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Sample records for alamethicin transmembrane channels

  1. Two classes of alamethicin transmembrane channels: molecular models from single-channel properties.

    PubMed Central

    Mak, D O; Webb, W W

    1995-01-01

    Molecular structures of transmembrane channels formed by alamethicin polypeptide aggregates were analyzed by measuring open-channel conductances and state-transition kinetics using voltage-clamp technique with artificial phospholipid bilayers isolated onto micropipettes by a novel solvent-free tip-dip method. Two distinct classes of alamethicin channels, each with a unique set of conductance states and kinetic properties, were identified. Alamethicin Rf50 at low temperatures forms mostly nonpersistent channels with lifetimes of < 1 min. Long-lasting persistent channels are formed by alamethicin Rf30 at all temperatures and by alamethicin Rf50 at room temperature. In the "modified barrel-stave" model for persistent channels based on the crystalline alamethicin secondary structure, the aqueous pore of the channel surrounded by parallel alamethicin monomers has a constriction generated by amino acid side chains protruding from the alamethicin helices into the pore. The model explains quantitatively the nonohmic channel conductance at high applied voltages and the conductance values and ion selectivities of various persistent channel states. The kinetic properties of nonpersistent channels are explained qualitatively by the "reversed-molecule" model in which nonpersistent channels differ from persistent channels by having one of the channel-forming alamethicin monomers oriented antiparallel to the others. PMID:8599639

  2. Molecular dynamics of alamethicin transmembrane channels from open-channel current noise analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Mak, D O; Webb, W W

    1995-01-01

    Conductance noise measurement of the open states of alamethicin transmembrane channels reveals excess noise attributable to cooperative low-frequency molecular dynamics that can generate fluctuations approximately 1 A rms in the effective channel pore radius. Single-channel currents through both persistent and nonpersistent channels with multiple conductance states formed by purified polypeptide alamethicin in artificial phospholipid bilayers isolated onto micropipettes with gigaohm seals were recorded using a voltage-clamp technique with low background noise (rms noise < 3 pA up to 20 kHz). Current noise power spectra between 100 Hz and 20 kHz of each open channel state showed little frequency dependence. Noise from undetected conductance state transitions was insignificant. Johnson and shot noises were evaluated. Current noise caused by electrolyte concentration fluctuation via diffusion was isolated by its dependence on buffer concentration. After removing these contributions, significant current noise remains in all persistent channel states and increases in higher conductance states. In nonpersistent channels, remaining noise occurs primarily in the lowest two states. These fluctuations of channel conductance are attributed to thermal oscillations of the channel molecular conformation and are modeled as a Langevin translational oscillation of alamethicin molecules moving radially from the channel pore, damped mostly by lipid bilayer viscosity. PMID:8599640

  3. Intrinsic rectification of ion flux in alamethicin channels: studies with an alamethicin dimer.

    PubMed Central

    Woolley, G A; Biggin, P C; Schultz, A; Lien, L; Jaikaran, D C; Breed, J; Crowhurst, K; Sansom, M S

    1997-01-01

    Covalent dimers of alamethicin form conducting structures with gating properties that permit measurement of current-voltage (I-V) relationships during the lifetime of a single channel. These I-V curves demonstrate that the alamethicin channel is a rectifier that passes current preferentially, with voltages of the same sign as that of the voltage that induced opening of the channel. The degree of rectification depends on the salt concentration; single-channel I-V relationships become almost linear in 3 M potassium chloride. These properties may be qualitatively understood by using Poisson-Nernst-Planck theory and a modeled structure of the alamethicin pore. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:9251793

  4. A tethered bilayer sensor containing alamethicin channels and its detection of amiloride based inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ping; Burns, Christopher J; Osman, Peter D J; Cornell, Bruce A

    2003-04-01

    Alamethicin, a small transmembrane peptide, inserts into a tethered bilayer membrane (tBLM) to form ion channels, which we have investigated using electrical impedance spectroscopy. The number of channels formed is dependent on the incubation time, concentration of the alamethicin and the application of DC voltage. The properties of the ion channels when formed in tethered bilayers are similar to those for such channels assembled into black lipid membranes (BLMs). Furthermore, amiloride and certain analogs can inhibit the channel pores, formed in the tBLMs. The potency and concentration of the inhibitors can be determined by measuring the change of impedance. Our work illustrates the possibility of using a synthetic tBLM for the study of small peptide voltage dependent ion channels. A potential application of such a device is as a screening tool in drug discovery processes.

  5. Metal-Assisted Channel Stabilization: Disposition of a Single Histidine on the N-terminus of Alamethicin Yields Channels with Extraordinarily Long Lifetimes

    PubMed Central

    Noshiro, Daisuke; Asami, Koji; Futaki, Shiroh

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Alamethicin, a member of the peptaibol family of antibiotics, is a typical channel-forming peptide with a helical structure. The self-assembly of the peptide in the membranes yields voltage-dependent channels. In this study, three alamethicin analogs possessing a charged residue (His, Lys, or Glu) on their N-termini were designed with the expectation of stabilizing the transmembrane structure. A slight elongation of channel lifetime was observed for the Lys and Glu analogs. On the other hand, extensive stabilization of certain channel open states was observed for the His analog. This stabilization was predominantly observed in the presence of metal ions such as Zn2+, suggesting that metal coordination with His facilitates the formation of a supramolecular assembly in the membranes. Channel stability was greatly diminished by acetylation of the N-terminal amino group, indicating that the N-terminal amino group also plays an important role in metal coordination. PMID:20441743

  6. Influence of proline position upon the ion channel activity of alamethicin.

    PubMed Central

    Kaduk, C; Duclohier, H; Dathe, M; Wenschuh, H; Beyermann, M; Molle, G; Bienert, M

    1997-01-01

    Alamethicin, a 20-residue peptaibol, induces voltage-dependent ion channels in lipid bilayers according to the barrel-stave model. To study relationships between the proline-14-induced kink region and the channel-forming behavior of the peptide, a set of alamethicin analogs with proline incorporated at positions 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, and 17, respectively, as well as an analog with alanine instead of proline at position 14 were synthesized. Macroscopic conductance experiments show that the voltage dependence of the peptides is conserved although slightly influenced, but the apparent mean number of monomers forming the channels is significantly reduced when proline is not located at position 14. This is confirmed in single-channel experiments. The analogs with proline next to position 14 (i.e., 13, 15, 16) show stable conductance levels, but of reduced number, which follows the order Alam-P14 > Alam-P15 > Alam-P16 > Alam-P13. This reduction in the number of levels is connected with changes in the lifetime of the channels. Analogs with proline at position 11, 12, or 17 produce erratic, extremely short-lived current events that could not be resolved. The changes in functional properties are related to structural properties as probed by circular dichroism. The results indicate that proline at position 14 results in optimal channel activity, whereas channels formed by the analogs bearing proline at different positions are considerably less stable. PMID:9129817

  7. Ion Channels of Alamethicin Dimer N-Terminally Linked by Disulfide Bond

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Takashi; Sakoh, Machiko; Nagaoka, Yasuo; Asami, Koji

    2003-01-01

    A covalent dimer of alamethicin Rf30 was synthesized by linking the N-termini by a disulfide bond. When the dimer peptides were added to the cis-side of a diphytanoyl PC membrane, macroscopic channel current was induced only at cis positive voltages. The single-channel recordings showed several conductance levels that were alternately stabilized. These results indicate that the dimer peptides form stable channels by N-terminal insertion like alamethicin and that most of the pores are assembled from even numbers of helices. Taking advantages of the long open duration of the dimer peptide channels, the current-voltage (I-V) relations of the single-channels were obtained by applying fast voltage ramps during the open states. The I-V relations showed rectification, such that current from the cis-side toward the trans-side is larger than that in the opposite direction. The intrinsic rectification is mainly attributed to the macro dipoles of parallel peptide helices surrounding a central pore. PMID:12829482

  8. Signal transduction across alamethicin ion channels in the presence of noise.

    PubMed Central

    Bezrukov, S M; Vodyanoy, I

    1997-01-01

    We have studied voltage-dependent ion channels of alamethicin reconstituted into an artificial planar lipid bilayer membrane from the point of view of electric signal transduction. Signal transduction properties of these channels are highly sensitive to the external electric noise. Specifically, addition of bandwidth-restricted "white" noise of 10-20 mV (r.m.s.) to a small sine wave input signal increases the output signal by approximately 20-40 dB conserving, and even slightly increasing, the signal-to-noise ratio at the system output. We have developed a small-signal adiabatic theory of stochastic resonance for a threshold-free system of voltage-dependent ion channels. This theory describes our main experimental findings giving good qualitative understanding of the underlying mechanism. It predicts the right value of the output signal-to-noise ratio and provides a reliable estimate for the noise intensity corresponding to its maximum. Our results suggest that the alamethicin channel in a lipid bilayer is a good model system for studies of mechanisms of primary electrical signal processing in biology showing an important feature of signal transduction improvement by a fluctuating environment. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:9370439

  9. Lipid-alamethicin interactions influence alamethicin orientation.

    PubMed

    Huang, H W; Wu, Y

    1991-11-01

    Whereas the barrel-stave configuration is accepted by most investigators as a good description of the conducting state of alamethicin, there are conflicting interpretations on its nonconducting state; in the absence of an applied field, some found alamethicin molecules on the membrane surface, but others found them incorporated in the hydrophobic core of the membrane. This problem is resolved by the discovery of a phase-transitionlike behavior of alamethicin in the membrane. As a function of lipid/peptide ratio L/P and the chemical potential of water mu, alamethicin molecules were observed to switch between two states: in one, the majority of the peptide molecules bind parallel to the membrane surface; in another, the majority of the peptide molecules insert perpendicularly into the membrane. The state of alamethicin was monitored by the method of oriented circular dichroism (OCD; Wu, Y., H. W. Huang, and G. A. Olah, 1990, Biophys. J. 57:797-806) using aligned multilayer samples in the liquid crystalline L(alpha) phase. If L/P exceeds a critical value, most of the peptide molecules are on the membrane surface. If L/P is below the critical value, most of the peptide molecules are incorporated in the membrane when mu is high; when mu is low, most of them are again on the membrane surface. In a typical conduction experiment of voltage dependence, alamethicin molecules are in a partition equilibrium between the aqueous phase and the lipid phase before the application of voltage; in the lipid phase, the lipid/peptide ratio is such that most of alamethicin molecules are on the membrane surface. This is the nonconducting state of alamethicin. The OCD analysis showed that there is essentially no change in the secondary structure when alamethicin changes between the surface state and the inserted state. The voltage-gating mechanism can be explained if we assume that these surface peptide molecules probabilistically turn into the membrane core to form channels due to the

  10. Lipid-alamethicin interactions influence alamethicin orientation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huey W.; Wu, Yili

    1991-01-01

    Whereas the barrel-stave configuration is accepted by most investigators as a good description of the conducting state of alamethicin, there are conflicting interpretations on its nonconducting state; in the absence of an applied field, some found alamethicin molecules on the membrane surface, but others found them incorporated in the hydrophobic core of the membrane. This problem is resolved by the discovery of a phase-transitionlike behavior of alamethicin in the membrane. As a function of lipid/peptide ratio L/P and the chemical potential of water μ, alamethicin molecules were observed to switch between two states: in one, the majority of the peptide molecules bind parallel to the membrane surface; in another, the majority of the peptide molecules insert perpendicularly into the membrane. The state of alamethicin was monitored by the method of oriented circular dichroism (OCD; Wu, Y., H. W. Huang, and G. A. Olah, 1990, Biophys. J. 57:797-806) using aligned multilayer samples in the liquid crystalline Lα phase. If L/P exceeds a critical value, most of the peptide molecules are on the membrane surface. If L/P is below the critical value, most of the peptide molecules are incorporated in the membrane when μ is high; when μ is low, most of them are again on the membrane surface. In a typical conduction experiment of voltage dependence, alamethicin molecules are in a partition equilibrium between the aqueous phase and the lipid phase before the application of voltage; in the lipid phase, the lipid/peptide ratio is such that most of alamethicin molecules are on the membrane surface. This is the nonconducting state of alamethicin. The OCD analysis showed that there is essentially no change in the secondary structure when alamethicin changes between the surface state and the inserted state. The voltage-gating mechanism can be explained if we assume that these surface peptide molecules probabilistically turn into the membrane core to form channels due to the dipole

  11. Modifications of alamethicin ion channels by substitution of Glu-7 for Gln-7.

    PubMed Central

    Asami, Koji; Okazaki, Takashi; Nagai, Yasuaki; Nagaoka, Yasuo

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the role of charged residues facing a pore lumen in stability of channel structure and ion permeation, we studied electrical properties of ion channels formed by synthesized native alamethicins (Rf50 (alm-Q7Q18) and Rf30 (alm-Q7E18)) and their analogs with Glu-7 (alm-E7Q18 and alm-E7E18). The single-channel currents were measured over a pH range of 3.5 to 8.7 using planar bilayers of diphytanoyl PC. The peptides all showed multi-level current fluctuations in this pH range. At pH 3.5 the channels formed by the four peptides were similar to each other irrespective of the side chain differences at positions 7 and 18. The ionization of Glu-7 (E7) and Glu-18 (E18) above neutral pH reduced the relative probabilities of low-conductance states (levels 1 and 2) and increased those of high-conductance states (levels 4-6). The channel conductance of the peptides with E7 and/or E18, which was distinct from that of alm-Q7Q18, showed a marked pH-dependence, especially for low-conductance states. The ionization of E7 further reduced the stability of channel structure, altered the current-voltage curve from a superlinear relation to a sublinear one, and enhanced cation selectivity. These results indicate that ionized E7 strongly influences the channel structure and the ion permeation, in contrast to ionized E18. PMID:12080114

  12. Ion fluxes through nanopores and transmembrane channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordin, J. R.; Diehl, A.; Barbosa, M. C.; Levin, Y.

    2012-03-01

    We introduce an implicit solvent Molecular Dynamics approach for calculating ionic fluxes through narrow nanopores and transmembrane channels. The method relies on a dual-control-volume grand-canonical molecular dynamics (DCV-GCMD) simulation and the analytical solution for the electrostatic potential inside a cylindrical nanopore recently obtained by Levin [Europhys. Lett.EULEEJ0295-507510.1209/epl/i2006-10240-4 76, 163 (2006)]. The theory is used to calculate the ionic fluxes through an artificial transmembrane channel which mimics the antibacterial gramicidin A channel. Both current-voltage and current-concentration relations are calculated under various experimental conditions. We show that our results are comparable to the characteristics associated to the gramicidin A pore, especially the existence of two binding sites inside the pore and the observed saturation in the current-concentration profiles.

  13. Dynamics and aggregation of the peptide ion channel alamethicin. Measurements using spin-labeled peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Archer, S J; Ellena, J F; Cafiso, D S

    1991-01-01

    Two spin-labeled derivatives of the ion conductive peptide alamethicin were synthesized and used to examine its binding and state of aggregation. One derivative was spin labeled at the C-terminus and the other, a leucine analogue, was spin labeled at the N-terminus. In methanol, both the C and N terminal labeled peptides were monomeric. In aqueous solution, the C-terminal derivative was monomeric at low concentrations, but aggregated at higher concentrations with a critical concentration of 23 microM. In the membrane, the C-terminal label was localized to the membrane-aqueous interface using 13C-NMR, and could assume more than one orientation. The membrane binding of the C-terminal derivative was examined using EPR, and it exhibited a cooperativity seen previously for native alamethicin. However, this cooperativity was not the result of an aggregation of the peptide in the membrane. When the spectra of either the C or N-terminal labeled peptide were examined over a wide range of membrane lipid to peptide ratios, no evidence for aggregation could be found and the peptides remained monomeric under all conditions examined. Because electrical measurements on this peptide provide strong evidence for an ion-conductive aggregate, the ion-conductive form of alamethicin likely represents a minor fraction of the total membrane bound peptide. PMID:1717016

  14. The Origins of Transmembrane Ion Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Even though membrane proteins that mediate transport of ions and small molecules across cell walls are among the largest and least understood biopolymers in contemporary cells, it is still possible to shed light on their origins and early evolution. The central observation is that transmembrane portions of most ion channels are simply bundles of -helices. By combining results of experimental and computer simulation studies on synthetic models and natural channels, mostly of non-genomic origin, we show that the emergence of -helical channels was protobiologically plausible, and did not require highly specific amino acid sequences. Despite their simple structure, such channels could possess properties that, at the first sight, appear to require markedly larger complexity. Specifically, we explain how the antiamoebin channels, which are made of identical helices, 16 amino acids in length, achieve efficiency comparable to that of highly evolved channels. We further show that antiamoebin channels are extremely flexible, compared to modern, genetically coded channels. On the basis of our results, we propose that channels evolved further towards high structural complexity because they needed to acquire stable rigid structures and mechanisms for precise regulation rather than improve efficiency. In general, even though architectures of membrane proteins are not nearly as diverse as those of water-soluble proteins, they are sufficiently flexible to adapt readily to the functional demands arising during evolution.

  15. Alamethicin helices in a bilayer and in solution: molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed Central

    Tieleman, D P; Sansom, M S; Berendsen, H J

    1999-01-01

    Alamethicin is an alpha-helical channel-forming peptide, which inserts into lipid bilayers in a voltage-dependent, asymmetrical fashion. Nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations have been used to compare alamethicin conformation and dynamics in three different environments: 1) in water; 2) in methanol; and 3) inserted into a lipid (palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine) bilayer to form a transmembrane helix. In the bilayer and in methanol, there was little change (Calpha RMSD approximately 0.2 nm over 2 ns and 1 ns) from the initial helical conformation of the peptide. In water there were substantial changes (Calpha RMSD approximately 0.4 nm over 1 ns), especially in the C-terminal segment of the peptide, which lost its alpha-helical conformation. In the bilayer and in methanol, the alamethicin molecule underwent hinge-bending motion about its central Gly-X-X-Pro sequence motif. Analysis of H-bonding interactions revealed that the polar C-terminal side chains of alamethicin provided an "anchor" to the bilayer/water interface via formation of multiple H-bonds that persisted throughout the simulation. This explains why the preferred mode of helix insertion into the bilayer is N-terminal, which is believed to underlie the asymmetry of voltage activation of alamethicin channels. PMID:9876121

  16. TOAC Spin Labels in the Backbone of Alamethicin: EPR Studies in Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Derek; Jost, Micha; Peggion, Cristina; Toniolo, Claudio

    2007-01-01

    Alamethicin is a 19-amino-acid residue hydrophobic peptide that produces voltage-dependent ion channels in membranes. Analogues of the Glu(OMe)7,18,19 variant of alamethicin F50/5 that are rigidly spin-labeled in the peptide backbone have been synthesized by replacing residue 1, 8, or 16 with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidine-1-oxyl-4-amino-4-carboxyl (TOAC), a helicogenic nitroxyl amino acid. Conventional electron paramagnetic resonance spectra are used to determine the insertion and orientation of the TOACn alamethicins in fluid lipid bilayer membranes of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine. Isotropic 14N-hyperfine couplings indicate that TOAC8 and TOAC16 are situated in the hydrophobic core of the membrane, whereas the TOAC1 label resides closer to the membrane surface. Anisotropic hyperfine splittings show that alamethicin is highly ordered in the fluid membranes. Experiments with aligned membranes demonstrate that the principal diffusion axis lies close to the membrane normal, corresponding to a transmembrane orientation. Combination of data from the three spin-labeled positions yields both the dynamic order parameter of the peptide backbone and the intramolecular orientations of the TOAC groups. The latter are compared with x-ray diffraction results from alamethicin crystals. Saturation transfer electron paramagnetic resonance, which is sensitive to microsecond rotational motion, reveals that overall rotation of alamethicin is fast in fluid membranes, with effective correlation times <30 ns. Thus, alamethicin does not form large stable aggregates in fluid membranes, and ionic conductance must arise from transient or voltage-induced associations. PMID:17056731

  17. Simulation Studies of Alamethicin-Bilayer Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Biggin, P. C.; Breed, J.; Son, H. S.; Sansom, M. S. P.

    1997-01-01

    Alamethicin is an α-helical peptide that forms voltage-activated ion channels. Experimental data suggest that channel formation occurs via voltage-dependent insertion of alamethicin helices into lipid bilayers, followed by self-assembly of inserted helices to form a parallel helix bundle. Changes in the kink angle of the alamethicin helix about its central proline residue have also been suggested to play a role in channel gating. Alamethicin helices generated by simulated annealing and restrained molecular dynamics adopt a kink angle similar to that in the x-ray crystal structure, even if such simulations start with an idealized unkinked helix. This suggests that the kinked helix represents a stable conformation of the molecule. Molecular dynamics simulations in the presence of a simple bilayer model and a transbilayer voltage difference are used to explore possible mechanisms of helix insertion. The bilayer is represented by a hydrophobicity potential. An alamethicin helix inserts spontaneously in the absence of a transbilayer voltage. Application of a cis positive voltage decreases the time to insertion. The helix kink angle fluctuates during the simulations. Insertion of the helix is associated with a decrease in the mean kink angle, thus helping the alamethicin molecule to span the bilayer. The simulation results are discussed in terms of models of alamethicin channel gating. ImagesFIGURE 1FIGURE 6 PMID:9017192

  18. Intramembrane Water Associated with TOAC Spin-Labeled Alamethicin: Electron Spin-Echo Envelope Modulation by D2O

    PubMed Central

    Bartucci, R.; Guzzi, R.; Sportelli, L.; Marsh, D.

    2009-01-01

    Alamethicin is a 20-residue, hydrophobic, helical peptide, which forms voltage-sensitive ion channels in lipid membranes. The helicogenic, nitroxyl amino acid TOAC was substituted isosterically for Aib at residue positions 1, 8, or 16 in a F50/5 alamethicin analog to enable EPR studies. Electron spin-echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy was used to investigate the water exposure of TOAC-alamethicin introduced into membranes of saturated or unsaturated diacyl phosphatidylcholines that were dispersed in D2O. Echo-detected EPR spectra were used to assess the degree of assembly of the peptide in the membrane, via the instantaneous diffusion from intermolecular spin-spin interactions. The profile of residue exposure to water differs between membranes of saturated and unsaturated lipids. In monounsaturated dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine, D2O-ESEEM intensities decrease from TOAC1 to TOAC8 and TOAC16 but not uniformly. This is consistent with a transmembrane orientation for the protoassembled state, in which TOAC16 is located in the bilayer leaflet opposite to that of TOAC1 and TOAC8. Relative to the monomer in fluid bilayers, assembled alamethicin is disposed asymmetrically about the bilayer midplane. In saturated dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine, the D2O-ESEEM intensity is greatest for TOAC8, indicating a more superficial location for alamethicin, which correlates with the difference in orientation between gel- and fluid-phase membranes found by conventional EPR of TOAC-alamethicin in aligned phosphatidylcholine bilayers. Increasing alamethicin/lipid ratio in saturated phosphatidylcholine shifts the profile of water exposure toward that with unsaturated lipid, consistent with proposals of a critical concentration for switching between the two different membrane-associated states. PMID:19186137

  19. The ion-channel activity of longibrachins LGA I and LGB II: effects of pro-2/Ala and gln-18/Glu substitutions on the alamethicin voltage-gated membrane channels.

    PubMed

    Cosette, P; Rebuffat, S; Bodo, B; Molle, G

    1999-11-01

    Longibrachins LGA I (Ac Aib Ala Aib Ala Aib(5) Ala Gln Aib Val Aib(10) Gly Leu Aib Pro Val(15) Aib Aib Gln Gln Pheol(20), with Aib: alpha-aminoisobutyric acid, pheol: phenylalaninol) and LGB II are two homologous 20-residue long-sequence peptaibols isolated from the fungus Trichoderma longibrachiatum that differ between them by a Gln-18/Glu substitution. They distinguish from alamethicin by a Pro-2 for Ala replacement, which allowed to examine for the first time with natural Aib-containing analogues, the effect of Pro-2 on the ion-channel properties exhibited by alamethicin. The influence of these structural modifications on the voltage-gated ion-channel forming activity of the peptides in planar lipid bilayers were analysed. The general 'barrel-stave' model of ion-channel activity, already described for alamethicin, was preserved with both longibrachins. The negatively charged LGB II promoted higher oligomerisation levels, which could presumably dilute the repulsive effect of the negative Glu ring near the entrance of the channel and resulted in lower lifetimes of the substates, confirming the strong anchor of the peptide C-terminus at the cis-interface. Reduction of the channel lifetimes was observed for the longibrachins, compared to alamethicin. This argues for a better stabilisation of the channels formed by peptaibols having a proline at position 2, which results in better anchoring of the peptide monomer N-terminus at the trans-bilayer interface. Qualitative assays of the temperature dependence on the neutral longibrachin channel properties demonstrated a high increase of channel lifetimes and a markedly reduced voltage-sensitivity when the temperature was decreased, showing that such conditions may allow to study the channel-forming properties of peptides leading to fast current fluctuations. PMID:10556493

  20. Lipid Chain-Length Dependence for Incorporation of Alamethicin in Membranes: Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Studies on TOAC-Spin Labeled Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Derek; Jost, Micha; Peggion, Cristina; Toniolo, Claudio

    2007-01-01

    Alamethicin is a 19-residue hydrophobic peptide, which is extended by a C-terminal phenylalaninol but lacks residues that might anchor the ends of the peptide at the lipid-water interface. Voltage-dependent ion channels formed by alamethicin depend strongly in their characteristics on chain length of the host lipid membranes. EPR spectroscopy is used to investigate the dependence on lipid chain length of the incorporation of spin-labeled alamethicin in phosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes. The spin-label amino acid TOAC is substituted at residue positions n = 1, 8, or 16 in the sequence of alamethicin F50/5 [TOACn, Glu(OMe)7,18,19]. Polarity-dependent isotropic hyperfine couplings of the three TOAC derivatives indicate that alamethicin assumes approximately the same location, relative to the membrane midplane, in fluid diCNPtdCho bilayers with chain lengths ranging from N = 10–18. Residue TOAC8 is situated closest to the bilayer midplane, whereas TOAC16 is located farther from the midplane in the hydrophobic core of the opposing lipid leaflet, and TOAC1 remains in the lipid polar headgroup region. Orientational order parameters indicate that the tilt of alamethicin relative to the membrane normal is relatively small, even at high temperatures in the fluid phase, and increases rather slowly with decreasing chain length (from 13° to 23° for N = 18 and 10, respectively, at 75°C). This is insufficient for alamethicin to achieve hydrophobic matching. Alamethicin differs in its mode of incorporation from other helical peptides for which transmembrane orientation has been determined as a function of lipid chain length. PMID:17351010

  1. Lipid chain-length dependence for incorporation of alamethicin in membranes: electron paramagnetic resonance studies on TOAC-spin labeled analogs.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Derek; Jost, Micha; Peggion, Cristina; Toniolo, Claudio

    2007-06-01

    Alamethicin is a 19-residue hydrophobic peptide, which is extended by a C-terminal phenylalaninol but lacks residues that might anchor the ends of the peptide at the lipid-water interface. Voltage-dependent ion channels formed by alamethicin depend strongly in their characteristics on chain length of the host lipid membranes. EPR spectroscopy is used to investigate the dependence on lipid chain length of the incorporation of spin-labeled alamethicin in phosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes. The spin-label amino acid TOAC is substituted at residue positions n = 1, 8, or 16 in the sequence of alamethicin F50/5 [TOAC(n), Glu(OMe)(7,18,19)]. Polarity-dependent isotropic hyperfine couplings of the three TOAC derivatives indicate that alamethicin assumes approximately the same location, relative to the membrane midplane, in fluid diC(N)PtdCho bilayers with chain lengths ranging from N = 10-18. Residue TOAC(8) is situated closest to the bilayer midplane, whereas TOAC(16) is located farther from the midplane in the hydrophobic core of the opposing lipid leaflet, and TOAC(1) remains in the lipid polar headgroup region. Orientational order parameters indicate that the tilt of alamethicin relative to the membrane normal is relatively small, even at high temperatures in the fluid phase, and increases rather slowly with decreasing chain length (from 13 degrees to 23 degrees for N = 18 and 10, respectively, at 75 degrees C). This is insufficient for alamethicin to achieve hydrophobic matching. Alamethicin differs in its mode of incorporation from other helical peptides for which transmembrane orientation has been determined as a function of lipid chain length. PMID:17351010

  2. Alamethicin-like behaviour of new 18-residue peptaibols, trichorzins PA. Role of the C-terminal amino-alcohol in the ion channel forming activity.

    PubMed

    Duval, D; Cosette, P; Rebuffat, S; Duclohier, H; Bodo, B; Molle, G

    1998-03-01

    The influences of peptide length, absence of a Glx (Gln/Glu) residue and the C-terminal amino alcohol on liposome permeabilization and ion-channel characteristics in planar lipid bilayers were examined with two 18-residue peptaibols, PA V and PA IX. As compared to the 20-residue alamethicin, both peptides belonging to the newly isolated trichorzin family, lack a proline in the N-terminal part and one of the two Gln/Glu residues in the C-terminal part of the sequence. The two analogues studied here differ among themselves in their C-terminal amino alcohol (tryptophanol for PA V and phenylalaninol for PA IX). These alpha-helical peptaibols modify to a similar extent the permeability of liposomes, as measured by leakage of a previously entrapped fluorescent probe. Monitoring tryptophanol fluorescence, a greater embedment of the peptide PA V is observed in cholesterol-free bilayers. Macroscopic conductance studies for PA V and PA IX display alamethicin-like current-voltage curves, with a similar voltage dependence, but a smaller mean number of monomers per conducting aggregate is estimated for the tryptophanol analogue, PA V. Single-channel recordings indicate faster current fluctuations for PA IX, while amplitude histograms show lower conductance levels for PA V. Apart from underlining the role of the mismatch between helix length and bilayer hydrophobic thickness, these results stress that the C-terminal tryptophanol favours a stabilization of the conducting aggregates. PMID:9518665

  3. Single-molecular artificial transmembrane water channels.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-Bo; Chen, Zhenxia; Tang, Gangfeng; Hou, Jun-Li; Li, Zhan-Ting

    2012-05-23

    Hydrazide-appended pillar[5]arene derivatives have been synthesized. X-ray crystal structure analysis and (1)H NMR studies revealed that the molecules adopt unique tubular conformations. Inserting the molecules into the lipid membranes of vesicles leads to the transport of water through the channels produced by single molecules, as supported by dynamic light scattering and cryo-SEM experiments. The channels exhibit the transport activity at a very low channel to lipid ratio (0.027 mol %), and a water permeability of 8.6 × 10(-10) cm s(-1) is realized. In addition, like natural water channel proteins, the artificial systems also block the transport of protons. PMID:22574988

  4. Forming transmembrane channels using end-functionalized nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, Meenakshi; Kuksenok, Olga; Little, Steven R.; Balazs, Anna C.

    2011-01-01

    Using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations, we examine the interaction between amphiphilic nanotubes and lipid bilayer membranes. The nanotubes are represented by a hydrophobic shaft that is end-functionalized with hydrophilic groups. Nanotubes that are capped by a monolayer of hydrophilic beads or also encompass hydrophilic ``hairs'' on just one end of the shaft are found to spontaneously penetrate and assume a transmembrane position; the process, however, depends critically on the membrane tension. On the other hand, nanotubes that include hydrophilic hairs at both ends of the hydrophobic shaft are not observed to spontaneously self-organize into the bilayer. When the membrane is stretched to form a pore, the nanotubes with two hairy ends adsorb on the edge of the pore and become localized in the membrane, thus forming a transmembrane channel. The findings from these studies provide guidelines for creating biomimetic nanotube channels that are capable of selectively transporting molecules through the membrane in response to changes in the local environment.

  5. Hydrogen bond stabilities in membrane-reconstituted alamethicin from amide-resolved hydrogen-exchange measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Dempsey, C E; Handcock, L J

    1996-01-01

    either the bulk solution or water within parallel or antiparallel transmembrane arrays of reconstituted alamethicin. PMID:8785337

  6. A thermodynamic approach to Alamethicin pore formation

    PubMed Central

    Rahaman, Asif; Lazaridis, Themis

    2013-01-01

    The structure and energetics of alamethicin Rf30 monomer to nonamer in cylindrical pores of 5 to 11 Å radius are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations in an implicit membrane model that includes the free energy cost of acyl chain hydrophobic area exposure. Stable, low energy pores are obtained for certain combinations of radius and oligomeric number. The trimer and the tetramer formed 6 Å pores that appear closed while the larger oligomers formed open pores at their optimal radius. The hexamer in an 8 Å pore and the octamer in an 11 Å pore give the lowest effective energy per monomer. However, all oligomers beyond the pentamer have comparable energies, consistent with the observation of multiple conductance levels. The results are consistent with the widely accepted “barrel-stave” model. The N terminal portion of the molecule exhibits smaller tilt with respect to the membrane normal than the C terminal portion, resulting in a pore shape that is a hybrid between a funnel and an hourglass. Transmembrane voltage has little effect on the structure of the oligomers but enhances or decreases their stability depending on its orientation. Antiparallel bundles are lower in energy than the commonly accepted parallel ones and could be present under certain experimental conditions. Dry aggregates (without an aqueous pore) have lower average effective energy than the corresponding aggregates in a pore, suggesting that alamethicin pores may be excited states that are stabilized in part by voltage and in part by the ion flow itself. PMID:24071593

  7. Alamethicin adsorption to a planar lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Vodyanoy, I; Hall, J E; Vodyanoy, V

    1988-05-01

    The effect of alamethicin and its derivatives on the voltage-dependent capacitance of phosphatidylethanolamine (squalane) membranes was measured using two different methods: lock-in detection and voltage pulse. Alamethicin and its derivatives modulate the voltage-dependent capacitance at voltages lower than the voltage at which alamethicin-induced conductance is detected. The magnitude and sign of this alamethicin-induced capacitance change depends on the aqueous alamethicin concentration and the kind of alamethicin used. Our experimental data can be interpreted as a potential-dependent pseudocapacitance associated with adsorbed alamethicin. Pseudocapacitance is expressed as a function of alamethicin charge, its concentration in the bathing solution and the applied electric field. The theory describes the dependence of the capacitance on applied voltage and alamethicin concentration. When alamethicin is neutral the theory predicts no change of the voltage-dependent capacitance with either sign of applied voltage. Experimental data are consistent with the model in which alamethicin molecules interact with each other while being adsorbed to the membrane surface. The energy of this interaction depends on the alamethicin concentration.

  8. Conductance and block of hair-cell mechanotransducer channels in transmembrane channel-like protein mutants.

    PubMed

    Beurg, Maryline; Kim, Kyunghee X; Fettiplace, Robert

    2014-07-01

    Transmembrane channel-like (TMC) proteins TMC1 and TMC2 are crucial to the function of the mechanotransducer (MT) channel of inner ear hair cells, but their precise function has been controversial. To provide more insight, we characterized single MT channels in cochlear hair cells from wild-type mice and mice with mutations in Tmc1, Tmc2, or both. Channels were recorded in whole-cell mode after tip link destruction with BAPTA or after attenuating the MT current with GsMTx-4, a peptide toxin we found to block the channels with high affinity. In both cases, the MT channels in outer hair cells (OHCs) of wild-type mice displayed a tonotopic gradient in conductance, with channels from the cochlear base having a conductance (110 pS) nearly twice that of those at the apex (62 pS). This gradient was absent, with channels at both cochlear locations having similar small conductances, with two different Tmc1 mutations. The conductance of MT channels in inner hair cells was invariant with cochlear location but, as in OHCs, was reduced in either Tmc1 mutant. The gradient of OHC conductance also disappeared in Tmc1/Tmc2 double mutants, in which a mechanically sensitive current could be activated by anomalous negative displacements of the hair bundle. This "reversed stimulus-polarity" current was seen with two different Tmc1/Tmc2 double mutants, and with Tmc1/Tmc2/Tmc3 triple mutants, and had a pharmacological sensitivity comparable to that of native MT currents for most antagonists, except dihydrostreptomycin, for which the affinity was less, and for curare, which exhibited incomplete block. The existence in the Tmc1/Tmc2 double mutants of MT channels with most properties resembling those of wild-type channels indicates that proteins other than TMCs must be part of the channel pore. We suggest that an external vestibule of the MT channel may partly account for the channel's large unitary conductance, high Ca(2+) permeability, and pharmacological profile, and that this vestibule

  9. Biomimetic Transmembrane Channels with High Stability and Transporting Efficiency from Helically Folded Macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Lang, Chao; Li, Wenfang; Dong, Zeyuan; Zhang, Xin; Yang, Feihu; Yang, Bing; Deng, Xiaoli; Zhang, Chenyang; Xu, Jiayun; Liu, Junqiu

    2016-08-01

    Membrane channels span the cellular lipid bilayers to transport ions and molecules into cells with sophisticated properties including high efficiency and selectivity. It is of particular biological importance in developing biomimetic transmembrane channels with unique functions by means of chemically synthetic strategies. An artificial unimolecular transmembrane channel using pore-containing helical macromolecules is reported. The self-folding, shape-persistent, pore-containing helical macromolecules are able to span the lipid bilayer, and thus result in extraordinary channel stability and high transporting efficiency for protons and cations. The lifetime of this artificial unimolecular channel in the lipid bilayer membrane is impressively long, rivaling those of natural protein channels. Natural channel mimics designed by helically folded polymeric scaffolds will display robust and versatile transport-related properties at single-molecule level.

  10. The first transmembrane domain (TM1) of β2-subunit binds to the transmembrane domain S1 of α-subunit in BK potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Morera, Francisco J.; Alioua, Abderrahmane; Kundu, Pallob; Salazar, Marcelo; Gonzalez, Carlos; Martinez, Agustin D.; Stefani, Enrico; Toro, Ligia; Latorre, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    The BK channel is one of the most broadly expressed ion channels in mammals. In many tissues, the BK channel pore-forming α-subunit is associated to an auxiliary β-subunit that modulates the voltage- and Ca2+-dependent activation of the channel. Structural components present in β-subunits that are important for the physical association with the α-subunit are yet unknown. Here, we show through co-immunoprecipitation that the intracellular C-terminus, the second transmembrane domain (TM2) and the extracellular loop of the β2-subunit are dispensable for association with the α-subunit pointing transmembrane domain 1 (TM1) as responsible for the interaction. Indeed, the TOXCAT assay for transmembrane protein–protein interactions demonstrated for the first time that TM1 of the β2-subunit physically binds to the transmembrane S1 domain of the α-subunit. PMID:22710124

  11. Transmembrane dynamics of the Thr-5 phosphorylated sarcolipin pentameric channel.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yipeng; Wu, Xue; Wang, Xinyu; Sun, Haiying; Lee, Imshik

    2016-08-15

    Sarcolipin (SLN), an important membrane protein expressed in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), regulates muscle contractions in cardiac and skeletal muscle. The phosphorylation at amino acid Thr5 of the SLN protein modulates the amount of Ca(2+) that passes through the SR. Using molecular dynamics simulation, we evaluated the phosphorylation at Thr5 of pentameric SLN (phospho-SLN) channel's energy barrier and pore characteristics by calculating the potential of mean force (PMF) along the channel pore and determining the diffusion coefficient. The results indicate that pentameric phospho-SLN promotes penetration of monovalent and divalent ions through the channel. The analysis of PMF, pore radius and diffusion coefficient indicates that Leu21 is the hydrophobic gate of the pentameric SLN channel. In the channel, water molecules near the Leu21 pore demonstrated a clear hydrated-dehydrated transition; however, the mutation of Leu21 to an Alanine (L21A) destroyed the hydrated-dehydrated transitions. These water-dynamic behaviors and PMF confirm that Leu21 is the key residue that regulates the ion permeability of the pentameric SLN channel. These results provide the structural-basis insights and molecular-dynamic information that are needed to understand the regulatory mechanisms of ion permeability in the pentameric SLN channel. PMID:27378083

  12. Structure and dynamics of one-dimensional ionic solutions in biological transmembrane channels.

    PubMed Central

    Skerra, A; Brickmann, J

    1987-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of solvated alkali metal cations in transmembrane channels are treated using the molecular dynamics simulation technique. The simulations are based on a modified Fischer-Brickmann model (Fischer, W., and J. Brickmann, 1983, Biophys. Chem., 18:323-337) for gramicidin A-type channels. The trajectories of all particles in the channel as well as two-dimensional pair correlation functions are analyzed. It is found from the analysis of the stationary simulation state that one-dimensional solvation complexes are formed and that the number of water molecules in the channel varies for different alkali metal cations. PMID:2440485

  13. The pore architecture of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channel revealed by co-mutation in pore-forming transmembrane regions.

    PubMed

    Qian, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Lu, C

    2016-07-18

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel contains 12 transmembrane (TM) regions that are presumed to form the channel pore. However, there is no direct evidence clearly illustrating the involvement of these transmembrane regions in the actual CFTR pore structure. To obtain insight into the architecture of the CFTR channel pore, we used patch clamp recording techniques and a strategy of co-mutagenesis of two potential pore-forming transmembrane regions (TM1 and TM6) to investigate the collaboration of these two TM regions. We performed a range of specific functional assays comparing the single channel conductance, anion binding, and anion selectivity properties of the co-mutated CFTR variants, and the results indicated that TM1 and TM6 play vital roles in forming the channel pore and, thus, determine the functional properties of the channel. Furthermore, we provided functional evidence that the amino acid threonine (T338) in TM6 has synergic effects with lysine (K95) in TM1. Therefore, we propose that these two residues have functional collaboration in the CFTR channel pore and may collectively form a selective filter. PMID:27070741

  14. Transmembrane passage of hydrophobic compounds through a protein channel wall.

    PubMed

    Hearn, Elizabeth M; Patel, Dimki R; Lepore, Bryan W; Indic, Mridhu; van den Berg, Bert

    2009-03-19

    Membrane proteins that transport hydrophobic compounds have important roles in multi-drug resistance and can cause a number of diseases, underscoring the importance of protein-mediated transport of hydrophobic compounds. Hydrophobic compounds readily partition into regular membrane lipid bilayers, and their transport through an aqueous protein channel is energetically unfavourable. Alternative transport models involving acquisition from the lipid bilayer by lateral diffusion have been proposed for hydrophobic substrates. So far, all transport proteins for which a lateral diffusion mechanism has been proposed function as efflux pumps. Here we present the first example of a lateral diffusion mechanism for the uptake of hydrophobic substrates by the Escherichia coli outer membrane long-chain fatty acid transporter FadL. A FadL mutant in which a lateral opening in the barrel wall is constricted, but which is otherwise structurally identical to wild-type FadL, does not transport substrates. A crystal structure of FadL from Pseudomonas aeruginosa shows that the opening in the wall of the beta-barrel is conserved and delineates a long, hydrophobic tunnel that could mediate substrate passage from the extracellular environment, through the polar lipopolysaccharide layer and, by means of the lateral opening in the barrel wall, into the lipid bilayer from where the substrate can diffuse into the periplasm. Because FadL homologues are found in pathogenic and biodegrading bacteria, our results have implications for combating bacterial infections and bioremediating xenobiotics in the environment.

  15. Engineering a Transmembrane Nanopore Ion Channel from a Membrane Breaker Peptide.

    PubMed

    Lella, Muralikrishna; Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan

    2016-07-01

    Re-engineering nature's molecules is an ideal strategy to obtain explicit functionality such as synthetic molecular machines, yet novel strategies for producing engineered molecular channels are few. Here we report a peptide engineering strategy through sequence reversal, which we applied on the first transmembrane peptide of the mycobacteriophage membranoporin protein holin. We have successfully redesigned the membrane rupture property of this peptide to form specific nanopore ion channels. We report the structural characterization and electrophysiology measurements of a library of 28-residue engineered membrane peptides, with remarkable ion channel behavior. We further identify that key residues at the peptide terminus, the central proline, charge distribution, and hydropathy index of the peptide together contribute to the channel properties that we measure. Our sequence reversal strategy for peptide engineering to successfully obtain nanopore channels can pave the way for better biobased design of controlled nanopores, using only natural amino acids. PMID:27257735

  16. Surface binding of alamethicin stabilizes its helical structure: molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed Central

    Tieleman, D P; Berendsen, H J; Sansom, M S

    1999-01-01

    Alamethicin is an amphipathic alpha-helical peptide that forms ion channels. An early event in channel formation is believed to be the binding of alamethicin to the surface of a lipid bilayer. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to compare the structural and dynamic properties of alamethicin in water and alamethicin bound to the surface of a phosphatidylcholine bilayer. The bilayer surface simulation corresponded to a loosely bound alamethicin molecule that interacted with lipid headgroups but did not penetrate the hydrophobic core of the bilayer. Both simulations started with the peptide molecule in an alpha-helical conformation and lasted 2 ns. In water, the helix started to unfold after approximately 300 ps and by the end of the simulation only the N-terminal region of the peptide remained alpha-helical and the molecule had collapsed into a more compact form. At the surface of the bilayer, loss of helicity was restricted to the C-terminal third of the molecule and the rod-shaped structure of the peptide was retained. In the surface simulation about 10% of the peptide/water H-bonds were replaced by peptide/lipid H-bonds. These simulations suggest that some degree of stabilization of an amphipathic alpha-helix occurs at a bilayer surface even without interactions between hydrophobic side chains and the acyl chain core of the bilayer. PMID:10354443

  17. Stoichiometry and novel gating mechanism within the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channel.

    PubMed

    Qian, Feng; Li, Tao; Yang, Fei; Liu, Lian

    2014-12-01

    Despite its fundamental importance to the molecular mechanism underlying cystic fibrosis, many details of the structural basis for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) remain unknown. In addition, the possible interactions among the CFTR proteins have not been clearly demonstrated. In order to identify whether the CFTR channel pore is formed as a monomer or a multimer, we analysed the single-channel properties in patches of cell membrane that coexpressed selected CFTR mutants having significantly different single-channel properties. No hybrid channel opening patterns were observed. We therefore propose that the CFTR channel pore is indeed composed of a monomer. However, we also observed that coexisting CFTR monomers in the cell membrane facilitated the activation of individual CFTR channels. The functional upregulation of this CFTR channel opening probability and the different gating behaviour suggest dynamic conformational changes among the interacting CFTR proteins within the multimeric CFTR complex. Our findings regarding the CFTR monomer channel pore and the novel synergistic gating behaviour within the CFTR channel complex will help to resolve the remaining contradictions among previous studies regarding whether CFTR is a monomer or a multimer.

  18. Channel Gating Regulation by the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) First Cytosolic Loop.

    PubMed

    Ehrhardt, Annette; Chung, W Joon; Pyle, Louise C; Wang, Wei; Nowotarski, Krzysztof; Mulvihill, Cory M; Ramjeesingh, Mohabir; Hong, Jeong; Velu, Sadanandan E; Lewis, Hal A; Atwell, Shane; Aller, Steve; Bear, Christine E; Lukacs, Gergely L; Kirk, Kevin L; Sorscher, Eric J

    2016-01-22

    In this study, we present data indicating a robust and specific domain interaction between the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) first cytosolic loop (CL1) and nucleotide binding domain 1 (NBD1) that allows ion transport to proceed in a regulated fashion. We used co-precipitation and ELISA to establish the molecular contact and showed that binding kinetics were not altered by the common clinical mutation F508del. Both intrinsic ATPase activity and CFTR channel gating were inhibited severely by CL1 peptide, suggesting that NBD1/CL1 binding is a crucial requirement for ATP hydrolysis and channel function. In addition to cystic fibrosis, CFTR dysregulation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of prevalent diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acquired rhinosinusitis, pancreatitis, and lethal secretory diarrhea (e.g. cholera). On the basis of clinical relevance of the CFTR as a therapeutic target, a cell-free drug screen was established to identify modulators of NBD1/CL1 channel activity independent of F508del CFTR and pharmacologic rescue. Our findings support a targetable mechanism of CFTR regulation in which conformational changes in the NBDs cause reorientation of transmembrane domains via interactions with CL1 and result in channel gating.

  19. Channel Gating Regulation by the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) First Cytosolic Loop.

    PubMed

    Ehrhardt, Annette; Chung, W Joon; Pyle, Louise C; Wang, Wei; Nowotarski, Krzysztof; Mulvihill, Cory M; Ramjeesingh, Mohabir; Hong, Jeong; Velu, Sadanandan E; Lewis, Hal A; Atwell, Shane; Aller, Steve; Bear, Christine E; Lukacs, Gergely L; Kirk, Kevin L; Sorscher, Eric J

    2016-01-22

    In this study, we present data indicating a robust and specific domain interaction between the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) first cytosolic loop (CL1) and nucleotide binding domain 1 (NBD1) that allows ion transport to proceed in a regulated fashion. We used co-precipitation and ELISA to establish the molecular contact and showed that binding kinetics were not altered by the common clinical mutation F508del. Both intrinsic ATPase activity and CFTR channel gating were inhibited severely by CL1 peptide, suggesting that NBD1/CL1 binding is a crucial requirement for ATP hydrolysis and channel function. In addition to cystic fibrosis, CFTR dysregulation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of prevalent diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acquired rhinosinusitis, pancreatitis, and lethal secretory diarrhea (e.g. cholera). On the basis of clinical relevance of the CFTR as a therapeutic target, a cell-free drug screen was established to identify modulators of NBD1/CL1 channel activity independent of F508del CFTR and pharmacologic rescue. Our findings support a targetable mechanism of CFTR regulation in which conformational changes in the NBDs cause reorientation of transmembrane domains via interactions with CL1 and result in channel gating. PMID:26627831

  20. Regulation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator anion channel by tyrosine phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Billet, Arnaud; Jia, Yanlin; Jensen, Tim; Riordan, John R.; Hanrahan, John W.

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel is activated by PKA phosphorylation of a regulatory domain that interacts dynamically with multiple CFTR domains and with other proteins. The large number of consensus sequences for phosphorylation by PKA has naturally focused most attention on regulation by this kinase. We report here that human CFTR is also phosphorylated by the tyrosine kinases p60c-Src (proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase) and the proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2), and they can also cause robust activation of quiescent CFTR channels. In excised patch-clamp experiments, CFTR activity during exposure to Src or Pyk2 reached ∼80% of that stimulated by PKA. Exposure to PKA after Src or Pyk2 caused a further increase to the level induced by PKA alone, implying a common limiting step. Channels became spontaneously active when v-Src or the catalytic domain of Pyk2 was coexpressed with CFTR and were further stimulated by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor dephostatin. Exogenous Src also activated 15SA-CFTR, a variant that lacks 15 potential PKA sites and has little response to PKA. PKA-independent activation by tyrosine phosphorylation has implications for the mechanism of regulation by the R domain and for the physiologic functions of CFTR.—Billet, A., Jia, Y., Jensen, T., Riordan, J. R., Hanrahan, J. W. Regulation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator anion channel by tyrosine phosphorylation. PMID:26062600

  1. [The activation effect of nobiletin on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel].

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang; Yu, Bo; Zhang, Yao-Fang; Wang, Xue; Yang, Hong

    2013-06-01

    Aim of the present study is to investigate activation effect of nobiletin on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel activity. CFTR-mediated iodide influx assay and patch-clamp tests were done on FRT cells stably co-transfected with human CFTR and EYFP/H148Q. Nobiletin potently activated CFTR chloride channel activity in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The CFTR blocker CFTR(inh)-172 could completely reverse the effect. Preliminary mechanism study indicated that nobiletin activated CFTR chloride channel through a direct binding way. In addition, ex vivo tests done on mice trachea showed that nobiletin time-dependently stimulated submucosal gland fluid secretion. Nobiletin may be a therapeutic lead compound in treating CFTR-related diseases including disseminated bronchiectasis.

  2. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR): CLOSED AND OPEN STATE CHANNEL MODELS.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Valentina; Vergani, Paola; Tieleman, D Peter

    2015-09-18

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. CFTR controls the flow of anions through the apical membrane of epithelia. Dysfunctional CFTR causes the common lethal genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Transitions between open and closed states of CFTR are regulated by ATP binding and hydrolysis on the cytosolic nucleotide binding domains, which are coupled with the transmembrane (TM) domains forming the pathway for anion permeation. Lack of structural data hampers a global understanding of CFTR and thus the development of "rational" approaches directly targeting defective CFTR. In this work, we explored possible conformational states of the CFTR gating cycle by means of homology modeling. As templates, we used structures of homologous ABC transporters, namely TM(287-288), ABC-B10, McjD, and Sav1866. In the light of published experimental results, structural analysis of the transmembrane cavity suggests that the TM(287-288)-based CFTR model could correspond to a commonly occupied closed state, whereas the McjD-based model could represent an open state. The models capture the important role played by Phe-337 as a filter/gating residue and provide structural information on the conformational transition from closed to open channel.

  3. CFTR anion channel modulates expression of human transmembrane mucin MUC3 through the PDZ protein GOPC.

    PubMed

    Pelaseyed, Thaher; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2011-09-15

    The transmembrane mucins in the enterocyte are type 1 transmembrane proteins with long and rigid mucin domains, rich in proline, threonine and serine residues that carry numerous O-glycans. Three of these mucins, MUC3, MUC12 and MUC17 are unique in harboring C-terminal class I PDZ motifs, making them suitable ligands for PDZ proteins. A screening of 123 different human PDZ domains for binding to MUC3 identified a strong interaction with the PDZ protein GOPC (Golgi-associated PDZ and coiled-coil motif-containing protein). This interaction was mediated by the C-terminal PDZ motif of MUC3, binding to the single GOPC PDZ domain. GOPC is also a binding partner for cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) that directs CFTR for degradation. Overexpression of GOPC downregulated the total levels of MUC3, an effect that was reversed by introducing CFTR. The results suggest that CFTR and MUC3 compete for binding to GOPC, which in turn can regulate levels of these two proteins. For the first time a direct coupling between mucins and the CFTR channel is demonstrated, a finding that will shed further light on the still poorly understood relationship between cystic fibrosis and the mucus phenotype of this disease.

  4. The Gramicidin A Transmembrane Channel: A Proposed π(L,D) Helix

    PubMed Central

    Urry, D. W.

    1971-01-01

    A lipophilic, left-handed helical structure is proposed for gramicidin A in which the C-O bonds alternately point toward the amino and carboxyl ends; it is a hybrid of the 4.314 and 4.416 helices. The C-O groups pointing toward the carboxyl end form part of 16-membered hydrogen-bonded rings, whereas the C-O moieties pointing toward the amino end form 14-membered hydrogenbonded rings. The proposed structure is based on conformational analysis combined with requirements for the gramicidin A transmembrane channel. Two helices combine to form the channel. The alternating C-O directions allow hydrogen-bonded dimerization by the unique possibilities of head-to-head and tail-to-tail attachment. The formyl group at the amino end allows for a favorable head-to-head attachment with no loss of structural continuity. Unpublished studies. by M. C. Goodall on the lipid bilayer conductance of deformyl gramicidin A strongly argue for head-to-head attachment. Such hydrogen-bonded association is not possible with previously described helices, as the C-O groups all point in the same direction. In relation to possible π(L,D) helices in mammalian systems, it should be noted that glycines would fill the role of D residues. The conformation can undergo ion-induced relaxations, which provide approximate tetrahedral coordination for the ion, with facile shifting of coordinations. The ready exchange of coordinations provides the mechanism for movement of the ion along the channel. Conceivably, such transmembrane channels could have application as models for ion transport across biological membranes—an application which may be as great as, or greater than, that of carriers such as valinomycin and nonactin. Specifically, biogenic amines and drugs containing aromatic groups could control access to the channel by interactions with the two tryptophan residues at the ethanolamine end and with the negative region provided by the three oxygens. Images PMID:5276779

  5. Conformational rearrangements in the transmembrane domain of CNGA1 channels revealed by single-molecule force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Sourav; Mazzolini, Monica; Arcangeletti, Manuel; Valbuena, Alejandro; Fabris, Paolo; Lazzarino, Marco; Torre, Vincent

    2015-05-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels are activated by binding of cyclic nucleotides. Although structural studies have identified the channel pore and selectivity filter, conformation changes associated with gating remain poorly understood. Here we combine single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) with mutagenesis, bioinformatics and electrophysiology to study conformational changes associated with gating. By expressing functional channels with SMFS fingerprints in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we were able to investigate gating of CNGA1 in a physiological-like membrane. Force spectra determined that the S4 transmembrane domain is mechanically coupled to S5 in the closed state, but S3 in the open state. We also show there are multiple pathways for the unfolding of the transmembrane domains, probably caused by a different degree of α-helix folding. This approach demonstrates that CNG transmembrane domains have dynamic structure and establishes SMFS as a tool for probing conformational change in ion channels.

  6. Conformational rearrangements in the transmembrane domain of CNGA1 channels revealed by single-molecule force spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Maity, Sourav; Mazzolini, Monica; Arcangeletti, Manuel; Valbuena, Alejandro; Fabris, Paolo; Lazzarino, Marco; Torre, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels are activated by binding of cyclic nucleotides. Although structural studies have identified the channel pore and selectivity filter, conformation changes associated with gating remain poorly understood. Here we combine single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) with mutagenesis, bioinformatics and electrophysiology to study conformational changes associated with gating. By expressing functional channels with SMFS fingerprints in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we were able to investigate gating of CNGA1 in a physiological-like membrane. Force spectra determined that the S4 transmembrane domain is mechanically coupled to S5 in the closed state, but S3 in the open state. We also show there are multiple pathways for the unfolding of the transmembrane domains, probably caused by a different degree of α-helix folding. This approach demonstrates that CNG transmembrane domains have dynamic structure and establishes SMFS as a tool for probing conformational change in ion channels. PMID:25963832

  7. Transmembrane Topologies of Ca2+-permeable Mechanosensitive Channels MCA1 and MCA2 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kamano, Shumpei; Kume, Shinichiro; Iida, Kazuko; Lei, Kai-Jian; Nakano, Masataka; Nakayama, Yoshitaka; Iida, Hidetoshi

    2015-12-25

    Sensing mechanical stresses, including touch, stretch, compression, and gravity, is crucial for growth and development in plants. A good mechanosensor candidate is the Ca(2+)-permeable mechanosensitive (MS) channel, the pore of which opens to permeate Ca(2+) in response to mechanical stresses. However, the structure-function relationships of plant MS channels are poorly understood. Arabidopsis MCA1 and MCA2 form a homotetramer and exhibit Ca(2+)-permeable MS channel activity; however, their structures have only been partially elucidated. The transmembrane topologies of these ion channels need to be determined in more detail to elucidate the underlying regulatory mechanisms. We herein determined the topologies of MCA1 and MCA2 using two independent methods, the Suc2C reporter and split-ubiquitin yeast two-hybrid methods, and found that both proteins are single-pass type I integral membrane proteins with extracellular N termini and intracellular C termini. These results imply that an EF hand-like motif, coiled-coil motif, and plac8 motif are all present in the cytoplasm. Thus, the activities of both channels can be regulated by intracellular Ca(2+) and protein interactions.

  8. Structural insight into the transmembrane segments 3 and 4 of the hERG potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingxin; Wong, Ying Lei; Ng, Hui Qi; Gayen, Shovanlal; Kang, CongBao

    2014-12-01

    The hERG (human ether-a-go-go related gene) potassium channel is a voltage-gated potassium channel containing an N-terminal domain, a voltage-sensor domain, a pore domain and a C-terminal domain. The transmembrane segment 4 (S4) is important for sensing changes of membrane potentials through positively charge residues. A construct containing partial S2-S3 linker, S3, S4 and the S4-S5 linker of the hERG channel was purified into detergent micelles. This construct exhibits good quality NMR spectrum when it was purified in lyso-myristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (LMPG) micelles. Structural study showed that S3 contains two short helices with a negatively charged surface. The S4 and S4-S5 linker adopt helical structures. The six positively charged residues in S4 localize at different sides, suggesting that they may have different functions in channel gating. Relaxation studies indicated that S3 is more flexible than S4. The boundaries of S3-S4 and S4-S4-S5 linker were identified. Our results provided structural information of the S3 and S4, which will be helpful to understand their roles in channel gating.

  9. Self-Assembling Organic Nanopores as Synthetic Transmembrane Channels with Tunable Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaoxi

    A long-standing goal in the area of supramolecular self-assembly involves the development of synthetic ion/water channels capable of mimicking the mass-transport characteristics of biological channels and pores. Few examples of artificial transmembrane channels with large lumen, high conductivity and selectivity are known. A review of pronounced biological transmembrane protein channels and some representative synthetic models have been provided in Chapter 1, followed by our discovery and initial investigation of shape-persistent oligoamide and phenylene ethynylene macrocycles as synthetic ion/water channels. In Chapter 2, the systematic structural modification of oligoamide macrocycles 1, the so-called first-generation of these shape-persistent macrocycles, has led to third-generation macrocycles 3. The third generation was found to exhibit unprecedented, strong intermolecular association in both the solid state and solution via multiple techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), SEM, and 1H NMR. Fluorescence spectroscopy paired with dynamic light scattering (DLS) revealed that macrocycles 3 can assemble into a singly dispersed nanotubular structure in solution. The resultant self-assembling pores consisting of 3 were examined by HPTS-LUVs assays and BLM studies (Chapter 3) and found to form cation-selective (PK+/PCl- = 69:1) transmembrane ion channels with large conductance (200 ˜ 2000 pS for alkali cations) and high stability with open times reaching to 103 seconds. Tuning the aggregation state of macrocycles by choosing an appropriate polar solvent mixture (i.e., 3:1, THF:DMF, v/v) and concentration led to the formation of ion channels with well-defined square top behavior. A parallel study using DLS to examine the size of aggregates was used in conjunction with channel activity assays (LUVs/BLM) to reveal the effects of the aggregation state on channel activity. Empirical evidence now clearly indicates that a preassembled state, perhaps that of a

  10. Conserved allosteric hot spots in the transmembrane domains of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channels and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) pumps.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shipeng; Roessler, Bryan C; Chauvet, Sylvain; Guo, Jingyu; Hartman, John L; Kirk, Kevin L

    2014-07-18

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are an ancient family of transmembrane proteins that utilize ATPase activity to move substrates across cell membranes. The ABCC subfamily of the ABC transporters includes active drug exporters (the multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs)) and a unique ATP-gated ion channel (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)). The CFTR channel shares gating principles with conventional ligand-gated ion channels, but the allosteric network that couples ATP binding at its nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) with conformational changes in its transmembrane helices (TMs) is poorly defined. It is also unclear whether the mechanisms that govern CFTR gating are conserved with the thermodynamically distinct MRPs. Here we report a new class of gain of function (GOF) mutation of a conserved proline at the base of the pore-lining TM6. Multiple substitutions of this proline promoted ATP-free CFTR activity and activation by the weak agonist, 5'-adenylyl-β,γ-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP). TM6 proline mutations exhibited additive GOF effects when combined with a previously reported GOF mutation located in an outer collar of TMs that surrounds the pore-lining TMs. Each TM substitution allosterically rescued the ATP sensitivity of CFTR gating when introduced into an NBD mutant with defective ATP binding. Both classes of GOF mutations also rescued defective drug export by a yeast MRP (Yor1p) with ATP binding defects in its NBDs. We conclude that the conserved TM6 proline helps set the energy barrier to both CFTR channel opening and MRP-mediated drug efflux and that CFTR channels and MRP pumps utilize similar allosteric mechanisms for coupling conformational changes in their translocation pathways to ATP binding at their NBDs.

  11. Functional Architecture of the Cytoplasmic Entrance to the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Chloride Channel Pore.

    PubMed

    El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2015-06-19

    As an ion channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator must form a continuous pathway for the movement of Cl(-) and other anions between the cytoplasm and the extracellular solution. Both the structure and the function of the membrane-spanning part of this pathway are well defined. In contrast, the structure of the pathway that connects the cytoplasm to the membrane-spanning regions is unknown, and functional roles for different parts of the protein forming this pathway have not been described. We used patch clamp recording and substituted cysteine accessibility mutagenesis to identify positively charged amino acid side chains that attract cytoplasmic Cl(-) ions to the inner mouth of the pore. Our results indicate that the side chains of Lys-190, Arg-248, Arg-303, Lys-370, Lys-1041, and Arg-1048, located in different intracellular loops of the protein, play important roles in the electrostatic attraction of Cl(-) ions. Mutation and covalent modification of these residues have charge-dependent effects on the rate of Cl(-) permeation, demonstrating their functional role in maximization of Cl(-) flux. Other nearby positively charged side chains were not involved in electrostatic interactions with Cl(-). The location of these Cl(-)-attractive residues suggests that cytoplasmic Cl(-) ions enter the pore via a lateral portal located between the cytoplasmic extensions to the fourth and sixth transmembrane helices; a secondary, functionally less relevant portal might exist between the extensions to the 10th and 12th transmembrane helices. These results define the cytoplasmic mouth of the pore and show how it attracts Cl(-) ions from the cytoplasm. PMID:25944907

  12. Multiscale modeling and computation of nano-electronic transistors and transmembrane proton channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Duan

    The miniaturization of nano-scale electronic transistors, such as metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), has given rise to a pressing demand in the new theoretical understanding and practical tactic for dealing with quantum mechanical effects in integrated circuits. In biology, proton dynamics and transport across membrane proteins are of paramount importance to the normal function of living cells. Similar physical characteristics are behind the two subjects, and model simulations share common mathematical interests/challenges. In this thesis work, multiscale and multiphysical models are proposed to study the mechanisms of nanotransistors and proton transport in transmembrane at the atomic level. For nano-electronic transistors, we introduce a unified two-scale energy functional to describe the electrons and the continuum electrostatic potential. This framework enables us to put microscopic and macroscopic descriptions on an equal footing at nano-scale. Additionally, this model includes layered structures and random doping effect of nano-transistors. For transmembrane proton channels, we describe proton dynamics quantum mechanically via a density functional approach while implicitly treat numerous solvent molecules as a dielectric continuum. The densities of all other ions in the solvent are assumed to obey the Boltzmann distribution. The impact of protein molecular structure and its charge polarization on the proton transport is considered in atomic details. We formulate a total free energy functional to include kinetic and potential energies of protons, as well as electrostatic energy of all other ions on an equal footing. For both nano-transistors and proton channels systems, the variational principle is employed to derive nonlinear governing equations. The Poisson-Kohn-Sham equations are derived for nano-transistors while the generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equation and Kohn-Sham equation are obtained for proton channels. Related numerical

  13. Emerging role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator - an epithelial chloride channel in gastrointestinal cancers.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yuning; Guan, Xiaoqing; Yang, Zhe; Li, Chunying

    2016-03-15

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a glycoprotein with 1480 amino acids, has been well established as a chloride channel mainly expressed in the epithelial cells of various tissues and organs such as lungs, sweat glands, gastrointestinal system, and reproductive organs. Although defective CFTR leads to cystic fibrosis, a common genetic disorder in the Caucasian population, there is accumulating evidence that suggests a novel role of CFTR in various cancers, especially in gastroenterological cancers, such as pancreatic cancer and colon cancer. In this review, we summarize the emerging findings that link CFTR with various cancers, with focus on the association between CFTR defects and gastrointestinal cancers as well as the underlying mechanisms. Further study of CFTR in cancer biology may help pave a new way for the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:26989463

  14. Emerging role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator - an epithelial chloride channel in gastrointestinal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yuning; Guan, Xiaoqing; Yang, Zhe; Li, Chunying

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a glycoprotein with 1480 amino acids, has been well established as a chloride channel mainly expressed in the epithelial cells of various tissues and organs such as lungs, sweat glands, gastrointestinal system, and reproductive organs. Although defective CFTR leads to cystic fibrosis, a common genetic disorder in the Caucasian population, there is accumulating evidence that suggests a novel role of CFTR in various cancers, especially in gastroenterological cancers, such as pancreatic cancer and colon cancer. In this review, we summarize the emerging findings that link CFTR with various cancers, with focus on the association between CFTR defects and gastrointestinal cancers as well as the underlying mechanisms. Further study of CFTR in cancer biology may help pave a new way for the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:26989463

  15. Voltage-dependent Gating of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Cl− Channel

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhiwei; Scott-Ward, Toby S.; Sheppard, David N.

    2003-01-01

    When excised inside-out membrane patches are bathed in symmetrical Cl−-rich solutions, the current-voltage (I-V) relationship of macroscopic cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− currents inwardly rectifies at large positive voltages. To investigate the mechanism of inward rectification, we studied CFTR Cl− channels in excised inside-out membrane patches from cells expressing wild-type human and murine CFTR using voltage-ramp and -step protocols. Using a voltage-ramp protocol, the magnitude of human CFTR Cl− current at +100 mV was 74 ± 2% (n = 10) of that at −100 mV. This rectification of macroscopic CFTR Cl− current was reproduced in full by ensemble currents generated by averaging single-channel currents elicited by an identical voltage-ramp protocol. However, using a voltage-step protocol the single-channel current amplitude (i) of human CFTR at +100 mV was 88 ± 2% (n = 10) of that at −100 mV. Based on these data, we hypothesized that voltage might alter the gating behavior of human CFTR. Using linear three-state kinetic schemes, we demonstrated that voltage has marked effects on channel gating. Membrane depolarization decreased both the duration of bursts and the interburst interval, but increased the duration of gaps within bursts. However, because the voltage dependencies of the different rate constants were in opposite directions, voltage was without large effect on the open probability (Po) of human CFTR. In contrast, the Po of murine CFTR was decreased markedly at positive voltages, suggesting that the rectification of murine CFTR is stronger than that of human CFTR. We conclude that inward rectification of CFTR is caused by a reduction in i and changes in gating kinetics. We suggest that inward rectification is an intrinsic property of the CFTR Cl− channel and not the result of pore block. PMID:14581585

  16. Developmental changes in the cochlear hair cell mechanotransducer channel and their regulation by transmembrane channel-like proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyunghee X; Fettiplace, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Vibration of the stereociliary bundles activates calcium-permeable mechanotransducer (MT) channels to initiate sound detection in cochlear hair cells. Different regions of the cochlea respond preferentially to different acoustic frequencies, with variation in the unitary conductance of the MT channels contributing to this tonotopic organization. Although the molecular identity of the MT channel remains uncertain, two members of the transmembrane channel-like family, Tmc1 and Tmc2, are crucial to hair cell mechanotransduction. We measured MT channel current amplitude and Ca(2+) permeability along the cochlea's longitudinal (tonotopic) axis during postnatal development of wild-type mice and mice lacking Tmc1 (Tmc1-/-) or Tmc2 (Tmc2-/-). In wild-type mice older than postnatal day (P) 4, MT current amplitude increased ~1.5-fold from cochlear apex to base in outer hair cells (OHCs) but showed little change in inner hair cells (IHCs), a pattern apparent in mutant mice during the first postnatal week. After P7, the OHC MT current in Tmc1-/- (dn) mice declined to zero, consistent with their deafness phenotype. In wild-type mice before P6, the relative Ca(2+) permeability, P(Ca), of the OHC MT channel decreased from cochlear apex to base. This gradient in P(Ca) was not apparent in IHCs and disappeared after P7 in OHCs. In Tmc1-/- mice, P(Ca) in basal OHCs was larger than that in wild-type mice (to equal that of apical OHCs), whereas in Tmc2-/-, P(Ca) in apical and basal OHCs and IHCs was decreased compared with that in wild-type mice. We postulate that differences in Ca(2+) permeability reflect different subunit compositions of the MT channel determined by expression of Tmc1 and Tmc2, with the latter conferring higher P(Ca) in IHCs and immature apical OHCs. Changes in P(Ca) with maturation are consistent with a developmental decrease in abundance of Tmc2 in OHCs but not in IHCs.

  17. Relevance of lysine snorkeling in the outer transmembrane domain of small viral potassium ion channels.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, Manuela; Henkes, Leonhard M; Tayefeh, Sascha; Hertel, Brigitte; Greiner, Timo; Van Etten, James L; Baumeister, Dirk; Cosentino, Cristian; Moroni, Anna; Kast, Stefan M; Thiel, Gerhard

    2012-07-17

    Transmembrane domains (TMDs) are often flanked by Lys or Arg because they keep their aliphatic parts in the bilayer and their charged groups in the polar interface. Here we examine the relevance of this so-called "snorkeling" of a cationic amino acid, which is conserved in the outer TMD of small viral K(+) channels. Experimentally, snorkeling activity is not mandatory for Kcv(PBCV-1) because K29 can be replaced by most of the natural amino acids without any corruption of function. Two similar channels, Kcv(ATCV-1) and Kcv(MT325), lack a cytosolic N-terminus, and neutralization of their equivalent cationic amino acids inhibits their function. To understand the variable importance of the cationic amino acids, we reanalyzed molecular dynamics simulations of Kcv(PBCV-1) and N-terminally truncated mutants; the truncated mutants mimic Kcv(ATCV-1) and Kcv(MT325). Structures were analyzed with respect to membrane positioning in relation to the orientation of K29. The results indicate that the architecture of the protein (including the selectivity filter) is only weakly dependent on TMD length and protonation of K29. The penetration depth of Lys in a given protonation state is independent of the TMD architecture, which leads to a distortion of shorter proteins. The data imply that snorkeling can be important for K(+) channels; however, its significance depends on the architecture of the entire TMD. The observation that the most severe N-terminal truncation causes the outer TMD to move toward the cytosolic side suggests that snorkeling becomes more relevant if TMDs are not stabilized in the membrane by other domains.

  18. Redistribution of Cholesterol in Model Lipid Membranes in Response to the Membrane-Active Peptide Alamethicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, William; Qian, Shuo

    2013-03-01

    The cellular membrane is a heterogeneous, dynamic mixture of molecules and macromolecules that self-assemble into a tightly-regulated functional unit that provides a semipermeable barrier between the cell and its environment. Among the many compositional differences between mammalian and bacterial cell membranes that impact its physical properties, one key difference is cholesterol content, which is more prevalent in mammals. Cholesterol is an amphiphile that associates with membranes and serves to maintain its fluidity and permeability. Membrane-active peptides, such as the alpha-helical peptide alamethicin, interact with membranes in a concentration- and composition-dependent manner to form transmembrane pores that are responsible for the lytic action of the peptide. Through the use of small-angle neutron scattering and deuterium labeling, it was possible to observe a redistribution of the lipid and cholesterol in unilamellar vesicles in response to the presence of alamethicin at a peptide-to-lipid ratio of 1/200. The results demonstrate that the membrane remodeling powers of alamethicin reach beyond the membrane thinning effect to altering the localization of specific components in the bilayer, complementing the accepted two-state mechanism of pore formation. Research was supported by U. S. DOE-OBER (CSMB; FWP ERKP291) and the U. S. DOE-BES Scientific User Facilities Division (ORNL's SNS and HFIR).

