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Sample records for alamos directed research

  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory strategic directions

    SciTech Connect

    Hecker, S.

    1995-10-01

    It is my pleasure to welcome you to Los Alamos. I like the idea of bringing together all aspects of the research community-defense, basic science, and industrial. It is particularly important in today`s times of constrained budgets and in fields such as neutron research because I am convinced that the best science and the best applications will come from their interplay. If we do the science well, then we will do good applications. Keeping our eye focused on interesting applications will spawn new areas of science. This interplay is especially critical, and it is good to have these communities represented here today.

  2. Publications of Los Alamos research 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Varjabedian, K.; Dussart, S.A.; McClary, W.J.; Rich, J.A.

    1989-12-01

    This bibliography lists unclassified publications of work done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for 1988. The entries, which are subdivided by broad subject categories, are cross-referenced with an author index and a numeric index.

  3. Publications of Los Alamos research 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, C.A.; Willis, J.K.

    1981-09-01

    This bibliography is a compilation of unclassified publications of work done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for 1980. Papers published in 1980 are included regardless of when they were actually written. Publications received too late for inclusion in earlier compilations have also been listed. Declassification of previously classified reports is considered to constitute publication. All classified issuances are omitted-even those papers, themselves unclassified, which were published only as part of a classified document. If a paper was pubished more than once, all places of publication are included. The bibliography includes Los Alamos National Laboratory reports, papers released as non-laboratory reports, journal articles, books, chapters of books, conference papers published either separately or as part of conference proceedings issued as books or reports, papers published in congressional hearings, theses, and US patents. Publications by Los Alamos authors that are not records of Laboratory-sponsored work are included when the Library becomes aware of them.

  4. Publications of Los Alamos Research, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, C.J.; McClary, W.J.; Rich, J.A.; Rodriguez, L.L.

    1984-10-01

    This bibliography is a compilation of unclassified publications of work done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for 1983. Papers published in 1982 are included regardless of when they were actually written. Publications received too late for inclusion in earlier compilations have also been listed. Declassification of previously classified reports is considered to constitute publication. All classified issuances are omitted - even those papers, themselves unclassified, which were published only as part of a classified document. If a paper was published more than once, all places of publication are included. The bibliography includes Los Alamos National Laboratory reports, papers released as non-Laboratory reports, journal articles, books, chapters of books, conference papers either published separately or as part of conference proceedings issued as books or reports, papers publishd in congressional hearings, theses, and US patents. Publications by Los Alamos authors that are not records of Laboratory-sponsored work are included when the Library becomes aware of them.

  5. Inertial Confinement Fusion Research at LOS Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batha, S. H.; Albright, B. J.; Alexander, D. J.; Barnes, Cris W.; Bradley, P. A.; Cobble, J. A.; Cooley, J. C.; Cooley, J. H.; Day, R. D.; DeFriend, K. A.; Delamater, N. D.; Dodd, E. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Fernandez, J. C.; Flippo, K. A.; Grim, G. P.; Goldman, S. R.; Greenfield, S. R.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hoffman, N. M.; Holmes, R. L.; Johnson, R. P.; Keiter, P. A.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Lanier, N. E.; Loomis, E.; Lopez, F. E.; Luo, S.; Mack, J. M.; Magelssen, G. R.; Montgomery, D. S.; Nobile, A.; Oertel, J. A.; Reardon, P.; Rose, H. A.; Schmidt, D.; Schmitt, M. J.; Seifter, A.; Shimada, T.; Swift, D. C.; Tierney, T. E.; Welser-Sherrill, L.; Wilke, M. D.; Wilson, D. C.; Workman, J.; Yin, L.

    2009-07-01

    Inertial confinement fusion research at Los Alamos National Laboratory is focused on high-leverage areas of thermonuclear ignition to which LANL can apply its historic strengths and that are complementary to high-energy-density-physics topics. Using the Trident and Omega laser facilities, experiments are pursued in laser-plasma instabilities, symmetry, Be technologies, neutron and fusion-product diagnostics, and defect hydrodynamics.

  6. The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory - An Isolated Nuclear Research Establishment

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, Norris E.; Meade, Roger Allen

    2016-09-23

    Early in his twenty-five year career as the Director of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Norris Bradbury wrote at length about the atomic bomb and the many implications the bomb might have on the world. His themes were both technical and philosophical. In 1963, after nearly twenty years of leading the nation’s first nuclear weapons laboratory, Bradbury took the opportunity to broaden his writing. In a paper delivered to the International Atomic Energy Agency’s symposium on the “Criteria in the Selection of Sites for the Construction of Reactors and Nuclear Research Centers,” Bradbury took the opportunity to talk about the business of nuclear research and the human component of operating a scientific laboratory. This report is the transcript of his talk.

  7. 2015 Los Alamos Space Weather Summer School Research Reports

    SciTech Connect

    Cowee, Misa; Chen, Yuxi; Desai, Ravindra; Hassan, Ehab; Kalmoni, Nadine; Lin, Dong; Depascuale, Sebastian; Hughes, Randall Scott; Zhou, Hong

    2015-11-24

    The fifth Los Alamos Space Weather Summer School was held June 1st - July 24th, 2015, at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). With renewed support from the Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures (IGPPS) and additional support from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science, we hosted a new class of five students from various U.S. and foreign research institutions. The summer school curriculum includes a series of structured lectures as well as mentored research and practicum opportunities. Lecture topics including general and specialized topics in the field of space weather were given by a number of researchers affiliated with LANL. Students were given the opportunity to engage in research projects through a mentored practicum experience. Each student works with one or more LANL-affiliated mentors to execute a collaborative research project, typically linked with a larger ongoing research effort at LANL and/or the student’s PhD thesis research. This model provides a valuable learning experience for the student while developing the opportunity for future collaboration. This report includes a summary of the research efforts fostered and facilitated by the Space Weather Summer School. These reports should be viewed as work-in-progress as the short session typically only offers sufficient time for preliminary results. At the close of the summer school session, students present a summary of their research efforts. Titles of the papers included in this report are as follows: Full particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation of whistler wave generation, Hybrid simulations of the right-hand ion cyclotron anisotropy instability in a sub-Alfvénic plasma flow, A statistical ensemble for solar wind measurements, Observations and models of substorm injection dispersion patterns, Heavy ion effects on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability: hybrid study, Simulating plasmaspheric electron densities with a two

  8. Publications of Los Alamos research, 1977-1981

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, C.J.; Garcia, C.A.

    1983-03-01

    This bibliography is a compilation of unclassified publications of work done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for 1977-1981. Papers published in those years are included regardless of when they were actually written. Publications received too late for inclusion in earlier compilations have also been listed. Declassification of previously classified reports is considered to constitute publication. All classified issuances are omitted - even those papers, themselves unclassified, which were published only as part of a classified document. If a paper was published more than once, all places of publication are included. The bibliography includes Los Alamos National Laboratory reports, papers released as non-Laboratory reports, journal articles, books, chapters of books, conference papers either published separately or as part of conference proceedings issued as books or reports, papers published in congressional hearings, theses, and US patents. Publications by Los Alamos authors that are not records of Laboratory-sponsored work are included when the Library becomes aware of them.

  9. Los Alamos research in nozzle based coaxial plasma thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuer, Jay; Schoenberg, Kurt; Gerwin, Richard; Henins, Ivars; Moses, Ronald, Jr.; Wurden, Glen

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: research approach; perspectives on efficient magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) operation; NASA and DOE supported research in ideal magnetohydrodynamic plasma acceleration and flow, electrode phenomena, and magnetic nozzles; and future research directions and plans.

  10. Recent advances in direct methanol fuel cells at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiaoming; Zelenay, Piotr; Thomas, Sharon; Davey, John; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    This paper describes recent advances in the science and technology of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) made at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The effort on DMFCs at LANL includes work devoted to portable power applications, funded by the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA), and work devoted to potential transport applications, funded by the US DOE. We describe recent results with a new type of DMFC stack hardware that allows to lower the pitch per cell to 2 mm while allowing low air flow and air pressure drops. Such stack technology lends itself to both portable power and potential transport applications. Power densities of 300 W/l and 1 kW/l seem achievable under conditions applicable to portable power and transport applications, respectively. DMFC power system analysis based on the performance of this stack, under conditions applying to transport applications (joint effort with U.C. Davis), has shown that, in terms of overall system efficiency and system packaging requirements, a power source for a passenger vehicle based on a DMFC could compete favorably with a hydrogen-fueled fuel cell system, as well as with fuel cell systems based on fuel processing on board. As part of more fundamental studies performed, we describe optimization of anode catalyst layers in terms of PtRu catalyst nature, loading and catalyst layer composition and structure. We specifically show that, optimized content of recast ionic conductor added to the catalyst layer is a sensitive function of the nature of the catalyst. Other elements of membrane/electrode assembly (MEA) optimization efforts are also described, highlighting our ability to resolve, to a large degree, a well-documented problem of polymer electrolyte DMFCs, namely "methanol crossover". This was achieved by appropriate cell design, enabling fuel utilization as high as 90% in highly performing DMFCs.

  11. Simplifying Complexity: Miriam Blake--Los Alamos National Laboratory Research Library, NM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The holy grail for many research librarians is one-stop searching: seamless access to all the library's resources on a topic, regardless of the source. Miriam Blake, Library Without Walls Project Leader at Los Alamos National laboratory (LANL), is making this vision a reality. Blake is part of a growing cadre of experts: a techie who is becoming a…

  12. Environmental Assessment for Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico - Final Document

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    1997-10-07

    As part of its initiative to fulfill its responsibilities to provide support for the incorporated County of Los Alamos (the County) as an Atomic Energy Community, while simultaneously fulfilling its obligations to enhance the self-sufficiency of the County under authority of the Atomic Energy Community Act of 1955 and the Defense Authorization Act, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to lease undeveloped land in Los Alamos, New Mexico, to the County for private sector use as a research park. The Proposed Action is intended to accelerate economic development activities within the County by creating regional employment opportunities through offering federal land for private sector lease and use. As a result of the proposed land lease, any government expenditures for providing infrastructure to the property would be somewhat supplemented by tenant purchase of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) expertise in research and development activities. The presence of a research park within LANL boundaries is expected to allow private sector tenants of the park to be able to quickly and efficiently call upon LANL scientific expertise and facility and equipment capabilities as part of their own research operations and LANL research personnel, in turn, would be challenged in areas complementary to their federally funded research. In this way a symbiotic relationship would be enjoyed by both parties while simultaneously promoting economic development for the County through new job opportunities at the Research Park and at LANL, new indirect support opportunities for the community at large, and through payment of the basic building space leases. A ''sliding-scale'' approach (DOE 1993) is the basis for the analysis of effects in this Environmental Assessment (EA). That is, certain aspects of the Proposed Action have a greater potential for creating adverse environmental effects than others; therefore, they are discussed in greater detail in this EA than those aspects of

  13. Los Alamos NEP research in advanced plasma thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenberg, Kurt; Gerwin, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Research was initiated in advanced plasma thrusters that capitalizes on lab capabilities in plasma science and technology. The goal of the program was to examine the scaling issues of magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster performance in support of NASA's MPD thruster development program. The objective was to address multi-megawatt, large scale, quasi-steady state MPD thruster performance. Results to date include a new quasi-steady state operating regime which was obtained at space exploration initiative relevant power levels, that enables direct coaxial gun-MPD comparisons of thruster physics and performance. The radiative losses are neglible. Operation with an applied axial magnetic field shows the same operational stability and exhaust plume uniformity benefits seen in MPD thrusters. Observed gun impedance is in close agreement with the magnetic Bernoulli model predictions. Spatial and temporal measurements of magnetic field, electric field, plasma density, electron temperature, and ion/neutral energy distribution are underway. Model applications to advanced mission logistics are also underway.

  14. Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's biomedical and environmental research programs. Progress report, January-December 1981. [Leading abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, L.M.; Stafford, C.G.

    1982-10-01

    This report summarizes research and development activities of the Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's Biomedical and Environmental Research program for the calendar year 1981. Individual reports describing the current status of projects have been entered individually into the data base.

  15. The Los Alamos Space Weather Summer School: Career and Research Benefits to Students and Mentors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowee, M.

    2014-12-01

    This last summer we held the 4th Los Alamos Space Weather Summer School. This 8-week long program is designed for mid-career graduate students in related fields to come to LANL, receive lectures on space physics and space environment topics, and carry out a research project under the mentorship of LANL staff members. On average we have accepted ~10 students per year to the program, with a strong applicant pool to choose from. This type of summer school program is relatively unique in the space physics community—there are several other summer schools but they are of shorter duration and do not include the mentor-research project aspect which builds a strong one-on-one connection between the summer student and his/her LANL mentor(s). From the LANL perspective, this program was intended to have several benefits including building collaborations between LANL staff and universities and recruitment of potential postdocs. From the student perspective, this program is not only an educational opportunity but a strong networking opportunity and a chance to enhance their professional skills and publication record. Students are permitted to work on projects directly related to their thesis or on projects in areas that are completely new to them. At the end of the summer school, the students also develop their presentation skills by preparing and giving 20 min presentations on their research projects to the research group. Over the past four years the summer school has increased in popularity, and the feedback from the student participants has been very positive. Alumni of the program have continued collaborations with their mentors, resulting in publications and conference presentations, and one postdoc hire to date.

  16. The Los Alamos Space Weather Summer School: Career and Research Benefits to Students and Mentors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowee, M.

    2015-12-01

    This last summer we held the 5th Los Alamos Space Weather Summer School. This 8-week long program is designed for mid-career graduate students in related fields to come to LANL, receive lectures on space physics and space environment topics, and carry out a research project under the mentorship of LANL staff members. We accept typically 6-8 students to the program, with a strong applicant pool to choose from. This type of summer school program is relatively unique in the space physics community—there are several other summer schools but they are of shorter duration and do not include the mentor-research project aspect which builds a strong one-on-one connection between the summer student and his/her LANL mentor(s). From the LANL perspective, this program was intended to have several benefits including building collaborations between LANL staff and universities and recruitment of potential postdocs. From the student perspective, this program is not only an educational opportunity but a strong networking opportunity and a chance to enhance their professional skills and publication record. Students are permitted to work on projects directly related to their thesis or on projects in areas that are completely new to them. At the end of the summer school, the students also develop their presentation skills by preparing and giving AGU-style presentations on their research projects to the research group. Over the past five years the summer school has increased in popularity, and the feedback from the student participants has been very positive. Alumni of the program have continued collaborations with their mentors, resulting in publications and conference presentations, and one postdoc hire to date.

  17. Research on fission induced plasmas and nuclear pumped lasers at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmick, H. H.

    1979-01-01

    A program of research on gaseous uranium and uranium plasmas is being conducted at The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory under sponsorship of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The objective of this work is twofold: (1) to demonstrate the proof of principle of a gaseous uranium fueled reactor, and (2) pursue fundamental research on nuclear pumped lasers. The relevancy of the two parallel programs is embodied in the possibility of a high-performance uranium plasma reactor being used as the power supply for a nuclear pumped laser system. The accomplishments in the two above fields are summarized

  18. Potential applicability of the Los Alamos Antiproton Research Program to advanced propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, S.D.; Hynes, M.V.; Prael, R.E.; Stewart, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory currently has a research program in antimatter interactions. The immediate objective of the program is to develop the low energy antiproton production capabilities at LEAR and the technology to store antiprotons. The initial experimental goal is to measure the gravitational mass of antiprotons. The technology required for the experiment, however, may allow high-density storage concepts to be experimentally investigated. Analysis of antiproton production over the last 30 years indicates that milligram quantities of antiprotons could conceivably be produced early in the next century. Thus, antiproton propulsion concepts may begin to be feasible. Some results of preliminary calculations pertinent to antiproton powered rocket engines will be presented.

  19. Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammel, Edward F., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Current and post World War II scientific research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (New Mexico) is discussed. The operation of the laboratory, the Los Alamos consultant program, and continuation education, and continuing education activities at the laboratory are also discussed. (JN)

  20. Laboratory directed research and development. FY 1995 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, J.; Prono, J.

    1996-03-01

    This document presents an overview of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Programs at Los Alamos. The nine technical disciplines in which research is described include materials, engineering and base technologies, plasma, fluids, and particle beams, chemistry, mathematics and computational science, atmic and molecular physics, geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, nuclear and particle physics, and biosciences. Brief descriptions are provided in the above programs.

  1. Capabilities for high explosive pulsed power research at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Goforth, James H; Oona, Henn; Tasker, Douglas G; Kaul, A M

    2008-01-01

    Research on topics requiring high magnetic fields and high currents have been pursued using high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) techniques since the 1950s at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We have developed many sophisticated HEPr systems through the years, and most of them depend on technology available from the nuclear weapons program. Through the 1980s and 1990s, our budgets would sustain parallel efforts in zpinch research using both HEPr and capacitor banks. In recent years, many changes have occurred that are driven by concerns such as safety, security, and environment, as well as reduced budgets and downsizing of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) complex due to the end of the cold war era. In this paper, we review the teclmiques developed to date, and adaptations that are driven by changes in budgets and our changing complex. One new Ranchero-based solid liner z-pinch experimental design is also presented. Explosives that are cast to shape instead of being machined, and initiation systems that depend on arrays of slapper detonators are important new tools. Some materials that are seen as hazardous to the environment are avoided in designs. The process continues to allow a wide range of research however, and there are few, if any, experiments that we have done in the past that could not be perform today. The HErr firing facility at Los Alamos continues to have a 2000 lb. high explosive limit, and our 2.4 MJ capacitor bank remains a mainstay of the effort. Modem diagnostic and data analysis capabilities allow fewer personnel to achieve better results, and in the broad sense we continue to have a robust capability.

  2. Los Alamos strategic defense research and the ABM (Anti-Ballistic Missile) Treaty

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, R.; Pendley, R.E.

    1988-04-01

    This report reviews the restrictions placed on Los Alamos strategic defense by current arms control treaty agreements, including controversies about the correct interpretation of the major treaty at issue, the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty; and it assesses the current status of the most significant Los Alamos strategic defense programs in terms of their compliance with that Treaty, and others. 7 tabs.

  3. Defense, basic, and industrial research at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Longshore, A.; Salgado, K.

    1995-10-01

    The Workshop on Defense, Basic, and Industrial Research at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center gathered scientists from Department of Energy national laboratories, other federal institutions, universities, and industry to discuss the use of neutrons in science-based stockpile stewardship, The workshop began with presentations by government officials, senior representatives from the three weapons laboratories, and scientific opinion leaders. Workshop participants then met in breakout sessions on the following topics: materials science and engineering; polymers, complex fluids, and biomaterials; fundamental neutron physics; applied nuclear physics; condensed matter physics and chemistry; and nuclear weapons research. They concluded that neutrons can play an essential role in science-based stockpile stewardship and that there is overlap and synergy between defense and other uses of neutrons in basic, applied, and industrial research from which defense and civilian research can benefit. This proceedings is a collection of talks and papers from the plenary, technical, and breakout session presentations. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  4. Shaping the library of the future: Digital library developments at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Research Library

    SciTech Connect

    Luce, R. E.

    1994-10-01

    This paper offers an overview of current efforts at the Research Library, Los Alamos National Laboratory, (LANL), to develop digital library services. Current projects of LANL`s Library without Walls initiative are described. Although the architecture of digital libraries generally is experimental and subject to debate, one principle of LANL`s approach to delivering library information is the use of Mosaic as a client for the Research Library`s resources. Several projects under development have significant ramifications for delivering library services over the Internet. Specific efforts via Mosaic include support for preprint databases, providing access to citation databases, and access to a digital image database of unclassified Los Alamos technical reports.

  5. Bombs, Bosons and Beer Cans-Research at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pynn, Roger

    1997-04-01

    The neutron scattering community is justifiably proud of the contributions it has made to basic research in many areas of science. Information obtained using neutrons has contributed strongly to our basic understanding of phenomena in diverse systems of interest to physicists, chemists and biologists - think, for example, of how little we would know about excitations in quantum fluids, the spin-density-wave state of chromium, electronic back-donation in the bonding of organometallic compounds, or the conformation of proteins and DNA in nucleosomes without neutron scattering. However, illustrious as this history of neutron scattering may be, it is not the only type of contribution neutrons have made to our modern scientific and technological enterprise. Increasingly in recent years, we have witnessed the application of neutrons to later parts of the R&D cycle, to problems that have been called ''strategic research'' and even in areas that are ''applied research'' or ''product development''. The purpose of my talk at this meeting is to illustrate this aspect of research at spallation neutron sources, using examples of work that has been done at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Some of this work is driven by the fact that our principal funding agency, the Office of Defense Programs within the U.S. Department of Energy, has a need to master the science behind technologies relevant to nuclear weapons. Even so, most of the examples I have picked are equally relevant to the industrial sector and several would not shame even the most devout proponent of ''pure'' research. To demonstrate the breadth of the research performed at LANSCE, I will describe examples of recent experiments in the following areas: materials texture; temperature and particle velocity measurement in reacting high explosives; radiographic imaging with protons; chemical bonding in metal-dihydride complexes; and the structure of thin adhesive layers. LANSCE operates a user program and

  6. Los Alamos offers Fellowships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico is calling for applications for postdoctoral appointments and research fellowships. The positions are available in geoscience as well as other scientific disciplines.The laboratory, which is operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy, awards J. Robert Oppenheimer Research Fellowships to scientists that either have or will soon complete doctoral degrees. The appointments are for two years, are renewable for a third year, and carry a stipend of $51,865 per year. Potential applicants should send a resume or employment application and a statement of research goals to Carol M. Rich, Div. 89, Human Resources Development Division, MS P290, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 by mid-November.

  7. 1999 LDRD Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Rita Spencer; Kyle Wheeler

    2000-06-01

    This is the FY 1999 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

  8. A legacy of the ""megagoule committee,"" thirty years of explosive pulsed power research and development at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Goforth, James H; Oona, Henn; Herrera, Dennis H; Torres, David T; Tasker, D. G.; Meyer, R. K.; Atchison, W. L.; Rousculp, C. L.; Reinovsky, R. E.; Sheppard, M.; Turchi, P. J.; Watt, R. G.

    2010-10-29

    In 1980, Los Alamos formed the 'Megajoule Committee' with the expressed goal of developing a one Megajoule plasma radiation source. The ensuing research and development has given rise to a wide variety of high explosive pulsed power accomplishments, and there is a continuous stream of work that continues to the present. A variety of flux compression generators (FCGs or generators) have been designed and tested, and a number of pulse shortening schemes have been investigated. Supporting computational tools have been developed in parallel with experiments. No fewer that six unique systems have been developed and used for experiments. This paper attempts to pull together the technical details, achievements, and wisdom amassed during the intervening thirty years, and notes how we would push for increased performance in the future.

  9. The Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility upgrades project - A model for waste minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, M.L.; Durrer, R.E.; Kennicott, M.A.

    1996-07-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Facility, constructed in 1952, is currently undergoing a major, multi-year construction project. Many of the operations required under this project (i.e., design, demolition, decontamination, construction, and waste management) mimic the processes required of a large scale decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) job and are identical to the requirements of any of several upgrades projects anticipated for LANL and other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. For these reasons the CMR Upgrades Project is seen as an ideal model facility - to test the application, and measure the success of - waste minimization techniques which could be brought to bear on any of the similar projects. The purpose of this paper will be to discuss the past, present, and anticipated waste minimization applications at the facility and will focus on the development and execution of the project`s {open_quotes}Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention Strategic Plan.{close_quotes}

  10. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000 Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2001-05-01

    This is the FY00 Annual Progress report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes progress on each project conducted during FY00, characterizes the projects according to their relevance to major funding sources, and provides an index to principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by LDRD component: Directed Research and Exploratory Research. Within each component, they are further grouped into the ten technical categories: (1) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and beams, (2) bioscience, (3) chemistry, (4) computer science and software engineering, (5) engineering science, (6) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (7) instrumentation and diagnostics, (8) materials science, (9) mathematics, simulation, and modeling, and (10) nuclear and particle physics.

  11. Low-Level, Measured Response of Los Alamos National Laboratories TA 16 - Building 411 and TA 8 - Building 23 to Direct Flash Attachment of Lightning

    SciTech Connect

    Dinallo, Michael A.; Holmes, Parris; Merewether, Kimball O.; Morris, Marvin E.

    1999-02-01

    On September 24, 25, 28, and 29, 1998 and on October 19 and 23, 1998, transfer impedance measurements were made on Los Alamos National Laboratories TA 16 - Building 411 and TA 8-- Building 23 to characterize their interior open-circuit voltage response to a direct lightning flash attachment to the structures. The theory, history, measurement methods and equipment, and specific measured results are detailed. The measured results demonstrate that if the remaining metallic penetrations are bonded, then the rebar of the two structures is sufficiently well connected to form a Faraday cage that reduces the maximum open-circuit voltage inside the structure to a sufficiently low level that the required standoff distance to prevent arcing to explosive assemblies is 6.8 inches for TA 16 - Building 411 and is 11.5 inches for TA 8 - Building 23.

  12. A Report on the Activities, Publications, and Pending Research of DHS/DOD Sponsored Post-doctoral Research Associate at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, Floyd E.; Tandon, Lav

    2012-04-26

    Since beginning at Los Alamos National Laboratory in February of 2012, I have been working as a DHS./DNDO Postdoctoral Research Associate under the mentorship of Lav Tandon and Khalil Spencer (NA-22 and mass spectrometry). The focus of my efforts, in addition to pursuing needed training and qualifications, has been the application of various instrumental approaches (e.g. Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry; TIMS) to a range of systems of interest in materials characterization and nuclear forensics. Research to be pursued in the coming months shall include the continued use of such approaches to advance current methods for: modified total evaporation, monitoring critical minor isotope systems, and chronometry. Each of the above points will be discussed.

  13. Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's biomedical and environmental research programs. Progress report, January-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, L.M.; Stafford, C.G.; Bolen, S.K.

    1981-09-01

    Highlights of research progress accomplished in the Life Sciences Division during the year ending December 1980 are summarized. Reports from the following groups are included: Toxicology, Biophysics, Genetics; Environmental Pathology, Organic Chemistry, and Environmental Sciences. Individual abstracts have been prepared for 46 items for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (RJC)

  14. Recent Research with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (dance) at the LOS Alamos Neutron Science Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, J. L.

    2014-09-01

    The DANCE detector at Los Alamos is a 160 element, nearly 4π BaF2 detector array designed to make measurements of neutron capture on rare or radioactive nuclides. It has also been used to make measurements of gamma-ray multiplicity following capture and gamma-ray output from fission. Several examples of measurements are briefly discussed.

  15. Laboratory directed research and development: FY 1997 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, J.; Prono, J.

    1998-05-01

    This is the FY 1997 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic and molecular physics and plasmas, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

  16. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 1998 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    John Vigil; Kyle Wheeler

    1999-04-01

    This is the FY 1998 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principle investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

  17. The Energy Science and Technology Database on a local library system: A case study at the Los Alamos National Research Library

    SciTech Connect

    Holtkamp, I.S.

    1994-10-01

    This paper presents an overview of efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory to acquire and mount the Energy Science and Technology Database (EDB) as a citation database on the Research Library`s Geac Advance system. The rationale for undertaking this project and expected benefits are explained. Significant issues explored are loading non-USMARC records into a MARC-based library system, the use of EDB records to replace or supplement in-house cataloging of technical reports, the impact of different cataloging standards and database size on searching and retrieval, and how integrating an external database into the library`s online catalog may affect staffing and workflow.

  18. An Overview of the Los Alamos Inertial Confinement Fusion and High-Energy-Density Physics Research Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Batha, Steven H.

