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Sample records for alamethicin transmembrane channels

  1. Two classes of alamethicin transmembrane channels: molecular models from single-channel properties.

    PubMed

    Mak, D O; Webb, W W

    1995-12-01

    Molecular structures of transmembrane channels formed by alamethicin polypeptide aggregates were analyzed by measuring open-channel conductances and state-transition kinetics using voltage-clamp technique with artificial phospholipid bilayers isolated onto micropipettes by a novel solvent-free tip-dip method. Two distinct classes of alamethicin channels, each with a unique set of conductance states and kinetic properties, were identified. Alamethicin Rf50 at low temperatures forms mostly nonpersistent channels with lifetimes of < 1 min. Long-lasting persistent channels are formed by alamethicin Rf30 at all temperatures and by alamethicin Rf50 at room temperature. In the "modified barrel-stave" model for persistent channels based on the crystalline alamethicin secondary structure, the aqueous pore of the channel surrounded by parallel alamethicin monomers has a constriction generated by amino acid side chains protruding from the alamethicin helices into the pore. The model explains quantitatively the nonohmic channel conductance at high applied voltages and the conductance values and ion selectivities of various persistent channel states. The kinetic properties of nonpersistent channels are explained qualitatively by the "reversed-molecule" model in which nonpersistent channels differ from persistent channels by having one of the channel-forming alamethicin monomers oriented antiparallel to the others.

  2. Two classes of alamethicin transmembrane channels: molecular models from single-channel properties.

    PubMed Central

    Mak, D O; Webb, W W

    1995-01-01

    Molecular structures of transmembrane channels formed by alamethicin polypeptide aggregates were analyzed by measuring open-channel conductances and state-transition kinetics using voltage-clamp technique with artificial phospholipid bilayers isolated onto micropipettes by a novel solvent-free tip-dip method. Two distinct classes of alamethicin channels, each with a unique set of conductance states and kinetic properties, were identified. Alamethicin Rf50 at low temperatures forms mostly nonpersistent channels with lifetimes of < 1 min. Long-lasting persistent channels are formed by alamethicin Rf30 at all temperatures and by alamethicin Rf50 at room temperature. In the "modified barrel-stave" model for persistent channels based on the crystalline alamethicin secondary structure, the aqueous pore of the channel surrounded by parallel alamethicin monomers has a constriction generated by amino acid side chains protruding from the alamethicin helices into the pore. The model explains quantitatively the nonohmic channel conductance at high applied voltages and the conductance values and ion selectivities of various persistent channel states. The kinetic properties of nonpersistent channels are explained qualitatively by the "reversed-molecule" model in which nonpersistent channels differ from persistent channels by having one of the channel-forming alamethicin monomers oriented antiparallel to the others. PMID:8599639

  3. Intrinsic rectification of ion flux in alamethicin channels: studies with an alamethicin dimer.

    PubMed Central

    Woolley, G A; Biggin, P C; Schultz, A; Lien, L; Jaikaran, D C; Breed, J; Crowhurst, K; Sansom, M S

    1997-01-01

    Covalent dimers of alamethicin form conducting structures with gating properties that permit measurement of current-voltage (I-V) relationships during the lifetime of a single channel. These I-V curves demonstrate that the alamethicin channel is a rectifier that passes current preferentially, with voltages of the same sign as that of the voltage that induced opening of the channel. The degree of rectification depends on the salt concentration; single-channel I-V relationships become almost linear in 3 M potassium chloride. These properties may be qualitatively understood by using Poisson-Nernst-Planck theory and a modeled structure of the alamethicin pore. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:9251793

  4. Alamethicin channel conductance modified by lipid charge.

    PubMed

    Aguilella, V M; Bezrukov, S M

    2001-08-01

    The membrane surface charge modifies the conductance of ion channels by changing the electric potential and redistributing the ionic composition in their vicinity. We have studied the effects of lipid charge on the conductance of a multi-state channel formed in planar lipid bilayers by the peptide antibiotic alamethicin. The channel conductance was measured in two lipids: in a neutral dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) and a negatively charged dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS). The charge state of DOPS was manipulated by the pH of the membrane-bathing solution. We find that at high salt concentrations (e.g., 2 M NaCl) the effect of the lipid charge is below the accuracy of our measurements. However, when the salt concentration in the membrane-bathing solution is decreased, the surface charge manifests itself as an increase in the conductance of the first two channel levels that correspond to the smallest conductive alamethicin aggregates. Our analysis shows that both the salt and pH dependence of the surface charge effect can be rationalized within the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann approach. Given channel conductance in neutral lipids, we use different procedures to account for the surface charge (e.g., introduce averaging over the channel aperture and take into account Na+ adsorption to DOPS heads), but only one adjustable parameter: an effective distance from the nearest lipid charge to the channel mouth center. We show that this distance varies by 0.3-0.4 nm upon channel transition from the minimal conducting aggregate (level L0) to the next larger one (level L1). This conclusion is in accord with a simple geometrical model of alamethicin aggregation.

  5. Analysis and evaluation of channel models: simulations of alamethicin.

    PubMed

    Tieleman, D Peter; Hess, Berk; Sansom, Mark S P

    2002-11-01

    Alamethicin is an antimicrobial peptide that forms stable channels with well-defined conductance levels. We have used extended molecular dynamics simulations of alamethicin bundles consisting of 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 helices in a palmitoyl-oleolyl-phosphatidylcholine bilayer to evaluate and analyze channel models and to link the models to the experimentally measured conductance levels. Our results suggest that four helices do not form a stable water-filled channel and might not even form a stable intermediate. The lowest measurable conductance level is likely to correspond to the pentamer. At higher aggregation numbers the bundles become less symmetrical. Water properties inside the different-sized bundles are similar. The hexamer is the most stable model with a stability comparable with simulations based on crystal structures. The simulation was extended from 4 to 20 ns or several times the mean passage time of an ion. Essential dynamics analyses were used to test the hypothesis that correlated motions of the helical bundles account for high-frequency noise observed in open channel measurements. In a 20-ns simulation of a hexameric alamethicin bundle, the main motions are those of individual helices, not of the bundle as a whole. A detailed comparison of simulations using different methods to treat long-range electrostatic interactions (a twin range cutoff, Particle Mesh Ewald, and a twin range cutoff combined with a reaction field correction) shows that water orientation inside the alamethicin channels is sensitive to the algorithms used. In all cases, water ordering due to the protein structure is strong, although the exact profile changes somewhat. Adding an extra 4-nm layer of water only changes the water ordering slightly in the case of particle mesh Ewald, suggesting that periodicity artifacts for this system are not serious.

  6. Analysis and evaluation of channel models: simulations of alamethicin.

    PubMed Central

    Tieleman, D Peter; Hess, Berk; Sansom, Mark S P

    2002-01-01

    Alamethicin is an antimicrobial peptide that forms stable channels with well-defined conductance levels. We have used extended molecular dynamics simulations of alamethicin bundles consisting of 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 helices in a palmitoyl-oleolyl-phosphatidylcholine bilayer to evaluate and analyze channel models and to link the models to the experimentally measured conductance levels. Our results suggest that four helices do not form a stable water-filled channel and might not even form a stable intermediate. The lowest measurable conductance level is likely to correspond to the pentamer. At higher aggregation numbers the bundles become less symmetrical. Water properties inside the different-sized bundles are similar. The hexamer is the most stable model with a stability comparable with simulations based on crystal structures. The simulation was extended from 4 to 20 ns or several times the mean passage time of an ion. Essential dynamics analyses were used to test the hypothesis that correlated motions of the helical bundles account for high-frequency noise observed in open channel measurements. In a 20-ns simulation of a hexameric alamethicin bundle, the main motions are those of individual helices, not of the bundle as a whole. A detailed comparison of simulations using different methods to treat long-range electrostatic interactions (a twin range cutoff, Particle Mesh Ewald, and a twin range cutoff combined with a reaction field correction) shows that water orientation inside the alamethicin channels is sensitive to the algorithms used. In all cases, water ordering due to the protein structure is strong, although the exact profile changes somewhat. Adding an extra 4-nm layer of water only changes the water ordering slightly in the case of particle mesh Ewald, suggesting that periodicity artifacts for this system are not serious. PMID:12414676

  7. Metal-Assisted Channel Stabilization: Disposition of a Single Histidine on the N-terminus of Alamethicin Yields Channels with Extraordinarily Long Lifetimes

    PubMed Central

    Noshiro, Daisuke; Asami, Koji; Futaki, Shiroh

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Alamethicin, a member of the peptaibol family of antibiotics, is a typical channel-forming peptide with a helical structure. The self-assembly of the peptide in the membranes yields voltage-dependent channels. In this study, three alamethicin analogs possessing a charged residue (His, Lys, or Glu) on their N-termini were designed with the expectation of stabilizing the transmembrane structure. A slight elongation of channel lifetime was observed for the Lys and Glu analogs. On the other hand, extensive stabilization of certain channel open states was observed for the His analog. This stabilization was predominantly observed in the presence of metal ions such as Zn2+, suggesting that metal coordination with His facilitates the formation of a supramolecular assembly in the membranes. Channel stability was greatly diminished by acetylation of the N-terminal amino group, indicating that the N-terminal amino group also plays an important role in metal coordination. PMID:20441743

  8. Ionophore properties of a synthetic alpha-helical transmembrane fragment of the mitochondrial H+ ATP synthetase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Comparison with alamethicin.

    PubMed Central

    Molle, G; Dugast, J Y; Duclohier, H; Daumas, P; Heitz, F; Spach, G

    1988-01-01

    A 22-amino acid polypeptide was synthesized to model the central transmembrane segment of subunit 8 of the H+ ATP synthetase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to test ionophore properties. Solid-phase synthesis was conducted on benzhydrilamino resin, and purification followed by high pressure liquid chromatography allowed the isolation of the pure product whose NH2 terminal was acetylated and whose molecular weight determined by Fast Atomic Bombardment was the expected 2,666. The infrared spectrum of this peptide in the solid state reveals a fully alpha-helical conformation, whereas in low dielectric constant solvents the alpha-helical content is 60%, as determined by circular dichroism studies. Macroscopic current-voltage curves displayed by different planar lipid bilayers (monomyristoleoyl-glycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine) doped with this peptide suggest a weakly voltage-dependent conductance. Only one conductance level is observed in any given single-channel conductance experiment. However, a series of experiments shows a distribution of conductance states, most often 440 or 3,000 pS, and occasionally 80, 1,200, or 6,500 pS. This behavior contrasts with the usual behavior of alamethicin, chosen as a model of "aggregating-helices" ionophore and whose conductance fluctuates continually between substates, through uptake and release of monomers. Nevertheless, alamethicin too can display, under certain conditions, long-lived and mono-level conductance states similar to those reported here for the newly synthesized peptide. These properties could possibly be explained by the formation of large domains of helical rods with a set of allowed and independent ionic pathways. PMID:2449918

  9. Ion Channels of Alamethicin Dimer N-Terminally Linked by Disulfide Bond

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Takashi; Sakoh, Machiko; Nagaoka, Yasuo; Asami, Koji

    2003-01-01

    A covalent dimer of alamethicin Rf30 was synthesized by linking the N-termini by a disulfide bond. When the dimer peptides were added to the cis-side of a diphytanoyl PC membrane, macroscopic channel current was induced only at cis positive voltages. The single-channel recordings showed several conductance levels that were alternately stabilized. These results indicate that the dimer peptides form stable channels by N-terminal insertion like alamethicin and that most of the pores are assembled from even numbers of helices. Taking advantages of the long open duration of the dimer peptide channels, the current-voltage (I-V) relations of the single-channels were obtained by applying fast voltage ramps during the open states. The I-V relations showed rectification, such that current from the cis-side toward the trans-side is larger than that in the opposite direction. The intrinsic rectification is mainly attributed to the macro dipoles of parallel peptide helices surrounding a central pore. PMID:12829482

  10. Ion channels of alamethicin dimer N-terminally linked by disulfide bond.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Takashi; Sakoh, Machiko; Nagaoka, Yasuo; Asami, Koji

    2003-07-01

    A covalent dimer of alamethicin Rf30 was synthesized by linking the N-termini by a disulfide bond. When the dimer peptides were added to the cis-side of a diphytanoyl PC membrane, macroscopic channel current was induced only at cis positive voltages. The single-channel recordings showed several conductance levels that were alternately stabilized. These results indicate that the dimer peptides form stable channels by N-terminal insertion like alamethicin and that most of the pores are assembled from even numbers of helices. Taking advantages of the long open duration of the dimer peptide channels, the current-voltage (I-V) relations of the single-channels were obtained by applying fast voltage ramps during the open states. The I-V relations showed rectification, such that current from the cis-side toward the trans-side is larger than that in the opposite direction. The intrinsic rectification is mainly attributed to the macro dipoles of parallel peptide helices surrounding a central pore.

  11. Signal transduction across alamethicin ion channels in the presence of noise.

    PubMed Central

    Bezrukov, S M; Vodyanoy, I

    1997-01-01

    We have studied voltage-dependent ion channels of alamethicin reconstituted into an artificial planar lipid bilayer membrane from the point of view of electric signal transduction. Signal transduction properties of these channels are highly sensitive to the external electric noise. Specifically, addition of bandwidth-restricted "white" noise of 10-20 mV (r.m.s.) to a small sine wave input signal increases the output signal by approximately 20-40 dB conserving, and even slightly increasing, the signal-to-noise ratio at the system output. We have developed a small-signal adiabatic theory of stochastic resonance for a threshold-free system of voltage-dependent ion channels. This theory describes our main experimental findings giving good qualitative understanding of the underlying mechanism. It predicts the right value of the output signal-to-noise ratio and provides a reliable estimate for the noise intensity corresponding to its maximum. Our results suggest that the alamethicin channel in a lipid bilayer is a good model system for studies of mechanisms of primary electrical signal processing in biology showing an important feature of signal transduction improvement by a fluctuating environment. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:9370439

  12. Single channel conductance modeling of the peptide alamethicin in synthetically formed bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creasy, M. Austin; Leo, Donald J.

    2011-04-01

    Bilayers are synthetically made cell membranes that are used to study cell membrane properties and make functional devices that incorporate inherent properties of the cell membranes. Lipids and proteins are two of the main components of a cell membrane. Lipids provide the structure of the membrane in the form of two leaflets or layers that are held together by the amphiphilic interaction between the lipids and water. Proteins are made from a combination of amino acids and the properties of these proteins are dependent on the amino acid sequence. Some proteins are antibiotics and can easily self insert into the membrane of a cell or into a synthetically formed bilayer. The peptide alamethicin is one such antibiotic that easily inserts into a bilayer and changes the conductance properties of the bilayer. Analytical models of the conductance change with respect to the potential and other variables across the bilayer follows the nonlinear conductance changes seen with the incorporation of the peptide in a bilayer. The individual channels formed by the peptide have been studied and the peptide has several discrete conductance levels. These discrete levels have been shown to be dependent on the potential across the bilayer and several other variables including the lipid variety. The conductance level for a single channel can change with time in a probabilistic fashion. This paper will model these discrete conductance levels of the peptide alamethicin and the model of the single channel conductance will be used to model the cumulative effect of multiple channels within a bilayer.

  13. An alamethicin channel in a lipid bilayer: molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed Central

    Tieleman, D P; Berendsen, H J; Sansom, M S

    1999-01-01

    We present the results of 2-ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a hexameric bundle of Alm helices in a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer. These simulations explore the dynamic properties of a model of a helix bundle channel in a complete phospholipid bilayer in an aqueous environment. We explore the stability and conformational dynamics of the bundle in a phospholipid bilayer. We also investigate the effect on bundle stability of the ionization state of the ring of Glu18 side chains. If all of the Glu18 side chains are ionised, the bundle is unstable; if none of the Glu18 side chains are ionized, the bundle is stable. pKA calculations suggest that either zero or one ionized Glu18 is present at neutral pH, correlating with the stable form of the helix bundle. The structural and dynamic properties of water in this model channel were examined. As in earlier in vacuo simulations (Breed et al., 1996 .Biophys. J. 70:1643-1661), the dipole moments of water molecules within the pore were aligned antiparallel to the helix dipoles. This contributes to the stability of the helix bundle. PMID:10096876

  14. Modifications of alamethicin ion channels by substitution of Glu-7 for Gln-7.

    PubMed

    Asami, Koji; Okazaki, Takashi; Nagai, Yasuaki; Nagaoka, Yasuo

    2002-07-01

    To evaluate the role of charged residues facing a pore lumen in stability of channel structure and ion permeation, we studied electrical properties of ion channels formed by synthesized native alamethicins (Rf50 (alm-Q7Q18) and Rf30 (alm-Q7E18)) and their analogs with Glu-7 (alm-E7Q18 and alm-E7E18). The single-channel currents were measured over a pH range of 3.5 to 8.7 using planar bilayers of diphytanoyl PC. The peptides all showed multi-level current fluctuations in this pH range. At pH 3.5 the channels formed by the four peptides were similar to each other irrespective of the side chain differences at positions 7 and 18. The ionization of Glu-7 (E7) and Glu-18 (E18) above neutral pH reduced the relative probabilities of low-conductance states (levels 1 and 2) and increased those of high-conductance states (levels 4-6). The channel conductance of the peptides with E7 and/or E18, which was distinct from that of alm-Q7Q18, showed a marked pH-dependence, especially for low-conductance states. The ionization of E7 further reduced the stability of channel structure, altered the current-voltage curve from a superlinear relation to a sublinear one, and enhanced cation selectivity. These results indicate that ionized E7 strongly influences the channel structure and the ion permeation, in contrast to ionized E18.

  15. Modifications of alamethicin ion channels by substitution of Glu-7 for Gln-7.

    PubMed Central

    Asami, Koji; Okazaki, Takashi; Nagai, Yasuaki; Nagaoka, Yasuo

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the role of charged residues facing a pore lumen in stability of channel structure and ion permeation, we studied electrical properties of ion channels formed by synthesized native alamethicins (Rf50 (alm-Q7Q18) and Rf30 (alm-Q7E18)) and their analogs with Glu-7 (alm-E7Q18 and alm-E7E18). The single-channel currents were measured over a pH range of 3.5 to 8.7 using planar bilayers of diphytanoyl PC. The peptides all showed multi-level current fluctuations in this pH range. At pH 3.5 the channels formed by the four peptides were similar to each other irrespective of the side chain differences at positions 7 and 18. The ionization of Glu-7 (E7) and Glu-18 (E18) above neutral pH reduced the relative probabilities of low-conductance states (levels 1 and 2) and increased those of high-conductance states (levels 4-6). The channel conductance of the peptides with E7 and/or E18, which was distinct from that of alm-Q7Q18, showed a marked pH-dependence, especially for low-conductance states. The ionization of E7 further reduced the stability of channel structure, altered the current-voltage curve from a superlinear relation to a sublinear one, and enhanced cation selectivity. These results indicate that ionized E7 strongly influences the channel structure and the ion permeation, in contrast to ionized E18. PMID:12080114

  16. The interactions with solvent, heat stability, and 13C-labelling of alamethicin, an ion-channel-forming peptide.

    PubMed

    Yee, A A; Marat, K; O'Neil, J D

    1997-01-15

    The peptide alamethicin was labelled with 13C and 15N by growing the fungus Trichoderma viride in a medium containing [U-13C] glucose and K15NO3. Spin-echo difference spectroscopy showed that 13C was incorporated to a level of about 50% and 15N to about 98%. Incorporation of 13C into the peptide provided residue-specific probes of the interactions with solvent and heat stability of this ion-channel-forming peptide. All of the carbonyl carbons and the alpha-carbons of the alpha-aminoisobutyric acid [Ala(Me)] residues of alamethicin in methanol were assigned using two-dimensional and three-dimensional heteronuclear correlation experiments. Measurements of 1JC'N revealed hydrogen bonding with solvent at residues 1 and 19 at the ends of the peptide and at Gly11 in the middle. The data also support the thesis [see Juranic, N., Ilich, P. K. & Macara, S. (1995) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 117, 405-410 that intramolecular hydrogen bonds in proteins and peptides are weaker than hydrogen bonds to solvent. The sensitivity of alamethicin carbonyl and proton chemical shifts to perturbation by dimethyl sulfoxide correlates well with the calculated solvent accessibilities of the carbonyls in the crystal structures and reveals residues in the middle of the peptide and at the C-terminus which interact with solvent. Taken together with the 1JC'N measurements, the data support a model in which hydrogen bonding to solvent at the Gly11/Leu12 amide could provide a site of hydration in the interior of the alamethicin channel structure. The temperature dependencies of the carbonyl chemical shifts support the suggestion that the peptide is flexible in the regions where solvent interacts with the backbone of the peptide. The linear temperature dependence of the carbonyl chemical shifts and molar ellipticity indicate that, due to steric constraints at the Ala(Me) residues, the peptide folding/unfolding transition is non-cooperative and that the peptide is remarkably heat stable.

  17. Conformational Changes in Alamethicin Associated with Substitution of Its α-Methylalanines with Leucines: A FTIR Spectroscopic Analysis and Correlation with Channel Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Haris, Parvez I.; Molle, Gérard; Duclohier, Hervé

    2004-01-01

    Alamethicin, a 20 residue-long peptaibol remains a favorite high voltage-dependent channel-forming peptide. However, the structural significance of its abundant noncoded residues (α-methylalanine or Aib) for its ion channel activity remains unknown, although a previous study showed that replacement of all Aib residues with leucines preserved the essential channel behavior except for much faster single-channel events. To correlate these functional properties with structural data, here we compare the secondary structures of an alamethicin derivative where all the eight Aibs were replaced by leucines and the native alamethicin. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of these peptides were recorded in methanol and in aqueous phospholipid membranes. Results obtained show a significant conformational change in alamethicin upon substitution of its Aib residues with Leu. The amide I band occurs at a lower frequency for the Leu-derivative indicating that its α-helices are involved in stronger hydrogen-bonding. In addition, the structure of the Leu-derivative is quite sensitive to membrane fluidity changes. The amide I band shifts to higher frequencies when the lipids are in the fluid phase. This indicates either a decreased solvation due to a more complete peptide insertion or a peptide stretching to match the full thickness of the bilayer. These results contribute to explain the fast single-channel kinetics displayed by the Leu-derivative. PMID:14695266

  18. Dynamics and aggregation of the peptide ion channel alamethicin. Measurements using spin-labeled peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Archer, S J; Ellena, J F; Cafiso, D S

    1991-01-01

    Two spin-labeled derivatives of the ion conductive peptide alamethicin were synthesized and used to examine its binding and state of aggregation. One derivative was spin labeled at the C-terminus and the other, a leucine analogue, was spin labeled at the N-terminus. In methanol, both the C and N terminal labeled peptides were monomeric. In aqueous solution, the C-terminal derivative was monomeric at low concentrations, but aggregated at higher concentrations with a critical concentration of 23 microM. In the membrane, the C-terminal label was localized to the membrane-aqueous interface using 13C-NMR, and could assume more than one orientation. The membrane binding of the C-terminal derivative was examined using EPR, and it exhibited a cooperativity seen previously for native alamethicin. However, this cooperativity was not the result of an aggregation of the peptide in the membrane. When the spectra of either the C or N-terminal labeled peptide were examined over a wide range of membrane lipid to peptide ratios, no evidence for aggregation could be found and the peptides remained monomeric under all conditions examined. Because electrical measurements on this peptide provide strong evidence for an ion-conductive aggregate, the ion-conductive form of alamethicin likely represents a minor fraction of the total membrane bound peptide. PMID:1717016

  19. Alamethicin helices in a bilayer and in solution: molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed Central

    Tieleman, D P; Sansom, M S; Berendsen, H J

    1999-01-01

    Alamethicin is an alpha-helical channel-forming peptide, which inserts into lipid bilayers in a voltage-dependent, asymmetrical fashion. Nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations have been used to compare alamethicin conformation and dynamics in three different environments: 1) in water; 2) in methanol; and 3) inserted into a lipid (palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine) bilayer to form a transmembrane helix. In the bilayer and in methanol, there was little change (Calpha RMSD approximately 0.2 nm over 2 ns and 1 ns) from the initial helical conformation of the peptide. In water there were substantial changes (Calpha RMSD approximately 0.4 nm over 1 ns), especially in the C-terminal segment of the peptide, which lost its alpha-helical conformation. In the bilayer and in methanol, the alamethicin molecule underwent hinge-bending motion about its central Gly-X-X-Pro sequence motif. Analysis of H-bonding interactions revealed that the polar C-terminal side chains of alamethicin provided an "anchor" to the bilayer/water interface via formation of multiple H-bonds that persisted throughout the simulation. This explains why the preferred mode of helix insertion into the bilayer is N-terminal, which is believed to underlie the asymmetry of voltage activation of alamethicin channels. PMID:9876121

  20. Simulation Studies of Alamethicin-Bilayer Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Biggin, P. C.; Breed, J.; Son, H. S.; Sansom, M. S. P.

    1997-01-01

    Alamethicin is an α-helical peptide that forms voltage-activated ion channels. Experimental data suggest that channel formation occurs via voltage-dependent insertion of alamethicin helices into lipid bilayers, followed by self-assembly of inserted helices to form a parallel helix bundle. Changes in the kink angle of the alamethicin helix about its central proline residue have also been suggested to play a role in channel gating. Alamethicin helices generated by simulated annealing and restrained molecular dynamics adopt a kink angle similar to that in the x-ray crystal structure, even if such simulations start with an idealized unkinked helix. This suggests that the kinked helix represents a stable conformation of the molecule. Molecular dynamics simulations in the presence of a simple bilayer model and a transbilayer voltage difference are used to explore possible mechanisms of helix insertion. The bilayer is represented by a hydrophobicity potential. An alamethicin helix inserts spontaneously in the absence of a transbilayer voltage. Application of a cis positive voltage decreases the time to insertion. The helix kink angle fluctuates during the simulations. Insertion of the helix is associated with a decrease in the mean kink angle, thus helping the alamethicin molecule to span the bilayer. The simulation results are discussed in terms of models of alamethicin channel gating. ImagesFIGURE 1FIGURE 6 PMID:9017192

  1. The Origins of Transmembrane Ion Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Even though membrane proteins that mediate transport of ions and small molecules across cell walls are among the largest and least understood biopolymers in contemporary cells, it is still possible to shed light on their origins and early evolution. The central observation is that transmembrane portions of most ion channels are simply bundles of -helices. By combining results of experimental and computer simulation studies on synthetic models and natural channels, mostly of non-genomic origin, we show that the emergence of -helical channels was protobiologically plausible, and did not require highly specific amino acid sequences. Despite their simple structure, such channels could possess properties that, at the first sight, appear to require markedly larger complexity. Specifically, we explain how the antiamoebin channels, which are made of identical helices, 16 amino acids in length, achieve efficiency comparable to that of highly evolved channels. We further show that antiamoebin channels are extremely flexible, compared to modern, genetically coded channels. On the basis of our results, we propose that channels evolved further towards high structural complexity because they needed to acquire stable rigid structures and mechanisms for precise regulation rather than improve efficiency. In general, even though architectures of membrane proteins are not nearly as diverse as those of water-soluble proteins, they are sufficiently flexible to adapt readily to the functional demands arising during evolution.

  2. Observing a model ion channel gating action in model cell membranes in real time in situ: membrane potential change induced alamethicin orientation change.

    PubMed

    Ye, Shuji; Li, Hongchun; Wei, Feng; Jasensky, Joshua; Boughton, Andrew P; Yang, Pei; Chen, Zhan

    2012-04-11

    Ion channels play crucial roles in transport and regulatory functions of living cells. Understanding the gating mechanisms of these channels is important to understanding and treating diseases that have been linked to ion channels. One potential model peptide for studying the mechanism of ion channel gating is alamethicin, which adopts a split α/3(10)-helix structure and responds to changes in electric potential. In this study, sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS), supplemented by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), has been applied to characterize interactions between alamethicin (a model for larger channel proteins) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) lipid bilayers in the presence of an electric potential across the membrane. The membrane potential difference was controlled by changing the pH of the solution in contact with the bilayer and was measured using fluorescence spectroscopy. The orientation angle of alamethicin in POPC lipid bilayers was then determined at different pH values using polarized SFG amide I spectra. Assuming that all molecules adopt the same orientation (a δ distribution), at pH = 6.7 the α-helix at the N-terminus and the 3(10)-helix at the C-terminus tilt at about 72° (θ(1)) and 50° (θ(2)) versus the surface normal, respectively. When pH increases to 11.9, θ(1) and θ(2) decrease to 56.5° and 45°, respectively. The δ distribution assumption was verified using a combination of SFG and ATR-FTIR measurements, which showed a quite narrow distribution in the angle of θ(1) for both pH conditions. This indicates that all alamethicin molecules at the surface adopt a nearly identical orientation in POPC lipid bilayers. The localized pH change in proximity to the bilayer modulates the membrane potential and thus induces a decrease in both the tilt and the bend angles of the two helices in alamethicin. This is the first reported application of SFG

  3. Ion channels of N-terminally linked alamethicin dimers: enhancement of cation-selectivity by substitution of Glu for Gln at position 7.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Takashi; Nagaoka, Yasuo; Asami, Koji

    2007-05-01

    Alamethicin forms voltage-gated ion channels that have moderate cation-selectivity. The enhancement of the cation-selectivity by introducing negatively charged residues at positions 7 and 18 has been studied using the tethered homodimers of alamethicin with Q7 and E18 (di-alm-Q7E18) and its analog with E7 and Q18 (di-alm-E7Q18). In the dimeric peptides, monomer peptides are linked at the N-termini by a disulfide bond. Both the peptides formed long lasting ion channels at cis-positive voltages when added to the cis-side membrane. Their long open duration enabled us to obtain current-voltage (I-V(m)) relations and reversal potentials at the single-channel level by applying a voltage ramp during the channel opening. The reversal potentials measured in asymmetric KCl solutions indicated that ionized E7 provided strong cation-selectivity, whereas ionized E18 little influenced the charge selectivity. This was also the case for the macroscopic charge selectivity determined from the reversal potentials obtained by the macroscopic I-V(m) measurements. The results are accounted for by stronger electrostatic interactions between permeant ions and negatively charged residues at the narrowest part of the pore than at the pore mouth.

  4. Continuum solvent model calculations of alamethicin-membrane interactions: thermodynamic aspects.

    PubMed Central

    Kessel, A; Cafiso, D S; Ben-Tal, N

    2000-01-01

    Alamethicin is a 20-amino acid antibiotic peptide that forms voltage-gated ion channels in lipid bilayers. Here we report calculations of its association free energy with membranes. The calculations take into account the various free-energy terms that contribute to the transfer of the peptide from the aqueous phase into bilayers of different widths. The electrostatic and nonpolar contributions to the solvation free energy are calculated using continuum solvent models. The contributions from the lipid perturbation and membrane deformation effects and the entropy loss associated with peptide immobilization in the bilayer are estimated from a statistical thermodynamic model. The calculations were carried out using two classes of experimentally observed conformations, both of which are helical: the NMR and the x-ray crystal structures. Our calculations show that alamethicin is unlikely to partition into bilayers in any of the NMR conformations because they have uncompensated backbone hydrogen bonds and their association with the membrane involves a large electrostatic solvation free energy penalty. In contrast, the x-ray conformations provide enough backbone hydrogen bonds for the peptide to associate with bilayers. We tested numerous transmembrane and surface orientations of the peptide in bilayers, and our calculations indicate that the most favorable orientation is transmembrane, where the peptide protrudes approximately 4 A into the water-membrane interface, in very good agreement with electron paramagnetic resonance and oriented circular dichroism measurements. The calculations were carried out using two alamethicin isoforms: one with glutamine and the other with glutamate in the 18th position. The calculations indicate that the two isoforms have similar membrane orientations and that their insertion into the membrane is likely to involve a 2-A deformation of the bilayer, again, in good agreement with experimental data. The implications of the results for the

  5. Proline-induced hinges in transmembrane helices: possible roles in ion channel gating.

    PubMed

    Tieleman, D P; Shrivastava, I H; Ulmschneider, M R; Sansom, M S

    2001-08-01

    A number of ion channels contain transmembrane (TM) alpha-helices that contain proline-induced molecular hinges. These TM helices include the channel-forming peptide alamethicin (Alm), the S6 helix from voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, and the D5 helix from voltage-gated chloride (CLC) channels. For both Alm and KvS6, experimental data implicate hinge-bending motions of the helix in an aspect of channel gating. We have compared the hinge-bending motions of these TM helices in bilayer-like environments by multi-nanosecond MD simulations in an attempt to describe motions of these helices that may underlie possible modes of channel gating. Alm is an alpha-helical channel-forming peptide, which contains a central kink associated with a Gly-x-x-Pro motif in its sequence. Simulations of Alm in a TM orientation for 10 ns in an octane slab indicate that the Gly-x-x-Pro motif acts as a molecular hinge. The S6 helix from Shaker Kv channels contains a Pro-Val-Pro motif. Modeling studies and recent experimental data suggest that the KvS6 helix may be kinked in the vicinity of this motif. Simulations (10 ns) of an isolated KvS6 helix in an octane slab and in a POPC bilayer reveal hinge-bending motions. A pattern-matching approach was used to search for possible hinge-bending motifs in the TM helices of other ion channel proteins. This uncovered a conserved Gly-x-Pro motif in TM helix D5 of CLC channels. MD simulations of a model of hCLC1-D5 spanning an octane slab suggest that this channel also contains a TM helix that undergoes hinge-bending motion. In conclusion, our simulations suggest a model in which hinge-bending motions of TM helices may play a functional role in the gating mechanisms of several different families of ion channels.

  6. Transmembrane channel formation in rhodopsin-containing bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Montal, M; Darszon, A; Trissl, H W

    1977-05-19

    Rhodopsin has been incorporated into planar lipid bilayer membranes. The effect of light is to increase the bilayer permeability in a pattern consistent with the formation of a transmembrane channel of about 10 A diameter. A model of visual excitation based on a light-activated and voltage-sensitive channel is presented.

  7. "Reversed" alamethicin conductance in lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, R J; de Levie, R

    1991-01-01

    Alamethicin at a concentration of 2 micrograms/ml on one side of a lipid bilayer, formed at the tip of a patch clamp pipette from diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol (2:1 mol ratio) in aqueous 0.5 M KCl, 5 mM Hepes, pH 7.0, exhibits an asymmetric current-voltage curve, only yielding alamethicin currents when the side to which the peptide has been added is made positive. Below room temperature, however, single alamethicin channels created in such membranes sometimes survive a sudden reversal of the polarity. These "reversed" channels are distinct from transiently observed states displayed as the channel closes after a polarity reversal. Such "reversed" channels can be monitored for periods up to several minutes, during which time we have observed them to fluctuate through more than 20 discrete conductance states. They are convenient for the study of isolated ion-conducting alamethicin aggregates because, after voltage reversal, no subsequent incorporation of additional ion-conducting aggregates takes place. PMID:1712238

  8. Ion Channel-Forming Alamethicin Is a Potent Elicitor of Volatile Biosynthesis and Tendril Coiling. Cross Talk between Jasmonate and Salicylate Signaling in Lima Bean1

    PubMed Central

    Engelberth, Jürgen; Koch, Thomas; Schüler, Göde; Bachmann, Nadine; Rechtenbach, Jana; Boland, Wilhelm

    2001-01-01

    Alamethicin (ALA), a voltage-gated, ion channel-forming peptide mixture from Trichoderma viride, is a potent elicitor of the biosynthesis of volatile compounds in lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus). Unlike elicitation with jasmonic acid or herbivore damage, the blend of substances emitted comprises only the two homoterpenes, 4,11-dimethylnona-1,3,7-triene and 4,8,12-trimethyltrideca-1,3,7,11-tetraene, and methyl salicylate. Inhibition of octadecanoid signaling by aristolochic acid and phenidone as well as mass spectrometric analysis of endogenous jasmonate demonstrate that ALA induces the biosynthesis of volatile compounds principally via the octadecanoid-signaling pathway (20-fold increase of jasmonic acid). ALA also up-regulates salicylate biosynthesis, and the time course of the production of endogenous salicylate correlates well with the appearance of the methyl ester in the gas phase. The massive up-regulation of the SA-pathway (90-fold) interferes with steps in the biosynthetic pathway downstream of 12-oxophytodienoic acid and thereby reduces the pattern of emitted volatiles to compounds previously shown to be induced by early octadecanoids. ALA also induces tendril coiling in various species like Pisum, Lathyrus, and Bryonia, but the response appears to be independent from octadecanoid biosynthesis, because inhibitors of lipoxygenase and phospholipase A2 do not prevent the coiling reaction. PMID:11154344

  9. Transmembrane allosteric coupling of the gates in a potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Benjamin J.; Bhate, Manasi P.; McDermott, Ann E.

    2014-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that transmembrane allostery is the basis for inactivation of the potassium channel KcsA: opening the intracellular gate is spontaneously followed by ion expulsion at the extracellular selectivity filter. This suggests a corollary: following ion expulsion at neutral pH, a spontaneous global conformation change of the transmembrane helices, similar to the motion involved in opening, is expected. Consequently, both the low potassium state and the low pH state of the system could provide useful models for the inactivated state. Unique NMR studies of full-length KcsA in hydrated bilayers provide strong evidence for such a mutual coupling across the bilayer: namely, upon removing ambient potassium ions, changes are seen in the NMR shifts of carboxylates E118 and E120 in the pH gate in the hinges of the inner transmembrane helix (98–103), and in the selectivity filter, all of which resemble changes seen upon acid-induced opening and inhibition and suggest that ion release can trigger channel helix opening. PMID:24344306

  10. Transmembrane allosteric coupling of the gates in a potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Benjamin J; Bhate, Manasi P; McDermott, Ann E

    2014-01-07

    It has been hypothesized that transmembrane allostery is the basis for inactivation of the potassium channel KcsA: opening the intracellular gate is spontaneously followed by ion expulsion at the extracellular selectivity filter. This suggests a corollary: following ion expulsion at neutral pH, a spontaneous global conformation change of the transmembrane helices, similar to the motion involved in opening, is expected. Consequently, both the low potassium state and the low pH state of the system could provide useful models for the inactivated state. Unique NMR studies of full-length KcsA in hydrated bilayers provide strong evidence for such a mutual coupling across the bilayer: namely, upon removing ambient potassium ions, changes are seen in the NMR shifts of carboxylates E118 and E120 in the pH gate in the hinges of the inner transmembrane helix (98-103), and in the selectivity filter, all of which resemble changes seen upon acid-induced opening and inhibition and suggest that ion release can trigger channel helix opening.

  11. Hydrogen bond stabilities in membrane-reconstituted alamethicin from amide-resolved hydrogen-exchange measurements.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, C E; Handcock, L J

    1996-04-01

    either the bulk solution or water within parallel or antiparallel transmembrane arrays of reconstituted alamethicin.

  12. Forming transmembrane channels using end-functionalized nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dutt, Meenakshi; Kuksenok, Olga; Little, Steven R; Balazs, Anna C

    2011-01-01

    Using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations, we examine the interaction between amphiphilic nanotubes and lipid bilayer membranes. The nanotubes are represented by a hydrophobic shaft that is end-functionalized with hydrophilic groups. Nanotubes that are capped by a monolayer of hydrophilic beads or also encompass hydrophilic "hairs" on just one end of the shaft are found to spontaneously penetrate and assume a transmembrane position; the process, however, depends critically on the membrane tension. On the other hand, nanotubes that include hydrophilic hairs at both ends of the hydrophobic shaft are not observed to spontaneously self-organize into the bilayer. When the membrane is stretched to form a pore, the nanotubes with two hairy ends adsorb on the edge of the pore and become localized in the membrane, thus forming a transmembrane channel. The findings from these studies provide guidelines for creating biomimetic nanotube channels that are capable of selectively transporting molecules through the membrane in response to changes in the local environment.

  13. The transmembrane channel-like protein family and human papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Jaime S; Stokes, Alexander J

    2014-01-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare genodermatosis characterized by increased sensitivity to infection by the β-subtype of human papillomaviruses (β-HPVs), causing persistent, tinea versicolor-like dermal lesions. In a majority of affected individuals, these macular lesions progress to invasive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) in sun-exposed areas. While mutations in transmembrane channel-like 6 (TMC6 / EVER1) and 8 (TMC8 / EVER2) have been causally linked to EV, their molecular functions are unclear. It is likely that their protective effects involve regulation of the β-HPV life cycle, host keratinocyte apoptosis vs. survival balance and/or T-cell interaction with infected host cells. PMID:24800179

  14. Incorporation of antimicrobial peptides into membranes: a combined liquid-state NMR and molecular dynamics study of alamethicin in DMPC/DHPC bicelles.

    PubMed

    Dittmer, Jens; Thøgersen, Lea; Underhaug, Jarl; Bertelsen, Kresten; Vosegaard, Thomas; Pedersen, Jan M; Schiøtt, Birgit; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Skrydstrup, Troels; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2009-05-14

    Detailed insight into the interplay between antimicrobial peptides and biological membranes is fundamental to our understanding of the mechanism of bacterial ion channels and the action of these in biological host-defense systems. To explore this interplay, we have studied the incorporation, membrane-bound structure, and conformation of the antimicrobial peptide alamethicin in lipid bilayers using a combination of 1H liquid-state NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. On the basis of experimental NMR data, we evaluate simple in-plane and transmembrane incorporation models as well as pore formation for alamethicin in DMPC/DHPC (1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine/1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine) bicelles. Peptide-lipid nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) data support a transmembrane configuration of the peptide in the bilayers, but they also reveal that the system cannot be described by a single simple conformational model because there is a very high degree of dynamics and heterogeneity in the three-component system. To explore the origin of this heterogeneity and dynamics, we have compared the NOE and PRE data with MD simulations of an ensemble of alamethicin peptides in a DMPC bilayer. From all-atom MD simulations, the contacts between peptide, lipid, and water protons are quantified over a time interval up to 95 ns. The MD simulations provide a statistical base that reflects our NMR data and even can explain some initially surprising NMR results concerning specific interactions between alamethicin and the lipids.

  15. [Polymethoxylated flavonoids activate cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel].

    PubMed

    Cao, Huan-Huan; Fang, Fang; Yu, Bo; Luan, Jian; Jiang, Yu; Yang, Hong

    2015-04-25

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-dependent chloride channel, plays key roles in fluid secretion in serous epithelial cells. Previously, we identified two polymethoxylated flavonoids, 3',4',5,5',6,7-hexamethoxyflavone (HMF) and 5-hydroxy-6,7,3',4'-tetramethoxyflavone (HTF) which could potentiate CFTR chloride channel activities. The present study was aimed to investigate the potentiation effects of HMF and HTF on CFTR Cl(-) channel activities by using a cell-based fluorescence assay and the short circuit Ussing chamber assay. The results of cell-based fluorescence assay showed that both HMF and HTF could dose-dependently potentiate CFTR Cl(-) channel activities in rapid and reversible ways, and the activations could be reversed by the CFTR blocker CFTRinh-172. Notably, HMF showed the highest affinity (EC50 = 2 μmol/L) to CFTR protein among the flavonoid CFTR activators identified so far. The activation of CFTR by HMF or HTF was forskolin (FSK) dependent. Both compounds showed additive effect with FSK and 3-Isobutyl-1-methylx (IBMX) in the activation of CFTR, while had no additive effect with genistein (GEN). In ex vivo studies, HMF and HTF could stimulate transepithelial Cl(-) secretion in rat colonic mucosa and enhance fluid secretion in mouse trachea submucosal glands. These results suggest that HMF and HTF may potentiate CFTR Cl(-) channel activities through both elevation of cAMP level and binding to CFTR protein pathways. The results provide new clues in elucidating structure and activity relationship of flavonoid CFTR activators. HMF might be developed as a new drug in the therapy of CFTR-related diseases such as bronchiectasis and habitual constipation.

  16. A thermodynamic approach to Alamethicin pore formation

    PubMed Central

    Rahaman, Asif; Lazaridis, Themis

    2013-01-01

    The structure and energetics of alamethicin Rf30 monomer to nonamer in cylindrical pores of 5 to 11 Å radius are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations in an implicit membrane model that includes the free energy cost of acyl chain hydrophobic area exposure. Stable, low energy pores are obtained for certain combinations of radius and oligomeric number. The trimer and the tetramer formed 6 Å pores that appear closed while the larger oligomers formed open pores at their optimal radius. The hexamer in an 8 Å pore and the octamer in an 11 Å pore give the lowest effective energy per monomer. However, all oligomers beyond the pentamer have comparable energies, consistent with the observation of multiple conductance levels. The results are consistent with the widely accepted “barrel-stave” model. The N terminal portion of the molecule exhibits smaller tilt with respect to the membrane normal than the C terminal portion, resulting in a pore shape that is a hybrid between a funnel and an hourglass. Transmembrane voltage has little effect on the structure of the oligomers but enhances or decreases their stability depending on its orientation. Antiparallel bundles are lower in energy than the commonly accepted parallel ones and could be present under certain experimental conditions. Dry aggregates (without an aqueous pore) have lower average effective energy than the corresponding aggregates in a pore, suggesting that alamethicin pores may be excited states that are stabilized in part by voltage and in part by the ion flow itself. PMID:24071593

  17. A thermodynamic approach to alamethicin pore formation.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Asif; Lazaridis, Themis

    2014-01-01

    The structure and energetics of alamethicin Rf30 monomer to nonamer in cylindrical pores of 5 to 11Å radius are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations in an implicit membrane model that includes the free energy cost of acyl chain hydrophobic area exposure. Stable, low energy pores are obtained for certain combinations of radius and oligomeric number. The trimer and the tetramer formed 6Å pores that appear closed while the larger oligomers formed open pores at their optimal radius. The hexamer in an 8Å pore and the octamer in an 11Å pore give the lowest effective energy per monomer. However, all oligomers beyond the pentamer have comparable energies, consistent with the observation of multiple conductance levels. The results are consistent with the widely accepted "barrel-stave" model. The N terminal portion of the molecule exhibits smaller tilt with respect to the membrane normal than the C terminal portion, resulting in a pore shape that is a hybrid between a funnel and an hourglass. Transmembrane voltage has little effect on the structure of the oligomers but enhances or decreases their stability depending on its orientation. Antiparallel bundles are lower in energy than the commonly accepted parallel ones and could be present under certain experimental conditions. Dry aggregates (without an aqueous pore) have lower average effective energy than the corresponding aggregates in a pore, suggesting that alamethicin pores may be excited states that are stabilized in part by voltage and in part by the ion flow itself.

  18. A thermodynamic approach to alamethicin pore formation.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Asif; Lazaridis, Themis

    2014-05-01

    The structure and energetics of alamethicin Rf30 monomer to nonamer in cylindrical pores of 5 to 11Å radius are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations in an implicit membrane model that includes the free energy cost of acyl chain hydrophobic area exposure. Stable, low energy pores are obtained for certain combinations of radius and oligomeric number. The trimer and the tetramer formed 6Å pores that appear closed while the larger oligomers formed open pores at their optimal radius. The hexamer in an 8Å pore and the octamer in an 11Å pore give the lowest effective energy per monomer. However, all oligomers beyond the pentamer have comparable energies, consistent with the observation of multiple conductance levels. The results are consistent with the widely accepted "barrel-stave" model. The N terminal portion of the molecule exhibits smaller tilt with respect to the membrane normal than the C terminal portion, resulting in a pore shape that is a hybrid between a funnel and an hourglass. Transmembrane voltage has little effect on the structure of the oligomers but enhances or decreases their stability depending on its orientation. Antiparallel bundles are lower in energy than the commonly accepted parallel ones and could be present under certain experimental conditions. Dry aggregates (without an aqueous pore) have lower average effective energy than the corresponding aggregates in a pore, suggesting that alamethicin pores may be excited states that are stabilized in part by voltage and in part by the ion flow itself.

  19. Transmembrane channel-like (tmc) gene regulates Drosophila larval locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yanmeng; Wang, Yuping; Zhang, Wei; Meltzer, Shan; Zanini, Damiano; Yu, Yue; Li, Jiefu; Cheng, Tong; Guo, Zhenhao; Wang, Qingxiu; Jacobs, Julie S.; Sharma, Yashoda; Eberl, Daniel F.; Göpfert, Martin C.; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung; Wang, Zuoren

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila larval locomotion, which entails rhythmic body contractions, is controlled by sensory feedback from proprioceptors. The molecular mechanisms mediating this feedback are little understood. By using genetic knock-in and immunostaining, we found that the Drosophila melanogaster transmembrane channel-like (tmc) gene is expressed in the larval class I and class II dendritic arborization (da) neurons and bipolar dendrite (bd) neurons, both of which are known to provide sensory feedback for larval locomotion. Larvae with knockdown or loss of tmc function displayed reduced crawling speeds, increased head cast frequencies, and enhanced backward locomotion. Expressing Drosophila TMC or mammalian TMC1 and/or TMC2 in the tmc-positive neurons rescued these mutant phenotypes. Bending of the larval body activated the tmc-positive neurons, and in tmc mutants this bending response was impaired. This implicates TMC’s roles in Drosophila proprioception and the sensory control of larval locomotion. It also provides evidence for a functional conservation between Drosophila and mammalian TMCs. PMID:27298354

  20. Voltage-dependent insertion of alamethicin at phospholipid/water and octane/water interfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Tieleman, D P; Berendsen, H J; Sansom, M S

    2001-01-01

    Understanding the binding and insertion of peptides in lipid bilayers is a prerequisite for understanding phenomena such as antimicrobial activity and membrane-protein folding. We describe molecular dynamics simulations of the antimicrobial peptide alamethicin in lipid/water and octane/water environments, taking into account an external electric field to mimic the membrane potential. At cis-positive potentials, alamethicin does not insert into a phospholipid bilayer in 10 ns of simulation, due to the slow dynamics of the peptide and lipids. However, in octane N-terminal insertion occurs at field strengths from 0.33 V/nm and higher, in simulations of up to 100 ns duration. Insertion of alamethicin occurs in two steps, corresponding to desolvation of the Gln7 side chain, and the backbone of Aib10 and Gly11. The proline induced helix kink angle does not change significantly during insertion. Polyalanine and alamethicin form stable helices both when inserted in octane and at the water/octane interface, where they partition in the same location. In water, both polyalanine and alamethicin partially unfold in multiple simulations. We present a detailed analysis of the insertion of alamethicin into the octane slab and the influence of the external field on the peptide structure. Our findings give new insight into the mechanism of channel formation by alamethicin and the structure and dynamics of membrane-associated helices. PMID:11159406

  1. Metal bridges illuminate transmembrane domain movements during gating of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    PubMed

    El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2014-10-10

    Opening and closing of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator are controlled by ATP binding and hydrolysis by the cytoplasmic nucleotide-binding domains. Different conformational changes in the channel pore have been described during channel opening and closing; however, the relative importance of these changes to the process of gating the pore is not known. We have used patch clamp recording to identify high affinity Cd(2+) bridges formed between pairs of pore-lining cysteine residues introduced into different transmembrane α-helices (TMs). Seven Cd(2+) bridges were identified forming between cysteines in TMs 6 and 12. Interestingly, each of these Cd(2+) bridges apparently formed only in closed channels, and their formation stabilized the closed state. In contrast, a single Cd(2+) bridge identified between cysteines in TMs 1 and 12 stabilized the channel open state. Analysis of the pattern of Cd(2+) bridge formation in different channel states suggests that lateral separation and convergence of different TMs, rather than relative rotation or translation of different TMs, is the key conformational change that causes the channel pore to open and close.

  2. Metal Bridges Illuminate Transmembrane Domain Movements during Gating of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Chloride Channel*

    PubMed Central

    El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Opening and closing of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator are controlled by ATP binding and hydrolysis by the cytoplasmic nucleotide-binding domains. Different conformational changes in the channel pore have been described during channel opening and closing; however, the relative importance of these changes to the process of gating the pore is not known. We have used patch clamp recording to identify high affinity Cd2+ bridges formed between pairs of pore-lining cysteine residues introduced into different transmembrane α-helices (TMs). Seven Cd2+ bridges were identified forming between cysteines in TMs 6 and 12. Interestingly, each of these Cd2+ bridges apparently formed only in closed channels, and their formation stabilized the closed state. In contrast, a single Cd2+ bridge identified between cysteines in TMs 1 and 12 stabilized the channel open state. Analysis of the pattern of Cd2+ bridge formation in different channel states suggests that lateral separation and convergence of different TMs, rather than relative rotation or translation of different TMs, is the key conformational change that causes the channel pore to open and close. PMID:25143385

  3. Biomimetic Transmembrane Channels with High Stability and Transporting Efficiency from Helically Folded Macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Lang, Chao; Li, Wenfang; Dong, Zeyuan; Zhang, Xin; Yang, Feihu; Yang, Bing; Deng, Xiaoli; Zhang, Chenyang; Xu, Jiayun; Liu, Junqiu

    2016-08-08

    Membrane channels span the cellular lipid bilayers to transport ions and molecules into cells with sophisticated properties including high efficiency and selectivity. It is of particular biological importance in developing biomimetic transmembrane channels with unique functions by means of chemically synthetic strategies. An artificial unimolecular transmembrane channel using pore-containing helical macromolecules is reported. The self-folding, shape-persistent, pore-containing helical macromolecules are able to span the lipid bilayer, and thus result in extraordinary channel stability and high transporting efficiency for protons and cations. The lifetime of this artificial unimolecular channel in the lipid bilayer membrane is impressively long, rivaling those of natural protein channels. Natural channel mimics designed by helically folded polymeric scaffolds will display robust and versatile transport-related properties at single-molecule level. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Structure of the Alamethicin Pore Reconstructed by X-Ray Diffraction Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Shuo; Wang, Wangchen; Yang, Lin; Huang, Huey W.

    2008-01-01

    We reconstructed the electron density profile of the alamethicin-induced transmembrane pore by x-ray diffraction. We prepared fully hydrated multiple bilayers of alamethicin-lipid mixtures in a condition where pores were present, as established previously by neutron in-plane scattering in correlation with oriented circular dichroism. At dehydrated conditions, the interbilayer distance shortened and the interactions between bilayers caused the membrane pores to become long-ranged correlated and form a periodically ordered lattice of rhombohedral symmetry. To resolve the phase problem of diffraction, we used a brominated lipid and performed multiwavelength anomalous diffraction at the bromine K edge. The result unambiguously shows that the alamethicin pore is of the barrel-stave type consisting of eight alamethicin helices. This pore structure corresponds to the stable pores detected by neutron in-plane scattering in fully hydrated fluid bilayers at high peptide/lipid ratios, which are the conditions at which alamethicin was tested for its antibacterial activity. PMID:18199659

  5. The first transmembrane domain (TM1) of β2-subunit binds to the transmembrane domain S1 of α-subunit in BK potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Morera, Francisco J.; Alioua, Abderrahmane; Kundu, Pallob; Salazar, Marcelo; Gonzalez, Carlos; Martinez, Agustin D.; Stefani, Enrico; Toro, Ligia; Latorre, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    The BK channel is one of the most broadly expressed ion channels in mammals. In many tissues, the BK channel pore-forming α-subunit is associated to an auxiliary β-subunit that modulates the voltage- and Ca2+-dependent activation of the channel. Structural components present in β-subunits that are important for the physical association with the α-subunit are yet unknown. Here, we show through co-immunoprecipitation that the intracellular C-terminus, the second transmembrane domain (TM2) and the extracellular loop of the β2-subunit are dispensable for association with the α-subunit pointing transmembrane domain 1 (TM1) as responsible for the interaction. Indeed, the TOXCAT assay for transmembrane protein–protein interactions demonstrated for the first time that TM1 of the β2-subunit physically binds to the transmembrane S1 domain of the α-subunit. PMID:22710124

  6. Surface binding of alamethicin stabilizes its helical structure: molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed Central

    Tieleman, D P; Berendsen, H J; Sansom, M S

    1999-01-01

    Alamethicin is an amphipathic alpha-helical peptide that forms ion channels. An early event in channel formation is believed to be the binding of alamethicin to the surface of a lipid bilayer. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to compare the structural and dynamic properties of alamethicin in water and alamethicin bound to the surface of a phosphatidylcholine bilayer. The bilayer surface simulation corresponded to a loosely bound alamethicin molecule that interacted with lipid headgroups but did not penetrate the hydrophobic core of the bilayer. Both simulations started with the peptide molecule in an alpha-helical conformation and lasted 2 ns. In water, the helix started to unfold after approximately 300 ps and by the end of the simulation only the N-terminal region of the peptide remained alpha-helical and the molecule had collapsed into a more compact form. At the surface of the bilayer, loss of helicity was restricted to the C-terminal third of the molecule and the rod-shaped structure of the peptide was retained. In the surface simulation about 10% of the peptide/water H-bonds were replaced by peptide/lipid H-bonds. These simulations suggest that some degree of stabilization of an amphipathic alpha-helix occurs at a bilayer surface even without interactions between hydrophobic side chains and the acyl chain core of the bilayer. PMID:10354443

  7. High-resolution /sup 1/H NMR study of the solution structure of alamethicin

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, G.; Carver, J.A.; Boyd, J.; Campbell, I.D.

    1987-02-24

    A /sup 1/H NMR study of the peptide alamethicin, which forms voltage-gated ion channels in membranes, is described. The molecule was studied in methanol as a function of temperature and pH. A complete assignment of the spectra is given, including several stereospecific assignments. Alamethicin was found to have a structure substantially similar to the crystal although, in solution, the C-terminal dipeptide adopts a somewhat extended conformation. The overall conformation was insensitive to the ionization of the side chain of the ionizable group, Glu-18.

  8. Transmembrane passage of hydrophobic compounds through a protein channel wall.

    PubMed

    Hearn, Elizabeth M; Patel, Dimki R; Lepore, Bryan W; Indic, Mridhu; van den Berg, Bert

    2009-03-19

    Membrane proteins that transport hydrophobic compounds have important roles in multi-drug resistance and can cause a number of diseases, underscoring the importance of protein-mediated transport of hydrophobic compounds. Hydrophobic compounds readily partition into regular membrane lipid bilayers, and their transport through an aqueous protein channel is energetically unfavourable. Alternative transport models involving acquisition from the lipid bilayer by lateral diffusion have been proposed for hydrophobic substrates. So far, all transport proteins for which a lateral diffusion mechanism has been proposed function as efflux pumps. Here we present the first example of a lateral diffusion mechanism for the uptake of hydrophobic substrates by the Escherichia coli outer membrane long-chain fatty acid transporter FadL. A FadL mutant in which a lateral opening in the barrel wall is constricted, but which is otherwise structurally identical to wild-type FadL, does not transport substrates. A crystal structure of FadL from Pseudomonas aeruginosa shows that the opening in the wall of the beta-barrel is conserved and delineates a long, hydrophobic tunnel that could mediate substrate passage from the extracellular environment, through the polar lipopolysaccharide layer and, by means of the lateral opening in the barrel wall, into the lipid bilayer from where the substrate can diffuse into the periplasm. Because FadL homologues are found in pathogenic and biodegrading bacteria, our results have implications for combating bacterial infections and bioremediating xenobiotics in the environment.

  9. Transmembrane Passage of Hydrophobic Compounds Through a Protein Channel Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Hearn, E.; Patel, D; Lepore, D; Indic, M; van den Berg, B

    2009-01-01

    Membrane proteins that transport hydrophobic compounds have important roles in multi-drug resistance and can cause a number of diseases, underscoring the importance of protein-mediated transport of hydrophobic compounds. Hydrophobic compounds readily partition into regular membrane lipid bilayers, and their transport through an aqueous protein channel is energetically unfavourable3. Alternative transport models involving acquisition from the lipid bilayer by lateral diffusion have been proposed for hydrophobic substrates. So far, all transport proteins for which a lateral diffusion mechanism has been proposed function as efflux pumps. Here we present the first example of a lateral diffusion mechanism for the uptake of hydrophobic substrates by the Escherichia coli outer membrane long-chain fatty acid transporter FadL. A FadL mutant in which a lateral opening in the barrel wall is constricted, but which is otherwise structurally identical to wild-type FadL, does not transport substrates. A crystal structure of FadL from Pseudomonas aeruginosa shows that the opening in the wall of the {beta}-barrel is conserved and delineates a long, hydrophobic tunnel that could mediate substrate passage from the extracellular environment, through the polar lipopolysaccharide layer and, by means of the lateral opening in the barrel wall, into the lipid bilayer from where the substrate can diffuse into the periplasm. Because FadL homologues are found in pathogenic and biodegrading bacteria, our results have implications for combating bacterial infections and bioremediating xenobiotics in the environment.

  10. Distribution and diffusion of alamethicin in a lecithin/water model membrane system.

    PubMed

    Fringeli, U P

    1980-06-15

    Attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy has been used to determine the equilibrium distribution of the peptide antibiotic alamethicin RF30 between dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine bilayers and the aqueous environment. The distribution coefficient K = cWeq/cMeq turned out to be concentration dependent, pointing to alamethicin association in the membrane with increasing concentration in the aqueous phase (cWeq). This concentration was varied within 28 and 310 nM, i.e., in a range typical for black film experiments. Furthermore. diffusion coefficients of alamethicin in the hydrophobic phase of the membrane (DM) and across the membrane/water interface (DI) have been estimated from the time course of the equilibration process. It was found that the diffusion rate of the uncharged analogue RF50 is about 10 times higher than that of the RF30 component, exhibiting one negative charge at the C-terminus. The time constants for transmembrane diffusion of alamethicin RF30 varied between 2.2hr at low concentration and 3.2 hr at higher concentration. The corresponding low concentration value of the RF50 component was found to be 0.25 hr.

  11. State-dependent access of anions to the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel pore.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Mohammad; Linsdell, Paul

    2008-03-07

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel is gated by intracellular factors; however, conformational changes in the channel pore associated with channel activation have not been identified. We have used patch clamp recording to investigate the state-dependent accessibility of substituted cysteine residues in the CFTR channel pore to a range of cysteine-reactive reagents applied to the extracellular side of the membrane. Using functional modification of the channel current-voltage relationship as a marker of modification, we find that several positively charged reagents are able to penetrate deeply into the pore from the outside irrespective of whether or not the channels have been activated. In contrast, access of three anionic cysteine-reactive reagents, the methanesulfonate sodium (2-sulfonatoethyl)methanesulfonate, the organic mercurial p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid, and the permeant anion Au(CN)(2)(-), to several different sites in the pore is strictly limited prior to channel activation. This suggests that in nonactivated channels some ion selectivity mechanism exists to exclude anions yet permit cations into the channel pore from the extracellular solution. We suggest that activation of CFTR channels involves a conformational change in the pore that removes a strong selectivity against anion entry from the extracellular solution. We propose further that this conformational change occurs in advance of channel opening, suggesting that multiple distinct closed pore conformations exist.

  12. Structural Changes Fundamental to Gating of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Anion Channel Pore.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an epithelial cell anion channel. Potentiator drugs used in the treatment of cystic fibrosis act on the channel to increase overall channel function, by increasing the stability of its open state and/or decreasing the stability of its closed state. The structure of the channel in either the open state or the closed state is not currently known. However, changes in the conformation of the protein as it transitions between these two states have been studied using functional investigation and molecular modeling techniques. This review summarizes our current understanding of the architecture of the transmembrane channel pore that controls the movement of chloride and other small anions, both in the open state and in the closed state. Evidence for different kinds of changes in the conformation of the pore as it transitions between open and closed states is described, as well as the mechanisms by which these conformational changes might be controlled to regulate normal channel gating. The ways that key conformational changes might be targeted by small compounds to influence overall CFTR activity are also discussed. Understanding the changes in pore structure that might be manipulated by such small compounds is key to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cystic fibrosis.

  13. Transmembrane Helix Straightening and Buckling Underlies Activation of Mechanosensitive and Thermosensitive K2P Channels

    PubMed Central

    Lolicato, Marco; Riegelhaupt, Paul M.; Arrigoni, Cristina; Clark, Kimberly A.; Minor, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Mechanical and thermal activation of ion channels is central to touch, thermosensation, and pain. The TRAAK/TREK K2P potassium channel subfamily produces background currents that alter neuronal excitability in response to pressure, temperature, signaling lipids, and anesthetics. How such diverse stimuli control channel function is unclear. Here we report structures of K2P4.1 (TRAAK) bearing C-type gate-activating mutations that reveal a tilting and straightening of the M4 inner transmembrane helix and a buckling of the M2 transmembrane helix. These conformational changes move M4 in a direction opposite to that in classical potassium channel activation mechanisms and open a passage lateral to the pore that faces the lipid bilayer inner leaflet. Together, our findings uncover a unique aspect of K2P modulation, indicate a means for how the K2P C-terminal cytoplasmic domain affects the C-type gate which lies ~40Å away, and suggest how lipids and bilayer inner leaflet deformations may gate the channel. PMID:25500157

  14. Transmembrane helix straightening and buckling underlies activation of mechanosensitive and thermosensitive K(2P) channels.

    PubMed

    Lolicato, Marco; Riegelhaupt, Paul M; Arrigoni, Cristina; Clark, Kimberly A; Minor, Daniel L

    2014-12-17

    Mechanical and thermal activation of ion channels is central to touch, thermosensation, and pain. The TRAAK/TREK K(2P) potassium channel subfamily produces background currents that alter neuronal excitability in response to pressure, temperature, signaling lipids, and anesthetics. How such diverse stimuli control channel function is unclear. Here we report structures of K(2P)4.1 (TRAAK) bearing C-type gate-activating mutations that reveal a tilting and straightening of the M4 inner transmembrane helix and a buckling of the M2 transmembrane helix. These conformational changes move M4 in a direction opposite to that in classical potassium channel activation mechanisms and open a passage lateral to the pore that faces the lipid bilayer inner leaflet. Together, our findings uncover a unique aspect of K(2P) modulation, indicate a means for how the K(2P) C-terminal cytoplasmic domain affects the C-type gate which lies ∼40Å away, and suggest how lipids and bilayer inner leaflet deformations may gate the channel.

  15. Pore formation in lipid membranes by alamethicin.

    PubMed Central

    Fringeli, U P; Fringeli, M

    1979-01-01

    The conformation of the linear peptide antibiotic alamethicin in dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine multilayers was investigated in the absence of an electric field by means of infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy. Alamethicin was found to be incorporated into the lipid membrane not only in the dry state but also in an aqueous environment. Its molecular conformation, however, changed from a helix when dry to an extended chain when aqueous. The extended chain aggregated to di- and multimers spanning the lipid bilayer. The equilibrium concentration of alamethicin in the surrounding water was 90 nM, which is in the range of concentrations used in black film experiments. The corresponding molar ratio of lipid to peptide was 80:1. Concerning the molecular mechanism of electric field-induced pore formation, one has to conclude that the dipole model proposed by several authors is very unlikely because it is based on the assumption that the major part of alamethicin is adsorbed on the membrane surface, from which small amounts flip into the membrane under the influence of an electric field. An alternative mechanism is proposed, based on a field-induced conformational change of the peptide from the extended state to a helix. This transition is favored by the resulting dipole moment of the alamethicin helix. PMID:291045

  16. Functional and Modeling Studies of the Transmembrane Region of the TRPM8 Channel.

    PubMed

    Bidaux, Gabriel; Sgobba, Miriam; Lemonnier, Loic; Borowiec, Anne-Sophie; Noyer, Lucile; Jovanovic, Srdan; Zholos, Alexander V; Haider, Shozeb

    2015-11-03

    Members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel family act as polymodal cellular sensors, which aid in regulating Ca(2+) homeostasis. Within the TRP family, TRPM8 is the cold receptor that forms a nonselective homotetrameric cation channel. In the absence of TRPM8 crystal structure, little is known about the relationship between structure and function. Inferences of TRPM8 structure have come from mutagenesis experiments coupled to electrophysiology, mainly regarding the fourth transmembrane helix (S4), which constitutes a moderate voltage-sensing domain, and about cold sensor and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate binding sites, which are both located in the C-terminus of TRPM8. In this study, we use a combination of molecular modeling and experimental techniques to examine the structure of the TRPM8 transmembrane and pore helix region including the conducting conformation of the selectivity filter. The model is consistent with a large amount of functional data and was further tested by mutagenesis. We present structural insight into the role of residues involved in intra- and intersubunit interactions and their link with the channel activity, sensitivity to icilin, menthol and cold, and impact on channel oligomerization.

  17. Functional and Modeling Studies of the Transmembrane Region of the TRPM8 Channel

    PubMed Central

    Bidaux, Gabriel; Sgobba, Miriam; Lemonnier, Loic; Borowiec, Anne-Sophie; Noyer, Lucile; Jovanovic, Srdan; Zholos, Alexander V.; Haider, Shozeb

    2015-01-01

    Members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel family act as polymodal cellular sensors, which aid in regulating Ca2+ homeostasis. Within the TRP family, TRPM8 is the cold receptor that forms a nonselective homotetrameric cation channel. In the absence of TRPM8 crystal structure, little is known about the relationship between structure and function. Inferences of TRPM8 structure have come from mutagenesis experiments coupled to electrophysiology, mainly regarding the fourth transmembrane helix (S4), which constitutes a moderate voltage-sensing domain, and about cold sensor and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate binding sites, which are both located in the C-terminus of TRPM8. In this study, we use a combination of molecular modeling and experimental techniques to examine the structure of the TRPM8 transmembrane and pore helix region including the conducting conformation of the selectivity filter. The model is consistent with a large amount of functional data and was further tested by mutagenesis. We present structural insight into the role of residues involved in intra- and intersubunit interactions and their link with the channel activity, sensitivity to icilin, menthol and cold, and impact on channel oligomerization. PMID:26536261

  18. Channel Gating Regulation by the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) First Cytosolic Loop.

    PubMed

    Ehrhardt, Annette; Chung, W Joon; Pyle, Louise C; Wang, Wei; Nowotarski, Krzysztof; Mulvihill, Cory M; Ramjeesingh, Mohabir; Hong, Jeong; Velu, Sadanandan E; Lewis, Hal A; Atwell, Shane; Aller, Steve; Bear, Christine E; Lukacs, Gergely L; Kirk, Kevin L; Sorscher, Eric J

    2016-01-22

    In this study, we present data indicating a robust and specific domain interaction between the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) first cytosolic loop (CL1) and nucleotide binding domain 1 (NBD1) that allows ion transport to proceed in a regulated fashion. We used co-precipitation and ELISA to establish the molecular contact and showed that binding kinetics were not altered by the common clinical mutation F508del. Both intrinsic ATPase activity and CFTR channel gating were inhibited severely by CL1 peptide, suggesting that NBD1/CL1 binding is a crucial requirement for ATP hydrolysis and channel function. In addition to cystic fibrosis, CFTR dysregulation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of prevalent diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acquired rhinosinusitis, pancreatitis, and lethal secretory diarrhea (e.g. cholera). On the basis of clinical relevance of the CFTR as a therapeutic target, a cell-free drug screen was established to identify modulators of NBD1/CL1 channel activity independent of F508del CFTR and pharmacologic rescue. Our findings support a targetable mechanism of CFTR regulation in which conformational changes in the NBDs cause reorientation of transmembrane domains via interactions with CL1 and result in channel gating.

  19. Channel Gating Regulation by the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) First Cytosolic Loop*

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhardt, Annette; Chung, W. Joon; Pyle, Louise C.; Wang, Wei; Nowotarski, Krzysztof; Mulvihill, Cory M.; Ramjeesingh, Mohabir; Hong, Jeong; Velu, Sadanandan E.; Lewis, Hal A.; Atwell, Shane; Aller, Steve; Bear, Christine E.; Lukacs, Gergely L.; Kirk, Kevin L.; Sorscher, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we present data indicating a robust and specific domain interaction between the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) first cytosolic loop (CL1) and nucleotide binding domain 1 (NBD1) that allows ion transport to proceed in a regulated fashion. We used co-precipitation and ELISA to establish the molecular contact and showed that binding kinetics were not altered by the common clinical mutation F508del. Both intrinsic ATPase activity and CFTR channel gating were inhibited severely by CL1 peptide, suggesting that NBD1/CL1 binding is a crucial requirement for ATP hydrolysis and channel function. In addition to cystic fibrosis, CFTR dysregulation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of prevalent diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acquired rhinosinusitis, pancreatitis, and lethal secretory diarrhea (e.g. cholera). On the basis of clinical relevance of the CFTR as a therapeutic target, a cell-free drug screen was established to identify modulators of NBD1/CL1 channel activity independent of F508del CFTR and pharmacologic rescue. Our findings support a targetable mechanism of CFTR regulation in which conformational changes in the NBDs cause reorientation of transmembrane domains via interactions with CL1 and result in channel gating. PMID:26627831

  20. Regulation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator anion channel by tyrosine phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Billet, Arnaud; Jia, Yanlin; Jensen, Tim; Riordan, John R.; Hanrahan, John W.

