969, February 21, 1971, and April 13, 1974, were measured together with peak water surface elevations along embankments and along cross sections. Manning 's roughness coefficient values in different parts of the flood plain are shown on maps, and flood-frequency relations are shown on graphs. (Woodard-USGS)

  2. Backwater at bridges and densely wooded flood plains, west fork Amite River near Liberty, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colson, B.E.; Ming, C.O.; Arcement, George J.

    1979-01-01

    Floodflow data that will provide a base for evaluating digital models relating to open-channel flow were obtained at 22 sites on streams in Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi. Thirty-five floods were measured. Analysis of the data indicated methods currently in use would be inaccurate where densely vegetated flood plains are crossed by highway embankments and single-opening bridges. This atlas presents flood information at the site on West Fork Amite River near Liberty, MS. Water depths , velocities, and discharges through bridge openings on West Fork Amite River near Liberty, MS for floods of December 6, 1971 , and March 25, 1973, are shown, together with peak water-surface elevations along embankments and along cross sections. Manning 's roughness coefficient values in different parts of the flood plain are shown on maps, and flood-frequency relations are shown on a graph. (USGS).

  3. Backwater at bridges and densely wooded flood plains, Thompson Creek near Clara, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colson, B.E.; Ming, C.O.; Arcement, George J.

    1979-01-01

    Floodflow data that will provide a base for evaluating digital models relating to open-channel flow were obtained at 22 sites on streams in Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi. Thirty-five floods were measured. Analysis of the data indicated methods currently in use would be inaccurate where densely vegetated flood plains are crossed by highway embankments and single-opening bridges. This atlas presents flood information at the site on Thompson Creek near Clara, MS: Water depths, velocities, and discharges through bridge openings on Thompson Creek near Clara, MS, for flood of March 3, 1971, are shown, together with peak water-surface elevations along embankments and along cross sections. Manning 's roughness coefficient values in different parts of the flood plain are shown on maps, and flood-frequency relations are shown on a graph. (USGS).

  4. Backwater at bridges and densely wooded flood plains, Yockanookany River near Thomastown, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colson, B.E.; Ming, C.O.; Arcement, George J.

    1979-01-01

    Floodflow data that will provide a base for evaluating digital models relating to open-channel flow were obtained at 22 sites on streams in Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi. Thirty-five floods were measured. Analysis of the data indicated methods currently in use would be inaccurate where densely vegetated flood plains are crossed by highway embankments and single-opening bridges. This atlas presents flood information at the site on Yockanookany River near Thomastown, Miss. Water depths, velocities, and discharges through bridge openings on Yockanookany River near Thomastown, Miss., for floods of April 12, 1969, January 2, 1970, and March 15, 1975, are shown, together with peak water-surface elevations along embankments and along cross sections. Manning 's roughness coefficient values in different parts of the flood plain are shown on maps, and flood-frequency relations are shown on a graph. (Kosco-USGS)

  5. Chapter 7. The GIS project for the geologic assessment of undiscovered oil and gas in the Cotton Valley group and Travis Peak and Hosston formations, East Texas basin and Louisiana-Mississippi salt basins provinces.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biewick, Laura R.H.

    2006-01-01

    A geographic information system (GIS) focusing on the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Cotton Valley Group and the Lower Cretaceous Travis Peak and Hosston Formations in the northern Gulf Coast region was developed as a visual-analysis tool for the U.S. Geological Survey's 2002 assessment of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil and natural gas resources in the East Texas Basin and Louisiana-Mississippi Salt Basins Provinces. The Central Energy Resources Team of the U.S. Geological Survey has also developed an Internet Map Service to deliver the GIS data to the public. This mapping tool utilizes information from a database about the oil and natural gas endowment of the United States-including physical locations of geologic and geographic data-and converts the data into visual layers. Portrayal and analysis of geologic features on an interactive map provide an excellent tool for understanding domestic oil and gas resources for strategic planning, formulating economic and energy policies, evaluating lands under the purview of the Federal Government, and developing sound environmental policies. Assessment results can be viewed and analyzed or downloaded from the internet web site, http://energy.cr.usgs.gov/oilgas/noga/ .

  6. Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of undiscovered oil and gas, Cotton Valley group and Travis Peak-Hosston formations, East Texas basin and Louisiana-Mississippi salt basins provinces of the northern Gulf Coast region. Chapters 1-7.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Oil and Gas Assessment is to develop geologically based hypotheses regarding the potential for additions to oil and gas reserves in priority areas of the United States. The USGS recently completed an assessment of undiscovered oil and gas potential of the Cotton Valley Group and Travis Peak and Hosston Formations in the East Texas Basin and Louisiana-Mississippi Salt Basins Provinces in the Gulf Coast Region (USGS Provinces 5048 and 5049). The Cotton Valley Group and Travis Peak and Hosston Formations are important because of their potential for natural gas resources. This assessment is based on geologic principles and uses the total petroleum system concept. The geologic elements of a total petroleum system include hydrocarbon source rocks (source rock maturation, hydrocarbon generation and migration), reservoir rocks (sequence stratigraphy and petrophysical properties), and hydrocarbon traps (trap formation and timing). The USGS used this geologic framework to define one total petroleum system and eight assessment units. Seven assessment units were quantitatively assessed for undiscovered oil and gas resources.

  7. 77 FR 58903 - Mississippi Disaster Number MS-00059

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-24

    ... of Mississippi (FEMA-4081-DR), dated 09/ 01/2012. Incident: Hurricane Isaac. Incident Period: 08/26..., Jones, Lauderdale, Lawrence, Madison, Newton, Perry, Rankin, Simpson, Wayne, Yazoo. Alabama:...

  8. A review of initial investigations to utilize ERTS-1 data in determining the availability and distribution of living marine resources. [harvest and management of fisheries resources in Mississippi Sound and Gulf waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, W. H.; Kemmerer, A. J.; Atwell, B. H.; Maughan, P. M.

    1974-01-01

    The National Marine Fisheries Service has been studying the application of aerospace remote sensing to fisheries management and utilization for many years. The 15-month ERTS study began in July 1972 to: (1) determine the reliability of satellite and high altitude sensors to provide oceanographic parameters in coastal waters; (2) demonstrate the use of remotely-sensed oceanographic information to predict the distribution and abundance of adult menhaden; and (3) demonstrate the potential use of satellites for acquiring information for improving the harvest and management of fisheries resources. The study focused on a coastal area in the north-central portion of the Gulf of Mexico, including parts of Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana. The test area used in the final analysis was the Mississippi Sound and the area outside the barrier islands to approximately the 18-meter (10-fathom) curve.

  9. Desegregation and the Rights of Educators in Louisiana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC. Commission on Professional Rights and Responsibilities.

    This legal handbook, developed at the recommendation of the 1970 National Education Association (NEA) fact-finding teams in Louisiana and Mississippi, describes the rights of teachers, with specific focus on Louisiana. The introductory section lists 10 cautionary rules to assist a teacher if his employment status on security is threatened by…

  10. 76 FR 1144 - CenterPoint Energy-Mississippi River Transmission Corporation; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-07

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission CenterPoint Energy-Mississippi River Transmission Corporation; Notice of Application December 29, 2010. Take notice that on December 15, 2010, CenterPoint Energy- Mississippi River... Energy Mississippi River Transmission Corporation, P.O. Box 21734, Shreveport, Louisiana 71151,...

  11. Desegregation and the Rights of Educators in Mississippi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC. Commission on Professional Rights and Responsibilities.

    This legal handbook, developed at the recommendation of the 1970 National Education Association (NEA) fact-finding teams in Louisiana and Mississippi, describes the rights of teachers, with specific focus on Mississippi. The introductory section lists 10 cautionary rules to assist a teacher if his employment status or security is treatened by…

  12. The role of deep processes in late 20th century subsidence of New Orleans and coastal areas of southern Louisiana and Mississippi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokka, Roy K.

    2011-06-01

    Geodetic leveling observations from Biloxi, MS, to New Orleans, LA, and water level gauge measurements in the New Orleans-Lake Pontchartrain area were analyzed to infer late 20th century vertical motions. These data were used to test the validity of previous subsidence rate measurements and the models that predict the location and causes of subsidence. Water gauges attached to bridge foundations and benchmarks affixed to deep rods that penetrate Holocene strata subsided as much as 0.8 m locally between 1955 and 1995. The observed deep-seated subsidence far exceeds model predictions and demonstrates that shallow processes such as compaction and consolidation of Holocene sediments are inadequate by themselves to explain late 20th century subsidence. Deep-seated subsidence occurring east and north of the normal faults marking the Gulf of Mexico basin margin can be explained by local groundwater withdrawal, and regional tectonic loading of the lithosphere by the modern Mississippi River delta (MRD). Sharp changes in subsidence coincide with strands of the basin margin normal faults. Displacements are consistent with activity and show motions consonant with fault creep. Deep subsidence of the region to the south, including New Orleans, can be explained by a combination of groundwater withdrawal from shallow upper Pleistocene aquifers, the aforementioned lithospheric loading, and perhaps, nongroundwater-related faulting. Subsidence due to groundwater extraction from aquifers ˜160 to 200 m deep dominated urbanized areas and is likely responsible for helping to lower local flood protection structures and bridges by as much as ˜0.8 m.

  13. Role of microbial Fe(III) reduction and solution chemistry in aggregation and settling of suspended particles in the Mississippi River Delta plain, Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaisi, D.P.; Ji, S.; Dong, H.; Blake, R.E.; Eberl, D.D.; Kim, J.

    2008-01-01

    River-dominated delta areas are primary sites of active biogeochemical cycling, with productivity enhanced by terrestrial inputs of nutrients. Particle aggregation in these areas primarily controls the deposition of suspended particles, yet factors that control particle aggregation and resulting sedimentation in these environments are poorly understood. This study was designed to investigate the role of microbial Fe(III) reduction and solution chemistry in aggregation of suspended particles in the Mississippi Delta. Three representative sites along the salinity gradient were selected and sediments were collected from the sediment-water interface. Based on quantitative mineralogical analyses 88-89 wt.% of all minerals in the sediments are clays, mainly smectite and illite. Consumption of SO421 and the formation of H2S and pyrite during microbial Fe(III) reduction of the non-sterile sediments by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 in artificial pore water (APW) media suggest simultaneous sulfate and Fe(III) reduction activity. The pHPZNPC of the sediments was ??? 3.5 and their zeta potentials at the sediment-water interface pH (6.9-7.3) varied from -35 to -45 mV, suggesting that both edges and faces of clay particles have negative surface charge. Therefore, high concentrations of cations in pore water are expected to be a predominant factor in particle aggregation consistent with the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. Experiments on aggregation of different types of sediments in the same APW composition revealed that the sediment with low zeta potential had a high rate of aggregation. Similarly, addition of external Fe(II) (i.e. not derived from sediments) was normally found to enhance particle aggregation and deposition in all sediments, probably resulting from a decrease in surface potential of particles due to specific Fe(II) sorption. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) images showed predominant face-to-face clay aggregation in native

  14. Mississippi Delta

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  The Mississippi Delta     Left: True Color Image ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) images of the Mississippi delta were acquired on April 26, 2000. The true color image displays the ...

  15. Graptemys pulchra Baur 1893: Alabama Map Turtle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Godwin, James C.; McCoy, C.J.; Rhodin, A. G. J.; Pritchard, P. C. H.; van Dijk, P. P.; Saumure, R.A.; Buhlmann, K.A.; Iverson, J.B.; Mittermeier, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    The Alabama Map Turtle, Graptemys pulchra (Family Emydidae), is a moderately large riverine species endemic to the Mobile Bay drainage system of Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi. Sexual size dimorphism is pronounced, with adult females (carapace length [CL] to 273 mm) attaining more than twice the size of adult males (CL to 117 mm). The species is an inhabitant of relatively large, swift creeks and rivers, often with wide sandbars. Stream sections open to the sun and with abundant basking sites in the form of logs and brush are preferred. Six to seven clutches of 4–7 eggs are laid each year on river sandbars. Although the species is locally abundant, populations are threatened by habitat destruction, declines in their prey base, commercial collection, and vandalism. It is listed as a Species of Special Concern in Alabama.

  16. Mississippi River

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Mississippi River Flooding during Spring 2001     ... the mighty river has flooded many times. The largest flood recorded in the lower valley occurred in 1927 and the largest in the upper Mississippi in 1993. In April 2001 another flooding event in the upper Mississippi was recorded by the Multi-angle Imaging ...

  17. Phytoplankton Community Structure, Biomass and Diversity on the Louisiana Continental Shelf

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phytoplankton communities on the Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) respond to nutrient loading from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya River Basin (MARB). Enhanced phytoplankton biomass is a source of organic matter contributing to the development of seasonal hypoxia. Samples were ...

  18. Water Use in Louisiana, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sargent, B. Pierre

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, approximately 8,500 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of water was withdrawn from groundwater and surface-water sources in Louisiana. Total groundwater withdrawals were about 1,600 Mgal/d, and total surfacewater withdrawals were about 7,000 Mgal/d. From 2005 to 2010, groundwater withdrawals in Louisiana increased by 1.8 percent, and surface-water withdrawals decreased by 19 percent. Total water withdrawals in Louisiana decreased by 17 percent from 2005 to 2010. Water withdrawal totals in Mgal/d in 2010 for various categories of use were as follows: public supply-750, industry-2,100, power generation-4,400, rural domestic-41, livestock-8.0, rice irrigation-690, general irrigation-240, and aquaculture-300. From 2005 to 2010, changes in withdrawals, in percent, for the categories of use were as follows: public supply increased by 3.7, industry decreased by 33, power generation decreased by 14, rural domestic decreased by 6.1, livestock was unchanged, rice irrigation decreased by 13, general irrigation increased by 17, and aquaculture increased by 12. Forty-one percent (about 650 Mgal/d) of all groundwater was withdrawn from the Chicot aquifer system, and 25 percent (about 390 Mgal/d) was withdrawn from the Mississippi River alluvial aquifer. Since 2005, withdrawals from the Chicot aquifer system decreased by 2.1 percent, and withdrawals from the Mississippi River alluvial aquifer increased by 2.7 percent. About 72 percent (5,000 Mgal/d) of all surface water withdrawn was from the Mississippi River mainstem. This value represents a 24 percent decrease in withdrawals from 2005 to 2010.

  19. Description and Status of the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, Richard J.; Christian, Hugh J.; Bailey, Jeffrey C.; Buechler, Dennis E.; Hall, John M.; McCaul, Eugene W.; Stano, Geoffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) is a network LMA detectors that detects and maps lightning using VHF radiation (TV Channel 5) in a region centered about Huntsville, Alabama that includes North Alabama, Central Tennessee and parts of Georgia and Mississippi. The North Alabama LMA has been in operation since late 2001, and has been providing real time data to regional National Weather Service (NSF) Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) since mid 2003 through the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) center. Data from this network (as well as other from other LMA systems) are now being used to create proxy Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) data sets for GOES-R risk reduction and algorithm development activities. In addition, since spring 2009 data are provided to the Storm Prediction Center in support of Hazardous Weather Testbed and GOES-R Proving Ground activities during the Spring Program. Description, status and plans will be discussed.

  20. 40 CFR 81.62 - Northeast Mississippi Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.62 Northeast Mississippi Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Alabama-Mississippi-Tennessee Interstate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the...

  1. 40 CFR 81.62 - Northeast Mississippi Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.62 Northeast Mississippi Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Alabama-Mississippi-Tennessee Interstate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the...

  2. 40 CFR 81.62 - Northeast Mississippi Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.62 Northeast Mississippi Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Alabama-Mississippi-Tennessee Interstate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the...

  3. 40 CFR 81.62 - Northeast Mississippi Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.62 Northeast Mississippi Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Alabama-Mississippi-Tennessee Interstate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the...

  4. High Prevalence of Food Insecurity and Hunger in Households in the Rural Lower Mississippi Delta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuff, Janice E.; Horton, Jacqueline A.; Bogle, Margaret L.; Connell, Carol; Ryan, Donna; Zaghloul, Sahar; Thornton, Alma; Simpson, Pippa; Gossett, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    Residents of the Lower Mississippi Delta of Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi are at risk for food insecurity since a high proportion of the population live in households with incomes below the poverty level and have reduced access to food and decreased availability of a variety of foods. However, the magnitude of the problem is unknown because…

  5. 77 FR 2287 - FFP Project 32, LLC and Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice Announcing Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission FFP Project 32, LLC and Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice..., in Tensas Parish, Louisiana, and Jefferson County Mississippi. The applications were filed by...

  6. Perceptions of Factors Influencing Healthful Food Consumption Behavior in the Lower Mississippi Delta: Focus Group Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Bernestine B.; Richardson, Valerie; Johnson, Glenda S.; Thornton, Alma; Johnson, Crystal; Yadrick, Kathleen; Ndirangu, Murugi; Goolsby, Susan; Watkins, Debra; Simpson, Pippa M.; Hyman, Edith; Stigger, Flavelia; Bogle, Margaret L.; Kramer, Tim R.; Strickland, Earline; McCabe-Sellers, Beverly

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To identify perceptions of Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD) residents regarding factors that influence a change in healthful food consumption behavior to assist in planning sustainable nutrition interventions in the LMD. Design: Nine focus groups were conducted with LMD residents in 9 counties in Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi. One…

  7. Guide to Louisiana's ground-water resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuart, C.G.; Knochenmus, D.D.; McGee, B.D.

    1994-01-01

    Ground water is one of the most valuable and abundant natural resources of Louisiana. Of the 4-.4 million people who live in the State, 61 percent use ground water as a source for drinking water. Most industrial and rural users and half of the irrigation users in the State rely on ground water. Quantity, however, is not the only aspect that makes ground water so valuable; quality also is important for its use. In most areas, little or no water treatment is required for drinking water and industrial purposes. Knowledge of Louisiana's ground-water resources is needed to ensure proper development and protection of this valuable resource. This report is designed to inform citizens about the availability and quality of ground water in Louisiana. It is not intended as a technical reference; rather, it is a guide to ground water and the significant role this resource plays in the state. Most of the ground water that is used in the State is withdrawn from 13 aquifers and aquifer systems: the Cockfield, Sparta, and Carrizo-Wilcox aquifersin northern Louisiana; Chicot aquifer system, Evangeline aquifer, Jasper aquifer system, and Catahoula aquifer in central and southwestern Louisiana; the Chicot equivalent, Evangeline equivalent, and Jasper equivalent aquifer systems in southeastern Louisiana; and the MississippiRiver alluvial, Red River alluvial, and upland terrace aquifers that are statewide. Ground water is affected by man's activities on the land surface, and the major ground-water concerns in Louisiana are: (1) contamination from surface disposal of hazardous waste, agricultural chemicals, and petroleum products; (2) contamination from surface wastes and saltwater through abandoned wells; (3) saltwater encroachment; and (4) local overdevelopment. Information about ground water in Louisiana is extensive and available to the public. Several State and Federal agencies provide published and unpublished material upon request.

  8. LOUISIANA ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING SYSTEM FOR HYPOXIA RELATED ISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An environmental assessment tool to evaluate the impacts of nonpoint source (NPS) pollutants discharged from Mississippi River basins into the Gulf of Mexico and to assess their effects on receiving water quality will be described. This system (Louisiana Environmental Modeling S...

  9. Topographic lidar survey of the Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana, February 6, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guy, Kristy K.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Bonisteel-Cormier, Jamie M.

    2014-01-01

    This Data Series Report contains lidar elevation data collected February 6, 2012, for Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana. Point cloud data in lidar data exchange format (LAS) and bare earth digital elevation models (DEMs) in ERDAS Imagine raster format (IMG) are available as downloadable files. The point cloud data—data points described in three dimensions—were processed to extract bare earth data; therefore, the point cloud data are organized into the following classes: 1– and 17–unclassified, 2–ground, 9–water, and 10–breakline proximity. Digital Aerial Solutions, LLC, (DAS) was contracted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to collect and process these data. The lidar data were acquired at a horizontal spacing (or nominal pulse spacing) of 0.5 meters (m) or less. The USGS conducted two ground surveys in small areas on the Chandeleur Islands on February 5, 2012. DAS calculated a root mean square error (RMSEz) of 0.034 m by comparing the USGS ground survey point data to triangulated irregular network (TIN) models built from the lidar elevation data. This lidar survey was conducted to document the topography and topographic change of the Chandeleur Islands. The survey supports detailed studies of Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama barrier islands that resolve annual and episodic changes in beaches, berms and dunes associated with processes driven by storms, sea-level rise, and even human restoration activities. These lidar data are available to Federal, State and local governments, emergency-response officials, resource managers, and the general public.

  10. 76 FR 31230 - Vessel Traffic Service Lower Mississippi River; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-31

    ...' W. vessels transiting Algiers Point Special Area. D Marlex Terminal 99.0 AHP 29 54.65' N; Downbound... published a final rule in the Federal Register on October 28, 2010 (75 FR 66309) establishing a mandatory... traffic management provisions of the Mississippi River, Louisiana--Regulated Navigation Area to the...

  11. Mississippi and Atchafalaya River Influence on Sediment Porewater Chemistry

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) receives 380 km3 of freshwater per year from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers. Sources and transport of nutrients and organic matter (OM) delivered to the LCS may result in spatial variation in sediment biogeochemistry important for un...

  12. Modeling flow and sediment transport dynamics in the lowermost Mississippi River, Louisiana, USA, with an upstream alluvial-bedrock transition and a downstream bedrock-alluvial transition: Implications for land building using engineered diversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viparelli, Enrica; Nittrouer, Jeffrey A.; Parker, Gary

    2015-03-01

    The lowermost Mississippi River, defined herein as the river segment downstream of the Old River Control Structure and hydrodynamically influenced by the Gulf of Mexico, extends for approximately 500 km. This segment includes a bedrock (or more precisely, mixed bedrock-alluvial) reach that is bounded by an upstream alluvial-bedrock transition and a downstream bedrock-alluvial transition. Here we present a one-dimensional mathematical formulation for the long-term evolution of lowland rivers that is able to reproduce the morphodynamics of both the alluvial-bedrock and the bedrock-alluvial transitions. Model results show that the magnitude of the alluvial equilibrium bed slope relative to the bedrock surface slope and the depth of bedrock surface relative to the water surface base level strongly influence the mobile bed equilibrium of low-sloping river channels. Using data from the lowermost Mississippi River, the model is zeroed and validated at field scale by comparing the numerical results with field measurements. The model is then applied to predict the influence on the stability of channel bed elevation in response to delta restoration projects. In particular, the response of the river bed to the implementation of two examples of land-building diversions to extract water and sediment from the main channel is studied. In this regard, our model results show that engineered land-building diversions along the lowermost Mississippi River are capable of producing equilibrated bed profiles with only modest shoaling or erosion, and therefore, such diversions are a sustainable strategy for mitigating land loss within the Mississippi River Delta.

  13. Assessment of Factors Contributing to Health Outcomes in the Eight States of the Mississippi Delta Region

    PubMed Central

    Jovaag, Amanda; Catlin, Bridget B.; Rodock, Matthew; Park, Hyojun

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this observational study was to examine the key contributors to health outcomes and to better understand the health disparities between Delta and non-Delta counties in 8 states in the Mississippi River Delta Region. We hypothesized that a unique set of contributors to health outcomes in the Delta counties could explain the disparities between Delta and non-Delta counties. Methods Data were from the 2014 County Health Rankings for counties in 8 states (Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, and Tennessee). We used the Delta Regional Authority definition to identify the 252 Delta counties and 468 non-Delta counties or county equivalents. Information on health factors (eg, health behaviors, clinical care) and outcomes (eg, mortality) were derived from 38 measures from the 2014 County Health Rankings. The contributions of health factors to health outcomes in Delta and non-Delta counties were examined using path analysis. Results We found similarities between Delta counties and non-Delta counties in the health factors (eg, tobacco use, diet and exercise) that significantly predicted the health outcomes of self-rated health and low birthweight. The most variation was seen in predictors of mortality; however, Delta counties shared 2 of the 3 significant predictors (ie, community safety and income) of mortality with non-Delta counties. On average across all measures, values in the Delta were 16% worse than in the non-Delta and 22% worse than in the rest of the United States. Conclusion The health status of Delta counties is poorer than that of non-Delta counties because the health factors that contribute to health outcomes in the entire region are worse in the Delta counties, not because of a unique set of health predictors. PMID:26940300

  14. Chiefs, Churches, and "Old Industries": Photographic Representations of Alabama-Coushatta and Coushatta Culture and Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Montigny, Stephanie May

    2008-01-01

    Ethnologists in the early twentieth century were the first to publish photographs of the Alabama-Coushatta people of Texas and the Coushatta (often written as "Koasati") of Louisiana. Since then, authors have shaped the photographic and textual representations according to their own notions of culture and identity. In this case, Mark Raymond…

  15. Energy Density, Nutrient Adequacy, and Cost per Serving Can Provide Insight into Food Choices in the Lower Mississippi Delta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connell, Carol L.; Zoellner, Jamie M.; Yadrick, M. Kathleen; Chekuri, Srinivasa C.; Crook, Lashaundrea B.; Bogle, Margaret L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare differences across food groups for food cost, energy, and nutrient profiles of 100 items from a cross-sectional survey of 225 stores in 18 counties across the Lower Mississippi Delta of Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi. Methods: Energy, nutrient, and cost profiles for food items were calculated by using Naturally Nutrient…

  16. Archive of digital Boomer and Chirp seismic reflection data collected during USGS Cruises 01RCE05 and 02RCE01 in the Lower Atchafalaya River, Mississippi River Delta, and offshore southeastern Louisiana, October 23-30, 2001, and August 18-19, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calderon, Karynna; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Kindinger, Jack G.; Flocks, James G.; Ferina, Nicholas F.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2004-01-01

    In October of 2001 and August of 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted geophysical surveys of the Lower Atchafalaya River, the Mississippi River Delta, Barataria Bay, and the Gulf of Mexico south of East Timbalier Island, Louisiana. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital marine seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, observers' logbooks, GIS information, and formal FGDC metadata. In addition, a filtered and gained GIF image of each seismic profile is provided. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and othes, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU). Examples of SU processing scripts and in-house (USGS) software for viewing SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are also provided. Processed profile images, trackline maps, navigation files, and formal metadata may be viewed with a web browser. Scanned handwritten logbooks and Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs may be viewed with Adobe Reader.

  17. Surviving the toxics in south Louisiana: A minority perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, B.

    1995-12-01

    The Louisiana industrial corridor along the Mississippi River is lined with 136 petro-chemical plants and serves oil refineries. This approximates nearly one plant or refinery for every half mile of the river. The air, ground, and water along this corridor are so full or carcinogens that it has been described as a massive human experiment. Poor blacks live in river towns near the brunt of this discharge. Total mortality rates and cancer mortality rates in counties along the Mississippi River are significantly higher than in the rest of the nation`s counties. Moreover, the areas of greatest toxic discharge. Findings of disproportionately high mortality rates along the Mississippi, especially in communities on the lower river where toxic discharge minority and poor communities along the Mississippi River chemical corridor.

  18. Mississippi River

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Spring Flooding on the Mississippi     ... to melt and the Wapsipinicon River was 52 centimeters above flood stage at De Witt, Iowa (between Clinton and Davenport). By mid-April ... slightly below the level reached in the record-setting flood of 1993. MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion ...

  19. View of Baton Rouge, Louisiana area seen from Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A view of the Baton Rouge, Louisiana area is seen in this Skylab 3 Earth Resources Package S190-B (five-inch earth terrain camera) photograph taken from the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. The large body of water in the upper right hand corner is Lake Pontchartrain. The Mississippi river flows through the center of the photo. Major thoroughfares and residential areas are clearly visible.

  20. South Louisiana remote-sensing environmental information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, J. P.; Schroeder, R. H.; Cartmill, R. H.

    1975-01-01

    Satellite gathered remote sensor data were used to update a basic environmental atlas of southern Louisiana to reflect recent dynamic geological changes, such as erosion by wave action along the coast and active delta building in the lower part of the Mississippi Basin. Standard pattern recognition programs were utilized to update LANDSAT pictures for three categories (generalized land use, ecological zones and vegetation) to obtain a simulated color photomap for LANDSAT frames for further rectification by a table lookup program.

  1. Alabama Education Quick Facts, 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This document is a quick look at general information about Alabama schools. The document contains 11 sections: (1) state statistics; (2) Alabama public schools; (3) Alabama board of education members; (4) financial data; (5) school size and enrollment; (6) transportation and school meals; (7) graduation requirements; (8) additional enrollment;…

  2. 33 CFR 165.812 - Security Zones; Lower Mississippi River, Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker 96.0, New Orleans...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Limited Access Areas Eighth Coast Guard District § 165.812 Security Zones; Lower Mississippi River... Mississippi River mile marker 96.0 in New Orleans, Louisiana. These moving security zones encompass all waters... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Security Zones; Lower...

  3. 33 CFR 165.812 - Security Zones; Lower Mississippi River, Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker 96.0, New Orleans...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Limited Access Areas Eighth Coast Guard District § 165.812 Security Zones; Lower Mississippi River... Mississippi River mile marker 96.0 in New Orleans, Louisiana. These moving security zones encompass all waters... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zones; Lower...

  4. 75 FR 23227 - Trade Adjustment Assistance for Farmers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-03

    ... Alliance on behalf of shrimpers in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South..., shrimpers who land and market shrimp in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Texas, will be eligible to apply to the Farm Service Agency for technical...

  5. 75 FR 42375 - Trade Adjustment Assistance for Farmers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-21

    ... Southern Shrimp Alliance on behalf of shrimp producers in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi... determination is affirmative, shrimpers who land and market shrimp in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Texas will be eligible to apply to the Farm Service...

  6. Vegetation Types in Coastal Louisiana in 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sasser, Charles E.; Visser, Jenneke M.; Mouton, Edmond; Linscombe, Jeb; Hartley, Steve B.

    2008-01-01

    During the summer and fall of 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, and the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Fur and Refuge Division jointly completed an aerial survey to collect data on 2007 vegetation types in coastal Louisiana. The current map presents the data collected in this effort. The 2007 aerial survey was conducted by using techniques developed over the last thirty years while conducting similar vegetation surveys. Transects flown were oriented in a north-south direction and spaced 1.87 mi (3 km) apart and covered coastal marshes from the Texas State line to the Mississippi State line and from the northern extent of fresh marshes to the southern end of saline (saltwater) marshes on the beaches of the Gulf of Mexico or of coastal bays. Navigation along these transects and to each sampling site was accomplished by using Global Positioning System (GPS) technology and geographic information system (GIS) software. As the surveyors reached each sampling station, observed areas of marsh were assigned as fresh, intermediate, brackish, or saline (saltwater) types, and dominant plant species were listed and ranked according to abundance. Delineations of marsh boundaries usually followed natural levees, bayous, or other features that impede or restrict water flow.

  7. Reactive Iron and Iron-Reducing Bacteria in Louisiana Continental Shelf Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers release sediments containing 15 x 106 t of iron onto the Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) each year. Iron oxides reaching the seafloor may be utilized as electron acceptors by iron-reducing bacteria for organic matter oxidation or become r...

  8. Speech by Drew S. Days, III, before the National Conference of Black Lawyers, Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Days III, Drew S.

