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Sample records for alamos advanced fel

  1. Fabrication and characterization of cesium telluride photocathodes: A promising electron source for the Los Alamos Advanced FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, S.H.; Nuguyen, D.C.; Sheffield, R.L.; Sherwood, B.A.

    1994-09-01

    The Advanced FEL at Los Alamos embodies a Y{sub 2}CsSb photocathode as an electron source. The photocathode consists of a K{sub 2}CsSb film deposited on a molybdenum plug that can be inserted into the linac of the FEL. However, because K{sub 2}CsSb is easily contaminated and has a half-life of less than a day when in use, switching to a more rugged high quantum efficiency (QE) material such as Cs{sub 2}Te is considered as a means to lengthen the beam time. Cs{sub 2}Te films were deposited on molybdenum plugs in an ultrahigh-vacuum research chamber. Several Cs{sub 2}Te films were measured in-situ for their spectral responses with a bias voltage of 90V; the resulting QEs were 12-18% at a wavelength of 254 nm, 0.2-1.2% at 334 nm, 10{sup {minus}4}-10{sup {minus}3} at 365 nm, and 10{sup {minus}7}-10{sup {minus}5} at 546 nm. For this cathode to be useful, the authors need to frequency quadruple the 1052 mn line of the Nd:YLF laser to achieve a wavelength of 263 mm. Initial studies showed that the 251-nm QE of Cs{sub 2}Te is much less sensitive to contamination than the 526-nm QE of K{sub 2}CsSb. The authors exposed Cs{sub 2}Te photocathodes to air at 10{sup {minus}4} torr for five minutes. As a result, the QEs dropped from 16-18% to 1-2% at 254 mn. However, heating the cathode to 165{degrees}C revived the QE to about 10%. They conclude that Cs{sub 2}Te is a very rugged photocathode material for use in an rf photoelectron source.

  2. Experiments on ocular tissue ablation at 5.3 and 6.0 {mu}m with the Los Alamos advanced FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Ren, Q.; Hill, R.

    1995-12-31

    We investigated the ablation characteristics of a picosecond free-electron laser and compared its ablation effects on ocular tissues at 5.3 {mu}m and 6.0 {mu}m. The Advanced FEL at Los Alamos, operating in the wavelength range 4-6 {mu}m, was used for this study. The 10-{mu}s macropulse consisted of {approximately}1000 micropulses, each approximately 15 ps in length and separated from one another by 9.2 ns. The FEL beam was passed through a series of attenuator and focused to a 200-{mu}m spot in the sample with a 150-mm f.l. CaF{sub 2} lens. The energy in each macropulse ranged from 5 to 120 mJ. Five transplantable corneal-scleral buttons preserved in corneal storage media were used for this study. The tissue sample was positioned at the focused FEL beam for the ablation, and then fixed for histologic study. Corneal cuts made at 6.0 {mu}m revealed a well-defined ablation boundary. The measured lateral zone of the tissue damage was 11 {+-} 2 {mu}m. The integrity of the adjacent tissue was well maintained. By contrast, the ablation boundary of the corneal cuts made at 5.3 {mu}m appeared to be very disruptive. The collagen fiber near the ablation was thermally denatured and lost its organized structure. The lateral dimension of such effect extended out to 220 {mu}m beyond the intended cut into the surrounding tissues. We concluded that a short-pulsed laser operating at 6 {mu}m may be a potentially effective tool for cutting ocular tissues.

  3. Recent progress of the Los Alamos advanced free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Austin, R.H.; Chan, K.C.D.; Feldman, D.W.; Goldstein, J.C.; Gierman, S.M.; Kinross-Wright, J.M.; Kong, S.H.; Plato, J.G.; Russell, S.J.

    1994-05-01

    Many industrial and research applications can benefit from the availability of a compact, user-friendly, broadly tunable and high average power free electron laser (FEL). Over the past four years, the Los Alamos Advanced FEL has been built with these design goals. The key to a compact FEL is the integration of advanced beam technologies such as a high-brightness photoinjector, a high-gradient compact linac, and permanent magnet beamline components. These technologies enable the authors to shrink the FEL size yet maintain its high average power capability. The Advanced FEL has been in operation in the near ir (4-6 {mu}m) since early 1993. Recent results of the Advanced FEL lasing at saturation and upgrades to improve its average power are presented.

  4. Los Alamos High-Brightness Accelerator FEL (HIBAF) facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelius, W.D.; Bender, S.; Meier, K.; Thode, L.E.; Watson, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The 10-/mu/m Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL) facility is being upgraded. The conventional electron gun and bunchers have been replaced with a much more compact 6-MeV photoinjector accelerator. By adding existing parts from previous experiments, the primary beam energy will be doubled to 40 MeV. With the existing 1-m wiggler (/lambda//sub w/ = 2.7 cm) and resonator, the facility can produce photons with wavelengths from 3 to 100 /mu/m when lasing on the fundamental mode and produce photons in the visible spectrum with short-period wigglers or harmonic operation. After installation of a 150/degree/ bend, a second wiggler will be added as an amplifier. The installation of laser transport tubes between the accelerator vault and an upstairs laboratory will provide experimenters with a radiation-free environment for experiments. Although the initial experimental program of the upgraded facility will be to test the single accelerator-master oscillator/power amplifier configuration, some portion of the operational time of the facility can be dedicated to user experiments. 13 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Performance of cesium telluride photocathodes as an electron source for the Los Alamos FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, S.H.; Kinross-Wright, J.; Nuguyen, D.C.; Sheffield, R.L.; Weber, M.E.

    1994-09-01

    The Los Alamos Advanced FEL was successfully operated with a Cs{sub 2}Te photocathode driven by a frequency quadrupled Nd:YLF laser as the electron source. Lasing was achieved at 5-6 microns. Cs{sub 2}Te photocathodes with quantum efficiencies of 12-18% at 254 nm were fabricated in an ultrahigh-vacuum chamber and transferred under high vacuum to the FEL. 263 mn light from the drive laser was focused to an 8 mm spot on the center of the photocathode. The authors estimated the operational life time of Cs{sub 2}Te photocathodes to be at least 20 times that for K{sub 2}CsSb photocathodes. The measured dark current of 0.3 mA in an electric field of 22-24 MV/m is well within the acceptable level. The maximum amount of charge extracted was observed to be limited by space charge to about 3.5 nC per micropulse. The emittance of the beam was estimated by fitting the data from a quadrupole scan. The authors measured an emittance that is comparable with the emittance measured with a K{sub 2}CsSb photocathode in their system. A pulse length of 9.3 {+-} 2 ps for 1.3 {+-} 0.2 nC electron micropulses and a pulse length of 7.1 {+-} 0.7 ps for the laser pulses were measured with a streak camera. Therefore, the response of the Cs{sub 2}Te photocathode to the laser pulse is sufficiently fast for FEL applications.

  6. Initial performance of Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Baca, D.M.; Chan, K.C.D.; Cheairs, R.B.; Fortgang, C.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Johnson, W.J.D.; Holcomb, D.E.; Kinross-Wright, J.; McCann, S.W.; Meier, K.L.; Plato, J.G.; Sheffield, R.L.; Sherwood, B.A.; Sigler, F.E.; Timmer, C.A.; Warren, R.W.; Weber, M.E.; Wilson, W.L.

    1992-09-01

    We report recent results on the high-brightness electron linac and initial performance of the Advanced FEL at Los Alamos. The design and construction of the Advanced FEL beamline are based upon integration of advanced technologies such as high-brightness photoinjector, high-gradient compact linac, and permanent-magnet beamline components. With the use of microwiggler, both permanent magnet and pulsed electromagnet, and compact optical resonator, the Advanced FEL will be the first of its kind small enough to be mounted on an optical table and yet capable of providing highpower optical output spanning the near-ir and visible regions. A schematic of the Advanced FEL is shown in. The source of high-current electron pulses is a laser-gated photoelectron injector which forms-an integral part of a high-gradient 1.2-m long rf linear accelerator. The latter is capable of accelerating electrons up to 20 MeV with room temperature operation and 25 MeV at 77K. The electrons are produced in 10-ps pulses with peak currents as high as 300 A. These electron pulses are transported in a brightness-preserving beamline consisting of permanent magnet dipoles and quadrupoles. The beamline has three 30{degrees} bends. The first bend allows for the photocathode drive laser input; the second allows for the FEL output and the third turns the electron beam into the floor for safety reasons. Additional information on the design physics of the Advanced FEL can be found elsewhere.

  7. Initial performance of Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Baca, D.M.; Chan, K.C.D.; Cheairs, R.B.; Fortgang, C.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Johnson, W.J.D.; Holcomb, D.E.; Kinross-Wright, J.; McCann, S.W.; Meier, K.L.; Plato, J.G.; Sheffield, R.L.; Sherwood, B.A.; Sigler, F.E.; Timmer, C.A.; Warren, R.W.; Weber, M.E.; Wilson, W.L.

    1992-01-01

    We report recent results on the high-brightness electron linac and initial performance of the Advanced FEL at Los Alamos. The design and construction of the Advanced FEL beamline are based upon integration of advanced technologies such as high-brightness photoinjector, high-gradient compact linac, and permanent-magnet beamline components. With the use of microwiggler, both permanent magnet and pulsed electromagnet, and compact optical resonator, the Advanced FEL will be the first of its kind small enough to be mounted on an optical table and yet capable of providing highpower optical output spanning the near-ir and visible regions. A schematic of the Advanced FEL is shown in. The source of high-current electron pulses is a laser-gated photoelectron injector which forms-an integral part of a high-gradient 1.2-m long rf linear accelerator. The latter is capable of accelerating electrons up to 20 MeV with room temperature operation and 25 MeV at 77K. The electrons are produced in 10-ps pulses with peak currents as high as 300 A. These electron pulses are transported in a brightness-preserving beamline consisting of permanent magnet dipoles and quadrupoles. The beamline has three 30{degrees} bends. The first bend allows for the photocathode drive laser input; the second allows for the FEL output and the third turns the electron beam into the floor for safety reasons. Additional information on the design physics of the Advanced FEL can be found elsewhere.

  8. Los Alamos Advanced Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.C.D.; Kraus, R.H.; Ledford, J.; Meier, K.L.; Meyer, R.E.; Nguyen, D.; Sheffield, R.L.; Sigler, F.L.; Young, L.M.; Wang, T.S.; Wilson, W.L.; Wood, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    At Los Alamos, we are building a free-electron laser (FEL) for industrial, medical, and research applications. This FEL, which will incorporate many of the new technologies developed over the last decade, will be compact in size, robust, and user-friendly. Electrons produced by a photocathode will be accelerated to 20 MeV by a high-brightness accelerator and transported using permanent-magnet quadrupoles and dipoles. They will form an electron beam with an excellent instantaneous beam quality of 10 {pi} mm mrad in transverse emittance and 0.3% in energy spread at a peak current up to 300 A. Including operation at higher harmonics, the laser wavelength extends form 3.7 {mu}m to 0.4 {mu}m. In this paper, we will describe the project and the programs to date. 10 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Control of linear accelerator noise in the Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL)

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, M.T.

    1986-01-01

    The Los Alamos FEL requires tight control of the amplitudes and phases of the fields in two linear accelerator tanks to obtain stable lasing. The accelerator control loops must establish constant, stable, repeatable amplitudes and phases of the rf fields and must have excellent bandwidth to control high-frequency noise components. A model of the feedback loops has been developed that agrees well with measurements and allows easy substitution of components and circuits, thus reducing breadboarding requirements. The model permits both frequency and time-domain analysis. This paper describes the accelerator control scheme and our model and discusses the control of noise in feedback loops, showing how low-frequency-noise components (errors) can be corrected, but high-frequency-noise components (errors) are actually amplified by the feedback circuit. Measurements of noise in both open- and closed-loop modes are shown and comparison is made with results from the model calculations.

  10. Initial performance of Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Austin, R.H.; Chan, K.C.D.

    1993-09-01

    The Los Alamos compact Advanced FEL has lased at 4.7 and 5.2 {mu}m with a 1-cm period wiggler and a high-brightness electron beam at 16.8 and 15.8 MeV, respectively. The measured electron beam normalized emittance is 1.7 {pi}{center_dot}mm{center_dot}mrad at a peak current of 100 A, corresponding to a beam brightness greater than 2 {times} 10{sup 12} A/m{sup 2}rad{sup 2}. Initial results indicate that the AFEL small signal gain is {approximately}8% at 0.3 nC (30 A peak). The maximum output energy is 7 mJ over a 2-{mu}s macropulse. The AFEL performance can be significantly enhanced by improvements in the rf and drive laser stability.

  11. Los Alamos NEP research in advanced plasma thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenberg, Kurt; Gerwin, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Research was initiated in advanced plasma thrusters that capitalizes on lab capabilities in plasma science and technology. The goal of the program was to examine the scaling issues of magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster performance in support of NASA's MPD thruster development program. The objective was to address multi-megawatt, large scale, quasi-steady state MPD thruster performance. Results to date include a new quasi-steady state operating regime which was obtained at space exploration initiative relevant power levels, that enables direct coaxial gun-MPD comparisons of thruster physics and performance. The radiative losses are neglible. Operation with an applied axial magnetic field shows the same operational stability and exhaust plume uniformity benefits seen in MPD thrusters. Observed gun impedance is in close agreement with the magnetic Bernoulli model predictions. Spatial and temporal measurements of magnetic field, electric field, plasma density, electron temperature, and ion/neutral energy distribution are underway. Model applications to advanced mission logistics are also underway.

  12. About the scheme of the infrared FEL system for the accelerator based on HF wells

    SciTech Connect

    Kabanov, V.S.; Dzergach, A.I.

    1995-12-31

    Accelerators, based on localization of plasmoids in the HF wells (RF traps) of the axially-symmetric electromagnetic field E {sub omn} in an oversized (m,n>>1) resonant system, can give accelerating gradients {approximately}100 kV/{lambda}, e.g. 10 GV/m if {lambda}=10 {mu}m. One of possible variants of HF feeding for these accelerators is based on using the powerful infrared FEL System with 2 frequencies. The corresponding FEL`s may be similar to the Los Alamos compact Advanced FEL ({lambda}{sub 1,2}{approximately}10 pm, e-beam energy {approximately}15 MeV, e-beam current {approximately}100 A). Their power is defined mainly by the HF losses in the resonant system of the supposed accelerator.

  13. Characterization and Suppression of the Electromagnetic Interference Induced Phase Shift in the JLab FEL Photo - Injector Advanced Drive Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    F. G. Wilson, D. Sexton, S. Zhang

    2011-09-01

    The drive laser for the photo-cathode gun used in the JLab Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility had been experiencing various phase shifts on the order of tens of degrees (>20{sup o} at 1497 MHz or >40ps) when changing the Advanced Drive Laser (ADL) [2][3][4] micro-pulse frequencies. These phase shifts introduced multiple complications when trying to setup the accelerator for operation, ultimately inhibiting the robustness and overall performance of the FEL. Through rigorous phase measurements and systematic characterizations, we determined that the phase shifts could be attributed to electromagnetic interference (EMI) coupling into the ADL phase control loop, and subsequently resolved the issue of phase shift to within tenths of a degree (<0.5{sup o} at 1497 MHz or <1ps). The diagnostic method developed and the knowledge gained through the entire process will prove to be invaluable for future designs of similar systems.

  14. The Los Alamos Laser Acceleration of Particles Workshop and beginning of the advanced accelerator concepts field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, C.

    2012-12-01

    The first Advanced Acceleration of Particles-AAC-Workshop (actually named Laser Acceleration of Particles Workshop) was held at Los Alamos in January 1982. The workshop lasted a week and divided all the acceleration techniques into four categories: near field, far field, media, and vacuum. Basic theorems of particle acceleration were postulated (later proven) and specific experiments based on the four categories were formulated. This landmark workshop led to the formation of the advanced accelerator R&D program in the HEP office of the DOE that supports advanced accelerator research to this day. Two major new user facilities at Argonne and Brookhaven and several more directed experimental efforts were built to explore the advanced particle acceleration schemes. It is not an exaggeration to say that the intellectual breadth and excitement provided by the many groups who entered this new field provided the needed vitality to then recently formed APS Division of Beams and the new online journal Physical Review Special Topics-Accelerators and Beams. On this 30th anniversary of the AAC Workshops, it is worthwhile to look back at the legacy of the first Workshop at Los Alamos and the fine groundwork it laid for the field of advanced accelerator concepts that continues to flourish to this day.

  15. Power beaming with FEL lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampel, Michael C.; Curtin, Mark S.; Burke, Robert J.; Cover, Ralph A.; Rakowsky, George; Bennett, Glenn T.

    1993-06-01

    FEL power beaming has broad application to space operations. The Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation has examined the commercial applications of beamed power from Earth to space using the Radio Frequency LINAC Free Electron Laser (RF FEL) and has determined that there is a substantial addressable market. Rocketdyne's experience in developing and demonstrating FEL technologies, optics and atmospheric compensation and advanced power and power distribution systems ideally positions the Division to conduct the initial demonstration to prove the feasibility of using a FEL to beam power to space platforms.

  16. Recent advances in direct methanol fuel cells at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiaoming; Zelenay, Piotr; Thomas, Sharon; Davey, John; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    This paper describes recent advances in the science and technology of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) made at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The effort on DMFCs at LANL includes work devoted to portable power applications, funded by the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA), and work devoted to potential transport applications, funded by the US DOE. We describe recent results with a new type of DMFC stack hardware that allows to lower the pitch per cell to 2 mm while allowing low air flow and air pressure drops. Such stack technology lends itself to both portable power and potential transport applications. Power densities of 300 W/l and 1 kW/l seem achievable under conditions applicable to portable power and transport applications, respectively. DMFC power system analysis based on the performance of this stack, under conditions applying to transport applications (joint effort with U.C. Davis), has shown that, in terms of overall system efficiency and system packaging requirements, a power source for a passenger vehicle based on a DMFC could compete favorably with a hydrogen-fueled fuel cell system, as well as with fuel cell systems based on fuel processing on board. As part of more fundamental studies performed, we describe optimization of anode catalyst layers in terms of PtRu catalyst nature, loading and catalyst layer composition and structure. We specifically show that, optimized content of recast ionic conductor added to the catalyst layer is a sensitive function of the nature of the catalyst. Other elements of membrane/electrode assembly (MEA) optimization efforts are also described, highlighting our ability to resolve, to a large degree, a well-documented problem of polymer electrolyte DMFCs, namely "methanol crossover". This was achieved by appropriate cell design, enabling fuel utilization as high as 90% in highly performing DMFCs.

  17. FEL Oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2003-05-12

    FEL Oscillators have been around since 1977 providing not only a test bed for the physics of Free Electron Lasers and electron/photon interactions but as a workhorse of scientific research. More than 30 FEL oscillators are presently operating around the world spanning a wavelength range from the mm region to the ultraviolet using DC and rf linear accelerators and storage rings as electron sources. The characteristics that have driven the development of these sources are the desire for high peak and average power, high micropulse energies, wavelength tunability, timing flexibility, and wavelengths that are unavailable from more conventional laser sources. Substantial user programs have been performed using such sources encompassing medicine, biology, solid state research, atomic and molecular physics, effects of non-linear fields, surface science, polymer science, pulsed laser vapor deposition, to name just a few.

  18. The APS SASE FEL : modeling and code comparison.

    SciTech Connect

    Biedron, S. G.

    1999-04-20

    A self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron laser (FEL) is under construction at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Five FEL simulation codes were used in the design phase: GENESIS, GINGER, MEDUSA, RON, and TDA3D. Initial comparisons between each of these independent formulations show good agreement for the parameters of the APS SASE FEL.

  19. Potential applicability of the Los Alamos Antiproton Research Program to advanced propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, S.D.; Hynes, M.V.; Prael, R.E.; Stewart, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory currently has a research program in antimatter interactions. The immediate objective of the program is to develop the low energy antiproton production capabilities at LEAR and the technology to store antiprotons. The initial experimental goal is to measure the gravitational mass of antiprotons. The technology required for the experiment, however, may allow high-density storage concepts to be experimentally investigated. Analysis of antiproton production over the last 30 years indicates that milligram quantities of antiprotons could conceivably be produced early in the next century. Thus, antiproton propulsion concepts may begin to be feasible. Some results of preliminary calculations pertinent to antiproton powered rocket engines will be presented.

  20. Analysis of FEL optical systems with grazing incidence mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, C.E.; Viswanathan, V.K.; Bender, S.C.; Appert, Q.D.; Lawrence, G.; Barnard, C.

    1986-01-01

    The use of grazing incidence optics in resonators alleviates the problem of damage to the optical elements and permits higher powers in cavities of reasonable dimensions for a free electron laser (FEL). The design and manufacture of a grazing incidence beam expander for the Los Alamos FEL mock-up has been completed. In this paper, we describe the analysis of a bare cavity, grazing incidence optical beam expander for an FEL system. Since the existing geometrical and physical optics codes were inadequate for such an analysis, the GLAD code was modified to include global coordinates, exact conic representation, raytracing, and exact aberration features to determine the alignment sensitivities of laser resonators. A resonator cavity has been manufactured and experimentally setup in the Optical Evaluation Laboratory at Los Alamos. Calculated performance is compared with the laboratory measurements obtained so far.

  1. Nonlinear harmonic generation and proposed experimental verification in SASE FELs.

    SciTech Connect

    Biedron, S. G.; Freund, H. P.; Milton, S. V.

    1999-08-24

    Recently, a 3D, polychromatic, nonlinear simulation code was developed to study the growth of nonlinear harmonics in self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron lasers (FELs). The simulation was applied to the parameters for each stage of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) SASE FEL, intended for operation in the visible, UV, and short UV wavelength regimes, respectively, to study the presence of nonlinear harmonic generation. Significant nonlinear harmonic growth is seen. Here, a discussion of the code development, the APS SASE FEL, the simulations and results, and, finally, the proposed experimental procedure for verification of such nonlinear harmonic generation at the APS SASE FEL will be given.

  2. Strong focusing influence on high gain FEL characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, A.; Varfolomeev, A.

    1995-12-31

    The use of intrinsic alternating focusing in a linac-driven FEL with planar undulator is considered numerically. The analysis is done on the basis of TDA code for soft X-ray FEL with FD lattice implementing focusing of quadrupole and periodic sextupole type. The influence of the focusing (type and phase advance) on FEL performance and the reasons of difference in FEL performance for focusing of two kinds are analyzed. A possibility of some kind of beam conditioning for intrinsic focusing is discussed.

  3. Two FEL`s in one

    SciTech Connect

    Epp, V.; Nikitin, M.

    1995-12-31

    A new scheme for a FEL operation is proposed. The conventional principle of FEL operation is means that the electron bunch passes through the interaction area of FEL only in one direction. We suggest another possible layout which implies that the electron bunch makes a turn after leaving the wiggler and entries the wiggler at the same end. Actually the wiggler is a kind of a bridge between two storage rings. The electron bunches on the orbit are expected to be adjusted in the way that after one of them leaves the wiggler, another one enters in the opposite direction and in the proper phase with the wave pulse emitted by the previous bunch. So the electron bunch comes in interaction with the amplified electromagnetic wave in both directions i.e. twice per period. It is especially important for the short wavelength FELs, because each reflection from the mirror causes a significant losses of the wave magnitude. The proposed design gives one interaction per each reflection instead of one interaction per two reflections in the traditional scheme. Another way to realize the suggested principle of operating is to insert the wiggler in the electron-positron storage ring. But this layout can be less efficient because of low intensity of the positron beam. The comparison study of radiation from different types of described double wigglers is fulfilled. The synchronization problems are discussed in this paper.

  4. Recent Research with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (dance) at the LOS Alamos Neutron Science Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, J. L.

    2014-09-01

    The DANCE detector at Los Alamos is a 160 element, nearly 4π BaF2 detector array designed to make measurements of neutron capture on rare or radioactive nuclides. It has also been used to make measurements of gamma-ray multiplicity following capture and gamma-ray output from fission. Several examples of measurements are briefly discussed.

  5. Theoretical study of the design and performance of a high-gain, high-extraction-efficiency FEL oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, J.; Nguyen, D.C.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1996-10-01

    We present the results of theoretical and simulation studies of the design and performance of a new F type of FEL oscillator. This device, known by the acronym RAFEL for Regenerative Amplifier Free-Electron Laser, will be constructed in the space presently occupied by the AFEL (Advanced FEL) at Los Alamos, and will be driven by an upgraded (to higher average power) version of the present AFEL linac. In order to achieve a long-time-averaged optical output power of {approximately} 1 kW using an electron beam with an average power of {approximately} 20 kW, a rather high extraction efficiency {eta} {approximately} 5% is required. We have designed a 2-m-long undulator to attain this goal: the first meter is untapered and provides high gain while the second meter is linearly-tapered in magnetic field amplitude to provide high extraction efficiency in the standard K-M-R manner. Two-plane focusing and linear polarization of the undulator are assumed. Electron-beam properties from PARMEIA simulations of the AFEL accelerator were used in the design. A large saturated gain, {approximately} 500, requires a very small optical feedback to keep the device operating at steady-state. However, the large gain leads to distorted optical modes which require two- and three-dimensional simulations to adequately treat diffraction effects. This FEL will be driven by 17 MeV electrons and will operate in the 16 {mu}m spectral region.

  6. Seeded FEL Microbunching Experiments at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Tochitsky, S. Ya.; Musumeci, P.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Joshi, C.; Gottschalk, S. C.

    2010-11-04

    Seeded high-gain FELs, which can generate very powerful radiation pulses in a relatively compact undulator and simultaneously modulate the electron beam longitudinally at the seed wavelength, are important tools for advanced accelerator development. A single-pass 0.5-9 THz FEL amplifier-buncher driven by a regular photoinjector is being built at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory. FEL interactions at 340 {mu}m (1 THz) are considered for the first experiment, since time-resolved measurements of longitudinal current distribution of the bunched beam using the RF deflecting cavity are possible. A design of a 0.2-2.0 {mu}m FEL using the same undulators is presented. In this case the FEL is driven by a high-peak current beam from the laser-plasma accelerator tunable in the 100-300 MeV range.

  7. Operation of the high-brightness linac for the advanced free-electron laser initiative at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, R.L.; Austin, R.H.; Chan, K.C.D.; Gierman, S.M.; Kinross-Wright, J.M.; Kong, S.H.; Nguyen, D.C.; Russell, S.J.; Timmer, C.A.

    1993-08-01

    Free-electron lasers and high-energy physics accelerators have increased the demand for very high-brightness beam sources. This paper describes the design of an accelerator which has produced beams of 2.1 {pi} mm-mrad at 1 nC and emittances of 3.7 and 6.5 {pi} mm-mrad for 2 and 3 nC, respectively. The accelerator has been operated between 10 and 18 MeV. The beam emittance growth in the accelerator is minimized by using a photoinjector electron source integrated into the design of the linac, a focusing solenoid to correct the emittance growth caused by space charge, and a special design of the coupling slots between accelerator cavities to minimize quadrupole effects. The FEL has recently operated at 5 microns.

  8. Transverse effects in UV FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Small, D.W.; Wong, R.K.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    In an ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL), the electron beam size can be approximately the same as the optical mode size. The performance of a UV FEL is studied including the effect of emittance, betatron focusing, and external focusing of the electron beam on the transverse optical mode. The results are applied to the Industrial Laser Consortium`s UV FEL.

  9. FEL-accelerator related diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Jordan; David Douglas; Stephen V. Benson; Pavel Evtuschenko

    2007-08-02

    Free Electron Lasers (FEL) present a unique set of beam parameters to the diagnostics suite. The FEL requires characterization of the full six dimensional phase space of the electron beam at the wiggler and accurate alignment of the electron beam to the optical mode of the laser. In addition to the FEL requirements on the diagnostics suite, the Jefferson Lab FEL is operated as an Energy Recovered Linac (ERL) which imposes additional requirements on the diagnostics. The ERL aspect of the Jefferson Lab FEL requires that diagnostics operate over a unique dynamic range and operate with simultaneous transport of the accelerated and energy recovered beams. This talk will present how these challenges are addressed at the Jefferson Lab FEL.

  10. Tapered undulators for SASE FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawley, William M.; Huang, Zhirong; Kim, Kwang-Je; Vinokurov, Nikolai A.

    2002-05-01

    We discuss the use of tapered undulators to enhance the performance of free-electron lasers (FELs) based upon self-amplified spontaneous emission, where the radiation tends to have a relatively broad bandwidth and limited temporal coherence. Using the polychromatic FEL simulation code GINGER, we numerically demonstrate the effectiveness of tapered undulators for parameters corresponding to the Argonne low-energy undulator test line FEL and the proposed linac coherent light source.

  11. Tapered undulator for SASE FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, William M.; Huang, Zhirong; Kim, Kwang-Je; Vinokurov, Nikolai A.

    2001-09-14

    We discuss the use of tapered undulators to enhance the performance of free-electron lasers (FELs) based upon self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), where the radiation tends to have a relatively broad bandwidth, limited temporal phase coherence, and large amplitude fluctuations. Using the polychromatic FEL simulation code GINGER, we numerically demonstrate the effectiveness of a tapered undulator for parameters corresponding to the existing Argonne low-energy undulator test line (LEUTL) FEL. We also study possible tapering options for proposed x-ray FELs such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS).

  12. Saturation and pulsed FEL dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Giannessi, L.; Mezi, L.

    1995-12-31

    The behavior of a FEL operating in the saturated pulsed regime, may be reproduced by the linear FEL integral equation, suitably modified to include saturation effects through a gain depression coefficient depending on the laser intensity. This simple method allows to evaluate several FEL parameters like gain, efficiency, band-width and optical pulse duration as functions of the optical cavity length, only with a numerical integration. The predictions have been compared with available experimental and numerical data, and the method has been applied to estimate the operating characteristics of some planned FEL experiments.

  13. Short wavelength FELS

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The generation of coherent ultraviolet and shorter wavelength light is presently limited to synchrotron sources. The recent progress in the development of brighter electron beams enables the use of much lower energy electron rf linacs to reach short-wavelengths than previously considered possible. This paper will summarize the present results obtained with synchrotron sources, review proposed short- wavelength FEL designs and then present a new design which is capable of over an order of magnitude higher power to the extreme ultraviolet. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  14. The Stanford Picosecond FEL Center

    SciTech Connect

    Schwettman, H.A.; Smith, T.I.; Swent, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    In the past two years, FELs have decisively passed the threshold of scientific productivity. There are now six FEL facilities in the United States and Europe, each delivering more than 2000 hours of FEL beam time per year. at the present time approximately 100 papers are published each in referred journals describing optics experiments performed with FELs. Despite the recent success there are important challenges the FEL facilities must address. At Stanford these challenges include: (1) Providing sufficient experimental time at reasonable cost: At Stanford we provide 2000 hours of experimental time per year at a cost of approximately $500 per hour: We are now studying options for markedly increasing experimental time and decreasing cost per hour. (2) Competing effectively with conventional lasers in the mid-IR: Despite the NRC report we do not intend to concede the mid-IR to conventional lasers. FELs are capable of providing optical beams of exceptional quality and stability, and they can also be remarkable flexible devices. Improvements in our superconducting linac driver and our optical beam conditioning systems will dramatically enhance our FEL experimental capabilities. (3) making the transition from first generation to second generation experiments: Important pump-probe and photon echo experiments have been performed at Stanford and others are feasible using present capabilities. None-the-less we are now investing substantial experimental time to improving signal-to-noise and developing other optical cababilities. (4) Extending operation to the far-infrared where the FEL is unique inits capabilities: {open_quotes}FIREFLY{close_quotes} will extend our FEL capabilities to 100 microns. We are now seeking funds for optical instrumentation. (5) Creating and maintaining a good environment for graduate students.

  15. Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammel, Edward F., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Current and post World War II scientific research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (New Mexico) is discussed. The operation of the laboratory, the Los Alamos consultant program, and continuation education, and continuing education activities at the laboratory are also discussed. (JN)

  16. FEL on slow cyclotron wave

    SciTech Connect

    Silivra, A.

    1995-12-31

    A physical mechanism of interaction of fast electromagnetic wave with slow cyclotron wave of relativistic electron beam in a FEL with helical wiggler field is described. It is shown that: (1) interaction is possible for both group of steady state electron trajectories (2) positive gain is achieved within certain interval of guide field strength (3) operation wavelength for group 1 trajectories ({Omega}{sub 0}/{gamma} < k{omega}{upsilon}{parallel}) is shorter than for the conventional FEL synchronism. A nonlinear analysis shows that efficiency of slow cyclotron FEL is restricted mainly by a breakdown of a single electron synchronism due to dependence of (modified) electron cyclotron frequency on an energy of electron. Nevertheless, as numerical simulation shows, typical efficiency of 15 % order is achieved in millimeter wavelength band for the midrelativistic ({gamma}= 3 {divided_by} 4) slow cyclotron wave FEL. Tapering of magnetic field results in a substantial increase of efficiency.

  17. Review of High Gain FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Shintake, Tsumoru

    2007-01-19

    For understanding on basic radiation mechanism of the high-gain FEL based on SASE, the author presents electron-crystal interpretation of FEL radiation. In the electron-crystal, electrons are localized at regularly spaced multi-layers, which represents micro-bunching, whose spacing is equal to the radiation wavelength, and the multi-layers are perpendicular to beam axis, thus, diffracted wave creates Bragg's spots in forward and backward directions. Due to the Doppler's effect, frequency of the back-scattered wave is up-converted, generates forwardly focused X-ray. The Bragg's effect contributes focusing the X-ray beam into a spot, thus peak power becomes extremely higher by factor of typically 107. This is the FEL radiation. As well known, the total numbers of scattered photons in Bragg's spots is equal to the total elastic scattering photons from the atoms contained in the crystal. Therefore, total power in the FEL laser is same as the spontaneous radiation power from the undulator for the same beam parameter. The FEL radiation phenomenon is simple interference effect. In today's presentations, we use the laser pointer, and we frequently experience difficulty in pointing precisely or steadily in one place on the screen, since the laser spot is very small and does not spread. Exactly same to this, X-ray FEL is a highly focused beam, and pointing stability dominates productivity of experiment, thus we need special care on beam stability from linear accelerator.

  18. Stockpile Stewardship: Los Alamos

    ScienceCinema

    McMillan, Charlie; Morgan, Nathanial; Goorley, Tom; Merrill, Frank; Funk, Dave; Korzekwa, Deniece; Laintz, Ken

    2016-07-12

    "Heritage of Science" is a short video that highlights the Stockpile Stewardship program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Stockpile Stewardship was conceived in the early 1990s as a national science-based program that could assure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear deterrent without the need for full-scale underground nuclear testing. This video was produced by Los Alamos National Laboratory for screening at the Lab's Bradbury Science Museum in Los Alamos, NM and is narrated by science correspondent Miles O'Brien.

  19. The ``TEU-FEL'' project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, G. J.; Witteman, W. J.; Verschuur, J. W. J.; Mols, R. F. X. A. M.; van Oerle, B. M.; Bouman, A. F. M.; Botman, J. I. M.; Hagedoorn, H. L.; Delhez, J. L.; Kleeven, W. J. G. M.

    1995-01-01

    The free-electron laser of the TEU-FEL project will be based on a 6 MeV photo-cathode linac as injector, a 25 MeV race-track microtron as main accelerator and a hybrid, 25 mm period undulator. The project will be carried out in two phases. In phase one only the 6 MeV linac will be used, The FEL will then produce tunable radiation around 200 μm. In phase two the linac will be used as an injector for the microtron. The FEL will then produce tunable radiation around 10 μm. Technical information will be presented on the different subsystems.

  20. Electron beam effects in a UV FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.K.; Blau, J.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    At the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), a free electron laser (FEL) is designed to produce ultraviolet (UV) light. A four-dimensional FEL simulation studies the effects of betatron oscillations, external focusing, and longitudinal pulse compression of the electron beam on the FEL performance.

  1. HIGH AVERAGE POWER OPTICAL FEL AMPLIFIERS.

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI, ILAN, DAYRAN, D.; LITVINENKO, V.

    2005-08-21

    Historically, the first demonstration of the optical FEL was in an amplifier configuration at Stanford University [l]. There were other notable instances of amplifying a seed laser, such as the LLNL PALADIN amplifier [2] and the BNL ATF High-Gain Harmonic Generation FEL [3]. However, for the most part FELs are operated as oscillators or self amplified spontaneous emission devices. Yet, in wavelength regimes where a conventional laser seed can be used, the FEL can be used as an amplifier. One promising application is for very high average power generation, for instance FEL's with average power of 100 kW or more. The high electron beam power, high brightness and high efficiency that can be achieved with photoinjectors and superconducting Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL) combine well with the high-gain FEL amplifier to produce unprecedented average power FELs. This combination has a number of advantages. In particular, we show that for a given FEL power, an FEL amplifier can introduce lower energy spread in the beam as compared to a traditional oscillator. This properly gives the ERL based FEL amplifier a great wall-plug to optical power efficiency advantage. The optics for an amplifier is simple and compact. In addition to the general features of the high average power FEL amplifier, we will look at a 100 kW class FEL amplifier is being designed to operate on the 0.5 ampere Energy Recovery Linac which is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Collider-Accelerator Department.

  2. The PixFEL project: Progress towards a fine pitch X-ray imaging camera for next generation FEL facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, G.; Batignani, G.; Benkechkache, M. A.; Bettarini, S.; Casarosa, G.; Comotti, D.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Fabris, L.; Forti, F.; Grassi, M.; Lodola, L.; Malcovati, P.; Manghisoni, M.; Mendicino, R.; Morsani, F.; Paladino, A.; Pancheri, L.; Paoloni, E.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Vacchi, C.; Verzellesi, G.; Xu, H.

    2016-07-01

    The INFN PixFEL project is developing the fundamental building blocks for a large area X-ray imaging camera to be deployed at next generation free electron laser (FEL) facilities with unprecedented intensity. Improvement in performance beyond the state of art in imaging instrumentation will be explored adopting advanced technologies like active edge sensors, a 65 nm node CMOS process and vertical integration. These are the key ingredients of the PixFEL project to realize a seamless large area focal plane instrument composed by a matrix of multilayer four-side buttable tiles. In order to minimize the dead area and reduce ambiguities in image reconstruction, a fine pitch active edge thick sensor is being optimized to cope with very high intensity photon flux, up to 104 photons per pixel, in the range from 1 to 10 keV. A low noise analog front-end channel with this wide dynamic range and a novel dynamic compression feature, together with a low power 10 bit analog to digital conversion up to 5 MHz, has been realized in a 110 μm pitch with a 65 nm CMOS process. Vertical interconnection of two CMOS tiers will be also explored in the future to build a four-side buttable readout chip with high density memories. In the long run the objective of the PixFEL project is to build a flexible X-ray imaging camera for operation both in burst mode, like at the European X-FEL, or in continuous mode with the high frame rates anticipated for future FEL facilities.

  3. Los Alamos offers Fellowships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico is calling for applications for postdoctoral appointments and research fellowships. The positions are available in geoscience as well as other scientific disciplines.The laboratory, which is operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy, awards J. Robert Oppenheimer Research Fellowships to scientists that either have or will soon complete doctoral degrees. The appointments are for two years, are renewable for a third year, and carry a stipend of $51,865 per year. Potential applicants should send a resume or employment application and a statement of research goals to Carol M. Rich, Div. 89, Human Resources Development Division, MS P290, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 by mid-November.

  4. Operation of FERMI FELs for users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svandrlik, M.

    2015-05-01

    The FERMI seeded free electron laser facility, located at the Elettra laboratory in Trieste (Italy), has been operated for user experiments in the past years using the first FEL line, FEL-1, covering the VUV - EVU spectral range (100 - 20 nm). After the conclusion of the commissioning for the soft-X ray FEL line, FEL-2, the facility is now ready to provide the scientific community with intense FEL pulses (<10 μJ) characterized by a high degree of coherence and spectral stability in the whole range from 100 nm down to 4 nm. We report about the recent achievement of FERMI FELs and our experience with operations for user requiring specific FEL configurations.

  5. The Los Alamos primer

    SciTech Connect

    Serber, R.

    1992-01-01

    This book contains the 1943 lecture notes of Robert Serber. Serber was a protege of J. Robert Oppenheimer and member of the team that built the first atomic bomb - reveal what the Los Alamos scientists knew, and did not know, about the terrifying weapon they were building.

  6. X-band prebunched FEL amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Kazuyoshi; Takayama, Ken; Ozaki, Toshiyuki

    1995-12-31

    Following the successful results of the ion-channel-guiding FEL experiments, we began a new experiment {open_quotes}prebunched FEL{close_quotes}. It is an FEL driven by prebunched beams, whose configuration is a normal FEL system with a prebuncher like the bunching section of a klystron. There are two purposes in this prebunched FEL system; (1) Demonstration of a compact/efficient FEL. Attaining the saturation power level with a short wiggler length (compact wiggler) and enhancing the power through the remaining wiggler length by wiggler tapering (high efficiency FEL). (2) Experimental simulation of multi-stage FELs in the FEL-TBA. Examination of FEL interactions with prebunched injection beams, especially, about the controllability of the output RF phase by changing the RF phase of the input seed power to the wiggler. Recent experimental results show: (1) The saturation power of 120MW has been attained at the wiggler length of 1.1m by 1.5MeV prebunched beams with a 45%-modulated 750A current. However, enhanced power has not been observed yet by wiggler tapering. (2) The current modulation of the injection beam (1.5MeV-500A) becoming higher than 30%, the adjustable range of the output RF phase was limitted less than 40 degrees by the input power of 60kW only. Detail explanations of design concept, theoretical and experimental results will be presented at the conference.

  7. Numerical study of the 3-D effect on FEL performance and its application to the APS LEUTL FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Chae, Y.C.

    1998-09-01

    A Low-Energy Undulator Test Line (LEUTL) is under construction at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). In LEUTL periodic focusing is provided by external quadrupoles. This results in an elliptical beam with its betatron oscillation envelope varying along the undulators. The free-electron laser (FEL) interaction with such a beam will exhibit truly 3-D effects. Thus the investigation of 3-D effects is important in optimizing the FEL performance. The programs GINGER and TDA3D, coupled with theoretically known facts, have been used for this purpose. Both programs are fully 3-D in moving the particle, but model the interaction between particles and axially symmetric electromagnetic waves. Even though TDA3D can include a few azimuthal modes in the interaction, it is still not a fully 3-D FEL code. However, they show that these 2-D programs can still be used for an elliptical beam whose aspect ratio is within certain limits. The author presents numerical results of FEL performance for the circular beam, the elliptical beam, and finally for the beam in the realistic LEUTL lattice.

  8. RF FEL for power beaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Robert

    The laser device components associated with operating a radio frequency-free electron laser (RF-FEL) for beaming power from Earth were designed and tested. Analysis of the power beaming system requirements reveals that the FEL, identified by NASA as the laser of choice, is the major subsystem requiring demonstration before proceeding further in proving the efficacy of laser power beaming. Rocketdyne has identified a series of low cost, low risk demonstrations which proceed sequentially, as follows: (1) a 1 kW proof-of-principle demonstration; (2) a 150 kW demonstration of beaming power to a satellite; and (3) a MW class demonstration of Earth to lunar surface power transmission. This sequence of events can be completed in 5.5 years at a cost of $188M, with key milestones each year.

  9. Commercialization of Los Alamos National Laboratory technologies via small businesses. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brice, R.; Carton, D.; Rhyne, T.

    1997-06-01

    Appendices are presented from a study performed on a concept model system for the commercialization of Los Alamos National Laboratory technologies via small businesses. Topics include a summary of information from the joint MCC/Los Alamos technology conference; a comparison of New Mexico infrastructure to other areas; a typical licensing agreement; technology screening guides; summaries of specific DOE/UC/Los Alamos documents; a bibliography; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory TCRD; The Ames Center for Advanced Technology Development; Los Alamos licensing procedures; presentation of slides from monthly MCC/Los Alamos review meetings; generalized entrepreneurship model; and a discussion on receiving equity for technology.

  10. Los Alamos Programming Models

    SciTech Connect

    Bergen, Benjamin Karl

    2016-07-07

    This is the PDF of a powerpoint presentation from a teleconference on Los Alamos programming models. It starts by listing their assumptions for the programming models and then details a hierarchical programming model at the System Level and Node Level. Then it details how to map this to their internal nomenclature. Finally, a list is given of what they are currently doing in this regard.

  11. Simulations of the LANL regenerative amplifier FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Kesselring, M.; Colson, W.B.; Wong, R.K.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1997-08-01

    The LANL regenerative amplifier FEL is designed to produce an average output power of 1 kW. Simulations study the transverse effects due to guiding by the intense electron beam and feedback. These simulations coupled with experimental measurements can be used to improve future high-power FEL designs.

  12. Compact FEL`s based on slow wave wigglers

    SciTech Connect

    Riyopoulos, S.

    1995-12-31

    Slow waves excited in magnetron-type cavities are attractive canditates as wigglers for compact Free Electron Lasers. Because of group velocities much below the speed of light, slow waves offer an order of magnitude increase in FEL gain under given circulating power in the wiggler resonator, compared to fast wave wigglers of similar period. In addition, they offer the versatility of operation either at modest beam energy via upshifing of the fundamental wavelength, or at low beam energy benefiting from the submillimeter wiggler harmonics. Because the main electron undulation is in the transverse direction for all spatial harmonics, the radiated power is increased by a factor {gamma}{sup 2} relative to the Smith-Purcell approach that relies on axial electron undulation. Technical advantages offered by magnetron-type wiggles are: the generation of the wiggler microwaves and the FEL interaction take place inside the same cavity, avoiding the issue of high power coupling between cavities; the excitation of wiggler microwaves relies on distributed electron emission from the cavity wall and does not require separate beam injection.

  13. Recent developments in CrystFEL 1

    PubMed Central

    White, Thomas A.; Mariani, Valerio; Brehm, Wolfgang; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Barty, Anton; Beyerlein, Kenneth R.; Chervinskii, Fedor; Galli, Lorenzo; Gati, Cornelius; Nakane, Takanori; Tolstikova, Alexandra; Yamashita, Keitaro; Yoon, Chun Hong; Diederichs, Kay; Chapman, Henry N.

    2016-01-01

    CrystFEL is a suite of programs for processing data from ‘serial crystallography’ experiments, which are usually performed using X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) but also increasingly with other X-ray sources. The CrystFEL software suite has been under development since 2009, just before the first hard FEL experiments were performed, and has been significantly updated and improved since then. This article describes the most important improvements which have been made to CrystFEL since the first release version. These changes include the addition of new programs to the suite, the ability to resolve ‘indexing ambiguities’ and several ways to improve the quality of the integrated data by more accurately modelling the underlying diffraction physics. PMID:27047311

  14. Integrated computer simulation on FIR FEL dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, H.; Kuruma, S.; Imasaki, K.

    1995-12-31

    An integrated computer simulation code has been developed to analyze the RF-Linac FEL dynamics. First, the simulation code on the electron beam acceleration and transport processes in RF-Linac: (LUNA) has been developed to analyze the characteristics of the electron beam in RF-Linac and to optimize the parameters of RF-Linac. Second, a space-time dependent 3D FEL simulation code (Shipout) has been developed. The RF-Linac FEL total simulations have been performed by using the electron beam data from LUNA in Shipout. The number of particles using in a RF-Linac FEL total simulation is approximately 1000. The CPU time for the simulation of 1 round trip is about 1.5 minutes. At ILT/ILE, Osaka, a 8.5MeV RF-Linac with a photo-cathode RF-gun is used for FEL oscillation experiments. By using 2 cm wiggler, the FEL oscillation in the wavelength approximately 46 {mu}m are investigated. By the simulations using LUNA with the parameters of an ILT/ILE experiment, the pulse shape and the energy spectra of the electron beam at the end of the linac are estimated. The pulse shape of the electron beam at the end of the linac has sharp rise-up and it slowly decays as a function of time. By the RF-linac FEL total simulations with the parameters of an ILT/ILE experiment, the dependencies of the start up of the FEL oscillations on the pulse shape of the electron beam at the end of the linac are estimated. The coherent spontaneous emission effects and the quick start up of FEL oscillations have been observed by the RF-Linac FEL total simulations.

  15. In-pixel conversion with a 10 bit SAR ADC for next generation X-ray FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodola, L.; Batignani, G.; Benkechkache, M. A.; Bettarini, S.; Casarosa, G.; Comotti, D.; Dalla Betta, G. F.; Fabris, L.; Forti, F.; Grassi, M.; Latreche, S.; Malcovati, P.; Manghisoni, M.; Mendicino, R.; Morsani, F.; Paladino, A.; Pancheri, L.; Paoloni, E.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Rizzo, G.; Traversi, G.; Vacchi, C.; Verzellesi, G.; Xu, H.

    2016-07-01

    This work presents the design of an interleaved Successive Approximation Register (SAR) ADC, part of the readout channel for the PixFEL detector. The PixFEL project aims at substantially advancing the state-of-the-art in the field of 2D X-ray imaging for applications at the next generation Free Electron Laser (FEL) facilities. For this purpose, the collaboration is developing the fundamental microelectronic building blocks for the readout channel. This work focuses on the design of the ADC carried out in a 65 nm CMOS technology. To obtain a good tradeoff between power consumption, conversion speed and area occupation, an interleaved SAR ADC architecture was adopted.

  16. Progress at the Jefferson Laboratory FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Tennant, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    As the only currently operating free electron laser (FEL) based on a CW superconducting energy recovering linac (ERL), the Jefferson Laboratory FEL Upgrade remains unique as an FEL driver. The present system represents the culmination of years of effort in the areas of SRF technology, ERL operation, lattice design, high power optics and DC photocathode gun technology. In 2001 the FEL Demo generated 2.1 kW of laser power. Following extensive upgrades, in 2006 the FEL Upgrade generated 14.3 kW of laser power breaking the previous world record. The FEL Upgrade remains a valuable testbed for studying a variety of collective effects, such as the beam breakup instability, longitudinal space charge and coherent synchrotron radiation. Additionally, there has been exploration of operation with lower injection energy and higher bunch charge. Recent progress and achievements in these areas will be presented, and two recent milestones â installation of a UV FEL and establishment of a DC gun test s

  17. FEL development at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokurov, N. A.

    1993-07-01

    There are three different FEL projects at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics: 1) the FEL on the VEPP-3 storage ring which operates in the visible and ultraviolet region; 2) the high power FEL using a racetrack microtron recuperator (this machine will provide an average power of about tens of kilowatt in the infrared region); and 3) the compact infrared FEL project, using a microton, and a powerful FEL on a dedicated superconducting storage ring, which is under consideration now.

  18. Laser-Pumped Coherent X-Ray FEL

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-14

    laser field replaces the magnetic wiggler field of a conventional FEL. Depending on the intensity and quality of both the electron beam and pump laser...and Line Width 16 IV. Comparison of Theory with Simulations 17 a) Wiggler based X-Ray FEL 17 b) Laser Pumped X-Ray FEL 18 V. Conclusions 19...FEL) an intense laser field replaces the magnetic wiggler field of a conventional FEL. Depending on the intensity and quality of both the electron

  19. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dogliani, Harold O

    2011-01-19

    The purpose of the briefing is to describe general laboratory technical capabilities to be used for various groups such as military cadets or university faculty/students and post docs to recruit into a variety of Los Alamos programs. Discussed are: (1) development and application of high leverage science to enable effeictive, predictable and reliability outcomes; (2) deter, detect, characterize, reverse and prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their use by adversaries and terrorists; (3) modeling and simulation to define complex processes, predict outcomes, and develop effective prevention, response, and remediation strategies; (4) energetic materials and hydrodynamic testing to develop materials for precise delivery of focused energy; (5) materials cience focused on fundamental understanding of materials behaviors, their quantum-molecular properties, and their dynamic responses, and (6) bio-science to rapidly detect and characterize pathogens, to develop vaccines and prophylactic remedies, and to develop attribution forensics.

  20. SASE FEL Polarization Control Using Crossed Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yuantao; Huang, Zhirong; /SLAC

    2008-09-30

    There is a growing interest in producing intense, coherent x-ray radiation with an adjustable and arbitrary polarization state. In this paper, we study the crossed undulator scheme for rapid polarization control in a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free electron laser (FEL). Because a SASE source is a temporally chaotic light, we perform a statistical analysis on the state of polarization using FEL theory and simulations. We show that by adding a small phase shifter and a short (about 1.3 times the FEL power gain length), 90{sup o} rotated planar undulator after the main SASE planar undulator, one can obtain circularly polarized light--with over 80% polarization--near the FEL saturation.

  1. Status of the "TEU-FEL" project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, G. J.; Witteman, W. J.; Verschuur, J. W. J.; Haselhoff, E. H.; Mols, R. F. X. A. M.; Bouman, A. F. M.; Botman, J. I. M.; Hagedoorn, H. L.; Delhez, J. L.; Kleeven, W. J. G. M.

    1992-07-01

    The free-electron laser of the TEU-FEL project will be realized in two phases. In phase I the FEL will be driven by a 6 MeV photoelectric linac. In phase II the linac will be used as an injector for a 25 MeV race-track microtron. Information is presented on some technical details and the status of the different subsystems.

  2. Temporal characteristics of a SASE FEL.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y,; Huang, Z.; Kim, K.-J.; Lewellen, J.; Milton, S. V.; Sajaev, V.

    2003-01-01

    We have performed a single-shot, time-resolved measurement of the output field of a SASE FEL using the frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) technique. The measurement reveals the phase and the amplitude of the SASE output as functions of time and frequency, hence enables us to perform a full characterization of the SASE FEL output. We examined both the single-shot field evolution as well as the statistics over multiple shots on the phase and intensity evolution.

  3. Mid-infrared FEL absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozub, John A.; Feng, Bibo; Gabella, William E.

    2002-04-01

    The Vanderbilt Mark III FEL is a tunable source of high- intensity coherent mid-infrared radiation occurring as a train of picosecond pulses spaced 350ps apart. The laser beam is transported to each laboratory under vacuum, but is typically transmitted through some distance of atmosphere before reaching the target. Losses due to absorption by water vapor and CO2 can be large, and since the bandwidth of the FEL is several percent of the wavelength, the spectrum can be altered by atmospheric absorptions. In order to provide an accurate representation of the laser spectrum delivered to the target, and to investigate any non-linear effects associated with transport of the FEL beam, we have recorded the spectrum of the FEL output using a vacuum spectrometer positioned after measured lengths of atmosphere. The spectrometer is equipped with a linear pyroelectric array which provides the laser spectrum for each pulse. Absorption coefficients are being measured for laboratory air, averaged over the bandwidth of the FEL. The high peak powers of this Fel have induced damage in common infrared-transparent materials; we are also measuring damage thresholds for several materials at various wavelengths.

  4. Ther FERMI FEL project at TRIESTE

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.P.; Bulfone, D.; Cargnello, F.