  19. Vitamin C controls the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Horst; Schwarzer, Christian; Illek, Beate

    2004-03-01

    Vitamin C (l-ascorbate) is present in the respiratory lining fluid of human lungs, and local deficits occur during oxidative stress. Here we report a unique function of vitamin C on the cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-dependent Cl channel that regulates epithelial surface fluid secretion. Vitamin C (100 microM) induced the openings of CFTR Cl channels by increasing its average open probability from 0 to 0.21 +/- 0.08, without a detectable increase in intracellular cAMP levels. Exposure of the apical airway surface to vitamin C stimulated the transepithelial Cl secretion to 68% of forskolin-stimulated currents. The average half-maximal stimulatory constant was 36.5 +/- 2.9 microM, which corresponds to physiological concentrations. When vitamin C was instilled into the nasal epithelium of human subjects, it effectively activated Cl transport in vivo. In CF epithelia, previous treatment of the underlying trafficking defect with trimethylamine oxide or expression of WT CFTR restored the activation of Cl transport by vitamin C. Sodium dependency and phloretin sensitivity, as well as the expression of transcripts for sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter (SVCT)-1 and SVCT2, support a model in which an apical vitamin C transporter is central for relaying the effect of vitamin C to CFTR. We conclude that cellular vitamin C is a biological regulator of CFTR-mediated Cl secretion in epithelia. The pool of vitamin C in the respiratory tract represents a potential nutraceutical and pharmaceutical target for the complementary treatment of sticky airway secretions by enhancing epithelial fluid secretion.

  20. [Application of Brownian dynamics to the description of transmembrane ion flow as exemplified by the chloride channel of glycine receptor].

    PubMed

    Boronovskiĭ, S E; Nartsissov, Ia R

    2009-01-01

    Using the Brownian dynamics of the movement of hydrated ion in a viscous water solution, a mathematical model has been built, which describes the transport of charged particles through a single protein pore in a lipid membrane. The dependences of transmembrane ion currents on ion concentrations in solution have been obtained. It was shown that, if the geometry of a membrane pore is identical to that of the inner part of the glycine receptor channel and there is no ion selectivity, then the values of both chloride and sodium currents are not greater than 0.5 pA at the physiological concentrations of these ions. If local charge heterogeneity caused by charged amino acid residues of transmembrane protein segments is included into the model calculations, the chloride current increases to about 3.7 pA, which exceeds more than seven times the value for sodium ions under the conditions of the complex channel geometry in the range of physiological concentrations of ions in the solution. The model takes changes in the density of charge distribution both inside the channel and near the protein surface into account. The alteration of pore geometry can be also considered as a parameter at the researcher's option. Thus, the model appears as an effective tool for the description of transmembrane currents for other types of membrane channels.

  1. Chemical nature and sequence of alamethicin.

    PubMed

    Martin, D R; Williams, R J

    1976-02-01

    An n.m.r. spectroscopy study of pure alamethicin shows it to be a linear polypeptide of 19 residues. The N-terminus is blocked by an acetyl group, and the eighteenth residue, glutamic acid, is linked by an amide bond on its side chain to phenylalaninol (Fig. 6). The new formula is confirmed by a comparison between pure chemical compounds and the products of partial hydrolysis. PMID:1275883

  2. Mouse cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator forms cAMP-PKA-regulated apical chloride channels in cortical collecting duct.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming; Dong, Ke; Egan, Marie E; Giebisch, Gerhard H; Boulpaep, Emile L; Hebert, Steven C

    2010-03-30

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is expressed in many segments of the mammalian nephron, where it may interact with and modulate the activity of a variety of apical membrane proteins, including the renal outer medullary potassium (ROMK) K(+) channel. However, the expression of CFTR in apical cell membranes or its function as a Cl(-) channel in native renal epithelia has not been demonstrated. Here, we establish that CFTR forms protein kinase A (PKA)-activated Cl(-) channels in the apical membrane of principal cells from the cortical collecting duct obtained from mice. These Cl(-) channels were observed in cell-attached apical patches of principal cells after stimulation by forskolin/3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. Quiescent Cl(-) channels were present in patches excised from untreated tubules because they could be activated after exposure to Mg-ATP and the catalytic subunit of PKA. The single-channel conductance, kinetics, and anion selectivity of these Cl(-) channels were the same as those of recombinant mouse CFTR channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The CFTR-specific closed-channel blocker CFTR(inh)-172 abolished apical Cl(-) channel activity in excised patches. Moreover, apical Cl(-) channel activity was completely absent in principal cells from transgenic mice expressing the DeltaF508 CFTR mutation but was present and unaltered in ROMK-null mice. We discuss the physiologic implications of open CFTR Cl(-) channels on salt handling by the collecting duct and on the functional CFTR-ROMK interactions in modulating the metabolic ATP-sensing of ROMK. PMID:20231442

  3. Transmembrane Communication: General Principles and Lessons from the Structure and Function of the M2 Proton Channel, K+ Channels, and Integrin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Grigoryan, Gevorg; Moore, David T.; DeGrado, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Signal transduction across biological membranes is central to life. This process generally happens through communication between different domains and hierarchical coupling of information. Here, we review structural and thermodynamic principles behind transmembrane (TM) signal transduction and discuss common themes. Communication between signaling domains can be understood in terms of thermodynamic and kinetic principles, and complex signaling patterns can arise from simple wiring of thermodynamically coupled domains. We relate this to functions of several signal transduction systems: the M2 proton channel from influenza A virus, potassium channels, integrin receptors, and bacterial kinases. We also discuss key features in the structural rearrangements responsible for signal transduction in these systems. PMID:21548783

  4. Transmembrane communication: general principles and lessons from the structure and function of the M2 proton channel, K⁺ channels, and integrin receptors.

    PubMed

    Grigoryan, Gevorg; Moore, David T; DeGrado, William F

    2011-01-01

    Signal transduction across biological membranes is central to life. This process generally happens through communication between different domains and hierarchical coupling of information. Here, we review structural and thermodynamic principles behind transmembrane (TM) signal transduction and discuss common themes. Communication between signaling domains can be understood in terms of thermodynamic and kinetic principles, and complex signaling patterns can arise from simple wiring of thermodynamically coupled domains. We relate this to functions of several signal transduction systems: the M2 proton channel from influenza A virus, potassium channels, integrin receptors, and bacterial kinases. We also discuss key features in the structural rearrangements responsible for signal transduction in these systems.

  5. A negative charge in transmembrane segment 1 of domain II of the cockroach sodium channel is critical for channel gating and action of pyrethroid insecticides

    SciTech Connect

    Du Yuzhe; Song Weizhong; Groome, James R.; Nomura, Yoshiko; Luo Ningguang; Dong Ke

    2010-08-15

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary target of pyrethroids, an important class of synthetic insecticides. Pyrethroids bind to a distinct receptor site on sodium channels and prolong the open state by inhibiting channel deactivation and inactivation. Recent studies have begun to reveal sodium channel residues important for pyrethroid binding. However, how pyrethroid binding leads to inhibition of sodium channel deactivation and inactivation remains elusive. In this study, we show that a negatively charged aspartic acid residue at position 802 (D802) located in the extracellular end of transmembrane segment 1 of domain II (IIS1) is critical for both the action of pyrethroids and the voltage dependence of channel activation. Charge-reversing or -neutralizing substitutions (K, G, or A) of D802 shifted the voltage dependence of activation in the depolarizing direction and reduced channel sensitivity to deltamethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide. The charge-reversing mutation D802K also accelerated open-state deactivation, which may have counteracted the inhibition of sodium channel deactivation by deltamethrin. In contrast, the D802G substitution slowed open-state deactivation, suggesting an additional mechanism for neutralizing the action of deltamethrin. Importantly, Schild analysis showed that D802 is not involved in pyrethroid binding. Thus, we have identified a sodium channel residue that is critical for regulating the action of pyrethroids on the sodium channel without affecting the receptor site of pyrethroids.

  6. The saxitoxin/tetrodotoxin binding site on cloned rat brain IIa Na channels is in the transmembrane electric field.

    PubMed Central

    Satin, J.; Limberis, J. T.; Kyle, J. W.; Rogart, R. B.; Fozzard, H. A.

    1994-01-01

    The rat brain IIa (BrIIa) Na channel alpha-subunit and the brain beta 1 subunit were coexpressed in Xenopus oocytes, and peak whole-oocyte Na current (INa) was measured at a test potential of -10 mV. Hyperpolarization of the holding potential resulted in an increased affinity of STX and TTX rested-state block of BrIIa Na channels. The apparent half-block concentration (ED50) for STX of BrIIa current decreased with hyperpolarizing holding potentials (Vhold). At Vhold of -100 mV, the ED50 was 2.1 +/- 0.4 nM, and the affinity increased to a ED50 of 1.2 +/- 0.2 nM with Vhold of -140 mV. In the absence of toxin, the peak current amplitude was the same for all potentials negative to -90 mV, demonstrating that all of the channels were in a closed conformation and maximally available to open in this range of holding potentials. The Woodhull model (1973) was used to describe the increase of the STX ED50 as a function of holding potential. The equivalent electrical distance of block (delta) by STX was 0.18 from the extracellular milieu when the valence of STX was fixed to +2. Analysis of the holding potential dependence of TTX block yielded a similar delta when the valence of TTX was fixed to +1. We conclude that the guanidinium toxin site is located partially within the transmembrane electric field. Previous site-directed mutagenesis studies demonstrated that an isoform-specific phenylalanine in the BrIIa channel is critical for high affinity toxin block. Therefore, we propose that amino acids at positions corresponding to this Phe in the BrIIa channel, which lie in the outer vestibule of the channel adjacent to the pore entrance,are partially in the transmembrane potential drop. PMID:7811911

  7. Neutron scattering in the plane of membranes: structure of alamethicin pores.

    PubMed Central

    He, K; Ludtke, S J; Worcester, D L; Huang, H W

    1996-01-01

    A technique of neutron in-plane scattering for studying the structures of peptide pores in membranes is described. Alamethicin in the inserted state was prepared and undeuterated and deuterated dilauroyl phosphatidylcholine (DLPC) hydrated with D2O or H2O. Neutron in-plane scattering showed a strong dependence on deuteration, clearly indicating that water is a part of the high-order structure of inserted alamethicin. The data are consistent with the simple barrel-stave model originally proposed by Baumann and Mueller. The theoretical curves computed with this model at four different deuteration conditions agree with the data in all cases. Both the diameter of the water pore and the effective outside diameter of the channel are determined accurately. Alamethicin forms pores in a narrow range of size. In a given sample condition, > 70% of the peptide forms pores of n and n +/- 1 monomers. The pore size varies with hydration and with lipid. In DLPC, the pores are made of n = 8-9 monomers, with a water pore approximately 18 A in diameter and with an effective outside diameter of approximately 40 A. In diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine, the pores are made of n approximately 11 monomers, with a water pore approximately 26 A in diameter, with an effective outside diameter of approximately 50 A. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8744303

  8. External Zn(2+) binding to cysteine-substituted cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator constructs regulates channel gating and curcumin potentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangyu; Linsley, Rheeann; Norimatsu, Yohei

    2016-07-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is activated by ATP binding-induced dimerization of nucleotide-binding domains, the interaction between the phosphorylated regulatory (R) domain and the curcumin-sensitive interface between intracellular loop (ICL) 1 and ICL4, and the resultant inward-to-'outward' reorientation of transmembrane domains. Although transmembrane helices (TM) 2 and TM11 link the ICL1-ICL4 interface with the interface between extracellular loop (ECL) 1 and ECL6, it is unknown whether both interfaces are gating-coupled during the reorientation. Herein, R334C and T1122C mutations were used to engineer two Zn(2+) bridges near and at the ECL1-ECL6 interface, respectively, and the gating effects of a Zn(2+) disturbance at the ECL1-ECL6 interface on the stimulatory ICL1/ICL4-R interaction were determined. The results showed that both Zn(2+) bridges inhibited channel activity in a dose- and Cl(-) -dependent manner, and the inhibition was reversed by a washout or suppressed by thiol-specific modification. Interestingly, their Cl(-) -dependent Zn(2+) inhibition was weakened at higher Zn(2+) concentrations, their Zn(2+) affinity was stronger in the resting state than in the activated state, and their activation current noises were decreased by external Zn(2+) binding. More importantly, the external Zn(2+) inhibition was reversed by internal curcumin in the R334C construct but not in the T1122C mutant. Therefore, although both Zn(2+) bridges may promote channel closure, external Zn(2+) may disturb the ECL1-ECL6 interface and thus prevent the stimulatory ICL1/ICL4-R interaction and curcumin potentiation via a gating coupling between these two interfaces. PMID:27175795

  9. Impact of biofilm accumulation on transmembrane and feed channel pressure drop: effects of crossflow velocity, feed spacer and biodegradable nutrient.

    PubMed

    Dreszer, C; Flemming, H-C; Zwijnenburg, A; Kruithof, J C; Vrouwenvelder, J S

    2014-03-01

    Biofilm formation causes performance loss in spiral-wound membrane systems. In this study a microfiltration membrane was used in experiments to simulate fouling in spiral-wound reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane modules without the influence of concentration polarization. The resistance of a microfiltration membrane is much lower than the intrinsic biofilm resistance, enabling the detection of biofilm accumulation in an early stage. The impact of biofilm accumulation on the transmembrane (biofilm) resistance and feed channel pressure drop as a function of the crossflow velocity (0.05 and 0.20 m s(-1)) and feed spacer presence was studied in transparent membrane biofouling monitors operated at a permeate flux of 20 L m(-2) h(-1). As biodegradable nutrient, acetate was dosed to the feed water (1.0 and 0.25 mg L(-1) carbon) to enhance biofilm accumulation in the monitors. The studies showed that biofilm formation caused an increased transmembrane resistance and feed channel pressure drop. The effect was strongest at the highest crossflow velocity (0.2 m s(-1)) and in the presence of a feed spacer. Simulating conditions as currently applied in nanofiltration and reverse osmosis installations (crossflow velocity 0.2 m s(-1) and standard feed spacer) showed that the impact of biofilm formation on performance, in terms of transmembrane and feed channel pressure drop, was strong. This emphasized the importance of hydrodynamics and feed spacer design. Biomass accumulation was related to the nutrient load (nutrient concentration and linear flow velocity). Reducing the nutrient concentration of the feed water enabled the application of higher crossflow velocities. Pretreatment to remove biodegradable nutrient and removal of biomass from the membrane elements played an important part to prevent or restrict biofouling.

  10. Loop diuretics are open-channel blockers of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator with distinct kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Min; Scott-Ward, Toby S; Liu, Jia; Khuituan, Pissared; Li, Hongyu; Cai, Zhiwei; Husbands, Stephen M; Sheppard, David N

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Loop diuretics are widely used to inhibit the Na+, K+, 2Cl− co-transporter, but they also inhibit the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel. Here, we investigated the mechanism of CFTR inhibition by loop diuretics and explored the effects of chemical structure on channel blockade. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Using the patch-clamp technique, we tested the effects of bumetanide, furosemide, piretanide and xipamide on recombinant wild-type human CFTR. KEY RESULTS When added to the intracellular solution, loop diuretics inhibited CFTR Cl− currents with potency approaching that of glibenclamide, a widely used CFTR blocker with some structural similarity to loop diuretics. To begin to study the kinetics of channel blockade, we examined the time dependence of macroscopic current inhibition following a hyperpolarizing voltage step. Like glibenclamide, piretanide blockade of CFTR was time and voltage dependent. By contrast, furosemide blockade was voltage dependent, but time independent. Consistent with these data, furosemide blocked individual CFTR Cl− channels with ‘very fast’ speed and drug-induced blocking events overlapped brief channel closures, whereas piretanide inhibited individual channels with ‘intermediate’ speed and drug-induced blocking events were distinct from channel closures. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Structure–activity analysis of the loop diuretics suggests that the phenoxy group present in bumetanide and piretanide, but absent in furosemide and xipamide, might account for the different kinetics of channel block by locking loop diuretics within the intracellular vestibule of the CFTR pore. We conclude that loop diuretics are open-channel blockers of CFTR with distinct kinetics, affected by molecular dimensions and lipophilicity. PMID:24117047

  11. Comparison of the gating behaviour of human and murine cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl− channels expressed in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Lansdell, K A; Delaney, S J; Lunn, D P; Thomson, S A; Sheppard, D N; Wainwright, B J

    1998-01-01

    To investigate the function of the murine cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a full-length cDNA encoding wild-type murine CFTR was assembled and stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Like human CFTR, murine CFTR formed Cl− channels that were regulated by cAMP-dependent phosphorylation and intracellular ATP. However, murine CFTR Cl− channels had a reduced single-channel conductance and decreased open probability (Po) compared with those of human CFTR. Analysis of the dwell time distributions of single channels suggested that the reduced Po of murine CFTR was caused by both decreased residence in the open state and transitions to a new closed state, described by an intermediate closed time constant. For both human and murine CFTR, ATP and ADP regulated the rate of exit from the long-lived closed state. 5′-Adenylylimidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP) and pyrophosphate, two compounds that disrupt cycles of ATP hydrolysis, stabilized the open state of human CFTR. However, neither agent locked murine CFTR Cl− channels open, although AMP-PNP increased the Po of murine CFTR. The data indicate that although human and murine CFTR have many properties in common, some important differences in function are observed. These differences could be exploited in future studies to provide new understanding about CFTR. PMID:9508803

  12. Conformation of alamethicin in oriented phospholipid bilayers determined by (15)N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Bak, M; Bywater, R P; Hohwy, M; Thomsen, J K; Adelhorst, K; Jakobsen, H J; Sørensen, O W; Nielsen, N C

    2001-01-01

    The conformation of the 20-residue antibiotic ionophore alamethicin in macroscopically oriented phospholipid bilayers has been studied using (15)N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in combination with molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. Differently (15)N-labeled variants of alamethicin and an analog with three of the alpha-amino-isobutyric acid residues replaced by alanines have been investigated to establish experimental structural constraints and determine the orientation of alamethicin in hydrated phospholipid (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine) bilayers and to investigate the potential for a major kink in the region of the central Pro(14) residue. From the anisotropic (15)N chemical shifts and (1)H-(15)N dipolar couplings determined for alamethicin with (15)N-labeling on the Ala(6), Val(9), and Val(15) residues and incorporated into phospholipid bilayer with a peptide:lipid molar ratio of 1:8, we deduce that alamethicin has a largely linear alpha-helical structure spanning the membrane with the molecular axis tilted by 10-20 degrees relative to the bilayer normal. In particular, we find compatibility with a straight alpha-helix tilted by 17 degrees and a slightly kinked molecular dynamics structure tilted by 11 degrees relative to the bilayer normal. In contrast, the structural constraints derived by solid-state NMR appear not to be compatible with any of several model structures crossing the membrane with vanishing tilt angle or the earlier reported x-ray diffraction structure (Fox and Richards, Nature. 300:325-330, 1982). The solid-state NMR-compatible structures may support the formation of a left-handed and parallel multimeric ion channel. PMID:11509381

  13. Direct Sensing of Intracellular pH by the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Cl− Channel*♦

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jeng-Haur; Cai, Zhiwei; Sheppard, David N.

    2009-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel disrupts epithelial ion transport and perturbs the regulation of intracellular pH (pHi). CFTR modulates pHi through its role as an ion channel and by regulating transport proteins. However, it is unknown how CFTR senses pHi. Here, we investigate the direct effects of pHi on recombinant CFTR using excised membrane patches. By altering channel gating, acidic pHi increased the open probability (Po) of wild-type CFTR, whereas alkaline pHi decreased Po and inhibited Cl− flow through the channel. Acidic pHi potentiated the MgATP dependence of wild-type CFTR by increasing MgATP affinity and enhancing channel activity, whereas alkaline pHi inhibited the MgATP dependence of wild-type CFTR by decreasing channel activity. Because these data suggest that pHi modulates the interaction of MgATP with the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of CFTR, we examined the pHi dependence of site-directed mutations in the two ATP-binding sites of CFTR that are located at the NBD1:NBD2 dimer interface (site 1: K464A-, D572N-, and G1349D-CFTR; site 2: G551D-, K1250M-, and D1370N-CFTR). Site 2 mutants, but not site 1 mutants, perturbed both potentiation by acidic pHi and inhibition by alkaline pHi, suggesting that site 2 is a critical determinant of the pHi sensitivity of CFTR. The effects of pHi also suggest that site 2 might employ substrate-assisted catalysis to ensure that ATP hydrolysis follows NBD dimerization. We conclude that the CFTR Cl− channel senses directly pHi. The direct regulation of CFTR by pHi has important implications for the regulation of epithelial ion transport. PMID:19837660

  14. Nano-pipette directed transport of nanotube transmembrane channels and hybrid vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, Meenakshi; Kuksenok, Olga; Balazs, Anna C.

    2013-09-01

    Using computational modeling, we simulate the interactions between a nanopipette and transmembrane, end-functionalized nanotubes that are localized within flat bilayers or nanoscopic vesicles. The functional groups (hairs) provide a ``handle'' for the moving pipette to controllably pick up and move the nanotubes to specific locations in the flat membrane, or the hybrid vesicle to specified regions on a surface. The ability to localize these hybrid vesicles on surfaces paves the way for creating nanoreactor arrays in fluidic devices.Using computational modeling, we simulate the interactions between a nanopipette and transmembrane, end-functionalized nanotubes that are localized within flat bilayers or nanoscopic vesicles. The functional groups (hairs) provide a ``handle'' for the moving pipette to controllably pick up and move the nanotubes to specific locations in the flat membrane, or the hybrid vesicle to specified regions on a surface. The ability to localize these hybrid vesicles on surfaces paves the way for creating nanoreactor arrays in fluidic devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr33991b

  15. Using experimental information to produce a model of the transmembrane domain of the ion channel phospholamban.

    PubMed Central

    Herzyk, P; Hubbard, R E

    1998-01-01

    Molecular models of the transmembrane domain of the phospholamban pentamer have been generated by a computational method that uses the experimentally measured effects of systematic single-site mutations as a guiding force in the modeling procedure. This method makes the assumptions that 1) the phospholamban transmembrane domain is a parallel five-helix bundle, and 2) nondisruptive mutation positions are lipid exposed, whereas 3) disruptive or partially disruptive mutations are not. Our procedure requires substantially less computer time than systematic search methods, allowing rapid assessment of the effects of different experimental results on the helix arrangement. The effectiveness of the approach is investigated in test calculations on two helix-dimer systems of known structure. Two independently derived sets of mutagenesis data were used to define the restraints for generating models of phospholamban. Both resulting models are left-handed, highly symmetrical pentamers. Although the overall bundle geometry is very similar in the two models, the orientation of individual helices differs by approximately 50 degrees, resulting in different sets of residues facing the pore. This demonstrates how differences in restraints can have an effect on the model structures generated, and how the violation of these restraints can identify inconsistent experimental data. PMID:9512019

  16. Highly Selective Artificial K(+) Channels: An Example of Selectivity-Induced Transmembrane Potential.

    PubMed

    Gilles, Arnaud; Barboiu, Mihail

    2016-01-13

    Natural KcsA K(+) channels conduct at high rates with an extraordinary selectivity for K(+) cations, excluding the Na(+) or other cations. Biomimetic artificial channels have been designed in order to mimick the ionic activity of KcSA channels, but simple artificial systems presenting high K(+)/Na(+) selectivity are rare. Here we report an artificial ion channel of H-bonded hexyl-benzoureido-15-crown-5-ether, where K(+) cations are highly preferred to Na(+) cations. The K(+)-channel conductance is interpreted as arising in the formation of oligomeric highly cooperative channels, resulting in the cation-induced membrane polarization and enhanced transport rates without or under pH-active gradient. These channels are selectively responsive to the presence of K(+) cations, even in the presence of a large excess of Na(+). From the conceptual point of view, these channels express a synergistic adaptive behavior: the addition of the K(+) cation drives the selection and the construction of constitutional polarized ion channels toward the selective conduction of the K(+) cation that promotes their generation in the first place.

  17. The transmembrane channel-like protein family and human papillomaviruses: Insights into epidermodysplasia verruciformis and progression to squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Horton, Jaime S; Stokes, Alexander J

    2014-01-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare genodermatosis characterized by increased sensitivity to infection by the β-subtype of human papillomaviruses (β-HPVs), causing persistent, tinea versicolor-like dermal lesions. In a majority of affected individuals, these macular lesions progress to invasive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) in sun-exposed areas. While mutations in transmembrane channel-like 6 (TMC6 / EVER1) and 8 (TMC8 / EVER2) have been causally linked to EV, their molecular functions are unclear. It is likely that their protective effects involve regulation of the β-HPV life cycle, host keratinocyte apoptosis vs. survival balance and/or T-cell interaction with infected host cells.

  18. Tryptophan Scanning Reveals Dense Packing of Connexin Transmembrane Domains in Gap Junction Channels Composed of Connexin32.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Matthew J; Karcz, Jennifer; Vaughn, Nicholas R; Woolwine-Cunningham, Yvonne; DePriest, Adam D; Escalona, Yerko; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Skerrett, I Martha

    2015-07-10

    Tryptophan was substituted for residues in all four transmembrane domains of connexin32. Function was assayed using dual cell two-electrode voltage clamp after expression in Xenopus oocytes. Tryptophan substitution was poorly tolerated in all domains, with the greatest impact in TM1 and TM4. For instance, in TM1, 15 substitutions were made, six abolished coupling and five others significantly reduced function. Only TM2 and TM3 included a distinct helical face that lacked sensitivity to tryptophan substitution. Results were visualized on a comparative model of Cx32 hemichannel. In this model, a region midway through the membrane appears highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution and includes residues Arg-32, Ile-33, Met-34, and Val-35. In the modeled channel, pore-facing regions of TM1 and TM2 were highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution, whereas the lipid-facing regions of TM3 and TM4 were variably tolerant. Residues facing a putative intracellular water pocket (the IC pocket) were also highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution. Although future studies will be required to separate trafficking-defective mutants from those that alter channel function, a subset of interactions important for voltage gating was identified. Interactions important for voltage gating occurred mainly in the mid-region of the channel and focused on TM1. To determine whether results could be extrapolated to other connexins, TM1 of Cx43 was scanned revealing similar but not identical sensitivity to TM1 of Cx32.

  19. Surface expression and channel function of TRPM8 are cooperatively controlled by transmembrane segments S3 and S4.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Frank J P; Winking, Mathis; Kühn, Cornelia; Hoffmann, Daniel C; Lückhoff, Andreas

    2013-11-01

    TRPM8 is a voltage-dependent cation channel additionally gated by cold temperatures, menthol, and icilin. Stimulation by the chemical agonists is at least in part mediated by a conserved sequence motif in transmembrane segment S3. Based on molecular dynamics simulation studies for TRPM8 a gating model was recently developed which predicts a direct electrostatic interaction between S3 and S4. Here, we performed charge reversal mutations to pinpoint possible interactions of the putative S4 voltage sensor with S3. The charge reversals R842D, R842E, and D835R in S4 prevented channel glycosylation and function, indicating a deficient insertion into the plasma membrane. The mutations R842D and R842E were specifically rescued by the reciprocal charge reversal D802R in S3. The alternative charge reversal in S3, D796R, failed to compensate for the dysfunction of the mutants R842D and R842E. Remarkably, the double charge reversal mutants R842D + D802R and R842E + D802R retained intrinsic voltage-sensitivity, although the critical voltage sensor arginine was substituted by a negatively charged residue. Likewise, the insertion of three additional positively charged residues into S4 did not crucially change the voltage-sensitivity of TRPM8 but abolished the sensitivity to icilin. We conclude that S4 does not play a separate role for the gating of TRPM8. Instead, the cooperation with the adjacent segment S3 and the combined charges in these two segments is of general importance for both channel maturation and channel function. This mechanism distinguishes TRPM8 from other voltage-dependent cation channels within and outside the TRP family.

  20. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator: Using Differential Reactivity toward Channel-Permeant and Channel-Impermeant Thiol-Reactive Probes To Test a Molecular Model for the Pore†

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The sixth transmembrane segment (TM6) of the CFTR chloride channel has been intensively investigated. The effects of amino acid substitutions and chemical modification of engineered cysteines (cysteine scanning) on channel properties strongly suggest that TM6 is a key component of the anion-conducting pore, but previous cysteine-scanning studies of TM6 have produced conflicting results. Our aim was to resolve these conflicts by combining a screening strategy based on multiple, thiol-directed probes with molecular modeling of the pore. CFTR constructs were screened for reactivity toward both channel-permeant and channel-impermeant thiol-directed reagents, and patterns of reactivity in TM6 were mapped onto two new, molecular models of the CFTR pore: one based on homology modeling using Sav1866 as the template and a second derived from the first by molecular dynamics simulation. Comparison of the pattern of cysteine reactivity with model predictions suggests that nonreactive sites are those where the TM6 side chains are occluded by other TMs. Reactive sites, in contrast, are generally situated such that the respective amino acid side chains either project into the predicted pore or lie within a predicted extracellular loop. Sites where engineered cysteines react with both channel-permeant and channel-impermeant probes occupy the outermost extent of TM6 or the predicted TM5−6 loop. Sites where cysteine reactivity is limited to channel-permeant probes occupy more cytoplasmic locations. The results provide an initial validation of two, new molecular models for CFTR and suggest that molecular dynamics simulation will be a useful tool for unraveling the structural basis of anion conduction by CFTR. PMID:19754156

  1. Electronic control of H+ current in a bioprotonic device with Gramicidin A and Alamethicin

    PubMed Central

    Hemmatian, Zahra; Keene, Scott; Josberger, Erik; Miyake, Takeo; Arboleda, Carina; Soto-Rodríguez, Jessica; Baneyx, François; Rolandi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    In biological systems, intercellular communication is mediated by membrane proteins and ion channels that regulate traffic of ions and small molecules across cell membranes. A bioelectronic device with ion channels that control ionic flow across a supported lipid bilayer (SLB) should therefore be ideal for interfacing with biological systems. Here, we demonstrate a biotic–abiotic bioprotonic device with Pd contacts that regulates proton (H+) flow across an SLB incorporating the ion channels Gramicidin A (gA) and Alamethicin (ALM). We model the device characteristics using the Goldman–Hodgkin–Katz (GHK) solution to the Nernst–Planck equation for transport across the membrane. We derive the permeability for an SLB integrating gA and ALM and demonstrate pH control as a function of applied voltage and membrane permeability. This work opens the door to integrating more complex H+ channels at the Pd contact interface to produce responsive biotic–abiotic devices with increased functionality. PMID:27713411

  2. Alamethicin Suppresses Methanogenesis and Promotes Acetogenesis in Bioelectrochemical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiuping; Siegert, Michael; Yates, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial electrosynthesis (MES) systems with mixed cultures often generate a variety of gaseous and soluble chemicals. Methane is the primary end product in mixed-culture MES because it is the thermodynamically most favorable reduction product of CO2. Here, we show that the peptaibol alamethicin selectively suppressed the growth of methanogens in mixed-culture MES systems, resulting in a shift of the solution and cathode communities to an acetate-producing system dominated by Sporomusa, a known acetogenic genus in MES systems. Archaea in the methane-producing control were dominated by Methanobrevibacter species, but no Archaea were detected in the alamethicin-treated reactors. No methane was detected in the mixed-culture reactors treated with alamethicin over 10 cycles (∼3 days each). Instead, acetate was produced at an average rate of 115 nmol ml−1 day−1, similar to the rate reported previously for pure cultures of Sporomusa ovata on biocathodes. Mixed-culture control reactors without alamethicin generated methane at nearly 100% coulombic recovery, and no acetate was detected. These results show that alamethicin is effective for the suppression of methanogen growth in MES systems and that its use enables the production of industrially relevant organic compounds by the inhibition of methanogenesis. PMID:25819972

  3. Inter- and intrasubunit interactions between transmembrane helices in the open state of P2X receptor channels

    PubMed Central

    Heymann, Gabriel; Dai, Jian; Silberberg, Shai D.; Zhou, Huan-Xiang; Swartz, Kenton J.

    2013-01-01

    P2X receptor channels open in response to the binding of extracellular ATP, a property that is essential for purinergic sensory signaling. Apo and ATP-bound X-ray structures of the detergent-solubilized zebrafish P2X4 receptor provide a blueprint for receptor mechanisms but unexpectedly showed large crevices between subunits within the transmembrane (TM) domain of the ATP-bound structure. Here we investigate both intersubunit and intrasubunit interactions between TM helices of P2X receptors in membranes using both computational and functional approaches. Our results suggest that intersubunit crevices found in the TM domain of the ATP-bound crystal structure are not present in membrane-embedded receptors but substantiate helix interactions within individual subunits and identify a hot spot at the internal end of the pore where both the gating and permeation properties of P2X receptors can be tuned. We propose a model for the structure of the open state that has stabilizing intersubunit interactions and that is compatible with available structural constraints from functional channels in membrane environments. PMID:24082111

  4. Human epithelial cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator without exon 5 maintains partial chloride channel function in intracellular membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Xie, J; Drumm, M L; Zhao, J; Ma, J; Davis, P B

    1996-01-01

    The cardiac isoform of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a splice variant of the epithelial CFTR, with lacks 30 amino acids encoded by exon 5 in the first intracellular loop. For examination of the role of exon 5 in CFTR channel function, a CFTR deletion mutant, in which exon 5 was removed from the human epithelial CFTR, was constructed. The wild type and delta exon5 CFTR were expressed in a human embryonic kidney cell line (293 HEK). Fully mature glycosylated CFTR (approximately 170 kDa) was immunoprecipitated from cells transfected with wild type CFTR cDNA, whereas cells transfected with delta exon5 CFTR express only a core-glycosylated from (approximately 140 kDa). The Western blot test performed on subcellular membrane fractions showed that delta exon5 CFTR was located in the intracellular membranes. Neither incubation at lower temperature (26 degrees C) nor stimulation of 293 HEK cells with forskolin or CPT-cAMP caused improvement in glycosylation and processing of delta exon5 CFTR proteins, indicating that the human epithelial CFTR lacking exon5 did not process properly in 293 HEK cells. On incorporation of intracellular membrane vesicles containing the delta exon5 CFTR proteins into the lipid bilayer membrane, functional phosphorylation- and ATP-dependent chloride channels were identified. CFTR channels with an 8-pS full-conductance state were observed in 14% of the experiments. The channel had an average open probability (Po) of 0.098 +/- 0.022, significantly less than that of the wild type CFTR (Po = 0.318 +/- 0.028). More frequently, the delta exon5 CFTR formed chloride channels with lower conductance states of approximately 2-3 and approximately 4-6 pS. These subconductance states were also observed with wild type CFTR but to a much lesser extent. Average Po for the 2-3-pS subconductance state, estimated from the area under the curve on an amplitude histogram, was 0.461 +/- 0.194 for delta exon5 CFTR and 0.332 +/- 0

  5. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mediates sulphonylurea block of the inwardly rectifying K+ channel Kir6.1

    PubMed Central

    Ishida-Takahashi, Ayako; Otani, Hideo; Takahashi, Chiaki; Washizuka, Takashi; Tsuji, Keiko; Noda, Makoto; Horie, Minoru; Sasayama, Shigetake

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant ATP-sensitive K+ channels (KATP channels) were heterologously expressed in the NIH3T3 mouse cell line, and the electrophysiological properties were studied using patch-clamp techniques. The NIH3T3 cell lines transfected with the inwardly rectifying K+ channel Kir6.1 alone or with both Kir6.1 and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) exhibited time-independent K+ currents with weak inward rectification. In contrast, no measurable K+ conductance was observed in mock-transfected cells or in cells transfected with CFTR alone. Regardless of co-transfection with Kir6.1, the transfection with CFTR produced a Cl− conductance that was activated by cell dialysis with cAMP (1 mm). The conductance was reversibly suppressed by glibenclamide (30 μm). Whole-cell currents at +60 mV were blocked in a concentration-dependent manner by Ba2+ ions with similar IC50 values: 89.3 ± 23.3 μm (Kir6.1 alone) and 67.3 ± 24.9 μm (Kir6.1-CFTR). The currents recorded from Kir6.1-transfected cells were not affected by glibenclamide, whereas glibenclamide did inhibit the conductance expressed in cells co-transfected with CFTR (IC50= 35.9 ± 6.6 μm). In the cell-attached mode with a 150 mm K+ pipette solution, both Kir6.1- and Kir6.1-CFTR-transfected cells displayed a class of K+ channels showing weak inward rectification and a slope conductance of 50.7 ± 1.0 and 52.4 ± 4.9 pS, respectively. In the inside-out mode, the single-channel currents recorded from both types of cells were not inhibited by intracellular ATP (1 mm). However, glibenclamide was found to block the single-channel activities in the co-transfected cells. PMID:9490811

  6. [Study of the volt-ampere characteristics of ion channels by transmembrane current harmonics].

    PubMed

    Flerov, M N; Pasechnik, V I; Gianik, T

    1981-01-01

    A method is proposed for measuring the coefficient of non--linearity beta of current--voltage characteristics of the class i (U) approximately U (1 + beta U2) of ionic channels formed by grammicidine A (Gra) and amphotericine B by the 3rd harmonics of the membrane current. For Gra A beta depends on the concentration of electrolyte c increasing lg c from -17 B-2 at 0.03 M to 8 B-2 at 3.4 M KCl turning to 0 at c0 = 0.3 divided by 1 M. The membranes of egg lecithin and glycerylmonooleate (GMO) differ in c0 value. Substitution of K+ ion for Li+, of the membrane solvent (n-heptane for n-hexadecane) and freezing of the GMO membrane do not affect beta.

  7. Arsenic promotes ubiquitinylation and lysosomal degradation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channels in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bomberger, Jennifer M; Coutermarsh, Bonita A; Barnaby, Roxanna L; Stanton, Bruce A

    2012-05-18

    Arsenic exposure significantly increases respiratory bacterial infections and reduces the ability of the innate immune system to eliminate bacterial infections. Recently, we observed in the gill of killifish, an environmental model organism, that arsenic exposure induced the ubiquitinylation and degradation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a chloride channel that is essential for the mucociliary clearance of respiratory pathogens in humans. Accordingly, in this study, we tested the hypothesis that low dose arsenic exposure reduces the abundance and function of CFTR in human airway epithelial cells. Arsenic induced a time- and dose-dependent increase in multiubiquitinylated CFTR, which led to its lysosomal degradation, and a decrease in CFTR-mediated chloride secretion. Although arsenic had no effect on the abundance or activity of USP10, a deubiquitinylating enzyme, siRNA-mediated knockdown of c-Cbl, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, abolished the arsenic-stimulated degradation of CFTR. Arsenic enhanced the degradation of CFTR by increasing phosphorylated c-Cbl, which increased its interaction with CFTR, and subsequent ubiquitinylation of CFTR. Because epidemiological studies have shown that arsenic increases the incidence of respiratory infections, this study suggests that one potential mechanism of this effect involves arsenic-induced ubiquitinylation and degradation of CFTR, which decreases chloride secretion and airway surface liquid volume, effects that would be proposed to reduce mucociliary clearance of respiratory pathogens.

  8. Effect of ceramic membrane channel geometry and uniform transmembrane pressure on limiting flux and serum protein removal during skim milk microfiltration.

    PubMed

    Adams, Michael C; Hurt, Emily E; Barbano, David M

    2015-11-01

    Our objectives were to determine the effects of a ceramic microfiltration (MF) membrane's retentate flow channel geometry (round or diamond-shaped) and uniform transmembrane pressure (UTP) on limiting flux (LF) and serum protein (SP) removal during skim milk MF at a temperature of 50°C, a retentate protein concentration of 8.5%, and an average cross-flow velocity of 7 m·s(-1). Performance of membranes with round and diamond flow channels was compared in UTP mode. Performance of the membrane with round flow channels was compared with and without UTP. Using UTP with round flow channel MF membranes increased the LF by 5% when compared with not using UTP, but SP removal was not affected by the use of UTP. Using membranes with round channels instead of diamond-shaped channels in UTP mode increased the LF by 24%. This increase was associated with a 25% increase in Reynolds number and can be explained by lower shear at the vertices of the diamond-shaped channel's surface. The SP removal factor of the diamond channel system was higher than the SP removal factor of the round channel system below the LF. However, the diamond channel system passed more casein into the MF permeate than the round channel system. Because only one batch of each membrane was tested in our study, it was not possible to determine if the differences in protein rejection between channel geometries were due to the membrane design or random manufacturing variation. Despite the lower LF of the diamond channel system, the 47% increase in membrane module surface area of the diamond channel system produced a modular permeate removal rate that was at least 19% higher than the round channel system. Consequently, using diamond channel membranes instead of round channel membranes could reduce some of the costs associated with ceramic MF of skim milk if fewer membrane modules could be used to attain the required membrane area. PMID:26298765

  9. Relative motion of transmembrane segments S0 and S4 during voltage sensor activation in the human BK(Ca) channel.

    PubMed

    Pantazis, Antonios; Kohanteb, Azadeh P; Olcese, Riccardo

    2010-12-01

    Large-conductance voltage- and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK(Ca)) channel α subunits possess a unique transmembrane helix referred to as S0 at their N terminus, which is absent in other members of the voltage-gated channel superfamily. Recently, S0 was found to pack close to transmembrane segments S3 and S4, which are important components of the BK(Ca) voltage-sensing apparatus. To assess the role of S0 in voltage sensitivity, we optically tracked protein conformational rearrangements from its extracellular flank by site-specific labeling with an environment-sensitive fluorophore, tetramethylrhodamine maleimide (TMRM). The structural transitions resolved from the S0 region exhibited voltage dependence similar to that of charge-bearing transmembrane domains S2 and S4. The molecular determinant of the fluorescence changes was identified in W203 at the extracellular tip of S4: at hyperpolarized potential, W203 quenches the fluorescence of TMRM labeling positions at the N-terminal flank of S0. We provide evidence that upon depolarization, W203 (in S4) moves away from the extracellular region of S0, lifting its quenching effect on TMRM fluorescence. We suggest that S0 acts as a pivot component against which the voltage-sensitive S4 moves upon depolarization to facilitate channel activation.

  10. Alamethicin biosynthesis: acetylation of the amino terminus and attachment of phenylalaninol.

    PubMed

    Mohr, H; Kleinkauf, H

    1978-10-12

    Alamethicin synthetase was extracted from the fungus Trichoderma viride at the end of its exponential growth phase. It is multienzyme complex with a molecular weight of approx. 480 000. The biosynthesis of alamethicin is initiated on the synthetase by acetylation of thiolester-bound aminoisobutyric acid, which remains enzyme bound. Acetyl-CoA serves as the acetate donor. Of the alamethicin constituents, glycine, alanine and valine are also acetylated when incubated alone. This acetylation is prevented by added aminoisobutyric acid, which indicates that the site on alamethicin synthetase catalyzing the acetylation has a preference for aminoisobutyric acid. Alamethicin formation on the synthetase is terminated by linkage of phenylalaninol to the carboxyl terminus of the peptide. It is unlikely that the amino alcohol is a degradation product of alamethicin or that it had been split off from the synthetase complex. Thus it is probably the reaction product of a separate enzyme system. PMID:568941

  11. Asymmetric distribution of charged lipids between the leaflets of a vesicle bilayer induced by melittin and alamethicin

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Shuo; Heller, William T

    2011-01-01

    Cellular membranes are complex mixtures of lipids, proteins, and other small molecules that provide functional, dynamic barriers between the cell and its environment, as well as between environments within the cell. The lipid composition of the membrane is highly specific and controlled in terms of both content and lipid localization. The membrane structure results from the complex interplay between the wide varieties of molecules present. Here, small-angle neutron scattering and selective deuterium labeling were used to probe the impact of the membrane-active peptides melittin and alamethicin on the structure of lipid bilayers composed of a mixture of the lipids dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) and chain-perdeuterated dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC). We found that both peptides enriched the outer leaflet of the bilayer with the negatively charged DMPG, creating an asymmetric distribution of lipids. The level of enrichment is peptide concentration-dependent and is stronger for melittin than it is for alamethicin. The enrichment between the inner and outer bilayer leaflets occurs at very low peptide concentrations and increases with peptide concentration, including when the peptide adopts a membrane-spanning, pore-forming state. The results suggest that these membrane-active peptides may have a secondary stressful effect on target cells at low concentrations that results from a disruption of the lipid distribution between the inner and outer leaflets of the bilayer that is independent of the formation of transmembrane pores.

  12. Lipid bilayer microarray for parallel recording of transmembrane ion currents.

    PubMed

    Le Pioufle, Bruno; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Tabata, Kazuhito V; Noji, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a multiwell biochip for simultaneous parallel recording of ion current through transmembrane pores reconstituted in planar lipid bilayer arrays. Use of a thin poly(p-xylylene) (parylene) film having micrometer-sized apertures (phi=15-50 microm, t=20 microm) led to formation of highly stable bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) for incorporation of transmembrane pores; thus, a large number of BLMs could be arrayed without any skillful technique. We optically confirmed the simultaneous formation of BLMs in a 5x5 matrix, and in our durability test, the BLM lasted more than 15 h. Simultaneous parallel recording of alamethicin and gramicidin transmembrane pores in multiple contiguous recording sites demonstrated the feasibility of high-throughput screening of transmembrane ion currents in artificial lipid bilayers.

  13. A residue in the transmembrane segment 6 of domain I in insect and mammalian sodium channels regulate differential sensitivities to pyrethroid insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Eugênio E.; Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Dong, Ke

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are critical for electrical signaling in the nervous system. Pyrethroid insecticides exert their toxic action by modifying the gating of sodium channels. A valine to methionine mutation in the transmembrane segment 6 of domain I (IS6) of sodium channels from tobacco budworms (Heliothis virescens) has been shown to alter channel gating and reduce insect sodium channel sensitivity to pyrethroids. A valine to leucine substitution was subsequently reported in pyrethroid-resistant bedbug populations. Intriguingly, pyrethroid-resistant mammalian sodium channels possess an isoleucine at the corresponding position. To determine whether different substitutions at this position alter channel gating and confer pyrethroid resistance, we made valine to methionine, isoleucine or leucine substitutions at the corresponding position, V409, in a cockroach sodium channel and examined the gating properties and pyrethroid sensitivity of the three mutants in Xenopus oocytes. All three mutations reduced the channel sensitivity to three pyrethroids (permethrin, cismethrin and deltamethrin). V409M, but not V409I or V409L, caused 6-7 mV depolarizing shifts in the voltage dependences of both activation and inactivation. V409M and V409L slowed channel activation kinetics and accelerated open-state deactivation kinetics, but V409I did not. Furthermore, the substitution of isoleucine with valine, but not with methionine nor leucine, at the corresponding position in a rat skeletal muscle sodium channel, rNav1.4, enhanced channel sensitivity to deltamethrin. Collectively, our study highlights an important role of residues at 409 in regulating not only sodium channel gating, but also the differential sensitivities of insect and mammalian sodium channels to pyrethroids. PMID:23764339

  14. Direct visualization of the alamethicin pore formed in a planar phospholipid matrix

    PubMed Central

    Pieta, Piotr; Mirza, Jeff; Lipkowski, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    We present direct visualization of pores formed by alamethicin (Alm) in a matrix of phospholipids using electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (EC-STM). High-resolution EC-STM images show individual peptide molecules forming channels. The channels are not dispersed randomly in the monolayer but agglomerate forming 2D nanocrystals with a hexagonal lattice in which the average channel–channel distance is 1.90 ± 0.1 nm. The STM images suggest that each Alm is shared between the two adjacent channels. Every channel consists of six Alm molecules. Three or four of these molecules have the hydrophilic group oriented toward the center of the channel allowing for water column formation inside the channel. The dimensions of the central pore in the images are consistent with the dimension of the water column in a model of hexameric pore proposed in the literature. The images obtained in this work validate the barrel-stave model of the pore formed in phospholipid membranes by amphiphatic peptides. They also provide direct evidence for cluster formation by such pores. PMID:23236158

  15. Helix bending in alamethicin: molecular dynamics simulations and amide hydrogen exchange in methanol.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, N; Sessions, R B; Williams, P B; Dempsey, C E

    1997-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of alamethicin in methanol were carried out with either a regular alpha-helical conformation or the x-ray crystal structure as starting structures. The structures rapidly converged to a well-defined hydrogen-bonding pattern with mixed alpha-helical and 3(10)-helical hydrogen bonds, consistent with NMR structural characterization, and did not unfold throughout the 1-ns simulation, despite some sizable backbone fluctuations involving reversible breaking of helical hydrogen bonds. Bending of the helical structure around residues Aib10-Aib13 was associated with reversible flips of the peptide bonds involving G11 (Aib10-G11 or G11-L12 peptide bonds), yielding discrete structural states in which the Aib10 carbonyl or (rarely) the G11 carbonyl was oriented away from the peptide helix. These peptide bond reversals could be accommodated without greatly perturbing the adjacent helical structure, and intramolecular hydrogen bonding was generally maintained in bent states through the formation of new (non-alpha or 3[10]) hydrogen bonds with good geometries: G11 NH-V9 CO (inverse gamma turn), Aib13 NH-Aib8 CO (pi-helix) and, rarely, L12 NH- Q7 NH (pi-helix). These observations may reconcile potentially conflicting NMR structural information for alamethicin in methanol, in which evidence for conformational flexibility in the peptide sequence before P14 (G11-Aib13) contrasts with the stability of backbone amide NH groups to exchange with solvent. Similar reversible reorientation of the Thr11-Gly12 peptide bond of melittin is also observed in dynamics simulations in methanol (R. B. Sessions, N. Gibbs, and C. E. Dempsey, submitted). This phenomenon may have some role in the orientation of the peptide carbonyl in solvating the channel lumen in membrane ion channel states of these peptides. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:9168025

  16. The Transmembrane Region of Guard Cell SLAC1 Channels Perceives CO2 Signals via an ABA-Independent Pathway in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoshiko; Negi, Juntaro; Wang, Cun; Isogai, Yasuhiro; Schroeder, Julian I; Iba, Koh

    2016-02-01

    The guard cell S-type anion channel, SLOW ANION CHANNEL1 (SLAC1), a key component in the control of stomatal movements, is activated in response to CO2 and abscisic acid (ABA). Several amino acids existing in the N-terminal region of SLAC1 are involved in regulating its activity via phosphorylation in the ABA response. However, little is known about sites involved in CO2 signal perception. To dissect sites that are necessary for the stomatal CO2 response, we performed slac1 complementation experiments using transgenic plants expressing truncated SLAC1 proteins. Measurements of gas exchange and stomatal apertures in the truncated transgenic lines in response to CO2 and ABA revealed that sites involved in the stomatal CO2 response exist in the transmembrane region and do not require the SLAC1 N and C termini. CO2 and ABA regulation of S-type anion channel activity in guard cells of the transgenic lines confirmed these results. In vivo site-directed mutagenesis experiments targeted to amino acids within the transmembrane region of SLAC1 raise the possibility that two tyrosine residues exposed on the membrane are involved in the stomatal CO2 response.

  17. Simulations of Membrane-Disrupting Peptides I: Alamethicin Pore Stability and Spontaneous Insertion.

    PubMed

    Perrin, B Scott; Pastor, Richard W

    2016-09-20

    An all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of the archetype barrel-stave alamethicin (alm) pore in a 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer at 313 K indicates that ∼7 μs is required for equilibration of a preformed 6-peptide pore; the pore remains stable for the duration of the remaining 7 μs of the trajectory, and the structure factors agree well with experiment. A 5 μs simulation of 10 surface-bound alm peptides shows significant peptide unfolding and some unbinding, but no insertion. Simulations at 363 and 413 K with a -0.2 V electric field yield peptide insertion in 1 μs. Insertion is initiated by the folding of residues 3-11 into an α-helix, and mediated by membrane water or by previously inserted peptides. The stability of five alm pore peptides at 413 K with a -0.2 V electric field demonstrates a significant preference for a transmembrane orientation. Hence, and in contrast to the cationic antimicrobial peptide described in the following article, alm shows a strong preference for the inserted over the surface-bound state. PMID:27653483

  18. Single-channel SCAM identifies pore-lining residues in the first extracellular loop and first transmembrane domains of Cx46 hemichannels.

    PubMed

    Kronengold, J; Trexler, E B; Bukauskas, F F; Bargiello, T A; Verselis, V K

    2003-10-01

    Gap junction (GJ) channels provide an important pathway for direct intercellular transmission of signaling molecules. Previously we showed that fixed negative charges in the first extracellular loop domain (E1) strongly influence charge selectivity, conductance, and rectification of channels and hemichannels formed of Cx46. Here, using excised patches containing Cx46 hemichannels, we applied the substituted cysteine accessibility method (SCAM) at the single channel level to residues in E1 to determine if they are pore-lining. We demonstrate residues D51, G46, and E43 at the amino end of E1 are accessible to modification in open hemichannels to positively and negatively charged methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents added to cytoplasmic or extracellular sides. Positional effects of modification along the length of the pore and opposing effects of oppositely charged modifying reagents on hemichannel conductance and rectification are consistent with placement in the channel pore and indicate a dominant electrostatic influence of the side chains of accessible residues on ion fluxes. Hemichannels modified by MTS-EA+, MTS-ET+, or MTS-ES- were refractory to further modification and effects of substitutions with positively charged residues that electrostatically mimicked those caused by modification with the positively charged MTS reagents were similar, indicating all six subunits were likely modified. The large reductions in conductance caused by MTS-ET+ were visible as stepwise reductions in single-channel current, indicative of reactions occurring at individual subunits. Extension of single-channel SCAM using MTS-ET+ into the first transmembrane domain, TM1, revealed continued accessibility at the extracellular end at A39 and L35. The topologically complementary region in TM3 showed no evidence of reactivity. Structural models show GJ channels in the extracellular gap to have continuous inner and outer walls of protein. If representative of open channels and hemichannels

  19. Intracellular segment between transmembrane helices S0 and S1 of BK channel α subunit contains two amphipathic helices connected by a flexible loop

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Pan; Li, Dong; Lai, Chaohua; Zhang, Longhua; Tian, Changlin

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •The loop between S0 and S1 of BK channel was overexpressed and purified in DPC. •NMR studies indicated BK-IS1 contained two helices connected by a flexible loop. •Mg{sup 2+} titration of BK-IS1 indicated two possible binding sites of divalent ions. -- Abstract: The BK channel, a tetrameric potassium channel with very high conductance, has a central role in numerous physiological functions. The BK channel can be activated by intracellular Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+}, as well as by membrane depolarization. Unlike other tetrameric potassium channels, the BK channel has seven transmembrane helices (S0–S6) including an extra helix S0. The intracellular segment between S0 and S1 (BK-IS1) is essential to BK channel functions and Asp99 in BK-IS1 is reported to be responsible for Mg{sup 2+} coordination. In this study, BK-IS1 (44–113) was over-expressed using a bacterial system and purified in the presence of detergent micelles for multidimensional heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structural studies. Backbone resonance assignment and secondary structure analysis showed that BK-IS1 contains two amphipathic helices connected by a 36-residue loop. Amide {sup 1}H–{sup 15}N heteronuclear NOE analysis indicated that the loop is very flexible, while the two amphipathic helices are possibly stabilized through interaction with the membrane. A solution NMR-based titration assay of BK-IS1 was performed with various concentrations of Mg{sup 2+}. Two residues (Thr45 and Leu46) with chemical shift changes were observed but no, or very minor, chemical shift difference was observed for Asp99, indicating a possible site for binding divalent ions or other modulation partners.

  20. Alamethicin-induced current-voltage curve asymmetry in lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Vodyanoy, I; Hall, J E; Balasubramanian, T M

    1983-01-01

    We have examined the causes of the asymmetry of the current-voltage curve induced by addition of alamethicin to one side of a black lipid membrane. We find that the alamethicin-induced current-voltage (I-V) curve has an inherent asymmetry. If it were possible to confine all alamethicin molecules to one side of the membrane, the I-V curve would exhibit a positive branch (voltage being measured with respect to the side of the membrane trans to the alamethicin addition) of steeper logarithmic slope than the negative branch and at a lower absolute value of potential. This condition is not usually realized, however, because alamethicin can leak through the membrane, so that, except at very high alamethicin concentrations and in certain kinds of membranes, the positive branch of the current-voltage curve has the same logarithmic slope as the negative branch and appears to arise from alamethicin which diffuses from the cis to the trans side of the membrane. We develop simple quantitative models for these two cases. PMID:6838983

  1. Hydrophobic interaction between contiguous residues in the S6 transmembrane segment acts as a stimuli integration node in the BK channel.

    PubMed

    Carrasquel-Ursulaez, Willy; Contreras, Gustavo F; Sepúlveda, Romina V; Aguayo, Daniel; González-Nilo, Fernando; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Large-conductance Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated K(+) channel (BK) open probability is enhanced by depolarization, increasing Ca(2+) concentration, or both. These stimuli activate modular voltage and Ca(2+) sensors that are allosterically coupled to channel gating. Here, we report a point mutation of a phenylalanine (F380A) in the S6 transmembrane helix that, in the absence of internal Ca(2+), profoundly hinders channel opening while showing only minor effects on the voltage sensor active-resting equilibrium. Interpretation of these results using an allosteric model suggests that the F380A mutation greatly increases the free energy difference between open and closed states and uncouples Ca(2+) binding from voltage sensor activation and voltage sensor activation from channel opening. However, the presence of a bulky and more hydrophobic amino acid in the F380 position (F380W) increases the intrinsic open-closed equilibrium, weakening the coupling between both sensors with the pore domain. Based on these functional experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, we propose that F380 interacts with another S6 hydrophobic residue (L377) in contiguous subunits. This pair forms a hydrophobic ring important in determining the open-closed equilibrium and, like an integration node, participates in the communication between sensors and between the sensors and pore. Moreover, because of its effects on open probabilities, the F380A mutant can be used for detailed voltage sensor experiments in the presence of permeant cations. PMID:25548136

  2. Hydrophobic interaction between contiguous residues in the S6 transmembrane segment acts as a stimuli integration node in the BK channel

    PubMed Central

    Carrasquel-Ursulaez, Willy; Contreras, Gustavo F.; Sepúlveda, Romina V.; Aguayo, Daniel; González-Nilo, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Large-conductance Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ channel (BK) open probability is enhanced by depolarization, increasing Ca2+ concentration, or both. These stimuli activate modular voltage and Ca2+ sensors that are allosterically coupled to channel gating. Here, we report a point mutation of a phenylalanine (F380A) in the S6 transmembrane helix that, in the absence of internal Ca2+, profoundly hinders channel opening while showing only minor effects on the voltage sensor active–resting equilibrium. Interpretation of these results using an allosteric model suggests that the F380A mutation greatly increases the free energy difference between open and closed states and uncouples Ca2+ binding from voltage sensor activation and voltage sensor activation from channel opening. However, the presence of a bulky and more hydrophobic amino acid in the F380 position (F380W) increases the intrinsic open–closed equilibrium, weakening the coupling between both sensors with the pore domain. Based on these functional experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, we propose that F380 interacts with another S6 hydrophobic residue (L377) in contiguous subunits. This pair forms a hydrophobic ring important in determining the open–closed equilibrium and, like an integration node, participates in the communication between sensors and between the sensors and pore. Moreover, because of its effects on open probabilities, the F380A mutant can be used for detailed voltage sensor experiments in the presence of permeant cations. PMID:25548136

  3. Hydrophobic interaction between contiguous residues in the S6 transmembrane segment acts as a stimuli integration node in the BK channel.

    PubMed

    Carrasquel-Ursulaez, Willy; Contreras, Gustavo F; Sepúlveda, Romina V; Aguayo, Daniel; González-Nilo, Fernando; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Large-conductance Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated K(+) channel (BK) open probability is enhanced by depolarization, increasing Ca(2+) concentration, or both. These stimuli activate modular voltage and Ca(2+) sensors that are allosterically coupled to channel gating. Here, we report a point mutation of a phenylalanine (F380A) in the S6 transmembrane helix that, in the absence of internal Ca(2+), profoundly hinders channel opening while showing only minor effects on the voltage sensor active-resting equilibrium. Interpretation of these results using an allosteric model suggests that the F380A mutation greatly increases the free energy difference between open and closed states and uncouples Ca(2+) binding from voltage sensor activation and voltage sensor activation from channel opening. However, the presence of a bulky and more hydrophobic amino acid in the F380 position (F380W) increases the intrinsic open-closed equilibrium, weakening the coupling between both sensors with the pore domain. Based on these functional experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, we propose that F380 interacts with another S6 hydrophobic residue (L377) in contiguous subunits. This pair forms a hydrophobic ring important in determining the open-closed equilibrium and, like an integration node, participates in the communication between sensors and between the sensors and pore. Moreover, because of its effects on open probabilities, the F380A mutant can be used for detailed voltage sensor experiments in the presence of permeant cations.

  4. Backbone Dynamics of Alamethicin Bound to Lipid Membranes: Spin-Echo Electron Paramagnetic Resonance of TOAC-Spin Labels

    PubMed Central

    Bartucci, Rosa; Guzzi, Rita; De Zotti, Marta; Toniolo, Claudio; Sportelli, Luigi; Marsh, Derek

    2008-01-01

    Alamethicin F50/5 is a hydrophobic peptide that is devoid of charged residues and that induces voltage-dependent ion channels in lipid membranes. The peptide backbone is likely to be involved in the ion conduction pathway. Electron spin-echo spectroscopy of alamethicin F50/5 analogs in which a selected Aib residue (at position n = 1, 8, or 16) is replaced by the TOAC amino-acid spin label was used to study torsional dynamics of the peptide backbone in association with phosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes. Rapid librational motions of limited angular amplitude were observed at each of the three TOAC sites by recording echo-detected spectra as a function of echo delay time, 2τ. Simulation of the time-resolved spectra, combined with conventional EPR measurements of the librational amplitude, shows that torsional fluctuations of the peptide backbone take place on the subnanosecond to nanosecond timescale, with little temperature dependence. Associated fluctuations in polar fields from the peptide could facilitate ion permeation. PMID:18096632

  5. Identification of a cluster of residues in transmembrane segment 6 of domain III of the cockroach sodium channel essential for the action of pyrethroid insecticides.

    PubMed

    Du, Yuzhe; Lee, Jung-Eun; Nomura, Yoshiko; Zhang, Tianxiang; Zhorov, Boris S; Dong, Ke

    2009-04-15

    A phenylalanine residue (Phe1519) in the sixth transmembrane segment of domain III (IIIS6) of the cockroach BgNa(v) sodium channel is required for the binding and action of pyrethroids. However, whether or not other residues in IIIS6 participate in the action of pyrethroids remains to be determined. In the present study, we conducted a systematic analysis of 20 residues in IIIS6 of the BgNa(v) channel using alanine-scanning mutagenesis. Our results show that alanine substitutions of four residues, Ile1514, Gly1516, Phe1518 and Asn1522, altered sodium channel sensitivity to pyrethroid insecticides. Whereas the G1516A, F1518A and N1522A substitutions diminished sodium channel sensitivity to all seven pyrethroids examined, including four type I (lacking the alpha-cyano group at the phenoxybenzyl alcohol) and three type II (containing the alpha-cyano group) pyrethroids, the I1514A substitution enhanced sodium channel sensitivity to four type I and type II pyrethroids that contain the phenoxybenzyl alcohol only. We also show that alanine/lysine substitutions of Leu1521 and Ser1517 affected the action of BTX (batrachotoxin), but not pyrethroids. In the Kv1.2-based homology model of the open sodium channel, side chains of Ile1514, Phe1518 and Asn1522 are exposed towards helix IIS5 and linker IIS4-IIS5, which contain previously identified pyrethroid-interacting residues, whereas Ser1517 and Leu1521 face the inner pore where the BTX receptor is located. Thus the present study provides further evidence for structural models in which pyrethroids bind to the lipid-exposed interface formed by helices IIIS6, IIS5 and linker helix IIS4-IIS5, whereas BTX binds to the pore-exposed side of the IIIS6 helix.

  6. The M4 Transmembrane α-Helix Contributes Differently to Both the Maturation and Function of Two Prokaryotic Pentameric Ligand-gated Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Hénault, Camille M; Juranka, Peter F; Baenziger, John E

    2015-10-01

    The role of the outermost transmembrane α-helix in both the maturation and function of the prokaryotic pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, GLIC and ELIC, was examined by Ala scanning mutagenesis, deletion mutations, and mutant cycle analyses. Ala mutations at the M4-M1/M3 interface lead to loss-of-function phenotypes in GLIC, with the largest negative effects occurring near the M4 C terminus. In particular, two aromatic residues at the M4 C terminus form a network of π-π and/or cation-π interactions with residues on M3 and the β6-β7 loop that is essential for both maturation and function. M4-M1/M3 interactions appear to be optimized in GLIC with even subtle structural changes at this interface leading to detrimental effects. In contrast, mutations along the M4-M1/M3 interface of ELIC typically lead to gain-of-function phenotypes, suggesting that these interactions in ELIC are not optimized for channel function. In addition, no cluster of interacting residues involving the M4 C terminus, M3, and the β6-β7 loop was found, suggesting that the M4 C terminus plays little role in ELIC maturation or function. This study shows that M4 makes distinct contributions to the maturation and gating of these two closely related homologs, suggesting that GLIC and ELIC exhibit divergent features of channel function.

  7. An electrostatic interaction at the tetrahelix bundle promotes phosphorylation-dependent cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel opening.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Roessler, Bryan C; Kirk, Kevin L

    2014-10-31

    The CFTR channel is an essential mediator of electrolyte transport across epithelial tissues. CFTR opening is promoted by ATP binding and dimerization of its two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs). Phosphorylation of its R domain (e.g. by PKA) is also required for channel activity. The CFTR structure is unsolved but homology models of the CFTR closed and open states have been produced based on the crystal structures of evolutionarily related ABC transporters. These models predict the formation of a tetrahelix bundle of intracellular loops (ICLs) during channel opening. Here we provide evidence that residues E267 in ICL2 and K1060 in ICL4 electrostatically interact at the interface of this predicted bundle to promote CFTR opening. Mutations or a thiol modifier that introduced like charges at these two positions substantially inhibited ATP-dependent channel opening. ATP-dependent activity was rescued by introducing a second site gain of function (GOF) mutation that was previously shown to promote ATP-dependent and ATP-independent opening (K978C). Conversely, the ATP-independent activity of the K978C GOF mutant was inhibited by charge- reversal mutations at positions 267 or 1060 either in the presence or absence of NBD2. The latter result indicates that this electrostatic interaction also promotes unliganded channel opening in the absence of ATP binding and NBD dimerization. Charge-reversal mutations at either position markedly reduced the PKA sensitivity of channel activation implying strong allosteric coupling between bundle formation and R domain phosphorylation. These findings support important roles of the tetrahelix bundle and the E267-K1060 electrostatic interaction in phosphorylation-dependent CFTR gating.

  8. Modeling the self-assembly of lipids and nanotubes in solution: forming vesicles and bicelles with transmembrane nanotube channels.

    PubMed

    Dutt, Meenakshi; Kuksenok, Olga; Nayhouse, Michael J; Little, Steven R; Balazs, Anna C

    2011-06-28

    Via dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), we simulate the self-assembly of end-functionalized, amphiphilic nanotubes and lipids in a hydrophilic solvent. Each nanotube encompasses a hydrophobic stalk and two hydrophilic ends, which are functionalized with end-tethered chains. With a relatively low number of the nanotubes in solution, the components self-assemble into stable lipid-nanotube vesicles. As the number of nanotubes is increased, the system exhibits a vesicle-to-bicelle transition, resulting in stable hybrid bicelle. Moreover, our results reveal that the nanotubes cluster into distinct tripod-like structures within the vesicles and aggregate into a ring-like assembly within the bicelles. For both the vesicles and bicelles, the nanotubes assume trans-membrane orientations, with the tethered hairs extending into the surrounding solution or the encapsulated fluid. Thus, the hairs provide a means of regulating the transport of species through the self-assembled structures. Our findings provide guidelines for creating nanotube clusters with distinctive morphologies that might be difficult to achieve through more conventional means. The results also yield design rules for creating synthetic cell-like objects or microreactors that can exhibit biomimetic functionality.

  9. Disease-associated mutations in cytoplasmic loops 1 and 2 of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator impede processing or opening of the channel.

    PubMed

    Seibert, F S; Jia, Y; Mathews, C J; Hanrahan, J W; Riordan, J R; Loo, T W; Clarke, D M

    1997-09-30

    Since little is known about the contribution to function of the N-terminal cytoplasmic loops (CL1, residues 139-194; CL2, residues 242-307) of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), all nine point mutations identified in CLs 1 and 2 from patients with cystic fibrosis were reconstructed in the expression vector pcDNA3-CFTR and expressed transiently in COS-1 and HEK-293 cells and stably in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Four amino acid substitutions retarded production of mature, fully glycosylated CFTR, suggesting that misprocessing of the channel causes the disease symptoms in the affected patients. Protein maturation could not be promoted by cell culture conditions of reduced temperature (26 degrees C). When properly processed mutants were evaluated for functional defects by the iodide efflux method, the G178R- and E193K-CFTR-expressing cell lines showed impaired anion translocation activities. Patch-clamp studies of single channels revealed that E193K variants had a significantly decreased open probability, which resulted from an increase in the mean closed time of the channels. This contrasted with a previous study of disease-associated point mutations in CL3 that mainly affected the mean open time. None of the maturation-competent CL 1 and 2 mutants had altered conductance. Thus, the N-terminal CLs appear not to contribute to the anion translocation pathway of CFTR; rather, mutations in CL1 can impede transition to the open state. Interestingly, the ability of the non-hydrolyzable ATP analogue adenylyl imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP) to lock the channel into open bursts was abolished by the I148T and G178R amino acid substitutions.

  10. Cyanoquinolines with Independent Corrector and Potentiator Activities Restore ΔPhe508-Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Chloride Channel Function in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Phuan, Puay-Wah; Yang, Baoxue; Knapp, John M.; Wood, Alex B.; Lukacs, Gergely L.; Kurth, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    The ΔPhe508 mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein impairs its folding, stability, and chloride channel gating. Although small molecules that separately correct defective ΔPhe508-CFTR folding/cellular processing (“correctors”) or chloride channel gating (“potentiators”) have been discovered and are in clinical trials, single compounds with bona fide dual corrector and potentiator activities have not been identified. Here, screening of ∼110,000 small molecules not tested previously revealed a cyanoquinoline class of compounds with independent corrector and potentiator activities (termed CoPo). Analysis of 180 CoPo analogs revealed 6 compounds with dual corrector and potentiator activities and 13 compounds with only potentiator activity. N-(2-((3-Cyano-5,7-dimethylquinolin-2-yl)amino)ethyl)-3-methoxybenzamide (CoPo-22), which was synthesized in six steps in 52% overall yield, had low micromolar EC50 for ΔPhe508-CFTR corrector and potentiator activities by short-circuit current assay. Maximal corrector and potentiator activities were comparable with those conferred by the bithiazole Corr-4a and the flavone genistein, respectively. CoPo-22 also activated wild-type and G551D CFTR chloride conductance within minutes in a forskolin-dependent manner. Compounds with dual corrector and potentiator activities may be useful for single-drug treatment of cystic fibrosis caused by ΔPhe508 mutation. PMID:21730204

  11. Allosteric coupling between proximal C-terminus and selectivity filter is facilitated by the movement of transmembrane segment 4 in TREK-2 channel

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Ren-Gong; Peng, Peng; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Yan, Hai-Tao; Xu, Jiang-Ping; Zheng, Jian-Quan; Wei, Xiao-Li; Ma, Xiao-Yun

    2016-01-01

    TREK-2, a member of two-pore-domain potassium channel family, regulates cellular excitability in response to diverse stimuli. However, how such stimuli control channel function remains unclear. Here, by characterizing the responses of cytosolic proximal C-terminus deletant (ΔpCt) and transmembrane segment 4 (M4)-glycine hinge mutant (G312A) to 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), an activator of TREK-2, we show that the transduction initiated from pCt domain is allosterically coupled with the conformation of selectivity filter (SF) via the movements of M4, without depending on the original status of SF. Moreover, ΔpCt and G312A also exhibited blunted responses to extracellular alkalization, a model to induce SF conformational transition. These results suggest that the coupling between pCt domain and SF is bidirectional, and M4 movements are involved in both processes. Further mechanistic exploration reveals that the function of Phe316, a residue close to the C-terminus of M4, is associated with such communications. However, unlike TREK-2, M4-hinge of TREK-1 only controls the transmission from pCt to SF, rather than SF conformational changes triggered by pHo changes. Together, our findings uncover the unique gating properties of TREK-2, and elucidate the mechanisms for how the extracellular and intracellular stimuli harness the pore gating allosterically. PMID:26879043

  12. Solid-State NMR Investigation of the Conformation, Proton Conduction, and Hydration of the Influenza B Virus M2 Transmembrane Proton Channel.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jonathan K; Tietze, Daniel; Lee, Myungwoon; Wang, Jun; Hong, Mei

    2016-07-01

    Together with the influenza A virus, influenza B virus causes seasonal flu epidemics. The M2 protein of influenza B (BM2) forms a tetrameric proton-conducting channel that is important for the virus lifecycle. BM2 shares little sequence homology with AM2, except for a conserved HxxxW motif in the transmembrane (TM) domain. Unlike AM2, no antiviral drugs have been developed to block the BM2 channel. To elucidate the proton-conduction mechanism of BM2 and to facilitate the development of BM2 inhibitors, we have employed solid-state NMR spectroscopy to investigate the conformation, dynamics, and hydration of the BM2 TM domain in lipid bilayers. BM2 adopts an α-helical conformation in lipid membranes. At physiological temperature and low pH, the proton-selective residue, His19, shows relatively narrow (15)N chemical exchange peaks for the imidazole nitrogens, indicating fast proton shuttling that interconverts cationic and neutral histidines. Importantly, pH-dependent (15)N chemical shifts indicate that His19 retains the neutral population to much lower pH than His37 in AM2, indicating larger acid-dissociation constants or lower pKa's. We attribute these dynamical and equilibrium differences to the presence of a second titratable histidine, His27, which may increase the proton-dissociation rate of His19. Two-dimensional (1)H-(13)C correlation spectra probing water (1)H polarization transfer to the peptide indicates that the BM2 channel becomes much more hydrated at low pH than at high pH, particularly at Ser12, indicating that the pore-facing serine residues in BM2 mediate proton relay to the proton-selective histidine. PMID:27286559

  13. Discovery of alpha-aminoazaheterocycle-methylglyoxal adducts as a new class of high-affinity inhibitors of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Routaboul, Christel; Norez, Caroline; Melin, Patricia; Molina, Marie-Carmen; Boucherle, Benjamin; Bossard, Florian; Noel, Sabrina; Robert, Renaud; Gauthier, Chantal; Becq, Frédéric; Décout, Jean-Luc

    2007-09-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) represents the main Cl(-) channel in the apical membrane of epithelial cells for cAMP-dependent Cl(-) secretion. Here we report on the synthesis and screening of a small library of nontoxic alpha-aminoazaheterocycle-methylglyoxal adducts, inhibitors of wild-type (WT) CFTR and G551D-, G1349D-, and F508del-CFTR Cl(-) channels. In whole-cell patch-clamp experiments of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing WT-CFTR, we recorded rapid and reversible inhibition of forskolin-activated CFTR currents in the presence of the adducts 5a and 8a,b at 10 pM concentrations. Using iodide efflux experiments, we compared concentration-dependent inhibition of CFTR with glibenclamide (IC(50) = 14.7 microM), 3-[(3-trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-5-[(4-carboxyphenyl-)methylene]-2-thioxo-4-thiazolidinone (CFTR(inh)-172) (IC(50) = 1.2 microM), and alpha-aminoazaheterocycle-methylglyoxal adducts and identified compounds 5a (IC(50) = 71 pM), 8a,b (IC(50) = 2.5 nM), and 7a,b (IC(50) = 3.4 nM) as the most potent inhibitors of WT-CFTR channels. Similar ranges of inhibition were also found when these compounds were evaluated on CFTR channels with the cystic fibrosis mutations F508del (in temperature-corrected human airway epithelial F508del/F508del CF15 cells)-, G551D-, and G1349D-CFTR (expressed in CHO and COS-7 cells). No effect of compound 5a was detected on the volume-regulated or calcium-regulated iodide efflux. Picomolar inhibition of WT-CFTR with adduct 5a was also found using a 6-methoxy-N-(3-sulfopropyl)-quinolinium fluorescent probe applied to the human tracheobronchial epithelial cell line 16HBE14o-. Finally, we found comparable inhibition by 5a or by CFTR(inh)-172 of forskolin-dependent short-circuit currents in mouse colon. To the best of our knowledge, these new nontoxic alpha-aminoazaheterocycle-methylglyoxal adducts represent the most potent compounds reported to inhibit CFTR chloride channels.