    The author of this speech discusses racial dualism in higher education in the American South. The states of Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisiana have all had suits brought against them for maintaining separate and unequal institutions for blacks and whites. In all three states, the vast proportion of funds allocated for higher education have been…

  9. Carbon Dynamics on the Louisiana Continental Shelf and Cross-Shelf Feeding of Hypoxia

    EPA Science Inventory

    Large-scale hypoxia regularly develops during the summer on the Louisiana continental shelf. Traditionally, hypoxia has been linked to the vast winter and spring nutrient inputs from the Mississippi River and its distributary, the Atchafalaya River. However, recent studies indica...

  10. Mississippi Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Mississippi River delta teems with sediment deposited by the river as it flows into the Gulf of Mexico in this true-color image captured by MODIS on October 15, 2001. The sediment, which is marked by brown swirls in the Gulf, provides nutrients for the bloom of phytoplankton visible as blue-green swirls off the coastline. In the high-resolution image the city of Memphis can be seen in the southwest corner of Tennessee, which is just to left of center at the top of the image. The brown coloration that encompasses Memphis and either side of the river, as flows north to south along the left side of the image, is the river's flood plain. Also visible, in the upper-right hand corner of the image is the southern end of the Appalachian Mountains.

  11. Alabama Water Use, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutson, Susan S.; Littlepage, Thomas M.; Harper, Michael J.; Tinney, James O.

    2009-01-01

    Water is one of Alabama's most precious natural resources. It is a vital component of human existence and essential to the overall quality of life. Wise stewardship of this valuable resource depends on a continuing assessment of water availability and water use. Population growth in many parts of the State has resulted in increased competition for available water resources. This competition includes offstream uses, such as residential, agricultural, and industrial, and instream uses for maintenance of species habitat and diversity, navigation, power generation, recreation, and water quality. Accurate water-use information is required for sound management decisions within this competitive framework and is necessary for a more comprehensive understanding of the link between water use, water supply, and overall water availability. A study of water use during 2005 was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs, Office of Water Resources, Water Management Branch (ADECA-OWR), to provide water-use data for local and State water managers. The results of the study about the amount of water used, how it was used, and where it was used in Alabama have been published in 'Estimated use of water in Alabama in 2005' by Hutson and others, 2009, and is accessible on the Web at http://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2009/5163 and available upon request as a CD-ROM through USGS and ADECA-OWR.

  12. Alabama and SREB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) is a nonprofit organization that works collaboratively with Alabama and 15 other member states to improve education at every level--from pre-K to postdoctoral study--through many effective programs and initiatives. SREB's "Challenge to Lead Goals for Education", which call for the region to lead the…

  13. Homonegativity among Alabama Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satcher, Jamie; Leggett, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Members of the Alabama Counseling Association were surveyed to examine the extent to which they demonstrate homonegativity (prejudicial attitudes toward homosexuality). The majority of the counselors did not appear to approach homosexuality from traditional prejudices, although almost one-third believed homosexuality to be immoral. The counselors…

  14. Academic Standards in Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    A+ Education Partnership, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Education policymakers and educators in Alabama are committed to improving the state's public education system to ensure that students gain the knowledge and skills they need to graduate from high school ready for real life. The state is on the path to implementing higher academic standards--the College and Career Ready Standards--which lay a…

  15. Quality of Shallow Groundwater and Drinking Water in the Mississippi Embayment-Texas Coastal Uplands Aquifer System and the Mississippi River Valley Alluvial Aquifer, South-Central United States, 1994-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welch, Heather L.; Kingsbury, James A.; Tollett, Roland W.; Seanor, Ronald C.

    2009-01-01

    The Mississippi embayment-Texas coastal uplands aquifer system is an important source of drinking water, providing about 724 million gallons per day to about 8.9 million people in Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Arkansas, Missouri, Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois, and Alabama. The Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer ranks third in the Nation for total withdrawals of which more than 98 percent is used for irrigation. From 1994 through 2004, water-quality samples were collected from 169 domestic, monitoring, irrigation, and public-supply wells in the Mississippi embayment-Texas coastal uplands aquifer system and the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer in various land-use settings and of varying well capacities as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Groundwater samples were analyzed for physical properties and about 200 water-quality constituents, including total dissolved solids, major inorganic ions, trace elements, radon, nutrients, dissolved organic carbon, pesticides, pesticide degradates, and volatile organic compounds. The occurrence of nutrients and pesticides differed among four groups of the 114 shallow wells (less than or equal to 200 feet deep) in the study area. Tritium concentrations in samples from the Holocene alluvium, Pleistocene valley trains, and shallow Tertiary wells indicated a smaller component of recent groundwater than samples from the Pleistocene terrace deposits. Although the amount of agricultural land overlying the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer was considerably greater than areas overlying parts of the shallow Tertiary and Pleistocene terrace deposits wells, nitrate was rarely detected and the number of pesticides detected was lower than other shallow wells. Nearly all samples from the Holocene alluvium and Pleistocene valley trains were anoxic, and the reducing conditions in these aquifers likely result in denitrification of nitrate. In contrast, most samples from the

  16. The Louisiana Scholarship Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egalite, Anna J.; Mills, Jonathan N.

    2014-01-01

    The Louisiana Scholarship Program (LSP), also known as the Student Scholarships for Educational Excellence Program, provides public funds for low-income students in low-performing public schools to enroll in local private schools. The program was initially piloted in New Orleans in 2008; Louisiana governor Bobby Jindal and the state legislature…

  17. Educational Reform in Louisiana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxcy, Spencer J.; Maxcy, Doreen O.

    1993-01-01

    Although education has appealed to southern governors as a catapult to historical recognition, future governors should consider Louisiana Governor Buddy Roemer's ill-fated educational reform plan for Louisiana State University's College of Education, particularly its teacher evaluation and internship program. Public education seems a low-priority…

  18. Our Mighty Mississippi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gragg, Betty A.

    1976-01-01

    History and geography are more than units in textbooks for students in Warren County, Mississippi. Here students have the opportunity to express visually and verbally the influences of the Mighty Mississippi on everyday life. (Author/RK)

  19. 77 FR 2287 - FFP Project 17, LLC and Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice Announcing Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission FFP Project 17, LLC and Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice..., near the town of North Vacherie, in St. James Parish, Louisiana. The applications were filed by...

  20. 77 FR 2288 - FFP Project 10, LLC, Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice Announcing Preliminary Permit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission FFP Project 10, LLC, Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice..., near the town of Avondale, in Jefferson Parish, Louisiana. The applications were filed by FFP...

  1. 77 FR 2287 - FFP Project 6, LLC and Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice Announcing Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission FFP Project 6, LLC and Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice..., near the town of New Orleans, in Orleans Parish, Louisiana. The applications were filed by FFP...

  2. 77 FR 2290 - FFP Project 30, LLC and Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice Announcing Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission FFP Project 30, LLC and Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice..., in West Feliciana and Pointe Coupee Parishes, Louisiana. The applications were filed by FFP...

  3. 77 FR 2290 - FFP Project 18, LLC, Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice Announcing Preliminary Permit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission FFP Project 18, LLC, Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice..., in St. James Parish, Louisiana. The applications were filed by FFP Project 18, LLC for Project No... filed at 8:30 a.m. on the next regular business day. 18 CFR 385.2001(a)(2) (2011). On January 17,...

  4. Area-wide management approach for tarnished plant bug in the Mississippi Delta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The tarnished plant bug, Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois), is the major insect pest of cotton, Gossypium hirsutum (L.), within the Mid-South region. From 2001 to 2012, the tarnished plant bug has been the number one insect pest of cotton in Louisiana and Mississippi in eleven and nine of those...

  5. Louisiana hydrologic atlas map no. 1 : Mean annual runoff in Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McWreath, Harry C.; Lowe, Alfred S.

    1986-01-01

    The map shows the mean annual runoff from drainage basins in Louisiana exclusive of those in the coastal zone and the alluvial valleys of the Mississippi, Ouachita, and Red Rivers. The mean annual runoff for the State of Louisiana varies from 0.7 (cu ft/s)/sq mi in the Sabine and Red River basins to >2.0 (cu ft/s)/sq mi in the upper reaches of the Mermentau River. Factors that account for the three-fold variation in runoff across Louisiana include regional differences in rainfall, varying physical characteristics of the land, and differing land use patterns. The mean annual runoff was determined on the basis of continuing measurements of stage and discharge of uncontrolled streams. The periods of record from the 88 stations shown on the map vary from 5 to 25 yr. The 88 stations were grouped into seven categories of runoff. The boundaries for each region generally correspond to drainage boundaries or physiographic boundaries. (Peters-PTT)

  6. The Role of Agriculture in the Social and Economic Development of the Lower Mississippi River Delta Region. Proceedings of a Regional Conference (Memphis, Tennessee, February 26-28, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Central Regional Center for Rural Development, Ames, IA.

    The lower Mississippi River delta region comprises 214 counties in Louisiana, Mississippi, Arkansas, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Illinois. The region is heavily dependent on agriculture and contains unusually high proportions of small farms, poor farmers, and black farmers. A conference planned by the region's 13 land-grant institutions and…

  7. 39. MISSISSIPPI BASIN MODEL AT CLINTON SUBSTATION. VIEW OF MISSISSIPPI ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. MISSISSIPPI BASIN MODEL AT CLINTON SUBSTATION. VIEW OF MISSISSIPPI RIVER, LOOKING UPSTREAM FROM THE CONFLUENCE OF THE OHIO AND MISSISSIPPI RIVERS. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  8. Spatio-Temporal Distribution of Particulate and CDOM in the Mississippi River Bight (MRB) from Optical Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Sa, Eurico; Miller, Richard; DelCastillo, Carlos

    2004-01-01

    NASA's projects for the Mississippi River Coastal Margin Study include Mississippi River Interdisciplinary Research (MiRIR) and NASA Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR). These projects, undertaken with the help of Tulane University and the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium (LUMCON) sampled water in the Gulf of Mexico to measure colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM). This viewgraph presentation contains images of each program's sampling strategy and equipment.

  9. Earthquake history of Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    von Hake, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    Since its admission into the Union in 1817, Mississippi has had only four earthquakes of intensity V or greater within its borders. Although the number of earthquakes known to have been centered within Mississippi's boundaries is small, the State has been affected by numerous shocks located in neighboring States. In 1811 and 1812, a series of great earthquakes near the New Madrid Missouri area was felt in Mississippi as far south as the gulf coast. The New Madrid series caused the banks of the Mississippi River to cave in as far as Vicksburg, mroe than 300 miles from the epicentral region. As a result of this great earthquake series, the northwest corner of Mississippi is in seismic risk zone 3, the highest risk zone. Expect for the new Madrid series, effects in Mississippi from earthquakes located outside of the State have been less than intensity V. 

  10. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  11. Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  12. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  13. Alabama Education News. Volume 27, Number 9

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  14. Alabama Education News. Volume 32, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  15. Alabama Education News. Volume 28, Number 9

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  16. Alabama Education News. Volume 28, Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  17. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  18. Alabama Education News. Volume 27, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  19. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  20. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  1. Alabama Education News. Volume 33, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  2. Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  3. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  4. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  5. Alabama Education News. Volume 29, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  6. Alabama Education News. Volume 28, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  7. Sediment-water 02 dynamics and feedbacks to sediment oxic, suboxic, and anoxic processes on the Louisiana shelf

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers annually discharge 674 km3 of freshwater, 86 x 109 moles nitrogen, 5 x 109 moles phosphorus, and 325 x 109 moles organic carbon to the Louisiana shelf. The seasonal input and transport of these materials causes large temporal and spatial va...

  8. Post-glacial Sediment Load and Subsidence in Coastal Louisiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivins, Erik R.; Dokka, Roy K.; Blom, Ronald G.

    2007-01-01

    Sea level rise in the Gulf of Mexico has occurred at a rate of 1.8-2.2 mm/yr during the 20th century, or nearly the same as observed globally due to combined steric and water mass changes. Tide gauges in coastal Louisiana, however, record a substantially larger rate of rise and while a number of causal mechanisms may be responsible, their specific contribution is poorly understood. Using a realistic viscoelastic Earth model, detailed geologic parameters for south Louisiana and new GPS data, we demonstrate that Holocene sedimentary loading in the Gulf and Mississippi River delta is capable of contributing to 1-8 mm/yr of subsidence over areas of 30-0.75 x 10(exp 3) km(exp 2).

  9. Louisiana coastal ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2000-01-01

    Louisiana's coast and its degradation and restoration are major environmental issues being studied at the National Wetlands Research Center. Coastal ecosystems are vulnerable because of the tremendous amount of human activity that takes place along the coast. Information on ecological processes is essential to guide the development along the coast as well as to protect and restore wildlife habitat.Louisiana has about 40% of coastal wetlands in the lower 48 states; they support fish, waterfowl, and fur-bearing animals as well as unique cultures like that of the Acadians. The fish and wildlife resources of Louisiana's coast produce over $1 billion each year in revenues.But Louisiana has the highest coastal loss rate because of natural and human causes. Over the past three decades, Louisiana has lost as much as 35-40 mi2 (90-104 km2) of coastal wetlands a year.The National Wetlands Research Center is qualified to assess and monitor this ecosystem because of its proximity to the study area, a staff chosen for their expertise in the system, and a number of established partnerships with others who study the areas. The Center is often the lead group in partnerships with universities, other federal agencies, and private entities who study this ecosystem.Most of the Center's research and technology development performed for coastal wetlands are done at the Lafayette headquarters; some work is performed at the National Wetlands Research Center's project office in Baton Rouge, LA.

  10. Groundwater availability of the Mississippi embayment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Brian R.; Hart, Rheannon M.; Gurdak, Jason J.

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater is an important resource for agricultural and municipal uses in the Mississippi embayment. Arkansas ranks first in the Nation for rice and third for cotton production, with both crops dependent on groundwater as a major source of irrigation requirements. Multiple municipalities rely on the groundwater resources to provide water for industrial and public use, which includes the city of Memphis, Tennessee. The demand for the groundwater resource has resulted in groundwater availability issues in the Mississippi embayment including: (1) declining groundwater levels of 50 feet or more in the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer in parts of eastern Arkansas from agricultural pumping, (2) declining groundwater levels of over 360 feet over the last 90 years in the confined middle Claiborne aquifer in southern Arkansas and northern Louisiana from municipal pumping, and (3) litigation between the State of Mississippi and a Memphis water utility over water rights in the middle Claiborne aquifer. To provide information to stakeholders addressing the groundwater-availability issues, the U.S. Geological Survey Groundwater Resources Program supported a detailed assessment of groundwater availability through the Mississippi Embayment Regional Aquifer Study (MERAS). This assessment included (1) an evaluation of how these resources have changed over time through the use of groundwater budgets, (2) development of a numerical modeling tool to assess system responses to stresses from future human uses and climate trends, and (3) application of statistical tools to evaluate the importance of individual observations within a groundwater-monitoring network. An estimated 12 million acre-feet per year (11 billion gallons per day) of groundwater was pumped in 2005 from aquifers in the Mississippi embayment. Irrigation constitutes the largest groundwater use, accounting for approximately 10 million acre-feet per year (9 billion gallons per day) in 2000 from the Mississippi

  11. NASA, Remote Sensing and Archaeology: An Example from Southeast Louisiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giardino, Marco J.

    2010-01-01

    NASA Stennis Space Center, located in Mississippi, USA, undertook an archaeological survey of the southeastern Louisiana marshes beginning in 2003. Progress on this activity was severely hampered by the 2005 hurricane season when both Katrina and Rita devastated the study area. In 2008, the NASA team reinitiated the analysis of the project data and that work continues today. The project was conducted initially in partnership with the U.S. Army, Corps of Engineers New Orleans District and Tulane University. NASA and its partners utilized a wide variety of satellite and airborne remote sensing instruments combined with field verification surveys to identify prehistoric archeological sites in the Southeastern Louisiana delta, both known and still undiscovered. The main approach was to carefully map known sites and use the spectral characteristics of these sites to locate high probability targets elsewhere in the region. The archaeological activities were conducted in support of Coast 2050 whose stated goals is to sustain and restore a coastal ecosystem that supports and protects the environment, economy and culture of southern Louisiana. As the Coast 2050 report states: [T]he rate of coastal land loss in Louisiana has reached catastrophic proportions. Within the last 50 years, land loss rates have exceeded 40 square miles per year, and in the 1990's the rate has been estimated to be between 25 and 35 square miles each year. This loss represents 80% of the coastal wetland loss in the entire continental United States.

  12. Exchange between Louisiana Bays/Lakes and Coastal Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Weeks, E.; White, J. R.; Bargu, S.; Liu, B.

    2011-12-01

    Although many advanced hydrodynamic models have been developed in the last several decades, the exchange of water and waterborne materials in coastal waters can only be accurately quantified by continuous and long-term observations. A good and reliable model product also relies on accurate observations for boundary and initial conditions, as well as for model validation and verification. The exchange between the estuarine systems and coastal water along the coast of Louisiana provide insight to the dynamics of the Mississippi River system, sediment transport, coastal geomorphodynamics, Louisiana shelf hypoxia, and related subjects about the land-marine ecosystem. In our study, several long-term moorings and continuous tidal cycle surveys in the tidal passes of Louisiana coastal bays and lakes have provided a large dataset that allows us to illustrate the flushing processes of Louisiana coastal bays. Long-term bottom mounted current profilers provide information of the land-ocean exchange in both normal and extreme weather conditions. Vessel-based continuous surveys are used to complement the mooring data, so that spatial variations can be quantified and total flux calculated. We provide statistics of the exchange processes and quantification of spatial variations that were not possible prior to our studies.

  13. Local sea level change and future of Louisiana coast

    SciTech Connect

    Nummedal, D.

    1983-09-01

    The relative elevation of sea and land has been changing through time in response to two fundamentally different groups of factors. Global factors include changes in the volume of the ocean basins owing to tectonic processes and changes in the total amount of ocean water due to glaciation. Local factors include subsidence of continental margins and compaction of recent sediments. Over this century, global sea level (eustatic) appears to have been rising at a rate of 1.2 mm per year. Along the south-central Louisiana coast the land surface appears to be sinking at a rate of about 8 mm per year. Recent global climatic modeling suggests strongly that we are about to enter a period of rapidly accelerating warming due to increased amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. As a consequence, eustatic sea level rise is predicted to accelerate because of both steric expansion of the ocean water and continued melting of polar ice caps. For the next 40 years the eustatic sea level rise may average 10 mm per year. The local relative sea level in coastal Louisiana would therefore rise at about twice its present rate over this time period. The numbers presented above are average value for the Louisiana coastal plain. Local variability in subsidence rate appear to be related to the thickness of Holocene sediments. The highest rates of subsidence are found in the modern Mississippi (birdfoot) delta and in coastal Terrebonne Parish above the late Pleistocene Mississippi trench; in both areas the Holocene section is in excess of 200 m (650 ft) thick. The high rate of local sea level rise along the Louisiana coast makes it imperative that plans for coastal development and protection consider the long-term consequences of sea level change.

  14. Mississippi River. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchberg, Wendy

    Based on novels and books about the Mississippi River, this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that the Mississippi River has made its mark on America's geography, commerce, and literature; and that booktalks provide a summary, explains what kind of reader the book will appeal to, and may also contain a oral…

  15. Mississippi Research Catalog, '99.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi State Board of Trustees of State Institutions of Higher Learning, Jackson.

    This document, mandated by the University Research Center Act of 1988, presents financial balance sheets listing receipts and disbursements of research funds for research activities being conducted at the eight state-supported universities in Mississippi: Alcorn State University; Delta State University; Jackson State University; Mississippi State…

  16. The 20th-century development and expansion of Louisiana shelf hypoxia, Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osterman, L.E.; Poore, R.Z.; Swarzenski, P.W.; Senn, D.B.; DiMarco, S.F.

    2009-01-01

    Since systematic measurements of Louisiana continental-shelf waters were initiated in 1985, hypoxia (oxygen content <2 mg L-1) has increased considerably in an area termed the dead zone. Monitoring and modeling studies have concluded that the expansion of the Louisiana shelf dead zone is related to increased anthropogenically derived nutrient delivery from the Mississippi River drainage basin, physical and hydrographical changes of the Louisiana Shelf, and possibly coastal erosion of wetlands in southern Louisiana. In order to track the development and expansion of seasonal low-oxygen conditions on the Louisiana shelf prior to 1985, we used a specific low-oxygen foraminiferal faunal proxy, the PEB index, which has been shown statistically to represent the modern Louisiana hypoxia zone. We constructed a network of 13 PEB records with excess 210Pb-derived chronologies to establish the development of low-oxygen and hypoxic conditions over a large portion of the modern dead zone for the last 100 years. The PEB index record indicates that areas of low-oxygen bottom water began to appear in the early 1910s in isolated hotspots near the Mississippi Delta and rapidly expanded across the entire Louisiana shelf beginning in the 1950s. Since ???1950, the percentage of PEB species has steadily increased over a large portion of the modern dead zone. By 1960, subsurface low-oxygen conditions were occurring seasonally over a large part of the geographic area now known as the dead zone. The long-term trends in the PEB index are consistent with the 20th-century observational and proxy data for low oxygen and hypoxia. ?? 2009 US Government.

  17. Louisiana Adolescent Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimbrell, Joe, Ed.; Daly, Maureen, Ed.; Sterne, Sylvia, Ed.; Howard, Sharon, Ed.; Evans, Trina, Ed.; Lowenthal, Nancy, Ed.; Galatas, Kate, Ed.; Sumrall, Liz, Ed.

    This report provides a comprehensive review of the status of Louisiana's youth and is designed to be used in planning efforts and in developing priorities for improving the health and welfare of the youth of the state. Chapter 1 of the report examines the concept of expanding the definition of health to include social and emotional development,…

  18. Louisiana and SREB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) is a nonprofit organization that works collaboratively with Louisiana and 15 other member states to improve education at every level--from pre-K to postdoctoral study--through many effective programs and initiatives. SREB's "Challenge to Lead" Goals for Education, which call for the region to lead the…

  19. Geographic Education in Louisiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Anthony J.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author analyzes and summarizes geographic education in Louisiana from a historical perspective with a specific emphasis on the degree to which geography was implemented into the state's standards. To accomplish that, he draws from the following three sources of information: active and retired social studies teachers from a…

  20. Landscape correlates along mourning dove call-count routes in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elmore, R.D.; Vilella, F.J.; Gerard, P.D.

    2007-01-01

    Mourning dove (Zenaida macroura) call-count surveys in Mississippi, USA, suggest declining populations. We used available mourning dove call-count data to evaluate long-term mourning dove habitat relationships. Dove routes were located in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley, Deep Loess Province, Mid Coastal Plain, and Hilly Coastal Plain physiographic provinces of Mississippi. We also included routes in the Blackbelt Prairie region of Mississippi and Alabama, USA. We characterized landscape structure and composition within 1.64-km buffers around 10 selected mourning dove call-count routes during 3 time periods. Habitat classes included agriculture, forest, urban, regeneration stands, wetland, and woodlot. We used Akaike's Information Criterion to select the best candidate model. We selected a model containing percent agriculture and edge density that contained approximately 40% of the total variability in the data set. Percent agriculture was positively correlated with relative dove abundance. Interestingly, we found a negative relationship between edge density and dove abundance. Researchers should conduct future research on dove nesting patterns in Mississippi and threshold levels of edge necessary to maximize dove density. During the last 20 years, Mississippi lost more than 800,000 ha of cropland while forest cover represented largely by pine (Pinus taeda) plantations increased by more than 364,000 ha. Our results suggest observed localized declines in mourning dove abundance in Mississippi may be related to the documented conversion of agricultural lands to pine plantations.

  1. Earthshots: Satellite images of environmental change – Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adamson, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Landsat recorded the devastation and continues to monitor the region’s wetlands. New Orleans, Louisiana, is near the bottom of the images along the Mississippi River. The city lies just south of Lake Pontchartrain. Hundreds of square miles of wetlands were lost after Katrina. Some marshlands became permanent water bodies. Some projects now aim to bring back marshlands because of their value in defending the coastline from storms.

  2. Distribution, abundance and habitat use of American White Pelicans in the Delta Region of Mississippi and along the Western Gulf of Mexico Coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, D.T.; Michot, T.C.

    2002-01-01

    Aerial surveys of American White Pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) were conducted over coastal Louisiana and the delta region of Mississippi on 1-2 days during December, February, and April each year from 1997 to 1999. Additional surveys were conducted in coastal Texas and Mexico during January 1998 and 1999. The numbers, location, and habitat of all pelicans observed were recorded. The coastal zone of Louisiana consistently had higher numbers of pelicans (18,000 to 35,000 birds) than other areas surveyed (3,000 to 8,000 birds), indicating that Louisiana may be the most important wintering area for American White Pelicans east of the Rocky Mountains. Among the four regions surveyed, the average size of pelican flocks was largest in Mississippi during January-February, particularly in 1999 (x?? = 245 birds/flock). Pelican numbers in Mississippi peaked in February but in Louisiana they were more variable. Pelicans in the delta region of Mississippi were found most often in fresh water and sand bar habitats during December, flooded field habitats during February, and catfish ponds in April. In Louisiana, pelicans used fresh, intermediate, and brackish marshes during December, but showed a preference for brackish and saline marshes in February and April. Received 4 August 2001, accepted 5 January 2002.

  3. Transport and fate of river waters under flood conditions and rim current influence: the Mississippi River test case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourafalou, Villy; Androulidakis, Yannis

    2013-04-01

    can increase both downstream (westward) and upstream (eastward) spreading. The high outflow rates enhance the anticyclonic bulge, strengthen the downstream coastal current toward the western Louisiana-Texas shelf. The substantial eastward spreading over the eastern Mississippi-Alabama-Florida shelf was highly correlated with the Loop Current northward extension. On the contrary, cyclonic eddies east of the Delta effectively block the offshore eastward spreading of the plume and may keep the river waters away from the eastern shelf. We show that the proximity of eddies to the shelf break is a sufficient condition for shelf-to-offshore interaction, which is facilitated by the steep bottom topography near the Delta.

  4. Evaluating the influence of source basins on downstream water quality in the Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, G.M.; Broshears, R.E.; Hooper, R.P.; Goolsby, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    Chemical variability in the Mississippi River during water years 1989 to 1998 was evaluated using stream discharge and water-quality data in conjunction with the DAFLOW/BLTM hydraulic model. Model simulations were used to identify subbasin contributions of water and chemical constituents to the Mississippi River upstream from its confluence with the Ohio and the Mississippi River and at the Atchafalaya Diversion in Louisiana. Concentrations of dissolved solids, sodium, and sulfate at the Thebes site showed a general decreasing trend, and concentrations of silica and nitrate showed a general increasing trend as the percentage of discharge from the Mississippi River upstream from Grafton increased. Concentrations of most chemical constituents in the Mississippi River at the Atchafalaya Diversion exhibited a decreasing trend as the percentage of water from the Ohio River increased. Regression models were used to evaluate the importance of the source of water to the water chemistry in the Mississippi River at Thebes and the Atchafalaya Diversion. The addition of terms in regression equations to account for the percent of water from subbasins improved coefficients of determination for predicting chemical concentrations by as much as nine percent at the Thebes site and by as much as 48 percent at the Atchafalaya Diversion site. The addition of source-water terms to regression equations increased the estimated annual loads of nitrate and silica delivered from the Mississippi River Basin to the Gulf of Mexico by as much as 14 and 13 percent, respectively.

  5. Libraries in Alabama: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/alabama.html Libraries in Alabama To use the sharing features on ... JavaScript. Birmingham American Sports Medicine Institute Sports Medicine LIBRARY 833 St. Vincent's Drive Suite 205 Birmingham, AL ...

  6. Challenges of ecosystem restoration in Louisiana - availability of sediment and its management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, S. M.; Freeman, A. M.

    2015-03-01

    Human intervention has impaired the Mississippi River's ability to deliver sediment to its delta wetlands, and as a consequence acute land loss in coastal Louisiana has resulted in an unprecedented ecocatastrophe. To mitigate this degradation, an unparalleled restoration effort is underway. For this effort to be successful and sustainable, various sediment input mechanisms must be integrated, including: building appropriate sediment-diversions; beneficially using the millions of cubic metres of sediment dredged annually from navigational channels; harvesting deposits of sand and suitable sediment from the river and offshore; and related sediment management activities that are compatible with other uses of the river. A comprehensive sediment management plan has been developed to identify and delineate potential sediment sources for restoration, and to provide a framework for managing sediment resources wisely, cost effectively, and in a systematic manner. The Louisiana Sediment Management Plan provides regional strategies for improved comprehensive management of Louisiana's limited sediment resources.

  7. Environmental assessment: Richton Dome site, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Richton Dome site in Mississippi as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Richton Dome site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. The site is in the Gulf interior region, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains two other potentially acceptable sites--the Cypress Creek Dome site in Mississippi and the Vacherie Dome site in Louisiana. Although the Cypress Creek Dome and the Vacherie Dome sites are suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Richton Dome site is the preferred site in the Gulf interior region. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Richton Dome site is not disqualified under the guidelines.

  8. Environmental assessment: Richton Dome Site, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Richton Dome site in Mississippi as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Richton Dome site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. The site is in the Gulf interior region, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains two other potentially acceptable sites--the Cypress Creek Dome site in Mississippi and the Vacherie Dome site in Louisiana. Although the Cypress Creek Dome and the Vacherie Dome sites are suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Richton Dome site is the preferred site in the Gulf interior region. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Richton Dome site is not disqualified under the guidelines.

  9. Louisiana's statewide beach cleanup

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindstedt, Dianne M.; Holmes, Joseph C.

    1989-01-01

    Litter along Lousiana's beaches has become a well-recognized problem. In September 1987, Louisiana's first statewide beach cleanup attracted about 3300 volunteers who filled 16,000 bags with trash collected along 15 beaches. An estimated 800,173 items were gathered. Forty percent of the items were made of plastic and 11% were of polystyrene. Of all the litter collected, 37% was beverage-related. Litter from the oil and gas, commercial fishing, and maritime shipping industries was found, as well as that left by recreational users. Although beach cleanups temporarily rid Louisiana beaches of litter, the real value of the effort is in public participation and education. Civic groups, school children, and individuals have benefited by increasing their awareness of the problems of trash disposal.

  10. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alabama River. 117.101 Section 117.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.101 Alabama River. (a) The...

  11. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alabama River. 117.101 Section 117.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.101 Alabama River. (a) The...

  12. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alabama River. 117.101 Section 117.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.101 Alabama River. (a) The...

  13. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alabama River. 117.101 Section 117.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.101 Alabama River. (a) The...

  14. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alabama River. 117.101 Section 117.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.101 Alabama River. (a) The...

  15. Multiple Stressors: Lessons from Louisiana Coastal Waters (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabalais, N. N.