    1995-12-31

    The goal of the FERMI project - Free Electron Radiation and Matching Instrumentation - is to construct a new user facility for FEL radiation beams covering a broad spectral range (2-250 {mu}m) to complement the high brightness VUV/Soft-Xray radiation available from the ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility at Trieste. A unique feature of the project will be the possibility of carrying out {open_quote}pump-probe{close_quote} experiments using synchronized radiation beams from FERMI and ELETTRA on the same sample. The project was launched at a meeting with Italian FEL experts held in Trieste on the 18th November 1994, chaired by C. Rubbia, as a collaboration between Sincrotrone Trieste, ENEA (Frascati), INFN (Frascati) and the University of Naples (Department of Electronic Engineering). The facility will make use of an existing linac, that forms part of the ELETTRA injection system, and a hall into which the beam can be extracted. In addition, for the first phase of the project equipment will be used from the suspended INFN/ENEA {open_quote}SURF{close_quote} FEL experiment, including the undulator, beam transport magnets and optical cavity. In this first International FEL Conference report on the project, we summarize the main features of the project, concentrating in particular on the most recent activities, including: results of measurements of the linac beam in the FEL mode of operation, further studies of the electron beam transport system including possibilities for bunch length manipulations, and further numerical calculations of the FEL performance.

  5. Optical beam transport system at FEL-SUT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomaru, K.; Kawai, M.; Yokoyama, M.; Oda, F.; Nakayama, A.; Koike, H.; Kuroda, H.

    2000-05-01

    Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. has installed an FEL beam transport system at the IR FEL Research Center of the Science University of Tokyo (FEL-SUT). This system transports the FEL output beam from the FEL machine room to the optical diagnostic room through a vacuum tube. The in-vacuum multi-mirror synchronized system operated from the FEL control room enables the operator to control the multiple mirrors simultaneously on or off axis of the FEL beam and to distribute the FEL output to one of the laboratories. The essential component of the transport system is the passive control optics that is composed of an elliptical and parabolic mirror couple. Once the control optics is aligned, a parallel FEL beam with a good pointing stability is obtained without any active operation to tune the optical system for different wavelengths.

  6. Performance of the photoinjector accelerator for the Los Alamos free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    O'Shea, P.G.; Bender, S.C.; Carlsten, B.E.; Early, J.W.; Feldman, D.W.; Feldman, R.B.; Johnson, W.J.D.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Sheffield, R.L.; Springer, R.W.; Stein, W.E.; Young, L.M.

    1991-01-01

    The Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL) facility has been greatly modified by the replacement of the thermionic electron gun and bunchers with a 1300 MHz RF photoinjector. Two more accelerator tanks have been added to increase the beam energy to 40 MeV. Preliminary studies at 15 MeV have demonstrated excellent beam quality with a normalized emittance of 40 {pi} mm-mrad. The beam quality is now sufficient to allow harmonic lasing in the visible. At present we are beginning FEL experiments at a wavelength near 3 {mu}m. In this paper we report on the performance of our photoinjector accelerator. 9 refs. , 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Towards attosecond X-ray pulses from the FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Zholents, Alexander A.; Fawley, William M.

    2004-07-01

    The ability to study ultrafast phenomena has been recently advanced by the demonstrated production and measurement of a single, 650-attosecond (10{sup 18} sec), VUV x-ray pulse[1] and, latter, a 250-attosecond pulse[2]. The next frontier is a production of the x-ray pulses with shorter wavelengths and in a broader spectral range. Several techniques for a generation of an isolated, attosecond duration, short-wavelength x-ray pulse based upon the ponderomotive laser acceleration [3], SASE and harmonic cascade FELs ([4] - [6]) had been already proposed. In this paper we briefly review a technique proposed in [5] and present some new results.

  8. Summary of the working group on FEL theory

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, C.

    1984-01-01

    The working group on FEL theory dedicated most of its discussions to topics relevant to the high gain regime in a free electron laser. In addition the area of interest was mainly restricted to FELs for the production of XUV radiation (<1000 A). A list of the topics that were felt to be relevant is: (1) characterization of the FEL high gain regime; (2) the amplified spontaneous emission mode of operation (ASE); (3) superradiance in FELs; (4) diffraction effects for high gain FELs; (5) noise and start-up; (6) coherence properties of the radiation for the ASE and superradiant FELS. 9 references.

  9. Status report on the development of a high-power UV/IR FEL at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, S.; Bohn, C.; Dylla, H.F.

    1995-12-31

    Last year we presented a design for a kilowatt industrial UV FEL based on a superconducting RF accelerator delivering 5 mA of electron-beam current at 200 MeV with energy recovery to enhance efficiency. Since then, we have progressed toward resolving several issues associated with that design. More exact simulations of the injector have resulted in a more accurate estimate of the injector performance. A new injection method has reduced the longitudinal and transverse emittance at the linac entrance. A more compact lattice has been designed for the UV FEL, and a new recirculation scheme has been identified which greatly increases the threshold for longitudinal instabilities. We decided to use a wiggler from the Advanced Photon Source which leads to a robust high-gain FEL. Analysis of the stability of an RF control system based on CEBAF control modules indicates that only minor modifications will be needed to apply them to this FEL. Detailed magnet specifications, vacuum-chamber beam apertures, and diagnostic specifications have been developed for the recirculation arcs. The design of the optical cavity has been conceptualized, and control systems have been devised to regulate mirror distortion. A half-scale model of one of the end-corner cubes has been built and tested. Finally, three-dimensional simulations have been carried out which indicate that the FEL should exceed its minimum design goals with adequate performance margin.

  10. Mercury: The Los Alamos ICF KrF laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Czuchlewski, S.J.; York, G.W.; Bigio, I.J.; Brucker, J.; Hanson, D.; Honig, E.M.; Kurnit, N.; Leland, W.; McCown, A.W.; McLeod, J.; Rose, E.; Thomas, S.; Thompson, D.

    1993-01-19

    The Mercury KrF laser facility at Los Alamos is being built with the benefit of lessons learned from the Aurora system. An increased understanding of KrF laser engineering, and the designed implementation of system flexibility, will permit Mercury to serve as a tested for a variety of advanced KrF technology concepts.

  11. Plasma and ion beam processing at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Davis, H.A.; Henins, I.

    1994-07-01

    Efforts are underway at Los Alamos National Laboratory to utilize plasma and intense ion beam science and technology of the processing of advanced materials. A major theme involves surface modification of materials, e.g., etching, deposition, alloying, and implantation. In this paper, we concentrate on two programs, plasma source ion implantation and high-intensity pulsed ion beam deposition.

  12. Optical tailoring of xFEL beams

    SciTech Connect

    West, Gavin; Coffee, R.

    2015-08-20

    There is an inherent exibility unique to free electron lasers (FELs) that lends well to experimental approaches normally too difficult for other light sources to accomplish. This includes the ability to optically shape the electron bunch prior to final its acceleration for the final FEL process. Optical pulse shaping of the electron bunch can enable both femtosecond and attosecond level FEL pulse control. Pulse shaping is currently implemented, not optically but mechanically, in LCLS-I with an adjustable foil slit that physically spoils the momentum phase of the electron bunch. This selectively suppresses the downstream FEL process ofspoiled electrons. Such a mechanical spoiling method fails for both the soft x-ray regime as well as the high repetition rates that are planned in LCLS-II. Our proposed optical spoiling method circumvents this limitation by making use of the existing ultrafast laser beam that is typically used for adjusting the energy spread for the initial electron bunch. Using Fourier domain shaping we can nearly arbitrarily shape the laser pulses to affect the electron bunch. This can selectively spoil electrons within each bunch. Here we demonstrate the viability of this approach with a programmable acousto-optic dispersive filter. This method is not only well suited for LCLS-II but also has several advantages over mechanical spoiling, including lack of radiation concerns, experiment specific FEL pulse shapes, and real-time adjustment for applications that require high duty-cycle variation such as lock-in amplification of small signals.

  13. Comparing an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) as a viable alternative for mid-infrared tissue ablation with a free electron laser (FEL).

    PubMed

    Mackanos, Mark A; Simanovskii, Dmitrii M; Contag, Christopher H; Kozub, John A; Jansen, E Duco

    2012-11-01

    Beneficial medical laser ablation removes material efficiently with minimal collateral damage. A Mark-III free electron laser (FEL), at a wavelength of 6.45 μm has demonstrated minimal damage and high ablation yield in ocular and neural tissues. While this wavelength has shown promise for surgical applications, further advances are limited by the high overhead for FEL use. Alternative mid-infrared sources are needed for further development. We compared the FEL with a 5-μs pulse duration with a Q-switched ZGP-OPO with a 100-ns pulse duration at mid-infrared wavelengths. There were no differences in the ablation threshold of water and mouse dermis with these two sources in spite of the difference in their pulse structures. There was a significant difference in crater depth between the ZGP:OPO and the FEL. At 6.1 μm, the OPO craters are eight times the depth of the FEL craters. The OPO craters at 6.45 and 6.73 μm were six and five times the depth of the FEL craters, respectively. Bright-field (pump-probe) images showed the classic ablation mechanism from formation of a plume through collapse and recoil. The crater formation, ejection, and collapse phases occurred on a faster time-scale with the OPO than with the FEL. This research showed that a ZGP-OPO laser could be a viable alternative to FEL for clinical applications.

  14. Design study of a longer wavelength FEL for FELIX

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.; Oepts, D.; Meer, A.F.G. van der

    1995-12-31

    We present a design study of FEL3, which will extend the FELIX spectral range towards a few hundred microns. A rectangular waveguide will be used to reduce diffraction losses. Calculations show that with a waveguide gap of 1 cm, only one sinusoidal mode along the guided direction can exist within the FEL gain bandwidth, thus excluding group velocity dispersion and lengthening of short radiation pulses. To incorporate FEL3 in the existing FELIX facility, two options are being considered: to combine FEL3 with FEL1 by insertion of a waveguide into FEL1, and to build a dedicated third beam line for FEL3 after the two linacs. Expected FEL performance: gain, spectrum, power, pulse shape, etc., will be presented based on numerical simulations.

  15. Photon Beam Diagnostics for VISA FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Murokh, A.; Pellegrini, C.; Rosenzweig, J.; Frigola, P.; Musumeci, P.; Tremaine, A.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Doyuran, A.; Johnson, E.; Skaritka, J.; Wang, X.J.; Van Bibber, K.; Hill, J.M.; LeSage, G.P.; Nguyen, D.; Cornacchia, M.

    1999-11-05

    The VISA (Visible to Infrared SASE Amplifier) project is designed to be a SASE-FEL driven to saturation in the sub-micron wavelength region. Its goal is to test various aspects of the existing theory of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission, as well as numerical codes. Measurements include: angular and spectral distribution of the FEL light at the exit and inside of the undulator; electron beam micro-bunching using CTR; single-shot time resolved measurements of the pulse profile, using auto-correlation technique and FROG algorithm. The diagnostics are designed to provide maximum information on the physics of the SASE-FEL process, to ensure a close comparison of the experimental results with theory and simulations.

  16. A high-power compact regenerative amplifier FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Sheffield, R.L.; Fortgang, C.M.; Kinross-Wright, J.M.; Ebrahim, N.A.; Goldstein, J.C.

    1997-08-01

    The Regenerative Amplifier FEL (RAFEL) is a new FEL approach aimed at achieving the highest optical power from a compact rf-linac FEL. The key idea is to feed back a small fraction (< 10%) of the optical power into a high-gain ({approximately}10{sup 5} in single pass) wiggler to enable the FEL to reach saturation in a few passes. This paper summarizes the design of a high-power compact regenerative amplifier FEL and describes the first experimental demonstration of the RAFEL concept.

  17. Some novel features of an FEL oscillator with tapered undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Yurkov, M.V.

    1995-12-31

    A one-dimensional analysis of an FEL oscillator with a linear undulator tapering is presented. Some principally novel results have been obtained. The origin of these results is in principal difference between the FEL oscillator and an FEL amplifier. In the case of the FEL amplifier the frequency of the amplified wave and all the other parameters are defined by an experimenter. Contrary to this, the case of the FEL oscillator with tapered undulator is more complicated. The lasing frequency is defined by the maximum of the small-signal gain and depends on the tapering depth in some complex way.

  18. Users program for storage-ring based FEL and synchrotron sources of the Duke FEL Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, K.D.; Barnett, G.; Burnham, B.

    1995-12-31

    The storage ring at the Duke FEL Laboratory was first operated with a stored e-beam in November, 1994. It has now achieved operation energies in excess 1 GeV with more than 100 mA current at 280 MeV. The ring has several ports for FEL and synchrotron light source research. The circulating ring current can be synchronized with the seperate Mark III FEL operating in the 2-9.5 {mu}m IR region. This allows low optical jitter (10-20 ps) between the two sources and thus pump-probe operation. The ring has been configured to drive a number of light sources including the OK-4 FEL system capable of FEL operation between 400 and 65 nm, an inverse Compton scattering source using this undulator which will yield 4-200 MeV gammas, an undulator source at approximately 40 {angstrom} (not an FEL), a mm FEL with inverse compton scattering providing 1-100 keV x-rays and two synchrotron ports from the bend magnets for which the {lambda}{sub c} = 11-12 {angstrom} for 1 GeV. The broadly tunable FEL sources and their associated inverse compton scattering are extremely bright. The initial research proposals, submitted to the Laboratory emphasizes photoelectron spectroscopy, PEEM, high resolution vacuum UV of gases, solid spectroscopy and photochemistry in the UV, X-ray microprobe studies, X-ray microscopy, X-ray holography, X-ray crystallography, Mossbauer spectroscopy, nuclear spectroscopy, neutron production, photon activation therapy and broadband synchrotron as a probe of fast reaction in the IR and near IR.

  19. Design of High Power FELS and the Effects of Diffraction on Detuning in an FEL Oscillator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    also show the effects of emittance versus electron beam energy and mirror shift versus mirror tilt on extraction. Analysis of these results examine the...robustness of FEL designs. 14. SUBJECT TERMS FEL, emittance, energy spread, mirror tilt, mirror shift 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 63 16. PRICE CODE 17...results that agree better with experiments. The results of new 4D simulations also show the effects of emittance versus electron beam energy and mirror

  20. A compact FEL upconverter of coherent radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Marshall, T.C.

    1995-12-31

    The objective is to generate a powerful millimeter-wave FEL signal in a single pass, using a coherent microwave source (24GHz) to prebunch the electron beam for a harmonically-related wave (72GHz). We use the Columbia FEL facility, operating the electron beam at 600kV, 100A; undulator period = 1.85cm and 250G (K = 0.25); electron beam diameter = 3mm inside a 8.5 mm ID drift tube; guiding field of 8800G. Under these conditions, both the microwave signal (5kW input) and the millimeter signal will show travelling-wave gain in the TE11 mode. We report initial experimental results for the millimeter wave spectrum and find an overall power gain of {approximately}20 for the 24GHz input wave. Also presented will be numerical solutions of the wave growth using the FEL equations with slippage. This device has the advantage of producing a high-power FEL output in a single-pass travelling-wave configuration, obtaining a millimeter wave which is phase-referenced to a coherent laboratory source.

  1. GINGER simulations of short-pulse effects in the LEUTL FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Fawley, W.M.

    2001-07-01

    While the long-pulse, coasting beam model is often used in analysis and simulation of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron lasers (FELs), many current SASE demonstration experiments employ relatively short electron bunches whose pulse length is on the order of the radiation slippage length. In particular, the low-energy undulator test line (LEUTL) FEL at the Advanced Photon Source has recently lased and nominally saturated in both visible and near-ultraviolet wavelength regions with a sub-ps pulse length that is somewhat shorter than the total slippage length in the 22-m undulator system. In this paper we explore several characteristics of the short pulse regime for SASE FELs with the multidimensional, time-dependent simulation code GINGER, concentrating on making a direct comparison with the experimental results from LEUTL. Items of interest include the radiation gain length, pulse energy, saturation position, and spectral bandwidth. We address the importance of short-pulse effects when scaling the LEUTL results to proposed x-ray FELs and also briefly discuss the possible importance of coherent spontaneous emission at startup.

  2. A proposed VUV oscillator-based FEL upgrade at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, S. V.; Douglas, D. R.; Evtushenko, P.; Hannon, F. E.; Hernandez-Garcia, C.; Klopf, J. M.; Legg, R. A.; Neil, G. R.; Shinn, M. D.; Tennant, C. D.; Zhang, S.; Williams, G. P.

    2011-09-20

    Advances in superconducting linac technology offer the possibility of an upgrade of the Jefferson Lab Free Electron Laser (JLab FEL) facility to an oscillator-based VUV-FEL that would produce 6 x 10{sup 12} coherent 100 eV photons per pulse at multi-MHz repetition rates in the fundamental. At present JLab operates a pair of oscillator-based continuous-wave Free Electron Lasers (FELs) as a linac-based next generation light source in the IR and UV, with sub-picosecond pulses up to 75 MHz. Harmonics upwards of 10 eV are produced and the fully coherent nature of the source results in peak and average brightness values that are several orders of magnitude higher than storage rings. The accelerator uses an energy recovered linac design for efficiency of operation. New style superconducting linac cryomodules with higher gradient, combined with a new injector and beam transport system allow the development of the FEL to higher photon energies.

  3. On a theory of an FEL oscillator with multicomponent undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Yurkov, M.V.

    1995-12-31

    Some novel results of a theory of an FEL oscillator with multicomponent undulator are presented. Two popular FEL oscillator configuration are under consideration: optical klystron and FEL oscillator with a prebuncher and tapered main undulator. Using similarity techniques, universal formulae and plots are obtained which allow one to calculate the FEL oscillator lasing conditions an output parameters at saturation. A one-dimensional analysis of an FEL oscillator with a linear undulator tapering is presented. Some principally novel results have been obtained. The origin of these results is in principal difference between the FEL oscillator and an FEL amplifier. In the case of the FEL amplifier the frequency of the amplified wave and all the other parameters are defined by an experimenter. Contrary to this, the case of the FEL oscillator with tapered undulator is more complicated. The lasing frequency is defined by the maximum of the small-signal gain and depends on the tapering depth in some complex way. In particular, at smooth increasing of the tapering depth, the lasing frequency may change by a leap and lasing occurs at another local maximum of the gain curve. This effect influences significantly on the FEL oscillator operation at saturation. As a result, generally accepted method of undulator tapering (for instance, by decreasing undulator field at fixed period) provides an efficiency increase only in a narrow range of the parameters of tapering. We show that in some cases, so called {open_quotes}negative tapering{close_quotes} (for instance, by increasing undulator field at fixed period) has a benefit against traditional tapering method. Ignoring of these basic features of the FEL oscillator with the tapered undulator have led many FEL research groups to nonoptimal design of the FEL experiments and incorrect interpretation of the obtained results.

  4. Satellites monitor Los Alamos fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalluri, Satya; White, Benjamin

    A man-made fire that was intended to be a “controlled burn” for clearing brush and wilderness at the Bandelier National Monument, New Mexico, became an inferno that devastated significant portions of Los Alamos during the first week of May 2000. Now known as the Cerro Grande fire, it was not confined to Los Alamos alone. The fire spread to 15% of the Santa Clara Indian Reservation and a substantial area of the surrounding national parks and U.S. forests.The National Weather Service estimates that more than 100,000 fires occur in the natural environment each year within the United States alone, of which about 90% are manmade. Remote sensing images from satellites could be used to detect and monitor these active fires and biomass burning. Forest fires have a significant environmental and economic impact, and timely information about their location and magnitude is essential to contain them.

  5. An Overview of the MaRIE X-FEL and Electron Radiography LINAC RF Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Joseph Thomas III; Rees, Daniel Earl; Scheinker, Alexander; Sheffield, Richard L.

    2015-05-04

    The purpose of the Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes (MaRIE) facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory is to investigate the performance limits of materials in extreme environments. The MaRIE facility will utilize a 12 GeV linac to drive an X-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL). Most of the same linac will also be used to perform electron radiography. The main linac is driven by two shorter linacs; one short linac optimized for X-FEL pulses and one for electron radiography. The RF systems have historically been the one of the largest single component costs of a linac. We will describe the details of the different types of RF systems required by each part of the linacs. Starting with the High Power RF system, we will present our methodology for the choice of RF system peak power and pulselength with respect to klystron parameters, modulator parameters, performance requirements and relative costs. We will also present an overview of the Low Level RF systems that are proposed for MaRIE and briefly describe their use with some proposed control schemes.

  6. Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator to drive the future FEL Light Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Power, J.; Zholents, A. )

    2011-04-20

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) are expensive instruments and a large part of the cost of the entire facility is driven by the accelerator. Using a high-energy gain dielectric wake-field accelerator (DWA) instead of the conventional accelerator may provide a significant cost saving and reduction of the facility size. In this article, we investigate using a collinear dielectric wakefield accelerator to provide a high repetition rate, high current, high energy beam to drive a future FEL x-ray light source. As an initial case study, a {approx}100 MV/m loaded gradient, 850 GHz quartz dielectric based 2-stage, wakefield accelerator is proposed to generate a main electron beam of 8 GeV, 50 pC/bunch, {approx}1.2 kA of peak current, 10 x 10 kHz (10 beamlines) in just 100 meters with the fill factor and beam loading considered. This scheme provides 10 parallel main beams with one 100 kHz drive beam. A drive-to-main beam efficiency {approx}38.5% can be achieved with an advanced transformer ratio enhancement technique. rf power dissipation in the structure is only 5 W/cm{sup 2} in the high repetition rate, high gradient operation mode, which is in the range of advanced water cooling capability. Details of study presented in the article include the overall layout, the transform ratio enhancement scheme used to increase the drive to main beam efficiency, main wakefield linac design, cooling of the structure, etc.

  7. New RF gun for Novosibirsk ERL FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Vladimir N.; Arbusov, Vladimir S.; Kenzhebulatov, Ermek K.; Kolobanov, Evgeniy I.; Kondakov, Aleksey A.; Kozyrev, Evgeniy V.; Krutikhin, Sergey A.; Kurkin, Grigoriy Ya.; Kuptsov, Igor V.; Motygin, Sergey V.; Ovchar, Vladimir K.; Petrov, Victor M.; Pilan, Andrey M.; Rotov, Evgeniy A.; Sedlyarov, Igor K.; Serednykov, Stanislav S.; Shevchenko, Oleg A.; Scheglov, Mikhail A.; Tribendis, Aleksey G.; Vinokurov, Nikolay A.

    The new radiofrequency (RF) gun making an intensive high-quality electron beam for injecting in Novosibirsk microtron recuperator (ERL) and driving Free Electron Laser (FEL) is made in Budker INP SB RAS. Bench tests of RF gun demonstrated good results in strict accordance with the calculations predicting average current of a bunch of 100 iA, energy of particles of 400 keV and normalized emittance less than 15 microns. The RF gun stand testing showed reliable work, unpretentious for vacuum conditions and stable in long-term operation. The additional injection beamline built-in to the existing system of the NovoFEL injector with the static gun is developed and designed.

  8. Duke storage rink UV/VUV FEL: Status and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Burnham, B.; Madey, J.M.J.

    1995-12-31

    The 1 GeV Duke storage ring was successfully commissioned with parameters exceeding initial specification. The OK-4 FEL has arrived at the Duke FEL laboratory from the Novosibirsk Institute of Nuclear Physics. The OK-4 installation and commissioning is in progress. In this paper we describe the up-to-date status of the Duke storage ring and the OK-4 FEL. The projected performance of the OK-4 UV/VUV FEL is presented based on the electron beam parameters achieved. Initial plans to operate the OK-4 UV/VUV FEL at the Duke 1 GeV storage ring are outlined. Future plans and prospects of both the OK-4 FEL and the Duke storage ring are discussed.

  9. Optical Klystron Enhancement to SASE X-ray FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yuantao; Emma, Paul; Huang, Zhirong; Kumar, Vinit

    2006-04-07

    The optical klystron enhancement to self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free electron lasers (FELs) is studied in theory and in simulations. In contrast to a seeded FEL, the optical klystron gain in a SASE FEL is not sensitive to any phase mismatch between the radiation and the microbunched electron beam. The FEL performance with the addition of four optical klystrons located at the undulator long breaks in the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) shows significant improvement if the uncorrelated energy spread at the undulator entrance can be controlled to a very small level. In addition, FEL saturation at shorter x-ray wavelengths (around 1.0 A) within the LCLS undulator length becomes possible. We also discuss the application of the optical klystron in a compact x-ray FEL design that employs relatively low electron beam energy together with a shorter-period undulator.

  10. High-power, high-efficiency FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1989-04-01

    High power, high efficiency FELs require tapering, as the particles loose energy, so as to maintain resonance between the electromagnetic wave and the particles. They also require focusing of the particles (usually done with curved pole faces) and focusing of the electromagnetic wave (i.e. optical guiding). In addition, one must avoid transverse beam instabilities (primarily resistive wall) and longitudinal instabilities (i.e sidebands). 18 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Energy recovery transport design for PKU FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Guimei Wang; Yu-Chiu Chao; KUI Zhao; Xiangyang Lu; Jiejia Zhuang; Chuyu Liu; Zhenchao Liu; Jiaer Chen

    2007-06-25

    A free-electron laser based on superconducting linac is under construction in Peking University(PKU). To increase FEL output power, energy recovery is chosen as one of the most potential and popular way. The design of beam transport system for energy recovery is presented, which is suitable for Peking University construction area. Especially, a chicane structure is chosen to change path length at +/-18 degree and R56 in the arc is adjusted for fully bunch compression.

  12. Harmonic cascade FEL designs for LUX

    SciTech Connect

    Penn, G.; Reinsch, M.; Wurtele, J.; Corlett, J.N.; Fawley, W.M.; Zholents, A.; Wan, W.

    2004-07-16

    LUX is a design concept for an ultrafast X-ray science facility, based on an electron beam accelerated to GeV energies in are circulating linac. Included in the design are short duration (200 fs or shorter FWHM) light sources using multiple stages of higher harmonic generation, seeded by a 200-250 nm laser of similar duration. This laser modulates the energy of a group of electrons within the electron bunch; this section of the electron bunch then produces radiation at a higher harmonic after entering a second, differently tuned undulator. Repeated stages in a cascade yield increasing photon energies up to 1 keV. Most of the undulators in the cascade operate in the low-gain FEL regime. Harmonic cascades have been designed for each pass of the recirculating linac up to a final electron beam energy of 3.1 GeV. For a given cascade, the photon energy can be selected over a wide range by varying the seed laser frequency and the field strength in the undulators. We present simulation results using the codes GENESIS and GINGER, as well as the results of analytical models which predict FEL performance. We discuss lattice considerations pertinent for harmonic cascade FELs, as well as sensitivity studies and requirements on the electron beam.

  13. Staged energy cascades for the LUX FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Penn, G.

    2004-07-27

    Designs and simulation studies for harmonic cascades, consisting of multiple stages of harmonic generation in free electron lasers (FELs), are presented as part of the LUX R&D project to design ultrafast, high photon energy light sources for basic science. Beam energies of 1.1, 2.1, and 3.1 GeV, corresponding to each pass through a recirculating linac, have independent designs for the harmonic cascade. Simulations were performed using the GENESIS FEL code, to obtain predictions for the performance of these cascades over a wide range of photon energies in terms of the peak power and laser profile. The output laser beam consists of photon energies of up to 1 keV, with durations of the order of 200 fs or shorter. The contribution of shot noise to the laser output is minimal, however fluctuations in the laser and electron beam properties can lead to variations in the FEL output. The sensitivity of the cascade to electron beam properties and misalignments is studied, taking advantage of the fact that GENESIS is a fully 3-dimensional code.

  14. FEL for the polymer processing industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Michael J.

    1997-05-01

    Polymers are everywhere in modern life because of their unique combination of end-use functionalities, ease of processing, recycling potential and modest cost. The physical and economic scope of the infrastructure committed to present polymers makes the introduction of entirely new chemistry unlikely. Rather, the breadth of commercial offerings more likely to shrink in the face of the widening mandate for recycling, especially of packaging. Improved performance and new functionality must therefore come by routes such as surface modification. However they must come with little environmental impact and at painfully low cost. Processing with strongly absorbed light offers unique advantages. The journal and patent literatures disclose a number of examples of benefits that can be achieved, principally by use of excimer lasers or special UV lamps. Examples of commercialization are few, however, because of the unit cost and maximum scale of existing light sources. A FEL, however, offers unique advantages: tunability to the optimum wavelength, potential for scale up to high average power, and a path to attractively low unit cost of light. A business analysis of prospective applications defines the technical and economic requirements a FEL for polymer surface processing must meet. These are compared to FEL technology as it now stands and as it is envisioned.

  15. A proposed visible FEL Facility at Boeing

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; Adamski, J.L.; Hayward, T.D.

    1995-12-31

    A 1-kW average power, visible wavelength FEL is described, based on a 120-MeV, 0.1. A macropulse average current linac operating at a duty factor of 0. 6% and having average beam power of 70 kW. The accelerator will employ a demonstrated photoinjector, 18-MeV, 433-MHz linac as an injector, followed by a 1300-MHz longitudinal phase space {open_quotes} linearizer,{close_quotes} a magnetic buncher chicane, and seven 1300-MHz, pulsed traveling wave linac sections. The magnets used to transport the beam from the linac to the FEL centerline, the 5-m THUNDER wiggler, and the optical resonator will be reclaimed from previous FEL demonstration experiments. We expect to attain pulse lengths of 7 ps for 3.5 nC, with minimal distortion of the pulse profile and normalized rms emittance of 7.5 {+-} 2.5 {pi} mm-mr. FELEX projects a laser conversion efficiency of 4.3 %, yielding average output of 3 kW.

  16. Start-Up of FEL Oscillator from Shot Noise

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, V.; Krishnagopal, S.; Fawley, W.M.

    2007-01-25

    In free-electron laser (FEL) oscillators, as inself-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) FELs, the buildup of cavitypower starts from shot noise resulting from the discreteness ofelectronic charge. It is important to do the start-up analysis for thebuild-up of cavity power in order to fix the macropulse width from theelectron accelerator such that the system reaches saturation. In thispaper, we use the time-dependent simulation code GINGER [1]toperformthis analysis. We present results of this analysis for theparameters of the Compact Ultrafast TErahertz FEL (CUTE-FEL) [2]beingbuilt atRRCAT.

  17. Los Alamos Science: Number 16

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, N.G.

    1988-01-01

    It was an unusually stimulating day and a half at Los Alamos when two Nobel Laureates in physiology, a leading paleontologist, and a leading bio-astrophysicist came together to discuss ''Unsolved Problems in the Science of Life,'' the topic of the second in a series of special meetings sponsored by the Fellows of the Laboratory. Just like the first one on ''Creativity in Science,'' this colloquium took us into a broader arena of ideas and viewpoints than is our usual daily fare. To contemplate the evolution and mysteries of intelligent life from the speakers' diverse points of view at one time, in one place was indeed a rare experience.

  18. Proposed uv-FEL user facility at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Di Mauro, L.F.; Krinsky, S.; White, M.G.; Yu, L.H.; Batchelor, K.; Friedman, A.; Fisher, A.S.; Halama, H.; Ingold, G.; Johnson, E.D.; Kramer, S.; Rogers, J.T.; Solomon, L.; Wachtel, J.; Zhang, X.

    1991-01-01

    The NSLS at Brookhaven National Laboratory is proposing the construction of a UV-FEL operating in the wavelength range from visible to 750{Angstrom}. Nano-Coulomb electron pulses will be generated at a laser photo-cathode RF gun at a repetition rate of 10 KHz. The 6 ps pulses will be accelerated to 250 MeV in a superconducting linac. The FEL output will serve four stations with independent wavelength tuning, using two wigglers and two rotating mirror beam switches. Seed radiation for the FEL amplifiers will be provided by conventional tunable lasers, and the final frequency multiplication from the visible or near UV to the VUV will be carried out in the FEL itself. Each FEL will comprise of an initial wiggler resonant to the seed wavelength, a dispersion section, and a second wiggler resonant to the output wavelength. The facility will provide pump probe capability, FEL or FEL, and FEL on synchrotron light from an insersion device on the NSLS X-Ray ring. 15 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Where Would Economics Education Be without Rendigs Fels?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegfried, John J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the career of Rendigs Fels from his first academic appointment in 1948 until the present. Concludes that Fels is one of a small number of respected economists who have made interest, involvement, and research in the teaching of economics an important and respectable part of the profession. (CFR)

  20. Gain results for low voltage FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, A.; Stuart, R.A.; Al-Shamma`a, A.

    1995-12-31

    We have designed and constructed a low voltage (130 kV) FEL system capable of operating in the microwave frequency range for which the electron beam current is cw (rather than pulsed) in time at a level of {approximately} 12 mA. The gain of this system has been measured as a function of the electron beam accelerating voltage and current level, and the input microwave frequency (8-10 GHz). The results are compared with the predictions of a simple theoretical model.

  1. Diagnostic technique applied for FEL electron bunches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovko, O.; Grebentsov, A.; Morozov, N.; Syresin, E.; Yurkov, M.

    2016-05-01

    Diagnostic technique applied for FEL ultrashort electron bunches is developed at JINR-DESY collaboration within the framework of the FLASH and XFEL projects. Photon diagnostics are based on calorimetric measurements and detection of undulator radiation. The infrared undulator constructed at JINR and installed at FLASH is used for longitudinal bunch shape measurements and for two-color lasing provided by the FIR and VUV undulators. The pump probe experiments with VUV and FIR undulators provide the bunch profile measurements with resolution of several femtosecond. The new three microchannel plates (MCP) detectors operated in X-ray range are under development now in JINR for SASE1-SASE 3 European XFEL.

  2. Feedback Requirements for SASE-FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Loos, Henrik; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    The operation of a Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) Free Electron Lasers (FEL) at soft and hard X-ray wavelengths driven by a high brightness electron beam imposes strong requirements on the stability of the accelerator and feedback systems are necessary to both guarantee saturation of the SASE process as well as a stable photon beam for user experiments. Diagnostics for the relevant transverse and longitudinal beam parameters are presented and various examples of feedback systems for bunches with low repetition rate as well as systems for intra bunch train feedbacks are discussed.

  3. Method for separating FEL output beams from long wavelength radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Neil, George; Shinn, Michelle D.; Gubeli, Joseph

    2016-04-26

    A method for improving the output beam quality of a free electron laser (FEL) by reducing the amount of emission at wavelengths longer than the electron pulse length and reducing the amount of edge radiation. A mirror constructed of thermally conductive material and having an aperture therein is placed at an oblique angle with respect to the beam downstream of the bending magnet but before any sensitive use of the FEL beam. The aperture in the mirror is sized to deflect emission longer than the wavelength of the FEL output while having a minor impact on the FEL output beam. A properly sized aperture will enable the FEL radiation, which is coherent and generally at a much shorter wavelength than the bending radiations, to pass through the aperture mirror. The much higher divergence bending radiations will subsequently strike the aperture mirror and be reflected safely out of the way.

  4. Transverse-coherence properties of the FEL at the LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yuantao; Huang, Zhirong; Ocko, Samuel A.; /MIT, Cambridge, Dept. Phys.

    2010-09-02

    The recently commissioned Linac Coherent Light Source is an x-ray free-electron laser at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, which is now operating at x-ray wavelengths of 20-1.2 Angstrom with peak brightness nearly ten orders of magnitude beyond conventional synchrotron sources. Understanding of coherence properties of the radiation from SASE FELs at LCLS is of great practical importance for some user experiments. We present the numerical analysis of the coherence properties at different wavelengths based on a fast algorithmusing ideal and start-end simulated FEL fields. The sucessful commissioning and operation of the linac coherent light source (LCLS) [1] has demonstrated that the x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) has come of age; these types of x-ray sources are poised to revolutionize the ultra-fast x-ray sciences. The LCLS and other hard x-ray FELs under construction are based on the principle of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) [2, 3], where the amplification process starts from the shot noise in the electron beam. A large number of transverse radiation modes are also excited when the electron beam enters the undulator. The FEL collective instability in the electron beam causes the modulation of the electron density to increase exponentially, and after sufficient undulator distances, a single transverse mode starts to dominate. As a result, SASE FEL is almost fully coherent in the transverse dimension. Understanding of transverse coherence properties of the radiation from SASE FELs is of great practical importance. The longitudinal coherence properties of SASE FELs have been studied before [4]. Some studies on the transverse coherence can be found in previous papers, for example, in ref. [5, 6, 7, 8, 9]. In this paper, we first discuss a new numerical algorithm based on Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques to calculate the FEL transverse coherence. Then we focus on the numerical analysis of the LCLS FEL transverse coherence.

  5. Los Alamos PC estimating system

    SciTech Connect

    Stutz, R.A.; Lemon, G.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Los Alamos Cost Estimating System (QUEST) is being converted to run on IBM personal computers. This very extensive estimating system is capable of supporting cost estimators from many different and varied fields. QUEST does not dictate any fixed method for estimating. QUEST supports many styles and levels of detail estimating. QUEST can be used with or without data bases. This system allows the estimator to provide reports based on levels of detail defined by combining work breakdown structures. QUEST provides a set of tools for doing any type of estimate without forcing the estimator to use any given method. The level of detail in the estimate can be mixed based on the amount of information known about different parts of the project. The system can support many different data bases simultaneously. Estimators can modify any cost in any data base.

  6. FEL gain optimisation and spontaneous radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bali, L.M.; Srivastava, A.; Pandya, T.P.

    1995-12-31

    Colson have evaluated FEL gains for small deviations from perfect electron beam injection, with radiation of the same polarisation as that of the wiggler fields. We find that for optimum gain the polarisation of the optical field should be the same as that of the spontaneous emission under these conditions. With a helical wiggler the axial oscillations resulting from small departures from perfect electron beam injection lead to injection dependent unequal amplitudes and phases of the spontaneous radiation in the two transverse directions. Viewed along the axis therefore the spontaneous emission is elliptically polarised. The azimuth of the ellipse varies with the difference of phase of the two transverse components of spontaneous emission but the eccentricity remains the same. With planar wigglers the spontaneous emission viewed in the axial direction is linearly polarised, again with an injection dependent azimuth. For optimum coherent gain of a radiation field its polarisation characteristics must be the same as those of the spontaneous radiation with both types of wiggler. Thus, with a helical wiggler and the data reported earlier, an increase of 10% in the FEL gain at the fundamental frequency and of 11% at the fifth harmonic has been calculated in the small gain per pass limit. Larger enhancements in gain may result from more favourable values of input parameters.

  7. Non equilibrium studies on FEL facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmand, Marion

    2013-06-01

    The recent development of Free Electron Lasers (FEL), giving ultrafast, high intensity pulses in the X-ray and XUV energy range is opening new opportunities for WDM studies. Development of X-ray diagnostics such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray scattering, has received much attention for the in situ measurement of the structure and physical properties of matter at extreme conditions. Coupled to ultrafast pump - probe schemas, such diagnostics are giving new insights into out-of-equilibrium processes and thus validate current models. We report recent developments to perform few fs time resolved pump - probe experiments, giving access to ultrafast transient WDM states. We also present collective Thomson Scattering with soft x-ray Free Electron Laser radiation (at FLASH) as a method to track the evolution of highly transient warm dense hydrogen with around 100 fs time resolution. In addition, recent experiments at LCLS are suggesting the possibility to perform X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES) on FEL facilities to provide simultaneously information on the valence electrons and on the atomic local arrangement within sub-ps time scales.

  8. The GALAXIE all-optical FEL project

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Arab, E.; Andonian, G.; Cahill, A.; Fitzmorris, K.; Fukusawa, A.; Hoang, P.; Jovanovic, I.; Marcus, G.; Marinelli, A.; Murokh, A.; Musumeci, P.; Naranjo, B.; O'Shea, B.; O'Shea, F.; Ovodenko, A.; Pogorelsky, I.; Putterman, S.; Roberts, K.; Shumail, M.; and others

    2012-12-21

    We describe a comprehensive project, funded under the DARPA AXiS program, to develop an all-optical table-top X-ray FEL based on dielectric acceleration and electromagnetic undulators, yielding a compact source of coherent X-rays for medical and related applications. The compactness of this source demands that high field (>GV/m) acceleration and undulation-inducing fields be employed, thus giving rise to the project's acronym: GV/m AcceLerator And X-ray Integrated Experiment (GALAXIE). There are numerous physics and technical hurdles to surmount in this ambitious scenario, and the integrated solutions include: a biharmonic photonic TW structure, 200 micron wavelength electromagnetic undulators, 5 {mu}m laser development, ultra-high brightness magnetized/asymmetric emittance electron beam generation, and SASE FEL operation. We describe the overall design philosophy of the project, the innovative approaches to addressing the challenges presented by the design, and the significant progress towards realization of these approaches in the nine months since project initialization.

  9. SUPERSTRUCTURES FOR HIGH CURRENT FEL APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Jacek Sekutowicz; Kevin Beard; Peter Kneisel; Genfa Wu; Catherine Thomas; Zheng

    2003-05-01

    The next generations of FELs at TJNAF will produce coherent light at power levels of 10 kW and 100 kW, respectively [1]. To achieve these power levels, 200 MeV electron beams of 10 mA and 100 mA have to be accelerated in the linear accelerators of the devices. The accelerators will be based on superconducting technology. Stable operation of these machines is only possible if the cavity Higher Order Modes (HOM) excited by the beams can sufficiently be damped. One of the possible accelerating structures which can fulfill this requirement, is a superstructure (SST) made of two weakly coupled subunits and equipped with appropriate HOM couplers. Based on the positive experience at DESY with 1.3 GHz superstructures, we are investigating for possible use similar structures in the linacs for the FEL upgrades. We have built a copper model of the proposed superstructure, based on two copper models of the 5-cell CEBAF cavities. This contribution presents measured results on this model. We are now in the process of fabrication a Nb prototype and hope to perform its cold test by the end of this year.

  10. Commissioning experience and beam physics measurements at the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schietinger, T.; Pedrozzi, M.; Aiba, M.; Arsov, V.; Bettoni, S.; Beutner, B.; Calvi, M.; Craievich, P.; Dehler, M.; Frei, F.; Ganter, R.; Hauri, C. P.; Ischebeck, R.; Ivanisenko, Y.; Janousch, M.; Kaiser, M.; Keil, B.; Löhl, F.; Orlandi, G. L.; Ozkan Loch, C.; Peier, P.; Prat, E.; Raguin, J.-Y.; Reiche, S.; Schilcher, T.; Wiegand, P.; Zimoch, E.; Anicic, D.; Armstrong, D.; Baldinger, M.; Baldinger, R.; Bertrand, A.; Bitterli, K.; Bopp, M.; Brands, H.; Braun, H. H.; Brönnimann, M.; Brunnenkant, I.; Chevtsov, P.; Chrin, J.; Citterio, A.; Csatari Divall, M.; Dach, M.; Dax, A.; Ditter, R.; Divall, E.; Falone, A.; Fitze, H.; Geiselhart, C.; Guetg, M. W.; Hämmerli, F.; Hauff, A.; Heiniger, M.; Higgs, C.; Hugentobler, W.; Hunziker, S.; Janser, G.; Kalantari, B.; Kalt, R.; Kim, Y.; Koprek, W.; Korhonen, T.; Krempaska, R.; Laznovsky, M.; Lehner, S.; Le Pimpec, F.; Lippuner, T.; Lutz, H.; Mair, S.; Marcellini, F.; Marinkovic, G.; Menzel, R.; Milas, N.; Pal, T.; Pollet, P.; Portmann, W.; Rezaeizadeh, A.; Ritt, S.; Rohrer, M.; Schär, M.; Schebacher, L.; Scherrer, St.; Schlott, V.; Schmidt, T.; Schulz, L.; Smit, B.; Stadler, M.; Steffen, B.; Stingelin, L.; Sturzenegger, W.; Treyer, D. M.; Trisorio, A.; Tron, W.; Vicario, C.; Zennaro, R.; Zimoch, D.

    2016-10-01

    The SwissFEL Injector Test Facility operated at the Paul Scherrer Institute between 2010 and 2014, serving as a pilot plant and test bed for the development and realization of SwissFEL, the x-ray Free-Electron Laser facility under construction at the same institute. The test facility consisted of a laser-driven rf electron gun followed by an S-band booster linac, a magnetic bunch compression chicane and a diagnostic section including a transverse deflecting rf cavity. It delivered electron bunches of up to 200 pC charge and up to 250 MeV beam energy at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The measurements performed at the test facility not only demonstrated the beam parameters required to drive the first stage of an FEL facility, but also led to significant advances in instrumentation technologies, beam characterization methods and the generation, transport and compression of ultralow-emittance beams. We give a comprehensive overview of the commissioning experience of the principal subsystems and the beam physics measurements performed during the operation of the test facility, including the results of the test of an in-vacuum undulator prototype generating radiation in the vacuum ultraviolet and optical range.

  11. Optics-free x-ray FEL oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Hao, Y.; Kayran, D.; Trbojevic, D.

    2011-03-28

    There is a need for an Optics-Free FEL Oscillators (OFFELO) to further the advantages of free-electron lasers and turning them in fully coherent light sources. While SASE (Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission) FELs demonstrated the capability of providing very high gain and short pulses of radiation and scalability to the X-ray range, the spectra of SASE FELs remains rather wide ({approx}0.5%-1%) compared with typical short wavelengths FEL-oscillators (0.01%-0.0003% in OK-4 FEL). Absence of good optics in VUV and X-ray ranges makes traditional oscillator schemes with very high average and peak spectral brightness either very complex or, strictly speaking, impossible. In this paper, we discuss lattice of the X-ray optics-free FEL oscillator and present results of initial computer simulations of the feedback process and the evolution of FEL spectrum in X-ray OFFELO. We also discuss main limiting factors and feasibility of X-ray OFFELO.

  12. Spontaneous emission effects in optically pumped x-ray FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Smetanin, I.V.; Grigor`ev, S.V.

    1995-12-31

    An effect of spontaneous emission in both quantum and classical regimes of the optically pumped X-ray free electron laser (FEL) in investigated. The quantum properties of an FEL are determined by the ratio of the separation {h_bar} between the absorption and emission lines (i.e. the quanta emitted) and their effective width {Delta}{epsilon} {eta}={h_bar}/{Delta}{epsilon}. In the conventional classical regime {eta} {much_lt} 1 an electron emits and absorbes a great number of shortwavelength photons over the interaction region, the gain in FEL being the result of these competitive processes. In the quantum limit {eta} {much_gt} 1 the emission and absorption lines are completely separated and thus the FEL becomes a two-level quantum oscillator with a completely inverted active medium. Spontaneous emission causes the electron to leave the range of energies where resonant interaction with the laser field occurs, thus effectively reducing the number of particles that take part in generating the induced X-ray signal. This effect is found to be crucial for lasing in optically pumped X-ray FEL. The characteristic relaxation times are calculated for both classical and quantum FEL regimes. It is shown that spontaneous emission results in FEL electron beam threshold current, which is of rather high value. An optimal range of pumping laser intensities is determined.

  13. CEBAF UV/IR FEL subsystem testing and validation program

    SciTech Connect

    G.R. Neil; S.V. Benson; H.F. Dylla; H. Liu

    1995-01-01

    A design has been established for IR and UV FELs within the Laser Processing Consortium's (LPC) program for development and application of high-average-power FELs for materials processing. Hardware prototyping and testing for the IR portion of the system are underway. The driver portion has been designed based on the superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) technology now seeing large-scale application in the commissioning of CEBAF, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, where LPC activities are centered. As of July 1994, measurements of beam performance confirm SRF's benefits in beam quality and stability, which are applicable to high-average-power FELs.

  14. High-power FEL design issues - a critical review

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Madey, J.M.J.; O`Shea, P.G.

    1995-12-31

    The high-average power capability of FELs has been much advertised but little realized. In this paper we provide a critical analysis of the technological and economic issues associated with high-average power FEL operation from the UV to near IR. The project of IR FEL for the Siberian Center of photochemical researches is described. The distinguished features of this project are the use of the race-track microtron-recuperator and the {open_quotes}electron output of radiation{close_quotes}. The building for the machine is under reconstruction now. About half of hardware has been manufactured. The assembly of installation began.

  15. Sunset at the ALaMO

    NASA Video Gallery

    A new color all-sky camera has opened its eyes at the ALaMO, or Automated Lunar and Meteor Observatory, at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Watch its inaugural video below, s...

  16. Publications of Los Alamos research 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Varjabedian, K.; Dussart, S.A.; McClary, W.J.; Rich, J.A.

    1989-12-01

    This bibliography lists unclassified publications of work done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for 1988. The entries, which are subdivided by broad subject categories, are cross-referenced with an author index and a numeric index.

  17. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    This report describes environmental monitoring activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory for 1994. Data were collected to assess external penetrating radiation, airborne emissions, liquid effluents, radioactivity of environmental materials and food stuffs, and environmental compliance.

  18. New Rad Lab for Los Alamos

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The topping out ceremony for a key construction stage in the Los Alamos National Laboratory's newest facility, the Radiological Laboratory Utility & Office Building. This is part of the National Nu...  

  19. New Rad Lab for Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    2008-08-06

    The topping out ceremony for a key construction stage in the Los Alamos National Laboratory's newest facility, the Radiological Laboratory Utility & Office Building. This is part of the National Nu...  

  20. Edward Teller Returns to LOS Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker, Siegfried S.

    2010-01-01

    I was asked to share some reflections of Edward Teller's return to Los Alamos during my directorship. I met Teller late in his life. My comments focus on that time and they will be mostly in the form of stories of my interactions and those of my colleagues with Teller. Although the focus of this symposium is on Teller's contributions to science, at Los Alamos it was never possible to separate Teller's science from policy and controversy ...

  1. Internship at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, Ryan Q.

    2012-07-11

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is located in Los Alamos, New Mexico. It provides support for our country's nuclear weapon stockpile as well as many other scientific research projects. I am an Undergraduate Student Intern in the Systems Design and Analysis group within the Nuclear Nonproliferation division of the Global Security directorate at LANL. I have been tasked with data analysis and modeling of particles in a fluidized bed system for the capture of carbon dioxide from power plant flue gas.

  2. Los Alamos Laser Eye Investigation.

    SciTech Connect

    Odom, C. R.

    2005-01-01

    A student working in a laser laboratory at Los Alamos National Laboratory sustained a serious retinal injury to her left eye when she attempted to view suspended particles in a partially evacuated target chamber. The principle investigator was using the white light from the flash lamp of a Class 4 Nd:YAG laser to illuminate the particles. Since the Q-switch was thought to be disabled at the time of the accident, the principal investigator assumed it would be safe to view the particles without wearing laser eye protection. The Laboratory Director appointed a team to investigate the accident and to report back to him the events and conditions leading up to the accident, equipment malfunctions, safety management causal factors, supervisory and management action/inaction, adequacy of institutional processes and procedures, emergency and notification response, effectiveness of corrective actions and lessons learned from previous similar events, and recommendations for human and institutional safety improvements. The team interviewed personnel, reviewed documents, and characterized systems and conditions in the laser laboratory during an intense six week investigation. The team determined that the direct and primary failures leading to this accident were, respectively, the principle investigator's unsafe work practices and the institution's inadequate monitoring of worker performance. This paper describes the details of the investigation, the human and institutional failures, and the recommendations for improving the laser safety program.

  3. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    SciTech Connect

    Kippen, Karen Elizabeth

    2016-11-08

    For more than 30 years the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has provided the scientific underpinnings in nuclear physics and material science needed to ensure the safety and surety of the nuclear stockpile into the future. In addition to national security research, the LANSCE User Facility has a vibrant research program in fundamental science, providing the scientific community with intense sources of neutrons and protons to perform experiments supporting civilian research and the production of medical and research isotopes. Five major experimental facilities operate simultaneously. These facilities contribute to the stockpile stewardship program, produce radionuclides for medical testing, and provide a venue for industrial users to irradiate and test electronics. In addition, they perform fundamental research in nuclear physics, nuclear astrophysics, materials science, and many other areas. The LANSCE User Program plays a key role in training the next generation of top scientists and in attracting the best graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, and early-career scientists. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) —the principal sponsor of LANSCE—works with the Office of Science and the Office of Nuclear Energy, which have synergistic long-term needs for the linear accelerator and the neutron science that is the heart of LANSCE.

  4. Optical properties of infrared FELs from the FELI Facility II

    SciTech Connect

    Saeki, K.; Okuma, S.; Oshita, E.

    1995-12-31

    The FELI Facility II has succeeded in infrared FEL oscillation at 1.91 {mu} m using a 68-MeV, 40-A electron beam from the FELI S-band linac in February 27, 1995. The FELI Facility II is composed of a 3-m vertical type undulator ({lambda}u=3.8cm, N=78, Km a x=1.4, gap length {ge}20mm) and a 6.72-m optical cavity. It can cover the wavelength range of 1-5{mu}m. The FELs can be delivered from the optical cavity to the diagnostics room through a 40-m evacuated optical pipeline. Wavelength and cavity length dependences of optical properties such as peak power, average power, spectrum width, FEL macropulse, FEL transverse profile are reported.

  5. Optical modeling of the Jefferson Lab IR Demo FEL

    SciTech Connect

    G. Neil; S. Benson; Michelle D. Shinn; P. Davidson; P. Kloppel

    1997-01-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (formerly known as CEBAF) has embarked on the construction of a 1 kW free-electron laser operating initially at 3 microns that is designed for laser-material interaction experiments and to explore the feasibility of scaling the system in power and wavelength for industrial and Navy defense applications. The superconducting radio-frequency linac, and single-pass transport which accelerates the beam from injector to wiggler, followed by energy-recovery deceleration to a dump. The electron and optical beam time structure in the design consists of a train of pecosecond pulses at a 37.425 MHz pulse repetition rate. The initial optical configuration is a conventional near-concentric resonator with transmissive outcoupling. Future upgrades of the system will increase the power and shorten the operating wavelength, and utilize a more advanced resonator system capable of scaling to high powers. The optical system of the laser has been mode led using the GLAD code by using a Beer's-law region to mimic the FEL interaction. Effects such as mirror heating have been calculated and compared with analytical treatments. The magnitude of the distorium for several materials and wavelengths has been estimated. The advantages as well as the limitations of this approach are discussed.

  6. Recent Progress in High-Gain FEL Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; /SLAC

    2005-09-30

    High-gain free electron lasers (FEL) are being developed as extremely bright x-ray sources of a next-generation radiation facility. In this paper, we review the basic theory and the recent progress in understanding the startup, the exponential growth and the saturation of the high-gain process, emphasizing the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE). We will also discuss how the FEL performance may be affected by various errors and wakefield effects in the undulator.

  7. Intrabeam Scattering in an X-ray FEL Driver

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.