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel is activated by PKA phosphorylation of a regulatory domain that interacts dynamically with multiple CFTR domains and with other proteins. The large number of consensus sequences for phosphorylation by PKA has naturally focused most attention on regulation by this kinase. We report here that human CFTR is also phosphorylated by the tyrosine kinases p60c-Src (proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase) and the proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2), and they can also cause robust activation of quiescent CFTR channels. In excised patch-clamp experiments, CFTR activity during exposure to Src or Pyk2 reached ∼80% of that stimulated by PKA. Exposure to PKA after Src or Pyk2 caused a further increase to the level induced by PKA alone, implying a common limiting step. Channels became spontaneously active when v-Src or the catalytic domain of Pyk2 was coexpressed with CFTR and were further stimulated by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor dephostatin. Exogenous Src also activated 15SA-CFTR, a variant that lacks 15 potential PKA sites and has little response to PKA. PKA-independent activation by tyrosine phosphorylation has implications for the mechanism of regulation by the R domain and for the physiologic functions of CFTR.—Billet, A., Jia, Y., Jensen, T., Riordan, J. R., Hanrahan, J. W. Regulation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator anion channel by tyrosine phosphorylation. PMID:26062600

  1. Transmembrane proteoglycans control stretch-activated channels to set cytosolic calcium levels

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Sandeep; Søgaard, Pernille; Multhaupt, Hinke A.B.; Pataki, Csilla; Okina, Elena; Xian, Xiaojie; Pedersen, Mikael E.; Stevens, Troy; Griesbeck, Oliver; Park, Pyong Woo; Pocock, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycans regulate multiple aspects of cell behavior, but the molecular basis of their signaling is unresolved. The major family of transmembrane proteoglycans is the syndecans, present in virtually all nucleated cells, but with mostly unknown functions. Here, we show that syndecans regulate transient receptor potential canonical (TRPCs) channels to control cytosolic calcium equilibria and consequent cell behavior. In fibroblasts, ligand interactions with heparan sulfate of syndecan-4 recruit cytoplasmic protein kinase C to target serine714 of TRPC7 with subsequent control of the cytoskeleton and the myofibroblast phenotype. In epidermal keratinocytes a syndecan–TRPC4 complex controls adhesion, adherens junction composition, and early differentiation in vivo and in vitro. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the TRPC orthologues TRP-1 and -2 genetically complement the loss of syndecan by suppressing neuronal guidance and locomotory defects related to increases in neuronal calcium levels. The widespread and conserved syndecan–TRPC axis therefore fine tunes cytoskeletal organization and cell behavior. PMID:26391658

  2. Molecular determinants of anion selectivity in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel pore.

    PubMed Central

    Linsdell, P; Evagelidis, A; Hanrahan, J W

    2000-01-01

    Ionic selectivity in many cation channels is achieved over a short region of the pore known as the selectivity filter, the molecular determinants of which have been identified in Ca(2+), Na(+), and K(+) channels. However, a filter controlling selectivity among different anions has not previously been identified in any Cl(-) channel. In fact, because Cl(-) channels are only weakly selective among small anions, and because their selectivity has proved so resistant to site-directed mutagenesis, the very existence of a discrete anion selectivity filter has been called into question. Here we show that mutation of a putative pore-lining phenylalanine residue, F337, in the sixth membrane-spanning region of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel, dramatically alters the relative permeabilities of different anions in the channel. Specifically, mutations that reduce the size of the amino acid side chain present at this position virtually abolish the relationship between anion permeability and hydration energy, a relationship that characterizes the anion selectivity not only of wild-type CFTR, but of most classes of Cl(-) channels. These results suggest that the pore of CFTR may indeed contain a specialized region, analogous to the selectivity filter of cation channels, at which discrimination between different permeant anions takes place. Because F337 is adjacent to another amino acid residue, T338, which also affects anion selectivity in CFTR, we suggest that selectivity is predominantly determined over a physically discrete region of the pore located near these important residues. PMID:10827976

  3. Alamethicin aggregation in lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jianjun; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Nagle, John F.

    2009-01-01

    X-ray scattering features induced by aggregates of alamethicin (Alm) were obtained in oriented stacks of model membranes of DOPC(diC18:1PC) and diC22:1PC. The first feature obtained near full hydration was Bragg rod in-plane scattering near 0.11 Å-1 in DOPC and near 0.08 Å-1 in diC22:1PC at 1:10 Alm:lipid ratio. This feature is interpreted as bundles consisting of N Alm monomers in a barrel-stave configuration surrounding a water pore. Fitting the scattering data to previously published MD simulations indicates that the number N of peptides per bundle is N=6 in DOPC and N≥9 in diC22:1PC. The larger bundle size in diC22:1PC is explained by hydrophobic mismatch of Alm with the thicker bilayer. A second diffuse scattering peak located at qr≈0.7 Å-1 is obtained for both DOPC and diC22:1PC at several peptide concentrations. Theoretical calculations indicate that this peak can not be caused by the Alm bundle structure. Instead, we interpret it as due to two-dimensional hexagonally packed clusters in equilibrium with Alm bundles. As the relative humidity was reduced, interactions between Alm in neighboring bilayers produced more peaks with three dimensional crystallographic character that do not index with the conventional hexagonal space groups. PMID:19789905

  4. [The activation effect of nobiletin on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel].

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang; Yu, Bo; Zhang, Yao-Fang; Wang, Xue; Yang, Hong

    2013-06-01

    Aim of the present study is to investigate activation effect of nobiletin on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel activity. CFTR-mediated iodide influx assay and patch-clamp tests were done on FRT cells stably co-transfected with human CFTR and EYFP/H148Q. Nobiletin potently activated CFTR chloride channel activity in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The CFTR blocker CFTR(inh)-172 could completely reverse the effect. Preliminary mechanism study indicated that nobiletin activated CFTR chloride channel through a direct binding way. In addition, ex vivo tests done on mice trachea showed that nobiletin time-dependently stimulated submucosal gland fluid secretion. Nobiletin may be a therapeutic lead compound in treating CFTR-related diseases including disseminated bronchiectasis.

  5. Regulation of Voltage-Activated K(+) Channel Gating by Transmembrane β Subunits.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaohui; Zaydman, Mark A; Cui, Jianmin

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-activated K(+) (K(V)) channels are important for shaping action potentials and maintaining resting membrane potential in excitable cells. K(V) channels contain a central pore-gate domain (PGD) surrounded by four voltage-sensing domains (VSDs). The VSDs will change conformation in response to alterations of the membrane potential thereby inducing the opening of the PGD. Many K(V) channels are heteromeric protein complexes containing auxiliary β subunits. These β subunits modulate channel expression and activity to increase functional diversity and render tissue specific phenotypes. This review focuses on the K(V) β subunits that contain transmembrane (TM) segments including the KCNE family and the β subunits of large conductance, Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated K(+) (BK) channels. These TM β subunits affect the voltage-dependent activation of K(V) α subunits. Experimental and computational studies have described the structural location of these β subunits in the channel complexes and the biophysical effects on VSD activation, PGD opening, and VSD-PGD coupling. These results reveal some common characteristics and mechanistic insights into K(V) channel modulation by TM β subunits.

  6. Transmembrane channel-like (TMC) genes are required for auditory and vestibular mechanosensation.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Kurima, Kiyoto; Pan, Bifeng; Griffith, Andrew J; Holt, Jeffrey R

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of the transmembrane channel-like 1 (TMC1) gene can cause dominant and recessive forms of deafness in humans and mice. TMC1 is one of eight mammalian TMC genes of unknown function. The multi-pass transmembrane topologic structure of the proteins they encode suggests roles as a receptor, transporter, channel, or pump. Tmc1 and the closely related Tmc2 gene are expressed in neurosensory hair cells of the auditory and vestibular end organs of the mouse inner ear. Recent studies have demonstrated that Tmc1 and Tmc2 are specifically required for mechanoelectrical transduction in hair cells. The exact role of these proteins in mechanoelectrical transduction is unknown. TMC1 and TMC2 are viable candidates for the mechanoelectrical transduction channel of hair cells, whose component molecules have eluded identification for over 30 years. We expect that studies of TMC proteins will yield insights into molecular components and mechanisms of mechanosensation in auditory and vestibular hair cells, as well as in other tissues and organs.

  7. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR): CLOSED AND OPEN STATE CHANNEL MODELS.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Valentina; Vergani, Paola; Tieleman, D Peter

    2015-09-18

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. CFTR controls the flow of anions through the apical membrane of epithelia. Dysfunctional CFTR causes the common lethal genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Transitions between open and closed states of CFTR are regulated by ATP binding and hydrolysis on the cytosolic nucleotide binding domains, which are coupled with the transmembrane (TM) domains forming the pathway for anion permeation. Lack of structural data hampers a global understanding of CFTR and thus the development of "rational" approaches directly targeting defective CFTR. In this work, we explored possible conformational states of the CFTR gating cycle by means of homology modeling. As templates, we used structures of homologous ABC transporters, namely TM(287-288), ABC-B10, McjD, and Sav1866. In the light of published experimental results, structural analysis of the transmembrane cavity suggests that the TM(287-288)-based CFTR model could correspond to a commonly occupied closed state, whereas the McjD-based model could represent an open state. The models capture the important role played by Phe-337 as a filter/gating residue and provide structural information on the conformational transition from closed to open channel.

  8. Membrane Anchoring and Interaction between Transmembrane Domains are Crucial for K+ Channel Function*

    PubMed Central

    Gebhardt, Manuela; Hoffgaard, Franziska; Hamacher, Kay; Kast, Stefan M.; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    The small viral channel Kcv is a Kir-like K+ channel of only 94 amino acids. With this simple structure, the tetramer of Kcv represents the pore module of all complex K+ channels. To examine the structural contribution of the transmembrane domains (TMDs) to channel function, we performed Ala scanning mutagenesis of the two domains and tested the functionality of the mutants in a yeast complementation assay. The data reveal, in combination with computational models, that the upper halves of both TMDs, which face toward the external medium, are rather rigid, whereas the inner parts are more flexible. The rigidity of the outer TMD is conferred by a number of essential aromatic amino acids that face the membrane and probably anchor this domain in the bilayer. The inner TMD is intimately connected with the rigid part of the outer TMD via π···π interactions between a pair of aromatic amino acids. This structural principle is conserved within the viral K+ channels and also present in Kir2.2, implying a general importance of this architecture for K+ channel function. PMID:21310959

  9. Chloride channel and chloride conductance regulator domains of CFTR, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    PubMed Central

    Schwiebert, Erik M.; Morales, Marcelo M.; Devidas, Sreenivas; Egan, Marie E.; Guggino, William B.

    1998-01-01

    CFTR is a cyclic AMP (cAMP)-activated chloride (Cl−) channel and a regulator of outwardly rectifying Cl− channels (ORCCs) in airway epithelia. CFTR regulates ORCCs by facilitating the release of ATP out of cells. Once released from cells, ATP stimulates ORCCs by means of a purinergic receptor. To define the domains of CFTR important for Cl− channel function and/or ORCC regulator function, mutant CFTRs with N- and C-terminal truncations and selected individual amino acid substitutions were created and studied by transfection into a line of human airway epithelial cells from a cystic fibrosis patient (IB3–1) or by injection of in vitro transcribed complementary RNAs (cRNAs) into Xenopus oocytes. Two-electrode voltage clamp recordings, 36Cl− efflux assays, and whole cell patch-clamp recordings were used to assay for the Cl− channel function of CFTR and for its ability to regulate ORCCs. The data showed that the first transmembrane domain (TMD-1) of CFTR, especially predicted α-helices 5 and 6, forms an essential part of the Cl− channel pore, whereas the first nucleotide-binding and regulatory domains (NBD1/R domain) are essential for its ability to regulate ORCCs. Finally, the data show that the ability of CFTR to function as a Cl− channel and a conductance regulator are not mutually exclusive; one function could be eliminated while the other was preserved. PMID:9482946

  10. Conformational rearrangements in the transmembrane domain of CNGA1 channels revealed by single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maity, Sourav; Mazzolini, Monica; Arcangeletti, Manuel; Valbuena, Alejandro; Fabris, Paolo; Lazzarino, Marco; Torre, Vincent

    2015-05-12

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels are activated by binding of cyclic nucleotides. Although structural studies have identified the channel pore and selectivity filter, conformation changes associated with gating remain poorly understood. Here we combine single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) with mutagenesis, bioinformatics and electrophysiology to study conformational changes associated with gating. By expressing functional channels with SMFS fingerprints in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we were able to investigate gating of CNGA1 in a physiological-like membrane. Force spectra determined that the S4 transmembrane domain is mechanically coupled to S5 in the closed state, but S3 in the open state. We also show there are multiple pathways for the unfolding of the transmembrane domains, probably caused by a different degree of α-helix folding. This approach demonstrates that CNG transmembrane domains have dynamic structure and establishes SMFS as a tool for probing conformational change in ion channels.

  11. Conformational rearrangements in the transmembrane domain of CNGA1 channels revealed by single-molecule force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Sourav; Mazzolini, Monica; Arcangeletti, Manuel; Valbuena, Alejandro; Fabris, Paolo; Lazzarino, Marco; Torre, Vincent

    2015-05-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels are activated by binding of cyclic nucleotides. Although structural studies have identified the channel pore and selectivity filter, conformation changes associated with gating remain poorly understood. Here we combine single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) with mutagenesis, bioinformatics and electrophysiology to study conformational changes associated with gating. By expressing functional channels with SMFS fingerprints in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we were able to investigate gating of CNGA1 in a physiological-like membrane. Force spectra determined that the S4 transmembrane domain is mechanically coupled to S5 in the closed state, but S3 in the open state. We also show there are multiple pathways for the unfolding of the transmembrane domains, probably caused by a different degree of α-helix folding. This approach demonstrates that CNG transmembrane domains have dynamic structure and establishes SMFS as a tool for probing conformational change in ion channels.

  12. Conformational rearrangements in the transmembrane domain of CNGA1 channels revealed by single-molecule force spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Maity, Sourav; Mazzolini, Monica; Arcangeletti, Manuel; Valbuena, Alejandro; Fabris, Paolo; Lazzarino, Marco; Torre, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels are activated by binding of cyclic nucleotides. Although structural studies have identified the channel pore and selectivity filter, conformation changes associated with gating remain poorly understood. Here we combine single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) with mutagenesis, bioinformatics and electrophysiology to study conformational changes associated with gating. By expressing functional channels with SMFS fingerprints in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we were able to investigate gating of CNGA1 in a physiological-like membrane. Force spectra determined that the S4 transmembrane domain is mechanically coupled to S5 in the closed state, but S3 in the open state. We also show there are multiple pathways for the unfolding of the transmembrane domains, probably caused by a different degree of α-helix folding. This approach demonstrates that CNG transmembrane domains have dynamic structure and establishes SMFS as a tool for probing conformational change in ion channels. PMID:25963832

  13. Self-Assembling Organic Nanopores as Synthetic Transmembrane Channels with Tunable Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaoxi

    A long-standing goal in the area of supramolecular self-assembly involves the development of synthetic ion/water channels capable of mimicking the mass-transport characteristics of biological channels and pores. Few examples of artificial transmembrane channels with large lumen, high conductivity and selectivity are known. A review of pronounced biological transmembrane protein channels and some representative synthetic models have been provided in Chapter 1, followed by our discovery and initial investigation of shape-persistent oligoamide and phenylene ethynylene macrocycles as synthetic ion/water channels. In Chapter 2, the systematic structural modification of oligoamide macrocycles 1, the so-called first-generation of these shape-persistent macrocycles, has led to third-generation macrocycles 3. The third generation was found to exhibit unprecedented, strong intermolecular association in both the solid state and solution via multiple techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), SEM, and 1H NMR. Fluorescence spectroscopy paired with dynamic light scattering (DLS) revealed that macrocycles 3 can assemble into a singly dispersed nanotubular structure in solution. The resultant self-assembling pores consisting of 3 were examined by HPTS-LUVs assays and BLM studies (Chapter 3) and found to form cation-selective (PK+/PCl- = 69:1) transmembrane ion channels with large conductance (200 ˜ 2000 pS for alkali cations) and high stability with open times reaching to 103 seconds. Tuning the aggregation state of macrocycles by choosing an appropriate polar solvent mixture (i.e., 3:1, THF:DMF, v/v) and concentration led to the formation of ion channels with well-defined square top behavior. A parallel study using DLS to examine the size of aggregates was used in conjunction with channel activity assays (LUVs/BLM) to reveal the effects of the aggregation state on channel activity. Empirical evidence now clearly indicates that a preassembled state, perhaps that of a

  14. Transmembrane Topologies of Ca2+-permeable Mechanosensitive Channels MCA1 and MCA2 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kamano, Shumpei; Kume, Shinichiro; Iida, Kazuko; Lei, Kai-Jian; Nakano, Masataka; Nakayama, Yoshitaka; Iida, Hidetoshi

    2015-12-25

    Sensing mechanical stresses, including touch, stretch, compression, and gravity, is crucial for growth and development in plants. A good mechanosensor candidate is the Ca(2+)-permeable mechanosensitive (MS) channel, the pore of which opens to permeate Ca(2+) in response to mechanical stresses. However, the structure-function relationships of plant MS channels are poorly understood. Arabidopsis MCA1 and MCA2 form a homotetramer and exhibit Ca(2+)-permeable MS channel activity; however, their structures have only been partially elucidated. The transmembrane topologies of these ion channels need to be determined in more detail to elucidate the underlying regulatory mechanisms. We herein determined the topologies of MCA1 and MCA2 using two independent methods, the Suc2C reporter and split-ubiquitin yeast two-hybrid methods, and found that both proteins are single-pass type I integral membrane proteins with extracellular N termini and intracellular C termini. These results imply that an EF hand-like motif, coiled-coil motif, and plac8 motif are all present in the cytoplasm. Thus, the activities of both channels can be regulated by intracellular Ca(2+) and protein interactions.

  15. Conserved allosteric hot spots in the transmembrane domains of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channels and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) pumps.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shipeng; Roessler, Bryan C; Chauvet, Sylvain; Guo, Jingyu; Hartman, John L; Kirk, Kevin L

    2014-07-18

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are an ancient family of transmembrane proteins that utilize ATPase activity to move substrates across cell membranes. The ABCC subfamily of the ABC transporters includes active drug exporters (the multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs)) and a unique ATP-gated ion channel (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)). The CFTR channel shares gating principles with conventional ligand-gated ion channels, but the allosteric network that couples ATP binding at its nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) with conformational changes in its transmembrane helices (TMs) is poorly defined. It is also unclear whether the mechanisms that govern CFTR gating are conserved with the thermodynamically distinct MRPs. Here we report a new class of gain of function (GOF) mutation of a conserved proline at the base of the pore-lining TM6. Multiple substitutions of this proline promoted ATP-free CFTR activity and activation by the weak agonist, 5'-adenylyl-β,γ-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP). TM6 proline mutations exhibited additive GOF effects when combined with a previously reported GOF mutation located in an outer collar of TMs that surrounds the pore-lining TMs. Each TM substitution allosterically rescued the ATP sensitivity of CFTR gating when introduced into an NBD mutant with defective ATP binding. Both classes of GOF mutations also rescued defective drug export by a yeast MRP (Yor1p) with ATP binding defects in its NBDs. We conclude that the conserved TM6 proline helps set the energy barrier to both CFTR channel opening and MRP-mediated drug efflux and that CFTR channels and MRP pumps utilize similar allosteric mechanisms for coupling conformational changes in their translocation pathways to ATP binding at their NBDs.

  16. New model of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator proposes active channel-like conformation.

    PubMed

    Dalton, James; Kalid, Ori; Schushan, Maya; Ben-Tal, Nir; Villà-Freixa, Jordi

    2012-07-23

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an unusual ABC transporter, functioning as a chloride channel critical for fluid homeostasis in multiple organs. Disruption of CFTR function is associated with cystic fibrosis making it an attractive therapeutic target. In addition, CFTR blockers are being developed as potential antidiarrheals. CFTR drug discovery is hampered by the lack of high resolution structural data, and considerable efforts have been invested in modeling the channel structure. Although previously published CFTR models that have been made publicly available mostly agree with experimental data relating to the overall structure, they present the channel in an outward-facing conformation that does not agree with expected properties of a "channel-like" structure. Here, we make available a model of CFTR in such a "channel-like" conformation, derived by a unique modeling approach combining restrained homology modeling and ROSETTA refinement. In contrast to others, the present model is in agreement with expected channel properties such as pore shape, dimensions, solvent accessibility, and experimentally derived distances. We have used the model to explore the interaction of open channel blockers within the pore, revealing a common binding mode and ionic interaction with K95, in agreement with experimental data. The binding-site was further validated using a virtual screening enrichment experiment, suggesting the model might be suitable for drug discovery. In addition, we subjected the model to a molecular dynamics simulation, revealing previously unaddressed salt-bridge interactions that may be important for structure stability and pore-lining residues that may take part in Cl(-) conductance.

  17. The role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator phenylalanine 508 side chain in ion channel gating.

    PubMed

    Cui, Liying; Aleksandrov, Luba; Hou, Yue-Xian; Gentzsch, Martina; Chen, Jey-Hsin; Riordan, John R; Aleksandrov, Andrei A

    2006-04-15

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an ion channel employing the ABC transporter structural motif. Deletion of a single residue (Phe508) in the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1), which occurs in most patients with cystic fibrosis, impairs both maturation and function of the protein. However, substitution of the Phe508 with small uncharged amino acids, including cysteine, is permissive for maturation. To explore the possible role of the phenylalanine aromatic side chain in channel gating we introduced a cysteine at this position in cysless CFTR, enabling its selective chemical modification by sulfhydryl reagents. Both cysless and wild-type CFTR ion channels have identical mean open times when activated by different nucleotide ligands. Moreover, both channels could be locked in an open state by introducing an ATPase inhibiting mutation (E1371S). However, the introduction of a single cysteine (F508C) prevented the cysless E1371S channel from maintaining the permanently open state, allowing closing to occur. Chemical modification of cysless E1371S/F508C by sulfhydryl reagents was used to probe the role of the side chain in ion channel function. Specifically, benzyl-methanethiosulphonate modification of this variant restored the gating behaviour to that of cysless E1371S containing the wild-type phenylalanine at position 508. This provides the first direct evidence that a specific interaction of the Phe508 aromatic side chain plays a role in determining the residency time in the closed state. Thus, despite the fact that this aromatic side chain is not essential for CFTR folding, it is important in the ion channel function.

  18. Direct block of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl(-) channel by niflumic acid.

    PubMed

    Scott-Ward, T S; Li, H; Schmidt, A; Cai, Z; Sheppard, D N

    2004-01-01

    Niflumic acid is widely used to inhibit Ca(2+) -activated Cl(-) channels. However, the chemical structure of niflumic acid resembles that of diphenylamine-2-carboxylate, a drug that inhibits the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel. To investigate how niflumic acid inhibits CFTR Cl(-) channel, we studied recombinant wild-type human CFTR in excised inside-out membrane patches. When added to the intracellular solution, niflumic acid caused a concentration- and voltage-dependent decrease of CFTR Cl(-) current with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (K(i)) of 253 microM and Hill co-efficient of approximately 1, at -50 mV. Niflumic acid inhibition of single CFTR Cl(-) channels was characterized by a very fast, flickery block that decreased dramatically current amplitude without altering open-probability. Consistent with these data, spectral analysis of CFTR Cl(-) currents suggested that channel block by niflumic acid was described by the closed <--> open <--> blocked kinetic scheme with blocker on rate (k(on)) = 13.9 x 10(6) M(-1)s(-1), off rate (k(off))=3348 s(-1) and dissociation constant (K(d)) = 241 microM, at -50 mV. Based on these data, we tested the effects of niflumic acid on transepithelial Cl(-) secretion and cyst growth using type I MDCK epithelial cells. Niflumic acid (200 microM) inhibited cAMP-stimulated, bumetanide-sensitive short-circuit current by 55%. Moreover, the drug potently retarded cyst growth. We conclude that niflumic acid is an open-channel blocker of CFTR that inhibits Cl(-) permeation by plugging the channel pore. It or related agents might be of value in the development of new therapies for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

  19. Redistribution of Cholesterol in Model Lipid Membranes in Response to the Membrane-Active Peptide Alamethicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, William; Qian, Shuo

    2013-03-01

    The cellular membrane is a heterogeneous, dynamic mixture of molecules and macromolecules that self-assemble into a tightly-regulated functional unit that provides a semipermeable barrier between the cell and its environment. Among the many compositional differences between mammalian and bacterial cell membranes that impact its physical properties, one key difference is cholesterol content, which is more prevalent in mammals. Cholesterol is an amphiphile that associates with membranes and serves to maintain its fluidity and permeability. Membrane-active peptides, such as the alpha-helical peptide alamethicin, interact with membranes in a concentration- and composition-dependent manner to form transmembrane pores that are responsible for the lytic action of the peptide. Through the use of small-angle neutron scattering and deuterium labeling, it was possible to observe a redistribution of the lipid and cholesterol in unilamellar vesicles in response to the presence of alamethicin at a peptide-to-lipid ratio of 1/200. The results demonstrate that the membrane remodeling powers of alamethicin reach beyond the membrane thinning effect to altering the localization of specific components in the bilayer, complementing the accepted two-state mechanism of pore formation. Research was supported by U. S. DOE-OBER (CSMB; FWP ERKP291) and the U. S. DOE-BES Scientific User Facilities Division (ORNL's SNS and HFIR).

  20. Slow conversions among subconductance states of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    PubMed Central

    Tao, T; Xie, J; Drumm, M L; Zhao, J; Davis, P B; Ma, J

    1996-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel exhibits multiple subconductance states. To study the regulation of conductance states of the CFTR channel, we expressed the wild-type CFTR protein in HEK 293 cells, and isolated microsomal membrane vesicles for reconstitution studies in lipid bilayer membranes. A single CFTR channel had a dominant conductance of 7.8 pS (H), plus two sub-open states with conductances of approximately 6 pS (M) and 2.7 pS (L) in 200 mM KCl with 1 mM MgCl2 (intracellular) and 50 mM KCl with no MgCl2 (extracellular), with pH maintained at 7.4 by 10 mM HEPES-Tris on both sides of the channel. In 200 mM KCl, both H and L states could be measured in stable single-channel recordings, whereas M could not. Spontaneous transitions between H and L were slow; it took 4.5 min for L-->H, and 3.2 min for H-->L. These slow conversions among subconductance states of the CFTR channel were affected by extracellular Mg; in the presence of millimolar Mg, the channel remained stable in the H state. Similar phenomena were also observed with endogenous CFTR channels in T84 cells. In high-salt conditions (1.5 M KCl), all three conductance states of the expressed CFTR channel, 12.1 pS, 8.2 pS, and 3.6 pS, became stable and seemed to gate independently from each other. The existence of multiple stable conductance states associated with the CFTR channel suggests two possibilities: either a single CFTR molecule can exist in multiple configurations with different conductance values, or the CFTR channel may contain multimers of the 170-kDa CFTR protein, and different conductance states are due to different aggregation states of the CFTR protein. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 8 PMID:8789091

  1. Slow conversions among subconductance states of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Tao, T; Xie, J; Drumm, M L; Zhao, J; Davis, P B; Ma, J

    1996-02-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel exhibits multiple subconductance states. To study the regulation of conductance states of the CFTR channel, we expressed the wild-type CFTR protein in HEK 293 cells, and isolated microsomal membrane vesicles for reconstitution studies in lipid bilayer membranes. A single CFTR channel had a dominant conductance of 7.8 pS (H), plus two sub-open states with conductances of approximately 6 pS (M) and 2.7 pS (L) in 200 mM KCl with 1 mM MgCl2 (intracellular) and 50 mM KCl with no MgCl2 (extracellular), with pH maintained at 7.4 by 10 mM HEPES-Tris on both sides of the channel. In 200 mM KCl, both H and L states could be measured in stable single-channel recordings, whereas M could not. Spontaneous transitions between H and L were slow; it took 4.5 min for L-->H, and 3.2 min for H-->L. These slow conversions among subconductance states of the CFTR channel were affected by extracellular Mg; in the presence of millimolar Mg, the channel remained stable in the H state. Similar phenomena were also observed with endogenous CFTR channels in T84 cells. In high-salt conditions (1.5 M KCl), all three conductance states of the expressed CFTR channel, 12.1 pS, 8.2 pS, and 3.6 pS, became stable and seemed to gate independently from each other. The existence of multiple stable conductance states associated with the CFTR channel suggests two possibilities: either a single CFTR molecule can exist in multiple configurations with different conductance values, or the CFTR channel may contain multimers of the 170-kDa CFTR protein, and different conductance states are due to different aggregation states of the CFTR protein.

  2. Functional Architecture of the Cytoplasmic Entrance to the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Chloride Channel Pore.

    PubMed

    El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2015-06-19

    As an ion channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator must form a continuous pathway for the movement of Cl(-) and other anions between the cytoplasm and the extracellular solution. Both the structure and the function of the membrane-spanning part of this pathway are well defined. In contrast, the structure of the pathway that connects the cytoplasm to the membrane-spanning regions is unknown, and functional roles for different parts of the protein forming this pathway have not been described. We used patch clamp recording and substituted cysteine accessibility mutagenesis to identify positively charged amino acid side chains that attract cytoplasmic Cl(-) ions to the inner mouth of the pore. Our results indicate that the side chains of Lys-190, Arg-248, Arg-303, Lys-370, Lys-1041, and Arg-1048, located in different intracellular loops of the protein, play important roles in the electrostatic attraction of Cl(-) ions. Mutation and covalent modification of these residues have charge-dependent effects on the rate of Cl(-) permeation, demonstrating their functional role in maximization of Cl(-) flux. Other nearby positively charged side chains were not involved in electrostatic interactions with Cl(-). The location of these Cl(-)-attractive residues suggests that cytoplasmic Cl(-) ions enter the pore via a lateral portal located between the cytoplasmic extensions to the fourth and sixth transmembrane helices; a secondary, functionally less relevant portal might exist between the extensions to the 10th and 12th transmembrane helices. These results define the cytoplasmic mouth of the pore and show how it attracts Cl(-) ions from the cytoplasm.

  3. Functional Architecture of the Cytoplasmic Entrance to the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Chloride Channel Pore*

    PubMed Central

    El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2015-01-01

    As an ion channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator must form a continuous pathway for the movement of Cl− and other anions between the cytoplasm and the extracellular solution. Both the structure and the function of the membrane-spanning part of this pathway are well defined. In contrast, the structure of the pathway that connects the cytoplasm to the membrane-spanning regions is unknown, and functional roles for different parts of the protein forming this pathway have not been described. We used patch clamp recording and substituted cysteine accessibility mutagenesis to identify positively charged amino acid side chains that attract cytoplasmic Cl− ions to the inner mouth of the pore. Our results indicate that the side chains of Lys-190, Arg-248, Arg-303, Lys-370, Lys-1041, and Arg-1048, located in different intracellular loops of the protein, play important roles in the electrostatic attraction of Cl− ions. Mutation and covalent modification of these residues have charge-dependent effects on the rate of Cl− permeation, demonstrating their functional role in maximization of Cl− flux. Other nearby positively charged side chains were not involved in electrostatic interactions with Cl−. The location of these Cl−-attractive residues suggests that cytoplasmic Cl− ions enter the pore via a lateral portal located between the cytoplasmic extensions to the fourth and sixth transmembrane helices; a secondary, functionally less relevant portal might exist between the extensions to the 10th and 12th transmembrane helices. These results define the cytoplasmic mouth of the pore and show how it attracts Cl− ions from the cytoplasm. PMID:25944907

  4. A CLAG3 mutation in an amphipathic transmembrane domain alters malaria parasite nutrient channels and confers leupeptin resistance.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Paresh; Rayavara, Kempaiah; Ito, Daisuke; Basore, Katherine; Desai, Sanjay A

    2015-06-01

    Erythrocytes infected with malaria parasites have increased permeability to ions and nutrients, as mediated by the plasmodial surface anion channel (PSAC) and recently linked to parasite clag3 genes. Although the encoded protein is integral to the host membrane, its precise contribution to solute transport remains unclear because it lacks conventional transmembrane domains and does not have homology to ion channel proteins in other organisms. Here, we identified a probable CLAG3 transmembrane domain adjacent to a variant extracellular motif. Helical-wheel analysis revealed strict segregation of polar and hydrophobic residues to opposite faces of a predicted α-helical transmembrane domain, suggesting that the domain lines a water-filled pore. A single CLAG3 mutation (A1210T) in a leupeptin-resistant PSAC mutant falls within this transmembrane domain and may affect pore structure. Allelic-exchange transfection and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that this mutation alters solute selectivity in the channel. The A1210T mutation also reduces the blocking affinity of PSAC inhibitors that bind on opposite channel faces, consistent with global changes in channel structure. Transfected parasites carrying this mutation survived a leupeptin challenge significantly better than a transfection control did. Thus, the A1210T mutation contributes directly to both altered PSAC activity and leupeptin resistance. These findings reveal the molecular basis of a novel antimalarial drug resistance mechanism, provide a framework for determining the channel's composition and structure, and should guide the development of therapies targeting the PSAC.

  5. Secondary Structure and Gating Rearrangements of Transmembrane Segments in Rat P2X4 Receptor Channels

    PubMed Central

    Silberberg, Shai D.; Chang, Tsg-Hui; Swartz, Kenton J.

    2005-01-01

    P2X receptors are cation selective channels that are activated by extracellular nucleotides. These channels are likely formed by three identical or related subunits, each having two transmembrane segments (TM1 and TM2). To identify regions that undergo rearrangement during gating and to probe their secondary structure, we performed tryptophan scanning mutagenesis on the two putative TMs of the rat P2X4 receptor channel. Mutant channels were expressed in Xenopus oocytes, concentration–response relationships constructed for ATP, and the EC50 estimated by fitting the Hill equation to the data. Of the 22 mutations in TM1 and 24 in TM2, all but one in TM1 and seven in TM2 result in functional channels. Interestingly, the majority of the functional mutants display an increased sensitivity to ATP, and in general these perturbations are more pronounced for TM2 when compared with TM1. For TM1 and for the outer half of TM2, the perturbations are consistent with these regions adopting α-helical secondary structures. In addition, the greatest perturbations in the gating equilibrium occur for mutations near the outer ends of both TM1 and TM2. Surface biotinylation experiments reveal that all the nonfunctional mutants traffic to the surface membrane at levels comparable to the WT channel, suggesting that these mutations likely disrupt ion conduction or gating. Taken together, these results suggest that the outer parts of TM1 and TM2 are helical and that they move during activation. The observation that the majority of nonconducting mutations are clustered toward the inner end of TM2 suggests a critical functional role for this region. PMID:15795310

  6. Nicotinic receptor M3 transmembrane domain: position 8' contributes to channel gating.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, María José; Rayes, Diego; Spitzmaul, Guillermo; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2002-08-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a pentamer of homologous subunits with composition alpha(2)(beta)(epsilon)(delta) in adult muscle. Each subunit contains four transmembrane domains (M1-M4). Position 8' of the M3 domain is phenylalanine in all heteromeric alpha subunits, whereas it is a hydrophobic nonaromatic residue in non-alpha subunits. Given this peculiar conservation pattern, we studied its contribution to muscle nAChR activation by combining mutagenesis with single-channel kinetic analysis. Construction of nAChRs carrying different numbers of phenylalanine residues at 8' reveals that the mean open time decreases as a function of the number of phenylalanine residues. Thus, all subunits contribute through this position independently and additively to the channel closing rate. The impairment of channel opening increases when the number of phenylalanine residues at 8' increases from two (wild-type nAChR) to five. The gating equilibrium constant of the latter mutant nAChR is 13-fold lower than that of the wild-type nAChR. The replacement of (alpha)F8', (beta)L8', (delta)L8', and (epsilon)V8' by a series of hydrophobic amino acids reveals that the structural bases of the observed kinetic effects are nonequivalent among subunits. In the alpha subunit, hydrophobic amino acids at 8' lead to prolonged channel lifetimes, whereas they lead either to normal kinetics (delta and epsilon subunits) or impaired channel gating (beta subunit) in the non-alpha subunits. The overall results indicate that 8' positions of the M3 domains of all subunits contribute to channel gating.

  7. Transmembrane proteoglycans control stretch-activated channels to set cytosolic calcium levels.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Sandeep; Søgaard, Pernille; Multhaupt, Hinke A B; Pataki, Csilla; Okina, Elena; Xian, Xiaojie; Pedersen, Mikael E; Stevens, Troy; Griesbeck, Oliver; Park, Pyong Woo; Pocock, Roger; Couchman, John R

    2015-09-28

    Transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycans regulate multiple aspects of cell behavior, but the molecular basis of their signaling is unresolved. The major family of transmembrane proteoglycans is the syndecans, present in virtually all nucleated cells, but with mostly unknown functions. Here, we show that syndecans regulate transient receptor potential canonical (TRPCs) channels to control cytosolic calcium equilibria and consequent cell behavior. In fibroblasts, ligand interactions with heparan sulfate of syndecan-4 recruit cytoplasmic protein kinase C to target serine714 of TRPC7 with subsequent control of the cytoskeleton and the myofibroblast phenotype. In epidermal keratinocytes a syndecan-TRPC4 complex controls adhesion, adherens junction composition, and early differentiation in vivo and in vitro. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the TRPC orthologues TRP-1 and -2 genetically complement the loss of syndecan by suppressing neuronal guidance and locomotory defects related to increases in neuronal calcium levels. The widespread and conserved syndecan-TRPC axis therefore fine tunes cytoskeletal organization and cell behavior. © 2015 Gopal et al.

  8. Multiscale modeling and computation of nano-electronic transistors and transmembrane proton channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Duan

    The miniaturization of nano-scale electronic transistors, such as metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), has given rise to a pressing demand in the new theoretical understanding and practical tactic for dealing with quantum mechanical effects in integrated circuits. In biology, proton dynamics and transport across membrane proteins are of paramount importance to the normal function of living cells. Similar physical characteristics are behind the two subjects, and model simulations share common mathematical interests/challenges. In this thesis work, multiscale and multiphysical models are proposed to study the mechanisms of nanotransistors and proton transport in transmembrane at the atomic level. For nano-electronic transistors, we introduce a unified two-scale energy functional to describe the electrons and the continuum electrostatic potential. This framework enables us to put microscopic and macroscopic descriptions on an equal footing at nano-scale. Additionally, this model includes layered structures and random doping effect of nano-transistors. For transmembrane proton channels, we describe proton dynamics quantum mechanically via a density functional approach while implicitly treat numerous solvent molecules as a dielectric continuum. The densities of all other ions in the solvent are assumed to obey the Boltzmann distribution. The impact of protein molecular structure and its charge polarization on the proton transport is considered in atomic details. We formulate a total free energy functional to include kinetic and potential energies of protons, as well as electrostatic energy of all other ions on an equal footing. For both nano-transistors and proton channels systems, the variational principle is employed to derive nonlinear governing equations. The Poisson-Kohn-Sham equations are derived for nano-transistors while the generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equation and Kohn-Sham equation are obtained for proton channels. Related numerical

  9. Structure of the transmembrane region of the M2 protein H+ channel

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junfeng; Kim, Sanguk; Kovacs, Frank; Cross, Timothy A.

    2001-01-01

    The transmembrane domain of the M2 protein from influenza A virus forms a nearly uniform and ideal helix in a liquid crystalline bilayer environment. The exposure of the hydrophilic backbone structure is minimized through uniform hydrogen bond geometry imposed by the low dielectric lipid environment. A high-resolution structure of the monomer backbone and a detailed description of its orientation with respect to the bilayer were achieved using orientational restraints from solid-state NMR. With this unique information, the tetrameric structure of this H+ channel is constrained substantially. Features of numerous published models are discussed in light of the experimental structure of the monomer and derived features of the tetrameric bundle. PMID:11604531

  10. Immobilization and characterization of the transmembrane ion channel peptide gramicidin in a sol-gel matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquembre, Rocío; Poveda, José Antonio; Mallavia, Ricardo; Mateo, C. Reyes

    2007-05-01

    Immobilization of ion channels requires of a methodology able to retain the physical properties of the lipid bilayer where their activity is performed. However, most of lipid membrane immobilization methods have been observed to alter the structural properties of the bilayers. Use of sol-gel routes seems to be an interesting alternative, although unstable liposomes were obtained when conventional sol-gel methodology was employed for immobilizing. Recently, we have suggested that use of alcohol-free sol-gel routes combined with negatively charged lipids could minimize effects exerted by host matrix on liposome structure, increasing its stability. Here we confirm this assumption by analysing the physical properties of a series of zwitterionic and anionic liposomes entrapped in a sol-gel matrix and we develop a methodology able to retain the physical properties of the lipid bilayer. This methodology has been successfully used to immobilize the transmembrane ion channel peptide gramicidin. Gramicidin was reconstituted in anionic liposomes and its immobilization was confirmed from changes observed in the photophysical properties of the tryptophan residues. Ion channel activity was determined using the fluorescent dye pyrene-1,3,6,8-tetrasulphonic acid (PTSA) and long term stability of the immobilized system was checked from steady-state fluorescence anisotropy measurements.

  11. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator: a chloride channel gated by ATP binding and hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Bompadre, Silvia G; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2007-08-25

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel that belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. Defective function of CFTR is responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder in Caucasian populations. The disease is manifested in defective chloride transport across the epithelial cells in various tissues. To date, more than 1400 different mutations have been identified as CF-associated. CFTR is regulated by phosphorylation in its regulatory (R) domain, and gated by ATP binding and hydrolysis at its two nucleotide-binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2). Recent studies reveal that the NBDs of CFTR may dimerize as observed in other ABC proteins. Upon dimerization of CFTR's two NBDs, in a head-to-tail configuration, the two ATP-binding pockets (ABP1 and ABP2) are formed by the canonical Walker A and B motifs from one NBD and the signature sequence from the partner NBD. Mutations of the amino acids that interact with ATP reveal that the two ABPs play distinct roles in controlling ATP-dependent gating of CFTR. It was proposed that binding of ATP to the ABP2, which is formed by the Walker A and B in NBD2 and the signature sequence in NBD1, is critical for catalyzing channel opening. While binding of ATP to the ABP1 alone may not increase the opening rate, it does contribute to the stabilization of the open channel conformation. Several disease-associated mutations of the CFTR channel are characterized by gating defects. Understanding how CFTR's two NBDs work together to gate the channel could provide considerable mechanistic information for future pharmacological studies, which could pave the way for tailored drug design for therapeutical interventions in CF.

  12. Determinants of Anion Permeation in the Second Transmembrane Domain of the Mouse Bestrophin-2 Chloride Channel

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Zhiqiang; Hartzell, Criss

    2004-01-01

    Bestrophins have been proposed to constitute a new family of Cl channels that are activated by cytosolic Ca. We showed previously that mutation of serine-79 to cysteine in mouse bestrophin-2 (mBest2) altered the relative permeability and conductance to SCN. In this paper, we have overexpressed various mutant constructs of mBest2 in HEK-293 cells to explore the contributions to anion selectivity of serine-79 and other amino acids (V78, F80, G83, F84, V86, and T87) located in the putative second transmembrane domain (TMD2). Residues selected for mutagenesis were distributed throughout TMD2, but mutations at all positions changed the selectivity. The effects on selectivity were rather modest. Replacement of residues 78, 79, 80, 83, 84, 86, or 87 with cysteine had similar effects: the permeability of the channel to SCN relative to Cl (PSCN/PCl) was decreased three- to fourfold and the relative SCN conductance (GSCN/GCl) was increased five- to tenfold. Side chains at positions 78 and 80 appeared to be situated close to the permeant anion, because the electrostatic charge at these positions affected permeation in specific ways. The effects of charged sulfhydryl-reactive MTS reagents were the opposite in the V78C and F80C mutants and the effects were partially mimicked by substitution of F80 with charged amino acids. In S79T, switching from Cl to SCN caused slow changes in GSCN/GCl (τ = 16.6 s), suggesting that SCN binding to the channel altered channel gating as well as conductance. The data in this paper and other data support a model in which TMD2 plays an important role in forming the bestrophin pore. We suggest that the major determinant in anion permeation involves partitioning of the permeant anion into an aqueous pore whose structural features are rather flexible. Furthermore, anion permeation and gating may be linked. PMID:15452198

  13. Expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator corrects defective chloride channel regulation in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, Devra P.; Anderson, Matthew P.; Gregory, Richard J.; Cheng, Seng H.; Paul, Sucharita; Jefferson, Douglas M.; McCann, John D.; Klinger, Katherine W.; Smith, Alan E.; Welsh, Michael J.

    1990-09-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) was expressed in cultured cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells and Cl- channel activation assessed in single cells using a fluorescence microscopic assay and the patch-clamp technique. Expression of CFTR, but not of a mutant form of CFTR (ΔF508), corrected the Cl- channel defect. Correction of the phenotypic defect demonstrates a causal relationship between mutations in the CFTR gene and defective Cl- transport which is the hallmark of the disease.

  14. Distinctly different interactions of anesthetic and nonimmobilizer with transmembrane channel peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, P; Hu, J; Liachenko, S; Xu, Y

    1999-01-01

    Although it plays no clinical role in general anesthesia, gramicidin A, a transmembrane channel peptide, provides an excellent model for studying the specific interaction between volatile anesthetics and membrane proteins at the molecular level. We show here that a pair of structurally similar volatile anesthetic and nonimmobilizer (nonanesthetic), 1-chloro-1,2,2-trifluorocyclobutane (F3) and 1, 2-dichlorohexafluorocyclobutane (F6), respectively, interacts differently with the transmembrane peptide. With 400 microM gramicidin A in a vesicle suspension of 60 mM phosphatidylcholine-phosphatidylglycerol (PC/PG), the intermolecular cross-relaxation rate constants between (19)F of F3 and (1)H in the chemical shift regions for the indole and backbone amide protons were 0.0106 +/- 0.0007 (n = 12) and 0.0105 +/- 0.0014 (n = 8) s(-1), respectively. No cross-relaxation was measurable between (19)F of F6 and protons in these regions. Sodium transport study showed that with 75 microM gramicidin A in a vesicle suspension of 66 mM PC/PG, F3 increased the (23)Na apparent efflux rate constant from 149.7 +/- 7.2 of control (n = 3) to 191.7 +/- 12.2 s(-1) (n = 3), and the apparent influx rate constant from 182.1 +/- 15.4 to 222.8 +/- 21.7 s(-1) (n = 3). In contrast, F6 had no effects on either influx or efflux rate. It is concluded that the ability of general anesthetics to interact with amphipathic residues near the peptide-lipid-water interface and the inability of nonimmobilizer to do the same may represent some characteristics of anesthetic-protein interaction that are of importance to general anesthesia. PMID:10423422

  15. Inhibition of volume-regulated anion channels by expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Vennekens, R; Trouet, D; Vankeerberghen, A; Voets, T; Cuppens, H; Eggermont, J; Cassiman, J J; Droogmans, G; Nilius, B

    1999-02-15

    1. To investigate whether the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) interacts with volume regulated anion channels (VRACs), we measured the volume-activated chloride current (ICl,swell) using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique in calf pulmonary artery endothelial (CPAE) cells and in COS cells transiently transfected with wild-type (WT) CFTR and the deletion mutant DeltaF508 CFTR. 2. ICl,swell was significantly reduced in CPAE cells expressing WT CFTR to 66.5 +/- 8.8 % (n = 13; mean +/- s. e.m.) of the control value (n = 11). This reduction was independent of activation of the CFTR channel. 3. Expression of DeltaF508 CFTR resulted in two groups of CPAE cells. In the first group IBMX and forskolin could activate a Cl- current. In these cells ICl,swell was reduced to 52.7 +/- 18.8 % (n = 5) of the control value (n = 21). In the second group IBMX and forskolin could not activate a current. The amplitude of ICl,swell in these cells was not significantly different from the control value (112.4 +/- 13.7 %, n = 11; 21 control cells). 4. Using the same method we showed that expression of WT CFTR in COS cells reduced ICl,swell to 62.1 +/- 11.9 % (n = 14) of the control value (n = 12) without any changes in the kinetics of the current. Non-stationary noise analysis suggested that there is no significant difference in the single channel conductance of VRAC between CFTR expressing and non-expressing COS cells. 5. We conclude that expression of WT CFTR down-regulates ICl, swell in CPAE and COS cells, suggesting an interaction between CFTR and VRAC independent of activation of CFTR.

  16. Relevance of lysine snorkeling in the outer transmembrane domain of small viral potassium ion channels.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, Manuela; Henkes, Leonhard M; Tayefeh, Sascha; Hertel, Brigitte; Greiner, Timo; Van Etten, James L; Baumeister, Dirk; Cosentino, Cristian; Moroni, Anna; Kast, Stefan M; Thiel, Gerhard

    2012-07-17

    Transmembrane domains (TMDs) are often flanked by Lys or Arg because they keep their aliphatic parts in the bilayer and their charged groups in the polar interface. Here we examine the relevance of this so-called "snorkeling" of a cationic amino acid, which is conserved in the outer TMD of small viral K(+) channels. Experimentally, snorkeling activity is not mandatory for Kcv(PBCV-1) because K29 can be replaced by most of the natural amino acids without any corruption of function. Two similar channels, Kcv(ATCV-1) and Kcv(MT325), lack a cytosolic N-terminus, and neutralization of their equivalent cationic amino acids inhibits their function. To understand the variable importance of the cationic amino acids, we reanalyzed molecular dynamics simulations of Kcv(PBCV-1) and N-terminally truncated mutants; the truncated mutants mimic Kcv(ATCV-1) and Kcv(MT325). Structures were analyzed with respect to membrane positioning in relation to the orientation of K29. The results indicate that the architecture of the protein (including the selectivity filter) is only weakly dependent on TMD length and protonation of K29. The penetration depth of Lys in a given protonation state is independent of the TMD architecture, which leads to a distortion of shorter proteins. The data imply that snorkeling can be important for K(+) channels; however, its significance depends on the architecture of the entire TMD. The observation that the most severe N-terminal truncation causes the outer TMD to move toward the cytosolic side suggests that snorkeling becomes more relevant if TMDs are not stabilized in the membrane by other domains.

  17. Internal structure and visualization of transmembrane domains of the RyR1 calcium release channel by cryo‐EM

    PubMed Central

    Samsó, Montserrat; Wagenknecht, Terence; Allen, PD

    2007-01-01

    RyR1 is an intracellular calcium channel with a central role in muscle contraction. We obtained a three‐dimensional reconstruction of the RyR1 in the closed state at a nominal resolution of ∼10 Å using cryo‐EM. The cytoplasmic assembly consists of a series of interconnected tubular structures that merge into four columns that extend into the transmembrane assembly. The transmembrane assembly, which has at least six transmembrane α‐helices per monomer, has four tilted rods that can be fitted with the inner helices of a closed K+ channel atomic structure. The rods splay out at the lumenal side and converge into a dense ring at the cytoplasmic side. Another set of four rods emerges from this ring and shapes the inner part of the four columns. The resulting constricted axial structure provides direct continuity between cytoplasmic and transmembrane assemblies, and a possible mechanism for control of channel gating through conformational changes in the cytoplasmic assembly. PMID:15908964

  18. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl⁻ channel: a versatile engine for transepithelial ion transport.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyu; Cai, Zhiwei; Chen, Jeng-Haur; Ju, Min; Xu, Zhe; Sheppard, David N

    2007-08-25

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a unique member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that forms a Cl(-) channel with complex regulation. CFTR is composed of five domains: two membrane-spanning domains (MSDs), two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) and a unique regulatory domain (RD). The MSDs assemble to form a low conductance (6-10 pS) anion-selective pore with deep intracellular and shallow extracellular vestibules separated by a selectivity filter. The NBDs form a head-to-tail dimer with two ATP-binding sites (termed sites 1 and 2) located at the dimer interface. Anion flow through CFTR is gated by the interaction of ATP with sites 1 and 2 powering cycles of NBD dimer association and dissociation and hence, conformational changes in the MSDs that open and close the channel pore. The RD is an unstructured domain with multiple consensus phosphorylation sites, phosphorylation of which stimulates CFTR function by enhancing the interaction of ATP with the NBDs. Tight spatial and temporal control of CFTR activity is achieved by macromolecular signalling complexes in which scaffolding proteins colocalise CFTR and plasma membrane receptors with protein kinases and phosphatases. Moreover, a macromolecular complex composed of CFTR and metabolic enzymes (a CFTR metabolon) permits CFTR activity to be coupled tightly to metabolic pathways within cells so that CFTR inhibition conserves vital energy stores. CFTR is expressed in epithelial tissues throughout the body, lining ducts and tubes. It functions to control the quantity and composition of epithelial secretions by driving either the absorption or secretion of salt and water. Of note, in the respiratory airways CFTR plays an additional important role in host defence. Malfunction of CFTR disrupts transepithelial ion transport leading to a wide spectrum of human disease.

  19. Three-dimensional reconstruction of human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel revealed an ellipsoidal structure with orifices beneath the putative transmembrane domain.

    PubMed

    Mio, Kazuhiro; Ogura, Toshihiko; Mio, Muneyo; Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Sato, Chikara; Sohma, Yoshiro

    2008-10-31

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is a membrane-integral protein that belongs to an ATP-binding cassette superfamily. Mutations in the CFTR gene cause cystic fibrosis in which salt, water, and protein transports are defective in various tissues. Here we expressed wild-type human CFTR as a FLAG-fused protein in HEK293 cells heterologously and purified it in three steps: anti-FLAG and wheat germ agglutinin affinity chromatographies and size exclusion chromatography. The stoichiometry of the protein was analyzed using various biochemical approaches, including chemical cross-linking, blue-native PAGE, size exclusion chromatography, and electron microscopy (EM) observation of antibody-decorated CFTR. All these data support a dimeric assembly of CFTR. Using 5,039 automatically selected particles from negatively stained EM images, the three-dimensional structure of CFTR was reconstructed at 2-nm resolution assuming a 2-fold symmetry. CFTR, presumably in a closed state, was shown to be an ellipsoidal particle with dimensions of 120 x 106 x 162 A. It comprises a small dome-shaped extracellular and membrane-spanning domain and a large cytoplasmic domain with orifices beneath the putative transmembrane domain. EM observation of CFTR.anti-regulatory domain antibody complex confirmed that two regulatory domains are located around the bottom end of the larger oval cytoplasmic domain.

  20. Erythrocyte Mr 28,000 transmembrane protein exists as a multisubunit oligomer similar to channel proteins.

    PubMed

    Smith, B L; Agre, P

    1991-04-05

    A novel Mr 28,000 erythrocyte transmembrane protein was recently purified and found to exist in two forms, "28kDa" and "gly28kDa," the latter containing N-linked carbohydrate (Denker, B. M., Smith, B. L., Kuhajda, F. P., and Agre, P. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 15634-15642). Although 28kDa protein resembles the Rh polypeptides biochemically, structural homologies were not identified by immunoblot or two-dimensional iodopeptide maps. The NH2-terminal amino acid sequence for the first 35 residues of purified 28kDa protein is 37% identical to the 26-kDa major intrinsic protein of lens (Gorin, M. B., Yancey, S. B., Cline, J., Revel, J.-P., and Horwitz, J. Cell 39, 49-59). Antisera to a synthetic peptide corresponding to the NH2-terminus of 28kDa protein gave a single reaction of molecular mass 28kDa on immunoblots of erythrocyte membranes. Selective digestions of intact erythrocytes and inside-out membrane vesicles with carboxypeptidase Y indicated the existence of a 5-kDa COOH-terminal cytoplasmic domain. Multiple studies indicated that 28kDa and gly28kDa proteins exist together as a multisubunit oligomer: 1) similar partial solubilizations in Triton X-100; 2) co-purification during ion exchange and lectin affinity chromatography; 3) cross-linking in low concentrations of glutaraldehyde; and 4) physical analyses of purified proteins and solubilized membranes in 1% (v/v) Triton X-100 showed 28kDa and gly28kDa proteins behave as a large single unit with Stokes radius of 61 A and sedimentation coefficient of 5.7 S. These studies indicate that the 28kDa and gly28kDa proteins are distinct from the Rh polypeptides and exist as a multisubunit oligomer. The 28kDa protein has NH2-terminal amino acid sequence homology and membrane organization similar to major intrinsic protein and other members of a newly recognized family of transmembrane channel proteins.

  1. Structure of six-transmembrane cation channels revealed by single-particle analysis from electron microscopic images.

    PubMed

    Mio, Kazuhiro; Ogura, Toshihiko; Sato, Chikara

    2008-05-01

    Six-transmembrane (6-TM) cation channels are plasma membrane-integral components of cellular signaling pathways conserved in almost all species, including animals, plants and some kinds of prokaryotes. These channels selectively permeate cations in response to various signals. In excitable and non-excitable mammalian cells, 6-TM cation channels play fundamental roles, including the generation of action potential and its transmission, the regulation of intracellular ion concentrations, and the activation of signaling cascades by humoral or mechanical pathways. Recently, the structures of three different 6-TM-type cation channels have been determined using single-particle analysis from cryo-electron microscopy images: the voltage-sensitive sodium channel, the IP(3) receptor and the TRPC3 channel. The basic structure of the molecules is similar: a bell-like shape comprising a relatively small extracellular (or luminal) domain, a protein-dense transmembrane domain and an expanded cytoplasmic domain. However, in detail, the cytoplasmic architectures are different from one another and are diversely evolved to their specific physiological functions.

  2. Structure of six-transmembrane cation channels revealed by single-particle analysis from electron microscopic images

    PubMed Central

    Mio, Kazuhiro; Ogura, Toshihiko; Sato, Chikara

    2008-01-01

    Six-transmembrane (6-TM) cation channels are plasma membrane-integral components of cellular signaling pathways conserved in almost all species, including animals, plants and some kinds of prokaryotes. These channels selectively permeate cations in response to various signals. In excitable and non-excitable mammalian cells, 6-TM cation channels play fundamental roles, including the generation of action potential and its transmission, the regulation of intracellular ion concentrations, and the activation of signaling cascades by humoral or mechanical pathways. Recently, the structures of three different 6-TM-type cation channels have been determined using single-particle analysis from cryo-electron microscopy images: the voltage-sensitive sodium channel, the IP3 receptor and the TRPC3 channel. The basic structure of the molecules is similar: a bell-like shape comprising a relatively small extracellular (or luminal) domain, a protein-dense transmembrane domain and an expanded cytoplasmic domain. However, in detail, the cytoplasmic architectures are different from one another and are diversely evolved to their specific physiological functions. PMID:18421141

  3. Conformation of alamethicin in oriented phospholipid bilayers determined by (15)N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Bak, M; Bywater, R P; Hohwy, M; Thomsen, J K; Adelhorst, K; Jakobsen, H J; Sørensen, O W; Nielsen, N C

    2001-01-01

    The conformation of the 20-residue antibiotic ionophore alamethicin in macroscopically oriented phospholipid bilayers has been studied using (15)N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in combination with molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. Differently (15)N-labeled variants of alamethicin and an analog with three of the alpha-amino-isobutyric acid residues replaced by alanines have been investigated to establish experimental structural constraints and determine the orientation of alamethicin in hydrated phospholipid (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine) bilayers and to investigate the potential for a major kink in the region of the central Pro(14) residue. From the anisotropic (15)N chemical shifts and (1)H-(15)N dipolar couplings determined for alamethicin with (15)N-labeling on the Ala(6), Val(9), and Val(15) residues and incorporated into phospholipid bilayer with a peptide:lipid molar ratio of 1:8, we deduce that alamethicin has a largely linear alpha-helical structure spanning the membrane with the molecular axis tilted by 10-20 degrees relative to the bilayer normal. In particular, we find compatibility with a straight alpha-helix tilted by 17 degrees and a slightly kinked molecular dynamics structure tilted by 11 degrees relative to the bilayer normal. In contrast, the structural constraints derived by solid-state NMR appear not to be compatible with any of several model structures crossing the membrane with vanishing tilt angle or the earlier reported x-ray diffraction structure (Fox and Richards, Nature. 300:325-330, 1982). The solid-state NMR-compatible structures may support the formation of a left-handed and parallel multimeric ion channel. PMID:11509381

  4. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR): three-dimensional structure and localization of a channel gate.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Mark F; O'Ryan, Liam P; Hughes, Guy; Zhao, Zhefeng; Aleksandrov, Luba A; Riordan, John R; Ford, Robert C

    2011-12-09

    Cystic fibrosis affects about 1 in 2500 live births and involves loss of transmembrane chloride flux due to a lack of a membrane protein channel termed the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). We have studied CFTR structure by electron crystallography. The data were compared with existing structures of other ATP-binding cassette transporters. The protein was crystallized in the outward facing state and resembled the well characterized Sav1866 transporter. We identified regions in the CFTR map, not accounted for by Sav1866, which were potential locations for the regulatory region as well as the channel gate. In this analysis, we were aided by the fact that the unit cell was composed of two molecules not related by crystallographic symmetry. We also identified regions in the fitted Sav1866 model that were missing from the map, hence regions that were either disordered in CFTR or differently organized compared with Sav1866. Apart from the N and C termini, this indicated that in CFTR, the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane helix 5/11 and its associated loop could be partly disordered (or alternatively located).

  5. Subunit-selective role of the M3 transmembrane domain of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in channel gating.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, María José; Corradi, Jeremías; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2008-02-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) can be either hetero-pentameric, composed of alpha and non-alpha subunits, or homo-pentameric, composed of alpha7 subunits. To explore the subunit-selective contributions of transmembrane domains to channel gating we analyzed single-channel activity of chimeric muscle AChRs. We exchanged M3 between alpha1 and epsilon or alpha7 subunits. The replacement of M3 in alpha1 by epsilonM3 significantly alters activation properties. Channel activity appears as bursts of openings whose durations are 20-fold longer than those of wild-type AChRs. In contrast, 7-fold briefer openings are observed in AChRs containing the reverse epsilon chimeric subunit. The duration of the open state decreases with the increase in the number of alpha1M3 segments, indicating additive contributions of M3 of all subunits to channel closing. Each alpha1M3 segment decreases the energy barrier of the closing process by approximately 0.8 kcal/mol. Partial chimeric subunits show that small stretches of the M3 segment contribute additively to the open duration. The replacement of alpha1 sequence by alpha7 in M3 leads to 3-fold briefer openings whereas in M1 it leads to 10-fold prolonged openings, revealing that the subunit-selective role is unique to each transmembrane segment.

  6. Contribution of a leucine residue in the first transmembrane segment to the selectivity filter region in the CFTR chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Negoda, Alexander; El Hiani, Yassine; Cowley, Elizabeth A; Linsdell, Paul

    2017-05-01

    The anion selectivity and conductance of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel are determined predominantly by interactions between permeant anions and the narrow region of the channel pore. This narrow region has therefore been described as functioning as the "selectivity filter" of the channel. Multiple pore-lining transmembrane segments (TMs) have previously been shown to contribute to the selectivity filter region. However, little is known about the three-dimensional organization of this region, or how multiple TMs combine to determine its functional properties. In the present study we have used patch clamp recording to identify changes in channel function associated with the formation of disulfide cross-links between cysteine residues introduced into different TMs within the selectivity filter. Cysteine introduced at position L102 in TM1 was able to form disulfide bonds with F337C and T338C in TM6, two positions that are known to play key roles in determining anion permeation properties. Consistent with this proximal arrangement of L102, F337 and T338, different mutations at L102 altered anion selectivity and conductance properties in a way that suggests that this residue plays an important role in determining selectivity filter function, albeit a much lesser role than that of F337. These results suggest an asymmetric three-dimensional arrangement of the key selectivity filter region of the pore, as well as having important implications regarding the molecular mechanism of anion permeation.

  7. N-terminal transmembrane domain of the SUR controls trafficking and gating of Kir6 channel subunits

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kim W.; Zhang, Hailin; Logothetis, Diomedes E.

    2003-01-01

    The sulfonylurea receptor (SUR), an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein, assembles with a potassium channel subunit (Kir6) to form the ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP) complex. Although SUR is an important regulator of Kir6, the specific SUR domain that associates with Kir6 is still unknown. All functional ABC proteins contain two transmembrane domains but some, including SUR and MRP1 (multidrug resistance protein 1), contain an extra N-terminal transmembrane domain called TMD0. The functions of any TMD0s are largely unclear. Using Xenopus oocytes to coexpress truncated SUR constructs with Kir6, we demonstrated by immunoprecipitation, single-oocyte chemiluminescence and electrophysiological measurements that the TMD0 of SUR1 strongly associated with Kir6.2 and modulated its trafficking and gating. Two TMD0 mutations, A116P and V187D, previously correlated with persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy, were found to disrupt the association between TMD0 and Kir6.2. These results underscore the importance of TMD0 in KATP channel function, explaining how specific mutations within this domain result in disease, and suggest how an ABC protein has evolved to regulate a potassium channel. PMID:12881418

  8. Evidence for intersubunit interactions between S4 and S5 transmembrane segments of the Shaker potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Neale, Edward J; Elliott, David J S; Hunter, Malcolm; Sivaprasadarao, Asipu

    2003-08-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels are transmembrane proteins made up of four subunits, each comprising six transmembrane (S1-S6) segments. S1-S4 form the voltage-sensing domain and S5-S6 the pore domain with its central pore. The sensor domain detects membrane depolarization and transmits the signal to the activation gates situated in the pore domain, thereby leading to channel opening. An understanding of the mechanism by which the sensor communicates the signal to the pore requires knowledge of the structure of the interface between the voltage-sensing and pore domains. Toward this end, we have introduced single cysteine mutations into the extracellular end of S4 (positions 356 and 357) in conjunction with a cysteine in S5 (position 418) of the Shaker channel and expressed the mutants in Xenopus oocytes. We then examined the propensity of each pair of engineered cysteines to form a metal bridge or a disulfide bridge, respectively, by examining the effect of Cd2+ ions and copper phenanthroline on the K+ conductance of a whole oocyte. Both reagents reduced currents through the S357C,E418C double mutant channel, presumably by restricting the movements necessary for coupling the voltage-sensing function to pore opening. This inhibitory effect was seen in the closed state of the channel and with heteromers composed of S357C and E418C single mutant subunits; no effect was seen with homomers of any of the single mutant channels. These data indicate that the extracellular end of S4 lies in close proximity to the extracellular end of the S5 of the neighboring subunit in closed channels.

  9. The Properties of Alamethicin Incorporated Into Planar Lipid Bilayers Under the Influence of Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinke, N.; Goldermann, M.; Hanke, W.

    2000-11-01

    During evolution, life on earth had adapted to the gravity of 1 g. Due to space flight, in the last decades the question arose what happens to the brain under microgravity on the molecular level. Ion channels among others are the molecular basis of brain function. Therefore, the investigation of ion channel function under microgravity seems to be a promising approach to gather knowledge on brain function during space flight. In a first step, the ion channel forming peptide Alamethicin was used as a model channel in an artificial membrane. It is well suitable for this kind of investigation, since its properties are well described under standard gravity [1]. For that reason, changes due to microgravity can be detected easily. All experiments were performed in the German drop tower at ZARM-FAB, Bremen. A special set-up was constructed based on the bilayer technique introduced by Mueller and Rudin [2]. All functions of this set-up can be observed and controlled remotely. In the first set of experiments, a dramatic change of electrical properties of Alamethicin under microgravity could be observed. Mainly, the pore frequency is significantly reduced.

  10. A negative charge in transmembrane segment 1 of domain II of the cockroach sodium channel is critical for channel gating and action of pyrethroid insecticides

    SciTech Connect

    Du Yuzhe; Song Weizhong; Groome, James R.; Nomura, Yoshiko; Luo Ningguang; Dong Ke

    2010-08-15

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary target of pyrethroids, an important class of synthetic insecticides. Pyrethroids bind to a distinct receptor site on sodium channels and prolong the open state by inhibiting channel deactivation and inactivation. Recent studies have begun to reveal sodium channel residues important for pyrethroid binding. However, how pyrethroid binding leads to inhibition of sodium channel deactivation and inactivation remains elusive. In this study, we show that a negatively charged aspartic acid residue at position 802 (D802) located in the extracellular end of transmembrane segment 1 of domain II (IIS1) is critical for both the action of pyrethroids and the voltage dependence of channel activation. Charge-reversing or -neutralizing substitutions (K, G, or A) of D802 shifted the voltage dependence of activation in the depolarizing direction and reduced channel sensitivity to deltamethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide. The charge-reversing mutation D802K also accelerated open-state deactivation, which may have counteracted the inhibition of sodium channel deactivation by deltamethrin. In contrast, the D802G substitution slowed open-state deactivation, suggesting an additional mechanism for neutralizing the action of deltamethrin. Importantly, Schild analysis showed that D802 is not involved in pyrethroid binding. Thus, we have identified a sodium channel residue that is critical for regulating the action of pyrethroids on the sodium channel without affecting the receptor site of pyrethroids.

  11. A monomer is the minimum functional unit required for channel and ATPase activity of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Ramjeesingh, M; Li, C; Kogan, I; Wang, Y; Huan, L J; Bear, C E

    2001-09-04

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) normally functions as a phosphorylation-regulated chloride channel on the apical surface of epithelial cells, and lack of this function is the primary cause for the fatal disease cystic fibrosis (CF). Previous studies showed that purified, reconstituted CFTR can function as a chloride channel and, further, that its intrinsic ATPase activity is required to regulate opening and closing of the channel gate. However, these previous studies did not identify the quaternary structure required to mediate conduction and catalysis. Our present studies show that CFTR molecules may self-associate in CHO and Sf9 membranes, as complexes close to the predicted size of CFTR dimers can be captured by chemical cross-linking reagents and detected using nondissociative PAGE. However, CFTR function does not require a multimeric complex for function as we determined that purified, reconstituted CFTR monomers are sufficient to mediate regulated chloride conduction and ATPase activity.

  12. The saxitoxin/tetrodotoxin binding site on cloned rat brain IIa Na channels is in the transmembrane electric field.

    PubMed Central

    Satin, J.; Limberis, J. T.; Kyle, J. W.; Rogart, R. B.; Fozzard, H. A.

    1994-01-01

    The rat brain IIa (BrIIa) Na channel alpha-subunit and the brain beta 1 subunit were coexpressed in Xenopus oocytes, and peak whole-oocyte Na current (INa) was measured at a test potential of -10 mV. Hyperpolarization of the holding potential resulted in an increased affinity of STX and TTX rested-state block of BrIIa Na channels. The apparent half-block concentration (ED50) for STX of BrIIa current decreased with hyperpolarizing holding potentials (Vhold). At Vhold of -100 mV, the ED50 was 2.1 +/- 0.4 nM, and the affinity increased to a ED50 of 1.2 +/- 0.2 nM with Vhold of -140 mV. In the absence of toxin, the peak current amplitude was the same for all potentials negative to -90 mV, demonstrating that all of the channels were in a closed conformation and maximally available to open in this range of holding potentials. The Woodhull model (1973) was used to describe the increase of the STX ED50 as a function of holding potential. The equivalent electrical distance of block (delta) by STX was 0.18 from the extracellular milieu when the valence of STX was fixed to +2. Analysis of the holding potential dependence of TTX block yielded a similar delta when the valence of TTX was fixed to +1. We conclude that the guanidinium toxin site is located partially within the transmembrane electric field. Previous site-directed mutagenesis studies demonstrated that an isoform-specific phenylalanine in the BrIIa channel is critical for high affinity toxin block. Therefore, we propose that amino acids at positions corresponding to this Phe in the BrIIa channel, which lie in the outer vestibule of the channel adjacent to the pore entrance,are partially in the transmembrane potential drop. PMID:7811911

  13. The saxitoxin/tetrodotoxin binding site on cloned rat brain IIa Na channels is in the transmembrane electric field.

    PubMed

    Satin, J; Limberis, J T; Kyle, J W; Rogart, R B; Fozzard, H A

    1994-09-01

    The rat brain IIa (BrIIa) Na channel alpha-subunit and the brain beta 1 subunit were coexpressed in Xenopus oocytes, and peak whole-oocyte Na current (INa) was measured at a test potential of -10 mV. Hyperpolarization of the holding potential resulted in an increased affinity of STX and TTX rested-state block of BrIIa Na channels. The apparent half-block concentration (ED50) for STX of BrIIa current decreased with hyperpolarizing holding potentials (Vhold). At Vhold of -100 mV, the ED50 was 2.1 +/- 0.4 nM, and the affinity increased to a ED50 of 1.2 +/- 0.2 nM with Vhold of -140 mV. In the absence of toxin, the peak current amplitude was the same for all potentials negative to -90 mV, demonstrating that all of the channels were in a closed conformation and maximally available to open in this range of holding potentials. The Woodhull model (1973) was used to describe the increase of the STX ED50 as a function of holding potential. The equivalent electrical distance of block (delta) by STX was 0.18 from the extracellular milieu when the valence of STX was fixed to +2. Analysis of the holding potential dependence of TTX block yielded a similar delta when the valence of TTX was fixed to +1. We conclude that the guanidinium toxin site is located partially within the transmembrane electric field. Previous site-directed mutagenesis studies demonstrated that an isoform-specific phenylalanine in the BrIIa channel is critical for high affinity toxin block. Therefore, we propose that amino acids at positions corresponding to this Phe in the BrIIa channel, which lie in the outer vestibule of the channel adjacent to the pore entrance,are partially in the transmembrane potential drop.