    2013-12-01

    Coastal Louisiana is a Mississippi River-dominated landscape driven by the long-term (millennia) and short-term (decades to hundreds of years) changes in materials flux, nature and human activities. The results are a highly productive coastal landscape and nearshore coastal waters that support rich natural and non-renewable resources. The ecosystem and socio-economic systems are intimately linked. Several factors have led to the demise of many of the healthy features of this coastal system, including long-term changes in the landscape of the Mississippi River basin watershed, alterations to the structure and flow of the Mississippi River and its tributaries, coastal landscape alterations leading to loss of productive marshes and protective barrier islands, increases in nitrogen and phosphorus loads to the coastal ocean and their detrimental effects, and reduction in the sediments delivered by the river. Increases in population and extraction of living resources and oil and gas reserves continue to drive many actions taken in the coastal landscape and waters. As a result, Louisiana is in a state of major disrepair (to be charitable) and needs thoughtful consideration of restoration actions taken in the river basin and within the coastal landscape. The first thought is to cause no further harm. The second is to proceed acknowledging that human and natural forces (particularly climate change, rising sea level and changing global economies) must be taken into account. Thirdly, a broader consideration of the river basin and coastal landscapes, their interconnectivity, and ecosystem health and social welfare must be taken into account.

  16. Observation of suspended sediments in Mobile Bay, Alabama from satellite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stumpf, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    As part of a comprehensive geologic study of coastal Alabama and Mississippi, the U.S. Geological Survey is investigating coastal sediment transport in Mobile Bay and the adjacent shelf. Satellite imagery from the NOAA AVHRR is being used to provide data on the variability of spatial patterns in the near-surface suspended sediment concentration. This imagery is processed using atmospheric corrections to remove haze and Rayleigh radiance in order to obtain water reflectances; the reflectances are than converted to approximate sediment concentrations using standard relationships between water reflectance and in situ sediment concentrations. A series of images from early 1990 shows rapid changes in sediment concentrations in response to high river flow of the Alabama-Tombigbee river system. During these times, suspended sediment tends to flow out Mobile Bay without mixing into the eastern lobe of the Bay (Bon Secour Bay). The sediment concentration field also appears to be disturbed by the main ship channel. The sediment plume extends more than 60 km offshore after the peak flow event. One wind event in December 1989 was identified as increasing sediment concentration in the Bay. It is not believed that such an event has been previously observed from satellite.

  17. Space radar image of New Orleans, Louisiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This image of the area surrounding the city of New Orleans, Louisiana in the southeastern United States demonstrates the ability of multi-frequency imaging radar to distinguish different types of land cover. The dark area in the center is Lake Pontchartrain. The thin line running across the lake is a causeway connecting New Orleans to the city of Mandeville. Lake Borgne is the dark area in the lower right of the image. The Mississippi River appears as a dark, wavy line in the lower left. The white dots on the Mississippi are ships. The French Quarter is the brownish square near the left center of the image. Lakefront Airport, a field used mostly for general aviation, is the bright spot near the center, jutting out into Lake Pontchartrain. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) during orbit 39 of space shuttle Endeavour on October 2, 1994. The area is located at 30.10 degrees north latitude and 89.1 degrees west longitude. The area shown is approximately 100 kilometers (60 miles) by 50 kilometers (30 miles). The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and received); blue represents the L-band (vertically transmitted and received). The green areas are primarily vegetation consisting of swamp land and swamp forest (bayou) growing on sandy soil, while the pink areas are associated with reflections from buildings in urban and suburban areas. Different tones and colors in the vegetation areas will be studied by scientists to see how effective imaging radar data is in discriminating between different types of wetlands. Accurate maps of coastal wetland areas are important to ecologists studying wild fowl and the coastal environment.

  18. EFFECTS OF HURRICANE KATRINA ON BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE COMMUNITIES ALONG THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO COAST

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was initiated in fall 2005 to assess potential effects on benthic fauna and habitat quality in coastal waters of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama following Hurricane Katrina, which struck the coast of Louisiana, between New Orleans and Bioloxi, Mississippi on August 29...

  19. Webinars at Louisiana Virtual School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Allen

    2009-01-01

    Delivering meaningful professional development, engaging students in exciting yet practical curricula, and effectively communicating with faculty and staff members are challenges in any school setting. At the Louisiana Virtual School, a state-funded virtual school run by the Louisiana Department of Education, the 6,000 students, 115 instructors,…

  20. Regional Phonological Variants in Louisiana Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubrecht, August Weston

    Based on tape recorded conversations of 28 informants in 18 Louisiana communities, this study investigated regional phonological variants in Louisiana speech. On the basis of settlement history and previous dialect studies, four regions are defined: northern Louisiana, the Florida Parishes, French Louisiana, and New Orleans. The informants are all…

  1. Alabama Counseling Association Journal, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Gypsy, Ed.; Elliott, Glenda R., Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Communicating ideas and information that will help counselors to implement the counseling role and develop the profession of counseling is the purpose of this journal. The first issue in volume 21 contains the following articles: "Policies and Procedures for Reporting Child Abuse in Alabama: Considerations for Counselors, Teachers, and School…

  2. KISATCHIE HILLS WILDERNESS, LOUISIANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haley, Boyd R.; Ryan, George S.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource survey of the Kisatchie Hills Wilderness, Louisiana indicated little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources. There is insufficient data on oil and gas producing formations that underlie the area to evaluate the oil and gas resource potential. All the oil fields of Wilcox age are less than 40 acres in extent; therefore, closer spaced deeper wells might find additional fields in sediments of Wilcox age. Oil and natural gas have been produced from older reservoirs (Cretaceous age) to the northwest of the wilderness, and deeper wells might find oil and natural gas in sediments of Cretaceous and older age in the vicinity of the wilderness.

  3. Denitrification in coastal Louisiana: A spatial assessment and research needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera-Monroy, Victor H.; Lenaker, Peter; Twilley, Robert R.; Delaune, Ronald D.; Lindau, Charles W.; Nuttle, William; Habib, Emad; Fulweiler, Robinson W.; Castañeda-Moya, Edward

    2010-04-01

    By transforming fixed nitrogen (N) into nitrogen gas, the biochemical processes that support denitrification provide a function critical to maintaining the integrity of ecosystems subjected to increased loading of N from anthropogenic sources. The Louisiana coastal region receives high nitrate (NO 3-) concentrations (> 100 µM) from the Mississippi-Ohio-Missouri River Basin and is also an area undergoing high rates of wetland loss. Ongoing and anticipated changes in the Louisiana coastal region promise to alter biogeochemical cycles including the net rate of denitrification by ecosystems. Projecting what these changes could mean for coastal water quality and natural resources requires an understanding of the magnitude and patterns of variation in denitrification rates and their connection to estuarine water quality at large temporal and spatial scales under current conditions. We compile and review denitrification rates reported in 32 studies conducted in a variety of habitats across coastal Louisiana during the period 1981- 2008. The acetylene inhibition and 15N flux were the preferred techniques (95%); most of the studies used sediment slurries rather than intact sediment cores. There are no estimates of denitrification rates using the N 2/Ar ratio and isotope pairing techniques, which address some of the problems and limitations of the acetylene inhibition and 15N flux techniques. These studies have shown that sediments from estuaries, lakes, marshes, forested wetlands, and the coastal shelf region are capable of high potential denitrification rates when exposed to high NO 3- concentrations (> 100 µM). Maximum potential denitrification rates in experimental and natural settings can reach values > 2500 µmol m 2 h - 1 . The lack of contemporary studies to understand the interactions among critical nitrogen transformations (e.g., organic matter mineralization, immobilization, aquatic plant assimilation, nitrification, nitrogen fixation, dissimilatory nitrate

  4. 33 CFR 165.812 - Security Zones; Lower Mississippi River, Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker 96.0, New Orleans...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... River and Southwest Pass, moving security zones are established around all cruise ships between the... Mississippi River mile marker 96.0 in New Orleans, Louisiana. These moving security zones encompass all waters within 500 yards of a cruise ship. These zones remain in effect during the entire transit of the...

  5. 33 CFR 165.812 - Security Zones; Lower Mississippi River, Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker 96.0, New Orleans...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... River and Southwest Pass, moving security zones are established around all cruise ships between the... Mississippi River mile marker 96.0 in New Orleans, Louisiana. These moving security zones encompass all waters within 500 yards of a cruise ship. These zones remain in effect during the entire transit of the...

  6. Irrigation in northeastern Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lang, J.W.; Boswell, E.H.

    1957-01-01

    The phenomenal increase in the use of water for agriculture, industry, and public water supply in the past few years has been an important factor in bringing about the current accelerated inventory and appraisal of the water resources of Mississippi. As a result of severe droughts during the past several years, and of the favorable results of experiments, the water resources of northeastern Mississippi today are rapidly being developed for irrigation. Records have shown that even during years of normal rainfall the distribution of the rain usually is such that supplementary irrigation can be profitably practiced on almost any crop. Although in northeaster Mississippi the annual precipitation generally is enough to support crops and pasture, short periods of drought are common. Supplemental irrigation protects against the periods of drought during the growing season and increases the yield and quality of crops.

  7. Tritium hydrology of the Mississippi River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michel, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    In the early 1960s, the US Geological Survey began routinely analysing river water samples for tritium concentrations at locations within the Mississippi River basin. The sites included the main stem of the Mississippi River (at Luling Ferry, Louisiana), and three of its major tributaries, the Ohio River (at Markland Dam, Kentucky), the upper Missouri River (at Nebraska City, Nebraska) and the Arkansas River (near Van Buren, Arkansas). The measurements cover the period during the peak of the bomb-produced tritium transient when tritium concentrations in precipitation rose above natural levels by two to three orders of magnitude. Using measurements of tritium concentrations in precipitation, a tritium input function was established for the river basins above the Ohio River, Missouri River and Arkansas River sampling locations. Owing to the extent of the basin above the Luling Ferry site, no input function was developed for that location. The input functions for the Ohio and Missouri Rivers were then used in a two-component mixing model to estimate residence times of water within these two basins. (The Arkansas River was not modelled because of extremely large yearly variations in flow during the peak of the tritium transient.) The two components used were: (i) recent precipitation (prompt outflow) and (ii) waters derived from the long-term groundwater reservoir of the basin. The tritium concentration of the second component is a function of the atmospheric input and the residence times of the groundwaters within the basin. Using yearly time periods, the parameters of the model were varied until a best fit was obtained between modelled and measured tritium data. The results from the model indicate that about 40% of the flow in the Ohio River was from prompt outflow, as compared with 10% for the Missouri River. Mean residence times of 10 years were calculated for the groundwater component of the Ohio River versus 4 years for the Missouri River. The mass flux of

  8. WATER QUALITY IN THE NEAR COASTAL WATERS OF THE GULF OF MEXICO AFFECTED BY HURRICANE KATRINA: BEFORE AND AFTER THE STORM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water quality was assessed following Hurricane Katrina in the affected waters of Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana. Post-landfall water quality was compared to pre-hurricane conditions using indicators assessed by EPA's National Coastal Assessment program and additional indicat...

  9. 50 CFR 600.1417 - Requirements for exempted state designation based on submission of recreational survey data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Marine Recreational Fisheries of the United States § 600.1417... (Atlantic coast); (ii) Florida (Gulf of Mexico coast), Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas;...

  10. Winter and summer home ranges and core use areas of double-crested cormorants captured near aquaculture facilities in the southeastern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Migration patterns of Double-crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) wintering in the southeastern United States are poorly understood. Movement data was analyzed from 28 cormorants captured in Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi and equipped with satellite transmitters. Four (3 immatur...

  11. Mississippi and SREB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) is a nonprofit organization that works collaboratively with Mississippi and 15 other member states to improve education at every level--from pre-K to postdoctoral study--through many effective programs and initiatives. SREB's "Challenge to Lead" Goals for Education, which call for the region to lead the…

  12. Downstream on the Mississippi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parfit, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Recounts a trip down the Lower Mississippi River starting in Memphis, describing the features of the river at different stops along the way. Aspects of life along the river discussed include the levee system built to contain the waters, flooding on the river, and travel on the river. (MDH)

  13. Numerical analysis of the primary processes controlling oxygen dynamics on the Louisiana shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L.; Fennel, K.; Laurent, A.; Murrell, M. C.; Lehrter, J. C.

    2015-04-01

    The Louisiana shelf, in the northern Gulf of Mexico, receives large amounts of freshwater and nutrients from the Mississippi-Atchafalaya river system. These river inputs contribute to widespread bottom-water hypoxia every summer. In this study, we use a physical-biogeochemical model that explicitly simulates oxygen sources and sinks on the Louisiana shelf to identify the key mechanisms controlling hypoxia development. First, we validate the model simulation against observed dissolved oxygen concentrations, primary production, water column respiration, and sediment oxygen consumption. In the model simulation, heterotrophy is prevalent in shelf waters throughout the year, except near the mouths of the Mississippi and Atchafalaya rivers, where primary production exceeds respiratory oxygen consumption during June and July. During this time, efflux of oxygen to the atmosphere, driven by photosynthesis and surface warming, becomes a significant oxygen sink. A substantial fraction of primary production occurs below the pycnocline in summer. We investigate whether this primary production below the pycnocline is mitigating the development of hypoxic conditions with the help of a sensitivity experiment where we disable biological processes in the water column (i.e., primary production and water column respiration). With this experiment we show that below-pycnocline primary production reduces the spatial extent of hypoxic bottom waters only slightly. Our results suggest that the combination of physical processes (advection and vertical diffusion) and sediment oxygen consumption largely determine the spatial extent and dynamics of hypoxia on the Louisiana shelf.

  14. Numerical analysis of the primary processes controlling oxygen dynamics on the Louisiana Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L.; Fennel, K.; Laurent, A.; Murrell, M. C.; Lehrter, J. C.

    2014-10-01

    The Louisiana shelf in the northern Gulf of Mexico receives large amounts of freshwater and nutrients from the Mississippi/Atchafalaya River system. These river inputs contribute to widespread bottom-water hypoxia every summer. In this study, we use a physical-biogeochemical model that explicitly simulates oxygen sources and sinks on the Louisiana shelf to identify the key mechanisms controlling hypoxia development. First, we validate the model simulation against observed dissolved oxygen concentrations, primary production, water column respiration, and sediment oxygen consumption. In the model simulation, heterotrophy is prevalent in shelf waters throughout the year except near the mouths of the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers where primary production exceeds respiratory oxygen consumption during June and July. During this time, efflux of oxygen to the atmosphere, driven by photosynthesis and surface warming, becomes a significant oxygen sink while the well-developed pycnocline isolates autotrophic surface waters from the heterotrophic and hypoxic waters below. A substantial fraction of primary production occurs below the pycnocline in summer. We investigate whether this primary production below the pycnocline is mitigating the development of hypoxic conditions with the help of a sensitivity experiment where we disable biological processes in the water column (i.e. primary production and water column respiration). In this experiment below-pycnocline primary production reduces the spatial extent of hypoxic bottom waters only slightly. Our results suggest that the combination of physical processes and sediment oxygen consumption largely determine the spatial extent and dynamics of hypoxia on the Louisiana shelf.

  15. Water use in Alabama, 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mooty, Will S.; Richardson, Joanne R.

    1998-01-01

    During 1995, the amount of water withdrawn from ground- and surface- water sources in Alabama was estimated to be about 7,100 million gallons per day. Of this amount, about 6,650 million gallons per day were from surface-water sources and about 445 million gallons per day were from ground-water sources. Total withdrawals in Alabama in 1995 for nine withdrawal categories were as follows: thermoelectric power, 5,200 million gallons per day; public supply, 813 million gallons per day; self-supplied industry, 733 million gallons per day; irrigation, 139 million gallons per day; aquaculture, 93.9 million gallons per day; self-supplied domestic, 61.9 million gallons per day; livestock, 34.9 million gallons per day; mining, 20.0 million gallons per day; and self-supplied commercial, 4.88 million gallons per day. Total withdrawals in Alabama decreased about 12 percent from 1990 to 1995, despite an increase of about 5 percent in the State's total population during the same period. Total withdrawals have increased about 135 percent since 1955, however, because of greater than normal usage for generation of thermoelectric power in 1975, withdrawals peaked in that year.

  16. Groundwater availability of the Mississippi embayment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Brian R.; Hart, Rheannon M.; Gurdak, Jason J.

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater is an important resource for agricultural and municipal uses in the Mississippi embayment. Arkansas ranks first in the Nation for rice and third for cotton production, with both crops dependent on groundwater as a major source of irrigation requirements. Multiple municipalities rely on the groundwater resources to provide water for industrial and public use, which includes the city of Memphis, Tennessee. The demand for the groundwater resource has resulted in groundwater availability issues in the Mississippi embayment including: (1) declining groundwater levels of 50 feet or more in the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer in parts of eastern Arkansas from agricultural pumping, (2) declining groundwater levels of over 360 feet over the last 90 years in the confined middle Claiborne aquifer in southern Arkansas and northern Louisiana from municipal pumping, and (3) litigation between the State of Mississippi and a Memphis water utility over water rights in the middle Claiborne aquifer. To provide information to stakeholders addressing the groundwater-availability issues, the U.S. Geological Survey Groundwater Resources Program supported a detailed assessment of groundwater availability through the Mississippi Embayment Regional Aquifer Study (MERAS). This assessment included (1) an evaluation of how these resources have changed over time through the use of groundwater budgets, (2) development of a numerical modeling tool to assess system responses to stresses from future human uses and climate trends, and (3) application of statistical tools to evaluate the importance of individual observations within a groundwater-monitoring network. An estimated 12 million acre-feet per year (11 billion gallons per day) of groundwater was pumped in 2005 from aquifers in the Mississippi embayment. Irrigation constitutes the largest groundwater use, accounting for approximately 10 million acre-feet per year (9 billion gallons per day) in 2000 from the Mississippi

  17. Denitrification in cypress swamp within the Atchafalaya River Basin, Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Lindau, C W; Delaune, R D; Scaroni, A E; Nyman, J A

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen has been implicated as a major cause of hypoxia in shallow water along the Louisiana/Texas, USA coasts. Excess nitrogen (mainly nitrate) from Mississippi and Atchafalaya River drainage basins may drive the onset and duration of hypoxia in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Restoring and enhancing denitrification have been proposed to reduce and control coastal hypoxia and improve water quality in the Mississippi River Basin. Sediments were collected from six baldcypress restoration sites within the Atchafalaya River Basin, Louisiana, USA. The acetylene blockage technique was used to measure background and potential sediment denitrification rates. Denitrification fluxes were measured before nitrate addition (background rates) and after nitrate addition of 100mgNl(-1) (potential denitrification) at three seasonal temperatures. Background denitrification was low across all cypress swamp sites ranging from 0.9 to 8.8, 0.6 to 28.5 and 8.8 to 47.5g N evolved ha(-1)d(-1) at water/sediment column temperatures of 8, 22 and 30 degrees C, respectively. After nitrate addition, temperature had a significant effect on sediment denitrification potential. Maximum rates measured at 8, 22 and 30 degrees C were approximately 250-260, 550 and 970gNha(-1)d(-1), respectively. Most of the added nitrate in water columns, incubated at 8 degrees C, was removed after 65d compared to 32d and 17d at 22 and 30 degrees C, respectively. These results indicate cypress swamps have the potential to assimilate and process elevated levels of floodwater nitrate with denitrification being a major removal mechanism.

  18. Alabama SEP Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, Elizabeth M.

    2014-06-30

    Executive Summary In the fall of 2010, the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs (ADECA) launched the Multi-State Model for Catalyzing the National Home Energy Retrofit Market Project (Multi-State Project). This residential energy efficiency pilot program was a collaborative effort among the states of Alabama, Massachusetts, Virginia, and Washington, and was funded by competitive State Energy Program (SEP) awards through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this project was to catalyze the home energy efficiency retrofit market in select areas within the state of Alabama. To achieve this goal, the project addressed a variety of marketplace elements that did not exist, or were underdeveloped, at the outset of the effort. These included establishing minimum standards and credentials for marketplace suppliers, educating and engaging homeowners on the benefits of energy efficiency and addressing real or perceived financial barriers to investments in whole-home energy efficiency, among others. The anticipated effect of the activities would be increased market demand for retrofits, improved audit to retrofit conversion rates and growth in overall community understanding of energy efficiency. The four-state collaborative was created with the intent of accelerating market transformation by allowing each state to learn from their peers, each of whom possessed different starting points, resources, and strategies for achieving the overall objective. The four partner states engaged the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) to oversee a project steering committee and to manage the project evaluation for all four states. The steering committee, comprised of key program partners, met on a regular basis to provide overall project coordination, guidance, and progress assessment. While there were variances in program design among the states, there were several common elements: use of the Energy Performance Score (EPS) platform; an

  19. Alabama Allied Health Needs Assessment Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Libby V.

    This study assessed the supply of and demand for allied health professionals in Alabama, focusing on the relationship between supply and demand in various workplace settings in the context of Alabama's demographics, current educational programs, and projected changes in health care. The health care professions included in the study were all fields…

  20. Alabama Department of Education Quick Facts, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This brochure presents state statistics; Alabama public schools 2007-08; Alabama State Board of Education members; financial data; public school size and enrollment; transportation; school meals; school personnel, 2007-2008; graduation requirements; student assessment; additional enrollment; and dropouts, 2006-07.

  1. 2008-2009 Alabama Education Report Card

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Year after year, the goal of educators, parents, and concerned citizens throughout Alabama is to provide this state's children with the highest level of quality education possible. The future of Alabama's businesses, industries, commerce, labor force, arts, humanities, and countless other areas are determined by the education that is provided to…

  2. Alabama Public Library Service Annual Report, 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    This annual report highlights the accomplishments of the Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) during 1989. Introductory materials include a map of Alabama's Congressional districts, photographs of the executive board of APLS, and comments from the chairman of the executive board and from APLS' director. The following accomplishments are then…

  3. Alabama Public Education at a Glance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rains, Thomas; West, Jill; Mitchell, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    A+ Education Partnership is a statewide, non-partisan, non-profit organization that works to shape policy, improve teaching and learning, and engage communities in ongoing conversations about the best ways to create great schools for every child and build a bright future for Alabama. "Alabama Public Education at a Glance" provides in…

  4. Alabama Education Quick Facts, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This brochure presents state statistics; Alabama public schools 2009-10; Alabama State Board of Education members; financial data; public school size and enrollment, 2009-10 school year; transportation; school meals; school personnel, 2009-2010; graduation requirements; student assessment; additional enrollment; and dropouts in school year 2008-09.

  5. Alabama Counseling Association Journal, 1998-1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnuson, Sandy, Ed.; Norem, Ken, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document consists of the two issues of the "Alabama Counseling Association Journal" that make up volume 24. Articles in Issue 1 include: (1) "Learning Comes in Many Forms" (Holly Forester-Miller); (2) "Legislative, Legal, and Sociological Aspects of Alabama's Mental Health System" (David Gamble; Jamie S. Satcher); (3) "Peer Supervision: A…

  6. Alabama Education Quick Facts: Plan 2020

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This brochure presents state statistics for the following categories; Alabama public schools, 2012-13; Alabama State Board of Education members; financial data, FY 2012; public school size and enrollment, 2012-13 school year; transportation, 2012-13; school meals, 2011-12; school personnel, 2012-13; graduation rates, 2010-11; graduation…

  7. Alabama Public Library Service Annual Report, 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    This annual report highlights the accomplishments of the Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) during 1990. Introductory materials include a map of Alabama's Congressional districts, photographs of the executive board of APLS, and comments from the chairman of the executive board and from APLS' director. Accomplishments are reported under the…

  8. AWARE (Alabama Working at Reading Excellence).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Univ., Tuscaloosa. Coll. of Education.

    The selected material from the Right-to-Read Institute consists of: (1) Goals of the Institute and Specific Objectives, (2) Alabama Working at Reading Excellence Program, (3) What is the Right to Read?, (4) Objectives, (5) Activities - Studies, (6) Inventory, (7) Recommendations, (8) Alabama Population Characteristics and (9) Sounds and Light for…

  9. Cloud-to-ground lightning enhancement over Southern Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiger, Scott M.; Orville, Richard E.

    2003-10-01

    Fourteen years (1989-2002) of cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning data show a significant enhancement of lightning associated with Lake Charles and Baton Rouge, Louisiana. A peak density value of 7 flashes km-2 yr-1 exists on the western side of the Lake Charles urban area. A comparison of the Louisiana CG flash density distribution with the locations of PM10 (particulate matter less than 10 μm in diameter) sources strongly suggests that pollution plays a key role in lightning enhancement. Urban and sea breeze effects can be neglected. The values of median peak negative current show a sharp difference between land and the Gulf of Mexico; inland values are near 24 kA, while over the Gulf waters immediately offshore are over 30 kA. This observation, along with a relative minimum of negative peak current from the mouth of the Mississippi River southeastward seems to support the hypothesis that the underlying surface characteristics influence the calculated negative current distribution.

  10. Trends and causes of historical wetland loss in coastal Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bernier, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Wetland losses in the northern Gulf Coast region of the United States are so extensive that they represent critical concerns to government environmental agencies and natural resource managers. In Louisiana, almost 3,000 square kilometers (km2) of low-lying wetlands converted to open water between 1956 and 2004, and billions of dollars in State and Federal funding have been allocated for coastal restoration projects intended to compensate for some of those wetland losses. Recent research at the St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center (SPCMSC) focused on understanding the physical processes and human activities that contributed to historical wetland loss in coastal Louisiana and the spatial and temporal trends of that loss. The physical processes (land-surface subsidence and sediment erosion) responsible for historical wetland loss were quantified by comparing marsh-surface elevations, water depths, and vertical displacements of stratigraphic contacts at 10 study areas in the Mississippi River delta plain and 6 sites at Sabine National Wildlife Refuge (SNWR) in the western chenier plain. The timing and extent of land loss at the study areas was determined by comparing historical maps, aerial photographs, and satellite imagery; the temporal and spatial trends of those losses were compared with historical subsidence rates and hydrocarbon production trends.

  11. Seafloor erosional processes offshore of the Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twichell, David C.; Brock, John C.

    2011-01-01

    The Chandeleur Islands are a chain of barrier islands that lies along the eastern side of the modern Mississippi River Delta plain. The island chain is located near the seaward edge of the relict St. Bernard Delta, the part of the Mississippi Delta that formed between approximately 4,000 and 2,000 years before present and was later abandoned as sedimentation shifted southward. After abandonment of the St. Bernard Delta, deposits were reworked, and the sandy component was shaped into the Chandeleur Islands. With continued subsidence, the islands became separated from their original delta headland sources and presently are isolated from the mainland by the shallow Chandeleur Sound. Newly acquired geophysical data and vibracores provide an opportunity to better understand the processes that are shaping seafloor morphology (i.e., shape, geometry, and structure of the seafloor) on the inner shelf adjacent to the Chandeleur Islands. The inner shelf offshore of the Chandeleur Islands was mapped in 2006 and 2007 using swath bathymetry, sidescan sonar, and high-resolution seismic-reflection techniques. The detailed results of this study were published in December 2009 (Twichell and others, 2009) as part of a special issue of Geo-Marine Letters that documents early results from the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) Ecosystem Change and Hazard Susceptibility Project. This study addresses questions and concerns related to limited sand resources along the Louisiana shelf and their implications to long-term relative sea-level rise and storm impacts.

  12. Impact of an extreme event on the sediment budget: Hurricane Andrew in the Louisiana barrier islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    List, Jeffrey H.; Hansen, Mark E.; Sallenger,, Asbury H.; Jaffe, Bruce E.; Edge, B.L

    1997-01-01

    This paper examines the influence of Hurricane Andrew on the sediment budget of an 80-kilometer section of the Louisiana barrier islands west of the modern Mississippi delta. Because long-term bathymetric change has been extensively studied in this area, excellent baseline data are available for evaluating the impact of Hurricane Andrew. Results show that despite the high intensity of the storm and a storm track optimally positioned to impact the study area, the storm did not have an overwhelming influence on the sediment budget when compared to the changes occurring over the previous 50 years. For the Louisiana barrier islands, a 50-year record appears to be adequate for averaging the long-term contributions of both major and minor storm events to the sediment budget.

  13. Regional Jurassic geologic framework of Alabama coastal waters area and adjacent Federal waters area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.; Mancini, E.A.

    1989-01-01

    To date, numerous Jurassic hydrocarbon fields and pools have been discovered in the Cotton Valley Group, Haynesville Formation, Smackover Formation and Norphlet Formation in the tri-state area of Mississippi, Alabama and Florida, and in Alabama State coastal waters and adjacent Federal waters area. Petroleum traps are basement highs, salt anticlines, faulted salt anticlines and extensional faults associated with salt movement. Reservoirs include continental and marine sandstones, limestones and dolostones. Hydrocarbon types are oil, condensate and natural gas. The onshore stratigraphic and structural information can be used to establish a regional geologic framework for the Jurassic for the State coastal waters and adjacent Federal waters areas. Evaluation of the geologic information along with the hydrocarbon data from the tri-state area indicates that at least three Jurassic hydrocarbon trends (oil, oil and gas condensate, and deep natural gas) can be identified onshore. These onshore hydrocarbon trends can be projected into the Mobile area in the Central Gulf of Mexico and into the Pensacola, Destin Dome and Apalachicola areas in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico. Substantial reserves of natural gas are expected to be present in Alabama State waters and the northern portion of the Mobile area. Significant accumulations of oil and gas condensate may be encountered in the Pensacola, Destin Dome, and Apalachicola areas. ?? 1989.

  14. Watershed Boundary Dataset for Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, K. Van; Clair, Michael G.; Turnipseed, D. Phil; Rebich, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality, U.S. Department of Agriculture-Natural Resources Conservation Service, Mississippi Department of Transportation, U.S. Department of Agriculture-Forest Service, and the Mississippi Automated Resource Information System developed a 1:24,000-scale Watershed Boundary Dataset for Mississippi including watershed and subwatershed boundaries, codes, names, and areas. The Watershed Boundary Dataset for Mississippi provides a standard geographical framework for water-resources and selected land-resources planning. The original 8-digit subbasins (Hydrologic Unit Codes) were further subdivided into 10-digit watersheds (62.5 to 391 square miles (mi2)) and 12-digit subwatersheds (15.6 to 62.5 mi2) - the exceptions being the Delta part of Mississippi and the Mississippi River inside levees, which were subdivided into 10-digit watersheds only. Also, large water bodies in the Mississippi Sound along the coast were not delineated as small as a typical 12-digit subwatershed. All of the data - including watershed and subwatershed boundaries, subdivision codes and names, and drainage-area data - are stored in a Geographic Information System database, which are available at: http://ms.water.usgs.gov/. This map shows information on drainage and hydrography in the form of U.S. Geological Survey hydrologic unit boundaries for water-resource 2-digit regions, 4-digit subregions, 6-digit basins (formerly called accounting units), 8-digit subbasins (formerly called cataloging units), 10-digit watershed, and 12-digit subwatersheds in Mississippi. A description of the project study area, methods used in the development of watershed and subwatershed boundaries for Mississippi, and results are presented in Wilson and others (2008). The data presented in this map and by Wilson and others (2008) supersede the data presented for Mississippi by Seaber and others (1987) and U.S. Geological Survey (1977).