  14. Functional extension of amino acid triads from the fourth transmembrane segment (S4) into its external linker in Shaker K(+) channels.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Chin; Lin, Shin; Chang, Po-Chun; Lin, Hsiao-Chun; Kuo, Chung-Chin

    2011-10-28

    The highly conserved fourth transmembrane segment (S4) is the primary voltage sensor of the voltage-dependent channel and would move outward upon membrane depolarization. S4 comprises repetitive amino acid triads, each containing one basic (presumably charged and voltage-sensing) followed by two hydrophobic residues. We showed that the triad organization is functionally extended into the S3-4 linker right external to S4 in Shaker K(+) channels. The arginine (and lysine) substitutes for the third and the sixth residues (Ala-359 and Met-356, respectively) external to the outmost basic residue (Arg-362) in S4 dramatically and additively stabilize S4 in the resting conformation. Also, Leu-361 and Leu-358 play a very similar role in stabilization of S4 in the resting position, presumably by their hydrophobic side chains. Moreover, the double mutation A359R/E283A leads to a partially extruded position of S4 and consequently prominent closed-state inactivation, suggesting that Glu-283 in S2 may coordinate with the arginines in the extruded S4 upon depolarization. We conclude that the triad organization extends into the S3-4 linker for about six amino acids in terms of their microenvironment. These approximately six residues should retain the same helical structure as S4, and their microenvironment serves as part of the "gating canal" accommodating the extruding S4. Upon depolarization, S4 most likely moves initially as a sliding helix and follows the path that is set by the approximately six residues in the S3-4 linker in the resting state, whereas further S4 translocation could be more like, for example, a paddle, without orderly coordination from the contiguous surroundings.

  15. Orientations and proximities of the extracellular ends of transmembrane helices S0 and S4 in open and closed BK potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaowei; Liu, Guoxia; Wu, Roland S; Chudasama, Neelesh; Zakharov, Sergey I; Karlin, Arthur; Marx, Steven O

    2013-01-01

    The large-conductance potassium channel (BK) α subunit contains a transmembrane (TM) helix S0 preceding the canonical TM helices S1 through S6. S0 lies between S4 and the TM2 helix of the regulatory β1 subunit. Pairs of Cys were substituted in the first helical turns in the membrane of BK α S0 and S4 and in β1 TM2. One such pair, W22C in S0 and W203C in S4, was 95% crosslinked endogenously. Under voltage-clamp conditions in outside-out patches, this crosslink was reduced by DTT and reoxidized by a membrane-impermeant bis-quaternary ammonium derivative of diamide. The rate constants for this reoxidation were not significantly different in the open and closed states of the channel. Thus, these two residues are approximately equally close in the two states. In addition, 90% crosslinking of a second pair, R20C in S0 and W203C in S4, had no effect on the V50 for opening. Taken together, these findings indicate that separation between residues at the extracellular ends of S0 and S4 is not required for voltage-sensor activation. On the contrary, even though W22C and W203C were equally likely to form a disulfide in the activated and deactivated states, relative immobilization by crosslinking of these two residues favored the activated state. Furthermore, the efficiency of recrosslinking of W22C and W203C on the cell surface was greater in the presence of the β1 subunit than in its absence, consistent with β1 acting through S0 to stabilize its immobilization relative to α S4.

  16. Mutating the Conserved Q-loop Glutamine 1291 Selectively Disrupts Adenylate Kinase-dependent Channel Gating of the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) and Reduces Channel Function in Primary Human Airway Epithelia.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qian; Ernst, Sarah E; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Shah, Viral S; Ver Heul, Amanda R; Welsh, Michael J; Randak, Christoph O

    2015-05-29

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and two other non-membrane-bound ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, exhibit adenylate kinase activity in the presence of physiologic concentrations of ATP and AMP or ADP (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). The crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of an SMC protein in complex with the adenylate kinase bisubstrate inhibitor P(1),P(5)-di(adenosine-5') pentaphosphate (Ap5A) suggests that AMP binds to the conserved Q-loop glutamine during the adenylate kinase reaction. Therefore, we hypothesized that mutating the corresponding residue in CFTR, Gln-1291, selectively disrupts adenylate kinase-dependent channel gating at physiologic nucleotide concentrations. We found that substituting Gln-1291 with bulky side-chain amino acids abolished the effects of Ap5A, AMP, and adenosine 5'-monophosphoramidate on CFTR channel function. 8-Azidoadenosine 5'-monophosphate photolabeling of the AMP-binding site and adenylate kinase activity were disrupted in Q1291F CFTR. The Gln-1291 mutations did not alter the potency of ATP at stimulating current or ATP-dependent gating when ATP was the only nucleotide present. However, when physiologic concentrations of ADP and AMP were added, adenylate kinase-deficient Q1291F channels opened significantly less than wild type. Consistent with this result, we found that Q1291F CFTR displayed significantly reduced Cl(-) channel function in well differentiated primary human airway epithelia. These results indicate that a highly conserved residue of an ABC transporter plays an important role in adenylate kinase-dependent CFTR gating. Furthermore, the results suggest that adenylate kinase activity is important for normal CFTR channel function in airway epithelia.

  17. Mutating the Conserved Q-loop Glutamine 1291 Selectively Disrupts Adenylate Kinase-dependent Channel Gating of the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) and Reduces Channel Function in Primary Human Airway Epithelia*

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Qian; Ernst, Sarah E.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Shah, Viral S.; Ver Heul, Amanda R.; Welsh, Michael J.; Randak, Christoph O.

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and two other non-membrane-bound ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, exhibit adenylate kinase activity in the presence of physiologic concentrations of ATP and AMP or ADP (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). The crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of an SMC protein in complex with the adenylate kinase bisubstrate inhibitor P1,P5-di(adenosine-5′) pentaphosphate (Ap5A) suggests that AMP binds to the conserved Q-loop glutamine during the adenylate kinase reaction. Therefore, we hypothesized that mutating the corresponding residue in CFTR, Gln-1291, selectively disrupts adenylate kinase-dependent channel gating at physiologic nucleotide concentrations. We found that substituting Gln-1291 with bulky side-chain amino acids abolished the effects of Ap5A, AMP, and adenosine 5′-monophosphoramidate on CFTR channel function. 8-Azidoadenosine 5′-monophosphate photolabeling of the AMP-binding site and adenylate kinase activity were disrupted in Q1291F CFTR. The Gln-1291 mutations did not alter the potency of ATP at stimulating current or ATP-dependent gating when ATP was the only nucleotide present. However, when physiologic concentrations of ADP and AMP were added, adenylate kinase-deficient Q1291F channels opened significantly less than wild type. Consistent with this result, we found that Q1291F CFTR displayed significantly reduced Cl− channel function in well differentiated primary human airway epithelia. These results indicate that a highly conserved residue of an ABC transporter plays an important role in adenylate kinase-dependent CFTR gating. Furthermore, the results suggest that adenylate kinase activity is important for normal CFTR channel function in airway epithelia. PMID:25887396

  18. The cellular localization of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, potassium channel, epithelial sodium channel γ and vacuolar-type H+-ATPase in human eccrine sweat glands.

    PubMed

    Li, Haihong; Zhang, Xiang; Zeng, Shaopeng; Chen, Lu; Li, Xuexue; Lin, Changmin; Zhang, Mingjun; Shu, Shenyou; Xie, Sitian; He, Yunpu; Yang, Lvjun; Tang, Shijie; Fu, Xiaobing

    2014-10-01

    The secretory portions of human eccrine sweat glands secrete isotonic fluid into the lumen and then the primary fluid is rendered hypotonic during its passage to the skin surface. During the processes of sweat secretion and absorption, many enzymes and proteins play important roles. In the study, the cellular localizations of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), potassium channel (KC), epithelial sodium channel γ (γENaC) and vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) in human eccrine sweat glands and epidermis were detected using immunofluorescence labeling. The results revealed that in the secretory coils, the basolateral membranes showed evidence of CFTR, NHE1 and KC activities, the apical membranes showed the activities of KC and NHE1, and the nucleus showed γEaNC and V-ATPase activities; in the duct, the peripheral and luminal ductal cells showed evidence of CFTR, NHE1 and KC, the apical membranes showed the activities of CFTR and NHE1, and the nucleus showed γEaNC, V-ATPase and KC activities. The cellular localization of these proteins in eccrine sweat glands is helpful to better understand the mechanisms of sweat secretion and absorption. PMID:25081942

  19. The cytosolic termini of the beta- and gamma-ENaC subunits are involved in the functional interactions between cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and epithelial sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Ji, H L; Chalfant, M L; Jovov, B; Lockhart, J P; Parker, S B; Fuller, C M; Stanton, B A; Benos, D J

    2000-09-01

    Epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) are co-localized in the apical membrane of many epithelia. These channels are essential for electrolyte and water secretion and/or reabsorption. In cystic fibrosis airway epithelia, a hyperactivated epithelial Na(+) conductance operates in parallel with defective Cl(-) secretion. Several groups have shown that CFTR down-regulates ENaC activity, but the mechanisms and the regulation of CFTR by ENaC are unknown. To test the hypothesis that ENaC and CFTR regulate each other, and to identify the region(s) of ENaC involved in the interaction between CFTR and ENaC, rENaC and its mutants were co-expressed with CFTR in Xenopus oocytes. Whole cell macroscopic sodium currents revealed that wild type (wt) alphabetagamma-rENaC-induced Na(+) current was inhibited by co-expression of CFTR, and further inhibited when CFTR was activated with a cAMP-raising mixture (CKT). Conversely, alphabetagamma-rENaC stimulated CFTR-mediated Cl(-) currents up to approximately 6-fold. Deletion mutations in the intracellular tails of the three rENaC subunits suggested that the carboxyl terminus of the beta subunit was required both for the down-regulation of ENaC by activated CFTR and the up-regulation of CFTR by ENaC. However, both the carboxyl terminus of the beta subunit and the amino terminus of the gamma subunit were essential for the down-regulation of rENaC by unstimulated CFTR. Interestingly, down-regulation of rENaC by activated CFTR was Cl(-)-dependent, while stimulation of CFTR by rENaC was not dependent on either cytoplasmic Na(+) or a depolarized membrane potential. In summary, there appear to be at least two different sites in ENaC involved in the intermolecular interaction between CFTR and ENaC. PMID:10821834

  20. Low temperature and chemical rescue affect molecular proximity of DeltaF508-cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC).

    PubMed

    Qadri, Yawar J; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle; Rooj, Arun K; Lee, William; Parpura, Vladimir; Fuller, Cathy M; Berdiev, Bakhrom K

    2012-05-11

    An imbalance of chloride and sodium ion transport in several epithelia is a feature of cystic fibrosis (CF), an inherited disease that is a consequence of mutations in the cftr gene. The cftr gene codes for a Cl(-) channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Some mutations in this gene cause the balance between Cl(-) secretion and Na(+) absorption to be disturbed in the airways; Cl(-) secretion is impaired, whereas Na(+) absorption is elevated. Enhanced Na(+) absorption through the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is attributed to the failure of mutated CFTR to restrict ENaC-mediated Na(+) transport. The mechanism of this regulation is controversial. Recently, we have found evidence for a close association of wild type (WT) CFTR and WT ENaC, further underscoring the role of ENaC along with CFTR in the pathophysiology of CF airway disease. In this study, we have examined the association of ENaC subunits with mutated ΔF508-CFTR, the most common mutation in CF. Deletion of phenylalanine at position 508 (ΔF508) prevents proper processing and targeting of CFTR to the plasma membrane. When ΔF508-CFTR and ENaC subunits were co-expressed in HEK293T cells, we found that individual ENaC subunits could be co-immunoprecipitated with ΔF508-CFTR, much like WT CFTR. However, when we evaluated the ΔF508-CFTR and ENaC association using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), FRET efficiencies were not significantly different from negative controls, suggesting that ΔF508-CFTR and ENaC are not in close proximity to each other under basal conditions. However, with partial correction of ΔF508-CFTR misprocessing by low temperature and chemical rescue, leading to surface expression as assessed by total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, we observed a positive FRET signal. Our findings suggest that the ΔF508 mutation alters the close association of CFTR and ENaC.

  1. Sensitivity of a renal K+ channel (ROMK2) to the inhibitory sulfonylurea compound glibenclamide is enhanced by coexpression with the ATP-binding cassette transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator.

    PubMed Central

    McNicholas, C M; Guggino, W B; Schwiebert, E M; Hebert, S C; Giebisch, G; Egan, M E

    1996-01-01

    We demonstrate here that coexpression of ROMK2, an inwardly rectifying ATP-sensitive renal K+ channel (IKATP) with cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) significantly enhances the sensitivity of ROMK2 to the sulfonylurea compound glibenclamide. When expressed alone, ROMK2 is relatively insensitive to glibenclamide. The interaction between ROMK2, CFTR, and glibenclamide is modulated by altering the phosphorylation state of either ROMK2, CFTR, or an associated protein, as exogenous MgATP and the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A significantly attenuate the inhibitory effect of glibenclamide on ROMK2. Thus CFTR, which has been demonstrated to interact with both Na+ and Cl- channels in airway epithelium, modulates the function of renal ROMK2 K+ channels. PMID:8755607

  2. Structural and membrane modifying properties of suzukacillin, a peptide antibiotic related to alamethicin. Part A. Sequence and conformation.

    PubMed

    Jung, G; König, W A; Leibfritz, D; Ooka, T; Janko, K; Boheim, G

    1976-04-16

    The primary structure and conformation of the polypeptide antibiotic suzukacillin A are investigated. Suzukacillin A is isolated from the Trichoderma viride strain 1037 and exhibits membrane modifying and lysing properties similar to those of alamethicin. A combined gas chromatographic mass spectrometric analysis of the trifluoroacetylated peptide methyl esters of partial hydrolysates revealed a tentative sequence of 23 residues including 10 2-methylalanines and one phenylalaninol, which shows many fragments known from alamethicin: Ac-Aib-Pro-Val-Aib-Val-Ala-Aib-Ala-Aib-Aib-Gln-Aib-Leu-Aib-Gly-Leu-Aib-Pro-Val-Aib-Aib-Glu(Pheol)-Gln-OH. All chiral amino acids and phenylalainol have L-configuration. Ultraviolet and infrared spectroscopy, circular dichroism in various solvents and in particular 13C nuclear magnetic resonance have been used for a comparative study of suzukacillin with alamethicin. Suzukacillin has a partially alpha-helical structure and the helix content increases largely from polar to lipophilic solvents. Suzukacillin aggregates more strongly than alamethicin in aqueous medis due to a longer alpha-helical part and higher number of aliphatic residues. A part of the alpha-helix is exceptionally stabilized due to 2-methylalanine residues shielding the peptide bonds from interactions with polar solvents. In lipophilic solvents and lecithin vesicles particularly large temperature induced reductions of the high alpha-helix content are found for alamethicin. Suzukacillin shows similar temperature coefficients in lipophilic media, however, in contrast to alamethicin a more linear change in intensity of the Cotton effects is observed. PMID:1260057

  3. Synthetic peptides corresponding to human follicle-stimulating hormone (hFSH)-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) induce uptake of 45Ca++ by liposomes: evidence for calcium-conducting transmembrane channel formation

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, P.; Santa-Coloma, T.A.; Reichert, L.E. Jr. )

    1991-06-01

    We have previously described FSH receptor-mediated influx of 45Ca++ in cultured Sertoli cells from immature rats and receptor-enriched proteoliposomes via activation of voltage-sensitive and voltage-independent calcium channels. We have further shown that this effect of FSH does not require cholera toxin- or pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding protein or activation of adenylate cyclase. In the present study, we have identified regions of human FSH-beta-subunit which appear to be involved in mediating calcium influx. We screened 11 overlapping peptide amides representing the entire primary structure of hFSH-beta-subunit for their effects on 45Ca++ flux in FSH receptor-enriched proteoliposomes. hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) induced uptake of 45Ca++ in a concentration-related manner. This effect of hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) was also observed in liposomes lacking incorporated FSH receptor. Reducing membrane fluidity by incubating liposomes (containing no receptor) with hFSH-beta-(1-15) or hFSH-beta-(51-65) at temperatures lower than the transition temperatures of their constituent phospholipids resulted in no significant (P greater than 0.05) difference in 45Ca++ uptake. The effectiveness of the calcium ionophore A23187, however, was abolished. Ruthenium red, a voltage-independent calcium channel antagonist, was able to completely block uptake of 45Ca++ induced by hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) whereas nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker specific for L-type voltage-sensitive calcium channels, was without effect. These results suggest that in addition to its effect on voltage-sensitive calcium channel activity, interaction of FSH with its receptor may induce formation of transmembrane aqueous channels which also facilitate influx of extracellular calcium.

  4. Molecular Motions in Ion Channels: a Possible Link to Noise in Single Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tieleman, D. Peter

    2003-05-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of proteins and lipid bilayers give detailed information on molecular motions on a timescale of up to a microsecond. Collective motions of proteins are thought to play a functionally important role in many water-soluble proteins and simulations of potassium channel structures show that ion transport might be linked to structural fluctuations in key areas of the protein. I describe simulations of two model channels —a channel consisting of parallel alpha-helices formed by the antimicrobial peptide alamethicin, and the bacterial porin OmpF, a large beta-barrel protein that forms three water-filled pores that allow transport of small molecules. Structural fluctuations in alamethicin during ion transport are hypothesized to be a possible source of high-frequency noise observed in single-channel conductance measurements. In a model of the alamethicin channel on a 100 ns time scale almost all the structural fluctuations are in individual helices with no evidence for collective motions of the channel as a whole. In porins, single channel measurements can obtain information on the interaction between permeating molecules and the protein. I present recent simulations that study the interactions between glucose and alanine with OmpF.

  5. Structure of Magainin and Alamethicin in Model Membranes Studied by X-Ray Reflectivity

    PubMed Central

    Li, C.; Salditt, T.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the structure of lipid bilayers containing varied molar ratios of different lipids and the antimicrobial peptides magainin and alamethicin. For this structural study, we have used x-ray reflectivity on highly aligned solid-supported multilamellar lipid membranes. The reflectivity curves have been analyzed by semi-kinematical reflectivity theory modeling the bilayer density profile ρ(z). Model simulations of the reflectivity curves cover a large range of vertical momentum transfer qz, and yield excellent agreement between data and theory. The structural changes observed as a function of the molar peptide/lipid concentration P/L are discussed in a comparative way. PMID:16920839

  6. Determining Favorable Binding Configurations of the Anti-Cancer Drug Ellipticine to the KV11.1 Potassium Channel V-VI Transmembrane Domain Through Autodock Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipscomb, Dawn; Gentile, Saverio; Brancaleon, Lorenzo

    2011-10-01

    Ellipticines such as 9-methoxy-N-2-methylellipticinium acetate (MMEA) and 9-hydroxy-N-2-methylellipticinium acetate (NMEA, Celiptium ) are antineoplastic drugs that exert their selective cytotoxicity against leukemia and endometrial carcinoma. Ellipticine's action is also related to severe physical side effects, but the link between undesired effects and pharmacological application is not well understood. We investigated the binding of Ellipticine derivatives with the Kv11.1 potassium ion channel using Autodock and revealed that hydroxyellipticinium derivatives provide binding configurations with Kv11.1, but the energy, location and estimated dissociation constant varied. The binding energy is as follows: Chloroceliptium (-6.60 kcal/mol) > Celiptium (- 6.37 kcal/mol) > Methoxyceliptium (- 6.20 kcal/mol) > Datelliptium (-6.08 kcal/mol). Autodock simulations demonstrate that binding affinity is high at opposing ends of the channel and low within the channel interior. These favorable binding configurations suggest that Ellipticine derivatives may bridge among end subunits of the channel and potentially inhibit the flow of ions.

  7. The Influenza M2 Ectodomain Regulates the Conformational Equilibria of the Transmembrane Proton Channel: Insights from Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Byungsu; Hong, Mei

    2016-09-27

    The influenza M2 protein is the target of the amantadine family of antiviral drugs, and its transmembrane (TM) domain structure and dynamics have been extensively studied. However, little is known about the structure of the highly conserved N-terminal ectodomain, which contains epitopes targeted by influenza vaccines. In this study, we synthesized an M2 construct containing the N-terminal ectodomain and the TM domain, to understand the site-specific conformation and dynamics of the ectodomain and to investigate the effect of the ectodomain on the TM structure. We incorporated (13)C- and (15)N-labeled residues into both domains and measured their chemical shifts and line widths using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. The data indicate that the entire ectodomain is unstructured and dynamic, but the motion is slower for residues closer to the TM domain. (13)C line shapes indicate that this ecto-TM construct undergoes fast uniaxial rotational diffusion, like the isolated TM peptide, but drug binding increases the motional rates of the TM helix while slowing the local motion of the ectodomain residues that are close to the TM domain. Moreover, (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts indicate that the ectodomain shifts the conformational equilibria of the TM residues toward the drug-bound state even in the absence of amantadine, thus providing a molecular structural basis for the lower inhibitory concentration of full-length M2 compared to that of the ectodomain-truncated M2. We propose that this conformational selection may result from electrostatic repulsion between negatively charged ectodomain residues in the tetrameric protein. Together with the recent study of the M2 cytoplasmic domain, these results show that intrinsically disordered extramembrane domains in membrane proteins can regulate the functionally relevant conformation and dynamics of the structurally ordered TM domains.

  8. Structural and dipolar properties of the voltage-dependent pore former alamethicin in octanol/dioxane.

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, G; Savko, P

    1982-01-01

    Dielectric constant and loss of the membrane-active peptide alamethicin in octanol/dioxane mixtures have been measured at frequencies between 5 kHz and 50 MHz. On the basis of a rotational mechanism of dipolar orientation, the observed dispersion provides information regarding size, shape, and dipole moment of the structural entities which the solute may assume in media of diverse lipophilicity. Particularly detailed results are obtained in a pure octanol solvent where an apparent molecular weight of alamethicin could be determined. It turns out that in this quite lipophilic medium most of the peptide material exists as a monomer particle that has approximate length and diameter of 35 and 13 A, respectively. It carries a dipole moment of approximately 75 Debye units (directed nearly parallel to the long axis). At our concentrations of a few milligrams per milliliters, appreciable formation of dimers by head-to-tail linkage is indicated. When the octanol content is reduced by adding greater amounts of dioxane, larger particles are encountered. This is accompanied by a decrease of the effective polarity. The inherent increase of hydrophilicity in the dioxane-enriched solvent apparently favors another monomer conformation that has a low dipole moment and easily aggregates to some kind of micelle. PMID:7115881

  9. From the sequence to the conformation of the unabridged transmembrane domains TM1 and TM2 of the cASIC1a ion channel - a parallel tempering approach.

    PubMed

    Pietra, Francesco

    2015-03-01

    This work was devised to unravel, along replica-exchange molecular-dynamics (REMD) simulations, the conformation in solution of the TM1 and TM2 transmembrane domains of the homotrimeric cASIC1a ion channel. This includes the head of TM1 and tail of TM2 that had previously defied X-ray diffraction analysis in the crystal. The structure of the open-channel complex of cASIC1a with psalmotoxin 1 (PcTx1) was chosen here as a basis, although, to make the simulations affordable, the procedure was limited to the missing portions, including a few adjacent α-helical turns. The latter were held fixed during the simulations. Reassembling the whole subunit, by superimposition of the fixed portions, resulted in diving of both TM1 and TM2 as continuous α-helices into the cytoplasm. At completion of this work, it appeared, from similar X-ray diffraction studies, that TM2 for both the complex of cASIC1a with the coral snake MitTx toxin, and the isolated desensitized ion channel, is discontinuous, with the triad G443-A444-S445 taking an extended, belt-like conformation. In this way, a filter ring against hydrated ions is formed by G443 in the trimer. Our REMD examination of this complex revealed a strong resistance by G443, and only that residue, to take dihedral-angle values compatible with an α-helical conformation. This suggests that the flexibility of glycine alone does not explain formation of the extended, belt-like conformation of the triad G443-A444-S445. This also requires cooperation in the trimer.

  10. Common Mechanism of Cross-Resistance Development in Pathogenic Bacteria Bacillus cereus Against Alamethicin and Pediocin Involves Alteration in Lipid Composition.

    PubMed

    Meena, Sunita; Mehla, Jitender; Kumar, Raj; Sood, S K

    2016-10-01

    To understand the mechanism of development of cross-resistance in food pathogen Bacillus cereus against an antimicrobial peptide pediocin and antibiotic alamethicin, the present study was designed. Pediococcus pentosaceus was taken as a source of pediocin, and it was purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by cation exchange chromatography with 14.01-fold purity and 14.4 % recovery. B. cereus strains alamethicin-resistant strains (IC50 3.23 µg/ml) were selected from sensitive population with IC50 2.37 µg/ml. The development of resistance in B. cereus against alamethicin was associated with decrease in alamethicin-membrane interaction observed by in vitro assay. Resistant strain of B. cereus was found to harbour one additional general lipid as compared to sensitive strain, one amino group lacking phospholipid and one amino group containing phospholipid (ACP). In addition, ACP content was increased in resistant mutant (29.7 %) as compared to sensitive strain (14.56 %). The alamethicin-resistant mutant B. cereus also showed increased IC50 (58.8 AU/ml) for pediocin as compared to sensitive strain (IC50 47.8 AU/ml). Cross-resistance to pediocin and alamethicin in resistant mutant of B. cereus suggested a common mechanism of resistance. Therefore, this understanding could result in the development of peptide which will be effective against the resistant strains that share same mechanism of resistance.

  11. Transmembrane signaling proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Couchman, John R

    2010-01-01

    Virtually all metazoan cells contain at least one and usually several types of transmembrane proteoglycans. These are varied in protein structure and type of polysaccharide, but the total number of vertebrate genes encoding transmembrane proteoglycan core proteins is less than 10. Some core proteins, including those of the syndecans, always possess covalently coupled glycosaminoglycans; others do not. Syndecan has a long evolutionary history, as it is present in invertebrates, but many other transmembrane proteoglycans are vertebrate inventions. The variety of proteins and their glycosaminoglycan chains is matched by diverse functions. However, all assume roles as coreceptors, often working alongside high-affinity growth factor receptors or adhesion receptors such as integrins. Other common themes are an ability to signal through their cytoplasmic domains, often to the actin cytoskeleton, and linkage to PDZ protein networks. Many transmembrane proteoglycans associate on the cell surface with metzincin proteases and can be shed by them. Work with model systems in vivo and in vitro reveals roles in growth, adhesion, migration, and metabolism. Furthermore, a wide range of phenotypes for the core proteins has been obtained in mouse knockout experiments. Here some of the latest developments in the field are examined in hopes of stimulating further interest in this fascinating group of molecules. PMID:20565253

  12. Incorporation kinetics in a membrane, studied with the pore-forming peptide alamethicin.

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, G; Gerke, H; Rizzo, V; Stankowski, S

    1987-01-01

    The reaction of fluorescence-labeled alamethicin with unilamellar phospholipid vesicles (DOPC and DMPC) has been investigated in a stopped-flow apparatus. Clearly single exponential time functions have been observed at temperatures above the phase transition of the bilayer. This can be interpreted in terms of an essentially one-step incorporation process. The pseudo first-order forward rate is found to be quite fast, falling in a range somewhat below the diffusion controlled upper bound. The data are quantitatively very well described on the basis of a simple mechanism. This comprises diffusion of peptide into the bilayer accompanied by a more or less slower change of the secondary structure. Aggregation of the incorporated molecules at higher concentrations is indicated to be comparatively rapid. PMID:3427183

  13. Effective diameters of ion channels formed by homologs of the antibiotic chrysospermin.

    PubMed

    Ternovsky, V I; Grigoriev, P A; Berestovsky, G N; Schlegel, R; Dornberger, K; Gräfe, U

    1997-01-01

    Radii of ion channels formed in the lipid bilayer by 4 homologs of the alamethicin-like antibiotic, chrysospermin, were determined using hydrophilic nonelectrolytes. It is shown that the replacement of isovaline amino acid at position 15 of the polypeptide chain by alpha-aminoisobutyric acid results in the decrease in the channel effective radius from 1.2 +/- 0.15 to 0.94 +/- 0.1 nm and a respective 2.5-fold decrease in channel conductance.

  14. Single-cell, time-resolved study of the effects of the antimicrobial peptide alamethicin on Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Barns, Kenneth J; Weisshaar, James C

    2016-04-01

    Alamethicin is a well-studied antimicrobial peptide (AMP) that kills Gram-positive bacteria. It forms narrow, barrel-stave pores in planar lipid bilayers. We present a detailed, time-resolved microscopy study of the sequence of events during the attack of alamethicin on individual, live Bacillus subtilis cells expressing GFP in the cytoplasm. At the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), the first observed symptom is the halting of growth, as judged by the plateau in measured cell length vs time. The data strongly suggest that this growth-halting event occurs prior to membrane permeabilization. Gradual degradation of the proton-motive force, inferred from a decrease in pH-dependent GFP fluorescence intensity, evidently begins minutes later and continues over about 5 min. There follows an abrupt permeabilization of the cytoplasmic membrane to the DNA stain Sytox Orange and concomitant loss of small osmolytes, causing observable cell shrinkage, presumably due to decreased turgor pressure. This permeabilization of the cytoplasmic membrane occurs uniformly across the entire membrane, not locally, on a timescale of 5s or less. GFP gradually leaks out of the cell envelope, evidently impeded by the shrunken peptidoglycan layer. Disruption of the cell envelope by alamethicin occurs in stages, with larger and larger species permeating the envelope as time evolves over tens of minutes. Some of the observed symptoms are consistent with the formation of barrel-stave pores, but the data do not rule out "chaotic pore" or "carpet" mechanisms. We contrast the effects of alamethicin and the human cathelicidin LL-37 on B. subtilis. PMID:26777771

  15. Interfacial water screens the protein-induced transmembrane voltage.

    PubMed

    Zarzycki, Piotr

    2015-01-29

    Transmembrane proteins are crucial in cellular traffic, signal transduction, and energy storage in a form of transmembrane voltage. These proteins are stabilized by hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions, in which cytoplasmic and exoplasmic water plays a special role. Water structural ordering generates the dipole potential that typically overcompensates for an intrinsic membrane-protein potential gradient, and thus it modifies and sustains an overall cellular electrostatics. Although the transmembrane voltage has been extensively studied, the dipole potential has attracted very little attention. Here, by using molecular dynamics, we examined water electrostatic response to the transmembrane charge, field, and potential asymmetry introduced by the presence of four integral membrane proteins: typical of inner (α-helix) and outer membrane (β-barrel). In all cases, the protein presence introduces electrostatic directionality in the transmembrane dipole field and voltage. In particular, water generates a deep potential sink if strongly polar residues are densely packed on one side of bilayer, as frequently occurs in a selectivity filter of the K(+) channel. We also found that protein secondary structure is less important than the polar residue distribution along the protein channel. Our findings are relevant for understanding the driving force behind biomembrane conductivity: the ability of biological water to electrostatically screen the transmembrane voltage.

  16. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR)

    PubMed Central

    Corradi, Valentina; Vergani, Paola; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. CFTR controls the flow of anions through the apical membrane of epithelia. Dysfunctional CFTR causes the common lethal genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Transitions between open and closed states of CFTR are regulated by ATP binding and hydrolysis on the cytosolic nucleotide binding domains, which are coupled with the transmembrane (TM) domains forming the pathway for anion permeation. Lack of structural data hampers a global understanding of CFTR and thus the development of “rational” approaches directly targeting defective CFTR. In this work, we explored possible conformational states of the CFTR gating cycle by means of homology modeling. As templates, we used structures of homologous ABC transporters, namely TM(287–288), ABC-B10, McjD, and Sav1866. In the light of published experimental results, structural analysis of the transmembrane cavity suggests that the TM(287–288)-based CFTR model could correspond to a commonly occupied closed state, whereas the McjD-based model could represent an open state. The models capture the important role played by Phe-337 as a filter/gating residue and provide structural information on the conformational transition from closed to open channel. PMID:26229102

  17. Differences Between Human and Rat Intestinal and Hepatic Bisphenol-A Glucuronidation and the Influence of Alamethicin on In vitro Kinetic Measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    The extent to which membrane disrupting agents, such as alamethicin, may alter cofactor transport and influence in vitro kinetic measurements of glucurondiation is a major concern regarding the characterization and extrapolation of inter-and intra-species pharmacokinetics of bisp...

  18. Using Ion Channel-Forming Peptides to Quantify Protein-Ligand Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Michael; Semetey, Vincent; Gitlin, Irina; Yang, Jerry; Whitesides, George M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for sensing affinity interactions by triggering disruption of self-assembly of ion channel-forming peptides in planar lipid bilayers. It shows that the binding of a derivative of alamethicin carrying a covalently attached sulfonamide ligand to carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) resulted in the inhibition of ion channel conductance through the bilayer. We propose that the binding of the bulky CA II protein (MW ~30 kD) to the ion channel-forming peptides (MW ~2.5 kD) either reduced the tendency of these peptides to self-assemble into a pore, or extracted them from the bilayer altogether. In both outcomes, the interactions between the protein and the ligand lead to a disruption of self-assembled pores. Addition of a competitive inhibitor – 4-carboxybenzenesulfonamide – to the solution released CA II from the alamethicin-sulfonamide conjugate and restored the current flow across the bilayer by allowing reassembly of the ion channels in the bilayer. Time-averaged recordings of the current over discrete time intervals made it possible to quantify this monovalent ligand binding interaction. This method gave a dissociation constant of ~2 µM for the binding of CA II to alamethicin-sulfonamide in the bilayer recording chamber: this value is consistent with a value obtained independently with CA II and a related sulfonamide derivative by isothermal titration calorimetry. PMID:18179217

  19. Disordered regions in transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Tusnády, Gábor E; Dobson, László; Tompa, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The functions of transmembrane proteins in living cells are widespread; they range from various transport processes to energy production, from cell-cell adhesion to communication. Structurally, they are highly ordered in their membrane-spanning regions, but may contain disordered regions in the cytosolic and extra-cytosolic parts. In this study, we have investigated the disordered regions in transmembrane proteins by a stringent definition of disordered residues on the currently available largest experimental dataset, and show a significant correlation between the spatial distributions of positively charged residues and disordered regions. This finding suggests a new role of disordered regions in transmembrane proteins by providing structural flexibility for stabilizing interactions with negatively charged head groups of the lipid molecules. We also find a preference of structural disorder in the terminal--as opposed to loop--regions in transmembrane proteins, and survey the respective functions involved in recruiting other proteins or mediating allosteric signaling effects. Finally, we critically compare disorder prediction methods on our transmembrane protein set. While there are no major differences between these methods using the usual statistics, such as per residue accuracies, Matthew's correlation coefficients, etc.; substantial differences can be found regarding the spatial distribution of the predicted disordered regions. We conclude that a predictor optimized for transmembrane proteins would be of high value to the field of structural disorder. PMID:26275590

  20. The stability of the three transmembrane and the four transmembrane human vitamin K epoxide reductase models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sangwook

    2016-04-01

    The three transmembrane and the four transmembrane helix models are suggested for human vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR). In this study, we investigate the stability of the human three transmembrane/four transmembrane VKOR models by employing a coarse-grained normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics simulation. Based on the analysis of the mobility of each transmembrane domain, we suggest that the three transmembrane human VKOR model is more stable than the four transmembrane human VKOR model.

  1. Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03693 Channel

    This channel is located south of Iani Chaos.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -10.9N, Longitude 345.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  2. X-ray diffraction study of lipid bilayer membranes interacting with amphiphilic helical peptides: diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine with alamethicin at low concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Y; He, K; Ludtke, S J; Huang, H W

    1995-01-01

    A variety of amphiphilic helical peptides have been shown to exhibit a transition from adsorbing parallel to a membrane surface at low concentrations to inserting perpendicularly into the membrane at high concentrations. Furthermore, this transition has been correlated to the peptides' cytolytic activities. X-ray lamellar diffraction of diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine-alamethicin mixtures revealed the changes of the bilayer structure with alamethicin concentration. In particular, the bilayer thickness decreases with increasing peptide concentration in proportion to the peptide-lipid molar ratio from as low as 1:150 to 1:47; the latter is near the threshold of the critical concentration for insertion. From the decreases of the bilayer thickness, one can calculate the cross sectional expansions of the lipid chains. For all of the peptide concentrations studied, the area expansion of the chain region for each adsorbed peptide is a constant 280 +/- 20 A2, which is approximately the cross sectional area of an adsorbed alamethicin. This implies that the peptide is adsorbed at the interface of the hydrocarbon region, separating the lipid headgroups laterally. Interestingly, the chain disorder caused by a peptide adsorption tends to spread over a large area, as much as 100 A in diameter. The theoretical basis of the long range nature of bilayer deformation is discussed. PMID:7647240

  3. Interface connections of a transmembrane voltage sensor.

    PubMed

    Freites, J Alfredo; Tobias, Douglas J; von Heijne, Gunnar; White, Stephen H

    2005-10-18

    Voltage-sensitive ion channels open and close in response to changes in transmembrane (TM) potential caused by the motion of the S4 voltage sensors. These sensors are alpha-helices that include four or more positively charged amino acids, most commonly arginine. The so-called paddle model, based on the high-resolution structure of the KvAP K+ channel [Jiang, et al. (2003) Nature 423, 33-41], posits that the S4 sensors move within the membrane bilayer in response to TM voltage changes. Direct exposure of S4 sensors to lipid is contrary to the classical expectation that the dielectric contrast between the membrane hydrocarbon core and water presents an insurmountable energetic penalty to burial of electric charges. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that a helix with the sequence of KvAP S4 can be inserted across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. To reconcile this result with the classical energetics argument, we have carried out a molecular dynamics simulation of an isolated TM S4 helix in a lipid bilayer. The simulation reveals a stabilizing hydrogen-bonded network of water and lipid phosphates around the arginines that reduces the effective thickness of the bilayer hydrocarbon core to approximately 10 A in the vicinity of the helix. It suggests that bilayer phospholipids can adapt locally to strongly perturbing protein elements, causing the phospholipids to become a structural extension of the protein.

  4. Are Aquaporins the Missing Transmembrane Osmosensors?

    PubMed

    Hill, A E; Shachar-Hill, Y

    2015-08-01

    Regulation of cell volume is central to homeostasis. It is assumed to begin with the detection of a change in water potential across the bounding membrane, but it is not clear how this is accomplished. While examples of general osmoreceptors (which sense osmotic pressure in one phase) and stretch-activated ion channels (which require swelling of a cell or organelle) are known, effective volume regulation requires true transmembrane osmosensors (TMOs) which directly detect a water potential difference spanning a membrane. At present, no TMO molecule has been unambiguously identified, and clear evidence for mammalian TMOs is notably lacking. In this paper, we set out a theory of TMOs which requires a water channel spanning the membrane that excludes the major osmotic solutes, responds directly without the need for any other process such as swelling, and signals to other molecules associated with the magnitude of changing osmotic differences. The most likely molecules that are fit for this purpose and which are also ubiquitous in eukaryotic cells are aquaporins (AQPs). We review experimental evidence from several systems which indicates that AQPs are essential elements in regulation and may be functioning as TMOs; i.e. the first step in an osmosensing sequence that signals osmotic imbalance in a cell or organelle. We extend this concept to several systems of current interest in which the cellular involvement of AQPs as simple water channels is puzzling or counter-intuitive. We suggest that, apart from regulatory volume changes in cells, AQPs may also be acting as TMOs in red cells, secretory granules and microorganisms. PMID:25791748

  5. Membrane orientation of the N-terminal segment of alamethicin determined by solid-state 15N NMR.

    PubMed Central

    North, C L; Barranger-Mathys, M; Cafiso, D S

    1995-01-01

    Alamethicin was synthesized with 15N incorporated into alanine at position 6 in the peptide sequence. In dispersions of hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine, solid-state 15N NMR yields an axially symmetric powder pattern indicating that the peptide is reorienting with a single axis of symmetry when associated with lamellar lipids. When incorporated into bilayers that are uniformly oriented with the bilayer normal parallel to the B(o) field, the position of the observed 15N chemical shift is 171 ppm. This is coincident with the sigma parallel to edge of the axially symmetric powder pattern for non-oriented hydrated samples. Thus the axis of motional averaging lies along the bilayer normal. Two-dimensional separated local field spectra were obtained that provide a measure of the N-H dipolar coupling in one dimension and the 15N chemical shift in the other. These data yield a dipolar coupling of 17 kHz corresponding to an average angle of 24 degrees for the N-H bond with respect to the B(o) field axis. An analysis of the possible structures and orientations that could produce the observed spectral parameters show that these values are consistent with an alpha-helical conformation inserted along the bilayer normal. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 6 PMID:8599645

  6. Transmembrane helix: simple or complex.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wing-Cheong; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Schneider, Georg; Eisenhaber, Frank

    2012-07-01

    Transmembrane helical segments (TMs) can be classified into two groups of so-called 'simple' and 'complex' TMs. Whereas the first group represents mere hydrophobic anchors with an overrepresentation of aliphatic hydrophobic residues that are likely attributed to convergent evolution in many cases, the complex ones embody ancestral information and tend to have structural and functional roles beyond just membrane immersion. Hence, the sequence homology concept is not applicable on simple TMs. In practice, these simple TMs can attract statistically significant but evolutionarily unrelated hits during similarity searches (whether through BLAST- or HMM-based approaches). This is especially problematic for membrane proteins that contain both globular segments and TMs. As such, we have developed the transmembrane helix: simple or complex (TMSOC) webserver for the identification of simple and complex TMs. By masking simple TM segments in seed sequences prior to sequence similarity searches, the false-discovery rate decreases without sacrificing sensitivity. Therefore, TMSOC is a novel and necessary sequence analytic tool for both the experimentalists and the computational biology community working on membrane proteins. It is freely accessible at http://tmsoc.bii.a-star.edu.sg or available for download.

  7. Biological insertion of computationally designed short transmembrane segments.

    PubMed

    Baeza-Delgado, Carlos; von Heijne, Gunnar; Marti-Renom, Marc A; Mingarro, Ismael

    2016-01-01

    The great majority of helical membrane proteins are inserted co-translationally into the ER membrane through a continuous ribosome-translocon channel. The efficiency of membrane insertion depends on transmembrane (TM) helix amino acid composition, the helix length and the position of the amino acids within the helix. In this work, we conducted a computational analysis of the composition and location of amino acids in transmembrane helices found in membrane proteins of known structure to obtain an extensive set of designed polypeptide segments with naturally occurring amino acid distributions. Then, using an in vitro translation system in the presence of biological membranes, we experimentally validated our predictions by analyzing its membrane integration capacity. Coupled with known strategies to control membrane protein topology, these findings may pave the way to de novo membrane protein design. PMID:26987712

  8. Biological insertion of computationally designed short transmembrane segments

    PubMed Central

    Baeza-Delgado, Carlos; von Heijne, Gunnar; Marti-Renom, Marc A.; Mingarro, Ismael

    2016-01-01

    The great majority of helical membrane proteins are inserted co-translationally into the ER membrane through a continuous ribosome-translocon channel. The efficiency of membrane insertion depends on transmembrane (TM) helix amino acid composition, the helix length and the position of the amino acids within the helix. In this work, we conducted a computational analysis of the composition and location of amino acids in transmembrane helices found in membrane proteins of known structure to obtain an extensive set of designed polypeptide segments with naturally occurring amino acid distributions. Then, using an in vitro translation system in the presence of biological membranes, we experimentally validated our predictions by analyzing its membrane integration capacity. Coupled with known strategies to control membrane protein topology, these findings may pave the way to de novo membrane protein design. PMID:26987712

  9. Grafting PNIPAAm from β-barrel shaped transmembrane nanopores.

    PubMed

    Charan, Himanshu; Kinzel, Julia; Glebe, Ulrich; Anand, Deepak; Garakani, Tayebeh Mirzaei; Zhu, Leilei; Bocola, Marco; Schwaneberg, Ulrich; Böker, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    The research on protein-polymer conjugates by grafting from the surface of proteins has gained significant interest in the last decade. While there are many studies with globular proteins, membrane proteins have remained untouched to the best of our knowledge. In this study, we established the conjugate formation with a class of transmembrane proteins and grow polymer chains from the ferric hydroxamate uptake protein component A (FhuA; a β-barrel transmembrane protein of Escherichia coli). As the lysine residues of naturally occurring FhuA are distributed over the whole protein, FhuA was reengineered to have up to 11 lysines, distributed symmetrically in a rim on the membrane exposed side (outside) of the protein channel and exclusively above the hydrophobic region. Reengineering of FhuA ensures a polymer growth only on the outside of the β-barrel and prevents blockage of the channel as a result of the polymerization. A water-soluble initiator for controlled radical polymerization (CRP) was consecutively linked to the lysine residues of FhuA and N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) polymerized under copper-mediated CRP conditions. The conjugate formation was analyzed by using MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry, SDS-PAGE, circular dichroism spectroscopy, analytical ultracentrifugation, dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy and size exclusion chromatography. Such conjugates combine the specific functions of the transmembrane proteins, like maintaining membrane potential gradients or translocation of substrates with the unique properties of synthetic polymers such as temperature and pH stimuli handles. FhuA-PNIPAAm conjugates will serve as functional nanosized building blocks for applications in targeted drug delivery, self-assembly systems, functional membranes and transmembrane protein gated nanoreactors. PMID:27614163

  10. Substitution of the transmembrane domain of Vpu in simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV{sub KU1bMC33}) with that of M2 of influenza A results in a virus that is sensitive to inhibitors of the M2 ion channel and is pathogenic for pig-tailed macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Hout, David R.; Gomez, Melissa L.; Pacyniak, Erik; Gomez, Lisa M.; Fegley, Barbara; Mulcahy, Ellyn R.; Hill, M. Sarah; Culley, Nathan; Pinson, David M.; Nothnick, Warren; Powers, Michael F.; Wong, Scott W.; Stephens, Edward B. . E-mail: estephen@kumc.edu

    2006-01-20

    The Vpu protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 has been shown to shunt the CD4 receptor molecule to the proteasome for degradation and to enhance virus release from infected cells. The exact mechanism by which the Vpu protein enhances virus release is currently unknown but some investigators have shown that this function is associated with the transmembrane domain and potential ion channel properties. In this study, we determined if the transmembrane domain of Vpu could be functionally substituted with that of the prototypical viroporin, the M2 protein of influenza A virus. We constructed chimeric vpu gene in which the transmembrane domain of Vpu was replaced with that of the M2 protein of influenza. This chimeric vpu gene was substituted for the vpu gene in the genome of a pathogenic simian human immunodeficiency virus, SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33}. The resulting virus, SHIV{sub M2}, synthesized a Vpu protein that had a slightly different M{sub r} compared to the parental SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33}, reflecting the different sizes of the two Vpu proteins. The SHIV{sub M2} was shown to replicate with slightly reduced kinetics when compared to the parental SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33} but electron microscopy revealed that the site of maturation was similar to the parental virus SHIV{sub KU1bMC33}. We show that the replication and spread of SHIV{sub M2} could be blocked with the antiviral drug rimantadine, which is known to target the M2 ion channel. Our results indicate a dose dependent inhibition of SHIV{sub M2} with 100 {mu}M rimantadine resulting in a >95% decrease in p27 released into the culture medium. Rimantadine did not affect the replication of the parental SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33}. Examination of SHIV{sub M2}-infected cells treated with 50 {mu}M rimantadine revealed numerous viral particles associated with the cell plasma membrane and within intracytoplasmic vesicles, which is similar to HIV-1 mutants lacking a functional vpu. To determine if SHIV{sub M2} was as pathogenic as

  11. An Autonomously Reciprocating Transmembrane Nanoactuator.

    PubMed

    Watson, Matthew A; Cockroft, Scott L

    2016-01-22

    Biological molecular machines operate far from equilibrium by coupling chemical potential to repeated cycles of dissipative nanomechanical motion. This principle has been exploited in supramolecular systems that exhibit true machine behavior in solution and on surfaces. However, designed membrane-spanning assemblies developed to date have been limited to simple switches or stochastic shuttles, and true machine behavior has remained elusive. Herein, we present a transmembrane nanoactuator that turns over chemical fuel to drive autonomous reciprocating (back-and-forth) nanomechanical motion. Ratcheted reciprocating motion of a DNA/PEG copolymer threaded through a single α-hemolysin pore was induced by a combination of DNA strand displacement processes and enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Ion-current recordings revealed saw-tooth patterns, indicating that the assemblies operated in autonomous, asymmetric cycles of conformational change at rates of up to one cycle per minute. PMID:26661295

  12. Type II Transmembrane Serine Proteases*

    PubMed Central

    Bugge, Thomas H.; Antalis, Toni M.; Wu, Qingyu

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of genome and expressed sequence tag data bases at the turn of the millennium unveiled a new protease family named the type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) in a Journal of Biological Chemistry minireview (Hooper, J. D., Clements, J. A., Quigley, J. P., and Antalis, T. M. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 857–860). Since then, the number of known TTSPs has more than doubled, and more importantly, our understanding of the physiological functions of individual TTSPs and their contribution to human disease has greatly increased. Progress has also been made in identifying molecular substrates and endogenous inhibitors. This minireview summarizes the current knowledge of the rapidly advancing TTSP field. PMID:19487698

  13. Transmembrane Helix Assembly by Max-Min Ant System Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sujaree, Kanon; Kitjaruwankul, Sunan; Boonamnaj, Panisak; Supunyabut, Chirayut; Sompornpisut, Pornthep

    2015-12-01

    Because of the rapid progress in biochemical and structural studies of membrane proteins, considerable attention has been given on developing efficient computational methods for solving low-to-medium resolution structures using sparse structural data. In this study, we demonstrate a novel algorithm, max-min ant system (MMAS), designed to find an assembly of α-helical transmembrane proteins using a rigid helix arrangement guided by distance constraints. The new algorithm generates a large variety with finite number of orientations of transmembrane helix bundle and finds the solution that is matched with the provided distance constraints based on the behavior of ants to search for the shortest possible path between their nest and the food source. To demonstrate the efficiency of the novel search algorithm, MMAS is applied to determine the transmembrane packing of KcsA and MscL ion channels from a limited distance information extracted from the crystal structures, and the packing of KvAP voltage sensor domain using a set of 10 experimentally determined constraints, and the results are compared with those of two popular used stochastic methods, simulated annealing Monte Carlo method and genetic algorithm. PMID:26058409

  14. Cooperative Transmembrane Penetration of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haizhen; Ji, Qiuju; Huang, Changjin; Zhang, Sulin; Yuan, Bing; Yang, Kai; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2015-01-01

    Physical penetration of lipid bilayer membranes presents an alternative pathway for cellular delivery of nanoparticles (NPs) besides endocytosis. NPs delivered through this pathway could reach the cytoplasm, thereby opening the possibility of organelle-specific targeting. Herein we perform dissipative particle dynamics simulations to elucidate the transmembrane penetration mechanisms of multiple NPs. Our simulations demonstrate that NPs’ translocation proceeds in a cooperative manner, where the interplay of the quantity and surface chemistry of the NPs regulates the translocation efficiency. For NPs with hydrophilic surfaces, the increase of particle quantity facilitates penetration, while for NPs with partly or totally hydrophobic surfaces, the opposite highly possibly holds. Moreover, a set of interesting cooperative ways, such as aggregation, aggregation-dispersion, and aggregation-dispersion-reaggregation of the NPs, are observed during the penetration process. We find that the penetration behaviors of multiple NPs are mostly dominated by the changes of the NP-membrane force components in the membrane plane direction, in addition to that in the penetration direction, suggesting a different interaction mechanism between the multiple NPs and the membrane compared with the one-NP case. These results provide a fundamental understanding in the underlying mechanisms of cooperative penetration of NPs, and shed light on the NP-based drug and gene delivery. PMID:26013284

  15. Structural and membrane modifying porperties of suzukacillin, a peptide antibiotic related to alamethicin. Part B. Pore formation in black lipid films.

    PubMed

    Boheim, G; Janko, K; Leibfritz, D; Ooka, T; König, W A; Jung, G

    1976-04-16

    Suzukacillin, a polypeptide consisting of presumably 23 amino acids and 1 phenylalaninol, is produced by a Trichoderma viride strain No. 1037 and it can be isolated from the culture medium. It shows membrane-modifying properties similar to those of alamethicin. Discrete condustance fluctuations indicate the formation of oligomer pores of varying diameter. On the basis of voltage jump relaxation experiments evidence is given that the dimer is the nucleation state from which pore formation starts and the oligomer disappears. According to the voltage-current characteristics, voltage-dependent and voltage-independent conductances are observed. A slow process is involved, which can be interpreted as a change in the equilibrium distribution between different conformations of the suzukacillin monomer at the membrane interphase. This change results from its interaction with the lipid matrix. Differences in experimental observations between suzukacillin and alamethicin are attributed to the relatively larger alpha-helix and higher number of aliphatic side chains of the suzukacillin monomer and to a more intense interaction with the lipid membrane. This leads to a higher probability of forming dimers from monomers and to the occurrence of "inactivation". PMID:1260058

  16. Transmembrane signaling in kidney health and disease.

    PubMed

    Hack, N; Schultz, A; Clayman, P; Goldberg, H; Skorecki, K L

    1995-08-01

    Transmembrane signal transduction is the process whereby a ligand binds to the external surface of the cell membrane and elicits a physiological response specific for that ligand and cell type. It is now appreciated that numerous disease states represent disturbances in normal transmembrane signaling mechanisms. In the current paper, we focus our attention on the mesangial cell of the glomerular microcirculation as a prototypical model system for understanding normal and abnormal transmembrane signaling processes. Among the major receptor and effector mechanisms for transmembrane signal transduction in the mesangial cell, this paper emphasizes the phospholipase effector response to growth factors and vasoactive hormones. The post-translational and transcriptional pathways for regulation of phospholipase C and phospholipase A2 are described, including consideration of perturbations in these systems that characterize two disease models, namely: acute cyclosporine nephrotoxicity and early diabetic glomerulopathy.

  17. Chloride Channels of Intracellular Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, John C.; Kahl, Christina R.

    2010-01-01

    Proteins implicated as intracellular chloride channels include the intracellular ClC proteins, the bestrophins, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, the CLICs, and the recently described Golgi pH regulator. This paper examines current hypotheses regarding roles of intracellular chloride channels and reviews the evidence supporting a role in intracellular chloride transport for each of these proteins. PMID:20100480

  18. Peptide models for membrane channels.

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, D

    1996-01-01

    Peptides may be synthesized with sequences corresponding to putative transmembrane domains and/or pore-lining regions that are deduced from the primary structures of ion channel proteins. These can then be incorporated into lipid bilayer membranes for structural and functional studies. In addition to the ability to invoke ion channel activity, critical issues are the secondary structures adopted and the mode of assembly of these short transmembrane peptides in the reconstituted systems. The present review concentrates on results obtained with peptides from ligand-gated and voltage-gated ion channels, as well as proton-conducting channels. These are considered within the context of current molecular models and the limited data available on the structure of native ion channels and natural channel-forming peptides. PMID:8615800

  19. Structure of Staphylococcal α-Hemolysin, a Heptameric Transmembrane Pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Langzhou; Hobaugh, Michael R.; Shustak, Christopher; Cheley, Stephen; Bayley, Hagan; Gouaux, J. Eric

    1996-12-01

    The structure of the Staphylococcus aureus α-hemolysin pore has been determined to 1.9 overset{circ}{mathrm A} resolution. Contained within the mushroom-shaped homo-oligomeric heptamer is a solvent-filled channel, 100 overset{circ}{mathrm A} in length, that runs along the sevenfold axis and ranges from 14 overset{circ}{mathrm A} to 46 overset{circ}{mathrm A} in diameter. The lytic, transmembrane domain comprises the lower half of a 14-strand antiparallel β barrel, to which each protomer contributes two β strands, each 65 overset{circ}{mathrm A} long. The interior of the β barrel is primarily hydrophilic, and the exterior has a hydrophobic belt 28 overset{circ}{mathrm A} wide. The structure proves the heptameric subunit stoichiometry of the α-hemolysin oligomer, shows that a glycine-rich and solvent-exposed region of a water-soluble protein can self-assemble to form a transmembrane pore of defined structure, and provides insight into the principles of membrane interaction and transport activity of β barrel pore-forming toxins.

  20. Assembly of transmembrane proteins on oil-water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunker, Peter; Landry, Corey; Chong, Shaorong; Weitz, David

    2015-03-01

    Transmembrane proteins are difficult to handle by aqueous solution-based biochemical and biophysical approaches, due to the hydrophobicity of transmembrane helices. Detergents can solubilize transmembrane proteins; however, surfactant coated transmembrane proteins are not always functional, and purifying detergent coated proteins in a micellar solution can be difficult. Motivated by this problem, we study the self-assembly of transmembrane proteins on oil-water interfaces. We found that the large water-oil interface of oil drops prevents nascent transmembrane proteins from forming non-functional aggregates. The oil provides a hydrophobic environment for the transmembrane helix, allowing the ectodomain to fold into its natural structure and orientation. Further, modifying the strength or valency of hydrophobic interactions between transmembrane proteins results in the self-assembly of spatially clustered, active proteins on the oil-water interface. Thus, hydrophobic interactions can facilitate, rather than inhibit, the assembly of transmembrane proteins.

  1. Large-Conductance Transmembrane Porin Made from DNA Origami.

    PubMed

    Göpfrich, Kerstin; Li, Chen-Yu; Ricci, Maria; Bhamidimarri, Satya Prathyusha; Yoo, Jejoong; Gyenes, Bertalan; Ohmann, Alexander; Winterhalter, Mathias; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2016-09-27

    DNA nanotechnology allows for the creation of three-dimensional structures at nanometer scale. Here, we use DNA to build the largest synthetic pore in a lipid membrane to date, approaching the dimensions of the nuclear pore complex and increasing the pore-area and the conductance 10-fold compared to previous man-made channels. In our design, 19 cholesterol tags anchor a megadalton funnel-shaped DNA origami porin in a lipid bilayer membrane. Confocal imaging and ionic current recordings reveal spontaneous insertion of the DNA porin into the lipid membrane, creating a transmembrane pore of tens of nanosiemens conductance. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations characterize the conductance mechanism at the atomic level and independently confirm the DNA porins' large ionic conductance.

  2. Large-Conductance Transmembrane Porin Made from DNA Origami.

    PubMed

    Göpfrich, Kerstin; Li, Chen-Yu; Ricci, Maria; Bhamidimarri, Satya Prathyusha; Yoo, Jejoong; Gyenes, Bertalan; Ohmann, Alexander; Winterhalter, Mathias; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2016-09-27

    DNA nanotechnology allows for the creation of three-dimensional structures at nanometer scale. Here, we use DNA to build the largest synthetic pore in a lipid membrane to date, approaching the dimensions of the nuclear pore complex and increasing the pore-area and the conductance 10-fold compared to previous man-made channels. In our design, 19 cholesterol tags anchor a megadalton funnel-shaped DNA origami porin in a lipid bilayer membrane. Confocal imaging and ionic current recordings reveal spontaneous insertion of the DNA porin into the lipid membrane, creating a transmembrane pore of tens of nanosiemens conductance. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations characterize the conductance mechanism at the atomic level and independently confirm the DNA porins' large ionic conductance. PMID:27504755

  3. Large-Conductance Transmembrane Porin Made from DNA Origami

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    DNA nanotechnology allows for the creation of three-dimensional structures at nanometer scale. Here, we use DNA to build the largest synthetic pore in a lipid membrane to date, approaching the dimensions of the nuclear pore complex and increasing the pore-area and the conductance 10-fold compared to previous man-made channels. In our design, 19 cholesterol tags anchor a megadalton funnel-shaped DNA origami porin in a lipid bilayer membrane. Confocal imaging and ionic current recordings reveal spontaneous insertion of the DNA porin into the lipid membrane, creating a transmembrane pore of tens of nanosiemens conductance. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations characterize the conductance mechanism at the atomic level and independently confirm the DNA porins’ large ionic conductance. PMID:27504755

  4. Transmembrane segments form tertiary hairpins in the folding vestibule of the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Tu, Liwei; Khanna, Pooja; Deutsch, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Folding of membrane proteins begins in the ribosome as the peptide is elongated. During this process, the nascent peptide navigates along 100Å of tunnel from the peptidyltransferase center to the exit port. Proximal to the exit port is a "folding vestibule" that permits the nascent peptide to compact and explore conformational space for potential tertiary folding partners. The latter occurs for cytosolic subdomains but has not yet been shown for transmembrane segments. We now demonstrate, using an accessibility assay and an improved intramolecular crosslinking assay, that the helical transmembrane S3b-S4 hairpin ("paddle") of a voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel, a critical region of the Kv voltage sensor, forms in the vestibule. S3-S4 hairpin interactions are detected at an early stage of Kv biogenesis. Moreover, this vestibule hairpin is consistent with a closed-state conformation of the Kv channel in the plasma membrane.

  5. Transmembrane Segments Form Tertiary Hairpins in the Folding Vestibule of the Ribosome.

    PubMed Central

    Tu, LiWei; Khanna, Pooja; Deutsch, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Folding of membrane proteins begins in the ribosome as the peptide is elongated. During this process, the nascent peptide navigates along 100 Å of tunnel from the peptidyltransferase center to the exit port. Proximal to the exit port is a ‘folding vestibule’ that permits the nascent peptide to compact and explore conformational space for potential tertiary folding partners. The latter occurs for cytosolic subdomains, but has not yet been shown for transmembrane segments. We now demonstrate, using an accessibility assay and an improved, intramolecular crosslinking assay, that the helical transmembrane S3b-S4 hairpin (‘paddle’) of a voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel, a critical region of the Kv voltage sensor, forms in the vestibule. S3-S4 hairpin interactions are detected at an early stage of Kv biogenesis. Moreover, this vestibule hairpin is consistent with a closed-state conformation of the Kv channel in the plasma membrane. PMID:24055377

  6. Transmembrane segments form tertiary hairpins in the folding vestibule of the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Tu, Liwei; Khanna, Pooja; Deutsch, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Folding of membrane proteins begins in the ribosome as the peptide is elongated. During this process, the nascent peptide navigates along 100Å of tunnel from the peptidyltransferase center to the exit port. Proximal to the exit port is a "folding vestibule" that permits the nascent peptide to compact and explore conformational space for potential tertiary folding partners. The latter occurs for cytosolic subdomains but has not yet been shown for transmembrane segments. We now demonstrate, using an accessibility assay and an improved intramolecular crosslinking assay, that the helical transmembrane S3b-S4 hairpin ("paddle") of a voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel, a critical region of the Kv voltage sensor, forms in the vestibule. S3-S4 hairpin interactions are detected at an early stage of Kv biogenesis. Moreover, this vestibule hairpin is consistent with a closed-state conformation of the Kv channel in the plasma membrane. PMID:24055377

  7. TRAMPLE: the transmembrane protein labelling environment.

    PubMed

    Fariselli, Piero; Finelli, Michele; Rossi, Ivan; Amico, Mauro; Zauli, Andrea; Martelli, Pier Luigi; Casadio, Rita

    2005-07-01

    TRAMPLE (http://gpcr.biocomp.unibo.it/biodec/) is a web application server dedicated to the detection and the annotation of transmembrane protein sequences. TRAMPLE includes different state-of-the-art algorithms for the prediction of signal peptides, transmembrane segments (both beta-strands and alpha-helices), secondary structure and fast fold recognition. TRAMPLE also includes a complete content management system to manage the results of the predictions. Each user of the server has his/her own workplace, where the data can be stored, organized, accessed and annotated with documents through a simple web-based interface. In this manner, TRAMPLE significantly improves usability with respect to other more traditional web servers. PMID:15980454

  8. Crystallizing Transmembrane Peptides in Lipidic Mesophases

    SciTech Connect

    Höfer, Nicole; Aragão, David; Caffrey, Martin

    2011-09-28

    Structure determination of membrane proteins by crystallographic means has been facilitated by crystallization in lipidic mesophases. It has been suggested, however, that this so-called in meso method, as originally implemented, would not apply to small protein targets having {le}4 transmembrane crossings. In our study, the hypothesis that the inherent flexibility of the mesophase would enable crystallogenesis of small proteins was tested using a transmembrane pentadecapeptide, linear gramicidin, which produced structure-grade crystals. This result suggests that the in meso method should be considered as a viable means for high-resolution structure determination of integral membrane peptides, many of which are predicted to be coded for in the human genome.

  9. Transmembrane Pores Formed by Human Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Shuo

    2011-01-01

    Human LL-37 is a multifunctional cathelicidin peptide that has shown a wide spectrum of antimicrobial activity by permeabilizing microbial membranes similar to other antimicrobial peptides; however, its molecular mechanism has not been clarified. Two independent experiments revealed LL-37 bound to membranes in the {alpha}-helical form with the axis lying in the plane of membrane. This led to the conclusion that membrane permeabilization by LL-37 is a nonpore carpet-like mechanism of action. Here we report the detection of transmembrane pores induced by LL-37. The pore formation coincided with LL-37 helices aligning approximately normal to the plane of the membrane. We observed an unusual phenomenon of LL-37 embedded in stacked membranes, which are commonly used in peptide orientation studies. The membrane-bound LL-37 was found in the normal orientation only when the membrane spacing in the multilayers exceeded its fully hydrated value. This was achieved by swelling the stacked membranes with excessive water to a swollen state. The transmembrane pores were detected and investigated in swollen states by means of oriented circular dichroism, neutron in-plane scattering, and x-ray lamellar diffraction. The results are consistent with the effect of LL-37 on giant unilamellar vesicles. The detected pores had a water channel of radius 2333 {angstrom}. The molecular mechanism of pore formation by LL-37 is consistent with the two-state model exhibited by magainin and other small pore-forming peptides. The discovery that peptide-membrane interactions in swollen states are different from those in less hydrated states may have implications for other large membrane-active peptides and proteins studied in stacked membranes.

  10. Photometric recording of transmembrane potential in outer hair cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Oghalai, John S.; Saggau, Peter; Rabbitt, Richard D.; Brownell, William E.

    2006-06-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) are polarized epithelial cells that have mechanoelectrical transduction channels within their apical stereocilia and produce electromotile force along their lateral wall. Phase shifts, or time delays, in the transmembrane voltage occurring at different axial locations along the cell may contribute to our understanding of how these cells operate at auditory frequencies. We developed a method to optically measure the phase of the OHC transmembrane potential using the voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) di-8-ANEPPS. The exit aperture of a fibre-optic light source was driven in two dimensions so that a 24 µm spot of excitation light could be positioned along the length of the OHC. We used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique in the current-clamp mode to stimulate the OHC at the base. The photometric response and the voltage response were monitored with a photodetector and patch-clamp amplifier, respectively. The photometric response was used to measure the regional changes in the membrane potential in response to maintained (dc) and sinusoidal (ac) current stimuli applied at the base of the cell. We used a neutral density filter to lower the excitation light intensity and reduce phototoxicity. A sensitive detector and lock-in amplifier were used to measure the small ac VSD signal. This permitted measurements of the ac photometric response below the noise floor of the static fluorescence. The amplitude and phase components of the photometric response were recorded for stimuli up to 800 Hz. VSD data at 400-800 Hz show the presence of a small phase delay between the stimulus voltage at the base of the cell and the local membrane potential measured along the lateral wall. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that OHCs exhibit inhomogeneous membrane potentials that vary with position in analogy with the voltage in nerve axons.

  11. Detection of single ion channel activity with carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weiwei; Wang, Yung Yu; Lim, Tae-Sun; Pham, Ted; Jain, Dheeraj; Burke, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Many processes in life are based on ion currents and membrane voltages controlled by a sophisticated and diverse family of membrane proteins (ion channels), which are comparable in size to the most advanced nanoelectronic components currently under development. Here we demonstrate an electrical assay of individual ion channel activity by measuring the dynamic opening and closing of the ion channel nanopores using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Two canonical dynamic ion channels (gramicidin A (gA) and alamethicin) and one static biological nanopore (α-hemolysin (α-HL)) were successfully incorporated into supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, an artificial cell membrane), which in turn were interfaced to the carbon nanotubes through a variety of polymer-cushion surface functionalization schemes. The ion channel current directly charges the quantum capacitance of a single nanotube in a network of purified semiconducting nanotubes. This work forms the foundation for a scalable, massively parallel architecture of 1d nanoelectronic devices interrogating electrophysiology at the single ion channel level. PMID:25778101

  12. Detection of single ion channel activity with carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weiwei; Wang, Yung Yu; Lim, Tae-Sun; Pham, Ted; Jain, Dheeraj; Burke, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Many processes in life are based on ion currents and membrane voltages controlled by a sophisticated and diverse family of membrane proteins (ion channels), which are comparable in size to the most advanced nanoelectronic components currently under development. Here we demonstrate an electrical assay of individual ion channel activity by measuring the dynamic opening and closing of the ion channel nanopores using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Two canonical dynamic ion channels (gramicidin A (gA) and alamethicin) and one static biological nanopore (α-hemolysin (α-HL)) were successfully incorporated into supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, an artificial cell membrane), which in turn were interfaced to the carbon nanotubes through a variety of polymer-cushion surface functionalization schemes. The ion channel current directly charges the quantum capacitance of a single nanotube in a network of purified semiconducting nanotubes. This work forms the foundation for a scalable, massively parallel architecture of 1d nanoelectronic devices interrogating electrophysiology at the single ion channel level.

  13. Detection of single ion channel activity with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weiwei; Wang, Yung Yu; Lim, Tae-Sun; Pham, Ted; Jain, Dheeraj; Burke, Peter J.

    2015-03-01

    Many processes in life are based on ion currents and membrane voltages controlled by a sophisticated and diverse family of membrane proteins (ion channels), which are comparable in size to the most advanced nanoelectronic components currently under development. Here we demonstrate an electrical assay of individual ion channel activity by measuring the dynamic opening and closing of the ion channel nanopores using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Two canonical dynamic ion channels (gramicidin A (gA) and alamethicin) and one static biological nanopore (α-hemolysin (α-HL)) were successfully incorporated into supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, an artificial cell membrane), which in turn were interfaced to the carbon nanotubes through a variety of polymer-cushion surface functionalization schemes. The ion channel current directly charges the quantum capacitance of a single nanotube in a network of purified semiconducting nanotubes. This work forms the foundation for a scalable, massively parallel architecture of 1d nanoelectronic devices interrogating electrophysiology at the single ion channel level.

  14. Structure of Self-Aggregated Alamethicin in ePC Membranes Detected by Pulsed Electron-Electron Double Resonance and Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation Spectroscopies

    PubMed Central

    Milov, Alexander D.; Samoilova, Rimma I.; Tsvetkov, Yuri D.; De Zotti, Marta; Formaggio, Fernando; Toniolo, Claudio; Handgraaf, Jan-Willem; Raap, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract PELDOR spectroscopy was exploited to study the self-assembled super-structure of the [Glu(OMe)7,18,19]alamethicin molecules in vesicular membranes at peptide to lipid molar ratios in the range of 1:70–1:200. The peptide molecules were site-specifically labeled with TOAC electron spins. From the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction between the nitroxides of the monolabeled constituents and the PELDOR decay patterns measured at 77 K, intermolecular-distance distribution functions were obtained and the number of aggregated molecules (n ≈ 4) was estimated. The distance distribution functions exhibit a similar maximum at 2.3 nm. In contrast to Alm16, for Alm1 and Alm8 additional maxima were recorded at 3.2 and ∼5.2 nm. From ESEEM experiments and based on the membrane polarity profiles, the penetration depths of the different spin-labeled positions into the membrane were qualitatively estimated. It was found that the water accessibility of the spin-labels follows the order TOAC-1 > TOAC-8 ≈ TOAC-16. The geometric data obtained are discussed in terms of a penknife molecular model. At least two peptide chains are aligned parallel and eight ester groups of the polar Glu(OMe)18,19 residues are suggested to stabilize the self-aggregate superstructure. PMID:19383464

  15. Ethanol Modulation is Quantitatively Determined by the Transmembrane Domain of Human α1 Glycine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Horani, Suzzane; Stater, Evan P.; Corringer, Pierre-Jean; Trudell, James R.; Harris, R. Adron; Howard, Rebecca J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mutagenesis and labeling studies have identified amino acids from the human α1 glycine receptor (GlyR) extracellular, transmembrane (TM), and intracellular domains in mediating ethanol potentiation. However, limited high-resolution structural data for physiologically relevant receptors in this Cys-loop receptor superfamily have made pinpointing the critical amino acids difficult. Homologous ion channels from lower organisms provide conserved models for structural and functional properties of Cys-loop receptors. We previously demonstrated that a single amino acid variant of the Gloeobacter violaceus ligand-gated ion channel (GLIC) produced ethanol and anesthetic sensitivity similar to that of GlyRs and provided crystallographic evidence for ethanol binding to GLIC. Methods We directly compared ethanol modulation of the α1 GlyR and GLIC to a chimera containing the transmembrane domain from human α1 GlyRs and the ligand-binding domain of GLIC using two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology of receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Results Ethanol potentiated α1 GlyRs in a concentration-dependent manner in the presence of zinc-chelating agents, but did not potentiate GLIC at pharmacologically relevant concentrations. The GLIC/GlyR chimera recapitulated the ethanol potentiation of GlyRs, without apparent sensitivity to zinc chelation. For chimera expression in oocytes, it was essential to suppress leakage current by adding 50 μM picrotoxin to the media, a technique that may have applications in expression of other ion channels. Conclusions Our results are consistent with a transmembrane mechanism of ethanol modulation in Cys-loop receptors. This work highlights the relevance of bacterial homologs as valuable model systems for studying ion channel function of human receptors and demonstrates the modularity of these channels across species. PMID:25973519

  16. Short and long range functions of amino acids in the transmembrane region of the sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase. A mutational study.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Sumbilla, C; Lewis, D; Zhong, L; Strock, C; Kirtley, M E; Inesi, G

    1996-05-01

    Mutational analysis of several amino acids in the transmembrane region of the sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase was performed by expressing wild type ATPase and 32 site-directed mutants in COS-1 cells followed by functional characterization of the microsomal fraction. Four different phenotype characteristics were observed in the mutants: (a) functions similar to those sustained by the wild type ATPase; (b) Ca2+ transport inhibited to a greater extent than ATPase hydrolytic activity; (c) inhibition of transport and hydrolytic activity in the presence of high levels of phosphorylated enzyme intermediate; and (d) total inhibition of ATP utilization by the enzyme while retaining the ability to form phosphoenzyme by utilization of P(i). Analysis of experimental observations and molecular models revealed short and long range functions of several amino acids within the transmembrane region. Short range functions include: (a) direct involvement of five amino acids in Ca2+ binding within a channel formed by clustered transmembrane helices M4, M5, M6, and M8; (b) roles of several amino acids in structural stabilization of the helical cluster for optimal channel function; and (c) a specific role of Lys297 in sealing the distal end of the channel, suggesting that the M4 helix rotates to allow vectorial flux of Ca2+ upon enzyme phosphorylation. Long range functions are related to the influence of several transmembrane amino acids on phosphorylation reactions with ATP or P(i), transmitted to the extramembranous region of the ATPase in the presence or in the absence of Ca2+.