    2016-07-15

    The Los Alamos Inertial Confinement Fusion and Science Programs engage in a vigorous array of experiments, theory, and modeling. We use the three major High Energy Density facilities, NIF, Omega, and Z to perform experiments. These include opacity, radiation transport, hydrodynamics, ignition science, and burn experiments to aid the ICF and Science campaigns in reaching their stewardship goals. The ICF program operates two nuclear diagnostics at NIF, the neutron imaging system and the gamma reaction history instruments. Both systems are being expanded with significant capability enhancements.

  19. Stockpile Stewardship: Los Alamos

    ScienceCinema

    McMillan, Charlie; Morgan, Nathanial; Goorley, Tom; Merrill, Frank; Funk, Dave; Korzekwa, Deniece; Laintz, Ken

    2016-07-12

    "Heritage of Science" is a short video that highlights the Stockpile Stewardship program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Stockpile Stewardship was conceived in the early 1990s as a national science-based program that could assure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear deterrent without the need for full-scale underground nuclear testing. This video was produced by Los Alamos National Laboratory for screening at the Lab's Bradbury Science Museum in Los Alamos, NM and is narrated by science correspondent Miles O'Brien.

  20. Internship at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, Ryan Q.

    2012-07-11

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is located in Los Alamos, New Mexico. It provides support for our country's nuclear weapon stockpile as well as many other scientific research projects. I am an Undergraduate Student Intern in the Systems Design and Analysis group within the Nuclear Nonproliferation division of the Global Security directorate at LANL. I have been tasked with data analysis and modeling of particles in a fluidized bed system for the capture of carbon dioxide from power plant flue gas.

  1. Laboratory directed research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-15

    The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory's R D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering proof-of-principle''; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these project are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne's Five Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne. Areas of emphasis are (1) advanced accelerator and detector technology, (2) x-ray techniques in biological and physical sciences, (3) advanced reactor technology, (4) materials science, computational science, biological sciences and environmental sciences. Individual reports summarizing the purpose, approach, and results of projects are presented.

  2. The Los Alamos primer

    SciTech Connect

    Serber, R.

    1992-01-01

    This book contains the 1943 lecture notes of Robert Serber. Serber was a protege of J. Robert Oppenheimer and member of the team that built the first atomic bomb - reveal what the Los Alamos scientists knew, and did not know, about the terrifying weapon they were building.

  3. Status of Monte Carlo at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, W.L.; Cashwell, E.D.

    1980-01-01

    At Los Alamos the early work of Fermi, von Neumann, and Ulam has been developed and supplemented by many followers, notably Cashwell and Everett, and the main product today is the continuous-energy, general-purpose, generalized-geometry, time-dependent, coupled neutron-photon transport code called MCNP. The Los Alamos Monte Carlo research and development effort is concentrated in Group X-6. MCNP treats an arbitrary three-dimensional configuration of arbitrary materials in geometric cells bounded by first- and second-degree surfaces and some fourth-degree surfaces (elliptical tori). Monte Carlo has evolved into perhaps the main method for radiation transport calculations at Los Alamos. MCNP is used in every technical division at the Laboratory by over 130 users about 600 times a month accounting for nearly 200 hours of CDC-7600 time.

  4. Los Alamos Programming Models

    SciTech Connect

    Bergen, Benjamin Karl

    2016-07-07

    This is the PDF of a powerpoint presentation from a teleconference on Los Alamos programming models. It starts by listing their assumptions for the programming models and then details a hierarchical programming model at the System Level and Node Level. Then it details how to map this to their internal nomenclature. Finally, a list is given of what they are currently doing in this regard.

  5. New Directions in Telecommunications Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Alex

    Telecommunications research has been focused mainly on technology. Now research about the human factors is crucial. This can be divided into four areas. (1) The needs telecommunications must satisfy--needs can be extrapolated from current behavior. (2) The technological alternatives available--important developments are being made in transmission…

  6. Airport-Noise Levels and Annoyance Model (ALAMO) system's reference manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, R.; Donaldson, J. L.; Johnson, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The airport-noise levels and annoyance model (ALAMO) is described in terms of the constituent modules, the execution of ALAMO procedure files, necessary for system execution, and the source code documentation associated with code development at Langley Research Center. The modules constituting ALAMO are presented both in flow graph form, and through a description of the subroutines and functions that comprise them.

  7. Future Directions in Second Language Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swain, Merrill

    Progress that has been made in second language research in the last two years and future directions in the research methodology of second language studies are discussed. In order to examine the continuation and expansion of current research, the research reported by Schumann (1976) is compared with current research as represented by the titles of…

  8. Directional Dependence in Developmental Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Eye, Alexander; DeShon, Richard P.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we discuss and propose methods that may be of use to determine direction of dependence in non-normally distributed variables. First, it is shown that standard regression analysis is unable to distinguish between explanatory and response variables. Then, skewness and kurtosis are discussed as tools to assess deviation from…

  9. Research Needs and Future Directions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The food safety challenges facing the growers, processors and consumers of fresh and fresh cut produce are complex and multi-faceted. Established and ongoing research has given new insights into the ways in which produce can be contaminated at any step in the supply chain. The goal of future researc...

  10. Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory energy-related history, research, managerial reorganization proposals, actions taken, and results. History report, 1945--1979

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, E.F.

    1997-03-01

    This report documents the development of major energy-related programs at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory between 1945 and 1979. Although the Laboratory`s primary mission during that era was the design and development of nuclear weapons and most of the Laboratory`s funding came from a single source, a number of factors were at work that led to the development of these other programs. Some of those factors were affected by the Laboratory`s internal management structure and organization; others were the result of increasing environmental awareness within the general population and the political consequences of that awareness; still others were related to the increasing demand for energy and the increasing turmoil in the energy-rich Middle East. This report also describes the various activities in Los Alamos, in Washington, and in other areas of the world that contributed to the development of major energy-related programs at Los Alamos. The author has a unique historical perspective because of his involvement as a scientist and manager at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory during the time period described within the report. In addition, in numerous footnotes and references, he cites a large body of documents that include the opinions and perspectives of many others who were involved at one time or another in these programs. Finally the report includes a detailed chronology of geopolitical events that led to the development of energy-related programs at Los Alamos.

  11. DIRECTIONS IN INDIGENOUS RESILIENCE RESEARCH

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Neil

    2010-01-01

    The last decade or so of research in Canada, reflected in this special issue, has increased our understanding of the distinction between Indigenous resilience and the research into Indigenous resilience. Measurement offers glimpses of resilience, mostly from the potentially distorted view of how resilient youth face specific adversity — adversity that is set by the funding opportunity: tobacco, substance abuse, suicide, or HIV infection. The driving role of funding has obvious problems; the priorities of funders may not be the priorities of communities and results can tell more about the funding opportunity than about resilience itself. Even so, this problem-focussed research has the very practical advantage of producing results geared to solutions. A major lesson of this body of work is that we should allow ourselves the space (and the modesty) to recognize that Aboriginal resilience is greater than we have been able to measure under specific funding opportunities. Even with this limitation, our results shows a large degree of specificity — what strengthens youth resilience to one type of adversity in one setting might well not work in another. Five proposals emerge from the findings. PMID:20835299

  12. Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Research Directions

    SciTech Connect

    Lowndes, D. H.; Alivisatos, A. P.; Alper, M.; Averback, R. S.; Jacob Barhen, J.; Eastman, J. A.; Imre, D.; Lowndes, D. H.; McNulty, I.; Michalske, T. A.; Ho, K-M; Nozik, A. J.; Russell, T. P.; Valentin, R. A.; Welch, D. O.; Barhen, J.; Agnew, S. R.; Bellon, P.; Blair, J.; Boatner, L. A.; Braiman, Y.; Budai, J. D.; Crabtree, G. W.; Feldman, L. C.; Flynn, C. P.; Geohegan, D. B.; George, E. P.; Greenbaum, E.; Grigoropoulos, C.; Haynes, T. E.; Heberlein, J.; Hichman, J.; Holland, O. W.; Honda, S.; Horton, J. A.; Hu, M. Z.-C.; Jesson, D. E.; Joy, D. C.; Krauss, A.; Kwok, W.-K.; Larson, B. C.; Larson, D. J.; Likharev, K.; Liu, C. T.; Majumdar, A.; Maziasz, P. J.; Meldrum, A.; Miller, J. C.; Modine, F. A.; Pennycook, S. J.; Pharr, G. M.; Phillpot, S.; Price, D. L.; Protopopescu, V.; Poker, D. B.; Pui, D.; Ramsey, J. M.; Rao, N.; Reichl, L.; Roberto, J.; Saboungi, M-L; Simpson, M.; Strieffer, S.; Thundat, T.; Wambsganss, M.; Wendleken, J.; White, C. W.; Wilemski, G.; Withrow, S. P.; Wolf, D.; Zhu, J. H.; Zuhr, R. A.; Zunger, A.; Lowe, S.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes important future research directions in nanoscale science, engineering and technology. It was prepared in connection with an anticipated national research initiative on nanotechnology for the twenty-first century. The research directions described are not expected to be inclusive but illustrate the wide range of research opportunities and challenges that could be undertaken through the national laboratories and their major national scientific user facilities with the support of universities and industry.

  13. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    SciTech Connect

    Kippen, Karen Elizabeth

    2016-11-08

    For more than 30 years the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has provided the scientific underpinnings in nuclear physics and material science needed to ensure the safety and surety of the nuclear stockpile into the future. In addition to national security research, the LANSCE User Facility has a vibrant research program in fundamental science, providing the scientific community with intense sources of neutrons and protons to perform experiments supporting civilian research and the production of medical and research isotopes. Five major experimental facilities operate simultaneously. These facilities contribute to the stockpile stewardship program, produce radionuclides for medical testing, and provide a venue for industrial users to irradiate and test electronics. In addition, they perform fundamental research in nuclear physics, nuclear astrophysics, materials science, and many other areas. The LANSCE User Program plays a key role in training the next generation of top scientists and in attracting the best graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, and early-career scientists. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) —the principal sponsor of LANSCE—works with the Office of Science and the Office of Nuclear Energy, which have synergistic long-term needs for the linear accelerator and the neutron science that is the heart of LANSCE.

  14. The unclosed circle: Los Alamos and the human and environmental legacy of the atom, 1943--1963

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Scott Daniel

    2000-12-01

    This dissertation examines the application of nuclear technology at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory and the legacy this technology wrought on humans and the environment during the period from 1943 to 1963. Through a focus directed primarily on the Health Division, the study considers various dimensions of the Los Alamos Laboratory including radioactive waste management, human subject experimentation, and nuclear weapons testing. Since its inception in 1943, Los Alamos has held a central role in the research and development of nuclear weapons for the United States. In relation to this central mission, the Laboratory produced various types of radioactive wastes, conducted human subject experiments, and participated in hundreds of nuclear weapons tests. All of these functions resulted in a myriad legacy of human and environmental effects whose consequences have not yet been fully assessed. This investigation, using primary, secondary, and recently declassified documents, discusses the development of nuclear physics and radiological health practices in the half-century prior to World War Two and the American reactions in the realms of science and politics to the news concerning nuclear fission. It then moves to a discussion of the emergence of Los Alamos and analyzes how personnel addressed the attendant hazards of nuclear technology and some of the implications of these past practices. Furthermore, the dissertation discusses human subject experimentation conducted at Los Alamos. The final part of the study investigates the multiple roles played by Los Alamos personnel in the testing of nuclear weapons, the attempts to understand and minimize the hazards of such testing, and the Ra-La sub-critical detonations conducted within the geographical boundaries at the Laboratory between 1943-1963. By focusing on a long-neglected part of the American West. Cold War Los Alamos, this dissertation will contribute to the study of the effects that both World War Two and the Cold

  15. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dogliani, Harold O

    2011-01-19

    The purpose of the briefing is to describe general laboratory technical capabilities to be used for various groups such as military cadets or university faculty/students and post docs to recruit into a variety of Los Alamos programs. Discussed are: (1) development and application of high leverage science to enable effeictive, predictable and reliability outcomes; (2) deter, detect, characterize, reverse and prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their use by adversaries and terrorists; (3) modeling and simulation to define complex processes, predict outcomes, and develop effective prevention, response, and remediation strategies; (4) energetic materials and hydrodynamic testing to develop materials for precise delivery of focused energy; (5) materials cience focused on fundamental understanding of materials behaviors, their quantum-molecular properties, and their dynamic responses, and (6) bio-science to rapidly detect and characterize pathogens, to develop vaccines and prophylactic remedies, and to develop attribution forensics.

  16. Los Alamos Novel Rocket Design Flight Tested

    ScienceCinema

    Tappan, Bryce

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists recently flight tested a new rocket design that includes a high-energy fuel and a motor design that also delivers a high degree of safety. Researchers will now work to scale-up the design, as well as explore miniaturization of the system, in order to exploit all potential applications that would require high-energy, high-velocity, and correspondingly high safety margins.

  17. Amphibians and Reptiles of Los Alamos County

    SciTech Connect

    Teralene S. Foxx; Timothy K. Haarmann; David C. Keller

    1999-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that amphibians and reptiles are good indicators of environmental health. They live in terrestrial and aquatic environments and are often the first animals to be affected by environmental change. This publication provides baseline information about amphibians and reptiles that are present on the Pajarito Plateau. Ten years of data collection and observations by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the University of New Mexico, the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish, and hobbyists are represented.

  18. Los Alamos Novel Rocket Design Flight Tested

    SciTech Connect

    Tappan, Bryce

    2014-10-23

    Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists recently flight tested a new rocket design that includes a high-energy fuel and a motor design that also delivers a high degree of safety. Researchers will now work to scale-up the design, as well as explore miniaturization of the system, in order to exploit all potential applications that would require high-energy, high-velocity, and correspondingly high safety margins.

  19. Beyond competence: advance directives in dementia research.

    PubMed

    Jongsma, Karin Rolanda; van de Vathorst, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Dementia is highly prevalent and incurable. The participation of dementia patients in clinical research is indispensable if we want to find an effective treatment for dementia. However, one of the primary challenges in dementia research is the patients' gradual loss of the capacity to consent. Patients with dementia are characterized by the fact that, at an earlier stage of their life, they were able to give their consent to participation in research. Therefore, the phase when patients are still competent to decide offers a valuable opportunity to authorize research, by using an advance research directive (ARD). Yet, the use of ARDs as an authorization for research participation remains controversial. In this paper we discuss the role of autonomous decision-making and the protection of incompetent research subjects. We will show why ARDs are a morally defensible basis for the inclusion of this population in biomedical research and that the use of ARDs is compatible with the protection of incompetent research subjects.

  20. Future directions in brain injury research.

    PubMed

    Gennarelli, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the potential future directions that are important for brain injury research, especially with regard to concussion. The avenues of proposed research are categorized according to current concepts of concussion, types of concussion, and a global schema for globally reducing the burden of concussion.

  1. Review of liquid metal heat pipe work at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.S.; Merrigan, M.A.; Sena, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    A survey of space-power related liquid metal heat pipe work at Los Alamos National Laboratory is presented. Heat pipe development at Los Alamos has been on-going since 1963. Heat pipes were initially developed for thermionic nuclear-electrical power production in space. Since then Los Alamos has developed liquid metal heat pipes for numerous applications related to high temperature systems in both the space and terrestrial environments. Some of these applications include thermionic electrical generators, thermoelectric energy conversion (both in-core and direct radiation), thermal energy storage, hypersonic vehicle leading edge cooling, and heat pipe vapor laser cells. Some of the work performed at Los Alamos has been documented in internal reports that are often little-known. A representative description and summary of progress in space-related liquid metal heat pipe technology is provided followed by a reference section citing sources where these works may be found. 53 refs.

  2. Review of liquid metal heat pipe work at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.S.; Merrigan, M.A.; Sena, J.T. )

    1991-01-10

    A survey of space-power related liquid metal heat pipe work at Los Alamos National Laboratory is presented. Heat pipe development at Los Alamos has been on-going since 1963. Heat pipes were initially developed for thermionic nuclear-electrical power production in space. Since then Los Alamos has developed liquid metal heat pipes for numerous applications related to high temperature systems in both the space and terrestrial environments. Some of these applications include thermionic electrical generators, thermoelectric energy conversion (both in-core and direct radiation), thermal energy storage, hypersonic vehicle leading edge cooling, and heat pipe vapor laser cells. Some of the work performed at Los Alamos has been documented in internal reports that are often little-known. A representative description and summary of progress in space-related liquid metal heat pipe technology is provided followed by a reference section citing sources where these works may be found.

  3. Industrial application for the Los Alamos Materials Modeling Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Lesar, R.; Charbon, C.; Kothe, D.; Wu, D.; Reddy, A.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Casting and solidification of molten metals and metal alloys is a critical step in the production of high-quality metal stock and in the fabrication of finished parts. Control of the casting process can be the determining factor in both the quality and cost of the final metal product. Major problems with the quality of cast stock or finished parts can arise because of the difficulty of preventing variations in the alloy content, the generation of porosity or poor surface finish, and the loss of microstructure controlled strength and toughness resulting from the poor understanding and design of the mold filling and solidification processes. In this project, we sought to develop a new set of applications focused on adding the ability to accurately model solidification and grain growth to casting simulations. We implemented these applications within the Los Alamos Materials Modeling Platform, LAMMP, a graphical-based materials, and materials modeling environment being created at the Computational Testbed for Industry.

  4. Recent progress in the Los Alamos KrF Program

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, T.E.; Cartwright, D.C.; Coggeshall, S.V.; Fenstermacher, C.A.; Figueira, J.F.; Foreman, L.R.; Goldstone, P.D.; Hanson, D.E.; Harris, D.B.; Hauer, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the Inertial Confinement Fusion Program (ICF) is to develop the ability to ignite and burn small masses of thermonuclear fuel. Although the present near-term objectives of the program are directed toward defense applications, ICF research continues to be carried out with a view to the longer term goal of commercial power production. The characteristics of a KrF laser make it an attractive candidate as an ICF driver. The KrF wavelength of 248 nm provides a target coupling that is very high at intensities of 10/sup 14/w/cm/sup 2/. In addition, the KrF laser can be repetitively operated at frequencies appropriate for a power reactor and has an intrinsically high efficiency, which allows projections to the long-term goal of energy production. The ICF program at Los Alamos consists of driver development, target design and fabrication, and target experimentation. The major effort at present is the investigation and development of KrF technology to determine its applicability for use in a laboratory driver at Los Alamos. Such a driver would be used in defense related technology studies and in areas of scientific study such as highly ionized materials and high-energy-density physics.

  5. Los Alamos Laser Eye Investigation.

    SciTech Connect

    Odom, C. R.

    2005-01-01

    A student working in a laser laboratory at Los Alamos National Laboratory sustained a serious retinal injury to her left eye when she attempted to view suspended particles in a partially evacuated target chamber. The principle investigator was using the white light from the flash lamp of a Class 4 Nd:YAG laser to illuminate the particles. Since the Q-switch was thought to be disabled at the time of the accident, the principal investigator assumed it would be safe to view the particles without wearing laser eye protection. The Laboratory Director appointed a team to investigate the accident and to report back to him the events and conditions leading up to the accident, equipment malfunctions, safety management causal factors, supervisory and management action/inaction, adequacy of institutional processes and procedures, emergency and notification response, effectiveness of corrective actions and lessons learned from previous similar events, and recommendations for human and institutional safety improvements. The team interviewed personnel, reviewed documents, and characterized systems and conditions in the laser laboratory during an intense six week investigation. The team determined that the direct and primary failures leading to this accident were, respectively, the principle investigator's unsafe work practices and the institution's inadequate monitoring of worker performance. This paper describes the details of the investigation, the human and institutional failures, and the recommendations for improving the laser safety program.

  6. Cloud Security: Issues and Research Directions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-18

    al. present two storage isolation schemes that enable cloud users with high security requirements to verify that their disk storage is isolated from...Proof of Isolation for Cloud Storage Zhan Wang, Kun Sun, Sushil Jajodia, and Jiwu Jing 6. Selective and Fine-Grained Access to Data in the Cloud ... Cloud Security: Issues and Research Directions We organized an invitational workshop at George Mason University on Cloud Security: Issues and Research

  7. Critical partnerships: Los Alamos, universities, and industry

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.L.

    1997-04-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, situated 35 miles northwest of Santa Fe, NM, is one of the Department of Energy`s three Defense Programs laboratories. It encompasses 43 square miles, employees approximately 10,000 people, and has a budget of approximately $1.1B in FY97. Los Alamos has a strong post-cold war mission, that of reducing the nuclear danger. But even with that key role in maintaining the nation`s security, Los Alamos views partnerships with universities and industry as critical to its future well being. Why is that? As the federal budget for R&D comes under continued scrutiny and certain reduction, we believe that the triad of science and technology contributors to the national system of R&D must rely on and leverage each others capabilities. For us this means that we will rely on these partners to help us in 5 key ways: We expect that partnerships will help us maintain and enhance our core competencies. In doing so, we will be able to attract the best scientists and engineers. To keep on the cutting edge of research and development, we have found that partnerships maintain the excellence of staff through new and exciting challenges. Additionally, we find that from our university and corporate partners we often learn and incorporate {open_quotes}best practices{close_quotes} in organizational management and operations. Finally, we believe that a strong national system of R&D will ensure and enhance our ability to generate revenues.

  8. Defining Future Directions for Endometriosis Research

    PubMed Central

    D’Hooghe, Thomas M.; Fazleabas, Asgerally; Giudice, Linda C.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Petraglia, Felice; Taylor, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    Endometriosis, defined as estrogen-dependent lesions containing endometrial glands and stroma outside the uterus, is a chronic and often painful gynecological condition that affects 6% to 10% of reproductive age women. Endometriosis has estimated annual costs of US $12 419 per woman (approximately €9579), comprising one-third of the direct health care costs with two-thirds attributed to loss of productivity. Decreased quality of life is the most important predictor of direct health care and total costs. It has been estimated that there is a mean delay of 6.7 years between onset of symptoms and a surgical diagnosis of endometriosis, and each affected woman loses on average 10.8 hours of work weekly, mainly owing to reduced effectiveness while working. To encourage and facilitate research into this debilitating disease, a consensus workshop to define future directions for endometriosis research was held as part of the 11th World Congress on Endometriosis in September 2011 in Montpellier, France. The objective of this workshop was to review and update the endometriosis research priorities consensus statement developed following the 10th World Congress on Endometriosis in 2008.1 A total of 56 recommendations for research have been developed, grouped under 6 subheadings: (1) diagnosis, (2) classification and prognosis, (3) clinical trials, treatment, and outcomes, (4) epidemiology, (5) pathophysiology, and (6) research policy. By producing this consensus international research priorities statement, it is the hope of the workshop participants that researchers will be encouraged to develop new interdisciplinary research proposals that will attract increased funding support for work on endometriosis. PMID:23427182

  9. Los Alamos National Laboratory computer benchmarking 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.L.

    1983-06-01

    Evaluating the performance of computing machinery is a continual effort of the Computer Research and Applications Group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This report summarizes the results of the group's benchmarking activities performed between October 1981 and September 1982, presenting compilation and execution times as well as megaflop rates for a set of benchmark codes. Tests were performed on the following computers: Cray Research, Inc. (CRI) Cray-1S; Control Data Corporation (CDC) 7600, 6600, Cyber 73, Cyber 825, Cyber 835, Cyber 855, and Cyber 205; Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) VAX 11/780 and VAX 11/782; and Apollo Computer, Inc., Apollo.

  10. Future directions for positive body image research.

    PubMed

    Halliwell, Emma

    2015-06-01

    The emergence of positive body image research during the last 10 years represents an important shift in the body image literature. The existing evidence provides a strong empirical basis for the study of positive body image and research has begun to address issues of age, gender, ethnicity, culture, development, and intervention in relation to positive body image. This article briefly reviews the existing evidence before outlining directions for future research. Specifically, six areas for future positive body image research are outlined: (a) conceptualization, (b) models, (c) developmental factors, (d) social interactions, (e) cognitive processing style, and (f) interventions. Finally, the potential role of positive body image as a protective factor within the broader body image literature is discussed.

  11. Research on laser direct metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongzhong; Shi, Likai

    2003-03-01

    Laser direct deposition of metallic parts is a new manufacturing technology, which combines with computer-aided design, laser cladding and rapid prototyping. Fully dense metallic parts can be directly obtained through melting the coaxially fed powders with a high-power laser in a layer-by-layer manner. The process characteristics, system composition as well as some research and advancement on laser direct deposition are presented here. The microstructure and properties observation of laser direct formed 663 copper alloy, 316L stainless steel and Rene'95 nickel super alloy samples indicate that, the as-deposited microstructure is similar to rapidly solidified materials, with homogenous composition and free of defects. Under certain conditions, directionally solidified microstructure can be obtained. The as-formed mechanical properties are equal to or exceed those for casting and wrought annealed materials. At the same time, some sample parts with complicate shape are presented for technology demonstration. The formed parts show good surface quality and dimensional accuracy.

  12. Los Alamos Using Neutrons to Stop Nuclear Smugglers

    ScienceCinema

    Favalli, Andrea; Swinhoe, Martyn

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers have successfully demonstrated for the first time that laser-generated neutrons can be enlisted as a useful tool in the War on Terror. The international research team used the short-pulse laser at Los Alamos's TRIDENT facility to generate a neutron beam with novel characteristics that interrogated a closed container to confirm the presence and quantity of nuclear material inside. The successful experiment paves the way for creation of a table-top-sized or truck-mounted neutron generator that could be installed at strategic locations worldwide to thwart smugglers trafficking in nuclear materials.

  13. Los Alamos Using Neutrons to Stop Nuclear Smugglers

    SciTech Connect

    Favalli, Andrea; Swinhoe, Martyn

    2013-06-03

    Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers have successfully demonstrated for the first time that laser-generated neutrons can be enlisted as a useful tool in the War on Terror. The international research team used the short-pulse laser at Los Alamos's TRIDENT facility to generate a neutron beam with novel characteristics that interrogated a closed container to confirm the presence and quantity of nuclear material inside. The successful experiment paves the way for creation of a table-top-sized or truck-mounted neutron generator that could be installed at strategic locations worldwide to thwart smugglers trafficking in nuclear materials.

  14. Direct metallic amalgam alternative: a research update.

    PubMed

    Eichmiller, F C; Marjenhoff, W A; Dariel, M P; Lashmore, D S

    1996-01-01

    Discussions between two group leaders at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) led to the suggestion that a mercury-free, silver-based material could be used for dental direct-filling applications. This concept brought about a new approach that, nonetheless, is still based on powder technology such as amalgams. The resulting material also retains the tin and silver components of conventional amalgams. The condensation of a loose powder mixture into a cohesive solid relies, however, on cold-welding across atomically clean silver-silver interfaces after a mild acid treatment of the surfaces. The National Institute of Dental Research (NIDR) and American Dental Association Health Foundation (ADAHF) became involved in the research in 1992, and ADAHF scientists continue to collaborate with NIST metallurgists and electrochemists toward the further development of this promising new technology.

  15. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Todd; Levy, Karin

    2001-02-27

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. Annual report on Laboratory Directed Research and Development for FY2000.

  16. Geysers advanced direct contact condenser research

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, J.; Bahning, T.; Bharathan, D.

    1997-12-31

    The first geothermal application of the Advanced Direct Contact Condenser (ADCC) technology developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is now operational and is being tested at The Geysers Power Plant Unit 11. This major research effort is being supported through the combined efforts of NREL, The Department of Energy (DOE), and Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E). NREL and PG&E have entered into a Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA) for a project to improve the direct-contact condenser performance at The Geysers Power Plant. This project is the first geothermal adaptation of an advanced condenser design developed for the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) systems. PG&E expects this technology to improve power plant performance and to help extend the life of the steam field by using steam more efficiently. In accordance with the CRADA, no money is transferred between the contracting parties. In this case the Department of Energy is funding NREL for their efforts in this project and PG&E is contributing funds in kind. Successful application of this technology at The Geysers will provide a basis for NREL to continue to develop this technology for other geothermal and fossil power plant systems.

  17. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ogeka, G.J.