  15. Collecting and Reporting Dropout Data in Louisiana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Bobby J.; Kochan, Susan

    This paper describes the design and function of Louisiana's statewide student-level database, the Student Information System (SIS). In Louisiana the State Board of Elementary and Secondary Education adopted the dropout definition of the National Center for Education Statistics for use by all Louisiana public schools in the 1989-1990 school year.…

  16. Teaching about the Louisiana Purchase. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, John J.

    The year 2003 marks the bicentennial of the 1803 Treaty of France, by which the United States of America acquired the Louisiana Territory, an area of more than 828,000 square miles. Upon this acquisition, known as the Louisiana Purchase, the territory of the United States doubled. Historians consider the Louisiana Purchase to be a landmark event…

  17. Geology and underground water resources of northern Louisiana and southern Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Veatch, A.C.

    1906-01-01

    In the fall of 1902 arrangements were made with the Geological Survey of Louisiana for the writer to prepare a report on the geology and underground water resources of northern Louisiana. In the prosecution of this work it was found necessary, in order that the questions involved might be more thoroughly understood, to include that portion of the Coastal Plain in southern Arkansas southwest of Arkansas River, and the portion of northeastern Texas not discussed in Hill's exhaustive report on the artesian-water conditions of the Black and Grand prairies a After the Arkansas work was well in hand and before the Texas investigation had advanced beyond a few preliminary letters the writer was detailed to the Long Island, New York, investigation, which consumed the field and office time from February, 1903, to July, 1904.b The present report is thus based on the'field work of the fall and winter of 1902 and 1903, supplemented by several years' field work with the Geological Survey of Louisiana and private work in eastern Texas. It covers southern Arkansas and northern Louisiana and small portions of adjacent areas in Mississippi and Texas.

  18. Generalized potentiometric surface of the Evangeline and equivalent aquifers in Louisiana, 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Angel; Whiteman, Charles D.

    1985-01-01

    A generalized potentiometric-surface map defines the altitude of water levels for 1980 in wells in the Evangeline aquifer in southwestern Louisiana and stratigraphically equivalent aquifers in southeastern Louisiana. The Evangeline and equivalent aquifers increase in thickness from zero at the northern edge of the outcrop/subcrop belt to more than 2,000 feet along the southern limit of fresh water. The aquifers are recharged by rainfall on the overlying upland terrace deposits of south-central Louisiana, southeastern Louisiana, and southwestern Mississippi. The aquifers are under artesian conditions except locally in the recharge areas. The regional flow direction is primarily southward. Water levels in wells in the Evangeline aquifer are lowered by heavy pumping from the overlying Chicot aquifer in Evangeline and Acadia Parishes. Areally definable cones of depression result from pumpage from the Evangeline and equivalent aquifers in and near Baton Rouge, Eunice, and Ville Platte. Water levels may differ vertically within the aquifer near pumping centers. The map does not account for localized distortion of the regional flow pattern near these centers. (USGS)

  19. Final Technical Report. Upgrades to Alabama Power Company Hydroelectric Developments

    SciTech Connect

    Crew, James F.; Johnson, Herbie N.

    2015-03-31

    From 2010 to 2014, Alabama Power Company (“Alabama Power”) performed upgrades on four units at three of the hydropower developments it operates in east-central Alabama under licenses issued by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (“FERC”). These three hydropower developments are located on the Coosa River in Coosa, Chilton, and Elmore counties in east-central Alabama.

  20. Saltwater in shallow aquifers in east-central and northeastern Louisiana and southeastern Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huff, G.F.; Bonck, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    The chemistry of water from irrigation and monitor wells in east-central Louisiana indicates the presence of saltwater in the Mississippi River alluvial aquifer and the uppermost part of the Jasper aquifer system. The salinity of this groundwater makes it unsuitable for use in irrigation of salt-sensitive crops. The geochemistry of bromide (Br) and chloride (Cl) ions and strontium (Sr) isotopes indicated that this saltwater could have originated from the mixing of freshwater with briny water originating from the Carrizo-Wilcox aquifer at altitudes from 5,800 to 6,800 feet below sea level. However, in the absence of data on the concentrations of Br and Cl ions and the values of (87)Sr/(86)Sr in water from the Catahoula, Cockfield, and Sparta aquifers within the study area, no conclusive statement can be made on the origin of saltwater in the alluvial aquifer and the uppermost part of the Jasper aquifer system. Analyses of water from irrigation wells in northeastern Louisiana and southeastern Arkansas indicated the presence of saltwater in the Mississippi River alluvial aquifer. Saltwater probably moves from southern Chicot County, Arkansas, into northeastern Louisiana by flowing to the southwest along a fluvial channel eroded into the Cockfield Formation. Saltwater in the Mississippi River alluvial aquifer in northeastern Louisiana and southeastern Arkansas can be hazardous to salt-sensitive crops, such as rice, when used for irrigation. The geochemistry of Br and Cl ions indicated that saltwater in the Mississippi River alluvial aquifer of southern Chicot County in southeastern Arkansas has two geochemically distinct sources. One source, which has Br/Cl ratios less than that of modern seawater, could be derived from saltwater present in aquifers of Tertiary age; this saltwater could enter the alluvial aquifer by upward flow from below as part of the natural regional groundwater flow pattern. The other source, which has Br/Cl ratios greater than that of modern sea

  1. Child Labor Laws in Mississippi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Jerry H.

    Child labor laws have not attracted much attention in recent years. Much of the basic legislation and the case law dates from the early part of the 20th century. This paper discusses the Mississippi statutory law on the subject, compares that law with legislation in five other States, and discusses case law in Mississippi and in other States.…

  2. LOUISIANA BARRIER ISLAND EROSION STUDY.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger,, Asbury H.; Penland, Shea; Williams, S. Jeffress; Suter, John R.

    1987-01-01

    During 1986, the U. S. Geological Survey and the Louisiana Geological Survey began a five-year cooperative study focused on the processes which cause erosion of barrier islands. These processes must be understood in order to predict future erosion and to better manage our coastal resources. The study area includes the Louisiana barrier islands which serve to protect 41% of the nation's wetlands. These islands are eroding faster than any other barrier islands in the United States, in places greater than 20 m/yr. The study is divided into three parts: geological development of barrier islands, quantitative processes of barrier island erosion and applications of results. The study focuses on barrier islands in Louisiana although many of the results are applicable nationwide.

  3. Benthic Foraminiferal Census Data from Louisiana Continental Shelf Cores, Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osterman, Lisa E.; Kelly, Wendy S.; Ricardo, John P.

    2009-01-01

    An area of oxygen-depleted bottom- and subsurface-water (hypoxia = dissolved oxygen < 2 mg/L-1) occurs seasonally on the Louisiana Shelf near the Mississippi River. The area of hypoxia, also known as the 'dead zone', forms when spring and early summer freshwater flow from the Mississippi River supplies a large amount of nutrients to the shelf while creating a freshwater lens, or cap, above the shelf water. The excess nutrients cause phytoplankton blooms in the shallow shelf water. After the bloom ceases, the organic material sinks in the water column and uses up oxygen during decomposition. Thus, the subsurface waters become oxygen depleted. The seasonal dead zone exists until a reduction in freshwater flow, or overturning by storms, allows mixing of the water column to restore normal oxygen conditions (Rabalais and others, 1994, 1996; Rabalais, 2002). Since systematic measurement of the extent of the dead zone began in 1985, the overall pattern indicates that the area of the dead zone is increasing (Rabalais and Turner, 2001; Turner and others, 2005). Several studies have concluded that the expansion of the Louisiana Shelf dead zone is related to increased nutrients (primarily nitrogen, but possibly also phosphorous) in the Mississippi River drainage basin and is responsible for the degradation of Gulf of Mexico marine habitats (Goolsby and others, 2001). This paper presents the benthic foraminiferal data from 10 sediment cores collected from the Continental Shelf of Louisiana (table 1), obtained as part of an initiative to investigate the geographic and temporal extent of hypoxia prior to 1985 in the Gulf of Mexico. Benthic foraminifers provide a method to track the development of hypoxia prior to 1985 (Blackwelder and others, 1996; Sen Gupta and others, 1996). Previous work (Osterman, 2003) has shown statistically that the relative occurrence of three low-oxygen-tolerant species represents the modern seasonal Louisiana hypoxia zone. The cumulative percentage of

  4. Abatement of wetland loss through diversions of Mississippi River water using siphons

    SciTech Connect

    Van Beek, J.L.; Roberts, D.W.; Fournet, S. )

    1990-09-01

    The long-term maintenance and renewal of Louisiana's wetlands cannot be accomplished without diversion of sediment laden water from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers. Because of ramifications for flood control, navigation, and established estuarine resource uses, such diversions, at least initially, are likely to be limited to structures that permit flow to be taken from the upper part of the water column. To evaluate the potential benefits from such diversions in terms of sediment introduction into the wetlands, and the possibility of abatement of wetland loss through small structures that could be implemented at a local level, an existing diversion by means of a siphon was investigated. The investigation focused on the White's Ditch Siphon, in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana. Siphon operation was monitored for the 1989-1990 water year to determine water and sediment discharge characteristics and their relationship to those of the Mississippi River and to estuarine hydrology To determine sedimentation benefits to the adjacent marsh and the need for outfall management, sediment dispersal was evaluated and sediment deposition was compared for a site within the siphon outfall area and a control site. Results of the siphon monitoring are extended to larger scale diversions. On the basis of suspended load characteristics of the Mississippi River and the operational characteristics of a major structure, as related to the estuarine salinity regime and resource constraints, the extent to which such diversions are likely to offset subsidence and related wetland loss is evaluated.

  5. Density and abundance of Wilson's snipe Gallinago delicata in winter in the Lower Mississippi Flyway, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carroll, James M.; Krementz, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Wilson's snipe Gallinago delicata is one of the least studied North American game birds, and information on snipe populations and abundance is mostly unknown. We conducted roadside surveys stratified at the township level in the lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley (LMAV) in Arkansas, Mississippi and Louisiana, as well as the Red River Region, and the Gulf Coastal Plain of Louisiana during winters of 2009 and 2010. We identified observer, vegetation cover, and water cover as important covariates in estimating snipe densities. We detected 2915 snipe along 814 line transects (1450 km) for 2009 and 2010 combined. We estimated snipe densities of 8.05 individuals km-2 (95% CI: 4.57-14.17) in 2009, and 2.13 individuals km-2 (95% CI: 1.47-3.08) in 2010. We used the resulting snipe density estimates within the study area to calculate abundance estimates of 1 026 431 (95% CI: 582 707-1 806 774) in 2009, and 271 590 (95% CI: 187 435-392 722) in 2010 for the LMAV. Our data indicate that a road transect survey method is effective for estimating wintering snipe density and abundance in the lower Mississippi Flyway.

  6. 27 CFR 9.96 - Mississippi Delta.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mississippi Delta. 9.96... Mississippi Delta. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Mississippi Delta.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Mississippi...

  7. 27 CFR 9.96 - Mississippi Delta.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mississippi Delta. 9.96... Mississippi Delta. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Mississippi Delta.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Mississippi...

  8. 27 CFR 9.96 - Mississippi Delta.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mississippi Delta. 9.96... Mississippi Delta. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Mississippi Delta.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Mississippi...

  9. 27 CFR 9.96 - Mississippi Delta.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mississippi Delta. 9.96... Mississippi Delta. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Mississippi Delta.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Mississippi...

  10. 27 CFR 9.96 - Mississippi Delta.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mississippi Delta. 9.96... Mississippi Delta. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Mississippi Delta.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Mississippi...

  11. Two cases of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 infection after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita--Louisiana, October 2005.

    PubMed

    2006-01-20

    Louisiana was struck by Hurricane Katrina on August 29, 2005, and by Hurricane Rita on September 24, 2005. The two hurricanes caused unprecedented damage from wind and storm surge to the Louisiana Gulf Coast region, and levee breaks resulted in flooding of large residential areas in and around New Orleans. With the flooding, an immediate public health concern was the potential for outbreaks of infectious diseases, including cholera. Nearly all Vibrio infections in the United States are caused by noncholeragenic Vibrio species (e.g., V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, and non-O1, non-O139 V. cholerae). Cases of cholera rarely occur in the United States, and cholera epidemics, such as those reported in certain developing countries, are unlikely, even with the extreme flooding caused by the two hurricanes. This report describes the investigation by the Louisiana Office of Public Health and CDC into two cases of toxigenic V. cholerae O1 infection in a Louisiana couple; the cases were attributed to consumption of undercooked or contaminated seafood. Although noncholeragenic Vibrio illnesses were reported in 22 residents of Louisiana and Mississippi after Hurricane Katrina, no epidemic of cholera was identified, and no evidence exists of increased risk to Gulf Coast residents.

  12. Biogeochemical implications of levee confinement in the lowermost Mississippi River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galler, J. J.; Bianchi, T. S.; Alison, M. A.; Wysocki, L. A.; Campanella, R.

    With the recent formation of the Center for River-Ocean Studies (CeROS) at Tulane University in Louisiana (see http://www.tulane.edu/~ceros) and the emerging state-federal partnership that is creating river diversions to combat coastal land loss, increased attention is being paid to the lowermost Mississippi River, from Baton Rouge to the Gulf of Mexico, as a critical juncture and storage area for sediment particles and bio-active compounds.CeROS scientists, working with the US. Geological Survey and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, have undertaken a detailed re-assessment of the channel floor and water column of this region using geophysical and biogeochemical data collection, combined with historical data sets.

  13. Mississippi Basin nitrogen flux believed to cause Gulf hypoxia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goolsby, Donald A.

    2000-01-01

    An expanding hypoxic zone develops each spring and summer on the Louisiana-Texas shelf of the Gulf of Mexico, and nitrogen from the Mississippi River Basin has been implicated as one of the principal causes. Hypoxic conditions, which occur when dissolved oxygen concentrations are less than 2 mg/L, can cause stress or death in bottom-dwelling organisms that cannot leave the zone. The mid-summer extent of the hypoxic zone has more than doubled since it was first systematically mapped in 1985 [Rabalais et al., 1999]. The largest hypoxic zone measured to date occurred in 1999, when it reached ∼20,000 km2, about the size of the state of New Jersey [Rabalais, 1999].

  14. Energy analysis of nonmarket values of the Mississippi Delta.

    PubMed

    Cardoch, L; Day, J W

    2001-11-01

    An energy analysis was used to estimate nonmarket values under various land cover scenarios in the Mississippi Delta. Land loss since 1900 has led to a decline in nonmarket values from $3.1 billion/year in 1900 to $2.5 billion in 1990, resulting in a total loss of $29.4 billion. This loss is concentrated in the Barataria-Terrebonne basins, where nonmarket value has dropped from $1.6 billion/year in 1956 to $1.3 billion/year in 1988. Although values are projected to increase in the Atchafalaya basin (from $723 million/year in 1988 to $756 million/year in 2058), total nonmarket value for the Louisiana coast is projected to decrease to $2.1 billion/year under currently approved levels of restoration.

  15. Geologic framework of the Jurassic (Oxfordian) Smackover Formation the Alabama coastal waters area

    SciTech Connect

    Tew, B.H.; Mancini, E.A. ); Mink R.M.; Mann, S.D. ); Mancini, E.A.

    1993-09-01

    The Jurassic (Oxfordian) Smackover Formation is a prolific hydrocarbon-producing geologic unit in the onshore Gulf of Mexico area, including southwest Alabama. However, no Smackover strata containing commercial accumulations of oil or gas have thus far been discovered in the Alabama state coastal waters area (ACW). This study of the regional geologic framework of the Smackover Formation was done to characterize the unit in the ACW and to compare strata in the ACW with productive Smackover intervals in the onshore area. In the study area, the Smackover Formation was deposited on a highly modified carbonate associated with pre-Smackover topographic features. In the onshore Alabama, north of the Wiggins arch complex, an inner ramp developed in the area of the Mississippi interior salt basin and the Manila and Conecuh embayments. South of the Wiggins arch complex in extreme southern onshore Alabama and in the ACW, an outer ramp formed that was characterized by a much thicker Smackover section. In the outer ramp setting, four lithofacies associations are recognized: lower, middle, and upper outer ramp lithofacies (ORL) and the coastal dolostone lithofacies. The coastal dolostone lithofacies accounts for most of the reservoir-grade porosity in the outer ramp setting. The lower, middle, and upper ORL, for the most part, are nonporous. Volumetrically, intercrystalline porosity is the most important pore type in the coastal dolostone lithofacies. Numerous data in the ACW area indicate that halokinesis has created structural conditions favorable for accumulation and entrapment of oil and gas in the outer ramp lithofacies of the Smackover. Prolific hydrocarbon source rocks are present in the ACW, as evidenced by the significant natural gas accumulations in the Norphlet Formation. To date, however, reservoir quality rocks of the coastal dolostone lithofacies coincident with favorable structural conditions have not been encountered in the ACW.

  16. Prevalence of encysted Toxoplasma gondii in raptors from Alabama.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, D S; Smith, P C; Hoerr, F J; Blagburn, B L

    1993-12-01

    Little is known about the prevalence of encysted Toxoplasma gondii in wild birds. We examined the hearts and breast muscles from 101 raptors for encysted T. gondii. All of the raptors had been submitted for necropsy to the State Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, Auburn, Alabama. Tissues were digested in acid-pepsin solution and inoculated into groups of 3-5 laboratory mice. Toxoplasma gondii was isolated from 27 of 101 (26.7%) raptors: 8 of 12 (66.7%) red-shouldered hawks (Buteo lineatus), 13 of 27 (41.1%) red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), 1 of 4 (25%) Cooper's hawks (Accipiter cooperi), 1 of 5 (20%) great horned owls (Bubo virginianus), 4 of 15 (26.7%) barred owls (Strix varia), and 1 of 3 (33.3%) kestrels (Falco sparverius). Toxoplasma gondii was not isolated from 3 broad-winged hawks (Buteo platypterus), 3 sharp-shinned hawks (Accipiter striatus), 6 barn owls (Tyto alba), 9 screech owls (Asio otus), a Mississippi kite (Ictinia misisippiensis), 2 golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos), a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), 4 ospreys (Pandion haliaetus), 4 turkey vultures (Cathartes aura), or 2 black vultures (Coragyps atratus). No significant difference (P > 0.05) in prevalence was detected based on sex using chi-square analysis. Chi-square analysis of the data demonstrated that adult raptors had encysted stages of T. gondii significantly (P < 0.05) more often than did immature raptors. PMID:8277379

  17. Religion and Education in Louisiana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stader, David L.; Armenta, Tony; Hill, Flo

    Church-state issues in education have a long history in America. Although the U.S. Supreme Court has made several landmark decisions with regard to the separation of church and state in schools, strong conservative influences in Southern states, including Louisiana, have resulted in state statutes and individual school-district policies and…

  18. Salmon, Mississippi Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-04

    The Salmon, Mississippi, Site, also called the Tatum Dome Test Site, is a 1,470-acre tract of land in Lamar County, Mississippi, 21 miles southwest of Hattiesburg. The nearest town is Purvis, about 10 miles east of the site. The site is in a forested region known as the long-leaf pine belt of the Gulf Coastal Plain. Elevations in the area range from about 240 to 350 feet above sea level. The site overlies a salt formation called the Tatum Salt Dome. Land around the Salmon site has residential, industrial, and commercial use, although no one lives within the boundary of the site itself. The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, a predecessor agency of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense conducted two underground nuclear tests at the site under the designation of Project Dribble, part of a larger program known as the Vela Uniform program. Two gas explosive tests, designated Project Miracle Play, were also conducted at the site.

  19. Sediment data collected in 2010 from Cat Island, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buster, Noreen A.; Kelso, Kyle W.; Miselis, Jennifer L.; Kindinger, Jack G.

    2014-01-01

    Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, in collaboration with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, conducted geophysical and sedimentological surveys in 2010 around Cat Island, Mississippi, which is the westernmost island in the Mississippi-Alabama barrier island chain. The objective of the study was to understand the geologic evolution of Cat Island relative to other barrier islands in the northern Gulf of Mexico by identifying relationships between the geologic history, present day morphology, and sediment distribution. This data series serves as an archive of terrestrial and marine sediment vibracores collected August 4-6 and October 20-22, 2010, respectively. Geographic information system data products include marine and terrestrial core locations and 2007 shoreline data. Additional files include marine and terrestrial core description logs, core photos, results of sediment grain-size analyses, optically stimulated luminescence dating and carbon-14 dating locations and results, Field Activity Collection System logs, and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee metadata.

  20. Alabama Power Company HVAC Training Center

    SciTech Connect

    Lovvorn, N.

    1996-06-01

    Alabama Power Company`s (APCo`s) HVAC training Center began in 1986 and serves people from around the country. The staff has a combined field experience of over 75 years. This paper describes the training facility and program.

  1. 76 FR 9700 - Alabama Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ... Alabama program in the May 20, 1982, Federal Register (47 FR 22030). You can also find later actions..., deletes the language where a license becomes null and void and replaces it with the issuance of...

  2. Alabama Magnet School Races toward Job Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Morgan

    2002-01-01

    Describes Alabama's Brewbaker Technology Magnet High School, which was built for only $70 per square foot. Explores the relationship between its school-to-work, collaborative-learning approach and the building's design. (EV)

  3. Characteristics of CDOM Optical Properties in Two Mississippi River Influenced Estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Sa, E. J.

    2014-12-01

    Absorption and fluorescence properties of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) are investigated in two estuarine systems, the Barataria Basin and the Breton Sound, Louisiana, USA. These two estuarine systems located directly west and east of the Mississippi River delta have experienced significant wetland loss and have man-made freshwater diversion structures used to divert water and associated constituents from the Mississippi River into the two estuaries. In the Barataria Basin, water samples were obtained along an axial transect from the marine end member to the upper basin while in the Breton Sound, sampling was conducted along two major routes dominated by wetlands through which diverted water travels. An assessment of CDOM absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEMs) fluorescence properties along with parallel factor analysis of the EEMs data acquired under different river discharge conditions will be presented.

  4. Sex Determination of Carolina Wrens (Thryothorus ludovicianus) in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twedt, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    I identified sexual dimorphism in wing length (unflattened chord) of Carolina Wrens (Thryothorus ludovicianus) within the central Mississippi Alluvial Valley (northeast Louisiana and west-central Mississippi) and used this difference to assign a sex to captured wrens. Wrens were identified as female when wing length was less than 57.5 mm or male when wing length was greater than 58.5 mm. Verification of predicted sex was obtained from recaptures of banded individuals where sex was ascertained from the presence of a cloacal protuberance or brood patch. Correct prediction of sex was 81% for adult females and 95% for adult males. An alternative model, which categorized wrens with wing lengths of 58 and 59 mm as birds of unknown sex, increased correct prediction of females to 93% but reduced the number of individuals to which sex was assigned. These simple, predictive, wing-length-based models also correctly assigned sex for more than 88% of young (hatching-year) birds.

  5. The Mississippi Delta Region: Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Michael D.; Roberts, Harry H.

    2012-05-01

    The Mississippi delta region of south Louisiana houses a wealth of resources within a dynamic, subsiding landscape. Foundations for the delta region reflect Neogene evolution of the depocenter, whereas details of the modern landscape reflect late Pleistocene to Holocene evolution of the alluvial-deltaic plain. The Holocene delta plain was constructed by cyclical growth of deltaic headlands, followed by avulsion and relocation of the fluvial sediment source. Abandoned headlands were then submerged and reworked while a new headland was created at the site of active fluvial sediment input. Historic-period levees have decoupled the delta plain from its fluvial sediment source at the same time global sea-level rise was accelerating, which has accelerated delta-plain submergence. Diversions of Mississippi River water and sediment are necessary to achieve delta plain sustainability, but upstream dams trap ˜50% of the total sediment load, and there is not enough supply to keep pace with subsidence and accelerated sea-level rise. The future delta region will not resemble the recent past, and significant drowning is inevitable.

  6. Mississippi River Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    As the Mississippi River enters the Gulf of Mexico, it loses energy and dumps its load of sediment that it has carried on its journey through the mid continent. This pile of sediment, or mud, accumulates over the years building up the delta front. As one part of the delta becomes clogged with sediment, the delta front will migrate in search of new areas to grow. The area shown on this image is the currently active delta front of the Mississippi. The migratory nature of the delta forms natural traps for oil. Most of the land in the image consists of mud flats and marsh lands. There is little human settlement in this area due to the instability of the sediments. The main shipping channel of the Mississippi River is the broad stripe running northwest to southeast.

    This image was acquired on May 24, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping

  7. Role of salt-marsh erosion in barrier island evolution and deterioration in coastal Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, D.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Barrier shoreline erosion in Louisiana reaches over 10 m/year, and island area decreased by 40% between 1880 and 1979. Salt-marsh erosion is an important factor in evolutionary barrier shoreline development and is presently contributing, both directly and indirectly, to the deterioration of Louisiana's barrier islands. The marshes originally developed as fresh marshes associated with regression of Mississippi River delta lobes. After abandonment, salinity gradually increased and natural habitat change occurred as subsidence of deltaic sediments and transgression of the coastline by marine processes proceeded. The marsh surface is subjected to relative sea level rise and unless there is sufficient sedimentation to maintain marsh elevation, erosional processes become dominant. Increased inundation of marsh vegetation stresses even halophytic vegetation and leads to plant death. Examination of variations in marsh topography over an area of approximately 1 ha. revealed marked variations in the frequency and duration of tidal inundation. Increased flooding of lower areas can be sufficient to cause plant death and the opening of marsh ponds. As small ponds expand and coalesce to form larger areas of open water, wave action becomes important in eroding pond banks and mobilizing sediment from the bed causing pond deepening. Fragmentation of the marsh by these subsidence-induced processes is part of the evolution of morphostratigraphic forms in the Mississippi deltaic plain from erosional headland with flanking barriers to barrier island arc.

  8. Analysis of shoreline and geomorphic change for Breton Island, Louisiana, from 1869 to 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Terrano, Joseph F.; Flocks, James G.; Smith, Kathryn E. L.

    2016-04-19

    Many barrier islands in the United States are eroding and losing elevation substantively because of storm surge, waves, and sea-level changes. This is particularly true for the deltaic barrier system in Louisiana. Breton Island is near the mouth of the Mississippi River at the southern end of the Chandeleur barrier island chain in southeast Louisiana. This report expands on previous geomorphic studies of Breton Island by incorporating additional historic and recent datasets. Multiple analyses focus on longand short-term shoreline change, as well as episodic events and anthropogenic modification. Analyses periods include long term (1869–2014), long-term historic (1869–1950), post-Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet (1950–2014), pre/post-Hurricane Katrina (2004–5), and recent (2005–14). In addition to shoreline change, barrier island geomorphology is evaluated using island area, elevation, and sediment volume change. In the long term (1869–2014), Breton Island was affected by landward transgression, island narrowing, and elevation loss. Major storm events exacerbated the long-term trends. In the recent period (2005–14), Breton Island eroded at a slower rate than in the long-term and gained area and total sediment volume. The recent accretion is likely because of the lack of major storms since Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

  9. Analysis of native water, bed material, and elutriate samples of major Louisiana waterways, 1975

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Demas, Charles R.

    1976-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, conducted a series of elutriate studies in selected reaches of major navigable waterways of Louisiana. As defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, an elutriate is the supernatant resulting from the vigorous 30-minute shaking of one part bottom sediment from the dredging site with four parts water (vol/vol) collected from the dredging site followed by one hour settling time and appropriate centrifugation and a 0.45-micron filtration. The elutriate studies were initiated to evaluate possible environmental effects of proposed dredging activities in selected reaches of Louisiana waterways. The waterways investigated were the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet, Breton Sound, Mississippi River downstream from Baton Rouge, Bayou Long, Intracoastal Waterway (east and west of the Harvey Canal), Three Rivers area, Ouachita River, Barataria Bay, Houma Navigation Canal, Atchafalaya Bay (Ship Channel), Berwick Bay, Intracoastal Waterway (Port Allen to Morgan City), Petite Anse area, and Calcasieu River and Ship Channel. The Geological Survey collected 227 samples of native water and bed (bottom) material from 130 different sites. These samples (as well as elutriates prepared from mixtures of native water and bed material) were analyzed for selected metal, pesticide, nutrient, and organic constituents. An additional 116 bed samples collected at 58 sites were analyzed for selected pesticides; and 4 additional native-water samples from 2 sites were analyzed for selected metal pesticide, nutrient, and organic constituents. (Woodard-USGS)

  10. The role of the Wetland Reserve Program in conservation efforts in the Mississippi River Alluvial Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Sammy L.; Twedt, Daniel J.; Wilson, R. Randy

    2006-01-01

    The Mississippi River Alluvial Valley includes the floodplain of the Mississippi River from Cairo, Illinois, USA, to the Gulf of Mexico. Originally this region supported about 10 million ha of bottomland hardwood forests, but only about 2.8 million ha remain today. Furthermore, most of the remaining bottomland forest is highly fragmented with altered hydrologic processes. During the 1990s landscape-scale conservation planning efforts were initiated for migratory birds and the threatened Louisiana black bear (Ursus americanus luteolus). These plans call for large-scale reforestation and restoration efforts in the region, particularly on private lands. In 1990 the Food, Agriculture, Conservation and Trade Act authorized the Wetlands Reserve Program (WRP). The WRP is a voluntary program administered by the United States Department of Agriculture that provides eligible landowners with financial incentives to restore wetlands and retire marginal farmlands from agricultural production. As of 30 September 2005, over 275,700 ha have been enrolled in the program in the Mississippi River Alluvial Valley, with the greatest concentration in Louisiana, Arkansas, and Mississippi, USA. Hydrologic restoration is common on most sites, with open-water wetlands, such as moist-soil units and sloughs, constituting up to 30% of a given tract. Over 33,200 ha of open-water wetlands have been created, potentially providing over 115,000,000 duck-use days. Twenty-three of 87 forest-bird conservation areas have met or exceed core habitat goals for migratory songbirds and another 24 have met minimum area requirements. The WRP played an integral role in the fulfillment of these goals. Although some landscape goals have been attained, the young age of the program and forest stands, and the lack of monitoring, has limited evaluations of the program's impact on wildlife populations.

  11. Horizontal technology helps spark Louisiana`s Austin chalk trend

    SciTech Connect

    Koen, A.D.

    1996-04-29

    A handful of companies paced by some of the most active operators in the US are pressing the limits of horizontal technology to ramp up Cretaceous Austin chalk exploration and development (E and D) across Louisiana. Companies find applications in Louisiana for lessons learned drilling horizontal wells to produce chalk intervals in Texas in Giddings, Pearsall, and Brookeland fields. Continuing advances in horizontal well technology are helping operators deal with deeper, hotter reservoirs in more complex geological settings that typify the chalk in Louisiana. Better horizontal drilling, completion, formation evaluation, and stimulation techniques have enabled operators to produce oil and gas from formations previously thought to be uneconomical. Most of the improved capabilities stem from better horizontal tools. Horizontal drilling breakthroughs include dual powered mud motors and retrievable whipstocks, key links in the ability to drill wells with more than one horizontal lateral. Better geosteering tools have enabled operators to maintain horizontal wellbores in desired intervals by signaling bit positions downhole while drilling. This paper reviews the technology and provides a historical perspective on the various drilling programs which have been completed in this trend. It also makes predictions on future drilling successes.

  12. The last 1000 years of natural and anthropogenic low-oxygen bottom-water on the Louisiana shelf, Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osterman, L.E.; Poore, R.Z.; Swarzenski, P.W.