  17. Predicting transmembrane beta-barrels in proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Bigelow, Henry R.; Petrey, Donald S.; Liu, Jinfeng; Przybylski, Dariusz; Rost, Burkhard

    2004-01-01

    Very few methods address the problem of predicting beta-barrel membrane proteins directly from sequence. One reason is that only very few high-resolution structures for transmembrane beta-barrel (TMB) proteins have been determined thus far. Here we introduced the design, statistics and results of a novel profile-based hidden Markov model for the prediction and discrimination of TMBs. The method carefully attempts to avoid over-fitting the sparse experimental data. While our model training and scoring procedures were very similar to a recently published work, the architecture and structure-based labelling were significantly different. In particular, we introduced a new definition of beta- hairpin motifs, explicit state modelling of transmembrane strands, and a log-odds whole-protein discrimination score. The resulting method reached an overall four-state (up-, down-strand, periplasmic-, outer-loop) accuracy as high as 86%. Furthermore, accurately discriminated TMB from non-TMB proteins (45% coverage at 100% accuracy). This high precision enabled the application to 72 entirely sequenced Gram-negative bacteria. We found over 164 previously uncharacterized TMB proteins at high confidence. Database searches did not implicate any of these proteins with membranes. We challenge that the vast majority of our 164 predictions will eventually be verified experimentally. All proteome predictions and the PROFtmb prediction method are available at http://www.rostlab.org/services/PROFtmb/. PMID:15141026

  18. Evolution of a transcriptional regulator from a transmembrane nucleoporin

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Tobias M.; Benner, Chris; Narvaiza, Iñigo; Marchetto, Maria C.N.; Young, Janet M.; Malik, Harmit S.; Gage, Fred H.; Hetzer, Martin W.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) emerged as nuclear transport channels in eukaryotic cells ∼1.5 billion years ago. While the primary role of NPCs is to regulate nucleo–cytoplasmic transport, recent research suggests that certain NPC proteins have additionally acquired the role of affecting gene expression at the nuclear periphery and in the nucleoplasm in metazoans. Here we identify a widely expressed variant of the transmembrane nucleoporin (Nup) Pom121 (named sPom121, for “soluble Pom121”) that arose by genomic rearrangement before the divergence of hominoids. sPom121 lacks the nuclear membrane-anchoring domain and thus does not localize to the NPC. Instead, sPom121 colocalizes and interacts with nucleoplasmic Nup98, a previously identified transcriptional regulator, at gene promoters to control transcription of its target genes in human cells. Interestingly, sPom121 transcripts appear independently in several mammalian species, suggesting convergent innovation of Nup-mediated transcription regulation during mammalian evolution. Our findings implicate alternate transcription initiation as a mechanism to increase the functional diversity of NPC components. PMID:27198230

  19. Evolution of a transcriptional regulator from a transmembrane nucleoporin.

    PubMed

    Franks, Tobias M; Benner, Chris; Narvaiza, Iñigo; Marchetto, Maria C N; Young, Janet M; Malik, Harmit S; Gage, Fred H; Hetzer, Martin W

    2016-05-15

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) emerged as nuclear transport channels in eukaryotic cells ∼1.5 billion years ago. While the primary role of NPCs is to regulate nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, recent research suggests that certain NPC proteins have additionally acquired the role of affecting gene expression at the nuclear periphery and in the nucleoplasm in metazoans. Here we identify a widely expressed variant of the transmembrane nucleoporin (Nup) Pom121 (named sPom121, for "soluble Pom121") that arose by genomic rearrangement before the divergence of hominoids. sPom121 lacks the nuclear membrane-anchoring domain and thus does not localize to the NPC. Instead, sPom121 colocalizes and interacts with nucleoplasmic Nup98, a previously identified transcriptional regulator, at gene promoters to control transcription of its target genes in human cells. Interestingly, sPom121 transcripts appear independently in several mammalian species, suggesting convergent innovation of Nup-mediated transcription regulation during mammalian evolution. Our findings implicate alternate transcription initiation as a mechanism to increase the functional diversity of NPC components. PMID:27198230

  20. Structural classification and prediction of reentrant regions in alpha-helical transmembrane proteins: application to complete genomes.

    PubMed

    Viklund, Håkan; Granseth, Erik; Elofsson, Arne

    2006-08-18

    Alongside the well-studied membrane spanning helices, alpha-helical transmembrane (TM) proteins contain several functionally and structurally important types of substructures. Here, existing 3D structures of transmembrane proteins have been used to define and study the concept of reentrant regions, i.e. membrane penetrating regions that enter and exit the membrane on the same side. We find that these regions can be divided into three distinct categories based on secondary structure motifs, namely long regions with a helix-coil-helix motif, regions of medium length with the structure helix-coil or coil-helix and regions of short to medium length consisting entirely of irregular secondary structure. The residues situated in reentrant regions are significantly smaller on average compared to other regions and reentrant regions can be detected in the inter-transmembrane loops with an accuracy of approximately 70% based on their amino acid composition. Using TOP-MOD, a novel method for predicting reentrant regions, we have scanned the genomes of Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Homo sapiens. The results suggest that more than 10% of transmembrane proteins contain reentrant regions and that the occurrence of reentrant regions increases linearly with the number of transmembrane regions. Reentrant regions seem to be most commonly found in channel proteins and least commonly in signal receptors.

  1. Prediction of drug clearance by glucuronidation from in vitro data: use of combined cytochrome P450 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase cofactors in alamethicin-activated human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Kilford, Peter J; Stringer, Rowan; Sohal, Bindi; Houston, J Brian; Galetin, Aleksandra

    2009-01-01

    Glucuronidation via UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) is an increasingly important clearance pathway. In this study intrinsic clearance (CL(int)) values for buprenorphine, carvedilol, codeine, diclofenac, gemfibrozil, ketoprofen, midazolam, naloxone, raloxifene, and zidovudine were determined in pooled human liver microsomes using the substrate depletion approach. The in vitro clearance data indicated a varying contribution of glucuronidation to the clearance of the compounds studied, ranging from 6 to 79% for midazolam and gemfibrozil, respectively. The CL(int) was obtained using either individual or combined cofactors for cytochrome P450 (P450) and UGT enzymes with alamethicin activation and in the presence and absence of 2% bovine serum albumin (BSA). In the presence of combined P450 and UGT cofactors, CL(int) ranged from 2.8 to 688 microl/min/mg for zidovudine and buprenorphine, respectively; the clearance was approximately equal to the sum of the CL(int) values obtained in the presence of individual cofactors. The unbound intrinsic clearance (CL(int, u)) was scaled to provide an in vivo predicted CL(int); the data obtained in the presence of combined cofactors resulted in 5-fold underprediction on average. Addition of 2% BSA to the incubation with both P450 and UGT cofactors reduced the bias in the clearance prediction, with 8 of 10 compounds predicted within 2-fold of in vivo values with the exception of raloxifene and gemfibrozil. The current study indicates the applicability of combined cofactor conditions in the assessment of clearance for compounds with a differential contribution of P450 and UGT enzymes to their elimination. In addition, improved predictability of microsomal data is observed in the presence of BSA, in particular for UGT2B7 substrates.

  2. Transmembrane protein sorting driven by membrane curvature

    PubMed Central

    Strahl, H.; Ronneau, S.; González, B. Solana; Klutsch, D.; Schaffner-Barbero, C.; Hamoen, L. W.

    2015-01-01

    The intricate structure of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells depends on the ability to target proteins to specific cellular locations. In most cases, we have a poor understanding of the underlying mechanisms. A typical example is the assembly of bacterial chemoreceptors at cell poles. Here we show that the classical chemoreceptor TlpA of Bacillus subtilis does not localize according to the consensus stochastic nucleation mechanism but accumulates at strongly curved membrane areas generated during cell division. This preference was confirmed by accumulation at non-septal curved membranes. Localization appears to be an intrinsic property of the protein complex and does not rely on chemoreceptor clustering, as was previously shown for Escherichia coli. By constructing specific amino-acid substitutions, we demonstrate that the preference for strongly curved membranes arises from the curved shape of chemoreceptor trimer of dimers. These findings demonstrate that the intrinsic shape of transmembrane proteins can determine their cellular localization. PMID:26522943

  3. Transmembrane protein sorting driven by membrane curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strahl, H.; Ronneau, S.; González, B. Solana; Klutsch, D.; Schaffner-Barbero, C.; Hamoen, L. W.

    2015-11-01

    The intricate structure of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells depends on the ability to target proteins to specific cellular locations. In most cases, we have a poor understanding of the underlying mechanisms. A typical example is the assembly of bacterial chemoreceptors at cell poles. Here we show that the classical chemoreceptor TlpA of Bacillus subtilis does not localize according to the consensus stochastic nucleation mechanism but accumulates at strongly curved membrane areas generated during cell division. This preference was confirmed by accumulation at non-septal curved membranes. Localization appears to be an intrinsic property of the protein complex and does not rely on chemoreceptor clustering, as was previously shown for Escherichia coli. By constructing specific amino-acid substitutions, we demonstrate that the preference for strongly curved membranes arises from the curved shape of chemoreceptor trimer of dimers. These findings demonstrate that the intrinsic shape of transmembrane proteins can determine their cellular localization.

  4. Molecular mechanisms for generating transmembrane proton gradients.

    PubMed

    Gunner, M R; Amin, Muhamed; Zhu, Xuyu; Lu, Jianxun

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins use the energy of light or high energy substrates to build a transmembrane proton gradient through a series of reactions leading to proton release into the lower pH compartment (P-side) and proton uptake from the higher pH compartment (N-side). This review considers how the proton affinity of the substrates, cofactors and amino acids are modified in four proteins to drive proton transfers. Bacterial reaction centers (RCs) and photosystem II (PSII) carry out redox chemistry with the species to be oxidized on the P-side while reduction occurs on the N-side of the membrane. Terminal redox cofactors are used which have pKas that are strongly dependent on their redox state, so that protons are lost on oxidation and gained on reduction. Bacteriorhodopsin is a true proton pump. Light activation triggers trans to cis isomerization of a bound retinal. Strong electrostatic interactions within clusters of amino acids are modified by the conformational changes initiated by retinal motion leading to changes in proton affinity, driving transmembrane proton transfer. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) catalyzes the reduction of O2 to water. The protons needed for chemistry are bound from the N-side. The reduction chemistry also drives proton pumping from N- to P-side. Overall, in CcO the uptake of 4 electrons to reduce O2 transports 8 charges across the membrane, with each reduction fully coupled to removal of two protons from the N-side, the delivery of one for chemistry and transport of the other to the P-side.

  5. Molecular mechanisms for generating transmembrane proton gradients.

    PubMed

    Gunner, M R; Amin, Muhamed; Zhu, Xuyu; Lu, Jianxun

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins use the energy of light or high energy substrates to build a transmembrane proton gradient through a series of reactions leading to proton release into the lower pH compartment (P-side) and proton uptake from the higher pH compartment (N-side). This review considers how the proton affinity of the substrates, cofactors and amino acids are modified in four proteins to drive proton transfers. Bacterial reaction centers (RCs) and photosystem II (PSII) carry out redox chemistry with the species to be oxidized on the P-side while reduction occurs on the N-side of the membrane. Terminal redox cofactors are used which have pKas that are strongly dependent on their redox state, so that protons are lost on oxidation and gained on reduction. Bacteriorhodopsin is a true proton pump. Light activation triggers trans to cis isomerization of a bound retinal. Strong electrostatic interactions within clusters of amino acids are modified by the conformational changes initiated by retinal motion leading to changes in proton affinity, driving transmembrane proton transfer. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) catalyzes the reduction of O2 to water. The protons needed for chemistry are bound from the N-side. The reduction chemistry also drives proton pumping from N- to P-side. Overall, in CcO the uptake of 4 electrons to reduce O2 transports 8 charges across the membrane, with each reduction fully coupled to removal of two protons from the N-side, the delivery of one for chemistry and transport of the other to the P-side. PMID:23507617

  6. Antitumor triptycene analogs induce a rapid collapse of mitochondrial transmembrane potential in HL-60 cells and isolated mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Perchellet, Elisabeth M; Ward, Mary M; Lou, Kaiyan; Zhao, Huiping; Battina, Srinivas K; Wiredu, Bernard; Hua, Duy H; Perchellet, Jean-Pierre H

    2006-01-01

    Since synthetic analogs of triptycene (TT code number), such as bisquinones TT2 and TT13, can trigger cytochrome c release without caspase activation and retain their ability to induce apoptosis in multidrug-resistant (MDR) tumor cells, fluorescent probes of transmembrane potential have been used to determine whether these antitumor compounds might directly target mitochondria in cell and cell-free systems to cause the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential ( downward arrow Deltapsim) that is linked to permeability transition pore (PTP) opening. Using JC-1 dye, the abilities of various TT analogs to induce the downward arrow Deltapsim in wild-type and MDR HL-60 cells are rapid (within 5-20 min), irreversible after drug removal, concentration dependent in the 0.64-25 microM range, and generally related to their antitumor activities in vitro. The downward arrow Deltapsim caused by TT2 and TT13, which are more potent than mitoxantrone, staurosporine and the reference depolarizing agent, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), in HL-60 cells, are not prevented by caspase-2 or -8 inhibitors, suggesting that activation of these apical caspases upstream of mitochondria is not involved in this process. Antitumor TT analogs (0.64-25 microM) also mimic the abilities of the known depolarizing agents, CCCP, alamethicin, gramicidin A and 100 microM CaCl(2), to directly induce within 20 min the downward arrow Deltapsim in isolated mitochondria prepared from mouse liver and loaded with rhodamine 123 dye. The fact that 20 microM Ca(2+), which is insufficient to trigger depolarization on its own, is required to reveal the depolarizing effect of TT2 in isolated mitochondria suggests that antitumor TT analogs might interact with the PTP to alter its conformation and increase its Ca(2+) sensitivity. Indeed, such Ca(2+)-dependent downward arrowDeltapsim of isolated mitochondria treated with 25 microM TT2 or 100 microM Ca(2+) are blocked by ruthenium red. Daunorubicin

  7. Researches toward potassium channels on tumor progressions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zheng; Yang, Qian; You, Qidong

    2009-01-01

    As trans-membrane proteins located in cytoplasm and organelle membrane, potassium (K(+)) channels are generally divided into four super-families: voltage-gated K(+) channels (K(v)), Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (K(Ca)), inwardly rectifying K(+) channels (K(ir)) and two-pore domain K(+) channels (K(2P)). Since dysfunctions of K(+) channels would induce many diseases, various studies toward their functions in physiologic and pathologic process have been extensively launched. This review focuses on the recent advances of K(+) channels in tumor progression, including the brief introduction of K(+) channels, the role of K(+) channels in tumor cells, the possible mechanism of action at cellular level, and the possible application of K(+) channel modulators in cancer chemotherapy.

  8. Dynamic behaviors and transport properties of ethanol molecules in transmembrane cyclic peptide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Fan, Jianfen; Li, Hui; Yan, Xiliang; Yu, Yi

    2015-07-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the dynamic behaviors and transport properties of ethanol molecules in transmembrane cyclic peptide nanotubes (CPNTs) with various radii, i.e., 8 × ( W L ¯ ) n = 3 , 4 , 5 / POPE . The results show that ethanol molecules spontaneously fill the octa- and deca-CPNTs, but not the hexa-CPNT. In the octa-CPNT, ethanol molecules are trapped at individual gaps with their carbon skeletons perpendicular to the tube axis and hydroxyl groups towards the tube wall, forming a broken single-file chain. As the channel radius increases, ethanol molecules inside the deca-CPNT tend to form a tubular layer and the hydroxyl groups mainly stretch towards the tube axis. Computations of diffusion coefficients indicate that ethanol molecules in the octa-CPNT nearly lost their diffusion abilities, while those in the deca-CPNT diffuse as 4.5 times as in a (8, 8) carbon nanotube with a similar tube diameter. The osmotic and diffusion permeabilities (pf and pd, respectively) of the octa- and deca-CPNTs transporting ethanol were deduced for the first time. The distributions of the gauche and trans conformers of ethanol molecules in two CPNTs are quite similar, both with approximately 57% gauche conformers. The non-bonded interactions of channel ethanol with a CPNT wall and surrounding ethanol were explored. The potential of mean force elucidates the mechanism underlying the transporting characteristics of channel ethanol in a transmembrane CPNT.

  9. Dynamic behaviors and transport properties of ethanol molecules in transmembrane cyclic peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Fan, Jianfen; Li, Hui; Yan, Xiliang; Yu, Yi

    2015-07-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the dynamic behaviors and transport properties of ethanol molecules in transmembrane cyclic peptide nanotubes (CPNTs) with various radii, i.e., 8×(WL¯)n=3,4,5/POPE. The results show that ethanol molecules spontaneously fill the octa- and deca-CPNTs, but not the hexa-CPNT. In the octa-CPNT, ethanol molecules are trapped at individual gaps with their carbon skeletons perpendicular to the tube axis and hydroxyl groups towards the tube wall, forming a broken single-file chain. As the channel radius increases, ethanol molecules inside the deca-CPNT tend to form a tubular layer and the hydroxyl groups mainly stretch towards the tube axis. Computations of diffusion coefficients indicate that ethanol molecules in the octa-CPNT nearly lost their diffusion abilities, while those in the deca-CPNT diffuse as 4.5 times as in a (8, 8) carbon nanotube with a similar tube diameter. The osmotic and diffusion permeabilities (pf and pd, respectively) of the octa- and deca-CPNTs transporting ethanol were deduced for the first time. The distributions of the gauche and trans conformers of ethanol molecules in two CPNTs are quite similar, both with approximately 57% gauche conformers. The non-bonded interactions of channel ethanol with a CPNT wall and surrounding ethanol were explored. The potential of mean force elucidates the mechanism underlying the transporting characteristics of channel ethanol in a transmembrane CPNT. PMID:26156492

  10. Transport properties of simple organic molecules in a transmembrane cyclic peptide nanotube.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Fan, Jian Fen; Zhang, Ming Ming; Weng, Pei Pei; Lin, Hui Fang

    2016-05-01

    Multiple molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to explore the transport properties of single methane, methanol, and ethanol molecules through the water-filled transmembrane cyclic peptide nanotube (CPNT) of 8 × (WL)₄-POPE, as well as the potential application of this CPNT in the separation of an alcohol/water mixture. Molecular size and hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity were found to significantly influence molecular diffusion behavior in the channel. Methane and ethanol display more explicit distributions in midplane regions, while methanol mainly occurs in α-plane zones. Methane and ethanol drift faster near an α-plane zone, whereas methanol diffuses uniformly throughout the whole transmembrane region. The dipole orientation of channel methanol is significantly affected by the bare carbonyl groups at the tube mouths and flips mainly in gap 4, whereas the rotation of ethanol is blocked. Ball-shaped hydrophobic methane experiences more flips in gap 4. The PMF (potential of mean force) profiles of the three organic molecules disclose their different diffusion behaviors in the CPNT. Amphiphilic alcohols are able to form direct H-bonds with channel water and the tube. Both single and double water bridges with the tube were observed in the methanol and ethanol systems. The different adsorption behaviors of the alcohols and water in the dehydrated CPNT may lead to the potential application of the CPNT as a means of separating alcohols from water. PMID:27083567

  11. Different transport behaviors of NH4 (+) and NH3 in transmembrane cyclic peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingming; Fan, Jianfen; Xu, Jian; Weng, Peipei; Lin, Huifang

    2016-10-01

    Two water-filled transmembrane cyclic peptide nanotubes (CPNTs) of 8×cyclo-(WL)n=4,5/POPE were chosen to investigate the dependences of the transport properties of the positive NH4 (+) and neutral NH3 on the channel radius. Molecular dynamic simulations revealed that molecular charge, size, ability to form H-bonds and channel radius all significantly influence the behaviors of NH4 (+) and NH3 in a CPNT. Higher electrostatic interactions, more H-bonds, and water-bridges were found in the NH4 (+) system, resulting in NH4 (+) meeting higher energy barriers, while NH3 can enter, exit and permeate the channels effortlessly. This work sheds a first light on the differences between the mechanisms of NH4 (+) and NH3 moving in a CPNT at an atomic level. Graphical Abstract Snapshot of the simulation system of NH4 (+)_octa-CPNT with an NH4 (+) initially positioned at one mouth of the tube, PMF profiles for single NH4 (+) ion and NH3 molecule moving through water-filled transmembrane CPNTs of 8×cyclo-(WL)n=4,5/POPE and sketch graphs of the possible H-bond forms of NH3 and NH4 (+) with the neighboring water. PMID:27600817

  12. Molecular Genetics of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator: Genotype and Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sosnay, Patrick R; Raraigh, Karen S; Gibson, Ronald L

    2016-08-01

    The cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene encodes an epithelial ion channel. Although one mutation remains the most common cause of CF (F508del), there have been more than 2000 reported variations in CFTR. For the most part, individuals who carry only one mutation (heterozygotes) have no symptoms; individuals who inherit deleterious mutations from both parents have CF. However, growing awareness of CFTR mutations that do not ever or do not always cause CF, and individuals with mild or single-organ system manifestations of CFTR-related disease have made this Mendelian relationship more complex. PMID:27469177

  13. Single-channel kinetics of BK (Slo1) channels

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Yanyan; Magleby, Karl L.

    2014-01-01

    Single-channel kinetics has proven a powerful tool to reveal information about the gating mechanisms that control the opening and closing of ion channels. This introductory review focuses on the gating of large conductance Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK or Slo1) channels at the single-channel level. It starts with single-channel current records and progresses to presentation and analysis of single-channel data and the development of gating mechanisms in terms of discrete state Markov (DSM) models. The DSM models are formulated in terms of the tetrameric modular structure of BK channels, consisting of a central transmembrane pore-gate domain (PGD) attached to four surrounding transmembrane voltage sensing domains (VSD) and a large intracellular cytosolic domain (CTD), also referred to as the gating ring. The modular structure and data analysis shows that the Ca2+ and voltage dependent gating considered separately can each be approximated by 10-state two-tiered models with five closed states on the upper tier and five open states on the lower tier. The modular structure and joint Ca2+ and voltage dependent gating are consistent with a 50 state two-tiered model with 25 closed states on the upper tier and 25 open states on the lower tier. Adding an additional tier of brief closed (flicker states) to the 10-state or 50-state models improved the description of the gating. For fixed experimental conditions a channel would gate in only a subset of the potential number of states. The detected number of states and the correlations between adjacent interval durations are consistent with the tiered models. The examined models can account for the single-channel kinetics and the bursting behavior of gating. Ca2+ and voltage activate BK channels by predominantly increasing the effective opening rate of the channel with a smaller decrease in the effective closing rate. Ca2+ and depolarization thus activate by mainly destabilizing the closed states. PMID:25653620

  14. Transmembrane beta-barrel protein structure prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, Arlo; Baldi, Pierre

    Transmembrane β-barrel (TMB) proteins are embedded in the outer membranes of mitochondria, Gram-negative bacteria, and chloroplasts. These proteins perform critical functions, including active ion-transport and passive nutrient intake. Therefore, there is a need for accurate prediction of secondary and tertiary structures of TMB proteins. A variety of methods have been developed for predicting the secondary structure and these predictions are very useful for constructing a coarse topology of TMB structure; however, they do not provide enough information to construct a low-resolution tertiary structure for a TMB protein. In addition, while the overall structural architecture is well conserved among TMB proteins, the amino acid sequences are highly divergent. Thus, traditional homology modeling methods cannot be applied to many putative TMB proteins. Here, we describe the TMBpro: a pipeline of methods for predicting TMB secondary structure, β-residue contacts, and finally tertiary structure. The tertiary prediction method relies on the specific construction rules that TMB proteins adhere to and on the predicted β-residue contacts to dramatically reduce the search space for the model building procedure.

  15. Video imaging of cardiac transmembrane activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, William T.; Davidenko, Jorge; Cabo, Candido; Jalife, Jose

    1994-05-01

    High resolution movies of transmembrane electrical activity in thin (0.5 mm) slices of sheep epicardial muscle were recorded by optical imaging with voltage-sensitive dyes and a CCD video camera. Activity was monitored at approximately 65,000 picture elements per 2 cm2 tissue for several seconds at a 16 msec sampling rate. Simple image processing operations permitted visualization and analysis of the optical signal, while isochrome maps depicted complex patterns of propagation. Maps of action potential duration and regional intermittent conduction block showed that even these small preparations may exhibit considerable spatial heterogeneity. Self-sustaining reentrant activity in the form of spiral waves was consistently initiated and observed either drifting across the tissue or anchored to small heterogeneities. The current limitations of video optical mappings are a low signal-to- noise ratio and low temporal resolution. The advantages include high spatial resolution and direct correlation of electrical activity with anatomy. Video optical mapping permits the analysis of the electrophysiological properties of any region of the preparation during both regular stimulation and reentrant activation, providing a useful tool for studying cardiac arrhythmias.

  16. A Functional-Phylogenetic Classification System for Transmembrane Solute Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Saier, Milton H.

    2000-01-01

    A comprehensive classification system for transmembrane molecular transporters has been developed and recently approved by the transport panel of the nomenclature committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. This system is based on (i) transporter class and subclass (mode of transport and energy coupling mechanism), (ii) protein phylogenetic family and subfamily, and (iii) substrate specificity. Almost all of the more than 250 identified families of transporters include members that function exclusively in transport. Channels (115 families), secondary active transporters (uniporters, symporters, and antiporters) (78 families), primary active transporters (23 families), group translocators (6 families), and transport proteins of ill-defined function or of unknown mechanism (51 families) constitute distinct categories. Transport mode and energy coupling prove to be relatively immutable characteristics and therefore provide primary bases for classification. Phylogenetic grouping reflects structure, function, mechanism, and often substrate specificity and therefore provides a reliable secondary basis for classification. Substrate specificity and polarity of transport prove to be more readily altered during evolutionary history and therefore provide a tertiary basis for classification. With very few exceptions, a phylogenetic family of transporters includes members that function by a single transport mode and energy coupling mechanism, although a variety of substrates may be transported, sometimes with either inwardly or outwardly directed polarity. In this review, I provide cross-referencing of well-characterized constituent transporters according to (i) transport mode, (ii) energy coupling mechanism, (iii) phylogenetic grouping, and (iv) substrates transported. The structural features and distribution of recognized family members throughout the living world are also evaluated. The tabulations should facilitate familial and functional

  17. A functional-phylogenetic classification system for transmembrane solute transporters.

    PubMed

    Saier, M H

    2000-06-01

    A comprehensive classification system for transmembrane molecular transporters has been developed and recently approved by the transport panel of the nomenclature committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. This system is based on (i) transporter class and subclass (mode of transport and energy coupling mechanism), (ii) protein phylogenetic family and subfamily, and (iii) substrate specificity. Almost all of the more than 250 identified families of transporters include members that function exclusively in transport. Channels (115 families), secondary active transporters (uniporters, symporters, and antiporters) (78 families), primary active transporters (23 families), group translocators (6 families), and transport proteins of ill-defined function or of unknown mechanism (51 families) constitute distinct categories. Transport mode and energy coupling prove to be relatively immutable characteristics and therefore provide primary bases for classification. Phylogenetic grouping reflects structure, function, mechanism, and often substrate specificity and therefore provides a reliable secondary basis for classification. Substrate specificity and polarity of transport prove to be more readily altered during evolutionary history and therefore provide a tertiary basis for classification. With very few exceptions, a phylogenetic family of transporters includes members that function by a single transport mode and energy coupling mechanism, although a variety of substrates may be transported, sometimes with either inwardly or outwardly directed polarity. In this review, I provide cross-referencing of well-characterized constituent transporters according to (i) transport mode, (ii) energy coupling mechanism, (iii) phylogenetic grouping, and (iv) substrates transported. The structural features and distribution of recognized family members throughout the living world are also evaluated. The tabulations should facilitate familial and functional

  18. Targeting potassium channels in cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Potassium channels are pore-forming transmembrane proteins that regulate a multitude of biological processes by controlling potassium flow across cell membranes. Aberrant potassium channel functions contribute to diseases such as epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia, and neuromuscular symptoms collectively known as channelopathies. Increasing evidence suggests that cancer constitutes another category of channelopathies associated with dysregulated channel expression. Indeed, potassium channel–modulating agents have demonstrated antitumor efficacy. Potassium channels regulate cancer cell behaviors such as proliferation and migration through both canonical ion permeation–dependent and noncanonical ion permeation–independent functions. Given their cell surface localization and well-known pharmacology, pharmacological strategies to target potassium channel could prove to be promising cancer therapeutics. PMID:25049269

  19. Failure of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator to Conduct ATP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, M. M.; Quinton, P. M.; Haws, C.; Wine, J. J.; Grygorczyk, R.; Tabcharani, J. A.; Hanrahan, J. W.; Gunderson, K. L.; Kopito, R. R.

    1996-03-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is chloride ion channel regulated by protein kinase A and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Loss of CFTR-mediated chloride ion conductance from the apical plasma membrane of epithelial cells is a primary physiological lesion in cystic fibrosis. CFTR has also been suggested to function as an ATP channel, although the size of the ATP anion is much larger than the estimated size of the CFTR pore. ATP was not conducted through CFTR in intact organs, polarized human lung cell lines, stably transfected mammalian cell lines, or planar lipid bilayers reconstituted with CFTR protein. These findings suggest that ATP permeation through the CFTR is unlikely to contribute to the normal function of CFTR or to the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis.

  20. Differential function of the two nucleotide binding domains on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Nagel, G

    1999-12-01

    The genetic disease cystic fibrosis is caused by defects in the chloride channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). CFTR belongs to the family of ABC transporters. In contrast to most other members of this family which transport substrates actively across a membrane, the main function of CFTR is to regulate passive flux of substrates across the plasma membrane. Chloride channel activity of CFTR is dependent on protein phosphorylation and presence of nucleoside triphosphates. From electrophysiological studies of CFTR detailed models of its regulation by phosphorylation and nucleotide interaction have evolved. These investigations provide ample evidence that ATP hydrolysis is crucial for CFTR gating. It becomes apparent that the two nucleotide binding domains on CFTR not only diverge strongly in sequence, but also in function. Based on previous models and taking into account new data from pre-steady-state experiments, a refined model for the action of nucleotides at two nucleotide binding domains was recently proposed.

  1. A deterministic algorithm for constrained enumeration of transmembrane protein folds.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, William Michael; Young, Malin M.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Schoeniger, Joseph S.

    2004-07-01

    A deterministic algorithm for enumeration of transmembrane protein folds is presented. Using a set of sparse pairwise atomic distance constraints (such as those obtained from chemical cross-linking, FRET, or dipolar EPR experiments), the algorithm performs an exhaustive search of secondary structure element packing conformations distributed throughout the entire conformational space. The end result is a set of distinct protein conformations, which can be scored and refined as part of a process designed for computational elucidation of transmembrane protein structures.

  2. MONNA, a Potent and Selective Blocker for Transmembrane Protein with Unknown Function 16/Anoctamin-1

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Soo-Jin; Hwang, Seok Jin; Jung, Jonghoon; Yu, Kuai; Kim, Jeongyeon; Choi, Jung Yoon; Hartzell, H. Criss

    2013-01-01

    Transmembrane protein with unknown function 16/anoctamin-1 (ANO1) is a protein widely expressed in mammalian tissues, and it has the properties of the classic calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC). This protein has been implicated in numerous major physiological functions. However, the lack of effective and selective blockers has hindered a detailed study of the physiological functions of this channel. In this study, we have developed a potent and selective blocker for endogenous ANO1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes (xANO1) using a drug screening method we previously established (Oh et al., 2008). We have synthesized a number of anthranilic acid derivatives and have determined the correlation between biological activity and the nature and position of substituents in these derived compounds. A structure-activity relationship revealed novel chemical classes of xANO1 blockers. The derivatives contain a −NO2 group on position 5 of a naphthyl group-substituted anthranilic acid, and they fully blocked xANO1 chloride currents with an IC50 < 10 μM. The most potent blocker, N-((4-methoxy)-2-naphthyl)-5-nitroanthranilic acid (MONNA), had an IC50 of 0.08 μM for xANO1. Selectivity tests revealed that other chloride channels such as bestrophin-1, chloride channel protein 2, and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator were not appreciably blocked by 10∼30 μM MONNA. The potent and selective blockers for ANO1 identified here should permit pharmacological dissection of ANO1/CaCC function and serve as potential candidates for drug therapy of related diseases such as hypertension, cystic fibrosis, bronchitis, asthma, and hyperalgesia. PMID:23997117

  3. Characterization of Disease-Associated Mutations in Human Transmembrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, János; Szakács, Gergely; Tusnády, Gábor E.

    2016-01-01

    Transmembrane protein coding genes are commonly associated with human diseases. We characterized disease causing mutations and natural polymorphisms in transmembrane proteins by mapping missense genetic variations from the UniProt database on the transmembrane protein topology listed in the Human Transmembrane Proteome database. We found characteristic differences in the spectrum of amino acid changes within transmembrane regions: in the case of disease associated mutations the non-polar to non-polar and non-polar to charged amino acid changes are equally frequent. In contrast, in the case of natural polymorphisms non-polar to charged amino acid changes are rare while non-polar to non-polar changes are common. The majority of disease associated mutations result in glycine to arginine and leucine to proline substitutions. Mutations to positively charged amino acids are more common in the center of the lipid bilayer, where they cause more severe structural and functional anomalies. Our analysis contributes to the better understanding of the effect of disease associated mutations in transmembrane proteins, which can help prioritize genetic variations in personal genomic investigations. PMID:26986070

  4. Control of epithelial Na+ conductance by the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Kunzelmann, K; Schreiber, R; Nitschke, R; Mall, M

    2000-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an epithelial Cl- channel expressed in luminal membranes of secretory and reabsorptive epithelia. CFTR plays a predominant role in both cAMP- and Ca2+-activated secretion of electrolytes. Although Ca2+-dependent Cl- channels exist independent of CFTR in the airway epithelium, their physiological significance remains to be determined. However, CFTR seems to be the only relevant Cl- conductance in the colonic epithelium. Apart from its secretory function, CFTR also has a task in regulating the reabsorption of electrolytes by controlling the activity of the epithelial Na+ channel, ENaC. Accordingly, defects in CFTR causing the disease cystic fibrosis (CF) lead to disturbances of both the secretion and absorption of electrolytes. Therefore, it is unclear what is pathophysiologically more important for the development of CF lung disease, the impaired secretion of Cl- or the enhanced reabsorption of Na+ and consecutive hyperabsorption of electrolytes. The mechanisms of how CFTR and ENaC interact are unknown. Previous work has given rise to several interesting working hypothesis, such as direct protein interaction or interaction via cytoskeletal proteins. Recent studies demonstrate the importance of the first nucleotide binding fold of CFTR, not only for the inhibition of ENaC but also for the interaction with other ion channels. Further studies are required to demonstrate whether regulation of other ion channels and membrane transport by CFTR occur by a common mechanism. PMID:10898518

  5. Positioning of extracellular loop 1 affects pore gating of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Infield, Daniel T; Cui, Guiying; Kuang, Christopher; McCarty, Nael A

    2016-03-01

    The cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride ion channel, the dysfunction of which directly leads to the life-shortening disease CF. Extracellular loop 1 (ECL1) of CFTR contains several residues involved in stabilizing the open state of the channel; some, including D110, are sites of disease-associated gating mutations. Structures from related proteins suggest that the position of CFTR's extracellular loops may change considerably during gating. To better understand the roles of ECL1 in CFTR function, we utilized functional cysteine cross-linking to determine the effects of modulation of D110C-CFTR and of a double mutant of D110C with K892C in extracellular loop 4 (ECL4). The reducing agent DTT elicited a large potentiation of the macroscopic conductance of D110C/K892C-CFTR, likely due to breakage of a spontaneous disulfide bond between C110 and C892. DTT-reduced D110C/K892C-CFTR was rapidly inhibited by binding cadmium ions with high affinity, suggesting that these residues frequently come in close proximity in actively gating channels. Effects of DTT and cadmium on modulation of pore gating were demonstrated at the single-channel level. Finally, disulfided D110C/K892C-CFTR channels were found to be less sensitive than wild-type or DTT-treated D110C/K892C-CFTR channels to stimulation by IBMX, suggesting an impact of this conformational restriction on channel activation by phosphorylation. The results are best explained in the context of a model of CFTR gating wherein stable channel opening requires correct positioning of functional elements structurally influenced by ECL1. PMID:26684250

  6. Cholesterol binding to ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Levitan, Irena; Singh, Dev K.; Rosenhouse-Dantsker, Avia

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies demonstrated that membrane cholesterol is a major regulator of ion channel function. The goal of this review is to discuss significant advances that have been recently achieved in elucidating the mechanisms responsible for cholesterol regulation of ion channels. The first major insight that comes from growing number of studies that based on the sterol specificity of cholesterol effects, show that several types of ion channels (nAChR, Kir, BK, TRPV) are regulated by specific sterol-protein interactions. This conclusion is supported by demonstrating direct saturable binding of cholesterol to a bacterial Kir channel. The second major advance in the field is the identification of putative cholesterol binding sites in several types of ion channels. These include sites at locations associated with the well-known cholesterol binding motif CRAC and its reversed form CARC in nAChR, BK, and TRPV, as well as novel cholesterol binding regions in Kir channels. Notably, in the majority of these channels, cholesterol is suggested to interact mainly with hydrophobic residues in non-annular regions of the channels being embedded in between transmembrane protein helices. We also discuss how identification of putative cholesterol binding sites is an essential step to understand the mechanistic basis of cholesterol-induced channel regulation. Clearly, however, these are only the first few steps in obtaining a general understanding of cholesterol-ion channels interactions and their roles in cellular and organ functions. PMID:24616704

  7. Non-silent story on synonymous sites in voltage-gated ion channel genes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tong; Ko, Eun A; Gu, Wanjun; Lim, Inja; Bang, Hyoweon; Ko, Jae-Hong

    2012-01-01

    Synonymous mutations are usually referred to as "silent", but increasing evidence shows that they are not neutral in a wide range of organisms. We looked into the relationship between synonymous codon usage bias and residue importance of voltage-gated ion channel proteins in mice, rats, and humans. We tested whether translationally optimal codons are associated with transmembrane or channel-forming regions, i.e., the sites that are particularly likely to be involved in the closing and opening of an ion channel. Our hypothesis is that translationally optimal codons are preferred at the sites within transmembrane domains or channel-forming regions in voltage-gated ion channel genes to avoid mistranslation-induced protein misfolding or loss-of-function. Using the Mantel-Haenszel procedure, which applies to categorical data, we found that translationally optimal codons are more likely to be used at transmembrane residues and the residues involved in channel-forming. We also found that the conservation level at synonymous sites in the transmembrane region is significantly higher than that in the non-transmembrane region. This study provides evidence that synonymous sites in voltage-gated ion channel genes are not neutral. Silent mutations at channel-related sites may lead to dysfunction of the ion channel.

  8. Ultrasound modulates ion channel currents.

    PubMed

    Kubanek, Jan; Shi, Jingyi; Marsh, Jon; Chen, Di; Deng, Cheri; Cui, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial focused ultrasound (US) has been demonstrated to stimulate neurons in animals and humans, but the mechanism of this effect is unknown. It has been hypothesized that US, a mechanical stimulus, may mediate cellular discharge by activating mechanosensitive ion channels embedded within cellular membranes. To test this hypothesis, we expressed potassium and sodium mechanosensitive ion channels (channels of the two-pore-domain potassium family (K2P) including TREK-1, TREK-2, TRAAK; NaV1.5) in the Xenopus oocyte system. Focused US (10 MHz, 0.3-4.9 W/cm(2)) modulated the currents flowing through the ion channels on average by up to 23%, depending on channel and stimulus intensity. The effects were reversible upon repeated stimulation and were abolished when a channel blocker (ranolazine to block NaV1.5, BaCl2 to block K2P channels) was applied to the solution. These data reveal at the single cell level that focused US modulates the activity of specific ion channels to mediate transmembrane currents. These findings open doors to investigations of the effects of  US on ion channels expressed in neurons, retinal cells, or cardiac cells, which may lead to important medical applications. The findings may also pave the way to the development of sonogenetics: a non-invasive, US-based analogue of optogenetics. PMID:27112990

  9. Ultrasound modulates ion channel currents

    PubMed Central

    Kubanek, Jan; Shi, Jingyi; Marsh, Jon; Chen, Di; Deng, Cheri; Cui, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial focused ultrasound (US) has been demonstrated to stimulate neurons in animals and humans, but the mechanism of this effect is unknown. It has been hypothesized that US, a mechanical stimulus, may mediate cellular discharge by activating mechanosensitive ion channels embedded within cellular membranes. To test this hypothesis, we expressed potassium and sodium mechanosensitive ion channels (channels of the two-pore-domain potassium family (K2P) including TREK-1, TREK-2, TRAAK; NaV1.5) in the Xenopus oocyte system. Focused US (10 MHz, 0.3–4.9 W/cm2) modulated the currents flowing through the ion channels on average by up to 23%, depending on channel and stimulus intensity. The effects were reversible upon repeated stimulation and were abolished when a channel blocker (ranolazine to block NaV1.5, BaCl2 to block K2P channels) was applied to the solution. These data reveal at the single cell level that focused US modulates the activity of specific ion channels to mediate transmembrane currents. These findings open doors to investigations of the effects of  US on ion channels expressed in neurons, retinal cells, or cardiac cells, which may lead to important medical applications. The findings may also pave the way to the development of sonogenetics: a non-invasive, US-based analogue of optogenetics. PMID:27112990

  10. Transmembrane domain interactions control biological functions of neuropilin-1.

    PubMed

    Roth, Lise; Nasarre, Cécile; Dirrig-Grosch, Sylvie; Aunis, Dominique; Crémel, Gérard; Hubert, Pierre; Bagnard, Dominique

    2008-02-01

    Neuropilin-1 (NRP1) is a transmembrane receptor playing a pivotal role in the control of semaphorins and VEGF signaling pathways. The exact mechanism controlling semaphorin receptor complex formation is unknown. A structural analysis and modeling of NRP1 revealed a putative dimerization GxxxG motif potentially important for NRP1 dimerization and oligomerization. Our data show that this motif mediates the dimerization of the transmembrane domain of NRP1 as demonstrated by a dimerization assay (ToxLuc assay) performed in natural membrane and FRET analysis. A synthetic peptide derived from the transmembrane segment of NRP1 abolished the inhibitory effect of Sema3A. This effect depends on the capacity of the peptide to interfere with NRP1 dimerization and the formation of oligomeric complexes. Mutation of the GxxxG dimerization motif in the transmembrane domain of NRP1 confirmed its biological importance for Sema3A signaling. Overall, our results shed light on an essential step required for semaphorin signaling and provide novel evidence for the crucial role of transmembrane domain of bitopic protein containing GxxxG motif in the formation of receptor complexes that are a prerequisite for cell signaling.

  11. PDBTM: Protein Data Bank of transmembrane proteins after 8 years.

    PubMed

    Kozma, Dániel; Simon, István; Tusnády, Gábor E

    2013-01-01

    The PDBTM database (available at http://pdbtm.enzim.hu), the first comprehensive and up-to-date transmembrane protein selection of the Protein Data Bank, was launched in 2004. The database was created and has been continuously updated by the TMDET algorithm that is able to distinguish between transmembrane and non-transmembrane proteins using their 3D atomic coordinates only. The TMDET algorithm can locate the spatial positions of transmembrane proteins in lipid bilayer as well. During the last 8 years not only the size of the PDBTM database has been steadily growing from ∼400 to 1700 entries but also new structural elements have been identified, in addition to the well-known α-helical bundle and β-barrel structures. Numerous 'exotic' transmembrane protein structures have been solved since the first release, which has made it necessary to define these new structural elements, such as membrane loops or interfacial helices in the database. This article reports the new features of the PDBTM database that have been added since its first release, and our current efforts to keep the database up-to-date and easy to use so that it may continue to serve as a fundamental resource for the scientific community.

  12. Isolated-patch recording from liposomes containing functionally reconstituted chloride channels from Torpedo electroplax.

    PubMed Central

    Tank, D W; Miller, C; Webb, W W

    1982-01-01

    Small unilamellar vesicles formed from purified phospholids by detergent/dialysis methods may be enlarged to 30-microns diameter by freezing and thawing. Very-high-resistance seals were formed by applying a glass micropipette to the surface of these large liposomes, and single bilayer "patches" of membrane were isolated from the liposome surface while remaining sealed to the micropipette. The exogenous channel-forming peptides gramicidin and alamethicin induced characteristic single-channel fluctuation behavior in these excised patches held under voltage-clamp conditions. Large liposomes were formed from the small unilamellar vesicles made from cholate extracts of Torpedo electroplax plasma membrane vesicles. Isolated patches formed from these reconstituted membranes displayed current fluctuations due to single voltage-gated Cl- channels from non-innervated-face membranes; the properties of these Cl- channels are identical to those observed in planar bilayer membranes after direct insertion from native membranes. This liposome-patch method combines the advantages of membrane protein incorporation into liposomes with high-resolution electrical recording methods and may provide a generally applicable approach to the study of integral membrane channel proteins after solubilization and reconstitution. Images PMID:6296849

  13. Structure and mechanism of proton transport through the transmembrane tetrameric M2 protein bundle of the influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Rudresh; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Fiorin, Giacomo; Levine, Benjamin G; Polishchuk, Alexei L; Balannik, Victoria; Samish, Ilan; Lamb, Robert A; Pinto, Lawrence H; DeGrado, William F; Klein, Michael L

    2010-08-24

    The M2 proton channel from influenza A virus is an essential protein that mediates transport of protons across the viral envelope. This protein has a single transmembrane helix, which tetramerizes into the active channel. At the heart of the conduction mechanism is the exchange of protons between the His37 imidazole moieties of M2 and waters confined to the M2 bundle interior. Protons are conducted as the total charge of the four His37 side chains passes through 2(+) and 3(+) with a pK(a) near 6. A 1.65 A resolution X-ray structure of the transmembrane protein (residues 25-46), crystallized at pH 6.5, reveals a pore that is lined by alternating layers of sidechains and well-ordered water clusters, which offer a pathway for proton conduction. The His37 residues form a box-like structure, bounded on either side by water clusters with well-ordered oxygen atoms at close distance. The conformation of the protein, which is intermediate between structures previously solved at higher and lower pH, suggests a mechanism by which conformational changes might facilitate asymmetric diffusion through the channel in the presence of a proton gradient. Moreover, protons diffusing through the channel need not be localized to a single His37 imidazole, but instead may be delocalized over the entire His-box and associated water clusters. Thus, the new crystal structure provides a possible unification of the discrete site versus continuum conduction models.

  14. How Phosphorylation and ATPase Activity Regulate Anion Flux though the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR).

    PubMed

    Zwick, Matthias; Esposito, Cinzia; Hellstern, Manuel; Seelig, Anna

    2016-07-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, ABCC7), mutations of which cause cystic fibrosis, belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family and works as a channel for small anions, such as chloride and bicarbonate. Anion channel activity is known to depend on phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) and CFTR-ATPase activity. Whereas anion channel activity has been extensively investigated, phosphorylation and CFTR-ATPase activity are still poorly understood. Here, we show that the two processes can be measured in a label-free and non-invasive manner in real time in live cells, stably transfected with CFTR. This study reveals three key findings. (i) The major contribution (≥90%) to the total CFTR-related ATP hydrolysis rate is due to phosphorylation by PKA and the minor contribution (≤10%) to CFTR-ATPase activity. (ii) The mutant CFTR-E1371S that is still conductive, but defective in ATP hydrolysis, is not phosphorylated, suggesting that phosphorylation requires a functional nucleotide binding domain and occurs in the post-hydrolysis transition state. (iii) CFTR-ATPase activity is inversely related to CFTR anion flux. The present data are consistent with a model in which CFTR is in a closed conformation with two ATPs bound. The open conformation is induced by ATP hydrolysis and corresponds to the post-hydrolysis transition state that is stabilized by phosphorylation and binding of chloride channel potentiators. PMID:27226582

  15. Neuronal transmembrane chloride electrochemical gradient: a key player in GABA A receptor activation physiological effect.

    PubMed

    Cupello, A

    2003-06-01

    It has long been accepted that GABA is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain, acting via GABA(A) or GABA(B) receptors. However, new evidences have shown that it may work as an excitatory transmitter, especially in the brain of newly-born animals and acting via GABA(A) receptors. The difference in the end results of GABA(A) receptors activation in the two cases is not due to the receptor associated channels, which in both cases are chloride channels. The different physiological effect in the two cases is due to different electrochemical gradients for chloride. When GABA acting via GABA(A) receptors is inhibitory, either there is no transmembrane electrochemical gradient for chloride or there is one forcing such negative ions into the nerve cell, once chloride channels are open. Viceversa, GABA is excitatory when the electrochemical gradient is such to make chloride ions flow outside the cell, upon opening of the GABA activated chloride channels.In this review this concept is discussed in details and evidence in the scientific literature for the existence of different types of chloride pumps (either internalizing or extruding chloride) is compiled.

  16. Vitamin A Transport and the Transmembrane Pore in the Cell-Surface Receptor for Plasma Retinol Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ming; Kawaguchi, Riki; Ter-Stepanian, Mariam; Kassai, Miki; Sun, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin A and its derivatives (retinoids) play diverse and crucial functions from embryogenesis to adulthood and are used as therapeutic agents in human medicine for eye and skin diseases, infections and cancer. Plasma retinol binding protein (RBP) is the principal and specific vitamin A carrier in the blood and binds vitamin A at 1∶1 ratio. STRA6 is the high-affinity membrane receptor for RBP and mediates cellular vitamin A uptake. STRA6 null mice have severely depleted vitamin A reserves for vision and consequently have vision loss, even under vitamin A sufficient conditions. STRA6 null humans have a wide range of severe pathological phenotypes in many organs including the eye, brain, heart and lung. Known membrane transport mechanisms involve transmembrane pores that regulate the transport of the substrate (e.g., the gating of ion channels). STRA6 represents a new type of membrane receptor. How this receptor interacts with its transport substrate vitamin A and the functions of its nine transmembrane domains are still completely unknown. These questions are critical to understanding the molecular basis of STRA6′s activities and its regulation. We employ acute chemical modification to introduce chemical side chains to STRA6 in a site-specific manner. We found that modifications with specific chemicals at specific positions in or near the transmembrane domains of this receptor can almost completely suppress its vitamin A transport activity. These experiments provide the first evidence for the existence of a transmembrane pore, analogous to the pore of ion channels, for this new type of cell-surface receptor. PMID:24223695

  17. Prediction of three-dimensional transmembrane helical protein structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Patrick

    Membrane proteins are critical to living cells and their dysfunction can lead to serious diseases. High-resolution structures of these proteins would provide very valuable information for designing eficient therapies but membrane protein crystallization is a major bottleneck. As an important alternative approach, methods for predicting membrane protein structures have been developed in recent years. This chapter focuses on the problem of modeling the structure of transmembrane helical proteins, and describes recent advancements, current limitations, and future challenges facing de novo modeling, modeling with experimental constraints, and high-resolution comparative modeling of these proteins. Abbreviations: MP, membrane protein; SP, water-soluble protein; RMSD, root-mean square deviation; Cα RMSD, root-mean square deviation over Cα atoms; TM, transmembrane; TMH, transmembrane helix; GPCR, G protein-coupled receptor; 3D, three dimensional; NMR, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy; EPR, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy; FTIR, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  18. Optimizing an emperical scoring function for transmembrane protein structure determination.

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Malin M.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Gray, Genetha Anne; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2003-10-01

    We examine the problem of transmembrane protein structure determination. Like many other questions that arise in biological research, this problem cannot be addressed by traditional laboratory experimentation alone. An approach that integrates experiment and computation is required. We investigate a procedure which states the transmembrane protein structure determination problem as a bound constrained optimization problem using a special empirical scoring function, called Bundler, as the objective function. In this paper, we describe the optimization problem and some of its mathematical properties. We compare and contrast results obtained using two different derivative free optimization algorithms.

  19. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion binding as a probe of the pore.

    PubMed Central

    Mansoura, M K; Smith, S S; Choi, A D; Richards, N W; Strong, T V; Drumm, M L; Collins, F S; Dawson, D C

    1998-01-01

    We compared the effects of mutations in transmembrane segments (TMs) TM1, TM5, and TM6 on the conduction and activation properties of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) to determine which functional property was most sensitive to mutations and, thereby, to develop a criterion for measuring the importance of a particular residue or TM for anion conduction or activation. Anion substitution studies provided strong evidence for the binding of permeant anions in the pore. Anion binding was highly sensitive to point mutations in TM5 and TM6. Permeability ratios, in contrast, were relatively unaffected by the same mutations, so that anion binding emerged as the conduction property most sensitive to structural changes in CFTR. The relative insensitivity of permeability ratios to CFTR mutations was in accord with the notion that anion-water interactions are important determinants of permeability selectivity. By the criterion of anion binding, TM5 and TM6 were judged to be likely to contribute to the structure of the anion-selective pore, whereas TM1 was judged to be less important. Mutations in TM5 and TM6 also dramatically reduced the sensitivity of CFTR to activation by 3-isobutyl 1-methyl xanthine (IBMX), as expected if these TMs are intimately involved in the physical process that opens and closes the channel. PMID:9512029

  20. The electrophysiology of the beta-cell based on single transmembrane protein characteristics.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Hermann, Michael E

    2007-10-15

    The electrophysiology of beta-cells is at the origin of insulin secretion. beta-Cells exhibit a complex behavior upon stimulation with glucose including repeated bursts and continuous spiking. Mathematical modeling is most suitable to improve knowledge about the function of various transmembrane currents provided the model is based on reliable data. This is the first attempt to build a mathematical model for the beta-cell electrophysiology in a bottom-up approach that relies on single protein conductance data. The results of previous whole-cell-based models are reconsidered. The full simulation including all prominent transmembrane proteins in beta-cells is used to provide a functional interpretation of their role in beta-cell bursting and an updated vantage point of beta-cell electrophysiology. As a result of a number of in silico knock-out and block experiments the novel model makes some unexpected predictions: single-channel conductance data imply that large-conductance calcium-gated potassium currents acquire the potential of driving oscillations at supralarge glucose levels. A more complex burst interruption model is presented. It also turns out that, depending on the species, sodium currents may be more relevant than considered so far. Experiments are proposed to verify these predictions. PMID:17573431

  1. Expression of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator in Ganglia of Human Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Xue, Ruiqi; Gu, Huan; Qiu, Yamei; Guo, Yong; Korteweg, Christine; Huang, Jin; Gu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    CF is caused by mutations of the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) which is an anion selective transmembrane ion channel that mainly regulates chloride transport, expressed in the epithelia of various organs. Recently, we have demonstrated CFTR expression in the brain, the spinal cord and the sympathetic ganglia. This study aims to investigate the expression and distribution of CFTR in the ganglia of the human gastrointestinal tract. Fresh tissue and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded normal gastrointestinal tract samples were collected from eleven surgical patients and five autopsy cases. Immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, laser-assisted microdissection and nested reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction were performed. Expression of CFTR protein and mRNA was detected in neurons of the ganglia of all segments of the human gastrointestinal tract examined, including the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, appendix, colon and rectum. The extensive expression of CFTR in the enteric ganglia suggests that CFTR may play a role in the physiology of the innervation of the gastro-intestinal tract. The presence of dysfunctional CFTRs in enteric ganglia could, to a certain extent, explain the gastrointestinal symptoms frequently experienced by CF patients. PMID:27491544

  2. Expression of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator in Ganglia of Human Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Ruiqi; Gu, Huan; Qiu, Yamei; Guo, Yong; Korteweg, Christine; Huang, Jin; Gu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    CF is caused by mutations of the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) which is an anion selective transmembrane ion channel that mainly regulates chloride transport, expressed in the epithelia of various organs. Recently, we have demonstrated CFTR expression in the brain, the spinal cord and the sympathetic ganglia. This study aims to investigate the expression and distribution of CFTR in the ganglia of the human gastrointestinal tract. Fresh tissue and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded normal gastrointestinal tract samples were collected from eleven surgical patients and five autopsy cases. Immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, laser-assisted microdissection and nested reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction were performed. Expression of CFTR protein and mRNA was detected in neurons of the ganglia of all segments of the human gastrointestinal tract examined, including the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, appendix, colon and rectum. The extensive expression of CFTR in the enteric ganglia suggests that CFTR may play a role in the physiology of the innervation of the gastro-intestinal tract. The presence of dysfunctional CFTRs in enteric ganglia could, to a certain extent, explain the gastrointestinal symptoms frequently experienced by CF patients. PMID:27491544

  3. Nanoporous microbead supported bilayers: stability, physical characterization, and incorporation of functional transmembrane proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Ryan W. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Brozik, James A. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Brozik, Susan Marie; Cox, Jason M.; Lopez, Gabriel P.; Barrick, Todd A.; Flores, Adrean

    2007-03-01

    The introduction of functional transmembrane proteins into supported bilayer-based biomimetic systems presents a significant challenge for biophysics. Among the various methods for producing supported bilayers, liposomal fusion offers a versatile method for the introduction of membrane proteins into supported bilayers on a variety of substrates. In this study, the properties of protein containing unilamellar phosphocholine lipid bilayers on nanoporous silica microspheres are investigated. The effects of the silica substrate, pore structure, and the substrate curvature on the stability of the membrane and the functionality of the membrane protein are determined. Supported bilayers on porous silica microspheres show a significant increase in surface area on surfaces with structures in excess of 10 nm as well as an overall decrease in stability resulting from increasing pore size and curvature. Comparison of the liposomal and detergent-mediated introduction of purified bacteriorhodopsin (bR) and the human type 3 serotonin receptor (5HT3R) are investigated focusing on the resulting protein function, diffusion, orientation, and incorporation efficiency. In both cases, functional proteins are observed; however, the reconstitution efficiency and orientation selectivity are significantly enhanced through detergent-mediated protein reconstitution. The results of these experiments provide a basis for bulk ionic and fluorescent dye-based compartmentalization assays as well as single-molecule optical and single-channel electrochemical interrogation of transmembrane proteins in a biomimetic platform.

  4. Characterizing diverse orthologues of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein for structural studies.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Naomi L; Rimington, Tracy L; Ford, Robert C

    2015-10-01

    As an ion channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein occupies a unique niche within the ABC family. Orthologues of CFTR are extant throughout the animal kingdom from sharks to platypods to sheep, where the osmoregulatory function of the protein has been applied to differing lifestyles and diverse organ systems. In humans, loss-of-function mutations to CFTR cause the disease cystic fibrosis, which is a significant health burden in populations of white European descent. Orthologue screening has proved fruitful in the pursuit of high-resolution structural data for several membrane proteins, and we have applied some of the princples developed in previous studies to the expression and purification of CFTR. We have overexpressed this protein, along with evolutionarily diverse orthologues, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and developed a purification to isolate it in quantities sufficient for structural and functional studies. PMID:26517900

  5. Deorphanizing the human transmembrane genome: A landscape of uncharacterized membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Babcock, Joseph J; Li, Min

    2014-01-01

    The sequencing of the human genome has fueled the last decade of work to functionally characterize genome content. An important subset of genes encodes membrane proteins, which are the targets of many drugs. They reside in lipid bilayers, restricting their endogenous activity to a relatively specialized biochemical environment. Without a reference phenotype, the application of systematic screens to profile candidate membrane proteins is not immediately possible. Bioinformatics has begun to show its effectiveness in focusing the functional characterization of orphan proteins of a particular functional class, such as channels or receptors. Here we discuss integration of experimental and bioinformatics approaches for characterizing the orphan membrane proteome. By analyzing the human genome, a landscape reference for the human transmembrane genome is provided. PMID:24241348

  6. Charging the Quantum Capacitance of Graphene with a Single Biological Ion Channel

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of cell and organelle membranes (lipid bilayers) with nanoelectronics can enable new technologies to sense and measure electrophysiology in qualitatively new ways. To date, a variety of sensing devices have been demonstrated to measure membrane currents through macroscopic numbers of ion channels. However, nanoelectronic based sensing of single ion channel currents has been a challenge. Here, we report graphene-based field-effect transistors combined with supported lipid bilayers as a platform for measuring, for the first time, individual ion channel activity. We show that the supported lipid bilayers uniformly coat the single layer graphene surface, acting as a biomimetic barrier that insulates (both electrically and chemically) the graphene from the electrolyte environment. Upon introduction of pore-forming membrane proteins such as alamethicin and gramicidin A, current pulses are observed through the lipid bilayers from the graphene to the electrolyte, which charge the quantum capacitance of the graphene. This approach combines nanotechnology with electrophysiology to demonstrate qualitatively new ways of measuring ion channel currents. PMID:24754625

  7. Marginally hydrophobic transmembrane α-helices shaping membrane protein folding

    PubMed Central

    De Marothy, Minttu T; Elofsson, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Cells have developed an incredible machinery to facilitate the insertion of membrane proteins into the membrane. While we have a fairly good understanding of the mechanism and determinants of membrane integration, more data is needed to understand the insertion of membrane proteins with more complex insertion and folding pathways. This review will focus on marginally hydrophobic transmembrane helices and their influence on membrane protein folding. These weakly hydrophobic transmembrane segments are by themselves not recognized by the translocon and therefore rely on local sequence context for membrane integration. How can such segments reside within the membrane? We will discuss this in the light of features found in the protein itself as well as the environment it resides in. Several characteristics in proteins have been described to influence the insertion of marginally hydrophobic helices. Additionally, the influence of biological membranes is significant. To begin with, the actual cost for having polar groups within the membrane may not be as high as expected; the presence of proteins in the membrane as well as characteristics of some amino acids may enable a transmembrane helix to harbor a charged residue. The lipid environment has also been shown to directly influence the topology as well as membrane boundaries of transmembrane helices—implying a dynamic relationship between membrane proteins and their environment. PMID:25970811

  8. Computational approaches to detect allosteric pathways in transmembrane molecular machines.

    PubMed

    Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Michino, Mayako; LeVine, Michael V; Weinstein, Harel; Shi, Lei

    2016-07-01

    Many of the functions of transmembrane proteins involved in signal processing and transduction across the cell membrane are determined by allosteric couplings that propagate the functional effects well beyond the original site of activation. Data gathered from breakthroughs in biochemistry, crystallography, and single molecule fluorescence have established a rich basis of information for the study of molecular mechanisms in the allosteric couplings of such transmembrane proteins. The mechanistic details of these couplings, many of which have therapeutic implications, however, have only become accessible in synergy with molecular modeling and simulations. Here, we review some recent computational approaches that analyze allosteric coupling networks (ACNs) in transmembrane proteins, and in particular the recently developed Protein Interaction Analyzer (PIA) designed to study ACNs in the structural ensembles sampled by molecular dynamics simulations. The power of these computational approaches in interrogating the functional mechanisms of transmembrane proteins is illustrated with selected examples of recent experimental and computational studies pursued synergistically in the investigation of secondary active transporters and GPCRs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov.

  9. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator: temperature-dependent cysteine reactivity suggests different stable conformers of the conduction pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuehong; Dawson, David C

    2011-11-29

    Cysteine scanning has been widely used to identify pore-lining residues in mammalian ion channels, including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). These studies, however, have been typically conducted at room temperature rather than human body temperature. Reports of substantial effects of temperature on gating and anion conduction in CFTR channels as well as an unexpected pattern of cysteine reactivity in the sixth transmembrane segment (TM6) prompted us to investigate the effect of temperature on the reactivity of cysteines engineered into TM6 of CFTR. We compared reaction rates at temperatures ranging from 22 to 37 °C for cysteines placed on either side of an apparent size-selective accessibility barrier previously defined by comparing reactivity toward channel-permeant and channel-impermeant, thiol-directed reagents. The results indicate that the reactivity of cysteines at three positions extracellular to the position of the accessibility barrier, 334, 336, and 337, is highly temperature-dependent. At 37 °C, cysteines at these positions were highly reactive toward MTSES(-), whereas at 22 °C, the reaction rates were 2-6-fold slower to undetectable. An activation energy of 157 kJ/mol for the reaction at position 337 is consistent with the hypothesis that, at physiological temperature, the extracellular portion of the CFTR pore can adopt conformations that differ significantly from those that can be accessed at room temperature. However, the position of the accessibility barrier defined empirically by applying channel-permeant and channel-impermeant reagents to the extracellular aspect of the pore is not altered. The results illuminate previous scanning results and indicate that the assay temperature is a critical variable in studies designed to use chemical modification to test structural models for the CFTR anion conduction pathway.

  10. Transmembrane water-flux through SLC4A11: a route defective in genetic corneal diseases.

    PubMed

    Vilas, Gonzalo L; Loganathan, Sampath K; Liu, Jun; Riau, Andri K; Young, James D; Mehta, Jodhbir S; Vithana, Eranga N; Casey, Joseph R

    2013-11-15

    Three genetic corneal dystrophies [congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy type 2 (CHED2), Harboyan syndrome and Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy] arise from mutations of the SLC4a11 gene, which cause blindness from fluid accumulation in the corneal stroma. Selective transmembrane water conductance controls cell size, renal fluid reabsorption and cell division. All known water-channelling proteins belong to the major intrinsic protein family, exemplified by aquaporins (AQPs). Here we identified SLC4A11, a member of the solute carrier family 4 of bicarbonate transporters, as an unexpected addition to known transmembrane water movement facilitators. The rate of osmotic-gradient driven cell-swelling was monitored in Xenopus laevis oocytes and HEK293 cells, expressing human AQP1, NIP5;1 (a water channel protein from plant), hCNT3 (a human nucleoside transporter) and human SLC4A11. hCNT3-expressing cells swelled no faster than control cells, whereas SLC4A11-mediated water permeation at a rate about half that of some AQP proteins. SLC4A11-mediated water movement was: (i) similar to some AQPs in rate; (ii) uncoupled from solute-flux; (iii) inhibited by stilbene disulfonates (classical SLC4 inhibitors); (iv) inactivated in one CHED2 mutant (R125H). Localization of AQP1 and SLC4A11 in human and murine corneal (apical and basolateral, respectively) suggests a cooperative role in mediating trans-endothelial water reabsorption. Slc4a11(-/-) mice manifest corneal oedema and distorted endothelial cells, consistent with loss of a water-flux. Observed water-flux through SLC4A11 extends the repertoire of known water movement pathways and call for a re-examination of explanations for water movement in human tissues.

  11. A statistical mechanical model of cell membrane ion channels in electric fields: The mean-field approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y. S.; Thompson, C. J.; Anderson, V.; Wood, A. W.

    A statistical mechanical model of cell membrane ion channels is proposed which incorporates interactions between ion channels and external electric fields. The model provides a physical explanation of trans-membrane ion transport. Under a mean-field approximation, the maximum fractions of open potassium and sodium channels are obtained by solving a self-consistent nonlinear algebraic equation. Using known parameters for the squid giant axon, the model gives excellent agreement with experimental measurements for potassium and sodium trans-membrane conductance. The numerical results imply that the chemical potential of open channels and the interaction energy between channels are well above the thermal noise.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations of water within models of ion channels.

    PubMed Central

    Breed, J; Sankararamakrishnan, R; Kerr, I D; Sansom, M S

    1996-01-01

    The transbilayer pores formed by ion channel proteins contain extended columns of water molecules. The dynamic properties of such waters have been suggested to differ from those of water in its bulk state. Molecular dynamics simulations of ion channel models solvated within and at the mouths of their pores are used to investigate the dynamics and structure of intra-pore water. Three classes of channel model are investigated: a) parallel bundles of hydrophobic (Ala20) alpha-helices; b) eight-stranded hydrophobic (Ala10) antiparallel beta-barrels; and c) parallel bundles of amphipathic alpha-helices (namely, delta-toxin, alamethicin, and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor M2 helix). The self-diffusion coefficients of water molecules within the pores are reduced significantly relative to bulk water in all of the models. Water rotational reorientation rates are also reduced within the pores, particularly in those pores formed by alpha-helix bundles. In the narrowest pore (that of the Ala20 pentameric helix bundle) self-diffusion coefficients and reorientation rates of intra-pore waters are reduced by approximately an order of magnitude relative to bulk solvent. In Ala20 helix bundles the water dipoles orient antiparallel to the helix dipoles. Such dipole/dipole interaction between water and pore may explain how water-filled ion channels may be formed by hydrophobic helices. In the bundles of amphipathic helices the orientation of water dipoles is modulated by the presence of charged side chains. No preferential orientation of water dipoles relative to the pore axis is observed in the hydrophobic beta-barrel models. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 PMID:8785323

  13. Transmembrane helix prediction using amino acid property features and latent semantic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathiraju, Madhavi; Balakrishnan, N; Reddy, Raj; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Background Prediction of transmembrane (TM) helices by statistical methods suffers from lack of sufficient training data. Current best methods use hundreds or even thousands of free parameters in their models which are tuned to fit the little data available for training. Further, they are often restricted to the generally accepted topology "cytoplasmic-transmembrane-extracellular" and cannot adapt to membrane proteins that do not conform to this topology. Recent crystal structures of channel proteins have revealed novel architectures showing that the above topology may not be as universal as previously believed. Thus, there is a need for methods that can better predict TM helices even in novel topologies and families. Results Here, we describe a new method "TMpro" to predict TM helices with high accuracy. To avoid overfitting to existing topologies, we have collapsed cytoplasmic and extracellular labels to a single state, non-TM. TMpro is a binary classifier which predicts TM or non-TM using multiple amino acid properties (charge, polarity, aromaticity, size and electronic properties) as features. The features are extracted from sequence information by applying the framework used for latent semantic analysis of text documents and are input to neural networks that learn the distinction between TM and non-TM segments. The model uses only 25 free parameters. In benchmark analysis TMpro achieves 95% segment F-score corresponding to 50% reduction in error rate compared to the best methods not requiring an evolutionary profile of a protein to be known. Performance is also improved when applied to more recent and larger high resolution datasets PDBTM and MPtopo. TMpro predictions in membrane proteins with unusual or disputed TM structure (K+ channel, aquaporin and HIV envelope glycoprotein) are discussed. Conclusion TMpro uses very few free parameters in modeling TM segments as opposed to the very large number of free parameters used in state-of-the-art membrane

  14. A new theoretical model for transmembrane potential and ion currents induced in a spherical cell under low frequency electromagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Gao, Yang; Chen, Ruijuan; Wang, Huiquan; Dong, Lei; Dou, Junrong

    2016-10-01

    Time-varying electromagnetic fields (EMF) can induce some physiological effects in neuronal tissues, which have been explored in many applications such as transcranial magnetic stimulation. Although transmembrane potentials and induced currents have already been the subjects of many theoretical studies, most previous works about this topic are mainly completed by utilizing Maxwell's equations, often by solving a Laplace equation. In previous studies, cells were often considered to be three-compartment models with different electroconductivities in different regions (three compartments are often intracellular regions, membrane, and extracellular regions). However, models like that did not take dynamic ion channels into consideration. Therefore, one cannot obtain concrete ionic current changes such as potassium current change or sodium current change by these models. The aim of the present work is to present a new and more detailed model for calculating transmembrane potentials and ionic currents induced by time-varying EMF. Equations used in the present paper originate from Nernst-Plank equations, which are ionic current-related equations. The main work is to calculate ionic current changes induced by EMF exposure, and then transmembrane potential changes are calculated with Hodgkin-Huxley model. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:481-492, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27438778

  15. Quantification of structural distortions in the transmembrane helices of GPCRs.

    PubMed

    Deupi, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    A substantial part of the structural and much of the functional information about G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comes from studies on rhodopsin. Thus, analysis tools for detailed structure comparison are key to see to what extent this information can be extended to other GPCRs. Among the methods to evaluate protein structures and, in particular, helix distortions, HELANAL has the advantage that it provides data (local bend and twist angles) that can be easily translated to structural effects, as a local opening/tightening of the helix.In this work I show how HELANAL can be used to extract detailed structural information of the transmembrane bundle of GPCRs, and I provide some examples on how these data can be interpreted to study basic principles of protein structure, to compare homologous proteins and to study mechanisms of receptor activation. Also, I show how in combination with the sequence analysis tools provided by the program GMoS, distortions in individual receptors can be put in the context of the whole Class A GPCR family. Specifically, quantification of the strong proline-induced distortions in the transmembrane bundle of rhodopsin shows that they are not standard proline kinks. Moreover, the helix distortions in transmembrane helix (TMH) 5 and TMH 6 of rhodopsin are also present in the rest of GPCR crystal structures obtained so far, and thus, rhodopsin-based homology models have modeled correctly these strongly distorted helices. While in some cases the inherent "rhodopsin bias" of many of the GPCR models to date has not been a disadvantage, the availability of more templates will clearly result in better homology models. This type of analysis can be, of course, applied to any protein, and it may be particularly useful for the structural analysis of other membrane proteins. A detailed knowledge of the local structural changes related to ligand binding and how they are translated into larger-scale movements of transmembrane domains is key to

  16. Transmembrane current imaging in the heart during pacing and fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Gray, Richard A; Mashburn, David N; Sidorov, Veniamin Y; Roth, Bradley J; Pathmanathan, Pras; Wikswo, John P

    2013-10-01

    Recently, we described a method to quantify the time course of total transmembrane current (Im) and the relative role of its two components, a capacitive current (Ic) and a resistive current (Iion), corresponding to the cardiac action potential during stable propagation. That approach involved recording high-fidelity (200 kHz) transmembrane potential (Vm) signals with glass microelectrodes at one site using a spatiotemporal coordinate transformation via measured conduction velocity. Here we extend our method to compute these transmembrane currents during stable and unstable propagation from fluorescence signals of Vm at thousands of sites (3 kHz), thereby introducing transmembrane current imaging. In contrast to commonly used linear Laplacians of extracellular potential (Ve) to compute Im, we utilized nonlinear image processing to compute the required second spatial derivatives of Vm. We quantified the dynamic spatial patterns of current density of Im and Iion for both depolarization and repolarization during pacing (including nonplanar patterns) by calibrating data with the microelectrode signals. Compared to planar propagation, we found that the magnitude of Iion was significantly reduced at sites of wave collision during depolarization but not repolarization. Finally, we present uncalibrated dynamic patterns of Im during ventricular fibrillation and show that Im at singularity sites was monophasic and positive with a significant nonzero charge (Im integrated over 10 ms) in contrast with nonsingularity sites. Our approach should greatly enhance the understanding of the relative roles of functional (e.g., rate-dependent membrane dynamics and propagation patterns) and static spatial heterogeneities (e.g., spatial differences in tissue resistance) via recordings during normal and compromised propagation, including arrhythmias. PMID:24094412

  17. Transmembrane Current Imaging in the Heart during Pacing and Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Richard A.; Mashburn, David N.; Sidorov, Veniamin Y.; Roth, Bradley J.; Pathmanathan, Pras; Wikswo, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we described a method to quantify the time course of total transmembrane current (Im) and the relative role of its two components, a capacitive current (Ic) and a resistive current (Iion), corresponding to the cardiac action potential during stable propagation. That approach involved recording high-fidelity (200 kHz) transmembrane potential (Vm) signals with glass microelectrodes at one site using a spatiotemporal coordinate transformation via measured conduction velocity. Here we extend our method to compute these transmembrane currents during stable and unstable propagation from fluorescence signals of Vm at thousands of sites (3 kHz), thereby introducing transmembrane current imaging. In contrast to commonly used linear Laplacians of extracellular potential (Ve) to compute Im, we utilized nonlinear image processing to compute the required second spatial derivatives of Vm. We quantified the dynamic spatial patterns of current density of Im and Iion for both depolarization and repolarization during pacing (including nonplanar patterns) by calibrating data with the microelectrode signals. Compared to planar propagation, we found that the magnitude of Iion was significantly reduced at sites of wave collision during depolarization but not repolarization. Finally, we present uncalibrated dynamic patterns of Im during ventricular fibrillation and show that Im at singularity sites was monophasic and positive with a significant nonzero charge (Im integrated over 10 ms) in contrast with nonsingularity sites. Our approach should greatly enhance the understanding of the relative roles of functional (e.g., rate-dependent membrane dynamics and propagation patterns) and static spatial heterogeneities (e.g., spatial differences in tissue resistance) via recordings during normal and compromised propagation, including arrhythmias. PMID:24094412

  18. CREST - a large and diverse superfamily of putative transmembrane hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A number of membrane-spanning proteins possess enzymatic activity and catalyze important reactions involving proteins, lipids or other substrates located within or near lipid bilayers. Alkaline ceramidases are seven-transmembrane proteins that hydrolyze the amide bond in ceramide to form sphingosine. Recently, a group of putative transmembrane receptors called progestin and adipoQ receptors (PAQRs) were found to be distantly related to alkaline ceramidases, raising the possibility that they may also function as membrane enzymes. Results Using sensitive similarity search methods, we identified statistically significant sequence similarities among several transmembrane protein families including alkaline ceramidases and PAQRs. They were unified into a large and diverse superfamily of putative membrane-bound hydrolases called CREST (alkaline ceramidase, PAQR receptor, Per1, SID-1 and TMEM8). The CREST superfamily embraces a plethora of cellular functions and biochemical activities, including putative lipid-modifying enzymes such as ceramidases and the Per1 family of putative phospholipases involved in lipid remodeling of GPI-anchored proteins, putative hormone receptors, bacterial hemolysins, the TMEM8 family of putative tumor suppressors, and the SID-1 family of putative double-stranded RNA transporters involved in RNA interference. Extensive similarity searches and clustering analysis also revealed several groups of proteins with unknown function in the CREST superfamily. Members of the CREST superfamily share seven predicted core transmembrane segments with several conserved sequence motifs. Conclusions Universal conservation of a set of histidine and aspartate residues across all groups in the CREST superfamily, coupled with independent discoveries of hydrolase activities in alkaline ceramidases and the Per1 family as well as results from previous mutational studies of Per1, suggests that the majority of CREST members are metal-dependent hydrolases

  19. Transmembrane chloride flux in tissue-cultured chick heart cells

    SciTech Connect

    Piwnica-Worms, D.; Jacob, R.; Horres, C.R.; Lieberman, M.