  14. External Zn(2+) binding to cysteine-substituted cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator constructs regulates channel gating and curcumin potentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangyu; Linsley, Rheeann; Norimatsu, Yohei

    2016-07-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is activated by ATP binding-induced dimerization of nucleotide-binding domains, the interaction between the phosphorylated regulatory (R) domain and the curcumin-sensitive interface between intracellular loop (ICL) 1 and ICL4, and the resultant inward-to-'outward' reorientation of transmembrane domains. Although transmembrane helices (TM) 2 and TM11 link the ICL1-ICL4 interface with the interface between extracellular loop (ECL) 1 and ECL6, it is unknown whether both interfaces are gating-coupled during the reorientation. Herein, R334C and T1122C mutations were used to engineer two Zn(2+) bridges near and at the ECL1-ECL6 interface, respectively, and the gating effects of a Zn(2+) disturbance at the ECL1-ECL6 interface on the stimulatory ICL1/ICL4-R interaction were determined. The results showed that both Zn(2+) bridges inhibited channel activity in a dose- and Cl(-) -dependent manner, and the inhibition was reversed by a washout or suppressed by thiol-specific modification. Interestingly, their Cl(-) -dependent Zn(2+) inhibition was weakened at higher Zn(2+) concentrations, their Zn(2+) affinity was stronger in the resting state than in the activated state, and their activation current noises were decreased by external Zn(2+) binding. More importantly, the external Zn(2+) inhibition was reversed by internal curcumin in the R334C construct but not in the T1122C mutant. Therefore, although both Zn(2+) bridges may promote channel closure, external Zn(2+) may disturb the ECL1-ECL6 interface and thus prevent the stimulatory ICL1/ICL4-R interaction and curcumin potentiation via a gating coupling between these two interfaces.

  15. Acute inhibition of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel by thyroid hormones involves multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhiwei; Li, Hongyu; Chen, Jeng-Haur; Sheppard, David N

    2013-10-15

    The chemical structures of the thyroid hormones triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) resemble those of small-molecules that inhibit the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel. We therefore tested the acute effects of T3, T4 and reverse T3 (rT3) on recombinant wild-type human CFTR using the patch-clamp technique. When added directly to the intracellular solution bathing excised membrane patches, T3, T4, and rT3 (all tested at 50 μM) inhibited CFTR in several ways: they strongly reduced CFTR open probability by impeding channel opening; they moderately decreased single-channel current amplitude, and they promoted transitions to subconductance states. To investigate the mechanism of CFTR inhibition, we studied T3. T3 (50 μM) had multiple effects on CFTR gating kinetics, suggestive of both allosteric inhibition and open-channel blockade. Channel inhibition by T3 was weakly voltage dependent and stronger than the allosteric inhibitor genistein, but weaker than the open-channel blocker glibenclamide. Raising the intracellular ATP concentration abrogated T3 inhibition of CFTR gating, but not the reduction in single-channel current amplitude nor the transitions to subconductance states. The decrease in single-channel current amplitude was relieved by membrane depolarization, but not the transitions to subconductance states. We conclude that T3 has complex effects on CFTR consistent with both allosteric inhibition and open-channel blockade. Our results suggest that there are multiple allosteric mechanisms of CFTR inhibition, including interference with ATP-dependent channel gating and obstruction of conformational changes that gate the CFTR pore. CFTR inhibition by thyroid hormones has implications for the development of innovative small-molecule CFTR inhibitors.

  16. Interaction between 2 extracellular loops influences the activity of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Steven D; Wang, Wuyang; Linsdell, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Activity of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is thought to be controlled by cytoplasmic factors. However, recent evidence has shown that overall channel activity is also influenced by extracellular anions that interact directly with the extracellular loops (ECLs) of the CFTR protein. Very little is known about the structure of the ECLs or how substances interacting with these ECLs might affect CFTR function. We used patch-clamp recording to investigate the accessibility of cysteine-reactive reagents to cysteines introduced throughout ECL1 and 2 key sites in ECL4. Furthermore, interactions between ECL1 and ECL4 were investigated by the formation of disulfide crosslinks between cysteines introduced into these 2 regions. Crosslinks could be formed between R899C (in ECL4) and a number of sites in ECL1 in a manner that was dependent on channel activity, suggesting that the relative orientation of these 2 loops changes on activation. Formation of these crosslinks inhibited channel function, suggesting that relative movement of these ECLs is important to normal channel function. Implications of these findings for the effects of mutations in the ECLs that are associated with cystic fibrosis and interactions with extracellular substances that influence channel activity are discussed.

  17. Alamethicin Suppresses Methanogenesis and Promotes Acetogenesis in Bioelectrochemical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiuping; Siegert, Michael; Yates, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial electrosynthesis (MES) systems with mixed cultures often generate a variety of gaseous and soluble chemicals. Methane is the primary end product in mixed-culture MES because it is the thermodynamically most favorable reduction product of CO2. Here, we show that the peptaibol alamethicin selectively suppressed the growth of methanogens in mixed-culture MES systems, resulting in a shift of the solution and cathode communities to an acetate-producing system dominated by Sporomusa, a known acetogenic genus in MES systems. Archaea in the methane-producing control were dominated by Methanobrevibacter species, but no Archaea were detected in the alamethicin-treated reactors. No methane was detected in the mixed-culture reactors treated with alamethicin over 10 cycles (∼3 days each). Instead, acetate was produced at an average rate of 115 nmol ml−1 day−1, similar to the rate reported previously for pure cultures of Sporomusa ovata on biocathodes. Mixed-culture control reactors without alamethicin generated methane at nearly 100% coulombic recovery, and no acetate was detected. These results show that alamethicin is effective for the suppression of methanogen growth in MES systems and that its use enables the production of industrially relevant organic compounds by the inhibition of methanogenesis. PMID:25819972

  18. Alamethicin suppresses methanogenesis and promotes acetogenesis in bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiuping; Siegert, Michael; Yates, Matthew D; Logan, Bruce E

    2015-06-01

    Microbial electrosynthesis (MES) systems with mixed cultures often generate a variety of gaseous and soluble chemicals. Methane is the primary end product in mixed-culture MES because it is the thermodynamically most favorable reduction product of CO2. Here, we show that the peptaibol alamethicin selectively suppressed the growth of methanogens in mixed-culture MES systems, resulting in a shift of the solution and cathode communities to an acetate-producing system dominated by Sporomusa, a known acetogenic genus in MES systems. Archaea in the methane-producing control were dominated by Methanobrevibacter species, but no Archaea were detected in the alamethicin-treated reactors. No methane was detected in the mixed-culture reactors treated with alamethicin over 10 cycles (∼ 3 days each). Instead, acetate was produced at an average rate of 115 nmol ml(-1) day(-1), similar to the rate reported previously for pure cultures of Sporomusa ovata on biocathodes. Mixed-culture control reactors without alamethicin generated methane at nearly 100% coulombic recovery, and no acetate was detected. These results show that alamethicin is effective for the suppression of methanogen growth in MES systems and that its use enables the production of industrially relevant organic compounds by the inhibition of methanogenesis. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Electronic control of H+ current in a bioprotonic device with Gramicidin A and Alamethicin

    PubMed Central

    Hemmatian, Zahra; Keene, Scott; Josberger, Erik; Miyake, Takeo; Arboleda, Carina; Soto-Rodríguez, Jessica; Baneyx, François; Rolandi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    In biological systems, intercellular communication is mediated by membrane proteins and ion channels that regulate traffic of ions and small molecules across cell membranes. A bioelectronic device with ion channels that control ionic flow across a supported lipid bilayer (SLB) should therefore be ideal for interfacing with biological systems. Here, we demonstrate a biotic–abiotic bioprotonic device with Pd contacts that regulates proton (H+) flow across an SLB incorporating the ion channels Gramicidin A (gA) and Alamethicin (ALM). We model the device characteristics using the Goldman–Hodgkin–Katz (GHK) solution to the Nernst–Planck equation for transport across the membrane. We derive the permeability for an SLB integrating gA and ALM and demonstrate pH control as a function of applied voltage and membrane permeability. This work opens the door to integrating more complex H+ channels at the Pd contact interface to produce responsive biotic–abiotic devices with increased functionality. PMID:27713411

  20. Electronic control of H+ current in a bioprotonic device with Gramicidin A and Alamethicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmatian, Zahra; Keene, Scott; Josberger, Erik; Miyake, Takeo; Arboleda, Carina; Soto-Rodríguez, Jessica; Baneyx, François; Rolandi, Marco

    2016-10-01

    In biological systems, intercellular communication is mediated by membrane proteins and ion channels that regulate traffic of ions and small molecules across cell membranes. A bioelectronic device with ion channels that control ionic flow across a supported lipid bilayer (SLB) should therefore be ideal for interfacing with biological systems. Here, we demonstrate a biotic-abiotic bioprotonic device with Pd contacts that regulates proton (H+) flow across an SLB incorporating the ion channels Gramicidin A (gA) and Alamethicin (ALM). We model the device characteristics using the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz (GHK) solution to the Nernst-Planck equation for transport across the membrane. We derive the permeability for an SLB integrating gA and ALM and demonstrate pH control as a function of applied voltage and membrane permeability. This work opens the door to integrating more complex H+ channels at the Pd contact interface to produce responsive biotic-abiotic devices with increased functionality.

  1. Walker mutations reveal loose relationship between catalytic and channel-gating activities of purified CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator).

    PubMed

    Ramjeesingh, M; Li, C; Garami, E; Huan, L J; Galley, K; Wang, Y; Bear, C E

    1999-02-02

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) functions as an ATPase and as a chloride channel. It has been hypothesized, on the basis of electrophysiological findings, that the catalytic activity of CFTR is tightly coupled to the opening and closing of the channel gate. In the present study, to determine the structural basis for the ATPase activity of CFTR, we assessed the effect of mutations within the "Walker A" consensus motifs on ATP hydrolysis by the purified, intact protein. Mutation of the lysine residue in the "Walker A" motif of either the first nucleotide binding fold (CFTRK464A) or the second nucleotide binding fold (CFTRK1250A) inhibited the ATPase activity of the purified intact CFTR protein significantly, by greater than 50%. This finding suggests that the two nucleotide binding folds of CFTR are functioning cooperatively in catalysis. However, the rate of channel gating was only significantly inhibited in one of these purified mutants, CFTRK1250A, suggesting that ATPase activity may not be tightly coupled to channel gating as previously hypothesized.

  2. The transmembrane channel-like protein family and human papillomaviruses: Insights into epidermodysplasia verruciformis and progression to squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Horton, Jaime S; Stokes, Alexander J

    2014-01-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare genodermatosis characterized by increased sensitivity to infection by the β-subtype of human papillomaviruses (β-HPVs), causing persistent, tinea versicolor-like dermal lesions. In a majority of affected individuals, these macular lesions progress to invasive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) in sun-exposed areas. While mutations in transmembrane channel-like 6 (TMC6 / EVER1) and 8 (TMC8 / EVER2) have been causally linked to EV, their molecular functions are unclear. It is likely that their protective effects involve regulation of the β-HPV life cycle, host keratinocyte apoptosis vs. survival balance and/or T-cell interaction with infected host cells.

  3. Tryptophan Scanning Reveals Dense Packing of Connexin Transmembrane Domains in Gap Junction Channels Composed of Connexin32.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Matthew J; Karcz, Jennifer; Vaughn, Nicholas R; Woolwine-Cunningham, Yvonne; DePriest, Adam D; Escalona, Yerko; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Skerrett, I Martha

    2015-07-10

    Tryptophan was substituted for residues in all four transmembrane domains of connexin32. Function was assayed using dual cell two-electrode voltage clamp after expression in Xenopus oocytes. Tryptophan substitution was poorly tolerated in all domains, with the greatest impact in TM1 and TM4. For instance, in TM1, 15 substitutions were made, six abolished coupling and five others significantly reduced function. Only TM2 and TM3 included a distinct helical face that lacked sensitivity to tryptophan substitution. Results were visualized on a comparative model of Cx32 hemichannel. In this model, a region midway through the membrane appears highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution and includes residues Arg-32, Ile-33, Met-34, and Val-35. In the modeled channel, pore-facing regions of TM1 and TM2 were highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution, whereas the lipid-facing regions of TM3 and TM4 were variably tolerant. Residues facing a putative intracellular water pocket (the IC pocket) were also highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution. Although future studies will be required to separate trafficking-defective mutants from those that alter channel function, a subset of interactions important for voltage gating was identified. Interactions important for voltage gating occurred mainly in the mid-region of the channel and focused on TM1. To determine whether results could be extrapolated to other connexins, TM1 of Cx43 was scanned revealing similar but not identical sensitivity to TM1 of Cx32.

  4. Mutations in the transmembrane helix S6 of domain IV confer cockroach sodium channel resistance to sodium channel blocker insecticides and local anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dingxin; Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Wang, Xingliang; Wu, Yidong; Zhorov, Boris S; Dong, Ke

    2015-11-01

    Indoxacarb and metaflumizone are two sodium channel blocker insecticides (SCBIs). They preferably bind to and trap sodium channels in the slow-inactivated non-conducting state, a mode of action similar to that of local anesthetics (LAs). Recently, two sodium channel mutations, F1845Y (F(4i15)Y) and V1848I (V(4i18)I), in the transmembrane segment 6 of domain IV (IVS6), were identified to be associated with indoxacarb resistance in Plutella xylostella. F(4i15) is known to be critical for the action of LAs on mammalian sodium channels. Previously, mutation F(4i15)A in a cockroach sodium channel, BgNav1-1a, has been shown to reduce the action of lidocaine, a LA, but not the action of SCBIs. In this study, we introduced mutations F(4i15)Y and V(4i18)A/I individually into the cockroach sodium channel, BgNav1-1a, and conducted functional analysis of the three mutants in Xenopus oocytes. We found that both the F(4i15)Y and V(4i18)I mutations reduced the inhibition of sodium current by indoxacarb, DCJW (an active metabolite of indoxacarb) and metaflumizone. F(4i15)Y and V(4i18)I mutations also reduced the use-dependent block of sodium current by lidocaine. In contrast, substitution V(4i18)A enhanced the action metaflumizone and lidocaine. These results show that both F(4i15)Y and V(4i18)I mutations may contribute to target-site resistance to SCBIs, and provide the first molecular evidence for common amino acid determinants on insect sodium channels involved in action of SCBIs and LA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Permeability of wild-type and mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channels to polyatomic anions.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, P; Tabcharani, J A; Rommens, J M; Hou, Y X; Chang, X B; Tsui, L C; Riordan, J R; Hanrahan, J W

    1997-10-01

    Permeability of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel to polyatomic anions of known dimensions was studied in stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells by using the patch clamp technique. Biionic reversal potentials measured with external polyatomic anions gave the permeability ratio (P/P) sequence NO > Cl > HCO > formate > acetate. The same selectivity sequence but somewhat higher permeability ratios were obtained when anions were tested from the cytoplasmic side. Pyruvate, propanoate, methane sulfonate, ethane sulfonate, and gluconate were not measurably permeant (P/P < 0.06) from either side of the membrane. The relationship between permeability ratios from the outside and ionic diameters suggests a minimum functional pore diameter of approximately 5.3 A. Permeability ratios also followed a lyotropic sequence, suggesting that permeability is dependent on ionic hydration energies. Site-directed mutagenesis of two adjacent threonines in TM6 to smaller, less polar alanines led to a significant (24%) increase in single channel conductance and elevated permeability to several large anions, suggesting that these residues do not strongly bind permeating anions, but may contribute to the narrowest part of the pore.

  6. Voltage-dependent block of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channel by two closely related arylaminobenzoates

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The gene defective in cystic fibrosis encodes a Cl- channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). CFTR is blocked by diphenylamine-2-carboxylate (DPC) when applied extracellularly at millimolar concentrations. We studied the block of CFTR expressed in Xenopus oocytes by DPC or by a closely related molecule, flufenamic acid (FFA). Block of whole-cell CFTR currents by bath-applied DPC or by FFA, both at 200 microM, requires several minutes to reach full effect. Blockade is voltage dependent, suggesting open-channel block: currents at positive potentials are not affected but currents at negative potentials are reduced. The binding site for both drugs senses approximately 40% of the electric field across the membrane, measured from the inside. In single-channel recordings from excised patches without blockers, the conductance was 8.0 +/- 0.4 pS in symmetric 150 mM Cl-. A subconductance state, measuring approximately 60% of the main conductance, was often observed. Bursts to the full open state lasting up to tens of seconds were uninterrupted at depolarizing membrane voltages. At hyperpolarizing voltages, bursts were interrupted by brief closures. Either DPC or FFA (50 microM) applied to the cytoplasmic or extracellular face of the channel led to an increase in flicker at Vm = -100 mV and not at Vm = +100 mV, in agreement with whole-cell experiments. DPC induced a higher frequency of flickers from the cytoplasmic side than the extracellular side. FFA produced longer closures than DPC; the FFA closed time was roughly equal (approximately 1.2 ms) at -100 mV with application from either side. In cell-attached patch recordings with DPC or FFA applied to the bath, there was flickery block at Vm = -100 mV, confirming that the drugs permeate through the membrane to reach the binding site. The data are consistent with the presence of a single binding site for both drugs, reached from either end of the channel. Open-channel block by DPC or FFA may

  7. Voltage-dependent block of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channel by two closely related arylaminobenzoates.

    PubMed

    McCarty, N A; McDonough, S; Cohen, B N; Riordan, J R; Davidson, N; Lester, H A

    1993-07-01

    The gene defective in cystic fibrosis encodes a Cl- channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). CFTR is blocked by diphenylamine-2-carboxylate (DPC) when applied extracellularly at millimolar concentrations. We studied the block of CFTR expressed in Xenopus oocytes by DPC or by a closely related molecule, flufenamic acid (FFA). Block of whole-cell CFTR currents by bath-applied DPC or by FFA, both at 200 microM, requires several minutes to reach full effect. Blockade is voltage dependent, suggesting open-channel block: currents at positive potentials are not affected but currents at negative potentials are reduced. The binding site for both drugs senses approximately 40% of the electric field across the membrane, measured from the inside. In single-channel recordings from excised patches without blockers, the conductance was 8.0 +/- 0.4 pS in symmetric 150 mM Cl-. A subconductance state, measuring approximately 60% of the main conductance, was often observed. Bursts to the full open state lasting up to tens of seconds were uninterrupted at depolarizing membrane voltages. At hyperpolarizing voltages, bursts were interrupted by brief closures. Either DPC or FFA (50 microM) applied to the cytoplasmic or extracellular face of the channel led to an increase in flicker at Vm = -100 mV and not at Vm = +100 mV, in agreement with whole-cell experiments. DPC induced a higher frequency of flickers from the cytoplasmic side than the extracellular side. FFA produced longer closures than DPC; the FFA closed time was roughly equal (approximately 1.2 ms) at -100 mV with application from either side. In cell-attached patch recordings with DPC or FFA applied to the bath, there was flickery block at Vm = -100 mV, confirming that the drugs permeate through the membrane to reach the binding site. The data are consistent with the presence of a single binding site for both drugs, reached from either end of the channel. Open-channel block by DPC or FFA may

  8. [Study of the volt-ampere characteristics of ion channels by transmembrane current harmonics].

    PubMed

    Flerov, M N; Pasechnik, V I; Gianik, T

    1981-01-01

    A method is proposed for measuring the coefficient of non--linearity beta of current--voltage characteristics of the class i (U) approximately U (1 + beta U2) of ionic channels formed by grammicidine A (Gra) and amphotericine B by the 3rd harmonics of the membrane current. For Gra A beta depends on the concentration of electrolyte c increasing lg c from -17 B-2 at 0.03 M to 8 B-2 at 3.4 M KCl turning to 0 at c0 = 0.3 divided by 1 M. The membranes of egg lecithin and glycerylmonooleate (GMO) differ in c0 value. Substitution of K+ ion for Li+, of the membrane solvent (n-heptane for n-hexadecane) and freezing of the GMO membrane do not affect beta.

  9. Ion access pathway to the transmembrane pore in P2X receptor channels

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Janice L.; Li, Mufeng; Silberberg, Shai D.

    2011-01-01

    P2X receptors are trimeric cation channels that open in response to the binding of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to a large extracellular domain. The x-ray structure of the P2X4 receptor from zebrafish (zfP2X4) receptor reveals that the extracellular vestibule above the gate opens to the outside through lateral fenestrations, providing a potential pathway for ions to enter and exit the pore. The extracellular region also contains a void at the central axis, providing a second potential pathway. To investigate the energetics of each potential ion permeation pathway, we calculated the electrostatic free energy by solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation along each of these pathways in the zfP2X4 crystal structure and a homology model of rat P2X2 (rP2X2). We found that the lateral fenestrations are energetically favorable for monovalent cations even in the closed-state structure, whereas the central pathway presents strong electrostatic barriers that would require structural rearrangements to allow for ion accessibility. To probe ion accessibility along these pathways in the rP2X2 receptor, we investigated the modification of introduced Cys residues by methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents and constrained structural changes by introducing disulfide bridges. Our results show that MTS reagents can permeate the lateral fenestrations, and that these become larger after ATP binding. Although relatively small MTS reagents can access residues in one of the vestibules within the central pathway, no reactive positions were identified in the upper region of this pathway, and disulfide bridges that constrain movements in that region do not prevent ion conduction. Collectively, these results suggest that ions access the pore using the lateral fenestrations, and that these breathe as the channel opens. The accessibility of ions to one of the chambers in the central pathway likely serves a regulatory function. PMID:21624948

  10. Experimental evidence for multi-element stochastic resonance in the system of membrane ion channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodyanoy, Igor

    1996-03-01

    The principles of biological amplification are far from understood; it is only clear that biological amplifiers are unique in their ability to detect small signals in a noisy environment. As was shown recently, many nonlinear systems can use noise to enhance their performance, and this phenomenon, called stochastic resonance, may underline the extraordinary ability of some biological systems to detect and amplify small signals. Previous work has demonstrated stochastic resonance in complex systems of biological transducers and neural signal pathways, but the possibility that it could occur at the sub-cellular level has remained open. Here we report the observation of noise-enhanced electrical signal transfer in a simple system of voltage-dependent ion channels formed by the peptide alamethicin in a lipid bilayer footnote S.M.Bezrukov and I.Vodyanoy, Nature (London), November 1995 (in press). Channels are expressed in a stochastic manner as "current bursts" rising from the background, and their formation is highly voltage-sensitive. An average alamethicin- induced conductance increases e-fold every 4 or 5 mV, depending on bilayer lipid composition. Alamethicin channel transitions between nonconducting and conducting aggregates can be described by a quasi-bistable energy diagram, where the probability distribution along the reaction coordinate is sensitive to the transmembrane voltage mostly at the level of the transition between two main energy wells. To study the interaction between external noise and signal transfer, we measure amplitude of output signal and the signal-to-noise ratio at the system output as a function of external noise intensity. We show that a hundred-fold increase in signal transduction induced by external noise is accompanied by a growth in the output signal-to-noise ratio. Recent theory and numerical simulation dealing with a parallel combination of noniteracting stochastic resonant elements may provide an explanation of the present results

  11. Arsenic Promotes Ubiquitinylation and Lysosomal Degradation of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Chloride Channels in Human Airway Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Bomberger, Jennifer M.; Coutermarsh, Bonita A.; Barnaby, Roxanna L.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic exposure significantly increases respiratory bacterial infections and reduces the ability of the innate immune system to eliminate bacterial infections. Recently, we observed in the gill of killifish, an environmental model organism, that arsenic exposure induced the ubiquitinylation and degradation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a chloride channel that is essential for the mucociliary clearance of respiratory pathogens in humans. Accordingly, in this study, we tested the hypothesis that low dose arsenic exposure reduces the abundance and function of CFTR in human airway epithelial cells. Arsenic induced a time- and dose-dependent increase in multiubiquitinylated CFTR, which led to its lysosomal degradation, and a decrease in CFTR-mediated chloride secretion. Although arsenic had no effect on the abundance or activity of USP10, a deubiquitinylating enzyme, siRNA-mediated knockdown of c-Cbl, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, abolished the arsenic-stimulated degradation of CFTR. Arsenic enhanced the degradation of CFTR by increasing phosphorylated c-Cbl, which increased its interaction with CFTR, and subsequent ubiquitinylation of CFTR. Because epidemiological studies have shown that arsenic increases the incidence of respiratory infections, this study suggests that one potential mechanism of this effect involves arsenic-induced ubiquitinylation and degradation of CFTR, which decreases chloride secretion and airway surface liquid volume, effects that would be proposed to reduce mucociliary clearance of respiratory pathogens. PMID:22467879

  12. Arsenic promotes ubiquitinylation and lysosomal degradation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channels in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bomberger, Jennifer M; Coutermarsh, Bonita A; Barnaby, Roxanna L; Stanton, Bruce A

    2012-05-18

    Arsenic exposure significantly increases respiratory bacterial infections and reduces the ability of the innate immune system to eliminate bacterial infections. Recently, we observed in the gill of killifish, an environmental model organism, that arsenic exposure induced the ubiquitinylation and degradation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a chloride channel that is essential for the mucociliary clearance of respiratory pathogens in humans. Accordingly, in this study, we tested the hypothesis that low dose arsenic exposure reduces the abundance and function of CFTR in human airway epithelial cells. Arsenic induced a time- and dose-dependent increase in multiubiquitinylated CFTR, which led to its lysosomal degradation, and a decrease in CFTR-mediated chloride secretion. Although arsenic had no effect on the abundance or activity of USP10, a deubiquitinylating enzyme, siRNA-mediated knockdown of c-Cbl, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, abolished the arsenic-stimulated degradation of CFTR. Arsenic enhanced the degradation of CFTR by increasing phosphorylated c-Cbl, which increased its interaction with CFTR, and subsequent ubiquitinylation of CFTR. Because epidemiological studies have shown that arsenic increases the incidence of respiratory infections, this study suggests that one potential mechanism of this effect involves arsenic-induced ubiquitinylation and degradation of CFTR, which decreases chloride secretion and airway surface liquid volume, effects that would be proposed to reduce mucociliary clearance of respiratory pathogens.

  13. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields depolarize transmembrane potential via voltage-gated K(+), Ca(2+) and TRPM8 channels in U87 glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Burke, Ryan C; Bardet, Sylvia M; Carr, Lynn; Romanenko, Sergii; Arnaud-Cormos, Delia; Leveque, Philippe; O'Connor, Rodney P

    2017-10-01

    Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) have a variety of applications in the biomedical and biotechnology industries. Cancer treatment has been at the forefront of investigations thus far as nsPEFs permeabilize cellular and intracellular membranes leading to apoptosis and necrosis. nsPEFs may also influence ion channel gating and have the potential to modulate cell physiology without poration of the membrane. This phenomenon was explored using live cell imaging and a sensitive fluorescent probe of transmembrane voltage in the human glioblastoma cell line, U87 MG, known to express a number of voltage-gated ion channels. The specific ion channels involved in the nsPEF response were screened using a membrane potential imaging approach and a combination of pharmacological antagonists and ion substitutions. It was found that a single 10ns pulsed electric field of 34kV/cm depolarizes the transmembrane potential of cells by acting on specific voltage-sensitive ion channels; namely the voltage and Ca2(+) gated BK potassium channel, L- and T-type calcium channels, and the TRPM8 transient receptor potential channel. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of ceramic membrane channel geometry and uniform transmembrane pressure on limiting flux and serum protein removal during skim milk microfiltration.

    PubMed

    Adams, Michael C; Hurt, Emily E; Barbano, David M

    2015-11-01

    Our objectives were to determine the effects of a ceramic microfiltration (MF) membrane's retentate flow channel geometry (round or diamond-shaped) and uniform transmembrane pressure (UTP) on limiting flux (LF) and serum protein (SP) removal during skim milk MF at a temperature of 50°C, a retentate protein concentration of 8.5%, and an average cross-flow velocity of 7 m·s(-1). Performance of membranes with round and diamond flow channels was compared in UTP mode. Performance of the membrane with round flow channels was compared with and without UTP. Using UTP with round flow channel MF membranes increased the LF by 5% when compared with not using UTP, but SP removal was not affected by the use of UTP. Using membranes with round channels instead of diamond-shaped channels in UTP mode increased the LF by 24%. This increase was associated with a 25% increase in Reynolds number and can be explained by lower shear at the vertices of the diamond-shaped channel's surface. The SP removal factor of the diamond channel system was higher than the SP removal factor of the round channel system below the LF. However, the diamond channel system passed more casein into the MF permeate than the round channel system. Because only one batch of each membrane was tested in our study, it was not possible to determine if the differences in protein rejection between channel geometries were due to the membrane design or random manufacturing variation. Despite the lower LF of the diamond channel system, the 47% increase in membrane module surface area of the diamond channel system produced a modular permeate removal rate that was at least 19% higher than the round channel system. Consequently, using diamond channel membranes instead of round channel membranes could reduce some of the costs associated with ceramic MF of skim milk if fewer membrane modules could be used to attain the required membrane area.

  15. Long-range coupling between the extracellular gates and the intracellular ATP binding domains of multidrug resistance protein pumps and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channels

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shipeng; Roessler, Bryan C.; Icyuz, Mert; Chauvet, Sylvain; Tao, Binli; Hartman, John L.; Kirk, Kevin L.

    2015-01-01

    The ABCC transporter subfamily includes pumps, the long and short multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs), and an ATP-gated anion channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). We show that despite their thermodynamic differences, these ABCC transporter subtypes use broadly similar mechanisms to couple their extracellular gates to the ATP occupancies of their cytosolic nucleotide binding domains. A conserved extracellular phenylalanine at this gate was a prime location for producing gain of function (GOF) mutants of a long MRP in yeast (Ycf1p cadmium transporter), a short yeast MRP (Yor1p oligomycin exporter), and human CFTR channels. Extracellular gate mutations rescued ATP binding mutants of the yeast MRPs and CFTR by increasing ATP sensitivity. Control ATPase-defective MRP mutants could not be rescued by this mechanism. A CFTR double mutant with an extracellular gate mutation plus a cytosolic GOF mutation was highly active (single-channel open probability >0.3) in the absence of ATP and protein kinase A, each normally required for CFTR activity. We conclude that all 3 ABCC transporter subtypes use similar mechanisms to couple their extracellular gates to ATP occupancy, and highly active CFTR channels that bypass defects in ATP binding or phosphorylation can be produced.—Wei, S., Roessler, B. C., Icyuz, M., Chauvet, S., Tao, B., Hartman IV, J. L., Kirk, K. L. Long-range coupling between the extracellular gates and the intracellular ATP binding domains of multidrug resistance protein pumps and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channels. PMID:26606940

  16. The Interface between Extracellular and Transmembrane Domains of Homomeric Cys-Loop Receptors Governs Open-Channel Lifetime and Rate of Desensitization

    PubMed Central

    Bartos, Mariana; Corradi, Jeremías

    2008-01-01

    The lifetimes of activated postsynaptic receptor channels contribute to the efficiency of synaptic transmission. Here we show that structural differences within the interface dividing extracellular and transmembrane domains of homomeric α7 and 5-HT3A receptors account for the large differences in open-channel lifetime and time of desensitization onset between these contrasting members of the Cys-loop receptor superfamily. For α7 receptors, agonist-evoked single-channel currents appear mainly as isolated brief openings (τo = 0.35 ms), whereas macroscopic currents after a step pulse of agonist desensitize rapidly (τd = 0.4 ms). In contrast for 5-HT3A receptors, agonist-evoked single-channel currents appear as clusters of many long openings in quick succession (τcluster = 1.2 s), whereas macroscopic currents desensitize slowly (τd = 1.1 s). A chimeric α7-5HT3A receptor exhibits functional properties intermediate between those of the parent receptors, but the functional signatures of each parent are reconstituted after substituting the major loops within the interface of the extracellular and transmembrane domains from the corresponding parent receptor. Furthermore, these structural loops contribute to open-channel lifetime and time of desensitization onset in a nonadditive manner. The results suggest that desensitization is the major determinant of the lifetimes of activated α7 and 5-HT3A receptors and that functional differences between the two receptors arise primarily through structural differences at the interface between extracellular and transmembrane domains. PMID:18667613

  17. A residue in the transmembrane segment 6 of domain I in insect and mammalian sodium channels regulate differential sensitivities to pyrethroid insecticides.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Eugênio E; Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Dong, Ke

    2013-09-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are critical for electrical signaling in the nervous system. Pyrethroid insecticides exert their toxic action by modifying the gating of sodium channels. A valine to methionine mutation in the transmembrane segment 6 of domain I (IS6) of sodium channels from tobacco budworms (Heliothis virescens) has been shown to alter channel gating and reduce insect sodium channel sensitivity to pyrethroids. A valine to leucine substitution was subsequently reported in pyrethroid-resistant bedbug populations. Intriguingly, pyrethroid-resistant mammalian sodium channels possess an isoleucine at the corresponding position. To determine whether different substitutions at this position alter channel gating and confer pyrethroid resistance, we made valine to methionine, isoleucine or leucine substitutions at the corresponding position, V409, in a cockroach sodium channel and examined the gating properties and pyrethroid sensitivity of the three mutants in Xenopus oocytes. All three mutations reduced the channel sensitivity to three pyrethroids (permethrin, cismethrin and deltamethrin). V409M, but not V409I or V409L, caused 6-7mV depolarizing shifts in the voltage dependences of both activation and inactivation. V409M and V409L slowed channel activation kinetics and accelerated open-state deactivation kinetics, but V409I did not. Furthermore, the substitution of isoleucine with valine, but not with methionine nor leucine, at the corresponding position in a rat skeletal muscle sodium channel, rNav1.4, enhanced channel sensitivity to deltamethrin. Collectively, our study highlights an important role of residues at 409 in regulating not only sodium channel gating, but also the differential sensitivities of insect and mammalian sodium channels to pyrethroids.

  18. Inhibitory complex of the transmembrane ammonia channel, AmtB, and the cytosolic regulatory protein, GlnK, at 1.96 Å

    PubMed Central

    Gruswitz, Franz; O'Connell, Joseph; Stroud, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    Ammonia conductance is highly regulated. A PII signal transduction protein, GlnK, is the final regulator of transmembrane ammonia conductance by the ammonia channel AmtB in Escherichia coli. The complex formed between AmtB and inhibitory GlnK at 1.96-Å resolution shows that the trimeric channel is blocked directly by GlnK and how, in response to intracellular nitrogen status, the ability of GlnK to block the channel is regulated by uridylylation/deuridylylation at Y51. ATP and Mg2+ augment the interaction of GlnK. The hydrolyzed product, adenosine 5′-diphosphate orients the surface of GlnK for AmtB blockade. 2-Oxoglutarate diminishes AmtB/GlnK association, and sites for 2-oxoglutarate are evaluated. PMID:17190799

  19. Glibenclamide induces apoptosis through inhibition of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channels and intracellular Ca(2+) release in HepG2 human hepatoblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, J A; Kang, Y S; Lee, S H; Lee, E H; Yoo, B H; Lee, Y S

    1999-08-11

    Glibenclamide, an inhibitor of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channels, induced apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner in HepG2 human hepatoblastoma cells. Glibenclamide increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, which was significantly inhibited by Ca(2+) release blockers dantrolene and TMB-8. BAPTA/AM, an intracellular Ca(2+) chelator, and the Ca(2+) release blockers significantly inhibited glibenclamide-induced apoptosis. Glibanclamide also increased intracellular Cl(-) concentration, which was significantly blocked by CFTR Cl(-) channel activators levamisole and bromotetramisole. These activators also significantly inhibited both intracellular Ca(2+) release and apoptosis induced by glibenclamide. The expression of CFTR protein in the cells was confirmed by Western blot analysis. These results suggest that glibenclamide induced apoptosis through inhibition of CFTR Cl(-) channels and intracellular Ca(2+) release and that this protein may be a good target for treatment of human hepatomas.

  20. The H-loop in the Second Nucleotide-binding Domain of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator is Required for Efficient Chloride Channel Closing

    PubMed Central

    Kloch, Monika; Milewski, Michał; Nurowska, Ewa; Dworakowska, Beata; Cutting, Garry R.; Dołowy, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride channel. The recent model of CFTR gating predicts that the ATP binding to both nucleotide-binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2) of CFTR is required for the opening of the channel, while the ATP hydrolysis at NBD2 induces subsequent channel closing. In most ABC proteins, efficient hydrolysis of ATP requires the presence of the invariant histidine residue within the H-loop located in the C-terminal part of the NBD. However, the contribution of the corresponding region (H-loop) of NBD2 to the CFTR channel gating has not been examined so far. Here we report that the alanine substitution of the conserved dipeptide HR motif (HR→AA) in the H-loop of NBD2 leads to prolonged open states of CFTR channel, indicating that the H-loop is required for efficient channel closing. On the other hand, the HR→AA substitution lead to the substantial decrease of CFTR-mediated current density (pA/pF) in transfected HEK 293 cells, as recorded in the whole-cell patch-clamp analysis. These results suggest that the H-loop of NBD2, apart from being required for CFTR channel closing, may be involved in regulating CFTR trafficking to the cell surface. PMID:20110677

  1. Intracellular segment between transmembrane helices S0 and S1 of BK channel α subunit contains two amphipathic helices connected by a flexible loop.

    PubMed

    Shi, Pan; Li, Dong; Lai, Chaohua; Zhang, Longhua; Tian, Changlin

    2013-08-02

    The BK channel, a tetrameric potassium channel with very high conductance, has a central role in numerous physiological functions. The BK channel can be activated by intracellular Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), as well as by membrane depolarization. Unlike other tetrameric potassium channels, the BK channel has seven transmembrane helices (S0-S6) including an extra helix S0. The intracellular segment between S0 and S1 (BK-IS1) is essential to BK channel functions and Asp99 in BK-IS1 is reported to be responsible for Mg(2+) coordination. In this study, BK-IS1 (44-113) was over-expressed using a bacterial system and purified in the presence of detergent micelles for multidimensional heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structural studies. Backbone resonance assignment and secondary structure analysis showed that BK-IS1 contains two amphipathic helices connected by a 36-residue loop. Amide (1)H-(15)N heteronuclear NOE analysis indicated that the loop is very flexible, while the two amphipathic helices are possibly stabilized through interaction with the membrane. A solution NMR-based titration assay of BK-IS1 was performed with various concentrations of Mg(2+). Two residues (Thr45 and Leu46) with chemical shift changes were observed but no, or very minor, chemical shift difference was observed for Asp99, indicating a possible site for binding divalent ions or other modulation partners.

  2. Synthesis of poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate)-grafted chitosan under γ-ray irradiation for alamethicin assembly.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuan; Dong, Ping; Wei, Yanqi; Qian, Jun; Hua, Daoben

    2015-08-01

    Interaction between peptide and lipid membrane plays a major role in biological activity of membrane-active peptide. We describe here a new biocompatible polymeric assembly to support membrane peptide. Specifically, chitosan-graft-poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (CS-g-PSBMA) was synthesized for alamethicin assembly by controlled polymerization under γ-ray irradiation. The graft copolymer could self-assemble into micelles in distilled water for supporting alamethicin. The assembly of alamethicin with CS-g-PSBMA micelles in aqueous solutions was related with the ratio of alamethicin/CS-g-PSBMA: the more alamethicin, the smaller sizes of the hybrid complex. Moreover, alamethicin penetrated into the hydrophobic cores of CS-g-PSBMA micelles while displayed secondary helical conformation in the complex. The results indicate that CS-g-PSBMA assemblies can be used to support membrane peptide.

  3. Single-channel SCAM Identifies Pore-lining Residues in the First Extracellular Loop and First Transmembrane Domains of Cx46 Hemichannels

    PubMed Central

    Kronengold, J.; Trexler, E.B.; Bukauskas, F.F.; Bargiello, T.A.; Verselis, V.K.

    2003-01-01

    Gap junction (GJ) channels provide an important pathway for direct intercellular transmission of signaling molecules. Previously we showed that fixed negative charges in the first extracellular loop domain (E1) strongly influence charge selectivity, conductance, and rectification of channels and hemichannels formed of Cx46. Here, using excised patches containing Cx46 hemichannels, we applied the substituted cysteine accessibility method (SCAM) at the single channel level to residues in E1 to determine if they are pore-lining. We demonstrate residues D51, G46, and E43 at the amino end of E1 are accessible to modification in open hemichannels to positively and negatively charged methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents added to cytoplasmic or extracellular sides. Positional effects of modification along the length of the pore and opposing effects of oppositely charged modifying reagents on hemichannel conductance and rectification are consistent with placement in the channel pore and indicate a dominant electrostatic influence of the side chains of accessible residues on ion fluxes. Hemichannels modified by MTS-EA+, MTS-ET+, or MTS-ES− were refractory to further modification and effects of substitutions with positively charged residues that electrostatically mimicked those caused by modification with the positively charged MTS reagents were similar, indicating all six subunits were likely modified. The large reductions in conductance caused by MTS-ET+ were visible as stepwise reductions in single-channel current, indicative of reactions occurring at individual subunits. Extension of single-channel SCAM using MTS-ET+ into the first transmembrane domain, TM1, revealed continued accessibility at the extracellular end at A39 and L35. The topologically complementary region in TM3 showed no evidence of reactivity. Structural models show GJ channels in the extracellular gap to have continuous inner and outer walls of protein. If representative of open channels and hemichannels

  4. S-carbocysteine-lysine salt monohydrate and cAMP cause non-additive activation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator channel in human respiratory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Meyer, G; Doppierio, S; Daffonchio, L; Cremaschi, D

    1997-03-03

    S-Carbocysteine-lysine salt monohydrate (S-CMC-Lys) has been shown to open a Cl- channel in the trachea, thus aiding fluid secretion. The aim of this study was to characterize the channel and the action mechanism on a culture line of human respiratory epithelial cells. The patch-clamp technique (in cell-attached or inside-out configuration) and conventional micro-electrodes were used. The activity and density of a cAMP-dependent Cl- channel, identical to the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) channel, proved to be maximally stimulated by 100 microM S-CMC-Lys present in the cAMP-free cell incubation medium for 240-290 min (cell-attached configuration). Subsequent addition of cAMP to the medium did not determine any further activation. S-CMC-Lys acted mostly indirectly as, when placed in direct contact with a membrane patch, activation of the CFTR channel was nil (cytoplasmic side) or limited (external side).

  5. Identification of an ion channel activity of the Vpu transmembrane domain and its involvement in the regulation of virus release from HIV-1-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Schubert, U; Ferrer-Montiel, A V; Oblatt-Montal, M; Henklein, P; Strebel, K; Montal, M

    1996-11-25

    HIV-1 Vpu catalyzes two independent functions, degradation of the virus receptor CD4 in the endoplasmic reticulum and enhancement of virus release from the cell surface. These activities are confined to distinct structural domains of Vpu, the cytoplasmic tail and the transmembrane (TM) anchor, respectively. It was recently reported that Vpu forms cation-selective ion channels in lipid bilayers. Here we report that this property of Vpu is a characteristic of its TM anchor. Expression of full-length Vpu in Xenopus oocytes increases membrane conductance. The Vpu-induced conductance is selective to monovalent cations over anions, does not discriminate Na+ over K+ and shows marginal permeability to divalent cations. Notably, introduction of the scrambled TM sequence into full-length Vpu abrogates its capacity to increase membrane conductance in oocytes and to promote virus release from infected cells. Reconstitution of synthetic Vpu fragments in lipid bilayers identified an ion channel activity for a sequence corresponding to the TM domain of Vpu. In contrast, a peptide with the same amino acid composition but with a scrambled sequence does not form ion channels. Our findings therefore suggest that the ability of Vpu to increase virus release from infected cells may be correlated with an ion channel activity of the TM domain, thereby providing a potential target for drug intervention based on the development of Vpu-specific channel blockers.

  6. N-terminal transmembrane domain of SUR1 controls gating of Kir6.2 by modulating channel sensitivity to PIP2.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Emily B; Tewson, Paul; Bruederle, Cathrin E; Skach, William R; Shyng, Show-Ling

    2011-03-01

    Functional integrity of pancreatic adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channels depends on the interactions between the pore-forming potassium channel subunit Kir6.2 and the regulatory subunit sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1). Previous studies have shown that the N-terminal transmembrane domain of SUR1 (TMD0) interacts with Kir6.2 and is sufficient to confer high intrinsic open probability (P(o)) and bursting patterns of activity observed in full-length K(ATP) channels. However, the nature of TMD0-Kir6.2 interactions that underlie gating modulation is not well understood. Using two previously described disease-causing mutations in TMD0 (R74W and E128K), we performed amino acid substitutions to study the structural roles of these residues in K(ATP) channel function in the context of full-length SUR1 as well as TMD0. Our results revealed that although R74W and E128K in full-length SUR1 both decrease surface channel expression and reduce channel sensitivity to ATP inhibition, they arrive there via distinct mechanisms. Mutation of R74 uniformly reduced TMD0 protein levels, suggesting that R74 is necessary for stability of TMD0. In contrast, E128 mutations retained TMD0 protein levels but reduced functional coupling between TMD0 and Kir6.2 in mini-K(ATP) channels formed by TMD0 and Kir6.2. Importantly, E128K full-length channels, despite having a greatly reduced P(o), exhibit little response to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)) stimulation. This is reminiscent of Kir6.2 channel behavior in the absence of SUR1 and suggests that TMD0 controls Kir6.2 gating by modulating Kir6.2 interactions with PIP(2). Further supporting this notion, the E128W mutation in full-length channels resulted in channel inactivation that was prevented or reversed by exogenous PIP(2). These results identify a critical determinant in TMD0 that controls Kir6.2 gating by controlling channel sensitivity to PIP(2). Moreover, they uncover a novel mechanism of K

  7. N-terminal transmembrane domain of SUR1 controls gating of Kir6.2 by modulating channel sensitivity to PIP2

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Emily B.; Tewson, Paul; Bruederle, Cathrin E.; Skach, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Functional integrity of pancreatic adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels depends on the interactions between the pore-forming potassium channel subunit Kir6.2 and the regulatory subunit sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1). Previous studies have shown that the N-terminal transmembrane domain of SUR1 (TMD0) interacts with Kir6.2 and is sufficient to confer high intrinsic open probability (Po) and bursting patterns of activity observed in full-length KATP channels. However, the nature of TMD0–Kir6.2 interactions that underlie gating modulation is not well understood. Using two previously described disease-causing mutations in TMD0 (R74W and E128K), we performed amino acid substitutions to study the structural roles of these residues in KATP channel function in the context of full-length SUR1 as well as TMD0. Our results revealed that although R74W and E128K in full-length SUR1 both decrease surface channel expression and reduce channel sensitivity to ATP inhibition, they arrive there via distinct mechanisms. Mutation of R74 uniformly reduced TMD0 protein levels, suggesting that R74 is necessary for stability of TMD0. In contrast, E128 mutations retained TMD0 protein levels but reduced functional coupling between TMD0 and Kir6.2 in mini-KATP channels formed by TMD0 and Kir6.2. Importantly, E128K full-length channels, despite having a greatly reduced Po, exhibit little response to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) stimulation. This is reminiscent of Kir6.2 channel behavior in the absence of SUR1 and suggests that TMD0 controls Kir6.2 gating by modulating Kir6.2 interactions with PIP2. Further supporting this notion, the E128W mutation in full-length channels resulted in channel inactivation that was prevented or reversed by exogenous PIP2. These results identify a critical determinant in TMD0 that controls Kir6.2 gating by controlling channel sensitivity to PIP2. Moreover, they uncover a novel mechanism of KATP channel inactivation

  8. Intracellular segment between transmembrane helices S0 and S1 of BK channel α subunit contains two amphipathic helices connected by a flexible loop

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Pan; Li, Dong; Lai, Chaohua; Zhang, Longhua; Tian, Changlin

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •The loop between S0 and S1 of BK channel was overexpressed and purified in DPC. •NMR studies indicated BK-IS1 contained two helices connected by a flexible loop. •Mg{sup 2+} titration of BK-IS1 indicated two possible binding sites of divalent ions. -- Abstract: The BK channel, a tetrameric potassium channel with very high conductance, has a central role in numerous physiological functions. The BK channel can be activated by intracellular Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+}, as well as by membrane depolarization. Unlike other tetrameric potassium channels, the BK channel has seven transmembrane helices (S0–S6) including an extra helix S0. The intracellular segment between S0 and S1 (BK-IS1) is essential to BK channel functions and Asp99 in BK-IS1 is reported to be responsible for Mg{sup 2+} coordination. In this study, BK-IS1 (44–113) was over-expressed using a bacterial system and purified in the presence of detergent micelles for multidimensional heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structural studies. Backbone resonance assignment and secondary structure analysis showed that BK-IS1 contains two amphipathic helices connected by a 36-residue loop. Amide {sup 1}H–{sup 15}N heteronuclear NOE analysis indicated that the loop is very flexible, while the two amphipathic helices are possibly stabilized through interaction with the membrane. A solution NMR-based titration assay of BK-IS1 was performed with various concentrations of Mg{sup 2+}. Two residues (Thr45 and Leu46) with chemical shift changes were observed but no, or very minor, chemical shift difference was observed for Asp99, indicating a possible site for binding divalent ions or other modulation partners.

  9. A chimeric prokaryotic-eukaryotic pentameric ligand gated ion channel reveals interactions between the extracellular and transmembrane domains shape neurosteroid modulation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Borna; Tsao, Tzu-Wei; Czajkowski, Cynthia

    2017-10-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) are the targets of several clinical and endogenous allosteric modulators including anesthetics and neurosteroids. Molecular mechanisms underlying allosteric drug modulation are poorly understood. Here, we constructed a chimeric pLGIC by fusing the extracellular domain (ECD) of the proton-activated, cation-selective bacterial channel GLIC to the transmembrane domain (TMD) of the human ρ1 chloride-selective GABAAR, and tested the hypothesis that drug actions are regulated locally in the domain that houses its binding site. The chimeric channels were proton-gated and chloride-selective demonstrating the GLIC ECD was functionally coupled to the GABAρ TMD. Channels were blocked by picrotoxin and inhibited by pentobarbital, etomidate and propofol. The point mutation, ρ TMD W328M, conferred positive modulation and direct gating by pentobarbital. The data suggest that the structural machinery mediating general anesthetic modulation resides in the TMD. Proton-activation and neurosteroid modulation of the GLIC-ρ chimeric channels, however, did not simply mimic their respective actions on GLIC and GABAρ revealing that across domain interactions between the ECD and TMD play important roles in determining their actions. Proton-induced current responses were biphasic suggesting that the chimeric channels contain an additional proton sensor. Neurosteroid modulation of the GLIC-ρ chimeric channels by the stereoisomers, 5α-THDOC and 5β-THDOC, were swapped compared to their actions on GABAρ indicating that positive versus negative neurosteroid modulation is not encoded solely in the TMD nor by neurosteroid isomer structure but is dependent on specific interdomain connections between the ECD and TMD. Our data reveal a new mechanism for shaping neurosteroid modulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Hydrophobic interaction between contiguous residues in the S6 transmembrane segment acts as a stimuli integration node in the BK channel.

    PubMed

    Carrasquel-Ursulaez, Willy; Contreras, Gustavo F; Sepúlveda, Romina V; Aguayo, Daniel; González-Nilo, Fernando; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Large-conductance Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated K(+) channel (BK) open probability is enhanced by depolarization, increasing Ca(2+) concentration, or both. These stimuli activate modular voltage and Ca(2+) sensors that are allosterically coupled to channel gating. Here, we report a point mutation of a phenylalanine (F380A) in the S6 transmembrane helix that, in the absence of internal Ca(2+), profoundly hinders channel opening while showing only minor effects on the voltage sensor active-resting equilibrium. Interpretation of these results using an allosteric model suggests that the F380A mutation greatly increases the free energy difference between open and closed states and uncouples Ca(2+) binding from voltage sensor activation and voltage sensor activation from channel opening. However, the presence of a bulky and more hydrophobic amino acid in the F380 position (F380W) increases the intrinsic open-closed equilibrium, weakening the coupling between both sensors with the pore domain. Based on these functional experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, we propose that F380 interacts with another S6 hydrophobic residue (L377) in contiguous subunits. This pair forms a hydrophobic ring important in determining the open-closed equilibrium and, like an integration node, participates in the communication between sensors and between the sensors and pore. Moreover, because of its effects on open probabilities, the F380A mutant can be used for detailed voltage sensor experiments in the presence of permeant cations. © 2015 Carrasquel-Ursulaez et al.

  11. Hydrophobic interaction between contiguous residues in the S6 transmembrane segment acts as a stimuli integration node in the BK channel

    PubMed Central

    Carrasquel-Ursulaez, Willy; Contreras, Gustavo F.; Sepúlveda, Romina V.; Aguayo, Daniel; González-Nilo, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Large-conductance Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ channel (BK) open probability is enhanced by depolarization, increasing Ca2+ concentration, or both. These stimuli activate modular voltage and Ca2+ sensors that are allosterically coupled to channel gating. Here, we report a point mutation of a phenylalanine (F380A) in the S6 transmembrane helix that, in the absence of internal Ca2+, profoundly hinders channel opening while showing only minor effects on the voltage sensor active–resting equilibrium. Interpretation of these results using an allosteric model suggests that the F380A mutation greatly increases the free energy difference between open and closed states and uncouples Ca2+ binding from voltage sensor activation and voltage sensor activation from channel opening. However, the presence of a bulky and more hydrophobic amino acid in the F380 position (F380W) increases the intrinsic open–closed equilibrium, weakening the coupling between both sensors with the pore domain. Based on these functional experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, we propose that F380 interacts with another S6 hydrophobic residue (L377) in contiguous subunits. This pair forms a hydrophobic ring important in determining the open–closed equilibrium and, like an integration node, participates in the communication between sensors and between the sensors and pore. Moreover, because of its effects on open probabilities, the F380A mutant can be used for detailed voltage sensor experiments in the presence of permeant cations. PMID:25548136

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations on the interaction of the transmembrane NavAb channel with cholesterol and lipids in the membrane.

    PubMed

    Suwattanasophon, Chonticha; Wolschann, Peter; Faller, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Increased cholesterol levels are associated with multiple pathological conditions. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations were applied to observe the influence of membrane cholesterol levels on a voltage-gated sodium channel. Different lipid compositions are modeled around the channel to obtain information about the possible effects by which cholesterol influences NavAb channels. Cholesterol was normally not directly interacting with either the closed or inactivated conformation. Cholesterol increased lipid packing implying that it plays a crucial role in restricting lipid movement in the region around 1 nm of the channel in a 1-palmitoyl-2-oeleoyl phosphatidylcholine matrix. Our results provide the first computational indication of an indirect modulation of NavAb channels by membrane cholesterol.

  13. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) potentiator VX-770 (ivacaftor) opens the defective channel gate of mutant CFTR in a phosphorylation-dependent but ATP-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Eckford, Paul D W; Li, Canhui; Ramjeesingh, Mohabir; Bear, Christine E

    2012-10-26

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) acts as a channel on the apical membrane of epithelia. Disease-causing mutations in the cystic fibrosis gene can lead to CFTR protein misfolding as in the case of the F508del mutation and/or channel dysfunction. Recently, a small molecule, VX-770 (ivacaftor), has shown efficacy in restoring lung function in patients bearing the G551D mutation, and this has been linked to repair of its channel gating defect. However, these studies did not reveal the mechanism of action of VX-770 in detail. Normally, CFTR channel activity is regulated by phosphorylation, ATP binding, and hydrolysis. Hence, it has been hypothesized that VX-770 modifies one or more of these metabolic events. In this study, we examined VX-770 activity using a reconstitution system for purified CFTR protein, a system that enables control of known regulatory factors. We studied the consequences of VX-770 interaction with CFTR incorporated in planar lipid bilayers and in proteoliposomes, using a novel flux-based assay. We found that purified and phosphorylated CFTR was potentiated in the presence of Mg-ATP, suggesting that VX-770 bound directly to the CFTR protein, rather than associated kinases or phosphatases. Interestingly, we also found that VX-770 enhanced the channel activity of purified and mutant CFTR in the nominal absence of Mg-ATP. These findings suggest that VX-770 can cause CFTR channel opening through a nonconventional ATP-independent mechanism. This work sets the stage for future studies of the structural properties that mediate CFTR gating using VX-770 as a probe.

  14. Propofol Binding to the Resting State of the Gloeobacter violaceus Ligand-gated Ion Channel (GLIC) Induces Structural Changes in the Inter- and Intrasubunit Transmembrane Domain (TMD) Cavities*

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Borna; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Czajkowski, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    General anesthetics exert many of their CNS actions by binding to and modulating membrane-embedded pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs). The structural mechanisms underlying how anesthetics modulate pLGIC function remain largely unknown. GLIC, a prokaryotic pLGIC homologue, is inhibited by general anesthetics, suggesting anesthetics stabilize a closed channel state, but in anesthetic-bound GLIC crystal structures the channel appears open. Here, using functional GLIC channels expressed in oocytes, we examined whether propofol induces structural rearrangements in the GLIC transmembrane domain (TMD). Residues in the GLIC TMD that frame intrasubunit and intersubunit water-accessible cavities were individually mutated to cysteine. We measured and compared the rates of modification of the introduced cysteines by sulfhydryl-reactive reagents in the absence and presence of propofol. Propofol slowed the rate of modification of L240C (intersubunit) and increased the rate of modification of T254C (intrasubunit), indicating that propofol binding induces structural rearrangements in these cavities that alter the local environment near these residues. Propofol acceleration of T254C modification suggests that in the resting state propofol does not bind in the TMD intrasubunit cavity as observed in the crystal structure of GLIC with bound propofol (Nury, H., Van Renterghem, C., Weng, Y., Tran, A., Baaden, M., Dufresne, V., Changeux, J. P., Sonner, J. M., Delarue, M., and Corringer, P. J. (2011) Nature 469, 428–431). In silico docking using a GLIC closed channel homology model suggests propofol binds to intersubunit sites in the TMD in the resting state. Propofol-induced motions in the intersubunit cavity were distinct from motions associated with channel activation, indicating propofol stabilizes a novel closed state. PMID:23640880

  15. Locating a Plausible Binding Site for an Open-Channel Blocker, GlyH-101, in the Pore of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance RegulatorS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Ivetac, Anthony; Alexander, Christopher; O'Donnell, Nicolette; Frye, Leah; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Dawson, David C.

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput screening has led to the identification of small-molecule blockers of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel, but the structural basis of blocker binding remains to be defined. We developed molecular models of the CFTR channel on the basis of homology to the bacterial transporter Sav1866, which could permit blocker binding to be analyzed in silico. The models accurately predicted the existence of a narrow region in the pore that is a likely candidate for the binding site of an open-channel pore blocker such as N-(2-naphthalenyl)-[(3,5-dibromo-2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)methylene]glycine hydrazide (GlyH-101), which is thought to act by entering the channel from the extracellular side. As a more-stringent test of predictions of the CFTR pore model, we applied induced-fit, virtual, ligand-docking techniques to identify potential binding sites for GlyH-101 within the CFTR pore. The highest-scoring docked position was near two pore-lining residues, Phe337 and Thr338, and the rates of reactions of anionic, thiol-directed reagents with cysteines substituted at these positions were slowed in the presence of the blocker, consistent with the predicted repulsive effect of the net negative charge on GlyH-101. When a bulky phenylalanine that forms part of the predicted binding pocket (Phe342) was replaced with alanine, the apparent affinity of the blocker was increased ∼200-fold. A molecular mechanics-generalized Born/surface area analysis of GlyH-101 binding predicted that substitution of Phe342 with alanine would substantially increase blocker affinity, primarily because of decreased intramolecular strain within the blocker-protein complex. This study suggests that GlyH-101 blocks the CFTR channel by binding within the pore bottleneck. PMID:22923500

  16. Modeling the self-assembly of lipids and nanotubes in solution: forming vesicles and bicelles with transmembrane nanotube channels.

    PubMed

    Dutt, Meenakshi; Kuksenok, Olga; Nayhouse, Michael J; Little, Steven R; Balazs, Anna C

    2011-06-28

    Via dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), we simulate the self-assembly of end-functionalized, amphiphilic nanotubes and lipids in a hydrophilic solvent. Each nanotube encompasses a hydrophobic stalk and two hydrophilic ends, which are functionalized with end-tethered chains. With a relatively low number of the nanotubes in solution, the components self-assemble into stable lipid-nanotube vesicles. As the number of nanotubes is increased, the system exhibits a vesicle-to-bicelle transition, resulting in stable hybrid bicelle. Moreover, our results reveal that the nanotubes cluster into distinct tripod-like structures within the vesicles and aggregate into a ring-like assembly within the bicelles. For both the vesicles and bicelles, the nanotubes assume trans-membrane orientations, with the tethered hairs extending into the surrounding solution or the encapsulated fluid. Thus, the hairs provide a means of regulating the transport of species through the self-assembled structures. Our findings provide guidelines for creating nanotube clusters with distinctive morphologies that might be difficult to achieve through more conventional means. The results also yield design rules for creating synthetic cell-like objects or microreactors that can exhibit biomimetic functionality.

  17. Heterozygosity for the F508del Mutation in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Anion Channel Attenuates Influenza Severity

    PubMed Central

    Aeffner, Famke; Abdulrahman, Basant; Hickman-Davis, Judy M.; Janssen, Paul M.; Amer, Amal; Bedwell, David M.; Sorscher, Eric J.; Davis, Ian C.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Seasonal and pandemic influenza are significant public health concerns. Influenza stimulates respiratory epithelial Cl− secretion via the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of this effect to influenza pathogenesis in mice with reduced CFTR activity. Methods. C57BL/6-congenic mice heterozygous for the F508del CFTR mutation (HET) and wild-type (WT) controls were infected intranasally with 10 000 focus-forming units of influenza A/WSN/33 (H1N1) per mouse. Body weight, arterial O2 saturation, and heart rate were monitored daily. Pulmonary edema and lung function parameters were derived from ratios of wet weight to dry weight and the forced-oscillation technique, respectively. Levels of cytokines and chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results. Relative to WT mice, influenza virus–infected HET mice showed significantly delayed mortality, which was accompanied by attenuated hypoxemia, cardiopulmonary dysfunction, and pulmonary edema. However, viral replication and weight loss did not differ. The protective HET phenotype was correlated with exaggerated alveolar macrophage and interleukin 6 responses to infection and was abrogated by alveolar macrophage depletion, using clodronate liposomes. Conclusions. Reduced CFTR expression modulates the innate immune response to influenza and alters disease pathogenesis. CFTR-mediated Cl− secretion is therefore an important host determinant of disease, and CFTR inhibition may be of therapeutic benefit in influenza. PMID:23749967

  18. Two salt bridges differentially contribute to the maintenance of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel function.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guiying; Freeman, Cody S; Knotts, Taylor; Prince, Chengyu Z; Kuang, Christopher; McCarty, Nael A

    2013-07-12

    Previous studies have identified two salt bridges in human CFTR chloride ion channels, Arg(352)-Asp(993) and Arg(347)-Asp(924), that are required for normal channel function. In the present study, we determined how the two salt bridges cooperate to maintain the open pore architecture of CFTR. Our data suggest that Arg(347) not only interacts with Asp(924) but also interacts with Asp(993). The tripartite interaction Arg(347)-Asp(924)-Asp(993) mainly contributes to maintaining a stable s2 open subconductance state. The Arg(352)-Asp(993) salt bridge, in contrast, is involved in stabilizing both the s2 and full (f) open conductance states, with the main contribution being to the f state. The s1 subconductance state does not require either salt bridge. In confirmation of the role of Arg(352) and Asp(993), channels bearing cysteines at these sites could be latched into a full open state using the bifunctional cross-linker 1,2-ethanediyl bismethanethiosulfonate, but only when applied in the open state. Channels remained latched open even after washout of ATP. The results suggest that these interacting residues contribute differently to stabilizing the open pore in different phases of the gating cycle.

  19. Two Salt Bridges Differentially Contribute to the Maintenance of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Channel Function*

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Guiying; Freeman, Cody S.; Knotts, Taylor; Prince, Chengyu Z.; Kuang, Christopher; McCarty, Nael A.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have identified two salt bridges in human CFTR chloride ion channels, Arg352-Asp993 and Arg347-Asp924, that are required for normal channel function. In the present study, we determined how the two salt bridges cooperate to maintain the open pore architecture of CFTR. Our data suggest that Arg347 not only interacts with Asp924 but also interacts with Asp993. The tripartite interaction Arg347-Asp924-Asp993 mainly contributes to maintaining a stable s2 open subconductance state. The Arg352-Asp993 salt bridge, in contrast, is involved in stabilizing both the s2 and full (f) open conductance states, with the main contribution being to the f state. The s1 subconductance state does not require either salt bridge. In confirmation of the role of Arg352 and Asp993, channels bearing cysteines at these sites could be latched into a full open state using the bifunctional cross-linker 1,2-ethanediyl bismethanethiosulfonate, but only when applied in the open state. Channels remained latched open even after washout of ATP. The results suggest that these interacting residues contribute differently to stabilizing the open pore in different phases of the gating cycle. PMID:23709221

  20. The tyrosine kinase p60c-src regulates the fast gate of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Fischer, H; Machen, T E

    1996-12-01

    The role of the tyrosine kinase p60c-src on the gating of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel was investigated with the cell-attached and excised patch clamp technique in conjunction with current noise analysis of recordings containing multiple channels per patch. Spectra of CFTR-generated current noise contained a low-frequency and a high-frequency Lorentzian noise component. In the cell-attached mode, the high-frequency Lorentzian was significantly dependent on the membrane potential, while the low-frequency Lorentzian was unaffected. Excision of forskolin-stimulated patches into ATP-containing solution significantly reduced the amplitude of the voltage-dependent high-frequency Lorentzian. Addition of the tyrosine kinase p60c-src to excised, active, CFTR-containing membrane patches increased mean currents by 54%, increased the corner frequency of the low-frequency Lorentzian, and recovered the high-frequency Lorentzian and its characteristics. Treatment with lambda-phosphatase inactivated src-induced currents and changes in gating. When active patches were excised under conditions in which patch-associated tyrosine phosphatases were blocked with sodium vanadate, the high-frequency gating remained relatively unchanged. The results suggest that CFTR's open probability and its voltage-dependent fast gate are dependent on tyrosine phosphorylation, and that membrane-associated tyrosine phosphatases are responsible for inactivation of the fast gate after patch excision.

  1. Reconstitution of a transmembrane protein, the voltage-gated ion channel, KvAP, into giant unilamellar vesicles for microscopy and patch clamp studies.

    PubMed

    Garten, Matthias; Aimon, Sophie; Bassereau, Patricia; Toombes, Gilman E S

    2015-01-22

    Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) are a popular biomimetic system for studying membrane associated phenomena. However, commonly used protocols to grow GUVs must be modified in order to form GUVs containing functional transmembrane proteins. This article describes two dehydration-rehydration methods - electroformation and gel-assisted swelling - to form GUVs containing the voltage-gated potassium channel, KvAP. In both methods, a solution of protein-containing small unilamellar vesicles is partially dehydrated to form a stack of membranes, which is then allowed to swell in a rehydration buffer. For the electroformation method, the film is deposited on platinum electrodes so that an AC field can be applied during film rehydration. In contrast, the gel-assisted swelling method uses an agarose gel substrate to enhance film rehydration. Both methods can produce GUVs in low (e.g., 5 mM) and physiological (e.g., 100 mM) salt concentrations. The resulting GUVs are characterized via fluorescence microscopy, and the function of reconstituted channels measured using the inside-out patch-clamp configuration. While swelling in the presence of an alternating electric field (electroformation) gives a high yield of defect-free GUVs, the gel-assisted swelling method produces a more homogeneous protein distribution and requires no special equipment.

  2. Allosteric coupling between proximal C-terminus and selectivity filter is facilitated by the movement of transmembrane segment 4 in TREK-2 channel

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Ren-Gong; Peng, Peng; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Yan, Hai-Tao; Xu, Jiang-Ping; Zheng, Jian-Quan; Wei, Xiao-Li; Ma, Xiao-Yun

    2016-01-01

    TREK-2, a member of two-pore-domain potassium channel family, regulates cellular excitability in response to diverse stimuli. However, how such stimuli control channel function remains unclear. Here, by characterizing the responses of cytosolic proximal C-terminus deletant (ΔpCt) and transmembrane segment 4 (M4)-glycine hinge mutant (G312A) to 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), an activator of TREK-2, we show that the transduction initiated from pCt domain is allosterically coupled with the conformation of selectivity filter (SF) via the movements of M4, without depending on the original status of SF. Moreover, ΔpCt and G312A also exhibited blunted responses to extracellular alkalization, a model to induce SF conformational transition. These results suggest that the coupling between pCt domain and SF is bidirectional, and M4 movements are involved in both processes. Further mechanistic exploration reveals that the function of Phe316, a residue close to the C-terminus of M4, is associated with such communications. However, unlike TREK-2, M4-hinge of TREK-1 only controls the transmission from pCt to SF, rather than SF conformational changes triggered by pHo changes. Together, our findings uncover the unique gating properties of TREK-2, and elucidate the mechanisms for how the extracellular and intracellular stimuli harness the pore gating allosterically. PMID:26879043

  3. Reconstitution of a Transmembrane Protein, the Voltage-gated Ion Channel, KvAP, into Giant Unilamellar Vesicles for Microscopy and Patch Clamp Studies

    PubMed Central

    Garten, Matthias; Aimon, Sophie; Bassereau, Patricia; Toombes, Gilman E. S.

    2015-01-01

    Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) are a popular biomimetic system for studying membrane associated phenomena. However, commonly used protocols to grow GUVs must be modified in order to form GUVs containing functional transmembrane proteins. This article describes two dehydration-rehydration methods — electroformation and gel-assisted swelling — to form GUVs containing the voltage-gated potassium channel, KvAP. In both methods, a solution of protein-containing small unilamellar vesicles is partially dehydrated to form a stack of membranes, which is then allowed to swell in a rehydration buffer. For the electroformation method, the film is deposited on platinum electrodes so that an AC field can be applied during film rehydration. In contrast, the gel-assisted swelling method uses an agarose gel substrate to enhance film rehydration. Both methods can produce GUVs in low (e.g., 5 mM) and physiological (e.g., 100 mM) salt concentrations. The resulting GUVs are characterized via fluorescence microscopy, and the function of reconstituted channels measured using the inside-out patch-clamp configuration. While swelling in the presence of an alternating electric field (electroformation) gives a high yield of defect-free GUVs, the gel-assisted swelling method produces a more homogeneous protein distribution and requires no special equipment. PMID:25650630

  4. Docking ellipticine to the V-VI transmembrane domain of the Kv11.1 potassium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipscomb, Dawn; Brancaleon, Lorenzo; Gentile, S.