    2008-01-01

    The relative abundance of three species of low-oxygen tolerant benthic foraminifers, the PEB index, in foraminiferal assemblages from sediment cores is used to trace the history of low-oxygen bottom-water conditions on the Louisiana shelf. Analyses of a network of box cores indicate that the modern zone of chronic seasonal hypoxia off the Mississippi Delta began to develop around 1920 and was well established by 1960. The pattern of development over the last century is consistent with the interpretation that the formation of modern chronic hypoxia is related to anthropogenic activities resulting in increased transport of nutrients to the Louisiana shelf. The PEB index in two gravity- and box core pairs (MRD05-4 and 05-6) indicates that low-oxygen bottom-water events have occurred periodically on the Louisiana Shelf for at least the last 1000 14C years. The pre-1900 low-oxygen bottom-water events are likely caused by intervals of increased Mississippi River discharge and widespread wetland export. The PEB record in gravity cores indicates that the pre-1900 low-oxygen bottom-water events were not as well developed or as geographically extensive as the modern hypoxia zone. We conclude that the development of low-oxygen bottom-water on the Louisiana shelf is a natural process that has been negatively modified by human activities in the last 100 years.

  13. 78 FR 69743 - Environmental Impact Statement: Caddo Parish, Louisiana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... Administrator, Louisiana Division, Federal Highway Administration, 5304 Flanders Drive, Suite A, Baton Rouge, LA.... Bolinger, Division Administrator, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. BILLING CODE 4910-22-P...

  14. Vegetation types in coastal Louisiana in 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sasser, Charles E.; Visser, Jenneke M.; Mouton, Edmond; Linscombe, Jeb; Hartley, Steve B.

    2014-01-01

    During the summer of 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey, Louisiana State University, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, and the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Coastal and Nongame Resources Division jointly completed an aerial survey to collect data on 2013 vegetation types in coastal Louisiana. Plant species were listed and their abundance classified. On the basis of species composition and abundance, each marsh sampling station was assigned a marsh type: fresh, intermediate, brackish, or saline (saltwater) marsh. The current map presents the data collected in this effort.

  15. In Brief: Protecting Louisiana's coasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2007-12-01

    With numerous wetlands restoration and protection projects slated for Louisiana, a well-developed implementation strategy that can address a number of uncertainties is important for the success of these projects, according to a 14 December report by the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO). GAO specifically urged maintaining the collaborative process that is used by Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection and Restoration Act (CWPPRA) program agencies, with scientists, engineers, and others working together to plan and design restoration projects. The report also noted the need to address such other issues as having an integrated monitoring system to determine whether goals and objectives are met as well as to understand that projects can encounter significant setbacks due to storms and hurricanes, landscape and structural causes, and spiraling project costs. Louisiana state officials anticipate the state could receive about $8.5 billion over the next 10 years for coastal restoration and protection. Nearly 40% of all coastal wetlands in the lower 48 U.S. states are located in Louisiana. For more information, visit the Web site: http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d08130.pdf.

  16. NGPL Louisiana station nears completion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-22

    Construction on a 3,600-hp compressor station on the Louisiana line of Natural Gas Pipeline Co. of America near Henry, La., was scheduled for completion later this month. The Louisiana line extends some 205 miles along the Gulf Coast between New Caney, Tex., and the Henry hub area. The new compressor station will be located about 44 miles west of the Henry hub. Work began on the $5.1 million expansion project in Cameron Parish, La., in May following Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) certification. By mid-September, the compressor building, service building, and meter house has been erected, final compressor inspections were under way, and gas piping tie-ins had been completed, according to NGPL. Powered by three 1,200-hp Solar Saturn gas-fired centrifugal engines, the station is designed to increase the capacity of the Louisiana line east of the Stingray pipeline system by up to 220 MMcfd. Current capacity for east bound flows is approximately 900 MMcfd.

  17. 75 FR 2896 - Alabama Disaster Number AL-00028

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ... Only for the State of Alabama (FEMA-1870-DR), dated 12/31/2009. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding... Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of Alabama, dated 12/31/2009, is hereby amended to...

  18. 2. ALABAMA GATES LOOKING SOUTHEAST ALONG LINED CHANNEL, NOTE CHEMICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. ALABAMA GATES LOOKING SOUTHEAST ALONG LINED CHANNEL, NOTE CHEMICAL PURIFICATION TANK IN DISTANCE FOR KEEPING DOWN GROWTH OF ALGAE - Los Angeles Aqueduct, Alabama Gates, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  19. 26. STARBOARD PROFILE OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN) WITH SAILS SET Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. STARBOARD PROFILE OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN) WITH SAILS SET Original 2-3/4'x2-1/4' photograph taken c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  20. Selected Mississippi Library Laws: From the Mississippi Code of 1972 current through the 1995 Regular Session of the Mississippi Legislature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Library Commission, Jackson.

    This document is a compilation of selected laws of the state of Mississippi that pertain to or impact libraries. Excerpts from the Mississippi state constitution, from the Mississippi Code of 1972, and from relevant amendments are all included. Coverage of the statutes extends to issues such as: (1) legal holidays; (2) liability; (3) zoning; (4)…

  1. Proceedings of the conference on coastal erosion and wetland modification in Louisiana: causes, consequences, and options

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boesch, Donald F.; Boesch, Donald F.

    1982-01-01

    This volume contains 16 papers and panel discussions from a conference held in Baton Rouge, La., 5-6 October 1981. The presentations consider the causes and consequences of coastal erosion and wetland modification in Louisiana and the mitigative options available to slow or reverse the rapid rate of coastal land loss. Detailed habitat mapping studies have allowed accurate estimates of coastal habitat change and land loss through 1978. Projections from these rates of change indicate an annual rate of land loss in coastal Louisiana in the early 1980's of approximately 130 km2/yr (50 m2/yr). The projected effects of wetland modification on the bountiful living resources of coastal Louisiana (fisheries, fur and hide bearers and waterfowl) are major because of the close dependence of these resources on estuarine wetlands. These changes and others related to flood protection, transportation and ownership of mineral resources are projected to have extensive social and economic consequences. Options proposed to slow coastal land loss include major and minor diversion of the Mississippi River, barrier island and shoreline restoration protection, hydrological management of wetlands and more restrictive permitting of dredging activities.

  2. Predicting geogenic arsenic contamination in shallow groundwater of south Louisiana, United States.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ningfang; Winkel, Lenny H E; Johannesson, Karen H

    2014-05-20

    Groundwater contaminated with arsenic (As) threatens the health of more than 140 million people worldwide. Previous studies indicate that geology and sedimentary depositional environments are important factors controlling groundwater As contamination. The Mississippi River delta has broadly similar geology and sedimentary depositional environments to the large deltas in South and Southeast Asia, which are severely affected by geogenic As contamination and therefore may also be vulnerable to groundwater As contamination. In this study, logistic regression is used to develop a probability model based on surface hydrology, soil properties, geology, and sedimentary depositional environments. The model is calibrated using 3286 aggregated and binary-coded groundwater As concentration measurements from Bangladesh and verified using 78 As measurements from south Louisiana. The model's predictions are in good agreement with the known spatial distribution of groundwater As contamination of Bangladesh, and the predictions also indicate high risk of As contamination in shallow groundwater from Holocene sediments of south Louisiana. Furthermore, the model correctly predicted 79% of the existing shallow groundwater As measurements in the study region, indicating good performance of the model in predicting groundwater As contamination in shallow aquifers of south Louisiana.

  3. East Louisiana continental shelf sediments: a product of delta reworking

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, Gregg R.; Kingdinger, Jack L.; Penland, Shea; Williams, S. Jeffress

    1995-01-01

    Data from 77 vibracores were integrated with 6,700 line-km of high- resolution seismic reflection profiles collected off the eastern Louisiana coast in the region of the St. Bernard Delta, the first of the Holocene highstand deltas of the Mississippi River. Seismic fades and sediment facies were integrated in order to establish the stratigraphic details within this relict delta. Results provide a regional geologic framework from which comparisons can be made with other areas. Holocene deposits in the study area overlie a heavily dissected surface interpreted to represent a lowstand erosional surface. Resting on this surface is a thin unit of relatively clean, quartz sand interpreted to have been deposited during early transgression. This unit is overlain by sediments of the St. Bernard Delta, a seaward-prograding, coarsening-upward wedge of sands and muds that contain vertically-stacked units of deltaic succession. Two or more prograding units separated by an unconformity, delineated from regional seismic profiles, may represent laterally shifting subdelta lobes. Surficial sediments consist of a thin unit of sands and muds derived from and reflecting the individual subenvirons of the underlying delta. Holocene inner-shelf development off eastern Louisiana has been controlled by relative sea-level rise and sediment supply. Sediment supply and deposition are a product of delta progradation and delta-lobe switching. The modern shelf configuration and surficial sediment distribution patterns reflect reworking of underlying deltaic deposits. The lack of modern sediment input helps to maintain the imprint of this ancient delta on the modern shelf surface.

  4. Assessing the sedimentation deficit problem in Louisiana's coastal salt marshes

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, D.J.

    1990-09-01

    The imbalance between relative sea-level rise and vertical marsh accretion is frequently cited as a major factor in the problem of wetland loss in coastal Louisiana. Relative sea-level rise rates are high, compared to the rest of the Gulf coast, owing to subsidence of Holocene Mississippi deltaic plain sediments, and although marsh accretion rates are also high, in comparison with other coastal areas of the US, they are usually insufficient to maintain the relative elevation of the marsh surface. This situation is commonly referred to as a sedimentation deficit. One of the problems with evaluating the magnitude of the sedimentation deficit problem in Louisiana, and its spatial variation, is that measurements of subsidence and marsh accretion or sedimentation are rarely made on similar time scales. Subsidence affecting the marsh surface is composed of a number of factors, including compaction of recently deposited sediments, regional downwarping, and diagenesis of underlying Pleistocene and earlier sediments. The total effect of these factors, in combination with eustatic sea-level rise, is frequently obtained from tide gauge measurements over the last 50 years or so. Subsidence is also measured by dating sedimentary horizons of known depth that characterize surface environments. Carbon-14 is a common tool for this type of study and subsidence is then averaged over periods of up to several thousand years. In comparison, marsh accretion or sediment deposition can be measured over periods from several hundred years, using Lead-210 dating, to several days, using marsh surface sediment traps. The many techniques available for measuring the sedimentary status of the marsh surface can provide a variety of information concerning the processes responsible for sediment deposition and vertical accretion.

  5. Libraries in Mississippi: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/mississippi.html Libraries in Mississippi To use the sharing features on ... Jackson G. V. (Sonny) Montgomery VA Medical Center Library Service (142D) 1500 E. Woodrow Wilson Jackson, MS ...

  6. 77 FR 58056 - Mississippi Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ... conditions of approval of the Mississippi program in the September 4, 1980, Federal Register (45 FR 58520... during regular business hours at the following location: Mississippi Office of Geology, Department...

  7. Restructuring, Restoring and Rebuilding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Kendra

    2006-01-01

    The 27 institutions damaged by hurricanes Katrina or Rita--there were 14 in Mississippi, 12 in Louisiana and one in Alabama--estimate their combined physical damages at $1.4 billion. But rather than providing aid, the Louisiana Legislature was forced to call for $77 million in cuts in November, leading to a wrenching gut-check on many campuses.…

  8. Mortality associated with Hurricane Katrina--Florida and Alabama, August-October 2005.

    PubMed

    2006-03-10

    On August 25, 2005, Hurricane Katrina made landfall between Hallandale Beach and Aventura, Florida, as a Category 1 hurricane, with sustained winds of 80 mph. Storm effects, primarily rain, flooding, and high winds, were substantial; certain areas reported nearly 12 inches of rainfall. After crossing southern Florida and entering the Gulf of Mexico, the hurricane strengthened and made landfall in southeastern Louisiana on August 29 as a Category 3 hurricane, with sustained winds of 125 mph. Katrina was one of the strongest hurricanes to strike the United States during the past 100 years and was likely the nation's costliest natural disaster to date. This report summarizes findings and recommendations from a review of mortality records of Florida's Medical Examiners Commission (FMEC) and the Alabama Department of Forensic Science (ADFS). CDC was invited by the Florida Department of Health (FDOH) and the Alabama Department of Public Health (ADPH) to assess the mortality related to Hurricane Katrina. The mortality review was intended to provide county-based information that would be used to 1) define the impact of the hurricane, 2) describe the etiology of deaths, and 3) identify strategies to prevent or reduce future hurricane-related mortality. Combined, both agencies identified five, 23, and 10 deaths, respectively, that were directly, indirectly, or possibly related to Hurricane Katrina. Information from the characterization of these deaths will be used to reduce hurricane-related mortality through early community awareness of hurricane-related risk, prevention measures, and effective communication of a coordinated hurricane response plan.

  9. Origin of modern quartzarenite beach sands in a temperate climate, Florida and Alabama, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehring, Joseph L.; McBride, Earle F.

    2007-10-01

    Quartzarenite coastal sands extending from eastern Louisiana eastward to Apalachee Bay, Florida, are anomalous: their position 7° north of the Tropic of Cancer contrasts with most other known modern quartzarenites, most of which are in a tropical setting. To determine the origin of these quartzarenite beach sands, we compared the mineralogy of samples taken from Alabama and Florida beaches, rivers that supply sand to the coast, and well cuttings representative of sandstone bedrock exposed in the Alabama coastal plain. To help assess the abundance of recycled quartz, and accepting the conventional wisdom that rounded sand-size quartz grains are recycled, we quantified the roundness of quartz grains in thin sections of river, beach, and well samples. We also determined the abundance of recycled grains with authigenic quartz using cathodoluminescence. River sands on Precambrian and Paleozoic bedrock in the study area have subarkose and sublitharenite compositions. However, as far as 200 km inland from the coast, river sands have attained quartzarenite composition and all rivers are presently delivering sand with at least 97% quartz to the coast. Rivers develop quartzarenite sand composition where they traverse poorly consolidated Tertiary sandstones, all of which we sampled are composed of > 95% quartz. Published experimental work indicates that abrasional rounding of sand-size quartz by rivers is insignificant and rounding in beaches is extremely slow. Hence, the abundance of quartz grains with some degree of rounding (96% for beaches; > 75% for rivers) further attests to the abundance of recycled quartz.

  10. Alabama's Education Report Card, 2011-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Educational progress has been moving in the right direction for several years in Alabama. Now, with the implementation of Alabama's own Plan 2020, an even higher level of accountability for students, teachers, administrators, support systems, and schools/school systems, Alabama is poised to experience unprecedented growth. Add to that, the…

  11. Assessing the importance of tropical cyclones on continental margin sedimentation in the Mississippi delta region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dail, Michael. B.; Reide Corbett, D.; Walsh, J. P.

    2007-08-01

    Recent research on the Mississippi margin indicates notable seasonal variation in seabed dynamics. During years with minimal tropical-system activity, sediments initially deposited from late spring to early fall are remobilized by wind-driven currents and wave energy during extra-tropical weather systems in the winter. This research reveals the profound significance of tropical cyclones on Louisiana Shelf sedimentation. The amount of material delivered to and advected across the shelf by recent tropical cyclones is considerably larger than that related to winter storm systems. In Fall 2004, the river-dominated shelf of Louisiana was impacted by three tropical systems in less than a month, including Hurricane Ivan. Ivan, with maximum sustained winds in excess of 74 m s -1 (144 knots) and a minimum measured central pressure of 910 mbar, was the eighth most intense Atlantic hurricane on record at the time. In order to assess the impact these tropical systems had on the continental margin west of the Mississippi delta, seabed samples were collected from box cores in October 2004 and analyzed for particle-reactive radionuclides 234Th, 7Be, and 210Pb. Radiochemical data and observations from X-radiographs indicate event-driven sediment deposits ranged from 4 to 30 cm on the shelf and 2-6 cm in the Mississippi Canyon. These deposits exhibit distinct radiochemical signatures and differ visually and texturally from the underlying sediment. The well-developed physical stratification and graded nature of the deposits observed in core X-radiographs suggests that the sediment could have been deposited from sediment-gravity flows. Inventories of 7Be and 7Be/ 234Th xs ratios reveal this series of cyclones transported considerably more material to the outer shelf and slope than periods of minimal tropical-system activity. When compared to seasonal depositional rates created by winter storms, tropical-cyclone-related event deposits on the middle and outer shelf are up to an order

  12. Analyses of native water and dredged material from southern Louisiana waterways, 1975-76

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Demas, Charles R.; Higgins, Patricia C.

    1977-01-01

    From June 1975 to July 1976 the U.S. Geological Survey conducted nine dredging and seven postdredging studies related to water quality in selected reaches of major navigable waterways of southern Louisiana. Samples were collected from the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet, Mississippi River at Southwest Pass, Mississippi River at New Orleans, Bayou Rigaud near Grand Isle, Barataria Bay and Waterway, Bayou La Carpe near Houma, Atchafalaya Bay (Ship Channel), Lower Atchafalaya River area, Intracoastal Waterway near Calumet, Intracoastal Waterway (Port Allen to Morgan City), Petite Anse area, and Calcasieu River and Ship Channel. These studies were conductd to determine potential environmental effects of dredging activities in the waterways. The Geological survey collected, treated, and analyzed 383 water and water-sediment mixture samples from 85 dredging sites and 142 postdredging samples (72 sites). Water samples were collected 100 yards upstream and downstream from the dredge effluent, from the disposal area, and from the effluent outfall during the dredge phase of the study; samples were collected at former dredge sites during the postdredging phase. Samples were analyzed for selected metals, pesticides, nutrients, and organic constituents. The analytical data are presented in tables. Sampling sites are shown on maps. (Woodard-USGS)

  13. Space Radar Image of Mississippi Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is a radar image of the Mississippi River Delta where the river enters into the Gulf of Mexico along the coast of Louisiana. This multi-frequency image demonstrates the capability of the radar to distinguish different types of wetlands surfaces in river deltas. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 2, 1995. The image is centered on latitude 29.3 degrees North latitude and 89.28 degrees West longitude. The area shown is approximately 63 kilometers by 43 kilometers (39 miles by 26 miles). North is towards the upper right of the image. As the river enters the Gulf of Mexico, it loses energy and dumps its load of sediment that it has carried on its journey through the mid-continent. This pile of sediment, or mud, accumulates over the years building up the delta front. As one part of the delta becomes clogged with sediment, the delta front will migrate in search of new areas to grow. The area shown on this image is the currently active delta front of the Mississippi. The migratory nature of the delta forms natural traps for oil and the numerous bright spots along the outside of the delta are drilling platforms. Most of the land in the image consists of mud flats and marsh lands. There is little human settlement in this area due to the instability of the sediments. The main shipping channel of the Mississippi River is the broad red stripe running northwest to southeast down the left side of the image. The bright spots within the channel are ships. The colors in the image are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; green is C-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; blue is X-band vertically transmitted, vertically received. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars

  14. Burning Mississippi: Letters Home, Hollywood History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarrow, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Recollects summer 1964, when hundreds of civil rights workers went to Mississippi to aid Black voter registration. Points out that the movie "Mississippi Burning" ignores the courageous struggle of Mississippi Blacks and, instead, presents a disempowering version of history focusing on violent White males (the Klan and the FBI). (SV)

  15. Smart Bodies: Louisiana Responds to Youth Overweight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Ellen P.; Holston, Denise; Tuuri, Georgianna

    2005-01-01

    In Louisiana, it is estimated that almost 33% of school-age children are at risk for becoming overweight or are already overweight (Louisiana Office of Public Health, 2004). Studies have shown that poor nutrition, physical inactivity, and weight problems often associated with being overweight adversely affect academic performance in school…

  16. Louisiana Folklife: A Guide to the State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitzer, Nicholas R., Ed.

    Louisiana is composed of a vast array of traditional cultures and activities. This resource directory to Louisiana folk arts and folk communities aims to promote better understanding and preservation of the cultural settings and meanings of those things already well known and to explicate the lesser-known activities that comprise living folk…

  17. Unique cover crops for Louisiana sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Louisiana sugarcane production practices provide a tremendous opportunity for the use of cover crops following the final sugarcane harvest in the fall of one year and prior to replanting sugarcane during the summer of the next year. A Louisiana sugarcane field is typically replanted every four years...

  18. State Education Finance and Governance Profile: Louisiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaikh, Naveed A.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents Louisiana's education finance and governance profile. Louisiana witnessed a 3.9% decline in population during the period from 2000 to 2007. Poverty persists both in urban and rural areas of the state, as demonstrated by visible poverty both in the agricultural parishes and in major cities such as New Orleans and Shreveport…

  19. 77 FR 55890 - Louisiana Disaster # LA-00048

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... ADMINISTRATION Louisiana Disaster LA-00048 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Louisiana (FEMA... INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409...

  20. 77 FR 30350 - Louisiana Disaster #LA-00045

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-22

    ... ADMINISTRATION Louisiana Disaster LA-00045 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Louisiana dated 05/15... INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409...

  1. 77 FR 30349 - Louisiana Disaster #LA-00044

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-22

    ... ADMINISTRATION Louisiana Disaster LA-00044 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Louisiana dated 05/15... INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409...

  2. 50 CFR 32.37 - Louisiana.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Louisiana. 32.37 Section 32.37 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING Refuge-Specific Regulations for Hunting and Fishing § 32.37 Louisiana. The following refuge units...

  3. Politician of the Year 2008: Lifting Louisiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2008-01-01

    This article features Mitch Landrieu and his contributions to the upliftment of Louisiana through libraries. After the onslaught of hurricanes Katrina and Rita, Landrieu said they realized how important libraries are. Now in his second term as lieutenant governor of Louisiana, Landrieu oversees the Office of the State Library along with the…

  4. Catholic Schools: A First in Louisiana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Monica L.; Hunt, Thomas C.

    1991-01-01

    Offers a brief history of Louisiana, highlighting the establishment of Catholic schools by missionaries before the development of public schools. Covers the French and Spanish, and Black Catholics in Louisiana, the Code Noir and the missionary church, the beginning of public schooling, north Louisianan schools, and the civil war. (DMM)

  5. Geochemical relationships of petroleum in Mesozoic reservoirs to carbonate source rocks of Jurassic Smackover Formation, southwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Claypool, G.E.; Mancini, E.A.

    1989-07-01

    Algal carbonate mudstones of the Jurassic Smackover Formation are the main source rocks for oil and condensate in Mesozoic reservoir rocks in southwestern Alabama. This interpretation is based on geochemical analyses of oils, condensates, and organic matter in selected samples of shale (Norphlet Formation, Haynesville Formation, Trinity Group, Tuscaloosa Group) and carbonate (Smackover Formation) rocks. Potential and probable oil source rocks are present in the Tuscaloosa Group and Smackover Formation, respectively. Extractable organic matter from Smackover carbonates has molecular and isotopic similarities to Jurassic oil. Although the Jurassic oils and condensates in southwestern Alabama have genetic similarities, they show significant compositional variations due to differences in thermal maturity and organic facies/lithofacies. Organic facies reflect different depositional conditions for source rocks in the various basins. The Mississippi Interior Salt basin was characterized by more continuous marine to hypersaline conditions, whereas the Manila and Conecuh embayments periodically had lower salnity and greater input of clastic debris and terrestrial organic matter. Petroleum and organic matter in Jurassic rocks of southwestern Alabama show a range of thermal transformations. The gas content of hydrocarbons in reservoirs increases with increasing depth and temperature. In some reservoirs where the temperature is above 266/degrees/F(130/degrees/C), gas-condensate is enriched in isotopically heavy sulfur, apparently derived from thermochemical reduction of Jurassic evaporite sulfate. This process also resulted in increase H/sub 2/S and CO in the gas, and depletion of saturated hydrocarbons in the condensate liquids.

  6. Radioisotopic data of sediment collected in Mobile and Bon Secour Bays, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marot, Marci E.; Smith, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this study was to determine the extent of natural and (or) anthropogenic impacts on the sedimentary records of Mobile and Bon Secour Bays, Alabama during the last 150 years. These bays are unique in that anthropogenic activities are generally widespread and span both the eastern and western shorelines. However, there is a clear distinction in the types of human development and infrastructure between the western and eastern shorelines. These activities and the differences in land-use and -change influence the overall supply and remobilization of sediment to and within the bay. These factors could subsequently threaten the health and integrity of these environments and their ability to mitigate against long-term processes associated with climate change. In an attempt to characterize long-term accretion rates within the Mobile Bay Estuarine System (MBES), seven box cores were collected and analyzed for excess lead-210 (210Pbxs, the difference between total and supported 210Pb) and cesium-137 (137Cs) activities. The MBES receives sediment and water from the Alabama and Tombigbee River watersheds, which converge into the Mobile-Tensaw River (MTR) system just prior to discharging into Mobile Bay. Riverine discharge from the MTR system to the bay is second only to the Mississippi River discharge to the Gulf of Mexico for the conterminous United States.

  7. An ecosystem analysis of oil and gas development on the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf. Biological services program

    SciTech Connect

    Gallaway, B.J.

    1981-08-01

    The Texas-Louisiana shelf ecosystem in the Gulf of Mexico is described in terms of its physiographic, oceanographic, and biological characteristics and as a recipient of oil and gas development activities and effluents. The northeast sector of the ecosystem is influenced by Mississippi River discharge, whereas high-salinity Caribbean water affects the southwest sector. Soft-bottom communities are prominent, characterized by economically valuable penaeid shrimps. The coral reef communities are more important than would normally be assumed. Pelagic communities are little known and harbor only a few commercially valuable species. Observed effects of oil and gas development activities and effluents are described.

  8. Mississippi State Axion Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, John

    2014-03-01

    The Mississippi State Axion Search (MASS) is an attempt to improve the limit on the mass coupling parameter of the Axion. The design features a sealed cavity partitioned by a lead wall into which RF power is transmitted. Another antenna on the far end of the cavity serves as the detector. The signal acquired by this antenna is fed through an integrator and a series of pre-amps and lock-ins before reaching the data acquisition system. The data acquisition system, written in the LabView front end DASYLab, operates at 1 kHz in synchronicity with a TTL pulse that resets the integrator. The value recorded by the DAQ is, therefore, the maximum voltage of integration in the millisecond period. The Axion signal would appear in the data as a voltage excess. Several measures have been implemented with more being developed to ensure the validity of detections. Large excesses are cut by an electronics system, and smaller anomalies will be excised in the data analysis. Results will also compared to a complete Monte Carlo simulation currently in development. Prajwal Mohanmurthy*, Dipangkar Dutta, Nicholas Fowler, Mikhail Gaerlan, Kris Madsen, Adam Powers, Amy Ray, David Reed, Robertsen Riehle, Mitra Shabestari, Zachary Windham, Zach Short.

  9. Ground-water program in Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaMoreaux, P.E.

    1955-01-01

    Several recent years of drought have emphasized the importance of Alabama's ground-water supplies, a matter of concern to us all.  So far we have been blessed in Alabama with ample ground-water, although a combination of increased use, waste, pollution, and drought has brought about critical local water shortages.  These problems serve as a fair warning of what lies ahead if we do not take the necessary steps to obtan adequate knowledge of our ground-water resources.

  10. Numerical modeling of hydrodynamics and sediment transport in lower Mississippi at a proposed delta building diversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meselhe, Ehab A.; Georgiou, Ioannis; Allison, Mead A.; McCorquodale, John A.

    2012-11-01

    SummaryThe Mississippi River Delta of south Louisiana USA is a highly engineered system with extensive levees, flood control, and diversion structures. This region is experiencing a high rate of coastal wetland loss. Solutions to divert or re-direct a portion of the River's sediment to benefit wetlands and reduce coastal land-loss are considered. The question that must be answered, regarding the impact and feasibility of sediment diversions is: What is the sediment-water ratio at a diversion? To help answer this question a numerical model of hydrodynamics and sediment transport supported by extensive field data is used to analyze a proposed sediment diversion near Myrtle Grove, Louisiana. This location is at a River Kilometer 90 above the Head of Passes - exit of the Mississippi River to the Gulf of Mexico. The numerical model showed that the location of the diversion, the size and the alignment of the diversion channel are critical parameters affecting the sediment-water ratio captured by the diversion. The analysis shows that locating the intake near a lateral sandbar increases the sediment-water ratio in the diversion. Further, the analysis shows that a larger diversion channel with a favorable alignment orientation to the flow direction in the river results in higher sediment-water ratio.

  11. The geomorphology of the Mississippi River chenier plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Penland, S.; Suter, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    The chenier plain of the Mississippi River is a shore-parallel zone of alternating transgressive clastic ridges separated by progradational mudflats. The term chenier is derived from the cajun term chene for oak, the tree species that colonizes the crests of the higher ridges. The Mississippi River chenier plain stretches 200 km from Sabine Pass, Texas, to Southwest Point, Louisiana and ranges between 20 and 30 km wide, with elevations of 2-6 m. The timing and the process of formation could be re-evaluated in the light of new chronostratigraphic findings in the Mississippi River delta plain. The stratigraphic relationship between the Teche and Lafourche delta complexes and Ship Shoal offshore indicates that these delta complexes belong to different delta plains that developed at different sealevels. It appears that the Teche delta complex is associated with the late Holocene delta plain which developed 7000 to 3000 yrs B.P. when sealevel stood 5-6 m lower than present. A regional transgression occurred between approximately 3000 BP and 2500 yrs B.P., leading to the transgressive submergence of the late Holocene delta plain, producing the regional Teche shoreline. The timing of this transgression conforms to the age of the most landward ridge in the chenier plain, the Little Chenier-Little Pecan Island trend, which dates at about 2500 yrs B.P. This ridge trend was originally interpreted as representing the Teche delta complex switching event with the landward Holocene/Pleistocene contact representing the high stand shoreline. The implication of this new interpretation is that the Little Chenier-Little Pecan Island trend represents the high stand shoreline, a continuation of the Teche shoreline separating the late Holocene and Recent delta plains, and that the Holocene/Pleistocene contact represents the leading edge of the marshes transgressing onto the Prairie Terrace. Significant mudflat progradation seems to require a westerly position of the Mississippi River

  12. Analyses of water, core material, and elutriate samples collected near New Orleans, Louisiana (Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, and vicinity hurricane protection project)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leone, Harold L.

    1976-01-01

    When a hurricane approaches the New Orleans, Louisiana area, the accompanying tides and heavy rainfall increase the level of water in Lake Borgne, Mississippi Sound, and Lake Pontchartrain and pose a major threat of water damage to the populated areas. During Hurricane Betsy (1965), for example, the level of Lake Pontchartrain rose as much as 13 feet. Nineteen core-material-sampling sites were chosen by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers as possible borrow areas for fill material to be used in levee construction for flood protection around Lake Pontchartrain. Twenty-three receiving-water sites were also selected to represent the water that will contact the proposed levees. Selected nutrients, metals, pesticides, and other organic constituents were analyzed from bed-material and native-water samples as well as upon elutriate samples of specific core material-receiving water systems. The results of these analyses are presented without interpretation. (Woodard-USGS)

  13. Surficial sediment character of the Louisiana offshore continental shelf region: a GIS compilation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, S. Jeffress; Arsenault, Matthew A.; Buczkowski, Brian J.; Reid, Jane A.; Flocks, James; Kulp, Mark A.; Penland, Shea; Jenkins, Chris J.