    1991-12-01

    Today, new ideas and opportunities, fostering the advancement of technology, are occurring at an ever-increasing rate. It, therefore, seems appropriate that a vehicle be available which fosters the development of these new ideas and technologies, promotes the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and which develops new fundable'' R D projects and programs. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor achieving and maintaining staff excellence, and a means to address national needs, with the overall mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals, and presentations at meetings and forums.

  18. Fifty-one years of Los Alamos Spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Fenimore, Edward E.

    2014-09-04

    From 1963 to 2014, the Los Alamos National Laboratory was involved in at least 233 spacecraft. There are probably only one or two institutions in the world that have been involved in so many spacecraft. Los Alamos space exploration started with the Vela satellites for nuclear test detection, but soon expanded to ionospheric research (mostly barium releases), radioisotope thermoelectric generators, solar physics, solar wind, magnetospheres, astrophysics, national security, planetary physics, earth resources, radio propagation in the ionosphere, and cubesats. Here, we present a list of the spacecraft, their purpose, and their launch dates for use during RocketFest

  19. Human-Robot Interaction Directed Research Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochlis, Jennifer; Ezer, Neta; Sandor, Aniko

    2011-01-01

    Human-robot interaction (HRI) is about understanding and shaping the interactions between humans and robots (Goodrich & Schultz, 2007). It is important to evaluate how the design of interfaces and command modalities affect the human s ability to perform tasks accurately, efficiently, and effectively (Crandall, Goodrich, Olsen Jr., & Nielsen, 2005) It is also critical to evaluate the effects of human-robot interfaces and command modalities on operator mental workload (Sheridan, 1992) and situation awareness (Endsley, Bolt , & Jones, 2003). By understanding the effects of interface design on human performance, workload, and situation awareness, interfaces can be developed that support the human in performing tasks with minimal errors and with appropriate interaction time and effort. Thus, the results of research on human-robot interfaces have direct implications for design. Because the factors associated with interfaces and command modalities in HRI are too numerous to address in 3 years of research, the proposed research concentrates on three manageable areas applicable to National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) robot systems. These topic areas emerged from the Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 work that included extensive literature reviews and observations of NASA systems. The three topic areas are: 1) video overlays, 2) camera views, and 3) command modalities. Each area is described in detail below, along with relevance to existing NASA human-robot systems. In addition to studies in these three topic areas, a workshop is proposed for FY12. The workshop will bring together experts in human-robot interaction and robotics to discuss the state of the practice as applicable to research in space robotics. Studies proposed in the area of video overlays consider two factors in the implementation of augmented reality (AR) for operator displays during teleoperation. The first of these factors is the type of navigational guidance provided by AR symbology. In the proposed

  20. Neurosciences research in space - Future directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulzman, Frank M.; Wolfe, James W.

    1991-01-01

    In order to gain a better understanding of the effects of long-duration space missions on the central nervous system, near-term research, to take place from 1990-1995, will be directed at investigating the acute effects of microgravity and the 'space adaptation syndrome'. These include experiments scheduled for the Spacelab Life Sciences 1 which is designed to evaluate changes in the visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive systems. An extensive series of experiments, collectively termed Microgravity Vestibular Investigations (MVI), is also planned for the IML-1 mission to be flown in 1992. The IML-2 mission will emphasize behavior and performance, biological rhythms, and further vestibular studies. Mid-term goals, projected to be achieved from 1995-2000, include the use of new technology such as magnetic recording techniques. Long-term goals are also discussed including studies dealing with neuronal plasticity and sensory substitution, augmentation, and robotic telepresence.

  1. Satellites monitor Los Alamos fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalluri, Satya; White, Benjamin

    A man-made fire that was intended to be a “controlled burn” for clearing brush and wilderness at the Bandelier National Monument, New Mexico, became an inferno that devastated significant portions of Los Alamos during the first week of May 2000. Now known as the Cerro Grande fire, it was not confined to Los Alamos alone. The fire spread to 15% of the Santa Clara Indian Reservation and a substantial area of the surrounding national parks and U.S. forests.The National Weather Service estimates that more than 100,000 fires occur in the natural environment each year within the United States alone, of which about 90% are manmade. Remote sensing images from satellites could be used to detect and monitor these active fires and biomass burning. Forest fires have a significant environmental and economic impact, and timely information about their location and magnitude is essential to contain them.

  2. Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Escobedo, G.M.; Hargis, K.M.; Douglass, C.R.

    2007-07-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) waste management program is responsible for disposition of waste generated by many of the LANL programs and operations. LANL generates liquid and solid waste that can include radioactive, hazardous, and other constituents. Where practical, LANL hazardous and mixed wastes are disposed through commercial vendors; low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and radioactive asbestos-contaminated waste are disposed on site at LANL's Area G disposal cells, transuranic (TRU) waste is disposed at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), and high-activity mixed wastes are disposed at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) after treatment by commercial vendors. An on-site radioactive liquid waste treatment facility (RLWTF) removes the radioactive constituents from liquid wastes and treated water is released through an NPDES permitted outfall. LANL has a very successful waste minimization program. Routine hazardous waste generation has been reduced over 90% since 1993. LANL has a DOE Order 450.1-compliant environmental management system (EMS) that is ISO 14001 certified; waste minimization is integral to setting annual EMS improvement objectives. Looking forward, under the new LANL management and operating contractor, Los Alamos National Security (LANS) LLC, a Zero Liquid Discharge initiative is being planned that should eliminate flow to the RLWTF NPDES-permitted outfall. The new contractor is also taking action to reduce the number of permitted waste storage areas, to charge generating programs directly for the cost to disposition waste, and to simplify/streamline the waste system. (authors)

  3. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Struble, G.L.; Middleton, C.; Anderson, S.E.; Baldwin, G.; Cherniak, J.C.; Corey, C.W.; Kirvel, R.D.; McElroy, L.A.

    1992-12-31

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) funds projects that nurture and enrich the core competencies of the Laboratory. The scientific and technical output from the FY 1992 RD Program has been significant. Highlights include (1) Creating the first laser guide star to be coupled with adaptive optics, thus permitting ground-based telescopes to obtain the same resolution as smaller space-based instruments but with more light-gathering power. (2) Significantly improving the limit on the mass of the electron antineutrino so that neutrinos now become a useful tool in diagnosing supernovas and we disproved the existence of a 17-keV neutrino. (3) Developing a new class of organic aerogels that have robust mechanical properties and that have significantly lower thermal conductivity than inorganic aerogels. (4) Developing a new heavy-ion accelerator concept, which may enable us to design heavy-ion experimental systems and use a heavy-ion driver for inertial fusion. (5) Designing and demonstrating a high-power, diode-pumped, solid-state laser concept that will allow us to pursue a variety of research projects, including laser material processing. (6) Demonstrating that high-performance semiconductor arrays can be fabricated more efficiently, which will make this technology available to a broad range of applications such as inertial confinement fusion for civilian power. (7) Developing a new type of fiber channel switch and new fiber channel standards for use in local- and wide-area networks, which will allow scientists and engineers to transfer data at gigabit rates. (8) Developing the nation`s only numerical model for high-technology air filtration systems. Filter designs that use this model will provide safer and cleaner environments in work areas where contamination with particulate hazardous materials is possible.

  4. Future directions for EPA Superfund research.

    PubMed

    Wentsel, Randall S; Blaney, Ben; Kowalski, Lorelei; Bennett, David A; Grevatt, Peter; Frey, Sharon

    2002-03-01

    The EPA Office of Research and Development (ORD) identifies and prioritizes future research areas through a Waste Research Coordination Team. The team works together to plan the ORD Superfund research program, and it has members from each of the ORD laboratories as well as representatives from the Superfund office. Superfund scientists have identified several research topics in applied research areas to improve risk assessment methods and reduce uncertainty in site-specific risk assessments. Research areas include: dermal exposure models and toxicity values, improved methods for exposure factors, pharmaco-kinetic dose-response models, bioavailability and statistical methods. This paper presents ORD future research plans in response to these identified research areas.

  5. Hot Dry Rock Overview at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Michael; Hendron, Robert H.

    1989-03-21

    The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy program is a renewable energy program that can contribute significantly to the nation's balanced and diversified energy mix. Having extracted energy from the first Fenton Hill HDR reservoir for about 400 days, and from the second reservoir for 30 days in a preliminary test, Los Alamos is focusing on the Long Term Flow Test and reservoir studies. Current budget limitations have slowed preparations thus delaying the start date of that test. The test is planned to gather data for more definitive reservoir modeling with energy availability or reservoir lifetime of primary interest. Other salient information will address geochemistry and tracer studies, microseismic response, water requirements and flow impedance which relates directly to pumping power requirements. During this year of ''preparation'' we have made progress in modeling studies, in chemically reactive tracer techniques, in improvements in acoustic or microseismic event analysis.

  6. 75 FR 15756 - Small Business Innovation Research Program Policy Directive

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... ADMINISTRATION RIN 3244-AF61 Small Business Innovation Research Program Policy Directive AGENCY: U.S. Small... announces a final amendment to the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program Policy Directive (PD... the Policy Directive; Small Business Innovation Research Program To: The Directors, Small...

  7. Los Alamos Science: Number 16

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, N.G.

    1988-01-01

    It was an unusually stimulating day and a half at Los Alamos when two Nobel Laureates in physiology, a leading paleontologist, and a leading bio-astrophysicist came together to discuss ''Unsolved Problems in the Science of Life,'' the topic of the second in a series of special meetings sponsored by the Fellows of the Laboratory. Just like the first one on ''Creativity in Science,'' this colloquium took us into a broader arena of ideas and viewpoints than is our usual daily fare. To contemplate the evolution and mysteries of intelligent life from the speakers' diverse points of view at one time, in one place was indeed a rare experience.

  8. [Los Alamos National Laboratory industrial applications and technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-30

    In October 1989, the Los Alamos Economic Development Corporation (LAEDC) entered into a contract with the Industrial Applications office (IAO) of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) whereby the LAEDC was to provide support services to IAO. More specifically, according to the Statement of Work in this contract The Los Alamos Economic Development Corporation shall assist the Los Alamos National Laboratory Industrial Applications Office in establishing and strengthening connections between potential entrepreneurs at the Laboratory and the business assistance community throughout New Mexico, directed toward enhancing the number, of successful start up businesses spinning off the Laboratory's technology base.'' As part of this contract and subsequent modifications thereof, the LAEDC was to perform seven tasks: 1. Provide business planning assistance to potential entrepreneurs. 2. (Assist IAO in preparing and distributing) informational materials on technology transfer. 3. (Organize and manage) meetings and seminars on technology transfer and entrepreneurship. 4. Identify new opportunities for technology transfer. 5. (Identify and implement programs for the) recognition of Laboratory Entrepreneurs. 6. Training Lab personnel, in the area of technology transfer and Laboratory industrial interactions. 7. Review and summarize prior New Mexico economic development studies. The purpose of this report, is to summarize the accomplishments of the LAEDC under its contract with IAO, and to fulfill its reporting requirements. This report covers the period from October 1989 to September 1992.

  9. Los Alamos Advanced Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.C.D.; Kraus, R.H.; Ledford, J.; Meier, K.L.; Meyer, R.E.; Nguyen, D.; Sheffield, R.L.; Sigler, F.L.; Young, L.M.; Wang, T.S.; Wilson, W.L.; Wood, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    At Los Alamos, we are building a free-electron laser (FEL) for industrial, medical, and research applications. This FEL, which will incorporate many of the new technologies developed over the last decade, will be compact in size, robust, and user-friendly. Electrons produced by a photocathode will be accelerated to 20 MeV by a high-brightness accelerator and transported using permanent-magnet quadrupoles and dipoles. They will form an electron beam with an excellent instantaneous beam quality of 10 {pi} mm mrad in transverse emittance and 0.3% in energy spread at a peak current up to 300 A. Including operation at higher harmonics, the laser wavelength extends form 3.7 {mu}m to 0.4 {mu}m. In this paper, we will describe the project and the programs to date. 10 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Information about Practicums at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Paul A.

    2012-07-24

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center is the premier facility for neutron science experiments ranging from cross section measurements, neutron scattering experiments, proton radiography, cold neutrons, actinide neutronic properties, and many other exciting topics. The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory is home to several powerful magnets, including the one that created the first non-destructive 100 Tesla field in March 2012. They probe the electronic structure of superconductors, magnetic properties of materials (including magneto-quantum effects). Research is also conducted in correlated materials, thermoacoustics, and magnetic properties of actinides. The Trident Laser has a unique niche with very high power, short pulse experiments, with a peak power of 10{sup 20} W in short pulse mode. Discoveries range from production of monoenergetic MeV ion beam, nonlinear kinetic plasma waves, the transition between kinetic and fluid nonlinear behavior and other laser-plasma interaction processes.

  11. Applications and suggested directions of transition research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper summarizes many of the applications of transition research having significant technological importance and suggests critical general areas for further research. Critical research requirements include identification and quantification of initial disturbance fields, disturbance internalization by inviscid and viscous flow fields and amplification in nonboundary-layer flows, along with elucidation of the roughness-induced destabilization physics.

  12. Human-Robot Interaction Directed Research Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandor, Aniko; Cross, Ernest V., II; Chang, M. L.

    2014-01-01

    Human-robot interaction (HRI) is a discipline investigating the factors affecting the interactions between humans and robots. It is important to evaluate how the design of interfaces and command modalities affect the human's ability to perform tasks accurately, efficiently, and effectively when working with a robot. By understanding the effects of interface design on human performance, workload, and situation awareness, interfaces can be developed to appropriately support the human in performing tasks with minimal errors and with appropriate interaction time and effort. Thus, the results of research on human-robot interfaces have direct implications for the design of robotic systems. This DRP concentrates on three areas associated with interfaces and command modalities in HRI which are applicable to NASA robot systems: 1) Video Overlays, 2) Camera Views, and 3) Command Modalities. The first study focused on video overlays that investigated how Augmented Reality (AR) symbology can be added to the human-robot interface to improve teleoperation performance. Three types of AR symbology were explored in this study, command guidance (CG), situation guidance (SG), and both (SCG). CG symbology gives operators explicit instructions on what commands to input, whereas SG symbology gives operators implicit cues so that operators can infer the input commands. The combination of CG and SG provided operators with explicit and implicit cues allowing the operator to choose which symbology to utilize. The objective of the study was to understand how AR symbology affects the human operator's ability to align a robot arm to a target using a flight stick and the ability to allocate attention between the symbology and external views of the world. The study evaluated the effects type of symbology (CG and SG) has on operator tasks performance and attention allocation during teleoperation of a robot arm. The second study expanded on the first study by evaluating the effects of the type of

  13. School Consultation Research: Methodological Critique and Future Research Directions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gresham, Frank M.; Kendell, Ginger K.

    1987-01-01

    This article reviews the current status of school consultation research and critiques the research methodologies used in consultation research. Major theoretical models in which consultation research has been conducted are briefly described. Consultation research is reviewed in three primary areas of investigation: (1) outcome research; (2)…

  14. Strategic Research Directions In Microgravity Materials Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinton, Raymond G., Jr.; Wargo, Michael J.; Marzwell, Neville L.; Sanders, Gerald; Schlagheck, Ron; Semmes, Ed; Bassler, Julie; Cook, Beth

    2004-01-01

    The Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR) is moving aggressively to align programs, projects, and products with the vision for space exploration. Research in advanced materials is a critical element in meeting exploration goals. Research in low gravity materials science in OBPR is being focused on top priority needs in support of exploration: 1) Space Radiation Shielding; 2) In Situ Resource Utilization; 3) In Situ Fabrication and Repair; 4) Materials Science for Spacecraft and Propulsion Systems; 5) Materials Science for Advanced Life Support Systems. Roles and responsibilities in low gravity materials research for exploration between OBPR and the Office of Exploration Systems are evolving.

  15. The NHMFL Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos National Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke, Chuck

    2014-03-01

    National user facilities provide scientists and industrial development companies with access to specialized experimental capabilities to enable development of materials and solve long standing technical problems. Magnetic fields have become an indispensable tool for researchers to better understand and manipulate ground states of electronic materials. As magnetic field intensities are increased the quantum nature of these materials become exponentially more likely to be observed and this is but one of the drivers to go further in high magnetic field generation. At the Los Alamos branch of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory we have significant efforts in extremely high magnetic field generation and experimentation. In direct opposition with our efforts are the tremendous electro-mechanical forces exerted on our magnets and the electromagnetic interference that couples to the sample under study and the diagnostic equipment. Challenges in magnetic field generation and research will be presented. Various methods of pulsed high magnetic field generation and experimentation capabilities will be reviewed, including our recent ``World Record'' for the highest non-destructive magnetic field. NSF-DMR 1157490.

  16. New Directions in Policy Borrowing Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner-Khamsi, Gita

    2016-01-01

    Research on policy borrowing is a well-established research area of comparative education. Over the past 20 years or so it gained prominence among globalization scholars. Of great interest is not so much the question of which reforms "travel" internationally, and which ones are homebound, but rather why traveling reforms resonate in a…

  17. International Migrations: A Framework for Directing Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogler, Lloyd H.

    1994-01-01

    Provides a framework encompassing components of the migration experience to aid research on human adaptation. The framework is a response to the argument that social networks, socioeconomic status, and culture should be treated as intertwining transitional experiences and therefore juxtaposed in research to examine their effects. (GLR)

  18. Human-Robot Interaction Directed Research Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandor, Aniko; Cross, Ernest V., II; Chang, Mai Lee

    2014-01-01

    Human-robot interaction (HRI) is a discipline investigating the factors affecting the interactions between humans and robots. It is important to evaluate how the design of interfaces and command modalities affect the human's ability to perform tasks accurately, efficiently, and effectively when working with a robot. By understanding the effects of interface design on human performance, workload, and situation awareness, interfaces can be developed to appropriately support the human in performing tasks with minimal errors and with appropriate interaction time and effort. Thus, the results of research on human-robot interfaces have direct implications for the design of robotic systems. This DRP concentrates on three areas associated with interfaces and command modalities in HRI which are applicable to NASA robot systems: 1) Video Overlays, 2) Camera Views, and 3) Command Modalities. The first study focused on video overlays that investigated how Augmented Reality (AR) symbology can be added to the human-robot interface to improve teleoperation performance. Three types of AR symbology were explored in this study, command guidance (CG), situation guidance (SG), and both (SCG). CG symbology gives operators explicit instructions on what commands to input, whereas SG symbology gives operators implicit cues so that operators can infer the input commands. The combination of CG and SG provided operators with explicit and implicit cues allowing the operator to choose which symbology to utilize. The objective of the study was to understand how AR symbology affects the human operator's ability to align a robot arm to a target using a flight stick and the ability to allocate attention between the symbology and external views of the world. The study evaluated the effects type of symbology (CG and SG) has on operator tasks performance and attention allocation during teleoperation of a robot arm. The second study expanded on the first study by evaluating the effects of the type of

  19. The engineering institute of Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, Charles R; Park, Gyuhae; Cornwell, Phillip J; Todd, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) have taken the unprecedented step of creating a collaborative, multi-disciplinary graduate education program and associated research agenda called the Engineering Institute. The mission of the Engineering Institute is to develop a comprehensive approach for conducting LANL mission-driven, multidisciplinary engineering research and to improve recruiting, revitalization, and retention of the current and future staff necessary to support the LANL' s national security responsibilities. The components of the Engineering Institute are (1) a joint LANL/UCSD degree program, (2) joint LANL/UCSD research projects, (3) the Los Alamos Dynamic Summer School, (4) an annual workshop, and (5) industry short courses. This program is a possible model for future industry/government interactions with university partners.

  20. New directions in qualitative research in psychology.

    PubMed

    Demuth, Carolin

    2015-06-01

    Qualitative Research gains increasing popularity in the field of Psychology. With the renewed interest, there are, however, also some risks related to the overhomogenization and increasing standardization of qualitative methods. This special issue is dedicated to clarify some of the existing misconceptions of qualitative research and to discuss its potentials for the field of psychology in light of recent endeavors to overcome paradigmatic battles and a re-orientation to the specifities of psychology. The issue comprises a discussion from workshop on the future of qualitative research in psychology organized at Aalborg University, and several contributions that resulted from it.

  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory's high-performance data system

    SciTech Connect

    Mercier, C.; Chorn, G.; Christman, R.; Collins, B.

    1991-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is designing a High-Performance Data System (HPDS) that will provide storage for supercomputers requiring large files and fast transfer speeds. The HPDS will meet the performance requirements by managing data transfers from high-speed storage systems connected directly to a high-speed network. File and storage management software will be distributed in workstations. Network protocols will ensure reliable, wide-area network data delivery to support long-distance distributed processing. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Los Alamos PC estimating system

    SciTech Connect

    Stutz, R.A.; Lemon, G.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Los Alamos Cost Estimating System (QUEST) is being converted to run on IBM personal computers. This very extensive estimating system is capable of supporting cost estimators from many different and varied fields. QUEST does not dictate any fixed method for estimating. QUEST supports many styles and levels of detail estimating. QUEST can be used with or without data bases. This system allows the estimator to provide reports based on levels of detail defined by combining work breakdown structures. QUEST provides a set of tools for doing any type of estimate without forcing the estimator to use any given method. The level of detail in the estimate can be mixed based on the amount of information known about different parts of the project. The system can support many different data bases simultaneously. Estimators can modify any cost in any data base.

  3. Future directions in human-environment research.

    PubMed

    Moran, Emilio F; Lopez, Maria Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Human-environment research in the 21st century will need to change in major ways. It will need to integrate the natural and the social sciences; it will need to engage stakeholders and citizens in the design of research and in the delivery of science for the benefit of society; it will need to address ethical and democratic goals; and it will need to address a myriad of important theoretical and methodological challenges that continue to impede progress in the advance of sustainability science.

  4. Audit of the radioactive liquid waste treatment facility operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-19

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) generates radioactive and liquid wastes that must be treated before being discharged to the environment. Presently, the liquid wastes are treated in the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (Treatment Facility), which is over 30 years old and in need of repair or replacement. However, there are various ways to satisfy the treatment need. The objective of the audit was to determine whether Los Alamos cost effectively managed its Treatment Facility operations. The audit determined that Los Alamos` treatment costs were significantly higher when compared to similar costs incurred by the private sector. This situation occurred because Los Alamos did not perform a complete analysis of privatization or prepare a {open_quotes}make-or-buy{close_quotes} plan for its treatment operations, although a {open_quotes}make-or-buy{close_quotes} plan requirement was incorporated into the contract in 1996. As a result, Los Alamos may be spending $2.15 million more than necessary each year and could needlessly spend $10.75 million over the next five years to treat its radioactive liquid waste. In addition, Los Alamos has proposed to spend $13 million for a new treatment facility that may not be needed if privatization proves to be a cost effective alternative. We recommended that the Manager, Albuquerque Operations Office (Albuquerque), (1) require Los Alamos to prepare a {open_quotes}make-or-buy{close_quotes} plan for its radioactive liquid waste treatment operations, (2) review the plan for approval, and (3) direct Los Alamos to select the most cost effective method of operations while also considering other factors such as mission support, reliability, and long-term program needs. Albuquerque concurred with the recommendations.

  5. Future Directions in ADHD Etiology Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigg, Joel T.

    2012-01-01

    Reviews salient emerging themes in the scientific literature related to identifying etiology and pathophysiology of ADHD. While bypassing the need for new treatment research, the review highlights three themes. First, recognition of the epigenetic effects is expected to revitalize the search for and mapping of early environmental influences on the…

  6. Biology Education Research: Lessons and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Susan R.; Nielsen, Natalie R.; Schweingruber, Heidi A.

    2013-01-01

    Biologists have long been concerned about the quality of undergraduate biology education. Over time, however, biology faculty members have begun to study increasingly sophisticated questions about teaching and learning in the discipline. These scholars, often called biology education researchers, are part of a growing field of inquiry called…

  7. Future Directions in Youth Involvement Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose-Krasnor, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Youth activity involvement has received increasing research and theoretical attention and should be of particular interest to social development investigators. Involvement has been correlated with a wide range of positive developmental indices, although not for all activities nor for all children. However, our ability to interpret such findings…

  8. Airport-Noise Levels and Annoyance Model (ALAMO) user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, R.; Donaldson, J. L.; Johnson, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    A guide for the use of the Airport-Noise Level and Annoyance MOdel (ALAMO) at the Langley Research Center computer complex is provided. This document is divided into 5 primary sections, the introduction, the purpose of the model, and an in-depth description of the following subsystems: baseline, noise reduction simulation and track analysis. For each subsystem, the user is provided with a description of architecture, an explanation of subsystem use, sample results, and a case runner's check list. It is assumed that the user is familiar with the operations at the Langley Research Center (LaRC) computer complex, the Network Operating System (NOS 1.4) and CYBER Control Language. Incorporated within the ALAMO model is a census database system called SITE II.

  9. Manufacturing Research: Self-Directed Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    MAY 1990 TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE SECTION 1 - ONGOING RESEARCH Processing Noisy Information Using Neural Nets...encapsulated by rectangular boxes. Cutter runout , i.e.tool eccentricity, is typically unwanted, but can only be minimized during set-up of the cutter in...of the added OPA complexity. One simulation trial result is presented here. Table I lists the trial, the geometry change associated with it, and the

  10. Malignant mesothelioma: Canadian perspective and research directions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C.W.; Martin, J.; MacRae, R.; Tsao, M.S.; Nguyen, E.; Johnston, M.; Baas, P.; Laurie, S.; Feld, R.; Murray, N.; Shepherd, F.A.

    2008-01-01

    Since the 1960s, the incidence of malignant mesothelioma in Canada has increased dramatically because of work-related asbestos exposures. Treatment options are limited. Although chemotherapy is now an accepted standard in the management of advanced disease, uncertainty surrounds the roles of radical surgery and radiation. In March 2007, a symposium was held in Vancouver, B.C., to review the current approach to malignant mesothelioma in Canada and to discuss development of a national clinical research strategy.

  11. Cultural psychiatry: research strategies and future directions.

    PubMed

    Kirmayer, Laurence J; Ban, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    This chapter reviews some key aspects of current research in cultural psychiatry and explores future prospects. The first section discusses the multiple meanings of culture in the contemporary world and their relevance for understanding mental health and illness. The next section considers methodological strategies for unpacking the concept of culture and studying the impact of cultural variables, processes and contexts. Multiple methods are needed to address the many different components or dimensions of cultural identity and experience that constitute local worlds, ways of life or systems of knowledge. Quantitative and observational methods of clinical epidemiology and experimental science as well as qualitative ethnographic methods are needed to capture crucial aspects of culture as systems of meaning and practice. Emerging issues in cultural psychiatric research include: cultural variations in illness experience and expression; the situated nature of cognition and emotion; cultural configurations of self and personhood; concepts of mental disorder and mental health literacy; and the prospect of ecosocial models of health and culturally based interventions. The conclusion considers the implications of the emerging perspectives from cultural neuroscience for psychiatric theory and practice.

  12. Leadership: current theories, research, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Avolio, Bruce J; Walumbwa, Fred O; Weber, Todd J

    2009-01-01

    This review examines recent theoretical and empirical developments in the leadership literature, beginning with topics that are currently receiving attention in terms of research, theory, and practice. We begin by examining authentic leadership and its development, followed by work that takes a cognitive science approach. We then examine new-genre leadership theories, complexity leadership, and leadership that is shared, collective, or distributed. We examine the role of relationships through our review of leader member exchange and the emerging work on followership. Finally, we examine work that has been done on substitutes for leadership, servant leadership, spirituality and leadership, cross-cultural leadership, and e-leadership. This structure has the benefit of creating a future focus as well as providing an interesting way to examine the development of the field. Each section ends with an identification of issues to be addressed in the future, in addition to the overall integration of the literature we provide at the end of the article.