    2005-01-31

    Intrabeam scattering (IBS) of a high-brightness electron beam in an x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) driver is studied. Such a beam is much ''colder'' in the longitudinal direction than in transverse ones. As a result, the beam energy spread is increased with negligible change of transverse emittances. We estimate the IBS induced energy spread in the Linac Coherent Light Source and evaluate its effects on FEL and CSR microbunching instabilities.

  8. The performance of the Duke FEL storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Burnham, B.; Litvinenko, V.N.

    1995-12-31

    The commissioning of the Duke FEL storage ring has been completed. During commissioning, we have conducted a series of performance measurements on the storage ring lattice and the electron beam parameters. In this paper, we will discuss the techniques used in the measurements, present measurement results, and compare the measured parameters with the design specifications. In addition, we will present the expected OK-4 FEL performance based on the measured beam parameters.

  9. Photon Source Capabilities of the Jefferson Lab FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, S. V.; Douglas, D. R.; Evtushenko, P.; Hannon, F. E.; Hernandez-Garcia, C.; Klopf, J. M.; Legg, R. A.; Neil, G. R.; Shinn, M. D.; Tennant, C. D.; Zhang, S.; Williams, G. P.

    2013-03-22

    Jefferson Lab operates a superconducting energy recovered linac which is operated with CW RF and which powers oscillator-based IR and UV Free Electron Lasers (FELs) with diffraction limited sub-picosecond pulses with >10{sup 13} photons per pulse (1.0%BW) at pulse repetition frequencies up to 75 MHz. Useful harmonics extend into the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV). Based on FEL model calculations validated using this facility, we have designed both an oscillator-based VUV-FEL that would produce 6 10{sup12} coherent (0.5% BW) 100 eV photons per pulse at multi-MHz repetition rates in the fundamental, and a dual FEL configuration that would allow simultaneous lasing lasing at THz and UV wavelengths. The VUV-FEL would utilize a novel high gain, low Q cavity, while the THz source would be an FEL oscillator with a short wiggler providing diffraction limited pulses with pulse energy exceeding 50 microJoules. The THz source would use the exhaust beam from a UVFEL. Such multiphoton capabilities would provide unique opportunities for out of equilibrium dynamical studies at time-scales down to 50 fs. The fully coherent nature of all these sources results in peak and average brightness values that are many orders of magnitude higher than storage rings. We acknowledge support from the Commonwealth of Virginia. Jefferson Lab is supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC05-84-ER40150.

  10. Study of waveguide resonators for FEL operating at submillimeter wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Yakover, I.M.; Pinhasi, Y.; Gover, A.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents theoretical results of waveguide resonator study for FEL operating at the submillimeter wavelength region. Because of increased ohmic losses it is harder to obtain high Q waveguide cavities at these wavelengths. The following unconventional multimode waveguides: metal-dielectric, corrugated and curved parallel plates, were considered. The type and structure of the operating modes were determined and their attenuation constant, effective mode area and wave impedance were calculated. On the basis of this analysis small-signal gain simulations were made. We have performed a parametric study of the various FEL oscillator cavity designs based on the parameters of the Israeli Tandem FEL experiment. It was found that an FEL utilizing unconventional waveguides has much better performance in comparison to an FEL based on conventional multimode rectangular and circular waveguides. In particular, promising design parameters for a sub-mm wavelength FEL utilizing a metal-dielectric waveguide were identified: gain of 45%/Amp and ohmic losses of 2% at frequency 300 GHz, and gain of 20%/Amp and ohmic losses 1% at frequency 675 GHz.

  11. An induction linac developed for FEL application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mascureau, J.; Anthouard, Ph.; Bardy, J.; Eyharts, Ph.; Eyl, P.; Launspach, J.; Thevenot, M.; Villate, D.

    1992-07-01

    An induction linac is being studied and built at CESTA for FEL application. At first we studied the induction technology and namely the high-voltage (HV) generators and the induction cells. A HV generator designed to feed the cells with calibrated pulses (150 kV, 50 ns, δV/V < 1%) has been built using a resonant charging system and magnetic switches. This generator is planned for kHz repetition-rate operation. A prototype induction cell has also been built and tested with a cable generator. An electron injector (1.5 MeV, 1.5kA) has been designed and is now under test: it uses ten induction cells and a thermionic dispenser cathode. Numerical codes have been developed and simulations have been compared with experimental results for HV generators, induction cells, and the injector. An induction accelerating module has been studied and we plan to have the accelerator working at 3 MeV in 1992.

  12. Status of Monte Carlo at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, W.L.; Cashwell, E.D.

    1980-01-01

    At Los Alamos the early work of Fermi, von Neumann, and Ulam has been developed and supplemented by many followers, notably Cashwell and Everett, and the main product today is the continuous-energy, general-purpose, generalized-geometry, time-dependent, coupled neutron-photon transport code called MCNP. The Los Alamos Monte Carlo research and development effort is concentrated in Group X-6. MCNP treats an arbitrary three-dimensional configuration of arbitrary materials in geometric cells bounded by first- and second-degree surfaces and some fourth-degree surfaces (elliptical tori). Monte Carlo has evolved into perhaps the main method for radiation transport calculations at Los Alamos. MCNP is used in every technical division at the Laboratory by over 130 users about 600 times a month accounting for nearly 200 hours of CDC-7600 time.

  13. Publications of Los Alamos research 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, C.A.; Willis, J.K.

    1981-09-01

    This bibliography is a compilation of unclassified publications of work done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for 1980. Papers published in 1980 are included regardless of when they were actually written. Publications received too late for inclusion in earlier compilations have also been listed. Declassification of previously classified reports is considered to constitute publication. All classified issuances are omitted-even those papers, themselves unclassified, which were published only as part of a classified document. If a paper was pubished more than once, all places of publication are included. The bibliography includes Los Alamos National Laboratory reports, papers released as non-laboratory reports, journal articles, books, chapters of books, conference papers published either separately or as part of conference proceedings issued as books or reports, papers published in congressional hearings, theses, and US patents. Publications by Los Alamos authors that are not records of Laboratory-sponsored work are included when the Library becomes aware of them.

  14. Publications of Los Alamos Research, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, C.J.; McClary, W.J.; Rich, J.A.; Rodriguez, L.L.

    1984-10-01

    This bibliography is a compilation of unclassified publications of work done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for 1983. Papers published in 1982 are included regardless of when they were actually written. Publications received too late for inclusion in earlier compilations have also been listed. Declassification of previously classified reports is considered to constitute publication. All classified issuances are omitted - even those papers, themselves unclassified, which were published only as part of a classified document. If a paper was published more than once, all places of publication are included. The bibliography includes Los Alamos National Laboratory reports, papers released as non-Laboratory reports, journal articles, books, chapters of books, conference papers either published separately or as part of conference proceedings issued as books or reports, papers publishd in congressional hearings, theses, and US patents. Publications by Los Alamos authors that are not records of Laboratory-sponsored work are included when the Library becomes aware of them.

  15. Water supply at Los Alamos during 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Purtymun, W.D.; McLin, S.G.; Stoker, A.K.; Maes, M.N.

    1995-09-01

    Municipal potable water supply during 1992 was 1,516 {times} 10{sup 6} gallons from wells in the Guaje and Pajarito well fields. About 13 {times} 10{sup 6} gallons were pumped from the Los Alamos Well Field and used in the construction of State Road 501 adjacent to the Field. The last year the Las Alamos Field was used for municipal supply was 1991. The nonpotable water supply used for steam plant support was about 0.12 {times} 10{sup 6} gallons from the spring gallery in Water Canyon. No nonpotable water was used for irrigation from Guaje and Los Alamos Reservoirs. Thus, the total water usage in 1992 was about 1,529 {times} 10{sup 6} gallons. Neither of the two new wells in the Otowi Well Field were operational in 1992.

  16. Electron Beam Diagnostics Of The JLAB UV FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Evtushenko, Pavel; Benson, Stephen; Biallas, George; Coleman, James; Dickover, Cody; Douglas, David; Marchlik, Matthew; Sexton, Daniel; Tennant, Christopher

    2011-03-01

    In this contribution we describe various systems and aspects of the electron beam diagnostics of the JLab UV FEL. The FEL is installed on a new bypass beam line at the existing 10 kW IR Upgrade FEL. Here, we describe a set of the following systems. A combination of OTR and phosphor viewers is used for measurements of the transverse beam profile, transverse emittance, and Twiss parameters. This system is also used for alignment of the optical cavity of the UV oscillator and to ensure the overlap between the electron beam and optical mode in the FEL wiggler. A system of beam position monitors equipped with log-amp based BPM electronics. Bunch length on the order of 120 fs RMS is measured with the help of a modified Martin-Puplett interferometer. The longitudinal transfer function measurement system is used to set up bunch compression in an optimal way, such that the LINAC RF curvature is compensated using only higher order magnetic elements of the beam transport. This set of diagnostic systems made a significant contribution in achieving first lasing of the FEL after only about 60 hours of beam operation.

  17. Temporal characterization of the Stanford Mid-IR FEL by frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, B.A.; DeLong, K.W.; Trebino, R.

    1995-02-01

    We measure the time-dependent intensity and phase of laser pulses from the Stanford Mid-IR FEL. We present the first measurements of near-transform-limited, linearly chirped, and sideband modulated FEL pulses.

  18. Seeded quantum FEL at 478 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.; Seggebrock, T.; Habs, D.

    2012-07-09

    We present for the first time the concept of a seeded {gamma} quantum Free-Electron-Laser (QFEL) at 478 keV, which has very different properties compared to a classical. The basic concept is to produce a highly brilliant {gamma} beam via SASE. To produce highly intense and coherent {gamma} beam, we intend to use a seeded FEL scheme. Important for the production of such a {gamma} beam are novel refractive {gamma}-lenses for focusing and an efficient monochromator, allowing to generate a very intense and coherent seed beam. The energy of the {gamma} beam is 478 keV, corresponding to a wavelength in the sub-Angstrom regime (1/38 A). To realize a coherent {gamma} beam at 478 keV, it is necessary to use a quantum FEL design. At such high radiation energies a classical description of the {gamma}-FEL becomes wrong.

  19. FERMI@Elettra FEL Design Technical Optimization Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, William; Penn, Gregory; Allaria, Enrico; De Ninno,Giovanni; Graves, William

    2006-07-31

    This is the final report of the FEL Design Group for the Technical Optimization Study for the FERMI{at}ELETTRA project. The FERMI{at}ELETTRA project is based on the principle of harmonic upshifting of an initial ''seed'' signal in a single pass, FEL amplifier employing multiple undulators. There are a number of FEL physics principles which underlie this approach to obtaining short wavelength output: (1) the energy modulation of the electron beam via the resonant interaction with an external laser seed (2) the use of a chromatic dispersive section to then develop a strong density modulation with large harmonic overtones (3) the production of coherent radiation by the microbunched beam in a downstream radiator. Within the context of the FERMI project, we discuss each of these elements in turn.

  20. Induction inserts at the Los Alamos PSR

    SciTech Connect

    King-Yuen Ng

    2002-09-30

    Ferrite-loaded induction tuners installed in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring have been successful in compensating space-charge effects. However, the resistive part of the ferrite introduces unacceptable microwave instability and severe bunch lengthening. An effective cure was found by heating the ferrite cores up to {approx} 130 C. An understanding of the instability and cure is presented.

  1. A Sailor in the Los Alamos Navy

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, D. L.

    2016-12-20

    As part of the War Department’s Manhattan Engineer District (MED), Los Alamos was an Army installation during World War II, complete with a base commander and a brace of MPs. But it was a unique Army installation, having more civilian then military personnel. Even more unique was the work performed by the civilian population, work that required highly educated scientists and engineers. As the breadth, scope, and complexity of the Laboratory’s work increased, more and more technically educated and trained personnel were needed. But, the manpower needs of the nation’s war economy had created a shortage of such people. To meet its manpower needs, the MED scoured the ranks of the Army for anyone who had technical training and reassigned these men to its laboratories, including Los Alamos, as part of its Special Engineer Detachment (SED). Among the SEDs assigned to Los Alamos was Val Fitch, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1980. Another was Al Van Vessem, who helped stack the TNT for the 100 ton test, bolted together the Trinity device, and rode shotgun with the bomb has it was driven from Los Alamos to ground zero.

  2. A Parameter Optimization for a National SASE FEL Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Yavas, O.; Yigit, S.

    2007-04-23

    The parameter optimization for a national SASE FEL facility was studied. Turkish State Planing Organization (DPT) gave financial support as an inter-universities project to begin technical design studies and test facility of National Accelerator Complex starting from 2006. In addition to a particle factory, the complex will contain a linac based free electron laser, positron ring based synchrotron radiation facilities and a proton accelerator. In this paper, we have given some results of main parameters of SASE FEL facility based on 130 MeV linac, application potential in basic and applied research.

  3. A Test of Superradiance in an FEL Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, R

    2004-12-14

    We describe the design of an FEL Amplifier Test Experiment (FATE)1 to demonstrate the superradiant short bunch regime of a Free Electron Laser in the 1-3 {micro}m wavelength range starting from noise. The relevance to the LCLS X-ray FEL [1] proposal is discussed and numerical simulations are shown. It is numerically demonstrated for the first time with the 2-D code GINGER, that clean-up of noise in the superradiant regime occurs even at low power levels.

  4. The Mark III IR FEL: Improvements in performance and operation

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, G.A.; Madey, J.M.J.; Straub, K.D.

    1995-12-31

    The Mark III IR FEL has been upgraded by the installation of a new thermionic microwave gun. The new gun yields a reduced emittance and allows operation at a higher repetition rate and an increased electron macropulse length. The RF system of the Mark III has also been phase-locked to the RF systemof the adjacent storage ring driver for the laboratory`s short-wavelength FEL sources, making possible two-color UV-IR pump probe experiments. In this paper, the design and performance of the new gun are presented and the implications of the improvements investigated.

  5. STARS A Two Stage High Gain Harmonic Generation FEL Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    M. Abo-Bakr; W. Anders; J. Bahrdt; P. Budz; K.B. Buerkmann-Gehrlein; O. Dressler; H.A. Duerr; V. Duerr; W. Eberhardt; S. Eisebitt; J. Feikes; R. Follath; A. Gaupp; R. Goergen; K. Goldammer; S.C. Hessler; K. Holldack; E. Jaeschke; Thorsten Kamps; S. Klauke; J. Knobloch; O. Kugeler; B.C. Kuske; P. Kuske; A. Meseck; R. Mitzner; R. Mueller; M. Neeb; A. Neumann; K. Ott; D. Pfluckhahn; T. Quast; M. Scheer; Th. Schroeter; M. Schuster; F. Senf; G. Wuestefeld; D. Kramer; Frank Marhauser

    2007-08-01

    BESSY is proposing a demonstration facility, called STARS, for a two-stage high-gain harmonic generation free electron laser (HGHG FEL). STARS is planned for lasing in the wavelength range 40 to 70 nm, requiring a beam energy of 325 MeV. The facility consists of a normal conducting gun, three superconducting TESLA-type acceleration modules modified for CW operation, a single stage bunch compressor and finally a two-stage HGHG cascaded FEL. This paper describes the faciliy layout and the rationale behind the operation parameters.

  6. FEL Gain Length and Taper Measurements at LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, Daniel; Brachmann, A.; Decker, F.J.; Ding, Y.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hays, G.; Hering, P.; Huang, Z.; Iverson, R.; Loos, H.; Miahnahri, A.; Nuhn, H.D.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; White, W.; Wu, J.; Xiang, D.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC /LBL, Berkeley

    2010-07-30

    We present experimental studies of the gain length and saturation power level from 1.5 nm to 1.5 {angstrom} at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). By disrupting the FEL process with an orbit kick, we are able to measure the X-ray intensity as a function of undulator length. This kick method is cross-checked with the method of removing undulator sections. We also study the FEL-induced electron energy loss after saturation to determine the optimal taper of the undulator K values. The experimental results are compared to theory and simulations.

  7. Rocketdyne FEL for power beaming using a regenerative amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cover, R. A.; Bennett, G. T.; Burke, R. J.; Curtin, M. S.; Lampel, M. C.; Rakowsky, G.; Stone, J. P.

    1993-08-01

    The Rocketdyne free-electron laser (FEL) being presently developed for operation in the visible to one-micron regime is described, with particular attention given to some of the principal optics and atmospheric propagation issues. The paper describes the system assembly and discusses the performance requirements for power beaming, the resonator design, and the basic ideas and calculations involved in the beam propagating through the atmosphere and tilt corrections. This FEL will be capable of an average output of greater than 1 kW in the near infrared. The laser system has an ability of scaling to power levels required for beaming power to space platforms.

  8. Undulators for the BESSY SASE-FEL Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrdt, J.; Frentrup, W.; Gaupp, A.; Kuske, B.; Meseck, A.; Scheer, M.

    2004-05-01

    BESSY plans to build a SASE-FEL facility for the energy range from 20 eV to 1000 eV. The energy range will be covered by three APPLE II type undulators with a magnetic length of about 60 m each. This paper summarizes the basic parameters of the FEL-undulators. The magnetic design will be presented. A modified APPLE II design will be discussed which provides higher fields at the expense of reduced horizontal access. GENESIS simulations give an estimate on the tolerances for the beam wander and for gap errors.

  9. Progress in the injector for FEL at CIAE

    SciTech Connect

    Tianlu Yang; Wenzhen Zhou; Shinian Fu

    1995-12-31

    An intense current RF-linac for the far-infrared FEL is now under construction at CIAE. The normalized brightness of 3.4 x 10{sup 9} A/(m-rad) was obtained from the injector of the linac. An acceleration section with 9 cells will be connected with the injector to provide an electron beam for the 200 {mu}m FEL oscillator. In this paper, the late results from the injector beam test will be reported. The physical design and research progress in the acceleration section, beam transport, undulator as well as optical cavity will be introduced respectively.

  10. Resonance hard radiation in a gas-loaded FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Gevorgian, L.A.

    1995-12-31

    The process of induced radiation under the condition when the relativistic beam oscillation frequency coincides with the plasma frequency of the FEL filling gas, is investigated. Such a resonance results in a giant enhancement of interaction between electrons and photons providing high gain in the hard FEL frequency region. Meanwhile the spectralwidth of the spontaneous radiation is broadened significantly. A method is proposed for maintaining the synchronism between the electron oscillation frequency and the medium plasma frequency, enabling to transform the electron energy into hard radiation with high efficiency.

  11. Undulators for the BESSY SASE-FEL Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bahrdt, J.; Frentrup, W.; Gaupp, A.; Kuske, B.; Meseck, A.; Scheer, M.

    2004-05-12

    BESSY plans to build a SASE-FEL facility for the energy range from 20 eV to 1000 eV. The energy range will be covered by three APPLE II type undulators with a magnetic length of about 60 m each. This paper summarizes the basic parameters of the FEL-undulators. The magnetic design will be presented. A modified APPLE II design will be discussed which provides higher fields at the expense of reduced horizontal access. GENESIS simulations give an estimate on the tolerances for the beam wander and for gap errors.

  12. Energy stability in a high average power FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Merminga, L.; Bisognano, J.J.

    1995-12-31

    Recirculating, energy-recovering linacs can be used as driver accelerators for high power FELs. Instabilities which arise from fluctuations of the cavity fields are investigated. Energy changes can cause beam loss on apertures, or, when coupled to M{sub 56}, phase oscillations. Both effects change the beam induced voltage in the cavities and can lead to unstable variations of the accelerating field. Stability analysis for small perturbations from equilibrium is performed and threshold currents determined. Design strategies to increase the instability threshold are discussed and the high average power FEL proposed for construction at CEBAF is used as an example.

  13. Post-Cold War Science and Technology at Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, John C.

    2002-04-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory serves the nation through the development and application of leading-edge science and technology in support of national security. Our mission supports national security by: ensuring the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile; reducing the threat of weapons of mass destruction in support of counter terrorism and homeland defense; and solving national energy, environment, infrastructure, and health security problems. We require crosscutting fundamental and advanced science and technology research to accomplish our mission. The Stockpile Stewardship Program develops and applies, advanced experimental science, computational simulation, and technology to ensure the safety and reliability of U.S. nuclear weapons in the absence of nuclear testing. This effort in itself is a grand challenge. However, the terrorist attack of September 11, 2001, reminded us of the importance of robust and vibrant research and development capabilities to meet new and evolving threats to our national security. Today through rapid prototyping we are applying new, innovative, science and technology for homeland defense, to address the threats of nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons globally. Synergistically, with the capabilities that we require for our core mission, we contribute in many other areas of scientific endeavor. For example, our Laboratory has been part of the NASA effort on mapping water on the moon and NSF/DOE projects studying high-energy astrophysical phenomena, understanding fundamental scaling phenomena of life, exploring high-temperature superconductors, investigating quantum information systems, applying neutrons to condensed-matter and nuclear physics research, developing large-scale modeling and simulations to understand complex phenomena, and exploring nanoscience that bridges the atomic to macroscopic scales. In this presentation, I will highlight some of these post-cold war science and technology advances

  14. Application of the green function formalism to nonlinear evolution of the low gain FEL oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Shvets, G.; Wurtele, J.S.; Gardent, D.

    1995-12-31

    A matrix formalism for the optical pulse evolution in the frequency domain, is applied to the nonlinear regime of operation. The formalism was previously developed for studies of the linear evolution of the low-gain FEL oscillator with an arbitrary shape of the electron beam. By varying experimentally controllable parameters, such as cavity detunning and cavity losses, different regimes of operation of the FEL oscillator, such as a steady state saturation and limit cycle saturation, are studied numerically. It is demonstrated that the linear supermodes, numerically obtained from the matrix formalism, provide an appropriate framework for analyzing the periodic change in the output power in the limit cycle regime. The frequency of this oscillation is related to the frequencies of the lowest-order linear supermodes. The response of the output radiation to periodic variation of the electron energy is studied. It is found that the response is enhanced when the frequency of the energy variation corresponds to the difference of per-pass phase advances of the lowest linear supermodes. Finally, various nonlinear models are tested to capture the steady state saturation and limit cycle variation of the EM field in the oscillator cavity.

  15. The Physics and Applications of High Brightness Beams: Working Group C Summary on Applications to FELS

    SciTech Connect

    Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter

    2003-03-19

    This is the summary of the activities in working group C, ''Application to FELs,'' which was based in the Bithia room at the Joint ICFA Advanced Accelerator and Beam Dynamics Workshop on July 1-6, 2002 in Chia Laguna, Sardinia, Italy. Working group C was small in relation to the other working groups at that workshop. Attendees include Enrica Chiadroni, University of Rome ape with an identical pulse length. ''La Sapienza'', Luca Giannessi, ENEA, Steve Lidia, LBNL, Vladimir Litvinenko, Duke University, Patrick Muggli, UCLA, Alex Murokh, UCLA, Heinz-Dieter Nuhn, SLAC, Sven Reiche, UCLA, Jamie Rosenzweig, UCLA, Claudio Pellegrini, UCLA, Susan Smith, Daresbury Laboratory, Matthew Thompson, UCLA, Alexander Varfolomeev, Russian Research Center, plus a small number of occasional visitors. The working group addressed a total of nine topics. Each topic was introduced by a presentation, which initiated a discussion of the topic during and after the presentation. The speaker of the introductory presentation facilitated the discussion. There were six topics that were treated in stand-alone sessions of working group C. In addition, there were two joint sessions, one with working group B, which included one topic, and one with working group C, which included two topics. The presentations that were given in the joint sessions are summarized in the working group summary reports for groups B and D, respectively. This summary will only discuss the topics that were addressed in the stand-alone sessions, including Start-To-End Simulations, SASE Experiment, PERSEO, ''Optics Free'' FEL Oscillators, and VISA II.

  16. A Comparison of Short Rayleigh Range FEL Performance with Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Stephen; Evtushenko, Pavel; Michelle D. Shinn; Neil, George; Blau, Joe; Burggraff, D.; Colson, William; Crooker, P.P.; Sans Aguilar, J.

    2007-08-01

    One approach to attaining very high power in a free-electron laser (FEL) is to operate with a Rayleigh range much smaller than the wiggler length. Previously, 3D simulations of Free-electron laser (FEL) oscillators showed that FEL gain doesn't fall off with Rayleigh range as predicted by one-dimensional simulations*. They also predict that the angular tolerance for the mirrors is much large than simplistic theory predicts. Using the IR Upgrade laser at Jefferson Lab lasing at 935 nm we have studied the performance of an FEL with very short Rayleigh range. We also looked at the angular sensitivity for several different Rayleigh ranges. We find very good agreement between simulations and measured gain and angular sensitivities. Surprisingly the gain continues to rise as the Rayleigh range is shortened and continues to grow even when the resonator becomes geometrically unstable. The same behavior is seen in both the experiment and simulations. We also find that, even for large Rayleigh r

  17. Ultrafast Coherent Control and Characterization of Surface Reactions using FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Ogasawara, Hirohito; Nordlund, Dennis a Nilsson, Anders; /SLAC, SSRL

    2005-09-30

    The microscopic understanding of reactions at surfaces requires an in-depth knowledge of the dynamics of elementary processes on an ultrafast timescale. This can be accomplished using an ultrafast excitation to initiate a chemical reaction and then probe the progression of the reaction with an ultrashort x-ray pulse from the FEL. There is a great potential to use atom-specific spectroscopy involving core levels to probe the chemical nature, structure and bonding of species on surfaces. The ultrashort electron pulse obtained in the linear accelerator to feed the X-ray FEL can also be used for generation of coherent synchrotron radiation in the low energy THz regime to be used as a pump. This radiation has an energy close to the thermal excitations of low-energy vibrational modes of molecules on surfaces and phonons in substrates. The coherent THz radiation will be an electric field pulse with a certain direction that can collectively manipulate atoms or molecules on surfaces. In this respect a chemical reaction can be initiated by collective atomic motion along a specific reaction coordinate. If the coherent THz radiation is generated from the same source as the X-ray FEL radiation, full-time synchronization for pump-probe experiments will be possible. The combination of THz and X-ray spectroscopy could be a unique opportunity for FEL facilities to conduct ultrafast chemistry studies at surfaces.

  18. A beam trajectory monitor for the TTF-FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Johnny S. T.

    1997-06-01

    A method to determine the electron beam trajectory inside a long undulator module is described. Three-dimensional information is obtained by imaging the spontaneous radiation off-axis using pinholes and high resolution position sensors. The proposal for such a monitor for the SASE-FEL at the TESLA Test Facility is discussed.

  19. Integrating the FEL on an All-Electric Ship

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    10 1. Undulator Fields and the Resonance Condition .............................10 2. Pendulum Equation and Electron Motion...12 3. The Wave Equation ...........................................................................14 4. FEL...presence of these fields is determined by the relativistic Lorentz force equation [5], ( ) ( )d e E B dt mc γβ β= − + × r rr r , (2.1) 2 1 1 γ β

  20. Numerical simulations of x-ray generation in miltisectional FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Pitatelev, M.M.

    1995-12-31

    The process of x-ray generation in milticomponent FELs with alternate undulator and dispersion sections is investigate. The coptuter simulation was fulfilled for the ultrarelativistic electron beams. It was shown that the use of much number of dispersion sections allows to increase the gain considerably and to use more short magnetic systems.

  1. Status of the project of Novosibirsk high power FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Pinayev, I.V.; Erg, G.I.; Gavrilov, N.G.

    1995-12-31

    The project of IR FEL for the Siberian Center of photochemical researches is described. The distinguished features of this project are the use of the race-track microtron-recuperator and the {open_quotes}electron output of radiation{close_quotes}. The building for the machine is under reconstruction now. About half of hardware has been manufactured. The assembly of installation began.

  2. Optimization Studies of the FERMI at ELETTRA FEL Design

    SciTech Connect

    De Ninno, Giovanni; Fawley, William M.; Penn, Gregory E.; Graves,William

    2005-08-25

    The FERMI at ELETTRA project at Sincotrone Trieste involves two FEL's, each based upon the principle of seeded harmonic generation and using the existing ELETTRA injection linac at 1.2 GeV beam energy. Scheduled to be completed in 2008, FEL-1 will operate in 40-100 nm wavelength range and will involve one stage of harmonic up-conversion. The second undulator line, FEL-2, will begin operation two years later in the 10-40 nm wavelength range and use two harmonic stages operating as a cascade. The FEL design assumes continuous wavelength tunability over the full wavelength range, and polarization tunability of the output radiation including vertical or horizontal linear as well as helical polarization. The design considers focusing properties and segmentation of realizable undulators and available input seed lasers. We review the studies that have led to our current design. We present results of simulations using GENESIS and GINGER simulation codes including studies of various shot-to-shot fluctuations and undulator errors. Findings for the expected output radiation in terms of the power, transverse and longitudinal coherence are reported.

  3. Efficiency optimization in a FEL with fields` nonadiabatic tapering

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, I.A.; Belyavskiy, E.D.; Silivra, A.A.

    1995-12-31

    Amplification of an electromagnetic wave in free electron lasers with a reversed guide field and right-hand polarized wiggler field is investigated both analytically and numerically. An effect of electron bunch trapping by the high frequency electromagnetic field is used for efficiency optimization. On the basis of motion stability criteria a possibility of bunches trapping by FEL parameters nonadiabatic (experimentally realizable) tapering is shown. The stability analysis of electron motion is based on Lyapunov theory for autonomy systems. A particle simulation is carried out for FEL parameters close to the experimental ones (relativistic factor {gamma}=4.75, wiggler field strength B{sub w}= 2.8 kG, guide field strength B{sub o}= -1.4 kG, operation wavelength {lambda}=6.2 mm) for the case of wiggler field tapering. Theoretically predicted rule of wiggler field tapering corresponding to FEL efficiency of 55% is approximated by stepped functions. For the experimentally realizable tapering it is found that FEL efficiency can be over 40%.

  4. The physics of FEL in an infinite electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Webb, S.

    2010-10-07

    We solve linearized Vlasov-Maxwell FEL equations for a 3-D perturbation in the infinite electron beam with Lorentzian energy distributions using paraxial approximation. We present analytical solutions for various initial perturbations and discuss the effect of optical guiding in such system.

  5. Neutron Capture Experiments Using the DANCE Array at Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashdorj, D.; Mitchell, G. E.; Baramsai, B.; Chyzh, A.; Walker, C.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becker, J. A.; Parker, W.; Sleaford, B.; Wu, C. Y.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Krtička, M.; Bečvář, F.

    2009-03-01

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is designed for neutron capture measurements on very small and/or radioactive targets. The DANCE array of 160 BaF2 scintillation detectors is located at the Lujan Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Accurate measurements of neutron capture data are important for many current applications as well as for basic understanding of neutron capture. The gamma rays following neutron capture reactions have been studied by the time-of-flight technique using the DANCE array. The high granularity of the array allows measurements of the gamma-ray multiplicity. The gamma-ray multiplicities and energy spectra for different multiplicities can be measured and analyzed for spin and parity determination of the resolved resonances.

  6. Decommissioning the UHTREX Reactor Facility at Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, M.; Elder, J.

    1992-08-01

    The Ultra-High Temperature Reactor Experiment (UHTREX) facility was constructed in the late 1960s to advance high-temperature and gas-cooled reactor technology. The 3-MW reactor was graphite moderated and helium cooled and used 93% enriched uranium as its fuel. The reactor was run for approximately one year and was shut down in February 1970. The decommissioning of the facility involved removing the reactor and its associated components. This document details planning for the decommissioning operations which included characterizing the facility, estimating the costs of decommissioning, preparing environmental documentation, establishing a system to track costs and work progress, and preplanning to correct health and safety concerns in the facility. Work to decommission the facility began in 1988 and was completed in September 1990 at a cost of $2.9 million. The facility was released to Department of Energy for other uses in its Los Alamos program.

  7. Neutron Capture Experiments Using the DANCE Array at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Dashdorj, D.; Mitchell, G. E.; Baramsai, B.; Chyzh, A.; Walker, C.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becker, J. A.; Parker, W.; Sleaford, B.; Wu, C. Y.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Krticka, M.; Becvar, F.

    2009-03-31

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is designed for neutron capture measurements on very small and/or radioactive targets. The DANCE array of 160 BaF{sub 2} scintillation detectors is located at the Lujan Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Accurate measurements of neutron capture data are important for many current applications as well as for basic understanding of neutron capture. The gamma rays following neutron capture reactions have been studied by the time-of-flight technique using the DANCE array. The high granularity of the array allows measurements of the gamma-ray multiplicity. The gamma-ray multiplicities and energy spectra for different multiplicities can be measured and analyzed for spin and parity determination of the resolved resonances.

  8. Recent Infrasound Calibration Activity at Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, R. W.; Marcillo, O. E.

    2014-12-01

    Absolute infrasound sensor calibration is necessary for estimating source sizes from measured waveforms. This can be an important function in treaty monitoring. The Los Alamos infrasound calibration chamber is capable of absolute calibration. Early in 2014 the Los Alamos infrasound calibration chamber resumed operations in its new location after an unplanned move two years earlier. The chamber has two sources of calibration signals. The first is the original mechanical piston, and the second is a CLD Dynamics Model 316 electro-mechanical unit that can be digitally controlled and provide a richer set of calibration options. During 2008-2010 a number of upgrades were incorporated for improved operation and recording. In this poster we give an overview of recent chamber work on sensor calibrations, calibration with the CLD unit, some measurements with different porous hoses and work with impulse sources.

  9. Nuclear Forensics at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Podlesak, David W; Steiner, Robert E.; Burns, Carol J.; LaMont, Stephen P.; Tandon, Lav

    2012-08-09

    The overview of this presentation is: (1) Introduction to nonproliferation efforts; (2) Scope of activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (3) Facilities for radioanalytical work at LANL; (4) Radiochemical characterization capabilities; and (5) Bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities. Some conclusions are: (1) Analytical chemistry measurements on plutonium and uranium matrices are critical to numerous defense and non-defense programs including safeguards accountancy verification measurements; (2) Los Alamos National Laboratory operates capable actinide analytical chemistry and material science laboratories suitable for nuclear material forensic characterization; (3) Actinide analytical chemistry uses numerous means to validate and independently verify that measurement data quality objectives are met; and (4) Numerous LANL nuclear facilities support the nuclear material handling, preparation, and analysis capabilities necessary to evaluate samples containing nearly any mass of an actinide (attogram to kilogram levels).

  10. Water Supply at Los Alamos during 1997

    SciTech Connect

    M. N. Maes; S. G. McLin; W. D. Purtymun

    1998-12-01

    Production of potable municipal water supplies during 1997 totaled about 1,285.9 million gallons from wells in the Guaje, Pajarito, and Otowi well fields. There was no water used from the spring gallery in Water Canyon or from Guaje Reservoir during 1997. About 2.4 million gallons of water from Los Alamos Reservoir was used to irrigate public parks and recreational lands. The total water usage in 1997 was about 1,288.3 million gallons, or about 135 gallons per day per person living in Los Alamos County. Groundwater pumpage was down about 82.2 million gallons in 1997 compared with the pumpage in 1996. Four new replacement wells were drilled and cased in Guaje Canyon between October 1997 and March 1998. These wells are currently being developed and aquifer tests are being performed. A special report summarizing the geological, geophysical, and well construction logs will be issued in the near future for these new wells.

  11. Harmonic millimeter radiation from a microwave FEL amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.-H.; Marshall, T. C.

    1997-02-01

    In this project, an electron beam is bunched at a microwave frequency and the harmonics of this bunching drive radiation at millimeter wavelengths, using a FEL, configured as a single-pass travelling wave amplifier. A 10 kW 24 GHz microwave input signal grows to ˜200 kW level using the lower-frequency unstable root of the waveguide FEL dispersion relation. The Columbia FEL facility operates at this frequency in the TE11 mode, using a helical undulator (1.85 cm period) and a 3 mm diameter 600 kV electron beam contained in a 8.7 mm ID cylindrical waveguide. The harmonic currents set up by the microwave are found to cause growth of harmonic power under two conditions. First, we choose the parameters of the device so that the upper frequency root corresponds to the third harmonic, in which case we observe a small amount of third-harmonic emission in the TE11 mode, accompanied by comparable second harmonic. The millimeter harmonic radiation produced is coherent and phase-related to the microwave source. Second, we have found substantial emission at the seventh harmonic, most likely from the TE72 mode — which, in cylindrical waveguide geometry, travels at very nearly the same wave speed as the 24 GHz TE11 power. In order to excite the seventh-harmonic radiation, the electron beam must be displaced from the system axis — ˜2 mm in this device. The seventh-harmonic output is potentially an attractive choice for a CW FEL which must generate appreciable power at ˜2 mm wavelength for plasma electron cyclotron heating since we can produce this radiation for electron beam energy as low as 400 kV. We present a theoretical model of the experiment which predicts that if the microwave signal is strong enough to drive the FEL into saturation, the harmonic emission becomes powerful.

  12. Los Alamos Novel Rocket Design Flight Tested

    ScienceCinema

    Tappan, Bryce

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists recently flight tested a new rocket design that includes a high-energy fuel and a motor design that also delivers a high degree of safety. Researchers will now work to scale-up the design, as well as explore miniaturization of the system, in order to exploit all potential applications that would require high-energy, high-velocity, and correspondingly high safety margins.

  13. Risk management at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, D.G.; Stack, D.W.

    1993-11-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has risk management programs at a number of administrative levels. Each line organization has responsibility for risk management for routine operations. The Facility Risk Management group (HS-3) is the Los Alamos organization with the primary responsibility for risk management including providing input and expertise to facilities and line managers in the management and documentation of ES&H hazards and risks associated with existing and new activities. One of the major contributions this group has made to laboratory risk management program is to develop and implement a hazard identification and classification methodology that is readily adaptable to continuously changing classification guidelines such as DOE-STD-1027. The increased emphasis on safety at Los Alamos has led to the formation of additional safety oversight organization such as the Integration and Coordination Office (ICO), which is responsible for prioritization of risk management activities. In the fall of 1991, nearly 170 DOE inspectors spent 6 weeks analyzing the environmental, safety, and health activities at Los Alamos. The result of this audit was a list of over 1000 findings, each indicating some deficiency in current Laboratory operations relative to DOE and other government regulation. The audit team`s findings were consolidated and ``action plans`` were developed to address the findings. This resulted in over 200 action plans with a total estimated cost of almost $1 billion. The Laboratory adopted a risk-based prioritization process to attempt to achieve as much risk reduction as possible with the available resources. This paper describes the risk based prioritization model that was developed.

  14. Los Alamos National Laboratory Facility Review

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ronald Owen

    2015-06-05

    This series of slides depicts the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The Center's 800-MeV linac produces H+ and H- beams as well as beams of moderated (cold to 1 MeV) and unmoderated (0.1 to 600 MeV) neutrons. Experimental facilities and their capabilities and characteristics are outlined. Among these are LENZ, SPIDER, and DANCE.

  15. Los Alamos Team Demonstrates Bottle Scanner Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle; Schultz, Larry

    2014-05-06

    Los Alamos scientists are demonstrating a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMR) technology that may provide a breakthrough for screening liquids at airport security. By adding low-power X-ray data to the NMR mix, scientists believe they have unlocked a new detection technology. Funded in part by the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate, the new technology is called MagRay.

  16. Los Alamos Team Demonstrates Bottle Scanner Technology

    ScienceCinema

    Espy, Michelle; Schultz, Larry

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos scientists are demonstrating a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMR) technology that may provide a breakthrough for screening liquids at airport security. By adding low-power X-ray data to the NMR mix, scientists believe they have unlocked a new detection technology. Funded in part by the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate, the new technology is called MagRay.

  17. Amphibians and Reptiles of Los Alamos County

    SciTech Connect

    Teralene S. Foxx; Timothy K. Haarmann; David C. Keller

    1999-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that amphibians and reptiles are good indicators of environmental health. They live in terrestrial and aquatic environments and are often the first animals to be affected by environmental change. This publication provides baseline information about amphibians and reptiles that are present on the Pajarito Plateau. Ten years of data collection and observations by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the University of New Mexico, the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish, and hobbyists are represented.

  18. Los Alamos Novel Rocket Design Flight Tested

    SciTech Connect

    Tappan, Bryce

    2014-10-23

    Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists recently flight tested a new rocket design that includes a high-energy fuel and a motor design that also delivers a high degree of safety. Researchers will now work to scale-up the design, as well as explore miniaturization of the system, in order to exploit all potential applications that would require high-energy, high-velocity, and correspondingly high safety margins.

  19. Critical partnerships: Los Alamos, universities, and industry

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.L.

    1997-04-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, situated 35 miles northwest of Santa Fe, NM, is one of the Department of Energy`s three Defense Programs laboratories. It encompasses 43 square miles, employees approximately 10,000 people, and has a budget of approximately $1.1B in FY97. Los Alamos has a strong post-cold war mission, that of reducing the nuclear danger. But even with that key role in maintaining the nation`s security, Los Alamos views partnerships with universities and industry as critical to its future well being. Why is that? As the federal budget for R&D comes under continued scrutiny and certain reduction, we believe that the triad of science and technology contributors to the national system of R&D must rely on and leverage each others capabilities. For us this means that we will rely on these partners to help us in 5 key ways: We expect that partnerships will help us maintain and enhance our core competencies. In doing so, we will be able to attract the best scientists and engineers. To keep on the cutting edge of research and development, we have found that partnerships maintain the excellence of staff through new and exciting challenges. Additionally, we find that from our university and corporate partners we often learn and incorporate {open_quotes}best practices{close_quotes} in organizational management and operations. Finally, we believe that a strong national system of R&D will ensure and enhance our ability to generate revenues.

  20. Los Alamos National Laboratory Building Cost Index

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, H.D.; Lemon, G.D.

    1983-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Building Cost Index indicates that actual escalation since 1970 is near 10% per year. Therefore, the Laboratory will continue using a 10% per year escalation rate for construction estimates through 1985 and a slightly lower rate of 8% per year from 1986 through 1990. The computerized program compares the different elements involved in the cost of a typical construction project, which for our purposes, is a complex of office buildings and experimental laboratores. The input data used in the program consist primarily of labor costs and material and equipment costs. The labor costs are the contractural rates of the crafts workers in the Los Alamos area. For the analysis, 12 field-labor draft categories are used; each is weighted corresponding to the labor craft distribution associated with the typical construction project. The materials costs are current Los Alamos prices. Additional information sources include material and equipment quotes obtained through conversations with vendors and from trade publications. The material and equipment items separate into 17 categories for the analysis and are weighted corresponding to the material and equipment distribution associated with the typical construction project. The building cost index is compared to other national building cost indexes.

  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory building cost index

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, H.D.; Lemon, G.D.

    1982-10-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Building Cost Index indicates that actual escalation since 1970 is near 10% per year. Therefore, the Laboratory will continue using a 10% per year escalation rate for construction estimates through 1985 and a slightly lower rate of 8% per year from 1986 through 1990. The computerized program compares the different elements involved in the cost of a typical construction project, which for our purposes, is a complex of office buildings and experimental laboratories. The input data used in the program consist primarily of labor costs and material and equipment costs. The labor costs are the contractual rates of the crafts workers in the Los Alamos area. For the analysis, 12 field-labor craft categories are used; each is weighted corresponding to the labor craft distribution associated with the typical construction project. The materials costs are current Los Alamos prices. Additional information sources include material and equipment quotes obtained through conversations with vendors and from trade publications. The material and equipment items separate into 17 categories for the analysis and are weighted corresponding to the material and equipment distribution associated with the typical construction project. The building cost index is compared to other national building cost indexes.

  2. Prospects for a soft x-ray FEL powered by a relativistic-klystron high-gradient accelerator (RK-HGA)

    SciTech Connect

    Shay, H.D.; Barletta, W.A.; Yu, S.S.; Schlueter, R.; Deis, G.A.

    1989-09-28

    We present here the concept of x-ray FELs using high gain, single-pass amplifiers with electron beams accelerated in high gradient structures powered by relativistic klystrons. Other authors have also considered x-ray FELs; the unique aspect of this paper is the use of high gradient acceleration. One of the authors has previously presented preliminary studies on this concept. The intent in this paper is to display the results of a top level design study on a high gain FEL, to present its sensitivity to a variety of fabrication and tuning errors, to discuss several mechanisms for increasing gain yet more, and to present explicitly the output characteristics of such an FEL. The philosophy of the design study is to find a plausible operating point which employs existing or nearly existing state-of-the-art technologies while minimizing the accelerator and wiggler lengths. The notion is to distribute the technical risk as evenly as possible over the several technologies so that each must advance only slightly in order to make this design feasible. This study entailed no systematic investigation of possible costs so that, for example, the sole criterion for balancing the trade-off between beam energy and wiggler length is that the two components have comparable lengths. 20 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  3. A Los Alamos concept for accelerator transmutation of waste and energy production (ATW)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This document contains the diagrams presented at the ATW (Accelerator Transmutation of Waste and Energy Production) External Review, December 10-12, 1990, held at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Included are the charge to the committee and the presentations for the committee`s review. Topics of the presentations included an overview of the concept, LINAC technology, near-term application -- high-level defense wastes (intense thermal neutron source, chemistry and materials), advanced application of the ATW concept -- fission energy without a high-level waste stream (overview, advanced technology, and advanced chemistry), and a summary of the research issues.

  4. Output characteristics of SASE-driven short wavelength FEL`s

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, W.M.

    1997-02-01

    This paper investigates various properties of the ``microspikes`` associated with self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) in a short wavelength free-electron laser (FEL). Using results from the 2-D numerical simulation code GINGER, we confirm theoretical predictions such as the convective group velocity in the exponential gain regime. In the saturated gain regime beyond the initial saturation, we find that the average radiation power continues to grow with an approximately linearly dependence upon undulator length. Moreover, the spectrum significantly broadens and shifts in wavelength to the redward direction, with{ital P(w)} approaching a constant, asymptotic value. This is in marked contrast to the exponential gain regime where the spectrum steadily narrows, {ital P(w)} grows, and the central wavelength remains constant with {ital z}. Via use of a spectrogram diagnostic {ital S(w,t)}, it appears that the radiation pattern in the saturated gain regime is composed of an ensemble of distinct ``sinews`` whose widths AA remain approximately constant but whose central wavelengths can ``chirp`` by varying a small extent with {ital t}.

  5. Field Encapsulation Library The FEL 2.2 User Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Patrick J.; Henze, Chris; Ellsworth, David

    1999-01-01

    This document describes version 2.2 of the Field Encapsulation Library (FEL), a library of mesh and field classes. FEL is a library for programmers - it is a "building block" enabling the rapid development of applications by a user. Since FEL is a library intended for code development, it is essential that enough technical detail be provided so that one can make full use of the code. Providing such detail requires some assumptions with respect to the reader's familiarity with the library implementation language, C++, particularly C++ with templates. We have done our best to make the explanations accessible to those who may not be completely C++ literate. Nevertheless, familiarity with the language will certainly help one's understanding of how and why things work the way they do. One consolation is that the level of understanding essential for using the library is significantly less than the level that one should have in order to modify or extend the library. One more remark on C++ templates: Templates have been a source of both joy and frustration for us. The frustration stems from the lack of mature or complete implementations that one has to work with. Template problems rear their ugly head particularly when porting. When porting C code, successfully compiling to a set of object files typically means that one is almost done. With templated C++ and the current state of the compilers and linkers, generating the object files is often only the beginning of the fun. On the other hand, templates are quite powerful. Used judiciously, templates enable more succinct designs and more efficient code. Templates also help with code maintenance. Designers can avoid creating objects that are the same in many respects, but not exactly the same. For example, FEL fields are templated by node type, thus the code for scalar fields and vector fields is shared. Furthermore, node type templating allows the library user to instantiate fields with data types not provided by the FEL

  6. Feasibility of an XUV FEL Oscillator Driven by a SCRF Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A. H.; Freund, H. P.; Reinsch, M.

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) facility is currently under construction at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Using a1-ms-long macropulse composed of up to 3000 micropulses, and with beam energies projected from 45 to 800 MeV, the possibility for an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) free-electron laser oscillator (FELO) with the higher energy is evaluated. We have used both GINGER with an oscillator module and the MEDUSA/OPC code to assess FELO saturation prospects at 120 nm, 40 nm, and 13.4 nm. The results support saturation at all of these wavelengths which are also shorter than the demonstrated shortest wavelength record of 176 nm from a storage-ring-based FELO. This indicates linac-driven FELOs can be extended into this XUV wavelength regime previously only reached with single-pass FEL configurations.

  7. Emittance studies at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.; Feldman, D.W.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Stein, W.E.; Warren, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Recent emittance studies at the Los Alamos FEL have indicated several areas of concern in the linac and beamline feeding the wiggler. Four emittance growth mechanisms of special importance have been studied. First, a rapid growth of the electron beam's emittance immediately after the spherical gridded Pierce gun resulted, in part, from the long time required for our pulsing electronics to ramp the grid voltage up at the start and down at the end of the pulse, which created a pulse with a cosine-like current distribution as a function of time. The growth was compounded by the extremely small radial beam size (almost a waist) leaving the gun. In addition, we saw evidence of electrostatic charging of the insulators in the gun, reducing the quality of the electron beam further. Second, the action of the solenoidal focusing fields in the low-voltage bunching region was studied, and criteria for a minimum emittance growth were established. Third, maximum misalignment angles and displacements for various elements of the beamline were calculated for the desired low emittance growth. Finally, emittance growth in the horizontal dimension through the nonisochronous bend caused by varying energy depression on the particles due to longitudinal wake fields was both calculated and observed. In addition, we measured energy depressions caused by the wake fields generated by various other elements in the beamline. Strategies were developed to relieve the magnitude of these wake-field effects. 10 refs., 12 figs.

  8. Locking Lasers to RF in an Ultra Fast FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, R.; Huang, G.; Doolittle, L.; White, W.; Frisch, J.; Coffee, R.

    2010-01-02

    Using a novel, phase-stabilized RF-over-fiber scheme, they transmit 3GHz over 300m with 27fs RMS error in 250kHz bandwidth over 12 hours, and phase lock a laser to enable ultrafast pump-probe experiments. Free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of producing short-duration (< 10fs), high-energy X-ray pulses for a range of scientific applications. The recently activated Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) FEL facility at SLAC will support experiments which require synchronized light pulses for pump-probe schemes. They developed and operated a fiber optic RF transmission system to synchronize lasers to the emitted X-ray pulses, which was used to enable the first pump-probe experiments at the LCLS.

  9. First lasing of the IR upgrade FEL at Jefferson lab

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Behre; Stephen Benson; George Biallas; James Boyce; Christopher Curtis; David Douglas; H. Dylla; L. Dillon-townes; Richard Evans; Albert Grippo; Joseph Gubeli; David Hardy; John Heckman; Carlos Hernandez-Garcia; Tommy Hiatt; Kevin Jordan; Nikolitsa Merminga; George Neil; Joseph Preble; Harvey Rutt; Michelle D. Shinn; Timothy Siggins; Hiroyuki Toyokawa; David W. Waldman; Richard Walker; Neil Wilson; Byung Yunn; Shukui Zhang

    2004-08-01

    We report initial lasing results from the IR Upgrade FEL at Jefferson Lab[1]. The electron accelerator was operated with low average current beam at 80 MeV. The time structure of the beam was 120 pC bunches at 4.678 MHz with up to 750 {micro}sec pulses at 2Hz. Lasing was established over the entire wavelength range of the mirrors (5.5-6.6 {micro}m). The detuning curve length, turn-on time, and power were in agreement with modeling results assuming a 1 psec FWHM micropulse. The same model predicts over 10 kW of power output with 10 mA of beam and 10% output coupling, which is the ultimate design goal of the IR Upgrade FEL. The behavior of the laser while the dispersion section strength was varied was found to qualitatively match predictions. Initial CW lasing results also will be presented.

  10. Cavity-mirror degradation in the deep-UV FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, K.; Yamazaki, T.; Sei, N.

    1995-12-31

    It is known that the degradation of dielectric multilayer mirrors used in short wavelength free-electron lasers (FELs) is caused by the carbon contamination on the mirror surface and the defects inside the dielectrics. We reported last year that the degraded dielectric multilayer mirrors can be repaired with both surface treatment by RF-induced oxygen plasma and thermal annealing. However, such a mirror degradation is still one of the most critical issues in the deep ultraviolet (UV) FELs, because the fundamental undulator radiation resonating in the laser cavity, the intensity of which is much higher than that of higher harmonics, can be sufficiently energetic to cause the mirror degradation through photochemical reactions. We are investigating the mirror degradation mainly in the deep UV region down to 240 nm. The experimental results will be shown. The mirror degradation mechanism will be discussed.

  11. Beam transport for an SRF recirculating-linac FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.; Douglas, D.; Li, Z.

    1995-12-31

    The beam transport system for the CEBAF UV Demo FEL includes a two-pan transport of the beam with acceleration from injector to wiggler, followed by energy recovery transport from wiggler to dump. From that contact we discuss the general problem of multi-pass energy-recovery beam transport for FELs. Tuneable, nearly-isochronous, large-momentum-acceptance import systems are required. The entire transport must preserve beam quality, particularly in the acceleration transport to the wiggler, and have low losses throughout the entire system. Issues such as injection and final energies, number of passes, linac focusing effects, beam separation, chronicity management, and stability constraints are critical. Various possible designs are discussed. Particle tracking results exploring the design options are also reported.

  12. Energy stability in a high average power FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Mermings, L.; Bisognano, J.; Delayen, J.

    1995-12-31

    Recirculating, energy-recovering linacs can be used as driver accelerators for high power FELs. Instabilities which arise from fluctuations of the cavity fields or beam current are investigated. Energy changes can cause beam loss on apertures, or, when coupled to M, phase oscillations. Both effects change the beam induced voltage in the cavities and can lead to unstable variations of the accelerating field. Stability analysis for small perturbations from equilibrium is performed and threshold currents are determined. Furthermore, the analytical model is extended to include feedback. Comparison with simulation results derived from direct integration of the equations of motion is presented. Design strategies to increase the instability threshold are discussed and the UV Demo FEL, proposed for construction at CEBAF, and the INP Recuperatron at Novosibirsk are used as examples.

  13. A wiggler magnet for FEL low voltage operation

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Shamma`a, A.; Stuart, R.A.; Lucas, J.

    1995-12-31

    In low voltage FELs (ie, 200kV), operation is necessarily in the microwave frequency range for wiggler periods of the order of cms., so that a waveguide system is mandatory. Also, because of the relatively low velocity of the electron beam, the wiggle amplitude of the electron beam can be much larger than is normal for highly relativistic FELs. Both these factors mean that the electron trajectory must be carefully controlled to avoid beam collision with the waveguide walls. A wiggler system with half poles at entrance and exit is not an acceptable solution because of the offset is gives rise to the electron trajectory. Consequently, we have designed and constructed a wiggler magnet with exponential entrance and exit tapers for a minimal deflection and displacement of the electron beam. Simulations and experimental measurements showed that an on axis trajectory is easily obtainable.