    1983-05-01

    To evaluate the transmembrane movement of chloride in a preparation of cardiac muscle lacking the extracellular diffusion limitations of natural specimens, intracellular chloride concentration ( (Cl) i) and transmembrane /sup 36/Cl efflux have been determined in growth-oriented embryonic chick heart cells in tissue culture. Using the method of isotopic equilibrium, (Cl)i was 25.1 +/- 7.3 mmol x (liter cell water)-1, comparable to the value of 24.9 +/- 5.4 mmol x (liter cell water)-1 determined by coulometric titration. Two cellular /sup 36/Cl compartments were found; one exchanged with a rate constant of 0.67 +/- 0.12 min-1 and was associated with the cardiac muscle cells; the other, attributed to the fibroblasts, exchanged with a rate constant of 0.18 +/- 0.05 min-1. At 37 degrees C, transmembrane Cl flux of cardiac muscle under steady-state conditions was 30 pmol x cm-2 x s-1. In K-free, normal, or high-Ko solutions, the responses of the membrane potential to changes in external Cl concentration suggested that chloride conductance was low. These results indicate that Cl transport across the myocardial cell membrane is more rapid than K transport and is largely electrically silent.

  20. Probing transmembrane mechanical coupling and cytomechanics using magnetic twisting cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, N.; Ingber, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    We recently developed a magnetic twisting cytometry technique that allows us to apply controlled mechanical stresses to specific cell surface receptors using ligand-coated ferromagnetic microbeads and to simultaneously measure the mechanical response in living cells. Using this technique, we have previously shown the following: (i) beta 1 integrin receptors mediate mechanical force transfer across the cell surface and to the cytoskeleton, whereas other transmembrane receptors (e.g., scavenger receptors) do not; (ii) cytoskeletal stiffness increases in direct proportion to the level of stress applied to integrins; and (iii) the slope of this linear stiffening response differs depending on the shape of the cell. We now show that different integrins (beta 1, alpha V beta 3, alpha V, alpha 5, alpha 2) and other transmembrane receptors (scavenger receptor, platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule) differ in their ability to mediate force transfer across the cell surface. In addition, the linear stiffening behavior previously observed in endothelial cells was found to be shared by other cell types. Finally, we demonstrate that dynamic changes in cell shape that occur during both cell spreading and retraction are accompanied by coordinate changes in cytoskeletal stiffness. Taken together, these results suggest that the magnetic twisting cytometry technique may be a powerful and versatile tool for studies analyzing the molecular basis of transmembrane mechanical coupling to the cytoskeleton as well as dynamic relations between changes in cytoskeletal structure and alterations in cell form and function.

  1. Transcriptome analysis reveals transmembrane targets on transplantable midbrain dopamine progenitors.

    PubMed

    Bye, Chris R; Jönsson, Marie E; Björklund, Anders; Parish, Clare L; Thompson, Lachlan H

    2015-04-14

    An important challenge for the continued development of cell therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD) is the establishment of procedures that better standardize cell preparations for use in transplantation. Although cell sorting has been an anticipated strategy, its application has been limited by lack of knowledge regarding transmembrane proteins that can be used to target and isolate progenitors for midbrain dopamine (mDA) neurons. We used a "FACS-array" approach to identify 18 genes for transmembrane proteins with high expression in mDA progenitors and describe the utility of four of these targets (Alcam, Chl1, Gfra1, and Igsf8) for isolating mDA progenitors from rat primary ventral mesencephalon through flow cytometry. Alcam and Chl1 facilitated a significant enrichment of mDA neurons following transplantation, while targeting of Gfra1 allowed for robust separation of dopamine and serotonin neurons. Importantly, we also show that mDA progenitors isolated on the basis of transmembrane proteins are capable of extensive, functional innervation of the host striatum and correction of motor impairment in a unilateral model of PD. These results are highly relevant for current efforts to establish safe and effective stem cell-based procedures for PD, where clinical translation will almost certainly require safety and standardization measures in order to deliver well-characterized cell preparations.

  2. Basic amino-acid side chains regulate transmembrane integrin signalling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chungho; Schmidt, Thomas; Cho, Eun-Gyung; Ye, Feng; Ulmer, Tobias S; Ginsberg, Mark H

    2011-12-18

    Side chains of Lys/Arg near transmembrane domain (TMD) membrane-water interfaces can 'snorkel', placing their positive charge near negatively charged phospholipid head groups; however, snorkelling's functional effects are obscure. Integrin β TMDs have such conserved basic amino acids. Here we use NMR spectroscopy to show that integrin β(3)(Lys 716) helps determine β(3) TMD topography. The α(ΙΙb)β(3) TMD structure indicates that precise β(3) TMD crossing angles enable the assembly of outer and inner membrane 'clasps' that hold the αβ TMD together to limit transmembrane signalling. Mutation of β(3)(Lys 716) caused dissociation of α(ΙΙb)β(3) TMDs and integrin activation. To confirm that altered topography of β(3)(Lys 716) mutants activated α(ΙΙb)β(3), we used directed evolution of β(3)(K716A) to identify substitutions restoring default state. Introduction of Pro(711) at the midpoint of β(3) TMD (A711P) increased α(ΙΙb)β(3) TMD association and inactivated integrin α(ΙΙb)β(3)(A711P,K716A). β(3)(Pro 711) introduced a TMD kink of 30 ± 1° precisely at the border of the outer and inner membrane clasps, thereby decoupling the tilt between these segments. Thus, widely occurring snorkelling residues in TMDs can help maintain TMD topography and membrane-embedding, thereby regulating transmembrane signalling.

  3. An intracellular anion channel critical for pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Lefkovith, Ariel J; Marks, Michael S; Oancea, Elena

    2014-12-16

    Intracellular ion channels are essential regulators of organellar and cellular function, yet the molecular identity and physiological role of many of these channels remains elusive. In particular, no ion channel has been characterized in melanosomes, organelles that produce and store the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanosome function cause albinism, characterized by vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired retinal development, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. The most common form of albinism is caused by mutations in oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), a melanosome-specific transmembrane protein with unknown function. Here we used direct patch-clamp of skin and eye melanosomes to identify a novel chloride-selective anion conductance mediated by OCA2 and required for melanin production. Expression of OCA2 increases organelle pH, suggesting that the chloride channel might regulate melanin synthesis by modulating melanosome pH. Thus, a melanosomal anion channel that requires OCA2 is essential for skin and eye pigmentation.

  4. pH-Dependent Tetramerization and Amantadine Binding of the Transmembrane Helix of M2 from the Influenza A Virus†

    PubMed Central

    Salom, David; Hill, Blake R.; Lear, James D.

    2011-01-01

    The M2 proton channel from the influenza A virus is a small protein with a single transmembrane helix that associates to form a tetramer in vivo. This protein forms proton-selective ion channels, which are the target of the drug amantadine. Here, we propose a mechanism for the pH-dependent association, and amantadine binding of M2, based on studies of a peptide representing the M2 transmembrane segment in dodecylphosphocholine micelles. Using analytical ultracentrifugation, we find that the sedimentation curves for the peptide depend on its concentration in the micellar phase. The data are well-described by a monomer–tetramer equilibrium, and the binding of amantadine shifts the monomer–tetramer equilibrium toward tetrameric species. Both tetramerization and the binding of amantadine lead to increases in the magnitude of the ellipticity at 223 nm in the circular dichroism spectrum of the peptide. The tetramerization and binding of amantadine are more favorable at elevated pH, with a pKa that is assigned to a His side chain, the only ionizable residue within the transmembrane helix. Our results, interpreted quantitatively in terms of a reversible monomer and tetramer protonation equilibrium model, suggest that amantadine competes with protons for binding to the deprotonated tetramer, thereby stabilizing the tetramer in a slightly altered conformation. This model accounts for the observed inhibition of proton flux by amantadine. Additionally, our measurements suggest that the M2 tetramer is substantially protonated at neutral pH and that both singly and doubly protonated states could be involved in M2’s proton conduction at more acidic pHs. PMID:11087364

  5. Therapeutic Approaches to Acquired Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Dysfunction in Chronic Bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Solomon, George M; Raju, S Vamsee; Dransfield, Mark T; Rowe, Steven M

    2016-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a common cause of morbidity and a rising cause of mortality worldwide. Its rising impact indicates the ongoing unmet need for novel and effective therapies. Previous work has established a pathophysiological link between the chronic bronchitis phenotype of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis as well as phenotypic similarities between these two airways diseases. An extensive body of evidence has established that cigarette smoke and its constituents contribute to acquired dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein in the airways, pointing to a mechanistic link with smoking-related and chronic bronchitis. Recent interest surrounding new drugs that target both mutant and wild-type CFTR channels has paved the way for a new treatment opportunity addressing the mucus defect in chronic bronchitis. We review the clinical and pathologic evidence for modulating CFTR to address acquired CFTR dysfunction and pragmatic issues surrounding clinical trials as well as a discussion of other ion channels that may represent alternative therapeutic targets. PMID:27115953

  6. Transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory protein regulation of competitive antagonism: a problem of interpretation.

    PubMed

    Maclean, David M; Bowie, Derek

    2011-11-15

    Synaptic AMPA receptors are greatly influenced by a family of transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) which control trafficking, channel gating and pharmacology. The prototypical TARP, stargazin (or γ2), shifts the blocking ability of several AMPAR-selective compounds including the commonly used quinoxalinedione antagonists, CNQX and NBQX. Stargazin's effect on CNQX is particularly intriguing as it not only apparently lowers the potency of block, as with NBQX, but also renders it a partial agonist. Given this, agonist behaviour by CNQX has been speculated to account for its weaker blocking effect on AMPAR-TARP complexes. Here we show that this is not the case. The apparent effect of stargazin on CNQX antagonism can be almost entirely explained by an increase in the apparent affinity for l-glutamate (l-Glu), a full agonist and neurotransmitter at AMPAR synapses. Partial agonism at best plays a minor role but not through channel gating per se but rather because CNQX elicits AMPAR desensitization. Our study reveals that CNQX is best thought of as a non-competitive antagonist at glutamatergic synapses due to the predominance of non-equilibrium conditions. Consequently, CNQX primarily reports the proportion of AMPARs available for activation but may also impose additional block by receptor desensitization.

  7. Transmembrane aromatic amino acid distribution in P-glycoprotein. A functional role in broad substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Pawagi, A B; Wang, J; Silverman, M; Reithmeier, R A; Deber, C M

    1994-01-14

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells is associated with overexpression of P-glycoprotein (Pgp), a membrane protein which interacts with structurally diverse hydrophobic molecules of high membrane affinity. In an analysis of the molecular basis for this broad range of substrate specificity, we found that the transmembrane (TM) regions of Pgp are rich in highly conserved aromatic amino acid residues. Computer-generated three-dimensional model structures showed that a typical substrate, rhodamine 123, can intercalate between three to four phenylalanine side-chains in any of several Pgp TM helices with minimal protrusion of the drug into bulk lipid, and that five to six (of the 12 Pgp putative TM segments) helices can facilitate transport through creation of a sterically compatible pore. In contrast to the case for proteins involved in the transport of membrane-impermeable, relatively polar substrates, the "transport path" for Pgp substrates need not be polar, and may involve either an internal channel occupied largely by aromatic side-chains, or external gaps along TM helix-lipid interfaces. Weakly polar interactions between drug cationic sites and Pgp aromatic residues contribute additionally to overall protein/drug binding. The ability of Pgp to recognize and efflux structurally diverse molecules suggests that rather than a unique structure, the Pgp channel may maintain the intrinsic capacity to undergo wide-ranging drug-dependent dynamic reorganization. PMID:7904655

  8. The Transport Properties of the Cell Membrane Ion Channels in Electric Fields: Bethe Lattice Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, Rıza; Ekiz, Cesur

    2007-11-01

    The interactive two-state model of cell membrane ion channels in an electric field is formulated on the Bethe lattice by means of the exact recursion relations. The probability of channel opening or maximum fractions of open potassium and sodium channels are obtained by solving a non-linear algebraic equation. Using known parameters for the conventional mean-field theory the model gives a good agreement with the experiment both at low and high trans-membrane potential values. For intermediate voltages, the numerical results imply that collective effects are introduced by trans-membrane voltage.

  9. Aquaglyceroporins: generalized metalloid channels

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Rita; Bhattacharjee, Hiranmoy; Rosen, Barry P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Aquaporins (AQPs), members of a superfamily of transmembrane channel proteins, are ubiquitous in all domains of life. They fall into a number of branches that can be functionally categorized into two major sub-groups: i) orthodox aquaporins, which are water-specific channels, and ii) aquaglyceroporins, which allow the transport of water, non-polar solutes, such as urea or glycerol, the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide, and gases such as ammonia, carbon dioxide and nitric oxide and, as described in this review, metalloids. Scope of Review: This review summarizes the key findings that AQP channels conduct bidirectional movement of metalloids into and out of cells. Major Conclusions: As(OH)3 and Sb(OH)3 behave as inorganic molecular mimics of glycerol, a property that allows their passage through AQP channels. Plant AQPs also allow the passage of boron and silicon as their hydroxyacids, boric acid (B(OH)3) and orthosilicic acid (Si(OH)4), respectively. Genetic analysis suggests that germanic acid (GeO2) is also a substrate. While As(III), Sb(III) and Ge(IV) are toxic metalloids, borate (B(III)) and silicate (Si(IV)) are essential elements in higher plants. General Significance: The uptake of environmental metalloids by aquaporins provides an understanding of (i) how toxic elements such as arsenic enter the food chain; (ii) the delivery of arsenic and antimony containing drugs in the treatment of certain forms of leukemia and chemotherapy of diseases caused by pathogenic protozoa; and (iii) the possibility that food plants such as rice could be made safer by genetically modifying them to exclude arsenic while still accumulating boron and silicon. PMID:24291688

  10. Activation of human 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptors via an allosteric transmembrane site.

    PubMed

    Lansdell, Stuart J; Sathyaprakash, Chaitra; Doward, Anne; Millar, Neil S

    2015-01-01

    In common with other members of the Cys-loop family of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptors (5-HT3Rs) are activated by the binding of a neurotransmitter to an extracellular orthosteric site, located at the interface of two adjacent receptor subunits. In addition, a variety of compounds have been identified that modulate agonist-evoked responses of 5-HT3Rs, and other Cys-loop receptors, by binding to distinct allosteric sites. In this study, we examined the pharmacological effects of a group of monoterpene compounds on recombinant 5-HT3Rs expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Two phenolic monoterpenes (carvacrol and thymol) display allosteric agonist activity on human homomeric 5-HT3ARs (64 ± 7% and 80 ± 4% of the maximum response evoked by the endogenous orthosteric agonist 5-HT, respectively). In addition, at lower concentrations, where agonist effects are less apparent, carvacrol and thymol act as potentiators of responses evoked by submaximal concentrations of 5-HT. By contrast, carvacrol and thymol have no agonist or potentiating activity on the closely related mouse 5-HT3ARs. Using subunit chimeras containing regions of the human and mouse 5-HT3A subunits, and by use of site-directed mutagenesis, we have identified transmembrane amino acids that either abolish the agonist activity of carvacrol and thymol on human 5-HT3ARs or are able to confer this property on mouse 5-HT3ARs. By contrast, these mutations have no significant effect on orthosteric activation of 5-HT3ARs by 5-HT. We conclude that 5-HT3ARs can be activated by the binding of ligands to an allosteric transmembrane site, a conclusion that is supported by computer docking studies. PMID:25338672

  11. Structure and mechanism of proton transport through the transmembrane tetrameric M2 protein bundle of the influenza A virus

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Rudresh; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Fiorin, Giacomo; Levine, Benjamin G.; Polishchuk, Alexei L.; Balannik, Victoria; Samish, Ilan; Lamb, Robert A.; Pinto, Lawrence H.; DeGrado, William F.; Klein, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    The M2 proton channel from influenza A virus is an essential protein that mediates transport of protons across the viral envelope. This protein has a single transmembrane helix, which tetramerizes into the active channel. At the heart of the conduction mechanism is the exchange of protons between the His37 imidazole moieties of M2 and waters confined to the M2 bundle interior. Protons are conducted as the total charge of the four His37 side chains passes through 2+ and 3+ with a pKa near 6. A 1.65 Å resolution X-ray structure of the transmembrane protein (residues 25–46), crystallized at pH 6.5, reveals a pore that is lined by alternating layers of sidechains and well-ordered water clusters, which offer a pathway for proton conduction. The His37 residues form a box-like structure, bounded on either side by water clusters with well-ordered oxygen atoms at close distance. The conformation of the protein, which is intermediate between structures previously solved at higher and lower pH, suggests a mechanism by which conformational changes might facilitate asymmetric diffusion through the channel in the presence of a proton gradient. Moreover, protons diffusing through the channel need not be localized to a single His37 imidazole, but instead may be delocalized over the entire His-box and associated water clusters. Thus, the new crystal structure provides a possible unification of the discrete site versus continuum conduction models. PMID:20689043

  12. Structure and Mechanism of Proton Transport Through the Transmembrane Tetrameric M2 Protein Bundle of the Influenza A Virus

    SciTech Connect

    R Acharya; V Carnevale; G Fiorin; B Levine; A Polishchuk; V Balannick; I Samish; R Lamb; L Pinto; et al.

    2011-12-31

    The M2 proton channel from influenza A virus is an essential protein that mediates transport of protons across the viral envelope. This protein has a single transmembrane helix, which tetramerizes into the active channel. At the heart of the conduction mechanism is the exchange of protons between the His37 imidazole moieties of M2 and waters confined to the M2 bundle interior. Protons are conducted as the total charge of the four His37 side chains passes through 2{sup +} and 3{sup +} with a pK{sub a} near 6. A 1.65 {angstrom} resolution X-ray structure of the transmembrane protein (residues 25-46), crystallized at pH 6.5, reveals a pore that is lined by alternating layers of sidechains and well-ordered water clusters, which offer a pathway for proton conduction. The His37 residues form a box-like structure, bounded on either side by water clusters with well-ordered oxygen atoms at close distance. The conformation of the protein, which is intermediate between structures previously solved at higher and lower pH, suggests a mechanism by which conformational changes might facilitate asymmetric diffusion through the channel in the presence of a proton gradient. Moreover, protons diffusing through the channel need not be localized to a single His37 imidazole, but instead may be delocalized over the entire His-box and associated water clusters. Thus, the new crystal structure provides a possible unification of the discrete site versus continuum conduction models.

  13. Noise analysis of ionization kinetics in a protein ion channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezrukov, Sergey M.; Kasianowicz, John J.

    1993-08-01

    We observed excess current noise generated by the reversible ionization of sites in a transmembrane protein ion channel, which is analogous to current fluctuations found recently in solid state microstructure electronic devices. Specifically the current through fully open single channels formed by Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin shows pH dependent fluctuations. We show that noise analysis of the open channel current can be used to evaluate the ionization rate constants, the number of sites participating in the ionization process, and the effect of recharging a single site on the channel conductance.

  14. Prolonged treatment of cells with genistein modulates the expression and function of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, A; Hughes, L K; Cai, Z; Mendes, F; Li, H; Sheppard, D N; Amaral, M D

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel. In the search for new CF therapies, small molecules have been identified that rescue the defective channel gating of CF mutants (termed CFTR potentiators). Here, we investigate the long-term effects of genistein, the best-studied CFTR potentiator, on the expression and function of CFTR. Experimental approach: We pre-treated baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells expressing wild-type or F508del-CFTR (the most common CF mutant) with concentrations of genistein that potentiate (30 μM) or inhibit (100 μM) CFTR function for 2 or 24 h at 37 °C before examining CFTR maturation, expression and single-channel activity. Key results: Using the iodide efflux technique, we found that genistein pre-treatment failed to restore function to F508del-CFTR, but altered that of wild-type CFTR. Pre-treatment of cells with genistein for 2 h had little effect on CFTR processing, whereas pre-treatment for 24 h either augmented (30 μM genistein) or impaired (100 μM genistein) CFTR maturation. Using immunocytochemistry, we found that all genistein pre-treatments increased the localization of CFTR protein to the cell surface. However, following the incubation of cells with genistein (100 μM) for 2 h, individual CFTR Cl− channels exhibited characteristics of channel block upon channel activation. Conclusions and implications: Genistein pre-treatment alters the maturation, cell surface expression and single-channel function of CFTR in ways distinct from its acute effects. Thus, CFTR potentiators have the potential to influence CFTR by mechanisms distinct from their effects on channel gating. PMID:18223673

  15. Molecular Insights into the Transmembrane Domain of the Thyrotropin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chantreau, Vanessa; Taddese, Bruck; Munier, Mathilde; Gourdin, Louis; Henrion, Daniel; Rodien, Patrice; Chabbert, Marie

    2015-01-01

    The thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is member of the leucine-rich repeat subfamily (LGR). In the absence of crystal structure, the success of rational design of ligands targeting the receptor internal cavity depends on the quality of the TSHR models built. In this subfamily, transmembrane helices (TM) 2 and 5 are characterized by the absence of proline compared to most receptors, raising the question of the structural conformation of these helices. To gain insight into the structural properties of these helices, we carried out bioinformatics and experimental studies. Evolutionary analysis of the LGR family revealed a deletion in TM5 but provided no information on TM2. Wild type residues at positions 2.58, 2.59 or 2.60 in TM2 and/or at position 5.50 in TM5 were substituted to proline. Depending on the position of the proline substitution, different effects were observed on membrane expression, glycosylation, constitutive cAMP activity and responses to thyrotropin. Only proline substitution at position 2.59 maintained complex glycosylation and high membrane expression, supporting occurrence of a bulged TM2. The TSHR transmembrane domain was modeled by homology with the orexin 2 receptor, using a protocol that forced the deletion of one residue in the TM5 bulge of the template. The stability of the model was assessed by molecular dynamics simulations. TM5 straightened during the equilibration phase and was stable for the remainder of the simulations. Our data support a structural model of the TSHR transmembrane domain with a bulged TM2 and a straight TM5 that is specific of glycoprotein hormone receptors. PMID:26545118

  16. Molecular Insights into the Transmembrane Domain of the Thyrotropin Receptor.

    PubMed

    Chantreau, Vanessa; Taddese, Bruck; Munier, Mathilde; Gourdin, Louis; Henrion, Daniel; Rodien, Patrice; Chabbert, Marie

    2015-01-01

    The thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is member of the leucine-rich repeat subfamily (LGR). In the absence of crystal structure, the success of rational design of ligands targeting the receptor internal cavity depends on the quality of the TSHR models built. In this subfamily, transmembrane helices (TM) 2 and 5 are characterized by the absence of proline compared to most receptors, raising the question of the structural conformation of these helices. To gain insight into the structural properties of these helices, we carried out bioinformatics and experimental studies. Evolutionary analysis of the LGR family revealed a deletion in TM5 but provided no information on TM2. Wild type residues at positions 2.58, 2.59 or 2.60 in TM2 and/or at position 5.50 in TM5 were substituted to proline. Depending on the position of the proline substitution, different effects were observed on membrane expression, glycosylation, constitutive cAMP activity and responses to thyrotropin. Only proline substitution at position 2.59 maintained complex glycosylation and high membrane expression, supporting occurrence of a bulged TM2. The TSHR transmembrane domain was modeled by homology with the orexin 2 receptor, using a protocol that forced the deletion of one residue in the TM5 bulge of the template. The stability of the model was assessed by molecular dynamics simulations. TM5 straightened during the equilibration phase and was stable for the remainder of the simulations. Our data support a structural model of the TSHR transmembrane domain with a bulged TM2 and a straight TM5 that is specific of glycoprotein hormone receptors. PMID:26545118

  17. Transmembrane peptides influence the affinity of sterols for phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Nyström, Joel H; Lönnfors, Max; Nyholm, Thomas K M

    2010-07-21

    Cholesterol is distributed unevenly between different cellular membrane compartments, and the cholesterol content increases from the inner bilayers toward the plasma membrane. It has been suggested that this cholesterol gradient is important in the sorting of transmembrane proteins. Cholesterol has also been to shown play an important role in lateral organization of eukaryotic cell membranes. In this study the aim was to determine how transmembrane proteins influence the lateral distribution of cholesterol in phospholipid bilayers. Insight into this can be obtained by studying how cholesterol interacts with bilayer membranes of different composition in the presence of designed peptides that mimic the transmembrane helices of proteins. For this purpose we developed an assay in which the partitioning of the fluorescent cholesterol analog CTL between LUVs and mbetaCD can be measured. Comparison of how cholesterol and CTL partitioning between mbetaCD and phospholipid bilayers with different composition suggests that CTL sensed changes in bilayer composition similarly as cholesterol. Therefore, the results obtained with CTL can be used to understand cholesterol distribution in lipid bilayers. The effect of WALP23 on CTL partitioning between DMPC bilayers and mbetaCD was measured. From the results it was clear that WALP23 increased both the order in the bilayers (as seen from CTL and DPH anisotropy) and the affinity of the sterol for the bilayer in a concentration dependent way. Although WALP23 also increased the order in DLPC and POPC bilayers the effects on CTL partitioning was much smaller with these lipids. This indicates that proteins have the largest effect on sterol interactions with phospholipids that have longer and saturated acyl chains. KALP23 did not significantly affect the acyl chain order in the phospholipid bilayers, and inclusion of KALP23 into DMPC bilayers slightly decreased CTL partitioning into the bilayer. This shows that transmembrane proteins can

  18. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (ABCC7) structure.

    PubMed

    Hunt, John F; Wang, Chi; Ford, Robert C

    2013-02-01

    Structural studies of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) are reviewed. Like many membrane proteins, full-length CFTR has proven to be difficult to express and purify, hence much of the structural data available is for the more tractable, independently expressed soluble domains. Therefore, this chapter covers structural data for individual CFTR domains in addition to the sparser data available for the full-length protein. To set the context for these studies, we will start by reviewing structural information on model proteins from the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily, to which CFTR belongs.

  19. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (ABCC7) Structure

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, John F.; Wang, Chi; Ford, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Structural studies of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) are reviewed. Like many membrane proteins, full-length CFTR has proven to be difficult to express and purify, hence much of the structural data available is for the more tractable, independently expressed soluble domains. Therefore, this chapter covers structural data for individual CFTR domains in addition to the sparser data available for the full-length protein. To set the context for these studies, we will start by reviewing structural information on model proteins from the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily, to which CFTR belongs. PMID:23378596

  20. Incorporating significant amino acid pairs to identify O-linked glycosylation sites on transmembrane proteins and non-transmembrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background While occurring enzymatically in biological systems, O-linked glycosylation affects protein folding, localization and trafficking, protein solubility, antigenicity, biological activity, as well as cell-cell interactions on membrane proteins. Catalytic enzymes involve glycotransferases, sugar-transferring enzymes and glycosidases which trim specific monosaccharides from precursors to form intermediate structures. Due to the difficulty of experimental identification, several works have used computational methods to identify glycosylation sites. Results By investigating glycosylated sites that contain various motifs between Transmembrane (TM) and non-Transmembrane (non-TM) proteins, this work presents a novel method, GlycoRBF, that implements radial basis function (RBF) networks with significant amino acid pairs (SAAPs) for identifying O-linked glycosylated serine and threonine on TM proteins and non-TM proteins. Additionally, a membrane topology is considered for reducing the false positives on glycosylated TM proteins. Based on an evaluation using five-fold cross-validation, the consideration of a membrane topology can reduce 31.4% of the false positives when identifying O-linked glycosylation sites on TM proteins. Via an independent test, GlycoRBF outperforms previous O-linked glycosylation site prediction schemes. Conclusion A case study of Cyclic AMP-dependent transcription factor ATF-6 alpha was presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of GlycoRBF. Web-based GlycoRBF, which can be accessed at http://GlycoRBF.bioinfo.tw, can identify O-linked glycosylated serine and threonine effectively and efficiently. Moreover, the structural topology of Transmembrane (TM) proteins with glycosylation sites is provided to users. The stand-alone version of GlycoRBF is also available for high throughput data analysis. PMID:21034461

  1. The two ATP binding sites of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) play distinct roles in gating kinetics and energetics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhen; Wang, Xiaohui; Liu, Hao-Yang; Zou, Xiaoqin; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2006-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a member of the ABC (ATP binding cassette) transporter family, is a chloride channel whose activity is controlled by protein kinase-dependent phosphorylation. Opening and closing (gating) of the phosphorylated CFTR is coupled to ATP binding and hydrolysis at CFTR's two nucleotide binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2). Recent studies present evidence that the open channel conformation reflects a head-to-tail dimerization of CFTR's two NBDs as seen in the NBDs of other ABC transporters (Vergani et al., 2005). Whether these two ATP binding sites play an equivalent role in the dynamics of NBD dimerization, and thus in gating CFTR channels, remains unsettled. Based on the crystal structures of NBDs, sequence alignment, and homology modeling, we have identified two critical aromatic amino acids (W401 in NBD1 and Y1219 in NBD2) that coordinate the adenine ring of the bound ATP. Conversion of the W401 residue to glycine (W401G) has little effect on the sensitivity of the opening rate to [ATP], but the same mutation at the Y1219 residue dramatically lowers the apparent affinity for ATP by >50-fold, suggesting distinct roles of these two ATP binding sites in channel opening. The W401G mutation, however, shortens the open time constant. Energetic analysis of our data suggests that the free energy of ATP binding at NBD1, but not at NBD2, contributes significantly to the energetics of the open state. This kinetic and energetic asymmetry of CFTR's two NBDs suggests an asymmetric motion of the NBDs during channel gating. Opening of the channel is initiated by ATP binding at the NBD2 site, whereas separation of the NBD dimer at the NBD1 site constitutes the rate-limiting step in channel closing.

  2. ICEPO: the ion channel electrophysiology ontology

    PubMed Central

    Hinard, V.; Britan, A.; Rougier, J.S.; Bairoch, A.; Abriel, H.; Gaudet, P.

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels are transmembrane proteins that selectively allow ions to flow across the plasma membrane and play key roles in diverse biological processes. A multitude of diseases, called channelopathies, such as epilepsies, muscle paralysis, pain syndromes, cardiac arrhythmias or hypoglycemia are due to ion channel mutations. A wide corpus of literature is available on ion channels, covering both their functions and their roles in disease. The research community needs to access this data in a user-friendly, yet systematic manner. However, extraction and integration of this increasing amount of data have been proven to be difficult because of the lack of a standardized vocabulary that describes the properties of ion channels at the molecular level. To address this, we have developed Ion Channel ElectroPhysiology Ontology (ICEPO), an ontology that allows one to annotate the electrophysiological parameters of the voltage-gated class of ion channels. This ontology is based on a three-state model of ion channel gating describing the three conformations/states that an ion channel can adopt: closed, open and inactivated. This ontology supports the capture of voltage-gated ion channel electrophysiological data from the literature in a structured manner and thus enables other applications such as querying and reasoning tools. Here, we present ICEPO (ICEPO ftp site: ftp://ftp.nextprot.org/pub/current_release/controlled_vocabularies/), as well as examples of its use. PMID:27055825

  3. ICEPO: the ion channel electrophysiology ontology.

    PubMed

    Hinard, V; Britan, A; Rougier, J S; Bairoch, A; Abriel, H; Gaudet, P

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels are transmembrane proteins that selectively allow ions to flow across the plasma membrane and play key roles in diverse biological processes. A multitude of diseases, called channelopathies, such as epilepsies, muscle paralysis, pain syndromes, cardiac arrhythmias or hypoglycemia are due to ion channel mutations. A wide corpus of literature is available on ion channels, covering both their functions and their roles in disease. The research community needs to access this data in a user-friendly, yet systematic manner. However, extraction and integration of this increasing amount of data have been proven to be difficult because of the lack of a standardized vocabulary that describes the properties of ion channels at the molecular level. To address this, we have developed Ion Channel ElectroPhysiology Ontology (ICEPO), an ontology that allows one to annotate the electrophysiological parameters of the voltage-gated class of ion channels. This ontology is based on a three-state model of ion channel gating describing the three conformations/states that an ion channel can adopt: closed, open and inactivated. This ontology supports the capture of voltage-gated ion channel electrophysiological data from the literature in a structured manner and thus enables other applications such as querying and reasoning tools. Here, we present ICEPO (ICEPO ftp site:ftp://ftp.nextprot.org/pub/current_release/controlled_vocabularies/), as well as examples of its use.

  4. The structure of GlpF, a glycerol conducting channel.

    PubMed

    Fu, Dax; Libson, Andrew; Stroud, Robert

    2002-01-01

    The passage of water or small neutral solutes across the cell membrane in animals, plants and bacteria is facilitated by a family of homologous membrane channels, variously known as aquaporins though perhaps more correctly as aquaglyceroporins. The glycerol facilitator (GlpF) is a 28 kDa aquaglyceroporin that catalyses transmembrane diffusion of glycerol and certain linear polyhydric alcohols in Escherichia coli. X-ray crystallographic analysis of GlpF to 2.2 A resolution revealed an alpha-barrel structure, surrounded by six full-length transmembrane helices and two half-spanning helices that are joined head-to-head in the middle of the membrane. These helices are arranged to a quasi twofold manner relative to the central membrane plane, where highly conserved residues make helix-to-helix contacts that stabilize the relative position and orientation of the helices in the structure. This sequence-structure correlation suggests that the evolutionary divergence of aquaporins and aquaglyceroporins is constrained by a conserved structural framework within which specialized function may be developed. Three glycerol molecules were resolved in the central channel through the GlpF monomer, thereby defining a transmembrane channel for glycerol permeation. The structure of glycerol GlpF complex provides insight into the chemical basis for transmembrane selective permeability. PMID:12027015

  5. Stability analysis of the inverse transmembrane potential problem in electrocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Martin; Mardal, Kent-André; Nielsen, Bjørn Fredrik

    2010-10-01

    In this paper we study some mathematical properties of an inverse problem arising in connection with electrocardiograms (ECGs). More specifically, we analyze the possibility for recovering the transmembrane potential in the heart from ECG recordings, a challenge currently investigated by a growing number of groups. Our approach is based on the bidomain model for the electrical activity in the myocardium, and leads to a parameter identification problem for elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs). It turns out that this challenge can be split into two subproblems: the task of recovering the potential at the heart surface from body surface recordings; the problem of computing the transmembrane potential inside the heart from the potential determined at the heart surface. Problem (1), which can be formulated as the Cauchy problem for an elliptic PDE, has been extensively studied and is well known to be severely ill-posed. The main purpose of this paper is to prove that problem (2) is stable and well posed if a suitable prior is available. Moreover, our theoretical findings are illuminated by a series of numerical experiments. Finally, we discuss some aspects of uniqueness related to the anisotropy in the heart.

  6. Synaptobrevin Transmembrane Domain Dimerization Studied by Multiscale Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jing; Pluhackova, Kristyna; Wassenaar, Tsjerk A.; Böckmann, Rainer A.

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle fusion requires assembly of the SNARE complex composed of SNAP-25, syntaxin-1, and synaptobrevin-2 (sybII) proteins. The SNARE proteins found in vesicle membranes have previously been shown to dimerize via transmembrane (TM) domain interactions. While syntaxin homodimerization is supposed to promote the transition from hemifusion to complete fusion, the role of synaptobrevin’s TM domain association in the fusion process remains poorly understood. Here, we combined coarse-grained and atomistic simulations to model the homodimerization of the sybII transmembrane domain and of selected TM mutants. The wild-type helix is shown to form a stable, right-handed dimer with the most populated helix-helix interface, including key residues predicted in a previous mutagenesis study. In addition, two alternative binding interfaces were discovered, which are essential to explain the experimentally observed higher-order oligomerization of sybII. In contrast, only one dimerization interface was found for a fusion-inactive poly-Leu mutant. Moreover, the association kinetics found for this mutant is lower as compared to the wild-type. These differences in dimerization between the wild-type and the poly-Leu mutant are suggested to be responsible for the reported differences in fusogenic activity between these peptides. This study provides molecular insight into the role of TM sequence specificity for peptide aggregation in membranes. PMID:26287628

  7. Bioenergetics and mitochondrial transmembrane potential during differentiation of cultured osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komarova, S. V.; Ataullakhanov, F. I.; Globus, R. K.

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between osteoblast differentiation and bioenergetics, cultured primary osteoblasts from fetal rat calvaria were grown in medium supplemented with ascorbate to induce differentiation. Before ascorbate treatment, the rate of glucose consumption was 320 nmol. h(-1). 10(6) cells(-1), respiration was 40 nmol. h(-1). 10(6) cells(-1), and the ratio of lactate production to glucose consumption was approximately 2, indicating that glycolysis was the main energy source for immature osteoblasts. Ascorbate treatment for 14 days led to a fourfold increase in respiration, a threefold increase in ATP production, and a fivefold increase in ATP content compared with that shown in immature cells. Confocal imaging of mitochondria stained with a transmembrane potential-sensitive vital dye showed that mature cells possessed abundant amounts of high-transmembrane-potential mitochondria, which were concentrated near the culture medium-facing surface. Acute treatment of mature osteoblasts with metabolic inhibitors showed that the rate of glycolysis rose to maintain the cellular energy supply constant. Thus progressive differentiation coincided with changes in cellular metabolism and mitochondrial activity, which are likely to play key roles in osteoblast function.

  8. GPCR and voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) signaling complexes.

    PubMed

    Altier, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are transmembrane proteins that control nerve impulses and cell homeostasis. Signaling molecules that regulate ion channel activity and density at the plasma membrane must be specifically and efficiently coupled to these channels in order to control critical physiological functions such as action potential propagation. Although their regulation by G-protein receptor activation has been extensively explored, the assembly of ion channels into signaling complexes of GPCRs plays a fundamental role, engaging specific downstream -signaling pathways that trigger precise downstream effectors. Recent work has confirmed that GPCRs can intimately interact with ion channels and serve as -chaperone proteins that finely control their gating and trafficking in subcellular microdomains. This chapter aims to describe examples of GPCR-ion channel co-assembly, focusing mainly on signaling complexes between GPCRs and voltage-gated calcium channels.

  9. Na+ Channel β Subunits: Overachievers of the Ion Channel Family

    PubMed Central

    Brackenbury, William J.; Isom, Lori L.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) in mammals contain a pore-forming α subunit and one or more β subunits. There are five mammalian β subunits in total: β1, β1B, β2, β3, and β4, encoded by four genes: SCN1B–SCN4B. With the exception of the SCN1B splice variant, β1B, the β subunits are type I topology transmembrane proteins. In contrast, β1B lacks a transmembrane domain and is a secreted protein. A growing body of work shows that VGSC β subunits are multifunctional. While they do not form the ion channel pore, β subunits alter gating, voltage-dependence, and kinetics of VGSCα subunits and thus regulate cellular excitability in vivo. In addition to their roles in channel modulation, β subunits are members of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecules and regulate cell adhesion and migration. β subunits are also substrates for sequential proteolytic cleavage by secretases. An example of the multifunctional nature of β subunits is β1, encoded by SCN1B, that plays a critical role in neuronal migration and pathfinding during brain development, and whose function is dependent on Na+ current and γ-secretase activity. Functional deletion of SCN1B results in Dravet Syndrome, a severe and intractable pediatric epileptic encephalopathy. β subunits are emerging as key players in a wide variety of physiopathologies, including epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia, multiple sclerosis, Huntington’s disease, neuropsychiatric disorders, neuropathic and inflammatory pain, and cancer. β subunits mediate multiple signaling pathways on different timescales, regulating electrical excitability, adhesion, migration, pathfinding, and transcription. Importantly, some β subunit functions may operate independently of α subunits. Thus, β subunits perform critical roles during development and disease. As such, they may prove useful in disease diagnosis and therapy. PMID:22007171

  10. Altered ion channel conductance and ionic selectivity induced by large imposed membrane potential pulse.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, W; Lee, R C

    1994-01-01

    The effects of large magnitude transmembrane potential pulses on voltage-gated Na and K channel behavior in frog skeletal muscle membrane were studied using a modified double vaseline-gap voltage clamp. The effects of electroconformational damage to ionic channels were separated from damage to lipid bilayer (electroporation). A 4 ms transmembrane potential pulse of -600 mV resulted in a reduction of both Na and K channel conductivities. The supraphysiologic pulses also reduced ionic selectivity of the K channels against Na+ ions, resulting in a depolarization of the membrane resting potential. However, TTX and TEA binding effects were unaltered. The kinetics of spontaneous reversal of the electroconformational damage of channel proteins was found to be dependent on the magnitude of imposed membrane potential pulse. These results suggest that muscle and nerve dysfunction after electrical shock may be in part caused by electroconformational damage to voltage-gated ion channels. PMID:7948676

  11. Marine Toxins Targeting Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Hugo R.

    2006-01-01

    This introductory minireview points out the importance of ion channels for cell communication. The basic concepts on the structure and function of ion channels triggered by membrane voltage changes, the so-called voltage-gated ion channels (VGICs), as well as those activated by neurotransmitters, the so-called ligand-gated ion channel (LGICs), are introduced. Among the most important VGIC superfamiles, we can name the voltage-gated Na+ (NaV), Ca2+ (CaV), and K+ (KV) channels. Among the most important LGIC super families, we can include the Cys-loop or nicotinicoid, the glutamate-activated (GluR), and the ATP-activated (P2XnR) receptor superfamilies. Ion channels are transmembrane proteins that allow the passage of different ions in a specific or unspecific manner. For instance, the activation of NaV, CaV, or KV channels opens a pore that is specific for Na+, Ca2+, or K+, respectively. On the other hand, the activation of certain LGICs such as nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, GluRs, and P2XnRs allows the passage of cations (e.g., Na+, K+, and/or Ca2+), whereas the activation of other LGICs such as type A γ-butyric acid and glycine receptors allows the passage of anions (e.g., Cl− and/or HCO3−). In this regard, the activation of NaV and CaV as well as ligand-gated cation channels produce membrane depolarization, which finally leads to stimulatory effects in the cell, whereas the activation of KV as well as ligand-gated anion channels induce membrane hyperpolarization that finally leads to inhibitory effects in the cell. The importance of these ion channel superfamilies is emphasized by considering their physiological functions throughout the body as well as their pathophysiological implicance in several neuronal diseases. In this regard, natural molecules, and especially marine toxins, can be potentially used as modulators (e.g., inhibitors or prolongers) of ion channel functions to treat or to alleviate a specific ion channel-linked disease (e

  12. TRPC6 channel translocation into phagosomal membrane augments phagosomal function

    PubMed Central

    Riazanski, Vladimir; Gabdoulkhakova, Aida G.; Boynton, Lin S.; Eguchi, Raphael R.; Deriy, Ludmila V.; Hogarth, D. Kyle; Loaëc, Nadège; Oumata, Nassima; Galons, Hervé; Brown, Mary E.; Shevchenko, Pavel; Gallan, Alexander J.; Yoo, Sang Gune; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.; Villereal, Mitchel L.; Beacham, Daniel W.; Bindokas, Vytautas P.; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Meijer, Laurent; Nelson, Deborah J.

    2015-01-01

    Defects in the innate immune system in the lung with attendant bacterial infections contribute to lung tissue damage, respiratory insufficiency, and ultimately death in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). Professional phagocytes, including alveolar macrophages (AMs), have specialized pathways that ensure efficient killing of pathogens in phagosomes. Phagosomal acidification facilitates the optimal functioning of degradative enzymes, ultimately contributing to bacterial killing. Generation of low organellar pH is primarily driven by the V-ATPases, proton pumps that use cytoplasmic ATP to load H+ into the organelle. Critical to phagosomal acidification are various channels derived from the plasma membrane, including the anion channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, which shunt the transmembrane potential generated by movement of protons. Here we show that the transient receptor potential canonical-6 (TRPC6) calcium-permeable channel in the AM also functions to shunt the transmembrane potential generated by proton pumping and is capable of restoring microbicidal function to compromised AMs in CF and enhancement of function in non-CF cells. TRPC6 channel activity is enhanced via translocation to the cell surface (and then ultimately to the phagosome during phagocytosis) in response to G-protein signaling activated by the small molecule (R)-roscovitine and its derivatives. These data show that enhancing vesicular insertion of the TRPC6 channel to the plasma membrane may represent a general mechanism for restoring phagosome activity in conditions, where it is lost or impaired. PMID:26604306

  13. Protein translocation through the anthrax toxin transmembrane pore is driven by a proton gradient.

    PubMed

    Krantz, Bryan A; Finkelstein, Alan; Collier, R John

    2006-02-01

    Protective antigen (PA) from anthrax toxin assembles into a homoheptamer on cell surfaces and forms complexes with the enzymatic components: lethal factor (LF) and edema factor (EF). Endocytic vesicles containing these complexes are acidified, causing the heptamer to transform into a transmembrane pore that chaperones the passage of unfolded LF and EF into the cytosol. We show in planar lipid bilayers that a physiologically relevant proton gradient (DeltapH, where the endosome is acidified relative to the cytosol) is a potent driving force for translocation of LF, EF and the LF amino-terminal domain (LFN) through the PA63 pore. DeltapH-driven translocation occurs even under a negligible membrane potential. We found that acidic endosomal conditions known to destabilize LFN correlate with an increased translocation rate. The hydrophobic heptad of lumen-facing Phe427 residues in PA (or phi clamp) drives translocation synergistically under a DeltapH. We propose that a Brownian ratchet mechanism proposed earlier for the phi clamp is cooperatively linked to a protonation-state, DeltapH-driven ratchet acting trans to the phi-clamp site. In a sense, the channel functions as a proton/protein symporter.

  14. Giant osmotic energy conversion measured in a single transmembrane boron nitride nanotube.

    PubMed

    Siria, Alessandro; Poncharal, Philippe; Biance, Anne-Laure; Fulcrand, Rémy; Blase, Xavier; Purcell, Stephen T; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2013-02-28

    New models of fluid transport are expected to emerge from the confinement of liquids at the nanoscale, with potential applications in ultrafiltration, desalination and energy conversion. Nevertheless, advancing our fundamental understanding of fluid transport on the smallest scales requires mass and ion dynamics to be ultimately characterized across an individual channel to avoid averaging over many pores. A major challenge for nanofluidics thus lies in building distinct and well-controlled nanochannels, amenable to the systematic exploration of their properties. Here we describe the fabrication and use of a hierarchical nanofluidic device made of a boron nitride nanotube that pierces an ultrathin membrane and connects two fluid reservoirs. Such a transmembrane geometry allows the detailed study of fluidic transport through a single nanotube under diverse forces, including electric fields, pressure drops and chemical gradients. Using this device, we discover very large, osmotically induced electric currents generated by salinity gradients, exceeding by two orders of magnitude their pressure-driven counterpart. We show that this result originates in the anomalously high surface charge carried by the nanotube's internal surface in water at large pH, which we independently quantify in conductance measurements. The nano-assembly route using nanostructures as building blocks opens the way to studying fluid, ionic and molecule transport on the nanoscale, and may lead to biomimetic functionalities. Our results furthermore suggest that boron nitride nanotubes could be used as membranes for osmotic power harvesting under salinity gradients.

  15. Mechanism of influenza A M2 transmembrane domain assembly in lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Georgieva, Elka R.; Borbat, Peter P.; Norman, Haley D.; Freed, Jack H.

    2015-01-01

    M2 from influenza A virus functions as an oligomeric proton channel essential for the viral cycle, hence it is a high-priority pharmacological target whose structure and functions require better understanding. We studied the mechanism of M2 transmembrane domain (M2TMD) assembly in lipid membranes by the powerful biophysical technique of double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy. By varying the M2TMD-to-lipid molar ratio over a wide range from 1:18,800 to 1:160, we found that M2TMD exists as monomers, dimers, and tetramers whose relative populations shift to tetramers with the increase of peptide-to-lipid (P/L) molar ratio. Our results strongly support the tandem mechanism of M2 assembly that is monomers-to-dimer then dimers-to-tetramer, since tight dimers are abundant at small P/L’s, and thereafter they assemble as dimers of dimers in weaker tetramers. The stepwise mechanism found for a single-pass membrane protein oligomeric assembly should contribute to the knowledge of the association steps in membrane protein folding. PMID:26190831

  16. Ultraslow Water-Mediated Transmembrane Interactions Regulate the Activation of A2A Adenosine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoonji; Kim, Songmi; Choi, Sun; Hyeon, Changbong

    2016-09-20

    Water molecules inside a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) have recently been spotlighted in a series of crystal structures. To decipher the dynamics and functional roles of internal water molecules in GPCR activity, we studied the A2A adenosine receptor using microsecond molecular-dynamics simulations. Our study finds that the amount of water flux across the transmembrane (TM) domain varies depending on the receptor state, and that the water molecules of the TM channel in the active state flow three times more slowly than those in the inactive state. Depending on the location in solvent-protein interface as well as the receptor state, the average residence time of water in each residue varies from ∼O(10(2)) ps to ∼O(10(2)) ns. Especially, water molecules, exhibiting ultraslow relaxation (∼O(10(2)) ns) in the active state, are found around the microswitch residues that are considered activity hotspots for GPCR function. A continuous allosteric network spanning the TM domain, arising from water-mediated contacts, is unique in the active state, underscoring the importance of slow water molecules in the activation of GPCRs. PMID:27653477

  17. Physiology and Pathophysiology of Sodium Channel Inactivation.

    PubMed

    Ghovanloo, M-R; Aimar, K; Ghadiry-Tavi, R; Yu, A; Ruben, P C

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are present in different tissues within the human body, predominantly nerve, muscle, and heart. The sodium channel is composed of four similar domains, each containing six transmembrane segments. Each domain can be functionally organized into a voltage-sensing region and a pore region. The sodium channel may exist in resting, activated, fast inactivated, or slow inactivated states. Upon depolarization, when the channel opens, the fast inactivation gate is in its open state. Within the time frame of milliseconds, this gate closes and blocks the channel pore from conducting any more sodium ions. Repetitive or continuous stimulations of sodium channels result in a rate-dependent decrease of sodium current. This process may continue until the channel fully shuts down. This collapse is known as slow inactivation. This chapter reviews what is known to date regarding, sodium channel inactivation with a focus on various mutations within each NaV subtype and with clinical implications. PMID:27586293

  18. MaxiK channel and cell signalling

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Ligia; Li, Min; Zhang, Zhu; Singh, Harpreet; Wu, Yong; Stefani, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    The large-conductance Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (MaxiK, BK, BKCa, Slo1, KCa1.1) channel role in cell signalling is becoming apparent as we learn how the channel interacts with a multiplicity of proteins not only at the plasma membrane but in intracellular organelles including the endoplasmic reticulum, nucleus and mitochondria. In this review, we focus on the interactions of MaxiK channels with seven transmembrane G-protein coupled receptors, and discuss information suggesting that the channel big C-terminus may act as nucleus of signalling molecules including kinases relevant for cell death and survival. Increasing evidence indicates that the channel is able to associate with a variety of receptors including β-adrenergic receptors, G-protein coupled estrogen receptors, acetylcholine receptors, thromboxane A2 receptors and angiotensin II receptors, which highlights the varied functions that the channel has (or may have) not only in regulating contraction/relaxation of muscle cells or neurotransmission in the brain but also in cell metabolism, proliferation, migration and gene expression. In line with this view, MaxiK channels have been implicated in obesity and in brain, prostate, and mammary cancers. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying or triggered by MaxiK channel abnormalities like overexpression in certain cancers may lead to new therapeutics to prevent devastating diseases. PMID:24077696

  19. Transmembrane helix dimerization: beyond the search for sequence motifs.

    PubMed

    Li, Edwin; Wimley, William C; Hristova, Kalina

    2012-02-01

    Studies of the dimerization of transmembrane (TM) helices have been ongoing for many years now, and have provided clues to the fundamental principles behind membrane protein (MP) folding. Our understanding of TM helix dimerization has been dominated by the idea that sequence motifs, simple recognizable amino acid sequences that drive lateral interaction, can be used to explain and predict the lateral interactions between TM helices in membrane proteins. But as more and more unique interacting helices are characterized, it is becoming clear that the sequence motif paradigm is incomplete. Experimental evidence suggests that the search for sequence motifs, as mediators of TM helix dimerization, cannot solve the membrane protein folding problem alone. Here we review the current understanding in the field, as it has evolved from the paradigm of sequence motifs into a view in which the interactions between TM helices are much more complex. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane protein structure and function.

  20. Allosteric and hyperekplexic mutant phenotypes investigated on an α1 glycine receptor transmembrane structure

    PubMed Central

    Moraga-Cid, Gustavo; Sauguet, Ludovic; Huon, Christèle; Malherbe, Laurie; Girard-Blanc, Christine; Petres, Stéphane; Murail, Samuel; Taly, Antoine; Baaden, Marc; Delarue, Marc; Corringer, Pierre-Jean

    2015-01-01

    The glycine receptor (GlyR) is a pentameric ligand-gated ion channel (pLGIC) mediating inhibitory transmission in the nervous system. Its transmembrane domain (TMD) is the target of allosteric modulators such as general anesthetics and ethanol and is a major locus for hyperekplexic congenital mutations altering the allosteric transitions of activation or desensitization. We previously showed that the TMD of the human α1GlyR could be fused to the extracellular domain of GLIC, a bacterial pLGIC, to form a functional chimera called Lily. Here, we overexpress Lily in Schneider 2 insect cells and solve its structure by X-ray crystallography at 3.5 Å resolution. The TMD of the α1GlyR adopts a closed-channel conformation involving a single ring of hydrophobic residues at the center of the pore. Electrophysiological recordings show that the phenotypes of key allosteric mutations of the α1GlyR, scattered all along the pore, are qualitatively preserved in this chimera, including those that confer decreased sensitivity to agonists, constitutive activity, decreased activation kinetics, or increased desensitization kinetics. Combined structural and functional data indicate a pore-opening mechanism for the α1GlyR, suggesting a structural explanation for the effect of some key hyperekplexic allosteric mutations. The first X-ray structure of the TMD of the α1GlyR solved here using GLIC as a scaffold paves the way for mechanistic investigation and design of allosteric modulators of a human receptor. PMID:25730860

  1. Magnetic resonance study of the transmembrane nitrite diffusion.

    PubMed

    Samouilov, A; Woldman, Ya Yu; Zweier, J L; Khramtsov, V V

    2007-05-01

    Nitrite (NO(2)-), being a product of metabolism of both nitric oxide (NO(*)) and nitrate (NO(3)-), can accumulate in tissues and regenerate NO() by several mechanisms. The effect of NO(2)- on ischemia/reperfusion injury was also reported. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of intracellular NO(2)- accumulation are poorly understood. We suggested significant role of nitrite penetration through biological membranes in the form of undissociated nitrous acid (HNO(2)). This hypothesis has been tested using large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine liposomes and several spectroscopic techniques. HNO(2) transport across the phospholipid bilayer of liposomes facilitates proton transfer resulting in intraliposomal acidification, which was measured using pH-sensitive probes. NO(2)(-)-mediated intraliposomal acidification was confirmed by EPR spectroscopy using membrane-impermeable pH-sensitive nitroxide, AMC (2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-yloxy-2,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-3-ium-4-yl)-aminomethanesulfonic acid (pK 5.25), and by (31)P NMR spectroscopy using inorganic phosphate (pK 6.9). Nitrite accumulates inside liposomes in concentration exceeding its concentration in the bulk solution, when initial transmembrane pH gradient (alkaline inside) is applied. Intraliposomal accumulation of NO(2)- was observed by direct measurement using chemiluminescence technique. Perfusion of isolated rat hearts with buffer containing 4 microM NO(2)- was performed. The nitrite concentrations in the effluent and in the tissue, measured after 1 min perfusion, were close, supporting fast penetration of the nitrite through the tissue. Measurements of the nitrite/nitrate showed that total concentration of NO(x) in myocardium increased from initial 7.8 to 24.7 microM after nitrite perfusion. Physiological significance of passive transmembrane transport of NO(2)- and its coupling with intraliposomal acidification are discussed.

  2. TRP Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voets, Thomas; Owsianik, Grzegorz; Nilius, Bernd

    The TRP superfamily represents a highly diverse group of cation-permeable ion channels related to the product of the Drosophila trp (transient receptor potential) gene. The cloning and characterization of members of this cation channel family has experienced a remarkable growth during the last decade, uncovering a wealth of information concerning the role of TRP channels in a variety of cell types, tissues, and species. Initially, TRP channels were mainly considered as phospholipase C (PLC)-dependent and/or store-operated Ca2+-permeable cation channels. More recent research has highlighted the sensitivity of TRP channels to a broad array of chemical and physical stimuli, allowing them to function as dedicated biological sensors involved in processes ranging from vision to taste, tactile sensation, and hearing. Moreover, the tailored selectivity of certain TRP channels enables them to play key roles in the cellular uptake and/or transepithelial transport of Ca2+, Mg2+, and trace metal ions. In this chapter we give a brief overview of the TRP channel superfamily followed by a survey of current knowledge concerning their structure and activation mechanisms.

  3. Peptidoglycan-associated outer membrane protein Mep45 of rumen anaerobe Selenomonas ruminantium forms a non-specific diffusion pore via its C-terminal transmembrane domain.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Seiji; Hayashi, Kanako; Tochigi, Saeko; Kusano, Tomonobu; Kaneko, Jun; Kamio, Yoshiyuki

    2016-10-01

    The major outer membrane protein Mep45 of Selenomonas ruminantium, an anaerobic Gram-negative bacterium, comprises two distinct domains: the N-terminal S-layer homologous (SLH) domain that protrudes into the periplasm and binds to peptidoglycan, and the remaining C-terminal transmembrane domain, whose function has been unknown. Here, we solubilized and purified Mep45 and characterized its function using proteoliposomes reconstituted with Mep45. We found that Mep45 forms a nonspecific diffusion channel via its C-terminal region. The channel was permeable to solutes smaller than a molecular weight of roughly 600, and the estimated pore radius was 0.58 nm. Truncation of the SLH domain did not affect the channel property. On the basis of the fact that Mep45 is the most abundant outer membrane protein in S. ruminantium, we conclude that Mep45 serves as a main pathway through which small solutes diffuse across the outer membrane of this bacterium.

  4. Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanck, Dorothy A.; Fozzard, Harry A.

    Voltage-gated sodium channels subserve regenerative excitation throughout the nervous system, as well as in skeletal and cardiac muscle. This excitation results from a voltage-dependent mechanism that increases regeneratively and selectively the sodium conductance of the channel e-fold for a 4-7 mV depolarization of the membrane with time constants in the range of tens of microseconds. Entry of Na+ into the cell without a companion anion depolarizes the cell. This depolarization, called the action potential, is propagated at rates of 1-20 meters/sec. In nerve it subserves rapid transmission of information and, in muscle cells, coordinates the trigger for contraction. Sodium-dependent action potentials depolarize the membrane to inside positive values of about 30-40 mV (approaching the electrochemical potential for the transmembrane sodium gradient). Repolarization to the resting potential (usually between -60 and -90 mV) occurs because of inactivation (closure) of sodium channels, which is assisted in different tissues by variable amounts of activation of voltage-gated potassium channels. This sequence results in all-or-nothing action potentials in nerve and fast skeletal muscle of 1-2 ms duration, and in heart muscle of 100-300 ms duration. Recovery of regenerative excitation, i.e., recovery of the ability of sodium channels to open, occurs after restoration of the resting potential with time constants of a few to several hundreds of milliseconds, depending on the channel isoform, and this rate controls the minimum interval for repetitive action potentials (refractory period).

  5. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator is an Epithelial Cell Receptor for Clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the Lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pier, Gerald B.; Grout, Martha; Zaidi, Tanweer S.

    1997-10-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride ion channel, but its relationship to the primary clinical manifestation of CF, chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pulmonary infection, is unclear. We report that CFTR is a cellular receptor for binding, endocytosing, and clearing P. aeruginosa from the normal lung. Murine cells expressing recombinant human wild-type CFTR ingested 30-100 times as many P. aeruginosa as cells lacking CFTR or expressing mutant Δ F508 CFTR protein. Purified CFTR inhibited ingestion of P. aeruginosa by human airway epithelial cells. The first extracellular domain of CFTR specifically bound to P. aeruginosa and a synthetic peptide of this region inhibited P. aeruginosa internalization in vivo, leading to increased bacterial lung burdens. CFTR clears P. aeruginosa from the lung, indicating a direct connection between mutations in CFTR and the clinical consequences of CF.

  6. Structural basis of open channel block in a prokaryotic pentameric ligand-gated ion channel.

    PubMed

    Hilf, Ricarda J C; Bertozzi, Carlo; Zimmermann, Iwan; Reiter, Alwin; Trauner, Dirk; Dutzler, Raimund

    2010-11-01

    The flow of ions through cation-selective members of the pentameric ligand-gated ion channel family is inhibited by a structurally diverse class of molecules that bind to the transmembrane pore in the open state of the protein. To obtain insight into the mechanism of channel block, we have investigated the binding of positively charged inhibitors to the open channel of the bacterial homolog GLIC by using X-ray crystallography and electrophysiology. Our studies reveal the location of two regions for interactions, with larger blockers binding in the center of the membrane and divalent transition metal ions binding to the narrow intracellular pore entry. The results provide a structural foundation for understanding the interactions of the channel with inhibitors that is relevant for the entire family.

  7. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance... DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5900 Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR... intended as an aid in confirmatory diagnostic testing of individuals with suspected cystic fibrosis...

  8. Strong cooperativity between subunits in voltage-gated proton channels

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Carlos; Koch, Hans P.; Drum, Ben M.; Larsson, H. Peter

    2010-01-01

    Voltage-activated proton (HV) channels are essential components in the innate immune response. HV channels are dimeric proteins with one proton permeation pathway per subunit. It is not known how HV channels are activated by voltage and whether there is any cooperativity between subunits during voltage activation. Using cysteine accessibility measurements and voltage clamp fluorometry, we show data that are consistent with that the fourth transmembrane segment S4 functions as the voltage sensor in HV channels from Ciona intestinalis. Surprisingly, in a dimeric HV channel, S4 in both subunits have to move to activate the two proton permeation pathways. In contrast, if HV subunits are prevented from dimerizing, then the movement of a single S4 is sufficient to activate the proton permeation pathway in a subunit. These results suggest a strong cooperativity between subunits in dimeric HV channels. PMID:20023639

  9. Mechanosensitivity of ion channels based on protein–lipid interactions

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Kenjiro; Sokabe, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    Ion channels form a group of membrane proteins that pass ions through a pore beyond the energy barrier of the lipid bilayer. The structure of the transmembrane segment of membrane proteins is influenced by the charges and the hydrophobicity of the surrounding lipids and the pressure on its surface. A mechanosensitive channel is specifically designed to change its conformation in response to changes in the membrane pressure (tension). However, mechanosensitive channels are not the only group that is sensitive to the physical environment of the membrane: voltage-gated channels are also amenable to the lipid environment. In this article, we review the structure and gating mechanisms of the mechanosensitive channels and voltage-gated channels and discuss how their functions are affected by the physical properties of the lipid bilayer. PMID:20356872

  10. Uniformly oriented gramicidin channels embedded in thick monodomain lecithin multilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, H W; Olah, G A

    1987-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine multilayers, containing 20% water by total sample weight and gramicidin/lipid molar ratios up to 1:40 were aligned by low temperature annealing (less than 60 degrees C) and mechanical stressing. We were able to obtain large (greater than 80 micron thick X 40 mm2 area) monodomain defect-free multilayers containing approximately 10(17) uniformly oriented gramicidin channels. The alignment of lipid multilayers was monitored by conoscopy and polarized microscopy. The smectic defects, which appeared during the alignment process, were identified and dissolved. The incorporation of gramicidin into the multilayers in the form of transmembrane channels was indicated by its circular dichroic (CD) spectrum. A well-defined CD spectrum of uniformly oriented gramicidin channels was obtained. The oriented samples will allow spectroscopic studies of the ion channel in its conducting state and diffraction studies of the channel-channel organization in the membrane. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:2440487

  11. Activation of transmembrane cell‐surface receptors via a common mechanism? The “rotation model”

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    It has long been thought that transmembrane cell‐surface receptors, such as receptor tyrosine kinases and cytokine receptors, among others, are activated by ligand binding through ligand‐induced dimerization of the receptors. However, there is growing evidence that prior to ligand binding, various transmembrane receptors have a preformed, yet inactive, dimeric structure on the cell surface. Various studies also demonstrate that during transmembrane signaling, ligand binding to the extracellular domain of receptor dimers induces a rotation of transmembrane domains, followed by rearrangement and/or activation of intracellular domains. The paper here describes transmembrane cell‐surface receptors that are known or proposed to exist in dimeric form prior to ligand binding, and discusses how these preformed dimers are activated by ligand binding. PMID:26241732

  12. Assignment of Oriented Sample NMR Resonances from a Three Transmembrane Helix Protein

    PubMed Central

    Murray, D. T.; Hung, I.; Cross, T. A.

    2014-01-01

    Oriented sample solid state NMR techniques have been routinely employed to determine the structures of membrane proteins with one or two transmembrane helices. For larger proteins the technique has been limited by spectral resolution and lack of assignment strategies. Here, a strategy for resonance assignment is devised and applied to a three transmembrane helix protein. Sequence specific assignments for all labeled transmembrane amino acid sites are obtained, which provide a set of orientational restraints and helix orientation in the bilayer. Our experiments expand the utility of solid state NMR in membrane protein structure characterization to three transmembrane helix proteins and represent a straightforward strategy for routinely characterizing multiple transmembrane helix protein structures. PMID:24509383

  13. Transmembrane Signaling Characterized in Bacterial Chemoreceptors by Using Sulfhydryl Cross-Linking in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Geoffrey F.; Lebert, Michael R.; Lilly, Angela A.; Hazelbauer, Gerald L.

    1995-04-01

    Transmembrane signaling by bacterial chemoreceptors is thought to involve conformational changes within a stable homodimer. We investigated the functional consequences of constraining movement between pairs of helices in the four-helix structure of the transmembrane domain of chemoreceptor Trg. Using a family of cysteine-containing receptors, we identified oxidation treatments for intact cells that catalyzed essentially complete sulfhydryl cross-linking at selected positions and yet left flagellar and sensory functions largely unperturbed. Constraining movement by cross-links between subunits had little effect on tactic response, but constraining movement between transmembrane segments of the monomer drastically reduced function. We deduce that transmembrane signaling requires substantial movement between transmembrane helices of a monomer but not between interacting helices across the interface between subunits.

  14. Oridonin: a small molecule inhibitor of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) isolated from traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Luan, Jian; Zhang, Yaofang; Yang, Shuang; Wang, Xue; Yu, Bo; Yang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an epithelial chloride channel regulating the transepithelial transport of electrolyte and water. In the recent years, CFTR chloride channel becomes the new molecular target of treating secretory diarrhea. The objective of this study is to find out a novel CFTR inhibitor from traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and study on its pharmacological activity. About 34,000 factions of TCM extracts were screened by high throughput screening (HTS) in this research. We found that Rabdosia rubescens show a potent inhibition on CFTR. Under the bio-active analysis guidance, an ent-kaurane diterpenoid - oridonin (PubChem CID: 34378) was isolated from R. rubescens. A series of intensive studies showed that oridonin remarkably reduced iodide influx in wt-CFTR and ΔF508-CFTR FRT epithelial cells in a dose-dependent and irreversible way. Oridonin sharply blocked FSK-stimulated short-circuit current in both rats and mice intestine in vitro. In mouse closed-loop model, oridonin reduced cholera toxin-induced fluid secretion significantly over 6hours in vivo. Thus we concluded that oridonin is a new inhibitor of CFTR Cl(-) channel. It will be a good leading compound for developing the new drug of cholera toxin-induced secretory diarrhea. PMID:25447156

  15. Characterization of transmembrane movement of glucose and glucose analogs in Streptococcus mutants Ingbritt.

    PubMed Central

    Dashper, S G; Reynolds, E C

    1990-01-01

    The transmembrane movement of radiolabeled, nonmetabolizable glucose analogs in Streptococcus mutants Ingbritt was studied under conditions of differing transmembrane electrochemical potentials (delta psi) and pH gradients (delta pH). The delta pH and delta psi were determined from the transmembrane equilibration of radiolabeled benzoate and tetraphenylphosphonium ions, respectively. Growth conditions of S. mutants Ingbritt were chosen so that the cells had a low apparent phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-dependent glucose:phosphotransferase activity. Cells energized under different conditions produced transmembrane proton potentials ranging from -49 to -103 mV but did not accumulate 6-deoxyglucose intracellularly. An artificial transmembrane proton potential was generated in deenergized cells by creating a delta psi with a valinomycin-induced K+ diffusion potential and a delta pH by rapid acidification of the medium. Artificial transmembrane proton potentials up to -83 mV, although producing proton influx, could not accumulate 6-deoxyglucose in deenergized cells or 2-deoxyglucose or thiomethylgalactoside in deenergized, PEP-depleted cells. The transmembrane diffusion of glucose in PEP-depleted, KF-treated cells did not exhibit saturation kinetics or competitive inhibition by 6-deoxyglucose or 2-deoxyglucose, indicating that diffusion was not facilitated by a membrane carrier. As proton-linked membrane carriers have been shown to facilitate diffusion in the absence of a transmembrane proton potential, the results therefore are not consistent with a proton-linked glucose carrier in S. mutans Ingbritt. This together with the lack of proton-linked transport of the glucose analogs suggests that glucose transmembrane movement in S. mutans Ingbritt is not linked to the transmembrane proton potential. PMID:2298698

  16. Is TMC1 the Hair Cell Mechanotransducer Channel?

    PubMed

    Fettiplace, Robert

    2016-07-12

    Transmembrane channel-like protein isoform-1 (TMC1) has emerged over the past five years as a prime contender for the mechano-electrical transducer (MET) channel in hair cells of the inner ear. TMC1 is thought to have a six-transmembrane domain structure reminiscent of some other ion-channel subunits, and is targeted to the tips of the stereocilia in the sensory hair bundle, where the MET channel is located. Moreover, there are TMC1 mutations linked to human deafness causing loss of conventional MET currents, hair cell degeneration, and deafness in mice. Finally, mutations of Tmc1 can alter the conductance and Ca(2+) selectivity of the MET channels. For several reasons though, it is unclear that TMC1 is indeed the MET channel pore: 1) in other animals or tissues, mutations of TMC family members do not directly affect cellular mechanosensitivity; 2) there are residual manifestations of mechanosensitivity in hair cells of mouse Tmc1:Tmc2 double knockouts; 3) there is so far no evidence that expression of mammalian Tmc1 generates a mechanically sensitive ion channel in the plasma membrane when expressed in heterologous cells; and 4) there are other proteins, such as TMIE and LHFPL5, which behave similarly to TMC1, their mutation also leading to loss of MET current and deafness. This review will present these disparate lines of evidence and describes recent work that addresses the role of TMC1. PMID:27410728

  17. Epithelial Sodium and Chloride Channels and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen; Ji, Hong-Long

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To focus on the asthmatic pathogenesis and clinical manifestations related to epithelial sodium channel (ENaC)/chlorine ion channel. Data Sources: The data analyzed in this review were the English articles from 1980 to 2015 from journal databases, primarily PubMed and Google Scholar. The terms used in the literature search were: (1) ENaCs; cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR); asthma/asthmatic, (2) ENaC/sodium salt; CF; asthma/asthmatic, (3) CFTR/chlorine ion channels; asthma/asthmatic, (4) ENaC/sodium channel/scnn1a/scnn1b/scnn1g/scnn1d/amiloride-sensitive/amiloride-inhibtable sodium channels/sodium salt; asthma/asthmatic, lung/pulmonary/respiratory/tracheal/alveolar, and (5) CFTR; CF; asthma/asthmatic (ti). Study Selection: These studies included randomized controlled trials or studies covering asthma pathogenesis and clinical manifestations related to ENaC/chlorine ion channels within the last 25 years (from 1990 to 2015). The data involving chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and CF obtained from individual studies were also reviewed by the authors. Results: Airway surface liquid dehydration can cause airway inflammation and obstruction. ENaC and CFTR are closely related to the airway mucociliary clearance. Ion transporters may play a critical role in pathogenesis of asthmatic exacerbations. Conclusions: Ion channels have been the center of many studies aiming to understand asthmatic pathophysiological mechanisms or to identify therapeutic targets for better control of the disease. PMID:26265620

  18. Investigating Alternative Transport of Integral Plasma Membrane Proteins from the ER to the Golgi: Lessons from the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR).