  13. Conditioned immunomodulation: research needs and directions.

    PubMed

    Ader, Robert

    2003-02-01

    Considering the brief time that psychoneuroimmunology has existed as a bona fide field of research, a great deal of data has been collected in support of the proposition that homeostatic mechanisms are the product of an integrated system of defenses of which the immune system is a critical component. It is now clear that immune function is influenced by autonomic nervous systems activity and by the release of neuroendocrine substances from the pituitary. Conversely, cytokines and hormones released by an activated immune system influence neural and endocrine processes. Regulatory peptides and receptors, once confined to the brain, are expressed by both the nervous and immune systems enabling each system to monitor and modulate the activities of the other. It is hardly surprising, then, that immunologic reactivity can be influenced by stressful life experiences or by Pavlovian conditioning.

  14. Neurosciences research in space Future directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulzman, Frank M.; Wolfe, James W.

    Future research in the neurosciences can best be understood in the context of NASA's life sciences goals in the near term (1990-1995), mid term (1995-2000), and long term (2000 and beyond). Since NASA is planning short-duration Spacelab and International Microgravity Laboratory (IML) flights for many years to come, the acute effects of exposure to microgravity will continue to be of experimental and operational interest in the near term. To this end, major new areas of research will be devoted to ground-based studies of preflight adaptation trainers and their efficacy in preventing or reducing the incidence of space motion sickness. In addition, an extensive series of studies of the vestibular system will be conducted inflight on the IML-1 mission The IML-2 mission will emphasize behavior and performance, biological rhythms, and further vestibular studies. In the mid-term period, Spacelab missions will employ new technology such as magnetic recording techniques in order to evaluate changes in the processing of sensory and motor inputs at the brainstem and cortical level during exposure to microgravity. Two Space Life Sciences (SLS) missions planned for the mid to late 1990's, SLS-4 and SLS-5, will utilize an onboard centrifuge facility that will enable investigators to study the effects of partial gravity on sensory and motor function. In the long term (2000 and beyond), Space Station Freedom and long-duration missions will provide opportunities to explore new options in the neurosciences, such as sensory substitution and augmentation, through the use of physical sensors to provide three-dimensional tactile-visual, tactile-auditory and tactile-somatosensory inputs. The use of this technology will be extremely important in the area of robotic telepresence. Finally, Space Station Freedom and proposed LifeSat missions will provide neuroscientists the opportunity to study the effects of partial gravity and microgravity on neuronal plasticity.

  15. Wildland fire ash: future research directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodí, Merche B.; Martins, Deborah A.; Cerdà, Artemi; Balfour, Victoria N.; Santin, Cristina; Doerr, Stefan H.; Pereira, Paulo; Mataix-Solera, Jorge

    2014-05-01

    Ash is a key component of the forest fires affected land (Cerdà, 1998; Bodí et al., 2011; Pereira et al., 2013a). Ash controls the hydrological processes and determines the water repellency (Dlapa et al., 2012) and the infiltration rates (Cerdà and Doerr, 2008;). Moreover, ash is the key factor on runoff initiation and then on the soil erosion. Little is known about the impact of ash in different ecosystems, but during the last decade a substantial increase in the papers that show the role of ash in the Earth and Soil System were published (Bodí et al., 2012; Pereira et al., 2013b).. Ash is being found as the key component of the post-fire pedological, geomorphological and hydrological response after forest fires (Fernández et al., 2012; Martín et al., 2012; Bodí et al., 2013; Guénon et al., 2013; Pereira et al., 2013c). A recent State-of-the-Art review about wildland fire ash (Bodí et al., 2014) compiles the knowledge regarding the production, composition and eco-hydro-geomorphic effects of wildland fire ash. In the present paper we indicate the knowledge gaps detected and suggest topics that need more research effort concerning: i) data collection and analysis techniques: a) To develop standardized sampling techniques that allow cross comparison among sites and avoid inclusion of the underlying soil unless the burned surface soil forms part of the ash layer, b) To develop standardized methods to define and characterize ash, including its color, physical properties such as particle size distribution or density, proportion of pyrogenic C, chemical and biological reactivity and persistence in the environment, c) To validate, calibrate and test measurements collected through remote sensing with on-the-ground measurements. ii) ash production, deposition redistribution and fate: d) To untangle the significance of the effects of maximum temperature reached during combustion versus the duration of heating, e) To understand the production of ash by measuring its

  16. Directions for environmentally biodegradable polymer research

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, G. )

    1993-03-01

    A major factor promoting interest in biodegradable polymers is the growing concern raised by the recalcitrance and unknown environmental fate of many of the currently used synthetic polymers. These polymers include both water-soluble and water-insoluble types. The former are generally specialty polymers with functional groups that effect water solubility such as carboxyl, hydroxyl, amido, etc.; the latter are usually nonfunctional polymers commonly referred to as commodity plastics. Both types of polymers are widely used in many applications. Water-soluble polymers are used, for example, in cosmetics, water treatment, dispersants, thickeners, detergents, and superabsorbents, and they include poly(acrylic acid), polyacrylamide, poly(vinyl alcohol), and poly(ethylene glycol). Plastics are used in packaging, disposable diaper backing, fishing nets, and agricultural film; they include polymers such as polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, poly(vinyl chloride), poly(ethylene terephthalate), and Nylon 6.6. In this Account, the author presents a personal perspective on definitions and test protocols for biodegradable polymers as well as how they will influence the future direction and developments in the field. However, before doing so he digresses briefly to present a commentary on the role of biodegradable polymers in environmental waste management. This should be useful for those readers unfamiliar with the subject, and it will set the stage for the rest of the discussion. 36 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Guest Editors' Introduction: Research on Direct Instruction in Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mac Iver, Martha Abele; Kemper, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    Introduces a special issue devoted to recent studies of the direct instruction reading program, providing a history of direct instruction, examining research on the effects and outcomes of direct instruction, and reviewing the studies contained in this special issue. (Contains references.) (SM)

  18. New Directions in Composition Research. Perspectives in Writing Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beach, Richard, Ed.; Bridwell, Lillian S., Ed.

    This book contains 20 articles, from a wide variety of perspectives, designed to bridge the interests of researchers and teachers on the topic of current composition research. The following articles are included: "Studying the Writing Abilities of a University Freshman Class: Strategies from a Case Study" (Charles R. Cooper, with Roger…

  19. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ogeka, G.J.; Romano, A.J.

    1992-12-01

    This report briefly discusses the following research: Advances in Geoexploration; Transvenous Coronary Angiography with Synchrotron X-Rays; Borehole Measurements of Global Warming; Molecular Ecology: Development of Field Methods for Microbial Growth Rate and Activity Measurements; A New Malaria Enzyme - A Potential Source for a New Diagnostic Test for Malaria and a Target for a New Antimalarial Drug; Basic Studies on Thoron and Thoron Precursors; Cloning of the cDNA for a Human Serine/Threonine Protein Kinase that is Activated Specifically by Double-Stranded DNA; Development of an Ultra-Fast Laser System for Accelerator Applications; Cluster Impact Fusion; Effect of a Bacterial Spore Protein on Mutagenesis; Structure and Function of Adenovirus Penton Base Protein; High Resolution Fast X-Ray Detector; Coherent Synchrotron Radiation Longitudinal Bunch Shape Monitor; High Grain Harmonic Generation Experiment; BNL Maglev Studies; Structural Investigations of Pt-Based Catalysts; Studies on the Cellular Toxicity of Cocaine and Cocaethylene; Human Melanocyte Transformation; Exploratory Applications of X-Ray Microscopy; Determination of the Higher Ordered Structure of Eukaryotic Chromosomes; Uranium Neutron Capture Therapy; Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Nanoscale Structures; Nuclear Techiques for Study of Biological Channels; RF Sources for Accelerator Physics; Induction and Repair of Double-Strand Breaks in the DNA of Human Lymphocytes; and An EBIS Source of High Charge State Ions up to Uranium.

  20. Research Issues and Language Program Direction. Issues in Language Program Direction: A Series of Annual Volumes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilenman, L. Kathy, Ed.

    This collection of papers is divided into two parts. After "Introduction" (L. Kathy Heilenman), Part 1, "Research and Language Program Directors: The Relationship," includes "Research Domains and Language Program Direction" (Bill VanPatten); "Language Program Direction and the Modernist Agenda" (Celeste…

  1. Integrating Advance Research Directives into the European Legal Framework.

    PubMed

    Andorno, Roberto; Gennet, Eloïse; Jongsma, Karin; Elger, Bernice

    2016-04-01

    The possibility of using advance directives to prospectively consent to research participation in the event of dementia remains largely unexplored in Europe. Moreover, the legal status of advance directives for research is unclear in the European regulations governing biomedical research. The article explores the place that advance research directives have in the current European legal framework, and considers the possibility of integrating them more explicitly into the existing regulations. Special focus is placed on issues regarding informed consent, the role of proxies, and the level of acceptable risks and burdens.

  2. Sunset at the ALaMO

    NASA Video Gallery

    A new color all-sky camera has opened its eyes at the ALaMO, or Automated Lunar and Meteor Observatory, at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Watch its inaugural video below, s...

  3. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    This report describes environmental monitoring activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory for 1994. Data were collected to assess external penetrating radiation, airborne emissions, liquid effluents, radioactivity of environmental materials and food stuffs, and environmental compliance.

  4. New Rad Lab for Los Alamos

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The topping out ceremony for a key construction stage in the Los Alamos National Laboratory's newest facility, the Radiological Laboratory Utility & Office Building. This is part of the National Nu...  

  5. New Rad Lab for Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    2008-08-06

    The topping out ceremony for a key construction stage in the Los Alamos National Laboratory's newest facility, the Radiological Laboratory Utility & Office Building. This is part of the National Nu...  

  6. Edward Teller Returns to LOS Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker, Siegfried S.

    2010-01-01

    I was asked to share some reflections of Edward Teller's return to Los Alamos during my directorship. I met Teller late in his life. My comments focus on that time and they will be mostly in the form of stories of my interactions and those of my colleagues with Teller. Although the focus of this symposium is on Teller's contributions to science, at Los Alamos it was never possible to separate Teller's science from policy and controversy ...

  7. Dosimetry at the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility: Past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect

    Malenfant, R.E.

    1993-10-01

    Although the primary reason for the existence of the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility is to provide basic data on the physics of systems of fissile material, the physical arrangements and ability to provide sources of radiation have led to applications for all types of radiation dosimetry. In the broad definition of radiation phenomena, the facility has provided sources to evaluate biological effects, radiation shielding and transport, and measurements of basic parameters such as the evaluation of delayed neutron parameters. Within the last 15 years, many of the radiation measurements have been directed to calibration and intercomparison of dosimetry related to nuclear criticality safety. Future plans include (1) the new applications of Godiva IV, a bare-metal pulse assembly, for dosimetry (including an evaluation of neutron and gamma-ray room return); (2) a proposal to relocate the Health Physics Research Reactor from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to Los Alamos, which will provide the opportunity to continue the application of a primary benchmark source to radiation dosimetry; and (3) a proposal to employ SHEBA, a low-enrichment solution assembly, for accident dosimetry and evaluation.

  8. The Los Alamos Laser Acceleration of Particles Workshop and beginning of the advanced accelerator concepts field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, C.

    2012-12-01

    The first Advanced Acceleration of Particles-AAC-Workshop (actually named Laser Acceleration of Particles Workshop) was held at Los Alamos in January 1982. The workshop lasted a week and divided all the acceleration techniques into four categories: near field, far field, media, and vacuum. Basic theorems of particle acceleration were postulated (later proven) and specific experiments based on the four categories were formulated. This landmark workshop led to the formation of the advanced accelerator R&D program in the HEP office of the DOE that supports advanced accelerator research to this day. Two major new user facilities at Argonne and Brookhaven and several more directed experimental efforts were built to explore the advanced particle acceleration schemes. It is not an exaggeration to say that the intellectual breadth and excitement provided by the many groups who entered this new field provided the needed vitality to then recently formed APS Division of Beams and the new online journal Physical Review Special Topics-Accelerators and Beams. On this 30th anniversary of the AAC Workshops, it is worthwhile to look back at the legacy of the first Workshop at Los Alamos and the fine groundwork it laid for the field of advanced accelerator concepts that continues to flourish to this day.

  9. Overview of laser technology at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, G. K.; Cremers, D. A.

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has had a long history of involvement in laser sciences and has been recognized both for its large laser programs and smaller scale developments in laser technology and applications. The first significant program was with the Rover nuclear-based rocket propulsion system in 1968 to study laser initiated fusion. From here applications spread to programs in laser isotope separation and development of large lasers for fusion. These programs established the technological human resource base of highly trained laser physicists, engineers, and chemists that remain at the Laboratory today. Almost every technical division at Los Alamos now has some laser capability ranging from laser development, applications, studies on nonlinear processes, modeling and materials processing. During the past six years over eight R&D-100 Awards have been received by Los Alamos for development of laser-based techniques and instrumentation. Outstanding examples of technology developed include LIDAR applications to environmental monitoring, single molecule detection using fluorescence spectroscopy, a laser-based high kinetic energy source of oxygen atoms produced by a laser-sustained plasma, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for compositional, analysis, thin film high temperature superconductor deposition, multi-station laser welding, and direct metal deposition and build-up of components by fusing powder particles with a laser beam.

  10. Los Alamos Science: The Human Genome Project. Number 20, 1992

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cooper, N. G.; Shea, N. eds.

    1992-01-01

    This document provides a broad overview of the Human Genome Project, with particular emphasis on work being done at Los Alamos. It tries to emphasize the scientific aspects of the project, compared to the more speculative information presented in the popular press. There is a brief introduction to modern genetics, including a review of classic work. There is a broad overview of the Genome Project, describing what the project is, what are some of its major five-year goals, what are major technological challenges ahead of the project, and what can the field of biology, as well as society expect to see as benefits from this project. Specific results on the efforts directed at mapping chromosomes 16 and 5 are discussed. A brief introduction to DNA libraries is presented, bearing in mind that Los Alamos has housed such libraries for many years prior to the Genome Project. Information on efforts to do applied computational work related to the project are discussed, as well as experimental efforts to do rapid DNA sequencing by means of single-molecule detection using applied spectroscopic methods. The article introduces the Los Alamos staff which are working on the Genome Project, and concludes with brief discussions on ethical, legal, and social implications of this work; a brief glimpse of genetics as it may be practiced in the next century; and a glossary of relevant terms.

  11. Los Alamos Science: The Human Genome Project. Number 20, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, N G; Shea, N

    1992-01-01

    This article provides a broad overview of the Human Genome Project, with particular emphasis on work being done at Los Alamos. It tries to emphasize the scientific aspects of the project, compared to the more speculative information presented in the popular press. There is a brief introduction to modern genetics, including a review of classic work. There is a broad overview of the Genome Project, describing what the project is, what are some of its major five-year goals, what are major technological challenges ahead of the project, and what can the field of biology, as well as society expect to see as benefits from this project. Specific results on the efforts directed at mapping chromosomes 16 and 5 are discussed. A brief introduction to DNA libraries is presented, bearing in mind that Los Alamos has housed such libraries for many years prior to the Genome Project. Information on efforts to do applied computational work related to the project are discussed, as well as experimental efforts to do rapid DNA sequencing by means of single-molecule detection using applied spectroscopic methods. The article introduces the Los Alamos staff which are working on the Genome Project, and concludes with brief discussions on ethical, legal, and social implications of this work; a brief glimpse of genetics as it may be practiced in the next century; and a glossary of relevant terms.

  12. Overview of laser technology at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, G.K.; Cremers, D.A.

    1994-09-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has had a long history of involvement in laser sciences and has been recognized both for its large laser programs and smaller scale developments in laser technology and applications. The first significant program was with the Rover nuclear-based rocket propulsion system in 1968 to study laser initiated fusion. From here applications spread to programs in laser isotope separation and development of large lasers for fusion. These programs established the technological human resource base of highly trained laser physicists, engineers, and chemists that remain at the Laboratory today. Almost every technical division at Los Alamos now has some laser capability ranging from laser development, applications, studies on nonlinear processes, modeling and materials processing. During the past six years over eight R&D-100 Awards have been received by Los Alamos for development of laser-based techniques and instrumentation. Outstanding examples of technology developed include LIDAR applications to environmental monitoring, single molecule detection using fluorescence spectroscopy, a laser-based high kinetic energy source of oxygen atoms produced by a laser-sustained plasma, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for compositional, analysis, thin film high temperature superconductor deposition, multi-station laser welding, and direct metal deposition and build-up of components by fusing powder particles with a laser beam.

  13. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ayat, R

    2001-05-24

    This Annual Report provides an overview of the FY2000 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and presents a summary of the results achieved by each project during the year.

  14. Laboratory directed research and development 2006 annual report.

    SciTech Connect

    Westrich, Henry Roger

    2007-03-01

    This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 2006. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 430 individual R&D projects in 17 categories.

  15. Directions and needs in asbestos research: new insights: conference summary.

    PubMed

    Pfau, Jean C; Pershouse, Mark; Putnam, Elizabeth A

    2008-04-01

    The Center for Environmental Health Sciences (CEHS) Conference, entitled "Directions and Needs in Asbestos Research: New Insights," was held at the University of Montana in Missoula. Researchers, physicians, health care workers, and federal agency representatives from around the country met for a cross-disciplinary exploration of many issues related to asbestos research. Topics included community and psychosocial issues in biomedical research, asbestos exposure assessment, assessment and mechanisms of asbestos related diseases, and new research directions. This meeting report is a summary of the conference presentations, and of the topics identified for future research directions. This conference was a follow-up to one hosted by the CEHS in June 2002, and continued to take advantage of opportunities to work with a unique population in Libby MT, where significant asbestos exposures have occurred due to the mining of asbestos-contaminated vermiculite. The goals of this conference were to bring together experts from diverse fields to identify progress made since the last conference and to develop new research avenues that would allow us to address the research needs in emerging asbestos-exposed populations. Participants indicated that these objectives were met, and expressed enthusiasm for follow-up conferences to maintain the dialog that has been established regarding directions and needs in asbestos research. Selected papers from the conference are presented here.

  16. PROBLEMS AND DIRECTIONS FOR RESEARCH ON PUBLIC SCHOOL DESEGREGATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KATZ, IRWIN

    THIS PAPER REVIEWS RESEARCH ON PUBLIC SCHOOL DESEGREGATION AND SUGGESTS DIRECTIONS FOR FURTHER STUDIES. IT NOTES THAT RESEARCHERS SHOULD CONTINUE TO INVESTIGATE THE FACTORS WHICH AFFECT THE PACE OF DESEGREGATION, SUCH AS THE PRESSURES OF THE NEGRO COMMUNITY AND OF THE STATE AND OTHER AGENCIES. FOR EXAMPLE, THEY SHOULD STUDY THE SPECIFIC…

  17. An Integrative Conceptual Framework of Disability: New Directions for Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, Denise G.; Pledger, Constance

    2003-01-01

    Examines various disability paradigms across time, assessing the relative contribution of the socioecological perspective in guiding research designed to improve the lives of people with disabilities. Recommends new research directions that include a focus on life span issues, biomedicine, biotechnology, the efficacy and effectiveness of current…

  18. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY-15 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Pillai, Rekha Sukamar

    2016-03-01

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the laboratory director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all INL programs. This report includes summaries of all INL LDRD research activities supported during Fiscal Year (FY) 2015.

  19. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY-10 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dena Tomchak

    2011-03-01

    The FY 2010 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Annual Report is a compendium of the diverse research performed to develop and ensure the INL's technical capabilities can support the future DOE missions and national research priorities. LDRD is essential to the INL -- it provides a means for the laboratory to pursue novel scientific and engineering research in areas that are deemed too basic or risky for programmatic investments. This research enhances technical capabilities at the laboratory, providing scientific and engineering staff with opportunities for skill building and partnership development.

  20. Water supply at Los Alamos during 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Purtymun, W.D.; McLin, S.G.; Stoker, A.K.; Maes, M.N.

    1995-09-01

    Municipal potable water supply during 1992 was 1,516 {times} 10{sup 6} gallons from wells in the Guaje and Pajarito well fields. About 13 {times} 10{sup 6} gallons were pumped from the Los Alamos Well Field and used in the construction of State Road 501 adjacent to the Field. The last year the Las Alamos Field was used for municipal supply was 1991. The nonpotable water supply used for steam plant support was about 0.12 {times} 10{sup 6} gallons from the spring gallery in Water Canyon. No nonpotable water was used for irrigation from Guaje and Los Alamos Reservoirs. Thus, the total water usage in 1992 was about 1,529 {times} 10{sup 6} gallons. Neither of the two new wells in the Otowi Well Field were operational in 1992.

  1. Simulations of flow interactions near Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Costigan, K. R.; Winterkamp, Judy; Bossert, J. E.; Langley, D. L.

    2002-01-01

    The Pajarito Plateau is located on the eastern flank of the Jemez Mountains and the west side of the Rio Grande Valley, in north-central New Mexico, where the river runs roughly north to south. On the Pajarito Plateau, a network of surface meteorological stations has been routinely maintained by Los Alamos National Laboratory. This network includes five instrumented towers, within an approximately 10 km by 15 km area. The towers stand from 23 m to 92 m tall, with multiple wind measurement heights. Investigation of the station records indicates that the wind fields can be quite complicated and may be the result of interactions of thermally and/or dynamically driven flows of many scales. Slope flows are often found on the plateau during the morning and evening transition times, but it is not unusual to find wind directions that are inconsistent with slope flows at some or all of the stations. It has been speculated that valley circulations, as well as synoptically driven winds, interact with the slope flows, but the mesonet measurements alone, with no measurements in the remainder of the valley, were not sufficient to investigate this hypothesis. Thus, during October of 1995, supplemental meteorological instrumentation was placed in the Rio Grande basin to study the complex interaction of flows in the area. A sodar was added near the 92 m tower and a radar wind profiler was placed in the Rio Grande Valley, just east of the plateau and near the river. Measurements were also added at the top of Pajarito Mountain, just west of the plateau, and across the valley, to the east, on top of Tesuque Peak (in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains). Two surface stations were also added to the north-facing slopes of Pajarito Mountain. This paper will present observations from October 1995 and results of simulations of this area that are used in the study of the complex interaction of dynamically and thermally driven flows on multiple scales.

  2. Comparative Effectiveness and Implementation Research: Directions for Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Vickrey, Barbara G.; Hirtz, Deborah; Waddy, Salina; Cheng, Eric M.; Johnston, S. Claiborne

    2013-01-01

    There is an enormous unmet need for knowledge about how new insights from discovery and translational research can yield measurable, population-level improvements in health and reduction in mortality among those having or at risk for neurological disease. Once several, well-conducted randomized controlled trials establish the efficacy of a given therapy, implementation research can generate new knowledge about barriers to uptake of the therapy into widespread clinical care, and what strategies are effective in overcoming those barriers and in addressing health disparities. Comparative effectiveness research aims to elucidate the relative value (including clinical benefit, clinical harms, and/or costs) of alternative efficacious management approaches to a neurological disorder, generally through direct comparisons, and may include comparisons of methodologies for implementation. Congress has recently appropriated resources and established an institute to prioritize funding for such research. Neurologists and neuroscientists should understand the scope and objectives of comparative effectiveness and implementation research, their range of methodological approaches (formal literature syntheses, randomized trials, observational studies, modeling), and existing research resources (centers for literature synthesis, registries, practice networks) relevant to research for neurological conditions, in order to close the well-documented “evidence-to-practice gap.” Future directions include building this research resource capacity, producing scientists trained to conduct rigorous comparative effectiveness and implementation research, and embracing innovative strategies to set research priorities in these areas. PMID:22718542

  3. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program: FY 2015 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    SLAC,

    2016-04-04

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) encourage innovation, creativity, originality and quality to maintain the Laboratory’s research activities and staff at the forefront of science and technology. To further advance its scientific research capabilities, the Laboratory allocates a portion of its funds for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program. With DOE guidance, the LDRD program enables SLAC scientists to make rapid and significant contributions that seed new strategies for solving important national science and technology problems. The LDRD program is conducted using existing research facilities.

  4. Laboratory Directed Research and Development LDRD-FY-2011

    SciTech Connect

    Dena Tomchak

    2012-03-01

    This report provides a summary of the research conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) during Fiscal Year (FY) 2011. This report demonstrates the types of cutting edge research the INL is performing to help ensure the nation's energy security. The research conducted under this program is aligned with our strategic direction, benefits the Department of Energy (DOE) and is in compliance with DOE order 413.2B. This report summarizes the diverse research and development portfolio with emphasis on the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) mission, encompassing both advanced nuclear science and technology and underlying technologies.

  5. The Los Alamos National Laboratory Nuclear Vision Project

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, E.D.; Wagner, R.L. Jr.

    1996-09-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has initiated a project to examine possible futures associated with the global nuclear enterprise over the course of the next 50 years. All major components are included in this study--weapons, nonproliferation, nuclear power, nuclear materials, and institutional and public factors. To examine key issues, the project has been organized around three main activity areas--workshops, research and analyses, and development of linkages with other synergistic world efforts. This paper describes the effort--its current and planned activities--as well as provides discussion of project perspectives on nuclear weapons, nonproliferation, nuclear energy, and nuclear materials focus areas.

  6. Induction inserts at the Los Alamos PSR

    SciTech Connect

    King-Yuen Ng

    2002-09-30

    Ferrite-loaded induction tuners installed in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring have been successful in compensating space-charge effects. However, the resistive part of the ferrite introduces unacceptable microwave instability and severe bunch lengthening. An effective cure was found by heating the ferrite cores up to {approx} 130 C. An understanding of the instability and cure is presented.

  7. A Sailor in the Los Alamos Navy

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, D. L.

    2016-12-20

    As part of the War Department’s Manhattan Engineer District (MED), Los Alamos was an Army installation during World War II, complete with a base commander and a brace of MPs. But it was a unique Army installation, having more civilian then military personnel. Even more unique was the work performed by the civilian population, work that required highly educated scientists and engineers. As the breadth, scope, and complexity of the Laboratory’s work increased, more and more technically educated and trained personnel were needed. But, the manpower needs of the nation’s war economy had created a shortage of such people. To meet its manpower needs, the MED scoured the ranks of the Army for anyone who had technical training and reassigned these men to its laboratories, including Los Alamos, as part of its Special Engineer Detachment (SED). Among the SEDs assigned to Los Alamos was Val Fitch, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1980. Another was Al Van Vessem, who helped stack the TNT for the 100 ton test, bolted together the Trinity device, and rode shotgun with the bomb has it was driven from Los Alamos to ground zero.

  8. New directions in InP solar cell research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Brinker, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    Recent research efforts representing new directions in InP solar cell research are reviewed. These include heteroepitaxial growth on silicon and gallium arsenide substrates, V-grooved cells, large area high efficiency cells, and surface passivation. Improvements in heteroepitaxial cell efficiency are described together with processing of 19.1 percent, 4 sq cm cells. Recommendations are made for improvements in processing leading to increased efficiencies.

  9. Laboratory directed research and development program FY 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    This report compiles the annual reports of Laboratory Directed Research and Development projects supported by the Berkeley Lab. Projects are arranged under the following topical sections: (1) Accelerator and fusion research division; (2) Chemical sciences division; (3) Computing Sciences; (4) Earth sciences division; (5) Environmental energy technologies division; (6) life sciences division; (7) Materials sciences division; (8) Nuclear science division; (9) Physics division; (10) Structural biology division; and (11) Cross-divisional. A total of 66 projects are summarized.

  10. Los Alamos National Laboratory Human and Intellectual Capital for Sustaining Nuclear Deterrence

    SciTech Connect

    McAlpine, Bradley

    2015-04-01

    This paper provides an overview of the current human and intellectual capital at Los Alamos National Laboratory, through specific research into the statistics and demographics as well as numerous personal interviews at all levels of personnel. Based on this information, a series of recommendations are provided to assist Los Alamos National Laboratory in ensuring the future of the human and intellectual capital for the nuclear deterrence mission. While the current human and intellectual capital is strong it stands on the precipice and action must be taken to ensure Los Alamos National Laboratory maintains leadership in developing and sustaining national nuclear capabilities. These recommendations may be applicable to other areas of the nuclear enterprise, including the Air Force, after further research and study.