  14. Studies of Resistive Wall Heating at JLAB FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Rui; Benson, Stephen V.

    2013-06-01

    When the JLAB FEL is under CW operation, it had been observed that temperature rises over the wiggler vacuum chamber, presumably as the result of the power deposition on the resistive wall of the wiggler chamber. Previous analyses have been done on the resistive wall impedance for various cases, such as DC, AC, and anomalous skin effects*. Here we report an investigation on the beam kinetic energy losses for each of these cases. This study includes the non-ultrarelativistic effect on resistive wall loss, for both round pipe and parallel plates. We will present the comparison of our results with the measured data obtained during CW operation of the JLAB FEL. Other possible factors contributing to the measured heating will also be discussed.

  15. Serial snapshot crystallography for materials science with SwissFEL

    SciTech Connect

    Dejoie, Catherine; Smeets, Stef; Baerlocher, Christian; Tamura, Nobumichi; Pattison, Philip; Abela, Rafael; McCusker, Lynne B.

    2015-04-21

    New opportunities for studying (sub)microcrystalline materials with small unit cells, both organic and inorganic, will open up when the X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) presently being constructed in Switzerland (SwissFEL) comes online in 2017. Our synchrotron-based experiments mimicking the 4%-energy-bandpass mode of the SwissFEL beam show that it will be possible to record a diffraction pattern of up to 10 randomly oriented crystals in a single snapshot, to index the resulting reflections, and to extract their intensities reliably. The crystals are destroyed with each XFEL pulse, but by combining snapshots from several sets of crystals, a complete set of data can be assembled, and crystal structures of materials that are difficult to analyze otherwise will become accessible. Even with a single shot, at least a partial analysis of the crystal structure will be possible, and with 10–50 femtosecond pulses, this offers tantalizing possibilities for time-resolved studies.

  16. Possible enhancement of SASE FEL output field intensity induced by local phase jump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varfolomeev, A. A.; Yarovoi, T. V.; Bousine, P. V.

    1998-02-01

    A possible influence on the FEL dynamics of a locally induced phase jump between the FEL radiation and electron beam is considered. A numerical study has been made for the SASE mode FEL supposing that the phase jumps are introduced at different depths inside the undulator. The FEL evolution starting from a small input signal was studied in 1D high gain approach. It was shown that the FEL radiation output is sensitive to the phase jump value if it is introduced at the depth where saturation of output power takes places. In the steady state regime, the phase displacement of order ˜π provides enhancement of the peak output power up to 50%. Some kind of optical tapering is also possible giving further FEL efficiency enhancement.

  17. AN EXPERIMENTAL TEST OF SUPERRADIANCE IN A SINGLE PASS SEEDED FEL.

    SciTech Connect

    WATANABE, T.; LIU, D.; MURPHY, J.B.; ROSE, J.; SHAFTAN, T.; TSANG, T.; WANG, X.J.; YU, L.H.

    2005-08-21

    Superradiance and nonlinear evolution of a FEL pulse in a single-pass FEL were experimentally demonstrated at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) Source Development Laboratory (SDL). The experiment was performed using a 1.5 ps high-brightness electron beam and a 100fs Ti:Sapphire seed laser. The seed laser and electron beam interact in the 10 meter long NISUS undulator with a period of 3.89 cm. The FEL spectrum, energy and pulse length along the undulator were measured. FEL saturation was observed, and gain of more the 200 (relative to seed laser) was measured. Both FEL spectrum widening and pulse length shortening were observed; FEL pulses as short as 65 fs FWHM were measured. The superradiance and nonlinear evolution were also simulated using the numerical code GENESIS1.3 yielding good agreement with the experimental results.

  18. Los Alamos National Laboratory computer benchmarking 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.L.

    1983-06-01

    Evaluating the performance of computing machinery is a continual effort of the Computer Research and Applications Group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This report summarizes the results of the group's benchmarking activities performed between October 1981 and September 1982, presenting compilation and execution times as well as megaflop rates for a set of benchmark codes. Tests were performed on the following computers: Cray Research, Inc. (CRI) Cray-1S; Control Data Corporation (CDC) 7600, 6600, Cyber 73, Cyber 825, Cyber 835, Cyber 855, and Cyber 205; Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) VAX 11/780 and VAX 11/782; and Apollo Computer, Inc., Apollo.

  19. Los Alamos National Laboratory strategic directions

    SciTech Connect

    Hecker, S.

    1995-10-01

    It is my pleasure to welcome you to Los Alamos. I like the idea of bringing together all aspects of the research community-defense, basic science, and industrial. It is particularly important in today`s times of constrained budgets and in fields such as neutron research because I am convinced that the best science and the best applications will come from their interplay. If we do the science well, then we will do good applications. Keeping our eye focused on interesting applications will spawn new areas of science. This interplay is especially critical, and it is good to have these communities represented here today.

  20. Environmental Programs at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Patricia

    2012-07-11

    Summary of this project is: (1) Teamwork, partnering to meet goals - (a) Building on cleanup successes, (b) Solving legacy waste problems, (c) Protecting the area's environment; (2) Strong performance over the past three years - (a) Credibility from four successful Recovery Act Projects, (b) Met all Consent Order milestones, (c) Successful ramp-up of TRU program; (3) Partnership between the National Nuclear Security Administration's Los Alamos Site Office, DOE Carlsbad Field Office, New Mexico Environment Department, and contractor staff enables unprecedented cleanup progress; (4) Continued focus on protecting water resources; and (5) All consent order commitments delivered on time or ahead of schedule.

  1. 140 GHz microwave FEL experiments using ELF-II

    SciTech Connect

    Throop, A.L.; Jong, R.A.; Atkinson, D.P.; Clark, J.C.; Felker, B.; Ferguson, S.W.; Makowski, M.A.; Nexsen, W.E.; Stallard, B.W.; Stever, R.D.; Turner, W.C.

    1989-09-01

    We describe the modeling, the experimental facility, and the initial operating results for ELF-II, an induction-linac based free-electron laser designed to produce up to 2 GW of peak power at 140 GHz. ELF-II is the initial configuration of an FEL system which will eventually produce up to 2 MW of average power at a frequency of 250 GHz, for use in plasma heating experiments in the Microwave Tokamak Experiment. 6 refs., 9 figs.

  2. Evolution of longitudinal modes in low voltage FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, R.A.; Al-Shamma`a, A.; Shaw, A.

    1995-12-31

    A low voltage FEL operating at 130 kV which can be run cw with a continuous electron beam current level up to 12 mA has been constructed for the X-Band microwave range (8-12 GHz). In this poster, we will report on the dependence on time, after the electron beam is switched on, of the growth and competition of those longitudinal modes in the cavity having nett gain.

  3. Energy Recovery Transport Design for Peking University FEL

    SciTech Connect

    G. M. Wang; Y.-C. Chao; J.-E. Chen; C. Liu; Z. C. Liu; X. Y. Lu; K. Zhao; J. Zhuang

    2007-08-01

    A free-electron laser based on a superconducting linac is under construction in Peking University. To increase FEL output power, energy recovery is chosen as one of the most potential and popular ways. The design of a beam transport system for energy recovery is presented, which is suitable for the Peking University construction area. Especially, a chicane structure is chosen to change path length at ±20 degree and M56 in the arc is adjusted for fully bunch compression.

  4. Simulation of waveguide FEL oscillator using RF linac

    SciTech Connect

    Kuruma, S.; Asakawa, M.; Imasaki, K.

    1995-12-31

    One dimensional multifrequency simulation code for waveguide mode FEL has been developed. Using this simulation code, we analyzed the spontaneous emission from electron micropulse from RF Linac. It is found that some parameters both high and low frequency waveguide modes are growing simultaneously, so the two radiation pulses are generated and amplified. And the experimental data for cavity length detuning of the radiation power are analyzed.

  5. Biological assessment for the effluent reduction program, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, S.P.

    1996-08-01

    This report describes the biological assessment for the effluent recution program proposed to occur within the boundaries of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Potential effects on wetland plants and on threatened and endangered species are discussed, along with a detailed description of the individual outfalls resulting from the effluent reduction program.

  6. LAMPF II workshop, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, February 1-4, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Thiessen, H.A.

    1982-01-01

    This report contains the proceedings of the first LAMPF II Workshop held at Los Alamos February 1 to 4, 1982. Included are the talks that were available in written form. The conclusion of the participants was that there are many exciting areas of physics that will be addressed by such a machine.

  7. Parameter design considerations for an oscillator IR-FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qi-Ka

    2017-01-01

    An infrared oscillator FEL user facility will be built at the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory at in Hefei, China. In this paper, the parameter design of the oscillator FEL is discussed, and some original relevant approaches and expressions are presented. Analytic formulae are used to estimate the optical field gain and saturation power for the preliminary design. By considering both physical and technical constraints, the relation of the deflection parameter K to the undulator period is analyzed. This helps us to determine the ranges of the magnetic pole gap, the electron energy and the radiation wavelength. The relations and design of the optical resonator parameters are analyzed. Using dimensionless quantities, the interdependences between the radii of curvature of the resonator mirror and the various parameters of the optical resonator are clearly demonstrated. The effect of the parallel-plate waveguide is analyzed for the far-infrared oscillator FEL. The condition of the necessity of using a waveguide and the modified filling factor in the case of the waveguide are given, respectively. Supported by National Nature Science Foundation of China (21327901, 11375199)

  8. Commissioning the FELI linac and UV-FEL facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tomimasu, T.; Saeki, K.; Miyauchi, Y.

    1995-12-31

    The FELI 165-MeV linac and UV-FEL facility are in the commissioning, stage. A thermionic triode gun of the 6-MeV injector emits 500-ps pulses of 2.3A at 22.3125MHz. These pulses are compressed to 60AX 7ps by a 714-MHz prebuncher and a 2856-MHz buncher and seven ETL type accelerating waveguides with a length of 2.93m. The length of the linac including bending sections of two S-type BT systems for two undulators used for IR-FEL oscillations is 46m. The buncher and these accelerating waveguides are powered by two klystrons (E3729, 2856MHz, total 48MW, 24-{mu}s flat top long pulses). The flatness of our klystron modulator pulses is 0.067% at 24-{mu}s duration. An rf-ageing for new four accelerating waveguides will be started in May. An S-type BT line for 165-MeV beam from the linac will be installed in the end of April. A 2.68-m undulator ({lambda}u=4.0cm, N=67, Kmax gap length {ge}16mm) and an optical cavity (Lc=6.72m) will be installed early in July. The beam conditionings for UV-FEL experiments will be started in July.

  9. Electron bunch length measurement at the Vanderbilt FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Amirmadhi, F.; Brau, C.A.; Mendenhall, M.

    1995-12-31

    During the past few years, a number of experiments have been performed to demonstrate the possibility to extract the longitudinal charge distribution from spectroscopic measurements of the coherent far-infrared radiation emitted as transition radiation or synchrotron radiation. Coherent emission occurs in a spectral region where the wavelength is comparable to or longer than the bunch length, leading to an enhancement of the radiation intensity that is on the order of the number of particles per bunch, as compared to incoherent radiation. This technique is particularly useful in the region of mm and sub-mm bunch lengths, a range where streak-cameras cannot be used for beam diagnostics due to their limited time resolution. Here we report on experiments that go beyond the proof of principle of this technique by applying it to the study and optimization of FEL performance. We investigated the longitudinal bunch length of the Vanderbilt FEL by analyzing the spectrum of coherent transition radiation emitted by the electron bunches. By monitoring the bunch length while applying a bunch-compression technique, the amount of the compression could be easily observed. This enabled us to perform a systematic study of the FEL performance, especially gain and optical pulse width, as a function of the longitudinal electron distribution in the bunch. The results of this study will be presented and discussed.

  10. Lightning control system using high power microwave FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Shiho, M.; Watanbe, A.; Kawasaki, S.

    1995-12-31

    A research project for developing a thunder lightning control system using an induction linac based high power microwave free electron laser (FEL) started at JAERI The system will produce weakly ionized plasma rod in the atmosphere by high power microwaves and control a lightning path, away from , e. g., nuclear power stations and rocket launchers. It has been known that about MW/cm{sup 2} power density is enough for the atmospheric breakdown in the microwave region, and which means high power microwave FEL with GW level output power is feasible for atmospheric breakdown, and accordingly is feasible for thunder lightning control tool with making a conductive plasma channel in the atmosphere. From the microwave attenuation consideration in the atmosphere, FEL of 35GHz(0.13dB/km), 90GHz(0.35dB/km), 140GHz(1.7dB/km), and of 270 GHz(4.5dB/km) are the best candidates for the system. Comparing with other proposed lightning control system using visible or ultraviolet laser, the system using microwave has an advantage that microwave suffers smaller attenuation by rain or snow which always exist in the real atmospheric circumstances when lightning occurs.

  11. Optical alignment and diagnostics for the ATF microundulator FEL oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Fang, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    The microundulator FEL oscillator has a wiggler period of 8.8 mm, and is designed for initial lasing at 0.5 microns with a 50 MeV electron beam. The design and performance of the optical diagnostics and alignment are discussed. A HeNe coalignment laser is mode-matched to the resonator cavity for transverse alignment. Interference fringes are observed in the cavity with a pellicle, allowing an alignment tolerance of +/- 10 micro-radians. The same pellicle is used to produce transition radiation by the electron beam. This enables precise transverse alignment of the electron beam to the resonator axis. The HeNe laser is also used to align the wiggler by backlighting its bore. This method aligns the wiggler to the optic axis to a tolerance of +/- 50 microns. A frequency-doubled,pulsed Nd:YAG laser that produces the electron bunch train is also mode-matched to the FEL cavity. The cavity length is adjusted to resonate with this pulse train. Light from the FEL is transported to the diagnostic room using two separate paths: one for the single pass spontaneous emission, and the second for the multipass cavity output. Several diagnostics (CCD camera, photodiode, photomultiplier tube, joulemeter, spectrometer, and streak camera) are used to characterize the light. These instruments measure light energy per micropulse ranging from 10 femto-Joules to 10 micro-Joules.

  12. Proposal for FEL Experiments Driven by the National Bureau of Standards’ CW Microtron.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-31

    CONTENTS 1. THE NES RACETRACK MICROTRON .......................... 1 II. FEL EXPERIMENTS....................................... 3 *III. SUMMARY...FOR FEL EXPERIMENTS DRIVEN BY THE NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS’ CW MICROTRON I. The NBS Racetrack Microtron The RTM has not previously received...Proposal for FEL Experiments Driven by the National Bureau of Standards’ CW Microtron CHA-MEI TANG AND P. SPRANGLE Plasma Theory Branch N Plasma Physics

  13. Water-cooled, in-cavity apertures for high power operation of FEL oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.; Li, J.; Wu, Y. K.

    2009-07-01

    In an oscillator FEL, higher-order harmonic radiation from wigglers can cause serious damage to the downstream FEL resonator mirror and limit the maximum electron beam current for FEL operation due to thermal overload. These problems can be effectively dealt with for FELs driven by helical wigglers using a system to block off-axis wiggler harmonic radiation. In this paper, we report a new scheme to block the off-axis radiation from helical wigglers using a set of motorized, water-cooled, in-cavity apertures. These apertures can reduce the wiggler harmonic radiation power load on the downstream FEL resonator mirror by two orders of magnitude or more. With these apertures, we were able to operate the Duke FEL with record high intracavity power in infrared and visible wavelengths and extend FEL operation into ultraviolet wavelengths with a large electron beam current. The technique for limiting wiggler harmonic radiation using in-cavity apertures is expected to be useful for other types of FEL oscillators including high average power FEL oscillators driven by superconducting linacs.

  14. Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Escobedo, G.M.; Hargis, K.M.; Douglass, C.R.

    2007-07-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) waste management program is responsible for disposition of waste generated by many of the LANL programs and operations. LANL generates liquid and solid waste that can include radioactive, hazardous, and other constituents. Where practical, LANL hazardous and mixed wastes are disposed through commercial vendors; low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and radioactive asbestos-contaminated waste are disposed on site at LANL's Area G disposal cells, transuranic (TRU) waste is disposed at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), and high-activity mixed wastes are disposed at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) after treatment by commercial vendors. An on-site radioactive liquid waste treatment facility (RLWTF) removes the radioactive constituents from liquid wastes and treated water is released through an NPDES permitted outfall. LANL has a very successful waste minimization program. Routine hazardous waste generation has been reduced over 90% since 1993. LANL has a DOE Order 450.1-compliant environmental management system (EMS) that is ISO 14001 certified; waste minimization is integral to setting annual EMS improvement objectives. Looking forward, under the new LANL management and operating contractor, Los Alamos National Security (LANS) LLC, a Zero Liquid Discharge initiative is being planned that should eliminate flow to the RLWTF NPDES-permitted outfall. The new contractor is also taking action to reduce the number of permitted waste storage areas, to charge generating programs directly for the cost to disposition waste, and to simplify/streamline the waste system. (authors)

  15. DOE Los Alamos National Laboratory – PV Feasibility Assessment, 2015 Update, NREL Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, Jesse; Witt, Monica Rene

    2016-04-06

    This report summarizes solar and wind potential for Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This report is part of the “Los Alamos National Laboratory and Los Alamos County Renewable Generation” study.

  16. Los Alamos personnel and area criticality dosimeter systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilik, D.G.; Martin, R.W.

    1981-06-01

    Fissionable materials are handled and processed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Although the probability of a nuclear criticality accident is very remote, it must be considered. Los Alamos maintains a broad spectrum of dose assessment capabilities. This report describes the methods employed for personnel neutron, area neutron, and photon dose evaluations with passive dosimetry systems.

  17. The Climate at Los Alamos; Are we measurement changes?

    SciTech Connect

    Dewart, Jean Marie

    2015-04-16

    A new report shows new graphic displays of the weather trends in Los Alamos, New Mexico, and at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The graphs show trends of average, minimum average, and maximum average temperature for summer and winter months going back decades. Records of summer and winter precipitation are also included in the report.

  18. Audit of personal property management at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-07

    The Department of Energy`s (Department) Albuquerque Operations Office (Albuquerque) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) are responsible for ensuring that Los Alamos maintains an efficient and effective personal property management system that protects, identifies, and controls Government-owned personal property in accordance with applicable regulations. Albuquerque is responsible for reviewing and approving Los Alamos` personal property management system. Los Alamos is responsible for ensuring that personal property is properly protected, identified, and controlled. The audit disclosed that Los Alamos did not have an efficient and effective personal property management system to ensure that personal property was adequately protected, identified, and controlled. In addition, Albuquerque did not approve or disapprove Los Alamos` personal property management system consistent with Federal and Department regulations. Specifically, the audit showed that Los Alamos did not account for $11.6 million of personal property. In addition, $22.2 million of personal property was not properly recorded in the database, $61.7 million of personal property could not be inventoried, and loans to employees and other entities were not adequately justified. As a result, from a total personal property inventory of approximately $1 billion, it is estimated that $100 million of personal property may not be accounted for, and $207 million may not be correctly recorded in the database. Moreover, substantial amounts of personal property on loan to employees and other entities were at risk of unauthorized use. Albuquerque concurred with the finding and agreed to implement the corrective actions recommended in the report.

  19. The Los Alamos Science Pillars The Science of Signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Joshua E.; Peterson, Eugene J.

    2012-09-13

    As a national security science laboratory, Los Alamos is often asked to detect and measure the characteristics of complex systems and to use the resulting information to quantify the system's behavior. The Science of Signatures (SoS) pillar is the broad suite of technical expertise and capability that we use to accomplish this task. With it, we discover new signatures, develop new methods for detecting or measuring signatures, and deploy new detection technologies. The breadth of work at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in SoS is impressive and spans from the initial understanding of nuclear weapon performance during the Manhattan Project, to unraveling the human genome, to deploying laser spectroscopy instrumentation on Mars. Clearly, SoS is a primary science area for the Laboratory and we foresee that as it matures, new regimes of signatures will be discovered and new ways of extracting information from existing data streams will be developed. These advances will in turn drive the development of sensing instrumentation and sensor deployment. The Science of Signatures is one of three science pillars championed by the Laboratory and vital to supporting our status as a leading national security science laboratory. As with the other two pillars, Materials for the Future and Information Science and Technology for Predictive Science (IS&T), SoS relies on the integration of technical disciplines and the multidisciplinary science and engineering that is our hallmark to tackle the most difficult national security challenges. Over nine months in 2011 and 2012, a team of science leaders from across the Laboratory has worked to develop a SoS strategy that positions us for the future. The crafting of this strategy has been championed by the Chemistry, Life, and Earth Sciences Directorate, but as you will see from this document, SoS is truly an Institution-wide effort and it has engagement from every organization at the Laboratory. This process tapped the insight and

  20. R&D Requirements, RF Gun Mode Studies, FEL-2 Steady-StateStudies, Preliminary FEL-1 Time-Dependent Studies, and Preliminary LayoutOption Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, John; Corlett, John; Doolittle, Larry; Fawley, William; Lidia, Steven; Penn, Gregory; Ratti, Alex; Staples, John; Wilcox Russell; Wurtele, Jonathan; Zholents, Alexander

    2005-10-01

    This report constitutes the third deliverable of LBNLs contracted role in the FERMI {at} Elettra Technical Optimization study. It describes proposed R&D activities for the baseline design of the Technical Optimization Study, initial studies of the RF gun mode-coupling and potential effects on beam dynamics, steady-state studies of FEL-2 performance to 10 nm, preliminary studies of time-dependent FEL-1 performance using electron bunch distribution from the start-to-end studies, and a preliminary investigation of a configuration with FEL sinclined at a small angle from the line of the linac.

  1. Portable MRI developed at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle

    2015-04-22

    Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory are developing an ultra-low-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system that could be low-power and lightweight enough for forward deployment on the battlefield and to field hospitals in the World's poorest regions. "MRI technology is a powerful medical diagnostic tool," said Michelle Espy, the Battlefield MRI (bMRI) project leader, "ideally suited for imaging soft-tissue injury, particularly to the brain." But hospital-based MRI devices are big and expensive, and require considerable infrastructure, such as large quantities of cryogens like liquid nitrogen and helium, and they typically use a large amount of energy. "Standard MRI machines just can't go everywhere," said Espy. "Soldiers wounded in battle usually have to be flown to a large hospital and people in emerging nations just don't have access to MRI at all. We've been in contact with doctors who routinely work in the Third World and report that MRI would be extremely valuable in treating pediatric encephalopathy, and other serious diseases in children." So the Los Alamos team started thinking about a way to make an MRI device that could be relatively easy to transport, set up, and use in an unconventional setting. Conventional MRI machines use very large magnetic fields that align the protons in water molecules to then create magnetic resonance signals, which are detected by the machine and turned into images. The large magnetic fields create exceptionally detailed images, but they are difficult and expensive to make. Espy and her team wanted to see if images of sufficient quality could be made with ultra-low-magnetic fields, similar in strength to the Earth's magnetic field. To achieve images at such low fields they use exquisitely sensitive detectors called Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices, or SQUIDs. SQUIDs are among the most sensitive magnetic field detectors available, so interference with the signal is the primary stumbling block. "SQUIDs are

  2. Portable MRI developed at Los Alamos

    ScienceCinema

    Espy, Michelle

    2016-07-12

    Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory are developing an ultra-low-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system that could be low-power and lightweight enough for forward deployment on the battlefield and to field hospitals in the World's poorest regions. "MRI technology is a powerful medical diagnostic tool," said Michelle Espy, the Battlefield MRI (bMRI) project leader, "ideally suited for imaging soft-tissue injury, particularly to the brain." But hospital-based MRI devices are big and expensive, and require considerable infrastructure, such as large quantities of cryogens like liquid nitrogen and helium, and they typically use a large amount of energy. "Standard MRI machines just can't go everywhere," said Espy. "Soldiers wounded in battle usually have to be flown to a large hospital and people in emerging nations just don't have access to MRI at all. We've been in contact with doctors who routinely work in the Third World and report that MRI would be extremely valuable in treating pediatric encephalopathy, and other serious diseases in children." So the Los Alamos team started thinking about a way to make an MRI device that could be relatively easy to transport, set up, and use in an unconventional setting. Conventional MRI machines use very large magnetic fields that align the protons in water molecules to then create magnetic resonance signals, which are detected by the machine and turned into images. The large magnetic fields create exceptionally detailed images, but they are difficult and expensive to make. Espy and her team wanted to see if images of sufficient quality could be made with ultra-low-magnetic fields, similar in strength to the Earth's magnetic field. To achieve images at such low fields they use exquisitely sensitive detectors called Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices, or SQUIDs. SQUIDs are among the most sensitive magnetic field detectors available, so interference with the signal is the primary stumbling block. "SQUIDs are

  3. Los Alamos National Laboratory transuranic database analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, D.V.; Rogers, P.S.Z.; Kosiewicz, S.T.; LeBrun, D.B.

    1997-02-01

    This paper represents an overview of analyses conducted on the TRU database maintained by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This evaluation was conducted to support the ``TRU Waste Workoff Strategies`` document and provides an estimation of the waste volume that potentially could be certified and ready for shipment to (WIPP) in April of 1998. Criteria defined in the WIPP WAC, including container type, weight limits, plutonium fissile gram equivalents and decay heat, were used to evaluated the waste for compliance. LANL evaluated the containers by facility and by waste stream to determining the most efficient plan for characterization and certification of the waste. Evaluation of the waste presently in storage suggested that 40- 60% potentially meets the WIPP WAC Rev. 5 criteria.

  4. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    This report documents the environmental surveillance program conducted by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) in 1979. Routine monitoring for radiation and radioactive or chemical substances was conducted on the Laboratory site and in the surrounding region to determine compliance with appropriate standards and permit early identification of possible undesirable trends. Results and interpretation of the data for 1979 on penetrating radiation, chemical and radiochemical quality of ambient air, surface and ground water, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, food, and airborne and liquid effluents are included. Comparisons with appropriate standards and regulations or with background levels from natural or other non-LASL sources provide a basis for concluding that environmental effects attributable to LASL operations are minor and cannot be considered likely to result in any hazard to the population of the area. Results of several special studies provide documentation of some unique environmental conditions in the LASL environs.

  5. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1987. Routine monitoring for radiation and radioactive or chemical materials is conducted on the Laboratory site as well as in the surrounding region. Monitoring results are used to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to permit early identification of potentially undesirable trends. Results and interpretation of data for 1987 cover: external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and liquid effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface and ground waters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Comparisons with appropriate standards, regulations, and background levels provide the basis for concluding that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are insignificant and do not pose a threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment. 113 refs., 33 figs., 120 tabs.

  6. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1989. Routine monitoring for radiation and radioactive or chemical materials is conducted on the Laboratory site as well as in the surrounding region. Monitoring results are used to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to permit early identification of potentially undesirable trends. Results and interpretation of data for 1989 cover external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface and ground waters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Comparisons with appropriate standards, regulations, and background levels provide the basis for concluding that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment. 58 refs., 31 figs., 39 tabs.

  7. Information about Practicums at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Paul A.

    2012-07-24

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center is the premier facility for neutron science experiments ranging from cross section measurements, neutron scattering experiments, proton radiography, cold neutrons, actinide neutronic properties, and many other exciting topics. The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory is home to several powerful magnets, including the one that created the first non-destructive 100 Tesla field in March 2012. They probe the electronic structure of superconductors, magnetic properties of materials (including magneto-quantum effects). Research is also conducted in correlated materials, thermoacoustics, and magnetic properties of actinides. The Trident Laser has a unique niche with very high power, short pulse experiments, with a peak power of 10{sup 20} W in short pulse mode. Discoveries range from production of monoenergetic MeV ion beam, nonlinear kinetic plasma waves, the transition between kinetic and fluid nonlinear behavior and other laser-plasma interaction processes.

  8. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) during 1995. The Laboratory routinely monitors for radiation and for radioactive and nonradioactive materials at (or on) Laboratory sites as well as in the surrounding region. LANL uses the monitoring result to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to identify potentially undesirable trends. Data were collected in 1995 to assess external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and liquid effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface waters and groundwaters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Using comparisons with standards, regulations, and background levels, this report concludes that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a demonstrable threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment.

  9. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Kohen, K.; Stoker, A.; Stone, G.

    1994-07-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program at Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1992. The Laboratory routinely monitors for radiation and for radioactive and nonradioactive materials at (or on) Laboratory sites as well as in the surrounding region. LANL uses the monitoring results to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to identify potentially undesirable trends. Data were collected in 1992 to assess external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and liquid effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface waters and groundwaters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Using comparisons with standards, regulations, and background levels, this report concludes that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a demonstrable threat to the public, laboratory employees, or the environment.

  10. Hot Dry Rock Overview at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Michael; Hendron, Robert H.

    1989-03-21

    The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy program is a renewable energy program that can contribute significantly to the nation's balanced and diversified energy mix. Having extracted energy from the first Fenton Hill HDR reservoir for about 400 days, and from the second reservoir for 30 days in a preliminary test, Los Alamos is focusing on the Long Term Flow Test and reservoir studies. Current budget limitations have slowed preparations thus delaying the start date of that test. The test is planned to gather data for more definitive reservoir modeling with energy availability or reservoir lifetime of primary interest. Other salient information will address geochemistry and tracer studies, microseismic response, water requirements and flow impedance which relates directly to pumping power requirements. During this year of ''preparation'' we have made progress in modeling studies, in chemically reactive tracer techniques, in improvements in acoustic or microseismic event analysis.

  11. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Fuehne, David; Gallagher, Pat; Hjeresen, Denny; Isaacson, John; Johson, Scot; Morgan, Terry; Paulson, David; Rogers, David

    2009-09-30

    Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos reports are prepared annually by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) Environmental Programs Directorate, as required by US Department of Energy Order 450.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and US Department of Energy Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. These annual reports summarize environmental data that are used to determine compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and departmental policies. Additional data, beyond the minimum required, are also gathered and reported as part of the Laboratory’s efforts to ensure public safety and to monitor environmental quality at and near the Laboratory. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the Laboratory’s major environmental programs and explains the risks and the actions taken to reduce risks at the Laboratory from environmental legacies and waste management operations. Chapter 2 reports the Laboratory’s compliance status for 2007. Chapter 3 provides a summary of the maximum radiological dose the public and biota populations could have potentially received from Laboratory operations and discusses chemical exposures. The environmental surveillance and monitoring data are organized by environmental media (Chapter 4, air; Chapters 5 and 6, water and sediments; Chapter 7, soils; and Chapter 8, foodstuffs and biota) in a format to meet the needs of a general and scientific audience. Chapter 9 provides a summary of the status of environmental restoration work around LANL. A glossary and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are in the back of the report. Appendix A explains the standards for environmental contaminants, Appendix B explains the units of measurements used in this report, Appendix C describes the Laboratory’s technical areas and their associated programs, and Appendix D provides web links to more information.

  12. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Fuehne, David; Poff, Ben; Hjeresen, Denny; Isaacson, John; Johnson, Scot; Morgan, Terry; Paulson, David; Salzman, Sonja; Rogers, David

    2010-09-30

    Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos reports are prepared annually by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) environmental organization, as required by US Department of Energy Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and US Department of Energy Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. These annual reports summarize environmental data that are used to determine compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and departmental policies. Additional data, beyond the minimum required, are also gathered and reported as part of the Laboratory’s efforts to ensure public safety and to monitor environmental quality at and near the Laboratory. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the Laboratory’s major environmental programs and explains the risks and the actions taken to reduce risks at the Laboratory from environmental legacies and waste management operations. Chapter 2 reports the Laboratory’s compliance status for 2009. Chapter 3 provides a summary of the maximum radiological dose the public and biota populations could have potentially received from Laboratory operations and discusses chemical exposures. The environmental surveillance and monitoring data are organized by environmental media (air in Chapter 4; water and sediments in Chapters 5 and 6; soils in Chapter 7; and foodstuffs and biota in Chapter 8) in a format to meet the needs of a general and scientific audience. Chapter 9 provides a summary of the status of environmental restoration work around LANL. The new Chapter 10 describes the Laboratory’s environmental stewardship efforts and provides an overview of the health of the Rio Grande. A glossary and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are in the back of the report. Appendix A explains the standards for environmental contaminants, Appendix B explains the units of measurements used in this report, Appendix C describes the Laboratory’s technical

  13. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 2005

    SciTech Connect

    2006-09-30

    Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos reports are prepared annually by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) environmental organization, as required by US Department of Energy Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and US Department of Energy Order 231.IA, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. These annual reports summarize environmental data that are used to determine compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and departmental policies. Additional data, beyond the minimum required, are also gathered and reported as part of the Laboratory's efforts to ensure public safety and to monitor environmental quality at and near the Laboratory. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the Laboratory's major environmental programs. Chapter 2 reports the Laboratory's compliance status for 2005. Chapter 3 provides a summary of the maximum radiological dose the public and biota populations could have potentially received from Laboratory operations. The environmental surveillance and monitoring data are organized by environmental media (Chapter 4, Air; Chapters 5 and 6, Water and Sediments; Chapter 7, Soils; and Chapter 8, Foodstuffs and Biota) in a format to meet the needs of a general and scientific audience. Chapter 9, new for this year, provides a summary of the status of environmental restoration work around LANL. A glossary and a list ofacronyms and abbreviations are in the back of the report. Appendix A explains the standards for environmental contaminants, Appendix B explains the units of measurements used in this report, Appendix C describes the Laboratory's technical areas and their associated programs, and Appendix D provides web links to more information.

  14. Environmental analysis of Lower Pueblo/Lower Los Alamos Canyon, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Buhl, T.E.; Stoker, A.K.; Becker, N.M.; Rodgers, J.C.; Hansen, W.R.

    1994-12-01

    The radiological survey of the former radioactive waste treatment plant site (TA-45), Acid Canyon, Pueblo Canyon, and Los Alamos Canyon found residual contamination at the site itself and in the channel and banks of Acid, Pueblo, and lower Los Alamos Canyons all the way to the Rio Grande. The largest reservoir of residual radioactivity is in lower Pueblo Canyon, which is on DOE property. However, residual radioactivity does not exceed proposed cleanup criteria in either lower Pueblo or lower Los Alamos Canyons. The three alternatives proposed are (1) to take no action, (2) to construct a sediment trap in lower Pueblo Canyon to prevent further transport of residual radioactivity onto San Ildefonso Indian Pueblo land, and (3) to clean the residual radioactivity from the canyon system. Alternative 2, to cleanup the canyon system, is rejected as a viable alternative. Thousands of truckloads of sediment would have to be removed and disposed of, and this effort is unwarranted by the low levels of contamination present. Residual radioactivity levels, under either present conditions or projected future conditions, will not result in significant radiation doses to persons exposed. Modeling efforts show that future transport activity will not result in any residual radioactivity concentrations higher than those already existing. Thus, although construction of a sediment trap in lower Pueblo Canyon is a viable alternative, this effort also is unwarranted, and the no-action alternative is the preferred alternative.

  15. Coherent undulator radiation of electron beam, microbunched for the FEL power outcoupling

    SciTech Connect

    Kulipanov, G.N.; Sokolov, A.S.; Vinokurov, N.A.

    1995-12-31

    The spectral intensity of the coherent undulator radiation of electron beam, preliminarily microbunched by the FEL oscillator for the FEL power outcoupling, is approximately calculated by simple analytic considerations, taking into account the transverse emittances and the energy spread of the microbunched electron beams.

  16. Shot noise startup of the 6 nm SASE FEL at the TESLA test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierini, P.; Fawley, W. M.

    1996-02-01

    We present here the results of an extensive simulation activity for the TESLA SASE FEL. We have used the program GINGER to determine the FEL saturation length and the power fluctuations from shot to shot. The spectral properties of the output power and the correlation functions are investigated and compared with available theoretical models.

  17. On use of time-dependent microwave fields to increase an FEL oscillator efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Yurkov, M.V.

    1995-12-31

    Various schemes of a high efficiency FEL oscillator with time-dependent accelerating (or decelerating) microwave field in interaction region are proposed. All the, schemes are based on standard accelerating structure and undulator technology. Feasibility of the proposed schemes is confirmed by results of numerical simulations. Realistic examples of FEL oscillators of infrared and visible wavelength ranges with efficiency about 20 % are presented.

  18. Development of a high average power, CW, MM-wave FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Ramian, G.

    1995-12-31

    Important operational attributes of FELs remain to be demonstrated including high average power and single-frequency, extremely narrow-linewidth lasing. An FEL specifically designed to achieve these goals for scientific research applications is currently under construction. Its most salient feature is operation in a continuous-wave (CW) mode with an electrostatically generated, high-current, recirculating, DC electron beam.

  19. Plasma switch as a temporal overlap tool for pump-probe experiments at FEL facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmand, M.; Murphy, C. D.; Brown, C. R. D.; Cammarata, M.; Döppner, T.; Düsterer, S.; Fritz, D.; Förster, E.; Galtier, E.; Gaudin, J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Göde, S.; Gregori, G.; Hilbert, V.; Hochhaus, D.; Laarmann, T.; Lee, H. J.; Lemke, H.; Meiwes-Broer, K.-H.; Moinard, A.; Neumayer, P.; Przystawik, A.; Redlin, H.; Schulz, M.; Skruszewicz, S.; Tavella, F.; Tschentscher, T.; White, T.; Zastrau, U.; Toleikis, S.

    2012-08-01

    We have developed an easy-to-use and reliable timing tool to determine the arrival time of an optical laser and a free electron laser (FEL) pulses within the jitter limitation. This timing tool can be used from XUV to X-rays and exploits high FELs intensities. It uses a shadowgraph technique where we optically (at 800 nm) image a plasma created by an intense XUV or X-ray FEL pulse on a transparent sample (glass slide) directly placed at the pump - probe sample position. It is based on the physical principle that the optical properties of the material are drastically changed when its free electron density reaches the critical density. At this point the excited glass sample becomes opaque to the optical laser pulse. The ultra-short and intense XUV or X-ray FEL pulse ensures that a critical electron density can be reached via photoionization and subsequent collisional ionization within the XUV or X-ray FEL pulse duration or even faster. This technique allows to determine the relative arrival time between the optical laser and the FEL pulses in only few single shots with an accuracy mainly limited by the optical laser pulse duration and the jitter between the FEL and the optical laser. Considering the major interest in pump-probe experiments at FEL facilities in general, such a femtosecond resolution timing tool is of utmost importance.

  20. Real time diagnostic for operation at a CW low voltage FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Balfour, C.; Shaw, A.; Mayhew, S.E.

    1995-12-31

    At Liverpool University, a system for single user control of an FEL has been designed to satisfy the low voltage FEL (ie 200kV) operational requirements. This system incorporates many aspects of computer automation for beam diagnostics, radiation detection and vacuum system management. In this paper the results of the development of safety critical control systems critical control systems are reported.

  1. FEL beam sharing systems for eight user`s stations of the FELI

    SciTech Connect

    Okuma, S.; Saeki, K.; Kobayashi, A.

    1995-12-31

    Two infrared free electron lasers (FELs) of the FELI are now operating in the wavelength range of 1-20 {mu}m. Two kinds of FEL beam are sent from the exits of the optical cavities to the diagnostics room through the evacuated optical pipelines whose inner diameter is about 150 mm. From the diagnostic room to user`s stations, FEL beams are delivered through FEL beam sharing systems. Au-coated mirrors with fan-shaped holes are used instead of half mirrors such as ZnSe to share FEL beams to the diagnostics room and the following user`s stations, since maximum diameter of FEL beams is 50 mm in the wavelength range of 1-20 {mu}m and an opening angle of the fan-shaped holes can change a sharing ratio of delivering FEL average power for user`s stations; for instance, 10% to the diagnostics room and 90% to eight user`s stations. Each system enables us to use the same FEL beam simultaneously at the user`s stations. The two beam sharing systems will be installed in the user`s facility early in August.

  2. Wavelength dependent delay in the onset of FEL tissue ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Tribble, J.A.; Edwards, G.S.; Lamb, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    We are investigating the wavelength dependence of the onset of laser tissue ablation in the IR Visible and UV ranges. Toward this end, we have made simultaneous measurements of the ejected material (using a HeNe probe beam tangential to the front surface) and the residual stress transient in the tissue (using traditional piezoelectric detection behind the thin samples). For the IR studies we have used the Vanderbilt FEL and for the UV and Vis range we have used a Q-switched ND:Yag with frequency doubling and quadrupling. To satisfy the conditions of the near field limit for the detection of the stress transient, the duration of the IR FEL macropulse must be as short as possible. We have obtained macropulses as short as 100 ns using Pockels Cell technology. The recording of the signals from both the photodiode monitoring the HeNe probe beam and the acoustic detector are synchronized with the arrival of the 100 ns macropulse. With subablative intensities, the resulting stress transient is bipolar with its positive peak separated from its negative peak by 100 ns in agreement with theory. Of particular interest is the comparison of ablative results using 3 {mu}m and 6.45 {mu}m pulses. Both the stress transient and the ejection of material suffer a greater delay (with respect to the arrival of the 100 ns pulse) when the FEL is tuned to 3 {mu}m as compared to 6.45 {mu}m. A comparison of IR Vis and UV data will be discussed in terms of microscopic mechanisms governing the laser ablation process.

  3. Parametric x-ray FEL operating with external Bragg reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Baryshevsky, V.G.; Batrakov, K.G.; Dubovskaya, I.Ya.

    1995-12-31

    In the crystal X-ray FELs using channeling and parametric quasi-Cherenkov mechanisms of spontaneous radiation were considered as versions of FEL allowing, in principle, to obtain coherent X-ray source. In this case a crystal is both radiator and resonator for X-rays emitted by a particle beam passing through crystal. However, it is well-known that a beam current density required for lasing is extremely high in X-ray spectral range for any radiation mechanisms and it is very important to find a way to lower its magnitude. The application of three-dimensional distributed feedback formed by dynamical diffraction of emitted photons permitted to reduce starting beam current density 10{sup 2}-10{sup 4} times up to 10{sup 9}. One of ways to lower the starting current is the formation of multi-wave distributed feedback the another one is the application of external reflectors. The thing is that lasing regime was shown to be produced at frequencies in the vicinity of degeneration point for roots of dispersion equation describing radiation modes excited in an active medium (crystal plus particle beam). Unfortunately, in case of parametric quasi-Cherenkov FEL this region coincides with the region of strong self-absorption of radiation inside a crystal. That fact, obviously, increases the starting beam current. In this report we have shown that the application of external Bragg reflectors gives the possibility to lower radiation self-absorption inside a crystal by modifying radiation modes excited in the active medium under consideration. The corresponding dispersion equation and the expression for excited modes are derived. The generation equation determining starting conditions for lasing is obtained. Using these expressions we have shown that the application of external Bragg reflectors permits to reduce starting beam current density more than 10 times.

  4. Small-signal gain in a gas-loaded FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Goloviznin, V.V.; Amersfoort, P.W. van

    1995-12-31

    At present, existing FEL facilities operate in the infrared and visible ranges of wavelengths. Generation of shorter waves (in the VUV and X-ray region) is of great scientific interest, but this would require a very expensive accelerator which could provide a high-current electron beam in the GeV-range of energies. A promising way to relax requirements on electron energy by introduction of a gas into the optical cavity was proposed nearly ten years ago. For small deviations from the vacuum wavelength, the idea was confirmed in experiments performed in Stanford; however, a detailed theory of such a device is still not developed. We present an analysis of the small-signal gain in a gas-loaded free-electron laser. Multiple scattering of electrons by the atoms of the gas inside the optical cavity is shown to lead to two additional effects, as compared to the case of a vacuum FEL: a loss of coherence between different parts of the electron trajectory and an enhancement of the phase {open_quotes}jitter{close_quotes}. Both effects become increasingly important at short wavelengths and significantly reduce the small-signal gain per pass. In 1D approximation analytical expressions are obtained and numerical calculations are made to estimate beam and undulator parameters necessary for lasing in the vacuum ultraviolet. Hydrogen-filled FELs are shown to have good prospects for this at today`s technological level. To operate in the range of wavelengths 125-140 nm, an electron beam should have an energy above 50 MeV and a good quality: a normalised emittance of the order of 5{pi} mm-mrad and an energy spread below 10{sup -3}. All these parameters are achieveable with modern linacs and photoinjectors.

  5. A cost estimation model for high power FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Neil, G.R.

    1995-12-31

    A cost estimation model for scaling high-power free-electron lasers has been developed for estimating the impact of system-level design choices in scaling high-average-power superconducting-accelerator-based FELs. The model consists of a number of modules which develop subsystem costs and derive as an economic criterion the cost per kilojoule of light produced. The model does not include design engineering or development costs, but represents the 2nd through nth device. Presented in the paper is the relative sensitivity of designs to power and linac frequency while allowing the operating temperature of the superconducting cavities to optimize.

  6. Scientific Applications of a Hard-X-Ray FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, John

    1998-04-01

    Free electron lasers are now being designed which will operate at wavelengths down to about 1 angstrom. Due to the physics of the high-gain, single pass FEL process that these sources will exploit, the radiation produced will have unique properties. In particular: -- The FEL peak intensity and peak brightness will be many orders of magnitude higher than can be produced by any other source. -- The pulse length will be less than 1 picosecond, orders of magnitude shorter than can be achieved with any other bright source such as a synchrotron. -- The FEL radiation will have full transverse coherence and a degeneracy parameter (photons/coherence volume) equal to 10^9 or more. No other source can produce hard x-radiation with a degeneracy parameter significantly greater than 1. These properties offer the chance to study chemical, biological, and condensed matter dynamical processes with sub-picosecond time resolution and angstrom spatial resolution. X-ray crystallography could be used to determine the structures of very-short-lived states of photosynthetic reaction centers. X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy could be used to study fluctuations in materials such as gels and glass-forming liquids, on a time scale complementary to that probed by neutron spin echo and dynamic light scattering techniques, but with better spatial resolution. Snap-shot x-ray scattering experiments could be performed on samples in extreme conditions such as ultra-high pulsed magnetic fields. Furthermore, the high peak power of the FEL radiation could be used to create precisely-controlled chemical and structural modifications inside samples. There is also the possibility that nonlinear x-ray interactions could be used to give increased resolution for spectroscopic studies, to greatly expand the parameter space for atomic physics studies, and to permit new fundamental tests of quantum mechanics. For example, the study of nonlinear photon interactions with core atomic electrons would test and

  7. Self-seeded injection-locked FEL amplifer

    DOEpatents

    Sheffield, Richard L.

    1999-01-01

    A self-seeded free electron laser (FEL) provides a high gain and extraction efficiency for the emitted light. An accelerator outputs a beam of electron pulses to a permanent magnet wiggler having an input end for receiving the electron pulses and an output end for outputting light and the electron pulses. An optical feedback loop collects low power light in a small signal gain regime at the output end of said wiggler and returns the low power light to the input end of the wiggler while outputting high power light in a high signal gain regime.

  8. Optimisation of An HHG-Seeded Harmonic Cascade FEL Design for the NLS Project

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, David; Thompson, Neil; Bartolini, Riccardo; Geng, Huiping; Huang, Zhirong; McNeil, Brian; /Strathclyde U.

    2012-06-25

    Optimization studies of an HHG-seeded harmonic cascade FEL design for the UK's proposed New Light Source (NLS) facility are presented. Three separate FELs are planned to meet the requirements for continuous coverage of the photon energy range 50-1000 eV with variable polarization, 20 fs pulse widths and good temporal coherence. The design uses an HHG seed source tuneable from 50-100 eV to provide direct FEL seeding in this range, and one or two stage harmonic cascades to reach the higher photon energies. Studies have been carried out to optimize a harmonic cascade FEL operating at 1 keV; topics investigated include modulator configuration, seed power level and ef- fects of the HHG seed structure. FEL simulations using realistic electron beam distributions are presented and tolerance to increased emittance has been considered.

  9. Steady State Analysis of Short-wavelength, High-gainFELs in a Large Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Bane, K.; Cai, Y.; Chao, A.; Hettel, R.; Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA

    2007-10-15

    Storage ring FELs have operated successfully in the low-gain regime using optical cavities. Discussions of a high-gain FEL in a storage ring typically involve a special bypass to decouple the FEL interaction from the storage ring dynamics. In this paper, we investigate the coupled dynamics of a high-gain FEL in a large storage ring such as PEP and analyze the equilibrium solution. We show that an FEL in the EUV and soft x-ray regimes can be integrated into a very bright storage ring and potentially provides three orders of magnitude improvement in the average brightness at these radiation wavelengths. We also discuss possibilities of seeding with HHG sources to obtain ultra-short, high-peak power EUV and soft x-ray pulses.

  10. Performance of hole coupling resonator in the presence of asymmetric modes and FEL gain

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming; Kim, Kwang-Je.

    1991-08-01

    We continue the study of the hole coupling resonator for free electron laser (FEL) application. The previous resonator code is further developed to include the effects of the azimutally asymmetric modes and the FEL gain. The implication of the additional higher order modes is that there are more degeneracies to be avoided in tuning the FEL wavelengths. The FEL interaction is modeled by constructing a transfer map in the small signal regime and incorporating it into the resonator code. The FEL gain is found to be very effective in selecting a dominant mode from the azimuthally symmetric class of modes. Schemes for broad wavelength tuning based on passive mode control via adjustable apertures are discussed. 12 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Stochastic Electron Detrapping in FELs (Free Electron Lasers) Caused by Sidebands

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-14

    S. Chen P. 0. Box 1663 MIT Plasma Fusion Center Los Alamos, NM 87545 NW16-176 Cambridge, MA 01890 Dr. A. Carmichael U. S. Army - FTC Dr. Yu- Juan Chen...Co. Los Alamos Natl. Scientific Lab. P. 0. Box 3999 P.O. Box 1663 Seattle, WA 98124 Los Alamos, NM 87545 Dr. J. Gallardo Dr. Yee Fu Goul Quantum

  12. Integrated sequence and immunology filovirus database at Los Alamos

    DOE PAGES

    Yusim, Karina; Yoon, Hyejin; Foley, Brian; ...

    2016-01-01

    The Ebola outbreak of 2013–15 infected more than 28,000 people and claimed more lives than all previous filovirus outbreaks combined. Governmental agencies, clinical teams, and the world scientific community pulled together in a multifaceted response ranging from prevention and disease control, to evaluating vaccines and therapeutics in human trials. We report that as this epidemic is finally coming to a close, refocusing on long-term prevention strategies becomes paramount. Given the very real threat of future filovirus outbreaks, and the inherent uncertainty of the next outbreak virus and geographic location, it is prudent to consider the extent and implications of knownmore » natural diversity in advancing vaccines and therapeutic approaches. To facilitate such consideration, we have updated and enhanced the content of the filovirus portion of Los Alamos Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses Database. We have integrated and performed baseline analysis of all family Filoviridae sequences deposited into GenBank, with associated immune response data, and metadata, and we have added new computational tools with web-interfaces to assist users with analysis. Here, we (i) describe the main features of updated database, (ii) provide integrated views and some basic analyses summarizing evolutionary patterns as they relate to geo-temporal data captured in the database and (iii) highlight the most conserved regions in the proteome that may be useful for a T cell vaccine strategy.« less

  13. Integrated sequence and immunology filovirus database at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Yusim, Karina; Yoon, Hyejin; Foley, Brian; Feng, Shihai; Macke, Jennifer; Dimitrijevic, Mira; Abfalterer, Werner; Szinger, James; Fischer, Will; Kuiken, Carla; Korber, Bette

    2016-01-01

    The Ebola outbreak of 2013–15 infected more than 28,000 people and claimed more lives than all previous filovirus outbreaks combined. Governmental agencies, clinical teams, and the world scientific community pulled together in a multifaceted response ranging from prevention and disease control, to evaluating vaccines and therapeutics in human trials. We report that as this epidemic is finally coming to a close, refocusing on long-term prevention strategies becomes paramount. Given the very real threat of future filovirus outbreaks, and the inherent uncertainty of the next outbreak virus and geographic location, it is prudent to consider the extent and implications of known natural diversity in advancing vaccines and therapeutic approaches. To facilitate such consideration, we have updated and enhanced the content of the filovirus portion of Los Alamos Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses Database. We have integrated and performed baseline analysis of all family Filoviridae sequences deposited into GenBank, with associated immune response data, and metadata, and we have added new computational tools with web-interfaces to assist users with analysis. Here, we (i) describe the main features of updated database, (ii) provide integrated views and some basic analyses summarizing evolutionary patterns as they relate to geo-temporal data captured in the database and (iii) highlight the most conserved regions in the proteome that may be useful for a T cell vaccine strategy.

  14. Los Alamos Shows Airport Security Technology at Work

    ScienceCinema

    Espy, Michelle; Schultz, Larry; Hunter, James

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos scientists have advanced a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technology that may provide a breakthrough for screening liquids at airport security. They've added low-power X-ray data to the mix, and as a result have unlocked a new detection technology. Funded in part by the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate, the new system is named MagRay. The goal is to quickly and accurately distinguish between liquids that visually appear identical. For example, what appears to be a bottle of white wine could potentially be nitromethane, a liquid that could be used to make an explosive. Both are clear liquids, one would be perfectly safe on a commercial aircraft, the other would be strictly prohibited. How to tell them apart quickly without error at an airport security area is the focus of Michelle Espy, Larry Schultz and their team. In this video, Espy and the MagRay team explain how the new technology works, how they've developed an easy operator interface, and what the next steps might be in transitioning this technology to the private sector.

  15. Los Alamos Shows Airport Security Technology at Work

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle; Schultz, Larry; Hunter, James

    2013-11-25

    Los Alamos scientists have advanced a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technology that may provide a breakthrough for screening liquids at airport security. They've added low-power X-ray data to the mix, and as a result have unlocked a new detection technology. Funded in part by the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate, the new system is named MagRay. The goal is to quickly and accurately distinguish between liquids that visually appear identical. For example, what appears to be a bottle of white wine could potentially be nitromethane, a liquid that could be used to make an explosive. Both are clear liquids, one would be perfectly safe on a commercial aircraft, the other would be strictly prohibited. How to tell them apart quickly without error at an airport security area is the focus of Michelle Espy, Larry Schultz and their team. In this video, Espy and the MagRay team explain how the new technology works, how they've developed an easy operator interface, and what the next steps might be in transitioning this technology to the private sector.