    2007-01-01

    The Louisiana coastal zone, comprising the Mississippi River delta plain stretching nearly 400 km from Sabine Pass at the Texas border east to the Chandeleur Islands at the Mississippi border, represents one of North America’s most important coastal ecosystems in terms of natural resources, human infrastructure, and cultural heritage. At the same time, this region has the highest rates of coastal erosion and wetland loss in the Nation due to a complex combination of natural processes and anthropogenic actions over the past century. Comparison of historical maps dating back to 1855 and recent aerial photography show the Louisiana coast undergoing net erosion at highly variable rates. Rates have increased significantly during the past several decades. Earlier published statewide average shoreline erosion rates were >6 m/yr; rates have increased recently to >10 m/yr. The increase is attributable to collective action of storms, rapid subsidence, and pervasive man-made alterations of the rivers and the coast. In response to the dramatic landloss, regional-scale restoration plans are being developed by a partnership of federal and state agencies for the delta plain that have the objectives of maintaining the barrier islands, reducing wetland loss, and enhancing the natural sediment delivery processes. There is growing awareness that the sustainability of coastal Louisiana's natural resources and human infrastructure depends on the successful restoration of natural geologic processes. Critical to the long term success of restoration is scientific understanding of the geologic history and processes of the coastal zone region, including interactions between the rivers, wetlands, coast, and inner shelf. A variety of geophysical studies and mapping of Late Quaternary sedimentary framework and coastal processes by U.S. Geological Survey and other scientists during the past 50 years document that the Louisiana delta plain is the product of a complex history of cyclic delta

  14. Low-Frequency Response Following the Passage of Hurricane Andrew on the Texas-Louisiana Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, S. M.; Smith, D. C.; Dimarco, S. F.

    2009-12-01

    During August 24th through 27th in 1992, Hurricane Andrew passed through the Gulf Of Mexico almost directly over several moorings on the easternmost Louisiana shelf portion of the Texas-Louisiana Shelf (LATEX) coastal ocean monitoring program. Examination of the current meter time-series showed the existence of fast moving, long shelf waves over the entire Texas-Louisiana shelf west of the storm passage for up to 12 days after direct forcing ceased. The LATEX program featured 31 moorings each with 3 current meters over the 10, 20, 50, and 200 meter isobaths in 5 cross sectional lines with additional coverage on the 200 meter isobath from the Louisiana-Mississippi River delta, to Corpus Christi, Texas. Additionally, several pressure records from LATEX and several NOAA historical coastal tide gauge data from Sabine Pass to Port Isabella, Texas were incorporated. Raw, 3-hour low pass filtered, and 40-hour low pass filtered versions of the current data were analyzed. The pressure data used were detided using a least squares fit, and the tidal records were detided using the NOAA predicted tides for that location. All data were analyzed using a wavelet analysis to determine the spectra over time. The analyzed data shows that the shelf response was largely dominated in the internal Kelvin wave mode. The wave propagated towards the west on the shelf at approximately 400 km/day. These results are contrasted and compared with wave modes predicted for coastal trapped wave solutions. The output of a coastal ocean model simulation using a forced wind field similar to the storm are also contrasted and compared with the observed data.

  15. Export of Dissolved Lignin from Coastal Wetlands to the Louisiana Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, T. S.; Dimarco, S. F.; Smith, R. W.; Schreiner, K. M.

    2008-12-01

    Here we report on spatial and temporal changes in the concentration and composition of dissolved lignin- phenols in surface and bottom waters off the Louisiana coast (USA). Samples were collected at 7 stations on 2 cruises (April, and July, 2008) along a transect that spanned from inside Terrebonne Bay, Louisiana (12 m water depth) to the outer-most station on the inner Louisiana shelf (21 m water depth). The highest average concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved lignin, during both cruises, occurred at the interface between Terrebonne Bay and the inner shelf. Average DOC and dissolved lignin concentrations were significantly higher in April than in July across most stations. Based on hydrologic data, these higher concentrations clearly reflect a combined mixing of DOM from plume waters to the west and local marsh inputs. The cinnamyl/vanillyl (C/V) and syringyl/vanillyl (S/V) ratios indicated that the predominant source of lignin was from non-woody angiosperms - likely the dominant species of wetland plants Spartina alterniflora and S. patens (Spartina spp.) that border the entire bay. The high vanillic acid to vanillin (Ad/Al)v ratios for all stations were typical of that found near estuarine boundaries, where biologically- and photochemically-mediated lignin decay processes are important. This preliminary data indicates that wetlands provide another source of dissolved organic matter (DOM) to the Louisiana shelf that likely contributes to microbial food resources and hence hypoxia, especially in the context of the instability and extensive erosion of these marshes over the past ca. 50 years. This has important implications for the current management plan to reduce hypoxia in the GOM, particularly in those regions that extend west of the nutrient-rich highly productive near-field zones of Atchafalaya-Mississippi river plumes.

  16. The ecology of Barataria Basin, Louisiana: An estuarine profile

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, W.H.; Day, J.W. Jr.

    1987-07-01

    The Barataria Basin lies entirely in Louisiana between the natural levees of the active Mississippi River and the abandoned Bayou Lafourche distributary. It is characterized by a network of interconnecting water bodies which allows transport of water, materials, and migrating organisms throughout the basin. Natural and artificial levees and barrier islands are the only high, well-drained ground in the basin, which is otherwise characterized by extensive swamp forests and fresh, brackish, and salt marshes. These wetlands and water bodies are extremely productive biologically and provide valuable nursery habitat for a number of commercial and recreational fish and shellfish, as well as habitat for wintering waterfowl and furbearers. The basin is a dynamic system undergoing constant change because of geologic and human processes. The network of bays, lakes, and bayous has gradually enlarged over time due to natural subsidence and erosion. Superimposed on these natural processes has been the construction of levees for flood control and network of canals constructed for oil and gas exploration and extraction. These human activities have altered natural hydrologic patterns in the basin and may directly or indirectly contribute to wetland losses. Controlling wetland deterioration in the basin is a major management concern.

  17. Seasonal sleep effects on Louisiana aerial applicators' safety.

    PubMed

    Gregory, J M; Barbosa, R N

    2010-01-01

    Sleep management is one of the documented factors affecting safety and health. Using SLEEP (Sleep Loss Effects on Everyday Performance), a web-based model that integrates the dynamics of sleep to predict performance loss, aerial applicators licensed to work in the state of Louisiana were surveyed and evaluated for sleep deprivation. On and off season sleeping patterns were compared. During the off season, agricultural pilots reported having average sleeping time (6.9 hours), while during the farming season, because of their grueling schedule (sometimes working 100 hours a week), pilots reported sleeping only 3 hours per day in the week before the survey was made. Sleep deprivation greatly increases the chances of accidents. In the Mississippi delta region, 84% of the fatal accidents in the past nine years involving agricultural pilots were ruled as caused by human factors. Younger pilots are particularly at risk due to their limited flying experience and greater sleep needs. The agricultural pilot community would likely benefit from educational programs focused on better sleep management and the value and limitations of countermeasures to cope with fatigue. PMID:20222271

  18. Modeling waves and circulation in Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Signell, Richard P.; List, Jeffrey H.

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is conducting a study of storm-driven sediment resuspension and transport in Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana. Two critical processes related to sediment transport in the lake are (1) the resuspension of sediments due to wind-generated storm waves and (2) the movement of resuspended material by lake currents during storm wind events. The potential for sediment resuspension is being studied with the wave prediction model which simulates local generation of waves by wind and shallow-water effects on waves (refraction, shoaling, bottom friction, and breaking). Long-term wind measurements are then used to determine the regional "climate" of bottom orbital velocity (showing the spatial and temporal variability of wave-induced currents at the bottom). The circulation of the lake is being studied with a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. Results of the modeling effort indicate that remote forcing due to water levels in Mississippi Sound dominate the circulation near the passes in the eastern end of the lake, while local wind forcing dominates water movement in the western end. During typical storms with winds from the north-northeast or the south-southeast, currents along the south coast near New Orleans generally transport material westward, while material in the central region moves against the wind. When periods of sustained winds are followed by a drop in coastal sea level, a large amount of suspended sediment can be flushed from the lake.

  19. Archive of digital Chirp subbottom profile data collected during USGS cruise 08CCT01, Mississippi Gulf Islands, July 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forde, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Flocks, James G.; Worley, Charles R.

    2011-01-01

    In July of 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted geophysical surveys to investigate the geologic controls on island framework from Ship Island to Horn Island, Mississippi, for the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) Ecosystem Change and Hazard Susceptibility project. Funding was provided through the Geologic Framework and Holocene Coastal Evolution of the Mississippi-Alabama Region Subtask (http://ngom.er.usgs.gov/task2_2/index.php); this project is also part of a broader USGS study on Coastal Change and Transport (CCT). This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital Chirp seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, Geographic Information System (GIS) files, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs, observer's logbook, and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata. Gained (a relative increase in signal amplitude) digital images of the seismic profiles are also provided. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansion of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report.

  20. New technology N products in alabama

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because of high fertilizer N prices, growers are interested in using less expensive sources of N and using fertilizer additives to reduce ammonia volatilization losses from urea sources. An experiment on a Lucedale fine sandy loam in Central Alabama (Prattville Research Unit) was conducted in 2007 ...

  1. New technology N products in alabama

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because of high fertilizer N prices, growers are interested in using less expensive sources of N and using fertilizer additives to reduce ammonia volatilization losses from urea sources. An experiment on a Lucedale fine sandy loam in Central Alabama (Prattville Research Unit) was conducted in 2007 t...

  2. Alabama Public Library Service Annual Report, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    This annual report summarizes activities of the Alabama Public Library Service for the fiscal year 1992. The following general areas are discussed: (1) agency services, including agency restructuring and personnel lay-offs, children's summer library program, the state union list of serials, automated systems, and production of a second edition of…

  3. Implementation of Alabama Resources Information System, ARIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, B. E.

    1978-01-01

    Development of ARIS - Alabama Resources Information System is summarized. Development of data bases, system simplification for user access, and making information available to personnel having a need to use ARIS or in the process of developing ARIS type systems are discussed.

  4. 75 FR 60371 - Alabama Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ... Register (47 FR 22030). You can also find later actions concerning the Alabama program and program... hearing until 4 p.m., c.d.t. on October 15, 2010. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments, identified by SATS No. AL-075-FOR by any of the following methods: E-mail: swilson@osmre.gov . Include ``SATS No....

  5. 76 FR 9642 - Alabama Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ... Alabama program in the May 20, 1982, Federal Register (47 FR 22030). You can also find later actions... the proposed amendment in the September 30, 2010, Federal Register (75 FR 60371). In the same document... the racial, gender, geographic, urban/rural and economic diversity of the state. This seven...

  6. Chemical Technician Manpower Survey: State of Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Donald; And Others

    The study was undertaken to assess the needs of Alabama's industry for chemical technicians and to determine the kinds and levels of skills required by major employers. Of the 75 organizations responding to the questionnaire with usable data, 62 were private industries, 6 were testing laboratories, and 7 were federal agencies. Generally, the study…

  7. Alabama Kids Count 2002 Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Apreill; Bogie, Don

    This Kids Count data book examines statewide trends in well-being of Alabamas children. The statistical portrait is based on 18 indicators in the areas of child health, education, safety, and security: (1) infant mortality rate; (2) low weight births; (3) child health index; (4) births to unmarried teens; (5) first grade retention; (6) school…

  8. Financial Reporting for Alabama Public Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Commission on Higher Education, Montgomery.

    Guidelines for preparing year-end financial reports are provided for Alabama public university staff to insure that reporting formats produce comparable financial reports and to keep up with recent developments in college accounting and financial reporting. The public institutions comply with two publications issued by the American Institute of…

  9. The University of Alabama's Integrated Science Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainey, Larry; Mitrook, Kim

    This program, supported by the Center for Communication and Educational Technology at the University of Alabama, incorporates the perspectives of biology, earth/space science, chemistry, and physics into an innovative science curriculum for the middle grades. Students are engaged for 20 minutes 3 times a week by an on-air instructor who is doing…

  10. Alabama Public Library Service. Annual Report, 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    This report on Alabama public and regional libraries and their services includes brief discussions of the year's state and federal aid, public library development, interlibrary cooperation, library automation, summer reading programs, services for the blind and physically handicapped, planning and research, library services to institutions,…

  11. Continuing Education in Alabama after One Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutton, Donnie; And Others

    Statistical data are presented on the attitudes, opinions, and participation patterns of 291 Alabama public health workers involved during the 1967-68 in statewide professional continuing education programs. Reactions to program components (instructional television, study manuals, group discussion sessions) and specific topics are summarized. Item…

  12. 78 FR 11577 - Alabama Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... Alabama program in the May 20, 1982, Federal Register (47 FR 22030). You can also find later actions... initiative. We announced receipt of the proposed amendment in the September 5, 2012, Federal Register (77 FR... competition, herbaceous ground cover on areas planted with woody vegetation or planted to food plots shall...

  13. Exploratory Programs in Alabama Middle Grades Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Louis L.; Allen, Michael G.; McKenna, Beverly

    Many educators believe that middle grades schools have a responsibility to capitalize on the natural curiosity of young adolescents through the use of an exploratory curriculum to help students understand the world in which they live. This study examined the status of middle grades exploratory programs in Alabama. A 22-item questionnaire was sent…

  14. 40 CFR 81.301 - Alabama.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Birmingham area is a maintenance area for the 1-hour NAAQS for purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X. Alabama... affecting § 81.301 see the List of CFR Sections Affected which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... County Choctaw County Clarke County Clay County Cleburne County Coffee County Colbert County...

  15. Significance of selected lineaments in Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drahovzal, J. A.; Neathery, T. L.; Wielchowsky, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    Four lineaments in the Alabama Appalachians that appear on ERTS-1 imagery have been geologically analysed. Two of the lineaments appear to have regional geologic significance, showing relationships to structural and stratigraphic frameworks, water and mineral resources, geophysical anomalies, and seismicity. The other two lineaments are of local geologic significance, but, nevertheless, have important environmental implications.

  16. Alabama Public Library Service Annual Report, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    This annual report summarizes activities of the Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) for the fiscal year 1995. The APLS is charged with improving library services throughout the state to ensure that all citizens have access to quality library and information services. During fiscal year 1995, major building renovations were completed with the…

  17. Alabama Kids Count 2001 Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Apreill; Bogie, Don

    This Kids Count data book examines statewide trends in well-being for Alabama's children. The statistical portrait is based on 17 indicators in the areas of health, education, safety, and security. The indicators are: (1) infant mortality rate; (2) low weight births; (3) child health index; (4) births to unmarried teens; (5) first grade retention;…

  18. Alabama Counseling Association Journal, 1997-1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnuson, Sandy, Ed.; Norem, Ken, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This document consists of the two issues of the "Alabama Counseling Association Journal" published during 1997. The focus of the journal is on communicating ideas and information that will help counselors to implement the counseling role and develop the profession of counseling. The following articles are contained in issue 1: "Management and…

  19. Natural gas plays in Jurassic reservoirs of southwestern Alabama and the Florida panhandle area

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A. Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa ); Mink, R.M.; Tew, B.H.; Bearden, B.L. )

    1990-09-01

    Three Jurassic natural gas trends can be delineated in Alabama and the Florida panhandle area. They include a deep natural gas trend, a natural gas and condensate trend, and an oil and associated natural gas trend. These trends are recognized by hydrocarbon types, basinal position, and relationship to regional structural features. Within these natural gas trends, at least eight distinct natural gas plays can be identified. These plays are recognized by characteristic petroleum traps and reservoirs. The deep natural gas trend includes the Mobile Bay area play, which is characterized by faulted salt anticlines associated with the Lower Mobile Bay fault system and Norphlet eolian sandstone reservoirs exhibiting primary and secondary porosity at depths exceeding 20,000 ft. The natural gas and condensate trend includes the Mississippi Interior Salt basin play, Mobile graben play, Wiggins arch flank play, and the Pollard fault system play. The Mississippi Interior Salt basin play is typified by salt anticlines associated with salt tectonism in the Mississippi Interior Salt basin and Smackover dolomitized peloidal and pelmoldic grainstone and packstone reservoirs at depths of approximately 16,000 ft. The Mobile graben play is exemplified by faulted salt anticlines associated with the Mobile graben and Smackover dolostone reservoirs at depths of approximately 18,000 ft. The Wiggins arch flank play is characterized by structural traps consisting of salt anticlines associated with stratigraphic thinning and Smackover dolostone reservoirs at depths of approximately 18,000 ft. The Pollard fault system play is typified by combination petroleum traps. The structural component is associated with the Pollard fault system and reservoirs at depths of approximately 15,000 ft. These reservoirs are dominantly Smackover dolomitized oomoldic and pelmoldic grainstones and packstones and Norphlet marine, eolian, and wadi sandstones exhibiting primary and secondary porosity.

  20. Floods of February-March 1961 in the southeastern States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Harry Hawthorne; Somers, William Philip

    1961-01-01

    Widespread, prolonged, disastrous floods struck parts of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and Florida following heavy rains Feb. 17-26, 1961. Three distinct low-pressure systems recurred in essentially the same area. Precipitation totaled more than 18 inches in some areas. Multiple floods of small streams became superimposed in the large rivers to produce rare, record-breaking peaks and prolonged inundation. Four lives were lost; one in Louisiana and three in Mississippi. Highways, railroads, urban areas, and farms were heavily damaged.

  1. Paleochannels and Sediment Characteristics of the Chenier Plain Inner Shelf, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Garcia, A.; Fagherazzi, S.; Orange, D.

    2011-12-01

    In the last 3000 yrs, sediments from the Mississippi Delta have been transported to the western part of the Louisiana shelf, triggering beach progradation through a series of shell and sandy ridges (cheniers) separated by muddy hollows. Distinct events of chenier plain development have been explained as being the result of delta lobe switching in the Mississippi delta combined to local processes responsible for formation of beach ridges, recurved spits, eolian deposits, storm berms, and natural levees. In the present work we investigate the recent infill of the inner shelf off the Chenier Plain coast, just west of the recent deltaic deposits of the Mississippi River. We use shallow seismic analysis and the identification of paleochannels to understand their relationship with current rivers off the present coastline. We have been able to identify four seismic units U1 to U4 and their associated surfaces and discontinuities. A tentative reconstruction for the last 20 ky sedimentary infill is provided, correlating well with the datations available for the area. The identification and tracking of several buried channels across the shelf in units U1 and U3 let us track the position of the Mermentau-Calcasieu hydrological system in previous lowstands. It is interpreted that the Mermentau river was flowing more eastward during the Wisconsinan, occupying the location of our study and was then diverted to the west as a result of coastal processes and the development of the Chenier plains. Also, the Mermentau was re-occupying almost the same location at different lowstands, and only when the Chenier formed (due to reactivation of the west Mississippi lobe), the Mermentau was deviated westward due to sediment accumulation at the shoreline.

  2. Mississippi: The View from Tougaloo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Clarice T.; Rogers, Oscar Allan, Jr.

    The historical development of Tougaloo College in Mississippi, beginning with its inception in 1869, is examined. The founding body of the college was the American Missionary Association, which responded to the educational needs of the newly emancipated blacks immediately following the end of the Civil War. The account begins with a history of the…

  3. Mississippi Kindergarten Guidelines. Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Richard A.

    This document details regulations that govern the administration of kindergarten programs in Mississippi public school districts. The guidelines are prefaced by a list of members of the K-3 Reading Work Group, who reviewed the regulations; a list of six learning principles; and the state's kindergarten philosophy with nine accompanying goals. The…

  4. Final report on decommissioning boreholes and wellsite restoration, Gulf Coast Interior Salt Domes of Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    In 1978, eight salt domes in Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi were identified for study as potential locations for a nuclear waste repository as part of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program. Three domes were selected in Mississippi for ``area characterization`` phase study as follows: Lampton Dome near Columbia, Cypress Creek Dome near New Augusta, and Richton Dome near Richton. The purpose of the studies was to acquire geologic and geohydrologic information from shallow and deep drilling investigations to enable selection of sites suitable for more intensive study. Eleven deep well sites were selected for multiple-well installations to acquire information on the lithologic and hydraulic properties of regional aquifers. In 1986, the Gulf Coast salt domes were eliminated from further consideration for repository development by the selection of three candidate sites in other regions of the country. In 1987, well plugging and restoration of these deferred sites became a closeout activity. The primary objectives of this activity are to plug and abandon all wells and boreholes in accordance with state regulations, restore all drilling sites to as near original condition as feasible, and convey to landowners any wells on their property that they choose to maintain. This report describes the activities undertaken to accomplish these objectives, as outlines in Activity Plan 1--2, ``Activity Plan for Well Plugging and Site Restoration of Test Hole Sites in Mississippi.``

  5. Rethinking the Mississippi River diversion for effective capture of riverine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y. Jun

    2015-03-01

    Many river deltas in the world are vibrant economic regions, serving as transportation hubs, population centres, and commercial hotspots. However, today, many of these deltaic areas face a tremendous challenge with land loss due to a number of factors, such as reduced riverine sediment supply, coastal land erosion, subsidence, and sea level rise. The development of the Mississippi River Deltaic Plain (MRDP) in southeast Louisiana, USA, over the past century is a good example. Since 1932, approximately 4877 km2 of the coastal land of MRDP has become submerged. The lower Mississippi River main channel entering the Gulf of Mexico has become an isolated waterway with both sides losing land. In contrast, large open water areas in the Mississippi River's distributary basin, the Atchafalaya River basin, have been silted up over the past century, and the river mouth has developed a prograding delta feature at its two outlets to the Gulf of Mexico. The retrospective analysis of this paper makes it clear that the main cause of the land loss in the MRDP is not the decline of riverine sediment, but the disconnection of the sediment sources from the natural flood plains. Future sediment management efforts in the MRDP should focus on restoring the natural connection of riverine sediment supplies with flood plains, rather than solely using channelized river diversion. This could be achieved through controlled overbank flooding (COF) and artificial floods in conjunction with the use of a hydrograph-based sediment availability assessment.

  6. Simulating the effects of phosphorus limitation in the Mississippi and Atchafalaya River plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, A.; Fennel, K.; Hu, J.; Hetland, R.

    2012-05-01

    The continental shelf of the northern Gulf of Mexico receives high dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus loads from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya rivers. The nutrient load results in high primary production in the river plumes and contributes to the development of hypoxia on the Texas-Louisiana shelf in summer. While phytoplankton growth is considered to be typically nitrogen-limited, phosphorus limitation has been observed in this region during periods of peak river discharge in spring and early summer. Here we investigate the presence, spatio-temporal distribution and implications of phosphorus limitation in the plume region using a circulation model of the northern Gulf of Mexico coupled to a multi-nutrient ecosystem model. Results from a 7 yr simulation (2001-2007) compare well with available observations and suggest that phosphorus limitation develops every year between the Mississippi and Atchafalaya deltas. Model simulations show that phosphorus limitation results in a delay and westward shift of a fraction of river-stimulated primary production. The consequence is a reduced flux of particulate organic matter to the sediment near the Mississippi delta, but enhanced fluxes westward in the Atchafalaya and far-field regions. Two discharge scenarios with altered river phosphate concentrations (±50 %) reveal a significant variation (±40 % in July) in the spatial extent of phosphorus limitation with changes in phosphate load.

  7. Simulating the effects of phosphorus limitation in the Mississippi and Atchafalaya River plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, A.; Fennel, K.; Hu, J.; Hetland, R.

    2012-11-01

    The continental shelf of the northern Gulf of Mexico receives high dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus loads from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya rivers. The nutrient load results in high primary production in the river plumes and contributes to the development of hypoxia on the Louisiana shelf in summer. While phytoplankton growth is considered to be typically nitrogen-limited in marine waters, phosphorus limitation has been observed in this region during periods of peak river discharge in spring and early summer. Here we investigate the presence, spatio-temporal distribution and implications of phosphorus limitation in the plume region using a circulation model of the northern Gulf of Mexico coupled to a multi-nutrient ecosystem model. Results from a 7-yr simulation (2001-2007) compare well with several sources of observations and suggest that phosphorus limitation develops every year between the Mississippi and Atchafalaya deltas. Model simulations show that phosphorus limitation results in a delay and westward shift of a fraction of river-stimulated primary production. The consequence is a reduced flux of particulate organic matter to the sediment near the Mississippi delta, but slightly enhanced fluxes west of Atchafalaya Bay. Simulations with altered river phosphate concentrations (±50%) show that significant variation in the spatial extent of phosphorus limitation (±40% in July) results from changes in phosphate load.

  8. Comparing regeneration techniques for afforesting previously farmed bottomland hardwood sites in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockhart, B.R.; Keeland, B.; McCoy, J.; Dean, T.J.

    2003-01-01

    A study was implemented to test site preparation methods and artificial regeneration of three oak (Quercus spp.) species on four agricultural fields in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley in Louisiana, USA. Six years after establishment, few consistent differences were found in oak density between sowing acorn methods (seed drill versus broadcast seeding), autumn sowing versus spring sowing, and sowing acorns versus planting oak seedlings. Results indicated that some degree of site preparation is needed to establish oak seedlings but few differences were found between site preparation treatments. These results indicate that no one prescription for oak regeneration fits all potential afforestation projects in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley. Successful bottomland hardwood afforestation projects will require plans that include specific objectives, site evaluation, and a regeneration prescription prior to sowing the first seed or planting the first seedling.

  9. Attitudes of Mississippi college students toward David Duke before and after seeing the film Who is David Duke?

    PubMed

    Eisenman, R; Girdner, E J; Burroughs, R G; Routman, M

    1993-01-01

    The attitudes of 211 students at a university in Mississippi were investigated both before and after seeing the Public Broadcasting Film Who Is David Duke? The film provided evidence of Duke's current racism, anti-Semitism, and pro-Nazi leanings. In a previous study with university students in Louisiana, the majority did not change their attitudes after watching the film (Eisenman, 1993). However, in the present study, students' attitudes showed change in an anti-Duke direction. The findings are discussed and reasons given for the differences between the two samples, and for the popularity of Duke, a former leader of the Ku Klux Klan.

  10. Attitudes of Mississippi college students toward David Duke before and after seeing the film Who is David Duke?

    PubMed

    Eisenman, R; Girdner, E J; Burroughs, R G; Routman, M

    1993-01-01

    The attitudes of 211 students at a university in Mississippi were investigated both before and after seeing the Public Broadcasting Film Who Is David Duke? The film provided evidence of Duke's current racism, anti-Semitism, and pro-Nazi leanings. In a previous study with university students in Louisiana, the majority did not change their attitudes after watching the film (Eisenman, 1993). However, in the present study, students' attitudes showed change in an anti-Duke direction. The findings are discussed and reasons given for the differences between the two samples, and for the popularity of Duke, a former leader of the Ku Klux Klan. PMID:8237541

  11. 27. VIEW SHOWING SOUTH SIDE OF MISSISSIPPI RIVER RECREATION OFFICE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. VIEW SHOWING SOUTH SIDE OF MISSISSIPPI RIVER RECREATION OFFICE BUILDING, LE CLAIRE BASE COMPOUND - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 14, Upper Mississippi River, Le Claire, Scott County, IA

  12. 12. Overview of bay with hydraulic mechanism northwest Mississippi ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Overview of bay with hydraulic mechanism northwest - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 1, In Mississippi River at Mississippi Boulevard, below Ford Parkway Bridge, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  13. 30. INTERIOR VIEW OF MISSISSIPPI RIVER RECREATION OFFICE, LE CLAIRE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. INTERIOR VIEW OF MISSISSIPPI RIVER RECREATION OFFICE, LE CLAIRE BASE COMPOUND, LOOKING EAST - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 14, Upper Mississippi River, Le Claire, Scott County, IA

  14. 15. Overview of bay with standpipes to southwest Mississippi ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Overview of bay with standpipes to southwest - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 1, In Mississippi River at Mississippi Boulevard, below Ford Parkway Bridge, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  15. 4. View of dam front and sluiceway outlets Mississippi ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View of dam front and sluiceway outlets - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 1, In Mississippi River at Mississippi Boulevard, below Ford Parkway Bridge, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  16. 29. INTERIOR VIEW OF MISSISSIPPI RIVER RECREATION OFFICE BUILDING, LE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. INTERIOR VIEW OF MISSISSIPPI RIVER RECREATION OFFICE BUILDING, LE CLAIRE BASE COMPOUND, LOOKING WEST - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 14, Upper Mississippi River, Le Claire, Scott County, IA

  17. 28. VIEW SHOWING NORTH SIDE OF MISSISSIPPI RIVER RECREATION OFFICE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. VIEW SHOWING NORTH SIDE OF MISSISSIPPI RIVER RECREATION OFFICE BUILDING, LE CLAIRE BASE COMPOUND - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 14, Upper Mississippi River, Le Claire, Scott County, IA

  18. Alabama-Mississippi Coastal Classification Maps - Perdido Pass to Cat Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Robert A.; Peterson, Russell L.

    2005-01-01

    The primary purpose of the USGS National Assessment of Coastal Change Project is to provide accurate representations of pre-storm ground conditions for areas that are designated high-priority because they have dense populations or valuable resources that are at risk from storm waves. Another purpose of the project is to develop a geomorphic (land feature) coastal classification that, with only minor modification, can be applied to most coastal regions in the United States. A Coastal Classification Map describing local geomorphic features is the first step toward determining the hazard vulnerability of an area. The Coastal Classification Maps of the National Assessment of Coastal Change Project present ground conditions such as beach width, dune elevations, overwash potential, and density of development. In order to complete a hazard vulnerability assessment, that information must be integrated with other information, such as prior storm impacts and beach stability. The Coastal Classification Maps provide much of the basic information for such an assessment and represent a critical component of a storm-impact forecasting capability. The map above shows the areas covered by this web site. Click on any of the location names or outlines to view the Coastal Classification Map for that area.

  19. 75 FR 10865 - Shoreline Management Initiative, Reservoirs in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-09

    ... Initiative (SMI). On August 20, 2009, the TVA Board of Directors decided to amend SMP to terminate the... SMI and SMP would still be met without the Maintain and Gain program. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT... environmental and project goals of the SMI and SMP would still be met. Consequently, the TVA Board of...

  20. Water quality in the Mobile River Basin, Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi, and Tennessee, 1999-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atkins, J. Brian; Zappia, Humbert; Robinson, James L.; McPherson, Ann K.; Moreland, Richard S.; Harned, Douglas A.; Johnston, Brett F.; Harvill, John S.