  11. Town Hall Meeting: Future Directions in Dynamic High Pressure Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellis, W. J.; Dlott, D.

    2007-12-01

    Shock-compression research began in the 1940s for reasons of national defense. While military-related research will continue to be a major motivator of shock research, war between nations is not as probable today as it was in the last century. Today other issues are gaining national and international importance. This situation raises the possibility of redistribution of federal funding into fields other than those related directly to military research. It is timely to consider possible future directions that would put us in a position to obtain support to address emerging needs of society, while maintaining traditional expertise. Possibilities for future research at national and military laboratories and at universities are suggested in the context of ideas and questions posed in a recent report of the National Research Council of the National Academies. Dynamic-compression research is positioned to play a prominent role in general scientific research and such results are needed to enhance probabilities of achieving present and emerging technological goals of national importance.

  12. Directions for Research and Development on Electronic Portfolios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrami, Philip C.; Barrett, Helen

    2005-01-01

    This lead article for the special issue of the "Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology" explores directions for research and development on electronic portfolios, which are digital containers capable of storing visual and auditory content; software for which may also be designed to support a variety of pedagogical processes and…

  13. A Directed Research Project Investigating Territoriality and Aggression in Crickets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling, Ruth A.

    2001-01-01

    Describes a directed research project that examines the territorial and aggressive behavior of crickets. Presents behavioral ecology laboratory experiments in which students test the hypothesis that crickets with established territories are more likely to win confrontations that intruding crickets. (Contains 11 references.) (ASK)

  14. New Directions for Learning Community Assessment and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huerta, Juan Carlos

    2008-01-01

    At the 12th Annual National Learning Communities Conference in November 2007, Juan Carlos Huerta, Gale Stuart, Lauren Chism, and Michele Hansen participated in a panel discussion about new directions in learning communities assessment and research. The intent of the panel discussion was to hear from those involved in learning community assessment,…

  15. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Assessment for FY 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Hatton, D.

    2014-03-01

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is required to provide a program description and overview of its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) to the Department of Energy in accordance with DOE Order 413.2B dated April 19, 2006. This report fulfills that requirement.

  16. Laboratory directed research and development program, FY 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 1996 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the projects supported and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The Berkeley Lab LDRD program is a critical tool for directing the Laboratory`s forefront scientific research capabilities toward vital, excellent, and emerging scientific challenges. The program provides the resources for Berkeley Lab scientists to make rapid and significant contributions to critical national science and technology problems. The LDRD program also advances the Laboratory`s core competencies, foundations, and scientific capability, and permits exploration of exciting new opportunities. Areas eligible for support include: (1) Work in forefront areas of science and technology that enrich Laboratory research and development capability; (2) Advanced study of new hypotheses, new experiments, and innovative approaches to develop new concepts or knowledge; (3) Experiments directed toward proof of principle for initial hypothesis testing or verification; and (4) Conception and preliminary technical analysis to explore possible instrumentation, experimental facilities, or new devices.

  17. New Voices in the Workplace: Research Directions in Multicultural Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fine, Marlene G.

    1991-01-01

    Develops a two-step framework (resistance to privileged discourse followed by harmonic discourse) for understanding multicultural communication in organizations based on the assumption of cultural difference. Suggests four directions for future research to create the data base that would allow development of a model of multicultural communication…

  18. Clinical Research Informatics: Recent Advances and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives To summarize significant developments in Clinical Research Informatics (CRI) over the past two years and discuss future directions. Methods Survey of advances, open problems and opportunities in this field based on exploration of current literature. Results Recent advances are structured according to three use cases of clinical research: Protocol feasibility, patient identification/recruitment and clinical trial execution. Discussion CRI is an evolving, dynamic field of research. Global collaboration, open metadata, content standards with semantics and computable eligibility criteria are key success factors for future developments in CRI. PMID:26293865

  19. New directions at TVA with special reference to agricultural research

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.J.; Rylant, K.E.

    1994-03-01

    Public Support for the Tennessee Valley Authority`s (TVA) fertilizer research and development program in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, ended in fiscal year 1993. TVA`s research center at Muscle Shoals, formerly known as the National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center, is now the TVA Environmental Research Center. Efforts at the Center have diversified to include research and support areas of Agricultural Research and Practices, Atmospheric Sciences, Biotechnology, Waste Management, and Remediation, Environmental Site Remediation, Support Services, Environmental Management, and Technology Transfer. ``We`re building on the expertise and success of our earlier research and focusing our new projects on emerging problems of the 21st century,`` TVA`s Chairman Craven Crowell said in prepared remarks to Congress on March 2, 1994. Agricultural Research in TVA has been aligned with corporate objectives to develop solutions to environmental problems of regional, national and international significance because the agency`s business incorporates a broad mix of responsibilities, including power generation, navigation, flood control, shoreline management, recreation, environmental research, and economic development. Agricultural strategies for watershed protection lie at the core of TVA`s new agricultural research agenda. The major influences for this agenda are TVA`s direct stewardship responsibilities for the 60,000 miles of streams that feed the 652-mile-long Tennessee River; the 11,000 miles of shoreline; and 470,000 acres of TVA-managed public land.

  20. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY2011

    SciTech Connect

    none, none

    2012-04-27

    Berkeley Lab's research and the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program support DOE's Strategic Themes that are codified in DOE's 2006 Strategic Plan (DOE/CF-0010), with a primary focus on Scientific Discovery and Innovation. For that strategic theme, the Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 LDRD projects support each one of the three goals through multiple strategies described in the plan. In addition, LDRD efforts support the four goals of Energy Security, the two goals of Environmental Responsibility, and Nuclear Security (unclassified fundamental research that supports stockpile safety and nonproliferation programs). Going forward in FY 2012, the LDRD program also supports the Goals codified in the new DOE Strategic Plan of May, 2011. The LDRD program also supports Office of Science strategic plans, including the 20-year Scientific Facilities Plan and the Office of Science Strategic Plan. The research also supports the strategic directions periodically under consideration and review by the Office of Science Program Offices, such as LDRD projects germane to new research facility concepts and new fundamental science directions. Brief summares of projects and accomplishments for the period for each division are included.

  1. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY2004

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Todd C.

    2005-03-22

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. Berkeley Lab's research and the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program support DOE's Strategic Goals that are codified in DOE's September 2003 Strategic Plan, with a primary focus on Advancing Scientific Understanding. For that goal, the Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 LDRD projects support every one of the eight strategies described in the plan. In addition, LDRD efforts support the goals of Investing in America's Energy Future (six of the fourteen strategies), Resolving the Environmental Legacy (four of the eight strategies), and Meeting National Security Challenges (unclassified fundamental research that supports stockpile safety and nonproliferation programs). The LDRD supports Office of Science strategic plans, including the 20 year Scientific Facilities Plan and the draft Office of Science Strategic Plan. The research also supports the strategic directions

  2. Evaluating the Risks of Clinical Research: Direct Comparative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Abdoler, Emily; Roberson-Nay, Roxann; Pine, Daniel S.; Wendler, David

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: Many guidelines and regulations allow children and adolescents to be enrolled in research without the prospect of clinical benefit when it poses minimal risk. However, few systematic methods exist to determine when research risks are minimal. This situation has led to significant variation in minimal risk judgments, raising concern that some children are not being adequately protected. To address this concern, we describe a new method for implementing the widely endorsed “risks of daily life” standard for minimal risk. This standard defines research risks as minimal when they do not exceed the risks posed by daily life activities or routine examinations. Methods: This study employed a conceptual and normative analysis, and use of an illustrative example. Results: Different risks are composed of the same basic elements: Type, likelihood, and magnitude of harm. Hence, one can compare the risks of research and the risks of daily life by comparing the respective basic elements with each other. We use this insight to develop a systematic method, direct comparative analysis, for implementing the “risks of daily life” standard for minimal risk. The method offers a way of evaluating research procedures that pose the same types of risk as daily life activities, such as the risk of experiencing anxiety, stress, or other psychological harm. We thus illustrate how direct comparative analysis can be applied in practice by using it to evaluate whether the anxiety induced by a respiratory CO2 challenge poses minimal or greater than minimal risks in children and adolescents. Conclusions: Direct comparative analysis is a systematic method for applying the “risks of daily life” standard for minimal risk to research procedures that pose the same types of risk as daily life activities. It thereby offers a method to protect children and adolescents in research, while ensuring that important studies are not blocked because of unwarranted concerns about

  3. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoreen, Terrence P

    2007-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the US Departmental of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2006. The associated FY 2006 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2007/2) provides financial data about the FY 2006 projects and an internal evaluation of the program's management process.

  4. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Assessment for FY 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, J P; Fox, K J

    2008-03-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary Laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal Year 2008 spending was $531.6 million. There are approximately 2,800 employees, and another 4,300 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development,' April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. To be a premier scientific Laboratory, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research and renew its research agenda. The competition for LDRD funds stimulates Laboratory scientists to think in new and creative ways, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining research excellence and a means to address National needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. By fostering high-risk, exploratory research, the LDRD program helps BNL to respond new scientific opportunities within

  5. RCRA facility investigation for the townsite of Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Dorries, A.M.; Conrad, R.C.; Nonno, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    During World War II, Los Alamos, New Mexico was established as an ideal location for the secrecy and safety needed for the research and development required to design a nuclear fission bomb. Experiments carried out in the 1940s generated both radioactive and hazardous waste constituents on what is presently part of the Los Alamos townsite. Under the RCRA permit issued to Los alamos national Laboratory in 1990, the Laboratory is scheduled for investigation of its solid waste management units (SWMUs). The existing information on levels of radioactivity on the townsite is principally data from soil samples taken during the last site decontamination in 1976, little information on the presence of hazardous constituents exists today. This paper addresses pathway analysis and a preliminary risk assessment for current residents of the Los Alamos townsite. The estimated dose levels, in mrem per year, show that the previously decontaminated SWMU areas on the Los Alamos townsite will not contribute a radiation dose of any concern to the current residents.

  6. Future directions in air quality research: economic issues.

    PubMed

    Adams, Richard M; Horst, Robert L

    2003-06-01

    Our challenge was to address future directions in air quality research that involve economic issues. The paper outlines the role of economics in the evaluation of air pollution impacts on environmental systems and describes existing research. We identify studies that address economic effects in the agricultural sector, in the commercial forest sector, and in unmanaged natural systems. Effects related to ozone exposure are highlighted. The summary of available research is followed by a discussion of research recommendations. Several short-term recommendations are identified that can augment some of the new research being considered by scientists. A more ambitious, long-term research project is outlined for valuing air pollution impacts in unmanaged natural environments. Specifically, the paper describes possible advantages of an 'integrated assessment' framework that more formally brings together the complex relationships that exist in both ecological and economic systems. A final section contains thoughts on the importance of education (i.e., information transfer) in the research process, especially in relation to policy. It is further noted that education should be inclusive of all members of the research team, throughout all stages of the research process.

  7. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY98

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, T.; Chartock, M.

    1999-02-05

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL or Berkeley Lab) Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 1998 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the supported projects and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The LBNL LDRD program is a critical tool for directing the Laboratory's forefront scientific research capabilities toward vital, excellent, and emerging scientific challenges. The program provides the resources for LBNL scientists to make rapid and significant contributions to critical national science and technology problems. The LDRD program also advances LBNL's core competencies, foundations, and scientific capability, and permits exploration of exciting new opportunities. All projects are work in forefront areas of science and technology. Areas eligible for support include the following: Advanced study of hypotheses, concepts, or innovative approaches to scientific or technical problems; Experiments and analyses directed toward ''proof of principle'' or early determination of the utility of new scientific ideas, technical concepts, or devices; and Conception and preliminary technical analyses of experimental facilities or devices.

  8. Los Alamos DP West Plutonium Facility decontamination project, 1978-1981

    SciTech Connect

    Garde, R.; Cox, E.J.; Valentine, A.M.

    1982-09-01

    The DP West Plutonium Facility operated by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico was decontaminated between April 1978 and April 1981. The facility was constructed in 1944 to 1945 to produce plutonium metal and fabricate parts for nuclear weapons. It was continually used as a plutonium processing and research facility until mid-1978. Decontamination operations included dismantling and removing gloveboxes and conveyor tunnels; removing process systems, utilities, and exhaust ducts; and decontaminating all remaining surfaces. This report describes glovebox and conveyor tunnel separations, decontamination techniques, health and safety considerations, waste management procedures, and costs of the operation.

  9. Measurements at Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility in Support of Global Security Mission Space

    SciTech Connect

    Stange, Sy; Mayo, Douglas R.; Herrera, Gary D.; McLaughlin, Anastasia D.; Montoya, Charles M.; Quihuis, Becky A.; Trujillo, Julio B.; Van Pelt, Craig E.; Wenz, Tracy R.

    2012-07-13

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility at Technical Area (TA) 55 is one of a few nuclear facilities in the United States where Research & Development measurements can be performed on Safeguards Category-I (CAT-I) quantities of nuclear material. This capability allows us to incorporate measurements of CAT-IV through CAT-I materials as a component of detector characterization campaigns and training courses conducted at Los Alamos. A wider range of measurements can be supported. We will present an overview of recent measurements conducted in support of nuclear emergency response, nuclear counterterrorism, and international and domestic safeguards. This work was supported by the NNSA Office of Counterterrorism.

  10. Future Research and Policy Directions in Physician Reimbursement

    PubMed Central

    McMenamin, Peter

    1981-01-01

    Payments to physicians absorb the second largest share of the health care dollar in the United States. In 1979, the share was 19 percent of the total, or $40.6 billion (Gibson, 1980). The Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) alone spent $8.6 billion for physician services, representing approximately 16 percent of all public funds disbursed under HCFA programs. This paper presents an overview of various issues concerning physician reimbursement. Several major areas have been identified (access, cost, quality, and improving or refining the Office of Research, Demonstrations, and Statistics' [ORDS] research techniques for analyzing topics concerning physician reimbursement). Each area is introduced with a brief discussion of some of the problems associated with the physician reimbursement systems relating to that area. Selected results are then presented from the previous research in each area, along with descriptions of continuing studies currently underway. Each section concludes with a discussion of potential future directions for new research or data development. PMID:10309465

  11. Laboratory-directed research and development: FY 1996 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, J.; Prono, J.

    1997-05-01

    This report summarizes the FY 1996 goals and accomplishments of Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) projects. It gives an overview of the LDRD program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, and provides an index to the projects` principal investigators. Projects are grouped by their LDRD component: Individual Projects, Competency Development, and Program Development. Within each component, they are further divided into nine technical disciplines: (1) materials science, (2) engineering and base technologies, (3) plasmas, fluids, and particle beams, (4) chemistry, (5) mathematics and computational sciences, (6) atomic and molecular physics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) biosciences.

  12. 1996 Laboratory directed research and development annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, C.E.; Harvey, C.L.; Lopez-Andreas, L.M.; Chavez, D.L.; Whiddon, C.P.

    1997-04-01

    This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 1996. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 259 individual R&D projects in seventeen categories. The general areas of research include: engineered processes and materials; computational and information sciences; microelectronics and photonics; engineering sciences; pulsed power; advanced manufacturing technologies; biomedical engineering; energy and environmental science and technology; advanced information technologies; counterproliferation; advanced transportation; national security technology; electronics technologies; idea exploration and exploitation; production; and science at the interfaces - engineering with atoms.

  13. 2014 Fermilab Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, W., editor

    2016-05-26

    Fermilab is executing Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) as outlined by order DOE O 413.2B in order to enhance and realize the mission of the laboratory in a manner that also supports the laboratory’s strategic objectives and the mission of the Department of Energy. LDRD funds enable scientific creativity, allow for exploration of “high risk, high payoff” research, and allow for the demonstration of new ideas, technical concepts, and devices. LDRD also has an objective of maintaining and enhancing the scientific and technical vitality of Fermilab.

  14. 1995 Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Cauffman, D.P.; Shoaf, D.L.; Hill, D.A.; Denison, A.B.

    1995-12-31

    The Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) is a key component of the discretionary research conducted by Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (Lockheed Idaho) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The threefold purpose and goal of the LDRD program is to maintain the scientific and technical vitality of the INEL, respond to and support new technical opportunities, and enhance the agility and flexibility of the national laboratory and Lockheed Idaho to address the current and future missions of the Department of Energy.

  15. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the 1992 fiscal year. It describes the projects supported and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The Divisions that report include: Accelerator and Fusion Research, Chemical Sciences, Earth Sciences, Energy and Environment, Engineering, Environment and Safety and Health, Information and Computing Sciences, Life Sciences, Materials Sciences, Nuclear Science, Physics and Structural Biology.

  16. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Newman,L.

    2007-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal year 2007 budget was $515 million. There are about 2,600 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development', April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. In accordance this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2007. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. We explicitly indicate that research conducted under the LDRD Program should be highly innovative, and an element of high risk as to success is acceptable. In the solicitation for new proposals for Fiscal Year 2007 we especially requested innovative new projects in support of RHIC and the Light Source and any of

  17. 2015 Fermilab Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, W., editor

    2015-05-26

    Fermilab is executing Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) as outlined by order DOE O 413.2B in order to enhance and realize the mission of the laboratory in a manner that also supports the laboratory’s strategic objectives and the mission of the Department of Energy. LDRD funds enable scientific creativity, allow for exploration of “high risk, high payoff” research, and allow for the demonstration of new ideas, technical concepts, and devices. LDRD also has an objective of maintaining and enhancing the scientific and technical vitality of Fermilab.

  18. Recent Infrasound Calibration Activity at Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, R. W.; Marcillo, O. E.

    2014-12-01

    Absolute infrasound sensor calibration is necessary for estimating source sizes from measured waveforms. This can be an important function in treaty monitoring. The Los Alamos infrasound calibration chamber is capable of absolute calibration. Early in 2014 the Los Alamos infrasound calibration chamber resumed operations in its new location after an unplanned move two years earlier. The chamber has two sources of calibration signals. The first is the original mechanical piston, and the second is a CLD Dynamics Model 316 electro-mechanical unit that can be digitally controlled and provide a richer set of calibration options. During 2008-2010 a number of upgrades were incorporated for improved operation and recording. In this poster we give an overview of recent chamber work on sensor calibrations, calibration with the CLD unit, some measurements with different porous hoses and work with impulse sources.

  19. Nuclear Forensics at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Podlesak, David W; Steiner, Robert E.; Burns, Carol J.; LaMont, Stephen P.; Tandon, Lav

    2012-08-09

    The overview of this presentation is: (1) Introduction to nonproliferation efforts; (2) Scope of activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (3) Facilities for radioanalytical work at LANL; (4) Radiochemical characterization capabilities; and (5) Bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities. Some conclusions are: (1) Analytical chemistry measurements on plutonium and uranium matrices are critical to numerous defense and non-defense programs including safeguards accountancy verification measurements; (2) Los Alamos National Laboratory operates capable actinide analytical chemistry and material science laboratories suitable for nuclear material forensic characterization; (3) Actinide analytical chemistry uses numerous means to validate and independently verify that measurement data quality objectives are met; and (4) Numerous LANL nuclear facilities support the nuclear material handling, preparation, and analysis capabilities necessary to evaluate samples containing nearly any mass of an actinide (attogram to kilogram levels).

  20. Water Supply at Los Alamos during 1997

    SciTech Connect

    M. N. Maes; S. G. McLin; W. D. Purtymun

    1998-12-01

    Production of potable municipal water supplies during 1997 totaled about 1,285.9 million gallons from wells in the Guaje, Pajarito, and Otowi well fields. There was no water used from the spring gallery in Water Canyon or from Guaje Reservoir during 1997. About 2.4 million gallons of water from Los Alamos Reservoir was used to irrigate public parks and recreational lands. The total water usage in 1997 was about 1,288.3 million gallons, or about 135 gallons per day per person living in Los Alamos County. Groundwater pumpage was down about 82.2 million gallons in 1997 compared with the pumpage in 1996. Four new replacement wells were drilled and cased in Guaje Canyon between October 1997 and March 1998. These wells are currently being developed and aquifer tests are being performed. A special report summarizing the geological, geophysical, and well construction logs will be issued in the near future for these new wells.

  1. Direct writing of metal nanostructures: lithographic tools for nanoplasmonics research.

    PubMed

    Leggett, Graham J

    2011-03-22

    Continued progress in the fast-growing field of nanoplasmonics will require the development of new methods for the fabrication of metal nanostructures. Optical lithography provides a continually expanding tool box. Two-photon processes, as demonstrated by Shukla et al. (doi: 10.1021/nn103015g), enable the fabrication of gold nanostructures encapsulated in dielectric material in a simple, direct process and offer the prospect of three-dimensional fabrication. At higher resolution, scanning probe techniques enable nanoparticle particle placement by localized oxidation, and near-field sintering of nanoparticulate films enables direct writing of nanowires. Direct laser "printing" of single gold nanoparticles offers a remarkable capability for the controlled fabrication of model structures for fundamental studies, particle-by-particle. Optical methods continue to provide a powerful support for research into metamaterials.

  2. Advances and future directions of research on spectral methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patera, A. T.

    1986-01-01

    Recent advances in spectral methods are briefly reviewed and characterized with respect to their convergence and computational complexity. Classical finite element and spectral approaches are then compared, and spectral element (or p-type finite element) approximations are introduced. The method is applied to the full Navier-Stokes equations, and examples are given of the application of the technique to several transitional flows. Future directions of research in the field are outlined.

  3. Risk management at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, D.G.; Stack, D.W.

    1993-11-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has risk management programs at a number of administrative levels. Each line organization has responsibility for risk management for routine operations. The Facility Risk Management group (HS-3) is the Los Alamos organization with the primary responsibility for risk management including providing input and expertise to facilities and line managers in the management and documentation of ES&H hazards and risks associated with existing and new activities. One of the major contributions this group has made to laboratory risk management program is to develop and implement a hazard identification and classification methodology that is readily adaptable to continuously changing classification guidelines such as DOE-STD-1027. The increased emphasis on safety at Los Alamos has led to the formation of additional safety oversight organization such as the Integration and Coordination Office (ICO), which is responsible for prioritization of risk management activities. In the fall of 1991, nearly 170 DOE inspectors spent 6 weeks analyzing the environmental, safety, and health activities at Los Alamos. The result of this audit was a list of over 1000 findings, each indicating some deficiency in current Laboratory operations relative to DOE and other government regulation. The audit team`s findings were consolidated and ``action plans`` were developed to address the findings. This resulted in over 200 action plans with a total estimated cost of almost $1 billion. The Laboratory adopted a risk-based prioritization process to attempt to achieve as much risk reduction as possible with the available resources. This paper describes the risk based prioritization model that was developed.

  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory Facility Review

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ronald Owen

    2015-06-05

    This series of slides depicts the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The Center's 800-MeV linac produces H+ and H- beams as well as beams of moderated (cold to 1 MeV) and unmoderated (0.1 to 600 MeV) neutrons. Experimental facilities and their capabilities and characteristics are outlined. Among these are LENZ, SPIDER, and DANCE.

  5. Los Alamos Team Demonstrates Bottle Scanner Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle; Schultz, Larry

    2014-05-06

    Los Alamos scientists are demonstrating a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMR) technology that may provide a breakthrough for screening liquids at airport security. By adding low-power X-ray data to the NMR mix, scientists believe they have unlocked a new detection technology. Funded in part by the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate, the new technology is called MagRay.

  6. Los Alamos Team Demonstrates Bottle Scanner Technology

    ScienceCinema

    Espy, Michelle; Schultz, Larry

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos scientists are demonstrating a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMR) technology that may provide a breakthrough for screening liquids at airport security. By adding low-power X-ray data to the NMR mix, scientists believe they have unlocked a new detection technology. Funded in part by the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate, the new technology is called MagRay.

  7. Laboratory Directed Research and Development annual report, Fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 5000.4A, LDRD is ``research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this Order. LDRD includes activities previously defined as ER&D, as well as other discretionary research and development activities not provided for in a DOE program.`` Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL`s Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches in research related to our ``core competencies.`` Currently, PNL`s core competencies have been identified as integrated environmental research; process technology; energy systems research. In this report, the individual summaries of Laboratory-level LDRD projects are organized according to these core competencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. A significant proportion of PNL`s LDRD funds are also allocated to projects within the various research centers that are proposed by individual researchers or small research teams. The projects are described in Section 2.0. The projects described in this report represent PNL`s investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. In accordance with DOE guidelines, the report provides an overview of PNL`s LDRD program and the management process used for the program and project summaries for each LDRD project.

  8. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM ASSESSMENT FOR FY 2006.

    SciTech Connect

    FOX,K.J.

    2006-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $460 million. There are about 2,500 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' April 19,2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13,2006. The goals and' objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and

  9. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Assessment for FY 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Newman,L.; Fox, K.J.

    2007-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal Year 2007 spending was $515 million. There are approximately 2,600 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development', April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining

  10. Los Alamos National Laboratory Building Cost Index

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, H.D.; Lemon, G.D.

    1983-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Building Cost Index indicates that actual escalation since 1970 is near 10% per year. Therefore, the Laboratory will continue using a 10% per year escalation rate for construction estimates through 1985 and a slightly lower rate of 8% per year from 1986 through 1990. The computerized program compares the different elements involved in the cost of a typical construction project, which for our purposes, is a complex of office buildings and experimental laboratores. The input data used in the program consist primarily of labor costs and material and equipment costs. The labor costs are the contractural rates of the crafts workers in the Los Alamos area. For the analysis, 12 field-labor draft categories are used; each is weighted corresponding to the labor craft distribution associated with the typical construction project. The materials costs are current Los Alamos prices. Additional information sources include material and equipment quotes obtained through conversations with vendors and from trade publications. The material and equipment items separate into 17 categories for the analysis and are weighted corresponding to the material and equipment distribution associated with the typical construction project. The building cost index is compared to other national building cost indexes.

  11. Los Alamos National Laboratory building cost index

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, H.D.; Lemon, G.D.

    1982-10-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Building Cost Index indicates that actual escalation since 1970 is near 10% per year. Therefore, the Laboratory will continue using a 10% per year escalation rate for construction estimates through 1985 and a slightly lower rate of 8% per year from 1986 through 1990. The computerized program compares the different elements involved in the cost of a typical construction project, which for our purposes, is a complex of office buildings and experimental laboratories. The input data used in the program consist primarily of labor costs and material and equipment costs. The labor costs are the contractual rates of the crafts workers in the Los Alamos area. For the analysis, 12 field-labor craft categories are used; each is weighted corresponding to the labor craft distribution associated with the typical construction project. The materials costs are current Los Alamos prices. Additional information sources include material and equipment quotes obtained through conversations with vendors and from trade publications. The material and equipment items separate into 17 categories for the analysis and are weighted corresponding to the material and equipment distribution associated with the typical construction project. The building cost index is compared to other national building cost indexes.

  12. Commercialization of Los Alamos National Laboratory technologies via small businesses. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brice, R.; Cartron, D.; Rhyne, T.; Schulze, M.; Welty, L.

    1997-06-01

    Over the past decade, numerous companies have been formed to commercialize research results from leading U.S. academic and research institutions. Emerging small businesses in areas such as Silicon Valley, Boston`s Route 128 corridor, and North Carolina`s Research Triangle have been especially effective in moving promising technologies from the laboratory bench to the commercial marketplace--creating new jobs and economic expansion in the process. Unfortunately, many of the U.S. national laboratories have not been major participants in this technology/commercialization activity, a result of a wide variety of factors which, until recently, acted against successful commercialization. This {open_quotes}commercialization gap{close_quotes} exists partly due to a lack, within Los Alamos in particular and the DOE in general, of in-depth expertise and experience in such business areas as new business development, securities regulation, market research and the determination of commercial potential, the identification of entrepreneurial management, marketing and distribution, and venture capital sources. The immediate consequence of these factors is the disappointingly small number of start-up companies based on technologies from Los Alamos National Laboratory that have been attempted, the modest financial return Los Alamos has received from these start-ups, and the lack of significant national recognition that Los Alamos has received for creating and commercializing these technologies.