    PubMed

    Amaral, Margarida D; Farinha, Carlos M; Matos, Paulo; Botelho, Hugo M

    2016-01-01

    Secretory traffic became a topical field because many important cell regulators are plasma membrane proteins (transporters, channels, receptors), being thus key targets in biomedicine and drug discovery. Cystic fibrosis (CF), caused by defects in a single gene encoding the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), constitutes the most common of rare diseases and certainly a paradigmatic one.Here we focus on five different approaches that allow biochemical and cellular characterization of CFTR from its co-translational insertion into the ER membrane to its delivery to the plasma membrane. PMID:27665554

  19. Spike initiation by transmembrane current: a white-noise analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, H L; Segundo, J P

    1976-01-01

    1. Those features of a transmembrane current correlated with spike initiation were examined in Aplysia neurones using a Gaussian white-noise stimulus. This stimulus has the advantages that it presents numerous wave forms in random order without prejudgement as to their efficacies, and that it allows straightforward statistical calculations. 2. Stimulation with a repeating segment of Gaussian white-noise current revealed remarkable invariance in the firing times of the tested neurones and indicated a high degree of reliability of their response. 3. Frequencies (less than 5 Hz) involved in spike triggering propagated faithfully for up to several millimetres, justifying intrasomatic current injection to examine spike initiation at the trigger locus. 4. Examination of current wave forms preceding spikes indicated that a wide variety could be effective. Hence, a statistical analysis was performed, including computation of probability densities, averages, standard deviations and correlation coefficients of pairs of current values. Each statistic was displayed as a function of time before the spike. 5. The average current trajectory preceding a spike was multiphasic and depended on the presence and polarity of a d.c. bias. An early relatively small inward- or outward-going phase was followed by a large outward phase before the spike. The early phase tended to oppose the polarity of the d.c. bias. 6. The late outward phase of the average current trajectory reached a maximum 40--75 msec before triggering the action potential (AP) and returned to near zero values at the moment of triggering. The fact that the current peak occurs in advance of the AP may be partially explained by a phase delay between the transmembrane current and potential. The failure of the average current trajectory to return to control values immediately following the peak argues for a positive role of the declining phase in spike triggering. 7. Probability densities preceding spikes were Gaussian

  20. Intrinsic gating mechanisms of epithelial sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong-Long; Fuller, Catherine M; Benos, Dale J

    2002-08-01

    The hypothesis that there is a highly conserved, positively charged region distal to the second transmembrane domain in alpha-ENaC (epithelial sodium channel) that acts as a putative receptor site for the negatively charged COOH-terminal beta- and gamma-ENaC tails was tested in mutagenesis experiments. After expression in Xenopus oocytes, alpha-ENaC constructs in which positively charged arginine residues were converted into negatively charged glutamic acids could not be inhibited by blocking peptides. These observations provide insight into the gating machinery of ENaC. PMID:12107075

  1. Topological Analysis of Hedgehog Acyltransferase, a Multipalmitoylated Transmembrane Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Konitsiotis, Antonio D.; Jovanović, Biljana; Ciepla, Paulina; Spitaler, Martin; Lanyon-Hogg, Thomas; Tate, Edward W.; Magee, Anthony I.

    2015-01-01

    Hedgehog proteins are secreted morphogens that play critical roles in development and disease. During maturation of the proteins through the secretory pathway, they are modified by the addition of N-terminal palmitic acid and C-terminal cholesterol moieties, both of which are critical for their correct function and localization. Hedgehog acyltransferase (HHAT) is the enzyme in the endoplasmic reticulum that palmitoylates Hedgehog proteins, is a member of a small subfamily of membrane-bound O-acyltransferase proteins that acylate secreted proteins, and is an important drug target in cancer. However, little is known about HHAT structure and mode of function. We show that HHAT is comprised of ten transmembrane domains and two reentrant loops with the critical His and Asp residues on opposite sides of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. We further show that HHAT is palmitoylated on multiple cytosolic cysteines that maintain protein structure within the membrane. Finally, we provide evidence that mutation of the conserved His residue in the hypothesized catalytic domain results in a complete loss of HHAT palmitoylation, providing novel insights into how the protein may function in vivo. PMID:25505265

  2. Decreasing transmembrane segment length greatly decreases perfringolysin O pore size

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Qingqing; Li, Huilin; Wang, Tong; London, Erwin

    2015-04-08

    Perfringolysin O (PFO) is a transmembrane (TM) β-barrel protein that inserts into mammalian cell membranes. Once inserted into membranes, PFO assembles into pore-forming oligomers containing 30–50 PFO monomers. These form a pore of up to 300 Å, far exceeding the size of most other proteinaceous pores. In this study, we found that altering PFO TM segment length can alter the size of PFO pores. A PFO mutant with lengthened TM segments oligomerized to a similar extent as wild-type PFO, and exhibited pore-forming activity and a pore size very similar to wild-type PFO as measured by electron microscopy and a leakage assay. In contrast, PFO with shortened TM segments exhibited a large reduction in pore-forming activity and pore size. This suggests that the interaction between TM segments can greatly affect the size of pores formed by TM β-barrel proteins. PFO may be a promising candidate for engineering pore size for various applications.

  3. Quantifying ligand bias at seven-transmembrane receptors.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Sudarshan; Ahn, Seungkirl; Rominger, David H; Gowen-MacDonald, William; Lam, Christopher M; Dewire, Scott M; Violin, Jonathan D; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2011-09-01

    Seven transmembrane receptors (7TMRs), commonly referred to as G protein-coupled receptors, form a large part of the "druggable" genome. 7TMRs can signal through parallel pathways simultaneously, such as through heterotrimeric G proteins from different families, or, as more recently appreciated, through the multifunctional adapters, β-arrestins. Biased agonists, which signal with different efficacies to a receptor's multiple downstream pathways, are useful tools for deconvoluting this signaling complexity. These compounds may also be of therapeutic use because they have distinct functional and therapeutic profiles from "balanced agonists." Although some methods have been proposed to identify biased ligands, no comparison of these methods applied to the same set of data has been performed. Therefore, at this time, there are no generally accepted methods to quantify the relative bias of different ligands, making studies of biased signaling difficult. Here, we use complementary computational approaches for the quantification of ligand bias and demonstrate their application to two well known drug targets, the β2 adrenergic and angiotensin II type 1A receptors. The strategy outlined here allows a quantification of ligand bias and the identification of weakly biased compounds. This general method should aid in deciphering complex signaling pathways and may be useful for the development of novel biased therapeutic ligands as drugs.

  4. Decreasing transmembrane segment length greatly decreases perfringolysin O pore size

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Qingqing; Li, Huilin; Wang, Tong; London, Erwin

    2015-04-08

    Perfringolysin O (PFO) is a transmembrane (TM) β-barrel protein that inserts into mammalian cell membranes. Once inserted into membranes, PFO assembles into pore-forming oligomers containing 30–50 PFO monomers. These form a pore of up to 300 Å, far exceeding the size of most other proteinaceous pores. In this study, we found that altering PFO TM segment length can alter the size of PFO pores. A PFO mutant with lengthened TM segments oligomerized to a similar extent as wild-type PFO, and exhibited pore-forming activity and a pore size very similar to wild-type PFO as measured by electron microscopy and a leakagemore » assay. In contrast, PFO with shortened TM segments exhibited a large reduction in pore-forming activity and pore size. This suggests that the interaction between TM segments can greatly affect the size of pores formed by TM β-barrel proteins. PFO may be a promising candidate for engineering pore size for various applications.« less

  5. Topological analysis of Hedgehog acyltransferase, a multipalmitoylated transmembrane protein.

    PubMed

    Konitsiotis, Antonio D; Jovanović, Biljana; Ciepla, Paulina; Spitaler, Martin; Lanyon-Hogg, Thomas; Tate, Edward W; Magee, Anthony I

    2015-02-01

    Hedgehog proteins are secreted morphogens that play critical roles in development and disease. During maturation of the proteins through the secretory pathway, they are modified by the addition of N-terminal palmitic acid and C-terminal cholesterol moieties, both of which are critical for their correct function and localization. Hedgehog acyltransferase (HHAT) is the enzyme in the endoplasmic reticulum that palmitoylates Hedgehog proteins, is a member of a small subfamily of membrane-bound O-acyltransferase proteins that acylate secreted proteins, and is an important drug target in cancer. However, little is known about HHAT structure and mode of function. We show that HHAT is comprised of ten transmembrane domains and two reentrant loops with the critical His and Asp residues on opposite sides of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. We further show that HHAT is palmitoylated on multiple cytosolic cysteines that maintain protein structure within the membrane. Finally, we provide evidence that mutation of the conserved His residue in the hypothesized catalytic domain results in a complete loss of HHAT palmitoylation, providing novel insights into how the protein may function in vivo. PMID:25505265

  6. Role of GxxxG Motifs in Transmembrane Domain Interactions.

    PubMed

    Teese, Mark G; Langosch, Dieter

    2015-08-25

    Transmembrane (TM) helices of integral membrane proteins can facilitate strong and specific noncovalent protein-protein interactions. Mutagenesis and structural analyses have revealed numerous examples in which the interaction between TM helices of single-pass membrane proteins is dependent on a GxxxG or (small)xxx(small) motif. It is therefore tempting to use the presence of these simple motifs as an indicator of TM helix interactions. In this Current Topic review, we point out that these motifs are quite common, with more than 50% of single-pass TM domains containing a (small)xxx(small) motif. However, the actual interaction strength of motif-containing helices depends strongly on sequence context and membrane properties. In addition, recent studies have revealed several GxxxG-containing TM domains that interact via alternative interfaces involving hydrophobic, polar, aromatic, or even ionizable residues that do not form recognizable motifs. In multipass membrane proteins, GxxxG motifs can be important for protein folding, and not just oligomerization. Our current knowledge thus suggests that the presence of a GxxxG motif alone is a weak predictor of protein dimerization in the membrane. PMID:26244771

  7. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator gene mutations in Bahrain.

    PubMed

    Eskandarani, H A

    2002-12-01

    A genotypic study was undertaken to characterize the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator gene mutations (CFTR) in the Bahraini cystic fibrosis (CF) population using a polymerase chain reaction-based direct gene test to search for 15 common CF mutations amongst Arabs. During the period October 2000 to May 2001, 19 patients (12 males and seven females; aged at time of study between 4 months and 14 years with a mean age of 5.4 +/- 4.3 years) from 13 families were recruited in the study. Patients were diagnosed as having CF, based on a typical clinical picture and sweat chloride levels > 60 mmol/l and were screened for CFTR mutations. The rate of consanguinity among the families was 77 per cent. Eight mutations were detected in 21 of the 26 alleles examined. The overall detection rate was approximately 81 per cent. The allele frequency of the eight mutations was estimated to be approximately 73 per cent. There was no specific phenotypic pattern that correlated with a specific genotype. All families except two were of Bahraini origin. Of the eight mutations detected, four were common among Bahrainis (2043delG > 548A --> T > 4041C --> G = deltaF508, in order of decreasing frequency), accounting for 66 per cent of the Bahraini CF alleles. However, we also detected four different heterozygous mutations, namely: 1161delC, 1756G -->T, 3120 + 1G --> A, and 3661A --> T, accounting for 16 per cent of the Bahraini CF alleles.

  8. LINKIN, a new transmembrane protein necessary for cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Mihoko; Chou, Tsui-Fen; Yu, Collin Z; DeModena, John; Sternberg, Paul W

    2014-01-01

    In epithelial collective migration, leader and follower cells migrate while maintaining cell–cell adhesion and tissue polarity. We have identified a conserved protein and interactors required for maintaining cell adhesion during a simple collective migration in the developing C. elegans male gonad. LINKIN is a previously uncharacterized, transmembrane protein conserved throughout Metazoa. We identified seven atypical FG–GAP domains in the extracellular domain, which potentially folds into a β-propeller structure resembling the α-integrin ligand-binding domain. C. elegans LNKN-1 localizes to the plasma membrane of all gonadal cells, with apical and lateral bias. We identified the LINKIN interactors RUVBL1, RUVBL2, and α-tubulin by using SILAC mass spectrometry on human HEK 293T cells and testing candidates for lnkn-1-like function in C. elegans male gonad. We propose that LINKIN promotes adhesion between neighboring cells through its extracellular domain and regulates microtubule dynamics through RUVBL proteins at its intracellular domain. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04449.001 PMID:25437307

  9. Structural Plasticity in Self-Assembling Transmembrane β-Sheets

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Christopher M.; Wimley, William C.

    2011-01-01

    Here we test the hypothesis that membrane-spanning β-sheets can exhibit structural plasticity in membranes due to their ability to shift hydrogen-bonding patterns. Transmembrane β-sheet forming peptides of the sequence AcWLn, where n = 5, 6, or 7, which range from 21 to 27 Å in maximum length, were incorporated into bilayers made of phosphatidylcholine lipids with saturated acyl chains containing 14, 16, or 18 carbons, which are 36–50 Å in thickness. The effect of the peptide β-sheets on fluid- and gel-phase bilayers were studied with differential scanning calorimetry and circular dichroism spectroscopy. We show that AcWL5 forms a stable, peptide-rich gel phase in all three lipids. The whole family of AcWLn peptides appears to form similarly stable, nonmembrane-disrupting β-sheets in all bilayer phases and thicknesses. Bilayers containing up to 20 mol % peptide, which is the maximum concentration tested, formed gel phases with melting temperatures that were equal to, or slightly higher than, the pure lipid transitions. Given the range of peptide lengths and bilayer thicknesses tested, these experiments show that the AcWLn family of membrane-inserted β-sheets exhibit remarkable structural plasticity in membranes. PMID:21843473

  10. Toxoplasma gondii transmembrane microneme proteins and their modular design

    PubMed Central

    Sheiner, Lilach; Santos, Joana M.; Klages, Natacha; Parussini, Fabiola; Jemmely, Noelle; Friedrich, Nikolas; Ward, Gary E.; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    Summary Host cell invasion by the Apicomplexa critically relies on regulated secretion of transmembrane micronemal proteins (TM-MICs). Toxoplasma gondii possesses functionally non-redundant MICs complexes that participate in gliding motility, host cell attachment, moving junction formation, rhoptry secretion and invasion. The TM-MICs are released onto the parasite’s surface as complexes capable of interacting with host cell receptors. Additionally, TgMIC2 simultaneously connects to the actomyosin system via binding to aldolase. During invasion these adhesive complexes are shed from the surface notably via intramembrane cleavage of the TM-MICs by a rhomboid protease. Some TM-MICs act as escorters and assure trafficking of the complexes to the micronemes. We have investigated the properties of TgMIC6, TgMIC8, TgMIC8.2, TgAMA1 and the new micronemal protein TgMIC16 with respect to interaction with aldolase, susceptibility to rhomboid cleavage and presence of trafficking signals. We conclude that several TM-MICs lack targeting information within their C-terminal domains, indicating that trafficking depends on yet unidentified proteins interacting with their ectodomains. Most TM-MICs serve as substrates for a rhomboid protease and some of them are able to bind to aldolase. We also show that the residues responsible for binding to aldolase are essential for TgAMA1 but dispensable forTgMIC6 function during invasion. PMID:20545864

  11. A small-molecule photoactivatable optical sensor of transmembrane potential

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, Vincent; Walker, Alison S.; Miller, Evan W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discloses the design, synthesis, and imaging applications of the first member of a new class of SPOTs, small-molecule photoactivatable optical sensors of transmembrane potential. SPOT2.1.Cl features an established voltage-sensitive dye, VoltageFluor2.1.Cl—or—VF capped with a dimethoxy-o-nitrobenzyl (DMNB) caging group to effectively eliminate fluorescence of the VF dye prior to uncaging. SPOT2.1.Cl localizes to cell membranes and displays weak fluorescence until photoactivated. Illumination generates the parent VF dye which then optically reports on changes in the membrane voltage. After photoactivation with spatially restricted light, SPOT2.1.Cl-loaded cells display bright, voltage-sensitive fluorescence associated with the plasma membrane, while neighboring cells remain dark. Activated SPOT reports on action potentials in single trials. SPOT can be activated in neuron cell bodies or uncaged in dendrites to enable structural tracing via “backfilling” of the dye to the soma, followed by functional imaging in the labeled cell. The combination of cellular specificity achieved through spatially-defined patterns of illumination, coupled with the fast, sensitive, and non-capacitive voltage sensing characteristics of VF dyes makes SPOT2.1.Cl a useful tool for interrogating both structure and function of neuronal systems. PMID:26247778

  12. Quantitative approaches to utilizing mutational analysis and disulfide crosslinking for modeling a transmembrane domain.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, G. F.; Hazelbauer, G. L.

    1995-01-01

    The transmembrane domain of chemoreceptor Trg from Escherichia coli contains four transmembrane segments in its native homodimer, two from each subunit. We had previously used mutational analysis and sulfhydryl cross-linking between introduced cysteines to obtain data relevant to the three-dimensional organization of this domain. In the current study we used Fourier analysis to assess these data quantitatively for periodicity along the sequences of the segments. The analyses provided a strong indication of alpha-helical periodicity in the first transmembrane segment and a substantial indication of that periodicity for the second segment. On this basis, we considered both segments as idealized alpha-helices and proceeded to model the transmembrane domain as a unit of four helices. For this modeling, we calculated helical crosslinking moments, parameters analogous to helical hydrophobic moments, as a quantitative way of condensing and utilizing a large body of crosslinking data. Crosslinking moments were used to define the relative separation and orientation of helical pairs, thus creating a quantitatively derived model for the transmembrane domain of Trg. Utilization of Fourier transforms to provide a quantitative indication of periodicity in data from analyses of transmembrane segments, in combination with helical crosslinking moments to position helical pairs should be useful in modeling other transmembrane domains. PMID:7549874

  13. Molecular transport through channels and pores: Effects of in-channel interactions and blocking

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Wolfgang R.; Nadler, Walter

    2006-01-01

    Facilitated translocation of molecules through channels and pores is of fundamental importance for transmembrane transport in biological systems. Several such systems have specific binding sites inside the channel, but a clear understanding of how the interaction between channel and molecules affects the flow is still missing. We present a generic analytical treatment of the problem that relates molecular flow to the first passage time across and the number of particles inside the channel. Both quantities depend in different ways on the channel properties. For the idealized case of noninteracting molecules, we find an increased flow whenever there is a binding site in the channel, despite an increased first passage time. In the more realistic case that molecules may block the channel, we find an increase of flow only up to a certain threshold value of the binding strength and a dependence on the sign of the concentration gradient, i.e., asymmetric transport. The optimal binding strength in that case is analyzed. In all cases the reason for transport facilitation is an increased occupation probability of a particle inside the channel that overcomes any increase in the first passage time because of binding. PMID:16861303

  14. Molecular transport through channels and pores: effects of in-channel interactions and blocking.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Wolfgang R; Nadler, Walter

    2006-08-01

    Facilitated translocation of molecules through channels and pores is of fundamental importance for transmembrane transport in biological systems. Several such systems have specific binding sites inside the channel, but a clear understanding of how the interaction between channel and molecules affects the flow is still missing. We present a generic analytical treatment of the problem that relates molecular flow to the first passage time across and the number of particles inside the channel. Both quantities depend in different ways on the channel properties. For the idealized case of noninteracting molecules, we find an increased flow whenever there is a binding site in the channel, despite an increased first passage time. In the more realistic case that molecules may block the channel, we find an increase of flow only up to a certain threshold value of the binding strength and a dependence on the sign of the concentration gradient, i.e., asymmetric transport. The optimal binding strength in that case is analyzed. In all cases the reason for transport facilitation is an increased occupation probability of a particle inside the channel that overcomes any increase in the first passage time because of binding.

  15. Regulation of Ion Channels by Pyridine Nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Kilfoil, Peter J.; Tipparaju, Srinivas M.; Barski, Oleg A.; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2014-01-01

    Recent research suggests that in addition to their role as soluble electron carriers, pyridine nucleotides [NAD(P)(H)] also regulate ion transport mechanisms. This mode of regulation seems to have been conserved through evolution. Several bacterial ion–transporting proteins or their auxiliary subunits possess nucleotide-binding domains. In eukaryotes, the Kv1 and Kv4 channels interact with pyridine nucleotide–binding β-subunits that belong to the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. Binding of NADP+ to Kvβ removes N-type inactivation of Kv currents, whereas NADPH stabilizes channel inactivation. Pyridine nucleotides also regulate Slo channels by interacting with their cytosolic regulator of potassium conductance domains that show high sequence homology to the bacterial TrkA family of K+ transporters. These nucleotides also have been shown to modify the activity of the plasma membrane KATP channels, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, the transient receptor potential M2 channel, and the intracellular ryanodine receptor calcium release channels. In addition, pyridine nucleotides also modulate the voltage-gated sodium channel by supporting the activity of its ancillary subunit—the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase-like protein. Moreover, the NADP+ metabolite, NAADP+, regulates intracellular calcium homeostasis via the 2-pore channel, ryanodine receptor, or transient receptor potential M2 channels. Regulation of ion channels by pyridine nucleotides may be required for integrating cell ion transport to energetics and for sensing oxygen levels or metabolite availability. This mechanism also may be an important component of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, memory, and circadian rhythms, and disruption of this regulatory axis may be linked to dysregulation of calcium homeostasis and cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:23410881

  16. How do mechanosensitive channels sense membrane tension?

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Tim

    2016-08-15

    Mechanosensitive (MS) channels provide protection against hypo-osmotic shock in bacteria whereas eukaryotic MS channels fulfil a multitude of important functions beside osmoregulation. Interactions with the membrane lipids are responsible for the sensing of mechanical force for most known MS channels. It emerged recently that not only prokaryotic, but also eukaryotic, MS channels are able to directly sense the tension in the membrane bilayer without any additional cofactor. If the membrane is solely viewed as a continuous medium with specific anisotropic physical properties, the sensitivity towards tension changes can be explained as result of the hydrophobic coupling between membrane and transmembrane (TM) regions of the channel. The increased cross-sectional area of the MS channel in the active conformation and elastic deformations of the membrane close to the channel have been described as important factors. However, recent studies suggest that molecular interactions of lipids with the channels could play an important role in mechanosensation. Pockets in between TM helices were identified in the MS channel of small conductance (MscS) and YnaI that are filled with lipids. Less lipids are present in the open state of MscS than the closed according to MD simulations. Thus it was suggested that exclusion of lipid fatty acyl chains from these pockets, as a consequence of increased tension, would trigger gating. Similarly, in the eukaryotic MS channel TRAAK it was found that a lipid chain blocks the conducting path in the closed state. The role of these specific lipid interactions in mechanosensation are highlighted in this review. PMID:27528747

  17. Changes of transmembrane Ca2+ gradient in the formation of macrophage-derived foam cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Zhang, Y; Huang, Y; Yang, F

    2000-02-01

    Macrophages from C57BL/6J mice, an animal susceptible to atherosclerosis, were chosen as target cells to study changes in the transmembrane Ca2+ gradient during the formation of macrophage-derived foam cells. The transmembrane Ca2+ gradients of single living cells were examined-using Fura-2/AM combined with Fluo-3/AM by laser scanning confocal microscopy. Exposure to Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein, decreases the Ca2+ gradient across macrophage plasma membrane, but increases that across the nuclear membrane. The altered transmembrane Ca2+ gradients could induce the up-regulation of scavenger receptor in macrophages, resulting in the formation of foam cells.

  18. A unique phenylalanine in the transmembrane domain strengthens homodimerization of the syndecan-2 transmembrane domain and functionally regulates syndecan-2.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Mi-Jung; Choi, Youngsil; Yun, Ji-Hye; Lee, Weontae; Han, Inn-Oc; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2015-02-27

    The syndecans are a type of cell surface adhesion receptor that initiates intracellular signaling events through receptor clustering mediated by their highly conserved transmembrane domains (TMDs). However, the exact function of the syndecan TMD is not yet fully understood. Here, we investigated the specific regulatory role of the syndecan-2 TMD. We found that syndecan-2 mutants in which the TMD had been replaced with that of syndecan-4 were defective in syndecan-2-mediated functions, suggesting that the TMD of syndecan-2 plays one or more specific roles. Interestingly, syndecan-2 has a stronger tendency to form sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-resistant homodimers than syndecan-4. Our structural studies showed that a unique phenylalanine residue (Phe(167)) enables an additional molecular interaction between the TMDs of the syndecan-2 homodimer. The presence of Phe(167) was correlated with a higher tendency toward oligomerization, and its replacement with isoleucine significantly reduced the SDS-resistant dimer formation and cellular functions of syndecan-2 (e.g. cell migration). Conversely, replacement of isoleucine with phenylalanine at this position in the syndecan-4 TMD rescued the defects observed in a mutant syndecan-2 harboring the syndecan-4 TMD. Taken together, these data suggest that Phe(167) in the TMD of syndecan-2 endows the protein with specific functions. Our work offers new insights into the signaling mediated by the TMD of syndecan family members.

  19. Voltage gated sodium channels as drug discovery targets.

    PubMed

    Bagal, Sharan K; Marron, Brian E; Owen, Robert M; Storer, R Ian; Swain, Nigel A

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels are a family of transmembrane ion channel proteins. They function by forming a gated, water-filled pore to help establish and control cell membrane potential via control of the flow of ions between the intracellular and the extracellular environments. Blockade of NaVs has been successfully accomplished in the clinic to enable control of pathological firing patterns that occur in a diverse range of conditions such as chronic pain, epilepsy, and cardiac arrhythmias. First generation sodium channel modulator drugs, despite low inherent subtype selectivity, preferentially act on over-excited cells which reduces undesirable side effects in the clinic. However, the limited therapeutic indices observed with the first generation demanded a new generation of sodium channel inhibitors. The structure, function and the state of the art in sodium channel modulator drug discovery are discussed in this chapter.

  20. Voltage gated sodium channels as drug discovery targets

    PubMed Central

    Bagal, Sharan K; Marron, Brian E; Owen, Robert M; Storer, R Ian; Swain, Nigel A

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels are a family of transmembrane ion channel proteins. They function by forming a gated, water-filled pore to help establish and control cell membrane potential via control of the flow of ions between the intracellular and the extracellular environments. Blockade of NaVs has been successfully accomplished in the clinic to enable control of pathological firing patterns that occur in a diverse range of conditions such as chronic pain, epilepsy, and cardiac arrhythmias. First generation sodium channel modulator drugs, despite low inherent subtype selectivity, preferentially act on over-excited cells which reduces undesirable side effects in the clinic. However, the limited therapeutic indices observed with the first generation demanded a new generation of sodium channel inhibitors. The structure, function and the state of the art in sodium channel modulator drug discovery are discussed in this chapter. PMID:26646477

  1. The phospholipid flippase ATP8B1 mediates apical localization of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator.

    PubMed

    van der Mark, Vincent A; de Jonge, Hugo R; Chang, Jung-Chin; Ho-Mok, Kam S; Duijst, Suzanne; Vidović, Dragana; Carlon, Marianne S; Oude Elferink, Ronald P J; Paulusma, Coen C

    2016-09-01

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 1 (PFIC1) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the phospholipid flippase ATP8B1. Apart from severe cholestatic liver disease, many PFIC1 patients develop extrahepatic symptoms characteristic of cystic fibrosis (CF), such as pulmonary infection, sweat gland dysfunction and failure to thrive. CF is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a chloride channel essential for epithelial fluid transport. Previously it was shown that CFTR transcript levels were strongly reduced in livers of PFIC1 patients. Here we have investigated the hypothesis that ATP8B1 is important for proper CFTR expression and function. We analyzed CFTR expression in ATP8B1-depleted intestinal and pulmonary epithelial cell lines and assessed CFTR function by measuring short-circuit currents across transwell-grown ATP8B1-depleted intestinal T84 cells and by a genetically-encoded fluorescent chloride sensor. In addition, we studied CFTR surface expression upon induction of CFTR transcription. We show that CFTR protein levels are strongly reduced in the apical membrane of human ATP8B1-depleted intestinal and pulmonary epithelial cell lines, a phenotype that coincided with reduced CFTR activity. Apical membrane insertion upon induction of ectopically-expressed CFTR was strongly impaired in ATP8B1-depleted cells. We conclude that ATP8B1 is essential for correct apical localization of CFTR in human intestinal and pulmonary epithelial cells, and that impaired CFTR localization underlies some of the extrahepatic phenotypes observed in ATP8B1 deficiency. PMID:27301931

  2. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator activation stimulates endosome fusion in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Biwersi, J; Emans, N; Verkman, A S

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested a role for cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in the regulation of intracellular vesicular trafficking. A quantitative fluorescence method was used to test the hypothesis that CFTR expression and activation affects endosome-endosome fusion in intact cells. Endosomes from CFTR-expressing and control (vector-transfected) Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts were labeled by internalization with 4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a, 4a-diaza-s-indacene (Bodipy)-avidin, a fluid-phase marker whose fluorescence increases approximately 8-fold upon biotin binding. Cells were washed, chased, and then labeled with biotin-albumin or biotin-transferrin. The fraction of Bodipy-avidin-labeled endosomes that fused with biotin-containing endosomes (f(fusion)) was quantified by ratio imaging microfluorimetry. Endosome fusion in unstimulated CFTR-expressing cells was similar to that in control cells. However, in CFTR-expressing cells activated by forskolin, ffusion was increased by 1.30 +/- 0.18- and 2.65 +/- 0.17-fold for a 0 and 10 min chase time between avidin and biotin-albumin pulses; f(fusion) also increased (1.32 +/- 0.11-fold) when biotin-transferrin replaced biotin-albumin. The stimulation of endosome fusion was not due to differences in rates of endocytosis or endosomal acidification. Endosome fusion was not stimulated by forskolin in Cl--depleted CFTR-expressing cells, suggesting that the increase in endosome fusion is due to the CFTR chloride channel activity. These results provide evidence that CFTR is involved in the regulation of endosome fusion and, thus, a possible basis for the cellular defects associated with cystic fibrosis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8901608

  3. Chapter Five - Ubiquitination of Ion Channels and Transporters.

    PubMed

    Lamothe, S M; Zhang, S

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels and transporters play essential roles in excitable cells including cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle cells, neurons, and endocrine cells. Their dysfunction underlies the pathology of various diseases. Thus, the tight regulation of these transmembrane proteins is essential for cell physiology. While the ubiquitin system is involved in many aspects of cellular processes, this chapter focuses on the ubiquitin-mediated degradation of ion channels and transporters. Ubiquitination of ion channels and transporters is multifaceted and occurs at various cellular compartments such as the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum. While various molecules are involved in the ubiquitination of ion channels and transporters, E3 ubiquitin ligases play a central role in selectively targeting substrates for ubiquitination and will be a major focus in this chapter. To date, the Nedd4 family of E3 ubiquitin ligases and their regulations of ion channels and transporters have been extensively studied. In this chapter, we will first review Nedd4/Nedd4-2 and their regulations. We will then discuss how E3 ubiquitin ligases, especially Nedd4-2, regulate various ion channels and transporters including epithelial Na(+) channels, voltage-gated Na(+) channels, KCNQ and hERG K(+) channels, Cl(-) channels such as CFTR, transporters such as Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, and gap junctions. Furthermore, diseases caused by improper ubiquitination of ion channels and transporters will be discussed to highlight the process of ubiquitination and its biological as well as clinical significance. PMID:27378758

  4. Chapter Five - Ubiquitination of Ion Channels and Transporters.

    PubMed

    Lamothe, S M; Zhang, S

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels and transporters play essential roles in excitable cells including cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle cells, neurons, and endocrine cells. Their dysfunction underlies the pathology of various diseases. Thus, the tight regulation of these transmembrane proteins is essential for cell physiology. While the ubiquitin system is involved in many aspects of cellular processes, this chapter focuses on the ubiquitin-mediated degradation of ion channels and transporters. Ubiquitination of ion channels and transporters is multifaceted and occurs at various cellular compartments such as the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum. While various molecules are involved in the ubiquitination of ion channels and transporters, E3 ubiquitin ligases play a central role in selectively targeting substrates for ubiquitination and will be a major focus in this chapter. To date, the Nedd4 family of E3 ubiquitin ligases and their regulations of ion channels and transporters have been extensively studied. In this chapter, we will first review Nedd4/Nedd4-2 and their regulations. We will then discuss how E3 ubiquitin ligases, especially Nedd4-2, regulate various ion channels and transporters including epithelial Na(+) channels, voltage-gated Na(+) channels, KCNQ and hERG K(+) channels, Cl(-) channels such as CFTR, transporters such as Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, and gap junctions. Furthermore, diseases caused by improper ubiquitination of ion channels and transporters will be discussed to highlight the process of ubiquitination and its biological as well as clinical significance.

  5. Cell volume regulation in cultured human retinal Müller cells is associated with changes in transmembrane potential.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Juan M; Di Giusto, Gisela; Kalstein, Maia; Melamud, Luciana; Rivarola, Valeria; Ford, Paula; Capurro, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Müller cells are mainly involved in controlling extracellular homeostasis in the retina, where intense neural activity alters ion concentrations and osmotic gradients, thus favoring cell swelling. This increase in cell volume is followed by a regulatory volume decrease response (RVD), which is known to be partially mediated by the activation of K(+) and anion channels. However, the precise mechanisms underlying osmotic swelling and subsequent cell volume regulation in Müller cells have been evaluated by only a few studies. Although the activation of ion channels during the RVD response may alter transmembrane potential (Vm), no studies have actually addressed this issue in Müller cells. The aim of the present work is to evaluate RVD using a retinal Müller cell line (MIO-M1) under different extracellular ionic conditions, and to study a possible association between RVD and changes in Vm. Cell volume and Vm changes were evaluated using fluorescent probe techniques and a mathematical model. Results show that cell swelling and subsequent RVD were accompanied by Vm depolarization followed by repolarization. This response depended on the composition of extracellular media. Cells exposed to a hypoosmotic solution with reduced ionic strength underwent maximum RVD and had a larger repolarization. Both of these responses were reduced by K(+) or Cl(-) channel blockers. In contrast, cells facing a hypoosmotic solution with the same ionic strength as the isoosmotic solution showed a lower RVD and a smaller repolarization and were not affected by blockers. Together, experimental and simulated data led us to propose that the efficiency of the RVD process in Müller glia depends not only on the activation of ion channels, but is also strongly modulated by concurrent changes in the membrane potential. The relationship between ionic fluxes, changes in ion permeabilities and ion concentrations -all leading to changes in Vm- define the success of RVD. PMID:23451196

  6. Bicarbonate conductance and pH regulatory capability of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, J H; Fischer, H; Illek, B; Machen, T E

    1994-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an epithelial Cl- channel regulated by protein kinase A. The most common mutation in cystic fibrosis (CF), deletion of Phe-508 (delta F508-CFTR), reduces Cl- secretion, but the fatal consequences of CF have been difficult to rationalize solely in terms of this defect. The aim of this study was to determine the role of CFTR in HCO3- transport across cell membranes. HCO3- permeability was assessed from measurements of intracellular pH [pHi; from spectrofluorimetry of the pH-sensitive dye 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and -6)carboxyfluorescein] and of channel activity (patch clamp; cell attached and isolated, inside-out patches) on NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and C127 mammary epithelial cells transfected with wild-type CFTR (WT-CFTR) or delta F508-CFTR, and also on mock-transfected cells. When WT-CFTR-transfected cells were acidified (pulsed with NH4Cl) and incubated in Na(+)-free (N-methyl-D-glucamine substitution) solutions (to block Na(+)-dependent pHi regulatory mechanisms), pHi remained acidic (pH approximately 6.5) until the cells were treated with 20 microM forskolin (increases cellular [cAMP]); pHi then increased toward (but not completely to) control level (pHi 7.2) at a rate of 0.055 pH unit/min. Forskolin had no effect on rate of pHi recovery in delta F508 and mock-transfected cells. This Na(+)-independent, forskolin-dependent pHi recovery was not observed in HCO3-/CO2-free medium. Forskolin-treated WT-CFTR-transfected (but not delta F508-CFTR or mock-transfected) cells in Cl(-)-containing, HCO3(-)-free solutions showed Cl- channels with a linear I/V relationship and a conductance of 10.4 +/- 0.5 pS in symmetrical 150 mM Cl-. When channels were incubated with different [Cl-] and [HCO3-] on the inside and outside, the Cl-/HCO3- permeability ratio (determined from reversal potentials of I/V curves) was 3.8 +/- 1.0 (mean +/- SEM; n = 9); the ratio of conductances was 3.9 +/- 0.5 (at 150 mM Cl- and 127 m

  7. English Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The cloud covered earthscape of Northern Europe demonstrates the difficulty of photographing this elusive subject from space. The English Channel (51.0N, 1.5E) separating the British Islands from Europe is in the center of the scene. The white cliffs of Dover on the SE coast of the UK, the Thames River estuary and a partial view of the city of London can be seen on the north side of the Channel while the Normandy coast of France is to the south.

  8. Orientation and conformation of lipids in crystals of transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Derek; Páli, Tibor

    2013-03-01

    Orientational order parameters and individual dihedral torsion angles are evaluated for phospholipid and glycolipid molecules that are resolved in X-ray structures of integral transmembrane proteins in crystals. The order parameters of the lipid chains and glycerol backbones in protein crystals are characterised by a much wider distribution of orientational order than is found in fluid lipid bilayers and reconstituted lipid-protein membranes. This indicates that the lipids that are resolved in crystals of membrane proteins are mostly not representative of the entire lipid-protein interface. Much of the chain configurational disorder of the membrane-bound lipids in crystals arises from C-C bonds in energetically disallowed skew conformations. This suggests configurational heterogeneity of the lipids at a single binding site: eclipsed conformations occur also in the glycerol backbone torsion angles and the C-C torsion angles of the lipid head groups. Conformations of the lipid glycerol backbone in protein crystals are not restricted to the gauche C1-C2 rotamers found invariably in phospholipid bilayer crystals. Lipid head-group conformations in the protein crystals also do not conform solely to the bent-down conformation, with gauche-gauche configuration of the phosphodiester, that is characteristic of phospholipid bilayer membranes. Stereochemical violations in the protein-bound lipids are evidenced by ester carboxyl groups in non-planar configurations, and even in the cis configuration. Some lipids have the incorrect enantiomeric configuration of the glycerol backbone, and many of the branched methyl groups in the phytanyl chains associated with bacteriorhodopsin have the incorrect S configuration. PMID:22644500

  9. Mechanisms of Hop Inhibition Include the Transmembrane Redox Reaction▿

    PubMed Central

    Behr, Jürgen; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, a novel mechanistic model of hop inhibition beyond the proton ionophore action toward (beer spoiling) bacteria was developed. Investigations were performed with model systems using cyclic voltammetry for the determination of redox processes/conditions in connection with growth challenges with hop-sensitive and -resistant Lactobacillus brevis strains in the presence of oxidants. Cyclic voltammetry identified a transmembrane redox reaction of hop compounds at low pH (common in beer) and in the presence of manganese (present in millimolar levels in lactic acid bacteria). The antibacterial action of hop compounds could be extended from the described proton ionophore activity, lowering the intracellular pH, to pronounced redox reactivity, causing cellular oxidative damage. Accordingly, a correlation between the resistance of L. brevis strains to a sole oxidant to their resistance to hop could not be expected and was not detected. However, in connection with our recent study concerning hop ionophore properties and the resistance of hop-sensitive and -tolerant L. brevis strains toward proton ionophores (J. Behr and R. F. Vogel, J. Agric. Food Chem. 57:6074-6081, 2009), we suggest that both ionophore and oxidant resistance are required for survival under hop stress conditions and confirmed this correlation according to the novel mechanistic model. In consequence, the expression of several published hop resistance mechanisms involved in manganese binding/transport and intracellular redox balance, as well as that of proteins involved in oxidative stress under “highly reducing” conditions (cf. anaerobic cultivation and “antioxidative” hop compounds in the growth medium), is now comprehensible. Accordingly, hop resistance as a multifactorial dynamic property at least implies distinct resistance levels against two different mechanisms of hop inhibition, namely, proton ionophore-induced and oxidative stress-induced mechanisms. Beyond this specific model of

  10. Hormone Action on Transmembrane Electron and H+ Transport 1

    PubMed Central

    Böttger, Michael; Hilgendorf, Frank

    1988-01-01

    A possible involvement of two different systems in proton translocation was investigated by simultaneous measurement of transmembrane electron flow and proton secretion in a pH-stat combined with a redoxstat. The pH gradient between cytoplasm and apoplast is probably maintained by an H+ -pumping ATPase and by a second proton extrusion system, which seems to be linked to a redox chain with NAD(P)H as electron donor. Indole acetic acid inhibits both e− and H+ efflux, but only if the `electron draw' from the outside is not too high. The electron draw depends on the hexacyanoferrate level at the plasmalemma surface and on the Ca2+ concentration. The inhibiting effect of auxin on e− and H+ efflux in the presence of hexacyanoferrate can be only detected at low levels of bivalent cations and of the artificial electron acceptor. The inhibition of e− and H+ efflux by auxin requires high oxygen levels. The influence of auxin on both e− and H+ transfer disappears below 2 kilopascals O2, a level which does not influence respiration. Ethanol and fusicoccin do not increase the e− flux, probably because the electron transfer from the plasma membrane to HCF III is the limiting step. If electron transfer is reduced by IAA pretreatment, ethanol increases e− flux. Fusicoccin decreases e− and increases H+ efflux if the rates have been lowered previously by indole acetic acid pretreatment. This effect depends on high oxygen levels and is reversible by lowering oxygen pressure. Auxin and Ca2+ change e− flow and H+ ejection in a 1:1 ratio. PMID:16666028

  11. Synaptobrevin Transmembrane Domain Influences Exocytosis by Perturbing Vesicle Membrane Curvature

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Che-Wei; Jackson, Meyer B.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion requires that nearly flat lipid bilayers deform into shapes with very high curvature. This makes membrane bending a critical force in determining fusion mechanisms. A lipid bilayer will bend spontaneously when material is distributed asymmetrically between its two monolayers, and its spontaneous curvature (C0) will influence the stability of curved fusion intermediates. Prior work on Ca2+-triggered exocytosis revealed that fusion pore lifetime (τ) varies with vesicle content (Q), and showed that this relation reflects membrane bending energetics. Lipids that alter C0 change the dependence of τ on Q. These results suggested that the greater stability of an initial exocytotic fusion pore associated with larger vesicles reflects the need to bend more membrane during fusion pore dilation. In this study, we explored the possibility of manipulating C0 by mutating the transmembrane domain (TMD) of the vesicle membrane protein synaptobrevin 2 (syb2). Amperometric measurements of exocytosis in mouse chromaffin cells revealed that syb2 TMD mutations altered the relation between τ and Q. The effects of these mutations showed a striking periodicity, changing sign as the structural perturbation moved through the inner and outer leaflets. Some glycine and charge mutations also influenced the dependence of τ on Q in a manner consistent with expected changes in C0. These results suggest that side chains in the syb2 TMD influence the kinetics of exocytosis by perturbing the packing of the surrounding lipids. The present results support the view that membrane bending occurs during fusion pore expansion rather than during fusion pore formation. This supports the view of an initial fusion pore through two relatively flat membranes formed by protein. PMID:26153704

  12. Transmembrane tumor necrosis factor-alpha sensitizes adipocytes to insulin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenjing; Yang, Peng; Liu, Li; Zheng, Shan; Zeng, Qingling; Liang, Huifang; Zhu, Yazhen; Zhang, Zunyue; Wang, Jing; Yin, Bingjiao; Gong, Feili; Wu, Yiping; Li, Zhuoya

    2015-05-01

    Transmembrane TNF-α (tmTNF-α) acts both as a ligand, delivering 'forward signaling' via TNFR, and as a receptor, transducing 'reverse signaling'. The contradiction of available data regarding the effect of tmTNF-α on insulin resistance may be due to imbalance in both signals. Here, we demonstrated that high glucose-induced impairment of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by 3T3-L1 adipocytes was concomitant with decreased tmTNF-α expression and increased soluble TNF-α (sTNF-α) secretion. However, when TACE was inhibited, preventing the conversion of tmTNF-α to sTNF-α, this insulin resistance was partially reversed, indicating a salutary role of tmTNF-α. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with exogenous tmTNF-α promoted insulin-induced phosphorylation of IRS-1 and Akt, facilitated GLUT4 expression and membrane translocation, and increased glucose uptake while addition of sTNF-α resulted in the opposite effect. Furthermore, tmTNF-α downregulated the production of IL-6 and MCP-1 via NF-κB inactivation, as silencing of A20, an inhibitor for NF-κB, by siRNA, abolished this effect of tmTNF-α. However, tmTNF-α upregulated adiponectin expression through the PPAR-γ pathway, as inhibition of PPAR-γ by GW9662 abrogated both tmTNF-α-induced adiponectin transcription and glucose uptake. Our data suggest that tmTNF-α functions as an insulin sensitizer via forward signaling.

  13. Mechanisms of hop inhibition include the transmembrane redox reaction.

    PubMed

    Behr, Jürgen; Vogel, Rudi F

    2010-01-01

    In this work, a novel mechanistic model of hop inhibition beyond the proton ionophore action toward (beer spoiling) bacteria was developed. Investigations were performed with model systems using cyclic voltammetry for the determination of redox processes/conditions in connection with growth challenges with hop-sensitive and -resistant Lactobacillus brevis strains in the presence of oxidants. Cyclic voltammetry identified a transmembrane redox reaction of hop compounds at low pH (common in beer) and in the presence of manganese (present in millimolar levels in lactic acid bacteria). The antibacterial action of hop compounds could be extended from the described proton ionophore activity, lowering the intracellular pH, to pronounced redox reactivity, causing cellular oxidative damage. Accordingly, a correlation between the resistance of L. brevis strains to a sole oxidant to their resistance to hop could not be expected and was not detected. However, in connection with our recent study concerning hop ionophore properties and the resistance of hop-sensitive and -tolerant L. brevis strains toward proton ionophores (J. Behr and R. F. Vogel, J. Agric. Food Chem. 57:6074-6081, 2009), we suggest that both ionophore and oxidant resistance are required for survival under hop stress conditions and confirmed this correlation according to the novel mechanistic model. In consequence, the expression of several published hop resistance mechanisms involved in manganese binding/transport and intracellular redox balance, as well as that of proteins involved in oxidative stress under "highly reducing" conditions (cf. anaerobic cultivation and "antioxidative" hop compounds in the growth medium), is now comprehensible. Accordingly, hop resistance as a multifactorial dynamic property at least implies distinct resistance levels against two different mechanisms of hop inhibition, namely, proton ionophore-induced and oxidative stress-induced mechanisms. Beyond this specific model of hop

  14. Bidirectional Transformation of a Metamorphic Protein between the Water-Soluble and Transmembrane Native States.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Koji; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-11-24

    The bidirectional transformation of a protein between its native water-soluble and integral transmembrane conformations is demonstrated for FraC, a hemolytic protein of the family of pore-forming toxins. In the presence of biological membranes, the water-soluble conformation of FraC undergoes a remarkable structural reorganization generating cytolytic transmembrane nanopores conducive to cell death. So far, the reverse transformation from the native transmembrane conformation to the native water-soluble conformation has not been reported. We describe the use of detergents with different physicochemical properties to achieve the spontaneous conversion of transmembrane pores of FraC back into the initial water-soluble state. Thermodynamic and kinetic stability data suggest that specific detergents cause an asymmetric change in the energy landscape of the protein, allowing the bidirectional transformation of a membrane protein.

  15. Transmembrane chemokines act as receptors in a novel mechanism termed inverse signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hattermann, Kirsten; Gebhardt, Henrike; Krossa, Sebastian; Ludwig, Andreas; Lucius, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    The transmembrane chemokines CX3CL1/fractalkine and CXCL16 are widely expressed in different types of tumors, often without an appropriate expression of their classical receptors. We observed that receptor-negative cancer cells could be stimulated by the soluble chemokines. Searching for alternative receptors we detected that all cells expressing or transfected with transmembrane chemokine ligands bound the soluble chemokines with high affinity and responded by phosphorylation of intracellular kinases, enhanced proliferation and anti-apoptosis. This activity requires the intracellular domain and apparently the dimerization of the transmembrane chemokine ligand. Thus, shed soluble chemokines can generate auto- or paracrine signals by binding and activating their transmembrane forms. We term this novel mechanism “inverse signaling”. We suppose that inverse signaling is an autocrine feedback and fine-tuning system in the communication between cells that in tumors supports stabilization and proliferation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10820.001 PMID:26796342

  16. Modulation of Innate Immune Signalling by Lipid-Mediated MAVS Transmembrane Domain Oligomerization

    PubMed Central

    Ron, David; Volmer, Romain

    2015-01-01

    RIG-I-like receptors detect viral RNA in infected cells and promote oligomerization of the outer mitochondrial membrane protein MAVS to induce innate immunity to viral infection through type I interferon production. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) have been shown to enhance anti-viral MAVS signalling, but the mechanisms have remained obscure. Using a biochemical oligomerization-reporter fused to the transmembrane domain of MAVS, we found that mROS inducers promoted lipid-dependent MAVS transmembrane domain oligomerization in the plane of the outer mitochondrial membrane. These events were mirrored by Sendai virus infection, which similarly induced lipid peroxidation and promoted lipid-dependent MAVS transmembrane domain oligomerization. Our observations point to a role for mROS-induced changes in lipid bilayer properties in modulating antiviral innate signalling by favouring the oligomerization of MAVS transmembrane domain in the outer-mitochondrial membrane. PMID:26317833

  17. Highly effective yet simple transmembrane anion transporters based upon ortho-phenylenediamine bis-ureas.

    PubMed

    Karagiannidis, Louise E; Haynes, Cally J E; Holder, Katie J; Kirby, Isabelle L; Moore, Stephen J; Wells, Neil J; Gale, Philip A

    2014-10-18

    Simple, highly fluorinated receptors are shown to function as highly effective transmembrane anion antiporters with the most active transporters rivalling the transport efficacy of natural anion transporter prodigiosin for bicarbonate.

  18. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator trafficking modulates the barrier function of airway epithelial cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    LeSimple, Pierre; Liao, Jie; Robert, Renaud; Gruenert, Dieter C; Hanrahan, John W

    2010-04-15

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an integral membrane glycoprotein which functions as an anion channel and influences diverse cellular processes. We studied its role in the development of epithelial tightness by expressing wild-type (WT-CFTR) or mutant (Delta F508-CFTR) CFTR in human airway epithelial cell monolayers cultured at the air-liquid interface. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged WT or Delta F508 constructs were expressed in the CF bronchial cell line CFBE41o(-) using adenoviruses, and the results were compared with those obtained using CFBE41o(-) lines stably complemented with wild-type or mutant CFTR. As predicted, GFP-Delta WT-CFTR reached the apical membrane whereas GFP-F508-CFTR was only detected intracellularly. Although CFTR expression would be expected to reduce transepithelial resistance (TER), expressing GFP-CFTR significantly increased the TER of CFBE41o(-) monolayers whilst GFP-Delta F508-CFTR had no effect. Similar results were obtained with cell lines stably overexpressing Delta F508-CFTR or WT-CFTR. Preincubating Delta F508-CFTR monolayers at 29 degrees C reduced mannitol permeability and restored TER, and the effect on TER was reversible during temperature oscillations. Expression of GFP-Delta F508-CFTR or GFP-WT-CFTR in a cell line already containing endogenous WT-CFTR (Calu-3) did not alter TER. The CFTR- and temperature-dependence of TER were not affected by the CFTR inhibitor CFTR(inh)172 or low-chloride medium; therefore the effect of CFTR on barrier function was unrelated to its ion channel activity. Modulation of TER was blunted but not eliminated by genistein, implying the involvement of tyrosine phosphorylation and other mechanisms. Modulation of CFTR trafficking was correlated with an increase in tight junction depth. The results suggest that CFTR trafficking is required for the normal organisation and function of tight junctions. A reduction in barrier function caused by endoplasmic reticulum

  19. BK Channels in the Vascular System.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy-Natarajan, G; Koide, M

    2016-01-01

    Autoregulation of blood flow is essential for the preservation of organ function to ensure continuous supply of oxygen and essential nutrients and removal of metabolic waste. This is achieved by controlling the diameter of muscular arteries and arterioles that exhibit a myogenic response to changes in arterial blood pressure, nerve activity and tissue metabolism. Large-conductance voltage and Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels (BK channels), expressed exclusively in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the vascular wall of healthy arteries, play a critical role in regulating the myogenic response. Activation of BK channels by intracellular, local, and transient ryanodine receptor-mediated "Ca(2+) sparks," provides a hyperpolarizing influence on the SMC membrane potential thereby decreasing the activity of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels and limiting Ca(2+) influx to promote SMC relaxation and vasodilation. The BK channel α subunit, a large tetrameric protein with each monomer consisting of seven-transmembrane domains, a long intracellular C-terminal tail and an extracellular N-terminus, associates with the β1 and γ subunits in vascular SMCs. The BK channel is regulated by factors originating within the SMC or from the endothelium, perivascular nerves and circulating blood, that significantly alter channel gating properties, Ca(2+) sensitivity and expression of the α and/or β1 subunit. The BK channel thus serves as a central receiving dock that relays the effects of the changes in several such concomitant autocrine and paracrine factors and influences cardiovascular health. This chapter describes the primary mechanism of regulation of myogenic response by BK channels and the alterations to this mechanism wrought by different vasoactive mediators. PMID:27238270

  20. Transmembrane Signaling by the Aspartate Receptor: Engineered Disulfides Reveal Static Regions of the Subunit Interface†

    PubMed Central

    Chervitz, Stephen A.; Lin, Christina M.; Falke, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    Ligand binding to the periplasmic domain of the transmembrane aspartate receptor generates an intramolecular conformational change which spans the bilayer and ultimately signals the cytoplasmic CheA histidine kinase, thereby triggering chemotaxis. The receptor is a homodimer stabilized by the interface between its two identical subunits: the present study investigates the role of the periplasmic and transmembrane regions of this interface in the mechanism of transmembrane signaling. Free cysteines and disulfide bonds are engineered into selected interfacial positions, and the resulting effects on the transmembrane signal are assayed by monitoring in vitro regulation of kinase activity. Three of the 14 engineered cysteine pairs examined, as well as six of the 14 engineered disulfides, cause perturbations of the interface structure which essentially destroy transmembrane regulation of the kinase. The remaining 11 cysteine pairs, and eight engineered disulfides covalently linking the two subunits at locations spanning positions 18–75, are observed to retain significant transmembrane kinase regulation. The eight functional disulfides positively identify adjacent faces of the two N-terminal helices in the native receptor dimer and indicate that large regions of the periplasmic and transmembrane subunit interface remain effectively static during the transmembrane signal. The results are consistent with a model in which the subunit interface plays a structural role, while the second membrane-spanning helix transmits the ligand-induced signal across the bilayer to the kinase binding domain. The effects of engineered cysteines and disulfides on receptor methylation in vitro are also measured, enabling direct comparison of the in vitro methylation and phosphorylation assays. PMID:7626643

  1. TMRPres2D: high quality visual representation of transmembrane protein models.

    PubMed

    Spyropoulos, Ioannis C; Liakopoulos, Theodore D; Bagos, Pantelis G; Hamodrakas, Stavros J

    2004-11-22

    The 'TransMembrane protein Re-Presentation in 2-Dimensions' (TMRPres2D) tool, automates the creation of uniform, two-dimensional, high analysis graphical images/models of alpha-helical or beta-barrel transmembrane proteins. Protein sequence data and structural information may be acquired from public protein knowledge bases, emanate from prediction algorithms, or even be defined by the user. Several important biological and physical sequence attributes can be embedded in the graphical representation. PMID:15201184

  2. A graph-theoretic approach for classification and structure prediction of transmembrane β-barrel proteins

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Transmembrane β-barrel proteins are a special class of transmembrane proteins which play several key roles in human body and diseases. Due to experimental difficulties, the number of transmembrane β-barrel proteins with known structures is very small. Over the years, a number of learning-based methods have been introduced for recognition and structure prediction of transmembrane β-barrel proteins. Most of these methods emphasize on homology search rather than any biological or chemical basis. Results We present a novel graph-theoretic model for classification and structure prediction of transmembrane β-barrel proteins. This model folds proteins based on energy minimization rather than a homology search, avoiding any assumption on availability of training dataset. The ab initio model presented in this paper is the first method to allow for permutations in the structure of transmembrane proteins and provides more structural information than any known algorithm. The model is also able to recognize β-barrels by assessing the pseudo free energy. We assess the structure prediction on 41 proteins gathered from existing databases on experimentally validated transmembrane β-barrel proteins. We show that our approach is quite accurate with over 90% F-score on strands and over 74% F-score on residues. The results are comparable to other algorithms suggesting that our pseudo-energy model is close to the actual physical model. We test our classification approach and show that it is able to reject α-helical bundles with 100% accuracy and β-barrel lipocalins with 97% accuracy. Conclusions We show that it is possible to design models for classification and structure prediction for transmembrane β-barrel proteins which do not depend essentially on training sets but on combinatorial properties of the structures to be proved. These models are fairly accurate, robust and can be run very efficiently on PC-like computers. Such models are useful for the genome

  3. Transmembrane AMPAR regulatory protein γ-2 is required for the modulation of GABA release by presynaptic AMPARs.

    PubMed

    Rigby, Mark; Cull-Candy, Stuart G; Farrant, Mark

    2015-03-11

    Presynaptic ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) play important roles in the control of synaptogenesis and neurotransmitter release, yet their regulation is poorly understood. In particular, the contribution of transmembrane auxiliary proteins, which profoundly shape the trafficking and gating of somatodendritic iGluRs, is unknown. Here we examined the influence of transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs) on presynaptic AMPARs in cerebellar molecular layer interneurons (MLIs). 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), a partial agonist at TARP-associated AMPARs, enhanced spontaneous GABA release in wild-type mice but not in stargazer mice that lack the prototypical TARP stargazin (γ-2). These findings were replicated in mechanically dissociated Purkinje cells with functional adherent synaptic boutons, demonstrating the presynaptic locus of modulation. In dissociated Purkinje cells from stargazer mice, AMPA was able to enhance mIPSC frequency, but only in the presence of the positive allosteric modulator cyclothiazide. Thus, ordinarily, presynaptic AMPARs are unable to enhance spontaneous release without γ-2, which is required predominantly for its effects on channel gating. Presynaptic AMPARs are known to reduce action potential-driven GABA release from MLIs. Although a G-protein-dependent non-ionotropic mechanism has been suggested to underlie this inhibition, paradoxically we found that γ-2, and thus AMPAR gating, was required. Following glutamate spillover from climbing fibers or application of CNQX, evoked GABA release was reduced; in stargazer mice such effects were markedly attenuated in acute slices and abolished in the dissociated Purkinje cell-nerve bouton preparation. We suggest that γ-2 association, by increasing charge transfer, allows presynaptic AMPARs to depolarize the bouton membrane sufficiently to modulate both phasic and spontaneous release. PMID:25762667

  4. Transmembrane AMPAR Regulatory Protein γ-2 Is Required for the Modulation of GABA Release by Presynaptic AMPARs

    PubMed Central

    Cull-Candy, Stuart G.

    2015-01-01

    Presynaptic ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) play important roles in the control of synaptogenesis and neurotransmitter release, yet their regulation is poorly understood. In particular, the contribution of transmembrane auxiliary proteins, which profoundly shape the trafficking and gating of somatodendritic iGluRs, is unknown. Here we examined the influence of transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs) on presynaptic AMPARs in cerebellar molecular layer interneurons (MLIs). 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), a partial agonist at TARP-associated AMPARs, enhanced spontaneous GABA release in wild-type mice but not in stargazer mice that lack the prototypical TARP stargazin (γ-2). These findings were replicated in mechanically dissociated Purkinje cells with functional adherent synaptic boutons, demonstrating the presynaptic locus of modulation. In dissociated Purkinje cells from stargazer mice, AMPA was able to enhance mIPSC frequency, but only in the presence of the positive allosteric modulator cyclothiazide. Thus, ordinarily, presynaptic AMPARs are unable to enhance spontaneous release without γ-2, which is required predominantly for its effects on channel gating. Presynaptic AMPARs are known to reduce action potential-driven GABA release from MLIs. Although a G-protein-dependent non-ionotropic mechanism has been suggested to underlie this inhibition, paradoxically we found that γ-2, and thus AMPAR gating, was required. Following glutamate spillover from climbing fibers or application of CNQX, evoked GABA release was reduced; in stargazer mice such effects were markedly attenuated in acute slices and abolished in the dissociated Purkinje cell-nerve bouton preparation. We suggest that γ-2 association, by increasing charge transfer, allows presynaptic AMPARs to depolarize the bouton membrane sufficiently to modulate both phasic and spontaneous release. PMID:25762667

  5. Transmembrane AMPAR regulatory protein γ-2 is required for the modulation of GABA release by presynaptic AMPARs.

    PubMed

    Rigby, Mark; Cull-Candy, Stuart G; Farrant, Mark

    2015-03-11

    Presynaptic ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) play important roles in the control of synaptogenesis and neurotransmitter release, yet their regulation is poorly understood. In particular, the contribution of transmembrane auxiliary proteins, which profoundly shape the trafficking and gating of somatodendritic iGluRs, is unknown. Here we examined the influence of transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs) on presynaptic AMPARs in cerebellar molecular layer interneurons (MLIs). 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), a partial agonist at TARP-associated AMPARs, enhanced spontaneous GABA release in wild-type mice but not in stargazer mice that lack the prototypical TARP stargazin (γ-2). These findings were replicated in mechanically dissociated Purkinje cells with functional adherent synaptic boutons, demonstrating the presynaptic locus of modulation. In dissociated Purkinje cells from stargazer mice, AMPA was able to enhance mIPSC frequency, but only in the presence of the positive allosteric modulator cyclothiazide. Thus, ordinarily, presynaptic AMPARs are unable to enhance spontaneous release without γ-2, which is required predominantly for its effects on channel gating. Presynaptic AMPARs are known to reduce action potential-driven GABA release from MLIs. Although a G-protein-dependent non-ionotropic mechanism has been suggested to underlie this inhibition, paradoxically we found that γ-2, and thus AMPAR gating, was required. Following glutamate spillover from climbing fibers or application of CNQX, evoked GABA release was reduced; in stargazer mice such effects were markedly attenuated in acute slices and abolished in the dissociated Purkinje cell-nerve bouton preparation. We suggest that γ-2 association, by increasing charge transfer, allows presynaptic AMPARs to depolarize the bouton membrane sufficiently to modulate both phasic and spontaneous release.

  6. Lipid-protein nanodiscs promote in vitro folding of transmembrane domains of multi-helical and multimeric membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Butenko, Ivan O; Petrovskaya, Lada E; Paramonov, Alexander S; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Nekrasova, Oksana V; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2013-02-01

    Production of helical integral membrane proteins (IMPs) in a folded state is a necessary prerequisite for their functional and structural studies. In many cases large-scale expression of IMPs in cell-based and cell-free systems results in misfolded proteins, which should be refolded in vitro. Here using examples of the bacteriorhodopsin ESR from Exiguobacterium sibiricum and full-length homotetrameric K(+) channel KcsA from Streptomyces lividans we found that the efficient in vitro folding of the transmembrane domains of the polytopic and multimeric IMPs could be achieved during the protein encapsulation into the reconstructed high-density lipoprotein particles, also known as lipid-protein nanodiscs. In this case the self-assembly of the IMP/nanodisc complexes from a mixture containing apolipoprotein, lipids and the partially denatured protein solubilized in a harsh detergent induces the folding of the transmembrane domains. The obtained folding yields showed significant dependence on the properties of lipids used for nanodisc formation. The largest recovery of the spectroscopically active ESR (~60%) from the sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was achieved in the nanodiscs containing anionic saturated lipid 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPG) and was approximately twice lower in the zwitterionic DMPC lipid. The reassembly of tetrameric KcsA from the acid-dissociated monomer solubilized in SDS was the most efficient (~80%) in the nanodiscs containing zwitterionic unsaturated lipid 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC). The charged and saturated lipids provided lower tetramer quantities, and the lowest yield (<20%) was observed in DMPC. The overall yield of the ESR and KcsA folding was mainly restricted by the efficiency of the protein encapsulation into the nanodiscs.

  7. Ion fluxes, transmembrane potential, and osmotic stabilization: a new dynamic electrophysiological model for eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Poignard, Clair; Silve, Aude; Campion, Frederic; Mir, Lluis M; Saut, Olivier; Schwartz, Laurent

    2011-03-01

    Survival of mammalian cells is achieved by tight control of cell volume, while transmembrane potential has been known to control many cellular functions since the seminal work of Hodgkin and Huxley. Regulation of cell volume and transmembrane potential have a wide range of implications in physiology, from neurological and cardiac disorders to cancer and muscle fatigue. Therefore, understanding the relationship between transmembrane potential, ion fluxes, and cell volume regulation has become of great interest. In this paper we derive a system of differential equations that links transmembrane potential, ionic concentrations, and cell volume. In particular, we describe the dynamics of the cell within a few seconds after an osmotic stress, which cannot be done by the previous models in which either cell volume was constant or osmotic regulation instantaneous. This new model demonstrates that both membrane potential and cell volume stabilization occur within tens of seconds of changes in extracellular osmotic pressure. When the extracellular osmotic pressure is constant, the cell volume varies as a function of transmembrane potential and ion fluxes, thus providing an implicit link between transmembrane potential and cell volume. Experimental data provide results that corroborate the numerical simulations of the model in terms of time-related changes in cell volume and dynamics of the phenomena. This paper can be seen as a generalization of previous electrophysiological results, since under restrictive conditions they can be derived from our model. PMID:21079946

  8. How are exons encoding transmembrane sequences distributed in the exon-intron structure of genes?

    PubMed

    Sawada, Ryusuke; Mitaku, Shigeki

    2011-01-01

    The exon-intron structure of eukaryotic genes raises a question about the distribution of transmembrane regions in membrane proteins. Were exons that encode transmembrane regions formed simply by inserting introns into preexisting genes or by some kind of exon shuffling? To answer this question, the exon-per-gene distribution was analyzed for all genes in 40 eukaryotic genomes with a particular focus on exons encoding transmembrane segments. In 21 higher multicellular eukaryotes, the percentage of multi-exon genes (those containing at least one intron) within all genes in a genome was high (>70%) and with a mean of 87%. When genes were grouped by the number of exons per gene in higher eukaryotes, good exponential distributions were obtained not only for all genes but also for the exons encoding transmembrane segments, leading to a constant ratio of membrane proteins independent of the exon-per-gene number. The positional distribution of transmembrane regions in single-pass membrane proteins showed that they are generally located in the amino or carboxyl terminal regions. This nonrandom distribution of transmembrane regions explains the constant ratio of membrane proteins to the exon-per-gene numbers because there are always two terminal (i.e., the amino and carboxyl) regions - independent of the length of sequences.

  9. ERAD of proteins containing aberrant transmembrane domains requires ubiquitylation of cytoplasmic lysine residues

    PubMed Central

    Briant, Kit; Koay, Yee-Hui; Otsuka, Yuka; Swanton, Eileithyia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clearance of misfolded proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in a process known as ER-associated degradation (ERAD). The mechanisms through which proteins containing aberrant transmembrane domains are degraded by ERAD are poorly understood. To address this question, we generated model ERAD substrates based on CD8 with either a non-native transmembrane domain but a folded ER luminal domain (CD8TMD*), or the native transmembrane domain but a misfolded luminal domain (CD8LUM*). Although both chimeras were degraded by ERAD, we found that the location of the folding defect determined the initial site of ubiquitylation. Ubiquitylation of cytoplasmic lysine residues was required for the extraction of CD8TMD* from the ER membrane during ERAD, whereas CD8LUM* continued to be degraded in the absence of cytoplasmic lysine residues. Cytoplasmic lysine residues were also required for degradation of an additional ERAD substrate containing an unassembled transmembrane domain and when a non-native transmembrane domain was introduced into CD8LUM*. Our results suggest that proteins with defective transmembrane domains are removed from the ER through a specific ERAD mechanism that depends upon ubiquitylation of cytoplasmic lysine residues. PMID:26446255

  10. Structure and selectivity in bestrophin ion channels

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Tingting; Liu, Qun; Kloss, Brian; Bruni, Renato; Kalathur, Ravi C.; Guo, Youzhong; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Colecraft, Henry M.; Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    2014-09-25

    Human bestrophin 1 (hBest1) is a calcium-activated chloride channel from the retinal pigment epithelium, where it can suffer mutations associated with vitelliform macular degeneration, or Best disease. We describe the structure of a bacterial homolog (KpBest) of hBest1 and functional characterizations of both channels. KpBest is a pentamer that forms a five-helix transmembrane pore, closed by three rings of conserved hydrophobic residues, and has a cytoplasmic cavern with a restricted exit. From electrophysiological analysis of structure-inspired mutations in KpBest and hBest1, we find a subtle control of ion selectivity in the bestrophins, including reversal of anion/cation selectivity, and dramatic activationmore » by mutations at the exit restriction. Lastly, a homology model of hBest1 shows the locations of disease-causing mutations and suggests possible roles in regulation.« less

  11. Structure and selectivity in bestrophin ion channels

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tingting; Liu, Qun; Kloss, Brian; Bruni, Renato; Kalathur, Ravi C.; Guo, Youzhong; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Colecraft, Henry M.; Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    2014-09-25

    Human bestrophin 1 (hBest1) is a calcium-activated chloride channel from the retinal pigment epithelium, where it can suffer mutations associated with vitelliform macular degeneration, or Best disease. We describe the structure of a bacterial homolog (KpBest) of hBest1 and functional characterizations of both channels. KpBest is a pentamer that forms a five-helix transmembrane pore, closed by three rings of conserved hydrophobic residues, and has a cytoplasmic cavern with a restricted exit. From electrophysiological analysis of structure-inspired mutations in KpBest and hBest1, we find a subtle control of ion selectivity in the bestrophins, including reversal of anion/cation selectivity, and dramatic activation by mutations at the exit restriction. Lastly, a homology model of hBest1 shows the locations of disease-causing mutations and suggests possible roles in regulation.

  12. Markov modeling of ion channels: implications for understanding disease.

    PubMed

    Lampert, Angelika; Korngreen, Alon

    2014-01-01

    Ion channels are the bridge between the biochemical and electrical domains of our life. These membrane crossing proteins use the electric energy stored in transmembrane ion gradients, which are produced by biochemical activity to generate ionic currents. Each ion channel can be imagined as a small power plant similar to a hydroelectric power station, in which potential energy is converted into electric current. This current drives basically all physiological mechanisms of our body. It is clear that a functional blueprint of these amazing cellular power plants is essential for understanding the principle of all aspects of physiology, particularly neurophysiology. The golden path toward this blueprint starts with the biophysical investigation of ion channel activity and continues through detailed numerical modeling of these channels that will eventually lead to a full system-level description of cellular and organ physiology. Here, we discuss the first two stages of this process focusing on voltage-gated channels, particularly the voltage-gated sodium channel which is neurologically and pathologically important. We first detail the correlations between the known structure of the channel and its activity and describe some pathologies. We then provide a hands-on description of Markov modeling for voltage-gated channels. These two sections of the chapter highlight the dichotomy between the vast amounts of electrophysiological data available on voltage-gated channels and the relatively meager number of physiologically relevant models for these channels.

  13. Proposed structure of putative glucose channel in GLUT1 facilitative glucose transporter.

    PubMed

    Zeng, H; Parthasarathy, R; Rampal, A L; Jung, C Y

    1996-01-01

    A family of structurally related intrinsic membrane proteins (facilitative glucose transporters) catalyzes the movement of glucose across the plasma membrane of animal cells. Evidence indicates that these proteins show a common structural motif where approximately 50% of the mass is embedded in lipid bilayer (transmembrane domain) in 12 alpha-helices (transmembrane helices; TMHs) and accommodates a water-filled channel for substrate passage (glucose channel) whose tertiary structure is currently unknown. Using recent advances in protein structure prediction algorithms we proposed here two three-dimensional structural models for the transmembrane glucose channel of GLUT1 glucose transporter. Our models emphasize the physical dimension and water accessibility of the channel, loop lengths between TMHs, the macrodipole orientation in four-helix bundle motif, and helix packing energy. Our models predict that five TMHs, either TMHs 3, 4, 7, 8, 11 (Model 1) or TMHs 2, 5, 11, 8, 7 (Model 2), line the channel, and the remaining TMHs surround these channel-lining TMHs. We discuss how our models are compatible with the experimental data obtained with this protein, and how they can be used in designing new biochemical and molecular biological experiments in elucidation of the structural basis of this important protein function.