    2011-03-01

    Ellipticines such as 9-methoxy-N-2-methylellipticinium acetate (MMEA) and 9-hydroxy-N-2-methylellipticinium acetate (NMEA, Celiptium ) are antineoplastic drugs exerting their selective cytotoxicity against leukemia and endometrial carcinoma. Ellipticine's action is also related to severe physical side effects, but the link between undesired effects and pharmacological application is not well understood. We investigated the binding of Ellipticine derivatives with the Kv11.1 potassium ion channel using Autodock and revealed that hydroxyellipticinium derivatives provide binding configurations with Kv11.1, but the energy, location and estimated dissociation constant varied. The binding energy is as follows: Chloroceliptium (-6.60 kcal/mol) Celiptium (- 6.37 kcal / mol) > Methoxyceliptium (- 6.20 kcal / mol) Datelliptium (-6.08 kcal/mol). The data shows that some configurations enable these molecules to bridge among channel subunits, thus potentially inhibiting the flow of ions.

  5. The N-terminal transmembrane domain (TMD0) and a cytosolic linker (L0) of sulphonylurea receptor define the unique intrinsic gating of KATP channels

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Kun; Csanády, László; Chan, Kim W

    2006-01-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels comprise four pore-forming Kir6 and four regulatory sulphonylurea receptor (SUR) subunits. SUR, an ATP-binding cassette protein, associates with Kir6 through its N-terminal transmembrane domain (TMD0). TMD0 connects to the core domain of SUR through a cytosolic linker (L0). The intrinsic gating of Kir6.2 is greatly altered by SUR. It has been hypothesized that these changes are conferred by TMD0. Exploiting the fact that the pancreatic (SUR1/Kir6.2) and the cardiac (SUR2A/Kir6.2) KATP channels show different gating behaviours, we have tested this hypothesis by comparing the intrinsic gating of Kir6.2 with the last 26 residues deleted (Kir6.2Δ26) co-expressed with SUR1, S1-TMD0, SUR2A and S2-TMD0 at −40 and −100 mV (S is an abbreviation for SUR; TMD0/Kir6.2Δ26, but not TMD0/Kir6.2, can exit the endoplastic reticulum and reach the cell membrane). Single-channel kinetic analyses revealed that the mean burst and interburst durations are shorter for TMD0/Kir6.2Δ26 than for the corresponding SUR channels. No differences were found between the two TMD0 channels. We further demonstrated that in isolation even TMD0-L0 (SUR truncated after L0) cannot confer the wild-type intrinsic gating to Kir6.2Δ26 and that swapping L0 (SUR truncated after L0)between SUR1 and SUR2A only partially exchanges their different intrinsic gating. Therefore, in addition to TMD0, L0 and the core domain also participate in determining the intrinsic gating of Kir6.2. However, TMD0 and L0 are responsible for the different gating patterns of full-length SUR1 and SUR2A channels. A kinetic model with one open and four closed states is presented to explain our results in a mechanistic context. PMID:16887879

  6. The M4 Transmembrane α-Helix Contributes Differently to Both the Maturation and Function of Two Prokaryotic Pentameric Ligand-gated Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Hénault, Camille M; Juranka, Peter F; Baenziger, John E

    2015-10-09

    The role of the outermost transmembrane α-helix in both the maturation and function of the prokaryotic pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, GLIC and ELIC, was examined by Ala scanning mutagenesis, deletion mutations, and mutant cycle analyses. Ala mutations at the M4-M1/M3 interface lead to loss-of-function phenotypes in GLIC, with the largest negative effects occurring near the M4 C terminus. In particular, two aromatic residues at the M4 C terminus form a network of π-π and/or cation-π interactions with residues on M3 and the β6-β7 loop that is essential for both maturation and function. M4-M1/M3 interactions appear to be optimized in GLIC with even subtle structural changes at this interface leading to detrimental effects. In contrast, mutations along the M4-M1/M3 interface of ELIC typically lead to gain-of-function phenotypes, suggesting that these interactions in ELIC are not optimized for channel function. In addition, no cluster of interacting residues involving the M4 C terminus, M3, and the β6-β7 loop was found, suggesting that the M4 C terminus plays little role in ELIC maturation or function. This study shows that M4 makes distinct contributions to the maturation and gating of these two closely related homologs, suggesting that GLIC and ELIC exhibit divergent features of channel function. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Optimization of the degenerated interfacial ATP binding site improves the function of disease-related mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channels.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Feng; Jih, Kang-Yang; Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2010-11-26

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel, an ATP binding cassette (ABC) protein whose defects cause the deadly genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF), encompasses two nucleotide binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2). Recent studies indicate that in the presence of ATP, the two NBDs coalesce into a dimer, trapping an ATP molecule in each of the two interfacial composite ATP binding sites (site 1 and site 2). Experimental evidence also suggests that CFTR gating is mainly controlled by ATP binding and hydrolysis in site 2, whereas site 1, which harbors several non-canonical substitutions in ATP-interacting motifs, is considered degenerated. The CF-associated mutation G551D, by introducing a bulky and negatively charged side chain into site 2, completely abolishes ATP-induced openings of CFTR. Here, we report a strategy to optimize site 1 for ATP binding by converting two amino acid residues to ABC consensus (i.e. H1348G) or more commonly seen residues in other ABC proteins (i.e. W401Y,W401F). Introducing either one or both of these mutations into G551D-CFTR confers ATP responsiveness for this disease-associated mutant channel. We further showed that the same maneuver also improved the function of WT-CFTR and the most common CF-associated ΔF508 channels, both of which rely on site 2 for gating control. Thus, our results demonstrated that the degenerated site 1 can be rebuilt to complement or support site 2 for CFTR function. Possible approaches for developing CFTR potentiators targeting site 1 will be discussed.

  8. The barrel-stave model as applied to alamethicin and its analogs reevaluated.

    PubMed

    Laver, D R

    1994-02-01

    Alamethicin and its analogs from cation selective, multi-conductance channels in lipid bilayers. The conductance levels have been thought to be due to a barrel-stave structure where conducting pores (barrels) are formed by the self-assembly of a variable number of alpha-helical rods (staves). The conductance transitions were then interpreted as the addition or deletion of peptide monomers from the pore-forming complex (Sansom, M.S. 1991. Prog. Biophys. Mol. Biol. 55:139-235). Initially, pore conductances were calculated from that expected of right circular cylinders of "bulk" electrolyte. More recent theories also included the access resistance of the electrolyte outside the pore. However, they all consistently overestimated the observed conductances. The reason for the discrepancy is presented here. Previous theories ignored the effects of ion concentration gradients near the pore. Hence, they only held in the limit of small bilayer potentials (< 25 mV) and so would overestimate measurements that typically used much larger potentials (> 100 mV). This theoretical flaw is corrected by using Läuger's theory of diffusion-limited ion flow (Läuger, P. 1976. Biochim. Biophys. Acta. 455:493-509). Thus, including the effects of ion concentration gradients results in a considerable improvement in predicting pore conductances. It is found that: 1) the effects of ion concentration gradients must be included in the barrel-stave model for it to apply to the available data; 2) previously published explanations for the discrepancy between the model and the data, namely the "distorted bundle" and the "head-to-tail aggregate" hypotheses are not necessary (reviewed by Sansom, 1991).

  9. Oxidation and reduction of pyridine nucleotides in alamethicin-permeabilized plant mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Fredrik I; Michalecka, Agnieszka M; Møller, Ian M; Rasmusson, Allan G

    2004-01-01

    The inner mitochondrial membrane is selectively permeable, which limits the transport of solutes and metabolites across the membrane. This constitutes a problem when intramitochondrial enzymes are studied. The channel-forming antibiotic AlaM (alamethicin) was used as a potentially less invasive method to permeabilize mitochondria and study the highly branched electron-transport chain in potato tuber (Solanum tuberosum) and pea leaf (Pisum sativum) mitochondria. We show that AlaM permeabilized the inner membrane of plant mitochondria to NAD(P)H, allowing the quantification of internal NAD(P)H dehydrogenases as well as matrix enzymes in situ. AlaM was found to inhibit the electron-transport chain at the external Ca2+-dependent rotenone-insensitive NADH dehydrogenase and around complexes III and IV. Nevertheless, under optimal conditions, especially complex I-mediated NADH oxidation in AlaM-treated mitochondria was much higher than what has been previously measured by other techniques. Our results also show a difference in substrate specificities for complex I in mitochondria as compared with inside-out submitochondrial particles. AlaM facilitated the passage of cofactors to and from the mitochondrial matrix and allowed the determination of NAD+ requirements of malate oxidation in situ. In summary, we conclude that AlaM provides the best method for quantifying NADH dehydrogenase activities and that AlaM will prove to be an important method to study enzymes under conditions that resemble their native environment not only in plant mitochondria but also in other membrane-enclosed compartments, such as intact cells, chloroplasts and peroxisomes. PMID:14972026

  10. In vitro and in vivo antitrypanosomal activities of three peptide antibiotics: leucinostatin A and B, alamethicin I and tsushimycin.

    PubMed

    Ishiyama, Aki; Otoguro, Kazuhiko; Iwatsuki, Masato; Iwatsuki, Masahito; Namatame, Miyuki; Nishihara, Aki; Nonaka, Kenichi; Kinoshita, Yuta; Takahashi, Yoko; Masuma, Rokuro; Shiomi, Kazuro; Yamada, Haruki; Omura, Satoshi

    2009-06-01

    In the course of our screening for antitrypanosomal compounds from soil microorganisms, as well as from the antibiotics library of the Kitasato Institute for Life Sciences, we found three peptide antibiotics, leucinostatin (A and B), alamethicin I and tsushimycin, which exhibited potent or moderate antitrypanosomal activity. We report here the in vitro and in vivo antitrypanosomal properties and cytotoxicities of leucinostatin A and B, alamethicin I and tsushimycin compared with suramin. We also discuss their possible mode of action. This is the first report of in vitro and in vivo trypanocidal activity of leucinostatin A and B, alamethicin I and tsushimycin.

  11. Analysis of trafficking, stability and function of human connexin 26 gap junction channels with deafness-causing mutations in the fourth transmembrane helix.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Cinzia; Walker, Amy E; Depriest, Adam D; Cone, Angela C; Lu, Connie; Badger, John; Skerrett, I Martha; Sosinsky, Gina E

    2013-01-01

    Human Connexin26 gene mutations cause hearing loss. These hereditary mutations are the leading cause of childhood deafness worldwide. Mutations in gap junction proteins (connexins) can impair intercellular communication by eliminating protein synthesis, mis-trafficking, or inducing channels that fail to dock or have aberrant function. We previously identified a new class of mutants that form non-functional gap junction channels and hemichannels (connexons) by disrupting packing and inter-helix interactions. Here we analyzed fourteen point mutations in the fourth transmembrane helix of connexin26 (Cx26) that cause non-syndromic hearing loss. Eight mutations caused mis-trafficking (K188R, F191L, V198M, S199F, G200R, I203K, L205P, T208P). Of the remaining six that formed gap junctions in mammalian cells, M195T and A197S formed stable hemichannels after isolation with a baculovirus/Sf9 protein purification system, while C202F, I203T, L205V and N206S formed hemichannels with varying degrees of instability. The function of all six gap junction-forming mutants was further assessed through measurement of dye coupling in mammalian cells and junctional conductance in paired Xenopus oocytes. Dye coupling between cell pairs was reduced by varying degrees for all six mutants. In homotypic oocyte pairings, only A197S induced measurable conductance. In heterotypic pairings with wild-type Cx26, five of the six mutants formed functional gap junction channels, albeit with reduced efficiency. None of the mutants displayed significant alterations in sensitivity to transjunctional voltage or induced conductive hemichannels in single oocytes. Intra-hemichannel interactions between mutant and wild-type proteins were assessed in rescue experiments using baculovirus expression in Sf9 insect cells. Of the four unstable mutations (C202F, I203T, L205V, N206S) only C202F and N206S formed stable hemichannels when co-expressed with wild-type Cx26. Stable M195T hemichannels displayed an increased

  12. Analysis of Trafficking, Stability and Function of Human Connexin 26 Gap Junction Channels with Deafness-Causing Mutations in the Fourth Transmembrane Helix

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosi, Cinzia; Walker, Amy E.; DePriest, Adam D.; Cone, Angela C.; Lu, Connie; Badger, John; Skerrett, I. Martha; Sosinsky, Gina E.

    2013-01-01

    Human Connexin26 gene mutations cause hearing loss. These hereditary mutations are the leading cause of childhood deafness worldwide. Mutations in gap junction proteins (connexins) can impair intercellular communication by eliminating protein synthesis, mis-trafficking, or inducing channels that fail to dock or have aberrant function. We previously identified a new class of mutants that form non-functional gap junction channels and hemichannels (connexons) by disrupting packing and inter-helix interactions. Here we analyzed fourteen point mutations in the fourth transmembrane helix of connexin26 (Cx26) that cause non-syndromic hearing loss. Eight mutations caused mis-trafficking (K188R, F191L, V198M, S199F, G200R, I203K, L205P, T208P). Of the remaining six that formed gap junctions in mammalian cells, M195T and A197S formed stable hemichannels after isolation with a baculovirus/Sf9 protein purification system, while C202F, I203T, L205V and N206S formed hemichannels with varying degrees of instability. The function of all six gap junction-forming mutants was further assessed through measurement of dye coupling in mammalian cells and junctional conductance in paired Xenopus oocytes. Dye coupling between cell pairs was reduced by varying degrees for all six mutants. In homotypic oocyte pairings, only A197S induced measurable conductance. In heterotypic pairings with wild-type Cx26, five of the six mutants formed functional gap junction channels, albeit with reduced efficiency. None of the mutants displayed significant alterations in sensitivity to transjunctional voltage or induced conductive hemichannels in single oocytes. Intra-hemichannel interactions between mutant and wild-type proteins were assessed in rescue experiments using baculovirus expression in Sf9 insect cells. Of the four unstable mutations (C202F, I203T, L205V, N206S) only C202F and N206S formed stable hemichannels when co-expressed with wild-type Cx26. Stable M195T hemichannels displayed an increased

  13. Differential activation of the HCO3− conductance through the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator anion channel by genistein and forskolin in murine duodenum

    PubMed Central

    Tuo, Biguang; Wen, Guorong; Seidler, Ursula

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Many cystic fibrosis (CF)-associated mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channels affect CFTR-activated HCO3− transport more than Cl− transport. Targeting the CFTR HCO3− conductance, if possible, may therefore be of major therapeutic benefit. In the present study, we examined the effects of genistein and forskolin on duodenal mucosal HCO3− and Cl− secretion. Experimental approach: Murine duodenal mucosal HCO3− and Cl− secretions were examined in vitro in Ussing chambers by the pH stat and short circuit current (Isc) techniques. Key results: Genistein markedly stimulated duodenal HCO3− secretion and Isc in a dose-dependent manner in CFTR wild-type mice, but not in CFTR null mice. CFTRinh-172, a highly specific CFTR inhibitor, inhibited genistein-stimulated duodenal HCO3− secretion and Isc in wild-type mice. Genistein induced 59% net HCO3− increase and 123% net Isc increase over basal value, whereas forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase, induced 94% net HCO3− increase and 507% net Isc increase, indicating that, compared with forskolin, genistein induced a relatively high HCO3−/Isc ratio. Further data showed that CFTR HCO3−/Cl− conductance ratio was 1.05 after genistein stimulation, whereas after forskolin stimulation, the CFTR HCO3−/Cl− conductance ratio was 0.27. Conclusions and implications: Genistein stimulates duodenal HCO3− and Cl− secretion through CFTR, and has a relatively high selectivity for the CFTR HCO3− conductance, compared with forskolin. This may indicate the feasibility of selective targeting of the HCO3− conductance of the CFTR channels. PMID:19788494

  14. Mutating the Conserved Q-loop Glutamine 1291 Selectively Disrupts Adenylate Kinase-dependent Channel Gating of the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) and Reduces Channel Function in Primary Human Airway Epithelia.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qian; Ernst, Sarah E; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Shah, Viral S; Ver Heul, Amanda R; Welsh, Michael J; Randak, Christoph O

    2015-05-29

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and two other non-membrane-bound ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, exhibit adenylate kinase activity in the presence of physiologic concentrations of ATP and AMP or ADP (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). The crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of an SMC protein in complex with the adenylate kinase bisubstrate inhibitor P(1),P(5)-di(adenosine-5') pentaphosphate (Ap5A) suggests that AMP binds to the conserved Q-loop glutamine during the adenylate kinase reaction. Therefore, we hypothesized that mutating the corresponding residue in CFTR, Gln-1291, selectively disrupts adenylate kinase-dependent channel gating at physiologic nucleotide concentrations. We found that substituting Gln-1291 with bulky side-chain amino acids abolished the effects of Ap5A, AMP, and adenosine 5'-monophosphoramidate on CFTR channel function. 8-Azidoadenosine 5'-monophosphate photolabeling of the AMP-binding site and adenylate kinase activity were disrupted in Q1291F CFTR. The Gln-1291 mutations did not alter the potency of ATP at stimulating current or ATP-dependent gating when ATP was the only nucleotide present. However, when physiologic concentrations of ADP and AMP were added, adenylate kinase-deficient Q1291F channels opened significantly less than wild type. Consistent with this result, we found that Q1291F CFTR displayed significantly reduced Cl(-) channel function in well differentiated primary human airway epithelia. These results indicate that a highly conserved residue of an ABC transporter plays an important role in adenylate kinase-dependent CFTR gating. Furthermore, the results suggest that adenylate kinase activity is important for normal CFTR channel function in airway epithelia.

  15. Mutating the Conserved Q-loop Glutamine 1291 Selectively Disrupts Adenylate Kinase-dependent Channel Gating of the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) and Reduces Channel Function in Primary Human Airway Epithelia*

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Qian; Ernst, Sarah E.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Shah, Viral S.; Ver Heul, Amanda R.; Welsh, Michael J.; Randak, Christoph O.

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and two other non-membrane-bound ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, exhibit adenylate kinase activity in the presence of physiologic concentrations of ATP and AMP or ADP (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). The crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of an SMC protein in complex with the adenylate kinase bisubstrate inhibitor P1,P5-di(adenosine-5′) pentaphosphate (Ap5A) suggests that AMP binds to the conserved Q-loop glutamine during the adenylate kinase reaction. Therefore, we hypothesized that mutating the corresponding residue in CFTR, Gln-1291, selectively disrupts adenylate kinase-dependent channel gating at physiologic nucleotide concentrations. We found that substituting Gln-1291 with bulky side-chain amino acids abolished the effects of Ap5A, AMP, and adenosine 5′-monophosphoramidate on CFTR channel function. 8-Azidoadenosine 5′-monophosphate photolabeling of the AMP-binding site and adenylate kinase activity were disrupted in Q1291F CFTR. The Gln-1291 mutations did not alter the potency of ATP at stimulating current or ATP-dependent gating when ATP was the only nucleotide present. However, when physiologic concentrations of ADP and AMP were added, adenylate kinase-deficient Q1291F channels opened significantly less than wild type. Consistent with this result, we found that Q1291F CFTR displayed significantly reduced Cl− channel function in well differentiated primary human airway epithelia. These results indicate that a highly conserved residue of an ABC transporter plays an important role in adenylate kinase-dependent CFTR gating. Furthermore, the results suggest that adenylate kinase activity is important for normal CFTR channel function in airway epithelia. PMID:25887396

  16. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator inhibitors CFTR(inh)-172 and GlyH-101 target mitochondrial functions, independently of chloride channel inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Mairead; Trudel, Stephanie; Brouillard, Franck; Bouillaud, Frederick; Colas, Julien; Nguyen-Khoa, Thao; Ollero, Mario; Edelman, Aleksander; Fritsch, Janine

    2010-04-01

    Two highly potent and selective cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane regulator (CFTR) inhibitors have been identified by high-throughput screening: the thiazolidinone CFTR(inh)-172 [3-[(3-trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-5-[(4-carboxyphenyl)methylene]- 2-thioxo-4-thiazolidinone] and the glycine hydrazide GlyH-101 [N-(2-naphthalenyl)-((3,5-dibromo-2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)methylene)glycine hydrazide]. Inhibition of the CFTR chloride channel by these compounds has been suggested to be of pharmacological interest in the treatment of secretory diarrheas and polycystic kidney disease. In addition, functional inhibition of CFTR by CFTR(inh)-172 has been proposed to be sufficient to mimic the CF inflammatory profile. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the two compounds on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial membrane potential in several cell lines: the CFTR-deficient human lung epithelial IB3-1 (expressing the heterozygous F508del/W1282X mutation), the isogenic CFTR-corrected C38, and HeLa and A549 as non-CFTR-expressing controls. Both inhibitors were able to induce a rapid increase in ROS levels and depolarize mitochondria in the four cell types, suggesting that these effects are independent of CFTR inhibition. In HeLa cells, these events were associated with a decrease in the rate of oxygen consumption, with GlyH-101 demonstrating a higher potency than CFTR(inh)-172. The impact of CFTR inhibitors on inflammatory parameters was also tested in HeLa cells. CFTR(inh)-172, but not GlyH-101, induced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB). CFTR(inh)-172 slightly decreased interleukin-8 secretion, whereas GlyH-101 induced a slight increase. These results support the conclusion that CFTR inhibitors may exert nonspecific effects regarding ROS production, mitochondrial failure, and activation of the NF-kappaB signaling pathway, independently of CFTR inhibition.

  17. The cellular localization of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, potassium channel, epithelial sodium channel γ and vacuolar-type H+-ATPase in human eccrine sweat glands.

    PubMed

    Li, Haihong; Zhang, Xiang; Zeng, Shaopeng; Chen, Lu; Li, Xuexue; Lin, Changmin; Zhang, Mingjun; Shu, Shenyou; Xie, Sitian; He, Yunpu; Yang, Lvjun; Tang, Shijie; Fu, Xiaobing

    2014-10-01

    The secretory portions of human eccrine sweat glands secrete isotonic fluid into the lumen and then the primary fluid is rendered hypotonic during its passage to the skin surface. During the processes of sweat secretion and absorption, many enzymes and proteins play important roles. In the study, the cellular localizations of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), potassium channel (KC), epithelial sodium channel γ (γENaC) and vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) in human eccrine sweat glands and epidermis were detected using immunofluorescence labeling. The results revealed that in the secretory coils, the basolateral membranes showed evidence of CFTR, NHE1 and KC activities, the apical membranes showed the activities of KC and NHE1, and the nucleus showed γEaNC and V-ATPase activities; in the duct, the peripheral and luminal ductal cells showed evidence of CFTR, NHE1 and KC, the apical membranes showed the activities of CFTR and NHE1, and the nucleus showed γEaNC, V-ATPase and KC activities. The cellular localization of these proteins in eccrine sweat glands is helpful to better understand the mechanisms of sweat secretion and absorption.

  18. Low temperature and chemical rescue affect molecular proximity of DeltaF508-cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC).

    PubMed

    Qadri, Yawar J; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle; Rooj, Arun K; Lee, William; Parpura, Vladimir; Fuller, Cathy M; Berdiev, Bakhrom K

    2012-05-11

    An imbalance of chloride and sodium ion transport in several epithelia is a feature of cystic fibrosis (CF), an inherited disease that is a consequence of mutations in the cftr gene. The cftr gene codes for a Cl(-) channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Some mutations in this gene cause the balance between Cl(-) secretion and Na(+) absorption to be disturbed in the airways; Cl(-) secretion is impaired, whereas Na(+) absorption is elevated. Enhanced Na(+) absorption through the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is attributed to the failure of mutated CFTR to restrict ENaC-mediated Na(+) transport. The mechanism of this regulation is controversial. Recently, we have found evidence for a close association of wild type (WT) CFTR and WT ENaC, further underscoring the role of ENaC along with CFTR in the pathophysiology of CF airway disease. In this study, we have examined the association of ENaC subunits with mutated ΔF508-CFTR, the most common mutation in CF. Deletion of phenylalanine at position 508 (ΔF508) prevents proper processing and targeting of CFTR to the plasma membrane. When ΔF508-CFTR and ENaC subunits were co-expressed in HEK293T cells, we found that individual ENaC subunits could be co-immunoprecipitated with ΔF508-CFTR, much like WT CFTR. However, when we evaluated the ΔF508-CFTR and ENaC association using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), FRET efficiencies were not significantly different from negative controls, suggesting that ΔF508-CFTR and ENaC are not in close proximity to each other under basal conditions. However, with partial correction of ΔF508-CFTR misprocessing by low temperature and chemical rescue, leading to surface expression as assessed by total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, we observed a positive FRET signal. Our findings suggest that the ΔF508 mutation alters the close association of CFTR and ENaC.

  19. Low Temperature and Chemical Rescue Affect Molecular Proximity of ΔF508-Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) and Epithelial Sodium Channel (ENaC)*

    PubMed Central

    Qadri, Yawar J.; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle; Rooj, Arun K.; Lee, William; Parpura, Vladimir; Fuller, Cathy M.; Berdiev, Bakhrom K.

    2012-01-01

    An imbalance of chloride and sodium ion transport in several epithelia is a feature of cystic fibrosis (CF), an inherited disease that is a consequence of mutations in the cftr gene. The cftr gene codes for a Cl− channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Some mutations in this gene cause the balance between Cl− secretion and Na+ absorption to be disturbed in the airways; Cl− secretion is impaired, whereas Na+ absorption is elevated. Enhanced Na+ absorption through the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is attributed to the failure of mutated CFTR to restrict ENaC-mediated Na+ transport. The mechanism of this regulation is controversial. Recently, we have found evidence for a close association of wild type (WT) CFTR and WT ENaC, further underscoring the role of ENaC along with CFTR in the pathophysiology of CF airway disease. In this study, we have examined the association of ENaC subunits with mutated ΔF508-CFTR, the most common mutation in CF. Deletion of phenylalanine at position 508 (ΔF508) prevents proper processing and targeting of CFTR to the plasma membrane. When ΔF508-CFTR and ENaC subunits were co-expressed in HEK293T cells, we found that individual ENaC subunits could be co-immunoprecipitated with ΔF508-CFTR, much like WT CFTR. However, when we evaluated the ΔF508-CFTR and ENaC association using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), FRET efficiencies were not significantly different from negative controls, suggesting that ΔF508-CFTR and ENaC are not in close proximity to each other under basal conditions. However, with partial correction of ΔF508-CFTR misprocessing by low temperature and chemical rescue, leading to surface expression as assessed by total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, we observed a positive FRET signal. Our findings suggest that the ΔF508 mutation alters the close association of CFTR and ENaC. PMID:22442149

  20. Sensitivity of a renal K+ channel (ROMK2) to the inhibitory sulfonylurea compound glibenclamide is enhanced by coexpression with the ATP-binding cassette transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator.

    PubMed Central

    McNicholas, C M; Guggino, W B; Schwiebert, E M; Hebert, S C; Giebisch, G; Egan, M E

    1996-01-01

    We demonstrate here that coexpression of ROMK2, an inwardly rectifying ATP-sensitive renal K+ channel (IKATP) with cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) significantly enhances the sensitivity of ROMK2 to the sulfonylurea compound glibenclamide. When expressed alone, ROMK2 is relatively insensitive to glibenclamide. The interaction between ROMK2, CFTR, and glibenclamide is modulated by altering the phosphorylation state of either ROMK2, CFTR, or an associated protein, as exogenous MgATP and the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A significantly attenuate the inhibitory effect of glibenclamide on ROMK2. Thus CFTR, which has been demonstrated to interact with both Na+ and Cl- channels in airway epithelium, modulates the function of renal ROMK2 K+ channels. PMID:8755607

  1. Studies of the interaction of gravity with biological membranes using alamethicin doped planar lipid bilayers as a model system.

    PubMed

    Hanke, W

    1996-01-01

    Gravity interacts with biological systems on different levels of complexity. For the understanding of the action of gravity on such systems at higher degrees of organisation, the investigation of interactions on the membrane and even on the molecular level is crucial. To do such studies, planar lipid bilayers with incorporated transport mediating molecules, i.e. membranes of defined biochemical composition, are close to perfect model systems. In our experiments we have used painted planar lipid bilayers doped with alamethicin. Alamethicin is especially suitable for such studies because of its high sensitivity to applied external forces, which is a result of its special pore forming mechanism. Additional, different to most other transport mediating molecules, a big amount of data from the literature is available about the dependency of alamethicin pores on physical and chemical membrane parameters. We found that the conductance of alamethicin doped bilayers is dependent on the angle of the bilayer with the gravitational vector and that it furthermore can be reduced significantly under hyper gravity conditions in a centrifuge. The effect of gravity here is not an effect on the pore conductance or the membrane-aqueous solution interface, but it is due to an interaction of gravity with the pore forming mechanism, as can be shown by investigating the dependency of the alamethicin pore kinetics on the applied forces.

  2. Single amino acid deletion in transmembrane segment D4S6 of sodium channel Scn8a (Nav1.6) in a mouse mutant with a chronic movement disorder.

    PubMed

    Jones, Julie M; Dionne, Louise; Dell'Orco, James; Parent, Rachel; Krueger, Jamie N; Cheng, Xiaoyang; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Bunton-Stasyshyn, Rosie K; Sharkey, Lisa M; Dowling, James J; Murphy, Geoffrey G; Shakkottai, Vikram G; Shrager, Peter; Meisler, Miriam H

    2016-05-01

    Mutations of the neuronal sodium channel gene SCN8A are associated with lethal movement disorders in the mouse and with human epileptic encephalopathy. We describe a spontaneous mouse mutation, Scn8a(9J), that is associated with a chronic movement disorder with early onset tremor and adult onset dystonia. Scn8a(9J) homozygotes have a shortened lifespan, with only 50% of mutants surviving beyond 6 months of age. The 3 bp in-frame deletion removes 1 of the 3 adjacent isoleucine residues in transmembrane segment DIVS6 of Nav1.6 (p.Ile1750del). The altered helical orientation of the transmembrane segment displaces pore-lining amino acids with important roles in channel activation and inactivation. The predicted impact on channel activity was confirmed by analysis of cerebellar Purkinje neurons from mutant mice, which lack spontaneous and induced repetitive firing. In a heterologous expression system, the activity of the mutant channel was below the threshold for detection. Observations of decreased nerve conduction velocity and impaired behavior in an open field are also consistent with reduced activity of Nav1.6. The Nav1.6Δ1750 protein is only partially glycosylated. The abundance of mutant Nav1.6 is reduced at nodes of Ranvier and is not detectable at the axon initial segment. Despite a severe reduction in channel activity, the lifespan and motor function of Scn8a(9J/9J) mice are significantly better than null mutants lacking channel protein. The clinical phenotype of this severe hypomorphic mutant expands the spectrum of Scn8a disease to include a recessively inherited, chronic and progressive movement disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Lipid membrane domain formation and alamethicin aggregation studied by calorimetry, sound velocity measurements, and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Oliynyk, Vitaliy; Jäger, Markus; Heimburg, Thomas; Buckin, Vitaly; Kaatze, Udo

    2008-05-01

    An experimental study of phosphocholine membranes made from one lipid, from mixtures of DPPC and DLPC, and also from lipids and small amounts of alamethicin is presented. We used atomic force microscopy to investigate the spatial organization and structure of lipid domains and also of the defects induced by the peptide. Alamethicin was found to alter the state of lipids in the gel state in a way that domains of fluid lipids are formed close to the defects. Differential calorimetry revealed phase characteristics of the lipid mixtures and the effect of small amounts of alamethicin on the phase behavior. It was also shown that the sound velocity profiles of the membranes suspensions can be well calculated from the heat capacity traces of the samples. This result confirms the correlation between the mechanical properties and the specific heat of membrane systems.

  4. Nicotinic Receptor Fourth Transmembrane Domain

    PubMed Central

    Bouzat, Cecilia; Barrantes, Francisco; Sine, Steven

    2000-01-01

    The fourth transmembrane domain (M4) of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) contributes to the kinetics of activation, yet its close association with the lipid bilayer makes it the outermost of the transmembrane domains. To investigate mechanistic and structural contributions of M4 to AChR activation, we systematically mutated αT422, a conserved residue that has been labeled by hydrophobic probes, and evaluated changes in rate constants underlying ACh binding and channel gating steps. Aromatic and nonpolar mutations of αT422 selectively affect the channel gating step, slowing the rate of opening two- to sevenfold, and speeding the rate of closing four- to ninefold. Additionally, kinetic modeling shows a second doubly liganded open state for aromatic and nonpolar mutations. In contrast, serine and asparagine mutations of αT422 largely preserve the kinetics of the wild-type AChR. Thus, rapid and efficient gating of the AChR channel depends on a hydrogen bond involving the side chain at position 422 of the M4 transmembrane domain. PMID:10779322

  5. Differential sensitivity of the cystic fibrosis (CF)-associated mutants G551D and G1349D to potentiators of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhiwei; Taddei, Alessandro; Sheppard, David N

    2006-01-27

    The genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by loss of function of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel. Two CF mutants, G551D and G1349D, affect equivalent residues in the highly conserved LSGGQ motifs that are essential components of the ATP-binding sites of CFTR. Both mutants severely disrupt CFTR channel gating by decreasing mean burst duration (MBD) and prolonging greatly the interburst interval (IBI). To identify small molecules that rescue the gating defects of G551D- and G1349D-CFTR and understand better how these agents work, we used the patch clamp technique to study the effects on G551D- and G1349D-CFTR of phloxine B, pyrophosphate (PP(i)), and 2'-deoxy ATP (2'-dATP), three agents that strongly enhance CFTR channel gating. Phloxine B (5 microm) potentiated robustly G551D-CFTR Cl- channels by altering both MBD and IBI. In contrast, phloxine B (5 microm) decreased the IBI of G1349D-CFTR, but this effect was insufficient to rescue G1349D-CFTR channel gating. PP(i) (5 mm) potentiated weakly G551D-CFTR and was without effect on the G1349D-CFTR Cl- channel. However, by altering both MBD and IBI, albeit with different efficacies, 2'-dATP (1 mm) potentiated both G551D- and G1349D-CFTR Cl- channels. Using the ATP-driven nucleotide-binding domain dimerization model of CFTR channel gating, we suggest that phloxine B, PP(i) and 2'-dATP alter channel gating by distinct mechanisms. We conclude that G551D- and G1349D-CFTR have distinct pharmacological profiles and speculate that drug therapy for CF is likely to be mutation-specific.

  6. Patch Clamp on the Luminal Membrane of Exocrine Gland Acini from Frog Skin (Rana esculenta) Reveals the Presence of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator–like Cl− Channels Activated by Cyclic AMP

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Larsen, Erik Hviid

    1998-01-01

    Chloride channels in the luminal membrane of exocrine gland acini from frog skin (Rana esculenta) constituted a single homogeneous population. In cell-attached patches, channels activated upon exposure to isoproterenol, forskolin, or dibutyryl-cAMP and isobutyl-1-methyl-xanthine rectified in the outward direction with a conductance of 10.0 ± 0.4 pS for outgoing currents. Channels in stimulated cells reversed at 0 mV applied potential, whereas channels in unstimulated cells reversed at depolarized potentials (28.1 ± 6.7 mV), indicating that Cl− was above electrochemical equilibrium in unstimulated, but not in stimulated, cells. In excised inside-out patches with 25 mM Cl− on the inside, activity of small (8-pS) linear Cl−-selective channels was dependent upon bath ATP (1.5 mM) and increased upon exposure to cAMP-dependent protein kinase. The channels displayed a single substate, located just below 2/3 of the full channel amplitude. Halide selectivity was identified as PBr > PI > PCl from the Goldman equation; however, the conductance sequence when either halide was permeating the channel was GCl > GBr >> GI. In inside-out patches, the channels were blocked reversibly by 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid, glibenclamide, and diphenylamine-2-carboxylic acid, whereas 4,4-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2-disulfonic acid blocked channel activity completely and irreversibly. Single-channel kinetics revealed one open state (mean lifetime = 158 ± 72 ms) and two closed states (lifetimes: 12 ± 4 and 224 ± 31 ms, respectively). Power density spectra had a double-Lorentzian form with corner frequencies 0.85 ± 0.11 and 27.9 ± 2.9 Hz, respectively. These channels are considered homologous to the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl− channel, which has been localized to the submucosal skin glands in Xenopus by immunohistochemistry (Engelhardt, J.F., S.S. Smith, E. Allen, J.R. Yankaskas, D.C. Dawson, and J.M. Wilson. 1994. Am. J. Physiol. 267

  7. Structure and orientation of antibiotic peptide alamethicin in phospholipid bilayers as revealed by chemical shift oscillation analysis of solid state nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Takashi; Mishima, Daisuke; Javkhlantugs, Namsrai; Wang, Jun; Ishioka, Daisuke; Yokota, Kiyonobu; Norisada, Kazushi; Kawamura, Izuru; Ueda, Kazuyoshi; Naito, Akira

    2015-11-01

    The structure, topology and orientation of membrane-bound antibiotic alamethicin were studied using solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. (13)C chemical shift interaction was observed in [1-(13)C]-labeled alamethicin. The isotropic chemical shift values indicated that alamethicin forms a helical structure in the entire region. The chemical shift anisotropy of the carbonyl carbon of isotopically labeled alamethicin was also analyzed with the assumption that alamethicin molecules rotate rapidly about the bilayer normal of the phospholipid bilayers. It is considered that the adjacent peptide planes form an angle of 100° or 120° when it forms α-helix or 310-helix, respectively. These properties lead to an oscillation of the chemical shift anisotropy with respect to the phase angle of the peptide plane. Anisotropic data were acquired for the 4 and 7 sites of the N- and C-termini, respectively. The results indicated that the helical axes for the N- and C-termini were tilted 17° and 32° to the bilayer normal, respectively. The chemical shift oscillation curves indicate that the N- and C-termini form the α-helix and 310-helix, respectively. The C-terminal 310-helix of alamethicin in the bilayer was experimentally observed and the unique bending structure of alamethicin was further confirmed by measuring the internuclear distances of [1-(13)C] and [(15)N] doubly-labeled alamethicin. Molecular dynamics simulation of alamethicin embedded into dimyristoyl phophatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers indicates that the helical axes for α-helical N- and 310-helical C-termini are tilted 12° and 32° to the bilayer normal, respectively, which is in good agreement with the solid state NMR results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Stochastic resonance in thermally activated reactions: Application to biological ion channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezrukov, Sergey M.; Vodyanoy, Igor

    1998-09-01

    At the molecular level many thermally activated reactions can be viewed as Poisson trains of events whose instantaneous rates are defined by the reaction activation barrier height and an effective collision frequency. When the barrier height depends on an external parameter, variation in this parameter induces variation in the event rate. Extending our previous work, we offer a detailed theoretical analysis of signal transduction properties of these reactions considering the external parameter as an input signal and the train of resulting events as an output signal. The addition of noise to the system input facilitates signal transduction in two ways. First, for a linear relationship between the barrier height and the external parameter the output signal power grows exponentially with the mean square fluctuation of the noise. Second, for noise of a sufficiently high bandwidth, its addition increases output signal quality measured as the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The output SNR reaches a maximum at optimal noise intensity defined by the reaction sensitivity to the external parameter, reaction initial rate, and the noise bandwidth. We apply this theory to ion channels of excitable biological membranes. Based on classical results of Hodgkin and Huxley we show that open/closed transitions of voltage-gated ion channels can be treated as thermally activated reactions whose activation barriers change linearly with applied transmembrane voltage. As an experimental example we discuss our recent results obtained with polypeptide alamethicin incorporated into planar lipid bilayers.

  9. Stochastic resonance in thermally activated reactions: Application to biological ion channels.

    PubMed

    Bezrukov, Sergey M.; Vodyanoy, Igor

    1998-09-01

    At the molecular level many thermally activated reactions can be viewed as Poisson trains of events whose instantaneous rates are defined by the reaction activation barrier height and an effective collision frequency. When the barrier height depends on an external parameter, variation in this parameter induces variation in the event rate. Extending our previous work, we offer a detailed theoretical analysis of signal transduction properties of these reactions considering the external parameter as an input signal and the train of resulting events as an output signal. The addition of noise to the system input facilitates signal transduction in two ways. First, for a linear relationship between the barrier height and the external parameter the output signal power grows exponentially with the mean square fluctuation of the noise. Second, for noise of a sufficiently high bandwidth, its addition increases output signal quality measured as the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The output SNR reaches a maximum at optimal noise intensity defined by the reaction sensitivity to the external parameter, reaction initial rate, and the noise bandwidth. We apply this theory to ion channels of excitable biological membranes. Based on classical results of Hodgkin and Huxley we show that open/closed transitions of voltage-gated ion channels can be treated as thermally activated reactions whose activation barriers change linearly with applied transmembrane voltage. As an experimental example we discuss our recent results obtained with polypeptide alamethicin incorporated into planar lipid bilayers.(c) 1998 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Amino acid residues of both the extracellular and transmembrane domains influence binding of the antiparasitic agent milbemycin to Haemonchus contortus AVR-14B glutamate-gated chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Mao; Sawa, Yoshihiro; Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Ozoe, Fumiyo; Ozoe, Yoshihisa

    2012-03-16

    Glutamate-gated chloride (GluCl) channels are pentameric receptors for the inhibitory neurotransmitter glutamate in invertebrates and are a major target for macrolide anthelmintics. Three amino acids in GluCl channels are reported to render macrolide resistance in nematodes and insects. To examine whether these three amino acids are involved in binding of the antiparasitic agent milbemycin (MLM) to the GluCl channels of the nematode parasite Haemonchus contortus, the equivalent amino acids (L256, P316, and G329) of the Hco-AVR-14B subunit were substituted with various amino acids. cDNAs encoding the wild type and mutants of this subunit were transfected into COS-1 cells for transient expression and analysis of GluCl channels. The abilities of these mutant channels to bind [(3)H]MLM A(4) were remarkably decreased when compared with the wild-type channel. In patch clamp analysis, L256F and P316S mutant channels were 37- and 100-fold less sensitive to MLM A(4) when compared with the wild-type channel, respectively. These findings indicate that amino acid changes in the β10 strand, the M2-M3 linker, and the M3 region influence MLM A(4) binding to the channel. Homology modeling and ligand docking studies suggest the presence of two potential binding sites for MLM A(4). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Structure and functional dynamics characterization of the ion channel of the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) small hydrophobic protein (SH) transmembrane domain by combining molecular dynamics with excited normal modes.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Gabriela C; Silva, Ricardo H T; Scott, Luis P B; Araujo, Alexandre S; Souza, Fatima P; de Oliveira, Ronaldo Junio

    2016-12-01

    The human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infection in children and elderly people worldwide. Its genome encodes 11 proteins including SH protein, whose functions are not well known. Studies show that SH protein increases RSV virulence degree and permeability to small compounds, suggesting it is involved in the formation of ion channels. The knowledge of SH structure and function is fundamental for a better understanding of its infection mechanism. The aim of this study was to model, characterize, and analyze the structural behavior of SH protein in the phospholipids bilayer environment. Molecular modeling of SH pentameric structure was performed, followed by traditional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the protein immersed in the lipid bilayer. Molecular dynamics with excited normal modes (MDeNM) was applied in the resulting system in order to investigate long time scale pore dynamics. MD simulations support that SH protein is stable in its pentameric form. Simulations also showed the presence of water molecules within the bilayer by density distribution, thus confirming that SH protein is a viroporin. This water transport was also observed in MDeNM studies with histidine residues of five chains (His22 and His51), playing a key role in pore permeability. The combination of traditional MD and MDeNM was a very efficient protocol to investigate functional conformational changes of transmembrane proteins that act as molecular channels. This protocol can support future investigations of drug candidates by acting on SH protein to inhibit viral infection. Graphical Abstract The ion channel of the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) small hydrophobic protein (SH) transmembrane domainᅟ.

  12. Synthetic peptides corresponding to human follicle-stimulating hormone (hFSH)-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) induce uptake of 45Ca++ by liposomes: evidence for calcium-conducting transmembrane channel formation

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, P.; Santa-Coloma, T.A.; Reichert, L.E. Jr. )

    1991-06-01

    We have previously described FSH receptor-mediated influx of 45Ca++ in cultured Sertoli cells from immature rats and receptor-enriched proteoliposomes via activation of voltage-sensitive and voltage-independent calcium channels. We have further shown that this effect of FSH does not require cholera toxin- or pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding protein or activation of adenylate cyclase. In the present study, we have identified regions of human FSH-beta-subunit which appear to be involved in mediating calcium influx. We screened 11 overlapping peptide amides representing the entire primary structure of hFSH-beta-subunit for their effects on 45Ca++ flux in FSH receptor-enriched proteoliposomes. hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) induced uptake of 45Ca++ in a concentration-related manner. This effect of hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) was also observed in liposomes lacking incorporated FSH receptor. Reducing membrane fluidity by incubating liposomes (containing no receptor) with hFSH-beta-(1-15) or hFSH-beta-(51-65) at temperatures lower than the transition temperatures of their constituent phospholipids resulted in no significant (P greater than 0.05) difference in 45Ca++ uptake. The effectiveness of the calcium ionophore A23187, however, was abolished. Ruthenium red, a voltage-independent calcium channel antagonist, was able to completely block uptake of 45Ca++ induced by hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) whereas nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker specific for L-type voltage-sensitive calcium channels, was without effect. These results suggest that in addition to its effect on voltage-sensitive calcium channel activity, interaction of FSH with its receptor may induce formation of transmembrane aqueous channels which also facilitate influx of extracellular calcium.

  13. Common Mechanism of Cross-Resistance Development in Pathogenic Bacteria Bacillus cereus Against Alamethicin and Pediocin Involves Alteration in Lipid Composition.

    PubMed

    Meena, Sunita; Mehla, Jitender; Kumar, Raj; Sood, S K

    2016-10-01

    To understand the mechanism of development of cross-resistance in food pathogen Bacillus cereus against an antimicrobial peptide pediocin and antibiotic alamethicin, the present study was designed. Pediococcus pentosaceus was taken as a source of pediocin, and it was purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by cation exchange chromatography with 14.01-fold purity and 14.4 % recovery. B. cereus strains alamethicin-resistant strains (IC50 3.23 µg/ml) were selected from sensitive population with IC50 2.37 µg/ml. The development of resistance in B. cereus against alamethicin was associated with decrease in alamethicin-membrane interaction observed by in vitro assay. Resistant strain of B. cereus was found to harbour one additional general lipid as compared to sensitive strain, one amino group lacking phospholipid and one amino group containing phospholipid (ACP). In addition, ACP content was increased in resistant mutant (29.7 %) as compared to sensitive strain (14.56 %). The alamethicin-resistant mutant B. cereus also showed increased IC50 (58.8 AU/ml) for pediocin as compared to sensitive strain (IC50 47.8 AU/ml). Cross-resistance to pediocin and alamethicin in resistant mutant of B. cereus suggested a common mechanism of resistance. Therefore, this understanding could result in the development of peptide which will be effective against the resistant strains that share same mechanism of resistance.

  14. Determining Favorable Binding Configurations of the Anti-Cancer Drug Ellipticine to the KV11.1 Potassium Channel V-VI Transmembrane Domain Through Autodock Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipscomb, Dawn; Gentile, Saverio; Brancaleon, Lorenzo

    2011-10-01

    Ellipticines such as 9-methoxy-N-2-methylellipticinium acetate (MMEA) and 9-hydroxy-N-2-methylellipticinium acetate (NMEA, Celiptium ) are antineoplastic drugs that exert their selective cytotoxicity against leukemia and endometrial carcinoma. Ellipticine's action is also related to severe physical side effects, but the link between undesired effects and pharmacological application is not well understood. We investigated the binding of Ellipticine derivatives with the Kv11.1 potassium ion channel using Autodock and revealed that hydroxyellipticinium derivatives provide binding configurations with Kv11.1, but the energy, location and estimated dissociation constant varied. The binding energy is as follows: Chloroceliptium (-6.60 kcal/mol) > Celiptium (- 6.37 kcal/mol) > Methoxyceliptium (- 6.20 kcal/mol) > Datelliptium (-6.08 kcal/mol). Autodock simulations demonstrate that binding affinity is high at opposing ends of the channel and low within the channel interior. These favorable binding configurations suggest that Ellipticine derivatives may bridge among end subunits of the channel and potentially inhibit the flow of ions.

  15. Microfabricated Teflon Membranes for Low-Noise Recordings of Ion Channels in Planar Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Michael; Kriebel, Jennah K.; Tosteson, Magdalena T.; Whitesides, George M.

    2003-01-01

    We present a straightforward, accessible method for the fabrication of micropores with diameters from 2 to 800 μm in films of amorphous Teflon (Teflon AF). Pores with diameters ≤40 μm made it possible to record ion fluxes through ion channels in planar bilayers with excellent signal characteristics. These pores afforded: i), stable measurements at transmembrane voltages up to 460 mV; ii), recordings at low noise levels (0.4 pA rms at 4.3 kHz bandwidth); iii), recordings at high effective bandwidth (10.7 kHz); and iv), formation of multiple planar lipid bilayers in parallel. Microfabricated pores in films of Teflon AF made it possible to examine, experimentally and theoretically, the influence of the pore diameter on the current noise in planar bilayer recordings. Reducing the pore diameter below 40 μm mainly increased the stability of the planar bilayers, but had only a small effect on the level of the current noise. The low-noise properties of bilayer recordings on micropores in Teflon AF films were exploited to record the smallest conductance state of alamethicin (24 pS) at an unprecedentedly high bandwidth of 10.7 kHz. PMID:14507731

  16. A Mutation in Transmembrane Domain 7 (TM7) of Excitatory Amino Acid Transporters Disrupts the Substrate-dependent Gating of the Intrinsic Anion Conductance and Drives the Channel into a Constitutively Open State*

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Salazar, Delany; Jiang, Jie; Divito, Christopher B.; Garcia-Olivares, Jennie; Amara, Susan G.

    2015-01-01

    In the mammalian central nervous system, excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) are responsible for the clearance of glutamate after synaptic release. This energetically demanding activity is crucial for precise neuronal communication and for maintaining extracellular glutamate concentrations below neurotoxic levels. In addition to their ability to recapture glutamate from the extracellular space, EAATs exhibit a sodium- and glutamate-gated anion conductance. Here we show that substitution of a conserved positively charged residue (Arg-388, hEAAT1) in transmembrane domain 7 with a negatively charged amino acid eliminates the ability of glutamate to further activate the anion conductance. When expressed in oocytes, R388D or R388E mutants show large anion currents that display no further increase in amplitude after application of saturating concentrations of Na+ and glutamate. They also show a substantially reduced transport activity. The mutant transporters appear to exist preferentially in a sodium- and glutamate-independent constitutive open channel state that rarely transitions to complete the transport cycle. In addition, the accessibility of cytoplasmic residues to membrane-permeant modifying reagents supports the idea that this substrate-independent open state correlates with an intermediate outward facing conformation of the transporter. Our data provide additional insights into the mechanism by which substrates gate the anion conductance in EAATs and suggest that in EAAT1, Arg-388 is a critical element for the structural coupling between the substrate translocation and the gating mechanisms of the EAAT-associated anion channel. PMID:26203187

  17. From the sequence to the conformation of the unabridged transmembrane domains TM1 and TM2 of the cASIC1a ion channel - a parallel tempering approach.

    PubMed

    Pietra, Francesco

    2015-03-01

    This work was devised to unravel, along replica-exchange molecular-dynamics (REMD) simulations, the conformation in solution of the TM1 and TM2 transmembrane domains of the homotrimeric cASIC1a ion channel. This includes the head of TM1 and tail of TM2 that had previously defied X-ray diffraction analysis in the crystal. The structure of the open-channel complex of cASIC1a with psalmotoxin 1 (PcTx1) was chosen here as a basis, although, to make the simulations affordable, the procedure was limited to the missing portions, including a few adjacent α-helical turns. The latter were held fixed during the simulations. Reassembling the whole subunit, by superimposition of the fixed portions, resulted in diving of both TM1 and TM2 as continuous α-helices into the cytoplasm. At completion of this work, it appeared, from similar X-ray diffraction studies, that TM2 for both the complex of cASIC1a with the coral snake MitTx toxin, and the isolated desensitized ion channel, is discontinuous, with the triad G443-A444-S445 taking an extended, belt-like conformation. In this way, a filter ring against hydrated ions is formed by G443 in the trimer. Our REMD examination of this complex revealed a strong resistance by G443, and only that residue, to take dihedral-angle values compatible with an α-helical conformation. This suggests that the flexibility of glycine alone does not explain formation of the extended, belt-like conformation of the triad G443-A444-S445. This also requires cooperation in the trimer.

  18. A model for the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ion channel: structure of the transmembrane M2 segments as a pentameric assembly in a lipid bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiz, Leonor; Klein, Michael L.

    2003-03-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is the neurotransmitter gated ion channel responsible for the fast propagation of electrical signals between cells at the nerve-muscle synapse and neurons. The current model for the pore region of the nAChR consists of a bundle of five M2 alpha helices, which is supported by recent solution and solid-state NMR spectroscopy experiments on micelle samples and oriented (DMPC) bilayers. In order to investigate the structure and properties of pore forming region of a simple model for the nAChR, we have performed a molecular dynamics simulation study of the homo-pentameric bundle of M2 peptides in a DMPC lipid bilayer at similar conditions to those of the NMR experiments. During the nanosecond time scale investigated, the peptide bundle adopts a left-handed supercoil structure and the calculated average tilt of the helices agrees well with the recent NMR data. The water filled bundle displays a funnel-like structure. We focuss on those aspects of the structure and dynamics relevant to the function of the channel.

  19. pH modulation of transport properties of alamethicin oligomers inserted in zwitterionic-based artificial lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Chiriac, Roxana; Luchian, Tudor

    2007-11-01

    Electric features of biological membranes are major determinants of the function and physiological manifestation of membrane-penetrating peptides, and such features are prone to be modulated by the properties of the surrounding aqueous medium. In this work, we demonstrate that pH plays crucial roles in modulating electric characteristics of zwitterionic-based artificial lipid membranes. The effect of pH on electrical properties of such membranes was probed by evaluating the transport properties of embedded alamethicin oligomers over a wide range of pH values (i.e., 0.65, 2.08, 2.94, 7 and 10.1). Our data strongly support the paradigm of a pH-dependent variation of the surface and membrane dipole potential which, in conjunction with possible lateral pressure effects within the lipid membrane, lead to a non-monotonic modulation of the electrical conductance of alamethicin oligomers. As expected, pH modulation of transport properties through the alamethicin oligomer is more visible for narrower pores (that is, the 1st conductive state) with slightly better cation selectivity as compared to larger oligomers.

  20. Nanomolar-Potency Aminophenyl-1,3,5-triazine Activators of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Chloride Channel for Prosecretory Therapy of Dry Eye Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sujin; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Felix, Christian M; Tan, Joseph-Anthony; Levin, Marc H; Verkman, Alan S

    2017-02-09

    Dry eye disorders are a significant health problem for which limited therapeutic options are available. CFTR is a major prosecretory chloride channel at the ocular surface. We previously identified, by high-throughput screening, aminophenyl-1,3,5-triazine CFTRact-K089 (1) that activated CFTR with EC50 ≈ 250 nM, which when delivered topically increased tear fluid secretion in mice and showed efficacy in an experimental dry eye model. Here, functional analysis of aminophenyl-1,3,5-triazine analogs elucidated structure-activity relationships for CFTR activation and identified substantially more potent analogs than 1. The most potent compound, 12, fully activated CFTR chloride conductance with EC50 ≈ 30 nM, without causing cAMP or calcium elevation. 12 was rapidly metabolized by hepatic microsomes, which supports its topical use. Single topical administration of 25 pmol of 12 increased tear volume in wild-type mice with sustained action for 8 h and was without effect in CFTR-deficient mice. Topically delivered 12 may be efficacious in human dry eye diseases.

  1. Interaction of tetanus toxin with lipid vesicles. Effects of pH, surface charge, and transmembrane potential on the kinetics of channel formation.

    PubMed Central

    Menestrina, G; Forti, S; Gambale, F

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the interaction of tetanus toxin with small unilamellar vesicles composed of different phospholipids as a function of pH, toxin concentration, temperature, and ionic strength of the solution. Tetanus toxin increased the permeability of the vesicles to fluorescent markers of molecular weight up to 700. The time course of the permeabilization was described as the sum of two exponential components of which the faster accounts for more than 70% of the total effect. Both time constants decreased when the pH of the solution was lowered and when vesicles contained negative lipids. These results can be explained in terms of a phenomenological model based on reaction rate theory. The model assumes that tetanus toxin, after equilibrating with the local pH existing at the surface of the vesicles, inserts into the lipid bilayer forming an ionic channel through which solutes can diffuse. Trigger event for the insertion of the toxin is the protonation, and consequent neutralization of one charged group which makes the molecule more hydrophobic. The intrinsic pK of this group was found to be 3.4 +/- 0.2, suggesting that it may be a carboxyl group. Since the toxin equilibrates with the local pH, the enhancing effect of acidic phospholipids is merely explained by the creation of a negative surface potential which increases the local proton concentration. This was confirmed by the inhibitory effect of high Na+ concentration which reduced the surface charge by screening and specific binding. We found still small differences between the lipids tested and the following order of sensitivity to the action of the toxin: phosphatidylinositol greater than phosphatidylserine greater than phosphatidylcholine approximately cholesterol. The activation energy for the two time constants was found to be 19.8 and 14.8 kcal/mol, fast and slow component, respectively, i.e., slightly larger than that for pure diffusion through the bilayer. The permeabilization induced by tetanus toxin

  2. Transmembrane signaling proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Couchman, John R

    2010-01-01

    Virtually all metazoan cells contain at least one and usually several types of transmembrane proteoglycans. These are varied in protein structure and type of polysaccharide, but the total number of vertebrate genes encoding transmembrane proteoglycan core proteins is less than 10. Some core proteins, including those of the syndecans, always possess covalently coupled glycosaminoglycans; others do not. Syndecan has a long evolutionary history, as it is present in invertebrates, but many other transmembrane proteoglycans are vertebrate inventions. The variety of proteins and their glycosaminoglycan chains is matched by diverse functions. However, all assume roles as coreceptors, often working alongside high-affinity growth factor receptors or adhesion receptors such as integrins. Other common themes are an ability to signal through their cytoplasmic domains, often to the actin cytoskeleton, and linkage to PDZ protein networks. Many transmembrane proteoglycans associate on the cell surface with metzincin proteases and can be shed by them. Work with model systems in vivo and in vitro reveals roles in growth, adhesion, migration, and metabolism. Furthermore, a wide range of phenotypes for the core proteins has been obtained in mouse knockout experiments. Here some of the latest developments in the field are examined in hopes of stimulating further interest in this fascinating group of molecules.

  3. Incorporation of β-Silicon-β3-Amino Acids in the Antimicrobial Peptide Alamethicin Provides a 20-Fold Increase in Membrane Permeabilization.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Julie L H; Hjørringgaard, Claudia U; Vad, Brian S; Otzen, Daniel; Skrydstrup, Troels

    2016-06-06

    Incorporation of silicon-containing amino acids in peptides is known to endow the peptide with desirable properties such as improved proteolytic stability and increased lipophilicity. In the presented study, we demonstrate that incorporation of β-silicon-β3-amino acids into the antimicrobial peptide alamethicin provides the peptide with improved membrane permeabilizing properties. A robust synthetic procedure for the construction of β-silicon-β3-amino acids was developed and the amino acid analogues were incorporated into alamethicin at different positions of the hydrophobic face of the amphipathic helix by using SPPS. The incorporation was shown to provide up to 20-fold increase in calcein release as compared with wild-type alamethicin. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Structural measurements on several alamethicin peptides by the time-of-flight correlation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe-Schriemer, N.; Ens, W.; O'Neil, J. D.; Spicer, V.; Standing, K. G.; Westmore, J. B.; Yee, A. A.

    1995-05-01

    Time-of-flight correlation methods have been used to determine the primary structure of the major component in a nonstandard preparation of alamethicins, and to give some sequence information about minor components. The peptide (MW [approximate] 2000 u) is blocked at the N terminus with an acetyl group and has a primary alcohol rather than a carboxyl group at the C terminus, so the usual wet chemical sequencing methods cannot be applied. Upon bombardment with 25 keVI- ions, the peptide, deposited on the surface of a solid target, produces both molecular ions and prompt fragment ions (i.e. ions formed at or very near the surface of the target). After acceleration, these ions may undergo metastable decay as they pass along the flight tube of a reflecting time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Measurement of the correlations between the neutral and charged daughters from these decompositions determines the decay pattern of each ion, which in turn yields definitive information about the sequence of the original peptide. All events are recorded on magnetic tape and analyzed off-line, so a single run on the spectrometer provides information on the decay of every ion produced at the target, i.e. information similar to that obtainable from a complete set of daughter ion scans on a multiple sector or triple quadrupole instrument.

  5. Membrane shape modulates transmembrane protein distribution

    PubMed Central

    Aimon, Sophie; Callan-Jones, Andrew; Berthaud, Alice; Pinot, Mathieu; Toombes, Gilman E. S.; Bassereau, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Summary Although membrane shape varies greatly throughout the cell, the contribution of membrane curvature to transmembrane protein targeting is unknown due to the numerous sorting mechanisms taking place concurrently in cells. To isolate the effect of membrane shape, cellsized Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) containing either the potassium channel, KvAP, or water channel, AQP0, were used to form membrane nanotubes with controlled radii. While the AQP0 concentrations in flat and curved membranes were indistinguishable, KvAP was enriched in the tubes, with greater enrichment in more highly curved membranes. FRAP measurements showed that both proteins could freely diffuse through the neck between the tube and GUV, and the effect of each protein on membrane shape and stiffness was characterized using a thermodynamic sorting model. This study establishes the importance of membrane shape for targeting transmembrane proteins, and provides a method for determining the effective shape and flexibility of membrane proteins. PMID:24480645

  6. Trichoderma viride cellulase induces resistance to the antibiotic pore-forming peptide alamethicin associated with changes in the plasma membrane lipid composition of tobacco BY-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Alamethicin is a membrane-active peptide isolated from the beneficial root-colonising fungus Trichoderma viride. This peptide can insert into membranes to form voltage-dependent pores. We have previously shown that alamethicin efficiently permeabilises the plasma membrane, mitochondria and plastids of cultured plant cells. In the present investigation, tobacco cells (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Bright Yellow-2) were pre-treated with elicitors of defence responses to study whether this would affect permeabilisation. Results Oxygen consumption experiments showed that added cellulase, already upon a limited cell wall digestion, induced a cellular resistance to alamethicin permeabilisation. This effect could not be elicited by xylanase or bacterial elicitors such as flg22 or elf18. The induction of alamethicin resistance was independent of novel protein synthesis. Also, the permeabilisation was unaffected by the membrane-depolarising agent FCCP. As judged by lipid analyses, isolated plasma membranes from cellulase-pretreated tobacco cells contained less negatively charged phospholipids (PS and PI), yet higher ratios of membrane lipid fatty acid to sterol and to protein, as compared to control membranes. Conclusion We suggest that altered membrane lipid composition as induced by cellulase activity may render the cells resistant to alamethicin. This induced resistance could reflect a natural process where the plant cells alter their sensitivity to membrane pore-forming agents secreted by Trichoderma spp. to attack other microorganisms, and thus adding to the beneficial effect that Trichoderma has for plant root growth. Furthermore, our data extends previous reports on artificial membranes on the importance of lipid packing and charge for alamethicin permeabilisation to in vivo conditions. PMID:21156059

  7. Discovery of pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyrazines derivatives as submicromolar affinity activators of wild type, G551D, and F508del cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Noel, Sabrina; Faveau, Christelle; Norez, Caroline; Rogier, Christian; Mettey, Yvette; Becq, Frédéric

    2006-10-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) represents the main Cl(-) channel in the apical membrane of epithelial cells for cAMP-dependent Cl(-) secretion. Here we report on the synthesis and screening of a small library of 6-phenylpyrrolo[2,3-b]pyrazines (named RP derivatives) evaluated as activators of wild-type CFTR, G551D-CFTR, and F508del-CFTR Cl(-) channels. Iodide efflux and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings analysis identified RP107 [7-n-butyl-6-(4-hydroxyphenyl)[5H]-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyrazine] as a submicromolar activator of wild-type (WT)-CFTR [human airway epithelial Calu-3 and WT-CFTR-Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells], G551D-CFTR (G551D-CFTR-CHO cells), and F508del-CFTR (in temperature-corrected human airway epithelial F508del/F508del CF15 cells). The structural analog RP108 [7-n-butyl-6-(4-chlorophenyl)[5H]pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyrazine], contrary to RP107, was a less potent activator only at micromolar concentrations. RP107 and RP108 did not have any effect on the cellular cAMP level. Activation was potentiated by low concentration of forskolin and inhibited by glibenclamide and CFTR(inh)-172 [3-[(3-trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-5-[(4-carboxyphenyl-)methylene]-2-thioxo-4-thiazolidinone]but not by calixarene or DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid). Finally, we found significant stimulation of short circuit current (I(sc)) by RP107 (EC(50) = 89 nM) and RP108 (EC(50) = 103 microM) on colon of Cftr(+)(/)(+) but not of Cftr(-/-) mice mounted in Ussing chamber. Stimulation of I(sc) was inhibited by glibenclamide but not affected by DIDS. These results show that RP107 stimulates wild-type CFTR and mutated CFTR, with submicromolar affinity by a cAMP-independent mechanism. Our preliminary structure-activity relationship study identified 4-hydroxyphenyl and 7-n-butyl as determinants required for activation of CFTR. The potency of these agents indicates that compounds in this class may be of therapeutic benefit in CFTR-related diseases

  8. Channels

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-29

    Two channels are visible in this image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft . The smaller one near the bottom did not carve as deeply as the larger channel at the top. The channel near the top of the image is near the origin of Mamers Valles.

  9. Differences Between Human and Rat Intestinal and Hepatic Bisphenol-A Glucuronidation and the Influence of Alamethicin on In vitro Kinetic Measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    The extent to which membrane disrupting agents, such as alamethicin, may alter cofactor transport and influence in vitro kinetic measurements of glucurondiation is a major concern regarding the characterization and extrapolation of inter-and intra-species pharmacokinetics of bisp...

  10. Differences Between Human and Rat Intestinal and Hepatic Bisphenol-A Glucuronidation and the Influence of Alamethicin on In vitro Kinetic Measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    The extent to which membrane disrupting agents, such as alamethicin, may alter cofactor transport and influence in vitro kinetic measurements of glucurondiation is a major concern regarding the characterization and extrapolation of inter-and intra-species pharmacokinetics of bisp...

  11. Interaction of Alamethicin with Ether-Linked Phospholipid Bilayers: Oriented Circular Dichroism, 31P Solid-State NMR, and Differential Scanning Calorimetry Studies

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Paresh C.; Billington, Emma; Pan, Yeang-Ling; Straus, Suzana K.

    2005-01-01

    The arrangement of the antimicrobial peptide alamethicin was studied by oriented circular dichroism, 31P solid-state NMR, and differential scanning calorimetry in ether-linked phospholipid bilayers composed of 1,2-O-dihexadecyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC). The measurements were performed as a function of alamethicin concentration relative to the lipid concentration, and results were compared to those reported in the literature for ester-linked phospholipid bilayers. At ambient temperature, alamethicin incorporates into the hydrophobic core of DHPC bilayers but results in more lipid disorder than observed for ester-linked 1-palmitoyl, 2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) lipid bilayers. This orientational disorder appears to depend on lipid properties such as bilayer thickness. Moreover, the results suggest that alamethicin inserts into the hydrophobic core of the bilayers (at high peptide concentration) for both ether- and ester-linked lipids but using a different mechanism, namely toroidal for DHPC and barrel-stave for POPC. PMID:16055546

  12. Effects of electric field on alamethicin bound at the lipid-water interface: a molecular mechanics study.

    PubMed Central

    Galaktionov, S G; Marshall, G R

    1993-01-01

    A systematic molecular mechanics study of the alamethicin molecule was made to determine a set of low-energy conformers in vacuo and in aqueous environment. The behavior of these conformers was investigated at the phase boundary which was modeled as a plane dividing two compartments with solvation properties of water and octanol with a constant electric field applied normal to the boundary. The calculations were performed with a molecular mechanics program for calculation of stable conformations at the phase boundary utilizing the Empiric Conformational Energy Program for Peptides force field and the Hopfinger-Scheraga solvation model. 371 minimum energy conformers of alamethicin, determined in vacuo with the build-up procedure, were used as starting conformations for energy minimization in aqueous environment and at the phase boundary. Only 49 interphase-bound structures were within 12 kcal/mol of the minima which was found. No helical structures having values close to the canonical parameters for an alpha- or 3(10)-helix were found despite the presence of eight alpha-methylalanine residues which favor the formation of these helices; four helix-like structures were found, having all negative phi, psi values. All the helical conformers have very high energies in water (approximately 14 kcal/mol), but are quite stable at the phase boundary (3.7-6.8 kcal/mol above the lowest minima found). The implications of these results for proposed mechanisms for membrane-binding and voltage-dependent gating are considered. PMID:8218891

  13. Fractional polymerization of a suspended planar bilayer creates a fluid, highly stable membrane for ion channel recordings.

    PubMed

    Heitz, Benjamin A; Jones, Ian W; Hall, Henry K; Aspinwall, Craig A; Saavedra, S Scott

    2010-05-26

    Suspended planar lipid membranes (or black lipid membranes (BLMs)) are widely used for studying reconstituted ion channels, although they lack the chemical and mechanical stability needed for incorporation into high-throughput biosensors and biochips. Lipid polymerization enhances BLM stability but is incompatible with ion channel function when membrane fluidity is required. Here, we demonstrate the preparation of a highly stable BLM that retains significant fluidity by using a mixture of polymerizable and nonpolymerizable phospholipids. Alamethicin, a voltage-gated peptide channel for which membrane fluidity is required for activity, was reconstituted into mixed BLMs prepared using bis-dienoyl phosphatidylcholine (bis-DenPC) and diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPhPC). Polymerization yielded BLMs that retain the fluidity required for alamethicin activity yet are stable for several days as compared to a few hours prior to polymerization. Thus, these polymerized, binary composition BLMs feature both fluidity and long-term stability.

  14. Alternating access to the transmembrane domain of the ATP-binding cassette protein cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (ABCC7).

    PubMed

    Wang, Wuyang; Linsdell, Paul

    2012-03-23

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein family, most members of which act as active transporters. Actively transporting ABC proteins are thought to alternate between "outwardly facing" and "inwardly facing" conformations of the transmembrane substrate pathway. In CFTR, it is assumed that the outwardly facing conformation corresponds to the channel open state, based on homology with other ABC proteins. We have used patch clamp recording to quantify the rate of access of cysteine-reactive probes to cysteines introduced into two different transmembrane regions of CFTR from both the intracellular and extracellular solutions. Two probes, the large [2-sulfonatoethyl]methanethiosulfonate (MTSES) molecule and permeant Au(CN)(2)(-) ions, were applied to either side of the membrane to modify cysteines substituted for Leu-102 (first transmembrane region) and Thr-338 (sixth transmembrane region). Channel opening and closing were altered by mutations in the nucleotide binding domains of the channel. We find that, for both MTSES and Au(CN)(2)(-), access to these two cysteines from the cytoplasmic side is faster in open channels, whereas access to these same sites from the extracellular side is faster in closed channels. These results are consistent with alternating access to the transmembrane regions, however with the open state facing inwardly and the closed state facing outwardly. Our findings therefore prompt revision of current CFTR structural and mechanistic models, as well as having broader implications for transport mechanisms in all ABC proteins. Our results also suggest possible locations of both functional and dysfunctional ("vestigial") gates within the CFTR permeation pathway.

  15. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR)

    PubMed Central

    Corradi, Valentina; Vergani, Paola; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. CFTR controls the flow of anions through the apical membrane of epithelia. Dysfunctional CFTR causes the common lethal genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Transitions between open and closed states of CFTR are regulated by ATP binding and hydrolysis on the cytosolic nucleotide binding domains, which are coupled with the transmembrane (TM) domains forming the pathway for anion permeation. Lack of structural data hampers a global understanding of CFTR and thus the development of “rational” approaches directly targeting defective CFTR. In this work, we explored possible conformational states of the CFTR gating cycle by means of homology modeling. As templates, we used structures of homologous ABC transporters, namely TM(287–288), ABC-B10, McjD, and Sav1866. In the light of published experimental results, structural analysis of the transmembrane cavity suggests that the TM(287–288)-based CFTR model could correspond to a commonly occupied closed state, whereas the McjD-based model could represent an open state. The models capture the important role played by Phe-337 as a filter/gating residue and provide structural information on the conformational transition from closed to open channel. PMID:26229102

  16. Channels

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-11-20

    Today's VIS image shows a number of unnamed channels located on the northeastern margin of Terra Sabaea. Orbit Number: 61049 Latitude: 33.5036 Longitude: 58.6967 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2015-09-18 12:54 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20097

  17. Electrophysiology investigation of Trichogin GA IV activity in planar lipid membranes reveals ion channels of well-defined size.