    2004-01-01

    This report contains the major findings of a 1999?2001 assessment of water quality in the Mobile River Basin. It is one of a series of reports by the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program that present major findings in 51 major river basins and aquifer systems across the Nation. In these reports, water quality is discussed in terms of local, State, and regional issues. Conditions in a particular basin or aquifer system are compared to conditions found elsewhere and to selected national benchmarks, such as those for drinking-water quality and the protection of aquatic organisms. This report is intended for individuals working with water-resource issues in Federal, State, or local agencies, universities, public interest groups, or in the private sector. The information will be useful in addressing a number of current issues, such as the effects of agricultural and urban land use on water quality, human health, drinking water, source-water protection, hypoxia and excessive growth of algae and plants, pesticide registration, and monitoring and sampling strategies. This report is also for individuals who wish to know more about the quality of streams and ground water in areas near where they live, and how that water quality compares to the quality of water in other areas across the Nation. The water-quality conditions in the Mobile River Basin summarized in this report are discussed in detail in other reports that can be accessed from the Mobile River Basin Web site (http://al.water.usgs.gov/pubs/mobl/mobl.html). Detailed technical information, data and analyses, collection and analytical methodology, models, graphs, and maps that support the findings presented in this report in addition to reports in this series from other basins can be accessed from the national NAWQA Web site (http://water.usgs.gov/nawqa).

  1. Stratigraphy of the Mississippi-Alabama shelf and the Mobile River incised-valley system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kindinger, Jack G.; Balson, Peter S.; Flocks, James G.; Dalrymple, Robert W.; Boyd, Ron; Zaitlin, Brian A.

    1994-01-01

    The Holocene incised-valley fill (estuarine facies) underlying Mobile Buy fit well into the conceptual facies model of a microtidal wave-dominated estuary. The model does not fit as well, however, with the rapidly transgressed shelf portion of the incised valley. The down dip section does not contain a clearly identifiable (from seismic profiles) estuarine facies; the valley fill is primarily fluvial and is overlain by marine shoals. In the Mobile River incised valley, the distal portion of the valley was rapidly drowned, allowing the thin estuarine facies to be reworked. The proximal portion was drowned more slowly, leaving the estuarine facies intact. Thus, the single incised valley contains two very different types of fill.

  2. Ground-water resources of the Pascagoula River basin, Mississippi and Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newcome, Roy

    1967-01-01

    Abundant ground-water resources underlie the Pascagoula River basin. These resources have been developed intensively in only a few places--namely, Hattiesburg, Laurel, Meridian, and Pascagoula. Seepage from the ground water reservoirs sustains the base flows of the Leaf, Chickasawhay, Pascagoula, and Escatawpa Rivers and their tributaries. The fresh-water-bearing section is 300 to 3,500 feet thick and is composed chiefly of sand and clay of Eocene to Recent age. Major rock units represented are the Wilcox, Claiborne, Jackson, and Vicksburg Groups and formations of Miocene and Pliocene ages. Aquifers in the Claiborne Group provide water for all purposes in the northern third of the basin. The Claiborne is underlain by the potentially important but virtually untapped Wilcox Group. Miocene aquifers are the main source of water supplies in the southern half of the basin, but Pliocene aquifers furnish most supplies in the Jackson County area at the basin's southern extremity. Much of the fresh-water section has undergone no water-supply development because of the great depth of many aquifers and the availability, at shallow depths, of supplies adequate for present needs. However, a large part of any substantial increase in ground-water withdrawal will probably come from wells deeper than those commonly drilled in the region. Ground-water levels are within 50 feet of the surface in most places, and flowing wells are common in the valleys and near the coast. Water-level declines due to pumping have become serious problems only in a few localities of heavy withdrawal. In most of these places redistribution of pumpage would alleviate the problem of excessive drawdown. Although few wells in the basin yield more than 500 gallons per minute, yields of 2,000 gallons per minute or more could be reasonably expected from efficiently constructed wells almost anywhere in the region. Total ground-water pumpage is estimated to be about 60 million gallons per day. Potential pumpage is many times that figure. Well fields capable of yielding several million gallons of water per day would be feasible in most places. The ground water is of good to excellent quality. Most of it is a sodium bicarbonate type of water. It usually is soft and has a low to moderate dissolved-solids content. Excessive iron is a problem in places, particularly where water supplies are obtained from shallow aquifers, but at least a part of the excess iron comes from corrosion of well and distribution-line fittings by slightly acidic water. Salt-water encroachment is a potential problem in the coastal area, but little increase in salinity has been observed in monitor wells in the period 1960-65. Saline-water resources are available for development at considerable depth in most of the region.

  3. Hunting injuries in Mississippi.

    PubMed

    Forks, Thomas P

    2002-11-01

    It is clear from the data that hunting injuries in Mississippi mirror those which occur nationwide. The vast majority of these injuries are easily preventable by following common sense hunting safety rules. As with firearm injuries, tree stand injuries are clearly preventable by following common sense rules (Table 1). Most falls are due to poorly constructed or old wooden tree stands that come apart or become detached from the tree thereby causing the hunter to fall. All bolts and fasteners should be inspected and replaced if found to be defective prior to use of the stand. Old, broken or rotten lumber should be replaced. Tree stands should only be placed in healthy, mature trees with strong healthy limbs. Unfortunately, tree stand hunters seldom wear safety harnesses when hunting. These devices, when used properly (worm around the chest under both arms), can greatly decrease morbidity and mortality associated with falls. To minimize trauma, tree stands should be constructed no greater than 20 feet above ground level. Hunters should be cautioned to wear non-slip boots [table| see text] and to apply a non-slip covering to the floor of their tree stands prior to use of the stands. Other safety tips include the removal of all logs, stones or other obstructions from around the base of the tree. As with all hunters, tree stand hunters are advised to carry a compass, whistle, flashlight and cellular phone with them during their hunt. Hunting equipment, including bows and arrows and all firearms should never be carried up to the stand. This equipment should only be lifted or lowered to or from the stand with the use of a haul line. Hunters must remember the 10 commandments of gun safety (Table 2). Every firearm should be treated as if it were loaded. Firearms should not be pointed at anything other than the intended target and the muzzle must be controlled at all times. The action and barrel should be inspected prior to loading ammunition to ensure that they are clear of

  4. Hunting injuries in Mississippi.

    PubMed

    Forks, Thomas P

    2002-11-01

    It is clear from the data that hunting injuries in Mississippi mirror those which occur nationwide. The vast majority of these injuries are easily preventable by following common sense hunting safety rules. As with firearm injuries, tree stand injuries are clearly preventable by following common sense rules (Table 1). Most falls are due to poorly constructed or old wooden tree stands that come apart or become detached from the tree thereby causing the hunter to fall. All bolts and fasteners should be inspected and replaced if found to be defective prior to use of the stand. Old, broken or rotten lumber should be replaced. Tree stands should only be placed in healthy, mature trees with strong healthy limbs. Unfortunately, tree stand hunters seldom wear safety harnesses when hunting. These devices, when used properly (worm around the chest under both arms), can greatly decrease morbidity and mortality associated with falls. To minimize trauma, tree stands should be constructed no greater than 20 feet above ground level. Hunters should be cautioned to wear non-slip boots [table| see text] and to apply a non-slip covering to the floor of their tree stands prior to use of the stands. Other safety tips include the removal of all logs, stones or other obstructions from around the base of the tree. As with all hunters, tree stand hunters are advised to carry a compass, whistle, flashlight and cellular phone with them during their hunt. Hunting equipment, including bows and arrows and all firearms should never be carried up to the stand. This equipment should only be lifted or lowered to or from the stand with the use of a haul line. Hunters must remember the 10 commandments of gun safety (Table 2). Every firearm should be treated as if it were loaded. Firearms should not be pointed at anything other than the intended target and the muzzle must be controlled at all times. The action and barrel should be inspected prior to loading ammunition to ensure that they are clear of

  5. Louisiana State University Libraries' Electronic Imaging Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Faye; Condrey, Richard

    1994-01-01

    Describes Louisiana State University Libraries' Electronic Imaging Laboratory for preservation. The project uses digital imaging technology to reformat rare book materials for access. This technology can exist with traditional conservation procedures. (JLB)

  6. Causes for the decline of suspended-sediment discharge in the Mississippi River system, 1940-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meade, R.H.; Moody, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Before 1900, the Missouri-Mississippi River system transported an estimated 400 million metric tons per year of sediment from the interior of the United States to coastal Louisiana. During the last two decades (1987-2006), this transport has averaged 145 million metric tons per year. The cause for this substantial decrease in sediment has been attributed to the trapping characteristics of dams constructed on the muddy part of the Missouri River during the 1950s. However, reexamination of more than 60 years of water- and sediment-discharge data indicates that the dams alone are not the sole cause. These dams trap about 100-150 million metric tons per year, which represent about half the decrease in sediment discharge near the mouth of the Mississippi. Changes in relations between water discharge and suspended-sediment concentration suggest that the Missouri-Mississippi has been transformed from a transport-limited to a supply-limited system. Thus, other engineering activities such as meander cutoffs, river-training structures, and bank revetments as well as soil erosion controls have trapped sediment, eliminated sediment sources, or protected sediment that was once available for transport episodically throughout the year. Removing major engineering structures such as dams probably would not restore sediment discharges to pre-1900 state, mainly because of the numerous smaller engineering structures and other soil-retention works throughout the Missouri-Mississippi system. ?? 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Organic carbon and nitrogen content associated with colloids and suspended particulates from the Mississippi River and some of its tributaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.; Leenheer, J.A.; Daniel, S.R.

    1997-01-01

    Suspended material samples were collected at 16 sites along the Mississippi River and some of its tributaries during July-August 1991, October-November 1991, and April-May 1992, and separated into colloid and particulate fractions to determine the organic carbon content of these two fractions of suspended material. Sample collection involved centrifugation to isolate the suspended particulate fraction and ultrafiltration to isolate the colloid fraction. For the first time, particulate and colloid concentrations and organic carbon and nitrogen content were investigated along the entire reach of the Mississippi River from above Minneapolis, Minnesota, to below New Orleans, Louisiana. Organic carbon content of the colloid (15.2 percent) was much higher than organic carbon content of the particulate material (4.8 percent). Carbon/nitrogen ratios of colloid and particulate phases were more similar to ratios for microorganisms than to ratios for soils, humic materials, or plants.Suspended material samples were collected at 16 sites along the Mississippi River and some of its tributaries during July-August 1991, October-November 1991, and April-May 1992, and separated into colloid and particulate fractions to determine the organic carbon content of these two fractions of suspended material. Sample collection involved centrifugation to isolate the suspended particulate fraction and ultrafiltration to isolate the colloid fraction. For the first time, particulate and colloid concentrations and organic carbon and nitrogen content were investigated along the entire reach of the Mississippi River from above Minneapolis, Minnesota, to below New Orleans, Louisiana. Organic carbon content of the colloid (15.2 percent) was much higher than organic carbon content of the particulate material (4.8 percent). Carbon/nitrogen ratios of colloid and particulate phases were more similar to ratios for microorganisms than to ratios for soils, humic materials, or plants.

  8. The Internet for Louisiana physicians.

    PubMed

    Ellis, M S

    2000-09-01

    Fewer than 50% of Louisiana physicians actively use the Internet, and many of them confine their usage to e-mailing among family and friends. The purpose of this article is to acquaint the reader with many of the benefits of exploiting the incredible potential of this technological invention. I provide addresses and information about sites that I believe warrant usage by our colleagues. Of the vast smorgasbord of data available we highlight educational Web sites for professionals and the public, how to determine credibility of information, clinical research of scientific articles, computer security, federal and state government sites, newspapers, political and socioeconomic functions, medical supply shops, e-mail and other computerized communication, electronic medical records, personal or professional Web sites, and future medical internet uses. It is hoped that this process will encourage nonparticipating colleagues to begin using this modality while also supplying sites that current users may not yet have discovered. PMID:11064554

  9. 77 FR 124 - Biological Processors of Alabama; Decatur, Morgan County, AL; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Biological Processors of Alabama; Decatur, Morgan County, AL; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Biological Processors of Alabama Superfund Site located in Decatur, Morgan County, Alabama. DATES: The...

  10. Reconstructing a 180 yr record of natural and anthropogenic induced low-oxygen conditions from Louisiana continental shelf sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osterman, L.E.; Poore, R.Z.; Swarzenski, P.W.; Turner, R.E.

    2005-01-01

    Hypoxia on the Louisiana continental shelf is tied to nutrient Loading and freshwater stratification from the Mississippi River. Variations in the relative abundance of low-oxygen-tolerant benthic foraminifers in four sediment cores from the Louisiana shelf provide a proxy record of low-oxygen events. Core chronologies are obtained using 210Pb dating techniques. The foraminiferal data are consistent with previous studies indicating that the intensity of hypoxic events (oxygen <2 mg /L) has increased over the past 50 yr owing to the higher nutrient loading associated with the use of commercial fertilizer, and also reveal several low-oxygen events between A.D. 1817 and 1910, prior to the widespread use of fertilizer. The pre-1910 low-oxygen events are associated with high Mississippi River discharge rates, indicating that these low-oxygen episodes are related to natural variations in river drainage that enhance transport of nutrients and freshwater to the continental shelf. Our data show that the low-oxygen events of the past few decades were more extreme than any that occurred in the previous ???180 yr, and support the interpretation that the increased use of fertilizer has amplified an otherwise naturally occurring process. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  11. Surficial sediment character of the Louisiana offshore continental shelf region: a GIS compilation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, S. Jeffress; Arsenault, Matthew A.; Buczkowski, Brian J.; Reid, Jane A.; Flocks, James; Kulp, Mark A.; Penland, Shea; Jenkins, Chris J.

    2007-01-01

    The Louisiana coastal zone, comprising the Mississippi River delta plain stretching nearly 400 km from Sabine Pass at the Texas border east to the Chandeleur Islands at the Mississippi border, represents one of North America’s most important coastal ecosystems in terms of natural resources, human infrastructure, and cultural heritage. At the same time, this region has the highest rates of coastal erosion and wetland loss in the Nation due to a complex combination of natural processes and anthropogenic actions over the past century. Comparison of historical maps dating back to 1855 and recent aerial photography show the Louisiana coast undergoing net erosion at highly variable rates. Rates have increased significantly during the past several decades. Earlier published statewide average shoreline erosion rates were >6 m/yr; rates have increased recently to >10 m/yr. The increase is attributable to collective action of storms, rapid subsidence, and pervasive man-made alterations of the rivers and the coast. In response to the dramatic landloss, regional-scale restoration plans are being developed by a partnership of federal and state agencies for the delta plain that have the objectives of maintaining the barrier islands, reducing wetland loss, and enhancing the natural sediment delivery processes. There is growing awareness that the sustainability of coastal Louisiana's natural resources and human infrastructure depends on the successful restoration of natural geologic processes. Critical to the long term success of restoration is scientific understanding of the geologic history and processes of the coastal zone region, including interactions between the rivers, wetlands, coast, and inner shelf. A variety of geophysical studies and mapping of Late Quaternary sedimentary framework and coastal processes by U.S. Geological Survey and other scientists during the past 50 years document that the Louisiana delta plain is the product of a complex history of cyclic delta

  12. Erosion and deterioration of Isles Dernieres Barrier Island arc, Louisiana: 1842-1988

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, R.A.; Westphal, K.; Penland, S. ); Jaffe, B. ) ); Williams, S.J. )

    1989-09-01

    The Isles Dernieres barrier island arc is the most rapidly eroding coastline in the US. Located on the Mississippi River delta plain in Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana, the Isles Dernieres consists of four smaller islands in a 32-km long chain. From west to east, these islands are known as Raccoon Island, Whiskey Island, Trinity Island, and East Island. The barrier island arc is separated from the mainland by Caillou Bay, Boca Caillou, and Lake Pelto lagoonal systems. The abandonment and transgression of the Bayou Petit Caillou delta (part of the larger Lafourche delta complex) over the last 600 years, along with sea level rise, repeated storm impacts, and rapid shoreface erosion, have led to the formation of the Isles Dernieres. Continued transgressive submergence combined with a diminishing sediment supply are driving the extreme coastal erosion found in the Isles Dernieres.

  13. COMPUTATION OF UNSTEADY FLOWS IN THE ALABAMA RIVER.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jeffcoat, Hillary H.; Jennings, Marshall E.

    1987-01-01

    An application is described of the branch-network flow model, BRANCH, to the upper Alabama River system in central Alabama. The model is used to simulate one-dimensional unsteady flows and water surface elevations in approximately 60 river miles of the Alabama River system. Preliminary calibration was made using 72 hours of observed data. Simulated discharges are about 10 percent lower than observed discharges at higher discharge rates and computer flows lag observed flows by about 30 minutes.

  14. Georgia/Alabama Regional Seismographic Network

    SciTech Connect

    Long, L.T. . School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)

    1990-11-01

    Data from the Georgia/Alabama network have contributed to a better understanding of the seismicity in the Southeast. Based on these data, a new theory explaining intraplate earthquakes was developed. The theory predicts that a decrease in strength of the lower crust (e.g. through a change in the fluid regime) leads to weakening and deformation of the stress channel in the mid-crustal zone. The weakening and stress concentration may lead to major earthquakes. Earthquake focal mechanisms in southeastern Tennessee are consistent with such a model. Conclusions reached from this and other studies suggest that major earthquakes have happened or could happen in southeastern Tennessee. Earthquakes in the Piedmont are of a different type, being mostly shallow, consistent with failure along joints and predominantly associated with reservoir impoundment. This mechanism may leave an upper magnitude limit of 5.7. In Alabama, except near southeastern Tennessee, the seismicity is largely induced by coal mine collapses. 3 figs.

  15. Mississippi freshwater discharge and terrigenous sediment supply into the northern Gulf of Mexico and Loop Current dynamics over glacial/interglacial changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuernberg, D.; Kujau, A.; Rieken, S.; Bahr, A.; Karas, C.; Ziegler, M.

    2011-12-01

    We here present (isotope)geochemical and sedimentological data from marine sediment cores from the northern Gulf of Mexico to approximate the temporally and spatially varying terrigenous sediment contribution via the Mississippi River and the related spread of freshwater over the last glacial-interglacial cycles, with specific focus on the last ca. 42.000 years. Our study is based on cores from the DeSoto Canyon (MD02-2576 and 2575), from ~90 km southeast off the Mississippi River delta (M78-181), and from southwest of the delta (IODP 1319A). The geochemical signature of the eastern cores closely matches that of the Mississippi catchment area rather than those of the Alabama and Mobile River catchments. In particular, the siliciclastic major element potassium (K), estimated from calibrated XRF core scanning, serves as a suitable proxy for Mississippi River sediment discharge, becoming less concentrated with distance from the delta. The K variability suggests enhanced glacial phase terrigenous influx triggered by strengthened fluvial runoff and changing fluvial and ice sheet dynamics. Mississippi River influx was at a maximum during glacial MIS 2/3, late MIS 8 and MIS 10, reflected by sedimentation rates being 4 to 5 times higher than in the Holocene. Late glacial to deglacial fluvial sediment supply, however, decreased abruptly at ca. 20 ka at our easternmost core location (MD02-2576), and ca. 2 kyr later at our core location closest to the Mississippi Delta, implying a gradual westward shift of the Mississippi outflow. Due to synchronous changes in sea-surface temperatures, we hypothesize an increasing impact of the northward extending Loop Current on the Mississippi outflow pattern. Combined stable oxygen isotope and element ratios from shallow and deep-dwelling as well as benthic foraminifers allow to approximate paleosalinity, and hence to follow the dispersal of freshwater across the Gulf of Mexico. According to our data, Mississippi freshwater discharge

  16. Development of Alabama Resources Information System (ARIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, B. E.; Vachon, R. I.

    1976-01-01

    A formal, organized set of information concerning the development status of the Alabama Resources Information System (ARIS) as of September 1976 is provided. A series of computer source language programs, and flow charts related to each of the computer programs to provide greater ease in performing future change are presented. Listings of the variable names, and their meanings, used in the various source code programs, and copies of the various user manuals which were prepared through this time are given.

  17. Application of a hydrodynamic and sediment transport model for guidance of response efforts related to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Northern Gulf of Mexico along the coast of Alabama and Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plant, Nathaniel G.; Long, Joseph W.; Dalyander, P. Soupy; Thompson, David M.; Raabe, Ellen A.

    2013-01-01

    U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists have provided a model-based assessment of transport and deposition of residual Deepwater Horizon oil along the shoreline within the northern Gulf of Mexico in the form of mixtures of sand and weathered oil, known as surface residual balls (SRBs). The results of this USGS research, in combination with results from other components of the overall study, will inform operational decisionmaking. The results will provide guidance for response activities and data collection needs during future oil spills. In May 2012 the U.S. Coast Guard, acting as the Deepwater Horizon Federal on-scene coordinator, chartered an operational science advisory team to provide a science-based review of data collected and to conduct additional directed studies and sampling. The goal was to characterize typical shoreline profiles and morphology in the northern Gulf of Mexico to identify likely sources of residual oil and to evaluate mechanisms whereby reoiling phenomena may be occurring (for example, burial and exhumation and alongshore transport). A steering committee cochaired by British Petroleum Corporation (BP) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is overseeing the project and includes State on-scene coordinators from four States (Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi), trustees of the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), and representatives from the U.S. Coast Guard. This report presents the results of hydrodynamic and sediment transport models and developed techniques for analyzing potential SRB movement and burial and exhumation along the coastline of Alabama and Florida. Results from these modeling efforts are being used to explain the complexity of reoiling in the nearshore environment and to broaden consideration of the different scenarios and difficulties that are being faced in identifying and removing residual oil. For instance, modeling results suggest that larger SRBs are not, under the most commonly

  18. Hydrologic characterization of the unconfined aquifer at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center, Tuscaloosa, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, S.H.; Newcomer, D.R.

    1992-02-01

    Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involves storing thermal energy such as winter chill, summer heat, and industrial waste heat for future use in heat and/or cooling buildings or for industrial processes. Widespread development and implementation of STES would significantly reduce the need to generate primary energy in the United States. Recent data indicate that STES is technically suitable for providing 5% to 10% of the nation's energy, with major contributions in the commercial and industrial sectors and in district heating and cooling applications. This report describes aquifer characterization at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The purpose of the testing is to provide design data for the University's use in modifying and expanding an existing ATES well field. The aquifer characterization work was conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program) in cooperation with the University of Alabama as part of efforts to assess the use of chill ATES for space cooling.

  19. Water use in Mississippi, 1975

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Callahan, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    Water use in Mississippi in 1975 amounted to 3,050 mgd (million gallons per day). The total represents pumpage of 1,130 mgd from ground-water sources and 1,920 mgd from surface-water sources. Included in the surface water pumpage are 540 mgd of brackish water from Back Bay of Biloxi. Public Supplies at Jackson in Hinds County and Meridian in Lauderdale County use both surface and ground water. Columbus in Lowndes County uses only surface water. All other public supplies in the State use ground water. A table shows the amount, source, and user of water used in each county of Mississippi during 1975. (Woodard-USGS)

  20. Tracking contaminants down the Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, P.; Campbell, P.

    2004-01-01

    The Mississippi River and its last major downstream distributary, the Atchafalaya River, provide approximately 90 percent of the freshwater input to the Gulf of Mexico. Analyses of sediment cores using organic and inorganic tracers as well as bethic foraminifera appear to provide a reliable record of the historic variability of hypoxia in the northern Gulf of Mexico over the past few centuries. Natural variability in hypoxic events may be driven largely by flooding cycles of El Nin??o/La Nin??a prior to recent increases in nutrient loading. Specifically, large floods in 1979, 1983, 1993 and 1998, compounded with the widespread use of fertilizers, also appear at least partially responsible for the recent (post-1980) dramatic increase of hypoxic events in the Mississippi Bight.

  1. Occurrence and load of selected herbicides and metabolites in the lower Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, G.M.; Goolsby, D.A.

    2000-01-01

    Analyses of water samples collected from the Mississippi River at Baton Rouge, Louisiana, during 1991-1997 indicate that hundreds of metric tons of herbicides and herbicide metabolites are being discharged annually to the Gulf of Mexico. Atrazine, metolachlor, and the ethane-sulfonic acid metabolite of alachlor (alachlor ESA) were the most frequently detected herbicides and, in general, were present in the largest concentrations. Almost 80% of the annual herbicide load to the Gulf of Mexico occurred during the growing season from May to August. The concentrations and loads of alachlor in the Mississippi River decreased dramatically after 1993 in response to decreased use in the basin. In contrast, the concentrations and loads of acetochlor increased after 1994, reflecting its role as a replacement for alachlor. The peak annual herbicide load occurred in 1993, when approximately 640 metric tons (t) of atrazine, 320 t of cyanazine, 215 t of metolachlor, 53 t of simazine, and 50 t of alachlor were discharged to the Gulf of Mexico. The annual loads of atrazine and cyanazine were generally 1-2% of the amount annually applied in the Mississippi River drainage basin; the annual loads of acetochlor, alachlor, and metolachlor were generally less than 1%. Despite a reduction in atrazine use, historical data do not indicate a long-term downward trend in the atrazine load to the Gulf of Mexico. Although a relation (r2=0.62) exists between the atrazine load and stream discharge during May to August, variations in herbicide use and rainfall patterns within subbasins can have a large effect on herbicide loads in the Mississippi River Basin and probably explain a large part of the annual variation in atrazine load to the Gulf of Mexico. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  2. Concentrations and loads of nitrogen and phosphorus in the Yazoo River, northwestern Mississippi, 1996-97

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coupe, Richard H.

    1998-01-01

    Increased nutrient loading to the Gulf of Mexico from off-continent flux has been identified as contributing to the increase in the areal extent of the low dissolved-oxygen zone that develops annually off the coast of Louisiana and Texas. The proximity of the Yazoo River Basin in northwestern Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico, and the intensive agriculture in the basin have lead to speculation that the Yazoo River Basin contributes a disproportionate amount of nitrogen and phosphorus to the Mississippi River and ultimately the Gulf of Mexico. Water samples from the Yazoo River were collected during 1996 and 1997 and were analyzed for total nitrogen, nitrate as nitrogen, total phosphorus, and orthophosphorus as part of the U.S. Geological Survey?s National Water-Quality Assessment Program. These data were used to compute annual loads of nitrogen and phosphorus discharged from the Yazoo River for 1996 and 1997. Annual loads of nitrogen and phosphorus were calculated by two methods. The first used multivariate regression and the second multiplied the mean annual concentration by the total annual flow. Load estimates based on the product of the mean annual concentration and the total annual flow were within the 95 percent confidence interval for the load calculated by multivariate regression in all cases. The Yazoo River loads, compared to long-term annual loads in the Mississippi River, indicated that the Yazoo River was contributing 2.3 percent or less of the total nitrogen load, 5.7 percent or less of the total phosphorus load, and 1 percent or less of the nitrate load in 1996 and 1997. The total nitrogen load from the Yazoo River Basin into the Mississippi River and ultimately the Gulf of Mexico was proportional to its discharge, the nitrate load was less than expected, whereas the total phosphorus load was slightly higher than expected based on discharge.

  3. Accelerated relative sea-level rise and rapid coastal erosion: Testing a causal relationship for the Louisiana barrier islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    List, J.H.; Sallenger, A.H., Jr.; Hansen, M.E.; Jaffe, B.E.

    1997-01-01

    The role of relative sea-level rise as a cause for the rapid erosion of Louisiana's barrier island coast is investigated through a numerical implementation of a modified Bruun rule that accounts for the low percentage of sand-sized sediment in the eroding Louisiana shoreface. Shore-normal profiles from 150 km of coastline west of the Mississippi delta are derived from bathymetric surveys conducted during the 1880s. 1930s and 1980s. An RMS difference criterion is employed to test whether an equilibrium profile form is maintained between survey years. Only about half the studied profiles meet the equilibrium Criterion this represents a significant limitation on the potential applicability of the Bruun rule. The profiles meeting the equilibrium criterion, along with measured rates of relative sea-level rise, are used to hindcast shoreline retreat rates at 37 locations within the study area. Modeled and observed shoreline retreat rates show no significant correlation. Thus in terms of the Bruun approach relative sea-level rise has no power for hindcasting (and presumably forecasting) rates of coastal erosion for the Louisiana barrier islands.

  4. Seismotectonic implications of sand blows in the southern Mississippi Embayment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, R.T.; Hill, A.A.; Larsen, D.; Holzer, T.; Forman, S.L.; Noce, T.; Gardner, C.; Morat, J.

    2007-01-01

    We explore seismically-induced sand blows from the southern Mississippi Embayment and their implications in resolving the question of near or distal epicentral source region. This was accomplished using aerial photography, field excavations, and cone penetration tests. Our analysis shows that three sand blow fields exhibit a distinct chronology of strong ground motion for the southern embayment: (1) The Ashley County, Arkansas sand blow field, near the Arkansas/Louisiana state border, experienced four Holocene sand venting episodes; (2) to the north, the Desha County field experienced at least three episodes of liquefaction; and (3) the Lincoln-Jefferson Counties field experienced at least one episode. Cone penetration tests (CPT) conducted in and between the sand blow fields suggest that the fields may not be distal liquefaction associated with New Madrid seismic zone earthquakes but rather are likely associated with strong earthquakes on local faults. This conclusion is consistent with the differences in timing of the southern embayment sand venting episodes and those in the New Madrid seismic zone. These results suggest that active tectonism and strong seismicity in intraplate North America may not be localized at isolated weak spots, but rather widespread on fault systems that are favorably oriented for slip in the contemporary stress field. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Distribution and textural character of surficial sediments, Isles Dernieres to Ship Shoal region, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, S.J.; Circe, R. ); Penland, S. )

    1989-09-01

    Since 1986, the US Geological Survey and the Louisiana Geological Survey have undertaken field studies of the physical processes responsible for the widespread and extremely rapid coastal erosion of Louisiana's barriers along the Mississippi River delta plain coast. The study area encompasses the coastal and inner shelf region from Raccoon Point to Sandy Point and includes a database of 12-m long vibracores, surface grab samples, sidescan sonar, high resolution seismic reflection profiles, and precision hydrographic profiles. This paper presents results in the coastal-shelf sector that includes the Isles Dernieres barrier island chain seaward almost 30 km to Ship Shoal. The surface and near-surface sediments of the region reflect fluvial and nearshore marine origin with pervasive evidence of winnowing and reworking by marine processes associated with frequent tropical storms and the passage of winter cold fronts. Beach sediments are remarkably uniform in grain size (fine quartz sand), except for the often abundant presence of carbonate shell debris, and are generally well to very well sorted. The shoreface and inner shelf are mantled with muddy sands and sandy muds, whereas, Ship Shoal is almost wholly fine quartz sand, similar in many sedimentologic respects to the Isles Dernieres. The results are consistent with the model of coastal evolution, presented in 1988, in which Ship Shoal is the prototypical example of a drowned coastal barrier undergoing submarine reworking and landward migration in pace with the rapid rates of sea level rise and subsidence.

  6. Towards sustainable management of louisiana's coastal wetland forests: Problems, constraints, and a new beginning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chambers, J.L.; Conner, W.H.; Keim, R.F.; Faulkner, S.P.; Day, J.W.; Gardiner, E.S.; Hughes, M.S.; King, S.L.; McLeod, K.W.; Miller, C.A.; Nyman, J.A.; Shaffer, G.P.