  14. Membrane channel gene expression in human costal and articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Asmar, A; Barrett-Jolley, R; Werner, A; Kelly, R; Stacey, M

    2016-04-01

    Chondrocytes are the uniquely resident cells found in all types of cartilage and key to their function is the ability to respond to mechanical loads with changes of metabolic activity. This mechanotransduction property is, in part, mediated through the activity of a range of expressed transmembrane channels; ion channels, gap junction proteins, and porins. Appropriate expression of ion channels has been shown essential for production of extracellular matrix and differential expression of transmembrane channels is correlated to musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoarthritis and Albers-Schönberg. In this study we analyzed the consistency of gene expression between channelomes of chondrocytes from human articular and costal (teenage and fetal origin) cartilages. Notably, we found 14 ion channel genes commonly expressed between articular and both types of costal cartilage chondrocytes. There were several other ion channel genes expressed only in articular (6 genes) or costal chondrocytes (5 genes). Significant differences in expression of BEST1 and KCNJ2 (Kir2.1) were observed between fetal and teenage costal cartilage. Interestingly, the large Ca(2+) activated potassium channel (BKα, or KCNMA1) was very highly expressed in all chondrocytes examined. Expression of the gap junction genes for Panx1, GJA1 (Cx43) and GJC1 (Cx45) was also observed in chondrocytes from all cartilage samples. Together, this data highlights similarities between chondrocyte membrane channel gene expressions in cells derived from different anatomical sites, and may imply that common electrophysiological signaling pathways underlie cellular control. The high expression of a range of mechanically and metabolically sensitive membrane channels suggest that chondrocyte mechanotransduction may be more complex than previously thought. PMID:27116676

  15. Membrane channel gene expression in human costal and articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Asmar, A.; Barrett-Jolley, R.; Werner, A.; Kelly, R.; Stacey, M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chondrocytes are the uniquely resident cells found in all types of cartilage and key to their function is the ability to respond to mechanical loads with changes of metabolic activity. This mechanotransduction property is, in part, mediated through the activity of a range of expressed transmembrane channels; ion channels, gap junction proteins, and porins. Appropriate expression of ion channels has been shown essential for production of extracellular matrix and differential expression of transmembrane channels is correlated to musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoarthritis and Albers-Schönberg. In this study we analyzed the consistency of gene expression between channelomes of chondrocytes from human articular and costal (teenage and fetal origin) cartilages. Notably, we found 14 ion channel genes commonly expressed between articular and both types of costal cartilage chondrocytes. There were several other ion channel genes expressed only in articular (6 genes) or costal chondrocytes (5 genes). Significant differences in expression of BEST1 and KCNJ2 (Kir2.1) were observed between fetal and teenage costal cartilage. Interestingly, the large Ca2+ activated potassium channel (BKα, or KCNMA1) was very highly expressed in all chondrocytes examined. Expression of the gap junction genes for Panx1, GJA1 (Cx43) and GJC1 (Cx45) was also observed in chondrocytes from all cartilage samples. Together, this data highlights similarities between chondrocyte membrane channel gene expressions in cells derived from different anatomical sites, and may imply that common electrophysiological signaling pathways underlie cellular control. The high expression of a range of mechanically and metabolically sensitive membrane channels suggest that chondrocyte mechanotransduction may be more complex than previously thought. PMID:27116676

  16. The channels of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Victor R.

    1988-01-01

    The geomorphology of Mars is discussed, focusing on the Martian channels. The great flood channels of Mars, the processes of channel erosion, and dendritic channel networks, are examined. The topography of the Channeled Scabland region of the northwestern U.S. is described and compared to the Martian channels. The importance of water in the evolution of the channel systems is considered.

  17. An intracellular anion channel critical for pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Lefkovith, Ariel J; Marks, Michael S; Oancea, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular ion channels are essential regulators of organellar and cellular function, yet the molecular identity and physiological role of many of these channels remains elusive. In particular, no ion channel has been characterized in melanosomes, organelles that produce and store the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanosome function cause albinism, characterized by vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired retinal development, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. The most common form of albinism is caused by mutations in oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), a melanosome-specific transmembrane protein with unknown function. Here we used direct patch-clamp of skin and eye melanosomes to identify a novel chloride-selective anion conductance mediated by OCA2 and required for melanin production. Expression of OCA2 increases organelle pH, suggesting that the chloride channel might regulate melanin synthesis by modulating melanosome pH. Thus, a melanosomal anion channel that requires OCA2 is essential for skin and eye pigmentation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04543.001 PMID:25513726

  18. An intracellular anion channel critical for pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Lefkovith, Ariel J; Marks, Michael S; Oancea, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular ion channels are essential regulators of organellar and cellular function, yet the molecular identity and physiological role of many of these channels remains elusive. In particular, no ion channel has been characterized in melanosomes, organelles that produce and store the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanosome function cause albinism, characterized by vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired retinal development, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. The most common form of albinism is caused by mutations in oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), a melanosome-specific transmembrane protein with unknown function. Here we used direct patch-clamp of skin and eye melanosomes to identify a novel chloride-selective anion conductance mediated by OCA2 and required for melanin production. Expression of OCA2 increases organelle pH, suggesting that the chloride channel might regulate melanin synthesis by modulating melanosome pH. Thus, a melanosomal anion channel that requires OCA2 is essential for skin and eye pigmentation. PMID:25513726

  19. Nonlinear channelizer.

    PubMed

    In, Visarath; Longhini, Patrick; Kho, Andy; Neff, Joseph D; Leung, Daniel; Liu, Norman; Meadows, Brian K; Gordon, Frank; Bulsara, Adi R; Palacios, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    The nonlinear channelizer is an integrated circuit made up of large parallel arrays of analog nonlinear oscillators, which, collectively, serve as a broad-spectrum analyzer with the ability to receive complex signals containing multiple frequencies and instantaneously lock-on or respond to a received signal in a few oscillation cycles. The concept is based on the generation of internal oscillations in coupled nonlinear systems that do not normally oscillate in the absence of coupling. In particular, the system consists of unidirectionally coupled bistable nonlinear elements, where the frequency and other dynamical characteristics of the emergent oscillations depend on the system's internal parameters and the received signal. These properties and characteristics are being employed to develop a system capable of locking onto any arbitrary input radio frequency signal. The system is efficient by eliminating the need for high-speed, high-accuracy analog-to-digital converters, and compact by making use of nonlinear coupled systems to act as a channelizer (frequency binning and channeling), a low noise amplifier, and a frequency down-converter in a single step which, in turn, will reduce the size, weight, power, and cost of the entire communication system. This paper covers the theory, numerical simulations, and some engineering details that validate the concept at the frequency band of 1-4 GHz.

  20. Transfer of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator to Human Cystic Fibrosis Cells Mediated by Extracellular Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Vituret, Cyrielle; Gallay, Kathy; Confort, Marie-Pierre; Ftaich, Najate; Matei, Constantin I; Archer, Fabienne; Ronfort, Corinne; Mornex, Jean-François; Chanson, Marc; Di Pietro, Attilio; Boulanger, Pierre; Hong, Saw See

    2016-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, resulting in a deficiency in chloride channel activity. In this study, extracellular vesicles (EVs), microvesicles, and exosomes were used as vehicles to deliver exogenous CFTR glycoprotein and its encoding mRNA (mRNA(GFP-CFTR)) to CF cells to correct the CFTR chloride channel function. We isolated microvesicles and exosomes from the culture medium of CFTR-positive Calu-3 cells, or from A549 cells transduced with an adenoviral vector overexpressing a GFP-tagged CFTR (GFP-CFTR). Both microvesicles and exosomes had the capacity to package and deliver the GFP-CFTR glycoprotein and mRNA(GFP-CFTR) to target cells in a dose-dependent manner. Homologous versus heterologous EV-to-cell transfer was studied, and it appeared that the cellular uptake of EVs was significantly more efficient in homologous transfer. The incubation of CF15 cells, a nasal epithelial cell line homozygous for the ΔF508 CFTR mutation, with microvesicles or exosomes loaded with GFP-CFTR resulted in the correction of the CFTR function in CF cells in a dose-dependent manner. A time-course analysis of EV-transduced CF cells suggested that CFTR transferred as mature glycoprotein was responsible for the CFTR-associated channel activity detected at early times posttransduction, whereas GFP-CFTR translated from exogenous mRNA(GFP-CFTR) was responsible for the CFTR function at later times. Collectively, this study showed the potential application of microvesicles and exosomes as vectors for CFTR transfer and functional correction of the genetic defect in human CF cells.

  1. Transfer of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator to Human Cystic Fibrosis Cells Mediated by Extracellular Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Vituret, Cyrielle; Gallay, Kathy; Confort, Marie-Pierre; Ftaich, Najate; Matei, Constantin I; Archer, Fabienne; Ronfort, Corinne; Mornex, Jean-François; Chanson, Marc; Di Pietro, Attilio; Boulanger, Pierre; Hong, Saw See

    2016-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, resulting in a deficiency in chloride channel activity. In this study, extracellular vesicles (EVs), microvesicles, and exosomes were used as vehicles to deliver exogenous CFTR glycoprotein and its encoding mRNA (mRNA(GFP-CFTR)) to CF cells to correct the CFTR chloride channel function. We isolated microvesicles and exosomes from the culture medium of CFTR-positive Calu-3 cells, or from A549 cells transduced with an adenoviral vector overexpressing a GFP-tagged CFTR (GFP-CFTR). Both microvesicles and exosomes had the capacity to package and deliver the GFP-CFTR glycoprotein and mRNA(GFP-CFTR) to target cells in a dose-dependent manner. Homologous versus heterologous EV-to-cell transfer was studied, and it appeared that the cellular uptake of EVs was significantly more efficient in homologous transfer. The incubation of CF15 cells, a nasal epithelial cell line homozygous for the ΔF508 CFTR mutation, with microvesicles or exosomes loaded with GFP-CFTR resulted in the correction of the CFTR function in CF cells in a dose-dependent manner. A time-course analysis of EV-transduced CF cells suggested that CFTR transferred as mature glycoprotein was responsible for the CFTR-associated channel activity detected at early times posttransduction, whereas GFP-CFTR translated from exogenous mRNA(GFP-CFTR) was responsible for the CFTR function at later times. Collectively, this study showed the potential application of microvesicles and exosomes as vectors for CFTR transfer and functional correction of the genetic defect in human CF cells. PMID:26886833

  2. Insight toward epithelial Na+ channel mechanism revealed by the acid-sensing ion channel 1 structure.

    PubMed

    Stockand, James D; Staruschenko, Alexander; Pochynyuk, Oleh; Booth, Rachell E; Silverthorn, Dee U

    2008-09-01

    The epithelial Na(+) channel/degenerin (ENaC/DEG) protein family includes a diverse group of ion channels, including nonvoltage-gated Na(+) channels of epithelia and neurons, and the acid-sensing ion channel 1 (ASIC1). In mammalian epithelia, ENaC helps regulate Na(+) and associated water transport, making it a critical determinant of systemic blood pressure and pulmonary mucosal fluidity. In the nervous system, ENaC/DEG proteins are related to sensory transduction. While the importance and physiological function of these ion channels are established, less is known about their structure. One hallmark of the ENaC/DEG channel family is that each channel subunit has only two transmembrane domains connected by an exceedingly large extracellular loop. This subunit structure was recently confirmed when Jasti and colleagues determined the crystal structure of chicken ASIC1, a neuronal acid-sensing ENaC/DEG channel. By mapping ENaC to the structural coordinates of cASIC1, as we do here, we hope to provide insight toward ENaC structure. ENaC, like ASIC1, appears to be a trimeric channel containing 1alpha, 1beta, and 1gamma subunit. Heterotrimeric ENaC and monomeric ENaC subunits within the trimer possibly contain many of the major secondary, tertiary, and quaternary features identified in cASIC1 with a few subtle but critical differences. These differences are expected to have profound effects on channel behavior. In particular, they may contribute to ENaC insensitivity to acid and to its constitutive activity in the absence of time- and ligand-dependent inactivation. Experiments resulting from this comparison of cASIC1 and ENaC may help clarify unresolved issues related to ENaC architecture, and may help identify secondary structures and residues critical to ENaC function.

  3. Impedance analysis and single-channel recordings on nano-black lipid membranes based on porous alumina.

    PubMed

    Römer, Winfried; Steinem, Claudia

    2004-02-01

    Ordered porous alumina substrates with pore diameters of 55 and 280 nm, respectively, were produced and utilized as a support to prepare membranes suspending the pores of the material. Highly ordered porous alumina was prepared by an anodization process followed by dissolution of the remaining aluminum and alumina at the backside of the pores. The dissolution process of Al(2)O(3) at the backside of the pores was monitored by electrical impedance spectroscopy ensuring the desired sieve-like structure of the porous alumina. One side of the porous material with an area of 7 mm(2) was coated with a thin gold layer followed by chemisorption of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphothioethanol. The hydrophobic monolayer on top of the upper surface was a prerequisite for the formation of suspending membranes, termed nano-black lipid membranes (nano-BLMs). The formation process, and long-term and mechanical stability of the nano-BLMs were followed by electrical impedance spectroscopy indicating the formation of lipid bilayers with typical specific membrane capacitances of (0.65 +/- 0.2) micro F/cm(2) and membrane resistances of up to 1.6 x 10(8) Omega cm(2). These high membrane resistances allowed for single-channel recordings. Gramicidin as well as alamethicin was successfully inserted into the nano-BLMs exhibiting characteristic conductance states.

  4. Hexadecameric structure of an invertebrate gap junction channel.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Atsunori; Matsuzawa, Tomohiro; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Tani, Kazutoshi; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2016-03-27

    Innexins are invertebrate-specific gap junction proteins with four transmembrane helices. These proteins oligomerize to constitute intercellular channels that allow for the passage of small signaling molecules associated with neural and muscular electrical activity. In contrast to the large number of structural and functional studies of connexin gap junction channels, few structural studies of recombinant innexin channels are reported. Here we show the three-dimensional structure of two-dimensionally crystallized Caenorhabditis elegans innexin-6 (INX-6) gap junction channels. The N-terminal deleted INX-6 proteins are crystallized in lipid bilayers. The three-dimensional reconstruction determined by cryo-electron crystallography reveals that a single INX-6 gap junction channel comprises 16 subunits, a hexadecamer, in contrast to chordate connexin channels, which comprise 12 subunits. The channel pore diameters at the cytoplasmic entrance and extracellular gap region are larger than those of connexin26. Two bulb densities are observed in each hemichannel, one in the pore and the other at the cytoplasmic side of the hemichannel in the channel pore pathway. These findings imply a structural diversity of gap junction channels among multicellular organisms. PMID:26883891

  5. Intermolecular Headgroup Interaction and Hydration as Driving Forces for Lipid Transmembrane Asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Smolentsev, Nikolay; Lütgebaucks, Cornelis; Okur, Halil I; de Beer, Alex G F; Roke, Sylvie

    2016-03-30

    Variations between the inner and outer leaflets of cell membranes are crucial for cell functioning and signaling, drug-membrane interactions, and the formation of lipid domains. Transmembrane asymmetry can in principle be comprised of an asymmetric charge distribution, differences in hydration, specific headgroup/H-bonding interactions, or a difference in the number of lipids per leaflet. Here, we characterize the transmembrane asymmetry of small unilamellar liposomes consisting of zwitterionic and charged lipids in aqueous solution using vibrational sum frequency scattering and second harmonic scattering, label-free methods, specifically sensitive to lipid and water asymmetries. For single component liposomes, transmembrane asymmetry is present for the charge distribution and lipid hydration, but the leaflets are not detectably asymmetric in terms of the number of lipids per leaflet, even though geometrical packing arguments would predict so. Such a lipid transmembrane asymmetry can, however, be induced in binary lipid mixtures under conditions that enable H-bonding interactions between phosphate and amine groups. In this case, the measured asymmetry consists of a different number of lipids in the outer and inner leaflet, a difference in transmembrane headgroup hydration, and a different headgroup orientation for the interacting phosphate groups.

  6. Intrinsic Disorder in Transmembrane Proteins: Roles in Signaling and Topology Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Bürgi, Jérôme; Xue, Bin; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) are peculiar stretches of amino acids that lack stable conformations in solution. Intrinsic Disorder containing Proteins (IDP) are defined by the presence of at least one large IDR and have been linked to multiple cellular processes including cell signaling, DNA binding and cancer. Here we used computational analyses and publicly available databases to deepen insight into the prevalence and function of IDRs specifically in transmembrane proteins, which are somewhat neglected in most studies. We found that 50% of transmembrane proteins have at least one IDR of 30 amino acids or more. Interestingly, these domains preferentially localize to the cytoplasmic side especially of multi-pass transmembrane proteins, suggesting that disorder prediction could increase the confidence of topology prediction algorithms. This was supported by the successful prediction of the topology of the uncharacterized multi-pass transmembrane protein TMEM117, as confirmed experimentally. Pathway analysis indicated that IDPs are enriched in cell projection and axons and appear to play an important role in cell adhesion, signaling and ion binding. In addition, we found that IDP are enriched in phosphorylation sites, a crucial post translational modification in signal transduction, when compared to fully ordered proteins and to be implicated in more protein-protein interaction events. Accordingly, IDPs were highly enriched in short protein binding regions called Molecular Recognition Features (MoRFs). Altogether our analyses strongly support the notion that the transmembrane IDPs act as hubs in cellular signal events. PMID:27391701

  7. Mitochondrial small conductance SK2 channels prevent glutamate-induced oxytosis and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Dolga, Amalia M; Netter, Michael F; Perocchi, Fabiana; Doti, Nunzianna; Meissner, Lilja; Tobaben, Svenja; Grohm, Julia; Zischka, Hans; Plesnila, Nikolaus; Decher, Niels; Culmsee, Carsten

    2013-04-12

    Small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK2/K(Ca)2.2) channels are known to be located in the neuronal plasma membrane where they provide feedback control of NMDA receptor activity. Here, we provide evidence that SK2 channels are also located in the inner mitochondrial membrane of neuronal mitochondria. Patch clamp recordings in isolated mitoplasts suggest insertion into the inner mitochondrial membrane with the C and N termini facing the intermembrane space. Activation of SK channels increased mitochondrial K(+) currents, whereas channel inhibition attenuated these currents. In a model of glutamate toxicity, activation of SK2 channels attenuated the loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, blocked mitochondrial fission, prevented the release of proapoptotic mitochondrial proteins, and reduced cell death. Neuroprotection was blocked by specific SK2 inhibitory peptides and siRNA targeting SK2 channels. Activation of mitochondrial SK2 channels may therefore represent promising targets for neuroprotective strategies in conditions of mitochondrial dysfunction.

  8. Mutation in S6 domain of HCN4 channel in patient with suspected Brugada syndrome modifies channel function.

    PubMed

    Biel, Stephanie; Aquila, Marco; Hertel, Brigitte; Berthold, Anne; Neumann, Thomas; DiFrancesco, Dario; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard; Kauferstein, Silke

    2016-10-01

    Diseases such as the sick sinus and the Brugada syndrome are cardiac abnormalities, which can be caused by a number of genetic aberrances. Among them are mutations in HCN4, a gene, which encodes the hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel 4; this pacemaker channel is responsible for the spontaneous activity of the sinoatrial node. The present genetic screening of patients with suspected or diagnosed Brugada or sick sinus syndrome identified in 1 out of 62 samples the novel mutation V492F. It is located in a highly conserved site of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN)4 channel downstream of the filter at the start of the last transmembrane domain S6. Functional expression of mutant channels in HEK293 cells uncovered a profoundly reduced channel function but no appreciable impact on channel synthesis and trafficking compared to the wild type. The inward rectifying HCN4 current could be partially rescued by an expression of heteromeric channels comprising wt and mutant monomers. These heteromeric channels were responsive to cAMP but they required a more negative voltage for activation and they exhibited a lower current density than the wt channel. This suggests a dominant negative effect of the mutation in patients, which carry this heterozygous mutation. Such a modulation of HCN4 activity could be the cause of the diagnosed cardiac abnormality.

  9. Mutation in S6 domain of HCN4 channel in patient with suspected Brugada syndrome modifies channel function.

    PubMed

    Biel, Stephanie; Aquila, Marco; Hertel, Brigitte; Berthold, Anne; Neumann, Thomas; DiFrancesco, Dario; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard; Kauferstein, Silke

    2016-10-01

    Diseases such as the sick sinus and the Brugada syndrome are cardiac abnormalities, which can be caused by a number of genetic aberrances. Among them are mutations in HCN4, a gene, which encodes the hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel 4; this pacemaker channel is responsible for the spontaneous activity of the sinoatrial node. The present genetic screening of patients with suspected or diagnosed Brugada or sick sinus syndrome identified in 1 out of 62 samples the novel mutation V492F. It is located in a highly conserved site of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN)4 channel downstream of the filter at the start of the last transmembrane domain S6. Functional expression of mutant channels in HEK293 cells uncovered a profoundly reduced channel function but no appreciable impact on channel synthesis and trafficking compared to the wild type. The inward rectifying HCN4 current could be partially rescued by an expression of heteromeric channels comprising wt and mutant monomers. These heteromeric channels were responsive to cAMP but they required a more negative voltage for activation and they exhibited a lower current density than the wt channel. This suggests a dominant negative effect of the mutation in patients, which carry this heterozygous mutation. Such a modulation of HCN4 activity could be the cause of the diagnosed cardiac abnormality. PMID:27553229

  10. Light and pH-induced Changes in Structure and Accessibility of Transmembrane Helix B and Its Immediate Environment in Channelrhodopsin-2.

    PubMed

    Volz, Pierre; Krause, Nils; Balke, Jens; Schneider, Constantin; Walter, Maria; Schneider, Franziska; Schlesinger, Ramona; Alexiev, Ulrike

    2016-08-12

    A variant of the cation channel channelrhodopsin-2 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrChR2) was selectively labeled at position Cys-79 at the end of the first cytoplasmic loop and the beginning of transmembrane helix B with the fluorescent dye fluorescein (acetamidofluorescein). We utilized (i) time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy experiments to monitor the structural dynamics at the cytoplasmic surface close to the inner gate in the dark and after illumination in the open channel state and (ii) time-resolved fluorescence quenching experiments to observe the solvent accessibility of helix B at pH 6.0 and 7.4. The light-induced increase in final anisotropy for acetamidofluorescein bound to the channel variant with a prolonged conducting state clearly shows that the formation of the open channel state is associated with a large conformational change at the cytoplasmic surface, consistent with an outward tilt of helix B. Furthermore, results from solute accessibility studies of the cytoplasmic end of helix B suggest a pH-dependent structural heterogeneity that appears below pH 7. At pH 7.4 conformational homogeneity was observed, whereas at pH 6.0 two protein fractions exist, including one in which residue 79 is buried. This inaccessible fraction amounts to 66% in nanodiscs and 82% in micelles. Knowledge about pH-dependent structural heterogeneity may be important for CrChR2 applications in optogenetics. PMID:27268055

  11. Expression and purification of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    O'Ryan, Liam; Rimington, Tracy; Cant, Natasha; Ford, Robert C

    2012-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel, that when mutated, can give rise to cystic fibrosis in humans.There is therefore considerable interest in this protein, but efforts to study its structure and activity have been hampered by the difficulty of expressing and purifying sufficient amounts of the protein(1-3). Like many 'difficult' eukaryotic membrane proteins, expression in a fast-growing organism is desirable, but challenging, and in the yeast S. cerevisiae, so far low amounts were obtained and rapid degradation of the recombinant protein was observed (4-9). Proteins involved in the processing of recombinant CFTR in yeast have been described(6-9) .In this report we describe a methodology for expression of CFTR in yeast and its purification in significant amounts. The protocol describes how the earlier proteolysis problems can be overcome and how expression levels of CFTR can be greatly improved by modifying the cell growth conditions and by controlling the induction conditions, in particular the time period prior to cell harvesting. The reagants associated with this protocol (murine CFTR-expressing yeast cells or yeast plasmids) will be distributed via the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, which has sponsored the research. An article describing the design and synthesis of the CFTR construct employed in this report will be published separately (Urbatsch, I.; Thibodeau, P. et al., unpublished). In this article we will explain our method beginning with the transformation of the yeast cells with the CFTR construct - containing yeast plasmid (Fig. 1). The construct has a green fluorescent protein (GFP) sequence fused to CFTR at its C-terminus and follows the system developed by Drew et al. (2008)(10). The GFP allows the expression and purification of CFTR to be followed relatively easily. The JoVE visualized protocol finishes after the preparation of microsomes from the yeast cells, although we include some suggestions for

  12. Expression and Purification of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    O'Ryan, Liam; Rimington, Tracy; Cant, Natasha; Ford, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel, that when mutated, can give rise to cystic fibrosis in humans.There is therefore considerable interest in this protein, but efforts to study its structure and activity have been hampered by the difficulty of expressing and purifying sufficient amounts of the protein1-3. Like many 'difficult' eukaryotic membrane proteins, expression in a fast-growing organism is desirable, but challenging, and in the yeast S. cerevisiae, so far low amounts were obtained and rapid degradation of the recombinant protein was observed 4-9. Proteins involved in the processing of recombinant CFTR in yeast have been described6-9 .In this report we describe a methodology for expression of CFTR in yeast and its purification in significant amounts. The protocol describes how the earlier proteolysis problems can be overcome and how expression levels of CFTR can be greatly improved by modifying the cell growth conditions and by controlling the induction conditions, in particular the time period prior to cell harvesting. The reagants associated with this protocol (murine CFTR-expressing yeast cells or yeast plasmids) will be distributed via the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, which has sponsored the research. An article describing the design and synthesis of the CFTR construct employed in this report will be published separately (Urbatsch, I.; Thibodeau, P. et al., unpublished). In this article we will explain our method beginning with the transformation of the yeast cells with the CFTR construct - containing yeast plasmid (Fig. 1). The construct has a green fluorescent protein (GFP) sequence fused to CFTR at its C-terminus and follows the system developed by Drew et al. (2008)10. The GFP allows the expression and purification of CFTR to be followed relatively easily. The JoVE visualized protocol finishes after the preparation of microsomes from the yeast cells, although we include some suggestions for

  13. Three ways in, one way out: water dynamics in the trans-membrane domains of the inner membrane translocase AcrB.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Nadine; Kandt, Christian

    2011-10-01

    Powered by proton-motive force, the inner membrane translocase AcrB is the engine of the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump in Escherichia coli. As proton conduction in proteins occurs along hydrogen-bonded networks of polar residues and water molecules, knowledge of the protein-internal water distribution and water-interacting residues allows drawing conclusions to possible pathways of proton conduction. Here, we report a series of 6× 50 ns independent molecular dynamics simulations of asymmetric AcrB embedded in a phospholipid/water environment. Simulating each monomer in its proposed protonation state, we calculated for each trans-membrane domain the average water distribution, identified residues interacting with these waters and quantified each residue's frequency of water hydrogen bond contact. Combining this information we find three possible routes of proton transfer connecting a continuously hydrated region of known key residues in the TMD interior to bulk water by one cytoplasmic and up to three periplasm water channels in monomer B and A. We find that water access of the trans-membrane domains is regulated by four groups of residues in a combination of side chain re-orientations and shifts of trans-membrane helices. Our findings support a proton release event via Arg971 during the C intermediate or in the transition to A, and proton uptake occurring in the A or B state or during a so far unknown intermediate in between B and C where cytoplasmic water access is still possible. Our simulations suggest experimentally testable hypotheses, which have not been investigated so far. PMID:21905112

  14. Transmembrane Photoredox in Model Protocellular Systems. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons as Plausible Light-harvesting/Electron Transfer Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cape, J. L.; Monnard, P.-A.; Ziock, H.-J.; Boncella, J. M.

    2010-04-01

    Mechanistic studies of transmembrane photoredox in a model protocell system indicate a plausible role for membrane solublized PAH species as primitive ‘photosynthetic' energy transduction catalysts.

  15. The Transmembrane Domain C of AMPA Receptors is Critically Involved in Receptor Function and Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Terhag, Jan; Gottschling, Kevin; Hollmann, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors are major players in synaptic transmission and are critically involved in many cognitive events. Although receptors of different subfamilies serve different functions, they all show a conserved domain topology. For most of these domains, structure–function relationships have been established and are well understood. However, up to date the role of the transmembrane domain C in receptor function has been investigated only poorly. We have constructed a series of receptor chimeras and point mutants designed to shed light on the structural and/or functional importance of this domain. We here present evidence that the role of transmembrane domain C exceeds that of a mere scaffolding domain and that several amino acid residues located within the domain are crucial for receptor gating and desensitization. Furthermore, our data suggest that the domain may be involved in receptor interaction with transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins. PMID:21206529

  16. Interaction of influenza virus haemagglutinin with sphingolipid-cholesterol membrane domains via its transmembrane domain.

    PubMed Central

    Scheiffele, P; Roth, M G; Simons, K

    1997-01-01

    Sphingolipid-cholesterol rafts are microdomains in biological membranes with liquid-ordered phase properties which are implicated in membrane traffic and signalling events. We have used influenza virus haemagglutinin (HA) as a model protein to analyse the interaction of transmembrane proteins with these microdomains. Here we demonstrate that raft association is an intrinsic property encoded in the protein. Mutant HA molecules with foreign transmembrane domain (TMD) sequences lose their ability to associate with the lipid microdomains, and mutations in the HA TMD reveal a requirement for hydrophobic residues in contact with the exoplasmic leaflet of the membrane. We also provide experimental evidence that cholesterol is critically required for association of proteins with lipid rafts. Our data suggest that the binding to specific membrane domains can be encoded in transmembrane proteins and that this information will be used for polarized sorting and signal transduction processes. PMID:9312009

  17. Photosensitized electron transport across lipid vesicle walls: enhancement of quantum yield by ionophores and transmembrane potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Laane, C.; Ford, W.E.; Otvos, J.W.; Calvin, M.

    1981-04-01

    The photosensitized reduction of heptylviologen in the bulk aqueous phase of phosphatidylcholine vesicles containing EDTA inside and a membrane-bound tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(2+) derivative is enhanced by a factor of 6.5 by the addition of valinomycin in the presence of K/sup +/. A 3-fold stimulation by gramicidin and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone is observed. The results suggest that, under these conditions, the rate of photoinduced electron transfer across vesicle walls in the absence of ion carriers is limited by cotransport of cations. The rate of electron transfer across vesicle walls could be influenced further by generating transmembrane potentials with K/sup +/ gradients inatthe presence of valinomycin. When vesicles are made with transmembrane potentials, interior more negative, the quantum yield of heptylviologen reduction is doubled, and, converseley, when vesicles are made with transmembrane potentials, interior more positive, the quantum yield is decreased and approaches the value found in the absence of valinomycin.

  18. Structural and dynamic study of the transmembrane domain of the amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Nadezhdin, K D; Bocharova, O V; Bocharov, E V; Arseniev, A S

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease affects people all over the world, regardless of nationality, gender or social status. An adequate study of the disease requires essential understanding of the molecular fundamentals of the pathogenesis. The amyloid β-peptide, which forms amyloid plaques in the brain of people with Alzheimer's disease, is the product of sequential cleavage of a single-span membrane amyloid precursor protein (APP). More than half of the APP mutations found to be associated with familial forms of Alzheimer's disease are located in its transmembrane domain. The pathogenic mutations presumably affect the structural-dynamic properties of the APP transmembrane domain by changing its conformational stability and/or lateral dimerization. In the present study, the structure and dynamics of the recombinant peptide corresponding to the APP fragment, Gln686-Lys726, which comprises the APP transmembrane domain with an adjacent N-terminal juxtamembrane sequence, were determined in the membrane mimetic environment composed of detergent micelles using NMR spectroscopy. The structure obtained in dodecylphosphocholine micelles consists of two α-helices: a short surface-associated juxtamembrane helix (Lys687-Asp694) and a long transmembrane helix (Gly700-Leu723), both connected via a mobile loop region. A minor bend of the transmembrane α-helix is observed near the paired residues Gly708-Gly709. A cholesterol-binding hydrophobic cavity is apparently formed under the loop region, where the juxtamembrane α-helix comes into contact with the membrane surface near the N-terminus of the transmembrane α-helix. PMID:22649674

  19. Hydrophobic Mismatch Drives the Interaction of E5 with the Transmembrane Segment of PDGF Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Windisch, Dirk; Ziegler, Colin; Grage, Stephan L.; Bürck, Jochen; Zeitler, Marcel; Gor’kov, Peter L.; Ulrich, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    The oncogenic E5 protein from bovine papillomavirus is a short (44 amino acids long) integral membrane protein that forms homodimers. It activates platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) β in a ligand-independent manner by transmembrane helix-helix interactions. The nature of this recognition event remains elusive, as numerous mutations are tolerated in the E5 transmembrane segment, with the exception of one hydrogen-bonding residue. Here, we examined the conformation, stability, and alignment of the E5 protein in fluid lipid membranes of substantially varying bilayer thickness, in both the absence and presence of the PDGFR transmembrane segment. Quantitative synchrotron radiation circular dichroism analysis revealed a very long transmembrane helix for E5 of ∼26 amino acids. Oriented circular dichroism and solid-state 15N-NMR showed that the alignment and stability of this unusually long segment depend critically on the membrane thickness. When reconstituted alone in exceptionally thick DNPC lipid bilayers, the E5 helix was found to be inserted almost upright. In moderately thick bilayers (DErPC and DEiPC), it started to tilt and became slightly deformed, and finally it became aggregated in conventional DOPC, POPC, and DMPC membranes due to hydrophobic mismatch. On the other hand, when E5 was co-reconstituted with the transmembrane segment of PDGFR, it was able to tolerate even the most pronounced mismatch and was stabilized by binding to the receptor, which has the same hydrophobic length. As E5 is known to activate PDGFR within the thin membranes of the Golgi compartment, we suggest that the intrinsic hydrophobic mismatch of these two interaction partners drives them together. They seem to recognize each other by forming a closely packed bundle of mutually aligned transmembrane helices, which is further stabilized by a specific pair of hydrogen-bonding residues. PMID:26287626

  20. The Homology Model of PMP22 Suggests Mutations Resulting in Peripheral Neuropathy Disrupt Transmembrane Helix Packing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) is a tetraspan membrane protein strongly expressed in myelinating Schwann cells of the peripheral nervous system. Myriad missense mutations in PMP22 result in varying degrees of peripheral neuropathy. We used Rosetta 3.5 to generate a homology model of PMP22 based on the recently published crystal structure of claudin-15. The model suggests that several mutations known to result in neuropathy act by disrupting transmembrane helix packing interactions. Our model also supports suggestions from previous studies that the first transmembrane helix is not tightly associated with the rest of the helical bundle. PMID:25243937

  1. Kv8.1, a new neuronal potassium channel subunit with specific inhibitory properties towards Shab and Shaw channels.

    PubMed Central

    Hugnot, J P; Salinas, M; Lesage, F; Guillemare, E; de Weille, J; Heurteaux, C; Mattéi, M G; Lazdunski, M

    1996-01-01

    Outward rectifier K+ channels have a characteristic structure with six transmembrane segments and one pore region. A new member of this family of transmembrane proteins has been cloned and called Kv8.1. Kv8.1 is essentially present in the brain where it is located mainly in layers II, IV and VI of the cerebral cortex, in hippocampus, in CA1-CA4 pyramidal cell layer as well in granule cells of the dentate gyrus, in the granule cell layer and in the Purkinje cell layer of the cerebellum. The Kv8.1 gene is in the 8q22.3-8q24.1 region of the human genome. Although Kv8.1 has the hallmarks of functional subunits of outward rectifier K+ channels, injection of its cRNA in Xenopus oocytes does not produce K+ currents. However Kv8.1 abolishes the functional expression of members of the Kv2 and Kv3 subfamilies, suggesting that the functional role of Kv8.1 might be to inhibit the function of a particular class of outward rectifier K+ channel types. Immunoprecipitation studies have demonstrated that inhibition occurs by formation of heteropolymeric channels, and results obtained with Kv8.1 chimeras have indicated that association of Kv8.1 with other types of subunits is via its N-terminal domain. Images PMID:8670833

  2. A nicotinic acetylcholine receptor transmembrane point mutation (G275E) associated with resistance to spinosad in Frankliniella occidentalis

    PubMed Central

    Puinean, Alin M; Lansdell, Stuart J; Collins, Toby; Bielza, Pablo; Millar, Neil S

    2013-01-01

    High levels of resistance to spinosad, a macrocyclic lactone insecticide, have been reported previously in western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis, an economically important insect pest of vegetables, fruit and ornamental crops. We have cloned the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) α6 subunit from F. occidentalis (Foα6) and compared the nucleotide sequence of Foα6 from susceptible and spinosad-resistant insect populations (MLFOM and R1S respectively). A single nucleotide change has been identified in Foα6, resulting in the replacement of a glycine (G) residue in susceptible insects with a glutamic acid (E) in resistant insects. The resistance-associated mutation (G275E) is predicted to lie at the top of the third α-helical transmembrane domain of Foα6. Although there is no direct evidence identifying the location of the spinosad binding site, the analogous amino acid in the C. elegans glutamate-gated chloride channel lies in close proximity (4.4 Å) to the known binding site of ivermectin, another macrocyclic lactone pesticide. The functional consequences of the resistance-associated mutation have been examined in the human nAChR α7 subunit. Introduction of an analogous (A272E) mutation in α7 abolishes the modulatory effects of spinosad whilst having no significant effect upon activation by acetylcholine, consistent with spinosad having an allosteric mechanism of action. PMID:23016960

  3. Pharmacological Rescue of the Mutant Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Detected by Use of a Novel Fluorescence Platform

    PubMed Central

    Holleran, John P; Glover, Matthew L; Peters, Kathryn W; Bertrand, Carol A; Watkins, Simon C; Jarvik, Jonathan W; Frizzell, Raymond A

    2012-01-01

    Numerous human diseases arise because of defects in protein folding, leading to their degradation in the endoplasmic reticulum. Among them is cystic fibrosis (CF), caused by mutations in the gene encoding the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR ), an epithelial anion channel. The most common mutation, F508del, disrupts CFTR folding, which blocks its trafficking to the plasma membrane. We developed a fluorescence detection platform using fluorogen-activating proteins (FAPs) to directly detect FAP-CFTR trafficking to the cell surface using a cell-impermeant probe. By using this approach, we determined the efficacy of new corrector compounds, both alone and in combination, to rescue F508del-CFTR to the plasma membrane. Combinations of correctors produced additive or synergistic effects, improving the density of mutant CFTR at the cell surface up to ninefold over a single-compound treatment. The results correlated closely with assays of stimulated anion transport performed in polarized human bronchial epithelia that endogenously express F508del-CFTR. These findings indicate that the FAP-tagged constructs faithfully report mutant CFTR correction activity and that this approach should be useful as a screening assay in diseases that impair protein trafficking to the cell surface. PMID:22396015

  4. The origin and early evolution of membrane channels.

    PubMed

    Pohorille, Andrew; Schweighofer, Karl; Wilson, Michael A

    2005-02-01

    The origin and early evolution of ion channels are considered from the point of view that the transmembrane segments of membrane proteins are structurally quite simple and do not require specific sequences to fold. We argue that the transport of solute species, especially ions, required an early evolution of efficient transport mechanisms, and that the emergence of simple ion channels was protobiologically plausible. We also argue that, despite their simple structure, such channels could possess properties that, at the first sight, appear to require markedly greater complexity. These properties can be subtly modulated by local modifications to the sequence rather than global changes in molecular architecture. In order to address the evolution and development of ion channels, we focus on identifying those protein domains that are commonly associated with ion channel proteins and are conserved throughout the three main domains of life (Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea). We discuss the potassium-sodium-calcium superfamily of voltage-gated ion channels, mechanosensitive channels, porins, and ABC-transporters and argue that these families of membrane channels have sufficiently universal architectures that they can readily adapt to the diverse functional demands arising during evolution.

  5. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) potentiators protect G551D but not ΔF508 CFTR from thermal instability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuehong; Dawson, David C

    2014-09-01

    The G551D cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutation is associated with severe disease in ∼5% of cystic fibrosis patients worldwide. This amino acid substitution in NBD1 results in a CFTR chloride channel characterized by a severe gating defect that can be at least partially overcome in vitro by exposure to a CFTR potentiator. In contrast, the more common ΔF508 mutation is associated with a severe protein trafficking defect, as well as impaired channel function. Recent clinical trials demonstrated a beneficial effect of the CFTR potentiator, Ivacaftor (VX-770), on lung function of patients bearing at least one copy of G551D CFTR, but no comparable effect on ΔF508 homozygotes. This difference in efficacy was not surprising in view of the established difference in the molecular phenotypes of the two mutant channels. Recently, however, it was shown that the structural defect introduced by the deletion of F508 is associated with the thermal instability of ΔF508 CFTR channel function in vitro. This additional mutant phenotype raised the possibility that the differences in the behavior of ΔF508 and G551D CFTR, as well as the disparate efficacy of Ivacaftor, might be a reflection of the differing thermal stabilities of the two channels at 37 °C. We compared the thermal stability of G551D and ΔF508 CFTR in Xenopus oocytes in the presence and absence of CTFR potentiators. G551D CFTR exhibited a thermal instability that was comparable to that of ΔF508 CFTR. G551D CFTR, however, was protected from thermal instability by CFTR potentiators, whereas ΔF508 CFTR was not. These results suggest that the efficacy of VX-770 in patients bearing the G551D mutation is due, at least in part, to the ability of the small molecule to protect the mutant channel from thermal instability at human body temperature.

  6. HEK‐293 cells expressing the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR): a model for studying regulation of Cl− transport

    PubMed Central

    Domingue, Jada C.; Ao, Mei; Sarathy, Jayashree; George, Alvin; Alrefai, Waddah A.; Nelson, Deborah J.; Rao, Mrinalini C.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cell line (HEK‐293) readily lends itself to genetic manipulation and is a common tool for biologists to overexpress proteins of interest and study their function and molecular regulation. Although these cells have some limitations, such as an inability to form resistive monolayers necessary for studying transepithelial ion transport, they are nevertheless valuable in studying individual epithelial ion transporters. We report the use of HEK‐293 cells to study the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel. While HEK‐293 cells endogenously express mRNA for the Cl− channels, ClC‐2 and TMEM16A, they neither express CFTR mRNA nor protein. Therefore, we stably transfected HEK‐293 cells with EGFP‐CFTR (HEK‐CFTR) and demonstrated CFTR function by measuring forskolin‐stimulated iodide efflux. This efflux was inhibited by CFTRinh172, and the protein kinase A inhibitor H89, but not by Ca2+ chelation. In contrast to intestinal epithelia, forskolin stimulation does not increase surface CFTR expression and does not require intact microtubules in HEK‐CFTR. To investigate the role of an endogenous GαS‐coupled receptor, we examined the bile acid receptor, TGR5. Although HEK‐CFTR cells express TGR5, the potent TGR5 agonist lithocholic acid (LCA; 5–500 μmol/L) did not activate CFTR. Furthermore, forskolin, but not LCA, increased [cAMP]i in HEK‐CFTR suggesting that endogenous TGR5 may not be functionally linked to GαS. However, LCA did increase [Ca2+]i and interestingly, abolished forskolin‐stimulated iodide efflux. Thus, we propose that the stable HEK‐CFTR cell line is a useful model to study the multiple signaling pathways that regulate CFTR. PMID:25263207

  7. Charged Residues at the First Transmembrane Region Contribute to the Voltage Dependence of the Slow Gate of Connexins.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Bernardo I; García, Isaac E; Pupo, Amaury; Retamal, Mauricio A; Martínez, Agustín D; Latorre, Ramón; González, Carlos

    2016-07-22

    Connexins (Cxs) are a family of membrane-spanning proteins that form gap junction channels and hemichannels. Connexin-based channels exhibit two distinct voltage-dependent gating mechanisms termed slow and fast gating. Residues located at the C terminus of the first transmembrane segment (TM-1) are important structural components of the slow gate. Here, we determined the role of the charged residues at the end of TM-1 in voltage sensing in Cx26, Cx46, and Cx50. Conductance/voltage curves obtained from tail currents together with kinetics analysis reveal that the fast and slow gates of Cx26 involves the movement of two and four charges across the electric field, respectively. Primary sequence alignment of different Cxs shows the presence of well conserved glutamate residues in the C terminus of TM-1; only Cx26 contains a lysine in that position (lysine 41). Neutralization of lysine 41 in Cx26 increases the voltage dependence of the slow gate. Swapping of lysine 41 with glutamate 42 maintains the voltage dependence. In Cx46, neutralization of negative charges or addition of a positive charge in the Cx26 equivalent region reduced the slow gate voltage dependence. In Cx50, the addition of a glutamate in the same region decreased the voltage dependence, and the neutralization of a negative charge increased it. These results indicate that the charges at the end of TM-1 are part of the slow gate voltage sensor in Cxs. The fact that Cx42, which has no charge in this region, still presents voltage-dependent slow gating suggests that charges still unidentified also contribute to the slow gate voltage sensitivity.

  8. The ABC protein turned chloride channel whose failure causes cystic fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadsby, David C.; Vergani, Paola; Csanády, László

    2006-03-01

    CFTR chloride channels are encoded by the gene mutated in patients with cystic fibrosis. These channels belong to the superfamily of ABC transporter ATPases. ATP-driven conformational changes, which in other ABC proteins fuel uphill substrate transport across cellular membranes, in CFTR open and close a gate to allow transmembrane flow of anions down their electrochemical gradient. New structural and biochemical information from prokaryotic ABC proteins and functional information from CFTR channels has led to a unifying mechanism explaining those ATP-driven conformational changes.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation for statistical mechanics model of ion-channel cooperativity in cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, Riza; Aydiner, Ekrem

    2009-03-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are key molecules for the generation and propagation of electrical signals in excitable cell membranes. The voltage-dependent switching of these channels between conducting and nonconducting states is a major factor in controlling the transmembrane voltage. In this study, a statistical mechanics model of these molecules has been discussed on the basis of a two-dimensional spin model. A new Hamiltonian and a new Monte Carlo simulation algorithm are introduced to simulate such a model. It was shown that the results well match the experimental data obtained from batrachotoxin-modified sodium channels in the squid giant axon using the cut-open axon technique.

  10. Calcitriol transmembrane signalling: regulation of rat muscle phospholipase D activity.

    PubMed

    Facchinetti, M M; Boland, R; de Boland, A R

    1998-01-01

    In rat skeletal muscle, calcitriol, the hormonal form of vitamin D3, rapidly stimulates the biphasic formation of diacylglycerol (DAG), the second phase being independent of phosphoinositide hydrolysis driven by phospholipase C. In this work we showed that the effect of calcitriol on the second phase of DAG formation was totally inhibited in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ and by the Ca2+-channel blockers nifedipine and verapamil, whereas the Ca2+ ionophore A23184, similar to calcitriol, increased DAG formation by 100%. GTPgammaS, which activates G protein-mediated signals, mimicked the effects of the hormone while GDPbetaS, an inhibitor of G proteins, suppressed calcitriol-induced DAG formation. To elucidate the metabolic pathway of the late phase of DAG production, we examined the contribution of phospholipase D (PLD), which acts on phosphatidylcholine (PC) generating phosphatidic acid that is converted to DAG by a phosphatidate phosphohydrolase. In [3H]arachidonate-labeled muscle, calcitriol increased [3H]phosphatidylethanol (PEt) formation in the presence of ethanol, a reaction specific for PLD. The effects of the hormone were time- and dose-dependent with maximum PEt levels achieved at 10(-9) M. The phorbol ester TPA also stimulated PEt formation. The combination of calcitriol and TPA was more effective than either compound alone. In rat muscle, calcitriol increased PKC activity in a time-dependent fashion. Bisindolymaleimide, a selective inhibitor of the enzyme, completely suppressed TPA-induced PEt and attenuated the effects of the hormone. These results provide the first evidence concerning calcitriol stimulation of the hydrolysis of PC in a mammalian tissue through a phospholipase D catalyzed mechanism involving Ca2+, protein kinase C, and G proteins.

  11. Molecular Dynamics of Membrane-Spanning DNA Channels: Conductance Mechanism, Electro-Osmotic Transport, and Mechanical Gating.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jejoong; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2015-12-01

    DNA self-assembly has emerged as a new paradigm for design of biomimetic membrane channels. Several experimental groups have already demonstrated assembly and insertion of DNA channels into lipid bilayer membranes; however, the structure of the channels and their conductance mechanism have remained undetermined. Here, we report the results of molecular dynamics simulations that characterized the biophysical properties of the DNA membrane channels with atomic precision. We show that, while overall remaining stable, the local structure of the channels undergoes considerable fluctuations, departing from the idealized design. The transmembrane ionic current flows both through the central pore of the channel as well as along the DNA walls and through the gaps in the DNA structure. Surprisingly, we find that the conductance of DNA channels depend on the membrane tension, making them potentially suitable for force-sensing applications. Finally, we show that electro-osmosis governs the transport of druglike molecules through the DNA channels. PMID:26551518

  12. Common Extracellular Sensory Domains in Transmembrane Receptors for Diverse Signal Transduction Pathways in Bacteria and Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Zhulin, Igor B.; Nikolskaya, Anastasia N.; Galperin, Michael Y.

    2003-01-01

    Transmembrane receptors in microorganisms, such as sensory histidine kinases and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins, are molecular devices for monitoring environmental changes. We report here that sensory domain sharing is widespread among different classes of transmembrane receptors. We have identified two novel conserved extracellular sensory domains, named CHASE2 and CHASE3, that are found in at least four classes of transmembrane receptors: histidine kinases, adenylate cyclases, predicted diguanylate cyclases, and either serine/threonine protein kinases (CHASE2) or methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (CHASE3). Three other extracellular sensory domains were shared by at least two different classes of transmembrane receptors: histidine kinases and either diguanylate cyclases, adenylate cyclases, or phosphodiesterases. These observations suggest that microorganisms use similar conserved domains to sense similar environmental signals and transmit this information via different signal transduction pathways to different regulatory circuits: transcriptional regulation (histidine kinases), chemotaxis (methyl-accepting proteins), catabolite repression (adenylate cyclases), and modulation of enzyme activity (diguanylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases). The variety of signaling pathways using the CHASE-type domains indicates that these domains sense some critically important extracellular signals. PMID:12486065

  13. Molecular basis of transmembrane beta-barrel formation of staphylococcal pore-forming toxins.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Daichi; Sugawara, Takaki; Takeshita, Miyu; Kaneko, Jun; Kamio, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Isao; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Yao, Min

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria secrete pore-forming toxins (PFTs) to attack target cells. PFTs are expressed as water-soluble monomeric proteins, which oligomerize into nonlytic prepore intermediates on the target cell membrane before forming membrane-spanning pores. Despite a wealth of biochemical data, the lack of high-resolution prepore structural information has hampered understanding of the β-barrel formation process. Here, we report crystal structures of staphylococcal γ-haemolysin and leucocidin prepores. The structures reveal a disordered bottom half of the β-barrel corresponding to the transmembrane region, and a rigid upper extramembrane half. Spectroscopic analysis of fluorescently labelled mutants confirmed that the prepore is distinct from the pore within the transmembrane region. Mutational analysis also indicates a pivotal role for the glycine residue located at the lipid-solvent interface as a 'joint' between the two halves of the β-barrel. These observations suggest a two-step transmembrane β-barrel pore formation mechanism in which the upper extramembrane and bottom transmembrane regions are formed independently. PMID:25263813

  14. Detergent properties influence the stability of the glycophorin A transmembrane helix dimer in lysophosphatidylcholine micelles.

    PubMed

    Stangl, Michael; Veerappan, Anbazhagan; Kroeger, Anja; Vogel, Peter; Schneider, Dirk

    2012-12-19

    Detergents might affect membrane protein structures by promoting intramolecular interactions that are different from those found in native membrane bilayers, and fine-tuning detergent properties can be crucial for obtaining structural information of intact and functional transmembrane proteins. To systematically investigate the influence of the detergent concentration and acyl-chain length on the stability of a transmembrane protein structure, the stability of the human glycophorin A transmembrane helix dimer has been analyzed in lyso-phosphatidylcholine micelles of different acyl-chain length. While our results indicate that the transmembrane protein is destabilized in detergents with increasing chain-length, the diameter of the hydrophobic micelle core was found to be less crucial. Thus, hydrophobic mismatch appears to be less important in detergent micelles than in lipid bilayers and individual detergent molecules appear to be able to stretch within a micelle to match the hydrophobic thickness of the peptide. However, the stability of the GpA TM helix dimer linearly depends on the aggregation number of the lyso-PC detergents, indicating that not only is the chemistry of the detergent headgroup and acyl-chain region central for classifying a detergent as harsh or mild, but the detergent aggregation number might also be important.

  15. Comparison between clinical indicators of transmembrane oxygenator thrombosis and multidetector computed tomographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Panigada, Mauro; L'Acqua, Camilla; Passamonti, Serena Maria; Mietto, Cristina; Protti, Alessandro; Riva, Roberto; Gattinoni, Luciano

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to assess whether multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) could accurately confirm the clinical suspicion of transmembrane oxygenator thrombosis (MOT) during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Twenty-seven oxygenators were examined using MDCT at the end of patient treatment. Transmembrane oxygenator thrombosis was suspected in 15 of them according to the presence of at least 2 of the following clinical indicators: (1) increase in d-dimer, (2) decrease in platelet count, (3) decrease in oxygenator performance, and (4) presence of clots on the surface of the oxygenator. Transmembrane oxygenator thrombosis was confirmed by MDCT in 5 (33%) of them. Transmembrane oxygenator thrombosis was unexpectedly found in 5 (41%) of the remaining 12 oxygenators not suspected for MOT. Eight (80%) of these oxygenators had clots accounting for less than 1% of total volume. Clots were mainly detectable at the apical corner of the oxygenator, most likely due to greater blood stasis. We found a significant increase in d-dimer and in membrane oxygenator shunt and a decrease in platelet count from the start to the discontinuation of ECMO. Hemostatic abnormalities significantly reverted 48 hours after oxygenator removal, suggesting the role of ECMO in activation of the coagulation cascade. Multidetector computed tomographic scan could not accurately confirm the clinical suspicion of MOT.

  16. A mutation in the first transmembrane domain of the lutropin receptor causes male precocious puberty.

    PubMed

    Gromoll, J; Partsch, C J; Simoni, M; Nordhoff, V; Sippell, W G; Nieschlag, E; Saxena, B B

    1998-02-01

    We describe a patient with onset of puberty at the age of 5 yr. characterized by accelerated growth, enlargement of genitalia, pubarche, and serum hormone levels compatible with noncentral precocious puberty. Exon 11 of the LH receptor gene was amplified from genomic DNA by PCR and directly sequenced. We identified a heterozygous C to T base change at nucleotide position 1126, exchanging codon 373 from Ala to Val in the first transmembrane domain. The LH receptor sequence of the parents was normal. The mutated receptor displayed an up to 7.5-fold increase in basal cAMP production compared to that of the wild-type receptor in transiently transfected COS-7 cells. Treatment of the patient with ketoconazole resulted in inconsistent suppression of serum testosterone levels. At the age of 9.1 yr, central activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis occurred. Additional treatment with a GnRH agonist led to complete suppression of testosterone secretion. This is the first description of constitutive activation of the LH receptor in the first transmembrane segment. It suggests the involvement of the first transmembrane helix in signal transduction and provides further insight into the structural organization of the seven transmembrane domains of the glycoprotein hormone receptor proteins.

  17. Variations in transmembrane Ca2+ gradient and apoptosis of macrophages induced by oxidized low density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Zhang, Y; Huang, Y; Yang, F

    2001-10-01

    While Ca2+ has been proposed to be a messenger in OxLDL-induced cell death, few studies have addressed the possibility that it may influence the occurrence of apoptosis and necrosis of macrophages induced by OxLDL in virtue of change of transmembrane Ca2+ gradient including that across plasma membrane and intracellular organelle membranes. In this paper, various lipophilic Ca2+ fluorescent indicators and specific organelle markers were used to study the relationship between the changes of the transmembrane Ca2+ gradients and the OxLDL induced apoptosis of macrophages. Our results showed that following exposure of low dose OxLDL to macrophages, the transmembrane Ca2+ gradient across the plasma membrane, as well as the membrane-proximal Ca2+ gradient, the transnuclear, and the transmitochondrial membrane Ca2+ gradient were all changed significantly. These data suggested that changes in transmembrane Ca2+ gradients might be involved in the apoptosis of macrophages induced by OxLDL.

  18. A quantitative model for using acridine orange as a transmembrane pH gradient probe.

    PubMed

    Clerc, S; Barenholz, Y

    1998-05-15

    Monitoring the acidification of the internal space of membrane vesicles by proton pumps can be achieved easily with optical probes. Transmembrane pH gradients cause a blue-shift in the absorbance spectrum and the quenching of the fluorescence of the cationic dye acridine orange. It has been postulated that these changes are caused by accumulation and aggregation of the dye inside the vesicles. We tested this hypothesis using liposomes with transmembrane concentration gradients of ammonium sulfate as model system. Fluorescence intensity of acridine orange solutions incubated with liposomes was affected by magnitude of the gradient, volume trapped by vesicles, and temperature. These experimental data were compared to a theoretical model describing the accumulation of acridine orange monomers in the vesicles according to the inside-to-outside ratio of proton concentrations, and the intravesicular formation of sandwich-like piles of acridine orange cations. This theoretical model predicted quantitatively the relationship between the transmembrane pH gradients and spectral changes of acridine orange. Therefore, adequate characterization of aggregation of dye in the lumen of biological vesicles provides the theoretical basis for using acridine orange as an optical probe to quantify transmembrane pH gradients.

  19. Theoretical analyses of cellular transmembrane voltage in suspensions induced by high-frequency fields.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yong; Wang, Changzhen; Peng, Ruiyun; Wang, Lifeng; Hu, Xiangjun

    2015-04-01

    A change of the transmembrane voltage is considered to cause biophysical and biochemical responses in cells. The present study focuses on the cellular transmembrane voltage (Δφ) induced by external fields. We detail analytical equations for the transmembrane voltage induced by external high-frequency (above the relaxation frequency of the cell membrane) fields on cells of a spherical shape in suspensions and layers. At direct current (DC) and low frequencies, the cell membrane was assumed to be non-conductive under physiologic conditions. However, with increasing frequency, the permittivity of the cytoplasm/extracellular medium and conductivity of the membrane must be accounted for. Our main work is to extend application of the analytical solution of Δφ to the high-frequency range. We first introduce the transmembrane voltage generated by DC and low-frequency exposures on a single cell. Then, we focus on cell suspensions exposed to high-frequency fields. Using the effective medium theory and the reasonable assumption, the approximate analytical solution of Δφ on cells in suspensions and layers can be derived. Phenomenological effective medium theory equations cannot be used to calculate the local electric field of cell suspensions, so we raised a possible solution based on the Bergman theory.

  20. Fine-tuning of voltage sensitivity of the Kv1.2 potassium channel by interhelix loop dynamics.

    PubMed

    Sand, Rheanna; Sharmin, Nazlee; Morgan, Carla; Gallin, Warren J

    2013-04-01

    Many proteins function by changing conformation in response to ligand binding or changes in other factors in their environment. Any change in the sequence of a protein, for example during evolution, which alters the relative free energies of the different functional conformations changes the conditions under which the protein will function. Voltage-gated ion channels are membrane proteins that open and close an ion-selective pore in response to changes in transmembrane voltage. The charged S4 transmembrane helix transduces changes in transmembrane voltage into a change in protein internal energy by interacting with the rest of the channel protein through a combination of non-covalent interactions between adjacent helices and covalent interactions along the peptide backbone. However, the structural basis for the wide variation in the V50 value between different voltage-gated potassium channels is not well defined. To test the role of the loop linking the S3 helix and the S4 helix in voltage sensitivity, we have constructed a set of mutants of the rat Kv1.2 channel that vary solely in the length and composition of the extracellular loop that connects S4 to S3. We evaluated the effect of these different loop substitutions on the voltage sensitivity of the channel and compared these experimental results with molecular dynamics simulations of the loop structures. Here, we show that this loop has a significant role in setting the precise V50 of activation in Kv1 family channels.

  1. Identification of cyclic nucleotide gated channels using regular expressions.

    PubMed

    Zelman, Alice K; Dawe, Adam; Berkowitz, Gerald A

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGCs) are nonselective cation channels found in plants, animals, and some bacteria. They have a six-transmembrane/one-pore structure, a cytosolic cyclic nucleotide-binding domain, and a cytosolic calmodulin-binding domain. Despite their functional similarities, the plant CNGC family members appear to have different conserved amino acid motifs within corresponding functional domains than animal and bacterial CNGCs do. Here we describe the development and application of methods employing plant CNGC-specific sequence motifs as diagnostic tools to identify novel candidate channels in different plants. These methods are used to evaluate the validity of annotations of putative orthologs of CNGCs from plant genomes. The methods detail how to employ regular expressions of conserved amino acids in functional domains of annotated CNGCs and together with Web tools such as PHI-BLAST and ScanProsite to identify novel candidate CNGCs in species including Physcomitrella patens.

  2. A functional Kv1.2-hERG chimaeric channel expressed in Pichia pastoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhillon, Mandeep S.; Cockcroft, Christopher J.; Munsey, Tim; Smith, Kathrine J.; Powell, Andrew J.; Carter, Paul; Wrighton, David C.; Rong, Hong-Lin; Yusaf, Shahnaz P.; Sivaprasadarao, Asipu

    2014-02-01

    Members of the six-transmembrane segment family of ion channels share a common structural design. However, there are sequence differences between the members that confer distinct biophysical properties on individual channels. Currently, we do not have 3D structures for all members of the family to help explain the molecular basis for the differences in their biophysical properties and pharmacology. This is due to low-level expression of many members in native or heterologous systems. One exception is rat Kv1.2 which has been overexpressed in Pichia pastoris and crystallised. Here, we tested chimaeras of rat Kv1.2 with the hERG channel for function in Xenopus oocytes and for overexpression in Pichia. Chimaera containing the S1-S6 transmembrane region of HERG showed functional and pharmacological properties similar to hERG and could be overexpressed and purified from Pichia. Our results demonstrate that rat Kv1.2 could serve as a surrogate to express difficult-to-overexpress members of the six-transmembrane segment channel family.

  3. Dependences of water permeation through cyclic octa-peptide nanotubes on channel length and membrane thickness.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Fan, Jianfen; Cen, Min; Song, Xuezeng; Liu, Dongyan; Zhou, Weiqun; Liu, Zhao; Yan, Jianfeng

    2012-08-27

    Effects of the channel length and membrane thickness on the water permeation through the transmembrane cyclic octa-peptide nanotubes (octa-PNTs) have been studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The water osmotic permeability (p(f)) through the PNTs of k × (WL)(4)/POPE (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-glycerophosphoethanolamine; k = 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10) was found to decay with the channel length (L) along the axis (~L(-2.0)). Energetic analysis showed that a series of water binding sites exist in these transmembrane PNTs, with the barriers of ~3k(B)T, which elucidates the tendency of p(f) well. Water diffusion permeability (p(d)) exhibits a relationship of ~L(-1.8), which results from the novel 1-2-1-2 structure of water chain in such confined nanolumens. In the range of simulation accuracy, the ratio (p(f)/p(d)) of the water osmotic and diffusion permeability is approximately a constant. MD simulations of water permeation through the transmembrane PNTs of 8 × (WL)(4)/octane with the different octane membrane thickness revealed that the water osmotic and diffusion permeability (p(f) and p(d)) are both independent of the octane membrane thickness, confirmed by the weak and nearly same interactions between the channel water and octane membranes with the different thickness. The results may be helpful for revealing the permeation mechanisms of biological water channels and designing artificial nanochannels. PMID:22834559

  4. Peptidoglycan-associated outer membrane protein Mep45 of rumen anaerobe Selenomonas ruminantium forms a non-specific diffusion pore via its C-terminal transmembrane domain

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Seiji; Hayashi, Kanako; Tochigi, Saeko; Kusano, Tomonobu; Kaneko, Jun; Kamio, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The major outer membrane protein Mep45 of Selenomonas ruminantium, an anaerobic Gram-negative bacterium, comprises two distinct domains: the N-terminal S-layer homologous (SLH) domain that protrudes into the periplasm and binds to peptidoglycan, and the remaining C-terminal transmembrane domain, whose function has been unknown. Here, we solubilized and purified Mep45 and characterized its function using proteoliposomes reconstituted with Mep45. We found that Mep45 forms a nonspecific diffusion channel via its C-terminal region. The channel was permeable to solutes smaller than a molecular weight of roughly 600, and the estimated pore radius was 0.58 nm. Truncation of the SLH domain did not affect the channel property. On the basis of the fact that Mep45 is the most abundant outer membrane protein in S. ruminantium, we conclude that Mep45 serves as a main pathway through which small solutes diffuse across the outer membrane of this bacterium. PMID:27310312

  5. Structural and Functional Characterization of the C-terminal Transmembrane Region of NBCe1-A*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Quansheng; Kao, Liyo; Azimov, Rustam; Abuladze, Natalia; Newman, Debra; Pushkin, Alexander; Liu, Weixin; Chang, Connie; Kurtz, Ira

    2010-01-01

    NBCe1-A and AE1 both belong to the SLC4 HCO3− transporter family. The two transporters share 40% sequence homology in the C-terminal transmembrane region. In this study, we performed extensive substituted cysteine-scanning mutagenesis analysis of the C-terminal region of NBCe1-A covering amino acids Ala800–Lys967. Location of the introduced cysteines was determined by whole cell labeling with a membrane-permeant biotin maleimide and a membrane-impermeant 2-((5(6)-tetramethylrhodamine)carboxylamino) ethyl methanethiosulfonate (MTS-TAMRA) cysteine-reactive reagent. The results show that the extracellular surface of the NBCe1-A C-terminal transmembrane region is minimally exposed to aqueous media with Met858 accessible to both biotin maleimide and TAMRA and Thr926–Ala929 only to TAMRA labeling. The intracellular surface contains a highly exposed (Met813–Gly828) region and a cryptic (Met887–Arg904) connecting loop. The lipid/aqueous interface of the last transmembrane segment is at Asp960. Our data clearly determined that the C terminus of NBCe1-A contains 5 transmembrane segments with greater average size compared with AE1. Functional assays revealed only two residues in the region of Pro868–Leu967 (a functionally important region in AE1) that are highly sensitive to cysteine substitution. Our findings suggest that the C-terminal transmembrane region of NBCe1-A is tightly folded with unique structural and functional features that differ from AE1. PMID:20837482

  6. Cloning and molecular characterization of a putative voltage-gated sodium channel gene in the crayfish.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Cagil; Purali, Nuhan

    2016-06-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channel genes and associated proteins have been cloned and studied in many mammalian and invertebrate species. However, there is no data available about the sodium channel gene(s) in the crayfish, although the animal has frequently been used as a model to investigate various aspects of neural cellular and circuit function. In the present work, by using RNA extracts from crayfish abdominal ganglia samples, the complete open reading frame of a putative sodium channel gene has firstly been cloned and molecular properties of the associated peptide have been analyzed. The open reading frame of the gene has a length of 5793 bp that encodes for the synthesis of a peptide, with 1930 amino acids, that is 82% similar to the α-peptide of a sodium channel in a neighboring species, Cancer borealis. The transmembrane topology analysis of the crayfish peptide indicated a pattern of four folding domains with several transmembrane segments, as observed in other known voltage-gated sodium channels. Upon analysis of the obtained sequence, functional regions of the putative sodium channel responsible for the selectivity filter, inactivation gate, voltage sensor, and phosphorylation have been predicted. The expression level of the putative sodium channel gene, as defined by a qPCR method, was measured and found to be the highest in nervous tissue. PMID:27032955

  7. Cytoplasmic Domains and Voltage-Dependent Potassium Channel Gating

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Francisco; Domínguez, Pedro; de la Peña, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    The basic architecture of the voltage-dependent K+ channels (Kv channels) corresponds to a transmembrane protein core in which the permeation pore, the voltage-sensing components and the gating machinery (cytoplasmic facing gate and sensor–gate coupler) reside. Usually, large protein tails are attached to this core, hanging toward the inside of the cell. These cytoplasmic regions are essential for normal channel function and, due to their accessibility to the cytoplasmic environment, constitute obvious targets for cell-physiological control of channel behavior. Here we review the present knowledge about the molecular organization of these intracellular channel regions and their role in both setting and controlling Kv voltage-dependent gating properties. This includes the influence that they exert on Kv rapid/N-type inactivation and on activation/deactivation gating of Shaker-like and eag-type Kv channels. Some illustrative examples about the relevance of these cytoplasmic domains determining the possibilities for modulation of Kv channel gating by cellular components are also considered. PMID:22470342

  8. Traveling ion channel density waves affected by a conservation law.

    PubMed

    Peter, Ronny; Zimmermann, Walter

    2006-07-01

    A model of mobile, charged ion channels embedded in a biomembrane is investigated. The ion channels fluctuate between an opened and a closed state according to a simple two-state reaction scheme whereas the total number of ion channels is a conserved quantity. Local transport mechanisms suggest that the ion channel densities are governed by electrodiffusionlike equations that have to be supplemented by a cable-type equation describing the dynamics of the transmembrane voltage. It is shown that the homogeneous distribution of ion channels may become unstable to either a stationary or an oscillatory instability. The nonlinear behavior immediately above threshold of an oscillatory bifurcation occurring at finite wave number is analyzed in terms of amplitude equations. Due to the conservation law imposed on ion channels, large-scale modes couple to the finite-wave-number instability and have thus to be included in the asymptotic analysis near the onset of pattern formation. A modified Ginzburg-Landau equation extended by long-wavelength stationary excitations is established, and it is highlighted how the global conservation law affects the stability of traveling ion channel density waves.

  9. Genomic organization of the human skeletal muscle sodium channel gene

    SciTech Connect

    George, A.L. Jr.; Iyer, G.S.; Kleinfield, R.; Kallen, R.G.; Barchi, R.L. )

    1993-03-01

    Voltage-dependent sodium channels are essential for normal membrane excitability and contractility in adult skeletal muscle. The gene encoding the principal sodium channel [alpha]-subunit isoform in human skeletal muscle (SCN4A) has recently been shown to harbor point mutations in certain hereditary forms of periodic paralysis. The authors have carried out an analysis of the detailed structure of this gene including delination of intron-exon boundaries by genomic DNA cloning and sequence analysis. The complete coding region of SCN4A is found in 32.5 kb of genomic DNA and consists of 24 exons (54 to >2.2 kb) and 23 introns (97 bp-4.85 kb). The exon organization of the gene shows no relationship to the predicted functional domains of the channel protein and splice junctions interrupt many of the transmembrane segments. The genomic organization of sodium channels may have been partially conserved during evolution as evidenced by the observation that 10 of the 24 splice junctions in SCN4A are positioned in homologous locations in a putative sodium channel gene in Drosophila (para). The information presented here should be extremely useful both for further identifying sodium channel mutations and for gaining a better understanding of sodium channel evolution. 39 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Thiol dependent intramolecular locking of Orai1 channels

    PubMed Central

    Alansary, Dalia; Schmidt, Barbara; Dörr, Kathrin; Bogeski, Ivan; Rieger, Heiko; Kless, Achim; Niemeyer, Barbara A.

    2016-01-01

    Store-operated Ca2+ entry mediated by STIM1-gated Orai1 channels is essential to activate immune cells and its inhibition or gain-of-function can lead to immune dysfunction and other pathologies. Reactive oxygen species interacting with cysteine residues can alter protein function. Pretreatment of the Ca2+ selective Orai1 with the oxidant H2O2 reduces ICRAC with C195, distant to the pore, being its major redox sensor. However, the mechanism of inhibition remained elusive. Here we combine experimental and theoretical approaches and show that oxidation of Orai1 leads to reduced subunit interaction, slows diffusion and that either oxidized C195 or its oxidomimetic mutation C195D located at the exit of transmembrane helix 3 virtually eliminates channel activation by intramolecular interaction with S239 of transmembrane helix 4, thereby locking the channel in a closed conformation. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanistic model for ROS-mediated inhibition of Orai1 and identify a candidate residue for pharmaceutical intervention. PMID:27624281

  11. Thiol dependent intramolecular locking of Orai1 channels.

    PubMed

    Alansary, Dalia; Schmidt, Barbara; Dörr, Kathrin; Bogeski, Ivan; Rieger, Heiko; Kless, Achim; Niemeyer, Barbara A

    2016-01-01

    Store-operated Ca(2+) entry mediated by STIM1-gated Orai1 channels is essential to activate immune cells and its inhibition or gain-of-function can lead to immune dysfunction and other pathologies. Reactive oxygen species interacting with cysteine residues can alter protein function. Pretreatment of the Ca(2+) selective Orai1 with the oxidant H2O2 reduces ICRAC with C195, distant to the pore, being its major redox sensor. However, the mechanism of inhibition remained elusive. Here we combine experimental and theoretical approaches and show that oxidation of Orai1 leads to reduced subunit interaction, slows diffusion and that either oxidized C195 or its oxidomimetic mutation C195D located at the exit of transmembrane helix 3 virtually eliminates channel activation by intramolecular interaction with S239 of transmembrane helix 4, thereby locking the channel in a closed conformation. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanistic model for ROS-mediated inhibition of Orai1 and identify a candidate residue for pharmaceutical intervention. PMID:27624281

  12. Targeting ion channels in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mall, Marcus A; Galietta, Luis J V

    2015-09-01

    Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene cause a characteristic defect in epithelial ion transport that plays a central role in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). Hence, pharmacological correction of this ion transport defect by targeting of mutant CFTR, or alternative ion channels that may compensate for CFTR dysfunction, has long been considered as an attractive approach to a causal therapy of this life-limiting disease. The recent introduction of the CFTR potentiator ivacaftor into the therapy of a subgroup of patients with specific CFTR mutations was a major milestone and enormous stimulus for seeking effective ion transport modulators for all patients with CF. In this review, we discuss recent breakthroughs and setbacks with CFTR modulators designed to rescue mutant CFTR including the common mutation F508del. Further, we examine the alternative chloride channels TMEM16A and SLC26A9, as well as the epithelial sodium channel ENaC as alternative targets in CF lung disease, which remains the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with CF. Finally, we will focus on the hurdles that still need to be overcome to make effective ion transport modulation therapies available for all patients with CF irrespective of their CFTR genotype.

  13. Conductance of Ion Channels - Theory vs. Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael; Mijajlovic, Milan

    2013-01-01

    Transmembrane ion channels mediate a number of essential physiological processes in a cell ranging from regulating osmotic pressure to transmission of neural signals. Kinetics and selectivity of ion transport is of critical importance to a cell and, not surprisingly, it is a subject of numerous experimental and theoretical studies. In this presentation we will analyze in detail computer simulations of two simple channels from fungi - antiamoebin and trichotoxin. Each of these channels is made of an alpha-helical bundle of small, nongenomically synthesized peptides containing a number of rare amino acids and exhibits strong antimicrobial activity. We will focus on calculating ionic conductance defined as the ratio of ionic current through the channel to applied voltage. From molecular dynamics simulations, conductance can be calculated in at least two ways, each involving different approximations. Specifically, the current, given as the number of charges transferred through the channel per unit of time, can be obtained from the number of events in which ions cross the channel during the simulation. This method works well for large currents (high conductance values and/or applied voltages). If the number of crossing events is small, reliable estimates of current are difficult to achieve. Alternatively, conductance can be estimated assuming that ion transport can be well approximated as diffusion in the external potential given by the free energy profile. Then, the current can be calculated by solving the one-dimensional diffusion equation in this external potential and applied voltage (the generalized Nernst-Planck equation). To do so three ingredients are needed: the free energy profile, the position-dependent diffusion coefficient and the diffusive flux of ions into the channel. All these quantities can be obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. An important advantage of this method is that it can be used equally well to estimating large and small currents

  14. Ion Channel Conductance Measurements on a Silicon-Based Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilk, S. J.; Aboud, S.; Petrossian, L.; Goryll, M.; Tang, J. M.; Eisenberg, R. S.; Saraniti, M.; Goodnick, S. M.; Thornton, T. J.