    PubMed

    Iftemi, Sorana; De Zotti, Marta; Formaggio, Fernando; Toniolo, Claudio; Stella, Lorenzo; Luchian, Tudor

    2014-07-01

    Trichogin GA IV, an antimicrobial peptaibol, exerts its function by augmenting membrane permeability, but the molecular aspects of its pore-forming mechanism are still debated. Several lines of evidence indicate a 'barrel-stave' channel structure, similar to that of alamethicin, but the length of a trichogin helix is too short to span a normal bilayer. Herein, we present electrophysiology measurements in planar bilayers, showing that trichogin does form channels of a well-defined size (R=4.2⋅10(9)  Ω; corresponding at least to a trimeric aggregate) that span the membrane and allow ion diffusion, but do not exhibit voltage-dependent rectification, unlike those of alamethicin. Copyright © 2014 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  18. Differences between human and rat intestinal and hepatic bisphenol A glucuronidation and the influence of alamethicin on in vitro kinetic measurements.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Christopher S; Kenneke, John F; Hess-Wilson, Janet K; Lipscomb, John C

    2010-12-01

    The extent to which membrane-disrupting agents, such as alamethicin, may alter cofactor transport and influence in vitro kinetic measurements of glucuronidation is a major concern regarding the characterization and extrapolation of inter- and intraspecies pharmacokinetics of bisphenol A (BPA). An additional concern is the omission of a BPA intestinal metabolism component in current pharmacokinetic models used to assess oral exposure. In this study, BPA glucuronidation in native hepatic microsomes from female rat and female human liver displayed higher V(max) values than that in males. In the presence of alamethicin, all hepatic V(max) values increased; however, this increase was disproportionately greater in males and gender differences were no longer observed. Female rats exhibited a much higher K(m) than all other species and genders; the addition of alamethicin had little influence on K(m) values for any of the test systems. The dissimilar K(m) measured for female rat suggests that different UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzyme(s) are involved in BPA glucuronidation. The presence of different UGTs in female rat was confirmed using Hill coefficients measured from diclofenac-mediated chemical inhibition assays within hepatic microsomes and purified human UGT2B7 and UGT2B15. Mixed-gender human intestinal microsomes showed little BPA glucuronidation reactivity compared with those from male rat intestine. Male rat intestinal microsomes in the presence of alamethicin exhibited a V(max) that was nearly 30-fold higher than that for mixed human microsomes. The species and gender metabolic differences we observed between rat and human liver and intestine provide key information for delineating BPA pharmacokinetics needed for human health risk assessment.

  19. Optimization of a UDP-glucuronosyltransferase assay for trout liver S9 fractions: activity enhancement by alamethicin, a pore-forming peptide.

    PubMed

    Ladd, Melanie A; Fitzsimmons, Patrick N; Nichols, John W

    2016-12-01

    1. An existing assay for UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activity in trout liver microsomes was optimized using trout liver S9 fractions. Individual experiments were conducted to determine the time dependence of UGT activity as well as optimal levels of S9 protein, uridine 5'-diphosphoglucuronic acid (UDPGA), substrate (p-nitrophenol) and alamethicin, a pore-forming agent added to eliminate latency. 2. Addition of Mg(2+ )(to 1 mM) or bovine serum albumin (BSA; to 2% w/v) had variable effects on activity, but these effects were minor. Eliminating alamethicin from the system resulted in very low levels of activity. A portion of this activity could be recovered by adding Triton X-100 or Brij 58; however, the optimal concentration range for either detergent was very narrow. 3. When expressed on a pmol/min/g liver basis, UGT activities determined using this updated assay were substantially higher than those reported previously for uninduced trout. 4. These results clearly demonstrate the advantages of using alamethicin for the removal of latency in UGT activity studies with trout and may have broad implications for the study of UGTs in other fish species.

  20. X-ray diffraction study of lipid bilayer membranes interacting with amphiphilic helical peptides: diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine with alamethicin at low concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Y; He, K; Ludtke, S J; Huang, H W

    1995-01-01

    A variety of amphiphilic helical peptides have been shown to exhibit a transition from adsorbing parallel to a membrane surface at low concentrations to inserting perpendicularly into the membrane at high concentrations. Furthermore, this transition has been correlated to the peptides' cytolytic activities. X-ray lamellar diffraction of diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine-alamethicin mixtures revealed the changes of the bilayer structure with alamethicin concentration. In particular, the bilayer thickness decreases with increasing peptide concentration in proportion to the peptide-lipid molar ratio from as low as 1:150 to 1:47; the latter is near the threshold of the critical concentration for insertion. From the decreases of the bilayer thickness, one can calculate the cross sectional expansions of the lipid chains. For all of the peptide concentrations studied, the area expansion of the chain region for each adsorbed peptide is a constant 280 +/- 20 A2, which is approximately the cross sectional area of an adsorbed alamethicin. This implies that the peptide is adsorbed at the interface of the hydrocarbon region, separating the lipid headgroups laterally. Interestingly, the chain disorder caused by a peptide adsorption tends to spread over a large area, as much as 100 A in diameter. The theoretical basis of the long range nature of bilayer deformation is discussed. PMID:7647240

  1. The stability of the three transmembrane and the four transmembrane human vitamin K epoxide reductase models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sangwook

    2016-04-01

    The three transmembrane and the four transmembrane helix models are suggested for human vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR). In this study, we investigate the stability of the human three transmembrane/four transmembrane VKOR models by employing a coarse-grained normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics simulation. Based on the analysis of the mobility of each transmembrane domain, we suggest that the three transmembrane human VKOR model is more stable than the four transmembrane human VKOR model.

  2. Anesthetics Target Interfacial Transmembrane Sites in Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Forman, Stuart A.; Chiara, David C.; Miller, Keith W.

    2014-01-01

    General anesthetics are a heterogeneous group of small amphiphilic ligands that interact weakly at multiple allosteric sites on many pentameric ligand gated ion channels (pLGICs), resulting in either inhibition, potentiation of channel activity, or both. Allosteric principles imply that modulator sites must change configuration and ligand affinity during receptor state transitions. Thus, general anesthetics and related compounds are useful both as state-dependent probes of receptor structure and as potentially selective modulators of pLGIC functions. This review focuses on general anesthetic sites in nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, which were among the first anesthetic-sensitive pLGIC experimental models studied, with particular focus on sites formed by transmembrane domain elements. Structural models place many of these sites at interfaces between two or more pLGIC transmembrane helices both within subunits and between adjacent subunits, and between transmembrane helices and either lipids (the lipid-protein interface) or water (i.e. the ion channel). A single general anesthetic may bind at multiple allosteric sites in pLGICs, producing a net effect of either inhibition (e.g. blocking the ion channel) or enhanced channel gating (e.g. inter-subunit sites). Other general anesthetic sites identified by photolabeling or crystallography are tentatively linked to functional effects, including intra-subunit helix bundle sites and the lipid-protein interface. PMID:25316107

  3. A periodicity analysis of transmembrane helices.

    PubMed

    Leonov, Hadas; Arkin, Isaiah T

    2005-06-01

    Transmembrane helices and the helical bundles which they form are the major building blocks of membrane proteins. Since helices are characterized by a given periodicity, it is possible to search for patterns of traits which typify one side of the helix and not the other (e.g. amphipathic helices contain a polar and apolar sides). Using Fourier transformation we have analyzed solved membrane protein structures as well as sequences of membrane proteins from the Swiss-Prot database. The traits searched included aromaticity, volume and ionization. While a number of motifs were already recognized in the literature, many were not. One particular example involved helix VII of lactose permease which contains seven aromatic residues on six helical turns. Similarly six glycine residues in four consecutive helical turns were identified as forming a motif in the chloride channel. A tabulation of all the findings is presented as well as a possible rationalization of the function of the motif.

  4. ATPase activity of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Ramjeesingh, M; Wang, W; Garami, E; Hewryk, M; Lee, D; Rommens, J M; Galley, K; Bear, C E

    1996-11-08

    The gene mutated in cystic fibrosis codes for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cyclic AMP-activated chloride channel thought to be critical for salt and water transport by epithelial cells. Plausible models exist to describe a role for ATP hydrolysis in CFTR channel activity; however, biochemical evidence that CFTR possesses intrinsic ATPase activity is lacking. In this study, we report the first measurements of the rate of ATP hydrolysis by purified, reconstituted CFTR. The mutation CFTRG551D resides within a motif conserved in many nucleotidases and is known to cause severe human disease. Following reconstitution the mutant protein exhibited both defective ATP hydrolysis and channel gating, providing direct evidence that CFTR utilizes ATP to gate its channel activity.

  5. Yeast Aquaglyceroporins Use the Transmembrane Core to Restrict Glycerol Transport*

    PubMed Central

    Geijer, Cecilia; Ahmadpour, Doryaneh; Palmgren, Madelene; Filipsson, Caroline; Klein, Dagmara Medrala; Tamás, Markus J.; Hohmann, Stefan; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Aquaglyceroporins are transmembrane proteins belonging to the family of aquaporins, which facilitate the passage of specific uncharged solutes across membranes of cells. The yeast aquaglyceroporin Fps1 is important for osmoadaptation by regulating intracellular glycerol levels during changes in external osmolarity. Upon high osmolarity conditions, yeast accumulates glycerol by increased production of the osmolyte and by restricting glycerol efflux through Fps1. The extended cytosolic termini of Fps1 contain short domains that are important for regulating glycerol flux through the channel. Here we show that the transmembrane core of the protein plays an equally important role. The evidence is based on results from an intragenic suppressor mutation screen and domain swapping between the regulated variant of Fps1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the hyperactive Fps1 ortholog from Ashbya gossypii. This suggests a novel mechanism for regulation of glycerol flux in yeast, where the termini alone are not sufficient to restrict Fps1 transport. We propose that glycerol flux through the channel is regulated by interplay between the transmembrane helices and the termini. This mechanism enables yeast cells to fine-tune intracellular glycerol levels at a wide range of extracellular osmolarities. PMID:22593571

  6. A monodisperse transmembrane α-helical peptide barrel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahendran, Kozhinjampara R.; Niitsu, Ai; Kong, Lingbing; Thomson, Andrew R.; Sessions, Richard B.; Woolfson, Derek N.; Bayley, Hagan

    2017-05-01

    The fabrication of monodisperse transmembrane barrels formed from short synthetic peptides has not been demonstrated previously. This is in part because of the complexity of the interactions between peptides and lipids within the hydrophobic environment of a membrane. Here we report the formation of a transmembrane pore through the self-assembly of 35 amino acid α-helical peptides. The design of the peptides is based on the C-terminal D4 domain of the Escherichia coli polysaccharide transporter Wza. By using single-channel current recording, we define discrete assembly intermediates and show that the pore is most probably a helix barrel that contains eight D4 peptides arranged in parallel. We also show that the peptide pore is functional and capable of conducting ions and binding blockers. Such α-helix barrels engineered from peptides could find applications in nanopore technologies such as single-molecule sensing and nucleic-acid sequencing.

  7. Substitution of the transmembrane domain of Vpu in simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV{sub KU1bMC33}) with that of M2 of influenza A results in a virus that is sensitive to inhibitors of the M2 ion channel and is pathogenic for pig-tailed macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Hout, David R.; Gomez, Melissa L.; Pacyniak, Erik; Gomez, Lisa M.; Fegley, Barbara; Mulcahy, Ellyn R.; Hill, M. Sarah; Culley, Nathan; Pinson, David M.; Nothnick, Warren; Powers, Michael F.; Wong, Scott W.; Stephens, Edward B. . E-mail: estephen@kumc.edu

    2006-01-20

    The Vpu protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 has been shown to shunt the CD4 receptor molecule to the proteasome for degradation and to enhance virus release from infected cells. The exact mechanism by which the Vpu protein enhances virus release is currently unknown but some investigators have shown that this function is associated with the transmembrane domain and potential ion channel properties. In this study, we determined if the transmembrane domain of Vpu could be functionally substituted with that of the prototypical viroporin, the M2 protein of influenza A virus. We constructed chimeric vpu gene in which the transmembrane domain of Vpu was replaced with that of the M2 protein of influenza. This chimeric vpu gene was substituted for the vpu gene in the genome of a pathogenic simian human immunodeficiency virus, SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33}. The resulting virus, SHIV{sub M2}, synthesized a Vpu protein that had a slightly different M{sub r} compared to the parental SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33}, reflecting the different sizes of the two Vpu proteins. The SHIV{sub M2} was shown to replicate with slightly reduced kinetics when compared to the parental SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33} but electron microscopy revealed that the site of maturation was similar to the parental virus SHIV{sub KU1bMC33}. We show that the replication and spread of SHIV{sub M2} could be blocked with the antiviral drug rimantadine, which is known to target the M2 ion channel. Our results indicate a dose dependent inhibition of SHIV{sub M2} with 100 {mu}M rimantadine resulting in a >95% decrease in p27 released into the culture medium. Rimantadine did not affect the replication of the parental SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33}. Examination of SHIV{sub M2}-infected cells treated with 50 {mu}M rimantadine revealed numerous viral particles associated with the cell plasma membrane and within intracytoplasmic vesicles, which is similar to HIV-1 mutants lacking a functional vpu. To determine if SHIV{sub M2} was as pathogenic as

  8. Molecular archeological studies of transmembrane transport systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saier, Milton H.; Wang, Bin; Sun, Eric I.; Matias, Madeleine; Yen, Ming Ren

    We here review studies concerned with the evolutionary pathways taken for the appearance of complex transport systems. The transmembrane protein constituents of these systems generally arose by (1) intragenic duplications, (2) gene fusions, and (3) the superimposition of enzymes onto carriers. In a few instances, we have documented examples of “reverse” or “retrograde” evolution where complex carriers have apparently lost parts of their polypeptide chains to give rise to simpler channels. Some functional superfamilies of transporters that are energized by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) or phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) include several independently evolving permease families. The ubiquitous ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily couples transport to ATP hydrolysis where the ATPases are superimposed on at least three distinct, independently evolving families of permeases. The prokaryotic sugar transporting phosphotransferase system (PTS) uses homologous PEP-dependent general energy-coupling phosphoryl transfer enzymes superimposed on at least three independently arising families of permeases to give rise to complex group translocators that modify their sugar substrates during transport, releasing cytoplasmic sugar phosphates. We suggest that simple carriers evolved independently of the energizing enzymes, and that chemical energization of transport resulted from the physical and functional coupling of the enzymes to the carriers.

  9. Atomic Structure of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Chen, Jue

    2016-12-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel evolved from the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family. In this study, we determined the structure of zebrafish CFTR in the absence of ATP by electron cryo-microscopy to 3.7 Å resolution. Human and zebrafish CFTR share 55% sequence identity, and 42 of the 46 cystic-fibrosis-causing missense mutational sites are identical. In CFTR, we observe a large anion conduction pathway lined by numerous positively charged residues. A single gate near the extracellular surface closes the channel. The regulatory domain, dephosphorylated, is located in the intracellular opening between the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs), preventing NBD dimerization and channel opening. The structure also reveals why many cystic-fibrosis-causing mutations would lead to defects either in folding, ion conduction, or gating and suggests new avenues for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. An Autonomously Reciprocating Transmembrane Nanoactuator.

    PubMed

    Watson, Matthew A; Cockroft, Scott L

    2016-01-22

    Biological molecular machines operate far from equilibrium by coupling chemical potential to repeated cycles of dissipative nanomechanical motion. This principle has been exploited in supramolecular systems that exhibit true machine behavior in solution and on surfaces. However, designed membrane-spanning assemblies developed to date have been limited to simple switches or stochastic shuttles, and true machine behavior has remained elusive. Herein, we present a transmembrane nanoactuator that turns over chemical fuel to drive autonomous reciprocating (back-and-forth) nanomechanical motion. Ratcheted reciprocating motion of a DNA/PEG copolymer threaded through a single α-hemolysin pore was induced by a combination of DNA strand displacement processes and enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Ion-current recordings revealed saw-tooth patterns, indicating that the assemblies operated in autonomous, asymmetric cycles of conformational change at rates of up to one cycle per minute. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Meet Me on the Other Side: Trans-Bilayer Modulation of a Model Voltage-Gated Ion Channel Activity by Membrane Electrostatics Asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Mereuta, Loredana; Asandei, Alina; Luchian, Tudor

    2011-01-01

    While it is accepted that biomembrane asymmetry is generated by proteins and phospholipids distribution, little is known about how electric changes manifested in a monolayer influence functional properties of proteins localized on the opposite leaflet. Herein we used single-molecule electrophysiology and investigated how asymmetric changes in the electrostatics of an artificial lipid membrane monolayer, generated oppositely from where alamethicin - a model voltage-gated ion channel - was added, altered peptide activity. We found that phlorizin, a membrane dipole potential lowering amphiphile, augmented alamethicin activity and transport features, whereas the opposite occurred with RH-421, which enhances the monolayer dipole potential. Further, the monolayer surface potential was decreased via adsorption of sodium dodecyl sulfate, and demonstrated that vectorial modification of it also affected the alamethicin activity in a predictive manner. A new paradigm is suggested according to which asymmetric changes in the monolayer dipole and surface potential extend their effects spatially by altering the intramembrane potential, whose gradient is sensed by distantly located peptides. PMID:21980414

  12. Molecular modelling approaches for cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator studies.

    PubMed

    Odolczyk, Norbert; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr

    2014-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most common genetic disorders, caused by loss of function mutations in the gene encoding the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. CFTR is a member of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters superfamily and functions as an ATP-gated anion channel. This review summarises the vast majority of the efforts which utilised molecular modelling approaches to gain insight into the various aspects of CFTR protein, related to its structure, dynamic properties, function and interactions with other protein partners, or drug-like compounds, with emphasis to its relation to CF disease.

  13. Transmembrane Helix Assembly by Max-Min Ant System Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sujaree, Kanon; Kitjaruwankul, Sunan; Boonamnaj, Panisak; Supunyabut, Chirayut; Sompornpisut, Pornthep

    2015-12-01

    Because of the rapid progress in biochemical and structural studies of membrane proteins, considerable attention has been given on developing efficient computational methods for solving low-to-medium resolution structures using sparse structural data. In this study, we demonstrate a novel algorithm, max-min ant system (MMAS), designed to find an assembly of α-helical transmembrane proteins using a rigid helix arrangement guided by distance constraints. The new algorithm generates a large variety with finite number of orientations of transmembrane helix bundle and finds the solution that is matched with the provided distance constraints based on the behavior of ants to search for the shortest possible path between their nest and the food source. To demonstrate the efficiency of the novel search algorithm, MMAS is applied to determine the transmembrane packing of KcsA and MscL ion channels from a limited distance information extracted from the crystal structures, and the packing of KvAP voltage sensor domain using a set of 10 experimentally determined constraints, and the results are compared with those of two popular used stochastic methods, simulated annealing Monte Carlo method and genetic algorithm. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Impact of histidine residues on the transmembrane helices of viroporins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Park, Sang Ho; Tian, Ye; Opella, Stanley J

    2013-11-01

    Abstract The role of histidine in channel-forming transmembrane (TM) helices was investigated by comparing the TM helices from Virus protein 'u' (Vpu) and the M2 proton channel. Both proteins are members of the viroporin family of small membrane proteins that exhibit ion channel activity, and have a single TM helix that is capable of forming oligomers. The TM helices from both proteins have a conserved tryptophan towards the C-terminus. Previously, alanine 18 of Vpu was mutated to histidine in order to artificially introduce the same HXXXW motif that is central to the proton channel activity of M2. Interestingly, the mutated Vpu TM resulted in an increase in helix tilt angle of 11° in lipid bilayers compared to the wild-type Vpu TM. Here, we find the reverse, when histidine 37 of the HXXXW motif in M2 was mutated to alanine, it decreased the helix tilt by 10° from that of wild-type M2. The tilt change is independent of both the helix length and the presence of tryptophan. In addition, compared to wild-type M2, the H37A mutant displayed lowered sensitivity to proton concentration. We also found that the solvent accessibility of histidine-containing M2 is greater than without histidine. This suggests that the TM helix may increase the solvent exposure by changing its tilt angle in order to accommodate a polar/charged residue within the hydrophobic membrane region. The comparative results of M2, Vpu and their mutants demonstrated the significance of histidine in a transmembrane helix and the remarkable plasticity of the function and structure of ion channels stemming from changes at a single amino acid site.

  15. Investigating the structural bases of voltage-gating model channels by using perfectly aligned multilayer samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huey W.

    1988-09-01

    One dimensional quasi crystals of perfect multilayers, in which ion channels are uniformly oriented within parallel membranes, can be used to study the structural base of channel conductivities. We have developed 1) the techniques for preparing such multilayer samples and 2) the spectroscopic methods (circular dichroism and x-ray diffraction) for extracting structural information from these samples. The sample variables include electric field, water content, ion concentrations, etc. We have observed conformation changes of alamethicin with water content, a result in favor of the barrel model (rather than the flip-flop model) for the channel. Our goal is to probe the conformation changes of the channels as we vary the sample variables, in order to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of voltage gating.

  16. Aquaporin-facilitated transmembrane diffusion of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Bienert, Gerd P; Chaumont, François

    2014-05-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is an important signaling compound that has recently been identified as a new substrate for several members of the aquaporin superfamily in various organisms. Evidence is emerging about the physiological significance of aquaporin-facilitated H2O2 diffusion. This review summarizes current knowledge about aquaporin-facilitated H2O2 diffusion across cellular membranes. It focuses on physicochemical and experimental evidence demonstrating the involvement of aquaporins in the transport of this redox signaling compound and discusses the regulation and structural prerequisites of these channels to transmit this signal. It also provides perspectives about the potential importance of aquaporin-facilitated H2O2 diffusion processes and places this knowledge in the context of the current understanding of transmembrane redox signaling processes. Specific aquaporin isoforms facilitate the passive diffusion of H2O2 across biological membranes and control H2O2 membrane permeability and signaling in living organisms. Redox signaling is a very important process regulating the physiology of cells and organisms in a similar way to the well-characterized hormonal and calcium signaling pathways. Efficient transmembrane diffusion of H2O2, a key molecule in the redox signaling network, requires aquaporins and makes these channels important players in this signaling process. Channel-mediated membrane transport allows the fine adjustment of H2O2 levels in the cytoplasm, intracellular organelles, the apoplast, and the extracellular space, which are essential for it to function as a signal molecule. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Aquaporins. © 2013.

  17. Highly Coarse-Grained Representations of Transmembrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Numerous biomolecules and biomolecular complexes, including transmembrane proteins (TMPs), are symmetric or at least have approximate symmetries. Highly coarse-grained models of such biomolecules, aiming at capturing the essential structural and dynamical properties on resolution levels coarser than the residue scale, must preserve the underlying symmetry. However, making these models obey the correct physics is in general not straightforward, especially at the highly coarse-grained resolution where multiple (∼3–30 in the current study) amino acid residues are represented by a single coarse-grained site. In this paper, we propose a simple and fast method of coarse-graining TMPs obeying this condition. The procedure involves partitioning transmembrane domains into contiguous segments of equal length along the primary sequence. For the coarsest (lowest-resolution) mappings, it turns out to be most important to satisfy the symmetry in a coarse-grained model. As the resolution is increased to capture more detail, however, it becomes gradually more important to match modular repeats in the secondary structure (such as helix-loop repeats) instead. A set of eight TMPs of various complexity, functionality, structural topology, and internal symmetry, representing different classes of TMPs (ion channels, transporters, receptors, adhesion, and invasion proteins), has been examined. The present approach can be generalized to other systems possessing exact or approximate symmetry, allowing for reliable and fast creation of multiscale, highly coarse-grained mappings of large biomolecular assemblies. PMID:28043122

  18. Structure of Staphylococcal α-Hemolysin, a Heptameric Transmembrane Pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Langzhou; Hobaugh, Michael R.; Shustak, Christopher; Cheley, Stephen; Bayley, Hagan; Gouaux, J. Eric

    1996-12-01

    The structure of the Staphylococcus aureus α-hemolysin pore has been determined to 1.9 overset{circ}{mathrm A} resolution. Contained within the mushroom-shaped homo-oligomeric heptamer is a solvent-filled channel, 100 overset{circ}{mathrm A} in length, that runs along the sevenfold axis and ranges from 14 overset{circ}{mathrm A} to 46 overset{circ}{mathrm A} in diameter. The lytic, transmembrane domain comprises the lower half of a 14-strand antiparallel β barrel, to which each protomer contributes two β strands, each 65 overset{circ}{mathrm A} long. The interior of the β barrel is primarily hydrophilic, and the exterior has a hydrophobic belt 28 overset{circ}{mathrm A} wide. The structure proves the heptameric subunit stoichiometry of the α-hemolysin oligomer, shows that a glycine-rich and solvent-exposed region of a water-soluble protein can self-assemble to form a transmembrane pore of defined structure, and provides insight into the principles of membrane interaction and transport activity of β barrel pore-forming toxins.

  19. Introduction to sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Peters, Colin H; Ruben, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are present in many tissue types within the human body including both cardiac and neuronal tissues. Like other channels, VGSCs activate, deactivate, and inactivate in response to changes in membrane potential. VGSCs also have a similar structure to other channels: 24 transmembrane segments arranged into four domains that surround a central pore. The structure and electrical activity of these channels allows them to create and respond to electrical signals in the body. Because of their distribution throughout the body, VGSCs are implicated in a variety of diseases including epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmias, and neuropathic pain. As such the study of these channels is essential. This brief review will introduce sodium channel structure, physiology, and pathophysiology.

  20. Assembly of transmembrane proteins on oil-water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunker, Peter; Landry, Corey; Chong, Shaorong; Weitz, David

    2015-03-01

    Transmembrane proteins are difficult to handle by aqueous solution-based biochemical and biophysical approaches, due to the hydrophobicity of transmembrane helices. Detergents can solubilize transmembrane proteins; however, surfactant coated transmembrane proteins are not always functional, and purifying detergent coated proteins in a micellar solution can be difficult. Motivated by this problem, we study the self-assembly of transmembrane proteins on oil-water interfaces. We found that the large water-oil interface of oil drops prevents nascent transmembrane proteins from forming non-functional aggregates. The oil provides a hydrophobic environment for the transmembrane helix, allowing the ectodomain to fold into its natural structure and orientation. Further, modifying the strength or valency of hydrophobic interactions between transmembrane proteins results in the self-assembly of spatially clustered, active proteins on the oil-water interface. Thus, hydrophobic interactions can facilitate, rather than inhibit, the assembly of transmembrane proteins.

  1. Large-Conductance Transmembrane Porin Made from DNA Origami.

    PubMed

    Göpfrich, Kerstin; Li, Chen-Yu; Ricci, Maria; Bhamidimarri, Satya Prathyusha; Yoo, Jejoong; Gyenes, Bertalan; Ohmann, Alexander; Winterhalter, Mathias; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2016-09-27

    DNA nanotechnology allows for the creation of three-dimensional structures at nanometer scale. Here, we use DNA to build the largest synthetic pore in a lipid membrane to date, approaching the dimensions of the nuclear pore complex and increasing the pore-area and the conductance 10-fold compared to previous man-made channels. In our design, 19 cholesterol tags anchor a megadalton funnel-shaped DNA origami porin in a lipid bilayer membrane. Confocal imaging and ionic current recordings reveal spontaneous insertion of the DNA porin into the lipid membrane, creating a transmembrane pore of tens of nanosiemens conductance. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations characterize the conductance mechanism at the atomic level and independently confirm the DNA porins' large ionic conductance.

  2. Large-Conductance Transmembrane Porin Made from DNA Origami

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    DNA nanotechnology allows for the creation of three-dimensional structures at nanometer scale. Here, we use DNA to build the largest synthetic pore in a lipid membrane to date, approaching the dimensions of the nuclear pore complex and increasing the pore-area and the conductance 10-fold compared to previous man-made channels. In our design, 19 cholesterol tags anchor a megadalton funnel-shaped DNA origami porin in a lipid bilayer membrane. Confocal imaging and ionic current recordings reveal spontaneous insertion of the DNA porin into the lipid membrane, creating a transmembrane pore of tens of nanosiemens conductance. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations characterize the conductance mechanism at the atomic level and independently confirm the DNA porins’ large ionic conductance. PMID:27504755

  3. A functional protein pore with a "retro" transmembrane domain.

    PubMed Central

    Cheley, S.; Braha, O.; Lu, X.; Conlan, S.; Bayley, H.

    1999-01-01

    Extended retro (reversed) peptide sequences have not previously been accommodated within functional proteins. Here, we show that the entire transmembrane portion of the beta-barrel of the pore-forming protein alpha-hemolysin can be formed by retrosequences comprising a total of 175 amino acid residues, 25 contributed by the central sequence of each subunit of the heptameric pore. The properties of wild-type and retro heptamers in planar bilayers are similar. The single-channel conductance of the retro pore is 15% less than that of the wild-type heptamer and its current-voltage relationship denotes close to ohmic behavior, while the wild-type pore is weakly rectifying. Both wild-type and retro pores are very weakly anion selective. These results and the examination of molecular models suggest that beta-barrels may be especially accepting of retro sequences compared to other protein folds. Indeed, the ability to form a retro domain could be diagnostic of a beta-barrel, explaining, for example, the activity of the retro forms of many membrane-permeabilizing peptides. By contrast with the wild-type subunits, monomeric retro subunits undergo premature assembly in the absence of membranes, most likely because the altered central sequence fails to interact with the remainder of the subunit, thereby initiating assembly. Despite this difficulty, a technique was devised for obtaining heteromeric pores containing both wild-type and retro subunits. Most probably as a consequence of unfavorable interstrand side-chain interactions, the heteromeric pores are less stable than either the wild-type or retro homoheptamers, as judged by the presence of subconductance states in single-channel recordings. Knowledge about the extraordinary plasticity of the transmembrane beta-barrel of alpha-hemolysin will be very useful in the de novo design of functional membrane proteins based on the beta-barrel motif. PMID:10386875

  4. Detection of single ion channel activity with carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weiwei; Wang, Yung Yu; Lim, Tae-Sun; Pham, Ted; Jain, Dheeraj; Burke, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Many processes in life are based on ion currents and membrane voltages controlled by a sophisticated and diverse family of membrane proteins (ion channels), which are comparable in size to the most advanced nanoelectronic components currently under development. Here we demonstrate an electrical assay of individual ion channel activity by measuring the dynamic opening and closing of the ion channel nanopores using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Two canonical dynamic ion channels (gramicidin A (gA) and alamethicin) and one static biological nanopore (α-hemolysin (α-HL)) were successfully incorporated into supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, an artificial cell membrane), which in turn were interfaced to the carbon nanotubes through a variety of polymer-cushion surface functionalization schemes. The ion channel current directly charges the quantum capacitance of a single nanotube in a network of purified semiconducting nanotubes. This work forms the foundation for a scalable, massively parallel architecture of 1d nanoelectronic devices interrogating electrophysiology at the single ion channel level. PMID:25778101

  5. Detection of single ion channel activity with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weiwei; Wang, Yung Yu; Lim, Tae-Sun; Pham, Ted; Jain, Dheeraj; Burke, Peter J.

    2015-03-01

    Many processes in life are based on ion currents and membrane voltages controlled by a sophisticated and diverse family of membrane proteins (ion channels), which are comparable in size to the most advanced nanoelectronic components currently under development. Here we demonstrate an electrical assay of individual ion channel activity by measuring the dynamic opening and closing of the ion channel nanopores using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Two canonical dynamic ion channels (gramicidin A (gA) and alamethicin) and one static biological nanopore (α-hemolysin (α-HL)) were successfully incorporated into supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, an artificial cell membrane), which in turn were interfaced to the carbon nanotubes through a variety of polymer-cushion surface functionalization schemes. The ion channel current directly charges the quantum capacitance of a single nanotube in a network of purified semiconducting nanotubes. This work forms the foundation for a scalable, massively parallel architecture of 1d nanoelectronic devices interrogating electrophysiology at the single ion channel level.

  6. Transmembrane Segments Form Tertiary Hairpins in the Folding Vestibule of the Ribosome.

    PubMed Central

    Tu, LiWei; Khanna, Pooja; Deutsch, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Folding of membrane proteins begins in the ribosome as the peptide is elongated. During this process, the nascent peptide navigates along 100 Å of tunnel from the peptidyltransferase center to the exit port. Proximal to the exit port is a ‘folding vestibule’ that permits the nascent peptide to compact and explore conformational space for potential tertiary folding partners. The latter occurs for cytosolic subdomains, but has not yet been shown for transmembrane segments. We now demonstrate, using an accessibility assay and an improved, intramolecular crosslinking assay, that the helical transmembrane S3b-S4 hairpin (‘paddle’) of a voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel, a critical region of the Kv voltage sensor, forms in the vestibule. S3-S4 hairpin interactions are detected at an early stage of Kv biogenesis. Moreover, this vestibule hairpin is consistent with a closed-state conformation of the Kv channel in the plasma membrane. PMID:24055377

  7. Transmembrane segments form tertiary hairpins in the folding vestibule of the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Tu, Liwei; Khanna, Pooja; Deutsch, Carol

    2014-01-09

    Folding of membrane proteins begins in the ribosome as the peptide is elongated. During this process, the nascent peptide navigates along 100Å of tunnel from the peptidyltransferase center to the exit port. Proximal to the exit port is a "folding vestibule" that permits the nascent peptide to compact and explore conformational space for potential tertiary folding partners. The latter occurs for cytosolic subdomains but has not yet been shown for transmembrane segments. We now demonstrate, using an accessibility assay and an improved intramolecular crosslinking assay, that the helical transmembrane S3b-S4 hairpin ("paddle") of a voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel, a critical region of the Kv voltage sensor, forms in the vestibule. S3-S4 hairpin interactions are detected at an early stage of Kv biogenesis. Moreover, this vestibule hairpin is consistent with a closed-state conformation of the Kv channel in the plasma membrane.

  8. Transmembrane helices in "classical" nuclear reproductive steroid receptors: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Morrill, Gene A; Kostellow, Adele B; Gupta, Raj K

    2015-01-01

    Steroid receptors of the nuclear receptor superfamily are proposed to be either: 1) located in the cytosol and moved to the cell nucleus upon activation, 2) tethered to the inside of the plasma membrane, or 3) retained in the nucleus until free steroid hormone enters and activates specific receptors. Using computational methods to analyze peptide receptor topology, we find that the "classical" nuclear receptors for progesterone (PRB/PGR), androgen (ARB/AR) and estrogen (ER1/ESR1) contain two transmembrane helices (TMH) within their ligand-binding domains (LBD).The MEMSAT-SVM algorithm indicates that ARB and ER2 (but not PRB or ER1) contain a pore-lining (channel-forming) region which may merge with other pore-lining regions to form a membrane channel. ER2 lacks a TMH, but contains a single pore-lining region. The MemBrain algorithm predicts that PRB, ARB and ER1 each contain one TMH plus a half TMH separated by 51 amino acids.ER2 contains two half helices. The TM-2 helices of ARB, ER1 and ER2 each contain 9-13 amino acid motifs reported to translocate the receptor to the plasma membrane, as well as cysteine palmitoylation sites. PoreWalker analysis of X-ray crystallographic data identifies a pore or channel within the LBDs of ARB and ER1 and predicts that 70 and 72 residues are pore-lining residues, respectively. The data suggest that (except for ER2), cytosolic receptors become anchored to the plasma membrane following synthesis. Half-helices and pore-lining regions in turn form functional ion channels and/or facilitate passive steroid uptake into the cell. In perspective, steroid-dependent insertion of "classical" receptors containing pore-lining regions into the plasma membrane may regulate permeability to ions such as Ca(2+), Na(+) or K(+), as well as facilitate steroid translocation into the nucleus.

  9. TRAMPLE: the transmembrane protein labelling environment.

    PubMed

    Fariselli, Piero; Finelli, Michele; Rossi, Ivan; Amico, Mauro; Zauli, Andrea; Martelli, Pier Luigi; Casadio, Rita

    2005-07-01

    TRAMPLE (http://gpcr.biocomp.unibo.it/biodec/) is a web application server dedicated to the detection and the annotation of transmembrane protein sequences. TRAMPLE includes different state-of-the-art algorithms for the prediction of signal peptides, transmembrane segments (both beta-strands and alpha-helices), secondary structure and fast fold recognition. TRAMPLE also includes a complete content management system to manage the results of the predictions. Each user of the server has his/her own workplace, where the data can be stored, organized, accessed and annotated with documents through a simple web-based interface. In this manner, TRAMPLE significantly improves usability with respect to other more traditional web servers.

  10. Crystallizing Transmembrane Peptides in Lipidic Mesophases

    SciTech Connect

    Höfer, Nicole; Aragão, David; Caffrey, Martin

    2011-09-28

    Structure determination of membrane proteins by crystallographic means has been facilitated by crystallization in lipidic mesophases. It has been suggested, however, that this so-called in meso method, as originally implemented, would not apply to small protein targets having {le}4 transmembrane crossings. In our study, the hypothesis that the inherent flexibility of the mesophase would enable crystallogenesis of small proteins was tested using a transmembrane pentadecapeptide, linear gramicidin, which produced structure-grade crystals. This result suggests that the in meso method should be considered as a viable means for high-resolution structure determination of integral membrane peptides, many of which are predicted to be coded for in the human genome.

  11. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and its stability.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xin; Clews, Jack; Kargas, Vasileios; Wang, Xiaomeng; Ford, Robert C

    2017-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is responsible for the disease cystic fibrosis (CF). It is a membrane protein belonging to the ABC transporter family functioning as a chloride/anion channel in epithelial cells around the body. There are over 1500 mutations that have been characterised as CF-causing; the most common of these, accounting for ~70 % of CF cases, is the deletion of a phenylalanine at position 508. This leads to instability of the nascent protein and the modified structure is recognised and then degraded by the ER quality control mechanism. However, even pharmacologically 'rescued' F508del CFTR displays instability at the cell's surface, losing its channel function rapidly and it is rapidly removed from the plasma membrane for lysosomal degradation. This review will, therefore, explore the link between stability and structure/function relationships of membrane proteins and CFTR in particular and how approaches to study CFTR structure depend on its stability. We will also review the application of a fluorescence labelling method for the assessment of the thermostability and the tertiary structure of CFTR.

  12. Expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in rat ovary.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lei; Tang, Ruiling

    2008-10-01

    The protein expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-activated Cl(-) channel, in ovarian stimulated premature female rat ovary during a cycle of follicle development and corpus luteum formation was investigated. Animals were injected with 10 U pregnant Mare's serum gonadotropin (PMSG) and subsequently 10 U hCG 48 h later. Time-dependent immunohistochemistry and Western blotting experiments were performed before and 24, 48, 72 h after hCG treatment. The immunohistochemistry revealed that administration of PMSG stimulated the CFTR expression in thecal cell layer and granulosa cell layer of mature follicles 48 h post injection, coincident with the PMSG-induced peak in follicular estradiol. However, the expression of CFTR in the granulose lutein cell layer and thecal lutein cell layer was time-dependently reduced following hCG injection, in accordance with the gradually increased progestogen level during luteum corpus formation. Western blotting analysis demonstrated that rat ovarian tissue expressed the special CFTR band at 170 kD. It is concluded that cAMP-dependent Cl(-) channels are involved in regulation of follicle development and luteum formation.

  13. Photometric recording of transmembrane potential in outer hair cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Oghalai, John S.; Saggau, Peter; Rabbitt, Richard D.; Brownell, William E.

    2006-06-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) are polarized epithelial cells that have mechanoelectrical transduction channels within their apical stereocilia and produce electromotile force along their lateral wall. Phase shifts, or time delays, in the transmembrane voltage occurring at different axial locations along the cell may contribute to our understanding of how these cells operate at auditory frequencies. We developed a method to optically measure the phase of the OHC transmembrane potential using the voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) di-8-ANEPPS. The exit aperture of a fibre-optic light source was driven in two dimensions so that a 24 µm spot of excitation light could be positioned along the length of the OHC. We used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique in the current-clamp mode to stimulate the OHC at the base. The photometric response and the voltage response were monitored with a photodetector and patch-clamp amplifier, respectively. The photometric response was used to measure the regional changes in the membrane potential in response to maintained (dc) and sinusoidal (ac) current stimuli applied at the base of the cell. We used a neutral density filter to lower the excitation light intensity and reduce phototoxicity. A sensitive detector and lock-in amplifier were used to measure the small ac VSD signal. This permitted measurements of the ac photometric response below the noise floor of the static fluorescence. The amplitude and phase components of the photometric response were recorded for stimuli up to 800 Hz. VSD data at 400-800 Hz show the presence of a small phase delay between the stimulus voltage at the base of the cell and the local membrane potential measured along the lateral wall. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that OHCs exhibit inhomogeneous membrane potentials that vary with position in analogy with the voltage in nerve axons.

  14. Transmembrane Pores Formed by Human Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Shuo

    2011-01-01

    Human LL-37 is a multifunctional cathelicidin peptide that has shown a wide spectrum of antimicrobial activity by permeabilizing microbial membranes similar to other antimicrobial peptides; however, its molecular mechanism has not been clarified. Two independent experiments revealed LL-37 bound to membranes in the {alpha}-helical form with the axis lying in the plane of membrane. This led to the conclusion that membrane permeabilization by LL-37 is a nonpore carpet-like mechanism of action. Here we report the detection of transmembrane pores induced by LL-37. The pore formation coincided with LL-37 helices aligning approximately normal to the plane of the membrane. We observed an unusual phenomenon of LL-37 embedded in stacked membranes, which are commonly used in peptide orientation studies. The membrane-bound LL-37 was found in the normal orientation only when the membrane spacing in the multilayers exceeded its fully hydrated value. This was achieved by swelling the stacked membranes with excessive water to a swollen state. The transmembrane pores were detected and investigated in swollen states by means of oriented circular dichroism, neutron in-plane scattering, and x-ray lamellar diffraction. The results are consistent with the effect of LL-37 on giant unilamellar vesicles. The detected pores had a water channel of radius 2333 {angstrom}. The molecular mechanism of pore formation by LL-37 is consistent with the two-state model exhibited by magainin and other small pore-forming peptides. The discovery that peptide-membrane interactions in swollen states are different from those in less hydrated states may have implications for other large membrane-active peptides and proteins studied in stacked membranes.

  15. Comprehensive analysis of the numbers, lengths and amino acid compositions of transmembrane helices in prokaryotic, eukaryotic and viral integral membrane proteins of high-resolution structure.

    PubMed

    Saidijam, Massoud; Azizpour, Sonia; Patching, Simon G

    2017-02-15

    We report a comprehensive analysis of the numbers, lengths and amino acid compositions of transmembrane helices in 235 high-resolution structures of integral membrane proteins. The properties of 1551 transmembrane helices in the structures were compared with those obtained by analysis of the same amino acid sequences using topology prediction tools. Explanations for the 81 (5.2%) missing or additional transmembrane helices in the prediction results were identified. Main reasons for missing transmembrane helices were mis-identification of N-terminal signal peptides, breaks in α-helix conformation or charged residues in the middle of transmembrane helices and transmembrane helices with unusual amino acid composition. The main reason for additional transmembrane helices was mis-identification of amphipathic helices, extramembrane helices or hairpin re-entrant loops. Transmembrane helix length had an overall median of 24 residues and an average of 24.9 ± 7.0 residues and the most common length was 23 residues. The overall content of residues in transmembrane helices as a percentage of the full proteins had a median of 56.8% and an average of 55.7 ± 16.0%. Amino acid composition was analysed for the full proteins, transmembrane helices and extramembrane regions. Individual proteins or types of proteins with transmembrane helices containing extremes in contents of individual amino acids or combinations of amino acids with similar physicochemical properties were identified and linked to structure and/or function. In addition to overall median and average values, all results were analysed for proteins originating from different types of organism (prokaryotic, eukaryotic, viral) and for subgroups of receptors, channels, transporters and others.

  16. Helix packing in polytopic membrane proteins: role of glycine in transmembrane helix association.

    PubMed Central

    Javadpour, M M; Eilers, M; Groesbeek, M; Smith, S O

    1999-01-01

    The nature and distribution of amino acids in the helix interfaces of four polytopic membrane proteins (cytochrome c oxidase, bacteriorhodopsin, the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, and the potassium channel of Streptomyces lividans) are studied to address the role of glycine in transmembrane helix packing. In contrast to soluble proteins where glycine is a noted helix breaker, the backbone dihedral angles of glycine in transmembrane helices largely fall in the standard alpha-helical region of a Ramachandran plot. An analysis of helix packing reveals that glycine residues in the transmembrane region of these proteins are predominantly oriented toward helix-helix interfaces and have a high occurrence at helix crossing points. Moreover, packing voids are generally not formed at the position of glycine in folded protein structures. This suggests that transmembrane glycine residues mediate helix-helix interactions in polytopic membrane proteins in a fashion similar to that seen in oligomers of membrane proteins with single membrane-spanning helices. The picture that emerges is one where glycine residues serve as molecular notches for orienting multiple helices in a folded protein complex. PMID:10465772

  17. CERAMIDE-RICH PLATFORMS IN TRANSMEMBRANE SIGNALING

    PubMed Central

    Stancevic, Branka; Kolesnick, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that ceramide regulates stress signaling via reorganization of the plasma membrane. The focus of this review will be to discuss the mechanism by which acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase)-generated ceramide initiates transmembrane signaling in the plasma membrane exoplasmic leaflet. In particular, we review the unique biophysical properties of ceramide that render it proficient in formation of signaling domains termed ceramide-rich platforms (CRPs), and the role of CRPs in the pathophysiology of various diseases. The biomedical significance of CRPs makes these structures an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:20178791

  18. [Efficient extraction of transmembrane proteins using ProteoExtract Transmembrane Protein Extraction Kit].

    PubMed

    Błachnio, Karina

    2010-01-01

    Detergents commonly used for solubilization of membrane proteins may be ionic or non-ionic. Exposing membrane proteins to detergents, however, can adversely affect their native structure, which can be a major hindrance for functional studies. This is especially true for proteins with multiple transmembrane domains. The ProteoExtract Transmembrane Protein Extraction Kit (TM-PEK), offered by Merck, provides a detergent-free novel reagents to enable the mild and efficient extraction of proteins containing seven transmembrane domains, such as GPCRs (G-Protein Coupled Receptors) e.g.: Frizzled-4 and CELSR-3, from mammalian cells. The fraction enriched in transmembrane proteins using TM-PEK is directly compatible with enzyme assays, non-denaturing gel electrophoresis, 1- and 2-D SDS-PAGE, MS analysis, Western blotting, immunoprecipitation and ELISA. Unlike many alternatives, TM-PEK extraction procedure does not require sonication, extended rigorous vortexing, ultracentrifugation, or incubation of samples at elevated temperatures--thus minimizing the risk of post-extraction degradation or modifications.

  19. Interaction between permeation and gating in a putative pore domain mutant in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Z R; McDonough, S I; McCarty, N A

    2000-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel with distinctive kinetics. At the whole-cell level, CFTR currents in response to voltage steps are time independent for wild type and for the many mutants reported so far. Single channels open for periods lasting up to tens of seconds; the openings are interrupted by brief closures at hyperpolarized, but not depolarized, potentials. Here we report a serine-to-phenylalanine mutation (S1118F) in the 11th transmembrane domain that confers voltage-dependent, single-exponential current relaxations and moderate inward rectification of the macroscopic currents upon expression in Xenopus oocytes. At steady state, the S1118F-CFTR single-channel conductance rectifies, corresponding to the whole-cell rectification. In addition, the open-channel burst duration is decreased 10-fold compared with wild-type channels. S1118F-CFTR currents are blocked in a voltage-dependent manner by diphenylamine-2-carboxylate (DPC); the affinity of S1118F-CFTR for DPC is similar to that of the wild-type channel, but blockade exhibits moderately reduced voltage dependence. Selectivity of the channel to a range of anions is also affected by this mutation. Furthermore, the permeation properties change during the relaxations, which suggests that there is an interaction between gating and permeation in this mutant. The existence of a mutation that confers voltage dependence upon CFTR currents and that changes kinetics and permeation properties of the channel suggests a functional role for the 11th transmembrane domain in the pore in the wild-type channel. PMID:10866956

  20. Expression of genes encoding multi-transmembrane proteins in specific primate taste cell populations.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Bryan D; Hevezi, Peter; Gao, Na; Lu, Min; Kalabat, Dalia; Soto, Hortensia; Echeverri, Fernando; Laita, Bianca; Yeh, Shaoyang Anthony; Zoller, Mark; Zlotnik, Albert

    2009-12-04

    Using fungiform (FG) and circumvallate (CV) taste buds isolated by laser capture microdissection and analyzed using gene arrays, we previously constructed a comprehensive database of gene expression in primates, which revealed over 2,300 taste bud-associated genes. Bioinformatics analyses identified hundreds of genes predicted to encode multi-transmembrane domain proteins with no previous association with taste function. A first step in elucidating the roles these gene products play in gustation is to identify the specific taste cell types in which they are expressed. Using double label in situ hybridization analyses, we identified seven new genes expressed in specific taste cell types, including sweet, bitter, and umami cells (TRPM5-positive), sour cells (PKD2L1-positive), as well as other taste cell populations. Transmembrane protein 44 (TMEM44), a protein with seven predicted transmembrane domains with no homology to GPCRs, is expressed in a TRPM5-negative and PKD2L1-negative population that is enriched in the bottom portion of taste buds and may represent developmentally immature taste cells. Calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1), a component of a novel calcium channel, along with family members CALHM2 and CALHM3; multiple C2 domains; transmembrane 1 (MCTP1), a calcium-binding transmembrane protein; and anoctamin 7 (ANO7), a member of the recently identified calcium-gated chloride channel family, are all expressed in TRPM5 cells. These proteins may modulate and effect calcium signalling stemming from sweet, bitter, and umami receptor activation. Synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2B (SV2B), a regulator of synaptic vesicle exocytosis, is expressed in PKD2L1 cells, suggesting that this taste cell population transmits tastant information to gustatory afferent nerve fibers via exocytic neurotransmitter release. Identification of genes encoding multi-transmembrane domain proteins expressed in primate taste buds provides new insights into the processes of taste cell

  1. Expression of Genes Encoding Multi-Transmembrane Proteins in Specific Primate Taste Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Na; Lu, Min; Kalabat, Dalia; Soto, Hortensia; Echeverri, Fernando; Laita, Bianca; Yeh, Shaoyang Anthony; Zoller, Mark; Zlotnik, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Background Using fungiform (FG) and circumvallate (CV) taste buds isolated by laser capture microdissection and analyzed using gene arrays, we previously constructed a comprehensive database of gene expression in primates, which revealed over 2,300 taste bud-associated genes. Bioinformatics analyses identified hundreds of genes predicted to encode multi-transmembrane domain proteins with no previous association with taste function. A first step in elucidating the roles these gene products play in gustation is to identify the specific taste cell types in which they are expressed. Methodology/Principal Findings Using double label in situ hybridization analyses, we identified seven new genes expressed in specific taste cell types, including sweet, bitter, and umami cells (TRPM5-positive), sour cells (PKD2L1-positive), as well as other taste cell populations. Transmembrane protein 44 (TMEM44), a protein with seven predicted transmembrane domains with no homology to GPCRs, is expressed in a TRPM5-negative and PKD2L1-negative population that is enriched in the bottom portion of taste buds and may represent developmentally immature taste cells. Calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1), a component of a novel calcium channel, along with family members CALHM2 and CALHM3; multiple C2 domains; transmembrane 1 (MCTP1), a calcium-binding transmembrane protein; and anoctamin 7 (ANO7), a member of the recently identified calcium-gated chloride channel family, are all expressed in TRPM5 cells. These proteins may modulate and effect calcium signalling stemming from sweet, bitter, and umami receptor activation. Synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2B (SV2B), a regulator of synaptic vesicle exocytosis, is expressed in PKD2L1 cells, suggesting that this taste cell population transmits tastant information to gustatory afferent nerve fibers via exocytic neurotransmitter release. Conclusions/Significance Identification of genes encoding multi-transmembrane domain proteins expressed in primate

  2. TSTMP: target selection for structural genomics of human transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Varga, Julia; Dobson, László; Reményi, István; Tusnády, Gábor E

    2017-01-04

    The TSTMP database is designed to help the target selection of human transmembrane proteins for structural genomics projects and structure modeling studies. Currently, there are only 60 known 3D structures among the polytopic human transmembrane proteins and about a further 600 could be modeled using existing structures. Although there are a great number of human transmembrane protein structures left to be determined, surprisingly only a small fraction of these proteins have 'selected' (or above) status according to the current version the TargetDB/TargetTrack database. This figure is even worse regarding those transmembrane proteins that would contribute the most to the structural coverage of the human transmembrane proteome. The database was built by sorting out proteins from the human transmembrane proteome with known structure and searching for suitable model structures for the remaining proteins by combining the results of a state-of-the-art transmembrane specific fold recognition algorithm and a sequence similarity search algorithm. Proteins were searched for homologues among the human transmembrane proteins in order to select targets whose successful structure determination would lead to the best structural coverage of the human transmembrane proteome. The pipeline constructed for creating the TSTMP database guarantees to keep the database up-to-date. The database is available at http://tstmp.enzim.ttk.mta.hu. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. TSTMP: target selection for structural genomics of human transmembrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Julia; Dobson, László; Reményi, István; Tusnády, Gábor E.

    2017-01-01

    The TSTMP database is designed to help the target selection of human transmembrane proteins for structural genomics projects and structure modeling studies. Currently, there are only 60 known 3D structures among the polytopic human transmembrane proteins and about a further 600 could be modeled using existing structures. Although there are a great number of human transmembrane protein structures left to be determined, surprisingly only a small fraction of these proteins have ‘selected’ (or above) status according to the current version the TargetDB/TargetTrack database. This figure is even worse regarding those transmembrane proteins that would contribute the most to the structural coverage of the human transmembrane proteome. The database was built by sorting out proteins from the human transmembrane proteome with known structure and searching for suitable model structures for the remaining proteins by combining the results of a state-of-the-art transmembrane specific fold recognition algorithm and a sequence similarity search algorithm. Proteins were searched for homologues among the human transmembrane proteins in order to select targets whose successful structure determination would lead to the best structural coverage of the human transmembrane proteome. The pipeline constructed for creating the TSTMP database guarantees to keep the database up-to-date. The database is available at http://tstmp.enzim.ttk.mta.hu. PMID:27924015

  4. Anchors aweigh: protein localization and transport mediated by transmembrane domains.

    PubMed

    Cosson, Pierre; Perrin, Jackie; Bonifacino, Juan S

    2013-10-01

    The transmembrane domains (TMDs) of integral membrane proteins have emerged as major determinants of intracellular localization and transport in the secretory and endocytic pathways. Unlike sorting signals in cytosolic domains, TMD sorting determinants are not conserved amino acid sequences but physical properties such as the length and hydrophilicity of the transmembrane span. The underlying sorting machinery is still poorly characterized, but several mechanisms have been proposed, including TMD recognition by transmembrane sorting receptors and partitioning into membrane lipid domains. Here we review the nature of TMD sorting determinants and how they may dictate transmembrane protein localization and transport.

  5. Anchors Aweigh: Protein Traffic Mediated by Transmembrane Domains

    PubMed Central

    Cosson, Pierre; Perrin, Jackie; Bonifacino, Juan S.

    2013-01-01

    The transmembrane domains (TMDs) of integral membrane proteins have emerged as major determinants of intracellular localization and transport in the secretory and endocytic pathways. Unlike sorting signals in the cytosolic domains, TMD sorting determinants are not conserved amino-acid sequences but physical properties such as length and hydrophilicity of the transmembrane span. The underlying sorting machinery is still poorly characterized but several mechanisms have been proposed, including TMD recognition by transmembrane sorting receptors and partitioning into membrane lipid domains. Here we review the nature of TMD sorting determinants and how they may dictate transmembrane protein localization and transport. PMID:23806646

  6. Bacterial sodium channels: models for eukaryotic sodium and calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Scheuer, Todd

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic sodium and calcium channels are made up of four linked homologous but different transmembrane domains. Bacteria express sodium channels comprised of four identical subunits, each being analogous to a single homologous domain of their eukaryotic counterparts. Key elements of primary structure are conserved between bacterial and eukaryotic sodium and calcium channels. The simple protein structure of the bacterial channels has allowed extensive structure-function probes of key regions as well as allowing determination of several X-ray crystallographic structures of these channels. The structures have revealed novel features of sodium and calcium channel pores and elucidated the structural importance of many of the conserved features of primary sequence. The structural information has also formed the basis for computational studies probing the basis for sodium and calcium selectivity and gating.

  7. Transmembrane voltage potential controls embryonic eye patterning in Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Vaibhav P.; Aw, Sherry; Shomrat, Tal; Lemire, Joan M.; Levin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Uncovering the molecular mechanisms of eye development is crucial for understanding the embryonic morphogenesis of complex structures, as well as for the establishment of novel biomedical approaches to address birth defects and injuries of the visual system. Here, we characterize change in transmembrane voltage potential (Vmem) as a novel biophysical signal for eye induction in Xenopus laevis. During normal embryogenesis, a striking hyperpolarization demarcates a specific cluster of cells in the anterior neural field. Depolarizing the dorsal lineages in which these cells reside results in malformed eyes. Manipulating Vmem of non-eye cells induces well-formed ectopic eyes that are morphologically and histologically similar to endogenous eyes. Remarkably, such ectopic eyes can be induced far outside the anterior neural field. A Ca2+ channel-dependent pathway transduces the Vmem signal and regulates patterning of eye field transcription factors. These data reveal a new, instructive role for membrane voltage during embryogenesis and demonstrate that Vmem is a crucial upstream signal in eye development. Learning to control bioelectric initiators of organogenesis offers significant insight into birth defects that affect the eye and might have significant implications for regenerative approaches to ocular diseases. PMID:22159581

  8. Evolution of a transcriptional regulator from a transmembrane nucleoporin

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Tobias M.; Benner, Chris; Narvaiza, Iñigo; Marchetto, Maria C.N.; Young, Janet M.; Malik, Harmit S.; Gage, Fred H.; Hetzer, Martin W.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) emerged as nuclear transport channels in eukaryotic cells ∼1.5 billion years ago. While the primary role of NPCs is to regulate nucleo–cytoplasmic transport, recent research suggests that certain NPC proteins have additionally acquired the role of affecting gene expression at the nuclear periphery and in the nucleoplasm in metazoans. Here we identify a widely expressed variant of the transmembrane nucleoporin (Nup) Pom121 (named sPom121, for “soluble Pom121”) that arose by genomic rearrangement before the divergence of hominoids. sPom121 lacks the nuclear membrane-anchoring domain and thus does not localize to the NPC. Instead, sPom121 colocalizes and interacts with nucleoplasmic Nup98, a previously identified transcriptional regulator, at gene promoters to control transcription of its target genes in human cells. Interestingly, sPom121 transcripts appear independently in several mammalian species, suggesting convergent innovation of Nup-mediated transcription regulation during mammalian evolution. Our findings implicate alternate transcription initiation as a mechanism to increase the functional diversity of NPC components. PMID:27198230

  9. Orphan Missense Mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator

    PubMed Central

    Fresquet, Fleur; Clement, Romain; Norez, Caroline; Sterlin, Adélaïde; Melin, Patricia; Becq, Frédéric; Kitzis, Alain; Thoreau, Vincent; Bilan, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    More than 1860 mutations have been found within the human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene sequence. These mutations can be classified according to their degree of severity in CF disease. Although the most common mutations are well characterized, few data are available for rare mutations. Thus, genetic counseling is particularly difficult when fetuses or patients with CF present these orphan variations. We describe a three-step in vitro assay that can evaluate rare missense CFTR mutation consequences to establish a correlation between genotype and phenotype. By using a green fluorescent protein–tagged CFTR construct, we expressed mutated proteins in COS-7 cells. CFTR trafficking was visualized by confocal microscopy, and the cellular localization of CFTR was determined using intracellular markers. We studied the CFTR maturation process using Western blot analysis and evaluated CFTR channel activity by automated iodide efflux assays. Of six rare mutations that we studied, five have been isolated in our laboratory. The cellular and functional impact that we observed in each case was compared with the clinical data concerning the patients in whom we encountered these mutations. In conclusion, we propose that performing this type of analysis for orphan CFTR missense mutations can improve CF genetic counseling. PMID:21708286

  10. Evolution of a transcriptional regulator from a transmembrane nucleoporin.

    PubMed

    Franks, Tobias M; Benner, Chris; Narvaiza, Iñigo; Marchetto, Maria C N; Young, Janet M; Malik, Harmit S; Gage, Fred H; Hetzer, Martin W

    2016-05-15

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) emerged as nuclear transport channels in eukaryotic cells ∼1.5 billion years ago. While the primary role of NPCs is to regulate nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, recent research suggests that certain NPC proteins have additionally acquired the role of affecting gene expression at the nuclear periphery and in the nucleoplasm in metazoans. Here we identify a widely expressed variant of the transmembrane nucleoporin (Nup) Pom121 (named sPom121, for "soluble Pom121") that arose by genomic rearrangement before the divergence of hominoids. sPom121 lacks the nuclear membrane-anchoring domain and thus does not localize to the NPC. Instead, sPom121 colocalizes and interacts with nucleoplasmic Nup98, a previously identified transcriptional regulator, at gene promoters to control transcription of its target genes in human cells. Interestingly, sPom121 transcripts appear independently in several mammalian species, suggesting convergent innovation of Nup-mediated transcription regulation during mammalian evolution. Our findings implicate alternate transcription initiation as a mechanism to increase the functional diversity of NPC components.

  11. Researches toward potassium channels on tumor progressions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zheng; Yang, Qian; You, Qidong

    2009-01-01

    As trans-membrane proteins located in cytoplasm and organelle membrane, potassium (K(+)) channels are generally divided into four super-families: voltage-gated K(+) channels (K(v)), Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (K(Ca)), inwardly rectifying K(+) channels (K(ir)) and two-pore domain K(+) channels (K(2P)). Since dysfunctions of K(+) channels would induce many diseases, various studies toward their functions in physiologic and pathologic process have been extensively launched. This review focuses on the recent advances of K(+) channels in tumor progression, including the brief introduction of K(+) channels, the role of K(+) channels in tumor cells, the possible mechanism of action at cellular level, and the possible application of K(+) channel modulators in cancer chemotherapy.

  12. [Effect of acupuncture on transmembrane signal pathway in AD mice: an analysis based on lipid-raft proteomics].

    PubMed

    Nie, Kun; Zhang, Xue-Zhu; Zhao, Lan; Jia, Yu-Jie; Han, Jing-Xian

    2014-08-01

    To reveal the transmembrane signal pathway participating in regulating neuron functions of treating Alzheimer's disease (AD) by acupuncture. SAMP8 mice was used for AD animal model. The effect of acupuncture method for qi benefiting, blood regulating, health supporting, and root strengthening on the amount and varieties of transmembrane signal proteins from hippocampal lipid rafts in SAMP8 mice was detected using HPLC MS/MS proteomics method. Compared with the control group, acupuncture increased 39 transmembrane signal proteins from hippocampal lipid rafts in SAMP8 mice, of them, 14 belonged to ionophorous protein, 8 to G protein, 8 to transmembrane signal receptor, and 9 to kinase protein. Totally 3 main cell signal pathways were involved, including G-protein-coupled receptors signal, enzyme linked receptor signal, and ion-channel mediated signal. Compared with the sham-acupuncture group, acupuncture resulted in significant increase of kinase signal protein amount. From the aspect of functions, they were dominant in regulating synapse functions relevant to cytoskeleton and secreting neurotransmitters. The cell biological mechanism for treating AD by acupuncture might be achieved by improving synapse functions and promoting the secretion of neurotransmitters through transmembrane signal transduction, thus improving cognitive function of AD patients.

  13. A functional R domain from cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator is predominantly unstructured in solution.

    PubMed

    Ostedgaard, L S; Baldursson, O; Vermeer, D W; Welsh, M J; Robertson, A D

    2000-05-09

    Phosphorylation of the regulatory (R) domain initiates cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel activity. To discover how the function of this domain is determined by its structure, we produced an R domain protein (R8) that spanned residues 708-831 of CFTR. Phosphorylated, but not unphosphorylated, R8 stimulated activity of CFTR channels lacking this domain, indicating that R8 is functional. Unexpectedly, this functional R8 was predominantly random coil, as revealed by CD and limited proteolysis. The CD spectra of both phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated R8 were similar in aqueous buffer. The folding agent trimethylamine N-oxide induced only a small increase in the helical content of nonphosphorylated R8 and even less change in the helical content of phosphorylated R8. These data, indicating that the R domain is predominantly random coil, may explain the seemingly complex way in which phosphorylation regulates CFTR channel activity.

  14. Structural Requirements in the Transmembrane Domain of GLIC Revealed by Incorporation of Noncanonical Histidine Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Rienzo, Matthew; Lummis, Sarah C.R.; Dougherty, Dennis A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The cyanobacterial pentameric ligand-gated ion channel GLIC, a homolog of the Cys-loop receptor superfamily, has provided useful structural and functional information about its eukaryotic counterparts. X-ray diffraction data and site-directed mutagenesis have previously implicated a transmembrane histi-dine residue (His234) as essential for channel function. Here, we investigated the role of His234 via synthesis and incorporation of histidine analogs and α-hydroxy acids using in vivo nonsense suppression. Receptors were expressed heterologously in Xenopus laevis oocytes, and whole-cell voltage-clamp electrophysiology was used to monitor channel activity. We show that an interhelix hydrogen bond involving His234 is important for stabilization of the open state, and that the shape and basicity of its side chain are highly sensitive to perturbations. In contrast, our data show that two other His residues are not involved in the acid-sensing mechanism. PMID:25525989

  15. Transmembrane protein sorting driven by membrane curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strahl, H.; Ronneau, S.; González, B. Solana; Klutsch, D.; Schaffner-Barbero, C.; Hamoen, L. W.

    2015-11-01

    The intricate structure of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells depends on the ability to target proteins to specific cellular locations. In most cases, we have a poor understanding of the underlying mechanisms. A typical example is the assembly of bacterial chemoreceptors at cell poles. Here we show that the classical chemoreceptor TlpA of Bacillus subtilis does not localize according to the consensus stochastic nucleation mechanism but accumulates at strongly curved membrane areas generated during cell division. This preference was confirmed by accumulation at non-septal curved membranes. Localization appears to be an intrinsic property of the protein complex and does not rely on chemoreceptor clustering, as was previously shown for Escherichia coli. By constructing specific amino-acid substitutions, we demonstrate that the preference for strongly curved membranes arises from the curved shape of chemoreceptor trimer of dimers. These findings demonstrate that the intrinsic shape of transmembrane proteins can determine their cellular localization.

  16. Transmembrane protein sorting driven by membrane curvature.

    PubMed

    Strahl, H; Ronneau, S; González, B Solana; Klutsch, D; Schaffner-Barbero, C; Hamoen, L W

    2015-11-02

    The intricate structure of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells depends on the ability to target proteins to specific cellular locations. In most cases, we have a poor understanding of the underlying mechanisms. A typical example is the assembly of bacterial chemoreceptors at cell poles. Here we show that the classical chemoreceptor TlpA of Bacillus subtilis does not localize according to the consensus stochastic nucleation mechanism but accumulates at strongly curved membrane areas generated during cell division. This preference was confirmed by accumulation at non-septal curved membranes. Localization appears to be an intrinsic property of the protein complex and does not rely on chemoreceptor clustering, as was previously shown for Escherichia coli. By constructing specific amino-acid substitutions, we demonstrate that the preference for strongly curved membranes arises from the curved shape of chemoreceptor trimer of dimers. These findings demonstrate that the intrinsic shape of transmembrane proteins can determine their cellular localization.

  17. Enteropeptidase, a type II transmembrane serine protease.

    PubMed

    Zheng, X Long; Kitamoto, Yasunori; Sadler, J Evan

    2009-06-01

    Enteropeptidase, a type II transmembrane serine protease, is localized to the brush border of the duodenal and jejunal mucosa. It is synthesized as a zymogen (proenteropeptidase) that requires activation by another protease, either trypsin or possibly duodenase. Active enteropeptidase then converts the pancreatic precursor, trypsinogen, to trypsin by cleavage of the specific trypsinogen activation peptide, Asp-Asp-Asp-Asp-Lys- Ile that is highly conserved in vertebrates. Trypsin, in turn, activates other digestive zymogens such as chymotrypsinogen, proelastase, procarboxypeptidase and prolipase in the lumen of the gut. The important biological function of enteropeptidase is highlighted by the manifestation of severe diarrhea, failure to thrive, hypoproteinemia and edema as a result of congenital deficiency of enteropeptidase activity in the gut. Conversely, duodenopancreatic reflux of proteolytically active enteropeptidase may cause acute and chronic pancreatitis.

  18. Molecular mechanisms for generating transmembrane proton gradients.

    PubMed

    Gunner, M R; Amin, Muhamed; Zhu, Xuyu; Lu, Jianxun

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins use the energy of light or high energy substrates to build a transmembrane proton gradient through a series of reactions leading to proton release into the lower pH compartment (P-side) and proton uptake from the higher pH compartment (N-side). This review considers how the proton affinity of the substrates, cofactors and amino acids are modified in four proteins to drive proton transfers. Bacterial reaction centers (RCs) and photosystem II (PSII) carry out redox chemistry with the species to be oxidized on the P-side while reduction occurs on the N-side of the membrane. Terminal redox cofactors are used which have pKas that are strongly dependent on their redox state, so that protons are lost on oxidation and gained on reduction. Bacteriorhodopsin is a true proton pump. Light activation triggers trans to cis isomerization of a bound retinal. Strong electrostatic interactions within clusters of amino acids are modified by the conformational changes initiated by retinal motion leading to changes in proton affinity, driving transmembrane proton transfer. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) catalyzes the reduction of O2 to water. The protons needed for chemistry are bound from the N-side. The reduction chemistry also drives proton pumping from N- to P-side. Overall, in CcO the uptake of 4 electrons to reduce O2 transports 8 charges across the membrane, with each reduction fully coupled to removal of two protons from the N-side, the delivery of one for chemistry and transport of the other to the P-side.

  19. Molecular mechanisms for generating transmembrane proton gradients

    PubMed Central

    Gunner, M.R.; Amin, Muhamed; Zhu, Xuyu; Lu, Jianxun

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins use the energy of light or high energy substrates to build a transmembrane proton gradient through a series of reactions leading to proton release into the lower pH compartment (P-side) and proton uptake from the higher pH compartment (N-side). This review considers how the proton affinity of the substrates, cofactors and amino acids are modified in four proteins to drive proton transfers. Bacterial reaction centers (RCs) and photosystem II (PSII) carry out redox chemistry with the species to be oxidized on the P-side while reduction occurs on the N-side of the membrane. Terminal redox cofactors are used which have pKas that are strongly dependent on their redox state, so that protons are lost on oxidation and gained on reduction. Bacteriorhodopsin is a true proton pump. Light activation triggers trans to cis isomerization of a bound retinal. Strong electrostatic interactions within clusters of amino acids are modified by the conformational changes initiated by retinal motion leading to changes in proton affinity, driving transmembrane proton transfer. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) catalyzes the reduction of O2 to water. The protons needed for chemistry are bound from the N-side. The reduction chemistry also drives proton pumping from N- to P-side. Overall, in CcO the uptake of 4 electrons to reduce O2 transports 8 charges across the membrane, with each reduction fully coupled to removal of two protons from the N-side, the delivery of one for chemistry and transport of the other to the P-side. PMID:23507617

  20. Coordinated Movement of Cytoplasmic and Transmembrane Domains of RyR1 upon Gating

    PubMed Central

    Samsó, Montserrat; Feng, Wei; Pessah, Isaac N; Allen, P. D

    2009-01-01

    Ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1) produces spatially and temporally defined Ca2+ signals in several cell types. How signals received in the cytoplasmic domain are transmitted to the ion gate and how the channel gates are unknown. We used EGTA or neuroactive PCB 95 to stabilize the full closed or open states of RyR1. Single-channel measurements in the presence of FKBP12 indicate that PCB 95 inverts the thermodynamic stability of RyR1 and locks it in a long-lived open state whose unitary current is indistinguishable from the native open state. We analyzed two datasets of 15,625 and 18,527 frozen-hydrated RyR1-FKBP12 particles in the closed and open conformations, respectively, by cryo-electron microscopy. Their corresponding three-dimensional structures at 10.2 Å resolution refine the structure surrounding the ion pathway previously identified in the closed conformation: two right-handed bundles emerging from the putative ion gate (the cytoplasmic “inner branches” and the transmembrane “inner helices”). Furthermore, six of the identifiable transmembrane segments of RyR1 have similar organization to those of the mammalian Kv1.2 potassium channel. Upon gating, the distal cytoplasmic domains move towards the transmembrane domain while the central cytoplasmic domains move away from it, and also away from the 4-fold axis. Along the ion pathway, precise relocation of the inner helices and inner branches results in an approximately 4 Å diameter increase of the ion gate. Whereas the inner helices of the K+ channels and of the RyR1 channel cross-correlate best with their corresponding open/closed states, the cytoplasmic inner branches, which are not observed in the K+ channels, appear to have at least as important a role as the inner helices for RyR1 gating. We propose a theoretical model whereby the inner helices, the inner branches, and the h1 densities together create an efficient novel gating mechanism for channel opening by relaxing two right-handed bundle

  1. New roles for old holes: ion channel function in aquaporin-1.

    PubMed

    Yool, Andrea J; Weinstein, Alan M

    2002-04-01

    Mammalian aquaporins are part of the diverse major intrinsic protein family of water and solute channels. Intriguing links exist in structural and functional properties between aquaporins and ion channels. A novel role for aquaporin-1 as a gated ion channel reshapes our current views of this ancient family of transmembrane channel proteins.