  16. Integrated sequence and immunology filovirus database at Los Alamos.

    PubMed

    Yusim, Karina; Yoon, Hyejin; Foley, Brian; Feng, Shihai; Macke, Jennifer; Dimitrijevic, Mira; Abfalterer, Werner; Szinger, James; Fischer, Will; Kuiken, Carla; Korber, Bette

    2016-01-01

    The Ebola outbreak of 2013-15 infected more than 28 000 people and claimed more lives than all previous filovirus outbreaks combined. Governmental agencies, clinical teams, and the world scientific community pulled together in a multifaceted response ranging from prevention and disease control, to evaluating vaccines and therapeutics in human trials. As this epidemic is finally coming to a close, refocusing on long-term prevention strategies becomes paramount. Given the very real threat of future filovirus outbreaks, and the inherent uncertainty of the next outbreak virus and geographic location, it is prudent to consider the extent and implications of known natural diversity in advancing vaccines and therapeutic approaches. To facilitate such consideration, we have updated and enhanced the content of the filovirus portion of Los Alamos Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses Database. We have integrated and performed baseline analysis of all family ITALIC! Filoviridaesequences deposited into GenBank, with associated immune response data, and metadata, and we have added new computational tools with web-interfaces to assist users with analysis. Here, we (i) describe the main features of updated database, (ii) provide integrated views and some basic analyses summarizing evolutionary patterns as they relate to geo-temporal data captured in the database and (iii) highlight the most conserved regions in the proteome that may be useful for a T cell vaccine strategy.Database URL:www.hfv.lanl.gov.

  17. Design and simulations of CAEP THz FEL resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Yuhuan; Shu, Xiaojian; Deng, Derong; Yang, Xingfan; Li, Ming

    2015-02-01

    A high power China Academy of Engineering Physics(CAEP) THz free electron laser (FEL) is designed and optimized in a radiation frequency range of 1~3 THz and average output power of about 10 W. The main work focuses on the optimization of different schemes through physical analysis. The wiggler peak field strength and electron beam energy have been selected with eleven frequencies ranging from 1 THz to 3 THz. It is found that the values of the gain and output power of the cavity are largest at 2.6 THz. So we can test the facility at this frequency. While the value of the output power is less than the design goal at the lower frequency region of about 1.0 THz due to the serious slippage between the electron bunch and radiation pulse. To increase the output power at the lower frequency region, the scheme of elliptical hole-coupling optical resonator is proposed to solve this problem. The simulation results show that the elliptical hole-coupling output is effective and applicable for the THz FEL and the output power can be increased by more than 30%.

  18. Design Principles for a Compact High Average Power IR FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Lia Merminga; Steve Benson

    2001-08-01

    Progress in superconducting rf (srf) technology has led to dramatic changes in cryogenic losses, cavity gradients, and microphonic levels. Design principles for a compact high average power Energy Recovery FEL at IR wavelengths, consistent with the state of the art in srf, are outlined, High accelerating gradients, of order 20 MV/m at Q{sub 0}{approx}1x10{sup 10} possible at rf frequencies of 1300 MHz and 1500 MHz, allow for a single-cryomodule linac, with minimum cryogenic losses. Filling every rf bucket, at these high frequencies, results in high average current at relatively low charge per bunch, thereby greatly ameliorating all single bunch phenomena, such as wakefields and coherent synchrotron radiation. These principles are applied to derive self-consistent sets of parameters for 100 kW and 1 MW average power IR FELs and are compared with low frequency solutions. This work supported by U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-84ER40150, the Commonwealth of Virginia and the Laser Processing Consortium.

  19. Grating-based pulse compressor for applications to FEL sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletto, Luca; Frassetto, Fabio; Miotti, Paolo; Gauthier, David; Fajardo, Marta; Mahieu, Benoit; Svetina, Cristian; Zangrando, Marco; Zeitoun, Philippe; De Ninno, Giovanni

    2015-05-01

    We present the optical layout of a reflective grating compressor specifically designed for extreme-ultraviolet FEL sources. The working principle is based on the use of a couple of constant-line-spaced gratings used at grazing incidence and illuminated in divergent light. The two possible grating configurations, namely the on-plane and off-plane, are analyzed and compared. The Group Delay Dispersion (GDD) introduced by the compressor is analytically analyzed and quantified. The spatial chirp also is considered, and its effect analyzed. The deviation from the ideal case in which the instrument is feed with a collimated beam is considered. The effect of the beam divergence on the compressor response is quantified and the attenuation of this effect by a "de-tuning" of the compressor is proposed. This solution avoids the use of a pre-collimating optics, therefore incrementing the total instrumental throughput. Finally, it is shown the optical design of an actual compressor for the FERMI FEL, that can be inserted in the optical path without any deviation or translation of the photon beam with respect to the nominal path.

  20. Serial snapshot crystallography for materials science with SwissFEL

    DOE PAGES

    Dejoie, Catherine; Smeets, Stef; Baerlocher, Christian; ...

    2015-04-21

    New opportunities for studying (sub)microcrystalline materials with small unit cells, both organic and inorganic, will open up when the X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) presently being constructed in Switzerland (SwissFEL) comes online in 2017. Our synchrotron-based experiments mimicking the 4%-energy-bandpass mode of the SwissFEL beam show that it will be possible to record a diffraction pattern of up to 10 randomly oriented crystals in a single snapshot, to index the resulting reflections, and to extract their intensities reliably. The crystals are destroyed with each XFEL pulse, but by combining snapshots from several sets of crystals, a complete set of datamore » can be assembled, and crystal structures of materials that are difficult to analyze otherwise will become accessible. Even with a single shot, at least a partial analysis of the crystal structure will be possible, and with 10–50 femtosecond pulses, this offers tantalizing possibilities for time-resolved studies.« less

  1. Robert R. Wilson Prize for Achievement in the Physics of Particle Accelerators Lecture: Frontiers of FEL Physics and Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madey, John M. J.

    2012-03-01

    For much of the past 40 years, efforts to advance the capabilities of FELs have focussed on the frontiers of operation at high average power and short wavelengths with impressive and gratifying results. But a number of potentially important additional frontiers remain to be explored. I will briefly describe several of the new areas in which we have worked relating to the exploitation of boundary conditions to enhance oscillator phase coherence and stability, the exploitation of phase coherence to reduce the quantum fluctuations in amplitude of the coherent harmonics, the elucidation of the classical Wheeler-Feynman coherent radiation reaction force in single pass radiation sources, the development of the precision, robust high peak and average power optical elements needed for the reliable operation of these sources and the application of these advances to the development of optimized inverse-Compton x-ray and gamma ray sources.

  2. Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos during 2007

    SciTech Connect

    2008-09-30

    Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos reports are prepared annually by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) Environmental Directorate, as required by US Department of Energy Order 450.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and US Department of Energy Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. These annual reports summarize environmental data that are used to determine compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and departmental policies. Additional data, beyond the minimum required, are also gathered and reported as part of the Laboratory’s efforts to ensure public safety and to monitor environmental quality at and near the Laboratory. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the Laboratory’s major environmental programs and explains the risks and the actions taken to reduce risks at the Laboratory from environmental legacies and waste management operations. Chapter 2 reports the Laboratory’s compliance status for 2007. Chapter 3 provides a summary of the maximum radiological dose the public and biota populations could have potentially received from Laboratory operations and discusses chemical exposures. The environmental surveillance and monitoring data are organized by environmental media (Chapter 4, air; Chapters 5 and 6, water and sediments; Chapter 7, soils; and Chapter 8, foodstuffs and biota) in a format to meet the needs of a general and scientific audience. Chapter 9 provides a summary of the status of environmental restoration work around LANL. A glossary and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are in the back of the report. Appendix A explains the standards for environmental contaminants, Appendix B explains the units of measurements used in this report, Appendix C describes the laboratory’s technical areas and their associated programs, and Appendix D provides web links to more information. In printed copies of this report or Executive Summary, we have

  3. Review of liquid metal heat pipe work at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.S.; Merrigan, M.A.; Sena, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    A survey of space-power related liquid metal heat pipe work at Los Alamos National Laboratory is presented. Heat pipe development at Los Alamos has been on-going since 1963. Heat pipes were initially developed for thermionic nuclear-electrical power production in space. Since then Los Alamos has developed liquid metal heat pipes for numerous applications related to high temperature systems in both the space and terrestrial environments. Some of these applications include thermionic electrical generators, thermoelectric energy conversion (both in-core and direct radiation), thermal energy storage, hypersonic vehicle leading edge cooling, and heat pipe vapor laser cells. Some of the work performed at Los Alamos has been documented in internal reports that are often little-known. A representative description and summary of progress in space-related liquid metal heat pipe technology is provided followed by a reference section citing sources where these works may be found. 53 refs.

  4. Review of liquid metal heat pipe work at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.S.; Merrigan, M.A.; Sena, J.T. )

    1991-01-10

    A survey of space-power related liquid metal heat pipe work at Los Alamos National Laboratory is presented. Heat pipe development at Los Alamos has been on-going since 1963. Heat pipes were initially developed for thermionic nuclear-electrical power production in space. Since then Los Alamos has developed liquid metal heat pipes for numerous applications related to high temperature systems in both the space and terrestrial environments. Some of these applications include thermionic electrical generators, thermoelectric energy conversion (both in-core and direct radiation), thermal energy storage, hypersonic vehicle leading edge cooling, and heat pipe vapor laser cells. Some of the work performed at Los Alamos has been documented in internal reports that are often little-known. A representative description and summary of progress in space-related liquid metal heat pipe technology is provided followed by a reference section citing sources where these works may be found.

  5. Los Alamos National Laboratory Prepares for Fire Season

    SciTech Connect

    L’Esperance, Manny

    2016-07-18

    Through the establishment of a Wildland Fire Program Office, and the Interagency Fire Base located on Laboratory property, Los Alamos National Laboratory is continuing and improving a program to prepare for wildland fire.

  6. Explosive Flux Compression: 50 Years of Los Alamos Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, C.M.; Thomson, D.B.; Garn, W.B.

    1998-10-18

    Los Alamos flux compression activities are surveyed, mainly through references in view of space limitations. However, two plasma physics programs done with Sandia National Laboratory are discussed in more detail.

  7. Los Alamos National Laboratory Prepares for Fire Season

    ScienceCinema

    L’Esperance, Manny

    2016-08-10

    Through the establishment of a Wildland Fire Program Office, and the Interagency Fire Base located on Laboratory property, Los Alamos National Laboratory is continuing and improving a program to prepare for wildland fire.

  8. Explosive Flux Compression:. 50 Years of LOS Alamos Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, C.; Thomson, D.; Garn, W.

    2004-11-01

    Los Alamos flux compression activities are surveyed, mainly through references in view of space limitations. However, two plasma physics programs done with Sandia National Laboratory are discussed in more detail.

  9. Tests of photocathodes for high repetition rate x-ray FELs at the APEX facility at LBNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sannibale, Fernando; Filippetto, Daniele; Qian, Houjun; Papadopoulos, Christos F.; Wells, Russell; Kramasz, Toby; Padmore, Howard; Feng, Jun; Nasiatka, James; Huang, Ruixuan; Zolotorev, Max; Staples, John W.

    2015-05-01

    After the formidable results of X-ray 4th generation light sources based on free electron lasers around the world, a new revolutionary step is undergoing to extend the FEL performance from the present few hundred Hz to MHz-class repetition rates. In such facilities, temporally equi-spaced pulses will allow for a wide range of previously non-accessible experiments. The Advanced Photo-injector EXperiment (APEX) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), is devoted to test the capability of a novel scheme electron source, the VHF-Gun, to generate the required electron beam brightness at MHz repetition rates. In linac-based FELs, the ultimate performance in terms of brightness is defined at the injector, and in particular, cathodes play a major role in the game. Part of the APEX program consists in testing high quantum efficiency photocathodes capable to operate at the conditions required by such challenging machines. Results and status of these tests at LBNL are presented.

  10. Strategic defense initiatives at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Rockwood, S.D.

    1985-01-01

    This presentation reviews the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) programs at Los Alamos National Laboratory, noting especially the needs for and applications of optics and optical technologies. Table I lists the various activities at Los Alamos contributing to SDI programs. The principal, nonnuclear SDI programs are: (1) the free-electron laser, and (2) neutral particle beams. Both should be considered as potential long-range-kill systems, but still in the futuristic category.

  11. Los Alamos upgrade in metallographic capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ledbetter, J.M.; Dowler, K.E.; Cook, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Los Alamos Wing 9 Hot Cell Facility is in the process of upgrading their metallographic sample preparation and examination capability. The present capability to grind, polish and etch samples from reactor fuels and materials has been in operation for 18 years. Macro photography and alpha and beta-gamma autoradiography are an important part of this capability. Some of the fast breeder reactor experiments have contained sodium as a coolant. Therefore, the capability to distill sodium from some samples scheduled for microstructural examinations is a requirement. Since the reactor fuel samples are highly radioactive and contain plutonium, either as fabricated or as a result of breeding during reactor service, these samples must be handled in shielded hot cells containing alpha boxes to isolate the plutonium and hazardous fission products from personnel and the environment. The present equipment that was designed and built into those alpha boxes has functioned very well for the past 18 years. During that time the technicians have thought of ways to improve the equipment to do the work faster and safer. These ideas and ideas that have been developed during the design of new alpha boxes and new equipment for microstructural sample preparation have provided the concepts for the capability to perform the work faster and maintain the equipment in a safer manner.

  12. Saving Water at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    ScienceCinema

    Erickson, Andy

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory decreased its water usage by 26 percent in 2014, with about one-third of the reduction attributable to using reclaimed water to cool a supercomputing center. The Laboratory's goal during 2014 was to use only re-purposed water to support the mission at the Strategic Computing Complex. Using reclaimed water from the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility, or SERF, substantially decreased water usage and supported the overall mission. SERF collects industrial wastewater and treats it for reuse. The reclamation facility contributed more than 27 million gallons of re-purposed water to the Laboratory's computing center, a secured supercomputing facility that supports the Laboratory’s national security mission and is one of the institution’s larger water users. In addition to the strategic water reuse program at SERF, the Laboratory reduced water use in 2014 by focusing conservation efforts on areas that use the most water, upgrading to water-conserving fixtures, and repairing leaks identified in a biennial survey.

  13. Oxidative lime pretreatment of Alamo switchgrass.

    PubMed

    Falls, Matthew; Holtzapple, Mark T

    2011-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that oxidative lime pretreatment is an effective delignification method that improves the enzymatic digestibility of many biomass feedstocks. The purpose of this work is to determine the recommended oxidative lime pretreatment conditions (reaction temperature, time, pressure, and lime loading) for Alamo switchgrass (Panicum virgatum). Enzymatic hydrolysis of glucan and xylan was used to determine the performance of the 52 studied pretreatment conditions. The recommended condition (110°C, 6.89 bar O(2), 240 min, 0.248 g Ca(OH)(2)/g biomass) achieved glucan and xylan overall yields (grams of sugar hydrolyzed/100 g sugar in raw biomass, 15 filter paper units (FPU)/g raw glucan) of 85.9 and 52.2, respectively. In addition, some glucan oligomers (2.6 g glucan recovered/100 g glucan in raw biomass) and significant levels of xylan oligomers (26.0 g xylan recovered/100 g xylan in raw biomass) were recovered from the pretreatment liquor. Combining a decrystallization technique (ball milling) with oxidative lime pretreatment further improved the overall glucan yield to 90.0 (7 FPU/g raw glucan).

  14. Historic Manhattan Project Sites at Los Alamos

    ScienceCinema

    McGehee, Ellen

    2016-07-12

    The Manhattan Project laboratory constructed at Los Alamos, New Mexico, beginning in 1943, was intended from the start to be temporary and to go up with amazing speed. Because most of those WWII-era facilities were built with minimal materials and so quickly, much of the original infrastructure was torn down in the late '40s and early '50s and replaced by more permanent facilities. However, a few key facilities remained, and are being preserved and maintained for historic significance. Four such sites are visited briefly in this video, taking viewers to V-Site, the buildings where the first nuclear explosive device was pre-assembled in preparation for the Trinity Test in Southern New Mexico. Included is another WWII area, Gun Site. So named because it was the area where scientists and engineers tested the so-called "gun method" of assembling nuclear materials -- the fundamental design of the Little Boy weapon that was eventually dropped on Hiroshima. The video also goes to Pajarito Site, home of the "Slotin Building" and "Pond Cabin." The Slotin Building is the place where scientist Louis Slotin conducted a criticality experiment that went awry in early 1946, leading to his unfortunate death, and the Pond Cabin served the team of eminent scientist Emilio Segre who did early chemistry work on plutonium that ultimately led to the Fat Man weapon.

  15. Historic Manhattan Project Sites at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    McGehee, Ellen

    2014-05-22

    The Manhattan Project laboratory constructed at Los Alamos, New Mexico, beginning in 1943, was intended from the start to be temporary and to go up with amazing speed. Because most of those WWII-era facilities were built with minimal materials and so quickly, much of the original infrastructure was torn down in the late '40s and early '50s and replaced by more permanent facilities. However, a few key facilities remained, and are being preserved and maintained for historic significance. Four such sites are visited briefly in this video, taking viewers to V-Site, the buildings where the first nuclear explosive device was pre-assembled in preparation for the Trinity Test in Southern New Mexico. Included is another WWII area, Gun Site. So named because it was the area where scientists and engineers tested the so-called "gun method" of assembling nuclear materials -- the fundamental design of the Little Boy weapon that was eventually dropped on Hiroshima. The video also goes to Pajarito Site, home of the "Slotin Building" and "Pond Cabin." The Slotin Building is the place where scientist Louis Slotin conducted a criticality experiment that went awry in early 1946, leading to his unfortunate death, and the Pond Cabin served the team of eminent scientist Emilio Segre who did early chemistry work on plutonium that ultimately led to the Fat Man weapon.

  16. Saving Water at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Andy

    2015-03-16

    Los Alamos National Laboratory decreased its water usage by 26 percent in 2014, with about one-third of the reduction attributable to using reclaimed water to cool a supercomputing center. The Laboratory's goal during 2014 was to use only re-purposed water to support the mission at the Strategic Computing Complex. Using reclaimed water from the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility, or SERF, substantially decreased water usage and supported the overall mission. SERF collects industrial wastewater and treats it for reuse. The reclamation facility contributed more than 27 million gallons of re-purposed water to the Laboratory's computing center, a secured supercomputing facility that supports the Laboratory’s national security mission and is one of the institution’s larger water users. In addition to the strategic water reuse program at SERF, the Laboratory reduced water use in 2014 by focusing conservation efforts on areas that use the most water, upgrading to water-conserving fixtures, and repairing leaks identified in a biennial survey.

  17. Potential applications of a dual-sweep streak camera system for characterizing particle and photon beams of VUV, XUV, and x-ray FELS

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A.

    1995-12-31

    The success of time-resolved imaging techniques in the Characterization of particle beams and photon beams of the recent generation of L-band linac-driven or storage ring FELs in the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet wavelength regions can be extended to the VUV, XUV, and x-ray FELs. Tests and initial data have been obtained with the Hamamatsu C5680 dual-sweep streak camera system which includes a demountable photocathode (thin Au) assembly and a flange that allows windowless operation with the transport vacuum system. This system can be employed at wavelengths shorter than 100 nm and down to 1 {Angstrom}. First tests on such a system at 248-nm wavelengths have been performed oil the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) drive laser source. A quartz window was used at the tube entrance aperture. A preliminary test using a Be window mounted on a different front flange of the streak tube to look at an x-ray bremsstrahlung source at the AWA was limited by photon statistics. This system`s limiting resolution of {sigma}{approximately}1.1 ps observed at 248 nm would increase with higher incoming photon energies to the photocathode. This effect is related to the fundamental spread in energies of the photoelectrons released from the photocathodes. Possible uses of the synchrotron radiation sources at the Advanced Photon Source and emerging short wavelength FELs to test the system will be presented.

  18. Technical report of biota, FEL Site 1, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.W.; Davilla, W.; Orloff, S.

    1986-09-26

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is considering an expansion of laser test facilities adjacent to its existing LLNL Site 300 test location. Construction of a free-electron laser, known as the FEL Project, is being considered on approximately 3900 hectates (10,500 acres) of land. We will refer to this proposed site as FEL Site 1. Knowledge of the flora and vegetation resources of the proposed FEL Site 1 is necessary in order to plan for construction, operation, and possible future expansion of the FEL facility. The purpose of botanical sections of this report is to quantitatively describe the variation of vegetation on FEL Site 1, and to relate the vegetation to potential environmental impacts associated with present operation and possible expansion of site facilities. The primary purpose of the wildlife studies was to determine the presence and status of any endangered, threatened, fully protected, or otherwise sensitive species on FEL Site 1 that might be affected by the proposed FEL project. We directed our studies mainly toward the federally endangered San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica), but also toward another 14 special status species that potentially occur on site, including the state threatened Alameda striped racer (Masticophis lateralis euryxanthus).

  19. Audit of consultant agreements at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-23

    The Department of Energy`s (Department) Albuquerque Operations Office (Albuquerque) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) are responsible for acquiring consulting services in a manner most advantageous to the Government by ensuring adequate competition. Although the Department prefers competitively awarding subcontracts, including consultant agreements, to ensure the lowest possible cost, it allows sole sourcing a subcontract if the sole source is fully justified. The objective of the audit was to determine whether Los Alamos` consultant agreements contained adequate sole source justifications. The audit showed that Los Alamos may not have acquired some of its consultant agreements at the lowest possible cost because it did not prepare adequate sole source justifications for 17 sole source consultant agreements valued at $842,900. This condition existed because: (1) requesters did not follow policies and procedures when preparing sole source justifications, (2) Los Alamos did not have an internal mechanism to reject consultant agreements that were not adequately justified, and (3) the Department did not review consultant agreements to evaluate the adequacy of sole source justifications. Without adequate justifications, the Department cannot be assured that consultant services were obtained at the lowest possible cost. We therefore recommended that the Manager, Albuquerque Operations Office require Los Alamos to ensure proper sole source justifications and enhance internal controls over consultant agreements. Management agreed to implement the recommendations.

  20. Los Alamos low-level waste performance assessment status

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, W.J.; Purtymun, W.D.; Dewart, J.M.; Rodgers, J.E.

    1986-06-01

    This report reviews the documented Los Alamos studies done to assess the containment of buried hazardous wastes. Five sections logically present the environmental studies, operational source terms, transport pathways, environmental dosimetry, and computer model development and use. This review gives a general picture of the Los Alamos solid waste disposal and liquid effluent sites and is intended for technical readers with waste management and environmental science backgrounds but without a detailed familiarization with Los Alamos. The review begins with a wide perspective on environmental studies at Los Alamos. Hydrology, geology, and meteorology are described for the site and region. The ongoing Laboratory-wide environmental surveillance and waste management environmental studies are presented. The next section describes the waste disposal sites and summarizes the current source terms for these sites. Hazardous chemical wastes and liquid effluents are also addressed by describing the sites and canyons that are impacted. The review then focuses on the transport pathways addressed mainly in reports by Healy and Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. Once the source terms and potential transport pathways are described, the dose assessment methods are addressed. Three major studies, the waste alternatives, Hansen and Rogers, and the Pantex Environmental Impact Statement, contributed to the current Los Alamos dose assessment methodology. Finally, the current Los Alamos groundwater, surface water, and environmental assessment models for these mesa top and canyon sites are described.

  1. High power induction linac for FEL applications at CESTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Launspach, J.; Angles, J. M.; Angles, M.; Anthouard, P.; Bardy, J.; Bonnafond, C.; Bottollier-Curtet, H.; Devin, A.; Eyharts, P.; Eyl, P.; Gardelle, J.; Germain, G.; Grua, P.; Labrouche, J.; de Mascureau, J.; Le Taillandier, P.; Stadnikoff, W.; Thevenot, M.

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of the LELIA program developed at CESTA is to acquire the knowledge on induction accelerator technology for high peak power FEL applications. In a first step we study basic technology: (1) A high voltage pulse generator (150 kV, 60 ns, 2 ω) has been designed to drive the induction injector and the accelerating cells. It is able to work at high repetition rate (typically 1 kHz) by the use of magnetic switches. A flat top of 130 kV with {ΔV}/{V} = ±0.8% has been obtained for about 50 ns. (2) An induction cell prototype has been built in order to check technological choices (vacuum, mechanics, magnetic guiding, voltage supply, etc.) for injector and accelerating modules. (3) The injector geometry is being studied using Euphrosyne (a classical intense relativistic electron beam device) which consists of a concave thermo-ionic oxide cathode, an intermediate electrode and a hollow anode with a magnetic guiding channel. This diode delivers an electron beam between 1 and 3 MV, about 1 kA and a flat top pulse during 20 ns. We will carry on the injector studies with our induction injector LELIA I (1.5 MV, 1.5 kA, 1 kHz) which will be available at the end of 1990. An accelerating module is also being designed, taking into account guiding and stability problems. All these points are described in more detail in a poster paper [J. Bardy et al., these Proceedings (12th Int. FEL Conf., Paris, France, 1990) Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A304 (1991) 311]. The main goal is to build a 10 MV, 1-3 kA, 1 kHz induction accelerator and to have it running at CESTA in 1993. On the other hand, we want to use the electron beam provided by Euphrosyne then in LELIA I to perform FEL experiments at 35 GHz using a bifilar helical wiggler [H. Bottollier-Curtet et al., these Proceedings, p. 197].

  2. Analysis of FEL-based CeC amplification at high gain limit

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Litvinenko, V.; Jing, Y.

    2015-05-03

    An analysis of Coherent electron Cooling (CeC) amplifier based on 1D Free Electron Laser (FEL) theory was previously performed with exact solution of the dispersion relation, assuming electrons having Lorentzian energy distribution. At high gain limit, the asymptotic behavior of the FEL amplifier can be better understood by Taylor expanding the exact solution of the dispersion relation with respect to the detuning parameter. In this work, we make quadratic expansion of the dispersion relation for Lorentzian energy distribution and investigate how longitudinal space charge and electrons’ energy spread affect the FEL amplification process.

  3. Polarization Analysis for Seeded FELs in a Crossed-Planar Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Huiping; Ding, Yuantao; Huang, Zhirong; Bartolini, Riccardo; Dunning, David; Thompson, Neil; /Daresbury

    2012-06-25

    The crossed-planar undulator is a promising scheme for full polarization control in x-ray FELs. For SASE FELs, it has been shown a maximum degree of circular polarization of about 80% is achievable at fundamental wavelength just before saturation. In this paper, we study the effectiveness of a crossed undulator for a seeded x-ray FEL. The degree of circular polarization for both the fundamental and the harmonic radiation are considered. Simulations with realistic beam distributions show that a degree of circular polarization of over 90% and 80% is obtainable at the fundamental and 2nd harmonic frequencies, respectively.

  4. Performance study of a soft X-ray harmonic generation FEL seededwith an EUV laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Gullans, M.; Wurtele, J.S.; Penn, G.; Zholents, A.A.

    2007-02-01

    The performance of a free electron laser (FEL) using alow-power extreme ultraviolet (EUV) pulse as an input seed isinvestigated. The parameters are appropriate for 30 nm seeds producedfrom high-power Ti:Sa pulses using high harmonic generation schemes. Itis found that, for reasonable beam parameters, robust FEL performance canbe obtained. Both time-independent and time-dependent simulations areperformed for varying system parameters using the GENESIS simulationcode. A comparison is made with a two-stage harmonic FEL that is seededby a high-power Ti:Sa pulse.

  5. Undulators to FELs: Nanometers, Femtoseconds, Coherence and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Attwood, David

    2011-11-30

    For scientists in many fields, from material science to the life sciences and archeology, synchrotron radiation, and in particular undulator radiation, has provide an intense source of x-rays which are tunable to the absorption edges of particular elements of interest, often permitting studies at high spatial and spectral resolution. Now a close cousin to the undulator, the x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) has emerged with improved spatial coherence and, perhaps more importantly, femtosecond pulse durations which permit dynamical studies. In the future attosecond x-ray capabilities are anticipated. In this colloqium we will describe some state of the art undulator studies, how undulators work, the evolution to FELs, their pulse and coherence properties, and the types of experiments envisioned.

  6. Study of CSR Effects in the Jefferson Laboratory FEL Driver

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, C. C.; Biedron, S.; Burleson, Theodore A.; Milton, Stephen V.; Morin, Auralee L.; Benson, Stephen V.; Douglas, David R.; Evtushenko, Pavel E.; Hannon, Fay E.; Li, Rui; Tennant, Christopher D.; Zhang, Shukui; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Lewellen, John W.

    2013-08-01

    In a recent experiment conducted on the Jefferson Laboratory IR FEL driver the effects of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) on beam quality were studied. The primary goal of this work was to explore CSR output and effect on the beam with variation of the bunch compression in the IR chicane. This experiment also provides a valuable opportunity to benchmark existing CSR models in a system that may not be fully represented by a 1-D CSR model. Here we present results from this experiment and compare to initial simulations of CSR in the magnetic compression chicane of the machine. Finally, we touch upon the possibility for CSR induced microbunching gain in the magnetic compression chicane, and show that parameters in the machine are such that it should be thoroughly damped.

  7. A 300-nm compact mm-wave linac FEL design

    SciTech Connect

    Nassiri, A.; Kustom, R.L.; Kang, Y.W.

    1995-12-31

    Microfabrication technology offers an alternative method for fabricating precision, miniature-size components suitable for use in accelerator physics and commercial applications. The original R&D work at Argonne, in collaboration with the University of Illinois at Chicago, has produced encouraging results in the area of rf accelerating structure design, optical and x-ray masks production, deep x-ray lithography (LIGA exposures), and precision structural alignments. In this paper we will present a design study for a compact single pass mm-linac FEL to produce short wavelength radiation. This system will consists of a photocathode rf gun operated at 30 GHz, a 50-MeV superconducting constant gradient structure operated at 60 GHz, and a microundulator with 1-mm period. Initial experimental results on a scale model rf gun and microundulator will be presented.

  8. High Power Operation of the JLab IR FEL Driver Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Beard; Stephen Benson; George Biallas; James Boyce; Donald Bullard; James Coleman; David Douglas; H. Dylla; Richard Evans; Pavel Evtushenko; Christopher Gould; Albert Grippo; Joseph Gubeli; David Hardy; Carlos Hernandez-Garcia; J. Hovater; Kevin Jordan; John Klopf; Rui Li; Steven Moore; George Neil; Benard Poelker; Thomas Powers; Joseph Preble; Robert Rimmer; Daniel Sexton; Michelle D. Shinn; Christopher Tennant; Richard Walker; Gwyn Williams; Shukui Zhang

    2007-08-01

    Operation of the JLab IR Upgrade FEL at CW powers in excess of 10 kW requires sustained production of high electron beam powers by the driver ERL. This in turn demands attention to numerous issues and effects, including: cathode lifetime; control of beamline and RF system vacuum during high current operation; longitudinal space charge; longitudinal and transverse matching of irregular/large volume phase space distributions; halo management; management of remnant dispersive effects; resistive wall, wake-field, and RF heating of beam vacuum chambers; the beam break up instability; the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation (both on beam quality and the performance of laser optics); magnetic component stability and reproducibility; and RF stability and reproducibility. We discuss our experience with these issues and describe the modus vivendi that has evolved during prolonged high current, high power beam and laser operation.

  9. Recent UCN source developments at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Seestrom, S.J.; Anaya, J.M.; Bowles, T.J.

    1998-12-01

    The most intense sources of ultra cold neutrons (UCN) have bee built at reactors where the high average thermal neutron flux can overcome the low UCN production rate to achieve usable densities of UCN. At spallation neutron sources the average flux available is much lower than at a reactor, though the peak flux can be comparable or higher. The authors have built a UCN source that attempts to take advantage of the high peak flux available at the short pulse spallation neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) to generate a useful number of UCN. In the source UCN are produced by Doppler-shifted Bragg scattering of neutrons to convert 400-m/s neutrons down into the UCN regime. This source was initially tested in 1996 and various improvements were made based on the results of the 1996 running. These improvements were implemented and tested in 1997. In sections 2 and 3 they discuss the improvements that have been made and the resulting source performance. Recently an even more interesting concept was put forward by Serebrov et al. This involves combining a solid Deuterium UCN source, previously studied by Serebrov et al., with a pulsed spallation source to achieve world record UCN densities. They have initiated a program of calculations and measurements aimed at verifying the solid Deuterium UCN source concept. The approach has been to develop an analytical capability, combine with Monte Carlo calculations of neutron production, and perform benchmark experiments to verify the validity of the calculations. Based on the calculations and measurements they plan to test a modified version of the Serebrov UCN factory. They estimate that they could produce over 1,000 UCN/cc in a 15 liter volume, using 1 {micro}amp of 800 MeV protons for two seconds every 500 seconds. They will discuss the result UCN production measurements in section 4.

  10. Simulations of flow interactions near Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Costigan, K. R.; Winterkamp, Judy; Bossert, J. E.; Langley, D. L.

    2002-01-01

    The Pajarito Plateau is located on the eastern flank of the Jemez Mountains and the west side of the Rio Grande Valley, in north-central New Mexico, where the river runs roughly north to south. On the Pajarito Plateau, a network of surface meteorological stations has been routinely maintained by Los Alamos National Laboratory. This network includes five instrumented towers, within an approximately 10 km by 15 km area. The towers stand from 23 m to 92 m tall, with multiple wind measurement heights. Investigation of the station records indicates that the wind fields can be quite complicated and may be the result of interactions of thermally and/or dynamically driven flows of many scales. Slope flows are often found on the plateau during the morning and evening transition times, but it is not unusual to find wind directions that are inconsistent with slope flows at some or all of the stations. It has been speculated that valley circulations, as well as synoptically driven winds, interact with the slope flows, but the mesonet measurements alone, with no measurements in the remainder of the valley, were not sufficient to investigate this hypothesis. Thus, during October of 1995, supplemental meteorological instrumentation was placed in the Rio Grande basin to study the complex interaction of flows in the area. A sodar was added near the 92 m tower and a radar wind profiler was placed in the Rio Grande Valley, just east of the plateau and near the river. Measurements were also added at the top of Pajarito Mountain, just west of the plateau, and across the valley, to the east, on top of Tesuque Peak (in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains). Two surface stations were also added to the north-facing slopes of Pajarito Mountain. This paper will present observations from October 1995 and results of simulations of this area that are used in the study of the complex interaction of dynamically and thermally driven flows on multiple scales.

  11. Ultrahigh harmonics generation in a FEL with a seed laser

    SciTech Connect

    Goloviznin, V.V.; Amersfoort, P.W. van

    1995-12-31

    One of the most challenging problems in modern FEL technology is to operate in the X-ray region, especially in the {open_quotes}water window{close_quotes}. Because of the absence of optical resonators in this range of wavelengths, only a single-pass device may be suitable for this task. The Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) mechanism is now under active discussion as a realistic way to provide high-power coherent emission in the X-ray range. Both the undulator parameters and the electron beam parameters required for the lasing are achieveable at today`s technological level. On the other hand, the SASE approach implies a very long and expensive periodic magnetic structure, typically several tens of meters long. This is mainly because of the rather long build-up time necessary to establish a coherent mode from incoherent noise. A mechanism of shortening this time would be therefore highly desirable. In the present paper we consider a scheme using two undulators and a seed-laser to produce coherent X-ray emission. The first undulator and the seed-laser provide a pre-modulation of the beam while the second undulator serves as a source of coherent spontaneous radiation at a very high harmonic of the seed-laser frequency; the whole scheme may then be considered to be an FEL-based frequency upconvertor. The total length of the periodic magnetic structure is shown to be of the order of several meters, nearly an order of magnitude shorter than in the SASE case. For the same beam quality as in the SASE scheme and with realistic seed-laser parameters, the efficiency of the beam pre-modulation at the 50-th (!) harmonic is shown to be as high as 15%. The output radiation is tunable between discrete harmonics of the seed-frequency.

  12. Coherent harmonic production using a two-section undulator FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Jaroszynski, D.A.; Prazeres, R.; Glotin, F.

    1995-12-31

    We present measurements and a theoretical analysis of a new method of generating harmonic radiation in a free-electron laser oscillator with a two section undulator in a single optical cavity. To produce coherent harmonic radiation the undulator is arranged so that the downstream undulator section resonance frequency matches a harmonic of the upstream undulator. Both the fundamental and the harmonic optical fields evolve in the same optical cavity and are coupled out with different extraction fractions using a hole in one of the cavity mirrors. We present measurements that show that the optical power at the second and third harmonic can be enhanced by more than an order of magnitude in this fundamental/harmonic configuration. We compare the production of harmonic radiation of a two sectioned fundamental/harmonic undulator with that produced from a FEL operating at its highest efficiency with a step-tapered undulator, where the bunching at the end of the first section is very large. We examine, the dependence of the harmonic power on the intracavity power by adjusting the optical cavity desynchronism, {delta}L. We also examine the evolution of the fundamental and harmonic powers as a function of cavity roundtrip number to evaluate the importance of the small signal gain at the harmonic. We compare our measurements with predictions of a multi-electron numerical model that follows the evolution of fundamental and harmonic power to saturation. This fundamental/harmonic mode, of operation of the FEL may have useful applications in the production of coherent X-ray and VUV radiation, a spectral range where high reflectivity optical cavity mirrors are difficult or impossible to manufacture.

  13. Picosecond pump-probe using an FEL and a synchrotron source

    SciTech Connect

    Denbeaux, G.; Straub, K.D.; Madey, J.M.J.

    1995-12-31

    Two color pump-probe experiments using both the Duke Storage Ring as a synchrotron light source for visible light the Mark III FEL as a tunable, high peak power IR source are possible. The visible synchrotron source can be used as a probe of vibrational excitation from the FEL in an experiment using vibrationally-assisted fluorescence as an indicator of overlap of the IR and the visible pulses. An optical delay line in the FEL beam will allow adjustment of the arrival time of the IR pulse relative to the visible probe. The storage ring RF booster and the Mark III FEL RF sources will be both driven by the same master oscillator with a timing jitter between sources of less than 20 psec. Exploration of coupling between electronic excitation and lifetimes of vibrational excitation of fluorescent compounds in solution can be carried out with this configuration.

  14. Coherence and linewidth studies of a 4-nm high power FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, W.M.; Sessler, A.M.; Scharlemann, E.T.

    1993-05-01

    Recently the SSRL/SLAC and its collaborators elsewhere have considered the merits of a 2 to 4-nm high power FEL utilizing the SLAC linac electron beam. The FEL would be a single pass amplifier excited by spontaneous emission rather than an oscillator, in order to eliminate the need for a soft X-ray resonant cavity. We have used GINGER, a multifrequency 2D FEL simulation code, to study the expected linewidth and coherence properties of the FEL, in both the exponential and saturated gain regimes. We present results concerning the effective shot noise input power and mode shape, the expected subpercent output line widths, photon flux, and the field temporal and spatial correlation functions. We also discuss the effects of tapering the wiggler upon the output power and line width.

  15. Diffraction and pulse slippage in the Boeing 1 kW FEL oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, J.; Wong, R.K.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    A four-dimensional simulation in x, y, z, and t, including betatron motion of the electrons, is used to study the combined effects of diffraction, pulse slippage and desynchronism in the Boeing 1 kW FEL oscillator.

  16. Statistical Analysis of Crossed Undulator for Polarization Control in a SASE FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yuantao; Huang, Zhirong; /SLAC

    2008-02-01

    There is a growing interest in producing intense, coherent x-ray radiation with an adjustable and arbitrary polarization state. In this paper, we study the crossed undulator scheme (K.-J. Kim, Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 445, 329 (2000)) for rapid polarization control in a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free electron laser (FEL). Because a SASE source is a temporally chaotic light, we perform a statistical analysis on the state of polarization using FEL theory and simulations. We show that by adding a small phase shifter and a short (about 1.3 times the FEL power gain length), 90{sup o} rotated planar undulator after the main SASE planar undulator, one can obtain circularly polarized light--with over 80% polarization--near the FEL saturation.

  17. Generation of XUV light by resonant frequency tripling in a two-wiggler FEL amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, R.; Desalvosouza, L.; Pierini, P.; Scharlemann, E. T.

    FEL operation at short wavelength is limited by electron beam quality, by the availability of mirrors for oscillators, and by the availability of input sources for FEL amplifiers. It is possible to use and FEL amplifier as a resonant frequency tripling device, generating light and strong bunching at the 3rd harmonic of a conventional input source in an initial section of wiggler, then using a second section of wiggler resonant at the tripled frequency to amplify the short wavelength light. Neither mirrors nor a short-wavelength input source are required, and some relaxation of electron beam quality appears to be possible. We illustrate the scheme with a one-dimensional model and then with NUTMEG simulations of an 80 nm FEL amplifier initiated by a 240 nm input signal, in which an efficiency of conversion of electron beam power to 80 nm light of nearly 10(exp -4) was obtained.

  18. Generation of XUV light by resonant frequency tripling in a two-wiggler FEL amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Bonifacio, R.; de Salvo Souza, L.; Pierini, P. . Dipt. di Fisica Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan ); Scharlemann, E.T. )

    1989-01-01

    FEL operation at short wavelength is limited by electron beam quality, by the availability of mirrors for oscillators, and by the availability of input sources for FEL amplifiers. It is possible to use and FEL amplifier as a resonant frequency tripling device, generating light and strong bunching at the 3rd harmonic of a conventional input source in an initial section of wiggler, then using a second section of wiggler resonant at the tripled frequency to amplify the short wavelength light. Neither mirrors nor a short-wavelength input source are required, and some relaxation of electron beam quality appears to be possible. We illustrate the scheme with a one-dimensional model and then with NUTMEG simulations of an 80 nm FEL amplifier initiated by a 240 nm input signal, in which an efficiency of conversion of electron beam power to 80 nm light of nearly 10{sup -4} was obtained. 3 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Generation of XUV light by resonant frequency tripling in a two-wiggler FEL amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, R.; De Salvo Souza, L.; Pierini, P.; Scharlemann, E. T.

    1990-10-01

    FEL operation at short wavelengths is limited by electron-beam quality, by the availability of mirrors for oscillators and by the availability of input sources for FEL amplifiers. It is possible to use an FEL amplifier as a resonant-frequency tripling device, generating light and strong bunching at the third harmonic of a conventional input source in an initial wiggler section, then using a second wiggler section resonant at the tripled frequency to amplify the short-wavelength light. Neither mirrors nor a short-wavelength input source are required, and some relaxation of the electron-beam quality appears to be possible. We illustrate the scheme with a one-dimensional model and then with NUTMEG simulations of an 80 nm FEL amplifier initiated by a 240 nm input signal, in which an efficiency of the electron-beam power conversion to 80 nm light of nearly 10-4 was obtained.

  20. Parameter study of the VUV-FEL at the Tesla Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brefeld, W.; Faatz, B.

    1995-12-31

    In this contribution we present a detailed study of the influence of the electron beam and machine parameters on the performance of the TTF VUV FEL, which is in its design stage at DESY. The TTF FEL will be a 6 nm SASE device operating with the beam provided by the Tesla Test Facility superconducting linac, driven by an rf photcathode gun. The FEL output power and saturation length have been assessed with the use of different 2D3-D steady state simulation codes. The parameter range over which the FEL would reach saturation within the specified undulator length of 25 to 30 m have been determined and checked against semi-analytical expressions.

  1. Optical properties of mid-infrared FELs from the FELI Facility I

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, A.; Okuma, S.; Oshita, E.

    1995-12-31

    The FELI Facility I has succeeded in mid-infrared FEL oscillation at 6 {mu} m using a 30-MeV, 42-A electron beam from the FELI S-band linac in October 31, 1994. The FELI Facility I is composed of a 2-m vertical type undulator ({lambda}u=3.4cm, N=58, K m a x = 55, gap length{ge}14mm) and a 6.72-m optical cavity. It can cover the wavelength range of 5-20{mu}m. The FELs can be delivered from the optical cavity to the diagnostics room through a 50-m evacuated optical pipeline. Wavelength and cavity length dependences of optical properties such as peak power, average power, spectrum width, subpulses in FEL macropulse, FEL transverse profile are reported.

  2. Reflection Matrix for Optical Resonators in FEL (Free Electron Lasers) Oscillators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-22

    is the dominant factor determining the reflction coefficient. The effects of deflecting tho’ light beam enter as small corrections, of first order in...RESONATORS IN FEL OSCILLATORS I. INTRODUCTION 1-7 Free Electron Lasers (FEL) operating as oscillators require the 8-10 trapping of light pulses between...The simplest oscillator configuration is that of an open resonator with two opposed identical mirrors. The radiation vector potential for this

  3. Gain enhancement plasma-loaded FEL in the presence of beat waves

    SciTech Connect

    Shamamian, A.H.; Gevorgian, L.A.

    1995-12-31

    An expression for the dielectric permittivity of underdense plasma interacting with laser beat waves is derived. It is shown that the presence of beat waves in plasma results in an effective growth of the plasma frequency. The FEL Gain is investigated in the case when the frequency of soft photons weakly depending on the electron beam energy and the synchronism condition is maintained. It is shown that the plasma beat waves lead to the essential increase in FEL gain.

  4. Optimization of single-step tapering amplitude and energy detuning for high-gain FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, He-Ting; Jia, Qi-Ka

    2015-01-01

    We put forward a method to optimize the single-step tapering amplitude of undulator strength and initial energy tuning of electron beam to maximize the saturation power of high gain free-electron lasers (FELs), based on the physics of longitudinal electron beam phase space. Using the FEL simulation code GENESIS, we numerically demonstrate the accuracy of the estimations for parameters corresponding to the linac coherent light source and the Tesla test facility.

  5. Scaling of gain with energy spread and energy in the PEP FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.S.

    1992-07-13

    The Sag Harbor paper on the PEP FEL discusses the scaling of various FEL parameters with energy spread {sigma}{sub {var epsilon}}. I will repeat some of this material here and then examine the benefit of increasing the energy spread. How much energy spread can be achieved with damping wigglers is the next topic. Finally, I consider the dependence of gain and saturation length on beam energy and undulator field.

  6. Scaling of gain with energy spread and energy in the PEP FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.S.

    1992-07-13

    The Sag Harbor paper on the PEP FEL discusses the scaling of various FEL parameters with energy spread {sigma}{sub {var_epsilon}}. I will repeat some of this material here and then examine the benefit of increasing the energy spread. How much energy spread can be achieved with damping wigglers is the next topic. Finally, I consider the dependence of gain and saturation length on beam energy and undulator field.

  7. 1993 Northern goshawk inventory on portions of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, D.T.; Kennedy, P.L.

    1994-06-01

    Northern goshawks (Accipiter gentilis) (hereafter referred to as goshawk) is a large forest dwelling hawk. Goshawks may be declining in population and reproduction in the southwestern United States. Reasons for the possible decline in goshawk populations include timber harvesting resulting in the loss of nesting habitat, toxic chemicals, and the effects of drought, fire, and disease. Thus, there is a need to determine their population status and assess impacts of management activities in potential goshawk habitat. Inventory for the goshawk was conducted on 2,254 ha of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to determine the presence of nesting goshawks on LANL lands. This information can be incorporated into LANL`s environmental management program. The inventory was conducted by Colorado State University personnel from May 12 to July 30, 1993. This report summarizes the results of this inventory.

  8. A progress report on UNICOS misuse detection at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.L.; Jackson, K.A.; Stallings, C.A.; Simmonds, D.D.; Siciliano, C.L.B.; Pedicini, G.A.

    1995-10-01

    An effective method for detecting computer misuse is the automatic monitoring and analysis of on-line user activity. During the past year, Los Alamos enhanced its Network Anomaly Detection and Intrusion Reporter (NADIR) to include analysis of user activity on Los Alamos` UNICOS Crays. In near real-time, NADIR compares user activity to historical profiles and tests activity against expert rules. The expert rules express Los Alamos` security policy and define improper or suspicious behavior. NADIR reports suspicious behavior to security auditors and provides tools to aid in follow-up investigations. This paper describes the implementation to date of the UNICOS component of NADIR, along with the operational experiences and future plans for the system.

  9. Publications of Los Alamos research, 1977-1981

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, C.J.; Garcia, C.A.

    1983-03-01

    This bibliography is a compilation of unclassified publications of work done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for 1977-1981. Papers published in those years are included regardless of when they were actually written. Publications received too late for inclusion in earlier compilations have also been listed. Declassification of previously classified reports is considered to constitute publication. All classified issuances are omitted - even those papers, themselves unclassified, which were published only as part of a classified document. If a paper was published more than once, all places of publication are included. The bibliography includes Los Alamos National Laboratory reports, papers released as non-Laboratory reports, journal articles, books, chapters of books, conference papers either published separately or as part of conference proceedings issued as books or reports, papers published in congressional hearings, theses, and US patents. Publications by Los Alamos authors that are not records of Laboratory-sponsored work are included when the Library becomes aware of them.

  10. Water Supply at Los Alamos 1998-2001

    SciTech Connect

    Richard J. Koch; David B. Rogers

    2003-03-01

    For the period 1998 through 2001, the total water used at Los Alamos from all sources ranged from 1325 million gallons (Mg) in 1999 to 1515 Mg in 2000. Groundwater production ranged from 1323 Mg in 1999 to 1506 Mg in 2000 from the Guaje, Pajarito, and Otowi fields. Nonpotable surface water used from Los Alamos reservoir ranged from zero gallons in 2001 to 9.3 Mg in 2000. For years 1998 through 2001, over 99% of all water used at Los Alamos was groundwater. Water use by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) between 1998 and 2001 ranged from 379 Mg in 2000 to 461 Mg in 1998. The LANL water use in 2001 was 393 Mg or 27% of the total water use at Los Alamos. Water use by Los Alamos County ranged from 872 Mg in 1999 to 1137 Mg in 2000, and averaged 1006 Mg/yr. Four new replacement wells in the Guaje field (G-2A, G-3A, G-4A, and G-5A) were drilled in 1998 and began production in 1999; with existing well G-1A, the Guaje field currently has five producing wells. Five of the old Guaje wells (G-1, G-2, G-4, G-5, and G-6) were plugged and abandoned in 1999, and one well (G-3) was abandoned but remains as an observation well for the Guaje field. The long-term water level observations in production and observation (test) wells at Los Alamos are consistent with the formation of a cone of depression in response to water production. The water level decline is gradual and at most has been about 0.7 to 2 ft per year for production wells and from 0.4 to 0.9 ft/yr for observation (test) wells. The largest water level declines have been in the Guaje field where nonpumping water levels were about 91 ft lower in 2001 than in 1951. The initial water levels of the Guaje replacement wells were 32 to 57 ft lower than the initial water levels of adjacent original Guaje wells. When production wells are taken off-line for pump replacement or repair, water levels have returned to within about 25 ft of initial static levels within 6 to 12 months. Thus, the water-level trends suggest no adverse

  11. Water supply at Los Alamos during 1993. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Purtymun, W.D.; Stoker, A.K.; McLin, S.G.; Maes, M.N.; Glasco, T.A.

    1995-10-01

    This report summarizes production and aquifer conditions for water wells in the Guaje, Pajarito, and Otowi Well Fields. These wells supplied all of the potable water used for municipal and some industrial purposes in Los Alamos County and the Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1993. The wells in the Los Alamos Well Field were transferred to San Ildefonso Pueblo in 1992. Four of the wells in the Los Alamos Well Field were plugged in 1993. One of the two new wells in the Otowi Well Field became operational in 1993. The spring gallery in Water Canyon supplied nonpotable water for industrial use, while surface water from the Los Alamos Reservoir was diverted for irrigation. In 1993 no water was used from the Guaje Reservoir. Due to the maintenance and operating cost of diverting water from the reservoirs, it is not economically feasible to continue their use for irrigation. This report fulfills some of the requirements of the Los Alamos Groundwater Protection Management Program by documenting use of the groundwater for water supply and providing information hydrologic characteristics of the main aquifer. This report is a joint effort between the Laboratory Water Quality and Hydrology Group and the Utilities Department of Johnson Controls World Services Inc. (JCI). The purpose of this report is to ensure a continuing historical record and to provide guidance for management of water resources in long-range planning for the water supply system. We have issued one summary report for the period of 1947 to 1971 and 22 annual reports that contain the results of our studies of these water supplies. An additional report summarized the hydrology of the main aquifer with reference to future development of groundwater supplies. A report was issued in 1988 that examined the status of wells and future water supply.

  12. A physicists guide to The Los Alamos Primer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, B. Cameron

    2016-11-01

    In April 1943, a group of scientists at the newly established Los Alamos Laboratory were given a series of lectures by Robert Serber on what was then known of the physics and engineering issues involved in developing fission bombs. Serber’s lectures were recorded in a 24 page report titled The Los Alamos Primer, which was subsequently declassified and published in book form. This paper describes the background to the Primer and analyzes the physics contained in its 22 sections. The motivation for this paper is to provide a firm foundation of the background and contents of the Primer for physicists interested in the Manhattan Project and nuclear weapons.

  13. Fifty-one years of Los Alamos Spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Fenimore, Edward E.

    2014-09-04

    From 1963 to 2014, the Los Alamos National Laboratory was involved in at least 233 spacecraft. There are probably only one or two institutions in the world that have been involved in so many spacecraft. Los Alamos space exploration started with the Vela satellites for nuclear test detection, but soon expanded to ionospheric research (mostly barium releases), radioisotope thermoelectric generators, solar physics, solar wind, magnetospheres, astrophysics, national security, planetary physics, earth resources, radio propagation in the ionosphere, and cubesats. Here, we present a list of the spacecraft, their purpose, and their launch dates for use during RocketFest

  14. Los Alamos Using Neutrons to Stop Nuclear Smugglers

    ScienceCinema

    Favalli, Andrea; Swinhoe, Martyn

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers have successfully demonstrated for the first time that laser-generated neutrons can be enlisted as a useful tool in the War on Terror. The international research team used the short-pulse laser at Los Alamos's TRIDENT facility to generate a neutron beam with novel characteristics that interrogated a closed container to confirm the presence and quantity of nuclear material inside. The successful experiment paves the way for creation of a table-top-sized or truck-mounted neutron generator that could be installed at strategic locations worldwide to thwart smugglers trafficking in nuclear materials.

  15. Los Alamos Using Neutrons to Stop Nuclear Smugglers

    SciTech Connect

    Favalli, Andrea; Swinhoe, Martyn

    2013-06-03

    Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers have successfully demonstrated for the first time that laser-generated neutrons can be enlisted as a useful tool in the War on Terror. The international research team used the short-pulse laser at Los Alamos's TRIDENT facility to generate a neutron beam with novel characteristics that interrogated a closed container to confirm the presence and quantity of nuclear material inside. The successful experiment paves the way for creation of a table-top-sized or truck-mounted neutron generator that could be installed at strategic locations worldwide to thwart smugglers trafficking in nuclear materials.

  16. The development of the atomic bomb, Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, R.W.

    1993-11-01

    The historical presentation begins with details of the selection of Los Alamos as the site of the Army installation. Wartime efforts of the Army Corps of Engineers, and scientists to include the leader of Los Alamos, Robert Oppenheimer are presented. The layout and construction of the facilities are discussed. The monumental design requirements of the bombs are discussed, including but not limited to the utilization of the second choice implosion method of detonation, and the production of bomb-grade nuclear explosives. The paper ends with a philosophical discussion on the use of nuclear weapons.