    2006-05-01

    Conductance measurements of the transmembrane porin protein OmpF as a function of pH and bath concentration have been made with both a microfabricated silicon substrate device and a commercially available polystyrene aperture. Ion transport through the channel was simulated in atomic detail: the measured current was compared with theoretically calculated current, using a Brownian Dynamics kernel coupled to the Poisson equation by a P3M force field. The explicit protein structure and fixed charge distribution in the protein are calculated using the molecular dynamics code, GROMACS. Reasonable agreement is obtained in the simulated versus measured conductance over the range of experimental concentrations studied.

  15. Lipid exposure prediction enhances the inference of rotational angles of transmembrane helices

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Since membrane protein structures are challenging to crystallize, computational approaches are essential for elucidating the sequence-to-structure relationships. Structural modeling of membrane proteins requires a multidimensional approach, and one critical geometric parameter is the rotational angle of transmembrane helices. Rotational angles of transmembrane helices are characterized by their folded structures and could be inferred by the hydrophobic moment; however, the folding mechanism of membrane proteins is not yet fully understood. The rotational angle of a transmembrane helix is related to the exposed surface of a transmembrane helix, since lipid exposure gives the degree of accessibility of each residue in lipid environment. To the best of our knowledge, there have been few advances in investigating whether an environment descriptor of lipid exposure could infer a geometric parameter of rotational angle. Results Here, we present an analysis of the relationship between rotational angles and lipid exposure and a support-vector-machine method, called TMexpo, for predicting both structural features from sequences. First, we observed from the development set of 89 protein chains that the lipid exposure, i.e., the relative accessible surface area (rASA) of residues in the lipid environment, generated from high-resolution protein structures could infer the rotational angles with a mean absolute angular error (MAAE) of 46.32˚. More importantly, the predicted rASA from TMexpo achieved an MAAE of 51.05˚, which is better than 71.47˚ obtained by the best of the compared hydrophobicity scales. Lastly, TMexpo outperformed the compared methods in rASA prediction on the independent test set of 21 protein chains and achieved an overall Matthew’s correlation coefficient, accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and precision of 0.51, 75.26%, 81.30%, 69.15%, and 72.73%, respectively. TMexpo is publicly available at http

  16. Homolog Structure of the SLAC1 Anion Channel for Closing Stomata in Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuhang; Hu, Lei; Punta, Marco; Bruni, Renato; Hillerich, Brandan; Kloss, Brian; Rost, Burkhard; Love, James; Siegelbaum, Steven A.; Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The plant SLAC1 anion channel controls turgor pressure in the aperture-defining guard cells of plant stomata, thereby regulating exchange of water vapor and photosynthetic gases in response to environmental signals such as drought or high levels of carbon dioxide. We determined the crystal structure of a bacterial homolog of SLAC1 at 1.20Å resolution, and we have used structure-inspired mutagenesis to analyze the conductance properties of SLAC1 channels. SLAC1 is a symmetric trimer composed from quasi-symmetric subunits, each having ten transmembrane helices arranged from helical hairpin pairs to form a central five-helix transmembrane pore that is gated by an extremely conserved phenylalanine residue. Conformational features suggest a mechanism for control of gating by kinase activation, and electrostatic features of the pore coupled with electrophysiological characteristics suggest that selectivity among different anions is largely a function of the energetic cost of ion dehydration. PMID:20981093

  17. Homologue Structure of the SLAC1 Anion Channel for Closing Stomata in Leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Y Chen; L Hu; M Punta; R Bruni; B Hillerich; B Kloss; B Rost; J Love; S Siegelbaum; W Hendrickson

    2011-12-31

    The plant SLAC1 anion channel controls turgor pressure in the aperture-defining guard cells of plant stomata, thereby regulating the exchange of water vapour and photosynthetic gases in response to environmental signals such as drought or high levels of carbon dioxide. Here we determine the crystal structure of a bacterial homologue (Haemophilus influenzae) of SLAC1 at 1.20 {angstrom} resolution, and use structure-inspired mutagenesis to analyse the conductance properties of SLAC1 channels. SLAC1 is a symmetrical trimer composed from quasi-symmetrical subunits, each having ten transmembrane helices arranged from helical hairpin pairs to form a central five-helix transmembrane pore that is gated by an extremely conserved phenylalanine residue. Conformational features indicate a mechanism for control of gating by kinase activation, and electrostatic features of the pore coupled with electrophysiological characteristics indicate that selectivity among different anions is largely a function of the energetic cost of ion dehydration.

  18. K₂p channels in plants and animals.

    PubMed

    González, Wendy; Valdebenito, Braulio; Caballero, Julio; Riadi, Gonzalo; Riedelsberger, Janin; Martínez, Gonzalo; Ramírez, David; Zúñiga, Leandro; Sepúlveda, Francisco V; Dreyer, Ingo; Janta, Michael; Becker, Dirk

    2015-05-01

    Two-pore domain potassium (K2P) channels are membrane proteins widely identified in mammals, plants, and other organisms. A functional channel is a dimer with each subunit comprising two pore-forming loops and four transmembrane domains. The genome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana harbors five genes coding for K2P channels. Homologs of Arabidopsis K2P channels have been found in all higher plants sequenced so far. As with the K2P channels in mammals, plant K2P channels are targets of external and internal stimuli, which fine-tune the electrical properties of the membrane for specialized transport and/or signaling tasks. Plant K2P channels are modulated by signaling molecules such as intracellular H(+) and calcium and physical factors like temperature and pressure. In this review, we ask the following: What are the similarities and differences between K2P channels in plants and animals in terms of their physiology? What is the nature of the last common ancestor (LCA) of these two groups of proteins? To answer these questions, we present physiological, structural, and phylogenetic evidence that discards the hypothesis proposing that the duplication and fusion that gave rise to the K2P channels occurred in a prokaryote LCA. Conversely, we argue that the K2P LCA was most likely a eukaryote organism. Consideration of plant and animal K2P channels in the same study is novel and likely to stimulate further exchange of ideas between students of these fields. PMID:25369776

  19. TRPC4- and TRPC4-containing channels.

    PubMed

    Freichel, Marc; Tsvilovskyy, Volodymyr; Camacho-Londoño, Juan E

    2014-01-01

    TRPC4 proteins comprise six transmembrane domains, a putative pore-forming region, and an intracellularly located amino- and carboxy-terminus. Among eleven splice variants identified so far, TRPC4α and TRPC4β are the most abundantly expressed and functionally characterized. TRPC4 is expressed in various organs and cell types including the soma and dendrites of numerous types of neurons; the cardiovascular system including endothelial, smooth muscle, and cardiac cells; myometrial and skeletal muscle cells; kidney; and immune cells such as mast cells. Both recombinant and native TRPC4-containing channels differ tremendously in their permeability and other biophysical properties, pharmacological modulation, and mode of activation depending on the cellular environment. They vary from inwardly rectifying store-operated channels with a high Ca(2+) selectivity to non-store-operated channels predominantly carrying Na(+) and activated by Gαq- and/or Gαi-coupled receptors with a complex U-shaped current-voltage relationship. Thus, individual TRPC4-containing channels contribute to agonist-induced Ca(2+) entry directly or indirectly via depolarization and activation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. The differences in channel properties may arise from variations in the composition of the channel complexes, in the specific regulatory pathways in the corresponding cell system, and/or in the expression pattern of interaction partners which comprise other TRPC proteins to form heteromultimeric channels. Additional interaction partners of TRPC4 that can mediate the activity of TRPC4-containing channels include (1) scaffolding proteins (e.g., NHERF) that may mediate interactions with signaling molecules in or in close vicinity to the plasma membrane such as Gα proteins or phospholipase C and with the cytoskeleton, (2) proteins in specific membrane microdomains (e.g., caveolin-1), or (3) proteins on cellular organelles (e.g., Stim1). The diversity of TRPC4-containing channels

  20. Combined approaches of EPR and NMR illustrate only one transmembrane helix in the human IFITM3

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Shenglong; Zhang, Chengwei; Wang, Wei; Cai, Xiaoying; Yu, Lu; Wu, Fangming; Zhang, Longhua; Tian, Changlin

    2016-01-01

    Interferon-inducible transmembrane protein IFITM3 was known to restrict the entry of a wide spectrum of viruses to the cytosol of the host. The mechanism used by the protein to restrict viral entry is unclear given the unavailability of the membrane topology and structures of the IFITM family proteins. Systematic site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies of IFITM3 in detergent micelles identified a single, long transmembrane helix in the C-terminus and an intramembrane segment in the N-terminal hydrophobic region. Solution NMR studies of the same sample verified the secondary structure distribution and demonstrated two rigid regions interacting with the micellar surface. The resulting membrane topology of IFITM3 supports the mechanism of an enhanced restricted membrane hemi-fusion. PMID:27046158

  1. Transmembrane pH gradients in vivo: measurements using fluorinated vitamin B6 derivatives.

    PubMed

    Mason, R P

    1999-06-01

    It is well recognized that pH plays a significant regulatory role in most cellular processes. Increasingly, there is interest in transmembrane pH gradients, particularly with respect to tumor growth and response to therapy. NMR offers a non-invasive approach to monitoring cellular pH and detecting changes in response to interventions. This review will consider the strengths of various approaches to measuring pH with particular focus on the reporter molecules designed to interrogate the cellular milieu. In particular, fluorinated vitamin B6 derivatives (6-fluoropyridoxol and 6-fluoropyridoxamine) will be described, which for the first time provide a practical non-destructive method to measure simultaneously intra- and extracellular pH, i.e., the transmembrane pH gradient in animals in vivo based on a single reporter molecule.

  2. Cancer Research Advance in CKLF-like MARVEL Transmembrane Domain Containing Member Family (Review).

    PubMed

    Lu, Jia; Wu, Qian-Qian; Zhou, Ya-Bo; Zhang, Kai-Hua; Pang, Bing-Xin; Li, Liang; Sun, Nan; Wang, Heng-Shu; Zhang, Song; Li, Wen-Jian; Zheng, Wei; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    CKLF-like MARVEL transmembrane domain-containing family (CMTM) is a novel family of genes first reported at international level by Peking University Human Disease Gene Research Center. The gene products are between chemokines and the transmembrane-4 superfamily. Loaceted in several human chromosomes, CMTMs, which are unregulated in kinds of tumors, are potential tumor suppressor genes consisting of CKLF and CMTM1 to CMTM8. CMTMs play important roles in immune, male reproductive and hematopoietic systems. Also, it has been approved that CMTM family has strong connection with diseases of autoimmunity, haematopoietic system and haematopoietic system. The in-depth study in recent years found the close relation between CMTMs and umorigenesis, tumor development and metastasis. CMTM family has a significant clinical value in diagnosis and treatment to the diseases linking to tumor and immune system. PMID:27356683

  3. Transmembrane myosin chitin synthase involved in mollusc shell formation produced in Dictyostelium is active.

    PubMed

    Schönitzer, Veronika; Eichner, Norbert; Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke; Weiss, Ingrid M

    2011-12-01

    Several mollusc shells contain chitin, which is formed by a transmembrane myosin motor enzyme. This protein could be involved in sensing mechanical and structural changes of the forming, mineralizing extracellular matrix. Here we report the heterologous expression of the transmembrane myosin chitin synthase Ar-CS1 of the bivalve mollusc Atrina rigida (2286 amino acid residues, M.W. 264 kDa/monomer) in Dictyostelium discoideum, a model organism for myosin motor proteins. Confocal laser scanning immunofluorescence microscopy (CLSM), chitin binding GFP detection of chitin on cells and released to the cell culture medium, and a radiochemical activity assay of membrane extracts revealed expression and enzymatic activity of the mollusc chitin synthase in transgenic slime mold cells. First high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of Ar-CS1 transformed cellulose synthase deficient D. discoideumdcsA(-) cell lines are shown.

  4. First principles design of a core bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer protein.

    PubMed

    Goparaju, Geetha; Fry, Bryan A; Chobot, Sarah E; Wiedman, Gregory; Moser, Christopher C; Dutton, P Leslie; Discher, Bohdana M

    2016-05-01

    Here we describe the design, Escherichia coli expression and characterization of a simplified, adaptable and functionally transparent single chain 4-α-helix transmembrane protein frame that binds multiple heme and light activatable porphyrins. Such man-made cofactor-binding oxidoreductases, designed from first principles with minimal reference to natural protein sequences, are known as maquettes. This design is an adaptable frame aiming to uncover core engineering principles governing bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer function and recapitulate protein archetypes proposed to represent the origins of photosynthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson.

  5. Fluorophores, environments and quantification techniques in the analysis of transmembrane helix interaction using FRET

    PubMed Central

    Khadria, Ambalika S.; Senes, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    FRET has been widely used as a spectroscopic tool in vitro to study the interactions between transmembrane helices in detergent and lipid environments. This technique has been instrumental to many studies that have greatly contributed to quantitative understanding of the physical principles that govern helix-helix interaction in the membrane. These studies have also improved our understanding of the biological role of oligomerization in membrane proteins. In this review, we focus on the combinations of fluorophores used, the membrane mimetic environments and measurement techniques that have been applied to study model systems as well as biological oligomeric complexes in vitro. We highlight the different formalisms used to calculate FRET efficiency, and the challenges associated with accurate quantification. The goal is to provide the reader with a comparative summary of the relevant literature for planning and designing FRET experiments aimed at measuring transmembrane helix-helix association. PMID:25968159

  6. First principles design of a core bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer protein.

    PubMed

    Goparaju, Geetha; Fry, Bryan A; Chobot, Sarah E; Wiedman, Gregory; Moser, Christopher C; Dutton, P Leslie; Discher, Bohdana M

    2016-05-01

    Here we describe the design, Escherichia coli expression and characterization of a simplified, adaptable and functionally transparent single chain 4-α-helix transmembrane protein frame that binds multiple heme and light activatable porphyrins. Such man-made cofactor-binding oxidoreductases, designed from first principles with minimal reference to natural protein sequences, are known as maquettes. This design is an adaptable frame aiming to uncover core engineering principles governing bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer function and recapitulate protein archetypes proposed to represent the origins of photosynthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. PMID:26672896

  7. Equalization in redundant channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulpule, Bhalchandra R. (Inventor); Collins, Robert E. (Inventor); Cominelli, Donald F. (Inventor); O'Neill, Richard D. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A miscomparison between a channel's configuration data base and a voted system configuration data base in a redundant channel system having identically operating, frame synchronous channels triggers autoequalization of the channel's historical signal data bases in a hierarchical, chronological manner with that of a correctly operating channel. After equalization, symmetrization of the channel's configuration data base with that of the system permits upgrading of the previously degraded channel to full redundancy. An externally provided equalization command, e.g., manually actuated, can also trigger equalization.

  8. The voltage-gated proton channel: a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    The main properties of voltage gated proton channels are described, along with what is known about how the channel protein structure accomplishes these functions. Just as protons are unique among ions, proton channels are unique among ion channels. Their four transmembrane helices sense voltage, the pH gradient, and conduct protons exclusively. Selectivity is achieved by the unique ability of H3O+ to protonate an Asp-Arg salt bridge. Pathognomonic sensitivity of gating to the pH gradient ensures channel opening only when acid extrusion will result, which is crucial to most biological functions. An exception occurs in dinoflagellates in which H+ influx through HV1 triggers the bioluminescent flash. Pharmacological interventions that promise to ameliorate cancer, asthma, brain damage in ischemic stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, autoimmune diseases, and numerous other conditions, await future progress. PMID:25964989

  9. Free RCK arrangement in Kch, a putative escherichia coli potassium channel, as suggested by electron crystallography.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Qie; Purhonen, Pasi; Jegerschöld, Caroline; Koeck, Philip J B; Hebert, Hans

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-gated potassium channels are stimulated by various kinds of messengers. Previous studies showed that ligand-gated potassium channels containing RCK domains (the regulator of the conductance of potassium ion) form a dimer of tetramer structure through the RCK octameric gating ring in the presence of detergent. Here, we have analyzed the structure of Kch, a channel of this type from Escherichia coli, in a lipid environment using electron crystallography. By combining information from the 3D map of the transmembrane part of the protein and docking of an atomic model of a potassium channel, we conclude that the RCK domains face the solution and that an RCK octameric gating ring arrangement does not form under our crystallization condition. Our findings may be applied to other potassium channels that have an RCK gating ring arrangement.

  10. Coupling of CFTR Cl- channel gating to an ATP hydrolysis cycle.

    PubMed

    Baukrowitz, T; Hwang, T C; Nairn, A C; Gadsby, D C

    1994-03-01

    For cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channels to open, they must be phosphorylated by protein kinase A and then exposed to a hydrolyzable nucleoside triphosphate, such as ATP. To test whether channel opening is linked to ATP hydrolysis, we applied VO4 and BeF3 to CFTR channels in inside-out patches excised from cardiac myocytes. These inorganic phosphate analogs interrupt ATP hydrolysis cycles by binding tightly in place of the released hydrolysis product, inorganic phosphate. The analogs acted only on CFTR channels opened by ATP and locked them open, increasing their mean open time by 2-3 orders of magnitude. These findings establish that opening and closing of CFTR channels are coupled to an ATP hydrolysis cycle.

  11. Mechanistic signs of double-barreled structure in a fluoride ion channel.

    PubMed

    Last, Nicholas B; Kolmakova-Partensky, Ludmila; Shane, Tania; Miller, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The Fluc family of F(-) ion channels protects prokaryotes and lower eukaryotes from the toxicity of environmental F(-). In bacteria, these channels are built as dual-topology dimers whereby the two subunits assemble in antiparallel transmembrane orientation. Recent crystal structures suggested that Fluc channels contain two separate ion-conduction pathways, each with two F(-) binding sites, but no functional correlates of this unusual architecture have been reported. Experiments here fill this gap by examining the consequences of mutating two conserved F(-)-coordinating phenylalanine residues. Substitution of each phenylalanine specifically extinguishes its associated F(-) binding site in crystal structures and concomitantly inhibits F(-) permeation. Functional analysis of concatemeric channels, which permit mutagenic manipulation of individual pores, show that each pore can be separately inactivated without blocking F(-) conduction through its symmetry-related twin. The results strongly support dual-pathway architecture of Fluc channels. PMID:27449280

  12. Transmembrane potential induced in a spherical cell model under low-frequency magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hui; Cotic, Marija; Carlen, Peter L.

    2007-09-01

    Time-varying magnetic fields can induce electric fields in the neuronal tissue, a phenomenon that has been recently explored in clinical applications such as peripheral nerve stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation. Although the transmembrane potential induced during direct electric stimulation has already been the subject of a number of theoretical studies, an analytical solution for the magnetically induced transmembrane potential change is still unavailable. In addition, although several studies have analyzed the impact of stimulation parameters, including stimulation intensity and frequency, as well as coil design and position, on the amount of tissue polarization, the effects of tissue non-homogeneity on cell polarization have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we have derived an analytical expression for the transmembrane potential induced by a low-frequency magnetic field in a spherical neuronal structure. This model is representative of a spherical cell body or any neuronal structure of a similar shape. The model cell is located in an extracellular medium and possesses a low-conductive membrane and an internal cytoplasm. These three regions represent the basic tissue non-homogeneity of a neuron at a microscopic level. The sensitivity of the induced transmembrane potential to the coil position and to the geometrical and electrical parameters of the model structure was studied in a broad physiologically relevant range. Our results demonstrate that the structure is regionally polarized, with the pattern of polarization depending on the relative positioning between the model cell and the stimulation coil. In addition, both the geometrical and electrical parameters of the structure affect the amount of polarization. These results may be generalized to other neuronal tissues that possess similar non-homogenous properties, but different shapes, such as an axon. Our results support the idea that aside from coil design and position, tissue non

  13. Transmembrane signaling and assembly of the cytochrome b6f-lipidic charge transfer complex.

    PubMed

    Saif Hasan, S; Yamashita, Eiki; Cramer, William A

    2013-01-01

    Structure-function properties of the cytochrome b6f complex are sufficiently unique compared to those of the cytochrome bc1 complex that b6f should not be considered a trivially modified bc1 complex. A unique property of the dimeric b6f complex is its involvement in transmembrane signaling associated with the p-side oxidation of plastoquinol. Structure analysis of lipid binding sites in the cyanobacterial b6f complex prepared by hydrophobic chromatography shows that the space occupied by the H transmembrane helix in the cytochrome b subunit of the bc1 complex is mostly filled by a lipid in the b6f crystal structure. It is suggested that this space can be filled by the domain of a transmembrane signaling protein. The identification of lipid sites and likely function defines the intra-membrane conserved central core of the b6f complex, consisting of the seven trans-membrane helices of the cytochrome b and subunit IV polypeptides. The other six TM helices, contributed by cytochrome f, the iron-sulfur protein, and the four peripheral single span subunits, define a peripheral less conserved domain of the complex. The distribution of conserved and non-conserved domains of each monomer of the complex, and the position and inferred function of a number of the lipids, suggests a model for the sequential assembly in the membrane of the eight subunits of the b6f complex, in which the assembly is initiated by formation of the cytochrome b6-subunit IV core sub-complex in a monomer unit. Two conformations of the unique lipidic chlorophyll a, defined in crystal structures, are described, and functions of the outlying β-carotene, a possible 'latch' in supercomplex formation, are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Respiratory complex III and related bc complexes. PMID:23507619

  14. tincar encodes a novel transmembrane protein expressed in the Tinman-expressing cardioblasts of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Yuki; Sawamoto, Kazunobu; Okano, Hideyuki

    2002-12-01

    We cloned and characterized the Drosophila gene, tincar (tinc), which encodes a novel protein with eight putative transmembrane domains. The tinc mRNA was expressed specifically in four of the six pairs of cardioblasts in each segment, in a pattern identical to that of tinman (tin), a homeobox gene required for the specification of the dorsal vessel. In the non-Tin-expressing pairs of cardioblasts, tinc transcription seemed to be repressed by Seven-up. PMID:14516698

  15. tincar encodes a novel transmembrane protein expressed in the Tinman-expressing cardioblasts of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Yuki; Sawamoto, Kazunobu; Okano, Hideyuki

    2002-12-01

    We cloned and characterized the Drosophila gene, tincar (tinc), which encodes a novel protein with eight putative transmembrane domains. The tinc mRNA was expressed specifically in four of the six pairs of cardioblasts in each segment, in a pattern identical to that of tinman (tin), a homeobox gene required for the specification of the dorsal vessel. In the non-Tin-expressing pairs of cardioblasts, tinc transcription seemed to be repressed by Seven-up. PMID:12617821

  16. Development of a Proteoliposome Model to Probe Transmembrane Electron-Transfer Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    White, Gaye F.; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; Dohnalkova, Alice; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    The mineral respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis uses a protein complex, MtrCAB, composed of two decaheme cytochromes brought together inside a transmembrane porin to transport electrons across the outer membrane to a variety of mineral-based electron acceptors. A proteoliposome system has been developed that contains methyl viologen (MV) as an internalised electron acceptor and valinomycin (V) as a membrane associated cation exchanger. These proteoliposomes can be used as a model system to investigate MtrCAB function.

  17. Transmembrane signaling and assembly of the cytochrome b6f-lipidic charge transfer complex.

    PubMed

    Saif Hasan, S; Yamashita, Eiki; Cramer, William A

    2013-01-01

    Structure-function properties of the cytochrome b6f complex are sufficiently unique compared to those of the cytochrome bc1 complex that b6f should not be considered a trivially modified bc1 complex. A unique property of the dimeric b6f complex is its involvement in transmembrane signaling associated with the p-side oxidation of plastoquinol. Structure analysis of lipid binding sites in the cyanobacterial b6f complex prepared by hydrophobic chromatography shows that the space occupied by the H transmembrane helix in the cytochrome b subunit of the bc1 complex is mostly filled by a lipid in the b6f crystal structure. It is suggested that this space can be filled by the domain of a transmembrane signaling protein. The identification of lipid sites and likely function defines the intra-membrane conserved central core of the b6f complex, consisting of the seven trans-membrane helices of the cytochrome b and subunit IV polypeptides. The other six TM helices, contributed by cytochrome f, the iron-sulfur protein, and the four peripheral single span subunits, define a peripheral less conserved domain of the complex. The distribution of conserved and non-conserved domains of each monomer of the complex, and the position and inferred function of a number of the lipids, suggests a model for the sequential assembly in the membrane of the eight subunits of the b6f complex, in which the assembly is initiated by formation of the cytochrome b6-subunit IV core sub-complex in a monomer unit. Two conformations of the unique lipidic chlorophyll a, defined in crystal structures, are described, and functions of the outlying β-carotene, a possible 'latch' in supercomplex formation, are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Respiratory complex III and related bc complexes.

  18. Combined effect of cortical cytoskeleton and transmembrane proteins on domain formation in biomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Sikder, Md. Kabir Uddin; Stone, Kyle A.; Kumar, P. B. Sunil; Laradji, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the combined effects of transmembrane proteins and the subjacent cytoskeleton on the dynamics of phase separation in multicomponent lipid bilayers using computer simulations of a particle-based implicit solvent model for lipid membranes with soft-core interactions. We find that microphase separation can be achieved by the protein confinement by the cytoskeleton. Our results have relevance to the finite size of lipid rafts in the plasma membrane of mammalian cells. PMID:25106608

  19. Mapping the Homodimer Interface of an Optimized, Artificial, Transmembrane Protein Activator of the Human Erythropoietin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bears, Zachary; Barrera, Francisco N.; Alonso, Miriam; Engelman, Donald M.; DiMaio, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Transmembrane proteins constitute a large fraction of cellular proteins, and specific interactions involving membrane-spanning protein segments play an important role in protein oligomerization, folding, and function. We previously isolated an artificial, dimeric, 44-amino acid transmembrane protein that activates the human erythropoietin receptor (hEPOR) in trans. This artificial protein supports limited erythroid differentiation of primary human hematopoietic progenitor cells in vitro, even though it does not resemble erythropoietin, the natural ligand of this receptor. Here, we used a directed-evolution approach to explore the structural basis for the ability of transmembrane proteins to activate the hEPOR. A library that expresses thousands of mutants of the transmembrane activator was screened for variants that were more active than the original isolate at inducing growth factor independence in mouse cells expressing the hEPOR. The most active mutant, EBC5-16, supports erythroid differentiation in human cells with activity approaching that of EPO, as assessed by cell-surface expression of glycophorin A, a late-stage marker of erythroid differentiation. EBC5-16 contains a single isoleucine to serine substitution at position 25, which increases its ability to form dimers. Genetic studies confirmed the importance of dimerization for activity and identified the residues constituting the homodimer interface of EBC5-16. The interface requires a GxxxG dimer packing motif and a small amino acid at position 25 for maximal activity, implying that tight packing of the EBC5-16 dimer is a crucial determinant of activity. These experiments identified an artificial protein that causes robust activation of its target in a natural host cell, demonstrated the importance of dimerization of this protein for engagement of the hEPOR, and provided the framework for future structure-function studies of this novel mechanism of receptor activation. PMID:24788775

  20. Combined effect of cortical cytoskeleton and transmembrane proteins on domain formation in biomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikder, Md. Kabir Uddin; Stone, Kyle A.; Kumar, P. B. Sunil; Laradji, Mohamed

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the combined effects of transmembrane proteins and the subjacent cytoskeleton on the dynamics of phase separation in multicomponent lipid bilayers using computer simulations of a particle-based implicit solvent model for lipid membranes with soft-core interactions. We find that microphase separation can be achieved by the protein confinement by the cytoskeleton. Our results have relevance to the finite size of lipid rafts in the plasma membrane of mammalian cells.

  1. Collective Diffusion Model for Ion Conduction through Microscopic Channels

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingting; Zhu, Fangqiang

    2013-01-01

    Ion conduction through microscopic channels is of central importance in both biology and nanotechnology. To better understand the current-voltage (I-V) dependence of ion channels, here we describe and prove a collective diffusion model that quantitatively relates the spontaneous ion permeation at equilibrium to the stationary ionic fluxes driven by small voltages. The model makes it possible to determine the channel conductance in the linear I-V range from equilibrium simulations without the application of a voltage. To validate the theory, we perform molecular-dynamics simulations on two channels—a conical-shaped nanopore and the transmembrane pore of an α-hemolysin—under both equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions. The simulations reveal substantial couplings between the motions of cations and anions, which are effectively captured by the collective coordinate in the model. Although the two channels exhibit very different linear ranges in the I-V curves, in both cases the channel conductance at small voltages is in reasonable agreement with the prediction from the equilibrium simulation. The simulations also suggest that channel charges, rather than geometric asymmetry, play a more prominent role in current rectification. PMID:23442858

  2. Channel nut tool

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Marvin

    2016-01-12

    A method, system, and apparatus for installing channel nuts includes a shank, a handle formed on a first end of a shank, and an end piece with a threaded shaft configured to receive a channel nut formed on the second end of the shaft. The tool can be used to insert or remove a channel nut in a channel framing system and then removed from the channel nut.

  3. Age of Martian channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, M. C.

    1976-01-01

    The ages of large Martian channels have been studied by determining the relative abundances of craters superimposed on channels and adjacent terrains and by examining superposition relationships between channels and plains and mantle materials. The channels are extremely old, are spatially confined and temporally related to the ancient cratered terrain, and in many cases are related to the as yet poorly understood genetic processes of fretting and chaos formation. No evidence is found for recent channel activity.

  4. Functional Expression of T-Type Ca2+ Channels in Spinal Motoneurons of the Adult Turtle

    PubMed Central

    Canto-Bustos, Martha; Loeza-Alcocer, Emanuel; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Gandini, María A.; Delgado-Lezama, Rodolfo; Felix, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV) channels are transmembrane proteins comprising three subfamilies named CaV1, CaV2 and CaV3. The CaV3 channel subfamily groups the low-voltage activated Ca2+ channels (LVA or T-type) a significant role in regulating neuronal excitability. CaV3 channel activity may lead to the generation of complex patterns of action potential firing such as the postinhibitory rebound (PIR). In the adult spinal cord, these channels have been found in dorsal horn interneurons where they control physiological events near the resting potential and participate in determining excitability. In motoneurons, CaV3 channels have been found during development, but their functional expression has not yet been reported in adult animals. Here, we show evidence for the presence of CaV3 channel-mediated PIR in motoneurons of the adult turtle spinal cord. Our results indicate that Ni2+ and NNC55-0396, two antagonists of CaV3 channel activity, inhibited PIR in the adult turtle spinal cord. Molecular biology and biochemical assays revealed the expression of the CaV3.1 channel isotype and its localization in motoneurons. Together, these results provide evidence for the expression of CaV3.1 channels in the spinal cord of adult animals and show also that these channels may contribute to determine the excitability of motoneurons. PMID:25255145

  5. Involvement of potassium channels in the progression of cancer to a more malignant phenotype.

    PubMed

    Comes, Nuria; Serrano-Albarrás, Antonio; Capera, Jesusa; Serrano-Novillo, Clara; Condom, Enric; Ramón Y Cajal, Santiago; Ferreres, Joan Carles; Felipe, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Potassium channels are a diverse group of pore-forming transmembrane proteins that selectively facilitate potassium flow through an electrochemical gradient. They participate in the control of the membrane potential and cell excitability in addition to different cell functions such as cell volume regulation, proliferation, cell migration, angiogenesis as well as apoptosis. Because these physiological processes are essential for the correct cell function, K+ channels have been associated with a growing number of diseases including cancer. In fact, different K+ channel families such as the voltage-gated K+ channels, the ether à-go-go K+ channels, the two pore domain K+ channels and the Ca2+-activated K+ channels have been associated to tumor biology. Potassium channels have a role in neoplastic cell-cycle progression and their expression has been found abnormal in many types of tumors and cancer cells. In addition, the expression and activity of specific K+ channels have shown a significant correlation with the tumor malignancy grade. The aim of this overview is to summarize published data on K+ channels that exhibit oncogenic properties and have been linked to a more malignant cancer phenotype. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers.

  6. Structural role of the conserved cysteines in the dimerization of the viral transmembrane oncoprotein E5.

    PubMed

    Windisch, Dirk; Hoffmann, Silke; Afonin, Sergii; Vollmer, Stefanie; Benamira, Soraya; Langer, Birgid; Bürck, Jochen; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Ulrich, Anne S

    2010-09-22

    The E5 oncoprotein is the major transforming protein of bovine papillomavirus type 1. This 44-residue transmembrane protein can interact with the platelet-derived growth factor receptor β, leading to ligand-independent activation and cell transformation. For productive interaction, E5 needs to dimerize via a C-terminal pair of cysteines, though a recent study suggested that its truncated transmembrane segment can dimerize on its own. To analyze the structure of the full protein in a membrane environment and elucidate the role of the Cys-Ser-Cys motif, we produced recombinantly the wild-type protein and four cysteine mutants. Comparison by circular dichroism in detergent micelles and lipid vesicular dispersion and by NMR in trifluoroethanol demonstrates that the absence of one or both cysteines does not influence the highly α-helical secondary structure, nor does it impair the ability of E5 to dimerize, observations that are further supported by sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We also observed assemblies of higher order. Oriented circular dichroism in lipid bilayers shows that E5 is aligned as a transmembrane helix with a slight tilt angle, and that this membrane alignment is also independent of any cysteines. We conclude that the Cys-containing motif represents a disordered region of the protein that serves as an extra covalent connection for stabilization.

  7. Light induced transmembrane proton gradient in artificial lipid vesicles reconstituted with photosynthetic reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Milano, Francesco; Trotta, Massimo; Dorogi, Márta; Fischer, Béla; Giotta, Livia; Agostiano, Angela; Maróti, Péter; Kálmán, László; Nagy, László

    2012-06-01

    Photosynthetic reaction center (RC) is the minimal nanoscopic photoconverter in the photosynthetic membrane that catalyzes the conversion of solar light to energy readily usable for the metabolism of the living organisms. After electronic excitation the energy of light is converted into chemical potential by the generation of a charge separated state accompanied by intraprotein and ultimately transmembrane proton movements. We designed a system which fulfills the minimum structural and functional requirements to investigate the physico/chemical conditions of the processes: RCs were reconstituted in closed lipid vesicles made of selected lipids entrapping a pH sensitive indicator, and electron donors (cytochrome c₂ and K₄[Fe(CN)₆]) and acceptors (decylubiquinone) were added to sustain the photocycle. Thanks to the low proton permeability of our preparations, we could show the formation of a transmembrane proton gradient under illumination and low buffering conditions directly by measuring proton-related signals simultaneously inside and outside the vesicles. The effect of selected ionophores such as gramicidin, nigericin and valinomycin was used to gain more information on the transmembrane proton gradient driven by the RC photochemistry.

  8. Factors influencing the trans-membrane transport of n-octadecane by Pseudomonas sp. DG17

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Fei; Wang, Hong Qi; Zhao, Yi Cun

    2014-01-01

    In soil bioremediation techniques, the trans-membrane transport of hydrocarbons across the cell membrane is a new and complex point of understanding the process of hydrocarbons biodegradation. In this study, the effect of different environmental factors, including substrate concentration, bacterial inoculums, pH, salinity, substrate analogues and nutrients, on the transport of [14C]n-octadecane by Pseudomonas sp. DG17 was investigated. The results showed that cellular [14C]n-octadecane levels increased along with the increase in the substrate concentration. However, the trans-membrane transport of [14C]n-octadecane was a saturable process in the case of equal amounts of inoculum (biomass). The highest concentration of accumulated [14C]n-octadecane was 0.51 μmol mg−1 ± 0.028 μmol mg−1 after incubation for 20 min. Meanwhile, the cellular n-octadecane concentration decreased along with the biomass increase, and reached a stable level. Acidic/alkaline conditions, high salinity, and supplement of substrate analogues could inhibit the transport of [14C]n-octadecane by Pseudomonas sp. DG17, whereas nitrogen or phosphorus deficiency did not influence this transport. The results suggested that trans-membrane transport of octadecane depends on both the substrate concentration and the microorganism biomass, and extreme environmental conditions could influence the biodegradation ability of microorganisms through inhibiting the transport of extracellular octadecane. PMID:26740764

  9. Structure of FGFR3 transmembrane domain dimer: implications for signaling and human pathologies.

    PubMed

    Bocharov, Eduard V; Lesovoy, Dmitry M; Goncharuk, Sergey A; Goncharuk, Marina V; Hristova, Kalina; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2013-11-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) transduces biochemical signals via lateral dimerization in the plasma membrane, and plays an important role in human development and disease. Eight different pathogenic mutations, implicated in cancers and growth disorders, have been identified in the FGFR3 transmembrane segment. Here, we describe the dimerization of the FGFR3 transmembrane domain in membrane-mimicking DPC/SDS (9/1) micelles. In the solved NMR structure, the two transmembrane helices pack into a symmetric left-handed dimer, with intermolecular stacking interactions occurring in the dimer central region. Some pathogenic mutations fall within the helix-helix interface, whereas others are located within a putative alternative interface. This implies that although the observed dimer structure is important for FGFR3 signaling, the mechanism of FGFR3-mediated transduction across the membrane is complex. We propose an FGFR3 signaling mechanism that is based on the solved structure, available structures of isolated soluble FGFR domains, and published biochemical and biophysical data.

  10. Distribution of the SynDIG4/proline-rich transmembrane protein 1 in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Lyndsey M; Ti, Shu W; Bishop, Hannah I; Orozco-Llamas, Mayra; Pham, Michelle; Trimmer, James S; Díaz, Elva

    2016-08-01

    The modulation of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) content at synapses is thought to be an underlying molecular mechanism of memory and learning. AMPAR content at synapses is highly plastic and is regulated by numerous AMPAR accessory transmembrane proteins such as TARPs, cornichons, and CKAMPs. SynDIG (synapse differentiation-induced gene) defines a family of four genes (SynDIG1-4) expressed in distinct and overlapping patterns in the brain. SynDIG1 was previously identified as a novel transmembrane AMPAR-associated protein that regulates synaptic strength. The related protein SynDIG4 [also known as Prrt1 (proline-rich transmembrane protein 1)] has recently been identified as a component of AMPAR complexes. In this study, we show that SynDIG1 and SynDIG4 have distinct yet overlapping patterns of expression in the central nervous system, with SynDIG4 having especially prominent expression in the hippocampus and particularly within CA1. In contrast to SynDIG1 and other traditional AMPAR auxiliary subunits, SynDIG4 is de-enriched at the postsynaptic density and colocalizes with extrasynaptic GluA1 puncta in primary dissociated neuron culture. These results indicate that, although SynDIG4 shares sequence similarity with SynDIG1, it might act through a unique mechanism as an auxiliary factor for extrasynaptic GluA1-containing AMPARs. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2266-2280, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Different Transmembrane Domains Associate with Distinct Endoplasmic Reticulum Components during Membrane Integration of a Polytopic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Meacock, Suzanna L.; Lecomte, Fabienne J.L.; Crawshaw, Samuel G.; High, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    We have been studying the insertion of the seven transmembrane domain (TM) protein opsin to gain insights into how the multiple TMs of polytopic proteins are integrated at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We find that the ER components associated with the first and second TMs of the nascent opsin polypeptide chain are clearly distinct. The first TM (TM1) is adjacent to the α and β subunits of the Sec61 complex, and a novel component, a protein associated with the ER translocon of 10 kDa (PAT-10). The most striking characteristic of PAT-10 is that it remains adjacent to TM1 throughout the biogenesis and membrane integration of the full-length opsin polypeptide. TM2 is also found to be adjacent to Sec61α and Sec61β during its membrane integration. However, TM2 does not form any adducts with PAT-10; rather, a transient association with the TRAM protein is observed. We show that the association of PAT-10 with opsin TM1 does not require the N-glycosylation of the nascent chain and occurs irrespective of the amino acid sequence and transmembrane topology of TM1. We conclude that the precise makeup of the ER membrane insertion site can be distinct for the different transmembrane domains of a polytopic protein. We find that the environment of a particular TM can be influenced by both the “stage” of nascent chain biosynthesis reached, and the TM's relative location within the polypeptide. PMID:12475939

  12. Localization and Characterization of Rat Transmembrane Protein 225 Specifically Expressed in Testis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shirui; Wang, Weiping; Lei, Chen; Liu, Qingmei; Xu, Fengqin; Xing, Xiaowei; Chen, Hao; Liu, Jiajia; Wu, Shiliang

    2011-01-01

    Testis is the one and only location of spermatogenesis and sexual hormone production. Spermatogenesis is a complicated physiological process regulated by many genes specifically and differentially expressed in the testis. In this study, Transmembrane Protein 225 (TMEM225), which is specifically expressed in rat testis, has been identified. TMEM225 was cloned from the testis cDNA library and was mapped to chromosome 8q22 by browsing the University of California Santa Cruz genomic database. It contains an open reading frame with a length of 696 bp, encoding a protein with four putative transmembrane helices. TMEM225 mRNA expression was evaluated by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization. In addition, the subcellular location of TMEM225 was evaluated. The results obtained highlighted age related specific expression of TMEM225 in testis, specifically during the adult period after age of 13 months. In situ hybridization analysis indicated that TMEM225 mRNA was mainly expressed in spermatocyte cells and round spermatids. Green fluorescence protein localization analysis showed that rat TMEM225 mainly surrounded the nuclear membrane, with a minority distribution in the cytoplasm, and the distribution of TMEM225 was affected by the deletion of N-terminal transmembrane domain. As the expression phase is not related to the first wave of spermatozoon development, our data presented here suggest that TMEM225 may play an important role in sperm degeneration but not in spermatogenesis. PMID:20979528

  13. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein expression in the male excretory duct system during development.

    PubMed

    Marcorelles, Pascale; Gillet, Danièle; Friocourt, Gaëlle; Ledé, Françoise; Samaison, Laura; Huguen, Geneviève; Ferec, Claude

    2012-03-01

    Sterility due to bilateral destruction in utero or in early infancy resulting in congenital absence of the vas deferens is the rule in male patients with cystic fibrosis. To understand the developmental pattern of this anomaly, the microscopic morphology of the male excretory system was analyzed during development and the expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein was explored by immunohistochemistry. We observed that cystic fibrosis fetuses had no excretory ducts agenesis or obstruction until 22 weeks of gestation. However, a focal inflammatory pattern and mucinous plugs in the oldest cystic fibrosis case suggested a disruptive mechanism. Immunolabeling of cytoplasmic epithelial cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein was demonstrated in all cystic fibrosis and control cases with a similar pattern of expression of the protein between age-matched controls and cystic fibrosis cases. At midgestation, an apical intensification appeared in both cystic fibrosis and control cases and was stable during the remainder of fetal life. No gradient of intensity could be detected between the different segments of the excretory tract. These findings are different from those reported in adults. The absence of any morphologic anomaly until 22 weeks of gestation, the focal destruction of the epithelial structures during the second trimester, and the chronological pattern of expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator are of interest for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of this disease.

  14. Transmembrane semaphorins, forward and reverse signaling: have a look both ways.

    PubMed

    Battistini, Chiara; Tamagnone, Luca

    2016-04-01

    Semaphorins are signaling molecules playing pivotal roles not only as axon guidance cues, but are also involved in the regulation of a range of biological processes, such as immune response, angiogenesis and invasive tumor growth. The main functional receptors for semaphorins are plexins, which are large single-pass transmembrane molecules. Semaphorin signaling through plexins-the "classical" forward signaling-affects cytoskeletal remodeling and integrin-dependent adhesion, consequently influencing cell migration. Intriguingly, semaphorins and plexins can interact not only in trans, but also in cis, leading to differentiated and highly regulated signaling outputs. Moreover, transmembrane semaphorins can also mediate a so-called "reverse" signaling, by acting not as ligands but rather as receptors, and initiate a signaling cascade through their own cytoplasmic domains. Semaphorin reverse signaling has been clearly demonstrated in fruit fly Sema1a, which is required to control motor axon defasciculation and target recognition during neuromuscular development. Sema1a invertebrate semaphorin is most similar to vertebrate class-6 semaphorins, and examples of semaphorin reverse signaling in mammalians have been described for these family members. Reverse signaling is also reported for other vertebrate semaphorin subsets, e.g. class-4 semaphorins, which bear potential PDZ-domain interaction motifs in their cytoplasmic regions. Therefore, thanks to their various signaling abilities, transmembrane semaphorins can play multifaceted roles both in developmental processes and in physiological as well as pathological conditions in the adult. PMID:26794845

  15. The Expanding Social Network of Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors: TARPs and Other Transmembrane Auxiliary Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Alexander C.; Nicoll, Roger A.

    2011-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) underlie rapid, excitatory synaptic signaling throughout the CNS. After years of intense research, our picture of iGluRs has evolved from imagining them companionless in the postsynaptic membrane to being the hub of dynamic supramolecular signaling complexes, interacting with an ever-expanding litany of other proteins that regulate their trafficking, scaffolding, stability, signaling and turnover. In particular, the discovery that transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) are auxiliary subunits of AMPA receptors, that are critical determinants of their trafficking, gating and pharmacology, has changed the way we think about iGluR function. Recently, a number of novel transmembrane proteins have been uncovered that may also serve as iGluR auxiliary proteins. Here we review pivotal developments in our understanding of the role of TARPs in AMPA receptor trafficking and gating, as well as an overview of how newly discovered transmembrane proteins expand our view of iGluR function in the CNS. PMID:21521608

  16. Cu**+ Transporting ATPases: Structure of the Two Transmembrane Cu**+ Transport Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Guerrero, M.; Eren, E.; Rawat, S.; Stemmler, T.L.; Arguello, J.M.

    2009-05-18

    Cu{sup +}-ATPases drive metal efflux from the cell cytoplasm. Paramount to this function is the binding of Cu{sup +} within the transmembrane region and its coupled translocation across the permeability barrier. Here, we describe the two transmembrane Cu{sup +} transport sites present in Archaeoglobus fulgidus CopA. Both sites can be independently loaded with Cu{sup +}. However, their simultaneous occupation is associated with enzyme turnover. Site I is constituted by two Cys in transmembrane segment (TM) 6 and a Tyr in TM7. An Asn in TM7 and Met and Ser in TM8 form Site II. Single site x-ray spectroscopic analysis indicates a trigonal coordination in both sites. This architecture is distinct from that observed in Cu{sup +}-trafficking chaperones and classical cuproproteins. The high affinity of these sites for Cu{sup +} (Site I K{sub {alpha}} = 1.3 fM{sup -1}, Site II K{sub {alpha}} = 1.1 fM{sup -1}), in conjunction with reversible direct Cu{sup +} transfer from chaperones, points to a transport mechanism where backward release of free Cu{sup +} to the cytoplasm is largely prevented.

  17. Trans-membrane transport of n-octadecane by Pseudomonas sp. DG17.

    PubMed

    Hua, Fei; Wang, Hong Qi; Li, Yi; Zhao, Yi Cun

    2013-12-01

    The trans-membrane transport of hydrocarbons is an important and complex aspect of the process of biodegradation of hydrocarbons by microorganisms. The mechanism of transport of (14)C n-octadecane by Pseudomonas sp. DG17, an alkane-degrading bacterium, was studied by the addition of ATP inhibitors and different substrate concentrations. When the concentration of n-octadecane was higher than 4.54 μmol/L, the transport of (14)C n-octadecane was driven by a facilitated passive mechanism following the intra/extra substrate concentration gradient. However, when the cells were grown with a low concentration of the substrate, the cellular accumulation of n-octadecane, an energy-dependent process, was dramatically decreased by the presence of ATP inhibitors, and n-octadecane accumulation continually increased against its concentration gradient. Furthermore, the presence of non-labeled alkanes blocked (14)C n-octadecane transport only in the induced cells, and the trans-membrane transport of n-octadecane was specific with an apparent dissociation constant K t of 11.27 μmol/L and V max of 0.96 μmol/min/mg protein. The results indicated that the trans-membrane transport of n-octadecane by Pseudomonas sp. DG17 was related to the substrate concentration and ATP.

  18. Bioassay-guided Isolation of Constituents of Piper sarmentosum Using a Mitochondrial Transmembrane Potential Assay

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Li; Matthew, Susan; Lantvit, Daniel D.; Zhang, Xiaoli; Ninh, Tran Ngoc; Chai, Heebyung; de Blanco, Esperanza J. Carcache; Soejarto, Djaja D.; Swanson, Steven M.; Kinghorn, A. Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation was conducted on a chloroform-soluble extract of the aerial parts of Piper sarmentosum collected in Vietnam, monitored by a mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP) assay using HT-29 human colon cancer cells. This led to the isolation of four new C-benzylated dihydroflavones, sarmentosumins A-D (1-4), as well as 14 known compounds. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data interpretation. Among these compounds, 1-4 as well as five known C-benzylated dihydroflavones (5-9), and pipercallosine, a piperamide (11), were found to induce apoptosis in HT-29 cells by moderately reducing the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm), with ED50 values ranging from 1.6 to 13.6 μM. Furthermore, 7-methoxydichamanetin (8) and pinocembrin (10) exhibited proteasome inhibitory activities in a human 20S proteasome bioassay with IC50 values of 3.45 ± 0.18 μM and 2.87 ± 0.26 μM, respectively. This is the first time that C-benzylated dihydroflavones have been reported to demonstrate an apoptotic effect associated with disruption of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential. PMID:21973101

  19. Diffusion of gases across lipid membranes with OmpA channel: a molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Huajun; Jameson, Cynthia J.; Murad, Sohail

    2010-06-01

    Molecular transport across biological membranes occurs in a range of important chemical and biological processes. The biological membrane can usually be modelled as a phospholipid bilayer, but to correctly represent biological transport, the embedded transmembrane proteins must also be included. In previous molecular simulation studies on transport of small gas molecules in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer membrane, a coarse-grained model was used to provide direct insight into collective phenomena in biological membranes. Coarse graining allowed investigation of longer time and length scales by reducing the degrees of freedom and employing suitable potentials. In this work, membranes that include transmembrane proteins are modelled. This allows one to compare the molecular transport across a lipid membrane with and without the assistance of transmembrane channels. Outer membrane protein A (OmpA) - a porin from Escherichia coli with a small pore size - was chosen in this study because its detailed structure is known, it has high stability and is known to form a nonspecific diffusion channel that permits the penetration of various solutes. In this work the pore characteristics and interaction between lipid and protein were investigated and transport of water and other small gas molecules within the channel were studied. The MD simulation results obtained are compared with previous simulation results and available experimental data. The results obtained from this study will lead to better understanding of protein functionality and advance the development of biochips and drug delivery systems.

  20. Mutations Causing Slow-Channel Myasthenia Reveal That a Valine Ring in the Channel Pore of Muscle AChR is Optimized for Stabilizing Channel Gating.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xin-Ming; Okuno, Tatsuya; Milone, Margherita; Otsuka, Kenji; Takahashi, Koji; Komaki, Hirofumi; Giles, Elizabeth; Ohno, Kinji; Engel, Andrew G

    2016-10-01

    We identify two novel mutations in acetylcholine receptor (AChR) causing a slow-channel congenital myasthenia syndrome (CMS) in three unrelated patients (Pts). Pt 1 harbors a heterozygous βV266A mutation (p.Val289Ala) in the second transmembrane domain (M2) of the AChR β subunit (CHRNB1). Pts 2 and 3 carry the same mutation at an equivalent site in the ε subunit (CHRNE), εV265A (p.Val285Ala). The mutant residues are conserved across all AChR subunits of all species and are components of a valine ring in the channel pore, which is positioned four residues above the leucine ring. Both βV266A and εV265A reduce the amino acid size and lengthen the channel opening bursts by fourfold by enhancing gating efficiency by approximately 30-fold. Substitution of alanine for valine at the corresponding position in the δ and α subunit prolongs the burst duration four- and eightfold, respectively. Replacing valine at ε codon 265 either by a still smaller glycine or by a larger leucine also lengthens the burst duration. Our analysis reveals that each valine in the valine ring contributes to channel kinetics equally, and the valine ring has been optimized in the course of evolution to govern channel gating. PMID:27375219

  1. Mutations Causing Slow-Channel Myasthenia Reveal That a Valine Ring in the Channel Pore of Muscle AChR is Optimized for Stabilizing Channel Gating.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xin-Ming; Okuno, Tatsuya; Milone, Margherita; Otsuka, Kenji; Takahashi, Koji; Komaki, Hirofumi; Giles, Elizabeth; Ohno, Kinji; Engel, Andrew G

    2016-10-01

    We identify two novel mutations in acetylcholine receptor (AChR) causing a slow-channel congenital myasthenia syndrome (CMS) in three unrelated patients (Pts). Pt 1 harbors a heterozygous βV266A mutation (p.Val289Ala) in the second transmembrane domain (M2) of the AChR β subunit (CHRNB1). Pts 2 and 3 carry the same mutation at an equivalent site in the ε subunit (CHRNE), εV265A (p.Val285Ala). The mutant residues are conserved across all AChR subunits of all species and are components of a valine ring in the channel pore, which is positioned four residues above the leucine ring. Both βV266A and εV265A reduce the amino acid size and lengthen the channel opening bursts by fourfold by enhancing gating efficiency by approximately 30-fold. Substitution of alanine for valine at the corresponding position in the δ and α subunit prolongs the burst duration four- and eightfold, respectively. Replacing valine at ε codon 265 either by a still smaller glycine or by a larger leucine also lengthens the burst duration. Our analysis reveals that each valine in the valine ring contributes to channel kinetics equally, and the valine ring has been optimized in the course of evolution to govern channel gating.

  2. Structural insights into Ca2+-activated long-range allosteric channel gating of RyR1

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Risheng; Wang, Xue; Zhang, Yan; Mukherjee, Saptarshi; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Qiang; Huang, Xinrui; Jing, Shan; Liu, Congcong; Li, Shuang; Wang, Guangyu; Xu, Yaofang; Zhu, Sujie; Williams, Alan J; Sun, Fei; Yin, Chang-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are a class of giant ion channels with molecular mass over 2.2 mega-Daltons. These channels mediate calcium signaling in a variety of cells. Since more than 80% of the RyR protein is folded into the cytoplasmic assembly and the remaining residues form the transmembrane domain, it has been hypothesized that the activation and regulation of RyR channels occur through an as yet uncharacterized long-range allosteric mechanism. Here we report the characterization of a Ca2+-activated open-state RyR1 structure by cryo-electron microscopy. The structure has an overall resolution of 4.9 Å and a resolution of 4.2 Å for the core region. In comparison with the previously determined apo/closed-state structure, we observed long-range allosteric gating of the channel upon Ca2+ activation. In-depth structural analyses elucidated a novel channel-gating mechanism and a novel ion selectivity mechanism of RyR1. Our work not only provides structural insights into the molecular mechanisms of channel gating and regulation of RyRs, but also sheds light on structural basis for channel-gating and ion selectivity mechanisms for the six-transmembrane-helix cation channel family. PMID:27573175

  3. Structural insights into Ca(2+)-activated long-range allosteric channel gating of RyR1.

    PubMed

    Wei, Risheng; Wang, Xue; Zhang, Yan; Mukherjee, Saptarshi; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Qiang; Huang, Xinrui; Jing, Shan; Liu, Congcong; Li, Shuang; Wang, Guangyu; Xu, Yaofang; Zhu, Sujie; Williams, Alan J; Sun, Fei; Yin, Chang-Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are a class of giant ion channels with molecular mass over 2.2 mega-Daltons. These channels mediate calcium signaling in a variety of cells. Since more than 80% of the RyR protein is folded into the cytoplasmic assembly and the remaining residues form the transmembrane domain, it has been hypothesized that the activation and regulation of RyR channels occur through an as yet uncharacterized long-range allosteric mechanism. Here we report the characterization of a Ca(2+)-activated open-state RyR1 structure by cryo-electron microscopy. The structure has an overall resolution of 4.9 Å and a resolution of 4.2 Å for the core region. In comparison with the previously determined apo/closed-state structure, we observed long-range allosteric gating of the channel upon Ca(2+) activation. In-depth structural analyses elucidated a novel channel-gating mechanism and a novel ion selectivity mechanism of RyR1. Our work not only provides structural insights into the molecular mechanisms of channel gating and regulation of RyRs, but also sheds light on structural basis for channel-gating and ion selectivity mechanisms for the six-transmembrane-helix cation channel family.

  4. Structural insights into Ca(2+)-activated long-range allosteric channel gating of RyR1.

    PubMed

    Wei, Risheng; Wang, Xue; Zhang, Yan; Mukherjee, Saptarshi; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Qiang; Huang, Xinrui; Jing, Shan; Liu, Congcong; Li, Shuang; Wang, Guangyu; Xu, Yaofang; Zhu, Sujie; Williams, Alan J; Sun, Fei; Yin, Chang-Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are a class of giant ion channels with molecular mass over 2.2 mega-Daltons. These channels mediate calcium signaling in a variety of cells. Since more than 80% of the RyR protein is folded into the cytoplasmic assembly and the remaining residues form the transmembrane domain, it has been hypothesized that the activation and regulation of RyR channels occur through an as yet uncharacterized long-range allosteric mechanism. Here we report the characterization of a Ca(2+)-activated open-state RyR1 structure by cryo-electron microscopy. The structure has an overall resolution of 4.9 Å and a resolution of 4.2 Å for the core region. In comparison with the previously determined apo/closed-state structure, we observed long-range allosteric gating of the channel upon Ca(2+) activation. In-depth structural analyses elucidated a novel channel-gating mechanism and a novel ion selectivity mechanism of RyR1. Our work not only provides structural insights into the molecular mechanisms of channel gating and regulation of RyRs, but also sheds light on structural basis for channel-gating and ion selectivity mechanisms for the six-transmembrane-helix cation channel family. PMID:27573175

  5. [The effect of the transmembrane potential level on the dynamic extinction of the amplitude of the synaptic reactions in the snail under potential-fixation conditions].

    PubMed

    Gusev, P V

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this work was to describe a contribution of postsynaptic membrane in synaptic plasticity. To solve this problem the influence of the level of transmembrane potential on the dynamics of transmembrane synaptic current amplitude was studied during rhythmical stimulation of the nerve. It was shown that with increase of transmembrane potential value the slope of the function of transmembrane current decrease became steeper. It was also shown that with higher stimulation frequency the influence of transmembrane holding potential upon the dynamics of synaptic reaction increased. The data obtained can be considered as an evidence to the contribution of postsynaptic membrane in synaptic plasticity.

  6. Conformational Response of Influenza A M2 Transmembrane Domain to Amantadine Drug Binding at Low pH (pH 5.5).

    PubMed

    Georgieva, Elka R; Borbat, Peter P; Grushin, Kirill; Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla; Kulkarni, Nichita J; Liang, Zhichun; Freed, Jack H

    2016-01-01

    The M2 protein from influenza A plays important roles in its viral cycle. It contains a single transmembrane helix, which oligomerizes into a homotetrameric proton channel that conducts in the low-pH environment of the host-cell endosome and Golgi apparatus, leading to virion uncoating at an early stage of infection. We studied conformational rearrangements that occur in the M2 core transmembrane domain residing on the lipid bilayer, flanked by juxtamembrane residues (M2TMD21-49 fragment), upon its interaction with amantadine drug at pH 5.5 when M2 is conductive. We also tested the role of specific mutation and lipid chain length. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and electron microscopy were applied to M2TMD21-49, labeled at the residue L46C with either nitroxide spin-label or Nanogold® reagent, respectively. Electron microscopy confirmed that M2TMD21-49 reconstituted into DOPC/POPS at 1:10,000 peptide-to-lipid molar ratio (P/L) either with or without amantadine, is an admixture of monomers, dimers, and tetramers, confirming our model based on a dimer intermediate in the assembly of M2TMD21-49. As reported by double electron-electron resonance (DEER), in DOPC/POPS membranes amantadine shifts oligomer equilibrium to favor tetramers, as evidenced by an increase in DEER modulation depth for P/L's ranging from 1:18,000 to 1:160. Furthermore, amantadine binding shortens the inter-spin distances (for nitroxide labels) by 5-8 Å, indicating drug induced channel closure on the C-terminal side. No such effect was observed for the thinner membrane of DLPC/DLPS, emphasizing the role of bilayer thickness. The analysis of continuous wave (cw) ESR spectra of spin-labeled L46C residue provides additional support to a more compact helix bundle in amantadine-bound M2TMD 21-49 through increased motional ordering. In contrast to wild-type M2TMD21-49, the amantadine-bound form does not exhibit noticeable conformational changes in the case of G34A mutation found in certain

  7. Conformational Response of Influenza A M2 Transmembrane Domain to Amantadine Drug Binding at Low pH (pH 5.5)

    PubMed Central

    Georgieva, Elka R.; Borbat, Peter P.; Grushin, Kirill; Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla; Kulkarni, Nichita J.; Liang, Zhichun; Freed, Jack H.

    2016-01-01

    The M2 protein from influenza A plays important roles in its viral cycle. It contains a single transmembrane helix, which oligomerizes into a homotetrameric proton channel that conducts in the low-pH environment of the host-cell endosome and Golgi apparatus, leading to virion uncoating at an early stage of infection. We studied conformational rearrangements that occur in the M2 core transmembrane domain residing on the lipid bilayer, flanked by juxtamembrane residues (M2TMD21−49 fragment), upon its interaction with amantadine drug at pH 5.5 when M2 is conductive. We also tested the role of specific mutation and lipid chain length. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and electron microscopy were applied to M2TMD21−49, labeled at the residue L46C with either nitroxide spin-label or Nanogold® reagent, respectively. Electron microscopy confirmed that M2TMD21−49 reconstituted into DOPC/POPS at 1:10,000 peptide-to-lipid molar ratio (P/L) either with or without amantadine, is an admixture of monomers, dimers, and tetramers, confirming our model based on a dimer intermediate in the assembly of M2TMD21−49. As reported by double electron-electron resonance (DEER), in DOPC/POPS membranes amantadine shifts oligomer equilibrium to favor tetramers, as evidenced by an increase in DEER modulation depth for P/L's ranging from 1:18,000 to 1:160. Furthermore, amantadine binding shortens the inter-spin distances (for nitroxide labels) by 5–8 Å, indicating drug induced channel closure on the C-terminal side. No such effect was observed for the thinner membrane of DLPC/DLPS, emphasizing the role of bilayer thickness. The analysis of continuous wave (cw) ESR spectra of spin-labeled L46C residue provides additional support to a more compact helix bundle in amantadine-bound M2TMD 21−49 through increased motional ordering. In contrast to wild-type M2TMD21−49, the amantadine-bound form does not exhibit noticeable conformational changes in the case of G34A mutation

  8. Transmembrane topography of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: immunochemical tests contradict theoretical predictions based on hydrophobicity profiles.

    PubMed

    Ratnam, M; Nguyen, D L; Rivier, J; Sargent, P B; Lindstrom, J

    1986-05-01

    In our preceding paper [Ratnam, M., Sargent, P. B., Sarin, V., Fox, J. L., Le Nguyen, D., Rivier, J., Criado, M., & Lindstrom, J. (1986) Biochemistry (preceding paper in this issue)], we presented results from peptide mapping studies of purified subunits of the Torpedo acetylcholine receptor which suggested that the sequence beta 429-441 is on the cytoplasmic surface of the receptor. Since this finding contradicts earlier theoretical models of the transmembrane structure of the receptor, which placed this sequence of the beta subunit on the extracellular surface, we investigated the location of the corresponding sequence (389-408) and adjacent sequences of the alpha subunit by a more direct approach. We synthesized peptides including the sequences alpha 330-346, alpha 349-364, alpha 360-378, alpha 379-385, and alpha 389-408 and shorter parts of these peptides. These peptides corresponded to a highly immunogenic region, and by using 125I-labeled peptides as antigens, we were able to detect in our library of monoclonal antibodies to alpha subunits between two and six which bound specifically to each of these peptides, except alpha 389-408. We obtained antibodies specific for alpha 389-408 both from antisera against the denatured alpha subunit and from antisera made against the peptide. These antibodies were specific to alpha 389-396. In binding assays, antibodies specific for all of these five peptides bound to receptor-rich membrane vesicles only after permeabilization of the vesicles to permit access of the antibodies to the cytoplasmic surface of the receptors, suggesting that the receptor sequences which bound these antibodies were located on the intracellular side of the membrane. Electron microscopy using colloidal gold to visualize the bound antibodies was used to conclusively demonstrate that all of these sequences are exposed on the cytoplasmic surface of the receptor. These results, along with our previous demonstration that the C-terminal 10 amino acids of

  9. A Trigger Residue for Transmembrane Signaling in the Escherichia coli Serine Chemoreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Kitanovic, Smiljka; Ames, Peter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The transmembrane Tsr protein of Escherichia coli mediates chemotactic responses to environmental serine gradients. Serine binds to the periplasmic domain of the homodimeric Tsr molecule, promoting a small inward displacement of one transmembrane helix (TM2). TM2 piston displacements, in turn, modulate the structural stability of the Tsr-HAMP domain on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane to control the autophosphorylation activity of the signaling CheA kinase bound to the membrane-distal cytoplasmic tip of Tsr. A five-residue control cable segment connects TM2 to the AS1 helix of HAMP and transmits stimulus and sensory adaptation signals between them. To explore the possible role of control cable helicity in transmembrane signaling by Tsr, we characterized the signaling properties of mutant receptors with various control cable alterations. An all-alanine control cable shifted Tsr output toward the kinase-on state, whereas an all-glycine control cable prevented Tsr from reaching either a fully on or fully off output state. Restoration of the native isoleucine (I214) in these synthetic control cables largely alleviated their signaling defects. Single amino acid replacements at Tsr-I214 shifted output toward the kinase-off (L, N, H, and R) or kinase-on (A and G) states, whereas other control cable residues tolerated most amino acid replacements with little change in signaling behavior. These findings indicate that changes in control cable helicity might mediate transitions between the kinase-on and kinase-off states during transmembrane signaling by chemoreceptors. Moreover, the Tsr-I214 side chain plays a key role, possibly through interaction with the membrane interfacial environment, in triggering signaling changes in response to TM2 piston displacements. IMPORTANCE The Tsr protein of E. coli mediates chemotactic responses to environmental serine gradients. Stimulus signals from the Tsr periplasmic sensing domain reach its cytoplasmic kinase control

  10. M2 Proton Channel: Toward a Model of a Primitive Proton Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chenyu; Pohorille, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    Transmembrane proton transfer was essential to early cellular systems in order to transduce energy for metabolic functions. The reliable, efficient and controlled generation of proton gradients became possible only with the emergence of active proton pumps. On the basis of features shared by most modern proton pumps we identify the essential mechanistic steps in active proton transport. Further, we discuss the mechanism of action of a small, transmembrane M2 proton channel from influenza A virus as a model for proton transport in protocells. The M2 channel is a 94-residue long, α-helical tetramer that is activated at low pH and exhibits high selectivity and directionality. A shorter construct, built of transmembrane fragments that are only 24 amino acids in length, exhibits very similar proton transport properties. Molecular dynamics simulations on the microsecond time-scale carried out for the M2 channel provided atomic level details on the activation of the channel in response to protonation of the histidine residue, His37. The pathway of proton conduction is mediated by His37, which accepts and donates protons at different interconverting conformation states when pH is lower than 6.5. The Val27 and Trp41 gates and the salt bridge between Asp44 and Arg45 further enhance the directionality of proton transport. It is argued that the architecture and the mechanism of action similar to that found in the M2 channel might have been the perfect starting point for evolution towards the earliest proton pumps, indicating that active proton transport could have readily emerged from simple, passive proton channels.

  11. What we don't know about the structure of ryanodine receptor calcium release channels.

    PubMed

    Dulhunty, Angela F; Pouliquin, Pierre

    2003-10-01

    1. The ryanodine receptor (RyR) is the Ca2+ release channel in the sarcoplamic reticulum of skeletal and cardiac muscle and is essential for respiration and heart beat. The RyR channel releases Ca2+ from intracellular stores in a variety of other cell types, where it normally coexists with the inositiol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R). The RyR and IP3R, forming a superfamily of homotetrameric ligand-gated intracellular Ca2+ channels, serve discrete functions: they can be located in independent Ca2+ stores with different activation mechanisms and can be coupled to different signalling pathways. 2. Although functional characteristics of the RyR have been investigated intensely, there remain major gaps in our knowledge about the structure of the protein, its ion-conducting pore, its ligand-binding sites and sites supporting the many protein/protein interactions that underlie the in vivo function of the channel. 3. Of particular importance are the transmembrane segments that form the membrane-spanning domain of the protein and the pore, define the conductance and selectivity of the channel and dictate the cytoplasmic and luminal domains and the overall protein structure. Hydropathy profiles predict between four and 12 transmembrane segments. One popular model shows four transmembrane segments in the C-terminal one-tenth of the protein. However, there is substantial evidence for a larger number of membrane-spanning segments located in both the C-terminal and central parts of the protein. 4. A model of the RyR pore based on the Streptomyces lividans KcsA channel structure is presented. Protein/protein interactions between the RyR and other regulatory proteins, as well as within the RyR subunit, are discussed. PMID:14516409

  12. Integrin α1 Has a Long Helix, Extending from the Transmembrane Region to the Cytoplasmic Tail in Detergent Micelles

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chaohua; Liu, Xiaoxi; Tian, Changlin; Wu, Fangming

    2013-01-01

    Integrin proteins are very important adhesion receptors that mediate cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. They play essential roles in cell signaling and the regulation of cellular shape, motility, and the cell cycle. Here, the transmembrane and cytoplasmic (TMC) domains of integrin α1 and β1 were over-expressed and purified in detergent micelles. The structure and backbone relaxations of α1-TMC in LDAO micelles were determined and analyzed using solution NMR. A long helix, extending from the transmembrane region to the cytoplasmic tail, was observed in α1-TMC. Structural comparisons of α1-TMC with reported αIIb-TMC domains indicated different conformations in the transmembrane regions and cytoplasmic tails. An NMR titration experiment indicated weak interactions between α1-TMC and β1-TMC through several α1-TMC residues located at its N-terminal juxta-transmembrane region and C-terminal extended helix region. PMID:23646163

  13. Microfluidic channel fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Don W.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Cardinale, Gregory F.

    2001-01-01

    A new channel structure for microfluidic systems and process for fabricating this structure. In contrast to the conventional practice of fabricating fluid channels as trenches or grooves in a substrate, fluid channels are fabricated as thin walled raised structures on a substrate. Microfluidic devices produced in accordance with the invention are a hybrid assembly generally consisting of three layers: 1) a substrate that can or cannot be an electrical insulator; 2) a middle layer, that is an electrically conducting material and preferably silicon, forms the channel walls whose height defines the channel height, joined to and extending from the substrate; and 3) a top layer, joined to the top of the channels, that forms a cover for the channels. The channels can be defined by photolithographic techniques and are produced by etching away the material around the channel walls.

  14. Molecular bioelectricity in developmental biology: new tools and recent discoveries: control of cell behavior and pattern formation by transmembrane potential gradients.

    PubMed

    Levin, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Significant progress in the molecular investigation of endogenous bioelectric signals during pattern formation in growing tissues has been enabled by recently developed techniques. Ion flows and voltage gradients produced by ion channels and pumps are key regulators of cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Now, instructive roles for bioelectrical gradients in embryogenesis, regeneration, and neoplasm are being revealed through the use of fluorescent voltage reporters and functional experiments using well-characterized channel mutants. Transmembrane voltage gradients (V(mem) ) determine anatomical polarity and function as master regulators during appendage regeneration and embryonic left-right patterning. A state-of-the-art recent study reveals that they can also serve as prepatterns for gene expression domains during craniofacial patterning. Continued development of novel tools and better ways to think about physical controls of cell-cell interactions will lead to mastery of the morphogenetic information stored in physiological networks. This will enable fundamental advances in basic understanding of growth and form, as well as transformative biomedical applications in regenerative medicine.

  15. The amiloride-inhibitable Na+ conductance is reduced by the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in normal but not in cystic fibrosis airways.

    PubMed Central

    Mall, M; Bleich, M; Greger, R; Schreiber, R; Kunzelmann, K

    1998-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) airway cells, besides their well-known defect in cAMP-dependent Cl- conductance, are characterized by an enhanced Na+ conductance. In this study we have examined the Na+ conductance in human respiratory tract by measuring transepithelial voltage and resistance (Vte, Rte) and by assessing membrane voltages (Vm) of freshly isolated airway epithelial cells from CF and non-CF patients. Basal amiloride inhibitable (10 micromol/liter) equivalent short circuit current (Isc = Vte/Rte) was significantly increased in CF compared with non-CF tissues. After stimulation by forskolin (10 micromol/liter) a significant depolarization of Vm corresponding to the cAMP-dependent activation of a Cl- conductance was observed in non-CF but not in CF airway cells. In non-CF tissue but not in CF tissue the effects of amiloride and N-methyl-D-glucamine on Vm were attenuated in the presence of forskolin. Also the amiloride-inhibitable Isc was significantly reduced by forskolin (1 micromol/liter) and isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX; 100 micromol/liter) only in non-CF tissue. We conclude that cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator acts as a downregulator of epithelial Na+ channels in human airways. This downregulation of epithelial Na+ channels is absent in CF airways, leading to hyperabsorption and to the characteristic increase in mucus viscosity. PMID:9649552

  16. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Controls Lung Proteasomal Degradation and Nuclear Factor-κB Activity in Conditions of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Boncoeur, Emilie; Roque, Telma; Bonvin, Elise; Saint-Criq, Vinciane; Bonora, Monique; Clement, Annick; Tabary, Olivier; Henrion-Caude, Alexandra; Jacquot, Jacky

    2008-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a lethal inherited disorder caused by mutations in a single gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein, resulting in progressive oxidative lung damage. In this study, we evaluated the role of CFTR in the control of ubiquitin-proteasome activity and nuclear factor (NF)-κB/IκB-α signaling after lung oxidative stress. After a 64-hour exposure to hyperoxia-mediated oxidative stress, CFTR-deficient (cftr−/−) mice exhibited significantly elevated lung proteasomal activity compared with wild-type (cftr+/+) animals. This was accompanied by reduced lung caspase-3 activity and defective degradation of NF-κB inhibitor IκB-α. In vitro, human CFTR-deficient lung cells exposed to oxidative stress exhibited increased proteasomal activity and decreased NF-κB-dependent transcriptional activity compared with CFTR-sufficient lung cells. Inhibition of the CFTR Cl− channel by CFTRinh-172 in the normal bronchial immortalized cell line 16HBE14o− increased proteasomal degradation after exposure to oxidative stress. Caspase-3 inhibition by Z-DQMD in CFTR-sufficient lung cells mimicked the response profile of increased proteasomal degradation and reduced NF-κB activity observed in CFTR-deficient lung cells exposed to oxidative stress. Taken together, these results suggest that functional CFTR Cl− channel activity is crucial for regulation of lung proteasomal degradation and NF-κB activity in conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:18372427

  17. The deubiquitinating enzyme USP10 regulates the post-endocytic sorting of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in airway epithelial cells.