  13. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2008 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    editor, Todd C Hansen

    2009-02-23

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. Berkeley Lab's research and the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program support DOE's Strategic Themes that are codified in DOE's 2006 Strategic Plan (DOE/CF-0010), with a primary focus on Scientific Discovery and Innovation. For that strategic theme, the Fiscal Year (FY) 2008 LDRD projects support each one of the three goals through multiple strategies described in the plan. In addition, LDRD efforts support the four goals of Energy Security, the two goals of Environmental Responsibility, and Nuclear Security (unclassified fundamental research that supports stockpile safety and nonproliferation programs). The LDRD program supports Office of Science strategic plans, including the 20-year Scientific Facilities Plan and the Office of Science Strategic Plan. The research also supports the strategic directions periodically under consideration and review by the

  14. Impression management and food intake. Current directions in research.

    PubMed

    Vartanian, Lenny R

    2015-03-01

    This paper reviews recent research on consumption stereotypes (judgments of others based on what they eat) and impression management (modifying one's eating behavior in order to create a particular impression). A major recent focus in the literature has been on masculinity and meat eating, with research showing that meat is strongly associated with masculinity, and that individuals who follow a meat-based diet are perceived as more masculine than are individuals who follow a vegetarian diet. Although direct evidence for impression management through food intake remains sparse, a number of methodological approaches (including priming techniques and ecological valid assessments) are described that could be used in future research to identify the motives underlying people's eating behavior. Consumption stereotypes and impression management may be important influences on people's eating behavior, but the complexities of how, when, and for whom these factors influence food intake are still not well understood.

  15. Investigation of excess thyroid cancer incidence in Los Alamos County

    SciTech Connect

    Athas, W.F.

    1996-04-01

    Los Alamos County (LAC) is home to the Los Alamos National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear research and design facility. In 1991, the DOE funded the New Mexico Department of Health to conduct a review of cancer incidence rates in LAC in response to citizen concerns over what was perceived as a large excess of brain tumors and a possible relationship to radiological contaminants from the Laboratory. The study found no unusual or alarming pattern in the incidence of brain cancer, however, a fourfold excess of thyroid cancer was observed during the late-1980`s. A rapid review of the medical records for cases diagnosed between 1986 and 1990 failed to demonstrate that the thyroid cancer excess had resulted from enhanced detection. Surveillance activities subsequently undertaken to monitor the trend revealed that the excess persisted into 1993. A feasibility assessment of further studies was made, and ultimately, an investigation was conducted to document the epidemiologic characteristics of the excess in detail and to explore possible causes through a case-series records review. Findings from the investigation are the subject of this report.

  16. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY2001 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ayat, R

    2002-06-20

    Established by Congress in 1991, the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program provides the Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) laboratories, like Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL or the Laboratory), with the flexibility to invest up to 6% of their budget in long-term, high-risk, and potentially high payoff research and development (R&D) activities to support the DOE/NNSA's national security missions. By funding innovative R&D, the LDRD Program at LLNL develops and extends the Laboratory's intellectual foundations and maintains its vitality as a premier research institution. As proof of the Program's success, many of the research thrusts that started many years ago under LDRD sponsorship are at the core of today's programs. The LDRD Program, which serves as a proving ground for innovative ideas, is the Laboratory's most important single resource for fostering excellent science and technology for today's needs and tomorrow's challenges. Basic and applied research activities funded by LDRD enhance the Laboratory's core strengths, driving its technical vitality to create new capabilities that enable LLNL to meet DOE/NNSA's national security missions. The Program also plays a key role in building a world-class multidisciplinary workforce by engaging the Laboratory's best researchers, recruiting its future scientists and engineers, and promoting collaborations with all sectors of the larger scientific community.

  17. Future Directions for Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Damiano, Cara R.; Mazefsky, Carla A.; White, Susan W.; Dichter, Gabriel S.

    2014-01-01

    This article suggests future directions for research aimed at improved understanding of the etiology and pathophysiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) as well as pharmacologic and psychosocial interventions for ASD across the lifespan. The past few years have witnessed unprecedented transformations in the understanding of ASD neurobiology, genetics, early identification, and early intervention. However, recent increases in ASD prevalence estimates highlight the urgent need for continued efforts to translate novel ASD discoveries into effective interventions for all individuals with ASD. In this article we highlight promising areas for ongoing and new research expected to quicken the pace of scientific discovery and ultimately the translation of research findings into accessible and empirically supported interventions for those with ASD. We highlight emerging research in the following domains as particularly promising and pressing: (1) preclinical models; (2) experimental therapeutics; (3) early identification and intervention; (4) psychiatric comorbidities and the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) initiative; (5) ecological momentary assessment; (6) neurotechnologies; and (7) the needs of adults with ASD. Increased research emphasis in these areas has the potential to hasten the translation of knowledge on the etiological mechanisms of ASD to psychosocial and biological interventions to reduce the burden of ASD on affected individuals and their families. PMID:25216048

  18. Clinical Research with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS): Challenges and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Brunoni, Andre Russowsky; Nitsche, Michael A.; Bolognini, Nadia; Bikson, Marom; Wagner, Tim; Merabet, Lotfi; Edwards, Dylan J.; Valero-Cabre, Antoni; Rotenberg, Alexander; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Ferrucci, Roberta; Priori, Alberto; Boggio, Paulo; Fregni, Felipe

    2011-01-01

    Background Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a neuromodulatory technique that delivers low-intensity, direct current to cortical areas facilitating or inhibiting spontaneous neuronal activity. In the past ten years, tDCS physiological mechanisms of action have been intensively investigated giving support for the investigation of its applications in clinical neuropsychiatry and rehabilitation. However, new methodological, ethical, and regulatory issues emerge when translating the findings of preclinical and phase I studies into phase II and III clinical studies. The aim of this comprehensive review is to discuss the key challenges of this process and possible methods to address them. Methods We convened a workgroup of researchers in the field to review, discuss and provide updates and key challenges of neuromodulation use for clinical research. Main Findings/Discussion We reviewed several basic and clinical studies in the field and identified potential limitations, taking into account the particularities of the technique. We review and discuss the findings into four topics: (i) mechanisms of action of tDCS, parameters of use and computer-based human brain modeling investigating electric current fields and magnitude induced by tDCS; (ii) methodological aspects related to the clinical research of tDCS as divided according to study phase (i.e., preclinical, phase I, phase II and phase III studies); (iii) ethical and regulatory concerns; (iv) future directions regarding novel approaches, novel devices, and future studies involving tDCS. Finally, we propose some alternative methods to facilitate clinical research on tDCS. PMID:22037126

  19. Overview of bureau research directed towards surface powered haulage safety

    SciTech Connect

    May, J.P.; Aldinger, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    Surface mining operations, including mills and preparation plants, employ over 260,000 people. This represents a significant contribution to our nation`s economy and an important source of skilled and well-paying jobs. As mine production has shifted from underground to surface, and with continuing advances in underground mine safety, surface mining has unfortunately become the leader in mine fatalities. In 1994 surface mining accidents accounted for 49% of all mine fatalities, followed by underground mining with 37% and mills and preparation plants with 14%. The U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM) has targeted surface mining as an important research priority to reduce the social and economic costs associated with fatalities and lost-work-time injuries. USBM safety research focuses on the development of technologies that can enhance productivity and reduce mining costs through a reduction in the number and severity of mining accidents. This report summarizes a number of completed and ongoing research programs directed towards surface powered haulage--the single largest category of fatalities in surface mining and a major cause of lost workdays. Research products designed for industry are highlighted and future USBM surface mining safety research is discussed.

  20. A changing landscape for advance directives in dementia research.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Robin

    2010-02-01

    The number of persons afflicted by dementia has increased steadily. The need for research leading to diagnostic and therapeutic interventions is widely recognized. However, dementia patients eventually lose the capacity to consent to the very research that could lead to discoveries of effective interventions. Worldwide, surrogate decision-making remains the primary means of consent for this population. This significantly restricts the autonomy of competent patients who wish to prospectively consent to research and do not wish to relinquish this decision to a third party. Advance research directives (ARDs) have been proposed as a mechanism for prospective consent for persons who anticipate cognitive impairment, as in the case of prodromal or early stage dementia patients. Currently, few guidelines specifically address the use of ARDs despite calls for official recognition. This absence of official guidelines regarding ARDs renders this mechanism susceptible to misuse, under-use, or non-use in instances where it could be advantageous for individuals, their families/caregivers, and progress in dementia research and treatment. This paper explores the changing landscape of ARDs, identifying relevant scientific, social, and policy developments, and queries whether, under these circumstances, reticence to use, recognize, or regulate ARDs is justified. It addresses some of the persistent issues related to vulnerability, the role of surrogates, and scope of prospective consent, and concludes that ARDs can serve as an important mechanism of autonomy and empowerment, and that protections should be crafted such that the availability of this option is not limited to those who also appoint a surrogate.

  1. 3D geo-database research: Retrospective and future directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, Martin; Zlatanova, Sisi

    2011-07-01

    3D geo-database research is a promising field to support challenging applications such as 3D urban planning, environmental monitoring, infrastructure management, and early warning or disaster management and response. In these fields, interdisciplinary research in GIScience and related fields is needed to support the modelling, analysis, management, and integration of large geo-referenced data sets, which describe human activities and geophysical phenomena. Geo-databases may serve as platforms to integrate 2D maps, 3D geo-scientific models, and other geo-referenced data. However, current geo-databases do not provide sufficient 3D data modelling and data handling techniques. New 3D geo-databases are needed to handle surface and volume models. This article first presents a 25-year retrospective of geo-database research. Data modelling, standards, and indexing of geo-data are discussed in detail. New directions for the development of 3D geo-databases to open new fields for interdisciplinary research are addressed. Two scenarios in the fields of early warning and emergency response demonstrate the combined management of human and geophysical phenomena. The article concludes with a critical outlook on open research problems.

  2. Laboratory directed research and development annual report: Fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 5000.4A, LDRD is ``research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this order. Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL`s Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches to research related to our ``core competencies.`` Currently, PNL`s core competencies have been identified as: integrated environmental research; process science and engineering; energy distribution and utilization. In this report, the individual summaries of Laboratory-level LDRD projects are organized according to these corecompetencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. The projects described in this report represent PNL`s investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. The report provides an overview of PNL`s LDRD program and the management process used for the program and project summaries for each LDRD project.

  3. Laboratory directed research and development annual report: Fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE's policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 5000.4A, LDRD is research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this order. Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL's Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches to research related to our core competencies.'' Currently, PNL's core competencies have been identified as: integrated environmental research; process science and engineering; energy distribution and utilization. In this report, the individual summaries of Laboratory-level LDRD projects are organized according to these corecompetencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. The projects described in this report represent PNL's investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. The report provides an overview of PNL's LDRD program and the management process used for the program and project summaries for each LDRD project.

  4. FY2007 Laboratory Directed Research and Development Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, W W; Sketchley, J A; Kotta, P R

    2008-03-20

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) annual report for fiscal year 2007 (FY07) provides a summary of LDRD-funded projects for the fiscal year and consists of two parts: An introduction to the LDRD Program, the LDRD portfolio-management process, program statistics for the year, and highlights of accomplishments for the year. A summary of each project, submitted by the principal investigator. Project summaries include the scope, motivation, goals, relevance to Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) mission areas, the technical progress achieved in FY07, and a list of publications that resulted from the research in FY07. Summaries are organized in sections by research category (in alphabetical order). Within each research category, the projects are listed in order of their LDRD project category: Strategic Initiative (SI), Exploratory Research (ER), Laboratory-Wide Competition (LW), and Feasibility Study (FS). Within each project category, the individual project summaries appear in order of their project tracking code, a unique identifier that consists of three elements. The first is the fiscal year the project began, the second represents the project category, and the third identifies the serial number of the proposal for that fiscal year.

  5. The legacy and future of CFD at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, N.L.

    1996-06-01

    The early history is presented of the prolific development of CFD methods in the Fluid Dynamics Group (T-3) at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the years from 1958 to the late 1960`s. Many of the currently used numerical methods--PIC, MAC, vorticity-stream-function, ICE, ALE methods and the {kappa}-{var_epsilon} method for turbulence--originated during this time. The rest of the paper summarizes the current research in T-3 for CFD, turbulence and solids modeling. The research areas include reactive flows, multimaterial flows, multiphase flows and flows with spatial discontinuities. Also summarized are modern particle methods and techniques developed for large scale computing on massively parallel computing platforms and distributed processors.

  6. Los Alamos Discovers Super Efficient Solar Using Perovskite Crystals

    ScienceCinema

    Mohite, Aditya; Nie, Wanyi

    2016-07-12

    State-of-the-art photovoltaics using high-purity, large-area, wafer-scale single-crystalline semiconductors grown by sophisticated, high temperature crystal-growth processes offer promising routes for developing low-cost, solar-based clean global energy solutions for the future. Solar cells composed of the recently discovered material organic-inorganic perovskites offer the efficiency of silicon, yet suffer from a variety of deficiencies limiting the commercial viability of perovskite photovoltaic technology. In research to appear in Science, Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers reveal a new solution-based hot-casting technique that eliminates these limitations, one that allows for the growth of high-quality, large-area, millimeter-scale perovskite crystals and demonstrates that highly efficient and reproducible solar cells with reduced trap assisted recombination can be realized.

  7. Operational status of the Los Alamos neutron science center (LANSCE)

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Kevin W; Erickson, John L; Schoenberg, Kurt F

    2010-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator and beam delivery complex generates the proton beams that serve three neutron production sources; the thermal and cold source for the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) high-energy neutron source, and a pulsed Ultra-Cold Neutron Source. These three sources are the foundation of strong and productive multi-disciplinary research programs that serve a diverse and robust user community. The facility also provides multiplexed beams for the production of medical radioisotopes and proton radiography of dynamic events. The recent operating history of these sources will be reviewed and plans for performance improvement will be discussed, together with the underlying drivers for the proposed LANSCE Refurbishment project. The details of this latter project are presented in a separate contribution.

  8. Los Alamos Discovers Super Efficient Solar Using Perovskite Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Mohite, Aditya; Nie, Wanyi

    2015-01-29

    State-of-the-art photovoltaics using high-purity, large-area, wafer-scale single-crystalline semiconductors grown by sophisticated, high temperature crystal-growth processes offer promising routes for developing low-cost, solar-based clean global energy solutions for the future. Solar cells composed of the recently discovered material organic-inorganic perovskites offer the efficiency of silicon, yet suffer from a variety of deficiencies limiting the commercial viability of perovskite photovoltaic technology. In research to appear in Science, Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers reveal a new solution-based hot-casting technique that eliminates these limitations, one that allows for the growth of high-quality, large-area, millimeter-scale perovskite crystals and demonstrates that highly efficient and reproducible solar cells with reduced trap assisted recombination can be realized.

  9. New Directions in Research: Contemporary Qualitative Research Methodologies and Issues in Literacy Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Joseph; Steinkuehler, Constance A.; Black, Rebecca W.; Clinton, Katherine A.; Hinchman, Kathleen A.; Dillon, Deborah R.

    2005-01-01

    Scholars who are drawn to qualitative research methodologies represent a diverse group of disciplines and fields. They also represent themselves as researchers and the theoretical frameworks in which they work quite differently. Indeed, it was this diversity in representation that initially motivated us to propose a New Directions feature on…

  10. Research ethics committees in Europe: implementing the directive, respecting diversity

    PubMed Central

    Hedgecoe, A; Carvalho, F; Lobmayer, P; Raka, F

    2006-01-01

    With the recent Clinical Trials Directive, a degree of harmonisation into research ethics committees (RECs) across Europe, including the time taken to assess a trial proposal and the kinds of issues a committee should take into account, has been introduced by the European Union (EU). How four different member states—Hungary, Portugal, Sweden and the UK—have chosen to implement the directive is shown. Although this has resulted in four very different ways of structuring RECs, similar themes are present in all four cases, such as centralisation of control over RECs within member states, harmonisation of REC procedures across the EU and increased role of political decision making with regard to such committees. PMID:16877630

  11. Bioarchaeological research development in Georgia: steps, peculiarities, directions.

    PubMed

    Shengelia, R; Bitadze, L; Laliashvili, Sh

    2012-10-01

    In Georgia, Bioarcheology in its broad sense started developing with the research in Paleoanthropology and Paleopathology. Paleoanthropology initially developed in line with Archaeology. The study of biomaterial through the angle of paleopathology started in 1956. Later works were devoted to Ethnogenesis, comparative Anthropology, spreading physiological stresses and other issues. In recent years newly discovered rich archeological materials and introduction of the modern methods of research has outlined new prospects, and our decision is to put them in to action. From our point of view the research methods and aims of Bioarchaeology include: 1. morphological study of biomaterial on the macroscopic level. 2. The research through chemical methods which gives us an opportunity to outline many parameters of life such as eating habits, the aspects of interrelation with the environment and metabolic processes through the spectrum analysis of main ingredients of material. The important part of this direction is the researching of stable isotopes which gives us additional and strong arguments. 3. Genetic research answers the following important questions: biomaterial's variety; racial and ethnic origin; time and place of migration processes traced on ethnogenesis; hereditary disease history (dating, the origin of the diseases, epidemics and other); human and animal genome evolution and mutational changes; the role of environment (food, ecosystems) in genome changes. The results of the above mentioned research allow answering a lot of important historical and biomedical issues. From these, we have started the comparative analyses of the Genographic data of Georgia, taking notes of the genetic changes which, in our opinion, are caused by the radical and stable changes of eating habits produced about 450-500 years ago, which probably resulted proportional imbalance of the diseases that appeared in the same period.

  12. Laboratory directed research and development annual report. Fiscal year 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. This report represents Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL`s) LDRD report for FY 1994. During FY 1994, 161 LDRD projects were selected for support through PNL`s LDRD project selection process. Total funding allocated to these projects was $13.7 million. Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL`s Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches in research related to our {open_quotes}core competencies.{close_quotes} Currently, PNL`s core competencies have been identified as integrated environmental research; process science and engineering; energy systems development. In this report, the individual summaries of LDRD projects (presented in Section 1.0) are organized according to these core competencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. Projects within the three core competency areas were approximately 91.4 % of total LDRD project funding at PNL in FY 1994. A significant proportion of PNL`s LDRD funds are also allocated to projects within the various research centers that are proposed by individual researchers or small research teams. Funding allocated to each of these projects is typically $35K or less. The projects described in this report represent PNL`s investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. The report provides an overview of PNL`s LDRD program, the management process used for the program, and project summaries for each LDRD project.

  13. 1997 Laboratory directed research and development. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, C.E.; Harvey, C.L.; Chavez, D.L.; Whiddon, C.P.

    1997-12-31

    This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 1997. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 218 individual R&D projects in eleven categories. Theses reports are grouped into the following areas: materials science and technology; computer sciences; electronics and photonics; phenomenological modeling and engineering simulation; manufacturing science and technology; life-cycle systems engineering; information systems; precision sensing and analysis; environmental sciences; risk and reliability; national grand challenges; focused technologies; and reserve.

  14. Laboratory directed research and development annual report 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-03-01

    This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 2004. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 352 individual R and D projects in 15 categories. The 15 categories are: (1) Advanced Concepts; (2) Advanced Manufacturing; (3) Biotechnology; (4) Chemical and Earth Sciences; (5) Computational and Information Sciences; (6) Differentiating Technologies; (7) Electronics and Photonics; (8) Emerging Threats; (9) Energy and Critical Infrastructures; (10) Engineering Sciences; (11) Grand Challenges; (12) Materials Science and Technology; (13) Nonproliferation and Materials Control; (14) Pulsed Power and High Energy Density Sciences; and (15) Corporate Objectives.

  15. Laboratory Directed Research and Development annual report, fiscal year 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    The Department of Energy Order 413.2(a) establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 413.2, LDRD is research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this Order. DOE Order 413.2 requires that each laboratory submit an annual report on its LDRD activities to the cognizant Secretarial Officer through the appropriate Operations Office Manager. The report provided in this document represents Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s LDRD report for FY 1997.

  16. Transnational nurse migration: future directions for medical anthropological research.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Megan; Nichter, Mark

    2014-04-01

    Transnational nurse migration is a serious global health issue in which inequitably distributed shortages hinder health and development goals. This article selectively reviews the literature on nurse migration that has emerged from nursing, health planning, and the social sciences and offers productive directions for future anthropological research. The literature on global nurse migration has largely focused on push/pull economic logic and the concept of brain drain to understand the causes and effects of nurse migration. These concepts obscure political-economic, historical, and cultural factors that pattern nurse migration and influence the complex effects of nurse migration. Global nurse care chain analysis helps illuminate the numerous nodes in the production and migration of nurses, and management of this transnational process. Examples are provided from the Philippines and India to illustrate ways in which this analysis may be deepened, refined and rendered more critical by anthropological research.

  17. Latino Immigrants, Acculturation, and Health: Promising New Directions in Research.

    PubMed

    Abraído-Lanza, Ana F; Echeverría, Sandra E; Flórez, Karen R

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an analysis of novel topics emerging in recent years in research on Latino immigrants, acculturation, and health. In the past ten years, the number of studies assessing new ways to conceptualize and understand how acculturation-related processes may influence health has grown. These new frameworks draw from integrative approaches testing new ground to acknowledge the fundamental role of context and policy. We classify the emerging body of evidence according to themes that we identify as promising directions--intrapersonal, interpersonal, social environmental, community, political, and global contexts, cross-cutting themes in life course and developmental approaches, and segmented assimilation--and discuss the challenges and opportunities each theme presents. This body of work, which considers acculturation in context, points to the emergence of a new wave of research that holds great promise in driving forward the study of Latino immigrants, acculturation, and health. We provide suggestions to further advance the ideologic and methodologic rigor of this new wave.

  18. Laboratory directed research and development program FY 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Todd; Levy, Karin

    2000-03-08

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. This is the annual report on Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program for FY99.

  19. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Todd; Levy, Karin

    2002-03-15

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. This is the annual report on Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program for FY01.

  20. Contemporary issues and future directions for research into pathological gambling.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, M; Baron, E

    2000-08-01

    The recent healthy increase in research into all aspects of gambling is noted. The dominant theme accounting for most of this research is the mental disorder model of pathological gambling and measures that have been derived from this conceptualization. It is suggested that an alternative approach focusing on the construct of choice or subjective control over gambling may be a research direction that will ensure that progress is maintained. In this paper a context for the discussion is provided by first identifying briefly fundamental conceptual and methodological issues associated with the mental disorder model. In particular it is argued that the heterogeneity of the diagnosis of pathological gambling makes the research task of assessing truly independent variables extremely difficult. Subsequently an illustrative schema is presented that demonstrates both the potential advantages and some of the complexities associated with the dependent variable of self-control over gambling behaviour. The main advantages are argued to be (a) the focus of research is narrowed to one potential cause of harmful impacts rather than the great diversity of impacts themselves, (b) prospective studies of regular gamblers in real gambling venues may be a key source of insight into the development of pathological gambling and (c) it promotes the development of theoretical links with the mainstream of the discipline of psychology. Despite the conceptual difficulties that may be associated with the variable of self-control, it is suggested that these may be overcome because contemporary research into the addictive behaviours has demonstrated considerable success in the definition and measurement of control and related themes such as craving, restraint and temptation.

  1. Laboratory directed research and development annual report 2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-03-01

    Science historian James Burke is well known for his stories about how technological innovations are intertwined and embedded in the culture of the time, for example, how the steam engine led to safety matches, imitation diamonds, and the landing on the moon.1 A lesson commonly drawn from his stories is that the path of science and technology (S&T) is nonlinear and unpredictable. Viewed another way, the lesson is that the solution to one problem can lead to solutions to other problems that are not obviously linked in advance, i.e., there is a ripple effect. The motto for Sandia's approach to research and development (R&D) is 'Science with the mission in mind.' In our view, our missions contain the problems that inspire our R&D, and the resulting solutions almost always have multiple benefits. As discussed below, Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program is structured to bring problems relevant to our missions to the attention of researchers. LDRD projects are then selected on the basis of their programmatic merit as well as their technical merit. Considerable effort is made to communicate between investment areas to create the ripple effect. In recent years, attention to the ripple effect and to the performance of the LDRD Program, in general, has increased. Inside Sandia, as it is the sole source of discretionary research funding, LDRD funding is recognized as being the most precious of research dollars. Hence, there is great interest in maximizing its impact, especially through the ripple effect. Outside Sandia, there is increased scrutiny of the program's performance to be sure that it is not a 'sandbox' in which researchers play without relevance to national security needs. Let us therefore address the performance of the LDRD Program in fiscal year 2003 and then show how it is designed to maximize impact.

  2. Smoking patterns among Los Alamos National Laboratory employees

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, M.C.; Wilkinson, G.S.

    1987-06-01

    Smoking patterns among 5507 employees at Los Alamos National Laboratory were investigated for those who underwent physical examinations by occupational physicians from 1978 to 1983. More male than female employees smoked, although differences in smoking rates between the sexes were not as large as differences observed for national smoking rates. Employees over 40 were more likely to smoke than younger employees, males consumed more cigarettes than did females, and Anglo employees smoked more cigarettes than did Hispanic employees. Highly educated employees smoked less than did less-educated workers, and staff members exhibited the lowest rates of smoking. Smoking cessation programs for Laboratory employees should be directed toward those subpopulations with the highest rates of smoking. 31 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Post-Cold War Science and Technology at Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, John C.

    2002-04-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory serves the nation through the development and application of leading-edge science and technology in support of national security. Our mission supports national security by: ensuring the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile; reducing the threat of weapons of mass destruction in support of counter terrorism and homeland defense; and solving national energy, environment, infrastructure, and health security problems. We require crosscutting fundamental and advanced science and technology research to accomplish our mission. The Stockpile Stewardship Program develops and applies, advanced experimental science, computational simulation, and technology to ensure the safety and reliability of U.S. nuclear weapons in the absence of nuclear testing. This effort in itself is a grand challenge. However, the terrorist attack of September 11, 2001, reminded us of the importance of robust and vibrant research and development capabilities to meet new and evolving threats to our national security. Today through rapid prototyping we are applying new, innovative, science and technology for homeland defense, to address the threats of nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons globally. Synergistically, with the capabilities that we require for our core mission, we contribute in many other areas of scientific endeavor. For example, our Laboratory has been part of the NASA effort on mapping water on the moon and NSF/DOE projects studying high-energy astrophysical phenomena, understanding fundamental scaling phenomena of life, exploring high-temperature superconductors, investigating quantum information systems, applying neutrons to condensed-matter and nuclear physics research, developing large-scale modeling and simulations to understand complex phenomena, and exploring nanoscience that bridges the atomic to macroscopic scales. In this presentation, I will highlight some of these post-cold war science and technology advances

  4. Environmental Programs at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Patricia

    2012-07-11

    Summary of this project is: (1) Teamwork, partnering to meet goals - (a) Building on cleanup successes, (b) Solving legacy waste problems, (c) Protecting the area's environment; (2) Strong performance over the past three years - (a) Credibility from four successful Recovery Act Projects, (b) Met all Consent Order milestones, (c) Successful ramp-up of TRU program; (3) Partnership between the National Nuclear Security Administration's Los Alamos Site Office, DOE Carlsbad Field Office, New Mexico Environment Department, and contractor staff enables unprecedented cleanup progress; (4) Continued focus on protecting water resources; and (5) All consent order commitments delivered on time or ahead of schedule.