  17. Needs assessment for fire department services and resources for the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-15

    This report has been developed in response to a request from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to evaluate the need for fire department services so as to enable the Laboratory to plan effective fire protection and thereby: meet LANL`s regulatory and contractual obligations; interface with the Department of Energy (DOE) and other agencies on matters relating to fire and emergency services; and ensure appropriate protection of the community and environment. This study is an outgrowth of the 1993 Fire Department Needs Assessment (prepared for DOE) but is developed from the LANL perspective. Input has been received from cognizant and responsible representatives at LANL, DOE, Los Alamos County (LAC) and the Los Alamos Fire Department (LAFD).

  18. Removal of cat major allergen (Fel d I) from futon (Japanese bedding) with a home washing machine.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, M; Nigi, H; Sakaguchi, M; Inouye, S; Miyazawa, H; Watanabe, M; Mitsuseki, M; Yasueda, H; Nitta, H

    1994-06-01

    We evaluated the removal of a cat major allergen (Fel d I) from futons (Japanese bedding) with the use of a large-sized home washing machine. Before and after washing a futon that had been used in a home with a cat, a small amount of cotton was collected from the futon and Fel d I was extracted from the cotton. The levels of Fel d I were assayed by a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We found that washing reduced the Fel d I level in futons by more than 95%. In conclusion, washing of futons is an effective method for elimination of their cat allergens.

  19. A survey of macromycete diversity at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Bandelier National Monument, and Los Alamos County; A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Jarmie, N.; Rogers, F.J.

    1997-11-01

    The authors have completed a 5-year survey (1991--1995) of macromycetes found in Los Alamos County, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Bandelier National Monument. The authors have compiled a database of 1,048 collections, their characteristics, and identifications. The database represents 123 (98%) genera and 175 (73%) species reliably identified. Issues of habitat loss, species extinction, and ecological relationships are addressed, and comparisons with other surveys are made. With this baseline information and modeling of this baseline data, one can begin to understand more about the fungal flora of the area.

  20. Output characteristics of SASE-driven short-wavelength FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawley, William M.

    1997-05-01

    This paper investigates various properties of the 'microspikes' associated with self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) in a short wavelength free-electron laser (FEL). Using results from the 2-D numerical simulation code GINGER, we confirm theoretical predictions such as the convective group velocity in the exponential gain regime. In the saturated gain regime beyond the initial saturation, we find that the average radiation power continues to grow with an approximately linearly dependence upon undulator length. Moreover, the spectrum significantly broadens and shifts in wavelength to the redward direction, with P(omega) approaching a constant, asymptotic value. This is in marked contrast to the exponential gain regime where the spectrum steadily narrows, P(omega) grows, and the central wavelength remains constant with z. Via use of a spectrogram diagnostic S(omega, t), it appears that the radiation pattern in the saturated gain regime is composed of an ensemble of distinct 'sinews' whose widths (Delta) (lambda) remain approximately constant but whose central wavelengths can 'chirp' by varying a small extent with t.

  1. Addressing Physics Grand Challenges Using the Jefferson Lab FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gwyn P.

    2006-11-01

    The Jefferson Lab Free Electron Laser[1] is the first of the so-called 4^th generation light sources to go operational. Capable of delivering extraordinarily bright, tunable light in ultrafast pulses from THz[2] through infrared to UV, the facility extends the experimental reach of accelerator-based light-sources by many orders of magnitude. This allows new opportunities to study many of the ``Grand Challenges'' recently defined by the Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences Division, most of which are concerned with understandings of equilibrium and non-equilibrium behavior of materials in physics, chemistry and biology using precise pump and probe techniques. Specifically, in condensed matter physics, the JLab FEL permits new studies which go beyond earlier studies of reductionist behavior to those which examine emergent behavior. Thus, the understanding of high Tc superconductivity, colossal magneto-resistance, and observations of the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, are examples of collective behavior which is now treated theoretically via the concept of quasiparticles. In this presentation we will describe the dual pathways of light source development and physics challenges, and then show how they are combined in experiments that allow new insights to be developed to understand material function. We will illustrate this with details of the evolution of accelerator-based light sources, and with examples of work performed to date. References: [1] Neil et al. Phys. Rev.Letts 84, 662 (2000). [2] Carr, Martin, McKinney, Neil, Jordan & Williams, Nature 420, 153 (2002).

  2. Spherical Focusing Mirror for the VUV-FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, H N

    2005-09-20

    Based on analysis and ray-tracing that he did, Jacek Krzywinski has suggested that it should be possible to focus the 32 nmVUV-FEL beam down below 0.2 {micro}m spot size with a normal-incidence multilayer-coated spherical mirror. There are advantages to a spherical mirror over an ellipsoid (or near-paraboloid) which are ease of manufacture and alignment. Off-axis aberrations are generally small, since for a beam that underfills the sphere's aperture, the beam itself defines the axis (rather than the optic). The dominant aberration for a sphere is spherical aberration, which decreases with increasing sphere radius of curvature. However, as the radius of curvature increases, so too does the focal length and f-number, and the diffraction-limited spot increases. Hence, as Jacek has pointed out, there is an optimum radius of curvature, to achieve the smallest possible spot, given a beam diameter. This optimum is determined by balancing the spread of the beam due to spherical aberration and the spread due to diffraction.

  3. Extension of the spectral range of the CLIO FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Marcouille, O.; Boyer, J.C.; Corlier, M.

    1995-12-31

    The CLIO FEL has been designed to lase between 2 and 20 {mu}m. The electrons are produced by a 32/50 MeV RF linear accelerator. The injector is a 100 keV thermoionic gun, followed by a subharmonic prebuncher at 0.5 GHz and a buncher at 3 GHz. The electron beam is then accelerated in a 4.5 m long travelling wave accelerating section, to the nominal energy. The undulator consisted of 48 periods of 40 mm and the optical cavity is 4.8 m long which corresponds to a 1.2 m Rayleigh length. The peak power extracted by a ZnSe Brewster plate is 10 MW at 10 {mu}. But, beyond 11{mu}m, the laser power decreases rapidely and no laser oscillation appears above 17 {mu}m. In order to lase at farther wavelengths, few changes have been made: First of all, the power limit is due to the diffraction losses of the undulator vaccuum chamber (7 mm height and 2 m long). Numerical calculations have been made and show that cavity losses reach 55 % at 15 {mu}m whereas the measured gain is 60 %. Consequently, the undulator vaccuum chamber have been replaced by a approximately twice bigger one. Then, the minimum gap is increased and the maximum deflection parameter K is reduced by a factor 2: laser tunability is greatly reduced. This why a new undulator has been built. The main characteristics are summarized.

  4. RF coupler for high-power CW FEL photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, S.; Young, L. M.

    2003-01-01

    A high-current emittance-compensated RF photoinjector is a key enabling technology for a high-power CW FEL. The design presently under way is a 100-mA 2.5-cell {pi}-mode, 700-MHz, normal conducting demonstration CW RF photoinjector. This photoinjector will be capable of accelerating 3 nC per bunch with an emittance at the wiggler less than 10 mm-mrad. The paper presents results for the RF coupling from ridged wave guides to hte photoinjector RF cavity. The LEDA and SNS couplers inspired this 'dog-bone' design. Electromagnetic modeling of the coupler-cavity system has been performed using both 2-D and 3-D frequency-domain calculations, and a novel time-domain approach with MicroWave Studio. These simulations were used to adjust the coupling coefficient and calculate the power-loss distribution on the coupling slot. The cooling of this slot is a rather challenging thermal management project.

  5. A photocathode RF gun for x-ray FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.J.; Batchelor, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    1995-12-31

    A 1.6 cell photocathode RF gun was developed by a BNL/SLAC/UCLA collaboration for X-ray FEL and other applications. The objective of the collaboration is to develop a cost effective and more reliable photocathode RF gun based on the operational experience of the original BNL gun. The new photocathode RF gun is cable of producing 1 mm-mrad normalized rms emittance photocurrent with a peak current of 100 A. The half-cell length of the new RF gun was lengthened to reduce the peak field on the cavity surface, the side-coupled scheme for cavity and waveguide coupling was replaced by a symmetrized coupling to the full-cell. The cavity aperture was increased to improve the coupling between two cells and for flat beam application. The experimental results of cold testing the RF gun will be presented. We will also present an injector design based on the new photocathode RF gun and emittance compensation technique.

  6. Working with Fermi at Chicago and Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garwin, Richard L.

    2010-02-01

    I discuss my experience with Enrico Fermi as student and fellow faculty member at Chicago and with him as consultants to the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory in 1950-1952. The talk shares observations about this great physicist and exemplary human being. )

  7. The Controlled-Air Incinerator at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Newmyer, J.N.

    1994-04-01

    The Controlled-Air Incinerator (CAI) at Los Alamos is being modified and upgraded to begin routine operations treating low-level mixed waste (LLMW), radioactively contaminated polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) wastes, low-level liquid wastes, and possibly transuranic (TRU) wastes. This paper describes those modifications. Routine waste operations should begin in late FY95.

  8. The Los Alamos nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation technology development program

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.A. Jr.; Menlove, H.O.; Reilly, T.D.; Bosler, G.E.; Hakkila, E.A.; Eccleston, G.W.

    1994-04-01

    For nearly three decades, Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed and implemented nuclear measurement technology and training in support of national and international nuclear safeguards. This paper outlines the major elements of those technologies and highlights some of the latest developments.

  9. [Los Alamos National Laboratory industrial applications and technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-30

    In October 1989, the Los Alamos Economic Development Corporation (LAEDC) entered into a contract with the Industrial Applications office (IAO) of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) whereby the LAEDC was to provide support services to IAO. More specifically, according to the Statement of Work in this contract The Los Alamos Economic Development Corporation shall assist the Los Alamos National Laboratory Industrial Applications Office in establishing and strengthening connections between potential entrepreneurs at the Laboratory and the business assistance community throughout New Mexico, directed toward enhancing the number, of successful start up businesses spinning off the Laboratory's technology base.'' As part of this contract and subsequent modifications thereof, the LAEDC was to perform seven tasks: 1. Provide business planning assistance to potential entrepreneurs. 2. (Assist IAO in preparing and distributing) informational materials on technology transfer. 3. (Organize and manage) meetings and seminars on technology transfer and entrepreneurship. 4. Identify new opportunities for technology transfer. 5. (Identify and implement programs for the) recognition of Laboratory Entrepreneurs. 6. Training Lab personnel, in the area of technology transfer and Laboratory industrial interactions. 7. Review and summarize prior New Mexico economic development studies. The purpose of this report, is to summarize the accomplishments of the LAEDC under its contract with IAO, and to fulfill its reporting requirements. This report covers the period from October 1989 to September 1992.

  10. Aqueous Nitrate Recovery Line at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Finstad, Casey Charles

    2016-06-15

    This powerpoint is part of the ADPSM Plutonium Engineering Lecture Series, which is an opportunity for new hires at LANL to get an overview of work done at TA55. It goes into detail about the aqueous nitrate recovery line at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  11. Brief review of Rover fuel development at Los Alamos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Keith V.

    1991-01-01

    A brief review of the graphite matrix uranium fuel development efforts at Los Alamos from 1955 through 1972 is presented. The uses of graphite flour carbon black, various binders, uranium dioxide, coated UC2 particles, and zirconium carbide in this development are described.

  12. Summary of environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    Linking the Rio Grande Valley and the Jemez Mountains, New Mexico`s Pajarito Plateau is home to a world-class scientific institution. Los Alamos National Laboratory (or the Laboratory), managed by the Regents of the University of California, is a government-owned, Department of Energy-supervised complex investigating all areas of modern science for the purposes of national defense, health, conservation, and ecology. The Laboratory was founded in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project, whose members assembled to create the first nuclear weapon. Occupying the campus of the Los Alamos Ranch School, American and British scientists gathered on the isolated mesa tops to harness recently discovered nuclear power with the hope of ending World War II. In July 1945, the initial objective of the Laboratory, a nuclear device, was achieved in Los Alamos and tested in White Sands, New Mexico. Today the Laboratory continues its role in defense, particularly in nuclear weapons, including developing methods for safely handling weapons and managing waste. For the past twenty years, the Laboratory has published an annual environmental report. This pamphlet offers a synopsis that briefly explains important concepts, such as radiation and provides a summary of the monitoring results and regulatory compliance status that are explained at length in the document entitled Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos during 1995.

  13. Airport-Noise Levels and Annoyance Model (ALAMO) system's reference manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, R.; Donaldson, J. L.; Johnson, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The airport-noise levels and annoyance model (ALAMO) is described in terms of the constituent modules, the execution of ALAMO procedure files, necessary for system execution, and the source code documentation associated with code development at Langley Research Center. The modules constituting ALAMO are presented both in flow graph form, and through a description of the subroutines and functions that comprise them.

  14. Environmental assessment for effluent reduction, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-11

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to eliminate industrial effluent from 27 outfalls at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The Proposed Action includes both simple and extensive plumbing modifications, which would result in the elimination of industrial effluent being released to the environment through 27 outfalls. The industrial effluent currently going to about half of the 27 outfalls under consideration would be rerouted to LANL`s sanitary sewer system. Industrial effluent from other outfalls would be eliminated by replacing once-through cooling water systems with recirculation systems, or, in a few instances, operational changes would result in no generation of industrial effluent. After the industrial effluents have been discontinued, the affected outfalls would be removed from the NPDES Permit. The pipes from the source building or structure to the discharge point for the outfalls may be plugged, or excavated and removed. Other outfalls would remain intact and would continue to discharge stormwater. The No Action alternative, which would maintain the status quo for LANL`s outfalls, was also analyzed. An alternative in which industrial effluent would be treated at the source facilities was considered but dismissed from further analysis because it would not reasonably meet the DOE`s purpose for action, and its potential environmental effects were bounded by the analysis of the Proposed Action and the No Action alternatives.

  15. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), conducted March 29, 1987 through April 17, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the LANL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the LANL, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the LANL Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the Survey for the LANL. 65 refs., 68 figs., 73 tabs.

  16. X-ray FEL Simulation with the MPP version of the GINGER Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawley, William

    2001-06-01

    GINGER is a polychromatic, 2D (r-z) PIC code originally developed in the 1980's to examine sideband growth in FEL amplifiers. In the last decade, GINGER simulations have examined various aspects of x-ray and XUV FEL's based upon initiation by self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE). Recently, GINGER's source code has been substantially updated to exploit many modern features of the Fortran90 language and extended to exploit multiprocessor hardware with the result that the code now runs effectively on platforms ranging from single processor workstations in serial mode to MPP hardware at NERSC such as the Cray-T3E and IBM-SP in full parallel mode. This poster discusses some of the numerical algorithms and structural details of GINGER which permitted relatively painless porting to parallel architectures. Examples of some recent SASE FEL modeling with GINGER will be given including both existing experiments such as the LEUTL UV FEL at Argonne and proposed projects such as the LCLS x-ray FEL at SLAC.

  17. FULL ELECTROMAGNETIC FEL SIMULATION VIA THE LORENTZ-BOOSTED FRAME TRANSFORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, William; Vay, Jean-Luc

    2010-08-16

    Numerical electromagnetic simulation of some systems containing charged particles with highly relativistic directed motion can by speeded up by orders of magnitude by choice of the proper Lorentz-boosted frame. A particularly good application for calculation in a boosted frame isthat of short wavelength free-electron lasers (FELs) where a high energy electron beam with small fractional energy spread interacts with a static magnetic undulator. In the optimal boost frame (i.e., the ponderomotive rest frame), the red-shifted FEL radiation and blue-shifted undulator field have identical wavelengths and the number of required longitudinal grid cells and time-steps for fully electromagnetic simulation (relative to the laboratory frame) decrease by factors of gamma^2 each. In theory, boosted frame EM codes permit direct study of FEL problems for which the eikonal approximation for propagation of the radiation field and wiggler-period-averaging for the particle-field interaction may be suspect. We have adapted the WARP code to apply this method to several electromagnetic FEL problems including spontaneous emission, strong exponential gain in a seeded, single pass amplifier configuration, and emission from e-beams in undulators with multiple harmonic components. WARP has a standard relativistic macroparticle mover and a fully 3-D electromagnetic field solver. We discuss our boosted frame results and compare with those obtained using the ?standard? eikonal FEL simulation approach.

  18. Validation of the dissemination of spectral irradiance values using FEL lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. C.; Graham, Gary D.; Saunders, Robert D.; Yoon, Howard W.; Shirley, Eric L.

    2012-09-01

    Scales of spectral irradiance are disseminated by NIST using assignment of values to FEL lamp standards for defined conditions. These lamp standards can be used for absolute calibrations of irradiance radiometers, or more typically, be used in conjunction with a diffuse reflectance standard to establish a scale of spectral radiance and for subsequent absolute calibrations of radiance radiometers. The NIST FEL standards are valuable artifacts requiring special care. Many users optimize resources by in-house transfer of their primary standard to working standards. There are a number of sources of uncertainty in utilizing FEL lamps, e.g., lamp current, alignment, distance setting, instrument aperture size, drift, scattered light, and interpolation in the wavelength grid for the specified irradiance values. In this work, we validated the transfer activity by ITT of their primary, NIST-traceable FEL lamp standards. A portable irradiance bench that had kinematic mounts for an FEL lamp, on-axis baffle, and three different irradiance radiometers was built, tested, and deployed to ITT in Rochester, NY. We report the results of this comparison activity. An uncertainty budget was developed and it was found that the results agreed well within the combined uncertainties of 1.5% to 1.6% (k = 2).

  19. Evidence for a Fel d I-like molecule in the "big cats" (Felidae species).

    PubMed

    de Groot, H; van Swieten, P; Aalberse, R C

    1990-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the cross-reactivity pattern of IgE and IgG4 antibodies to the major feline allergen, Fel d I. We studied the IgE and IgG4 response of 11 cat-allergic patients against Fel d I-like structures in eight members of the Felidae family: ocelot, puma, serval, siberian tiger, lion, jaguar, snow leopard, and caracal. Hair from these "big cats" was collected, extracted, and used in a RAST system and histamine-release test. By means of a RAST-inhibition assay with affinity-purified Fel d I from cat dander, it was established that, in the Felidae species, a Fel d I equivalent is present that reacts with IgE and IgG4 antibodies. We found that all patients had cross-reacting IgE antibodies to seven of the Felidae tested; no IgE antibodies reactive with the caracal were found. Eight of 10 patients with IgG4 antibodies directed to cat dander also had IgG4 antibodies directed to several Felidae species, including the caracal. However, the correlation between the IgE and the IgG4 antibody specificity was low, indicating that, in the case of Fel d I IgE and IgG4, antibodies do not necessarily have the same specificity.

  20. PFM2: a 32 × 32 processor for X-ray diffraction imaging at FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manghisoni, M.; Fabris, L.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Ratti, L.; Grassi, M.; Lodola, L.; Malcovati, P.; Vacchi, C.; Pancheri, L.; Benkechcache, M. E. A.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Xu, H.; Verzellesi, G.; Ronchin, S.; Boscardin, M.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Casarosa, G.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Morsani, F.

    2016-11-01

    This work is concerned with the design of a readout chip for application to experiments at the next generation X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FEL). The ASIC, named PixFEL Matrix (PFM2), has been designed in a 65 nm CMOS technology and consists of 32 × 32 pixels. Each cell covers an area of 110 × 110 μm2 and includes a low-noise charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) with dynamic signal compression, a time-variant shaper used to process the preamplifier output signal, a 10-bit successive approximation register (SAR) analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and digital circuitry for channel control and data readout. Two different solutions for the readout channel, based on different versions of the time-variant filter, have been integrated in the chip. Both solutions can be operated in such a way to cope with the high frame rate (exceeding 1 MHz) foreseen for future X-ray FEL machines. The ASIC will be bump bonded to a slim/active edge pixel sensor to form the first demonstrator for the PixFEL X-ray imager. This work has been carried out in the frame of the PixFEL project funded by Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Italy.

  1. Polarization control in X-ray FELs by reverse undulator tapering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2015-05-01

    Baseline design of a typical X-ray FEL undulator assumes a planar configuration which results in a linear polarization of the FEL radiation. However, many experiments at X-ray FEL user facilities would profit from using a circularly polarized radiation. As a cheap upgrade one can consider an installation of a short helical (or cross-planar) afterburner, but then one should have an efficient method to suppress powerful linearly polarized background from the main undulator. In this paper we propose a new method for such a suppression: an application of the reverse taper in the main undulator. We discover that in a certain range of the taper strength, the density modulation (bunching) at saturation is practically the same as in the case of non-tapered undulator while the power of linearly polarized radiation is suppressed by orders of magnitude. Then strongly modulated electron beam radiates at full power in the afterburner. Considering SASE3 undulator of the European XFEL as a practical example, we demonstrate that soft X-ray radiation pulses with peak power in excess of 100 GW and an ultimately high degree of circular polarization can be produced. The proposed method is rather universal, i.e. it can be used at SASE FELs and seeded (self-seeded) FELs, with any wavelength of interest, in a wide range of electron beam parameters, and with any repetition rate.

  2. On a theory of an FEL amplifier with circular waveguide and guiding magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Yurkov, M.V.

    1995-12-31

    We consider an FEL amplifier with an axisymmetric electron beam, circular waveguide, helical undulator and guiding magnetic field. The presented nonlinear theory of the FEL amplifier is based on Hamiltonian description of particle motion and radiation field representation with Green function method. The space charge fields, energy spread and diffraction effects are taken into consideration. Such an FEL amplifier configuration possesses some peculiarities when it operates in a regime with the negative longitudinal mass (i.e. when{mu}{sup -1}{proportional_to}dv{sub z}/dE < 0). It is shown that in the presence of strong space charge fields, the so-called {open_quotes}negative mass{close_quotes} instability may influence significantly on the FEL amplifier operation resulting in a significant increase in the FEL amplifier efficiency. It is proposed in the presented paper to use the effect of the {open_quotes}negative mass instability{close_quotes} to achieve an effective bunching of the CERN Linear Collider (LIC) driving beam.

  3. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION, FREE ELECTRON LASER, APPLICATION OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY, ETC.: Operating the SDUV-FEL with the echo-enabled harmonic generation scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian-Hui; Deng, Hai-Xiao; Gu, Qiang; Li, Dong-Guo; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Meng; Zhao, Zhen-Tang

    2009-08-01

    Using the recently proposed echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) free-electron laser (FEL) scheme, it is shown that operating the Shanghai deep ultraviolet FEL (SDUV-FEL) with single-stage to higher harmonics is very promising, with higher frequency up-conversion efficiency, higher harmonic selectivity and lower power requirement of the seed laser. The considerations on a proof-of-principle experiment and expected performance in SDUV-FEL are given.

  4. The DarkLight Experiment at the JLab FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Peter

    2013-10-01

    DarkLight will study the production of gauge bosons associated with Dark Forces theories in the scattering of 100 MeV electrons on proton a target. DarkLight is a spectrometer to measure all the final state particles in e- + p -->e- + p +e- +e+ . QED allows this process and the invariant mass distribution of the e+e- pair is a continuum from nearly zero to nearly the electron beam energy. Dark Forces theories, which allow the dark matter mass scale to be over 1 TeV, predict a gauge boson A' in the mass range of 10-1,000 MeV and decays to an electron-positron pair with an invariant mass of mA'. We aim to search for this process using the 100 MeV, 10 mA electron beam at the JLab Free Electron Laser impinging on a hydrogen target with a 1019 cm-2 density. The resulting luminosity of 6 ×1035/cm2-s gives the experiment enough sensitivity to probe A' couplings of 10-9 α . DarkLight is unique in its design to detect all four particles in the final state. The leptons will be measured in a large high-rate TPC and a silicon sensor will measure the protons. A 0.5 T solenoidal magnetic field provides the momentum resolution and focuses the copious Møller scattering background down the beam line, away from the detectors. A first beam test has shown the FEL beam is compatible with the target design and that the hall backgrounds are manageable. The experiment has been approved by Jefferson Lab for first running in 2017.

  5. Critical review of high gain x-ray FEL experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kwang-Je

    1996-08-01

    There is a renewed interest at the present time to develop x-ray free electron lasers (FELs). The interest is driven by the scientific opportunities with coherent x-rays glimpsed at the third generation light sources. With the recent development in linac technology in producing high-energy, high-brightness electron beams, it is now possible to design intense coherent x-ray source for wavelengths as short as one Angstrom based on the self- amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) principle. Major linac laboratories such as SLAC and DESY are therefore actively pursuing detailed design studies for the x-ray SASE facilities. The x-rays from these facilities will provide a peak brightness more than ten orders of magnitude higher than that of the current synchrotron radiation sources. Short wavelength coherent radiation could also be generated with harmonic generation techniques in linacs or storage rings. However, these schemes are not expected to be effective for 1 {Angstrom} wavelengths. This review will therefore concentrate on the linac based SASE scheme. The critical components of the SASE are: an electron source consisting of an RF photocathode gun with the emittance corrector producing high brightness electron beam; the beam bunching and acceleration; and a long undulator in which the radiation develops from initially incoherent radiation to intense, coherent radiation. We discuss the critical experimental issues in these components highlighting some relevant recent experiments. We also discuss issues related to the SASE experiment which are distinct from the usual free electron lasers. We give a brief survey of the world-wide SASE experiments. We conclude with a summary and outlook.

  6. X-ray FEL induced multiphton ionization and molecular dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Li

    2014-05-01

    X-ray Free electron lasers (FELs) enable multiphoton absorption at the core levels which is not possible with conventional light sources. Multiphoton ionization and the subsequent core-hole states relaxation lead to dramatic dynamics of the molecules. We present our experimental as well as theoretical results on multiphoton ionization and molecular fragmentation dynamics with the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC National Laboratory. We investigated simple diatomic system, N2 molecules, where we used multiphoton ionization as an internal clock for imaging the dynamics in time and the internuclear separation domain. We observed the modification of the ionization dynamic by varying the x-ray beam parameters and the effect of the spatial distribution on the ionization. We also investigated a complex system, C60, where we developed a full model to simulate the multiphoton ionization that results in various molecular ions and atomic carbon ions up to charge 6+. The calculation agrees well with our experimental results in ion kinetic energy distribution and charge state distribution. Moreover, our model provides further insights into the photoionization and dissociation dynamics as a function of time and molecular size. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. Thank T. Osipov, B. Murphy, Z. Jurek, S.-K. Son, R. Santra, and N. Berrah, M. Hoener, O. Gessner, F. Tarantelli, S.T. Pratt, O. Kornilov, C. Buth, M. Güehr, E. Kanter, C. Bostedt, J. D. Bozek, P. H. Bucksbaum, M. Chen, R. Coffee, J. Cryan, L. DiMauro, M. Glownia, E. Kukk, S.R. Leone, L. Avaldi, P. Bolognesi, J. Eland, J. Farrell, R. Feifel, L. Frasinski, D.T. Ha, K. Hoffmann, B. McFarland, C. Miron, M. Mucke, R. Squibb, K. Ueda for their contributions to this work.

  7. X-band photoinjector for a chirped-pulse FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Luhmann, Jr., N. C.; Alvis, R. M.; Baldis, H. A.; Hartemann, F. V; Heritage, J. P.; Ho, C. H.; Landahl, E. C.; Li, K.; Troha,A. L.; White, W. E.

    1998-12-15

    The phase noise and jitter characteristics of the laser and rf systems of a high gradient X-band photoinjector have been measured experimentally. When > 100 coherently phased 5 MeV electron bunches are produced in bursts, the photoinjector should be an ideal electron source for a pulsed, pre-bunched free-electron laser (FEL) operating at 100 GHz. The laser oscillator is a self-modelocked Titanium:Sapphire system operating at the 108th subharmonic of the rf gun. The X-band signal is produced from the laser by a phase-locked dielectric resonance oscillator, and amplified by a pulsed TWT and klystron. A comparison between the klystron and TWT amplifier phase noise and the fields excited in the rf gun demonstrates the filtering effect of the high Q structure, thus indicating that the rf gun can be used as a master oscillator, and could be energized by either a rf oscillator such as a magnetron or a compact source such as a cross-field amplifier. In particular, the rf gun can play the role of a pulsed rf clock to synchronize the photocathode laser system: direct drive of a synchronously mode-locked AlGaAs quantum well laser has been achieved using the X0-band gun rf fields. This novel, GHz repetition rate, sub-picosecond laser system is being developed to replace the more conventional femtosecond Ti: Al2O3 system. Some advantages include pumping this laser with a stabilized current source instead of a costly, low efficiency pump laser. Finally, dark current measurements and initial photoelectron measurements are reported.

  8. Development of an alternative testing strategy for the fish early life-stage (FELS) test using the AOP framework

    EPA Science Inventory

    Currently, the fish early life-stage (FELS) test (OECD 210) is the primary guideline used to estimate chronic toxicity of regulated chemicals. Although already more cost-efficient than adult fish tests, the FELS test has some important drawbacks. Both industry and regulatory inst...

  9. Physical design of FEL injector based on the performance-enhanced EC-ITC RF gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Tong-Ning; Chen, Qu-Shan; Pei, Yuan-Ji; Li, Ji; Qin, Bin

    2014-01-01

    To meet the requirements of high performance THz-FEL (Free Electron Laser), a compact scheme of FEL injector was proposed. A thermionic cathode was chosen to emit electrons instead of a photo-cathode with its complex structure and high cost. The effective bunch charge was improved to ~200 pC by adopting an enhanced EC-ITC (External Cathode Independently Tunable Cells) RF gun to extract micro-bunches; back bombardment effects were almost eliminated as well. Constant gradient accelerator structures were designed to improve energy to ~14 MeV, while the focusing system was applied for emittance suppressing and bunch state maintenance. The physical design and beam dynamics of the key components for the FEL injector were analyzed. Furthermore, start-to-end simulations with multi-pulses were performed using homemade MATLAB and Parmela. The results show that continual high brightness electron bunches with a low energy spread and emittance could be obtained stably.

  10. IR-FEL-induced green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene transfer into plant cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awazu, Kunio; Kinpara, Takeshi; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2002-05-01

    A Free Electron Laser (FEL) holds potential for various biotechnological applications due to its characteristics such as flexible wavelength tunability, short pulse and high peak power. We could successfully introduce the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) gene into tobacco BY2 cells by IR-FEL laser irradiation. The irradiated area of the solution containing BY2 cells and plasmid was about 0.1 mm 2. FEL irradiation at a wavelength of 5.75 and 6.1 μm, targeting absorption by the ester bond of the lipid and the amide I bond of the protein, respectively, was shown to cause the introduction of the fluorescent dye into the cell. On the other hand, transient expression of the GFP fluorescence was only observed after irradiation at 5.75 μm. The maximum transfer efficiency was about 0.5%.

  11. The research facilities of the Duke FEL Laboratory - uniqueness and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Madey, J.M.J.; Barnett, G.; Burnham, B.

    1995-12-31

    FEL light sources offer unique promise as broadly tuneable, high brightness sources of radiation throughout the electromagnetic spectrum. But the effective utilization of these new light sources also raises a series of unprecedented issues and challenges arising, in general, from the limited number of beamlines which can be supported by a single source. The cost effective utilization of this technology therefore requires emphasis on (1) the realization of one or more truly unique research capabilities, (2) the optimization of access to the research beamlines which are available, and (3) the management and support services required by users to maximize their productivity. The experience we have acquired in the development and operation of the facilities of the Duke FEL Lab provide a point of reference which may prove useful to other research-oriented FEL facilities.

  12. Start-to-end Simulation for the LCLS Xray-FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Emma, Paul J

    2002-08-23

    X-ray FELs, such as the LCLS and TESLA FEL, require electron beams with large peak current and very small emittance. The X-ray peak power, temporal and spectral properties, depend significantly on details of the electron beam phase space distribution. The electron beam distribution is determined by many effects, as the emission process at the gun photo-cathode, bunch compression, acceleration and wakefields within the undulator. Although analytical results can give an estimate of the expected performance, the complexity of the electron beam generation, acceleration and compression can only be evaluated using a numerical simulation of all these processes, a start-to-end simulation. In this presentation we discuss the LCLS X-Ray FEL performance estimated by a start-to-end simulation, and we compare the results with those obtained using a simpler model.

  13. Quasi-real-time photon pulse duration measurement by analysis of FEL radiation spectra

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Robin; Düsterer, Stefan; Brenner, Günter; Teubner, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    For photon diagnostics at free-electron lasers (FELs), the determination of the photon pulse duration is an important challenge and a complex task. This is especially true for SASE FELs with strongly fluctuating pulse parameters. However, most techniques require an extensive experimental setup, data acquisition and evaluation time, limiting the usability in all-day operation. In contrast, the presented work uses an existing approach based on the analysis of statistical properties of measured SASE FEL spectra and implements it as a software tool, integrated in FLASH’s data acquisition system. This allows the calculation of the average pulse durations from a set of measured spectral distributions with only seconds of delay, whenever high-resolution spectra are recorded. PMID:26698053

  14. Scaling formulae for FEL operating in linear and non linear regime

    SciTech Connect

    Dattoli, G.; Mezi, L.; Segreto, A.

    1995-12-31

    Scaling relations for the FEL gain, including the e-beam quality effects, have been usefully exploited to design FEL devices. We propose further extension of the above formulae including high gain, inhomogeneous broadening and saturation effects. A crucial role to get these relations is the use of approximant methods generalizing the Pade procedure. We derive gain equations containing the corrections due to energy spread, emittances and field intensity. It is shown that these equations can be exploited to {open_quotes}simulate{close_quotes} the FEL evolution with an almost negligible computational effort. Comments on the role of the saturation intensity and its dependence on the e-beam quality, high gain corrections etc. are also presented.

  15. A Dynamic Feedback Model for High Repetition Rate LINAC-Driven FELS

    SciTech Connect

    Mellado Munoz, M.; Doolittle, L.; Emma, P.; Huang, G.; Ratti, A.; Serrano, C.; Byrd, J. M.

    2012-05-20

    One of the concepts for the next generation of linacdriven FELs is a CW superconducting linac driving an electron beam with MHz repetition rates. One of the challenges for next generation FELs is improve the stability of the xray pulses by improving the shot-to-shot stability of the energy, charge, peak current, and timing jitter of the electron beam. A high repetition rate FEL with a CW linac presents an opportunity to use a variety of broadband feedbacks to stabilize the beam parameters. To understand the performance of such a feedback system, we are developing a dynamic model of the machine with a focus on the longitudinal beam properties. The model is being developed as an extension of the LITrack code and includes the dynamics of the beam-cavity interaction, RF feedback, beam-based feedback, and multibunch effects. In this paper, we present a detailed description of this model.

  16. EXPERIENCE AND PLANS OF THE JLAB FEL FACILITY AS A USER FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Michelle D. Shinn

    2007-08-26

    Jefferson Lab's IR Upgrade FEL building was planned from the beginning to be a user facility, and includes an associated 600 m2 area containing seven laboratories. The high average power capability (multikilowatt-level) in the near-infrared (1-3 microns), and many hundreds of watts at longer wavelengths, along with an ultrafast (~ 1 ps) high PRF (10's MHz) temporal structure makes this laser a unique source for both applied and basic research. In addition to the FEL, we have a dedicated laboratory capable of delivering high power (many tens of watts) of broadband THz light. After commissioning the IR Upgrade, we once again began delivering beam to users in 2005. In this presentation, I will give an overview of the FEL facility and its current performance, lessons learned over the last two years, and a synopsis of current and future experiments.

  17. Laser-plasma interactions from thin tapes for high-energy electron accelerators and seeding compact FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Brian Henry

    This thesis comprises a detailed investigation of the physics of using a plasma mirror (PM) from a tape by reflecting ultrashort pulses from a laser-triggered surface plasma. The tapes used in the characterization of the PM are VHS and computer data storage tape. The tapes are 6.6 m (computer storage tape) and 15 m (VHS) thick. Each tape is 0.5 inches wide, and 10s of meters of tape are spooled using a tape drive; providing thousands of shots on a single reel of tape. The amount of reflected energy of the PM was studied for different input intensities. The fluence was varied by translating the focus of the laser upstream and downstream of the tape, which changed the spot size on the tape surface and hence changed the fluence. This study measured reflectances from both sides of the two tapes, and for input light of both s and p-polarizations. Lastly, an analytic model was developed to understand the reflectance as a function of fluence for each tape material and polarization. Another application that benefits from the advancements of LPA technology is an LPAbased FEL. By sending a high quality electron bunch through an undulator (a periodic structure of positive and negative magnetic poles), the electrons oscillate transversely to the propagation axis and produce radiation. The 1.5 m THUNDER undulator at the BELLA Center has been commissioned using electron beams of 400MeV beams with broad energy spread (35%). To produce a coherent LPA-based FEL, the beam quality would need to improve to sub-percent level energy spread. A seed source could be used to help induce bunching of the electron beam within the undulator. This thesis described the experimental investigation of the physics of using solid-based surface high-harmonic generation (SHHG) from a thin tape as a possible seed source for an FEL. A thin tape placed within centimeters of the undulator's entrance could act as a harmonic generating source, while simultaneously transmitting an electron beam. This removes

  18. Request for Information from entities interested in commercializing Laboratory-developed advanced in vitro assessment technology

    SciTech Connect

    Intrator, Miranda Huang

    2016-03-30

    Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) is the manager and operator of Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) for the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC52- 06NA25396. Los Alamos is a mission-centric Federally Funded Research and Development Center focused on solving critical national security challenges through science and engineering for both government and private customers. LANS is opening this formal Request for Information (RFI) to gauge interest in engaging as an industry partner to LANS for collaboration in advancing the bio-assessment platform described below. Please see last section for details on submitting a Letter of Interest.

  19. Cat (Fel d 1) and dog (Can f 1) allergen levels in cars, dwellings and schools.

    PubMed

    Niesler, A; Ścigała, G; Łudzeń-Izbińska, B

    Pets are an important source of indoor allergens. The aim of the study was to compare cat and dog allergen levels in cars, schools and homes. The study was carried out in 17 cars, 14 classrooms and 19 dwellings located in the highly industrialized and urbanized region of Poland. Dust and air samples were analyzed for Fel d 1 and Can f 1 using a double monoclonal ELISA assay. The highest amounts of cat and dog allergens (Fel d 1: 1169 μg/g; Can f 1: 277 μg/g) were found in dwellings with pets. Allergen concentrations were correlated with the number of animals kept at home. Although concentrations on automobile seats were lower, Fel d 1 levels exceeded 8 μg/g in 23.5 % of cars and high levels of Can f 1 (>10 μg/g) were found in 17.6 % of cars. The study revealed that cars of pet owners may be reservoirs of cat and dog allergens even when animals are not transported in them. In schools, concentrations of pet allergens did not reach high levels, but the moderate levels of Fel d 1 (≥1-8 μg/g) and Can f 1 (≥2-10 μg/g) were detected in 42.9 and 7.1 % of the investigated classrooms. Concentrations of cat and dog allergen in schools were higher than in homes without pets. While airborne Fel d 1 and Can f 1 levels were found low, residential allergen concentrations in settled dust and air were correlated. The study results suggest that classrooms and cars of pet owners may be important sites of exposure to cat and dog allergens, though the highest concentrations of Fel d 1 and Can f 1 are found in homes of pet owners.

  20. An Analysis of Shot Noise Propagation and Amplificationin Harmonic Cascade FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; /SLAC

    2006-12-11

    The harmonic generation process in a harmonic cascade (HC) FEL is subject to noise degradation which is proportional to the square of the total harmonic order. In this paper, we study the shot noise evolution in the first-stage modulator and radiator of a HC FEL that produces the dominant noise contributions. We derive the effective input noise for a modulator operating in the low-gain regime, and analyze the radiator noise for a density-modulated beam. The significance of these noise sources in different harmonic cascade designs is also discussed.

  1. Time-resolved protein dynamics using synchronized Ti sapphire regenerative amplifier/infrared FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, R.J.; Haar, P.; Boxer, S.G.

    1995-12-31

    We have synchronized a femtosecond 5 kHz Ti Sapphire regenerative amplifier (regen) to the Stanford Superconducting Accelerator/Free Electron laser (SCA/FEL) to within 2 picoseconds time jitter. We are using this capability to measure the time resolved spectral evolution of the radical cation band of the initial electron donor from bacterial reaction centers (Rb sphaeroides) after the initiation of electron transfer using a {approximately} 120 fs NIR pulse from the regen. The FEL is used to probe for the appearance of the radical cation band at {approximately} 4 {mu}m.

  2. Gain length dependence on phase shake in the VUV-FEL at the TESLA Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pflueger, J.; Pierini, P.

    1995-12-31

    The TTF VUV FEL, which is in its design stage at DESY, consists of a 30 m long SASE FEL which will radiate around 6 nm, driven by a superconducting linac with final energy of 1 GeV. One of the important issues in its design is the undulator performance, which is studied in this paper. The present setup, including FODO lattice, is discussed in this paper. Results of simulations, including the realistic wiggler field errors and beam stearing, are presented. Dependence of the performance, in particular the gain and saturation length as well as the saturation peak power, on the wiggler field errors is discussed.

  3. Strategies for minimizing emittance growth in high charge CW FEL injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.

    1995-12-31

    This paper is concerned with the best strategies for designing low emittance, high charge CW FEL injectors. This issue has become more and more critical as today`s interest in FELs is toward UV wavelength high average power operation. The challenge of obtaining the smallest possible emittance is discussed from both the practical point of view and the beam physics point of view. Various mechanisms responsible for beam emittance growth are addressed in detail. Finally, the design of a high charge injector test stand at CEBAF is chosen to help illustrate the design strategies and emittance growth mechanisms discussed in this paper.

  4. Analysis of longitudinal bunching in an FEL driven two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, S.; Gardelle, J.; Lefevre, T.; Donohue, J.T.; Gouard, P.; Rullier, J.L.; Vermare, C.

    2000-08-01

    Recent experiments have explored the use of a free-electron laser (FEL) as a buncher for a microwave two-beam accelerator, and the subsequent driving of a standing-wave rf output cavity. Here the authors present a deeper analysis of the longitudinal dynamics of the electron bunches as they are transported from the end of the FEL and through the output cavity. In particular, the authors examine the effect of the transport region and cavity aperture to filter the bunched portion of the beam.

  5. Beam Line Commissioning of a UV/VUV FEL at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Stephen; Blackburn, Keith; Bullard, Daniel; Clavero Perez, Cesar; Coleman, James; Dickover, Cody; Douglas, David; Ellingsworth, Forrest; Evtushenko, Pavel; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Gould, Christopher; Gubeli, Joseph; Hardy, David; Jordan, Kevin; Klopf, John; James, Kortze; Legg, Robert; Marchlik, Matthew; Moore, Steven; Neil, George; Powers, Thomas; Sexton, Daniel; Shinn, Michelle D; Tennant, Christopher; Walker, Richard; Williams, Gwyn; Wilson, Frederick; Zhang, Shukui

    2011-08-01

    Many novel applications in photon sciences require very high brightness and/or short pulses in the vacuum ultra-violet (VUV). Jefferson Lab has commissioned a UV oscillator with high gain and has transported the third harmonic of the UV to a user lab. The experimental performance of the UV FEL is much better than simulated performance in both gain and efficiency. This success is important for efforts to push towards higher gain FELs at short wavelengths where mirrors absorb strongly. We will report on efforts to characterize the UV laser and the VUV coherent harmonics as well as designs to lase directly in the VUV wavelength range.

  6. High gain FEL amplification of charge modulation caused by a hadron

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko,V.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Hao, Y.; Kayran, D.; Pozdeyev, E.; Wang, G.; Reiche, S.; Shevchenko, O.; Vinokurov, N. A.

    2008-08-24

    In scheme of coherent electron cooling (CeC) [1,2], a modulation of electron beam density induced by a copropagation hadron is amplified in high gain FEL. The resulting amplified modulation of electron beam, its shape, form and its lethargy determine number of important properties of the coherent electron cooling. In this talk we present both analytical and numerical (using codes RON [3] and Genesis [4]) evaluations of the corresponding Green functions. We also discuss influence of electron beam parameters on the FEL response.

  7. Penetrating radiation: applications at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Scott; Hunter, James; Morris, Christopher

    2013-09-01

    Los Alamos has used penetrating radiography extensively throughout its history dating back to the Manhattan Project where imaging dense, imploding objects was the subject of intense interest. This interest continues today as major facilities like DARHT1 have become the mainstay of the US Stockpile Stewardship Program2 and the cornerstone of nuclear weapons certification. Meanwhile, emerging threats to national security from cargo containers and improvised explosive devices (IEDs) have invigorated inspection efforts using muon tomography, and compact x-ray radiography. Additionally, unusual environmental threats, like those from underwater oil spills and nuclear power plant accidents, have caused renewed interest in fielding radiography in severe operating conditions. We review the history of penetrating radiography at Los Alamos and survey technologies as presently applied to these important problems.

  8. The engineering institute of Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, Charles R; Park, Gyuhae; Cornwell, Phillip J; Todd, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) have taken the unprecedented step of creating a collaborative, multi-disciplinary graduate education program and associated research agenda called the Engineering Institute. The mission of the Engineering Institute is to develop a comprehensive approach for conducting LANL mission-driven, multidisciplinary engineering research and to improve recruiting, revitalization, and retention of the current and future staff necessary to support the LANL' s national security responsibilities. The components of the Engineering Institute are (1) a joint LANL/UCSD degree program, (2) joint LANL/UCSD research projects, (3) the Los Alamos Dynamic Summer School, (4) an annual workshop, and (5) industry short courses. This program is a possible model for future industry/government interactions with university partners.

  9. A NEW GENERATION OF LOS ALAMOS OPACITY TABLES

    SciTech Connect

    Colgan, J.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Magee, N. H.; Sherrill, M. E.; Abdallah, J. Jr.; Hakel, P.; Fontes, C. J.; Guzik, J. A.; Mussack, K. A.

    2016-02-01

    We present a new, publicly available set of Los Alamos OPLIB opacity tables for the elements hydrogen through zinc. Our tables are computed using the Los Alamos ATOMIC opacity and plasma modeling code, and make use of atomic structure calculations that use fine-structure detail for all the elements considered. Our equation of state model, known as ChemEOS, is based on the minimization of free energy in a chemical picture and appears to be a reasonable and robust approach to determining atomic state populations over a wide range of temperatures and densities. In this paper we discuss in detail the calculations that we have performed for the 30 elements considered, and present some comparisons of our monochromatic opacities with measurements and other opacity codes. We also use our new opacity tables in solar modeling calculations and compare and contrast such modeling with previous work.

  10. A New Generation of Los Alamos Opacity Tables

    SciTech Connect

    Colgan, James Patrick; Kilcrease, David Parker; Magee, Jr., Norman H.; Sherrill, Manolo Edgar; Abdallah, Joseph; Hakel, Peter; Fontes, Christopher John; Guzik, Joyce Ann; Mussack Tamashiro, Kathleen Anita

    2016-01-26

    We present a new, publicly available, set of Los Alamos OPLIB opacity tables for the elements hydrogen through zinc. Our tables are computed using the Los Alamos ATOMIC opacity and plasma modeling code, and make use of atomic structure calculations that use fine-structure detail for all the elements considered. Our equation-of-state (EOS) model, known as ChemEOS, is based on the minimization of free energy in a chemical picture and appears to be a reasonable and robust approach to determining atomic state populations over a wide range of temperatures and densities. In this paper we discuss in detail the calculations that we have performed for the 30 elements considered, and present some comparisons of our monochromatic opacities with measurements and other opacity codes. We also use our new opacity tables in solar modeling calculations and compare and contrast such modeling with previous work.

  11. A New Generation of Los Alamos Opacity Tables

    DOE PAGES

    Colgan, James Patrick; Kilcrease, David Parker; Magee, Jr., Norman H.; ...

    2016-01-26

    We present a new, publicly available, set of Los Alamos OPLIB opacity tables for the elements hydrogen through zinc. Our tables are computed using the Los Alamos ATOMIC opacity and plasma modeling code, and make use of atomic structure calculations that use fine-structure detail for all the elements considered. Our equation-of-state (EOS) model, known as ChemEOS, is based on the minimization of free energy in a chemical picture and appears to be a reasonable and robust approach to determining atomic state populations over a wide range of temperatures and densities. In this paper we discuss in detail the calculations thatmore » we have performed for the 30 elements considered, and present some comparisons of our monochromatic opacities with measurements and other opacity codes. We also use our new opacity tables in solar modeling calculations and compare and contrast such modeling with previous work.« less

  12. A new generation of Los Alamos opacity tables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgan, J.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Magee, N. H.; Abdallah, J.; Sherrill, M. E.; Fontes, C. J.; Hakel, P.; Guzik, J. A.; Mussack, K. A.; Walczak, P.

    2017-03-01

    We review a recently completed set of Los Alamos OPLIB opacity tables for the elements hydrogen through zinc. Our tables have been computed using the Los Alamos ATOMIC code, which makes use of atomic structure calculations that include fine-structure detail for all the elements considered. We utilize an equation-of-state model, known as ChemEOS, that is based on the minimization of free energy in a chemical picture. Recent publications by us have compared our calculations to available experimental opacity data and to other opacity calculations. Our tables are publicly available via our website, and have already been used in solar modeling calculations as well as the modeling of pulsating B-type stars. This proceedings submission will give an overview of our opacity calculations and briefly review the conclusions from the astrophysical modeling.

  13. Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) located in Los Alamos, New Mexico. LANL is operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by the University of California. The Tiger Team Assessment was conducted from September 23 to November 8, 1991, under the auspices of the DOE Office of Special Projects, Office of Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health. The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing environmental, safety, and health (ES H) disciplines; management; and contractor and DOE self-assessments. Compliance with applicable Federal, state, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal LANL site requirements was assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and the site contractors' management of ES H/quality assurance programs was conducted. This volume discusses findings concerning the environmental assessment.

  14. Airport-Noise Levels and Annoyance Model (ALAMO) user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, R.; Donaldson, J. L.; Johnson, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    A guide for the use of the Airport-Noise Level and Annoyance MOdel (ALAMO) at the Langley Research Center computer complex is provided. This document is divided into 5 primary sections, the introduction, the purpose of the model, and an in-depth description of the following subsystems: baseline, noise reduction simulation and track analysis. For each subsystem, the user is provided with a description of architecture, an explanation of subsystem use, sample results, and a case runner's check list. It is assumed that the user is familiar with the operations at the Langley Research Center (LaRC) computer complex, the Network Operating System (NOS 1.4) and CYBER Control Language. Incorporated within the ALAMO model is a census database system called SITE II.

  15. Los Alamos x-ray characterization facilities for plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Day, R.H.; Blake, R.L.; Stradling, G.L.; Trela, W.J.; Bartlett, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    A summary is given of characteristics of x-ray sources used by Los Alamos National Laboratory to calibrate various x-ray diagnostic packages and components. Included are D.C. sourcs in electron impact and fluorescence modes, a pulsed laser source for soft x rays with 100 ps time resolution, Febetron pulsed electron impact sources, and both EUV and x-ray synchrotron beamlines.

  16. Los Alamos National Laboratory's high-performance data system

    SciTech Connect

    Mercier, C.; Chorn, G.; Christman, R.; Collins, B.

    1991-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is designing a High-Performance Data System (HPDS) that will provide storage for supercomputers requiring large files and fast transfer speeds. The HPDS will meet the performance requirements by managing data transfers from high-speed storage systems connected directly to a high-speed network. File and storage management software will be distributed in workstations. Network protocols will ensure reliable, wide-area network data delivery to support long-distance distributed processing. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Recent results in the Los Alamos compact torus program

    SciTech Connect

    Tuszewski, M.; Armstrong, W.T.; Barnes, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    A Compact Toroid is a toroidal magnetic-plasma-containment geometry in which no conductors or vacuum-chamber walls pass through the hole in the torus. Two types of compact toroids are studied experimentally and theoretically at Los Alamos: spheromaks that are oblate in shape and contain both toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields, and field-reversed configurations (FRC) that are very prolate and contain poloidal field only.

  18. [Los Alamos National Laboratory industrial applications and technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-31

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of the Los Alamos Economic Development Corporation (LAEDC) under its contract with the Industrial Applications Office (IAO). The LAEDC has: provided business planning assistance to potential entrepreneurs, assisted IAO in preparing and distributing informational materials on technology, organized and managed meetings and seminars on technology transfer and entrepreneurship, identified new opportunities for technology transfer, and identified and implemented programs for the recognition of Laboratory entrepreneurs.

  19. Los Alamos Canyon Ice Rink Parking Flood Plain Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hathcock, Charles Dean

    2015-02-10

    The project location is in Los Alamos Canyon east of the ice rink facility at the intersection of West and Omega roads (Figure 1). Forty eight parking spaces will be constructed on the north and south side of Omega Road, and a lighted walking path will be constructed to the ice rink. Some trees will be removed during this action. A guardrail of approximately 400 feet will be constructed along the north side of West Road to prevent unsafe parking in that area.

  20. Inertial Confinement Fusion Research at LOS Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batha, S. H.; Albright, B. J.; Alexander, D. J.; Barnes, Cris W.; Bradley, P. A.; Cobble, J. A.; Cooley, J. C.; Cooley, J. H.; Day, R. D.; DeFriend, K. A.; Delamater, N. D.; Dodd, E. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Fernandez, J. C.; Flippo, K. A.; Grim, G. P.; Goldman, S. R.; Greenfield, S. R.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hoffman, N. M.; Holmes, R. L.; Johnson, R. P.; Keiter, P. A.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Lanier, N. E.; Loomis, E.; Lopez, F. E.; Luo, S.; Mack, J. M.; Magelssen, G. R.; Montgomery, D. S.; Nobile, A.; Oertel, J. A.; Reardon, P.; Rose, H. A.; Schmidt, D.; Schmitt, M. J.; Seifter, A.; Shimada, T.; Swift, D. C.; Tierney, T. E.; Welser-Sherrill, L.; Wilke, M. D.; Wilson, D. C.; Workman, J.; Yin, L.

    2009-07-01

    Inertial confinement fusion research at Los Alamos National Laboratory is focused on high-leverage areas of thermonuclear ignition to which LANL can apply its historic strengths and that are complementary to high-energy-density-physics topics. Using the Trident and Omega laser facilities, experiments are pursued in laser-plasma instabilities, symmetry, Be technologies, neutron and fusion-product diagnostics, and defect hydrodynamics.