    2006-01-01

    Over 345,000 ha of forested swamps occur throughout the Mississippi River Deltaic Plain. Natural and anthropogenic changes in hydrology and geomorphology at local and landscape levels have reduced the productivity in many of these coastal wetland forests areas and have caused the complete loss of forest cover in some places. A summary and interpretation of the available science, suggestions for policy change, and a multidisciplinary (multi-responsibility) approach were needed to address these issues [in the context of private land]. In response, the Louisiana Governor's office formed a Coastal Wetland Forest Conservation and Use Science Working Group (SWG) and an associated Advisory Panel to provide the Governor with information and suggestions of strategies for environmental and economic utilization, conservation, and protection of Louisiana's coastal wetland forest ecosystem in the long-term. The process of engaging scientists, resource managers, and other stakeholders in this effort is described, and the recommendations of the SWG are presented relative to forestry practices and the potential for sustainable management of coastal wetland forests.

  7. Transport of nitrate in the Mississippi river in July-August 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kendall, Carol; Bohlke, John Karl; McMahon, Peter B.; Coupe, Richard H.; Battaglin, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Lagrangian sampling was conducted on the Mississippi River in late July through early August 1999 to test the hypothesis that nitrate (NO3-) is transported conservatively in the Mississippi River. Three different approaches were pursued to test the hypothesis: (1) a mass balance for NO3 was evaluated for evidence of net gains and losses, (2) stable isotopes of NO3 were measured (δ15N and δ18O) to determine if fractionation occurred, and (3) the concentrations of dissolved gases (N2O, N2 and Ar) in river water were measured and compared to theoretical equilibrium concentrations. Integrated water samples and flow measurements were obtained at 10 sites on the Mississippi River and 7 sites near the mouths of major tributaries from northern Iowa to southern Louisiana, a distance of about 2,250 river kilometers. Mass balance calculations indicate that more than 80 percent of the NO3 mass discharged from the Mississippi River (1,930 metric tons/day) during the study period originated in the first 500 river kilometers of the study reach. The mass balance calculations alsoindicate that NO3- was not lost from the water column upstream of Vicksburg, MS, but that there might have been some loss of NO3- in the lower 700 kilometers ofthe study reach. The stable isotope ratios of N and O (δ15N and δ18O) of NO3- were consistent with mixing and transport in the absence of fractionating gains or losses. The concentrations of nitrogen (N2) and argon (Ar) dissolved in river water decreased in the downstream direction, approximately in equilibrium with air at increasing temperatures, giving no evidence of gains or losses of N2 by nitrogen fixation or denitrification. Nitrous oxide (N2O) concentrations in the Mississippi River were approximately 26 to 200 percent of air saturation, indicating relatively low net production by combination of nitrification and denitrification. Results from this study indicate that most (>90%) of theNO3- that entered

  8. Analyses of native water, bottom material, and elutriate samples of southern Louisiana waterways, 1977-78

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dupuy, Alton J.; Couvillion, Nolan P.

    1979-01-01

    From March 1977 to July 1978 the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers conducted a series of elutriate studies to determine water quality in selected reaches of major navigable waterways of southern Louisiana. Sample were collected from the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet areas; Mississippi River, South Pass; Baptiste Collette Bayou; Tiger Pass area; Baou Long; Bayou Barataria and Barataria Bay Waterway area (gulf section); Bayou Segnette Waterway, Lake Pontchartrain near Tangipahoa River mouth; Bayou Grand Caillou; Bayou la Carpe at Homa; Houma Navigation Canal and Terrebonne Bay; Bayou Boeuf, Bayou Chene, and Baou Black, Atchafalaya River Channel, Atchafalaya Bay; Old River Lock tailbay; Red River below mouth of Black River; Freshwaer Canal; Mermentau River and Lake Arthur Mermentau River outlet; and Calcasieu Ship Channel. The studies were initiated at the request of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to evaluate possible environmental effects of proposed dredging activities in those waterways. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and U.S. Geological Survey collected 189 samples of native water and 172 samples of bottom (bed) material from 163 different sites. A total of 117 elutriates (Mixtures of native water and bottom material) were prepared. The native water and elutriate samples were analyzed for selected metals, pesticides, nutrients organics, and pysical constituents. Particle-size determinations were made on bottom-material samples. (Kosco-USGS)

  9. Pictorial account and landscape evolution of the crevasses near Fort St. Philip, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suir, Glenn M.; Jones, William R.; Garber, Adrienne L.; Barras, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying the effects of active natural and constructed crevasses is critical to the planning and success of future ecosystem restoration activities. This document provides a historical overview of landscape changes within the vicinity of the natural crevasses near Fort St. Philip, Louisiana. A significant event influencing landscape change within the Fort St. Philip study area was the breaching of the eastern levee of the Mississippi River. Initially, the river water that was diverted through these crevasse channels physically removed significant marsh areas within the study area. These initial direct impacts were succeeded by several decades of larger regional loss patterns driven by subsidence and other episodic events (e.g, hurricanes and floods), and recent localized land gains. These increases in land area are potentially the long-term results of the Fort St. Philip crevasses, and the short-term impacts of delta management activities. However, for the majority of the 1956-2008 period of analysis, the crevassing of the eastern bank of the Mississippi River levee was a loss accelerant in the Fort St. Philip area.

  10. Effects of hurricanes Katrina and Rita on Louisiana black bear habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Joseph D.; Murrow, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    The Louisiana black bear (Ursus americanus luteolus) is comprised of 3 subpopulations, each being small, geographically isolated, and vulnerable to extinction. Hurricanes Katrina and Rita struck the Louisiana and Mississippi coasts in 2005, potentially altering habitat occupied by this federally threatened subspecies. We used data collected on radio-telemetered bears from 1993 to 1995 and pre-hurricane landscape data to develop a habitat model based on the Mahalanobis distance (D2) statistic. We then applied that model to post-hurricane landscape data where the telemetry data were collected (i.e., occupied study area) and where bear range expansion might occur (i.e., unoccupied study area) to quantify habitat loss or gain. The D2 model indicated that quality bear habitat was associated with areas of high mast-producing forest density, low water body density, and moderate forest patchiness. Cross-validation and testing on an independent data set in central Louisiana indicated that prediction and transferability of the model were good. Suitable bear habitat decreased from 348 to 345 km2 (0.9%) within the occupied study area and decreased from 34,383 to 33,891 km2 (1.4%) in the unoccupied study area following the hurricanes. Our analysis indicated that bear habitat was not significantly degraded by the hurricanes, although changes that could have occurred on a microhabitat level would be more difficult to detect at the resolution we used. We suggest that managers continue to monitor the possible long-term effects of these hurricanes (e.g., vegetation changes from flooding, introduction of toxic chemicals, or water quality changes).

  11. The Mississippi Years (1969-1974)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agras, W. Stewart

    2012-01-01

    The 4 years that Michel Hersen spent at the University of Mississippi Medical Center (1970-1974) are described in this article from the viewpoint of his place in the history of the development of behavior analysis and therapy. The Department of Psychiatry at the University of Mississippi Medical Center became a leader in enhancing the role of…

  12. The Mississippi Chinese: Between Black and White.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loewen, James W.

    Society in the Delta region of Mississippi is still rigidly segregated. A vast social and economic gulf yawns between the dominant white and subordinate black. Yet one group in Mississippi, a "third race," the Chinese, has managed to leap that chasm. This book focuses on the causes of their changes in status, the processes by which it came about,…

  13. Directory of Mississippi Libraries, 1996-97.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Library Commission, Jackson.

    The Directory of Mississippi Libraries is an annual publication which provides librarians, educators, and other interested persons with a basic source of current information on Mississippi libraries. The major section of the directory consists of listings for public, academic, school, special and institutional libraries. In addition to basic…

  14. Mississippi Public School Accountability Standards, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi State Dept. of Education, Jackson.

    This report provides a detailed overview of public-school accreditation in Mississippi. It opens with a short history of accreditation, which began in the 1890s. Early efforts were organized around the University of Mississippi, which had formulated programs of study that would prepare high-school students for college. These efforts evolved into a…

  15. 75 FR 79064 - Mississippi Disaster #MS-00042

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-17

    ... ADMINISTRATION Mississippi Disaster MS-00042 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Mississippi dated 12... INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409...

  16. 77 FR 55890 - Mississippi Disaster # MS-00059

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... ADMINISTRATION Mississippi Disaster MS-00059 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Mississippi (FEMA... INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409...

  17. Mississippi Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatum, W. Hugh; And Others

    Objectives of the official comprehensive outdoor recreation plan for the State of Mississippi are (1) to guide recreational development in Mississippi in an orderly fashion on a statewide level; (2) to survey public, semipublic, commercial, and private outdoor recreational opportunities; (3) to determine recreational needs for meeting present and…

  18. 76 FR 76801 - Mississippi Disaster #MS-00052

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Mississippi Disaster MS-00052 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of MISSISSIPPI dated...

  19. 75 FR 29371 - Mississippi Disaster #MS-00037

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Mississippi Disaster MS-00037 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Mississippi...

  20. 76 FR 27139 - Mississippi Disaster # MS-00045

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Mississippi Disaster MS-00045 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Mississippi...

  1. 76 FR 29810 - Mississippi Disaster #MS-00048

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Mississippi Disaster MS-00048 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Mississippi...

  2. 75 FR 25304 - Mississippi Disaster #MS-00035

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Mississippi Disaster MS-00035 AGENCY: Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Mississippi...

  3. 78 FR 12805 - Mississippi Disaster #MS-00064

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Mississippi Disaster MS-00064 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Mississippi...

  4. 78 FR 3494 - Mississippi Disaster #MS-00063

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Mississippi Disaster MS-00063 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Mississippi dated...

  5. The Mississippi Community College Fellowship Program (MCCFP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Billy; And Others

    The Mississippi Community College Fellowship Program (MCCFP), a project of the Department of Educational Leadership at Mississippi State University, is designed to assist in the identification, development, and training of the state's future community college leaders. Two participants are nominated by each of the 16 public community college…

  6. Fait A La Main: A Source Book of Louisiana Crafts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergeron, Maida, Ed.

    The Louisiana Crafts Program is an economic development program that strives to stimulate several markets for Louisiana craftsmen. This publication is a directory of juried Louisiana craftsmen of various types; it is intended as a source book for anyone interested in handmade crafts. It is divided into two sections: "Folk Craftsmen" and…

  7. Acadians of Louisiana: Curriculum Guide. Grade 8. Bulletin 1780.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge. Div. of Academic Programs.

    This document, a supplement to the "Louisiana Studies Curriculum Guide," was designed to enhance junior high school students' appreciation for the Acadian settlers impact on Louisiana history and culture. A course outline presents four units of study that include: (1) early history; (2) life in Louisiana; (3) social and cultural life; and (4) the…

  8. Geophysical modelling of subsidence on the Mississippi Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolstencroft, Martin; Shen, Zhixiong; Törnqvist, Torbjorn; Milne, Glenn; Kulp, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Louisiana with respect to stable North America. Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L23308, doi:10.1029/2006GL027250. Penland, S., and K. E. Ramsey (1990), Relative sea-level rise in Louisiana and the Gulf of Mexico: 1908-1988, J. Coastal Res., 6, 323-342. Törnqvist, T. E., S. J. Bick, K. van der Borg, and A. F. M. de Jong (2006), How stable is the Mississippi Delta? Geology, 34(8), 697-700, doi:10.1130/G22624.1. Yu, S.-Y., T. E. Törnqvist, and P. Hu (2012), Quantifying Holocene lithospheric subsidence rates underneath the Mississippi Delta. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 331-332, 21-30, doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2012.02.021.

  9. Alabama's Education Report Card, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In a more consistent and viable manner than ever before, education in Alabama is moving toward its ultimate goal of providing every student with a quality education, thereby preparing them for work, college, and life after high school. Alabama's graduation rates from 2002 to 2008 increased significantly, tripling the national average increase…

  10. 76 FR 77995 - Southcross Alabama Pipeline LLC; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Southcross Alabama Pipeline LLC; Notice of Filing Take notice that on December 7, 2011, Southcross Alabama Pipeline LLC (SAP) submitted a revised Statement of...

  11. The Alabama High School Graduation Examination Experience: Technical Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockwood, Robert E.

    A technical advisory committee assisted the Alabama State Department of Education in establishing passing scores and equating test forms of the Alabama High School Graduation Examination (AHSGE). The committee examined four methods of setting cutting scores: (1) Jensen's theoretical method--probability theory is used to set standards that are…

  12. Aeromonas hydrophila in 2010: Characteristics of Alabama outbreaks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For a second year, epidemics associated with a virulent strain of Aeromonas hydrophila resulted in losses of hundreds of thousands of pounds of market size Alabama (AL) catfish. During this period, the Alabama Fish Farming Center diagnosed outbreaks of this strain of A. hydrophila on 25% (28/113) o...

  13. Alabama's Education Report Card 2010-11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Public education in Alabama is moving in the right direction and is poised to be a national model for the college and career readiness of its students. Through some of the most challenging financial circumstances, public education in Alabama has continued to show great promise in many areas, including reading, math, and science. The success of…

  14. 14. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Southern RR at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Southern RR at Epes Alabama Great Southern RR bridge. View from S. Copy of photo taken in 1922 by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms., Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  15. The Rural Alabama Pregnancy and Infant Health (RAPIH) Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeper, J. D.; And Others

    The impact of the Rural Alabama Pregnancy and Infant Health (RAPIH) Program was evaluated in relation to prenatal care, birth outcome measures, and several child health and home environment outcomes. Begun in 1983, RAPIH targets poor rural blacks in three of west-central Alabama's poorest counties, where economic conditions and infant mortality…

  16. 76 FR 32982 - Alabama; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-07

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Alabama; Emergency and Related Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of the Presidential declaration of an emergency for the State of Alabama (FEMA-3319-EM), dated April 27, 2011, and...

  17. Alabama Commission on Higher Education. Occasional Papers on Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Commission on Higher Education, Montgomery.

    Two papers on the funding formula of the Alabama Commission for Higher Education are presented. The first paper, by John F. Porter, Jr., "The Origins and Evolutions of the Funding Formula Model Utilized by the Alabama Commission on Higher Education, 1973-82," presents the historical antecedents for the existing formula elements and notes…

  18. Alabama Linkage: An Innovative Higher Education Consortium Maximizing Statewide Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joiner, Charles L.; And Others

    In the late 1960's and early 1970's, attracting physicians to areas of rural Alabama was virtually impossible because of the lack of professional health care workers available to become part of the necessary health care team. To address this problem, the University of Alabama (UA) adopted a plan to create a consortium of higher education…

  19. Trends in Tobacco Use by Alabama Youth (1995-1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Feng; Bruess, Clint

    To examine changes in tobacco use among high school students in Alabama from 1995 to 1999, Alabama Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBS) survey data were analyzed. The survey has been used since 1990 to examine the health practices of adolescents and to monitor priority health-risk behaviors that contribute to the leading causes of…

  20. Inservice Education at a Distance: A Rural Consortium in Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addleton, Robert L.; Edmonds, Charles; Gamble, Lanny; Watkins, J. Foster

    1983-01-01

    The articles describes the efforts of seven rural systems in northeast Alabama to respond in a cooperative manner to new initiatives from the State Department of Education to improve their inservice/staff development programs. The University of Alabama, primarily through its Gadsden Center, provided professional support and coordinating…

  1. A Study of School Size among Alabama's Public High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindahl, Ronald A.; Cain, Patrick M., Sr.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the size of Alabama's public high schools, selected school quality and financial indicators, and their students' performance on standardized exams. When the socioeconomic level of the student bodies is held constant, the size of high schools in Alabama has relatively little…

  2. Alabama University Professor's View of the Birmingham Bombing Trial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Presents the views of Alabama university scholars regarding the historical significance of the 2001 trial of Thomas Blanton for his role in the Ku Klux Klan bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist church in Birmingham, Alabama thet killed four girls. Their discussions note the need to examine the American judicial system, the weak case against Mr.…

  3. Phorid Flies in Alabama: A tale of two species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two species of phorid fly have been released at 11 sites in Alabama and have been recovered from 9 sites. Pseudacteon tricuspis Borgmeier (Diptera: Phoridae) was released in South Alabama in populations of the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), and Pseudacteon...

  4. 23. VIEW FROM STARBOARD BOW OF ALABAMA AS 'ALABAMIAN.' Uncopyrighted ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. VIEW FROM STARBOARD BOW OF ALABAMA AS 'ALABAMIAN.' Uncopyrighted 3-1/2'x5-5/8' postcard; image taken on station in Gulf of Mexico, c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  5. 24. STARBOARD PROFILE OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN); VESSEL AT ANCHOR ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. STARBOARD PROFILE OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN); VESSEL AT ANCHOR ON STATION IN GULF OF MEXICO WITH MOTOR BOAT TIED AT STERN Original 4-3/4'x6-3/4' photograph taken c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  6. 25. VIEW OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN) FROM OFF PORT BOW; VESSEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. VIEW OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN) FROM OFF PORT BOW; VESSEL AT ANCHOR ON STATION IN GULF OF MEXICO WITH MOTOR BOAT TIED AT STERN Original 4-3/4'x6-3/4' photograph taken c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  7. 77 FR 41132 - Air Quality Implementation Plans; Alabama; Attainment Plan for the Alabama Portion of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-12

    ... for the 1997 PM 2.5 NAAQS (72 FR 20586). This rule describes the CAA framework and requirements for... portion of the Chattanooga Area on February 8, 2012 (77 FR 6469). EPA has determined that Alabama's PM 2.5... for EPA's proposed action? A. Designation History On July 18, 1997 (62 FR 38652), EPA established...

  8. 77 FR 60904 - Air Quality Implementation Plans; Alabama; Attainment Plan for the Alabama Portion of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ... October 7, 2009, SIP revision regarding reasonably available control technology (RACT) and reasonably... the mobile source contribution to ambient PM 2.5 levels for the Alabama portion of the Chattanooga... insignificance determination for mobile direct PM 2.5 and NO X emissions for transportation conformity...

  9. Alabama Bound: Identifying Factors Associated with Secondary Education Students' Choice of Attending The University of Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acker, Jon Charles; Hughes, William W.; Fendley, William R., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Alabama's primary competitor in recruiting is in-state rival Auburn University which lures away roughly one in eight of UA's admitted students. Two factors stand above all others in attracting students to UA--academic reputation and social activities reputation. Factors following distantly are a visit to the UA campus, financial assistance and the…

  10. Analyses of water and dredged material from selected southern Louisiana waterways and selected areas in the Gulf of Mexico, 1976-78

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stallworth, Geraldine R.; Jordan, Helen F.

    1980-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey was requested by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to provide water-quality data to evaluate the potential environmental effects of (1) dredging activities in selected navigable waterways of southern Louisiana and (2) the disposal of dredged material at selected areas in the Gulf of Mexico. Areas studied from September 1976 to May 1978 included five ocean disposal sites in the Gulf of Mexico, in addition to the following waterways: Baptiste, Collette Bayou, Mississippi River at Head of Passes and Southwest Pass, Mississippi River at Tiger Pass, Bayou Black, Intracoastal Waterway (Port Allen to Morgan City), and Calcasieu River and Ship Channel. Samples were analyzed for selected chemical, physical, and biological constituents. (USGS)

  11. Estimating occupancy dynamics in an anuran assemblage from Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walls, Susan C.; Waddle, J. Hardin; Dorazio, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Effective monitoring programs are designed to track changes in the distribution, occurrence, and abundance of species. We developed an extension of Royle and Kéry's (2007) single species model to estimate simultaneously temporal changes in probabilities of detection, occupancy, colonization, extinction, and species turnover using data on calling anuran amphibians, collected from 2002 to 2006 in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley of Louisiana, USA. During our 5-year study, estimates of occurrence probabilities declined for all 12 species detected. These declines occurred primarily in conjunction with variation in estimates of local extinction probabilities (cajun chorus frog [Pseudacris fouquettei], spring peeper [P. crucifer], northern cricket frog [Acris crepitans], Cope's gray treefrog [Hyla chrysoscelis], green treefrog [H. cinerea], squirrel treefrog [H. squirella], southern leopard frog [Lithobates sphenocephalus], bronze frog [L. clamitans], American bullfrog [L. catesbeianus], and Fowler's toad [Anaxyrus fowleri]). For 2 species (eastern narrowmouthed toad [Gastrophryne carolinensis] and Gulf Coast toad [Incilius nebulifer]), declines in occupancy appeared to be a consequence of both increased local extinction and decreased colonization events. The eastern narrow-mouthed toad experienced a 2.5-fold increase in estimates of occupancy in 2004, possibly because of the high amount of rainfall received during that year, along with a decrease in extinction and increase in colonization of new sites between 2003 and 2004. Our model can be incorporated into monitoring programs to estimate simultaneously the occupancy dynamics for multiple species that show similar responses to ecological conditions. It will likely be an important asset for those monitoring programs that employ the same methods to sample assemblages of ecologically similar species, including those that are rare. By combining information from multiple species to decrease the variance on estimates

  12. Principal Component Analysis and Molecular Characterization of Reniform Nematode Populations in Alabama

    PubMed Central

    Nyaku, Seloame T.; Kantety, Ramesh V.; Cebert, Ernst; Lawrence, Kathy S.; Honger, Joseph O.; Sharma, Govind C.

    2016-01-01

    U.S. cotton production is suffering from the yield loss caused by the reniform nematode (RN), Rotylenchulus reniformis. Management of this devastating pest is of utmost importance because, no upland cotton cultivar exhibits adequate resistance to RN. Nine populations of RN from distinct regions in Alabama and one population from Mississippi were studied and thirteen morphometric features were measured on 20 male and 20 female nematodes from each population. Highly correlated variables (positive) in female and male RN morphometric parameters were observed for body length (L) and distance of vulva from the lip region (V) (r = 0.7) and tail length (TL) and c′ (r = 0.8), respectively. The first and second principal components for the female and male populations showed distinct clustering into three groups. These results show pattern of sub-groups within the RN populations in Alabama. A one-way ANOVA on female and male RN populations showed significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) among the variables. Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) of 18S rRNA sequences (421) showed lengths of 653 bp. Sites within the aligned sequences were conserved (53%), parsimony-informative (17%), singletons (28%), and indels (2%), respectively. Neighbor-Joining analysis showed intra and inter-nematodal variations within the populations as clone sequences from different nematodes irrespective of the sex of nematode isolate clustered together. Morphologically, the three groups (I, II and III) could not be distinctly associated with the molecular data from the 18S rRNA sequences. The three groups may be identified as being non-geographically contiguous. PMID:27147932

  13. Discharge, suspended sediment, and salinity in the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway and adjacent surface waters in South-Central Louisiana, 1997–2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, Christopher M.; Perrien, Scott M.

    2015-10-19

    River water penetrates much of the Louisiana coast, as demonstrated by the large year-to-year fluctuations in salinity regimes of intradistributary basins in response to differences in flow regimes of the Mississippi and the Atchafalaya Rivers. This occurs directly through inflow along the GIWW and through controlled diversions and indirectly by transport into basin interiors after mixing with the Gulf of Mexico. The GIWW plays an important role in moderating salinity in intradistributary basins; for example, salinity in surface waters just south of the GIWW between Bayou Boeuf and the Houma Navigation Canal remained low even during a year with prolonged low water (2000).

  14. Discharge, suspended sediment, and salinity in the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway and adjacent surface waters in South-Central Louisiana, 1997–2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, Christopher M.; Perrien, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    River water penetrates much of the Louisiana coast, as demonstrated by the large year-to-year fluctuations in salinity regimes of intradistributary basins in response to differences in flow regimes of the Mississippi and the Atchafalaya Rivers. This occurs directly through inflow along the GIWW and through controlled diversions and indirectly by transport into basin interiors after mixing with the Gulf of Mexico. The GIWW plays an important role in moderating salinity in intradistributary basins; for example, salinity in surface waters just south of the GIWW between Bayou Boeuf and the Houma Navigation Canal remained low even during a year with prolonged low water (2000).

  15. Groundwater quality at Alabama Plating and Vincent Spring, Vincent, Alabama, 2007–2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Michael W.; Gill, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    The former Alabama Plating site in Vincent, Alabama, includes the location where the Alabama Plating Company operated an electroplating facility from 1956 until 1986. The operation of the facility generated waste containing cyanide, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, zinc, and other heavy metals. Contamination resulting from the site operations was identified in groundwater, soil, and sediment. Vincent Spring, used as a public water supply by the city of Vincent, Alabama, is located about ½ mile southwest of the site. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, conducted an investigation at Vincent Spring and the Alabama Plating site, Vincent, Alabama, during 2007–2008 to evaluate the groundwater quality and evaluate the potential effect of contaminated groundwater on the water quality of Vincent Spring. The results of the investigation will provide scientific data and information on the occurrence, fate, and transport of contaminants in the water resources of the area and aid in the evaluation of the vulnerability of the public water supply to contamination. Samples were analyzed to evaluate the water quality at the former plating site, investigate the presence of possible contaminant indicators at Vincent Spring, and determine the usefulness of stable isotopes and geochemical properties in understanding groundwater flow and contaminant transport in the area. Samples collected from 16 monitor wells near the plating site and Vincent Spring were analyzed for major constituents, trace metals, nutrients, and the stable isotopes for hydrogen (2H/H) and oxygen (18O/16O). Groundwater collected from Vincent Spring was characterized as a calcium-magnesium-bicarbonate water type with total dissolved solids concentrations ranging from 110 to 120 milligrams per liter and pH ranging from about 7.5 to 7.9 units. Groundwater chemistry at the monitor wells at the Alabama Plating site was highly variable by location and depth

  16. A modeling study of the physical processes affecting the development of seasonal hypoxia over the inner Louisiana-Texas shelf: Circulation and stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lixia; Justić, Dubravko

    2009-06-01

    The physical processes affecting the development of seasonal hypoxia over the Louisiana-Texas shelf were examined using a high-resolution, three-dimensional, unstructured-grid, Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM). The model was forced with the observed freshwater fluxes from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers, surface winds, heat fluxes, tides and offshore conditions. The simulations were carried out over a six-month period, from April to September 2002, and the model performance was evaluated against several independent series of observations that included tidal gauge data, Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data, shipboard measurements of temperature and salinity, vertical salinity and sigma-t profiles, and satellite imagery. The model accurately described the offshore circulation mode generated over the Louisiana-Texas shelf by the westerly winds during summer months, as well as the prevalent westward flow along the coast caused by the easterly winds during the rest of the study period. The seasonal cycle of stratification also was well represented by the model. During 2002, the stratification was initiated in early spring and subsequently enhanced by the intensity and phasing of riverine freshwater discharges. Strong stratification persisted throughout the summer and was finally broken down in September by tropical storms. The model simulations also revealed a quasi-permanent anticyclonic gyre in the Louisiana Bight region formed by the rotational transformation of the Mississippi River plume, whose existence during 2002 was supported by the satellite imagery and ADCP current measurements. Model simulations support the conclusion that local wind forcing and buoyancy flux resulting from riverine freshwater discharges were the dominant mechanisms affecting the circulation and stratification over the inner Louisiana-Texas shelf.

  17. Reservoir characterization of the Smackover Formation in southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Hall, D.R.; Mann, S.D.; Tew, B.H.

    1993-02-01

    The Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation is found in an arcuate belt in the subsurface from south Texas to panhandle Florida. The Smackover is the most prolific hydrocarbon-producing formation in Alabama and is an important hydrocarbon reservoir from Florida to Texas. In this report Smackover hydrocarbon reservoirs in southwest Alabama are described. Also, the nine enhanced- and improved-recovery projects that have been undertaken in the Smackover of Alabama are evaluated. The report concludes with recommendations about potential future enhanced- and improved-recovery projects in Smackover reservoirs in Alabama and an estimate of the potential volume of liquid hydrocarbons recoverable by enhanced- and improved-recovery methods from the Smackover of Alabama.

  18. 33 CFR 207.310 - Mississippi River at Keokuk, Iowa; operation of power dam by Mississippi River Power Co.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mississippi River at Keokuk, Iowa; operation of power dam by Mississippi River Power Co. 207.310 Section 207.310 Navigation and Navigable... Mississippi River at Keokuk, Iowa; operation of power dam by Mississippi River Power Co. (a) All...

  19. Soil Sampling Techniques For Alabama Grain Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, A. N.; Shaw, J. N.; Mask, P. L.; Touchton, J. T.; Rickman, D.

    2003-01-01

    Characterizing the spatial variability of nutrients facilitates precision soil sampling. Questions exist regarding the best technique for directed soil sampling based on a priori knowledge of soil and crop patterns. The objective of this study was to evaluate zone delineation techniques for Alabama grain fields to determine which method best minimized the soil test variability. Site one (25.8 ha) and site three (20.0 ha) were located in the Tennessee Valley region, and site two (24.2 ha) was located in the Coastal Plain region of Alabama. Tennessee Valley soils ranged from well drained Rhodic and Typic Paleudults to somewhat poorly drained Aquic Paleudults and Fluventic Dystrudepts. Coastal Plain s o i l s ranged from coarse-loamy Rhodic Kandiudults to loamy Arenic Kandiudults. Soils were sampled by grid soil sampling methods (grid sizes of 0.40 ha and 1 ha) consisting of: 1) twenty composited cores collected randomly throughout each grid (grid-cell sampling) and, 2) six composited cores collected randomly from a -3x3 m area at the center of each grid (grid-point sampling). Zones were established from 1) an Order 1 Soil Survey, 2) corn (Zea mays L.) yield maps, and 3) airborne remote sensing images. All soil properties were moderately to strongly spatially dependent as per semivariogram analyses. Differences in grid-point and grid-cell soil test values suggested grid-point sampling does not accurately represent grid values. Zones created by soil survey, yield data, and remote sensing images displayed lower coefficient of variations (8CV) for soil test values than overall field values, suggesting these techniques group soil test variability. However, few differences were observed between the three zone delineation techniques. Results suggest directed sampling using zone delineation techniques outlined in this paper would result in more efficient soil sampling for these Alabama grain fields.

  20. Paleocene lignite deposits of southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.

    1984-04-01

    In southwest Alabama, lignite having economic potential occurs in the Oak Hill Member of the Naheola Formation. This middle Paleocene lignite generally consists of a single bed of 1-14 ft (0.5-4 m) in thickness and is the most extensive lignite in the southwest Alabama region. The Oak Hill lignite deposit accumulated in lower delta plain coastal marshes in interchannel areas behind a barrier system. The source area for the deltaic sediments was probably to the west and/or northwest of Choctaw County, Alabama. The lignite occurs in a clay-dominated sequence. Oak Hill interdistributary bay ripple-laminated clays are interbedded with ripple-laminated, crevasse splay sands generally less than 15 ft (5 m) thick. The glauconitic sands of the overlying Coal Bluff Marl Member of the Naheola Formation represent times of marine encroachment into the interchannel basin area. Lignite having subeconomic value at present occurs in the upper part of the Tuscahoma Sand. This upper Paleocene lignite is irregular in its outcrop pattern and apparently is not represented over extensive areas. It is locally persistent with one or more beds less than 3 ft (1 m) thick. The Tuscahoma may contain up to 6 lignite seams that may exceed a total thickness of 5 ft (1.5 m). These lignite beds were deposited in lower delta-plain coastal marshes adjacent to high constructive deltaic bar finger sands. Tuscahoma marsh clays are interbedded with ripple-laminated and cross-bedded bar finger sands. The Tuscahoma Sand is overlain by the Bashi Marl Member of the Hatchetigbee Formation. The Bashi contains a diverse lower Eocene marine fossil assemblage.