  2. Functional architecture of the CFTR chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of membrane transport proteins. CFTR is unique among ABC proteins in that it functions not as an active transporter but as an ATP-gated Cl(-) channel. As an ion channel, the function of the CFTR transmembrane channel pore that mediates Cl(-) movement has been studied in great detail. On the other hand, only low resolution structural data is available on the transmembrane parts of the protein. The structure of the channel pore has, however, been modeled on the known structure of active transporter ABC proteins. Currently, significant barriers exist to building a unified view of CFTR pore structure and function. Reconciling functional data on the channel with indirect structural data based on other proteins with very different transport functions and substrates has proven problematic. This review summarizes current structural and functional models of the CFTR Cl(-) channel pore, including a comprehensive review of previous electrophysiological investigations of channel structure and function. In addition, functional data on the three-dimensional arrangement of pore-lining helices, as well as contemporary hypotheses concerning conformational changes in the pore that occur during channel opening and closing, are discussed. Important similarities and differences between different models of the pore highlight current gaps in our knowledge of CFTR structure and function. In order to fill these gaps, structural and functional models of the membrane-spanning pore need to become better integrated.

  3. Dynamic behaviors and transport properties of ethanol molecules in transmembrane cyclic peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Fan, Jianfen; Li, Hui; Yan, Xiliang; Yu, Yi

    2015-07-07

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the dynamic behaviors and transport properties of ethanol molecules in transmembrane cyclic peptide nanotubes (CPNTs) with various radii, i.e., 8×(WL¯)n=3,4,5/POPE. The results show that ethanol molecules spontaneously fill the octa- and deca-CPNTs, but not the hexa-CPNT. In the octa-CPNT, ethanol molecules are trapped at individual gaps with their carbon skeletons perpendicular to the tube axis and hydroxyl groups towards the tube wall, forming a broken single-file chain. As the channel radius increases, ethanol molecules inside the deca-CPNT tend to form a tubular layer and the hydroxyl groups mainly stretch towards the tube axis. Computations of diffusion coefficients indicate that ethanol molecules in the octa-CPNT nearly lost their diffusion abilities, while those in the deca-CPNT diffuse as 4.5 times as in a (8, 8) carbon nanotube with a similar tube diameter. The osmotic and diffusion permeabilities (pf and pd, respectively) of the octa- and deca-CPNTs transporting ethanol were deduced for the first time. The distributions of the gauche and trans conformers of ethanol molecules in two CPNTs are quite similar, both with approximately 57% gauche conformers. The non-bonded interactions of channel ethanol with a CPNT wall and surrounding ethanol were explored. The potential of mean force elucidates the mechanism underlying the transporting characteristics of channel ethanol in a transmembrane CPNT.

  4. Dynamic behaviors and transport properties of ethanol molecules in transmembrane cyclic peptide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Fan, Jianfen; Li, Hui; Yan, Xiliang; Yu, Yi

    2015-07-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the dynamic behaviors and transport properties of ethanol molecules in transmembrane cyclic peptide nanotubes (CPNTs) with various radii, i.e., 8 × ( W L ¯ ) n = 3 , 4 , 5 / POPE . The results show that ethanol molecules spontaneously fill the octa- and deca-CPNTs, but not the hexa-CPNT. In the octa-CPNT, ethanol molecules are trapped at individual gaps with their carbon skeletons perpendicular to the tube axis and hydroxyl groups towards the tube wall, forming a broken single-file chain. As the channel radius increases, ethanol molecules inside the deca-CPNT tend to form a tubular layer and the hydroxyl groups mainly stretch towards the tube axis. Computations of diffusion coefficients indicate that ethanol molecules in the octa-CPNT nearly lost their diffusion abilities, while those in the deca-CPNT diffuse as 4.5 times as in a (8, 8) carbon nanotube with a similar tube diameter. The osmotic and diffusion permeabilities (pf and pd, respectively) of the octa- and deca-CPNTs transporting ethanol were deduced for the first time. The distributions of the gauche and trans conformers of ethanol molecules in two CPNTs are quite similar, both with approximately 57% gauche conformers. The non-bonded interactions of channel ethanol with a CPNT wall and surrounding ethanol were explored. The potential of mean force elucidates the mechanism underlying the transporting characteristics of channel ethanol in a transmembrane CPNT.

  5. Structural Investigation of the Transmembrane Domain of KCNE1 in Proteoliposomes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    KCNE1 is a single-transmembrane protein of the KCNE family that modulates the function of voltage-gated potassium channels, including KCNQ1. Hereditary mutations in KCNE1 have been linked to diseases such as long QT syndrome (LQTS), atrial fibrillation, sudden infant death syndrome, and deafness. The transmembrane domain (TMD) of KCNE1 plays a key role in mediating the physical association with KCNQ1 and in subsequent modulation of channel gating kinetics and conductance. However, the mechanisms associated with these roles for the TMD remain poorly understood, highlighting a need for experimental structural studies. A previous solution NMR study of KCNE1 in LMPG micelles revealed a curved transmembrane domain, a structural feature proposed to be critical to KCNE1 function. However, this curvature potentially reflects an artifact of working in detergent micelles. Double electron electron resonance (DEER) measurements were conducted on KCNE1 in LMPG micelles, POPC/POPG proteoliposomes, and POPC/POPG lipodisq nanoparticles to directly compare the structure of the TMD in a variety of different membrane environments. Experimentally derived DEER distances coupled with simulated annealing molecular dynamic simulations were used to probe the bilayer structure of the TMD of KCNE1. The results indicate that the structure is helical in proteoliposomes and is slightly curved, which is consistent with the previously determined solution NMR structure in micelles. The evident resilience of the curvature in the KCNE1 TMD leads us to hypothesize that the curvature is likely to be maintained upon binding of the protein to the KCNQ1 channel. PMID:25234231

  6. Functional Swapping between Transmembrane Proteins TMEM16A and TMEM16F*

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takayuki; Suzuki, Jun; Nagata, Shigekazu

    2014-01-01

    The transmembrane proteins TMEM16A and -16F each carry eight transmembrane regions with cytoplasmic N and C termini. TMEM16A carries out Ca2+-dependent Cl− ion transport, and TMEM16F is responsible for Ca2+-dependent phospholipid scrambling. Here we established assay systems for the Ca2+-dependent Cl− channel activity using 293T cells and for the phospholipid scramblase activity using TMEM16F−/− immortalized fetal thymocytes. Chemical cross-linking analysis showed that TMEM16A and -16F form homodimers in both 293T cells and immortalized fetal thymocytes. Successive deletion from the N or C terminus of both proteins and the swapping of regions between TMEM16A and -16F indicated that their cytoplasmic N-terminal (147 amino acids for TMEM16A and 95 for 16F) and C-terminal (88 amino acids for TMEM16A and 68 for 16F) regions were essential for their localization at plasma membranes and protein stability, respectively, and could be exchanged. Analyses of TMEM16A and -16F mutants with point mutations in the pore region (located between the fifth and sixth transmembrane regions) indicated that the pore region is essential for both the Cl− channel activity of TMEM16A and the phospholipid scramblase activity of TMEM16F. Some chemicals such as epigallocatechin-3-gallate and digallic acid inhibited the Cl− channel activity of TMEM16A and the scramblase activity of TMEM16F with an opposite preference. These results indicate that TMEM16A and -16F use a similar mechanism for sorting to plasma membrane and protein stabilization, but their functional domains significantly differ. PMID:24478309

  7. Membrane Composition Variation and Underdamped Mechanics near Transmembrane Proteins and Coats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautu, S. Alex; Rowlands, George; Turner, Matthew S.

    2015-03-01

    We study the effect of transmembrane proteins on the shape, composition, and thermodynamic stability of the surrounding membrane. When the coupling between membrane composition and curvature is strong enough, the nearby membrane composition and shape both undergo a transition from overdamped to underdamped spatial variation, well before the membrane becomes unstable in the bulk. This transition is associated with a change in the sign of the thermodynamic energy and, hence, favors the early stages of coat assembly necessary for vesiculation (budding) and may suppress the activity of mechanosensitive membrane channels and transporters. Our results suggest an approach to obtain physical parameters of the membrane that are otherwise difficult to measure.

  8. Electric Field Dependence of Protein Conformation and Channel Function in Lipid Membranes of Different Compositions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    conformation of bacteriorhodopsin and of alamethicin incorporated in lipid bilayers was obtained from the change in the measured circular dichroism (CD... bacteriorhodopsin and of alamethicin. changed with the applied membrane potential. However. in the case of bacteriorhodopsin which was fully embedded In thie

  9. Potentiation of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors via an allosteric transmembrane site.

    PubMed

    Young, Gareth T; Zwart, Ruud; Walker, Alison S; Sher, Emanuele; Millar, Neil S

    2008-09-23

    Positive allosteric modulators of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have attracted considerable interest as potential tools for the treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. However, despite the potential therapeutic usefulness of these compounds, little is known about their mechanism of action. Here, we have examined two allosteric potentiators of alpha7 nAChRs (PNU-120596 and LY-2087101). From studies with a series of subunit chimeras, we have identified the transmembrane regions of alpha7 as being critical in facilitating potentiation of agonist-evoked responses. Furthermore, we have identified five transmembrane amino acids that, when mutated, significantly reduce potentiation of alpha7 nAChRs. The amino acids we have identified are located within the alpha-helical transmembrane domains TM1 (S222 and A225), TM2 (M253), and TM4 (F455 and C459). Mutation of either A225 or M253 individually have particularly profound effects, reducing potentiation of EC(20) concentrations of acetylcholine to a tenth of the level seen with wild-type alpha7. Reference to homology models of the alpha7 nAChR, based on the 4A structure of the Torpedo nAChR, indicates that the side chains of all five amino acids point toward an intrasubunit cavity located between the four alpha-helical transmembrane domains. Computer docking simulations predict that the allosteric compounds such as PNU-120596 and LY-2087101 may bind within this intrasubunit cavity, much as neurosteroids and volatile anesthetics are thought to interact with GABA(A) and glycine receptors. Our findings suggest that this is a conserved modulatory allosteric site within neurotransmitter-gated ion channels.

  10. Cl(-) channels in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wanitchakool, Podchanart; Ousingsawat, Jiraporn; Sirianant, Lalida; MacAulay, Nanna; Schreiber, Rainer; Kunzelmann, Karl

    2016-10-01

    A remarkable feature of apoptosis is the initial massive cell shrinkage, which requires opening of ion channels to allow release of K(+), Cl(-), and organic osmolytes to drive osmotic water movement and cell shrinkage. This article focuses on the role of the Cl(-) channels LRRC8, TMEM16/anoctamin, and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in cellular apoptosis. LRRC8A-E has been identified as a volume-regulated anion channel expressed in many cell types. It was shown to be required for regulatory and apoptotic volume decrease (RVD, AVD) in cultured cell lines. Its presence also determines sensitivity towards cytostatic drugs such as cisplatin. Recent data point to a molecular and functional relationship of LRRC8A and anoctamins (ANOs). ANO6, 9, and 10 (TMEM16F, J, and K) augment apoptotic Cl(-) currents and AVD, but it remains unclear whether these anoctamins operate as Cl(-) channels or as regulators of other apoptotic Cl(-) channels, such as LRRC8. CFTR has been known for its proapoptotic effects for some time, and this effect may be based on glutathione release from the cell and increase in cytosolic reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although we find that CFTR is activated by cell swelling, it is possible that CFTR serves RVD/AVD through accumulation of ROS and activation of independent membrane channels such as ANO6. Thus activation of ANO6 will support cell shrinkage and induce additional apoptotic events, such as membrane phospholipid scrambling.

  11. Measuring Mitochondrial Transmembrane Potential by TMRE Staining.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Lisa C; Christensen, Melinda E; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-12-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is the main source of energy for metabolism. Mitochondria provide the majority of this ATP by a process known as oxidative phosphorylation. This process involves active transfer of positively charged protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane resulting in a net internal negative charge, known as the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm). The proton gradient is then used by ATP synthase to produce ATP by fusing adenosine diphosphate and free phosphate. The net negative charge across a healthy mitochondrion is maintained at approximately -180 mV, which can be detected by staining cells with positively charged dyes such as tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE). TMRE emits a red fluorescence that can be detected by flow cytometry or fluorescence microscopy and the level of TMRE fluorescence in stained cells can be used to determine whether mitochondria in a cell have high or low ΔΨm. Cytochrome c is essential for producing ΔΨm because it promotes the pumping the protons into the mitochondrial intermembrane space as it shuttles electrons from Complex III to Complex IV along the electron transport chain. Cytochrome c is released from the mitochondrial intermembrane space into the cytosol during apoptosis. This impairs its ability to shuttle electrons between Complex III and Complex IV and results in rapid dissipation of ΔΨm. Loss of ΔΨm is therefore closely associated with cytochrome c release during apoptosis and is often used as a surrogate marker for cytochrome c release in cells.

  12. The infrared dichroism of transmembrane helical polypeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Axelsen, P H; Kaufman, B K; McElhaney, R N; Lewis, R N

    1995-01-01

    Polarized attenuated total internal reflectance techniques were applied to study the infrared dichroism of the amide I transition moment in two membrane-bound peptides that are known to form oriented transmembrane helices: gramicidin A in a supported phospholipid monolayer and Ac-Lys2-Leu24-Lys2-amide (L24) in oriented multibilayers. These studies were performed to test the ability of these techniques to determine the orientation of these peptides, to verify the value of optical parameters used to calculate electric field strengths, to examine the common assumptions regarding the amide I transition moment orientation, and to ascertain the effect of surface imperfections on molecular disorder. The two peptides exhibit marked differences in the shape and frequency of their amide I absorption bands. Yet both peptides are highly ordered and oriented with their helical axes perpendicular to the membrane surface. In the alpha-helix formed by L24, there is evidence for a mode with type E1 symmetry contributing to amide I, and the amide I transition moment must be more closely aligned with the peptide C=O (< 34 degrees) than earlier studies have suggested. These results indicate that long-standing assumptions about the orientation of amide I in a peptide require some revision, but that in general, infrared spectroscopy yields reliable information about the orientation of membrane-bound helical peptides. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8599683

  13. Transmembrane beta-barrel protein structure prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, Arlo; Baldi, Pierre

    Transmembrane β-barrel (TMB) proteins are embedded in the outer membranes of mitochondria, Gram-negative bacteria, and chloroplasts. These proteins perform critical functions, including active ion-transport and passive nutrient intake. Therefore, there is a need for accurate prediction of secondary and tertiary structures of TMB proteins. A variety of methods have been developed for predicting the secondary structure and these predictions are very useful for constructing a coarse topology of TMB structure; however, they do not provide enough information to construct a low-resolution tertiary structure for a TMB protein. In addition, while the overall structural architecture is well conserved among TMB proteins, the amino acid sequences are highly divergent. Thus, traditional homology modeling methods cannot be applied to many putative TMB proteins. Here, we describe the TMBpro: a pipeline of methods for predicting TMB secondary structure, β-residue contacts, and finally tertiary structure. The tertiary prediction method relies on the specific construction rules that TMB proteins adhere to and on the predicted β-residue contacts to dramatically reduce the search space for the model building procedure.

  14. Exogenous agents that target transmembrane domains of proteins.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hang

    2008-01-01

    Although membrane proteins account for approximately one third of all proteins encoded in the human genome, the functions and structures of their transmembrane domains are much less understood than the water-soluble regions. A major hurdle in studying these transmembrane domains is the lack of appropriate exogenous agents that can be used as specific probes. Despite the daunting challenges, major strides have recently been made in targeting the transmembrane domains of a variety of membrane proteins. High affinity and selectivity have been achieved in model biophysical systems, membranes of bacteria, and mammalian cells.

  15. Prediction of transmembrane helix orientation in polytopic membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Adamian, Larisa; Liang, Jie

    2006-01-01

    Background Membrane proteins compose up to 30% of coding sequences within genomes. However, their structure determination is lagging behind compared with soluble proteins due to the experimental difficulties. Therefore, it is important to develop reliable computational methods to predict structures of membrane proteins. Results We present a method for prediction of the TM helix orientation, which is an essential step in ab initio modeling of membrane proteins. Our method is based on a canonical model of the heptad repeat originally developed for coiled coils. We identify the helical surface patches that interface with lipid molecules at an accuracy of about 88% from the sequence information alone, using an empirical scoring function LIPS (LIPid-facing Surface), which combines lipophilicity and conservation of residues in the helix. We test and discuss results of prediction of helix-lipid interfaces on 162 transmembrane helices from 18 polytopic membrane proteins and present predicted orientations of TM helices in TRPV1 channel. We also apply our method to two structures of homologous cytochrome b6f complexes and find discrepancy in the assignment of TM helices from subunits PetG, PetN and PetL. The results of LIPS calculations and analysis of packing and H-bonding interactions support the helix assignment found in the cytochrome b6f structure from green alga but not the assignment of TM helices in the cyanobacterium b6f structure. Conclusion LIPS calculations can be used for the prediction of helix orientation in ab initio modeling of polytopic membrane proteins. We also show with the example of two cytochrome b6f structures that our method can identify questionable helix assignments in membrane proteins. The LIPS server is available online at . PMID:16792816

  16. A Functional-Phylogenetic Classification System for Transmembrane Solute Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Saier, Milton H.

    2000-01-01

    A comprehensive classification system for transmembrane molecular transporters has been developed and recently approved by the transport panel of the nomenclature committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. This system is based on (i) transporter class and subclass (mode of transport and energy coupling mechanism), (ii) protein phylogenetic family and subfamily, and (iii) substrate specificity. Almost all of the more than 250 identified families of transporters include members that function exclusively in transport. Channels (115 families), secondary active transporters (uniporters, symporters, and antiporters) (78 families), primary active transporters (23 families), group translocators (6 families), and transport proteins of ill-defined function or of unknown mechanism (51 families) constitute distinct categories. Transport mode and energy coupling prove to be relatively immutable characteristics and therefore provide primary bases for classification. Phylogenetic grouping reflects structure, function, mechanism, and often substrate specificity and therefore provides a reliable secondary basis for classification. Substrate specificity and polarity of transport prove to be more readily altered during evolutionary history and therefore provide a tertiary basis for classification. With very few exceptions, a phylogenetic family of transporters includes members that function by a single transport mode and energy coupling mechanism, although a variety of substrates may be transported, sometimes with either inwardly or outwardly directed polarity. In this review, I provide cross-referencing of well-characterized constituent transporters according to (i) transport mode, (ii) energy coupling mechanism, (iii) phylogenetic grouping, and (iv) substrates transported. The structural features and distribution of recognized family members throughout the living world are also evaluated. The tabulations should facilitate familial and functional

  17. A novel method for structure-based prediction of ion channel conductance properties.

    PubMed Central

    Smart, O S; Breed, J; Smith, G R; Sansom, M S

    1997-01-01

    A rapid and easy-to-use method of predicting the conductance of an ion channel from its three-dimensional structure is presented. The method combines the pore dimensions of the channel as measured in the HOLE program with an Ohmic model of conductance. An empirically based correction factor is then applied. The method yielded good results for six experimental channel structures (none of which were included in the training set) with predictions accurate to within an average factor of 1.62 to the true values. The predictive r2 was equal to 0.90, which is indicative of a good predictive ability. The procedure is used to validate model structures of alamethicin and phospholamban. Two genuine predictions for the conductance of channels with known structure but without reported conductances are given. A modification of the procedure that calculates the expected results for the effect of the addition of nonelectrolyte polymers on conductance is set out. Results for a cholera toxin B-subunit crystal structure agree well with the measured values. The difficulty in interpreting such studies is discussed, with the conclusion that measurements on channels of known structure are required. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 10 PMID:9138559

  18. Transmembrane Location of Retinal in Purple Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Kometani, Tadaatsu; Kinosita, Kazuhiko; Furuno, Taiji; Kouyama, Tsutomu; Ikegami, Akira

    1987-01-01

    Transmembrane location of the retinal chromophore in the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium was investigated in three different systems in which excitation energy transfer between the chromophore and external dye molecules condensed on the membrane surfaces was observed. In system ii, the energy donor was the retinal chromophore converted in situ to a fluorescent derivative. The fluorescent membranes were embedded in solid cobalt-EDTA, which served as energy acceptors. System iii was similar to system ii, except that the acceptors were tris(2,2′-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) complex in solid form. The positively charged ruthenium complex had a radius of 0.7 nm, whereas the cobalt complex in system ii was smaller (radius ∼0.4 nm) and negatively charged. System iv was stacked sheets of native purple membrane with interspersed ruthenium complex; energy transfer from the luminescent ruthenuim complex to the native retinal chromophore was observed. The energy transfer rates in these three systems, and in two additional systems already described (Kouyama, T., K. Kinosita, Jr., and A. Ikegami, 1983, J. Mol. Biol., 165:91-107), were all consistent with a location of the retinal chromophore at a depth of 1.0 ± 0.3 nm from a surface of the purple membrane. All the analyses in the present work involved an assumption that contacts between the external dye molecules and membrane surfaces were maximal; the depth values obtained cannot be underestimates. The chromophore therefore must be outside the middle one-third of the thickness, ∼4.5 nm, of the purple membrane. PMID:19431704

  19. Molecular mechanisms of intercellular communication: transmembrane signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Bitensky, M.W.; George, J.S.; Siegel, H.N.; McGregor, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    This short discussion of transmembrane signaling depicts a particular class of signaling devices whose functional characteristics may well be representative of broader classes of membrane switches. These multicomponent aggregates are characterized by tight organization of interacting components which function by conformational interactions to provide sensitive, amplified, rapid, and modulated responses. It is clear that the essential role of such switches in cell-cell interactions necessitated their appearance early in the history of the development of multicellular organisms. It also seems clear that once such devices made their appearance, the conformationally interactive moieties were firmly locked into a regulatory relationship. Since modification of interacting components could perturb or interfere with the functional integrity of the whole switch, genetic drift was only permitted at the input and outflow extremes. However, the GTP binding moiety and its interacting protein domains on contiguous portions of the receptor and readout components were highly conserved. The observed stringent evolutionary conservation of the molecular features of these membrane switches thus applies primarily to the central (GTP binding) elements. An extraordinary degree of variation was permitted within the domains of signal recognition and enzymatic output. Thus, time and evolution have adapted the central logic of the regulatory algorithm to serve a great variety of cellular purposes and to recognize a great variety of chemical and physical signals. This is exemplified by the richness of the hormonal and cellular dialogues found in primates such as man. Here the wealth of intercellular communiation can support the composition and performance of symphonies and the study of cellular immunology.

  20. Polar residue tagging of transmembrane peptides.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Roman A; Partridge, Anthony W; Yip, Jeannie; Wu, Yanqiu; Goto, Natalie K; Deber, Charles M

    2003-01-01

    Studies that focus on packing interactions between transmembrane (TM) helices in membrane proteins would greatly benefit from the ability to investigate their association and packing interactions in multi-spanning TM domains. However, the production, purification, and characterization of such units have been impeded by their high intrinsic hydrophobicity. We describe the polar tagging approach to biophysical analysis of TM segment peptides, where incorporation of polar residues of suitable type and number at one or both peptide N- and C-termini can serve to counterbalance the apolar nature of a native TM segment, and render it aqueous-soluble. Using the native TM sequences of the human erythrocyte protein glycophorin A (GpA) and bacteriophage M13 major coat protein (MCP), properties of tags such as Lys, His, Asp, sarcosine, and Pro-Gly are evaluated, and general procedures for tagging a given TM segment are presented. Gel-shift assays on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) establish that various tagged GpA TM segments spontaneously insert into micellar membranes, and exhibit native TM dimeric states. Sedimentation equilibrium analytical centrifugation is used to confirm that Lys-tagged GpA peptides retain the native dimer state. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy studies on Lys-tagged TM MCP peptides selectively enriched with N-15 illustrate the usefulness of this system for evaluating monomer-dimer equilibria in micelle environments. The overall results suggest that polar-tagging of hydrophobic (TM) peptides approach constitutes a valuable tool for the study of protein-protein interactions in membranes. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Secondary structure, orientation, and oligomerization of phospholemman, a cardiac transmembrane protein

    PubMed Central

    Beevers, Andrew J.; Kukol, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Human phospholemman (PLM) is a 72-residue protein, which is expressed at high density in the cardiac plasma membrane and in various other tissues. It forms ion channels selective for K+, Cl−, and taurine in lipid bilayers and colocalizes with the Na+/K+-ATPase and the Na+/Ca2+-exchanger, which may suggest a role in the regulation of cell volume. Here we present the first structural data based on synthetic peptides representing the transmembrane domain of PLM. Perfluoro-octaneoate-PAGE of reconstituted proteoliposomes containing PLM reveals a tetrameric homo-oligomerization. Infrared spectroscopy of proteoliposomes shows that the PLM peptide is completely α-helical, even beyond the hydrophobic core residues. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments reveal that a core of 20–22 residues is not accessible to water, thus embedded in the lipid membrane. The maximum helix tilt is 17° ± 2° obtained by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy. Thus, our data support the idea of ion channel formation by the PLM transmembrane domain. PMID:16597826

  2. Structure of nucleotide-binding domain 1 of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Hal A; Buchanan, Sean G; Burley, Stephen K; Conners, Kris; Dickey, Mark; Dorwart, Michael; Fowler, Richard; Gao, Xia; Guggino, William B; Hendrickson, Wayne A; Hunt, John F; Kearins, Margaret C; Lorimer, Don; Maloney, Peter C; Post, Kai W; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Rutter, Marc E; Sauder, J Michael; Shriver, Stephanie; Thibodeau, Patrick H; Thomas, Philip J; Zhang, Marie; Zhao, Xun; Emtage, Spencer

    2004-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter that functions as a chloride channel. Nucleotide-binding domain 1 (NBD1), one of two ABC domains in CFTR, also contains sites for the predominant CF-causing mutation and, potentially, for regulatory phosphorylation. We have determined crystal structures for mouse NBD1 in unliganded, ADP- and ATP-bound states, with and without phosphorylation. This NBD1 differs from typical ABC domains in having added regulatory segments, a foreshortened subdomain interconnection, and an unusual nucleotide conformation. Moreover, isolated NBD1 has undetectable ATPase activity and its structure is essentially the same independent of ligand state. Phe508, which is commonly deleted in CF, is exposed at a putative NBD1-transmembrane interface. Our results are consistent with a CFTR mechanism, whereby channel gating occurs through ATP binding in an NBD1–NBD2 nucleotide sandwich that forms upon displacement of NBD1 regulatory segments. PMID:14685259

  3. The role of palmitoylation and transmembrane domain in sorting of transmembrane adaptor proteins.

    PubMed

    Chum, Tomáš; Glatzová, Daniela; Kvíčalová, Zuzana; Malínský, Jan; Brdička, Tomáš; Cebecauer, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane proteins synthesised at the endoplasmic reticulum are delivered to the cell surface via sorting pathways. Hydrophobic mismatch theory based on the length of the transmembrane domain (TMD) dominates discussion about determinants required for protein sorting to the plasma membrane. Transmembrane adaptor proteins (TRAP) are involved in signalling events which take place at the plasma membrane. Members of this protein family have TMDs of varying length. We were interested in whether palmitoylation or other motifs contribute to the effective sorting of TRAP proteins. We found that palmitoylation is essential for some, but not all, TRAP proteins independent of their TMD length. We also provide evidence that palmitoylation and proximal sequences can modulate sorting of artificial proteins with TMDs of suboptimal length. Our observations point to a unique character of each TMD defined by its primary amino acid sequence and its impact on membrane protein localisation. We conclude that, in addition to the TMD length, secondary sorting determinants such as palmitoylation or flanking sequences have evolved for the localisation of membrane proteins. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. TOPPER: topology prediction of transmembrane protein based on evidential reasoning.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xinyang; Liu, Qi; Hu, Yong; Deng, Yong

    2013-01-01

    The topology prediction of transmembrane protein is a hot research field in bioinformatics and molecular biology. It is a typical pattern recognition problem. Various prediction algorithms are developed to predict the transmembrane protein topology since the experimental techniques have been restricted by many stringent conditions. Usually, these individual prediction algorithms depend on various principles such as the hydrophobicity or charges of residues. In this paper, an evidential topology prediction method for transmembrane protein is proposed based on evidential reasoning, which is called TOPPER (topology prediction of transmembrane protein based on evidential reasoning). In the proposed method, the prediction results of multiple individual prediction algorithms can be transformed into BPAs (basic probability assignments) according to the confusion matrix. Then, the final prediction result can be obtained by the combination of each individual prediction base on Dempster's rule of combination. The experimental results show that the proposed method is superior to the individual prediction algorithms, which illustrates the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  5. Exploring the dynamic behaviors and transport properties of gas molecules in a transmembrane cyclic peptide nanotube.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Fan, Jianfen; Li, Hui; Yan, Xiliang; Yu, Yi

    2013-12-05

    The dynamic behaviors and transport properties of O2, CO2, and NH3 molecules through a transmembrane cyclic peptide nanotube (CPNT) of 8×cyclo-(WL)4/POPE have been investigated by steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations and adaptive biasing force (ABF) samplings. Different external forces are needed for three gas molecules to enter the channel. The periodic change of the pulling force curve for a gas traveling through the channel mainly arises from the regular and periodic arrangement of the composed CP subunits of the CPNT. Radial distribution functions (RDFs) between gas and water disclose the density decrease of channel water, which strongly aggravates the discontinuity of H-bond formation between a gas molecule and the neighboring water. Compared to hardly any H-bond formation between CO2 (or O2) and the framework of the CPNT, NH3 can form abundant H-bonds with the carbonyl/amide groups of the CPNT, leading to a fierce competition to NH3-water H-bonded interactions. In addition to direct H-bonded interactions, all three gases can form water bridges with the tube. The potential profile of mean force coincides with the occurring probability of a gas molecule along the tube axis. The energy barriers at two mouths of the CPNT elucidate the phenomenon that CO2 and O2 are thoroughly confined in the narrow lumen while NH3 can easily go outside the tube. Intermolecular interactions of each gas with channel water and the CPNT framework and the formation of H-bonds and water bridges illuminate the different gas translocation behaviors. The results uncover interesting and comprehensive mechanisms underlying the permeation characteristics of three gas molecules traveling through a transmembrane CPNT.

  6. MONNA, a potent and selective blocker for transmembrane protein with unknown function 16/anoctamin-1.

    PubMed

    Oh, Soo-Jin; Hwang, Seok Jin; Jung, Jonghoon; Yu, Kuai; Kim, Jeongyeon; Choi, Jung Yoon; Hartzell, H Criss; Roh, Eun Joo; Lee, C Justin

    2013-11-01

    Transmembrane protein with unknown function 16/anoctamin-1 (ANO1) is a protein widely expressed in mammalian tissues, and it has the properties of the classic calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC). This protein has been implicated in numerous major physiological functions. However, the lack of effective and selective blockers has hindered a detailed study of the physiological functions of this channel. In this study, we have developed a potent and selective blocker for endogenous ANO1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes (xANO1) using a drug screening method we previously established (Oh et al., 2008). We have synthesized a number of anthranilic acid derivatives and have determined the correlation between biological activity and the nature and position of substituents in these derived compounds. A structure-activity relationship revealed novel chemical classes of xANO1 blockers. The derivatives contain a --NO₂ group on position 5 of a naphthyl group-substituted anthranilic acid, and they fully blocked xANO1 chloride currents with an IC₅₀ < 10 μM. The most potent blocker, N-((4-methoxy)-2-naphthyl)-5-nitroanthranilic acid (MONNA), had an IC₅₀ of 0.08 μM for xANO1. Selectivity tests revealed that other chloride channels such as bestrophin-1, chloride channel protein 2, and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator were not appreciably blocked by 10∼30 μM MONNA. The potent and selective blockers for ANO1 identified here should permit pharmacological dissection of ANO1/CaCC function and serve as potential candidates for drug therapy of related diseases such as hypertension, cystic fibrosis, bronchitis, asthma, and hyperalgesia.

  7. A deterministic algorithm for constrained enumeration of transmembrane protein folds.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, William Michael; Young, Malin M.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Schoeniger, Joseph S.

    2004-07-01

    A deterministic algorithm for enumeration of transmembrane protein folds is presented. Using a set of sparse pairwise atomic distance constraints (such as those obtained from chemical cross-linking, FRET, or dipolar EPR experiments), the algorithm performs an exhaustive search of secondary structure element packing conformations distributed throughout the entire conformational space. The end result is a set of distinct protein conformations, which can be scored and refined as part of a process designed for computational elucidation of transmembrane protein structures.

  8. Positioning of extracellular loop 1 affects pore gating of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Infield, Daniel T; Cui, Guiying; Kuang, Christopher; McCarty, Nael A

    2016-03-01

    The cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride ion channel, the dysfunction of which directly leads to the life-shortening disease CF. Extracellular loop 1 (ECL1) of CFTR contains several residues involved in stabilizing the open state of the channel; some, including D110, are sites of disease-associated gating mutations. Structures from related proteins suggest that the position of CFTR's extracellular loops may change considerably during gating. To better understand the roles of ECL1 in CFTR function, we utilized functional cysteine cross-linking to determine the effects of modulation of D110C-CFTR and of a double mutant of D110C with K892C in extracellular loop 4 (ECL4). The reducing agent DTT elicited a large potentiation of the macroscopic conductance of D110C/K892C-CFTR, likely due to breakage of a spontaneous disulfide bond between C110 and C892. DTT-reduced D110C/K892C-CFTR was rapidly inhibited by binding cadmium ions with high affinity, suggesting that these residues frequently come in close proximity in actively gating channels. Effects of DTT and cadmium on modulation of pore gating were demonstrated at the single-channel level. Finally, disulfided D110C/K892C-CFTR channels were found to be less sensitive than wild-type or DTT-treated D110C/K892C-CFTR channels to stimulation by IBMX, suggesting an impact of this conformational restriction on channel activation by phosphorylation. The results are best explained in the context of a model of CFTR gating wherein stable channel opening requires correct positioning of functional elements structurally influenced by ECL1. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Positioning of extracellular loop 1 affects pore gating of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    PubMed Central

    Infield, Daniel T.; Cui, Guiying; Kuang, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride ion channel, the dysfunction of which directly leads to the life-shortening disease CF. Extracellular loop 1 (ECL1) of CFTR contains several residues involved in stabilizing the open state of the channel; some, including D110, are sites of disease-associated gating mutations. Structures from related proteins suggest that the position of CFTR's extracellular loops may change considerably during gating. To better understand the roles of ECL1 in CFTR function, we utilized functional cysteine cross-linking to determine the effects of modulation of D110C-CFTR and of a double mutant of D110C with K892C in extracellular loop 4 (ECL4). The reducing agent DTT elicited a large potentiation of the macroscopic conductance of D110C/K892C-CFTR, likely due to breakage of a spontaneous disulfide bond between C110 and C892. DTT-reduced D110C/K892C-CFTR was rapidly inhibited by binding cadmium ions with high affinity, suggesting that these residues frequently come in close proximity in actively gating channels. Effects of DTT and cadmium on modulation of pore gating were demonstrated at the single-channel level. Finally, disulfided D110C/K892C-CFTR channels were found to be less sensitive than wild-type or DTT-treated D110C/K892C-CFTR channels to stimulation by IBMX, suggesting an impact of this conformational restriction on channel activation by phosphorylation. The results are best explained in the context of a model of CFTR gating wherein stable channel opening requires correct positioning of functional elements structurally influenced by ECL1. PMID:26684250

  10. Characterization of Disease-Associated Mutations in Human Transmembrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, János; Szakács, Gergely; Tusnády, Gábor E.

    2016-01-01

    Transmembrane protein coding genes are commonly associated with human diseases. We characterized disease causing mutations and natural polymorphisms in transmembrane proteins by mapping missense genetic variations from the UniProt database on the transmembrane protein topology listed in the Human Transmembrane Proteome database. We found characteristic differences in the spectrum of amino acid changes within transmembrane regions: in the case of disease associated mutations the non-polar to non-polar and non-polar to charged amino acid changes are equally frequent. In contrast, in the case of natural polymorphisms non-polar to charged amino acid changes are rare while non-polar to non-polar changes are common. The majority of disease associated mutations result in glycine to arginine and leucine to proline substitutions. Mutations to positively charged amino acids are more common in the center of the lipid bilayer, where they cause more severe structural and functional anomalies. Our analysis contributes to the better understanding of the effect of disease associated mutations in transmembrane proteins, which can help prioritize genetic variations in personal genomic investigations. PMID:26986070

  11. Simultaneous prediction of protein secondary structure and transmembrane spans.

    PubMed

    Leman, Julia Koehler; Mueller, Ralf; Karakas, Mert; Woetzel, Nils; Meiler, Jens

    2013-07-01

    Prediction of transmembrane spans and secondary structure from the protein sequence is generally the first step in the structural characterization of (membrane) proteins. Preference of a stretch of amino acids in a protein to form secondary structure and being placed in the membrane are correlated. Nevertheless, current methods predict either secondary structure or individual transmembrane states. We introduce a method that simultaneously predicts the secondary structure and transmembrane spans from the protein sequence. This approach not only eliminates the necessity to create a consensus prediction from possibly contradicting outputs of several predictors but bears the potential to predict conformational switches, i.e., sequence regions that have a high probability to change for example from a coil conformation in solution to an α-helical transmembrane state. An artificial neural network was trained on databases of 177 membrane proteins and 6048 soluble proteins. The output is a 3 × 3 dimensional probability matrix for each residue in the sequence that combines three secondary structure types (helix, strand, coil) and three environment types (membrane core, interface, solution). The prediction accuracies are 70.3% for nine possible states, 73.2% for three-state secondary structure prediction, and 94.8% for three-state transmembrane span prediction. These accuracies are comparable to state-of-the-art predictors of secondary structure (e.g., Psipred) or transmembrane placement (e.g., OCTOPUS). The method is available as web server and for download at www.meilerlab.org. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Chloride channels in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ya-ping; Zhang, Hao; Duan, Dayue Darrel

    2013-01-01

    Vascular remodeling of cerebral arterioles, including proliferation, migration, and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), is the major cause of changes in the cross-sectional area and diameter of the arteries and sudden interruption of blood flow or hemorrhage in the brain, ie, stroke. Accumulating evidence strongly supports an important role for chloride (Cl−) channels in vascular remodeling and stroke. At least three Cl− channel genes are expressed in VSMCs: 1) the TMEM16A (or Ano1), which may encode the calcium-activated Cl− channels (CACCs); 2) the CLC-3 Cl− channel and Cl−/H+ antiporter, which is closely related to the volume-regulated Cl− channels (VRCCs); and 3) the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), which encodes the PKA- and PKC-activated Cl− channels. Activation of the CACCs by agonist-induced increase in intracellular Ca2+ causes membrane depolarization, vasoconstriction, and inhibition of VSMC proliferation. Activation of VRCCs by cell volume increase or membrane stretch promotes the production of reactive oxygen species, induces proliferation and inhibits apoptosis of VSMCs. Activation of CFTR inhibits oxidative stress and may prevent the development of hypertension. In addition, Cl− current mediated by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor has also been implicated a role in ischemic neuron death. This review focuses on the functional roles of Cl− channels in the development of stroke and provides a perspective on the future directions for research and the potential to develop Cl− channels as new targets for the prevention and treatment of stroke. PMID:23103617

  13. Ultrasound modulates ion channel currents

    PubMed Central

    Kubanek, Jan; Shi, Jingyi; Marsh, Jon; Chen, Di; Deng, Cheri; Cui, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial focused ultrasound (US) has been demonstrated to stimulate neurons in animals and humans, but the mechanism of this effect is unknown. It has been hypothesized that US, a mechanical stimulus, may mediate cellular discharge by activating mechanosensitive ion channels embedded within cellular membranes. To test this hypothesis, we expressed potassium and sodium mechanosensitive ion channels (channels of the two-pore-domain potassium family (K2P) including TREK-1, TREK-2, TRAAK; NaV1.5) in the Xenopus oocyte system. Focused US (10 MHz, 0.3–4.9 W/cm2) modulated the currents flowing through the ion channels on average by up to 23%, depending on channel and stimulus intensity. The effects were reversible upon repeated stimulation and were abolished when a channel blocker (ranolazine to block NaV1.5, BaCl2 to block K2P channels) was applied to the solution. These data reveal at the single cell level that focused US modulates the activity of specific ion channels to mediate transmembrane currents. These findings open doors to investigations of the effects of  US on ion channels expressed in neurons, retinal cells, or cardiac cells, which may lead to important medical applications. The findings may also pave the way to the development of sonogenetics: a non-invasive, US-based analogue of optogenetics. PMID:27112990

  14. Charging the quantum capacitance of graphene with a single biological ion channel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yung Yu; Pham, Ted D; Zand, Katayoun; Li, Jinfeng; Burke, Peter J

    2014-05-27

    The interaction of cell and organelle membranes (lipid bilayers) with nanoelectronics can enable new technologies to sense and measure electrophysiology in qualitatively new ways. To date, a variety of sensing devices have been demonstrated to measure membrane currents through macroscopic numbers of ion channels. However, nanoelectronic based sensing of single ion channel currents has been a challenge. Here, we report graphene-based field-effect transistors combined with supported lipid bilayers as a platform for measuring, for the first time, individual ion channel activity. We show that the supported lipid bilayers uniformly coat the single layer graphene surface, acting as a biomimetic barrier that insulates (both electrically and chemically) the graphene from the electrolyte environment. Upon introduction of pore-forming membrane proteins such as alamethicin and gramicidin A, current pulses are observed through the lipid bilayers from the graphene to the electrolyte, which charge the quantum capacitance of the graphene. This approach combines nanotechnology with electrophysiology to demonstrate qualitatively new ways of measuring ion channel currents.

  15. Charging the Quantum Capacitance of Graphene with a Single Biological Ion Channel

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of cell and organelle membranes (lipid bilayers) with nanoelectronics can enable new technologies to sense and measure electrophysiology in qualitatively new ways. To date, a variety of sensing devices have been demonstrated to measure membrane currents through macroscopic numbers of ion channels. However, nanoelectronic based sensing of single ion channel currents has been a challenge. Here, we report graphene-based field-effect transistors combined with supported lipid bilayers as a platform for measuring, for the first time, individual ion channel activity. We show that the supported lipid bilayers uniformly coat the single layer graphene surface, acting as a biomimetic barrier that insulates (both electrically and chemically) the graphene from the electrolyte environment. Upon introduction of pore-forming membrane proteins such as alamethicin and gramicidin A, current pulses are observed through the lipid bilayers from the graphene to the electrolyte, which charge the quantum capacitance of the graphene. This approach combines nanotechnology with electrophysiology to demonstrate qualitatively new ways of measuring ion channel currents. PMID:24754625

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of water within models of ion channels.

    PubMed

    Breed, J; Sankararamakrishnan, R; Kerr, I D; Sansom, M S

    1996-04-01

    The transbilayer pores formed by ion channel proteins contain extended columns of water molecules. The dynamic properties of such waters have been suggested to differ from those of water in its bulk state. Molecular dynamics simulations of ion channel models solvated within and at the mouths of their pores are used to investigate the dynamics and structure of intra-pore water. Three classes of channel model are investigated: a) parallel bundles of hydrophobic (Ala20) alpha-helices; b) eight-stranded hydrophobic (Ala10) antiparallel beta-barrels; and c) parallel bundles of amphipathic alpha-helices (namely, delta-toxin, alamethicin, and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor M2 helix). The self-diffusion coefficients of water molecules within the pores are reduced significantly relative to bulk water in all of the models. Water rotational reorientation rates are also reduced within the pores, particularly in those pores formed by alpha-helix bundles. In the narrowest pore (that of the Ala20 pentameric helix bundle) self-diffusion coefficients and reorientation rates of intra-pore waters are reduced by approximately an order of magnitude relative to bulk solvent. In Ala20 helix bundles the water dipoles orient antiparallel to the helix dipoles. Such dipole/dipole interaction between water and pore may explain how water-filled ion channels may be formed by hydrophobic helices. In the bundles of amphipathic helices the orientation of water dipoles is modulated by the presence of charged side chains. No preferential orientation of water dipoles relative to the pore axis is observed in the hydrophobic beta-barrel models.

  17. Exploring transmembrane transport through alpha-hemolysin with grid-steered molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wells, David B; Abramkina, Volha; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2007-09-28

    The transport of biomolecules across cell boundaries is central to cellular function. While structures of many membrane channels are known, the permeation mechanism is known only for a select few. Molecular dynamics (MD) is a computational method that can provide an accurate description of permeation events at the atomic level, which is required for understanding the transport mechanism. However, due to the relatively short time scales accessible to this method, it is of limited utility. Here, we present a method for all-atom simulation of electric field-driven transport of large solutes through membrane channels, which in tens of nanoseconds can provide a realistic account of a permeation event that would require a millisecond simulation using conventional MD. In this method, the average distribution of the electrostatic potential in a membrane channel under a transmembrane bias of interest is determined first from an all-atom MD simulation. This electrostatic potential, defined on a grid, is subsequently applied to a charged solute to steer its permeation through the membrane channel. We apply this method to investigate permeation of DNA strands, DNA hairpins, and alpha-helical peptides through alpha-hemolysin. To test the accuracy of the method, we computed the relative permeation rates of DNA strands having different sequences and global orientations. The results of the G-SMD simulations were found to be in good agreement in experiment.

  18. How Phosphorylation and ATPase Activity Regulate Anion Flux though the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR).

    PubMed

    Zwick, Matthias; Esposito, Cinzia; Hellstern, Manuel; Seelig, Anna

    2016-07-08

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, ABCC7), mutations of which cause cystic fibrosis, belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family and works as a channel for small anions, such as chloride and bicarbonate. Anion channel activity is known to depend on phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) and CFTR-ATPase activity. Whereas anion channel activity has been extensively investigated, phosphorylation and CFTR-ATPase activity are still poorly understood. Here, we show that the two processes can be measured in a label-free and non-invasive manner in real time in live cells, stably transfected with CFTR. This study reveals three key findings. (i) The major contribution (≥90%) to the total CFTR-related ATP hydrolysis rate is due to phosphorylation by PKA and the minor contribution (≤10%) to CFTR-ATPase activity. (ii) The mutant CFTR-E1371S that is still conductive, but defective in ATP hydrolysis, is not phosphorylated, suggesting that phosphorylation requires a functional nucleotide binding domain and occurs in the post-hydrolysis transition state. (iii) CFTR-ATPase activity is inversely related to CFTR anion flux. The present data are consistent with a model in which CFTR is in a closed conformation with two ATPs bound. The open conformation is induced by ATP hydrolysis and corresponds to the post-hydrolysis transition state that is stabilized by phosphorylation and binding of chloride channel potentiators.

  19. Role of Transmembrane Domain 4 in Ligand Permeation by Crithidia fasciculata Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter 2 (CfNT2)*

    PubMed Central

    Arendt, Cassandra S.; Ullman, Buddy

    2010-01-01

    Equilibrative nucleoside transporters play essential roles in nutrient uptake, cardiovascular and renal function, and purine analog drug chemotherapies. Limited structural information is available for this family of transporters; however, residues in transmembrane domains 1, 2, 4, and 5 appear to be important for ligand and inhibitor binding. In order to identify regions of the transporter that are important for ligand specificity, a genetic selection for mutants of the inosine-guanosine-specific Crithidia fasciculata nucleoside transporter 2 (CfNT2) that had gained the ability to transport adenosine was carried out in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nearly all positive clones from the genetic selection carried mutations at lysine 155 in transmembrane domain 4, highlighting lysine 155 as a pivotal residue governing the ligand specificity of CfNT2. Mutation of lysine 155 to asparagine conferred affinity for adenosine on the mutant transporter at the expense of inosine and guanosine affinity due to weakened contacts to the purine ring of the ligand. Following systematic cysteine-scanning mutagenesis, thiol-specific modification of several positions within transmembrane domain 4 was found to interfere with inosine transport capability, indicating that this helix lines the water-filled ligand translocation channel. Additionally, the pattern of modification of transmembrane domain 4 suggested that it may deviate from helicity in the vicinity of residue 155. Position 155 was also protected from modification in the presence of ligand, suggesting that lysine 155 is in or near the ligand binding site. Transmembrane domain 4 and particularly lysine 155 appear to play key roles in ligand discrimination and translocation by CfNT2. PMID:20037157

  20. Conductance of P2X4 purinergic receptor is determined by conformational equilibrium in the transmembrane region

    PubMed Central

    Minato, Yuichi; Suzuki, Shiho; Hara, Tomoaki; Kofuku, Yutaka; Kasuya, Go; Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Igarashi, Shunsuke; Suzuki, Ei-ichiro; Nureki, Osamu; Hattori, Motoyuki; Ueda, Takumi; Shimada, Ichio

    2016-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels are partially activated by their ligands, resulting in currents lower than the currents evoked by the physiological full agonists. In the case of P2X purinergic receptors, a cation-selective pore in the transmembrane region expands upon ATP binding to the extracellular ATP-binding site, and the currents evoked by α,β-methylene ATP are lower than the currents evoked by ATP. However, the mechanism underlying the partial activation of the P2X receptors is unknown although the crystal structures of zebrafish P2X4 receptor in the apo and ATP-bound states are available. Here, we observed the NMR signals from M339 and M351, which were introduced in the transmembrane region, and the endogenous alanine and methionine residues of the zebrafish P2X4 purinergic receptor in the apo, ATP-bound, and α,β-methylene ATP-bound states. Our NMR analyses revealed that, in the α,β-methylene ATP-bound state, M339, M351, and the residues that connect the ATP-binding site and the transmembrane region, M325 and A330, exist in conformational equilibrium between closed and open conformations, with slower exchange rates than the chemical shift difference (<100 s−1), suggesting that the small population of the open conformation causes the partial activation in this state. Our NMR analyses also revealed that the transmembrane region adopts the open conformation in the state bound to the inhibitor trinitrophenyl-ATP, and thus the antagonism is due to the closure of ion pathways, except for the pore in the transmembrane region: i.e., the lateral cation access in the extracellular region. PMID:27071117

  1. Solution NMR studies reveal the location of the second transmembrane domain of the human sigma-1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Roldan, Jose Luis; Ossa, Felipe; Amin, Nader T.; Schnell, Jason R.

    2015-01-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is a ligand-regulated membrane chaperone protein associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress response, and modulation of ion channel activities at the plasma membrane. We report here a solution NMR study of a S1R construct (S1R(Δ35)) in which only the first transmembrane domain and the eight-residue N-terminus have been removed. The second transmembrane helix is found to be composed of residues 91–107, which corresponds to the first steroid binding domain-like region. The cytosolic domain is found to contain three helices, and the secondary structure and backbone dynamics of the chaperone domain are consistent with that determined previously for the chaperone domain alone. The position of TM2 provides a framework for ongoing studies of S1R ligand binding and oligomerisation. PMID:25647032

  2. All atom NMDA receptor transmembrane domain model development and simulations in lipid bilayers and water

    PubMed Central

    Mesbahi-Vasey, Samaneh; Veras, Lea; Yonkunas, Michael; Johnson, Jon W.; Kurnikova, Maria G.

    2017-01-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are members of the ionotropic glutamate receptor family that mediate excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. The channels of NMDARs are permeable to Ca2+ but blocked by Mg2+, distinctive properties that underlie essential brain processes such as induction of synaptic plasticity. However, due to limited structural information about the NMDAR transmembrane ion channel forming domain, the mechanism of divalent cation permeation and block is understood poorly. In this paper we developed an atomistic model of the transmembrane domain (TMD) of NMDARs composed of GluN1 and GluN2A subunits (GluN1/2A receptors). The model was generated using (a) a homology model based on the structure of the NaK channel and a partially resolved structure of an AMPA receptor (AMPAR), and (b) a partially resolved X-ray structure of GluN1/2B NMDARs. Refinement and extensive Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of the NMDAR TMD model were performed in explicit lipid bilayer membrane and water. Targeted MD with simulated annealing was introduced to promote structure refinement. Putative positions of the Mg2+ and Ca2+ ions in the ion channel divalent cation binding site are proposed. Differences in the structural and dynamic behavior of the channel protein in the presence of Mg2+ or Ca2+ are analyzed. NMDAR protein conformational flexibility was similar with no ion bound to the divalent cation binding site and with Ca2+ bound, whereas Mg2+ binding reduced protein fluctuations. While bound at the binding site both ions retained their preferred ligand coordination numbers: 6 for Mg2+, and 7–8 for Ca2+. Four asparagine side chain oxygens, a back-bone oxygen, and a water molecule participated in binding a Mg2+ ion. The Ca2+ ion first coordination shell ligands typically included four to five side-chain oxygen atoms of the binding site asparagine residues, two water molecules and zero to two backbone oxygens of the GluN2B subunits. These

  3. Comparison of distance information in [TOAC(1) , Glu(OMe)(7, 18, 19) ] alamethicin F50/5 from paramagnetic relaxation enhancement measurements with data obtained from an X-ray diffraction-based model.

    PubMed

    Jose, Rani Alphonsa; De Zotti, Marta; Peggion, Cristina; Formaggio, Fernando; Toniolo, Claudio; De Borggraeve, Wim M

    2011-05-01

    Peptaibol antibiotics are membrane-active linear peptides of fungal origin that are characterized by a high population of the C(α) -tetrasubstituted, strongly helicogenic, α-amino acid, α-aminoisobutyric acid, an N-terminal acetyl group, and a C-terminal 1,2-amino alcohol. Alamethicins (Alms), among the longest peptaibiotics, are a group of closely sequence-related peptides composed of 19 amino acid residues. [TOAC(1) , Glu(OMe)(7, 18, 19) ] Alm and [TOAC(16) , Glu(OMe)(7, 18, 19) ] Alm are synthetic, nitroxide free-radical labeled analogs of [Glu(OMe)(7, 18, 19) ] Alm F50/5. In this work, nitroxide to peptide NH proton distance information obtained from paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) studies on [TOAC(1) , Glu(OMe)(7, 18, 19) ] Alm is compared with distances derived from an X-ray diffraction-based model. The methodology for PRE determination, as well as the generation of the X-ray diffraction-based model three-dimensional structures, is discussed. The distances obtained from PRE measurements are in close agreement with the information derived from the X-ray diffraction-based model. This finding suggests that this type of information could be implemented as long-range distance restraints in NMR-based structure determination.

  4. Vitamin A transport and the transmembrane pore in the cell-surface receptor for plasma retinol binding protein.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ming; Kawaguchi, Riki; Ter-Stepanian, Mariam; Kassai, Miki; Sun, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin A and its derivatives (retinoids) play diverse and crucial functions from embryogenesis to adulthood and are used as therapeutic agents in human medicine for eye and skin diseases, infections and cancer. Plasma retinol binding protein (RBP) is the principal and specific vitamin A carrier in the blood and binds vitamin A at 1:1 ratio. STRA6 is the high-affinity membrane receptor for RBP and mediates cellular vitamin A uptake. STRA6 null mice have severely depleted vitamin A reserves for vision and consequently have vision loss, even under vitamin A sufficient conditions. STRA6 null humans have a wide range of severe pathological phenotypes in many organs including the eye, brain, heart and lung. Known membrane transport mechanisms involve transmembrane pores that regulate the transport of the substrate (e.g., the gating of ion channels). STRA6 represents a new type of membrane receptor. How this receptor interacts with its transport substrate vitamin A and the functions of its nine transmembrane domains are still completely unknown. These questions are critical to understanding the molecular basis of STRA6's activities and its regulation. We employ acute chemical modification to introduce chemical side chains to STRA6 in a site-specific manner. We found that modifications with specific chemicals at specific positions in or near the transmembrane domains of this receptor can almost completely suppress its vitamin A transport activity. These experiments provide the first evidence for the existence of a transmembrane pore, analogous to the pore of ion channels, for this new type of cell-surface receptor.

  5. Tethered bilayer lipid micromembranes for single-channel recording: the role of adsorbed and partially fused lipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Becucci, Lucia; D'Amico, Massimo; Cinotti, Serena; Daniele, Salvatore; Guidelli, Rolando

    2011-08-07

    A mercury-supported bilayer lipid micromembrane was prepared by anchoring a thiolipid monolayer to a mercury cap electrodeposited on a platinum microdisc about 20 μm in diameter; a lipid monolayer was then self-assembled on top of the thiolipid monolayer either by vesicle fusion or by spilling a few drops of a lipid solution in chloroform on the cap and allowing the solvent to evaporate. Single-channel recording following incorporation of the alamethicin channel-forming peptide exhibits quite different features, depending on the procedure followed to form the distal lipid monolayer. The "spilling" procedure, which avoids the formation of adsorbed or partially fused vesicles, yields very sharp single-channel currents lasting only one or two milliseconds. These are ascribed to ionic flux into the hydrophilic spacer moiety of the thiolipid. Conversely, the vesicle-fusion procedure yields much longer single-channel openings analogous to those obtained with conventional bilayer lipid membranes, albeit smaller. This difference in behavior is explained by ascribing the latter single-channel currents to ionic flux into vesicles adsorbed and/or partially fused onto the tethered lipid bilayer, via capacitive coupling. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  6. The MEMPACK alpha-helical transmembrane protein structure prediction server

    PubMed Central

    Nugent, Timothy; Ward, Sean; Jones, David T.

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: The experimental difficulties of alpha-helical transmembrane protein structure determination make this class of protein an important target for sequence-based structure prediction tools. The MEMPACK prediction server allows users to submit a transmembrane protein sequence and returns transmembrane topology, lipid exposure, residue contacts, helix–helix interactions and helical packing arrangement predictions in both plain text and graphical formats using a number of novel machine learning-based algorithms. Availability: The server can be accessed as a new component of the PSIPRED portal by at http://bioinf.cs.ucl.ac.uk/psipred/. Contact: d.jones@cs.ucl.ac.uk; t.nugent@cs.ucl.ac.uk PMID:21349872

  7. Structure elucidation of dimeric transmembrane domains of bitopic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Volynsky, Pavel E.; Pavlov, Konstantin V.; Efremov, Roman G.; Arseniev, Alexander S.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between transmembrane helices is of great interest because it directly determines biological activity of a membrane protein. Either destroying or enhancing such interactions can result in many diseases related to dysfunction of different tissues in human body. One much studied form of membrane proteins known as bitopic protein is a dimer containing two membrane-spanning helices associating laterally. Establishing structure-function relationship as well as rational design of new types of drugs targeting membrane proteins requires precise structural information about this class of objects. At present time, to investigate spatial structure and internal dynamics of such transmembrane helical dimers, several strategies were developed based mainly on a combination of NMR spectroscopy, optical spectroscopy, protein engineering and molecular modeling. These approaches were successfully applied to homo- and heterodimeric transmembrane fragments of several bitopic proteins, which play important roles in normal and in pathological conditions of human organism. PMID:20421711

  8. Cluster formation of transmembrane proteins due to hydrophobic mismatching.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Ulrich; Guigas, Gernot; Weiss, Matthias

    2008-09-19

    Membranes are the defining envelopes of living cells. At this boundary a multitude of transmembrane proteins mediate signal and mass transfer between cells and their environment. Clustering of these proteins is a frequent and often vital phenomenon that relies at least in part on membrane-mediated interactions. Indeed, the mismatch between proteins' hydrophobic transmembrane domains and the surrounding lipid bilayer has been predicted to facilitate clustering, yet unequivocal quantitative data in support of these predictions have been lacking. Here, we have used coarse-grained membrane simulations to thoroughly address the clustering of transmembrane proteins in detail. Our results emphasize the universal nature of membrane-mediated attraction which relaxes the need for a plethora of fine-tuned interactions between membrane proteins.

  9. The gating of the CFTR channel.

    PubMed

    Moran, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel expressed in the apical membrane of epithelia. Mutations in the CFTR gene are the cause of cystsic fibrosis. CFTR is the only ABC-protein that constitutes an ion channel pore forming subunit. CFTR gating is regulated in complex manner as phosphorylation is mandatory for channel activity and gating is directly regulated by binding of ATP to specific intracellular sites on the CFTR protein. This review covers our current understanding on the gating mechanism in CFTR and illustrates the relevance of alteration of these mechanisms in the onset of cystic fibrosis.

  10. Expression of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator in Ganglia of Human Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Ruiqi; Gu, Huan; Qiu, Yamei; Guo, Yong; Korteweg, Christine; Huang, Jin; Gu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    CF is caused by mutations of the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) which is an anion selective transmembrane ion channel that mainly regulates chloride transport, expressed in the epithelia of various organs. Recently, we have demonstrated CFTR expression in the brain, the spinal cord and the sympathetic ganglia. This study aims to investigate the expression and distribution of CFTR in the ganglia of the human gastrointestinal tract. Fresh tissue and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded normal gastrointestinal tract samples were collected from eleven surgical patients and five autopsy cases. Immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, laser-assisted microdissection and nested reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction were performed. Expression of CFTR protein and mRNA was detected in neurons of the ganglia of all segments of the human gastrointestinal tract examined, including the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, appendix, colon and rectum. The extensive expression of CFTR in the enteric ganglia suggests that CFTR may play a role in the physiology of the innervation of the gastro-intestinal tract. The presence of dysfunctional CFTRs in enteric ganglia could, to a certain extent, explain the gastrointestinal symptoms frequently experienced by CF patients. PMID:27491544

  11. Nanoporous microbead supported bilayers: stability, physical characterization, and incorporation of functional transmembrane proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Ryan W. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Brozik, James A. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Brozik, Susan Marie; Cox, Jason M.; Lopez, Gabriel P.; Barrick, Todd A.; Flores, Adrean

    2007-03-01

    The introduction of functional transmembrane proteins into supported bilayer-based biomimetic systems presents a significant challenge for biophysics. Among the various methods for producing supported bilayers, liposomal fusion offers a versatile method for the introduction of membrane proteins into supported bilayers on a variety of substrates. In this study, the properties of protein containing unilamellar phosphocholine lipid bilayers on nanoporous silica microspheres are investigated. The effects of the silica substrate, pore structure, and the substrate curvature on the stability of the membrane and the functionality of the membrane protein are determined. Supported bilayers on porous silica microspheres show a significant increase in surface area on surfaces with structures in excess of 10 nm as well as an overall decrease in stability resulting from increasing pore size and curvature. Comparison of the liposomal and detergent-mediated introduction of purified bacteriorhodopsin (bR) and the human type 3 serotonin receptor (5HT3R) are investigated focusing on the resulting protein function, diffusion, orientation, and incorporation efficiency. In both cases, functional proteins are observed; however, the reconstitution efficiency and orientation selectivity are significantly enhanced through detergent-mediated protein reconstitution. The results of these experiments provide a basis for bulk ionic and fluorescent dye-based compartmentalization assays as well as single-molecule optical and single-channel electrochemical interrogation of transmembrane proteins in a biomimetic platform.

  12. Cysteine scanning of transmembrane domain three of the human dipeptide transporter: implications for substrate transport.

    PubMed

    Links, Jennifer L S; Kulkarni, Ashutosh A; Davies, Daryl L; Lee, Vincent H L; Haworth, Ian S

    2007-04-01

    The human intestinal dipeptide transporter (hPepT1) transports dipeptides and pharmacologically active drugs from the intestine to the blood. The role of transmembrane domain 3 (TMD3) of hPepT1 was studied using cysteine-scanning mutagenesis and methane thiosulfonate (MTS) cysteine modification. Each amino acid in TMD3 was individually mutated to a cysteine and Gly-Sar uptake by each mutated and modified transporter was determined relative to wild-type hPepT1. Uptake data for mutated transporters modified with the lipid-insoluble cysteine-modifying reagent MTSET suggested tilting of TMD3 relative to the substrate translocation pathway; the extracellular region of TMD3 showed little MTSET reactivity, indicative of solvent inaccessibility, whereas the intracellular part of TMD3 was relatively solvent accessible. Modification at 10 positions of TMD3 with MTSEA, a lipid-soluble cysteine-modifying reagent, gave unusual and statistically significant increases in Gly-Sar uptake relative to untreated mutants. We interpret these data in terms of the spatial properties of the hPepT1 substrate translocation channel and possible interactions of TMD3 with other transmembrane domains.

  13. Investigation of transmembrane protein fused in lipid bilayer membranes supported on porous silicon.

    PubMed

    Tantawi, Khalid Hasan; Cerro, Ramon; Berdiev, Bakhrom; Martin, M Elena Diaz; Montes, Francisco Javier; Patel, Darayas; Williams, John D

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates a device made from a porous silicon structure supporting a lipid bilayer membrane (LBM)fused with Epithelial Sodium Channel protein. The electrochemically-fabricated porous silicon template had pore diameters in the range 0.2~2 µm. Membranes were composed of two synthetic phospholipids: 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoserine and 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine. The LBMwas formed by means of the Langmuir-Blodgett and Langmuir-Schaefer techniques, at a monolayer surface tension of 26 m Nm(-1) in room temperature and on a deionized water subphase, which resulted in an average molecular area of 0.68-0.73 nm(2). Fusion of transmembrane protein was investigated using Atomic Force Microscopy. Initial atomic force microscopy results demonstrate the ability to support lipid bilayers fused with transmembrane proteins across a porous silicon substrate. However, more control of the membrane's surface tension using traditional membrane fusion techniques is required to optimize protein incorporation.

  14. Optimizing an emperical scoring function for transmembrane protein structure determination.

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Malin M.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Gray, Genetha Anne; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2003-10-01

    We examine the problem of transmembrane protein structure determination. Like many other questions that arise in biological research, this problem cannot be addressed by traditional laboratory experimentation alone. An approach that integrates experiment and computation is required. We investigate a procedure which states the transmembrane protein structure determination problem as a bound constrained optimization problem using a special empirical scoring function, called Bundler, as the objective function. In this paper, we describe the optimization problem and some of its mathematical properties. We compare and contrast results obtained using two different derivative free optimization algorithms.

  15. A statistical mechanical model of cell membrane ion channels in electric fields: The mean-field approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y. S.; Thompson, C. J.; Anderson, V.; Wood, A. W.

    A statistical mechanical model of cell membrane ion channels is proposed which incorporates interactions between ion channels and external electric fields. The model provides a physical explanation of trans-membrane ion transport. Under a mean-field approximation, the maximum fractions of open potassium and sodium channels are obtained by solving a self-consistent nonlinear algebraic equation. Using known parameters for the squid giant axon, the model gives excellent agreement with experimental measurements for potassium and sodium trans-membrane conductance. The numerical results imply that the chemical potential of open channels and the interaction energy between channels are well above the thermal noise.

  16. Deorphanizing the human transmembrane genome: A landscape of uncharacterized membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Babcock, Joseph J; Li, Min

    2014-01-01

    The sequencing of the human genome has fueled the last decade of work to functionally characterize genome content. An important subset of genes encodes membrane proteins, which are the targets of many drugs. They reside in lipid bilayers, restricting their endogenous activity to a relatively specialized biochemical environment. Without a reference phenotype, the application of systematic screens to profile candidate membrane proteins is not immediately possible. Bioinformatics has begun to show its effectiveness in focusing the functional characterization of orphan proteins of a particular functional class, such as channels or receptors. Here we discuss integration of experimental and bioinformatics approaches for characterizing the orphan membrane proteome. By analyzing the human genome, a landscape reference for the human transmembrane genome is provided.

  17. A model of a transmembrane drug-efflux pump from Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Recio, Juan; Walas, Fabien; Federici, Luca; Venkatesh Pratap, J; Bavro, Vassiliy N; Miguel, Ricardo Nunez; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Luisi, Ben

    2004-12-03

    In Gram-negative bacteria, drug resistance is due in part to the activity of transmembrane efflux-pumps, which are composed of three types of proteins. A representative pump from Escherichia coli is an assembly of the trimeric outer-membrane protein TolC, which is an allosteric channel, the trimeric inner-membrane proton-antiporter AcrB, and the periplasmic protein, AcrA. The pump displaces drugs vectorially from the bacterium using proton electrochemical force. Crystal structures are available for TolC and AcrB from E. coli, and for the AcrA homologue MexA from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Based on homology modelling and molecular docking, we show how AcrA, AcrB and TolC might assemble to form a tripartite pump, and how allostery may occur during transport.

  18. IA channels: diverse regulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Carrasquillo, Yarimar; Nerbonne, Jeanne M

    2014-04-01

    In many peripheral and central neurons, A-type K(+) currents, IA, have been identified and shown to be key determinants in shaping action potential waveforms and repetitive firing properties, as well as in the regulation of synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity. The functional properties and physiological roles of native neuronal IA, however, have been shown to be quite diverse in different types of neurons. Accumulating evidence suggests that this functional diversity is generated by multiple mechanisms, including the expression and subcellular distributions of IA channels encoded by different voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channel pore-forming (α) subunits, interactions of Kv α subunits with cytosolic and/or transmembrane accessory subunits and regulatory proteins and post-translational modifications of channel subunits. Several recent reports further suggest that local protein translation in the dendrites of neurons and interactions between IA channels with other types of voltage-gated ion channels further expands the functional diversity of native neuronal IA channels. Here, we review the diverse molecular mechanisms that have been shown or proposed to underlie the functional diversity of native neuronal IA channels.

  19. Relationships between cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, extracellular nucleotides and cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Marcet, Brice; Boeynaems, Jean-Marie

    2006-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most common lethal autosomal recessive genetic diseases in the Caucasian population, with a frequency of about 1 in 3000 livebirths. CF is due to a mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene encoding the CFTR protein, a cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-regulated chloride channel localized in the apical membrane of epithelial cells. CFTR is a multifunctional protein which, in addition to be a Cl-channel, is also a regulator of multiple ion channels and other proteins. In particular CFTR has been reported to play a role in the outflow of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) from cells, but this remains controversial. Extracellular nucleotides are signaling molecules that regulate ion transport and mucociliary clearance by acting on P2 nucleotide receptors, in particular the P2Y(2) receptor. Nucleotides activating the P2Y(2) receptor represent thus one pharmacotherapeutic strategy to treat CF disease, via improvement of mucus hydration and mucociliary clearance in airways. Phase II clinical trials have recently shown that aerosolized denufosol (INS37217, Inspire(R)) improves pulmonary function in CF patients: denufosol was granted orphan drug status and phase III trials are planned. Here, we review what is known about the relationship between extracellular nucleotides and CFTR, the role of extracellular nucleotides in epithelial pathophysiology and their putative role as therapeutic agents.

  20. Direct effects of 9-anthracene compounds on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gating

    PubMed Central

    Ai, T.; Bompadre, S. G.; Sohma, Y.; Wang, X.; Li, M.; Sohma, Y.; Ai, T.