  1. Los Alamos sequence analysis package for nucleic acids and proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kanehisa, M I

    1982-01-01

    An interactive system for computer analysis of nucleic acid and protein sequences has been developed for the Los Alamos DNA Sequence Database. It provides a convenient way to search or verify various sequence features, e.g., restriction enzyme sites, protein coding frames, and properties of coded proteins. Further, the comprehensive analysis package on a large-scale database can be used for comparative studies on sequence and structural homologies in order to find unnoted information stored in nucleic acid sequences. PMID:6174934

  2. Overview of laser technology at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, G. K.; Cremers, D. A.

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has had a long history of involvement in laser sciences and has been recognized both for its large laser programs and smaller scale developments in laser technology and applications. The first significant program was with the Rover nuclear-based rocket propulsion system in 1968 to study laser initiated fusion. From here applications spread to programs in laser isotope separation and development of large lasers for fusion. These programs established the technological human resource base of highly trained laser physicists, engineers, and chemists that remain at the Laboratory today. Almost every technical division at Los Alamos now has some laser capability ranging from laser development, applications, studies on nonlinear processes, modeling and materials processing. During the past six years over eight R&D-100 Awards have been received by Los Alamos for development of laser-based techniques and instrumentation. Outstanding examples of technology developed include LIDAR applications to environmental monitoring, single molecule detection using fluorescence spectroscopy, a laser-based high kinetic energy source of oxygen atoms produced by a laser-sustained plasma, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for compositional, analysis, thin film high temperature superconductor deposition, multi-station laser welding, and direct metal deposition and build-up of components by fusing powder particles with a laser beam.

  3. Los Alamos, Toshiba probing Fukushima with cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Christopher

    2014-06-16

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has announced an impending partnership with Toshiba Corporation to use a Los Alamos technique called muon tomography to safely peer inside the cores of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors and create high-resolution images of the damaged nuclear material inside without ever breaching the cores themselves. The initiative could reduce the time required to clean up the disabled complex by at least a decade and greatly reduce radiation exposure to personnel working at the plant. Muon radiography (also called cosmic-ray radiography) uses secondary particles generated when cosmic rays collide with upper regions of Earth's atmosphere to create images of the objects that the particles, called muons, penetrate. The process is analogous to an X-ray image, except muons are produced naturally and do not damage the materials they contact. Muon radiography has been used before in imaginative applications such as mapping the interior of the Great Pyramid at Giza, but Los Alamos's muon tomography technique represents a vast improvement over earlier technology.

  4. Los Alamos Science: The Human Genome Project. Number 20, 1992

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cooper, N. G.; Shea, N. eds.

    1992-01-01

    This document provides a broad overview of the Human Genome Project, with particular emphasis on work being done at Los Alamos. It tries to emphasize the scientific aspects of the project, compared to the more speculative information presented in the popular press. There is a brief introduction to modern genetics, including a review of classic work. There is a broad overview of the Genome Project, describing what the project is, what are some of its major five-year goals, what are major technological challenges ahead of the project, and what can the field of biology, as well as society expect to see as benefits from this project. Specific results on the efforts directed at mapping chromosomes 16 and 5 are discussed. A brief introduction to DNA libraries is presented, bearing in mind that Los Alamos has housed such libraries for many years prior to the Genome Project. Information on efforts to do applied computational work related to the project are discussed, as well as experimental efforts to do rapid DNA sequencing by means of single-molecule detection using applied spectroscopic methods. The article introduces the Los Alamos staff which are working on the Genome Project, and concludes with brief discussions on ethical, legal, and social implications of this work; a brief glimpse of genetics as it may be practiced in the next century; and a glossary of relevant terms.

  5. Los Alamos Science: The Human Genome Project. Number 20, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, N G; Shea, N

    1992-01-01

    This article provides a broad overview of the Human Genome Project, with particular emphasis on work being done at Los Alamos. It tries to emphasize the scientific aspects of the project, compared to the more speculative information presented in the popular press. There is a brief introduction to modern genetics, including a review of classic work. There is a broad overview of the Genome Project, describing what the project is, what are some of its major five-year goals, what are major technological challenges ahead of the project, and what can the field of biology, as well as society expect to see as benefits from this project. Specific results on the efforts directed at mapping chromosomes 16 and 5 are discussed. A brief introduction to DNA libraries is presented, bearing in mind that Los Alamos has housed such libraries for many years prior to the Genome Project. Information on efforts to do applied computational work related to the project are discussed, as well as experimental efforts to do rapid DNA sequencing by means of single-molecule detection using applied spectroscopic methods. The article introduces the Los Alamos staff which are working on the Genome Project, and concludes with brief discussions on ethical, legal, and social implications of this work; a brief glimpse of genetics as it may be practiced in the next century; and a glossary of relevant terms.

  6. Los Alamos, Toshiba probing Fukushima with cosmic rays

    ScienceCinema

    Morris, Christopher

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has announced an impending partnership with Toshiba Corporation to use a Los Alamos technique called muon tomography to safely peer inside the cores of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors and create high-resolution images of the damaged nuclear material inside without ever breaching the cores themselves. The initiative could reduce the time required to clean up the disabled complex by at least a decade and greatly reduce radiation exposure to personnel working at the plant. Muon radiography (also called cosmic-ray radiography) uses secondary particles generated when cosmic rays collide with upper regions of Earth's atmosphere to create images of the objects that the particles, called muons, penetrate. The process is analogous to an X-ray image, except muons are produced naturally and do not damage the materials they contact. Muon radiography has been used before in imaginative applications such as mapping the interior of the Great Pyramid at Giza, but Los Alamos's muon tomography technique represents a vast improvement over earlier technology.

  7. Overview of laser technology at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, G.K.; Cremers, D.A.

    1994-09-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has had a long history of involvement in laser sciences and has been recognized both for its large laser programs and smaller scale developments in laser technology and applications. The first significant program was with the Rover nuclear-based rocket propulsion system in 1968 to study laser initiated fusion. From here applications spread to programs in laser isotope separation and development of large lasers for fusion. These programs established the technological human resource base of highly trained laser physicists, engineers, and chemists that remain at the Laboratory today. Almost every technical division at Los Alamos now has some laser capability ranging from laser development, applications, studies on nonlinear processes, modeling and materials processing. During the past six years over eight R&D-100 Awards have been received by Los Alamos for development of laser-based techniques and instrumentation. Outstanding examples of technology developed include LIDAR applications to environmental monitoring, single molecule detection using fluorescence spectroscopy, a laser-based high kinetic energy source of oxygen atoms produced by a laser-sustained plasma, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for compositional, analysis, thin film high temperature superconductor deposition, multi-station laser welding, and direct metal deposition and build-up of components by fusing powder particles with a laser beam.

  8. Water supply at Los Alamos during 1996. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McLin, S.G.; Purtymun, W.D.; Maes, M.N.; Longmire, P.A.

    1997-12-01

    Production of potable municipal water supplies during 1996 totaled about 1,368.1 million gallons from wells in the Guaje, Pajarito, and Otowi well fields. There was no water used from either the spring gallery in Water Canyon or from Guaje Reservoir during 1996. About 2.6 million gallons of water from Los Alamos Reservoir was used for lawn irrigation. The total water usage in 1996 was about 1,370.7 million gallons, or about 131 gallons per day per person living in Los Alamos County. Groundwater pumpage was up about 12.0 million gallons in 1996 compared with the pumpage in 1995. This report fulfills requirements specified in US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 (Groundwater Protection Management Program), which requires the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to monitor and document groundwater conditions below Pajarito Plateau and to protect the regional aquifer from contamination associated with Laboratory operations. Furthermore, this report also fulfills special conditions by providing information on hydrologic characteristics of the regional aquifer, including operating conditions of the municipal water supply system.

  9. First operation of an FEL in same-cell energy recovery mode

    SciTech Connect

    G.R. Neil; S. Benson; G. Biallas; C.L. Bohn; D. Douglas; H.F. Dylla; R. Evans; J. Fugitt; J. Gubeli; R. Hill; K. Jordan; G. Krafft; R. Li; L. Merminga; D. Oepts; P. Piot; J. Preble; Michelle D. Shinn; T. Siggins; R. Walker; B. Yunn

    1999-09-01

    The driver for Jefferson Lab's kW-level infrared free-electron laser (FEL) is a superconducting, recirculating accelerator that recovers 75% of the electron-beam power and converts it to radio frequency power. As reported in FEL'98, the accelerator operated ''straight-ahead'' to deliver 38 MeV, 1.1 mA cw current for lasing at wavelengths in the vicinity of 5 microns. The waste beam was sent directly to a dump, bypassing the recirculation loop. Stable operation at up to 311 W cw was achieved in this mode. The machine has now recirculated cw average current up to 4.6 mA and has lased cw with energy recovery up to 1,720 W output at 3.1 microns. This is the first FEL to ever operate in the ''same-cell'' energy recovery mode. Energy recovery offers several advantages (reduced RF power and dramatically reduced radio-nuclide production at the dump) and several challenges will be described. The authors have observed heating effects in the mirrors which will be described. They will also report on the additional performance measurements of the FEL that have been performed and connect those measurements to standard models.

  10. Availability Performance and Considerations for LCLS X-Ray FEL at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, W.B.; Brachmann, A.; Colocho, W.; Stanek, M.; Warren, J.; /SLAC

    2011-08-16

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is an X-ray Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility located at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. LCLS has been in operation since spring 2009, and it has completed its 3rd user run. LCLS is the first in its class of X-ray FEL user facilities, and presents different availability challenges compared to storage ring light sources. This paper presents recent availability performance of the FEL as well as factors to consider when defining the operational availability figure of merit for user runs. During LCLS [1] user runs, an availability of 95% has been set as a goal. In run III, LCLS photon and electron beam systems achieved availabilities of 94.8% and 96.7%, respectively. The total availability goal can be distributed among subsystems to track performance and identify areas that need attention in order to maintain and improve hardware reliability and operational availability. Careful beam time accounting is needed to understand the distribution of down time. The LCLS complex includes multiple experimental hutches for X-ray science, and each user program has different requirements of a set of parameters that the FEL can be configured to deliver. Since each user may have different criteria for what is considered 'acceptable beam', the quality of the beam must be considered to determine the X-ray beam availability.

  11. Numerical modeling of thermal loading of diamond crystal in X-ray FEL oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mei-Qi; Zhang, Qing-Min; Guo, Yu-Hang; Li, Kai; Deng, Hai-Xiao

    2016-04-01

    Due to high reflectivity and high resolution of X-ray pulses, diamond is one of the most popular Bragg crystals serving as the reflecting mirror and mono-chromator in the next generation of free electron lasers (FELs). The energy deposition of X-rays will result in thermal heating, and thus lattice expansion of the diamond crystal, which may degrade the performance of X-ray FELs. In this paper, the thermal loading effect of diamond crystal for X-ray FEL oscillators has been systematically studied by combined simulation with Geant4 and ANSYS, and its dependence on the environmental temperature, crystal size, X-ray pulse repetition rate and pulse energy are presented. Our results show that taking the thermal loading effects into account, X-ray FEL oscillators are still robust and promising with an optimized design. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175240, 11205234, 11322550) and Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University (IRT1280)

  12. Studies for a beam trajectory monitor for TTF-FEL at DESY

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Ute Carina

    1997-06-01

    A beam trajectory monitor for the FEL at the TESLA test facility at DESY has been proposed for the reconstruction of the electron beam trajectory by observing the spontaneous undulator radiation along the beam using the pinhole camera principle. Simulations for this concept have been performed and results are presented here.

  13. Optical design and performance of an XUV FEL (free-electron laser) oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, J.C.; McVey, B.D.; Newnam, B.E.

    1989-01-01

    A study of numerical simulation of the performance of a multifacet metal mirror ring resonator FEL is presented for several XUV wavelengths. Laser performance in the presence of mirror aberrations and thermal distortion is calculated for two different output coupling methods, a scraper mirror and a hole. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Oscillator Seeding of a High Gain Harmonic Generation FEL in a Radiator-First Configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, P.; Wurtele, J.; Penn, G.; Reinsch, M.

    2012-05-20

    A longitudinally coherent X-ray pulse from a high repetition rate free electron laser (FEL) is desired for a wide variety of experimental applications. However, generating such a pulse with a repetition rate greater than 1 MHz is a significant challenge. The desired high repetition rate sources, primarily high harmonic generation with intense lasers in gases or plasmas, do not exist now, and, for the multi-MHz bunch trains that superconducting accelerators can potentially produce, are likely not feasible with current technology. In this paper, we propose to place an oscillator downstream of a radiator. The oscillator generates radiation that is used as a seed for a high gain harmonic generation (HGHG) FEL which is upstream of the oscillator. For the first few pulses the oscillator builds up power and, until power is built up, the radiator has no HGHG seed. As power in the oscillator saturates, the HGHG is seeded and power is produced. The dynamics and stability of this radiator-first scheme is explored analytically and numerically. A single-pass map is derived using a semi-analytic model for FEL gain and saturation. Iteration of the map is shown to be in good agreement with simulations. A numerical example is presented for a soft X-ray FEL.

  15. Experimental setups for FEL-based four-wave mixing experiments at FERMI

    SciTech Connect

    Bencivenga, Filippo; Zangrando, Marco; Svetina, Cristian; Abrami, Alessandro; Battistoni, Andrea; Borghes, Roberto; Capotondi, Flavio; Cucini, Riccardo; Dallari, Francesco; Danailov, Miltcho; Demidovich, Alexander; Fava, Claudio; Gaio, Giulio; Gerusina, Simone; Gessini, Alessandro; Giacuzzo, Fabio; Gobessi, Riccardo; Godnig, Roberto; Grisonich, Riccardo; Kiskinova, Maya; Kurdi, Gabor; Loda, Giorgio; Lonza, Marco; Mahne, Nicola; Manfredda, Michele; Mincigrucci, Riccardo; Pangon, Gianpiero; Parisse, Pietro; Passuello, Roberto; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Pivetta, Lorenzo; Prica, Milan; Principi, Emiliano; Rago, Ilaria; Raimondi, Lorenzo; Sauro, Roberto; Scarcia, Martin; Sigalotti, Paolo; Zaccaria, Maurizio; Masciovecchio, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The recent advent of free-electron laser (FEL) sources is driving the scientific community to extend table-top laser research to shorter wavelengths adding elemental selectivity and chemical state specificity. Both a compact setup (mini-TIMER) and a separate instrument (EIS-TIMER) dedicated to four-wave-mixing (FWM) experiments has been designed and constructed, to be operated as a branch of the Elastic and Inelastic Scattering beamline: EIS. The FWM experiments that are planned at EIS-TIMER are based on the transient grating approach, where two crossed FEL pulses create a controlled modulation of the sample excitations while a third time-delayed pulse is used to monitor the dynamics of the excited state. This manuscript describes such experimental facilities, showing the preliminary results of the commissioning of the EIS-TIMER beamline, and discusses original experimental strategies being developed to study the dynamics of matter at the fs–nm time–length scales. In the near future such experimental tools will allow more sophisticated FEL-based FWM applications, that also include the use of multiple and multi-color FEL pulses.

  16. Powerful electrostatic FEL: Regime of operation, recovery of the spent electron beam and high voltage generator

    SciTech Connect

    Boscolo, I.; Gong, J.

    1995-02-01

    FEL, driven by a Cockcroft-Walton electrostatic accelerator with the recovery of the spent electron beam, is proposed as powerful radiation source for plasma heating. The low gain and high gain regimes are compared in view of the recovery problem and the high gain regime is shown to be much more favourable. A new design of the onion Cockcroft-Walton is presented.

  17. Effects of undulator interruptions on the performance of high-gain FEL amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.; Xie, M.; Pelligrini, C.

    1995-12-31

    The high-gain amplifiers for short wavelength free electron lasers (FELs) such as the LCLS project require a long undulator. The construction of the undulator as well as the FEL operation would become easier if the undulator could be interrupted with drift sections every few gain lengths. We have investigated the influence of such interruption on the FEL performances. Three effects are considered: (i) the diffraction loss, (ii) the phase mismatch and, (iii) the phase smearing due to velocity spread and to dispersion errors. The effect (i) is the loss during the process in which the optical mode in a section of the undulator leaves the undulator, propagates through the free space and then re-enters and re-adjusts in the next section. The effect (ii) is the fact that the phase of the optical beam is displaced with respect to the electrons density modulation for optical FEL interaction due to the slippage of the electron beam in the interruption region. The effect (iii) is the fact that electrons velocity spread, emittance, and dispersion due to misalignment of the quadrupoles used for additional focusing lead to a reduction of the bunching factor. We present an approximate analysis of these effects. When applied to the LCLS parameters, we find that the effect (i) is negligible, the effect (ii) gives a condition on the length of the drift section, and the effects (iii) are small, but could be non-negligible if there are sufficient number of interruptions.

  18. Beam quality and wavelength limitation in visible and UV FEL oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Tomimasu, T.

    1995-12-31

    The FELI linac beam has succeeded in visible-FEL oscillation on the third harmonics at 0.64 {mu}m using a 3-m undulator and a 6.72-m optical cavity with two Au-coated mirrors in Feb. 28, 1995. The beam is a 68-MeV, 40-A electron beam with a normalized emittance of 26 {pi}mm{center_dot}mrad and a relative energy spread of 1%. In 1993, an ultraviolet (UV) FEL oscillation was already achieved on the third harmonics at 0.37{mu} m using a 46-MeV, 130-A electron beam with a normalized emittance of 3{pi}mm{center_dot}mrad and a relative energy spread of 0.24% from the APEX L-band linac with an rf photocathode electron gun. However, we are now trying to achieve an FEL oscillation in the UV range using the FELI linac with the thermionic gun because of long-life, easy-operation, and low-cost of the thermionic gun, as the FELI ring with 9.8-m long straight sections capable of storing a long lived 1-A beam is in the design stage. Recent experimental and theoretical results on relations between beam quality and short wavelength FEL oscillations have been also reviewed and wavelength limitations due to normalized emittance and relative energy spread are discussed.

  19. Microbunching Instability Effect Studies and Laser Heater Optimization for the SPARX FEL Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Vaccarezza, C.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.; Giannessi, L.; Quattromini, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Venturini, C.; Migliorati, M.; Dattoli, G.

    2010-05-23

    The effects of microbunching instability for the SPARX accelerator have been analyzed by means of numerical simulations. The laser heater counteracting action has been addressed in order to optimize the parameters of the compression system, either hybrid RF plus magnetic chicane or only magnetic, and possibly enhance the FEL performance.

  20. Bunch Length Measurements at the JLab FEL Using Coherent Transition and Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel Evtushenko; James Coleman; Kevin Jordan; J. Michael Klopf; George Neil; Gwyn Williams

    2006-05-01

    The JLab FEL is routinely operated with sub-picosecond bunches. The short bunch length is important for high gain of the FEL. Coherent transition radiation has been used for the bunch length measurements for many years [1]. This diagnostic can be used only in the pulsed beam mode. It is our goal to run the FEL with CW beam and a 74.85 MHz micropulse repetition rate, which, with the 135 pC nominal bunch charge corresponds to the beam average current of 10 mA. Hence it is very desirable to have the possibility of making bunch length measurements when running CW beam with any micropulse frequency. We use a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interferometer, which is essentially a Michelson interferometer, to measure the spectrum of the coherent synchrotron radiation generated in the last dipole of the magnetic bunch compressor upstream of the FEL wiggler. This noninvasive diagnostic provides bunch length measurements for CW beam operation at any micropulse frequency. We also compare the measurements made with the help of the FTIR interferometer with data obtained using the Martin-Puplett interferometer [1]. Results of the two diagnostics agree within 15 %. Here we present a description of the experimental setup, data evaluation procedure and results of the beam measurements.

  1. Use of Multipass Recirculation and Energy Recovery In CW SRF X-FEL Driver Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, David; Akers, Walt; Benson, Stephen V.; Biallas, George; Blackburn, Keith; Boyce, James; Bullard, Donald; Coleman, James; Dickover, Cody; Ellingsworth, Forrest; Evtushenko, Pavel; Fisk, Sally; Gould, Christopher; Gubeli, Joseph; Hannon, Fay; Hardy, David; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Jordan, Kevin; Klopf, John; Kortze, J.; Legg, Robert; Li, Rui; Marchlik, Matthew; Moore, Steven W.; Neil, George; Powers, Thomas; Sexton, Daniel; Shin, Ilkyoung; Shinn, Michelle D.; Tennant, Christopher; Terzic, Balsa; Walker, Richard; Williams, Gwyn P.; Wilson, G.; Zhang, Shukui

    2010-08-01

    We discuss the use of multipass recirculation and energy recovery in CW SRF drivers for short wavelength FELs. Benefits include cost management (through reduced system footprint, required RF and SRF hardware, and associated infrastructure - including high power beam dumps and cryogenic systems), ease in radiation control (low drive beam exhaust energy), ability to accelerate and deliver multiple beams of differing energy to multiple FELs, and opportunity for seamless integration of multistage bunch length compression into the longitudinal matching scenario. Issues include all those associated with ERLs compounded by the challenge of generating and preserving the CW electron drive beam brightness required by short wavelength FELs. We thus consider the impact of space charge, BBU and other environmental wakes and impedances, ISR and CSR, potential for microbunching, intra-beam and beam-residual gas scattering, ion effects, RF transients, and halo, as well as the effect of traditional design, fabrication, installation and operational errors (lattice aberrations, alignment, powering, field quality). Context for the discussion is provided by JLAMP, the proposed VUV/X-ray upgrade to the existing Jefferson Lab FEL.

  2. Progress of the commissioning of the DELTA storage ring FEL facility

    SciTech Connect

    Noelle, D.; Geisler, A.; Ridder, M.

    1995-12-31

    This paper will present the status of the ongoing commissioning of the DELTA storage-ring FEL facility. The commissioning of the LINAC started in autumn `94. The operation of the booster started in spring `95, the first stored beam was achieved end of march `95. During the summer of `95 the commissioning of the main storage ring will be started. Simultaneously, the first FEL FELICTA I was built. All FEL hardware is in house, the undulator is already mounted in the storage-ring. Thus first operation of the undulator with electron beam, will take place immediately after the first stored beam in DELTA. Therefore, first spontanous photons are to be expected in late summer `95. As soon as DELTA provides stable and rather reliable operation the experiments on FELICITA I will start. 16 mA total average current in DELTA at 500 MeV should be sufficient to reach the laser threshold in the FEL mode of FELICITA I. Operating the device as an optical klystron should result in lasing at substantial less currents.

  3. The cat lipocalin Fel d 7 and its cross-reactivity with the dog lipocalin Can f 1.

    PubMed

    Apostolovic, D; Sánchez-Vidaurre, S; Waden, K; Curin, M; Grundström, J; Gafvelin, G; Cirkovic Velickovic, T; Grönlund, H; Thomas, W R; Valenta, R; Hamsten, C; van Hage, M

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the prevalence of sensitization to the cat lipocalin Fel d 7 among 140 cat-sensitized Swedish patients and elucidated its allergenic activity and cross-reactivity with the dog lipocalin Can f 1. Sixty-five of 140 patients had IgE to rFel d 7 whereof 60 also had IgE to rCan f 1. A moderate correlation between IgE levels to rFel d 7 and rCan f 1 was found. rFel d 7 activated basophils in vitro and inhibited IgE binding to rCan f 1 in 4 of 13 patients, whereas rCan f 1 inhibited IgE binding to rFel d 7 in 7 of 13 patients. Fel d 7 and Can f 1 showed high similarities in protein structure and epitopes in common were found using cross-reactive antisera. Fel d 7 is a common allergen in a Swedish cat-sensitized population that cross-reacts with Can f 1, and may contribute to symptoms in cat- but also in dog-allergic patients.

  4. ECH by FEL and gyrotron sources on the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Stallard, B.W.; Turner, W.C.; Allen, S.L.; Byers, J.A.; Felker, B.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Ferguson, S.W.; Hooper, E.G.; Thomassen, K.I.; Throop, A.L. ); Makowski, M.A. )

    1990-08-09

    The Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) at LLNL is studying the physics of intense pulse ECH is a high-density tokamak plasma using a microwave FEL. Related technology development includes the FEL, a windowless quasi-optical transmission system, and other microwave components. Initial plasma experiments have been carried out at 140 GHz with single rf pulses generated using the ETA-II accelerator and the ELF wiggler. Peak power levels up to 0.2 GW and pulse durations up to 10 ns were achieved for injection into the plasma using as untapered wiggler. FEL pulses were transmitted over 33 m from the FEL to MTX using six mirrors mounted in a 50-cm-diam evacuated pipe. Measurements of the microwave beam and transmission through the plasma were carried out. For future rapid pulse experiments at high average power (4 GW peak power, 5kHz pulse rate, and {bar P} > 0.5 MW) using the IMP wiggler with tapered magnetic field, a gyrotron (140 GHz, 400 kW cw or up to 1 MW short pulse) is being installed to drive the FEL input or to directly heat the tokamak plasma at full gyrotron power. Quasi-optic techniques will be used to couple the gyrotron power. For direct plasma heating, the gyrotron will couple into the existing mirror transport system. Using both sources of rf generation, experiments are planned to investigate intense pulse absorption and tokamak physics, such as the ECH of a pellet-fueled plasma and plasma control using localized heating. 12 refs., 9 figs.

  5. Amplification of current density modulation in a FEL with an infinite electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Webb, S.D.

    2011-03-28

    We show that the paraxial field equation for a free electron laser (FEL) in an infinitely wide electron beam with {kappa}-2 energy distribution can be reduced to a fourth ordinary differential equation (ODE). Its solution for arbitrary initial phase space density modulation has been derived in the wave-vector domain. For initial current modulation with Gaussian profile, close form solutions are obtained in space-time domain. In developing an analytical model for a FEL-based coherent electron cooling system, an infinite electron beam has been assumed for the modulation and correction processes. While the assumption has its limitation, it allows for an analytical close form solution to be obtained, which is essential for investigating the underlying scaling law, benchmarking the simulation codes and understanding the fundamental physics. 1D theory was previously applied to model a CeC FEL amplifier. However, the theory ignores diffraction effects and does not provide the transverse profile of the amplified electron density modulation. On the other hand, 3D theories developed for a finite electron beam usually have solutions expanded over infinite number of modes determined by the specific transverse boundary conditions. Unless the mode with the largest growth rate substantially dominates other modes, both evaluation and extracting scaling laws can be complicated. Furthermore, it is also preferable to have an analytical FEL model with assumptions consistent with the other two sections of a CeC system. Recently, we developed the FEL theory in an infinitely wide electron beam with {kappa}-1 (Lorentzian) energy distribution. Close form solutions have been obtained for the amplified current modulation initiated by an external electric field with various spatial-profiles. In this work, we extend the theory into {kappa}-2 energy distribution and study the evolution of current density induced by an initial density modulation.

  6. Inverse Compton gamma-ray source for nuclear physics and related applications at the Duke FEL

    SciTech Connect

    O`Shea, P.G.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Madey, J.M.J.

    1995-12-31

    In recent years the development of intense, short-wavelength FEL light sources has opened opportunities for the development new applications of high-energy Compton-backscattered photons. These applications range from medical imaging with X-ray photons to high-energy physics with {gamma}{gamma} colliders. In this paper we discuss the possibilities for nuclear physics studies using polarized Compton backscattered {gamma}-rays from the Duke storage-ring-driven UV-FEL. There are currently a number of projects that produce polarized {gamma}-rays for nuclear physics studies. All of these facilities operate by scattering conventional laser-light against electrons circulating in a storage ring. In our scheme, intra-cavity scattering of the UV-FEL light will produce a {gamma}-flux enhancement of approximately 10{sup 3} over existing sources. The Duke ring can operate at energies up to 1.2 GeV and can produce FEL photons up to 12.5 eV. We plan to generate {gamma}-rays up to 200 MeV in energy with an average flux in excess of 10{sup 7} /s/MeV, using a modest scattering beam of 10-mA average stored current. The {gamma}-ray energy may be tuned by varying the FEL wavelength or by adjusting the stored electron beam energy. Because of the intense flux, we can eliminate the need for photon energy tagging by collimating of the {gamma}-ray beam. We will discuss the characteristics of the device and its research opportunities.

  7. A helical optical for circular polarized UV-FEL project at the UVSOR

    SciTech Connect

    Hama, Hiroyuki

    1995-12-31

    Most of existing storage ring free electron lasers (SRFEL) are restricted those performances by degradation of mirrors in optical cavities. In general, the SRFEL gain at the short wavelength region with high energy electrons is quite low, and the high reflectivity mirrors such as dielectric multilayer mirrors are therefore required. The mirror degradation is considered as a result of irradiation of higher harmonic photons that are simultaneously emitted from planar optical klystron (OK) type undulators, which are commonly used in SRFEL. This problem is getting severer as the lasing wavelength becomes shorter. The UVSOR-FEL had been originally scheduled to be shutdown by 1996 because another undulator project for spectroscopic studies with circular polarized photon would take the FEL`s place. According to suggestion of the insertion device group of the SPring-8, we have designed a helical undulator that is able to vary degree and direction of the polarization easily. In addition, the undulator can be converted into a helical OK by replacing magnets at the center part of undulator in order to coexist with further FEL experiments. Using a calculated magnetic field for magnet configurations of the OK mode, the radiation spectrum at wide wavelength range was simulated by a Fourier transform of Lienard-Wiechert potentials. As a matter of course, some higher harmonics are radiated on the off-axis angle. However it was found out that the higher harmonics is almost negligible as far as inside a solid angle of the Gaussian laser mode. Moreover the gain at the UV region of 250 nm is expected to be much higher than our present FEL because of high brilliant fundamental radiation. The calculated spatial distribution of higher harmonics and the estimated instantaneous gain is presented. Advantages of the helical OK for SRFEL will be discussed in view of our experience, and a possibility of application two-color experiment with SR will be also mentioned.

  8. The role of radiation reaction in Lienard-Wiechert description of FEL interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kimel, I.; Elias, L.R.

    1995-12-31

    The most common theoretical analysis of the FEL interaction is based on the set of equations consisting of Lorentz and wave equations. This approach explains most of FEL features and, in particular, works well to describe operation in the amplifier mode. In that approach however, there are some difficulties in describing operation in oscillator mode, as well as self amplified spontaneous emission. In particular, it is not possible to describe the start up stage since there is no wave to start with. It is clear that a different approach is required in such situations. That is why we have pursued the study of the FEL interaction in the framework of Lorentz plus Lienard-Wiechert equations. The Lienard-Wiechert Lorentz equation approach however, presents its own set of problems. Variation in energy of the electrons is given exclusively by the Lorentz equation. Thus, the energy lost due to the radiation process is not properly taken into account. This, of course, is a long standing problem in classical electrodynamics. In order to restore energy conservation radiation reaction has to be incorporated into the framework. The first question in that regard has to do with which form of the radiation reaction equations is the most convenient for computations in the FEL process. This has to do with the fact that historically, radiation reaction has been added in an ad hoc manner instead of being derived from the fundamental equations. Another problem discussed is how to take into account the radiation reaction in a collective manner in the interaction among electrons. Also discussed is the radiation reaction vis a vi the coherence properties of the FEL process.

  9. ECH by FEL and gyrotron sources on the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stallard, B. W.; Turner, W. C.; Allen, S. L.; Byers, J. A.; Felker, B.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Ferguson, S. W.; Hooper, E. G.; Thomassen, K. I.; Throop, A. L.

    1990-08-01

    The Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) at LLNL is studying the physics of intense pulse ECH is a high-density tokamak plasma using a microwave FEL. Related technology development includes the FEL, a windowless quasi-optical transmission system, and other microwave components. Initial plasma experiments have been carried out at 140 GHz with single RF pulses generated using the ETA-2 accelerator and the ELF wiggler. Peak power levels up to 0.2 GW and pulse durations up to 10 ns were achieved for injection into the plasma using as untapered wiggler. FEL pulses were transmitted over 33 m from the FEL to MTX using six mirrors mounted in a 50 cm diam evacuated pipe. Measurements of the microwave beam and transmission through the plasma were carried out. For future rapid pulse experiments at high average power (4 GW peak power, 5 kHz pulse rate, and bar P is greater than 0.5 MW) using the IMP wiggler with tapered magnetic field, a gyrotron (140 GHz, 400 kW CW or up to 1 MW short pulse) is being installed to drive the FEL input or to directly heat the tokamak plasma at full gyrotron power. Quasi-optic techniques will be used to couple the gyrotron power. For direct plasma heating, the gyrotron will couple into the existing mirror transport system. Using both sources of RF generation, experiments are planned to investigate intense pulse absorption and tokamak physics, such as the ECH of a pellet-fueled plasma and plasma control using localized heating.

  10. Predicted performance of a multi-section VUV FEL with the Amsterdam pulse stretcher and storage ring AmPS

    SciTech Connect

    Bazylev, V.A.; Pitatelev, M.I.; Tulupov, A.V.

    1995-12-31

    A design is proposed to realize a VUV FEL with the Amsterdam Pulse Stretcher and Storage Ring (AmPS). The FEL is based on 4 identical undulator sections and 3 dispersive sections. The total magnetic system has a length of 12 m. 3 D simulations with the actual electron beam parameters of AmPS have been done with a version of TDA code modified for multi-sectional FELs. The spectral range between 50 and 100 nm has been considered. The simulations show that an amplification as large as 1*E5 - 1*E7 can be achieved. The amplification can be enhanced by a further optimisation procedure.

  11. Audit Report, "Fire Protection Deficiencies at Los Alamos National Laboratory"

    SciTech Connect

    2009-06-01

    The Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) maintains some of the Nation's most important national security assets, including nuclear materials. Many of Los Alamos' facilities are located in close proximity to one another, are occupied by large numbers of contract and Federal employees, and support activities ranging from nuclear weapons design to science-related activities. Safeguarding against fires, regardless of origin, is essential to protecting employees, surrounding communities, and national security assets. On June 1, 2006, Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS), became the managing and operating contractor for Los Alamos, under contract with the Department's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). In preparation for assuming its management responsibilities at Los Alamos, LANS conducted walk-downs of the Laboratory's facilities to identify pre-existing deficiencies that could give rise to liability, obligation, loss or damage. The walk-downs, which identified 812 pre-existing fire protection deficiencies, were conducted by subject matter professionals, including fire protection experts. While the Los Alamos Site Office has overall responsibility for the effectiveness of the fire protection program, LANS, as the Laboratory's operating contractor, has a major, day-to-day role in minimizing fire-related risks. The issue of fire protection at Los Alamos is more than theoretical. In May 2000, the 'Cerro Grande' fire burned about 43,000 acres, including 7,700 acres of Laboratory property. Due to the risk posed by fire to the Laboratory's facilities, workforce, and surrounding communities, we initiated this audit to determine whether pre-existing fire protection deficiencies had been addressed. Our review disclosed that LANS had not resolved many of the fire protection deficiencies that had been identified in early 2006: (1) Of the 296 pre-existing deficiencies we selected for audit, 174 (59 percent) had not been corrected

  12. Groundwater level status report for 2009, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

    2010-03-01

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2009 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 179 monitoring wells, including 55 regional aquifer wells (including 11 regional/intermediate wells), 26 intermediate wells, 98 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 161 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells.

  13. Los Alamos National Laboratory Economic Analysis Capability Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Boero, Riccardo; Edwards, Brian Keith; Pasqualini, Donatella; Rivera, Michael Kelly

    2016-04-19

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed two types of models to compute the economic impact of infrastructure disruptions. FastEcon is a fast running model that estimates first-­order economic impacts of large scale events such as hurricanes and floods and can be used to identify the amount of economic activity that occurs in a specific area. LANL’s Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model estimates more comprehensive static and dynamic economic impacts of a broader array of events and captures the interactions between sectors and industries when estimating economic impacts.

  14. Bradbury science museum: your window to Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Deck, Linda Theresa

    2009-03-05

    The Bradbury Science Museum is the public's window to Los Alamos National Laboratory and supports the Community Program Office's mission to develop community support to accomplish LANL's national security and science mission. It does this by stimulating interest in and increasing basic knowledge of science and technology in northern New Mexico audiences, and increasing public understanding and appreciation of how LANL science and technology solve our global problems. In performing these prime functions, the Museum also preserves the history of scientific accomplishment at the Lab by collecting and preserving artifacts of scientific and historical importance.

  15. Groundwater level status report for 2010, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

    2011-03-01

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2010 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 194 monitoring wells, including 63 regional aquifer wells (including 10 regional/intermediate wells), 34 intermediate wells, 97 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 162 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells and seasonal responses to snowmelt runoff observed in intermediate wells.

  16. Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The purpose of the safety and health assessment was to determine the effectiveness of representative safety and health programs at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Within the safety and health programs at LANL, performance was assessed in the following technical areas: Organization and Administration, Quality Verification, Operations, Maintenance, Training and Certification, Auxiliary Systems, Emergency Preparedness, Technical Support, Packaging and Transportation, Nuclear Criticality Safety, Security/Safety Interface, Experimental Activities, Site/Facility Safety Review, Radiological Protection, Personnel Protection, Worker Safety and Health (OSHA) Compliance, Fire Protection, Aviation Safety, Explosives Safety, Natural Phenomena, and Medical Services.

  17. Recent developments in the Los Alamos radiation transport code system

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, R.A.; Parsons, K.

    1997-06-01

    A brief progress report on updates to the Los Alamos Radiation Transport Code System (LARTCS) for solving criticality and fixed-source problems is provided. LARTCS integrates the Diffusion Accelerated Neutral Transport (DANT) discrete ordinates codes with the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code. The LARCTS code is being developed with a graphical user interface for problem setup and analysis. Progress in the DANT system for criticality applications include a two-dimensional module which can be linked to a mesh-generation code and a faster iteration scheme. Updates to MCNP Version 4A allow statistical checks of calculated Monte Carlo results.

  18. Groundwater level status report for 2008, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

    2009-03-01

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2008 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 179 monitoring wells, including 45 regional aquifer wells, 28 intermediate wells, 8 regional/intermediate wells, 106 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 166 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells.

  19. Groundwater Level Status Report for 2005 Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    S.P. Allen; R.J. Koch

    2006-05-15

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 2005 is provided in this report. The Groundwater Level Monitoring Project was instituted in 2005 to provide a framework for the collection and processing of quality controlled groundwater level data. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 137 monitoring wells, including 41 regional aquifer wells, 22 intermediate wells, and 74 alluvial wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 118 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well.

  20. The Los Alamos National Laboratory Nuclear Vision Project

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, E.D.; Wagner, R.L. Jr.

    1996-09-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has initiated a project to examine possible futures associated with the global nuclear enterprise over the course of the next 50 years. All major components are included in this study--weapons, nonproliferation, nuclear power, nuclear materials, and institutional and public factors. To examine key issues, the project has been organized around three main activity areas--workshops, research and analyses, and development of linkages with other synergistic world efforts. This paper describes the effort--its current and planned activities--as well as provides discussion of project perspectives on nuclear weapons, nonproliferation, nuclear energy, and nuclear materials focus areas.

  1. Los Alamos Science, Number 25 -- 1997: Celebrating the Neutrino

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cooper, N. G. ed.

    1997-01-01

    This issue is devoted to the neutrino and its remaining mysteries. It is divided into the following areas: (1) The Reines-Cowan experiment -- detecting the poltergeist; (2) The oscillating neutrino -- an introduction to neutrino masses and mixing; (3) A brief history of neutrino experiments at LAMPF; (4) A thousand eyes -- the story of LSND (Los Alamos neutrino oscillation experiment); (5) The evidence for oscillations; (6) The nature of neutrinos in muon decay and physics beyond the Standard Model; (7) Exorcising ghosts -- in pursuit of the missing solar neutrinos; (8) MSW -- a possible solution to the solar neutrino problem; (8) Neutrinos and supernovae; and (9) Dark matter and massive neutrinos.

  2. Mac configuration management at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, Allan B

    2010-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) had a need for central configuration management of non-Windows computers. LANL has three to five thousand Macs and an equal number of Linux based systems. The primary goal was to be able to inventory all non-windows systems and patch Mc OS X systems. LANL examined a number of commercial and open source solutions and ultimately selected Puppet. This paper will discuss why we chose Puppet, how we implemented it, and some lessons we learned along the way.

  3. Los Alamos Science, Number 25 -- 1997: Celebrating the neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, N.G.

    1997-12-31

    This issue is devoted to the neutrino and its remaining mysteries. It is divided into the following areas: (1) The Reines-Cowan experiment -- detecting the poltergeist; (2) The oscillating neutrino -- an introduction to neutrino masses and mixing; (3) A brief history of neutrino experiments at LAMPF; (4) A thousand eyes -- the story of LSND (Los Alamos neutrino oscillation experiment); (5) The evidence for oscillations; (6) The nature of neutrinos in muon decay and physics beyond the Standard Model; (7) Exorcising ghosts -- in pursuit of the missing solar neutrinos; (8) MSW -- a possible solution to the solar neutrino problem; (8) Neutrinos and supernovae; and (9) Dark matter and massive neutrinos.

  4. Los Alamos safeguards program overview and NDA in safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Keepin, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    Over the years the Los Alamos safeguards program has developed, tested, and implemented a broad range of passive and active nondestructive analysis (NDA) instruments (based on gamma and x-ray detection and neutron counting) that are now widely employed in safeguarding nuclear materials of all forms. Here very briefly, the major categories of gamma ray and neutron based NDA techniques, give some representative examples of NDA instruments currently in use, and cite a few notable instances of state-of-the-art NDA technique development. Historical aspects and a broad overview of the safeguards program are also presented.

  5. Water supply at Los Alamos during 1995. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McLin, S.G.; Purtymun, W.D.; Maes, M.N.

    1997-04-01

    Production of potable municipal water supplies during 1995 totaled about 1,356.1 million gallons from wells in the Guaje and Pajarito well fields. Wells in the Otowi field were not operational during 1995. The nonpotable water supply for industrial use was about 1.6 million gallons from the spring gallery in Water Canyon, and another 1.6 million gallons from Los Alamos Reservoir was used for lawn irrigation. There was no water used from Guaje Reservoir in 1995. The total water usage in 1995 was about 1,359.3 million gallons. Groundwater pumpage during 1995 was the lowest on record since 1966.

  6. Water supply at Los Alamos during 1985: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Purtymun, W.D.; Becker, N.M.; Maes, M.N.

    1986-10-01

    Well field operations during 1985 were satisfactory with municipal and industrial supplies consisting of 1587 x 10/sup 6/ gal from wells in three well fields and 37 x 10/sup 6/ gal from the gallery in Water Canyon. About 2.8 x 10/sup 6/ gal of water from Guaje Reservoir and 0.9 x 10/sup 6/ gal from Los Alamos Reservoir were used for irrigation; thus the total water usage in 1985 was about 1628 x 10/sup 6/ gal. Primary and secondary chemical quality of water in the distribution system is in compliance with federal regulations.

  7. Multidimensional simulation studies of the SELENE FEL oscillator/buncher followed by a radiator/amplifier output scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, S.J.; Fawley, W.M.

    1995-02-01

    We analyze and present numerical simulations of the so-called electron output scheme [G. I. Erg et al., 15th Int. FEL Conf., The Hague, The Netherlands, 1993, Book of Abstracts p. 50; Preprint Budker INP 93-75] applied to the SELENE proposal of using a high power FEL to illuminate satellite solar cells. In this scheme, a first stage FEL oscillator bunches the electron beam while a second stage ``radiator`` extracts high power radiation. Our analysis suggests only in the case where the radiator employs a long, tapered undulator will the electron output scheme produce a significant increase in extraction efficiency over what is obtainable from a simple, single-stage oscillator. 1- and 2-D numerical simulations of a 1.7{mu}m FEL employing the electron output scheme show reasonably large bunching fractions ({approximately} 0.3--0.4) at the output of the oscillator stage but only {le}2% extraction efficiency from the radiator stage.

  8. Multi-stage FEL amplifier with diaphragm focusing line as direct energy driver for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Ulyanov, Yu.N.

    1995-12-31

    An FEL based energy driver for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is proposed. The key element of the scheme is free electron laser system. Novel technical solutions, namely, using of multichannel, multi-stage FEL amplifier with diaphragm focusing line, reveal a possibility to construct the FEL system operating at radiation wavelength {lambda} = 0.5 {mu}m and providing flush energy E = 1 MJ and brightness 4 x 10{sup 22} W cm{sup -2} sr{sup -1} within steering pulse duration {tau} {approximately} 0.1-2 ns. Total energy efficiency of the proposed ICF energy driver is about of 11% and repetition rate is 40 Hz. It is shown that the FEL based ICF energy driver may be constructed at the present level of accelerator technique R& D.

  9. A high-average power tapered FEL amplifier at submillimeter frequencies using sheet electron beams and short-period wigglers

    SciTech Connect

    Bidwell, S.W.; Radack, D.J.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Booske, J.H.; Carmel, Y.; Destler, W.W.; Granatstein, V.L.; Levush, B.; Latham, P.E.; Zhang, Z.X.

    1990-01-01

    A high-average-power FEL amplifier operating at submillimeter frequencies is under development at the University of Maryland. Program goals are to produce a CW, {approximately}1 MW, FEL amplifier source at frequencies between 280 GHz and 560 GHz. To this end, a high-gain, high-efficiency, tapered FEL amplifier using a sheet electron beam and a short-period (superconducting) wiggler has been chosen. Development of this amplifier is progressing in three stages: (1) beam propagation through a long length ({approximately}1 m) of short period ({lambda}{sub {omega}} = 1 cm) wiggler, (2) demonstration of a proof-of-principle amplifier experiment at 98 GHz, and (3) designs of a superconducting tapered FEL amplifier meeting the ultimate design goal specifications. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  10. The Calcium Goes Meow: Effects of Ions and Glycosylation on Fel d 1, the Major Cat Allergen

    PubMed Central

    Pol-Fachin, Laércio; Verli, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    The major cat allergen, Fel d 1, is a structurally complex protein with two N-glycosylation sites that may be filled by different glycoforms. In addition, the protein contains three putative Ca2+ binding sites. Since the impact of these Fel d 1 structure modifications on the protein dynamics, physiology and pathology are not well established, the present work employed computational biology techniques to tackle these issues. While conformational effects brought upon by glycosylation were identified, potentially involved in cavity volume regulation, our results indicate that only the central Ca2+ ion remains coordinated to Fel d 1 in biological solutions, impairing its proposed role in modulating phospholipase A2 activity. As these results increase our understanding of Fel d 1 structural biology, they may offer new support for understanding its physiological role and impact into cat-promoted allergy. PMID:26134118

  11. Bendable Focusing X-Ray Optics for the ALS and the LCLS/FEL: Design, Metrology, and Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchuk, V. V.; Yuan, S.; Baker, S.; Bozek, J.; Celestre, R.; Church, M.; Goldberg, K. A.; Fernandez-Perea, M.; Kelez, N.; Kunz, M.; McKinney, W. R.; Morrison, G.; Padmore, H. A.; Soufli, R.; Tamura, N.; Warwick, T.

    2010-06-02

    We review the recent development of bendable x-ray optics used for focusing of beams of soft and hard x-rays at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray free electron laser (FEL) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) National Accelerator Laboratory. For simultaneous focusing in the tangential and sagittal directions, two elliptically cylindrical reflecting elements, a Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) pair, are used. Because fabrication of elliptical surfaces is complicated, the cost of directly fabricated tangential elliptical cylinders is often prohibitive. Moreover, such optics cannot be easily readjusted for use in multiple, different experimental arrangements, e.g. at different focal distances. This is in contrast to flat optics that are simpler to manufacture and easier to measure by conventional interferometry. The tangential figure of a flat substrate is changed by placing torques (couples) at each end. Depending on the applied couples, one can tune the shape close to a desired tangential cylinder, ellipse or parabola. We review the nature of the bending, requirements and approaches to the mechanical design, describe original optical and at-wavelength techniques for optimal tuning of bendable optics and alignment on the beamline, and provide beamline performance of the bendable optics used for sub-micro and nano focusing of soft x-rays.

  12. University of New Mexico-Los Alamos National Laboratory Program in Volcanology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, F.; Fischer, T.; Baldridge, W.; Wohletz, K.; Smith, G.; Heiken, G.; Valentine, G.; Elston, W.

    2002-05-01

    The UNM-LANL Program in Volcanology was a vision of Wolf Elston in the late 1980s. Finally established in mid-1992, the program takes advantage of the extensive volcanic record preserved in northern New Mexico, and of the unique expertise and exceptional research facilities existing at the two institutions. Courses are directed toward upper division and graduate level students. The Los Alamos participants are adjunct professors and they take an active role in creating courses, advising thesis candidates, and providing research support. The curriculum is flexible but has a core upper division class in Physical Volcanology. Other classes offered in various years have included Volcanology and Human Affairs; Magmatic and Geothermal Systems; Tectonics and Magma Generation; Volcanoes of North America; Instrumentation for Volcanology; and Advanced Igneous Petrology. Perhaps the most renowned class in the program is the Volcanology Summer Field Course offered in even numbered years. This 3.5-week class is based in the Jemez Mountains volcanic field, which contains the famous Valles caldera (1.2 Ma to 50 ka). All types of calc-alkaline to alkalic domes, flows, tuffs, and intrusions, plus derivative sediments, mineralized zones, and thermal fluids are available for instructional purposes. Students are required to complete nine rigorous field exercises starting with basic instruction in pyroclastic fall, flow, and surge, then progressing towards hydrothermally altered, intracaldera resurgent dome and moat deposits in an active hot spring and fumarole system. The class is open to graduate students, advanced undergraduates, and private sector employees with special needs. Enrollment is competitive with limited financial support and limited space for 17 students. Evening lectures, study time, lodging, and meals are provided at the UNM-owned Young's Ranch built in the 1920s, nestled in a canyon flanked by orange cliffs of Bandelier Tuff. About 120 students from 12 countries have

  13. Temporal characterization of FEL micropulses as function of cavity length detuning using frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, B.A.; DeLong, K.W.; Trebino, R.

    1995-12-31

    Results of frequency resolved optical gating (FROG) measurements on the Stanford mid-IR FEL system show the effect of FEL cavity length detuning on the micropulse temporal structure. The FROG technique enables the acquisition of complete and uniquely invertible amplitude and phase temporal dependence of optical pulses. Unambiguous phase and amplitude profiles are recovered from the data. The optical pulses are nearly transform limited, and the pulse length increases with cavity length detuning.

  14. Industrial application for the Los Alamos Materials Modeling Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Lesar, R.; Charbon, C.; Kothe, D.; Wu, D.; Reddy, A.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Casting and solidification of molten metals and metal alloys is a critical step in the production of high-quality metal stock and in the fabrication of finished parts. Control of the casting process can be the determining factor in both the quality and cost of the final metal product. Major problems with the quality of cast stock or finished parts can arise because of the difficulty of preventing variations in the alloy content, the generation of porosity or poor surface finish, and the loss of microstructure controlled strength and toughness resulting from the poor understanding and design of the mold filling and solidification processes. In this project, we sought to develop a new set of applications focused on adding the ability to accurately model solidification and grain growth to casting simulations. We implemented these applications within the Los Alamos Materials Modeling Platform, LAMMP, a graphical-based materials, and materials modeling environment being created at the Computational Testbed for Industry.

  15. Exploding metallic foil fuse modeling at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Lindemuth, I.R.; Reinovsky, R.E.; Goforth, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    A ''first-principles'' computational model of exploding metallic foil behavior has been developed at Los Alamos. The model couples zero-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics with ohmic heating and electrical circuit equations and uses the Los Alamos SESAME atomic data base computer library to determine the foil material's temperature- and density-dependent pressure, specific energy, and electrical conductivity. The model encompasses many previously successful empirical models and offers plausible physical explanations of phenomena not treated by the empirical models. In addition to addressing the electrical circuit performance of an exploding foil, the model provides information on the temporal evolution of the foil material's density, temperature, pressure, electrical conductivity, and expansion and translational velocities. In this paper, we report the physical insight gained by computational studies of two opening switch concepts being developed for application in an FCG-driven 1-MJ-class imploding plasma z-pinch experiment. The first concept considered is a ''conventional'' electrically exploded fuse, which has been demonstrated to operate at 16 MA driven by the 15-MJ-class FCG to be used in the 1 MJ implosion experiment. The second concept considered is a Type 2 explosively formed fuse (EFF), which has been demonstrated to operate at the 8 MA level by a 1-MJ-class FCG.

  16. An organizational survey of the Los Alamos Site

    SciTech Connect

    Shurberg, D.A.; Haber, S.B.

    1991-11-01

    An Organizational Survey (OS) was administered at the Los Alamos Site that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental, safety, and health concern, hazardous nature of work, safety and overall job satisfaction. The purpose of the OS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the notion of culture;'' that is, the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In addition, through the OS, a broad sample of individuals can be reached that would probably not be interviewed or observed during the course of a typical assessment. The OS also provides a descriptive profile of the organization at one point in time that can then be compared to a profile taken at a different point in time to assess changes in the culture of the organization. While comparisons among groups are made, it is not the purpose of this report to make evaluative statements of which profile may be positive or negative. However, using the data presented in this report in conjunction with other evaluative activities, may provide useful insight into the organization. The OS administration at the Los Alamos Site was the ninth to occur at a Department of Energy (DOE) facility. All data from the OS is presented in group summaries, by organization, department or directorate within organization, supervisory level both overall and within organization, and staff classification within organization. Statistically significant differences between groups are identified and discussed. 9 refs., 94 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. An organizational survey of the Los Alamos Site

    SciTech Connect

    Shurberg, D.A.; Haber, S.B.

    1991-11-01

    An Organizational Survey (OS) was administered at the Los Alamos Site that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental, safety, and health concern, hazardous nature of work, safety and overall job satisfaction. The purpose of the OS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the notion of ``culture;`` that is, the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In addition, through the OS, a broad sample of individuals can be reached that would probably not be interviewed or observed during the course of a typical assessment. The OS also provides a descriptive profile of the organization at one point in time that can then be compared to a profile taken at a different point in time to assess changes in the culture of the organization. While comparisons among groups are made, it is not the purpose of this report to make evaluative statements of which profile may be positive or negative. However, using the data presented in this report in conjunction with other evaluative activities, may provide useful insight into the organization. The OS administration at the Los Alamos Site was the ninth to occur at a Department of Energy (DOE) facility. All data from the OS is presented in group summaries, by organization, department or directorate within organization, supervisory level both overall and within organization, and staff classification within organization. Statistically significant differences between groups are identified and discussed. 9 refs., 94 figs., 11 tabs.

  18. Fuels Inventories in the Los Alamos National Laboratory Region: 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Balice, R.G.; Oswald, B.P.; Martin, C.

    1999-03-01

    Fifty-four sites were surveyed for fuel levels, vegetational structures, and topographic characteristics. Most of the surveyed sites were on Los Alamos National Laboratory property, however, some surveys were also conducted on U.S. Forest Service property. The overall vegetation of these sites ranged from pinon-juniper woodlands to ponderosa pine forests to mixed conifer forests, and the topographic positions included canyons, mesas, and mountains. The results of these surveys indicate that the understory fuels are the greatest in mixed conifer forests and that overstory fuels are greatest in both mixed conifer forests and ponderosa pine forests on mesas. The geographic distribution of these fuels would suggest a most credible wildfire scenario for the Los Alamos region. Three major fires have occurred since 1954 and these fires behaved in a manner that is consistent with this scenario. The most credible wildfire scenario was also supported by the results of BEHAVE modeling that used the fuels inventory data as inputs. Output from the BEHAVE model suggested that catastrophic wildfires would continue to occur during any season with sufficiently dry, windy weather.