  5. Biological assessment for the effluent reduction program, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, S.P.

    1996-08-01

    This report describes the biological assessment for the effluent recution program proposed to occur within the boundaries of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Potential effects on wetland plants and on threatened and endangered species are discussed, along with a detailed description of the individual outfalls resulting from the effluent reduction program.

  6. LAMPF II workshop, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, February 1-4, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Thiessen, H.A.

    1982-01-01

    This report contains the proceedings of the first LAMPF II Workshop held at Los Alamos February 1 to 4, 1982. Included are the talks that were available in written form. The conclusion of the participants was that there are many exciting areas of physics that will be addressed by such a machine.

  7. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Looney,J.P.; Fox, K.

    2009-04-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that maintains a primary mission focus the physical sciences, energy sciences, and life sciences, with additional expertise in environmental sciences, energy technologies, and national security. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal year 2008 budget was $531.6 million. There are about 2,800 employees, and another 4,300 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development,' April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Developlnent at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. Accordingly, this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2008. BNL expended $12 million during Fiscal Year 2008 in support of 69 projects. The program has two categories, the annual Open Call LDRDs and Strategic LDRDs, which combine to meet the overall objectives of the LDRD Program. Proposals are solicited annually for review and approval concurrent with the next fiscal year, October 1. For the open call for proposals, an LDRD Selection Committee, comprised of the Associate Laboratory Directors (ALDs) for the Scientific Directorates, an equal number of scientists recommended by the Brookhaven Council, plus the Assistant Laboratory Director for Policy and Strategic Planning, review the proposals submitted in response to the solicitation. The Open Can LDRD category emphasizes innovative research concepts

  8. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM ACTIVITIES FOR FY2002.

    SciTech Connect

    FOX,K.J.

    2002-12-31

    Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $450 million. There are about 3,000 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 4 1 3.2A, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' January 8, 2001, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence

  9. FY03 Engineering Technology Reports Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Minichino, C

    2004-03-05

    This report summarizes the science and technology research and development efforts in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Engineering Directorate for FY2003, and exemplifies Engineering's 50-year history of researching and developing the engineering technologies needed to support the Laboratory's missions. Engineering has been a partner in every major program and project at the Laboratory throughout its existence, and has prepared for this role with a skilled workforce and the technical resources developed through venues like the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD). This accomplishment is well summarized by Engineering's mission: ''Enable program success today and ensure the Laboratory's vitality tomorrow.'' Engineering's investment in technologies is carried out through two programs, the LDRD program and the ''Tech Base'' program. LDRD is the vehicle for creating those technologies and competencies that are cutting edge, or that require a significant level of research, or contain some unknown that needs to be fully understood. Tech Base is used to apply those technologies, or adapt them to a Laboratory need. The term commonly used for Tech Base projects is ''reduction to practice.'' Therefore, the LDRD report covered here has a strong research emphasis. Areas that are presented all fall into those needed to accomplish our mission. For FY2003, Engineering's LDRD projects were focused on mesoscale target fabrication and characterization, development of engineering computational capability, material studies and modeling, remote sensing and communications, and microtechnology and nanotechnology for national security applications. Engineering's five Centers, in partnership with the Division Leaders and Department Heads, are responsible for guiding the science and technology investments for the Directorate. The Centers represent technology areas that have been identified as critical for the present and future work of the Laboratory, and are

  10. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY2008 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kammeraad, J E; Jackson, K J; Sketchley, J A; Kotta, P R

    2009-03-24

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program, authorized by Congress in 1991 and administered by the Institutional Science and Technology Office at Lawrence Livermore, is our primary means for pursuing innovative, long-term, high-risk, and potentially high-payoff research that supports the full spectrum of national security interests encompassed by the missions of the Laboratory, the Department of Energy, and National Nuclear Security Administration. The accomplishments described in this annual report demonstrate the strong alignment of the LDRD portfolio with these missions and contribute to the Laboratory's success in meeting its goals. The LDRD budget of $91.5 million for fiscal year 2008 sponsored 176 projects. These projects were selected through an extensive peer-review process to ensure the highest scientific quality and mission relevance. Each year, the number of deserving proposals far exceeds the funding available, making the selection a tough one indeed. Our ongoing investments in LDRD have reaped long-term rewards for the Laboratory and the nation. Many Laboratory programs trace their roots to research thrusts that began several years ago under LDRD sponsorship. In addition, many LDRD projects contribute to more than one mission area, leveraging the Laboratory's multidisciplinary team approach to science and technology. Safeguarding the nation from terrorist activity and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction will be an enduring mission of this Laboratory, for which LDRD will continue to play a vital role. The LDRD Program is a success story. Our projects continue to win national recognition for excellence through prestigious awards, papers published in peer-reviewed journals, and patents granted. With its reputation for sponsoring innovative projects, the LDRD Program is also a major vehicle for attracting and retaining the best and the brightest technical staff and for establishing collaborations with universities

  11. Laboratory directed research and development FY98 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ayat, R; Holzrichter, J

    1999-05-01

    In 1984, Congress and the Department of Energy (DOE) established the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program to enable the director of a national laboratory to foster and expedite innovative research and development (R and D) in mission areas. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) continually examines these mission areas through strategic planning and shapes the LDRD Program to meet its long-term vision. The goal of the LDRD Program is to spur development of new scientific and technical capabilities that enable LLNL to respond to the challenges within its evolving mission areas. In addition, the LDRD Program provides LLNL with the flexibility to nurture and enrich essential scientific and technical competencies and enables the Laboratory to attract the most qualified scientists and engineers. The FY98 LDRD portfolio described in this annual report has been carefully structured to continue the tradition of vigorously supporting DOE and LLNL strategic vision and evolving mission areas. The projects selected for LDRD funding undergo stringent review and selection processes, which emphasize strategic relevance and require technical peer reviews of proposals by external and internal experts. These FY98 projects emphasize the Laboratory's national security needs: stewardship of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile, responsibility for the counter- and nonproliferation of weapons of mass destruction, development of high-performance computing, and support of DOE environmental research and waste management programs.

  12. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Ogeka, G.J.

    1991-12-01

    Today, new ideas and opportunities, fostering the advancement of technology, are occurring at an ever-increasing rate. It, therefore, seems appropriate that a vehicle be available which fosters the development of these new ideas and technologies, promotes the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and which develops new ``fundable`` R&D projects and programs. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor achieving and maintaining staff excellence, and a means to address national needs, with the overall mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals, and presentations at meetings and forums.

  13. Plans for an Ultra Cold Neutron source at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Seestrom, S.J.; Bowles, T.J.; Hill, R.; Greene, G.L.

    1996-10-01

    Ultra Cold Neutrons (UCN) can be produced at spallation sources using a variety of techniques. To date the technique used has been to Bragg scatter and Doppler shift cold neutrons into UCN from a moving crystal. This is particularly applicable to short-pulse spallation sources. We are presently constructing a UCN source at LANSCE using this method. In addition, large gains in UCN density should be possible using cryogenic UCN sources. Research is under way at Gatchina to demonstrate technical feasibility of a frozen deuterium source. If successful, a source of this type could be implemented at future spallation source, such as the long pulse source being planned at Los Alamos, with a UCN density that may be two orders of magnitude higher than that presently available at reactors.

  14. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Nuclear Science Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ronald Owen; Wender, Steve

    2015-06-19

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facilities for Nuclear Science consist of a high-energy "white" neutron source (Target 4) with 6 flight paths, three low-energy nuclear science flight paths at the Lujan Center, and a proton reaction area. The neutron beams produced at the Target 4 complement those produced at the Lujan Center because they are of much higher energy and have shorter pulse widths. The neutron sources are driven by the 800-MeV proton beam of the LANSCE linear accelerator. With these facilities, LANSCE is able to deliver neutrons with energies ranging from a milli-electron volt to several hundreds of MeV, as well as proton beams with a wide range of energy, time and intensity characteristics. The facilities, instruments and research programs are described briefly.

  15. Los Alamos Explosives Performance Key to Stockpile Stewardship

    ScienceCinema

    Dattelbaum, Dana

    2016-07-12

    As the U.S. Nuclear Deterrent ages, one essential factor in making sure that the weapons will continue to perform as designed is understanding the fundamental properties of the high explosives that are part of a nuclear weapons system. As nuclear weapons go through life extension programs, some changes may be advantageous, particularly through the addition of what are known as "insensitive" high explosives that are much less likely to accidentally detonate than the already very safe "conventional" high explosives that are used in most weapons. At Los Alamos National Laboratory explosives research includes a wide variety of both large- and small-scale experiments that include small contained detonations, gas and powder gun firings, larger outdoor detonations, large-scale hydrodynamic tests, and at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site, underground sub-critical experiments.

  16. Los Alamos Explosives Performance Key to Stockpile Stewardship

    SciTech Connect

    Dattelbaum, Dana

    2014-11-03

    As the U.S. Nuclear Deterrent ages, one essential factor in making sure that the weapons will continue to perform as designed is understanding the fundamental properties of the high explosives that are part of a nuclear weapons system. As nuclear weapons go through life extension programs, some changes may be advantageous, particularly through the addition of what are known as "insensitive" high explosives that are much less likely to accidentally detonate than the already very safe "conventional" high explosives that are used in most weapons. At Los Alamos National Laboratory explosives research includes a wide variety of both large- and small-scale experiments that include small contained detonations, gas and powder gun firings, larger outdoor detonations, large-scale hydrodynamic tests, and at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site, underground sub-critical experiments.

  17. Recent progress of the Los Alamos advanced free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Austin, R.H.; Chan, K.C.D.; Feldman, D.W.; Goldstein, J.C.; Gierman, S.M.; Kinross-Wright, J.M.; Kong, S.H.; Plato, J.G.; Russell, S.J.

    1994-05-01

    Many industrial and research applications can benefit from the availability of a compact, user-friendly, broadly tunable and high average power free electron laser (FEL). Over the past four years, the Los Alamos Advanced FEL has been built with these design goals. The key to a compact FEL is the integration of advanced beam technologies such as a high-brightness photoinjector, a high-gradient compact linac, and permanent magnet beamline components. These technologies enable the authors to shrink the FEL size yet maintain its high average power capability. The Advanced FEL has been in operation in the near ir (4-6 {mu}m) since early 1993. Recent results of the Advanced FEL lasing at saturation and upgrades to improve its average power are presented.

  18. University of New Mexico-Los Alamos National Laboratory Program in Volcanology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, F.; Fischer, T.; Baldridge, W.; Wohletz, K.; Smith, G.; Heiken, G.; Valentine, G.; Elston, W.

    2002-05-01

    The UNM-LANL Program in Volcanology was a vision of Wolf Elston in the late 1980s. Finally established in mid-1992, the program takes advantage of the extensive volcanic record preserved in northern New Mexico, and of the unique expertise and exceptional research facilities existing at the two institutions. Courses are directed toward upper division and graduate level students. The Los Alamos participants are adjunct professors and they take an active role in creating courses, advising thesis candidates, and providing research support. The curriculum is flexible but has a core upper division class in Physical Volcanology. Other classes offered in various years have included Volcanology and Human Affairs; Magmatic and Geothermal Systems; Tectonics and Magma Generation; Volcanoes of North America; Instrumentation for Volcanology; and Advanced Igneous Petrology. Perhaps the most renowned class in the program is the Volcanology Summer Field Course offered in even numbered years. This 3.5-week class is based in the Jemez Mountains volcanic field, which contains the famous Valles caldera (1.2 Ma to 50 ka). All types of calc-alkaline to alkalic domes, flows, tuffs, and intrusions, plus derivative sediments, mineralized zones, and thermal fluids are available for instructional purposes. Students are required to complete nine rigorous field exercises starting with basic instruction in pyroclastic fall, flow, and surge, then progressing towards hydrothermally altered, intracaldera resurgent dome and moat deposits in an active hot spring and fumarole system. The class is open to graduate students, advanced undergraduates, and private sector employees with special needs. Enrollment is competitive with limited financial support and limited space for 17 students. Evening lectures, study time, lodging, and meals are provided at the UNM-owned Young's Ranch built in the 1920s, nestled in a canyon flanked by orange cliffs of Bandelier Tuff. About 120 students from 12 countries have

  19. Providing Internet access to Los Alamos National Laboratory technical reports: A case history in providing public access to previously restricted documents

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, K.A.

    1996-12-31

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Research Library recently fulfilled a strategic goal of providing worldwide desktop access via the Internet to full-image files of the complete unclassified holdings of Los Alamos technical reports in its Report Collection. This effort began in late 1994 with the scanning of paper and microfiche format reports. Concurrently, the Research Library helped to initiate shifting the model for publishing new technical reports from paper to electronic; the files could then be directly mounted on the Research Library`s Web server. Providing desktop access to these reports was instrumental in expediting the development of internal policies that would better define what documents, previously restricted to the general public, could be publicly released. Undoubtedly, the most significant category of such reports were previously classified reports that had been declassified, but had not gone through a further review for public release. Collaboration with LANL`s Classification Group led to approval for public release of 97% of these reports. The LANL Research Library`s Web site now offers unique and unprecedented access to the world of a huge body of technical reports never available before anywhere in any form. This paper discusses the issues and steps involved in this achievement.

  20. DOE Los Alamos National Laboratory – PV Feasibility Assessment, 2015 Update, NREL Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, Jesse; Witt, Monica Rene

    2016-04-06

    This report summarizes solar and wind potential for Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This report is part of the “Los Alamos National Laboratory and Los Alamos County Renewable Generation” study.

  1. A Wildfire Behavior Modeling System at Los Alamos National Laboratory for Operational Applications

    SciTech Connect

    S.W. Koch; R.G.Balice

    2004-11-01

    To support efforts to protect facilities and property at Los Alamos National Laboratory from damages caused by wildfire, we completed a multiyear project to develop a system for modeling the behavior of wildfires in the Los Alamos region. This was accomplished by parameterizing the FARSITE wildfire behavior model with locally gathered data representing topography, fuels, and weather conditions from throughout the Los Alamos region. Detailed parameterization was made possible by an extensive monitoring network of permanent plots, weather towers, and other data collection facilities. We also incorporated a database of lightning strikes that can be used individually as repeatable ignition points or can be used as a group in Monte Carlo simulation exercises and in other randomization procedures. The assembled modeling system was subjected to sensitivity analyses and was validated against documented fires, including the Cerro Grande Fire. The resulting modeling system is a valuable tool for research and management. It also complements knowledge based on professional expertise and information gathered from other modeling technologies. However, the modeling system requires frequent updates of the input data layers to produce currently valid results, to adapt to changes in environmental conditions within the Los Alamos region, and to allow for the quick production of model outputs during emergency operations.

  2. 2015 Fermilab Laboratory Directed Research & Development Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, W.

    2016-05-26

    The Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is conducting a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program. Fiscal year 2015 represents the first full year of LDRD at Fermilab and includes seven projects approved mid-year in FY14 and six projects approved in FY15. One of the seven original projects has been completed just after the beginning of FY15. The implementation of LDRD at Fermilab is captured in the approved Fermilab 2015 LDRD Annual Program Plan. In FY15, the LDRD program represents 0.64% of Laboratory funding. The scope of the LDRD program at Fermilab will be established over the next couple of years where a portfolio of about 20 on-going projects representing approximately between 1% and 1.5% of the Laboratory funding is anticipated. This Annual Report focuses on the status of the current projects and provides an overview of the current status of LDRD at Fermilab.

  3. Los Alamos personnel and area criticality dosimeter systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilik, D.G.; Martin, R.W.

    1981-06-01

    Fissionable materials are handled and processed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Although the probability of a nuclear criticality accident is very remote, it must be considered. Los Alamos maintains a broad spectrum of dose assessment capabilities. This report describes the methods employed for personnel neutron, area neutron, and photon dose evaluations with passive dosimetry systems.

  4. The Climate at Los Alamos; Are we measurement changes?

    SciTech Connect

    Dewart, Jean Marie

    2015-04-16

    A new report shows new graphic displays of the weather trends in Los Alamos, New Mexico, and at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The graphs show trends of average, minimum average, and maximum average temperature for summer and winter months going back decades. Records of summer and winter precipitation are also included in the report.

  5. Audit of personal property management at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-07

    The Department of Energy`s (Department) Albuquerque Operations Office (Albuquerque) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) are responsible for ensuring that Los Alamos maintains an efficient and effective personal property management system that protects, identifies, and controls Government-owned personal property in accordance with applicable regulations. Albuquerque is responsible for reviewing and approving Los Alamos` personal property management system. Los Alamos is responsible for ensuring that personal property is properly protected, identified, and controlled. The audit disclosed that Los Alamos did not have an efficient and effective personal property management system to ensure that personal property was adequately protected, identified, and controlled. In addition, Albuquerque did not approve or disapprove Los Alamos` personal property management system consistent with Federal and Department regulations. Specifically, the audit showed that Los Alamos did not account for $11.6 million of personal property. In addition, $22.2 million of personal property was not properly recorded in the database, $61.7 million of personal property could not be inventoried, and loans to employees and other entities were not adequately justified. As a result, from a total personal property inventory of approximately $1 billion, it is estimated that $100 million of personal property may not be accounted for, and $207 million may not be correctly recorded in the database. Moreover, substantial amounts of personal property on loan to employees and other entities were at risk of unauthorized use. Albuquerque concurred with the finding and agreed to implement the corrective actions recommended in the report.

  6. Investment horizon heterogeneity and wavelet: Overview and further research directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Anindya; De, Anupam; Gunasekaran, Angappa; Dubey, Rameshwar

    2015-07-01

    Wavelet based multi-scale analysis of financial time series has attracted much attention, lately, from both the academia and practitioners from all around the world. The unceasing metamorphosis of the discipline of finance from its humble beginning as applied economics to the more sophisticated depiction as applied physics and applied psychology has revolutionized the way we perceive the market and its complexities. One such complexity is the presence of heterogeneous horizon agents in the market. In this context, we have performed a generous review of different aspects of horizon heterogeneity that has been successfully elucidated through the synergy between wavelet theory and finance. The evolution of wavelet has been succinctly delineated to bestow necessary information to the readers who are new to this field. The migration of wavelet into finance and its subsequent branching into different sub-divisions have been sketched. The pertinent literature on the impact of horizon heterogeneity on risk, asset pricing and inter-dependencies of the financial time series are explored. The significant contributions are collated and classified in accordance to their purpose and approach so that potential researcher and practitioners, interested in this subject, can be benefited. Future research possibilities in the direction of "agency cost mitigation" and "synergy between econophysics and behavioral finance in stock market forecasting" are also suggested in the paper.

  7. Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders: Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Gary C.; Gonzalez, Yoly M.; Ohrbach, Richard; Truelove, Edmond L.; Sommers, Earl; Look, John O.; Schiffman, Eric L.

    2011-01-01

    The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) Validation Project provided the first comprehensive assessment of reliability and validity of the original Axis I and II. In addition, Axis I of the RDC/TMD was revised with estimates of reliability and validity. These findings are reported in previous papers. Further revisions for Axis I and II are presented for consideration by the TMD research and clinical communities. Potential Axis I revisions include addressing concerns with orofacial pain differential diagnosis and changes in nomenclature in an attempt to provide improved consistency with other musculoskeletal diagnostic systems. In addition, expansion of the RDC/TMD to include the less common TMD conditions and disorders would make it more comprehensive and clinically useful. The original standards for diagnostic sensitivity (≤0.70) and specificity (≤0.95) should be reconsidered to reflect changes in the field since the RDC/TMD was published in 1992. Pertaining to Axis II, current recommendations for all chronic pain conditions include standardized instruments and expansion of the domains assessed. In addition there is need for improved clinical efficiency of Axis II instruments and exploring methods to better integrate Axis I and II in clinical settings. To that end, this paper recommends an international symposium to provide future direction. PMID:20213033

  8. [New directions of research related to chronic wound healing].

    PubMed

    Rusak, Agnieszka; Rybak, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Optimal nutrition, immunological state and psychological condition play an important role in the process of chronic wound healing. Infections caused by pathogens resistant to commonly used antibiotics additionally complicate and disturb regeneration of wounds. As part of the treatment, modern wound dressings are used, for example designed on the basis of alginates, dextranomers, hydrogels, hydrofiber, polyurethanes foams, hydrocolloids and liquids for wound debridement such us 0.9% NaCl, the PWE liquid, Ringer's liquid, octenidine. Owing to their features, treatment in accordance with TIME concept could be realized, because they provide moisture wound bed, protection against contamination, gas exchange, protection of wound edges and infection control. Repairing process in chronic wounds is dependent on blood flow in tissues, which may be insufficient. The result is a permanent hypoxia. Natural occurring antioxidants are becoming more crucial in chronic wound treatment. They decrease oxygen radical concentration, increase angiogenesis, reduce inflammatory response, stimulate fibroblasts and keratinocytes proliferation, possess antibacterial properties against chemotherapeutic resistant strains. There are a lot of antioxidants in honey, papaya fruit (Carrica papaia L.), transgenic flax (Linum usitatissimum), and in orange oil (Citrus sinensis), stem of acanthus (Acanthus ebracteatus), leafs of tea (Camellia sinensis). Application of biologically active, natural derived compounds is nowadays a direction of intense in vitro and in vivo research focused on the chronic wound treatment. Results suggest beneficial influence of antioxidant on wound repairing process. Clinical research are needed to state effective influence of natural compound in the chronic wound treatment.

  9. Laboratory Directed Research and Development 1998 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Pam Hughes; Sheila Bennett eds.

    1999-07-14

    The Laboratory's Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program encourages the advancement of science and the development of major new technical capabilities from which future research and development will grow. Through LDRD funding, Pacific Northwest continually replenishes its inventory of ideas that have the potential to address major national needs. The LDRD program has enabled the Laboratory to bring to bear its scientific and technical capabilities on all of DOE's missions, particularly in the arena of environmental problems. Many of the concepts related to environmental cleanup originally developed with LDRD funds are now receiving programmatic support from DOE, LDRD-funded work in atmospheric sciences is now being applied to DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program. We also have used concepts initially explored through LDRD to develop several winning proposals in the Environmental Management Science Program. The success of our LDRD program is founded on good management practices that ensure funding is allocated and projects are conducted in compliance with DOE requirements. We thoroughly evaluate the LDRD proposals based on their scientific and technical merit, as well as their relevance to DOE's programmatic needs. After a proposal is funded, we assess progress annually using external peer reviews. This year, as in years past, the LDRD program has once again proven to be the major enabling vehicle for our staff to formulate new ideas, advance scientific capability, and develop potential applications for DOE's most significant challenges.

  10. Munchausen by Internet: Current Research and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jacqui

    2012-01-01

    about their health in the online environment. We also suggest directions for future research. PMID:22914203

  11. Laboratory directed research and development program FY 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Todd

    2004-03-27

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. In FY03, Berkeley Lab was authorized by DOE to establish a funding ceiling for the LDRD program of $15.0 M, which equates to about 3.2% of Berkeley Lab's FY03 projected operating and capital equipment budgets. This funding level was provided to develop new scientific ideas and opportunities and allow the Berkeley Lab Director an opportunity to initiate new directions. Budget constraints limited available resources, however, so only $10.1 M was expended for operating and $0.6 M for capital equipment (2.4% of actual Berkeley Lab FY03 costs). In FY03, scientists submitted 168 proposals, requesting over $24.2 M in operating funding. Eighty-two projects were funded, with awards ranging from $45 K to $500 K. These projects are summarized in Table 1.

  12. Advancing vector biology research: a community survey for future directions, research applications and infrastructure requirements.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Alain; Pondeville, Emilie; Schnettler, Esther; Crisanti, Andrea; Supparo, Clelia; Christophides, George K; Kersey, Paul J; Maslen, Gareth L; Takken, Willem; Koenraadt, Constantianus J M; Oliva, Clelia F; Busquets, Núria; Abad, F Xavier; Failloux, Anna-Bella; Levashina, Elena A; Wilson, Anthony J; Veronesi, Eva; Pichard, Maëlle; Arnaud Marsh, Sarah; Simard, Frédéric; Vernick, Kenneth D

    2016-01-01

    Vector-borne pathogens impact public health, animal production, and animal welfare. Research on arthropod vectors such as mosquitoes, ticks, sandflies, and midges which transmit pathogens to humans and economically important animals is crucial for development of new control measures that target transmission by the vector. While insecticides are an important part of this arsenal, appearance of resistance mechanisms is increasingly common. Novel tools for genetic manipulation of vectors, use of Wolbachia endosymbiotic bacteria, and other biological control mechanisms to prevent pathogen transmission have led to promising new intervention strategies, adding to strong interest in vector biology and genetics as well as vector-pathogen interactions. Vector research is therefore at a crucial juncture, and strategic decisions on future research directions and research infrastructure investment should be informed by the research community. A survey initiated by the European Horizon 2020 INFRAVEC-2 consortium set out to canvass priorities in the vector biology research community and to determine key activities that are needed for researchers to efficiently study vectors, vector-pathogen interactions, as well as access the structures and services that allow such activities to be carried out. We summarize the most important findings of the survey which in particular reflect the priorities of researchers in European countries, and which will be of use to stakeholders that include researchers, government, and research organizations.

  13. Low Energy Accelerator Laboratory Technical Area 53, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes the potential environmental impacts that would be expected to occur if the Department of Energy (DOE) were to construct and operate a small research and development laboratory building at Technical Area (TA) 53 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, New Mexico. DOE proposes to construct a small building to be called the Low Energy Accelerator Laboratory (LEAL), at a previously cleared, bladed, and leveled quarter-acre site next to other facilities housing linear accelerator research activities at TA-53. Operations proposed for LEAL would consist of bench-scale research, development, and testing of the initial section of linear particle accelerators. This initial section consists of various components that are collectively called an injector system. The anticipated life span of the proposed development program would be about 15 years.