    2005-01-01

    Anthracene-9-carboxylic acid (9-AC) has been reported to show both potentiation and inhibitory effects on guinea-pig cardiac cAMP-activated chloride channels via two different binding sites, and inhibition of Mg2+-sensitive protein phosphatases has been proposed for the mechanism of 9-AC potentiation effect. In this study, we examined the effects of 9-AC on wild-type and mutant human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channels expressed in NIH3T3 or CHO cells. 9-AC inhibits whole-cell CFTR current in a voltage-dependent manner, whereas the potentiation effect is not affected by membrane potentials. Anthracene-9-methanol, an electro-neutral 9-AC analog, fails to block CFTR, but shows a nearly identical potentiation effect, corroborating the idea that two chemically distinct sites are responsible, respectively, for potentiation and inhibitory actions of 9-AC. 9-AC also enhances the activity of ΔR-CFTR, a constitutively active CFTR mutant whose R-domain is removed. In excised inside-out patches, 9-AC increases Po by prolonging the mean burst durations and shortening the interburst durations. We therefore conclude that two different 9-AC binding sites for potentiation and inhibitory effects on CFTR channels are located outside of the R-domain. We also speculate that 9-AC potentiates CFTR activity by directly affecting CFTR gating. PMID:15290302

  1. Autonomous transmembrane segment S4 of the voltage sensor domain partitions into the lipid membrane.

    PubMed

    Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup; Miller, Melissa; Butko, Peter; Li, Min

    2012-07-01

    The S4 transmembrane segment in voltage-gated ion channels, a highly basic alpha helix, responds to changes in membrane potential and induces channel opening. Earlier work by others indicates that the S4 segment interacts with lipids in plasma membrane, but its mechanism is unclear. Working with synthetic tryptophan-labeled S4 peptides, we characterized binding of autonomous S4 to lipid membranes. The binding free energy (5.2 +/- 0.2 kcal/mol) of the peptide-lipid interaction was estimated from the apparent dissociation constants, determined from the changes in anisotropy of tryptophan fluorescence induced by addition of lipid vesicles with 30 mol% phosphatidylglycerol. The results are in good agreement with the prediction based on the Wimley-White hydrophobicity scale for interfacial (IF) binding of an alpha-helical peptide to the lipid bilayer (6.98 kcal/mol). High salt inhibited the interaction, thus indicating that the peptide/membrane interaction has both electrostatic and non-electrostatic components. Furthermore, the synthetic S4 corresponding to the Shaker potassium channel was found to spontaneously penetrate into the negatively charged lipid membrane to a depth of about 9 A. Our results revealed important biophysical parameters that influence the interaction of S4 with the membrane: they include fluidity, surface charge, and surface pressure of the membrane, and the at helicity and regular spacing of basic amino-acid residues in the S4 sequence.

  2. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator is an extracellular chloride sensor.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Steven D; Ramjeesingh, Mohabir; Bear, Christine E; Argent, Barry E; Linsdell, Paul; Gray, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a Cl(-) channel that governs the quantity and composition of epithelial secretions. CFTR function is normally tightly controlled as dysregulation can lead to life-threatening diseases such as secretory diarrhoea and cystic fibrosis. CFTR activity is regulated by phosphorylation of its cytosolic regulatory (R) domain, and ATP binding and hydrolysis at two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). Here, we report that CFTR activity is also controlled by extracellular Cl(-) concentration ([Cl(-)]o). Patch clamp current recordings show that a rise in [Cl(-)]o stimulates CFTR channel activity, an effect conferred by a single arginine residue, R899, in extracellular loop 4 of the protein. Using NBD mutants and ATP dose response studies in WT channels, we determined that [Cl(-)]o sensing was linked to changes in ATP binding energy at NBD1, which likely impacts NBD dimer stability. Biochemical measurements showed that increasing [Cl(-)]o decreased the intrinsic ATPase activity of CFTR mainly through a reduction in maximal ATP turnover. Our studies indicate that sensing [Cl(-)]o is a novel mechanism for regulating CFTR activity and suggest that the luminal ionic environment is an important physiological arbiter of CFTR function, which has significant implications for salt and fluid homeostasis in epithelial tissues.

  3. Environmental alkalinity sensing mediated by the transmembrane guanylyl cyclase GCY-14 in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Takashi; Takayama, Jun; Fujiwara, Mayuki; Maruyama, Ichiro N

    2013-06-03

    Survival requires that living organisms continuously monitor environmental and tissue pH. Animals sense acidic pH using ion channels and G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), but monitoring of alkaline pH is not well understood. We report here that in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a transmembrane receptor-type guanylyl cyclase (RGC), GCY-14, of the ASEL gustatory neuron, plays an essential role in the sensing of extracellular alkalinity. Activation of GCY-14 opens a cGMP-gated cation channel encoded by tax-2 and tax-4, resulting in Ca(2+) entry into ASEL. Ectopic expression of GCY-14 in other neurons indicates that it accounts for the alkalinity sensing capability. Domain-swapping and site-directed mutagenesis of GCY-14 reveal that GCY-14 functions as a homodimer, in which histidine of the extracellular domains plays a crucial role in alkalinity detection. These results argue that in addition to ion channels and GPCRs, RGCs also play a role in pH sensation in neurons. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Autonomous Transmembrane Segment S4 of the Voltage Sensor Domain Partitions into the Lipid Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup; Miller, Melissa; Butko, Peter; Li, Min

    2012-01-01

    The S4 transmembrane segment in voltage-gated ion channels, a highly basic α helix, responds to changes in membrane potential and induces channel opening. Earlier work by others indicates that the S4 segment interacts with lipids in plasma membrane, but its mechanism is unclear. Working with synthetic tryptophan-labeled S4 peptides, we characterized binding of autonomous S4 to lipid membranes. The binding free energy (5.2 ± 0.2 kcal/mol) of the peptide-lipid interaction was estimated from the apparent dissociation constants, determined from the changes in anisotropy of tryptophan fluorescence induced by addition of lipid vesicles with 30 mol% phosphatidylglycerol. The results are in good agreement with the prediction based on the Wimley-White hydrophobicity scale for interfacial (IF) binding of an alpha-helical peptide to the lipid bilayer (6.98 kcal/mol). High salt inhibited the interaction, thus indicating that the peptide/membrane interaction has both electrostatic and non-electrostatic components. Furthermore, the synthetic S4 corresponding to the Shaker potassium channel was found to spontaneously penetrate into the negatively charged lipid membrane to a depth of about 9 Å. Our results revealed important biophysical parameters that influence the interaction of S4 with the membrane: they include fluidity, surface charge, and surface pressure of the membrane, and the α helicity and regular spacing of basic amino-acid residues in the S4 sequence. PMID:22465069

  5. Interactions between intersubunit transmembrane domains regulate the chaperone-dependent degradation of an oligomeric membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Buck, Teresa M; Jordahl, Alexa S; Yates, Megan E; Preston, G Michael; Cook, Emily; Kleyman, Thomas R; Brodsky, Jeffrey L

    2017-02-01

    In the kidney, the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) regulates blood pressure through control of sodium and volume homeostasis, and in the lung, ENaC regulates the volume of airway and alveolar fluids. ENaC is a heterotrimer of homologous α-, β- and γ-subunits, and assembles in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) before it traffics to and functions at the plasma membrane. Improperly folded or orphaned ENaC subunits are subject to ER quality control and targeted for ER-associated degradation (ERAD). We previously established that a conserved, ER lumenal, molecular chaperone, Lhs1/GRP170, selects αENaC, but not β- or γ-ENaC, for degradation when the ENaC subunits were individually expressed. We now find that when all three subunits are co-expressed, Lhs1-facilitated ERAD was blocked. To determine which domain-domain interactions between the ENaC subunits are critical for chaperone-dependent quality control, we employed a yeast model and expressed chimeric α/βENaC constructs in the context of the ENaC heterotrimer. We discovered that the βENaC transmembrane domain was sufficient to prevent the Lhs1-dependent degradation of the α-subunit in the context of the ENaC heterotrimer. Our work also found that Lhs1 delivers αENaC for proteasome-mediated degradation after the protein has become polyubiquitinated. These data indicate that the Lhs1 chaperone selectively recognizes an immature form of αENaC, one which has failed to correctly assemble with the other channel subunits via its transmembrane domain. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  6. Transmembrane water-flux through SLC4A11: a route defective in genetic corneal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Vilas, Gonzalo L.; Loganathan, Sampath K.; Liu, Jun; Riau, Andri K.; Young, James D.; Mehta, Jodhbir S.; Vithana, Eranga N.; Casey, Joseph R.

    2013-01-01

    Three genetic corneal dystrophies [congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy type 2 (CHED2), Harboyan syndrome and Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy] arise from mutations of the SLC4a11 gene, which cause blindness from fluid accumulation in the corneal stroma. Selective transmembrane water conductance controls cell size, renal fluid reabsorption and cell division. All known water-channelling proteins belong to the major intrinsic protein family, exemplified by aquaporins (AQPs). Here we identified SLC4A11, a member of the solute carrier family 4 of bicarbonate transporters, as an unexpected addition to known transmembrane water movement facilitators. The rate of osmotic-gradient driven cell-swelling was monitored in Xenopus laevis oocytes and HEK293 cells, expressing human AQP1, NIP5;1 (a water channel protein from plant), hCNT3 (a human nucleoside transporter) and human SLC4A11. hCNT3-expressing cells swelled no faster than control cells, whereas SLC4A11-mediated water permeation at a rate about half that of some AQP proteins. SLC4A11-mediated water movement was: (i) similar to some AQPs in rate; (ii) uncoupled from solute-flux; (iii) inhibited by stilbene disulfonates (classical SLC4 inhibitors); (iv) inactivated in one CHED2 mutant (R125H). Localization of AQP1 and SLC4A11 in human and murine corneal (apical and basolateral, respectively) suggests a cooperative role in mediating trans-endothelial water reabsorption. Slc4a11−/− mice manifest corneal oedema and distorted endothelial cells, consistent with loss of a water-flux. Observed water-flux through SLC4A11 extends the repertoire of known water movement pathways and call for a re-examination of explanations for water movement in human tissues. PMID:23813972

  7. Marginally hydrophobic transmembrane α-helices shaping membrane protein folding

    PubMed Central

    De Marothy, Minttu T; Elofsson, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Cells have developed an incredible machinery to facilitate the insertion of membrane proteins into the membrane. While we have a fairly good understanding of the mechanism and determinants of membrane integration, more data is needed to understand the insertion of membrane proteins with more complex insertion and folding pathways. This review will focus on marginally hydrophobic transmembrane helices and their influence on membrane protein folding. These weakly hydrophobic transmembrane segments are by themselves not recognized by the translocon and therefore rely on local sequence context for membrane integration. How can such segments reside within the membrane? We will discuss this in the light of features found in the protein itself as well as the environment it resides in. Several characteristics in proteins have been described to influence the insertion of marginally hydrophobic helices. Additionally, the influence of biological membranes is significant. To begin with, the actual cost for having polar groups within the membrane may not be as high as expected; the presence of proteins in the membrane as well as characteristics of some amino acids may enable a transmembrane helix to harbor a charged residue. The lipid environment has also been shown to directly influence the topology as well as membrane boundaries of transmembrane helices—implying a dynamic relationship between membrane proteins and their environment. PMID:25970811

  8. Marginally hydrophobic transmembrane α-helices shaping membrane protein folding.

    PubMed

    De Marothy, Minttu T; Elofsson, Arne

    2015-07-01

    Cells have developed an incredible machinery to facilitate the insertion of membrane proteins into the membrane. While we have a fairly good understanding of the mechanism and determinants of membrane integration, more data is needed to understand the insertion of membrane proteins with more complex insertion and folding pathways. This review will focus on marginally hydrophobic transmembrane helices and their influence on membrane protein folding. These weakly hydrophobic transmembrane segments are by themselves not recognized by the translocon and therefore rely on local sequence context for membrane integration. How can such segments reside within the membrane? We will discuss this in the light of features found in the protein itself as well as the environment it resides in. Several characteristics in proteins have been described to influence the insertion of marginally hydrophobic helices. Additionally, the influence of biological membranes is significant. To begin with, the actual cost for having polar groups within the membrane may not be as high as expected; the presence of proteins in the membrane as well as characteristics of some amino acids may enable a transmembrane helix to harbor a charged residue. The lipid environment has also been shown to directly influence the topology as well as membrane boundaries of transmembrane helices-implying a dynamic relationship between membrane proteins and their environment. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  9. High Transmembrane Voltage Raised by Close Contact Initiates Fusion Pore

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Bing; Tian, Zhiqi; Li, Dechang; Ji, Baohua

    2016-01-01

    Membrane fusion lies at the heart of neuronal communication but the detailed mechanism of a critical step, fusion pore initiation, remains poorly understood. Here, through atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, a transient pore formation induced by a close contact of two apposed bilayers is firstly reported. Such a close contact gives rise to a high local transmembrane voltage that induces the transient pore formation. Through simulations on two apposed bilayers fixed at a series of given distances, the process in which two bilayers approaching to each other under the pulling force from fusion proteins for membrane fusion was mimicked. Of note, this close contact induced fusion pore formation is contrasted with previous reported electroporation under ad hoc applied external electric field or ionic charge in-balance. We show that the transmembrane voltage increases with the decrease of the distance between the bilayers. Below a critical distance, depending on the lipid composition, the local transmembrane voltage can be sufficiently high to induce the transient pores. The size of these pores is approximately 1~2 nm in diameter, which is large enough to allow passing of neurotransmitters. A resealing of the membrane pores resulting from the neutralization of the transmembrane voltage by ions through the pores was then observed. We also found that the membrane tension can either prolong the lifetime of transient pores or cause them to dilate for full collapse. This result provides a possible mechanism for fusion pore formation and regulation of pathway of fusion process. PMID:28018169

  10. High Transmembrane Voltage Raised by Close Contact Initiates Fusion Pore.

    PubMed

    Bu, Bing; Tian, Zhiqi; Li, Dechang; Ji, Baohua

    2016-01-01

    Membrane fusion lies at the heart of neuronal communication but the detailed mechanism of a critical step, fusion pore initiation, remains poorly understood. Here, through atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, a transient pore formation induced by a close contact of two apposed bilayers is firstly reported. Such a close contact gives rise to a high local transmembrane voltage that induces the transient pore formation. Through simulations on two apposed bilayers fixed at a series of given distances, the process in which two bilayers approaching to each other under the pulling force from fusion proteins for membrane fusion was mimicked. Of note, this close contact induced fusion pore formation is contrasted with previous reported electroporation under ad hoc applied external electric field or ionic charge in-balance. We show that the transmembrane voltage increases with the decrease of the distance between the bilayers. Below a critical distance, depending on the lipid composition, the local transmembrane voltage can be sufficiently high to induce the transient pores. The size of these pores is approximately 1~2 nm in diameter, which is large enough to allow passing of neurotransmitters. A resealing of the membrane pores resulting from the neutralization of the transmembrane voltage by ions through the pores was then observed. We also found that the membrane tension can either prolong the lifetime of transient pores or cause them to dilate for full collapse. This result provides a possible mechanism for fusion pore formation and regulation of pathway of fusion process.

  11. Thiourea isosteres as anion receptors and transmembrane transporters.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Marco; Light, Mark E; Davis, Anthony P; Gale, Philip A

    2011-07-21

    Compounds containing cyanoguanidine and 3-amino-1,2,4-benzothiadiazine-1,1-dioxide have been studied as anion receptors and transporters. Significant affinity for oxo-anions was observed in organic solution and the receptors were found to function as transmembrane chloride/nitrate antiporters with transport rates enhanced in the presence of valinomycin-K(+) complex.

  12. Hydrophobic Gating in Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Prafulla; Sansom, Mark S.P.; Tucker, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Biological ion channels are nanoscale transmembrane pores. When water and ions are enclosed within the narrow confines of a sub-nanometer hydrophobic pore, they exhibit behavior not evident from macroscopic descriptions. At this nanoscopic level, the unfavorable interaction between the lining of a hydrophobic pore and water may lead to liquid-vapor oscillations. The resultant transient vapor state is ‘dewetted’ i.e. effectively devoid of water molecules within all, or part of the pore, thus leading to an energetic barrier to ion conduction. This process, termed ‘hydrophobic gating’, was first observed in molecular dynamics simulations of model nanopores, where the principles underlying hydrophobic gating (i.e. changes in diameter, polarity, or transmembrane voltage) have now been extensively validated. Computational, structural and functional studies now indicate that biological ion channels may also exploit hydrophobic gating to regulate ion flow within their pores. Here we review the evidence for this process, and propose that this unusual behavior of water represents an increasingly important element in understanding the relationship between ion channel structure and function. PMID:25106689

  13. Transmembrane helix prediction using amino acid property features and latent semantic analysis.

    PubMed

    Ganapathiraju, Madhavi; Balakrishnan, N; Reddy, Raj; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Prediction of transmembrane (TM) helices by statistical methods suffers from lack of sufficient training data. Current best methods use hundreds or even thousands of free parameters in their models which are tuned to fit the little data available for training. Further, they are often restricted to the generally accepted topology "cytoplasmic-transmembrane-extracellular" and cannot adapt to membrane proteins that do not conform to this topology. Recent crystal structures of channel proteins have revealed novel architectures showing that the above topology may not be as universal as previously believed. Thus, there is a need for methods that can better predict TM helices even in novel topologies and families. Here, we describe a new method "TMpro" to predict TM helices with high accuracy. To avoid overfitting to existing topologies, we have collapsed cytoplasmic and extracellular labels to a single state, non-TM. TMpro is a binary classifier which predicts TM or non-TM using multiple amino acid properties (charge, polarity, aromaticity, size and electronic properties) as features. The features are extracted from sequence information by applying the framework used for latent semantic analysis of text documents and are input to neural networks that learn the distinction between TM and non-TM segments. The model uses only 25 free parameters. In benchmark analysis TMpro achieves 95% segment F-score corresponding to 50% reduction in error rate compared to the best methods not requiring an evolutionary profile of a protein to be known. Performance is also improved when applied to more recent and larger high resolution datasets PDBTM and MPtopo. TMpro predictions in membrane proteins with unusual or disputed TM structure (K+ channel, aquaporin and HIV envelope glycoprotein) are discussed. TMpro uses very few free parameters in modeling TM segments as opposed to the very large number of free parameters used in state-of-the-art membrane prediction methods, yet achieves very

  14. Molecular model of the action potential sodium channel.

    PubMed Central

    Guy, H R; Seetharamulu, P

    1986-01-01

    Secondary and tertiary structural models of sodium channel transmembrane segments were developed from its recently determined primary sequence in Electrophorus electricus. The model has four homologous domains, and each domain has eight homologous transmembrane segments, S1 through S8. Each domain contains three relatively apolar segments (S1, S2 and S3) and two very apolar segments (S5 and S8), all postulated to be transmembrane alpha-helices. S4 segments have positively charged residues, mainly arginines, at every third residue. The model channel lining is formed by four S4 transmembrane alpha-helices and four negatively charged S7 segments. S7 segments are postulated to be short, partially transmembrane amphipathic alpha-helices in three domains and a beta-strand in the last domain. S7 segments are preceded by short apolar segments (S6) postulated to be alpha-helices in three domains and a beta-strand in the last domain. Positively charged side chains of S4 form salt bridges with negatively charged side chains on S7 and near the ends of S1 and S3. Putative extracellular segments that contain 5 of the 10 potential N-glycosylation sites link S5 to S6. Channel activation may involve a 'helical screw' mechanism in which S4 helices rotate around their axes as they move toward the extracellular surface. Images PMID:2417247

  15. A new theoretical model for transmembrane potential and ion currents induced in a spherical cell under low frequency electromagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Gao, Yang; Chen, Ruijuan; Wang, Huiquan; Dong, Lei; Dou, Junrong

    2016-10-01

    Time-varying electromagnetic fields (EMF) can induce some physiological effects in neuronal tissues, which have been explored in many applications such as transcranial magnetic stimulation. Although transmembrane potentials and induced currents have already been the subjects of many theoretical studies, most previous works about this topic are mainly completed by utilizing Maxwell's equations, often by solving a Laplace equation. In previous studies, cells were often considered to be three-compartment models with different electroconductivities in different regions (three compartments are often intracellular regions, membrane, and extracellular regions). However, models like that did not take dynamic ion channels into consideration. Therefore, one cannot obtain concrete ionic current changes such as potassium current change or sodium current change by these models. The aim of the present work is to present a new and more detailed model for calculating transmembrane potentials and ionic currents induced by time-varying EMF. Equations used in the present paper originate from Nernst-Plank equations, which are ionic current-related equations. The main work is to calculate ionic current changes induced by EMF exposure, and then transmembrane potential changes are calculated with Hodgkin-Huxley model. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:481-492, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Use of thiol-disulfide equilibria to measure the energetics of assembly of transmembrane helices in phospholipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristian, Lidia; Lear, James D.; Degrado, William F.

    2003-12-01

    Despite significant efforts and promising progress, the understanding of membrane protein folding lags behind that of soluble proteins. Insights into the energetics of membrane protein folding have been gained from biophysical studies in membrane-mimicking environments (primarily detergent micelles). However, the development of techniques for studying the thermodynamics of folding in phospholipid bilayers remains a considerable challenge. We had previously used thiol-disulfide exchange to study the thermodynamics of association of transmembrane -helices in detergent micelles; here, we extend this methodology to phospholipid bilayers. The system for this study is the homotetrameric M2 proton channel protein from the influenza A virus. Transmembrane peptides from this protein specifically self-assemble into tetramers that retain the ability to bind to the drug amantadine. Thiol-disulfide exchange under equilibrium conditions was used to quantitatively measure the thermodynamics of this folding interaction in phospholipid bilayers. The effects of phospholipid acyl chain length and cholesterol on the peptide association were investigated. The association of the helices strongly depends on the thickness of the bilayer and cholesterol levels present in the phospholipid bilayer. The most favorable folding occurred when there was a good match between the width of the apolar region of the bilayer and the hydrophobic length of the transmembrane helix. Physiologically relevant variations in the cholesterol level are sufficient to strongly influence the association. Evaluation of the energetics of peptide association in the presence and absence of cholesterol showed a significantly tighter association upon inclusion of cholesterol in the lipid bilayers.

  17. An intracellular anion channel critical for pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Lefkovith, Ariel J; Marks, Michael S; Oancea, Elena

    2014-12-16

    Intracellular ion channels are essential regulators of organellar and cellular function, yet the molecular identity and physiological role of many of these channels remains elusive. In particular, no ion channel has been characterized in melanosomes, organelles that produce and store the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanosome function cause albinism, characterized by vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired retinal development, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. The most common form of albinism is caused by mutations in oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), a melanosome-specific transmembrane protein with unknown function. Here we used direct patch-clamp of skin and eye melanosomes to identify a novel chloride-selective anion conductance mediated by OCA2 and required for melanin production. Expression of OCA2 increases organelle pH, suggesting that the chloride channel might regulate melanin synthesis by modulating melanosome pH. Thus, a melanosomal anion channel that requires OCA2 is essential for skin and eye pigmentation.

  18. Interaction of the M4 Segment with Other Transmembrane Segments Is Required for Surface Expression of Mammalian α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic Acid (AMPA) Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Salussolia, Catherine L.; Corrales, Alexandra; Talukder, Iehab; Kazi, Rashek; Akgul, Gulcan; Bowen, Mark; Wollmuth, Lonnie P.

    2011-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors (GluRs) are ligand-gated ion channels with a modular structure. The ion channel itself shares structural similarity, albeit an inverted membrane topology, with P-loop channels. Like P-loop channels, prokaryotic GluR subunits (e.g. GluR0) have two transmembrane segments. In contrast, eukaryotic GluRs have an additional transmembrane segment (M4), located C-terminal to the ion channel core. However, the structural/functional significance of this additional transmembrane segment is poorly defined. Although topologically similar to GluR0, mammalian AMPA receptor (GluA1) subunits lacking the M4 segment do not display surface expression. This lack of expression is not due to the M4 segment serving as an anchor to the ligand-binding domain because insertion of an artificial polyleucine transmembrane segment does not rescue surface expression. Specific interactions between M4 and the ligand-binding domain are also unlikely because insertion of polyglycines into the linker connecting them has no deleterious effects on function or surface expression. However, tryptophan and cysteine scanning mutagenesis of the M4 segment, as well as recovery of function in the polyleucine background, defined a unique face of the M4 helix that is required for GluR surface expression. In the AMPA receptor structure, this face forms intersubunit contacts with the transmembrane helices of the ion channel core (M1 and M3) from another subunit within the homotetramer. Thus, our experiments show that a highly specific interaction of the M4 segment with an adjacent subunit is required for surface expression of AMPA receptors. This interaction may represent a mechanism for regulating AMPA receptor biogenesis. PMID:21930708

  19. Critical role of the first transmembrane domain of Cx26 in regulating oligomerization and function

    PubMed Central

    Jara, Oscar; Acuña, Rodrigo; García, Isaac E.; Maripillán, Jaime; Figueroa, Vania; Sáez, Juan C.; Araya-Secchi, Raúl; Lagos, Carlos F.; Pérez-Acle, Tomas; Berthoud, Viviana M.; Beyer, Eric C.; Martínez, Agustín D.

    2012-01-01

    To identify motifs involved in oligomerization of the gap junction protein Cx26, we studied individual transmembrane (TM) domains and the full-length protein. Using the TOXCAT assay for interactions of isolated TM α-helices, we found that TM1, a Cx26 pore domain, had a strong propensity to homodimerize. We identified amino acids Val-37–Ala-40 (VVAA) as the TM1 motif required for homodimerization. Two deafness-associated Cx26 mutations localized in this region, Cx26V37I and Cx26A40G, differentially affected dimerization. TM1-V37I dimerized only weakly, whereas TM1-A40G did not dimerize. When the full-length mutants were expressed in HeLa cells, both Cx26V37I and Cx26A40G formed oligomers less efficiently than wild-type Cx26. A Cx26 cysteine substitution mutant, Cx26V37C formed dithiothreitol-sensitive dimers. Substitution mutants of Val-37 formed intercellular channels with reduced function, while mutants of Ala-40 did not form functional gap junction channels. Unlike wild-type Cx26, neither Cx26V37I nor Cx26A40G formed functional hemichannels in low extracellular calcium. Thus the VVAA motif of Cx26 is critical for TM1 dimerization, hexamer formation, and channel function. The differential effects of VVAA mutants on hemichannels and gap junction channels imply that inter-TM interactions can differ in unapposed and docked hemichannels. Moreover, Cx26 oligomerization appears dependent on transient TM1 dimerization as an intermediate step. PMID:22787277

  20. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Reduces Microtubule-Dependent Campylobacter jejuni Invasion.

    PubMed

    Kido, Junko; Shimohata, Takaaki; Amano, Sachie; Hatayama, Sho; Nguyen, Anh Quoc; Sato, Yuri; Kanda, Yuna; Tentaku, Aya; Fukushima, Shiho; Nakahashi, Mutsumi; Uebanso, Takashi; Mawatari, Kazuaki; Takahashi, Akira

    2017-10-01

    Campylobacterjejuni is a foodborne pathogen that induces gastroenteritis. Invasion and adhesion are essential in the process of C. jejuni infection leading to gastroenteritis. The mucosal layer plays a key role in the system of defense against efficient invasion and adhesion by bacteria, which is modulated by several ion channels and transporters mediated by water flux in the intestine. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) plays the main role in water flux in the intestine, and it is closely associated with bacterial clearance. We previously reported that C. jejuni infection suppresses CFTR channel activity in intestinal epithelial cells; however, the mechanism and importance of this suppression are unclear. This study sought to elucidate the role of CFTR in C. jejuni infection. Using HEK293 cells that stably express wild-type and mutated CFTR, we found that CFTR attenuated C. jejuni invasion and that it was not involved in bacterial adhesion or intracellular survival but was associated with microtubule-dependent intracellular transport. Moreover, we revealed that CFTR attenuated the function of the microtubule motor protein, which caused inhibition of C. jejuni invasion, but did not affect microtubule stability. Meanwhile, the CFTR mutant G551D-CFTR, which had defects in channel activity, suppressed C. jejuni invasion, whereas the ΔF508-CFTR mutant, which had defects in maturation, did not suppress C. jejuni invasion, suggesting that CFTR suppression of C. jejuni invasion is related to CFTR maturation but not channel activity. When these findings are taken together, it may be seen that mature CFTR inhibits C. jejuni invasion by regulating microtubule-mediated pathways. We suggest that CFTR plays a critical role in cellular defenses against C. jejuni invasion and that suppression of CFTR may be an initial step in promoting cell invasion during C. jejuni infection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. Potassium transmembrane fluxes in anoxic hepatocytes from goldfish (Carassius auratus L.).

    PubMed

    Mut, P N; Espelt, M V; Krumschnabel, G; Schwarzbaum, P J

    2006-01-01

    Despite the fact that anoxic goldfish hepatocytes can maintain the transmembrane gradients of Na(+), H(+) and Ca(2+), cyanide (CN) intoxication leads to a rapid breakdown of K(+) homeostasis. In this study, [(86)Rb(+)] K(+) fluxes across the plasma membrane of goldfish hepatocytes were studied in order to identify the possible causes of this imbalance. Four minutes of cyanide incubation induced an acute and stable 61% decrease of K(+) influx (mostly driven by Na,K-ATPase activity), whereas K(+) efflux increased by 24.3%, this imbalance yielding a net K(+) efflux of 0.279+/-0.024 nmol 10(-6) cells(-1) min(-1). This uncoupling was not observed when glycolytic ATP production was inhibited with iodoacetic acid. Although the CN-induced decrease of K(+) influx was fully reversible upon washout of the inhibitor, it could not be prevented by any of the following treatments: (1) addition of 2% bovine serum albumin, which binds extracellular fatty acids known to activate specific K(+) channels; (2) addition of ascorbate, which acts as a radical scavenger; (3) inclusion of 5 mM glucose as an extracellular carbon source; and (4) removal of medium oxygen (obtained by nitrogen bubbling). Regarding the elevation of K(+) efflux in the presence of CN, neither ATP-dependent K(+) channels nor the KCl cotransporter appeared to be activated, whereas BaCl(2), an inhibitor of voltage-gated K(+) channels, decreased K(+) efflux of CN-intoxicated cells to control levels. In summary, these results indicate that, in goldfish hepatocytes, the CN-induced K(+) imbalance results from acute Na,K-ATPase inhibition together with the activation of voltage-dependent K(+) channels, the latter probably resulting from transient membrane depolarization.

  2. Shifting hydrogen bonds may produce flexible transmembrane helices.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zheng; Bowie, James U

    2012-05-22

    The intricate functions of membrane proteins would not be possible without bends or breaks that are remarkably common in transmembrane helices. The frequent helix distortions are nevertheless surprising because backbone hydrogen bonds should be strong in an apolar membrane, potentially rigidifying helices. It is therefore mysterious how distortions can be generated by the evolutionary currency of random point mutations. Here we show that we can engineer a transition between distinct distorted helix conformations in bacteriorhodopsin with a single-point mutation. Moreover, we estimate the energetic cost of the conformational transitions to be smaller than 1 kcal/mol. We propose that the low energy of distortion is explained in part by the shifting of backbone hydrogen bonding partners. Consistent with this view, extensive backbone hydrogen bond shifts occur during helix conformational changes that accompany functional cycles. Our results explain how evolution has been able to liberally exploit transmembrane helix bending for the optimization of membrane protein structure, function, and dynamics.

  3. A potential smoothing algorithm accurately predicts transmembrane helix packing.

    PubMed

    Pappu, R V; Marshall, G R; Ponder, J W

    1999-01-01

    Potential smoothing, a deterministic analog of stochastic simulated annealing, is a powerful paradigm for the solution of conformational search problems that require extensive sampling, and should be a useful tool in computational approaches to structure prediction and refinement. A novel potential smoothing and search (PSS) algorithm has been developed and applied to predict the packing of transmembrane helices. The highlight of this method is the efficient manner in which it circumvents the combinatorial explosion associated with the large number of minima on multidimensional potential energy surfaces in order to converge to the global energy minimum. Here we show how our potential smoothing and search method succeeds in finding the global minimum energy structure for the glycophorin A (GpA) transmembrane helix dimer by optimizing interhelical van der Waals interactions over rigid and semi-rigid helices. Structures obtained from our ab initio predictions are in close agreement with recent experimental data.

  4. The Lantibiotic Nisin Induces Transmembrane Movement of a Fluorescent Phospholipid

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Gert N.; Konings, Wil N.; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    1998-01-01

    Nisin is a pore-forming antimicrobial peptide. The capacity of nisin to induce transmembrane movement of a fluorescent phospholipid in lipid vesicles was investigated. Unilamellar phospholipid vesicles that contained a fluorescent phospholipid (1-acyl-2-{6-[(7-nitro-2-1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)amino]caproyl}-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) in the inner leaflet of the bilayer were used. Nisin-induced movement of the fluorescent phospholipid from the inner leaflet to the outer leaflet of the membrane reached stable levels, which were dependent on the concentration of nisin added. The rate constant k of this nisin-induced transmembrane movement increased with the nisin concentration but was not dependent on temperature within the range of 5 to 30°C. In contrast, the rate constant of movement of fluorescent phospholipid from vesicle to vesicle strongly depended on temperature. The data indicate that nisin transiently disturbs the phospholipid organization of the target membrane. PMID:9852000

  5. Transmembrane current imaging in the heart during pacing and fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Gray, Richard A; Mashburn, David N; Sidorov, Veniamin Y; Roth, Bradley J; Pathmanathan, Pras; Wikswo, John P

    2013-10-01

    Recently, we described a method to quantify the time course of total transmembrane current (Im) and the relative role of its two components, a capacitive current (Ic) and a resistive current (Iion), corresponding to the cardiac action potential during stable propagation. That approach involved recording high-fidelity (200 kHz) transmembrane potential (Vm) signals with glass microelectrodes at one site using a spatiotemporal coordinate transformation via measured conduction velocity. Here we extend our method to compute these transmembrane currents during stable and unstable propagation from fluorescence signals of Vm at thousands of sites (3 kHz), thereby introducing transmembrane current imaging. In contrast to commonly used linear Laplacians of extracellular potential (Ve) to compute Im, we utilized nonlinear image processing to compute the required second spatial derivatives of Vm. We quantified the dynamic spatial patterns of current density of Im and Iion for both depolarization and repolarization during pacing (including nonplanar patterns) by calibrating data with the microelectrode signals. Compared to planar propagation, we found that the magnitude of Iion was significantly reduced at sites of wave collision during depolarization but not repolarization. Finally, we present uncalibrated dynamic patterns of Im during ventricular fibrillation and show that Im at singularity sites was monophasic and positive with a significant nonzero charge (Im integrated over 10 ms) in contrast with nonsingularity sites. Our approach should greatly enhance the understanding of the relative roles of functional (e.g., rate-dependent membrane dynamics and propagation patterns) and static spatial heterogeneities (e.g., spatial differences in tissue resistance) via recordings during normal and compromised propagation, including arrhythmias. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Aquaglyceroporins: generalized metalloid channels

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Rita; Bhattacharjee, Hiranmoy; Rosen, Barry P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Aquaporins (AQPs), members of a superfamily of transmembrane channel proteins, are ubiquitous in all domains of life. They fall into a number of branches that can be functionally categorized into two major sub-groups: i) orthodox aquaporins, which are water-specific channels, and ii) aquaglyceroporins, which allow the transport of water, non-polar solutes, such as urea or glycerol, the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide, and gases such as ammonia, carbon dioxide and nitric oxide and, as described in this review, metalloids. Scope of Review: This review summarizes the key findings that AQP channels conduct bidirectional movement of metalloids into and out of cells. Major Conclusions: As(OH)3 and Sb(OH)3 behave as inorganic molecular mimics of glycerol, a property that allows their passage through AQP channels. Plant AQPs also allow the passage of boron and silicon as their hydroxyacids, boric acid (B(OH)3) and orthosilicic acid (Si(OH)4), respectively. Genetic analysis suggests that germanic acid (GeO2) is also a substrate. While As(III), Sb(III) and Ge(IV) are toxic metalloids, borate (B(III)) and silicate (Si(IV)) are essential elements in higher plants. General Significance: The uptake of environmental metalloids by aquaporins provides an understanding of (i) how toxic elements such as arsenic enter the food chain; (ii) the delivery of arsenic and antimony containing drugs in the treatment of certain forms of leukemia and chemotherapy of diseases caused by pathogenic protozoa; and (iii) the possibility that food plants such as rice could be made safer by genetically modifying them to exclude arsenic while still accumulating boron and silicon. PMID:24291688

  7. Transcriptome analysis reveals transmembrane targets on transplantable midbrain dopamine progenitors.

    PubMed

    Bye, Chris R; Jönsson, Marie E; Björklund, Anders; Parish, Clare L; Thompson, Lachlan H

    2015-04-14

    An important challenge for the continued development of cell therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD) is the establishment of procedures that better standardize cell preparations for use in transplantation. Although cell sorting has been an anticipated strategy, its application has been limited by lack of knowledge regarding transmembrane proteins that can be used to target and isolate progenitors for midbrain dopamine (mDA) neurons. We used a "FACS-array" approach to identify 18 genes for transmembrane proteins with high expression in mDA progenitors and describe the utility of four of these targets (Alcam, Chl1, Gfra1, and Igsf8) for isolating mDA progenitors from rat primary ventral mesencephalon through flow cytometry. Alcam and Chl1 facilitated a significant enrichment of mDA neurons following transplantation, while targeting of Gfra1 allowed for robust separation of dopamine and serotonin neurons. Importantly, we also show that mDA progenitors isolated on the basis of transmembrane proteins are capable of extensive, functional innervation of the host striatum and correction of motor impairment in a unilateral model of PD. These results are highly relevant for current efforts to establish safe and effective stem cell-based procedures for PD, where clinical translation will almost certainly require safety and standardization measures in order to deliver well-characterized cell preparations.

  8. Probing transmembrane mechanical coupling and cytomechanics using magnetic twisting cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, N.; Ingber, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    We recently developed a magnetic twisting cytometry technique that allows us to apply controlled mechanical stresses to specific cell surface receptors using ligand-coated ferromagnetic microbeads and to simultaneously measure the mechanical response in living cells. Using this technique, we have previously shown the following: (i) beta 1 integrin receptors mediate mechanical force transfer across the cell surface and to the cytoskeleton, whereas other transmembrane receptors (e.g., scavenger receptors) do not; (ii) cytoskeletal stiffness increases in direct proportion to the level of stress applied to integrins; and (iii) the slope of this linear stiffening response differs depending on the shape of the cell. We now show that different integrins (beta 1, alpha V beta 3, alpha V, alpha 5, alpha 2) and other transmembrane receptors (scavenger receptor, platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule) differ in their ability to mediate force transfer across the cell surface. In addition, the linear stiffening behavior previously observed in endothelial cells was found to be shared by other cell types. Finally, we demonstrate that dynamic changes in cell shape that occur during both cell spreading and retraction are accompanied by coordinate changes in cytoskeletal stiffness. Taken together, these results suggest that the magnetic twisting cytometry technique may be a powerful and versatile tool for studies analyzing the molecular basis of transmembrane mechanical coupling to the cytoskeleton as well as dynamic relations between changes in cytoskeletal structure and alterations in cell form and function.

  9. Splice isoform estrogen receptors as integral transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hee; Toomre, Derek; Bender, Jeffrey R

    2011-11-01

    In addition to enhancing or repressing transcription, steroid hormone receptors rapidly transduce kinase activation signals. On ligand engagement, an N-terminus-truncated splice isoform of estrogen receptor (ER) α, ER46, triggers membrane-initiated signals, resulting in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation and endothelial NO production. The orientation of ER46 at the plasma membrane is incompletely defined. With the use of ecliptic pHluorin-fused ER46, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy in live human endothelial cells illustrates that ER46 can topologically conform to a type I transmembrane protein structure. Mutation of isoleucine-386 at the center of ER46's transmembrane hydrophobic core prevents membrane spanning, obscures the N-terminal ectodomain, and effects a marked reduction in membrane-impermeant estrogen binding with diminished rapid eNOS activation and NO production, despite maintained genomic induction of an estrogen response element-luciferase reporter. Thus there exist pools of transmembrane steroid hormone receptors that are efficient signaling molecules and potential novel therapeutic targets.

  10. An analysis of oligomerization interfaces in transmembrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The amount of transmembrane protein (TM) structures solved to date is now large enough to attempt large scale analyses. In particular, extensive studies of oligomeric interfaces in the transmembrane region are now possible. Results We have compiled the first fully comprehensive set of validated transmembrane protein interfaces in order to study their features and assess what differentiates them from their soluble counterparts. Conclusions The general features of TM interfaces do not differ much from those of soluble proteins: they are large, tightly packed and possess many interface core residues. In our set, membrane lipids were not found to significantly mediate protein-protein interfaces. Although no G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) was included in the validated set, we analyzed the crystallographic dimerization interfaces proposed in the literature. We found that the putative dimer interfaces proposed for class A GPCRs do not show the usual patterns of stable biological interfaces, neither in terms of evolution nor of packing, thus they likely correspond to crystal interfaces. We cannot however rule out the possibility that they constitute transient or weak interfaces. In contrast we do observe a clear signature of biological interface for the proposed dimer of the class F human Smoothened receptor. PMID:24134166

  11. Transmembrane chloride flux in tissue-cultured chick heart cells

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    To evaluate the transmembrane movement of chloride in a preparation of cardiac muscle lacking the extracellular diffusion limitations of natural specimens, intracellular chloride concentration ( [Cl] i) and transmembrane 36Cl efflux have been determined in growth-oriented embryonic chick heart cells in tissue culture. Using the method of isotopic equilibrium, [Cl]i was 25.1 +/- 7.3 mmol x (liter cell water)- 1, comparable to the value of 24.9 +/- 5.4 mmol x (liter cell water)-1 determined by coulometric titration. Two cellular 36Cl compartments were found; one exchanged with a rate constant of 0.67 +/- 0.12 min-1 and was associated with the cardiac muscle cells; the other, attributed to the fibroblasts, exchanged with a rate constant of 0.18 +/- 0.05 min- 1. At 37 degrees C, transmembrane Cl flux of cardiac muscle under steady-state conditions was 30 pmol x cm-2 x s-1. In K-free, normal, or high-Ko solutions, the responses of the membrane potential to changes in external Cl concentration suggested that chloride conductance was low. These results indicate that Cl transport across the myocardial cell membrane is more rapid than K transport and is largely electrically silent. PMID:6864192

  12. Transcriptome analysis reveals transmembrane targets on transplantable midbrain dopamine progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Jönsson, Marie E.; Björklund, Anders; Parish, Clare L.; Thompson, Lachlan H.

    2015-01-01

    An important challenge for the continued development of cell therapy for Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the establishment of procedures that better standardize cell preparations for use in transplantation. Although cell sorting has been an anticipated strategy, its application has been limited by lack of knowledge regarding transmembrane proteins that can be used to target and isolate progenitors for midbrain dopamine (mDA) neurons. We used a “FACS-array” approach to identify 18 genes for transmembrane proteins with high expression in mDA progenitors and describe the utility of four of these targets (Alcam, Chl1, Gfra1, and Igsf8) for isolating mDA progenitors from rat primary ventral mesencephalon through flow cytometry. Alcam and Chl1 facilitated a significant enrichment of mDA neurons following transplantation, while targeting of Gfra1 allowed for robust separation of dopamine and serotonin neurons. Importantly, we also show that mDA progenitors isolated on the basis of transmembrane proteins are capable of extensive, functional innervation of the host striatum and correction of motor impairment in a unilateral model of PD. These results are highly relevant for current efforts to establish safe and effective stem cell-based procedures for PD, where clinical translation will almost certainly require safety and standardization measures in order to deliver well-characterized cell preparations. PMID:25775569

  13. Probing transmembrane mechanical coupling and cytomechanics using magnetic twisting cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, N.; Ingber, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    We recently developed a magnetic twisting cytometry technique that allows us to apply controlled mechanical stresses to specific cell surface receptors using ligand-coated ferromagnetic microbeads and to simultaneously measure the mechanical response in living cells. Using this technique, we have previously shown the following: (i) beta 1 integrin receptors mediate mechanical force transfer across the cell surface and to the cytoskeleton, whereas other transmembrane receptors (e.g., scavenger receptors) do not; (ii) cytoskeletal stiffness increases in direct proportion to the level of stress applied to integrins; and (iii) the slope of this linear stiffening response differs depending on the shape of the cell. We now show that different integrins (beta 1, alpha V beta 3, alpha V, alpha 5, alpha 2) and other transmembrane receptors (scavenger receptor, platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule) differ in their ability to mediate force transfer across the cell surface. In addition, the linear stiffening behavior previously observed in endothelial cells was found to be shared by other cell types. Finally, we demonstrate that dynamic changes in cell shape that occur during both cell spreading and retraction are accompanied by coordinate changes in cytoskeletal stiffness. Taken together, these results suggest that the magnetic twisting cytometry technique may be a powerful and versatile tool for studies analyzing the molecular basis of transmembrane mechanical coupling to the cytoskeleton as well as dynamic relations between changes in cytoskeletal structure and alterations in cell form and function.

  14. Regulation of endogenous transmembrane receptors through optogenetic Cry2 clustering.

    PubMed

    Bugaj, L J; Spelke, D P; Mesuda, C K; Varedi, M; Kane, R S; Schaffer, D V

    2015-04-22

    Transmembrane receptors are the predominant conduit through which cells sense and transduce extracellular information into intracellular biochemical signals. Current methods to control and study receptor function, however, suffer from poor resolution in space and time and often employ receptor overexpression, which can introduce experimental artefacts. We report a genetically encoded approach, termed Clustering Indirectly using Cryptochrome 2 (CLICR), for spatiotemporal control over endogenous transmembrane receptor activation, enabled through the optical regulation of target receptor clustering and downstream signalling using noncovalent interactions with engineered Arabidopsis Cryptochrome 2 (Cry2). CLICR offers a modular platform to enable photocontrol of the clustering of diverse transmembrane receptors including fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and integrins in multiple cell types including neural stem cells. Furthermore, light-inducible manipulation of endogenous receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) activity can modulate cell polarity and establish phototaxis in fibroblasts. The resulting spatiotemporal control over cellular signalling represents a powerful new optogenetic framework for investigating and controlling cell function and fate.

  15. Ion conduction pore is conserved among potassium channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhe; Klem, Angela M.; Ramu, Yajamana

    2001-10-01

    Potassium channels, a group of specialized membrane proteins, enable K+ ions to flow selectively across cell membranes. Transmembrane K+ currents underlie electrical signalling in neurons and other excitable cells. The atomic structure of a bacterial K+ channel pore has been solved by means of X-ray crystallography. To the extent that the prokaryotic pore is representative of other K+ channels, this landmark achievement has profound implications for our general understanding of K+ channels. But serious doubts have been raised concerning whether the prokaryotic K+ channel pore does actually represent those of eukaryotes. Here we have addressed this fundamental issue by substituting the prokaryotic pore into eukaryotic voltage-gated and inward-rectifier K+ channels. The resulting chimaeras retain the respective functional hallmarks of the eukaryotic channels, which indicates that the ion conduction pore is indeed conserved among K+ channels.

  16. Viruses infecting marine picoplancton encode functional potassium ion channels.

    PubMed

    Siotto, Fenja; Martin, Corinna; Rauh, Oliver; Van Etten, James L; Schroeder, Indra; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard

    2014-10-01

    Phycodnaviruses are dsDNA viruses, which infect algae. Their large genomes encode many gene products, like small K(+) channels, with homologs in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Screening for K(+) channels revealed their abundance in viruses from fresh-water habitats. Recent sequencing of viruses from marine algae or from salt water in Antarctica revealed sequences with the predicted characteristics of K(+) channels but with some unexpected features. Two genes encode either 78 or 79 amino acid proteins, which are the smallest known K(+) channels. Also of interest is an unusual sequence in the canonical α-helixes in K(+) channels. Structural prediction algorithms indicate that the new channels have the conserved α-helix folds but the algorithms failed to identify the expected transmembrane domains flanking the K(+) channel pores. In spite of these unexpected properties electophysiological studies confirmed that the new proteins are functional K(+) channels. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Mechanosensitive Piezo Channels in the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Alcaino, C; Farrugia, G; Beyder, A

    2017-01-01

    Sensation of mechanical forces is critical for normal function of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and abnormalities in mechanosensation are linked to GI pathologies. In the GI tract there are several mechanosensitive cell types-epithelial enterochromaffin cells, intrinsic and extrinsic enteric neurons, smooth muscle cells and interstitial cells of Cajal. These cells use mechanosensitive ion channels that respond to mechanical forces by altering transmembrane ionic currents in a process called mechanoelectrical coupling. Several mechanosensitive ionic conductances have been identified in the mechanosensory GI cells, ranging from mechanosensitive voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels to the mechanogated ion channels, such as the two-pore domain potassium channels K2P (TREK-1) and nonselective cation channels from the transient receptor potential family. The recently discovered Piezo channels are increasingly recognized as significant contributors to cellular mechanosensitivity. Piezo1 and Piezo2 are nonselective cationic ion channels that are directly activated by mechanical forces and have well-defined biophysical and pharmacologic properties. The role of Piezo channels in the GI epithelium is currently under investigation and their role in the smooth muscle syncytium and enteric neurons is still not known. In this review, we outline the current state of knowledge on mechanosensitive ion channels in the GI tract, with a focus on the known and potential functions of the Piezo channels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanosensitive Piezo Channels in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Alcaino, C.; Farrugia, G.; Beyder, A.

    2017-01-01

    Sensation of mechanical forces is critical for normal function of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and abnormalities in mechanosensation are linked to GI pathologies. In the GI tract there are several mechanosensitive cell types—epithelial enterochromaffin cells, intrinsic and extrinsic enteric neurons, smooth muscle cells and interstitial cells of Cajal. These cells use mechanosensitive ion channels that respond to mechanical forces by altering transmembrane ionic currents in a process called mechanoelectrical coupling. Several mechanosensitive ionic conductances have been identified in the mechano-sensory GI cells, ranging from mechanosensitive voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels to the mechanogated ion channels, such as the two-pore domain potassium channels K2P (TREK-1) and nonselective cation channels from the transient receptor potential family. The recently discovered Piezo channels are increasingly recognized as significant contributors to cellular mechanosensitivity. Piezo1 and Piezo2 are nonselective cationic ion channels that are directly activated by mechanical forces and have well-defined biophysical and pharmacologic properties. The role of Piezo channels in the GI epithelium is currently under investigation and their role in the smooth muscle syncytium and enteric neurons is still not known. In this review, we outline the current state of knowledge on mechanosensitive ion channels in the GI tract, with a focus on the known and potential functions of the Piezo channels. PMID:28728818

  19. A Mathematical Model of T Lymphocyte Calcium Dynamics Derived from Single Transmembrane Protein Properties

    PubMed Central

    Schmeitz, Christine; Hernandez-Vargas, Esteban Abelardo; Fliegert, Ralf; Guse, Andreas H.; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Fate decision processes of T lymphocytes are crucial for health and disease. Whether a T lymphocyte is activated, divides, gets anergic, or initiates apoptosis depends on extracellular triggers and intracellular signaling. Free cytosolic calcium dynamics plays an important role in this context. The relative contributions of store-derived calcium entry and calcium entry from extracellular space to T lymphocyte activation are still a matter of debate. Here we develop a quantitative mathematical model of T lymphocyte calcium dynamics in order to establish a tool which allows to disentangle cause-effect relationships between ion fluxes and observed calcium time courses. The model is based on single transmembrane protein characteristics which have been determined in independent experiments. This reduces the number of unknown parameters in the model to a minimum and ensures the predictive power of the model. Simulation results are subsequently used for an analysis of whole cell calcium dynamics measured under various experimental conditions. The model accounts for a variety of these conditions, which supports the suitability of the modeling approach. The simulation results suggest a model in which calcium dynamics dominantly relies on the opening of channels in calcium stores while calcium entry through calcium-release activated channels (CRAC) is more associated with the maintenance of the T lymphocyte calcium levels and prevents the cell from calcium depletion. Our findings indicate that CRAC guarantees a long-term stable calcium level which is required for cell survival and sustained calcium enhancement. PMID:24065966

  20. Human Amnion Epithelial Cells Induced to Express Functional Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Sean V.; Lim, Rebecca; Heraud, Philip; Cholewa, Marian; Le Gros, Mark; de Jonge, Martin D.; Howard, Daryl L.; Paterson, David; McDonald, Courtney; Atala, Anthony; Jenkin, Graham; Wallace, Euan M.

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis, an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a mutation in a gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), remains a leading cause of childhood respiratory morbidity and mortality. The respiratory consequences of cystic fibrosis include the generation of thick, tenacious mucus that impairs lung clearance, predisposing the individual to repeated and persistent infections, progressive lung damage and shortened lifespan. Currently there is no cure for cystic fibrosis. With this in mind, we investigated the ability of human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs) to express functional CFTR. We found that hAECs formed 3-dimensional structures and expressed the CFTR gene and protein after culture in Small Airway Growth Medium (SAGM). We also observed a polarized CFTR distribution on the membrane of hAECs cultured in SAGM, similar to that observed in polarized airway cells in vivo. Further, hAECs induced to express CFTR possessed functional iodide/chloride (I−/Cl−) ion channels that were inhibited by the CFTR-inhibitor CFTR-172, indicating the presence of functional CFTR ion channels. These data suggest that hAECs may be a promising source for the development of a cellular therapy for cystic fibrosis. PMID:23029546

  1. Therapeutic Approaches to Acquired Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Dysfunction in Chronic Bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Solomon, George M; Raju, S Vamsee; Dransfield, Mark T; Rowe, Steven M

    2016-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a common cause of morbidity and a rising cause of mortality worldwide. Its rising impact indicates the ongoing unmet need for novel and effective therapies. Previous work has established a pathophysiological link between the chronic bronchitis phenotype of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis as well as phenotypic similarities between these two airways diseases. An extensive body of evidence has established that cigarette smoke and its constituents contribute to acquired dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein in the airways, pointing to a mechanistic link with smoking-related and chronic bronchitis. Recent interest surrounding new drugs that target both mutant and wild-type CFTR channels has paved the way for a new treatment opportunity addressing the mucus defect in chronic bronchitis. We review the clinical and pathologic evidence for modulating CFTR to address acquired CFTR dysfunction and pragmatic issues surrounding clinical trials as well as a discussion of other ion channels that may represent alternative therapeutic targets.

  2. Differential Regulation of 6- and 7-Transmembrane Helix Variants of μ-Opioid Receptor in Response to Morphine Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Convertino, Marino; Samoshkin, Alexander; Viet, Chi T.; Gauthier, Josee; Li Fraine, Steven P.; Sharif-Naeini, Reza; Schmidt, Brian L.; Maixner, William; Diatchenko, Luda; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacological effect of opioids originates, at the cellular level, by their interaction with the μ-opioid receptor (mOR) resulting in the regulation of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and inwardly rectifying K+ channels that ultimately modulate the synaptic transmission. Recently, an alternative six trans-membrane helix isoform of mOR, (6TM-mOR) has been identified, but its function and signaling are still largely unknown. Here, we present the structural and functional mechanisms of 6TM-mOR signaling activity upon binding to morphine. Our data suggest that despite the similarity of binding modes of the alternative 6TM-mOR and the dominant seven trans-membrane helix variant (7TM-mOR), the interaction with morphine generates different dynamic responses in the two receptors, thus, promoting the activation of different mOR-specific signaling pathways. We characterize a series of 6TM-mOR-specific cellular responses, and observed that they are significantly different from those for 7TM-mOR. Morphine stimulation of 6TM-mOR does not promote a cellular cAMP response, while it increases the intracellular Ca2+ concentration and reduces the cellular K+ conductance. Our findings indicate that 6TM-mOR has a unique contribution to the cellular opioid responses. Therefore, it should be considered as a relevant target for the development of novel pharmacological tools and medical protocols involving the use of opioids. PMID:26554831

  3. Lava Channels

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-12-03

    The channels and linear depression in this image captured by NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft are located on the western margin of the Elysium Volcanic complex. The channels were created by lava flow.

  4. Cytolysis by Ca-permeable transmembrane channels. Pore formation causes extensive DNA degradation and cell lysis

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of the purified membrane pore formers, staphylococcal alpha-toxin and CTL perforin, on target cell lysis as measured by 51Cr release and on nuclear damage as measured by DNA degradation and 125IUdR release. Both pore formers cause dose- dependent cell lysis, which is accompanied by DNA release. The ratio of DNA/Cr release depends on the nature of target cell and shows the same pattern as the ratio of release of the two markers reported for CTL- mediated lysis of the same targets. DNA degradation is dependent on the presence of intracellular Ca in the target cell and is totally blocked if Ca is chelated by Quin 2 intracellularly and EGTA extracellularly. DNA degradation, in addition, is inhibited by the lysosomotropic agents NH4Cl, chloroquine, and monensin. rTNF doubles the degree of DNA degradation mediated by alpha-toxin in 3-h assays. We conclude that pore formers alone can mediate DNA degradation. In addition, they may promote the uptake of other factors and thereby accelerate their time course of action. DNA degradation by pore formers requires active target participation in a pathway that is dependent on intracellular Ca and lysosomes. These aspects of target lysis resemble CTL- and NK cell- mediated cytolysis. PMID:2538546

  5. Experimental determination of the vertical alignment between the second and third transmembrane segments of muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mnatsakanyan, Nelli; Jansen, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are members of the Cys-loop ligand-gated ion channel superfamily. Muscle nAChR are heteropentamers that assemble from two α, and one each of β, γ, and δ subunits. Each subunit is composed of three domains, extracellular, transmembrane and intracellular. The transmembrane domain consists of four α-helical segments (M1–M4). Pioneering structural information was obtained using electronmicroscopy of Torpedo nAChR. The recently-solved X-ray structure of the first eukaryotic Cys-loop receptor, a truncated (intracellular domain missing) glutamate-gated chloride channel α (GluClα)showed the same overall architecture . However, a significant difference with regard to the vertical alignment between the channel-lining segment M2 and segment M3 was observed. Here we used functional studies utilizing disulfide trapping experiments in muscle nAChR to determine the spatial orientation between M2 and M3. Our results are in agreement with the vertical alignment as obtained when using the GluClα structure as a template to homology model muscle nAChR, however, they cannot be reconciled with the current Torpedo nAChR model. The vertical M2–M3 alignments as observed in X-ray structures of prokaryotic Gloeobacter violaceus ligand-gated ion channel (GLIC) and GluClα are in agreement. Our results further confirm that this alignment in Cys-loop receptors is conserved between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. PMID:23565737

  6. Structure and Mechanism of Proton Transport Through the Transmembrane Tetrameric M2 Protein Bundle of the Influenza A Virus

    SciTech Connect

    R Acharya; V Carnevale; G Fiorin; B Levine; A Polishchuk; V Balannick; I Samish; R Lamb; L Pinto; et al.

    2011-12-31

    The M2 proton channel from influenza A virus is an essential protein that mediates transport of protons across the viral envelope. This protein has a single transmembrane helix, which tetramerizes into the active channel. At the heart of the conduction mechanism is the exchange of protons between the His37 imidazole moieties of M2 and waters confined to the M2 bundle interior. Protons are conducted as the total charge of the four His37 side chains passes through 2{sup +} and 3{sup +} with a pK{sub a} near 6. A 1.65 {angstrom} resolution X-ray structure of the transmembrane protein (residues 25-46), crystallized at pH 6.5, reveals a pore that is lined by alternating layers of sidechains and well-ordered water clusters, which offer a pathway for proton conduction. The His37 residues form a box-like structure, bounded on either side by water clusters with well-ordered oxygen atoms at close distance. The conformation of the protein, which is intermediate between structures previously solved at higher and lower pH, suggests a mechanism by which conformational changes might facilitate asymmetric diffusion through the channel in the presence of a proton gradient. Moreover, protons diffusing through the channel need not be localized to a single His37 imidazole, but instead may be delocalized over the entire His-box and associated water clusters. Thus, the new crystal structure provides a possible unification of the discrete site versus continuum conduction models.

  7. Sequence-structure relationship study in all-α transmembrane proteins using an unsupervised learning approach.

    PubMed

    Esque, Jérémy; Urbain, Aurélie; Etchebest, Catherine; de Brevern, Alexandre G

    2015-11-01

    Transmembrane proteins (TMPs) are major drug targets, but the knowledge of their precise topology structure remains highly limited compared with globular proteins. In spite of the difficulties in obtaining their structures, an important effort has been made these last years to increase their number from an experimental and computational point of view. In view of this emerging challenge, the development of computational methods to extract knowledge from these data is crucial for the better understanding of their functions and in improving the quality of structural models. Here, we revisit an efficient unsupervised learning procedure, called Hybrid Protein Model (HPM), which is applied to the analysis of transmembrane proteins belonging to the all-α structural class. HPM method is an original classification procedure that efficiently combines sequence and structure learning. The procedure was initially applied to the analysis of globular proteins. In the present case, HPM classifies a set of overlapping protein fragments, extracted from a non-redundant databank of TMP 3D structure. After fine-tuning of the learning parameters, the optimal classification results in 65 clusters. They represent at best similar relationships between sequence and local structure properties of TMPs. Interestingly, HPM distinguishes among the resulting clusters two helical regions with distinct hydrophobic patterns. This underlines the complexity of the topology of these proteins. The HPM classification enlightens unusual relationship between amino acids in TMP fragments, which can be useful to elaborate new amino acids substitution matrices. Finally, two challenging applications are described: the first one aims at annotating protein functions (channel or not), the second one intends to assess the quality of the structures (X-ray or models) via a new scoring function deduced from the HPM classification.

  8. TRP Channels

    PubMed Central

    Venkatachalam, Kartik; Montell, Craig

    2011-01-01

    The TRP (Transient Receptor Potential) superfamily of cation channels is remarkable in that it displays greater diversity in activation mechanisms and selectivities than any other group of ion channels. The domain organizations of some TRP proteins are also unusual, as they consist of linked channel and enzyme domains. A unifying theme in this group is that TRP proteins play critical roles in sensory physiology, which include contributions to vision, taste, olfaction, hearing, touch, and thermo- and osmosensation. In addition, TRP channels enable individual cells to sense changes in their local environment. Many TRP channels are activated by a variety of different stimuli and function as signal integrators. The TRP superfamily is divided into seven subfamilies: the five group 1 TRPs (TRPC, TRPV, TRPM, TRPN, and TRPA) and two group 2 subfamilies (TRPP and TRPML). TRP channels are important for human health as mutations in at least four TRP channels underlie disease. PMID:17579562

  9. High-throughput synthesis of stable isotope-labeled transmembrane proteins for targeted transmembrane proteomics using a wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system.

    PubMed

    Takemori, Nobuaki; Takemori, Ayako; Matsuoka, Kazuhiro; Morishita, Ryo; Matsushita, Natsuki; Aoshima, Masato; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Endo, Yaeta; Higashiyama, Shigeki

    2015-02-01

    Using a wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system, we developed a high-throughput method for the synthesis of stable isotope-labeled full-length transmembrane proteins as proteoliposomes to mimic the in vivo environment, and we successfully constructed an internal standard library for targeted transmembrane proteomics by using mass spectrometry.

  10. Poisson-Nernst-Planck Models of Nonequilibrium Ion Electrodiffusion through a Protegrin Transmembrane Pore

    PubMed Central

    Bolintineanu, Dan S.; Sayyed-Ahmad, Abdallah; Davis, H. Ted; Kaznessis, Yiannis N.

    2009-01-01

    Protegrin peptides are potent antimicrobial agents believed to act against a variety of pathogens by forming nonselective transmembrane pores in the bacterial cell membrane. We have employed 3D Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) calculations to determine the steady-state ion conduction characteristics of such pores at applied voltages in the range of −100 to +100 mV in 0.1 M KCl bath solutions. We have tested a variety of pore structures extracted from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations based on an experimentally proposed octomeric pore structure. The computed single-channel conductance values were in the range of 290–680 pS. Better agreement with the experimental range of 40–360 pS was obtained using structures from the last 40 ns of the MD simulation, where conductance values range from 280 to 430 pS. We observed no significant variation of the conductance with applied voltage in any of the structures that we tested, suggesting that the voltage dependence observed experimentally is a result of voltage-dependent channel formation rather than an inherent feature of the open pore structure. We have found the pore to be highly selective for anions, with anionic to cationic current ratios (ICl−/IK+) on the order of 103. This is consistent with the highly cationic nature of the pore but surprisingly in disagreement with the experimental finding of only slight anionic selectivity. We have additionally tested the sensitivity of our PNP model to several parameters and found the ion diffusion coefficients to have a significant influence on conductance characteristics. The best agreement with experimental data was obtained using a diffusion coefficient for each ion set to 10% of the bulk literature value everywhere inside the channel, a scaling used by several other studies employing PNP calculations. Overall, this work presents a useful link between previous work focused on the structure of protegrin pores and experimental efforts aimed at investigating their conductance

  11. Poisson-Nernst-Planck models of nonequilibrium ion electrodiffusion through a protegrin transmembrane pore.

    PubMed

    Bolintineanu, Dan S; Sayyed-Ahmad, Abdallah; Davis, H Ted; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2009-01-01

    Protegrin peptides are potent antimicrobial agents believed to act against a variety of pathogens by forming nonselective transmembrane pores in the bacterial cell membrane. We have employed 3D Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) calculations to determine the steady-state ion conduction characteristics of such pores at applied voltages in the range of -100 to +100 mV in 0.1 M KCl bath solutions. We have tested a variety of pore structures extracted from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations based on an experimentally proposed octomeric pore structure. The computed single-channel conductance values were in the range of 290-680 pS. Better agreement with the experimental range of 40-360 pS was obtained using structures from the last 40 ns of the MD simulation, where conductance values range from 280 to 430 pS. We observed no significant variation of the conductance with applied voltage in any of the structures that we tested, suggesting that the voltage dependence observed experimentally is a result of voltage-dependent channel formation rather than an inherent feature of the open pore structure. We have found the pore to be highly selective for anions, with anionic to cationic current ratios (I(Cl-)/I(K+)) on the order of 10(3). This is consistent with the highly cationic nature of the pore but surprisingly in disagreement with the experimental finding of only slight anionic selectivity. We have additionally tested the sensitivity of our PNP model to several parameters and found the ion diffusion coefficients to have a significant influence on conductance characteristics. The best agreement with experimental data was obtained using a diffusion coefficient for each ion set to 10% of the bulk literature value everywhere inside the channel, a scaling used by several other studies employing PNP calculations. Overall, this work presents a useful link between previous work focused on the structure of protegrin pores and experimental efforts aimed at investigating their conductance

  12. Pore dynamics and conductance of RyR1 transmembrane domain.

    PubMed

    Shirvanyants, David; Ramachandran, Srinivas; Mei, Yingwu; Xu, Le; Meissner, Gerhard; Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2014-06-03

    Ryanodine receptors (RyR) are calcium release channels, playing a major role in the regulation of muscular contraction. Mutations in skeletal muscle RyR (RyR1) are associated with congenital diseases such as malignant hyperthermia and central core disease (CCD). The absence of high-resolution structures of RyR1 has limited our understanding of channel function and disease mechanisms at the molecular level. Previously, we have reported a hypothetical structure of the RyR1 pore-forming region, obtained by homology modeling and supported by mutational scans, electrophysiological measurements, and cryo-electron microscopy. Here, we utilize the expanded model encompassing six transmembrane helices to calculate the RyR1 pore region conductance, to analyze its structural stability, and to hypothesize the mechanism of the Ile4897 CCD-associated mutation. The calculated conductance of the wild-type RyR1 suggests that the proposed pore structure can sustain ion currents measured in single-channel experiments. We observe a stable pore structure on timescales of 0.2 μs, with multiple cations occupying the selectivity filter and cytosolic vestibule, but not the inner chamber. We further suggest that stability of the selectivity filter critically depends on the interactions between the I4897 residue and several hydrophobic residues of the neighboring subunit. Loss of these interactions in the case of polar substitution I4897T results in destabilization of the selectivity filter, a possible cause of the CCD-specific reduced Ca(2+) conductance.

  13. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator–associated ATP Release Is Controlled by a Chloride Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qinshi; Mak, Daniel; Devidas, Sreenivas; Schwiebert, Erik M.; Bragin, Alvina; Zhang, Yulong; Skach, William R.; Guggino, William B.; Foskett, J. Kevin; Engelhardt, John F.

    1998-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel that is defective in cystic fibrosis, and has also been closely associated with ATP permeability in cells. Using a Xenopus oocyte cRNA expression system, we have evaluated the molecular mechanisms that control CFTR-modulated ATP release. CFTR-modulated ATP release was dependent on both cAMP activation and a gradient change in the extracellular chloride concentration. Activation of ATP release occurred within a narrow concentration range of external Cl− that was similar to that reported in airway surface fluid. Mutagenesis of CFTR demonstrated that Cl− conductance and ATP release regulatory properties could be dissociated to different regions of the CFTR protein. Despite the lack of a need for Cl− conductance through CFTR to modulate ATP release, alterations in channel pore residues R347 and R334 caused changes in the relative ability of different halides to activate ATP efflux (wtCFTR, Cl >> Br; R347P, Cl >> Br; R347E, Br >> Cl; R334W, Cl = Br). We hypothesize that residues R347 and R334 may contribute a Cl− binding site within the CFTR channel pore that is necessary for activation of ATP efflux in response to increases of extracellular Cl−. In summary, these findings suggest a novel chloride sensor mechanism by which CFTR is capable of responding to changes in the extracellular chloride concentration by modulating the activity of an unidentified ATP efflux pathway. This pathway may play an important role in maintaining fluid and electrolyte balance in the airway through purinergic regulation of epithelial cells. Insight into these molecular mechanisms enhances our understanding of pathogenesis in the cystic fibrosis lung. PMID:9813087

  14. ICEPO: the ion channel electrophysiology ontology.

    PubMed

    Hinard, V; Britan, A; Rougier, J S; Bairoch, A; Abriel, H; Gaudet, P

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels are transmembrane proteins that selectively allow ions to flow across the plasma membrane and play key roles in diverse biological processes. A multitude of diseases, called channelopathies, such as epilepsies, muscle paralysis, pain syndromes, cardiac arrhythmias or hypoglycemia are due to ion channel mutations. A wide corpus of literature is available on ion channels, covering both their functions and their roles in disease. The research community needs to access this data in a user-friendly, yet systematic manner. However, extraction and integration of this increasing amount of data have been proven to be difficult because of the lack of a standardized vocabulary that describes the properties of ion channels at the molecular level. To address this, we have developed Ion Channel ElectroPhysiology Ontology (ICEPO), an ontology that allows one to annotate the electrophysiological parameters of the voltage-gated class of ion channels. This ontology is based on a three-state model of ion channel gating describing the three conformations/states that an ion channel can adopt: closed, open and inactivated. This ontology supports the capture of voltage-gated ion channel electrophysiological data from the literature in a structured manner and thus enables other applications such as querying and reasoning tools. Here, we present ICEPO (ICEPO ftp site:ftp://ftp.nextprot.org/pub/current_release/controlled_vocabularies/), as well as examples of its use. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  15. Protein translocation by the Sec61/SecY channel.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Andrew R; Rapoport, Tom A; van den Berg, Bert

    2005-01-01

    The conserved protein-conducting channel, referred to as the Sec61 channel in eukaryotes or the SecY channel in eubacteria and archaea, translocates proteins across cellular membranes and integrates proteins containing hydrophobic transmembrane segments into lipid bilayers. Structural studies illustrate how the protein-conducting channel accomplishes these tasks. Three different mechanisms, each requiring a different set of channel binding partners, are employed to move polypeptide substrates: The ribosome feeds the polypeptide chain directly into the channel, a ratcheting mechanism is used by the eukaryotic endoplasmic reticulum chaperone BiP, and a pushing mechanism is utilized by the bacterial ATPase SecA. We review these translocation mechanisms, relating biochemical and genetic observations to the structures of the protein-conducting channel and its binding partners.