  19. Cleanup at Los Alamos National Laboratory - the challenges - 9493

    SciTech Connect

    Stiger, Susan G; Hargis, Kenneth M; Graham, Michael J; Rael, George J

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of environmental cleanup at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and some of the unique aspects and challenges. Cleanup of the 65-year old Department of Energy Laboratory is being conducted under a RCRA Consent Order with the State of New Mexico. This agreement is one of the most recent cleanup agreements signed in the DOE complex and was based on lessons learned at other DOE sites. A number of attributes create unique challenges for LANL cleanup -- the proximity to the community and pueblos, the site's topography and geology, and the nature of LANL's on-going missions. This overview paper will set the stage for other papers in this session, including papers that present: Plans to retrieve buried waste at Material Disposal Area B, across the street from oen of Los Alamos' commercial districts and the local newspaper; Progress to date and joint plans with WIPP for disposal of the remaining inventory of legacy transuranic waste; Reviews of both groundwater and surface water contamination and the factors complicating both characterization and remediation; Optimizing the disposal of low-level radioactive waste from ongoing LANL missions; A stakeholder environmental data transparency project (RACER), with full public access to all available information on contamination at LANL, and A description of the approach to waste processing cost recovery from the programs that generate hazardous and radioactive waste at LANL.

  20. The Los Alamos suite of relativistic atomic physics codes

    DOE PAGES

    Fontes, C. J.; Zhang, H. L.; Jr, J. Abdallah; ...

    2015-05-28

    The Los Alamos SuitE of Relativistic (LASER) atomic physics codes is a robust, mature platform that has been used to model highly charged ions in a variety of ways. The suite includes capabilities for calculating data related to fundamental atomic structure, as well as the processes of photoexcitation, electron-impact excitation and ionization, photoionization and autoionization within a consistent framework. These data can be of a basic nature, such as cross sections and collision strengths, which are useful in making predictions that can be compared with experiments to test fundamental theories of highly charged ions, such as quantum electrodynamics. The suitemore » can also be used to generate detailed models of energy levels and rate coefficients, and to apply them in the collisional-radiative modeling of plasmas over a wide range of conditions. Such modeling is useful, for example, in the interpretation of spectra generated by a variety of plasmas. In this work, we provide a brief overview of the capabilities within the Los Alamos relativistic suite along with some examples of its application to the modeling of highly charged ions.« less

  1. Recent progress in the Los Alamos KrF Program

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, T.E.; Cartwright, D.C.; Coggeshall, S.V.; Fenstermacher, C.A.; Figueira, J.F.; Foreman, L.R.; Goldstone, P.D.; Hanson, D.E.; Harris, D.B.; Hauer, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the Inertial Confinement Fusion Program (ICF) is to develop the ability to ignite and burn small masses of thermonuclear fuel. Although the present near-term objectives of the program are directed toward defense applications, ICF research continues to be carried out with a view to the longer term goal of commercial power production. The characteristics of a KrF laser make it an attractive candidate as an ICF driver. The KrF wavelength of 248 nm provides a target coupling that is very high at intensities of 10/sup 14/w/cm/sup 2/. In addition, the KrF laser can be repetitively operated at frequencies appropriate for a power reactor and has an intrinsically high efficiency, which allows projections to the long-term goal of energy production. The ICF program at Los Alamos consists of driver development, target design and fabrication, and target experimentation. The major effort at present is the investigation and development of KrF technology to determine its applicability for use in a laboratory driver at Los Alamos. Such a driver would be used in defense related technology studies and in areas of scientific study such as highly ionized materials and high-energy-density physics.

  2. The Los Alamos universe: Using multimedia to promote laboratory capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kindel, J.

    2000-03-01

    This project consists of a multimedia presentation that explains the technological capabilities of Los Alamos National Laboratory. It takes the form of a human-computer interface built around the metaphor of the universe. The project is intended promote Laboratory capabilities to a wide audience. Multimedia is simply a means of communicating information through a diverse set of tools--be they text, sound, animation, video, etc. Likewise, Los Alamos National Laboratory is a collection of diverse technologies, projects, and people. Given the ample material available at the Laboratory, there are tangible benefits to be gained by communicating across media. This paper consists of three parts. The first section provides some basic information about the Laboratory, its mission, and its needs. The second section introduces this multimedia presentation and the metaphor it is based on along with some basic concepts of color and user interaction used in the building of this project. The final section covers construction of the project, pitfalls, and future improvements.

  3. Investigation of excess thyroid cancer incidence in Los Alamos County

    SciTech Connect

    Athas, W.F.

    1996-04-01

    Los Alamos County (LAC) is home to the Los Alamos National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear research and design facility. In 1991, the DOE funded the New Mexico Department of Health to conduct a review of cancer incidence rates in LAC in response to citizen concerns over what was perceived as a large excess of brain tumors and a possible relationship to radiological contaminants from the Laboratory. The study found no unusual or alarming pattern in the incidence of brain cancer, however, a fourfold excess of thyroid cancer was observed during the late-1980`s. A rapid review of the medical records for cases diagnosed between 1986 and 1990 failed to demonstrate that the thyroid cancer excess had resulted from enhanced detection. Surveillance activities subsequently undertaken to monitor the trend revealed that the excess persisted into 1993. A feasibility assessment of further studies was made, and ultimately, an investigation was conducted to document the epidemiologic characteristics of the excess in detail and to explore possible causes through a case-series records review. Findings from the investigation are the subject of this report.

  4. The Los Alamos suite of relativistic atomic physics codes

    SciTech Connect

    Fontes, C. J.; Zhang, H. L.; Jr, J. Abdallah; Clark, R. E. H.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Colgan, J.; Cunningham, R. T.; Hakel, P.; Magee, N. H.; Sherrill, M. E.

    2015-05-28

    The Los Alamos SuitE of Relativistic (LASER) atomic physics codes is a robust, mature platform that has been used to model highly charged ions in a variety of ways. The suite includes capabilities for calculating data related to fundamental atomic structure, as well as the processes of photoexcitation, electron-impact excitation and ionization, photoionization and autoionization within a consistent framework. These data can be of a basic nature, such as cross sections and collision strengths, which are useful in making predictions that can be compared with experiments to test fundamental theories of highly charged ions, such as quantum electrodynamics. The suite can also be used to generate detailed models of energy levels and rate coefficients, and to apply them in the collisional-radiative modeling of plasmas over a wide range of conditions. Such modeling is useful, for example, in the interpretation of spectra generated by a variety of plasmas. In this work, we provide a brief overview of the capabilities within the Los Alamos relativistic suite along with some examples of its application to the modeling of highly charged ions.

  5. Water supply at Los Alamos during 1994. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McLin, S.G.; Purtymun, W.D.; Stoker, A.K.; Maes, M.N.

    1996-10-01

    Production of potable municipal water supplies during 1994 totaled about 1,426.6 million gallons of wells in the Guaje, Pajarito, and Otowi Fields. The non-potable water supply for industrial use was about 11.6 million gallons from the spring gallery in Water Canyon. There was no water used for irrigation from Guaje or Los Alamos Reservoirs; thus, the total water usage in 1994 was about 1,438.2 million gallons. Pumps in Guaje Well 5 and Otowi Well 4 failed during the year and were not operational by the end of 1994. Water production resumed in Pajarito Well 3 in June. Wells in the Los Alamos Field, on Pueblo Land, were plugged and abandoned in 1992, or were transferred to San Ildefonso Pueblo. This report fulfills requirements which require the Laboratory to monitor and document groundwater conditions below Pajarito Plateau, and to protect the main aquifer from contamination associated with Laboratory operations by providing information on hydrologic characteristics of the main aquifer, including operating conditions of the municipal water supply system.

  6. Mixed low-level waste minimization at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Starke, T.P.

    1998-12-01

    During the first six months of University of California 98 Fiscal Year (July--December) Los Alamos National Laboratory has achieved a 57% reduction in mixed low-level waste generation. This has been accomplished through a systems approach that identified and minimized the largest MLLW streams. These included surface-contaminated lead, lead-lined gloveboxes, printed circuit boards, and activated fluorescent lamps. Specific waste minimization projects have been initiated to address these streams. In addition, several chemical processing equipment upgrades are being implemented. Use of contaminated lead is planned for several high energy proton beam stop applications and stainless steel encapsulated lead is being evaluated for other radiological control area applications. INEEL is assisting Los Alamos with a complete systems analysis of analytical chemistry derived mixed wastes at the CMR building and with a minimum life-cycle cost standard glovebox design. Funding for waste minimization upgrades has come from several sources: generator programs, waste management, the generator set-aside program, and Defense Programs funding to INEEL.

  7. Plutonium scrap processing at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Nixon, A.E.; McKerley, B.J.; Christensen, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory currently has the newest plutonium handling facility in the nation. Los Alamos has been active in the processing of plutonium almost since the discovery of this man-made element in 1941. One of the functions of the new facility is the processing of plutonium scrap generated at LASL and other sites. The feed for the scrap processing program is extremely varied, and a wide variety of contaminants are often encountered. Depending upon the scrap matrix and contaminants present, the majority of material receives a nitric acid/hydrofluoric acid or nitric acid/calcium fluoride leach. The plutonium nitrate solutions are then loaded onto an anion exchange column charged with DOWEX 1 x 4, 50 to 100 mesh, nitrate form resin. The column is eluted with 0.48 M hydroxyl amine nitrate. The Pu(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/ is then precipitated as plutonium III oxalate which is calcined at 450 to 500/sup 0/C to yield a purified PuO/sub 2/ product.

  8. Upgrade and Certification of the Los Alamos National Laboratory SHENC 2011 - 12270

    SciTech Connect

    Stanfield, S.B.; Villani, M.; Barton, P.T.; Gerlock, C.; Nakazawa, D.; Baumann, R.C.; Mowry, R.; Harvill, J.P.

    2012-07-01

    Nondestructive assay measurements of Transuranic (TRU) waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) required the addition of a standard waste box (SWB) assay system. A Super High Efficiency Neutron Counter (SHENC) located at Hanford was identified to be relocated to LANL. After careful evaluation of waste streams at LANL, it was determined that the current configuration of the SHENC was not sufficient to quantify certain waste streams. At LANL, there is still a large amount of waste that needs to be retrieved and repackaged within SWB's to meet agreements with the State of New Mexico. Prior to relocating the SHENC, the only assay systems available were High Efficiency Neutron Counters having only a 55-gallon drum capacity. Further analyses indicated that the SHENC system should be capable of quantitative gamma measurements that are to be linked, and combined, with the neutron measurements. The SHENC system was therefore augmented with a new high-resolution gamma spectroscopy system using BE5030 detectors and upgraded gamma electronics. The neutron side of the system was also upgraded with an advanced shift register (JSR-15), an improved Programmable Logic Controller and NDA-2000 software. This report will include calibration of both the neutron and gamma modalities of the SHENC system and how the modality results are combined to produce a single assay result. Preliminary performance results will be discussed based on both mock and real waste measurements. Discussions will also include a complete description of the adjustable parameters as well as the calibration plan, techniques and validations including calibration confirmation based on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Acceptance Criteria (WIPP-WAC). The SHENC was successfully upgraded to efficiently measure the complex waste streams at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A new PLC was successfully added to the system for Add-A-Source control. A new shift register was added to the SHENC (JSR-15) which provides

  9. Advanced Induction Accelerator Designs for Ground Based and Space Based FELs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-30

    MeV Electron injector module 2-2 2.2 Electrical Schematic of SNOMAD-IV solid-state driver 2-4 I 2.3 SNOMAD-IV accelerator cell 2-7 2.4 Coupling...injector accelerator cell assembly. 2-20 2.9 Preliminary assembly drawing of cathode extraction optics and vacuum pumping port. 2-22 I 2.10 SNOMAD-IV...Accelerator Cell 3-10 3.7 SNOMAD-IVB Accelerator Cells 3-11 E 3.8 SNOMAD-IVB Main Body Enclosure 3-13 3.9 SNOMAD-IVB Base Plate Enclosure 3-14 I 3.10 SNOMAD

  10. The ENEA F-CUBE Facility: Trends in R.F. driven compact FELs and related diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Doria, A.; Gallerano, G.P.; Giovenale, E.

    1995-12-31

    The Frascati FEL Facility F-CUBE (FEL-Compact for User Basic Experiment) currently operates in the mm-wave region providing about 600 hrs of beam time per year to users. This FEL is a low cost compact device intended to be the first step in making the FEL a laboratory tool. It exploits some unique features like short pulses with coherent emission seeding and the dispersion properties of a waveguide resonator at {open_quotes}zero slippage{close_quotes} to provide wide band tunability. The system is presently being upgraded to extend these characteristics into the far infrared. A new NdFeB permanent magnet undulator has been built and magnetic measurements have been performed. FEL tunability in the interval from 400 to 900 pm will be provided by the variation of the undulator gap and of the gap of the planar waveguide in the resonator. Due to the short electron bunch duration coherent spontaneous emission is expected also in this wavelength range. Its effect on the FEL performance will be discussed together with a comparison of different coherent emission mechanisms, like coherent transition radiation (CTR), which can be used as a diagnostic tool.

  11. High Average Current Electron Guns for High-Power FELs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-09

    20 A/cm2, while more advanced cathodes (with controlled porosity) can generate up to ~ 100 A/cm2. Single crystal cathodes such as lanthanum ...polycrystalline form of carbon that will operate at high temperatures and has improved strength and uniformity compared to grids made of tungsten or

  12. An overview of the Los Alamos Crestone Project : uses for astrophysical problems

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, R. P.; Gittings, M. L.; Gisler, Galen R.; Coker, R. F.; New, K. C.; Hueckstaedt, R. M.

    2004-01-01

    The Los Alamos Crestone Project is part of the Department of Energy's (DoE) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program. The main goal of this project is to investigate the use of continuous adaptive mesh refinement (CAMR) techniques for application to problems of interest to the Laboratory. An overview of the astrophysical simulations performed with the SAGE/RAGE codes will be shown here, including asteroid impacts in the deep-ocean, asteroid impacts on the continental shelf (e.g. - Chicxulub - the dinosaur killer), calculations of massive black holes at the galactic center, and calculations of supernova explosions. Examples of these simulations will be shown. We have shown that the SAGE and RAGE codes of the Crestone Project have been very successful products of the DoE's Advanced Simulation and Computing program. It is clear to those performing massively-parallel computations, that the use of thousands of processors in parallel is fundamentally changing the way we think about computer simulations. The Crestone Project codes are fully utilizing each new ASC supercomputer as they become available. The SAGE and RAGE codes are sophisticated Continuous Adaptive Mesh Refinement hydrodynamics codes for large parallel simulations. SAGE and RAGE are becoming useful tools for astrophysical applications. Further research is starting in a wider variety of areas, including cosmological studies with Mike Norman's group at UCSD.

  13. L- and K-shell emission from X-FEL heated iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Philip; Hansen, Stephanie; Loisel, Guillaume; Bailey, James; Gamboa, Eliseo; Glenzer, Siegfried; Mancini, Roberto; Saunders, Alison; Falcone, Roger; Galtier, Eric

    2016-10-01

    At the LCLS MEC instrument, a tightly focused X-ray FEL beam is used to isochorically heat thin iron samples. Two compound refractive lenses produce a focus estimated to be 0.5 microns (FWHM). The L-emission from the hot, solid-density samples is measured by RAP(001) crystal and grating spectrometers. In addition, the K-emission is observed by a Ge(111) crystal spectrometer. The L-shell emission from iron, which is initially photoionized by the X-ray FEL, tests recent measurements indicating higher-than-predicted broadening of the L-shell emission lines. Heating at 7 and 9.2 keV photon energies compares different heating mechanisms.

  14. Performance Achievements and Challenges for FELs based on Energy Recovered Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey Krafft

    2006-08-27

    During the past decade several groups have assembled free electron lasers based on energy recovered linacs (ERLs). Such arrangements have been built to obtain high average power electron and photon beams, by using high repetition rate beam pulses driving FEL oscillators. In this paper the performance of many existing and several proposed facilities from around the world are reviewed. Going forward, many questions must be addressed to achieve still better performance including: higher average current injectors, better optimized accelerating cavities, higher energy acceptance and lower loss beam recirculation systems, and better optical cavity designs for dealing with the optical beam power circulating in the ERL FELs. This paper presents some of the current thinking on each of these issues.

  15. Design Concept for a Compact ERL to Drive a VUV/Soft X-Ray FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Tennant ,David Douglas

    2011-03-01

    We explore possible upgrades of the existing Jefferson Laboratory IR/UV FEL driver to higher electron beam energy and shorter wavelength through use of multipass recirculation to drive an amplifier FEL. The system would require beam energy at the wiggler of 600 MeV with 1 mA of average current. The system must generate a high brightness beam, configure it appropriately, and preserve beam quality through the acceleration cycle ? including multiple recirculations ? and appropriately manage the phase space during energy recovery. The paper will discuss preliminary design analysis of the longitudinal match, space charge effects in the linac, and recirculator design issues, including the potential for the microbunching instability. A design concept for the low energy recirculator and an emittance preserving lattice solution will be presented.

  16. A hybrid type undulator for far-infrared FELs at FELI

    SciTech Connect

    Zako, A.; Miyauchi, Y.; Koga, A.

    1995-12-31

    Two FEL facilities of the FELI are now operating in the wavelength range of 1-20 {mu}m. A 3.2-m hybrid type undulator ({lambda}{sub u}=80mm, N=40) has been designed for far-infrared FELs and will be installed in December. It can cover the wavelength of 20-60 {mu}m by changing K-value from 1 to 2.7 for a 28.0-MeV electron beam. It is composed of ferrite magnetic poles and Sm-Co permanent magnets. Commonly wound coils induce alternating magnetic field in ferrite poles. Combination of the induced field and the permanent magnet field can controls the magnetic field between the undulator gap.

  17. Intense inverse compton {gamma}-ray source from Duke storage ring FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Madey, J.M.J.

    1995-12-31

    We suggest using FEL intracavity power in the Duke storage ring fortrays production via Inverse Compton Backscattering (ICB). The OK-4 FEL driven by the Duke storage ring will tens of watts of average lasing power in the UV/VUV range. Average intracavity power will be in kilowatt range and can be used to pump ICB source. The {gamma}-rays with maximum energy from 40 MeV to 200 MeV with intensity of 0.1-5 10{sup 10}{gamma} per second can be generated. In this paper we present expected parameters of {gamma}-ray beam parameters including its intensity and distribution. We discuss influence of e-beam parameters on collimated {gamma}-rays spectrum and optimization of photon-electron interaction point.

  18. FEL gain as a function of phace displacements induced by undulator intersection gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Varfolomeev, A.A.

    1995-12-31

    Gain characteristics are analytically considered for FEL based on a multisection undulator with short intersection gaps. It is shown that small phase displacements between laser beam and electron beam respectively caused by the above intersection gaps can seriously change the gain resonance frequency as well as gain curve shape. This effect is different from that of OK and can be used for fast undulator tuning or for its tapering. Gain characteristics are analitically considered for FEL based on a multisection undulator with short intersection gaps. It is shown that small phase displacements between laser beam and electron beam respectively caused by the above intersection gaps can seriously change the gain resonance frequency as well as gain curve shape. This effect is different from that of OK and can be used for fast undulator tuning or for its tapering.

  19. OPERATION AND COMMISSIONING OF THE JEFFERSON LAB UV FEL USING AN SRF DRIVER ERL

    SciTech Connect

    R. Legg; S. Benson; G. Biallas; K. Blackburn; J. Boyce; D. Bullard; J. Coleman; C. Dickover; D. Douglas; F. Ellingsworth; P. Evtushenko; F. Hannon; C. Hernandez-Garcia; C. Gould; J. Gubeli; D. Hardy; K. Jordan; M. Klopf; J. Kortze; M. Marchlik; W. Moore; G. Neil; T. Powers; D. Sexton; Michelle D. Shinn; C. Tennant; R. Walker; G. Wilson

    2011-03-01

    We describe the operation and commissioning of the Jefferson Lab UV FEL using a CW SRF ERL driver. Based on the same 135 MeV linear accelerator as the Jefferson Lab 10 kW IR Upgrade FEL, the UV driver ERL uses a bypass geometry to provide transverse phase space control, bunch length compression, and nonlinear aberration compensation necessitating a unique set of commissioning and operational procedures. Additionally, a novel technique to initiate lasing is described. To meet these constraints and accommodate a challenging installation schedule, we adopted a staged commissioning plan with alternating installation and operation periods. This report addresses these issues and presents operational results from on-going beam operations.

  20. Neutron dose rate at the SwissFEL injector test facility: first measurements.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, E; Frey, N; Fuchs, A; Harm, C; Hödlmoser, H; Lüscher, R; Mayer, S; Morath, O; Philipp, R; Rehmann, A; Schietinger, T

    2014-10-01

    At the Paul Scherrer Institute, the new SwissFEL Free Electron Laser facility is currently in the design phase. It is foreseen to accelerate electrons up to a maximum energy of 7 GeV with a pulsed time structure. An injector test facility is operated at a maximum energy of 300 MeV and serves as the principal test and demonstration plant for the SwissFEL project. Secondary radiation is created in unavoidable interactions of the primary beam with beamline components. The resulting ambient dose-equivalent rate due to neutrons was measured along the beamline with different commercially available survey instruments. The present study compares the readings of these neutron detectors (one of them is specifically designed for measurements in pulsed fields). The experiments were carried out in both, a normal and a diagnostic mode of operation of the injector.

  1. JLAMP: AN AMPLIFIER-BASED FEL IN THE JLAB SRF ERL DRIVER

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Jordan; Stephen V. Benson; David Douglas; Pavel Evtushenko; Carlos Hernandez-Garcia; George R. Neil

    2007-06-13

    Notional designs for energy-recovering linac (“ERL”) -driven high average power free electron lasers (“FEL”s) often invoke amplifier-based architectures. To date, however, amplifier FELs have been limited in average power output to values several orders of magnitude lower than those demonstrated in optical-resonator based systems; this is due at least in part to the limited electron beam powers available from their driver accelerators. In order to directly contrast the performance available from amplifiers to that provided by high-power cavity-based resonators, we have developed a scheme to test an amplifier FEL in the JLab SRF ERL driver. We describe an accelerator system design that can seamlessly and non-invasively integrate a 10 m wiggler into the existing system and which provides, at least in principle, performance that would support high-efficiency lasing in an amplifier configuration. Details of the design and an accelerator performance analysis will be presented

  2. Recollections of a very junior physicist at Los Alamos, 1944-1946

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Anthony P.

    2008-04-01

    The author came to Los Alamos as a member of the British Mission after two years of making fission cross section measurements at the Cavendish Laboratory. He worked in a group headed by Egon Bretscher in Enrico Fermi's F Division. The talk presents his personal memories and experiences at Los Alamos as compared to his life and work in wartime Britain.

  3. 75 FR 1793 - Study Team for the Los Alamos Historical Document Retrieval and Assessment (LAHDRA) Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Study Team for the Los Alamos Historical...: Public Meeting of the Study Team for the Los Alamos Historical Document Retrieval and Assessment Project...://www.ohkay.com/contactus.html . Status: Open to the public, limited only by the space available....

  4. Office of Inspector General report on audit of environmental restoration at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    Los Alamos` Environmental Restoration Program is charged with cost effectively remediating contaminated sites. To monitor progress toward this goal, the University of California, the contractor operating Los Alamos, and the Department negotiated eight performance measures. The objective of this audit was to determine whether the contract performance criteria were reasonable, measurable, and complete, thereby allowing the Department to determine if Los Alamos had expeditiously and cost effectively remediated contaminated sites. The audit determined that Los Alamos did not generate the information needed to assess the cost effectiveness of remediation on a site-by-site basis. This situation occurred because the performance criteria used to evaluate cost effectiveness were not always reasonable, measurable, and complete. As a result, neither Los Alamos nor the Department could evaluate the cost effectiveness or progress of the remediation program or accurately budget for upcoming remediation activities. The audit also determined that Los Alamos` sample validation procedures were too costly because Los Alamos validated more samples than called for by Federal and New Mexico standard practices. While the Office of Inspector General recognizes the importance of prudent sample validation, Los Alamos paid $540,000 more than necessary to validate sample results. These funds could have been used to remediate contaminated sites.

  5. Bulk processing of radionuclide generator parents at the Los Alamos Hot Cell Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fassbender, M. E.; Nortier, F. M.; Phillips, Dennis R.; Peterson, E. J.

    2004-01-01

    Bulk radionuclide processing at Los Alamos includes isotopes with short-lived radioactive daughter nuclides ('generator parents') for medical applications. The generator radionuclide parents {sup 68}Ge, {sup 82}Sr, {sup 88}Zr and {sup 109}Cd are regularly processed at the Los Alamos Hot Cell Facility. Nuclear chemical aspects related to the production and processing of these generator parents are briefly outlined.

  6. 75 FR 72829 - Los Alamos Historical Document Retrieval and Assessment (LAHDRA) Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Los Alamos Historical Document Retrieval and... Los Alamos Historical Document Retrieval and Assessment (LAHDRA)Project. Time and Date: 5 p.m.-7...

  7. Los Alamos strategic defense research and the ABM (Anti-Ballistic Missile) Treaty

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, R.; Pendley, R.E.

    1988-04-01

    This report reviews the restrictions placed on Los Alamos strategic defense by current arms control treaty agreements, including controversies about the correct interpretation of the major treaty at issue, the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty; and it assesses the current status of the most significant Los Alamos strategic defense programs in terms of their compliance with that Treaty, and others. 7 tabs.

  8. Spontaneous and amplified radiation at the initial stage of a SASE FEL.

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Kim, K.-J.

    2002-11-01

    At the initial stage of a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron laser (FEL), spontaneous undulator radiation in certain experimental configurations can dominate the amplified signal over an extended undulator distance. In this paper they study both the spontaneous and the amplified radiation in the framework of the paraxial wave equation and determine the transition from the dominance of spontaneous emission to exponential amplification. They compare theoretical expectations with SASE simulation codes GINGER and GENESIS.

  9. Spontaneous and amplified radiation at the initial stage of a SASE FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhirong; Kim, Kwang-Je

    2003-07-01

    At the initial stage of a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron laser (FEL), spontaneous undulator radiation in certain experimental configurations can dominate the amplified signal over an extended undulator distance. In this paper we study both the spontaneous and the amplified radiation in the framework of the paraxial wave equation and determine the transition from the dominance of spontaneous emission to exponential amplification. We compare theoretical expectations with SASE simulation codes GINGER and GENESIS.

  10. High-efficiency FEL-oscillator with Bragg resonator operated in reversed guide field regime

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminsky, A.K.; Sedykh, S.N.; Sergeyev, A.P.

    1995-12-31

    The aim of the present work was to develop a narrow-band FEL-oscillator working in millimeter wavelength with, high efficiency. It looked promising to combine the high selective property of Bragg resonator with high efficiency and other advantages of FEL operation in the reversed guide-field regime. An experimental study of the FEL was performed using lilac LIU-3000 (JINR, Dubna) with the electron energy of 1 MeV, beam current up to 200 A and pulse duration of 200 ns. The beam was injected into the internction region with guide magnetic field of 2.9 kGs. Transverse oscillations of electrons were pumped by the helical wiggler with the period length of 6 cm and the field slowly up-tapering over the initial 6 periods. The FEI electrodynamic system consisted of a circular waveguide with diameter 20 mm and two Bragg reflectors. The H wave of the circular waveguide was shown for operation. Two effective feedback waves were observed in {open_quotes}cold{close_quotes} electrodynamic measurement in correspondence with calculations; the E wave near the frequency of 31. 5 GHz and the E wave - 37.5 GHz. The width of the both reflection resonances was about 2%. In {open_quotes}hot{close_quotes} experiments the radiation on the designed H wave and frequencies corresponding to the both feedback waves was registered separately. Selection of the frequency was realized by varying of the wiggler field strength. The spectrum was measured with a set of the cut--off waveguide filters with inaccuracy less than 2%. Calibrated Semiconductor detectors wire used to measure the radiation power. The radiation with the frequencies of 37.5 and 31.5 GHz was observed in vicinity of the wiggler field amplitude of 2.5 kGs. The measured spectrum width of the output FEL-oscillator radiation did not exceed the width of the Bragg reflector resonances for the both feedback waves.

  11. Use of a miniature Toroidal Grating Monochromator on the FEL Undulator at the NSLS

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.D.; Hulbert, S.L.; Howells, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    The use of a miniature Toroidal Grating Monochromator is described which we intend to use to monochromatize the radiation from the free electron laser (FEL) Undulator at the NSLS. Some of the properties of Undulators are described with reference to the design of beamlines and review the properties of TGM's. The results of ray tracing a beamline using such a device and estimates of the expected flux are given.

  12. Dynamical aspects on FEL interaction in single passage and storage ring devices

    SciTech Connect

    Dattoli, G.; Renieri, A.

    1995-12-31

    The dynamical behaviour of the free-electron lasers is investigated using appropriate scaling relations valid for devices operating in the low and high gain regimes, including saturation. The analysis is applied to both single passage and storage ring configurations. In the latter case the interplay between the interaction of the electron bean with the laser field and with the accelerator environment is investigated. In particular we discuss the effect of FEL interaction on the microwave instability.

  13. Transformations of Gaussian Light Beams Caused by Reflection in FEL (free Electron Lasers) Resonators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-27

    il FILE COPy Naval Research Laboratory Washingon, DC 20375-500 NRL Memorandum Report 6347 ,qJ. o Transformations of Gaussian Light Beams N Caused by...Transformations of 7aussian Light Beams Caused by Reflection in FEL Resonators 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Riyopoulos,* S., Tang, C.M. and Sprangle, P...34 𔃾-6603 -"I, -,’ SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE 19. ABSTRACTS (Continued) cross-coupling among vector components of the radiation field, caused

  14. Nonlinear absorption and transmission properties of Ge, Te and InAs using tuneable IR FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Amirmadhi, F.; Becker, K.; Brau, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Nonlinear absorption properties of Ge, Te and InAs are being investigated using the transmission of FEL optical pulses through these semiconductors (z-scan method). Wavelength, intensity and macropulse dependence are used to differentiate between two-photon and free-carrier absorption properties of these materials. Macropulse dependence is resolved by using a Pockles Cell to chop the 4-{mu}s macropulse down to 100 ns. Results of these experiments will be presented and discussed.

  15. Studies of a Linac Driver for a High Repetition Rate X-Ray FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, M.; Corlett, J.; Doolittle, L.; Filippetto, D.; Papadopoulos, C.; Penn, G.; Prosnitz, D.; Qiang, J.; Reinsch, M.; Ryne, R.; Sannibale, F.; Staples, J.; Wells, R.; Wurtele, J.; Zolotorev, M.; Zholents, A.

    2011-06-01

    We report on on-going studies of a superconducting CW linac driver intended to support a high repetition rate FEL operating in the soft x-rays spectrum. We present a pointdesign for a 1.8 GeV machine tuned for 300 pC bunches and delivering low-emittance, low-energy spread beams as needed for the SASE and seeded beamlines.

  16. JINR test facility for studies FEL bunching technique for CLIC driving beam

    SciTech Connect

    Dolbilov, G.V.; Fateev, A.A.; Ivanov, I.N.

    1995-12-31

    SILUND-21 linear induction accelerator (energy up to 10 MeV, peak current about of 1 kA, pulse duration 50 - 70 ns) is constructed at JINR in the framework of experimental program to study free electron laser physics, a problem of two-beam acceleration and microwave electronics. In this paper we present project of an experiment to adopt the FEL bunching technique for generation of the CLIC driving beam.

  17. Primary experimental studies on mid-infrared FEL irradiation on dental substances at BFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junbiao, Zhu; Yonggui, Li; Nianqing, Liu; Guoqing, Zhang; Minkai, Wang; Gan, Wu; Xuepin, Yan; Yuying, Huang; Wei, He; Yanmei, Dong; Xuejun, Gao

    2001-12-01

    A free electron laser (FEL) with its characteristics of wide wavelength tunability, ultrashort pulse time structure, and high peak power density is predominantly superior to all other conventional lasers in applications. Several experimental studies on mid-infrared FEL irradiation on dental enamel and dentine were performed at the Beijing FEL. Experimental aims were to investigate changes in the hardness, ratios of P to Ca and Cs before and after irradiation on samples with a characteristic absorption wavelength of 9.66 μm, in the colors of these sample surfaces after irradiation with different wavelengths around the peak wavelength. The time dependence of temperature of the dentine sample was measured with its ps pulse effects compared to that with a continuous CO 2 laser. FTIR absorption spectra in the range of 2.5-15.4 μm for samples of these hard dental substances and pure hydroxyapatite were first examined to decide their chemical components and absorption maximums. Primary experimental results will be presented.

  18. A high average current DC GaAs photocathode gun for ERLs and FELs

    SciTech Connect

    C. Hernandez-Garcia; T. Siggins; S. Benson; D. Bullard; H. F. Dylla; K. Jordan; C. Murray; G. R. Neil; Michelle D. Shinn; R. Walker

    2005-05-01

    The Jefferson Lab (JLab) 10 kW IR Upgrade FEL DC GaAs photocathode gun is presently the highest average current electron source operational in the U.S., delivering a record 9.1 mA CW, 350 kV electron beam with 122 pC/bunch at 75 MHz rep rate. Pulsed operation has also been demonstrated with 8 mA per pulse (110 pC/bunch) in 16 ms-long pulses at 2 Hz rep rate. Routinely the gun delivers 5 mA CW and pulse current at 135 pC/bunch for FEL operations. The Upgrade DC photocathode gun is a direct evolution of the DC photocathode gun used in the previous JLab 1 kW IR Demo FEL. Improvements in the vacuum conditions, incorporation of two UHV motion mechanisms (a retractable cathode and a photocathode shield door) and a new way to add cesium to the GaAs photocathode surface have extended its lifetime to over 450 Coulombs delivered between re-cesiations (quantum efficiency replenishment). With each photocathode activation quantum efficiencies above 6% are routinely achieved. The photocathode activation and performance will be described in detail.

  19. Photon Source Capabilities of the Jefferson Lab THz to VUV FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, G. P.; Benson, S. V.; Douglas, D.; Evtushenko, P.; Hannon, F. E.; Hernandez-Garcia, C.; Klopf, J. M.; Legg, R. A.; Neil, G. R.; Shinn, M. D.; Tennant, C. D.; Zhang, S.

    2013-03-01

    Jefferson Lab operates a sub-picosecond photon science R&D facility with peak and average brightness values that are many orders of magnitude higher than storage rings in the THz - VUV range. It also has multiphoton capabilities that provide unique opportunities for out of equilibrium dynamical studies at time-scales down to ~ 100 fs FWHM. The facility is based on a superconducting energy recovered linac which is operated with CW RF that powers oscillator-based IR and UV Free Electron Lasers (FELs) with diffraction limited sub-picosecond pulses with > 1013 photons per pulse (1.0% BW) at pulse repetition frequencies up to 75 MHz. Details of the facility and its present performance will be presented along with some example science applications. In addition we will discuss on-going upgrades to the facility that will allow 10 eV lasing in the fundamental. Finally we will present two potential upgrades including the design of an oscillator-based VUV-FEL that would produce 6 × 1012 coherent (0.5% BW) 100 eV photons per pulse at multi-MHz repetition rates in the fundamental, and a dual FEL configuration that would allow simultaneous lasing at THz and UV wavelengths. We acknowledge support from the Commonwealth of Virginia. Jefferson Lab is supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC05-84-ER40150.

  20. FERMI @ Elettra -- A Seeded Harmonic Cascade FEL for EUV and SoftX-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Bocchetta, C.; Bulfone, D.; Craievich, P.; Danailov, M.B.; D'Auria,G.; DeNinno, G.; Di Mitri, S.; Diviacco, B.; Ferianis, M.; Gomezel, A.; Iazzourene, F.; Karantzoulis, E.; Parmigiani, F.; Penco, G.; Trovo, M.; Corlett, J.; Fawley, W.; Lidia, S.; Penn, G.; Ratti, A.; Staples, J.; Wilcox, R.; Zholents, A.; Graves, W.; Ilday, F.O.; Kaertner,F.; Wang, D.; Zwart, T.; Cornacchia, M.; Emma, P.; Huang, Z.; Wu, J.

    2005-09-01

    We describe the machine layout and major performance parameters for the FERMI FEL project funded for construction at Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy, within the next five years. The project will be the first user facility based on seeded harmonic cascade FELs, providing controlled, high peak-power pulses. With a high-brightness rf photocathode gun, and using the existing 1.2 GeV S-band linac, the facility will provide tunable output over a range from {approx}100 nm to {approx}10nm, with pulse duration from 40 fs to {approx} 1 ps, peak power GW, and with fully variable output polarization. Initially, two FEL cascades are planned; a single-stage harmonic generation to operate >40 nm, and a two stage cascade operating from {approx}40 nm to {approx}10 nm or shorter wavelength. The output is spatially and temporally coherent, with peak power in the GW range. Lasers provide modulation to the electron beam, as well as driving the photocathode and other systems, and the facility will integrate laser systems with the accelerator infrastructure, including a state-of-the-art optical timing system providing synchronization of rf signals, lasers, and x-ray pulses. Major systems and overall facility layout are described, and key performance parameters summarized.

  1. Thermal Acoustic Sensor for High Pulse Energy X-ray FEL Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, T.J.; Frisch, J.C.; Kraft, E.M.; Loos, J.; Bentsen, G.S.; /Rochester U.

    2011-12-13

    The pulse energy density of X-ray FELs will saturate or destroy conventional X-ray diagnostics, and the use of large beam attenuation will result in a beam that is dominated by harmonics. We present preliminary results at the LCLS from a pulse energy detector based on the thermal acoustic effect. In this type of detector an X-ray resistant material (boron carbide in this system) intercepts the beam. The pulse heating of the target material produces an acoustic pulse that can be detected with high frequency microphones to produce a signal that is linear in the absorbed energy. The thermal acoustic detector is designed to provide first- and second-order calorimetric measurement of X-ray FEL pulse energy. The first-order calorimetry is a direct temperature measurement of a target designed to absorb all or most of the FEL pulse power with minimal heat leak. The second-order measurement detects the vibration caused by the rapid thermoelastic expansion of the target material each time it absorbs a photon pulse. Both the temperature change and the amplitude of the acoustic signal are directly related to the photon pulse energy.

  2. Development of intense terahertz coherent synchrotron radiation at KU-FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sei, Norihiro; Zen, Heishun; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2016-10-01

    We produced intense coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz (THz) region using an S-band linac at the Kyoto University Free Electron Laser (KU-FEL), which is a mid-infrared free-electron laser facility. The CSR beam was emitted from short-pulse electron bunches compressed by a 180° arc, and was transferred to air at a large solid angle of 0.10 rad. The measured CSR energy was 55 μJ per 7 μs macropulse, and KU-FEL was one of the most powerful CSR sources in normal conducting linear accelerator facilities. The CSR spectra were measured using an uncooled pyroelectric detector and a Michelson-type interferometer designed specifically for the KU-FEL electron beam, and had a maximum at a frequency of 0.11 THz. We found that adjusting the energy slit enhanced the CSR energy and shortened the electron beam bunch length in the CSR spectra measurements. Our results demonstrated that the efficient use of the energy slit can help improve the characteristics of CSR.

  3. Harmonic cascade FEL designs for LUX, a facility for ultrafast x-ray science

    SciTech Connect

    Corlett, John; Fawley, William; Penn, Gregory; Wan, Weishi; Zholents, A.; Reinsch, M.; Wurtele, Jonathan

    2004-08-25

    LUX is a design study to develop concepts for future ultrafast x-ray facilities. Presently, LUX is based on an electron beam accelerated to {approx}3-GeV energy in a superconducting, recirculating linac. Included in the design are multiple free-electron laser (FEL) beamlines which use the harmonic cascade approach to produce coherent XUV and soft X-ray emission beginning with a strong input seed at {approx}200-nm wavelength obtained from a ''conventional'' laser. Each cascade module generally operates in the low-gain regime and is composed of a radiator together with a modulator section, separated by a magnetic chicane. The chicane temporally delays the electron beam pulse in order that a ''virgin'' pulse region (with undegraded energy spread) be brought into synchronism with the radiation pulse. For a given cascade, the output photon energy can be selected over a wide range by varying the seed laser wavelength and the field strength in the undulators. We present numerical simulation results, as well as those from analytical models, to examine certain aspects of the predicted FEL performance. We also discuss lattice considerations pertinent to harmonic cascade FELs, some sensitivity studies and requirements on the undulator alignment, and temporal pulse evolution initiated by short input radiation seeds.

  4. Design of the SRF Driver ERL for the Jefferson Lab UV FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, David R; Benson, Stephen; Biallas, George; Blackburn, Keith; Boyce, James; Bullard, Donald; Coleman, James; Dickover, Cody; Ellingsworth, Forrest; Evtushenko, Pavel; Gould, Christopher; Gubeli, Joseph; Hannon, Fay; Hardy, David; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Jordan, Kevin; Klopf, Michael; Kortze, James; Marchlik, Matthew; Moore, Steven; Neil, George; Powers, Thomas; Sexton, Daniel; Shinn, Michelle D; Tennant, Christopher; Walker, Richard; Wilson, Frederick; Zhang, Shukui

    2011-03-01

    We describe the design of the SRF Energy-Recovering Linac (ERL) providing the CW electron drive beam at the Jefferson Lab UV FEL. Based on the same 135 MeV linear accelerator as and sharing portions of the recirculator with the Jefferson Lab 10 kW IR Upgrade FEL, the UV driver ERL uses a novel bypass geometry to provide transverse phase space control, bunch length compression, and nonlinear aberration compensation (including correction of RF curvature effects) without the use of magnetic chicanes or harmonic RF. Stringent phase space requirements at the wiggler, low beam energy, high beam current, and use of a pre-existing facility and legacy hardware subject the design to numerous constraints. These are imposed not only by the need for both transverse and longitudinal phase space management, but also by the potential impact of collective phenomena (space charge, wakefields, beam break-up (BBU), and coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR)), and by interactions between the FEL and the accelerator RF system. This report addresses these issues and presents the accelerator design solution that is now in operation.

  5. Generation of doublet spectral lines at self-seeded X-ray FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni

    2011-06-01

    Self-seeding schemes, consisting of two undulators with a monochromator in between, aim to reduce the bandwidth of SASE X-ray FELs. We recently proposed to use a new method of monochromatization exploiting a single crystal in Bragg transmission geometry for self-seeding in the hard X-ray range. The obvious and technically possible extension is to use such kind of monochromator setup with two (or more) crystals arranged in a series to spectrally filter the SASE radiation at two (or more) closely-spaced wavelengths within the FEL gain band. This allows for the production of doublet (or multiplet) spectral lines. Exploitations of such mode of operation involve any situation where there is a large change in cross-section over a narrow wavelength range. In this paper we consider the simultaneous operation of the LCLS hard X-ray FEL at two closely spaced wavelengths. We present simulation results for the LCLS baseline, and we show that this method can produce fully coherent radiation shared between two longitudinal modes. Mode spacing can be easily tuned within the FEL gain band, i.e. within 10 eV. An interesting aspect of the proposed scheme is a way of modulating the electron bunch at optical frequencies without a seed quantum laser. In fact, the XFEL output intensity contains an oscillating "mode-beat" component whose frequency is related to the frequency difference between the pair of longitudinal modes considered. Thus, at saturation one obtains FEL-induced modulations of energy loss and energy spread in the electron bunch at optical frequency. These modulations can be converted into density modulation at the same optical frequency with the help of a weak chicane installed behind the baseline undulator. Powerful coherent radiation can then be generated with the help of an optical transition radiation (OTR) station, which have important applications. In this paper we briefly consider how the doublet structure of the XFEL generation spectra can be monitored by an

  6. Common ground: An environmental ethic for Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, F.L.

    1991-01-01

    Three predominant philosophies have characterized American business ethical thinking over the past several decades. The first phase is the ethics of self-interest'' which argues that maximizing self-interest coincidentally maximizes the common good. The second phase is legality ethics.'' Proponents argue that what is important is knowing the rules and following them scrupulously. The third phase might be called stake-holder ethics.'' A central tenant is that everyone affected by a decision has a moral hold on the decision maker. This paper will discuss one recent initiative of the Los Alamos National Laboratory to move beyond rules and regulations toward an environmental ethic that integrates the values of stakeholder ethics'' into the Laboratory's historical culture and value systems. These Common Ground Principles are described. 11 refs.

  7. The legacy and future of CFD at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, N.L.

    1996-06-01

    The early history is presented of the prolific development of CFD methods in the Fluid Dynamics Group (T-3) at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the years from 1958 to the late 1960`s. Many of the currently used numerical methods--PIC, MAC, vorticity-stream-function, ICE, ALE methods and the {kappa}-{var_epsilon} method for turbulence--originated during this time. The rest of the paper summarizes the current research in T-3 for CFD, turbulence and solids modeling. The research areas include reactive flows, multimaterial flows, multiphase flows and flows with spatial discontinuities. Also summarized are modern particle methods and techniques developed for large scale computing on massively parallel computing platforms and distributed processors.

  8. Los Alamos Guns Take Aim at Material's Mysteries

    SciTech Connect

    Byers, Mark; Moore, David; Dimarino, Steve

    2014-04-14

    Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists and technicians conduct thousands of experiments a year, delving into the fundamental nature of everything from supernovas to subatomic particles. One set of instruments used to better understand the fundamental nature of various materials are 10 scientific gun systems that fire various projectiles at high-tech targets to create enormous velocities, pressures, and temperatures - and using laser, x-ray, and other diagnostics - explore the very nature of metals and other materials. The hundreds of gun-based experiments conducted every year at the Laboratory require a highly-skilled staff of scientists and technicians, and has given rise to a special organization called the "gun working group" to foster open communications, cooperation, problem-solving, and a healthy safety culture.

  9. Environmental surveillance and compliance at Los Alamos during 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report presents environmental data that characterize environmental performance and addresses compliance with environmental standards and requirements at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) during 1996. The Laboratory routinely monitors for radiation and for radioactive nonradioactive materials at Laboratory sites as well as in the surrounding region. LANL uses the monitoring results to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to identify potentially undesirable trends. Data were collected in 1996 to assess external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions; and concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface waters and groundwaters, the municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs. Using comparisons with standards and regulations, this report concludes that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a demonstrable threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment. Laboratory operations were in compliance with all major environmental regulations.

  10. Root lengths of plants on Los Alamos National Laboratory lands

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, G.D.; Foxx, T.S.

    1987-01-01

    Maximum root lengths of 22 plant species occurring on Los Alamos National Laboratory lands were measured. An average of two longest roots from each species were dug up and their lengths, typical shapes, and qualitative morphologics were noted along with the overstory dimensions of the plant individual with which the roots were associated. Maximum root lengths were compared with overstory (height times width) dimensions. Among the life forms studied, the shrubs tend to show the longest roots in relation to overstory size. Forbs show the shortest roots in relation to overstory size. Measurements of tree roots suggest only that immature trees on the Pajarito Plateau may have root-length to overstory-size ratios near one. 30 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Los Alamos Discovers Super Efficient Solar Using Perovskite Crystals

    ScienceCinema

    Mohite, Aditya; Nie, Wanyi

    2016-07-12

    State-of-the-art photovoltaics using high-purity, large-area, wafer-scale single-crystalline semiconductors grown by sophisticated, high temperature crystal-growth processes offer promising routes for developing low-cost, solar-based clean global energy solutions for the future. Solar cells composed of the recently discovered material organic-inorganic perovskites offer the efficiency of silicon, yet suffer from a variety of deficiencies limiting the commercial viability of perovskite photovoltaic technology. In research to appear in Science, Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers reveal a new solution-based hot-casting technique that eliminates these limitations, one that allows for the growth of high-quality, large-area, millimeter-scale perovskite crystals and demonstrates that highly efficient and reproducible solar cells with reduced trap assisted recombination can be realized.

  12. Los Alamos National Laboratory capability reviews - FY 2011 status

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, Everett P

    2011-01-12

    Capability reviews are the Los Alamos National Laboratory approach to assess the quality of its science, technology, and engineering (STE), and its integration across the Laboratory. There are seven capability reviews in FY 2011 reviews. The Weapons Science and Engineering review will be replaced by the National Nuclear Security Administration's Predictive Science Panel for 2011 . Beginning in 2011, third-year LORD projects will be reviewed by capability review committees rather than the first-year LORD projects that have been performed for the last three years. This change addresses concerns from committees about reviewing a project before it had made any substantive progress. The current schedule, and chairs for the 2011 capability reviews is presented. The three-year cycle (2011-2013) for capability reviews are presented for planning purposes.

  13. Plans for an Ultra Cold Neutron source at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Seestrom, S.J.; Bowles, T.J.; Hill, R.; Greene, G.L.

    1996-10-01

    Ultra Cold Neutrons (UCN) can be produced at spallation sources using a variety of techniques. To date the technique used has been to Bragg scatter and Doppler shift cold neutrons into UCN from a moving crystal. This is particularly applicable to short-pulse spallation sources. We are presently constructing a UCN source at LANSCE using this method. In addition, large gains in UCN density should be possible using cryogenic UCN sources. Research is under way at Gatchina to demonstrate technical feasibility of a frozen deuterium source. If successful, a source of this type could be implemented at future spallation source, such as the long pulse source being planned at Los Alamos, with a UCN density that may be two orders of magnitude higher than that presently available at reactors.

  14. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Nuclear Science Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ronald Owen; Wender, Steve

    2015-06-19

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facilities for Nuclear Science consist of a high-energy "white" neutron source (Target 4) with 6 flight paths, three low-energy nuclear science flight paths at the Lujan Center, and a proton reaction area. The neutron beams produced at the Target 4 complement those produced at the Lujan Center because they are of much higher energy and have shorter pulse widths. The neutron sources are driven by the 800-MeV proton beam of the LANSCE linear accelerator. With these facilities, LANSCE is able to deliver neutrons with energies ranging from a milli-electron volt to several hundreds of MeV, as well as proton beams with a wide range of energy, time and intensity characteristics. The facilities, instruments and research programs are described briefly.

  15. Los Alamos Explosives Performance Key to Stockpile Stewardship

    ScienceCinema

    Dattelbaum, Dana

    2016-07-12

    As the U.S. Nuclear Deterrent ages, one essential factor in making sure that the weapons will continue to perform as designed is understanding the fundamental properties of the high explosives that are part of a nuclear weapons system. As nuclear weapons go through life extension programs, some changes may be advantageous, particularly through the addition of what are known as "insensitive" high explosives that are much less likely to accidentally detonate than the already very safe "conventional" high explosives that are used in most weapons. At Los Alamos National Laboratory explosives research includes a wide variety of both large- and small-scale experiments that include small contained detonations, gas and powder gun firings, larger outdoor detonations, large-scale hydrodynamic tests, and at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site, underground sub-critical experiments.

  16. HELIOS: applications at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, R.T.; Mosteller, R.D.; Chodak, Paul III; Charlton, W.; Adams, B.T.

    1997-10-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is involved in the analysis of many different types of nuclear systems. The nuclear systems that we have analyzed have included subcritical accelerator driven systems for the transmutation of waste, fusion systems, critical experiment systems, and space propulsion and power systems. We have also analyzed special purpose reactors such as the LANL Omega West reactor, production reactors, and conventional commercial light- and heavy-water reactors. Thus the systems that we analyze and the type of results desired, often vary considerably from those of a power company normally analyzing their PWR or BWR for fissile fuel burnup and production. The reactor geometries that we model are often quite complicated such as those of an RBMK or Savannah River Production Reactor. Rather than fissile fuel production and burnup, the goal of a calculation could be the production rate of some obscure isotope which has medical applications.

  17. Experiments on planar plasma flow switches at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Benage, J.F. Jr.; Wysocki, F.J.; Bowers, R.; Oona, H.

    1997-12-01

    The authors have performed a series of experiments on the Colt facility at Los Alamos to study the performance of plasma flow switches and to understand the important physics issues which affect that performance. These experiments were done in planar geometry on a small machine to allow for better diagnostic access and a higher repetition rate. The Colt facility is a capacitor bank which stores 300 kJ at maximum charge and produced a peak current of 1.1 MA in 2.0 microseconds for these experiments. The diagnostics used for these experiments included an array of b-dot probes, visible framing pictures, visible spectroscopy, and laser interferometry. Characteristics of the switch are determined from spatial and temporal profiles of the magnetic field and the spatial profile and temperature of the switch plasma. Here the authors present results from experiments for a variety of switch conditions.

  18. Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The Management Subteam conducted a management and organization assessment of environment, safety, and health (ES H) activities performed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and onsite contractor personnel. The objectives of the assessment were to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of management systems and practices in terms of ensuring environmental compliance and the safety and health of workers and the general public, (2) identify key findings, and (3) identify root causes for all ES H findings and concerns. The scope of the assessment included examinations of the following from an ES H perspective: (1) strategic and program planning; (2) organizational structure and management configuration; (3) human resource management, including training and staffing; (4) management systems, including performance monitoring and assessment; (5) conduct of operations; (6) public and institutional interactions; and (7) corporate'' parent support.

  19. Smoking patterns among Los Alamos National Laboratory employees

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, M.C.; Wilkinson, G.S.

    1987-06-01

    Smoking patterns among 5507 employees at Los Alamos National Laboratory were investigated for those who underwent physical examinations by occupational physicians from 1978 to 1983. More male than female employees smoked, although differences in smoking rates between the sexes were not as large as differences observed for national smoking rates. Employees over 40 were more likely to smoke than younger employees, males consumed more cigarettes than did females, and Anglo employees smoked more cigarettes than did Hispanic employees. Highly educated employees smoked less than did less-educated workers, and staff members exhibited the lowest rates of smoking. Smoking cessation programs for Laboratory employees should be directed toward those subpopulations with the highest rates of smoking. 31 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Operational status of the Los Alamos neutron science center (LANSCE)

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Kevin W; Erickson, John L; Schoenberg, Kurt F

    2010-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator and beam delivery complex generates the proton beams that serve three neutron production sources; the thermal and cold source for the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) high-energy neutron source, and a pulsed Ultra-Cold Neutron Source. These three sources are the foundation of strong and productive multi-disciplinary research programs that serve a diverse and robust user community. The facility also provides multiplexed beams for the production of medical radioisotopes and proton radiography of dynamic events. The recent operating history of these sources will be reviewed and plans for performance improvement will be discussed, together with the underlying drivers for the proposed LANSCE Refurbishment project. The details of this latter project are presented in a separate contribution.