  16. Mechanosensory hair cells express two molecularly distinct mechanotransduction channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Cunningham, Christopher; Harkins-Perry, Sarah; Coste, Bertrand; Ranade, Sanjeev; Zebarjadi, Navid; Beurg, Maryline; Fettiplace, Robert; Patapoutian, Ardem; Mueller, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Auditory hair cells contain mechanotransduction channels that rapidly open in response to sound-induced vibrations. Surprisingly, we report here that auditory hair cells contain two molecularly distinct mechanotransduction channels. One ion channel is activated by sound and is responsible for sensory transduction. This sensory transduction channel is expressed in hair-cell stereocilia and previous studies show that its activity is affected by mutations in the genes encoding the transmembrane proteins TMHS/LHFPL5, TMIE and TMC1/2. We show here that the second ion channel is expressed at the apical surface of hair cells and contains the Piezo2 protein. The activity of the Piezo2-dependent channel is controlled by the intracellular Ca2+ concentration and can be recorded following disruption of the sensory transduction machinery or more generally by disruption of the sensory epithelium. We thus conclude that hair cells express two molecularly and functionally distinct mechanotransduction channels with different subcellular distribution. PMID:27893727

  17. Mechanosensory hair cells express two molecularly distinct mechanotransduction channels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zizhen; Grillet, Nicolas; Zhao, Bo; Cunningham, Christopher; Harkins-Perry, Sarah; Coste, Bertrand; Ranade, Sanjeev; Zebarjadi, Navid; Beurg, Maryline; Fettiplace, Robert; Patapoutian, Ardem; Mueller, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Auditory hair cells contain mechanotransduction channels that rapidly open in response to sound-induced vibrations. We report here that auditory hair cells contain two molecularly distinct mechanotransduction channels. One ion channel is activated by sound and is responsible for sensory transduction. This sensory transduction channel is expressed in hair cell stereocilia, and previous studies show that its activity is affected by mutations in the genes encoding the transmembrane proteins TMHS, TMIE, TMC1 and TMC2. We show here that the second ion channel is expressed at the apical surface of hair cells and that it contains the Piezo2 protein. The activity of the Piezo2-dependent channel is controlled by the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and can be recorded following disruption of the sensory transduction machinery or more generally by disruption of the sensory epithelium. We thus conclude that hair cells express two molecularly and functionally distinct mechanotransduction channels with different subcellular distributions.

  18. Transmembrane Peptides Influence the Affinity of Sterols for Phospholipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Nyström, Joel H.; Lönnfors, Max; Nyholm, Thomas K.M.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Cholesterol is distributed unevenly between different cellular membrane compartments, and the cholesterol content increases from the inner bilayers toward the plasma membrane. It has been suggested that this cholesterol gradient is important in the sorting of transmembrane proteins. Cholesterol has also been to shown play an important role in lateral organization of eukaryotic cell membranes. In this study the aim was to determine how transmembrane proteins influence the lateral distribution of cholesterol in phospholipid bilayers. Insight into this can be obtained by studying how cholesterol interacts with bilayer membranes of different composition in the presence of designed peptides that mimic the transmembrane helices of proteins. For this purpose we developed an assay in which the partitioning of the fluorescent cholesterol analog CTL between LUVs and mβCD can be measured. Comparison of how cholesterol and CTL partitioning between mβCD and phospholipid bilayers with different composition suggests that CTL sensed changes in bilayer composition similarly as cholesterol. Therefore, the results obtained with CTL can be used to understand cholesterol distribution in lipid bilayers. The effect of WALP23 on CTL partitioning between DMPC bilayers and mβCD was measured. From the results it was clear that WALP23 increased both the order in the bilayers (as seen from CTL and DPH anisotropy) and the affinity of the sterol for the bilayer in a concentration dependent way. Although WALP23 also increased the order in DLPC and POPC bilayers the effects on CTL partitioning was much smaller with these lipids. This indicates that proteins have the largest effect on sterol interactions with phospholipids that have longer and saturated acyl chains. KALP23 did not significantly affect the acyl chain order in the phospholipid bilayers, and inclusion of KALP23 into DMPC bilayers slightly decreased CTL partitioning into the bilayer. This shows that transmembrane proteins

  19. Membrane topology of transmembrane proteins: determinants and experimental tools.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hunsang; Kim, Hyun

    2014-10-17

    Membrane topology refers to the two-dimensional structural information of a membrane protein that indicates the number of transmembrane (TM) segments and the orientation of soluble domains relative to the plane of the membrane. Since membrane proteins are co-translationally translocated across and inserted into the membrane, the TM segments orient themselves properly in an early stage of membrane protein biogenesis. Each membrane protein must contain some topogenic signals, but the translocation components and the membrane environment also influence the membrane topology of proteins. We discuss the factors that affect membrane protein orientation and have listed available experimental tools that can be used in determining membrane protein topology.

  20. Transmembrane anion transport and cytotoxicity of synthetic tambjamine analogs.

    PubMed

    Hernando, Elsa; Soto-Cerrato, Vanessa; Cortés-Arroyo, Susana; Pérez-Tomás, Ricardo; Quesada, Roberto

    2014-03-21

    Ten synthetic analogs of the marine alkaloids tambjamines, bearing aromatic enamine moieties, have been synthesized. These compounds proved to be highly efficient transmembrane anion transporters in model liposomes. Changes in the electronic nature of the substituents of the aromatic enamine or the alkoxy group of the central pyrrole group did not affect this anionophore activity. The in vitro activity of these compounds has also been studied. They trigger apoptosis in several cancer cell lines with IC50 values in the low micromolar range as well as modify the intracellular pH, inducing the basification of acidic organelles.

  1. Marine Toxins Targeting Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Hugo R.

    2006-01-01

    This introductory minireview points out the importance of ion channels for cell communication. The basic concepts on the structure and function of ion channels triggered by membrane voltage changes, the so-called voltage-gated ion channels (VGICs), as well as those activated by neurotransmitters, the so-called ligand-gated ion channel (LGICs), are introduced. Among the most important VGIC superfamiles, we can name the voltage-gated Na+ (NaV), Ca2+ (CaV), and K+ (KV) channels. Among the most important LGIC super families, we can include the Cys-loop or nicotinicoid, the glutamate-activated (GluR), and the ATP-activated (P2XnR) receptor superfamilies. Ion channels are transmembrane proteins that allow the passage of different ions in a specific or unspecific manner. For instance, the activation of NaV, CaV, or KV channels opens a pore that is specific for Na+, Ca2+, or K+, respectively. On the other hand, the activation of certain LGICs such as nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, GluRs, and P2XnRs allows the passage of cations (e.g., Na+, K+, and/or Ca2+), whereas the activation of other LGICs such as type A γ-butyric acid and glycine receptors allows the passage of anions (e.g., Cl− and/or HCO3−). In this regard, the activation of NaV and CaV as well as ligand-gated cation channels produce membrane depolarization, which finally leads to stimulatory effects in the cell, whereas the activation of KV as well as ligand-gated anion channels induce membrane hyperpolarization that finally leads to inhibitory effects in the cell. The importance of these ion channel superfamilies is emphasized by considering their physiological functions throughout the body as well as their pathophysiological implicance in several neuronal diseases. In this regard, natural molecules, and especially marine toxins, can be potentially used as modulators (e.g., inhibitors or prolongers) of ion channel functions to treat or to alleviate a specific ion channel-linked disease (e

  2. Analysis of dihedral angle preferences for alanine and glycine residues in alpha and beta transmembrane regions.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, K M; Krishnaswamy, S

    2015-01-01

    For the past 50 years, the Ramachandran map has been used effectively to study the protein structure and folding. However, though extensive analysis has been done on dihedral angle preferences of residues in globular proteins, related studies and reports of membrane proteins are limited. It is of interest to explore the conformational preferences of residues in transmembrane regions of membrane proteins which are involved in several important and diverse biological processes. Hence, in the present work, a systematic comparative computational analysis has been made on dihedral angle preferences of alanine and glycine in alpha and beta transmembrane regions (the two major classes of transmembrane proteins) with the aid of the Ramachandran map. Further, the conformational preferences of residues in transmembrane regions were compared with the non-transmembrane regions. We have extracted cation-pi interacting residues present in transmembrane regions and explored the dihedral angle preferences. From our observations, we reveal the higher percentage of occurrences of glycine in alpha and beta transmembrane regions than other hydrophobic residues. Further, we noted a clear shift in ψ-angle preferences of glycine residues from negative bins in alpha transmembrane regions to positive bins in beta transmembrane regions. Also, cation-pi interacting residues in beta transmembrane regions avoid preferring ψ-angles in the range of -59° to -30°. In this article, we insist that the studies on preferences of dihedral angles in transmembrane regions, thorough understanding of structure and folding of transmembrane proteins, can lead to modeling of novel transmembrane regions towards designing membrane proteins.

  3. Altered ion channel conductance and ionic selectivity induced by large imposed membrane potential pulse.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, W; Lee, R C

    1994-01-01

    The effects of large magnitude transmembrane potential pulses on voltage-gated Na and K channel behavior in frog skeletal muscle membrane were studied using a modified double vaseline-gap voltage clamp. The effects of electroconformational damage to ionic channels were separated from damage to lipid bilayer (electroporation). A 4 ms transmembrane potential pulse of -600 mV resulted in a reduction of both Na and K channel conductivities. The supraphysiologic pulses also reduced ionic selectivity of the K channels against Na+ ions, resulting in a depolarization of the membrane resting potential. However, TTX and TEA binding effects were unaltered. The kinetics of spontaneous reversal of the electroconformational damage of channel proteins was found to be dependent on the magnitude of imposed membrane potential pulse. These results suggest that muscle and nerve dysfunction after electrical shock may be in part caused by electroconformational damage to voltage-gated ion channels. PMID:7948676

  4. TRPC6 channel translocation into phagosomal membrane augments phagosomal function.

    PubMed

    Riazanski, Vladimir; Gabdoulkhakova, Aida G; Boynton, Lin S; Eguchi, Raphael R; Deriy, Ludmila V; Hogarth, D Kyle; Loaëc, Nadège; Oumata, Nassima; Galons, Hervé; Brown, Mary E; Shevchenko, Pavel; Gallan, Alexander J; Yoo, Sang Gune; Naren, Anjaparavanda P; Villereal, Mitchel L; Beacham, Daniel W; Bindokas, Vytautas P; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Meijer, Laurent; Nelson, Deborah J

    2015-11-24

    Defects in the innate immune system in the lung with attendant bacterial infections contribute to lung tissue damage, respiratory insufficiency, and ultimately death in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). Professional phagocytes, including alveolar macrophages (AMs), have specialized pathways that ensure efficient killing of pathogens in phagosomes. Phagosomal acidification facilitates the optimal functioning of degradative enzymes, ultimately contributing to bacterial killing. Generation of low organellar pH is primarily driven by the V-ATPases, proton pumps that use cytoplasmic ATP to load H(+) into the organelle. Critical to phagosomal acidification are various channels derived from the plasma membrane, including the anion channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, which shunt the transmembrane potential generated by movement of protons. Here we show that the transient receptor potential canonical-6 (TRPC6) calcium-permeable channel in the AM also functions to shunt the transmembrane potential generated by proton pumping and is capable of restoring microbicidal function to compromised AMs in CF and enhancement of function in non-CF cells. TRPC6 channel activity is enhanced via translocation to the cell surface (and then ultimately to the phagosome during phagocytosis) in response to G-protein signaling activated by the small molecule (R)-roscovitine and its derivatives. These data show that enhancing vesicular insertion of the TRPC6 channel to the plasma membrane may represent a general mechanism for restoring phagosome activity in conditions, where it is lost or impaired.

  5. TRPC6 channel translocation into phagosomal membrane augments phagosomal function

    PubMed Central

    Riazanski, Vladimir; Gabdoulkhakova, Aida G.; Boynton, Lin S.; Eguchi, Raphael R.; Deriy, Ludmila V.; Hogarth, D. Kyle; Loaëc, Nadège; Oumata, Nassima; Galons, Hervé; Brown, Mary E.; Shevchenko, Pavel; Gallan, Alexander J.; Yoo, Sang Gune; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.; Villereal, Mitchel L.; Beacham, Daniel W.; Bindokas, Vytautas P.; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Meijer, Laurent; Nelson, Deborah J.

    2015-01-01

    Defects in the innate immune system in the lung with attendant bacterial infections contribute to lung tissue damage, respiratory insufficiency, and ultimately death in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). Professional phagocytes, including alveolar macrophages (AMs), have specialized pathways that ensure efficient killing of pathogens in phagosomes. Phagosomal acidification facilitates the optimal functioning of degradative enzymes, ultimately contributing to bacterial killing. Generation of low organellar pH is primarily driven by the V-ATPases, proton pumps that use cytoplasmic ATP to load H+ into the organelle. Critical to phagosomal acidification are various channels derived from the plasma membrane, including the anion channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, which shunt the transmembrane potential generated by movement of protons. Here we show that the transient receptor potential canonical-6 (TRPC6) calcium-permeable channel in the AM also functions to shunt the transmembrane potential generated by proton pumping and is capable of restoring microbicidal function to compromised AMs in CF and enhancement of function in non-CF cells. TRPC6 channel activity is enhanced via translocation to the cell surface (and then ultimately to the phagosome during phagocytosis) in response to G-protein signaling activated by the small molecule (R)-roscovitine and its derivatives. These data show that enhancing vesicular insertion of the TRPC6 channel to the plasma membrane may represent a general mechanism for restoring phagosome activity in conditions, where it is lost or impaired. PMID:26604306

  6. Transmembrane semaphorin signalling controls laminar stratification in the mammalian retina.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Ryota L; Nguyen-Ba-Charvet, Kim T; Parray, Aijaz; Badea, Tudor C; Chédotal, Alain; Kolodkin, Alex L

    2011-02-10

    In the vertebrate retina, establishment of precise synaptic connections among distinct retinal neuron cell types is critical for processing visual information and for accurate visual perception. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), amacrine cells and bipolar cells establish stereotypic neurite arborization patterns to form functional neural circuits in the inner plexiform layer (IPL), a laminar region that is conventionally divided into five major parallel sublaminae. However, the molecular mechanisms governing distinct retinal subtype targeting to specific sublaminae within the IPL remain to be elucidated. Here we show that the transmembrane semaphorin Sema6A signals through its receptor PlexinA4 (PlexA4) to control lamina-specific neuronal stratification in the mouse retina. Expression analyses demonstrate that Sema6A and PlexA4 proteins are expressed in a complementary fashion in the developing retina: Sema6A in most ON sublaminae and PlexA4 in OFF sublaminae of the IPL. Mice with null mutations in PlexA4 or Sema6A exhibit severe defects in stereotypic lamina-specific neurite arborization of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-expressing dopaminergic amacrine cells, intrinsically photosensitive RGCs (ipRGCs) and calbindin-positive cells in the IPL. Sema6A and PlexA4 genetically interact in vivo for the regulation of dopaminergic amacrine cell laminar targeting. Therefore, neuronal targeting to subdivisions of the IPL in the mammalian retina is directed by repulsive transmembrane guidance cues present on neuronal processes.

  7. Transmembrane semaphorin signaling controls laminar stratification in the mammalian retina

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Ryota L.; Nguyen-Ba-Charvet, Kim T.; Parray, Aijaz; Badea, Tudor C.; Chédotal, Alain; Kolodkin, Alex L.

    2010-01-01

    In the vertebrate retina, establishment of precise synaptic connections among distinct retinal neuron cell types is critical for processing visual information and for accurate visual perception. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), amacrine cells, and bipolar cells establish stereotypic neurite arborization patterns to form functional neural circuits in the inner plexiform layer (IPL)1–3: a laminar region that is conventionally divided into five major parallel sublaminae1,2. However, the molecular mechanisms governing distinct retinal subtype targeting to specific sublaminae within the IPL remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that the transmembrane semaphorin Sema6A signals through its receptor PlexinA4 (PlexA4) to control lamina-specific neuronal stratification in the mouse retina. Expression analyses demonstrate that Sema6A and PlexA4 proteins are expressed in a complementary fashion in the developing retina: Sema6A in most ON sublaminae and PlexA4 in OFF sublaminae of the IPL. Mice with null mutations in PlexA4 or Sema6A exhibit severe defects in stereotypic lamina-specific neurite arborization of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-expressing dopaminergic amacrine cells, intrinsically photosensitive RGCs (ipRGCs), and calbindin-positive cells in the IPL. Sema6A and PlexA4 genetically interact in vivo with respect to the regulation of dopaminergic amacrine cell laminar targeting. Therefore, neuronal targeting to subdivisions of the IPL in the mammalian retina is directed by repulsive transmembrane guidance cues present on neuronal processes. PMID:21270798

  8. The Transmembrane Adaptor Protein SIT Inhibits TCR-Mediated Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, Börge; Krieger, Tina; Kalinski, Thomas; Thielitz, Anja; Reinhold, Dirk; Roessner, Albert; Schraven, Burkhart; Simeoni, Luca

    2011-01-01

    Transmembrane adaptor proteins (TRAPs) organize signaling complexes at the plasma membrane, and thus function as critical linkers and integrators of signaling cascades downstream of antigen receptors. We have previously shown that the transmembrane adaptor protein SIT regulates the threshold for thymocyte selection. Moreover, T cells from SIT-deficient mice are hyperresponsive to CD3 stimulation and undergo enhanced lymphopenia-induced homeostatic proliferation, thus indicating that SIT inhibits TCR-mediated signaling. Here, we have further addressed how SIT regulates signaling cascades in T cells. We demonstrate that the loss of SIT enhances TCR-mediated Akt activation and increased phosphorylation/inactivation of Foxo1, a transcription factor of the Forkhead family that inhibits cell cycle progression and regulates T-cell homeostasis. We have also shown that CD4+ T cells from SIT-deficient mice display increased CD69 and CD40L expression indicating an altered activation status. Additional biochemical analyses further revealed that suppression of SIT expression by RNAi in human T cells resulted in an enhanced proximal TCR signaling. In summary, the data identify SIT as an important modulator of TCR-mediated signaling that regulates T-cell activation, homeostasis and tolerance. PMID:21957439

  9. Transmembrane Domains of Attraction on the TSH Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ali, M. Rejwan; Mezei, Mihaly; Davies, Terry F.

    2015-01-01

    The TSH receptor (TSHR) has the propensity to form dimers and oligomers. Our data using ectodomain-truncated TSHRs indicated that the predominant interfaces for oligomerization reside in the transmembrane (TM) domain. To map the potentially interacting residues, we first performed in silico studies of the TSHR transmembrane domain using a homology model and using Brownian dynamics (BD). The cluster of dimer conformations obtained from BD analysis indicated that TM1 made contact with TM4 and two residues in TM2 made contact with TM5. To confirm the proximity of these contact residues, we then generated cysteine mutants at all six contact residues predicted by the BD analysis and performed cysteine cross-linking studies. These results showed that the predicted helices in the protomer were indeed involved in proximity interactions. Furthermore, an alternative experimental approach, receptor truncation experiments and LH receptor sequence substitution experiments, identified TM1 harboring a major region involved in TSHR oligomerization, in agreement with the conclusion from the cross-linking studies. Point mutations of the predicted interacting residues did not yield a substantial decrease in oligomerization, unlike the truncation of the TM1, so we concluded that constitutive oligomerization must involve interfaces forming domains of attraction in a cooperative manner that is not dominated by interactions between specific residues. PMID:25406938

  10. Transmembrane transport of peptidoglycan precursors across model and bacterial membranes.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Vincent; Sijbrandi, Robert; Kol, Matthijs; Swiezewska, Ewa; de Kruijff, Ben; Breukink, Eefjan

    2007-05-01

    Translocation of the peptidoglycan precursor Lipid II across the cytoplasmic membrane is a key step in bacterial cell wall synthesis, but hardly understood. Using NBD-labelled Lipid II, we showed by fluorescence and TLC assays that Lipid II transport does not occur spontaneously and is not induced by the presence of single spanning helical transmembrane peptides that facilitate transbilayer movement of membrane phospholipids. MurG catalysed synthesis of Lipid II from Lipid I in lipid vesicles also did not result in membrane translocation of Lipid II. These findings demonstrate that a specialized protein machinery is needed for transmembrane movement of Lipid II. In line with this, we could demonstrate Lipid II translocation in isolated Escherichia coli inner membrane vesicles and this transport could be uncoupled from the synthesis of Lipid II at low temperatures. The transport process appeared to be independent from an energy source (ATP or proton motive force). Additionally, our studies indicate that translocation of Lipid II is coupled to transglycosylation activity on the periplasmic side of the inner membrane.

  11. Bioenergetics and mitochondrial transmembrane potential during differentiation of cultured osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komarova, S. V.; Ataullakhanov, F. I.; Globus, R. K.

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between osteoblast differentiation and bioenergetics, cultured primary osteoblasts from fetal rat calvaria were grown in medium supplemented with ascorbate to induce differentiation. Before ascorbate treatment, the rate of glucose consumption was 320 nmol. h(-1). 10(6) cells(-1), respiration was 40 nmol. h(-1). 10(6) cells(-1), and the ratio of lactate production to glucose consumption was approximately 2, indicating that glycolysis was the main energy source for immature osteoblasts. Ascorbate treatment for 14 days led to a fourfold increase in respiration, a threefold increase in ATP production, and a fivefold increase in ATP content compared with that shown in immature cells. Confocal imaging of mitochondria stained with a transmembrane potential-sensitive vital dye showed that mature cells possessed abundant amounts of high-transmembrane-potential mitochondria, which were concentrated near the culture medium-facing surface. Acute treatment of mature osteoblasts with metabolic inhibitors showed that the rate of glycolysis rose to maintain the cellular energy supply constant. Thus progressive differentiation coincided with changes in cellular metabolism and mitochondrial activity, which are likely to play key roles in osteoblast function.

  12. Retromer-Mediated Trafficking of Transmembrane Receptors and Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Stine C.; Siupka, Piotr; Nielsen, Morten S.

    2015-01-01

    Transport between the endoplasmatic reticulum, the Golgi-network, the endo-lysosomal system and the cell surface can be categorized as anterograde or retrograde, describing traffic that goes forward or backward, respectively. Traffic going from the plasma membrane to endosomes and lysosomes or the trans-Golgi network (TGN) constitutes the major retrograde transport routes. Several transmembrane proteins undergo retrograde transport as part of a recycling mechanism that contributes to reutilization and maintenance of a steady-state protein localization. In addition, some receptors are hijacked by exotoxins and used for entry and intracellular transport. The physiological relevance of retrograde transport cannot be overstated. Retrograde trafficking of the amyloid precursor protein determines the distribution between organelles, and hence the possibility of cleavage by γ-secretase. Right balancing of the pathways is critical for protection against Alzheimer’s disease. During embryonic development, retrograde transport of Wntless to the TGN is essential for the following release of Wnt from the plasma membrane. Furthermore, overexpression of Wntless has been linked to oncogenesis. Here, we review relevant aspects of the retrograde trafficking of mammalian transmembrane receptors and transporters, with focus on the retromer-mediated transport between endosomes and the TGN. PMID:26154780

  13. Bioenergetics and mitochondrial transmembrane potential during differentiation of cultured osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komarova, S. V.; Ataullakhanov, F. I.; Globus, R. K.

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between osteoblast differentiation and bioenergetics, cultured primary osteoblasts from fetal rat calvaria were grown in medium supplemented with ascorbate to induce differentiation. Before ascorbate treatment, the rate of glucose consumption was 320 nmol. h(-1). 10(6) cells(-1), respiration was 40 nmol. h(-1). 10(6) cells(-1), and the ratio of lactate production to glucose consumption was approximately 2, indicating that glycolysis was the main energy source for immature osteoblasts. Ascorbate treatment for 14 days led to a fourfold increase in respiration, a threefold increase in ATP production, and a fivefold increase in ATP content compared with that shown in immature cells. Confocal imaging of mitochondria stained with a transmembrane potential-sensitive vital dye showed that mature cells possessed abundant amounts of high-transmembrane-potential mitochondria, which were concentrated near the culture medium-facing surface. Acute treatment of mature osteoblasts with metabolic inhibitors showed that the rate of glycolysis rose to maintain the cellular energy supply constant. Thus progressive differentiation coincided with changes in cellular metabolism and mitochondrial activity, which are likely to play key roles in osteoblast function.

  14. Structural Dynamics of Insulin Receptor and Transmembrane Signaling.

    PubMed

    Tatulian, Suren A

    2015-09-15

    The insulin receptor (IR) is a (αβ)2-type transmembrane tyrosine kinase that plays a central role in cell metabolism. Each αβ heterodimer consists of an extracellular ligand-binding α-subunit and a membrane-spanning β-subunit that comprises the cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase (TK) domain and the phosphorylation sites. The α- and β-subunits are linked via a single disulfide bridge, and the (αβ)2 tetramer is formed by disulfide bonds between the α-chains. Insulin binding induces conformational changes in IR that reach the intracellular β-subunit followed by a protein phosphorylation and activation cascade. Defects in this signaling process, including IR dysfunction caused by mutations, result in type 2 diabetes. Rational drug design aimed at treatment of diabetes relies on knowledge of the detailed structure of IR and the dynamic structural transformations during transmembrane signaling. Recent X-ray crystallographic studies have provided important clues about the mode of binding of insulin to IR, the resulting structural changes and their transmission to the TK domain, but a complete understanding of the structural basis underlying insulin signaling has not been achieved. This review presents a critical analysis of the current status of the structure-function relationship of IR, with a comparative assessment of the other IR family receptors, and discusses potential advancements that may provide insight into the molecular mechanism of insulin signaling.

  15. Aspirin and some other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs inhibit cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein gene expression in T-84 cells.

    PubMed

    Tondelier, D; Brouillard, F; Lipecka, J; Labarthe, R; Bali, M; Costa de Beauregard, M A; Torossi, T; Cougnon, M; Edelman, A; Baudouin-Legros, M

    1999-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF gene, which encodes CF transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR), a transmembrane protein that acts as a cAMP-regulated chloride channel The disease is characterized by inflammation but the relationship between inflammation, abnormal transepithelial ion transport, and the clinical manifestations of CF are uncertain. The present study was undertaken to determine whether three nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (aspirin, ibuprofen, and indomethacin) modulate CFTR gene expression in T-84 cells. Treatment with NSAIDs reduced CFTR transcripts, and decreased cAMP-stimulated anion fluxes, an index of CFTR function. However, the two phenomena occurred at different concentrations of both drugs. The results indicate that NSAIDs can regulate both CFTR gene expression and the function of CFTR-related chloride transport, and suggest that NSAIDs act via multiple transduction pathways.

  16. Topology based identification and comprehensive classification of four-transmembrane helix containing proteins (4TMs) in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Attwood, Misty M; Krishnan, Arunkumar; Pivotti, Valentina; Yazdi, Samira; Almén, Markus Sällman; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2016-03-31

    Membrane proteins are key components in a large spectrum of diverse functions and thus account for the major proportion of the drug-targeted portion of the genome. From a structural perspective, the α-helical transmembrane proteins can be categorized into major groups based on the number of transmembrane helices and these groups are often associated with specific functions. When compared to the well-characterized seven-transmembrane containing proteins (7TM), other TM groups are less explored and in particular the 4TM group. In this study, we identify the complete 4TM complement from the latest release of the human genome and assess the 4TM structure group as a whole. We functionally characterize this dataset and evaluate the resulting groups and ubiquitous functions, and furthermore describe disease and drug target involvement. We classified 373 proteins, which represents ~7 % of the human membrane proteome, and includes 69 more proteins than our previous estimate. We have characterized the 4TM dataset based on functional, structural, and/or evolutionary similarities. Proteins that are involved in transport activity constitute 37 % of the dataset, 23 % are receptor-related, and 13 % have enzymatic functions. Intriguingly, proteins involved in transport are more than double the 15 % of transporters in the entire human membrane proteome, which might suggest that the 4TM topological architecture is more favored for transporting molecules over other functions. Moreover, we found an interesting exception to the ubiquitous intracellular N- and C-termini localization that is found throughout the entire membrane proteome and 4TM dataset in the neurotransmitter gated ion channel families. Overall, we estimate that 58 % of the dataset has a known association to disease conditions with 19 % of the genes possibly involved in different types of cancer. We provide here the most robust and updated classification of the 4TM complement of the human genome as a platform to further

  17. TRP Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voets, Thomas; Owsianik, Grzegorz; Nilius, Bernd

    The TRP superfamily represents a highly diverse group of cation-permeable ion channels related to the product of the Drosophila trp (transient receptor potential) gene. The cloning and characterization of members of this cation channel family has experienced a remarkable growth during the last decade, uncovering a wealth of information concerning the role of TRP channels in a variety of cell types, tissues, and species. Initially, TRP channels were mainly considered as phospholipase C (PLC)-dependent and/or store-operated Ca2+-permeable cation channels. More recent research has highlighted the sensitivity of TRP channels to a broad array of chemical and physical stimuli, allowing them to function as dedicated biological sensors involved in processes ranging from vision to taste, tactile sensation, and hearing. Moreover, the tailored selectivity of certain TRP channels enables them to play key roles in the cellular uptake and/or transepithelial transport of Ca2+, Mg2+, and trace metal ions. In this chapter we give a brief overview of the TRP channel superfamily followed by a survey of current knowledge concerning their structure and activation mechanisms.

  18. The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Potentiator Ivacaftor Augments Mucociliary Clearance Abrogating Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Inhibition by Cigarette Smoke.

    PubMed

    Raju, S Vamsee; Lin, Vivian Y; Liu, Limbo; McNicholas, Carmel M; Karki, Suman; Sloane, Peter A; Tang, Liping; Jackson, Patricia L; Wang, Wei; Wilson, Landon; Macon, Kevin J; Mazur, Marina; Kappes, John C; DeLucas, Lawrence J; Barnes, Stephen; Kirk, Kevin; Tearney, Guillermo J; Rowe, Steven M

    2017-01-01

    Acquired cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) dysfunction may contribute to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease pathogenesis and is a potential therapeutic target. We sought to determine the acute effects of cigarette smoke on ion transport and the mucociliary transport apparatus, their mechanistic basis, and whether deleterious effects could be reversed with the CFTR potentiator ivacaftor (VX-770). Primary human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells and human bronchi were exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and/or ivacaftor. CFTR function and expression were measured in Ussing chambers and by surface biotinylation. CSE-derived acrolein modifications on CFTR were determined by mass spectroscopic analysis of purified protein, and the functional microanatomy of the airway epithelia was measured by 1-μm resolution optical coherence tomography. CSE reduced CFTR-dependent current in HBE cells (P < 0.05) and human bronchi (P < 0.05) within minutes of exposure. The mechanism involved CSE-induced reduction of CFTR gating, decreasing CFTR open-channel probability by approximately 75% immediately after exposure (P < 0.05), whereas surface CFTR expression was partially reduced with chronic exposure, but was stable acutely. CSE treatment of purified CFTR resulted in acrolein modifications on lysine and cysteine residues that likely disrupt CFTR gating. In primary HBE cells, CSE reduced airway surface liquid depth (P < 0.05) and ciliary beat frequency (P < 0.05) within 60 minutes that was restored by coadministration with ivacaftor (P < 0.005). Cigarette smoking transmits acute reductions in CFTR activity, adversely affecting the airway surface. These effects are reversible by a CFTR potentiator in vitro, representing a potential therapeutic strategy in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with chronic bronchitis.

  19. Rippley Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    18 September 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a narrow channel on the upper east flank of the martian volcano, Hadriaca Patera. Because it is located on a volcano, most likely this channel was formed by lava, perhaps as a lava tube at which the thin roof later collapsed. Large ripples of windblown sediment now occur on the channel floor; their crests are generally perpendicular to the channel walls, suggesting that winds blow up and down through this channel.

    Location near: 30.5oS, 266.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Autumn

  20. Rippley Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    18 September 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a narrow channel on the upper east flank of the martian volcano, Hadriaca Patera. Because it is located on a volcano, most likely this channel was formed by lava, perhaps as a lava tube at which the thin roof later collapsed. Large ripples of windblown sediment now occur on the channel floor; their crests are generally perpendicular to the channel walls, suggesting that winds blow up and down through this channel.

    Location near: 30.5oS, 266.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Autumn

  1. Rational Coupled Dynamics Network Manipulation Rescues Disease-Relevant Mutant Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator

    PubMed Central

    Proctor, Elizabeth A.; Kota, Pradeep; Aleksandrov, Andrei A.; He, Lihua; Riordan, John R.; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2014-01-01

    Many cellular functions necessary for life are tightly regulated by protein allosteric conformational change, and correlated dynamics between protein regions has been found to contribute to the function of proteins not previously considered allosteric. The ability to map and control such dynamic coupling would thus create opportunities for the extension of current therapeutic design strategy. Here, we present an approach to determine the networks of residues involved in the transfer of correlated motion across a protein, and apply our approach to rescue disease-causative mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) ion channels, ΔF508 and ΔI507, which together constitute over 90% of cystic fibrosis cases. We show that these mutations perturb dynamic coupling within the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1), and uncover a critical residue that mediates trans-domain coupled dynamics. By rationally designing a mutation to this residue, we improve aberrant dynamics of mutant CFTR as well as enhance surface expression and function of both mutants, demonstrating the rescue of a disease mutation by rational correction of aberrant protein dynamics. PMID:25685315

  2. Structure-function study of the fourth transmembrane segment of the GABAρ1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Mondragón, Argel; Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Miledi, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    The Cys-loop family of receptors mediates synaptic neurotransmission in the central nervous system of vertebrates. These receptors share several structural characteristics and assemble in the plasma membrane as multimers with fivefold symmetry. Of these, the ionotropic GABA receptors are key players in the pathogenesis of diseases like epilepsy, anxiety, and schizophrenia. Different experimental approaches have shed some light on the mechanisms behind the function of these receptors; but little is known about their structure at high resolution. Sequence homology with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor predicts that ionotropic GABA receptors possess four transmembrane segments (TM1–4) and that TM2 forms the wall of the ion channel. However, the role of the other three segments is unclear. The GABAρ1 receptor plays a fundamental role in the regulation of neurotransmission along the visual pathway, is highly sensitive to GABA, and exhibits little desensitization. In our recent investigations of the role of TM4 in receptor function, a key residue in this domain (W475) was found to be involved in activation of the receptor. Here we have generated a structural model of the GABAρ1 receptor in silico and assessed its validity by electrophysiologically testing nine amino acid substitutions of W475 and deletions of the neighboring residues (Y474 and S476). The results identify a critical linkage between the ligand-binding domain and the TM4 domain and provide a framework for more detailed structure-function analyses of ionotropic GABA receptors. PMID:20876117

  3. Giant osmotic energy conversion measured in a single transmembrane boron nitride nanotube.

    PubMed

    Siria, Alessandro; Poncharal, Philippe; Biance, Anne-Laure; Fulcrand, Rémy; Blase, Xavier; Purcell, Stephen T; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2013-02-28

    New models of fluid transport are expected to emerge from the confinement of liquids at the nanoscale, with potential applications in ultrafiltration, desalination and energy conversion. Nevertheless, advancing our fundamental understanding of fluid transport on the smallest scales requires mass and ion dynamics to be ultimately characterized across an individual channel to avoid averaging over many pores. A major challenge for nanofluidics thus lies in building distinct and well-controlled nanochannels, amenable to the systematic exploration of their properties. Here we describe the fabrication and use of a hierarchical nanofluidic device made of a boron nitride nanotube that pierces an ultrathin membrane and connects two fluid reservoirs. Such a transmembrane geometry allows the detailed study of fluidic transport through a single nanotube under diverse forces, including electric fields, pressure drops and chemical gradients. Using this device, we discover very large, osmotically induced electric currents generated by salinity gradients, exceeding by two orders of magnitude their pressure-driven counterpart. We show that this result originates in the anomalously high surface charge carried by the nanotube's internal surface in water at large pH, which we independently quantify in conductance measurements. The nano-assembly route using nanostructures as building blocks opens the way to studying fluid, ionic and molecule transport on the nanoscale, and may lead to biomimetic functionalities. Our results furthermore suggest that boron nitride nanotubes could be used as membranes for osmotic power harvesting under salinity gradients.

  4. Targeting a genetic defect: cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator modulators in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Derichs, Nico

    2013-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by genetic mutations that affect the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. These mutations can impact the synthesis and transfer of the CFTR protein to the apical membrane of epithelial cells, as well as influencing the gating or conductance of chloride and bicarbonate ions through the channel. CFTR dysfunction results in ionic imbalance of epithelial secretions in several organ systems, such as the pancreas, gastrointestinal tract, liver and the respiratory system. Since discovery of the CFTR gene in 1989, research has focussed on targeting the underlying genetic defect to identify a disease-modifying treatment for CF. Investigated management strategies have included gene therapy and the development of small molecules that target CFTR mutations, known as CFTR modulators. CFTR modulators are typically identified by high-throughput screening assays, followed by preclinical validation using cell culture systems. Recently, one such modulator, the CFTR potentiator ivacaftor, was approved as an oral therapy for CF patients with the G551D-CFTR mutation. The clinical development of ivacaftor not only represents a breakthrough in CF care but also serves as a noteworthy example of personalised medicine.

  5. Mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator Gene and In Vivo Transepithelial Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Wilschanski, Michael; Dupuis, Annie; Ellis, Lynda; Jarvi, Keith; Zielenski, Julian; Tullis, Elizabeth; Martin, Sheelagh; Corey, Mary; Tsui, Lap-Chee; Durie, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To examine the relationship between cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator gene mutations (CFTR) and in vivo transepithelial potentials. Methods: We prospectively evaluated 162 men including 31 healthy subjects, 21 obligate heterozygotes, 60 with congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD) and 50 with CF by extensive CFTR genotyping, sweat chloride and nasal potential difference testing. Results: Six (10%) men with CBAVD carried no CFTR mutations, 18 (30%) carried one mutation, including the 5T variant, and 36 (60%) carried mutations on both alleles, for a significantly higher rate carrying one or more mutations than healthy controls (90% versus 19%, p < 0.001). There was an overlapping spectrum of ion channel measurements among the men with CBAVD, ranging from values in the control and obligate heterozygote range at one extreme, to values in the CF range at the other. All pancreatic-sufficient patients with CF and 34 of 36 patients with CBAVD with mutations on both alleles carried at least one mild mutation. However, the distribution of mild mutations in the two groups differed greatly. Genotyping, sweat chloride and nasal potential difference (alone or in combination) excluded CF in all CBAVD men with no mutations. CF was confirmed in 56% and 67% of CBAVD men carrying 1 and 2 CFTR mutations, respectively. Conclusion: Abnormalities of CFTR transepithelial function correlate with the number and severity of CFTR gene mutations. PMID:16840743

  6. An allosteric Sec61 inhibitor traps nascent transmembrane helices at the lateral gate

    PubMed Central

    MacKinnon, Andrew L; Paavilainen, Ville O; Sharma, Ajay; Hegde, Ramanujan S; Taunton, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Membrane protein biogenesis requires the coordinated movement of hydrophobic transmembrane domains (TMD) from the cytosolic vestibule of the Sec61 channel into the lipid bilayer. Molecular insight into TMD integration has been hampered by the difficulty of characterizing intermediates during this intrinsically dynamic process. In this study, we show that cotransin, a substrate-selective Sec61 inhibitor, traps nascent TMDs in the cytosolic vestibule, permitting detailed interrogation of an early pre-integration intermediate. Site-specific crosslinking revealed the pre-integrated TMD docked to Sec61 near the cytosolic tip of the lateral gate. Escape from cotransin-arrest depends not only on cotransin concentration, but also on the biophysical properties of the TMD. Genetic selection of cotransin-resistant cancer cells uncovered multiple mutations clustered near the lumenal plug of Sec61α, thus revealing cotransin’s likely site of action. Our results suggest that TMD/lateral gate interactions facilitate TMD transfer into the membrane, a process that is allosterically modulated by cotransin binding to the plug. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01483.001 PMID:24497544

  7. Inhibition of Bak Activation by VDAC2 Is Dependent on the Bak Transmembrane Anchor*

    PubMed Central

    Lazarou, Michael; Stojanovski, Diana; Frazier, Ann E.; Kotevski, Aneta; Dewson, Grant; Craigen, William J.; Kluck, Ruth M.; Vaux, David L.; Ryan, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    Bax and Bak are pro-apoptotic factors that are required for cell death by the mitochondrial or intrinsic pathway. Bax is found in an inactive state in the cytosol and upon activation is targeted to the mitochondrial outer membrane where it releases cytochrome c and other factors that cause caspase activation. Although Bak functions in the same way as Bax, it is constitutively localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane. In the membrane, Bak activation is inhibited by the voltage-dependent anion channel isoform 2 (VDAC2) by an unknown mechanism. Using blue native gel electrophoresis, we show that in healthy cells endogenous inactive Bak exists in a 400-kDa complex that is dependent on the presence of VDAC2. Activation of Bak is concomitant with its release from the 400-kDa complex and the formation of lower molecular weight species. Furthermore, substitution of the Bak transmembrane anchor with that of the mitochondrial outer membrane tail-anchored protein hFis1 prevents association of Bak with the VDAC2 complex and increases the sensitivity of cells to an apoptotic stimulus. Our results suggest that VDAC2 interacts with the hydrophobic tail of Bak to sequester it in an inactive state in the mitochondrial outer membrane, thereby raising the stimulation threshold necessary for permeabilization of the mitochondrial outer membrane and cell death. PMID:20851889

  8. Ultraslow Water-Mediated Transmembrane Interactions Regulate the Activation of A2A Adenosine Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yoonji; Kim, Songmi; Choi, Sun; Hyeon, Changbong

    2016-09-01

    Water molecules inside G-protein coupled receptor have recently been spotlighted in a series of crystal structures. To decipher the dynamics and functional roles of internal waters in GPCR activity, we studied A$_{\\text{2A}}$ adenosine receptor using $\\mu$sec-molecular dynamics simulations. Our study finds that the amount of water flux across the transmembrane (TM) domain varies depending on the receptor state, and that the water molecules of the TM channel in the active state flow three times slower than those in the inactive state. Depending on the location in solvent-protein interface as well as the receptor state, the average residence time of water in each residue varies from $\\sim\\mathcal{O}(10^2)$ psec to $\\sim\\mathcal{O}(10^2)$ nsec. Especially, water molecules, exhibiting ultraslow relaxation ($\\sim\\mathcal{O}(10^2)$ nsec) in the active state, are found around the microswitch residues that are considered activity hotspots for GPCR function. A continuous allosteric network spanning the TM domain, arising from water-mediated contacts, is unique in the active state, underscoring the importance of slow waters in the GPCR activation.

  9. Asymmetric 4-aryl-1,4-dihydropyridines potentiate mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR).

    PubMed

    Giampieri, Michele; Vanthuyne, Nicolas; Nieddu, Erika; Mazzei, Marco T; Anzaldi, Maria; Pedemonte, Nicoletta; Galietta, Luis J V; Roussel, Christian; Mazzei, Mauro

    2012-10-01

    Some of the genetic mutations that cause cystic fibrosis (CF) impair the gating of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) ion channel. This defect can be corrected with pharmacological tools (potentiators) that belong to various chemical families, including the 1,4-dihydropyridines (DHPs). A small set of asymmetric 4-aryl-DHPs was synthesized, and each racemic couple was tested in a functional assay carried out on cells expressing the G1349D, ΔF508, and G551D mutants. The most active racemates were subjected to chiral separation by HPLC, and the pure enantiomers were tested to evaluate any gains in activity. Although three enantiomers demonstrated high potency (K(d) values less than 0.09, 0.1, and 0.5 μM in G1349D, ΔF508, and G551D, respectively), in general, the screening of pure enantiomers did not produce a great diversity in potency values. It is probable that the degree of DHP asymmetry considered in our analysis is still insufficient with respect to that allowed in a putative DHP binding site in CFTR, so that the site could equally accommodate both enantiomers.

  10. Light-controlled ion channels formed by amphiphilic small molecules regulate ion conduction via cis-trans photoisomerization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Bao, Chunyan; Wang, Haiyan; Lin, Yao; Jia, Huijuan; Zhu, Linyong

    2013-11-11

    Light-regulated ion channel-transport across lipid bilayers was realized using structurally simple azobenzene-based amphiphilic small molecules. UV or visible irradiation triggers molecular photoisomerization, which induces structural and membrane affinity changes in self-assembled channels, thus resulting in light-regulated ion transmembrane transport.

  11. Molecular cloning and transmembrane structure of hCLCA2 from human lung, trachea, and mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Gruber, A D; Schreur, K D; Ji, H L; Fuller, C M; Pauli, B U

    1999-06-01

    The CLCA family of Ca2+-activated Cl- channels has recently been discovered, with an increasing number of closely related members isolated from different species. Here we report the cloning of the second human homolog, hCLCA2, from a human lung cDNA library. Northern blot and RT-PCR analyses revealed additional expression in trachea and mammary gland. A primary translation product of 120 kDa was cleaved into two cell surface-associated glycoproteins of 86 and 34 kDa in transfected HEK-293 cells. hCLCA2 is the first CLCA homolog for which the transmembrane structure has been systematically studied. Glycosylation site scanning and protease protection assays revealed five transmembrane domains with a large, cysteine-rich, amino-terminal extracellular domain. Whole cell patch-clamp recordings of hCLCA2-transfected HEK-293 cells detected a slightly outwardly rectifying anion conductance that was increased in the presence of the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin and inhibited by DIDS, dithiothreitol, niflumic acid, and tamoxifen. Expression in human trachea and lung suggests that hCLCA2 may play a role in the complex pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis.

  12. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in human muscle: Dysfunction causes abnormal metabolic recovery in exercise.

    PubMed

    Lamhonwah, Anne-Marie; Bear, Christine E; Huan, Ling Jun; Kim Chiaw, Patrick; Ackerley, Cameron A; Tein, Ingrid

    2010-06-01

    Individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) have exercise intolerance and skeletal muscle weakness not solely attributable to physical inactivity or pulmonary function abnormalities. CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) has been demonstrated in human bronchial smooth and cardiac muscle. Using (31)P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy of skeletal muscle, we showed CF patients to have lower resting muscle adenosine triphosphate and delayed phosphocreatine recovery times after high-intensity exercise, suggesting abnormal muscle aerobic metabolism; and higher end-exercise pH values, suggesting altered bicarbonate transport. Our objective was to study CFTR expression in human skeletal muscle. We studied CFTR expression in human skeletal muscle by Western blot with anti-CFTR antibody (Ab) L12B4 and demonstrated a single band with expected molecular weight of 168kDa. We isolated the cDNA by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and directly sequenced a 975bp segment (c. 3,600-4,575) that was identical to the human CFTR sequence. We showed punctate staining of CFTR in sarcoplasm and sarcolemma by immunofluorescence microscopy with L12B4 Ab and secondary Alexa 488-labeled Ab. We confirmed CFTR expression in the sarcotubular network and sarcolemma by electron microscopy, using immunogold-labeled anti-CFTR Ab. We observed activation of CFTR Cl(-) channels with iodide efflux, on addition of forskolin, 3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xanthine, and 8-chlorphenylthio-cyclic adenosine monophosphate, in wild-type C57BL/6J isolated muscle fibers in contrast to no efflux from mutant F508del-CFTR muscle. We speculate that a defect in sarcoplasmic reticulum CFTR Cl(-) channels could alter the electrochemical gradient, causing dysregulation of Ca(2+) homeostasis, for example, ryanodine receptor or sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+) adenosine triphosphatases essential to excitation-contraction coupling leading to exercise intolerance and muscle weakness in CF.

  13. Allosteric and hyperekplexic mutant phenotypes investigated on an α1 glycine receptor transmembrane structure.

    PubMed

    Moraga-Cid, Gustavo; Sauguet, Ludovic; Huon, Christèle; Malherbe, Laurie; Girard-Blanc, Christine; Petres, Stéphane; Murail, Samuel; Taly, Antoine; Baaden, Marc; Delarue, Marc; Corringer, Pierre-Jean

    2015-03-03

    The glycine receptor (GlyR) is a pentameric ligand-gated ion channel (pLGIC) mediating inhibitory transmission in the nervous system. Its transmembrane domain (TMD) is the target of allosteric modulators such as general anesthetics and ethanol and is a major locus for hyperekplexic congenital mutations altering the allosteric transitions of activation or desensitization. We previously showed that the TMD of the human α1GlyR could be fused to the extracellular domain of GLIC, a bacterial pLGIC, to form a functional chimera called Lily. Here, we overexpress Lily in Schneider 2 insect cells and solve its structure by X-ray crystallography at 3.5 Å resolution. The TMD of the α1GlyR adopts a closed-channel conformation involving a single ring of hydrophobic residues at the center of the pore. Electrophysiological recordings show that the phenotypes of key allosteric mutations of the α1GlyR, scattered all along the pore, are qualitatively preserved in this chimera, including those that confer decreased sensitivity to agonists, constitutive activity, decreased activation kinetics, or increased desensitization kinetics. Combined structural and functional data indicate a pore-opening mechanism for the α1GlyR, suggesting a structural explanation for the effect of some key hyperekplexic allosteric mutations. The first X-ray structure of the TMD of the α1GlyR solved here using GLIC as a scaffold paves the way for mechanistic investigation and design of allosteric modulators of a human receptor.

  14. Allosteric and hyperekplexic mutant phenotypes investigated on an α1 glycine receptor transmembrane structure

    PubMed Central

    Moraga-Cid, Gustavo; Sauguet, Ludovic; Huon, Christèle; Malherbe, Laurie; Girard-Blanc, Christine; Petres, Stéphane; Murail, Samuel; Taly, Antoine; Baaden, Marc; Delarue, Marc; Corringer, Pierre-Jean

    2015-01-01

    The glycine receptor (GlyR) is a pentameric ligand-gated ion channel (pLGIC) mediating inhibitory transmission in the nervous system. Its transmembrane domain (TMD) is the target of allosteric modulators such as general anesthetics and ethanol and is a major locus for hyperekplexic congenital mutations altering the allosteric transitions of activation or desensitization. We previously showed that the TMD of the human α1GlyR could be fused to the extracellular domain of GLIC, a bacterial pLGIC, to form a functional chimera called Lily. Here, we overexpress Lily in Schneider 2 insect cells and solve its structure by X-ray crystallography at 3.5 Å resolution. The TMD of the α1GlyR adopts a closed-channel conformation involving a single ring of hydrophobic residues at the center of the pore. Electrophysiological recordings show that the phenotypes of key allosteric mutations of the α1GlyR, scattered all along the pore, are qualitatively preserved in this chimera, including those that confer decreased sensitivity to agonists, constitutive activity, decreased activation kinetics, or increased desensitization kinetics. Combined structural and functional data indicate a pore-opening mechanism for the α1GlyR, suggesting a structural explanation for the effect of some key hyperekplexic allosteric mutations. The first X-ray structure of the TMD of the α1GlyR solved here using GLIC as a scaffold paves the way for mechanistic investigation and design of allosteric modulators of a human receptor. PMID:25730860

  15. Coupling a mechanosensitive channel with a vesicle under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, On Shun; Young, Yuan Nan; Veerapaneni, Shravan; Stone, Howard

    2014-11-01

    Mechanosensitive channels enable cells to respond to their local environment. Continuum mechanical models have been proposed to describe how bilayer deformation induced by the transmembrane protein and the membrane tension influence the free energy of channel gating under static conditions. The dynamics of mechanosensitive channels under flow conditions however remains largely unexplored. Cells under flow display interesting features not observed under static environments. Here we present a model coupling a mechanosensitive channel with the dynamics of a vesicle under shear flow to investigate how the channel gating responds to hydrodynamic stress. The model could be used to investigate the release of signaling molecules, transport of ions or drugs across cell membranes under flow in biological systems, as well as the design and control of channel gating in synthetic cells.

  16. Transmembrane helix assembly and the role of salt bridges.

    PubMed

    Walther, Torsten H; Ulrich, Anne S

    2014-08-01

    Transmembrane helix-helix interactions mediate the folding and assembly of membrane proteins. Recognition motifs range from GxxxG and leucine zippers to polar side chains and salt bridges. Some canonical membrane proteins contain local charge clusters that are important for folding and function, and which have to be compatible with a stable insertion into the bilayer via the translocon. Recently, the electrostatic "charge zipper" has been described as another kind of assembly motif. The protein sequences exhibit a quasi-symmetrical pattern of complementary charges that can form extended ladders of salt bridges. Such segments can insert reversibly into membranes, or even translocate across them. Nature uses charge zippers in transport processes, and they can also be adapted in the design of cell-penetrating carriers. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Transmembrane signaling by GPCRs: insight from rhodopsin and opsin structures.

    PubMed

    Choe, Hui-Woog; Park, Jung Hee; Kim, Yong Ju; Ernst, Oliver P

    2011-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), also known as seven-transmembrane (7TM) receptors, are the largest family of membrane proteins in the human genome. As versatile signaling molecules, they mediate cellular responses to extracellular signals. Diffusible ligands like hormones and neurotransmitters bind to GPCRs to modulate GPCR activity. An extraordinary and highly specialized GPCR is the photoreceptor rhodopsin which contains the chromophore retinal as its covalently bound ligand. For receptor activation the configuration of retinal is altered by photon absorption. To date, rhodopsin is the only GPCR for which crystal structures of inactive, active and ligand-free conformations are known. Although the photochemical activation is unique to rhodopsin, many mechanistic insights from this receptor can be generalized for GPCRs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator expression in human hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Mulberg, A E; Weyler, R T; Altschuler, S M; Hyde, T M

    1998-01-05

    We have previously characterized the expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR) gene, mRNA and protein in rat brain with reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR amplification, in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry. We now report that the CFTR mRNA is expressed in the human anterior hypothalamus, an area involved in regulation of appetite, resting energy expenditure and sexual differentiation. Expression of CFTR in neurons localized to this region may elucidate the pathogenesis of other non-pulmonary manifestations of cystic fibrosis which commonly are observed in children with CF, including congenital absence of the vas deferens. Neuron-specific expression of CFTR in brain may be involved in the regulation of homeostatic functions including reproductive function and fertility through effects on neurosecretion, i.e. GnRH release. Dysregulation of normal neuropeptide vesicle trafficking by mutant CFTR in brain my lead to alteration in physiological function.

  19. Hkat, a novel nutritionally regulated transmembrane protein in adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ren

    2012-01-01

    White adipose tissue is an active endocrine organ regulating many aspects of whole body physiology and pathology. Adipogenesis, a process in which premature cells differentiate into adipocytes, is a complex process that includes orchestrated changes in gene expression and cell morphology in response to various nutritional and hormonal stimuli. To profile transcriptome changes in response to nutritional stimulation, we performed RNA-seq on fat in mice treated with either a high-fat diet or fasting. We identified a novel nutritionally regulated gene, Gm12824, named Hkat (heart, kidney, adipose-enriched transmembrane protein). We show that both fasting and obesity dramatically reduce Hkat in white adipose tissue, and that fasting reduces while obesity increases its expression in brown fat. Hkat is localized to the plasma membrane and induced during adipogenesis. Therefore, Hkat is a novel nutritionally regulated gene that is potentially involved in metabolism.

  20. Functional relevance of transmembrane domains in membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Nikolaus, Jörg; Herrmann, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    Membrane fusion is ubiquitous in life. Fusion of biological membranes is mediated by specialized fusion proteins anchored to the bilayers destined to fuse. Here we describe these proteins as being instrumental in viral, intracellular and developmental fusion. Next, we review experimental and theoretical evidence that points to fusion in the different systems as following a common 'fusion through hemifusion' pathway. We also focus on the structure and dynamics of the transmembrane segment that anchors the fusion proteins to the bilayer, and its role in driving fusion. In particular, we highlight the influence of this single segment on the surrounding membrane lipids and on the overall shape of the membrane along the way to fusion.

  1. Retrieval of transmembrane proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    A COOH-terminal double lysine motif maintains type I transmembrane proteins in the ER. Proteins tagged with this motif, eg., CD8/E19 and CD4/E19, rapidly receive post-translational modifications characteristic of the intermediate compartment and partially colocalized to this organelle. These proteins also received modifications characteristic of the Golgi but much more slowly. Lectin staining localized these Golgi modified proteins to ER indicating that this motif is a retrieval signal. Differences in the subcellular distribution and rate of post-translational modification of CD8 maintained in the ER by sequences derived from a variety of ER resident proteins suggested that the efficiency of retrieval was dependent on the sequence context of the double lysine motif and that retrieval may be initiated from multiple positions along the exocytotic pathway. PMID:8468349

  2. Spatial changes in the transmembrane potential during extracellular electric stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X; Knisley, S B; Smith, W M; Rollins, D; Pollard, A E; Ideker, R E

    1998-11-16

    The purpose of this study was to determine the spatial changes in the transmembrane potential caused by extracellular electric field stimulation. The transmembrane potential was recorded in 10 guinea pig papillary muscles in a tissue bath using a double-barrel microelectrode. After 20 S1 stimuli, a 10-ms square wave S2 shock field with a 30-ms S1-S2 coupling interval was given via patch shock electrodes 1 cm on either side of the tissue during the action potential plateau. Two shock strengths (2.1+/-0.2 and 6.5+/-0.6 V/cm) were tested with both shock polarities. The recording site was moved across the tissue along fibers with either 200 micrometer (macroscopic group [n=5], 12 consecutive recording sites over a 2. 2-mm tissue length in each muscle) or 20 micrometer (microscopic group [n=5], 21 consecutive recording sites over a 0.4-mm tissue length in each muscle) between adjacent recording sites. In the macroscopic group, the portion of the tissue toward the anode was hyperpolarized, whereas the portion toward the cathode was depolarized, with 1 zero-potential crossing from hyperpolarization to depolarization present near the center of the tissue. In the microscopic group, only 1 zero-potential crossing was observed in the center region of the tissue, whereas, away from the center, only hyperpolarization was observed toward the anode and depolarization toward the cathode. Although these results are consistent with predictions from field stimulation of continuous representations of myocardial structure, ie, the bidomain and cable equation models, they are not consistent with the prediction of depolarization-hyperpolarization oscillation from representations based on cellular-level resistive discontinuities associated with gap junctions, ie, the sawtooth model.

  3. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Membranes and a Transmembrane Helix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Tap Ha; Mehler, Ernest L.; Weinstein, Harel

    1999-05-01

    Three molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of 1.5-ns length were carried out on fully hydrated patches of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers in the liquid-crystalline phase. The simulations were performed using different ensembles and electrostatic conditions: a microcanonical ensemble or constant pressure-temperature ensemble, with or without truncated electrostatic interactions. Calculated properties of the membrane patches from the three different protocols were compared to available data from experiments. These data include the resulting overall geometrical dimensions, the order characteristics of the lipid hydrocarbon chains, as well as various measures of the conformations of the polar head groups. The comparisons indicate that the simulation carried out within the microcanonical ensemble with truncated electrostatic interactions yielded results closest to the experimental data, provided that the initial equilibration phase preceding the production run was sufficiently long. The effects of embedding a non-ideal helical protein domain in the membrane patch were studied with the same MD protocols. This simulation was carried out for 2.5 ns. The protein domain corresponds to the seventh transmembrane segment (TMS7) of the human serotonin 5HT 2Areceptor. The peptide is composed of two α-helical segments linked by a hinge domain around a perturbing Asn-Pro motif that produces at the end of the simulation a kink angle of nearly 80° between the two helices. Several aspects of the TMS7 structure, such as the bending angle, backbone Φ and Ψ torsion angles, the intramolecular hydrogen bonds, and the overall conformation, were found to be very similar to those determined by NMR for the corresponding transmembrane segment of the tachykinin NK-1 receptor. In general, the simulations were found to yield structural and dynamic characteristics that are in good agreement with experiment. These findings support the application of simulation methods to the study

  4. Analysis of Structured and Intrinsically Disordered Regions of Transmembrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Bin; Li, Liwei; Meroueh, Samy O.; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Dunker, A. Keith

    2010-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins display two major types of transmembrane structures, helical bundles and beta barrels. The main functional roles of transmembrane proteins are the transport of small molecules and cell signaling, and sometimes these two roles are coupled. For cytosolic, water-soluble proteins, signaling and regulatory functions are often carried out by intrinsically disordered regions. Our long range goal is to determine whether integral membrane proteins likewise often use disordered regions for signaling and regulation. Here we carried out a systematic bioinformatics investigation of intrinsically disordered regions obtained from integral membrane proteins for which crystal structures have been determined, and for which the intrinsic disorder was identified as missing electron density. We found 120 disorder-containing integral membrane proteins having a total of 33,675 residues, with 3209 of the residues distributed among 240 different disordered regions. These disordered regions were compared with those obtained from water-soluble proteins with regard to their amino acid compositional biases, and with regard to accuracies of various disorder predictors. The results of these analyses show that the disordered regions from helical bundle integral membrane proteins, those from beta barrel integral membrane proteins, and those from water soluble proteins all exhibit statistically distinct amino acid compositional biases. Despite these differences in composition, current algorithms make reasonably accurate predictions of disorder for these membrane proteins. Although the small size of the current data sets are limiting, these results suggest that developing new predictors that make use of data from disordered regions in helical bundles and beta barrels, especially as these datasets increase in size, will likely lead to significantly more accurate disorder predictions for these two classes of integral membrane proteins. PMID:19585006

  5. Prediction of transmembrane helices from hydrophobic characteristics of proteins.

    PubMed

    Ponnuswamy, P K; Gromiha, M M

    1993-10-01

    Membrane proteins, requiring to be embedded into the lipid bilayers, have evolved to have amino acid sequences that will fold with a hydrophobic surface in contact with the alkane chains of the lipids and polar surface in contact with the aqueous phases on both sides of the membrane and the polar head groups of the lipids. It is generally assumed that the characteristics of the aqueous parts of the membrane proteins are similar to those of normal globular proteins, and the embedded parts are highly hydrophobic. In our earlier works, we introduced the concept of 'surrounding hydrophobicity' and developed a hydrophobicity scale for the 20 amino acid residues, and applied it successfully to the study of the family of globular proteins. In this work we use the concept of surrounding hydrophobicity to indicate quantitatively how the aqueous parts of membrane proteins compare with the normal globular proteins, and how rich the embedded parts are in their hydrophobic activity. We then develop a surrounding hydrophobicity scale applicable to membrane proteins, by mixing judicially the surrounding hydrophobicities observed in the crystals of the membrane protein, photosynthetic reaction center from the bacterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis, porin from Rhodobacter capsulatus and a set of 64 globular proteins. A predictive scheme based on this scale predicts from amino acid sequence, transmembrane segments in PRC and randomly selected 26 membrane proteins to 80% level of accuracy. This is a much higher predictive power when compared to the existing popular methods. A new procedure to measure the amphipathicity of sequence segments is proposed, and it is used to characterize the transmembrane parts of the sample membrane proteins.

  6. Transmembrane potentials during high voltage shocks in ischemic cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Holley, L K; Knisley, S B

    1997-01-01

    Transmembrane, voltage sensitive fluorescent dye (TMF) recording techniques have shown that high voltage shocks (HVS), typically used in defibrillation, produce either hyper- or depolarization of the transmembrane potential (TMP) when delivered in the refractory period of an action potential (AP) in normal cardiac tissue (NT). Further, HVS produce an extension of the AP, which has been hypothesized as a potential mechanism for electrical defibrillation. We examined whether HVS modify TMP of ischemic tissue (IT) in a similar manner. In seven Langendorff rabbit hearts, recordings of APs were obtained in both NT and IT with TMF using di-4-ANEPPS, and diacetylmonoxime (23 microM) to avoid motion artifacts. Local ischemia was produced by occlusion of the LAD, HVS of either biphasic (5 + 5 ms) or (3 + 2 ms) or monophasic shapes (5 ms) were delivered at varying times (20%-90%) of the paced AP. Intracardiac ECG and TMF recordings of the TMP were each amplified, recorded, and digitized at a frequency of 1 kHz. The paced AP in IT was triangular in shape with no obvious phase 3 plateau, typically seen in NT. There was normally a reduced AP amplitude (expressed as fractional fluorescence) in IT (2.6% +/- 1.79%) compared to 3.8% +/- 0.66% in NT, and shortened AP duration (137 +/- 42 vs 171 +/- 11 ms). One hundred-Volt HVS delivered during the refractory period of paced AP in IT in five rabbits, elicited a depolarization response of the TMP with an amplitude up to three times greater than the paced AP. This is in contrast to NT where the 100-V HVS produced hyperpolarization in four hearts, and only a slight depolarization response in one heart. These results suggest that HVS, typically delivered by a defibrillation shock, modify TMPs in a significantly different manner for ischemic cells, which may influence success in defibrillation.

  7. Roles of carboxyl groups in the transmembrane insertion of peptides

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, Francisco N.; Weerakkody, Dhammika; Anderson, Michael; Andreev, Oleg A.; Reshetnyak, Yana K.; Engelman, Donald M.

    2011-01-01

    We have used the pHLIP® peptide to study the roles of carboxyl groups in transmembrane peptide insertion. The pH (low) insertion peptide (pHLIP) binds to the surface of a lipid bilayer as a disordered peptide at neutral pH, and when the pH is lowered it inserts across the membrane to form a transmembrane helix. Peptide insertion is reversed when the pH is raised above the characteristic pKa (6.0). A key event facilitating the membrane insertion is the protonation of aspartic (Asp) and/or glutamic (Glu) acid residues, since at neutral pH their negatively charged side chains hinder membrane insertion. In order to gain mechanistic understanding, we studied the membrane insertion and exit of a series of pHLIP variants where the four Asp residues were sequentially mutated to nonacidic residues, including histidine (His). Our results show that the presence of His residues does not prevent the pH-dependent peptide membrane insertion at ~pH 4 driven by the protonation of carboxyl groups at the inserting end of the peptide. A further pH drop leads to the protonation of His residues in the TM part of peptide, which induces peptide exit from the bilayer. We also find that the number of ionizable residues that undergo a change in protonation during membrane insertion correlates with the pH-dependent insertion into and exit from the lipid bilayer, and that cooperativity increases with their number. We expect that our understanding will be used to improve the targeting of acidic diseased tissue by pHLIP peptides. PMID:21888917

  8. The pore-lining regions in cytochrome c oxidases: A computational analysis of caveolin, cholesterol and transmembrane helix contributions to proton movement.

    PubMed

    Morrill, Gene A; Kostellow, Adele B; Gupta, Raj K

    2014-11-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is the terminal enzyme in the electron transfer chain. CcO catalyzes a four electron reduction of O2 to water at a catalytic site formed by high-spin heme (a3) and copper atoms (CuB). While it is recognized that proton movement is coupled to oxygen reduction, the proton channel(s) have not been well defined. Using computational methods developed to study protein topology, membrane channels and 3D packing arrangements within transmembrane (TM) helix arrays, we find that subunit-1 (COX-1), subunit-2 (COX-2) and subunit-3 (COX-3) contribute 139, 46 and 25 residues, respectively, to channel formation between the mitochondrial matrix and intermembrane space. Nine of 12 TM helices in COX-1, both helices in COX-2 and 5 of the 6 TM helices in COX-3 are pore-lining regions (possible channel formers). Heme a3 and the CuB sites (as well as the CuA center of COX-2) are located within the channel that includes TM-6, TM-7, TM-10 and TM-11 of COX-1 and are associated with multiple cholesterol and caveolin-binding (CB) motifs. Sequence analysis identifies five CB motifs within COX-1, two within COX-2 and four within COX-3; each caveolin containing a pore-lining helix C-terminal to a TM helix-turn-helix. Channel formation involves interaction between multiple pore-lining regions within protein subunits and/or dimers. PoreWalker analysis lends support to the D-channel model of proton translocation. Under physiological conditions, caveolins may introduce channel formers juxtaposed to those in COX-1, COX-2 and COX-3, which together with cholesterol may form channel(s) essential for proton translocation through the inner mitochondrial membrane.

  9. A tale of two tails: cytosolic termini and K(+) channel function.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Anurag; Mathew, M K

    2003-11-01

    The enormous variety of neuronal action potential waveforms can be ascribed, in large part, to the sculpting of their falling phases by currents through voltage-gated potassium channels. These proteins play several additional roles in other tissues such as the regulation of heartbeat and of insulin release from pancreatic cells as well as auditory signal processing in the cochlea. The functional channel is a tetramer with either six or two transmembrane segments per monomer. Selectivity filters, voltage sensors and gating elements have been mapped to residues within the transmembrane region. Cytoplasmic residues, which are accessible targets for signal transduction cascades and provide attractive means of regulation of channel activity, are now seen to be capable of modulating various aspects of channel function. Here we review structural studies on segments of the cytoplasmic tails of K(+) channels, as well as the range of modulatory activities of these tails.

  10. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator is an Epithelial Cell Receptor for Clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the Lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pier, Gerald B.; Grout, Martha; Zaidi, Tanweer S.

    1997-10-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride ion channel, but its relationship to the primary clinical manifestation of CF, chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pulmonary infection, is unclear. We report that CFTR is a cellular receptor for binding, endocytosing, and clearing P. aeruginosa from the normal lung. Murine cells expressing recombinant human wild-type CFTR ingested 30-100 times as many P. aeruginosa as cells lacking CFTR or expressing mutant Δ F508 CFTR protein. Purified CFTR inhibited ingestion of P. aeruginosa by human airway epithelial cells. The first extracellular domain of CFTR specifically bound to P. aeruginosa and a synthetic peptide of this region inhibited P. aeruginosa internalization in vivo, leading to increased bacterial lung burdens. CFTR clears P. aeruginosa from the lung, indicating a direct connection between mutations in CFTR and the clinical consequences of CF.

  11. Epithelial Sodium and Chloride Channels and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen; Ji, Hong-Long

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To focus on the asthmatic pathogenesis and clinical manifestations related to epithelial sodium channel (ENaC)/chlorine ion channel. Data Sources: The data analyzed in this review were the English articles from 1980 to 2015 from journal databases, primarily PubMed and Google Scholar. The terms used in the literature search were: (1) ENaCs; cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR); asthma/asthmatic, (2) ENaC/sodium salt; CF; asthma/asthmatic, (3) CFTR/chlorine ion channels; asthma/asthmatic, (4) ENaC/sodium channel/scnn1a/scnn1b/scnn1g/scnn1d/amiloride-sensitive/amiloride-inhibtable sodium channels/sodium salt; asthma/asthmatic, lung/pulmonary/respiratory/tracheal/alveolar, and (5) CFTR; CF; asthma/asthmatic (ti). Study Selection: These studies included randomized controlled trials or studies covering asthma pathogenesis and clinical manifestations related to ENaC/chlorine ion channels within the last 25 years (from 1990 to 2015). The data involving chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and CF obtained from individual studies were also reviewed by the authors. Results: Airway surface liquid dehydration can cause airway inflammation and obstruction. ENaC and CFTR are closely related to the airway mucociliary clearance. Ion transporters may play a critical role in pathogenesis of asthmatic exacerbations. Conclusions: Ion channels have been the center of many studies aiming to understand asthmatic pathophysiological mechanisms or to identify therapeutic targets for better control of the disease. PMID:26265620

  12. Hysteresis in voltage-gated channels.

    PubMed

    Villalba-Galea, Carlos A

    2016-09-30

    Ion channels constitute a superfamily of membrane proteins found in all living creatures. Their activity allows fast translocation of ions across the plasma membrane down the ion's transmembrane electrochemical gradient, resulting in a difference in electrical potential across the plasma membrane, known as the membrane potential. A group within this superfamily, namely voltage-gated channels, displays activity that is sensitive to the membrane potential. The activity of voltage-gated channels is controlled by the membrane potential, while the membrane potential is changed by these channels' activity. This interplay produces variations in the membrane potential that have evolved into electrical signals in many organisms. These signals are essential for numerous biological processes, including neuronal activity, insulin release, muscle contraction, fertilization and many others. In recent years, the activity of the voltage-gated channels has been observed not to follow a simple relationship with the membrane potential. Instead, it has been shown that the activity of voltage-gated channel displays hysteresis. In fact, a growing number of evidence have demonstrated that the voltage dependence of channel activity is dynamically modulated by activity itself. In spite of the great impact that this property can have on electrical signaling, hysteresis in voltage-gated channels is often overlooked. Addressing this issue, this review provides examples of voltage-gated ion channels displaying hysteretic behavior. Further, this review will discuss how Dynamic Voltage Dependence in voltage-gated channels can have a physiological role in electrical signaling. Furthermore, this review will elaborate on the current thoughts on the mechanism underlying hysteresis in voltage-gated channels.

  13. Mechanosensitive Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinac, Boris

    Living cells are exposed to a variety of mechanical stimuli acting throughout the biosphere. The range of the stimuli extends from thermal molecular agitation to potentially destructive cell swelling caused by osmotic pressure gradients. Cellular membranes present a major target for these stimuli. To detect mechanical forces acting upon them cell membranes are equipped with mechanosensitive (MS) ion channels. Functioning as molecular mechanoelectrical transducers of mechanical forces into electrical and/or chemical intracellular signals these channels play a critical role in the physiology of mechanotransduction. Studies of prokaryotic MS channels and recent work on MS channels of eukaryotes have significantly increased our understanding of their gating mechanism, physiological functions, and evolutionary origins as well as their role in the pathology of disease.