  14. Portable MRI developed at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle

    2015-04-22

    Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory are developing an ultra-low-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system that could be low-power and lightweight enough for forward deployment on the battlefield and to field hospitals in the World's poorest regions. "MRI technology is a powerful medical diagnostic tool," said Michelle Espy, the Battlefield MRI (bMRI) project leader, "ideally suited for imaging soft-tissue injury, particularly to the brain." But hospital-based MRI devices are big and expensive, and require considerable infrastructure, such as large quantities of cryogens like liquid nitrogen and helium, and they typically use a large amount of energy. "Standard MRI machines just can't go everywhere," said Espy. "Soldiers wounded in battle usually have to be flown to a large hospital and people in emerging nations just don't have access to MRI at all. We've been in contact with doctors who routinely work in the Third World and report that MRI would be extremely valuable in treating pediatric encephalopathy, and other serious diseases in children." So the Los Alamos team started thinking about a way to make an MRI device that could be relatively easy to transport, set up, and use in an unconventional setting. Conventional MRI machines use very large magnetic fields that align the protons in water molecules to then create magnetic resonance signals, which are detected by the machine and turned into images. The large magnetic fields create exceptionally detailed images, but they are difficult and expensive to make. Espy and her team wanted to see if images of sufficient quality could be made with ultra-low-magnetic fields, similar in strength to the Earth's magnetic field. To achieve images at such low fields they use exquisitely sensitive detectors called Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices, or SQUIDs. SQUIDs are among the most sensitive magnetic field detectors available, so interference with the signal is the primary stumbling block. "SQUIDs are

  15. Portable MRI developed at Los Alamos

    ScienceCinema

    Espy, Michelle

    2016-07-12

    Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory are developing an ultra-low-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system that could be low-power and lightweight enough for forward deployment on the battlefield and to field hospitals in the World's poorest regions. "MRI technology is a powerful medical diagnostic tool," said Michelle Espy, the Battlefield MRI (bMRI) project leader, "ideally suited for imaging soft-tissue injury, particularly to the brain." But hospital-based MRI devices are big and expensive, and require considerable infrastructure, such as large quantities of cryogens like liquid nitrogen and helium, and they typically use a large amount of energy. "Standard MRI machines just can't go everywhere," said Espy. "Soldiers wounded in battle usually have to be flown to a large hospital and people in emerging nations just don't have access to MRI at all. We've been in contact with doctors who routinely work in the Third World and report that MRI would be extremely valuable in treating pediatric encephalopathy, and other serious diseases in children." So the Los Alamos team started thinking about a way to make an MRI device that could be relatively easy to transport, set up, and use in an unconventional setting. Conventional MRI machines use very large magnetic fields that align the protons in water molecules to then create magnetic resonance signals, which are detected by the machine and turned into images. The large magnetic fields create exceptionally detailed images, but they are difficult and expensive to make. Espy and her team wanted to see if images of sufficient quality could be made with ultra-low-magnetic fields, similar in strength to the Earth's magnetic field. To achieve images at such low fields they use exquisitely sensitive detectors called Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices, or SQUIDs. SQUIDs are among the most sensitive magnetic field detectors available, so interference with the signal is the primary stumbling block. "SQUIDs are

  16. Idaho National Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY-2009

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-03-01

    The FY 2009 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Annual Report is a compendium of the diverse research performed to develop and ensure the INL's technical capabilities can support the future DOE missions and national research priorities. LDRD is essential to the INL - it provides a means for the laboratory to pursue novel scientific and engineering research in areas that are deemed too basic or risky for programmatic investments. This research enhances technical capabilities at the laboratory, providing scientific and engineering staff with opportunities for skill building and partnership development. Established by Congress in 1991, LDRD proves its benefit each year through new programs, intellectual property, patents, copyrights, publications, national and international awards, and new hires from the universities and industry, which helps refresh the scientific and engineering workforce. The benefits of INL's LDRD research are many as shown in the tables below. Last year, 91 faculty members from various universities contributed to LDRD research, along with 7 post docs and 64 students. Of the total invention disclosures submitted in FY 2009, 7 are attributable to LDRD research. Sixty three refereed journal articles were accepted or published, and 93 invited presentations were attributable to LDRD research conducted in FY 2009. The LDRD Program is administered in accordance with requirements set in DOE Order 413.2B, accompanying contractor requirements, and other DOE and federal requirements invoked through the INL contract. The LDRD Program is implemented in accordance with the annual INL LDRD Program Plan, which is approved by the DOE, Nuclear Energy Program Secretarial Office. This plan outlines the method the laboratory uses to develop its research portfolio, including peer and management reviews, and the use of other INL management systems to ensure quality, financial, safety, security and environmental requirements and risks are appropriately

  17. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2005 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoreen, Terrence P

    2006-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (January 8, 2001), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report describes all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2005 and includes final reports for completed projects and shorter progress reports for projects that were active, but not completed, during this period. The FY 2005 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2006/2) provides financial data about the FY 2005 projects and an internal evaluation of the program's management process. ORNL is a DOE multiprogram science, technology, and energy laboratory with distinctive capabilities in materials science and engineering, neutron science and technology, energy production and end-use technologies, biological and environmental science, and scientific computing. With these capabilities ORNL conducts basic and applied research and development (R&D) to support DOE's overarching national security mission, which encompasses science, energy resources, environmental quality, and national nuclear security. As a national resource, the Laboratory also applies its capabilities and skills to the specific needs of other federal agencies and customers through the DOE Work For Others (WFO) program. Information about the Laboratory and its programs is available on the Internet at . LDRD is a relatively small but vital DOE program that allows ORNL, as well as other multiprogram DOE laboratories, to select a limited number of R&D projects for the purpose of: (1) maintaining the scientific and technical vitality of the Laboratory; (2) enhancing

  18. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2007 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoreen, Terrence P

    2008-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries for all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2007. The associated FY 2007 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2008/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program's management process. ORNL is a DOE multiprogram science, technology, and energy laboratory with distinctive capabilities in materials science and engineering, neutron science and technology, energy production and end-use technologies, biological and environmental science, and scientific computing. With these capabilities ORNL conducts basic and applied research and development (R&D) to support DOE's overarching mission to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States and promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission. As a national resource, the Laboratory also applies its capabilities and skills to specific needs of other federal agencies and customers through the DOE Work for Others (WFO) program. Information about the Laboratory and its programs is available on the Internet at http://www.ornl.gov/. LDRD is a relatively small but vital DOE program that allows ORNL, as well as other DOE laboratories, to select a limited number of R&D projects for the purpose of: (1) maintaining the scientific and technical vitality of the Laboratory; (2) enhancing the Laboratory's ability to address future DOE missions; (3) fostering creativity and stimulating exploration of forefront science

  19. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2004 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoreen, Terrence P

    2005-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (January 8, 2001), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report describes all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2004 and includes final reports for completed projects and shorter progress reports for projects that were active, but not completed, during this period. The FY 2004 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2005/2) provides financial data about the FY 2004 projects and an internal evaluation of the program's management process. ORNL is a DOE multiprogram science, technology, and energy laboratory with distinctive capabilities in materials science and engineering, neutron science and technology, energy production and end-use technologies, biological and environmental science, and scientific computing. With these capabilities ORNL conducts basic and applied research and development (R&D) to support DOE's overarching national security mission, which encompasses science, energy resources, environmental quality, and national nuclear security. As a national resource, the Laboratory also applies its capabilities and skills to the specific needs of other federal agencies and customers through the DOE Work For Others (WFO) program. Information about the Laboratory and its programs is available on the Internet at . LDRD is a relatively small but vital DOE program that allows ORNL, as well as other multiprogram DOE laboratories, to select a limited number of R&D projects for the purpose of: (1) maintaining the scientific and technical vitality of the Laboratory; (2) enhancing

  20. FY04 Engineering Technology Reports Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, R M

    2005-01-27

    This report summarizes the science and technology research and development efforts in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Engineering Directorate for FY2004, and exemplifies Engineering's more than 50-year history of developing the technologies needed to support the Laboratory's missions. Engineering has been a partner in every major program and project at the Laboratory throughout its existence and has prepared for this role with a skilled workforce and the technical resources developed through venues like the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD). This accomplishment is well summarized by Engineering's mission: ''Enable program success today and ensure the Laboratory's vitality tomorrow''. Engineering's investment in technologies is carried out through two programs, the ''Tech Base'' program and the LDRD program. LDRD is the vehicle for creating those technologies and competencies that are cutting edge. These require a significant level of research or contain some unknown that needs to be fully understood. Tech Base is used to apply technologies to a Laboratory need. The term commonly used for Tech Base projects is ''reduction to practice''. Therefore, the LDRD report covered here has a strong research emphasis. Areas that are presented all fall into those needed to accomplish our mission. For FY2004, Engineering's LDRD projects were focused on mesoscale target fabrication and characterization, development of engineering computational capability, material studies and modeling, remote sensing and communications, and microtechnology and nanotechnology for national security applications. Engineering's five Centers, in partnership with the Division Leaders and Department Heads, are responsible for guiding the long-term science and technology investments for the Directorate. The Centers represent technologies that have been identified as critical for the present and future work of the Laboratory, and are chartered to develop their respective

  1. Artificial intelligence and design: Opportunities, research problems and directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amarel, Saul

    1990-01-01

    that are of intrinsic concern to AI. We present examples of current AI work on specific design tasks, and discuss new directions of research, both as extensions of current work and in the context of new design tasks where domain knowledge is either intractable or incomplete. The domains discussed include Digital Circuit Design, Mechanical Design of Rotational Transmissions, Design of Computer Architectures, Marine Design, Aircraft Design, and Design of Chemical Processes and Materials. Work in these domains is significant on technical grounds, and it is also important for economic and policy reasons.

  2. Preparation of fused chloride salts for use in pyrochemical plutonium recovery operations at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Fife, K.W.; Bowersox, D.F.; Christensen, D.C.; Williams, J.D.

    1986-07-01

    The Plutonium Metal Technology Group at Los Alamos routinely uses pyrochemical processes to produce and purify plutonium from impure sources. The basic processes (metal production, metal purification, and residue treatment) involve controlling oxidation and reduction reactions between plutonium and its compounds in molten salts. Current production methods are described, as well as traditional approaches and recent developments in the preparation of solvent salts for electrorefining, molten salt extraction, lean metal (pyroredox) purification, and direct oxide reduction.

  3. 2016 Fermilab Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    W. Wester

    2016-05-25

    Fermilab is executing Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) as outlined by order DOE O 413.2B in order to enhance and realize the mission of the laboratory in a manner that also supports the laboratory’s strategic objectives and the mission of the Department of Energy. LDRD funds enable scientific creativity, allow for exploration of “high risk, high payoff” research, and allow for the demonstration of new ideas, technical concepts, and devices. LDRD also has an objective of maintaining and enhancing the scientific and technical vitality of Fermilab. LDRD is able to fund employee-initiated proposals that address the current strategic objectives and better position Fermilab for future mission needs. The request for such funds is made in consideration of the investment needs, affordability, and directives from DOE and Congress. Review procedures of the proposals will insure that those proposals which most address the strategic goals of the DOE and the Laboratory or which best position Fermilab for the future will be recommended to the Laboratory Director who has responsibility for approval. The execution of each approved project will be the responsibility of the Principal Investigator, PI, who will follow existing Laboratory guidelines to ensure compliance with safety, environmental, and quality assurance practices. A Laboratory Director-appointed LDRD Coordinator will work with Committees, Laboratory Management, other Fermilab Staff, and the PI’s to oversee the implementation of policies and procedures of LDRD and provide the management and execution of this Annual Program Plan. FY16 represents third fiscal year in which LDRD has existed at Fermilab. The number of preliminary proposals (117) submitted in response to the LDRD Call for Proposals indicates very strong interest of the program within the Fermilab community. The first two Calls have resulted in thirteen active LDRD projects – and it is expected that between five and seven new

  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory transuranic database analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, D.V.; Rogers, P.S.Z.; Kosiewicz, S.T.; LeBrun, D.B.

    1997-02-01

    This paper represents an overview of analyses conducted on the TRU database maintained by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This evaluation was conducted to support the ``TRU Waste Workoff Strategies`` document and provides an estimation of the waste volume that potentially could be certified and ready for shipment to (WIPP) in April of 1998. Criteria defined in the WIPP WAC, including container type, weight limits, plutonium fissile gram equivalents and decay heat, were used to evaluated the waste for compliance. LANL evaluated the containers by facility and by waste stream to determining the most efficient plan for characterization and certification of the waste. Evaluation of the waste presently in storage suggested that 40- 60% potentially meets the WIPP WAC Rev. 5 criteria.

  5. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    This report documents the environmental surveillance program conducted by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) in 1979. Routine monitoring for radiation and radioactive or chemical substances was conducted on the Laboratory site and in the surrounding region to determine compliance with appropriate standards and permit early identification of possible undesirable trends. Results and interpretation of the data for 1979 on penetrating radiation, chemical and radiochemical quality of ambient air, surface and ground water, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, food, and airborne and liquid effluents are included. Comparisons with appropriate standards and regulations or with background levels from natural or other non-LASL sources provide a basis for concluding that environmental effects attributable to LASL operations are minor and cannot be considered likely to result in any hazard to the population of the area. Results of several special studies provide documentation of some unique environmental conditions in the LASL environs.

  6. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1987. Routine monitoring for radiation and radioactive or chemical materials is conducted on the Laboratory site as well as in the surrounding region. Monitoring results are used to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to permit early identification of potentially undesirable trends. Results and interpretation of data for 1987 cover: external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and liquid effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface and ground waters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Comparisons with appropriate standards, regulations, and background levels provide the basis for concluding that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are insignificant and do not pose a threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment. 113 refs., 33 figs., 120 tabs.

  7. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1989. Routine monitoring for radiation and radioactive or chemical materials is conducted on the Laboratory site as well as in the surrounding region. Monitoring results are used to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to permit early identification of potentially undesirable trends. Results and interpretation of data for 1989 cover external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface and ground waters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Comparisons with appropriate standards, regulations, and background levels provide the basis for concluding that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment. 58 refs., 31 figs., 39 tabs.

  8. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) during 1995. The Laboratory routinely monitors for radiation and for radioactive and nonradioactive materials at (or on) Laboratory sites as well as in the surrounding region. LANL uses the monitoring result to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to identify potentially undesirable trends. Data were collected in 1995 to assess external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and liquid effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface waters and groundwaters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Using comparisons with standards, regulations, and background levels, this report concludes that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a demonstrable threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment.

  9. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Kohen, K.; Stoker, A.; Stone, G.

    1994-07-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program at Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1992. The Laboratory routinely monitors for radiation and for radioactive and nonradioactive materials at (or on) Laboratory sites as well as in the surrounding region. LANL uses the monitoring results to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to identify potentially undesirable trends. Data were collected in 1992 to assess external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and liquid effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface waters and groundwaters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Using comparisons with standards, regulations, and background levels, this report concludes that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a demonstrable threat to the public, laboratory employees, or the environment.

  10. Laboratory directed research and development fy1999 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ayat, R A

    2000-04-11

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was founded in 1952 and has been managed since its inception by the University of California (UC) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Because of this long association with UC, the Laboratory has been able to recruit a world-class workforce, establish an atmosphere of intellectual freedom and innovation, and achieve recognition in relevant fields of knowledge as a scientific and technological leader. This environment and reputation are essential for sustained scientific and technical excellence. As a DOE national laboratory with about 7,000 employees, LLNL has an essential and compelling primary mission to ensure that the nation's nuclear weapons remain safe, secure, and reliable and to prevent the spread and use of nuclear weapons worldwide. The Laboratory receives funding from the DOE Assistant Secretary for Defense Programs, whose focus is stewardship of our nuclear weapons stockpile. Funding is also provided by the Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, many Department of Defense sponsors, other federal agencies, and the private sector. As a multidisciplinary laboratory, LLNL has applied its considerable skills in high-performance computing, advanced engineering, and the management of large research and development projects to become the science and technology leader in those areas of its mission responsibility. The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program was authorized by the U.S. Congress in 1984. The Program allows the Director of each DOE laboratory to fund advanced, creative, and innovative research and development (R&D) activities that will ensure scientific and technical vitality in the continually evolving mission areas at DOE and the Laboratory. In addition, the LDRD Program provides LLNL with the flexibility to nurture and enrich essential scientific and technical competencies, which attract the most qualified scientists and engineers. The LDRD Program also

  11. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY2011 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, W; Sketchley, J; Kotta, P

    2012-03-22

    A premier applied-science laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has earned the reputation as a leader in providing science and technology solutions to the most pressing national and global security problems. The LDRD Program, established by Congress at all DOE national laboratories in 1991, is LLNL's most important single resource for fostering excellent science and technology for today's needs and tomorrow's challenges. The LDRD internally directed research and development funding at LLNL enables high-risk, potentially high-payoff projects at the forefront of science and technology. The LDRD Program at Livermore serves to: (1) Support the Laboratory's missions, strategic plan, and foundational science; (2) Maintain the Laboratory's science and technology vitality; (3) Promote recruiting and retention; (4) Pursue collaborations; (5) Generate intellectual property; and (6) Strengthen the U.S. economy. Myriad LDRD projects over the years have made important contributions to every facet of the Laboratory's mission and strategic plan, including its commitment to nuclear, global, and energy and environmental security, as well as cutting-edge science and technology and engineering in high-energy-density matter, high-performance computing and simulation, materials and chemistry at the extremes, information systems, measurements and experimental science, and energy manipulation. A summary of each project was submitted by the principal investigator. Project summaries include the scope, motivation, goals, relevance to DOE/NNSA and LLNL mission areas, the technical progress achieved in FY11, and a list of publications that resulted from the research. The projects are: (1) Nuclear Threat Reduction; (2) Biosecurity; (3) High-Performance Computing and Simulation; (4) Intelligence; (5) Cybersecurity; (6) Energy Security; (7) Carbon Capture; (8) Material Properties, Theory, and Design; (9) Radiochemistry; (10) High-Energy-Density Science; (11) Laser Inertial

  12. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Fuehne, David; Gallagher, Pat; Hjeresen, Denny; Isaacson, John; Johson, Scot; Morgan, Terry; Paulson, David; Rogers, David

    2009-09-30

    Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos reports are prepared annually by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) Environmental Programs Directorate, as required by US Department of Energy Order 450.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and US Department of Energy Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. These annual reports summarize environmental data that are used to determine compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and departmental policies. Additional data, beyond the minimum required, are also gathered and reported as part of the Laboratory’s efforts to ensure public safety and to monitor environmental quality at and near the Laboratory. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the Laboratory’s major environmental programs and explains the risks and the actions taken to reduce risks at the Laboratory from environmental legacies and waste management operations. Chapter 2 reports the Laboratory’s compliance status for 2007. Chapter 3 provides a summary of the maximum radiological dose the public and biota populations could have potentially received from Laboratory operations and discusses chemical exposures. The environmental surveillance and monitoring data are organized by environmental media (Chapter 4, air; Chapters 5 and 6, water and sediments; Chapter 7, soils; and Chapter 8, foodstuffs and biota) in a format to meet the needs of a general and scientific audience. Chapter 9 provides a summary of the status of environmental restoration work around LANL. A glossary and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are in the back of the report. Appendix A explains the standards for environmental contaminants, Appendix B explains the units of measurements used in this report, Appendix C describes the Laboratory’s technical areas and their associated programs, and Appendix D provides web links to more information.

  13. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Fuehne, David; Poff, Ben; Hjeresen, Denny; Isaacson, John; Johnson, Scot; Morgan, Terry; Paulson, David; Salzman, Sonja; Rogers, David

    2010-09-30

    Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos reports are prepared annually by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) environmental organization, as required by US Department of Energy Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and US Department of Energy Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. These annual reports summarize environmental data that are used to determine compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and departmental policies. Additional data, beyond the minimum required, are also gathered and reported as part of the Laboratory’s efforts to ensure public safety and to monitor environmental quality at and near the Laboratory. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the Laboratory’s major environmental programs and explains the risks and the actions taken to reduce risks at the Laboratory from environmental legacies and waste management operations. Chapter 2 reports the Laboratory’s compliance status for 2009. Chapter 3 provides a summary of the maximum radiological dose the public and biota populations could have potentially received from Laboratory operations and discusses chemical exposures. The environmental surveillance and monitoring data are organized by environmental media (air in Chapter 4; water and sediments in Chapters 5 and 6; soils in Chapter 7; and foodstuffs and biota in Chapter 8) in a format to meet the needs of a general and scientific audience. Chapter 9 provides a summary of the status of environmental restoration work around LANL. The new Chapter 10 describes the Laboratory’s environmental stewardship efforts and provides an overview of the health of the Rio Grande. A glossary and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are in the back of the report. Appendix A explains the standards for environmental contaminants, Appendix B explains the units of measurements used in this report, Appendix C describes the Laboratory’s technical

  14. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 2005

    SciTech Connect

    2006-09-30

    Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos reports are prepared annually by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) environmental organization, as required by US Department of Energy Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and US Department of Energy Order 231.IA, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. These annual reports summarize environmental data that are used to determine compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and departmental policies. Additional data, beyond the minimum required, are also gathered and reported as part of the Laboratory's efforts to ensure public safety and to monitor environmental quality at and near the Laboratory. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the Laboratory's major environmental programs. Chapter 2 reports the Laboratory's compliance status for 2005. Chapter 3 provides a summary of the maximum radiological dose the public and biota populations could have potentially received from Laboratory operations. The environmental surveillance and monitoring data are organized by environmental media (Chapter 4, Air; Chapters 5 and 6, Water and Sediments; Chapter 7, Soils; and Chapter 8, Foodstuffs and Biota) in a format to meet the needs of a general and scientific audience. Chapter 9, new for this year, provides a summary of the status of environmental restoration work around LANL. A glossary and a list ofacronyms and abbreviations are in the back of the report. Appendix A explains the standards for environmental contaminants, Appendix B explains the units of measurements used in this report, Appendix C describes the Laboratory's technical areas and their associated programs, and Appendix D provides web links to more information.

  15. Environmental analysis of Lower Pueblo/Lower Los Alamos Canyon, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Buhl, T.E.; Stoker, A.K.; Becker, N.M.; Rodgers, J.C.; Hansen, W.R.

    1994-12-01

    The radiological survey of the former radioactive waste treatment plant site (TA-45), Acid Canyon, Pueblo Canyon, and Los Alamos Canyon found residual contamination at the site itself and in the channel and banks of Acid, Pueblo, and lower Los Alamos Canyons all the way to the Rio Grande. The largest reservoir of residual radioactivity is in lower Pueblo Canyon, which is on DOE property. However, residual radioactivity does not exceed proposed cleanup criteria in either lower Pueblo or lower Los Alamos Canyons. The three alternatives proposed are (1) to take no action, (2) to construct a sediment trap in lower Pueblo Canyon to prevent further transport of residual radioactivity onto San Ildefonso Indian Pueblo land, and (3) to clean the residual radioactivity from the canyon system. Alternative 2, to cleanup the canyon system, is rejected as a viable alternative. Thousands of truckloads of sediment would have to be removed and disposed of, and this effort is unwarranted by the low levels of contamination present. Residual radioactivity levels, under either present conditions or projected future conditions, will not result in significant radiation doses to persons exposed. Modeling efforts show that future transport activity will not result in any residual radioactivity concentrations higher than those already existing. Thus, although construction of a sediment trap in lower Pueblo Canyon is a viable alternative, this effort also is unwarranted, and the no-action alternative is the preferred alternative.

  16. Center for Materials Science, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Status report, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Parkin, D.M.; Boring, A.M.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Center for Materials Science (CMS) from October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991, and is the nineth such annual report. It has been a year of remarkable progress in building the programs of the Center. The extent of this progress is described in detail. The CMS was established to enhance the contribution of materials science and technology to the Laboratory`s defense, energy and scientific missions, and the Laboratory. In carrying out these responsibilities it has accepted four demanding missions: (1) Build a core group of highly rated, established materials scientists and solid state physicists. (2) Promote and support top quality, interdisciplinary materials research programs at Los Alamos. (3) Strengthen the interactions of materials science and Los Alamos with the external materials science community. and (4) Establish and maintain modern materials research facilities in a readily accessible, central location.

  17. Assessment of research directions for high-voltage direct-current power systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Long, W F

    1982-09-01

    High voltage direct current (HVDC) power transmission continues to be an emerging technology nearly thirty years after its introduction into modern power systems. To date its use has been restricted to either specialized applications having identifiable economic advantages (e.g., breakeven distance) or, rarely, applications where decoupling is needed. Only recently have the operational advantages (e.g., power modulation) of HVDC been realized on operating systems. A research project whose objective was to identify hardware developments and, where appropriate, system applications which can exemplify cost and operational advantages of integrated ac/dc power systems is discussed. The three principal tasks undertaken were: assessment of equipment developments; quantification of operational advantages; and interaction with system planners. Interest in HVDC power transmission has increased markedly over the past several years, and many new systems are now being investigated. The dissemination of information about HVDC, including specifically the symposium undertaken for Task 3, is a critical factor in fostering an understanding of this important adjunct to ac power transmission.

  18. Operational status and life extension plans for the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE)

    SciTech Connect

    Garnett, Robert W; Gulley, Mark S; Jones, Kevin W; Erickson, John L

    2010-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator and beam delivery complex generates the proton beams that serve three neutron production sources, a proton radiography facility and a medical and research isotope production facility. The recent operating history of the facility, including both achievements and challenges, will be reviewed. Plans for performance improvement will be discussed, together with the underlying drivers for the ongoing LANSCE Risk Mitigation project. The details of this latter project will also be discussed.

  19. Operational Status and Life Extension Plans for the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE)

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, John L.; Rees, Daniel E.

    2011-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator and beam delivery complex generates the proton beams that serve three neutron production sources, a proton radiography facility and a medical and research isotope production facility. The recent operating history of the facility, including both achievements and challenges, will be reviewed. Plans for performance improvement will be discussed, together with the underlying drivers for the ongoing LANSCE Linac Risk Mitigation (LRM) project. The details of this latter project will also be discussed.

  20. Integrating the digital library puzzle: The library without walls at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Luce, R. E.

    1998-01-01

    Current efforts at the Research Library, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), to develop digital library services are described. A key principle of LANL`s approach to delivering library information is the integration of products into a common interface and the use of the Web as the medium of service provision. Products described include science databases such as the SciSearch at LANL and electronic journals. Project developments described have significant ramifications for delivering library services over the Internet.

  1. More Thoughts on New Directions in Mass Communication Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, James A.

    A clearer understanding of the capacity of research and researchers in the mass communication field is needed. In the past, when statistical researchers have found they cannot meet criteria, they have devised a new set of test characteristics. For example, when validity cannot be measured, researchers measure reliability, despite the fact that…

  2. Los Alamos National Security, LLC Request for Information from industrial entities that desire to commercialize Laboratory-developed Extremely Low Resource Optical Identifier (ELROI) tech

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Michael Charles

    2015-11-10

    Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) is the manager and operator of the Los Alamos National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. LANS is a mission-centric Federally Funded Research and Development Center focused on solving the most critical national security challenges through science and engineering for both government and private customers.

  3. Regulatory ozone modeling: status, directions, and research needs.

    PubMed Central

    Georgopoulos, P G

    1995-01-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 have established selected comprehensive, three-dimensional, Photochemical Air Quality Simulation Models (PAQSMs) as the required regulatory tools for analyzing the urban and regional problem of high ambient ozone levels across the United States. These models are currently applied to study and establish strategies for meeting the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ozone in nonattainment areas; State Implementation Plans (SIPs) resulting from these efforts must be submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) in November 1994. The following presentation provides an overview and discussion of the regulatory ozone modeling process and its implications. First, the PAQSM-based ozone attainment demonstration process is summarized in the framework of the 1994 SIPs. Then, following a brief overview of the representation of physical and chemical processes in PAQSMs, the essential attributes of standard modeling systems currently in regulatory use are presented in a nonmathematical, self-contained format, intended to provide a basic understanding of both model capabilities and limitations. The types of air quality, emission, and meteorological data needed for applying and evaluating PAQSMs are discussed, as well as the sources, availability, and limitations of existing databases. The issue of evaluating a model's performance in order to accept it as a tool for policy making is discussed, and various methodologies for implementing this objective are summarized. Selected interim results from diagnostic analyses, which are performed as a component of the regulatory ozone modeling process for the Philadelphia-New Jersey region, are also presented to provide some specific examples related to the general issues discussed in this work. Finally, research needs related to a) the evaluation and refinement of regulatory ozone modeling, b) the characterization of uncertainty in photochemical modeling, and c

  4. Data interpretation in breath biomarker research: pitfalls and directions.

    PubMed

    Miekisch, Wolfram; Herbig, Jens; Schubert, Jochen K

    2012-09-01

    Most--if not all--potential diagnostic applications in breath research involve different marker concentrations rather than unique breath markers which only occur in the diseased state. Hence, data interpretation is a crucial step in breath analysis. To avoid artificial significance in breath testing every effort should be made to implement method validation, data cross-testing and statistical validation along this process. The most common data analysis related problems can be classified into three groups: confounding variables (CVs), which have a real correlation with both the diseased state and a breath marker but lead to the erroneous conclusion that disease and breath are in a causal relationship; voodoo correlations (VCs), which can be understood as statistically true correlations that arise coincidentally in the vast number of measured variables; and statistical misconceptions in the study design (SMSD). CV: Typical confounding variables are environmental and medical history, host factors such as gender, age, weight, etc and parameters that could affect the quality of breath data such as subject breathing mode, effects of breath sampling and effects of the analytical technique itself. VC: The number of measured variables quickly overwhelms the number of samples that can feasibly be taken. As a consequence, the chances of finding coincidental 'voodoo' correlations grow proportionally. VCs can typically be expected in the following scenarios: insufficient number of patients, (too) many measurement variables, the use of advanced statistical data mining methods, and non-independent data for validation. SMSD: Non-prospective, non-blinded and non-randomized trials, a priori biased study populations or group selection with unrealistically high disease prevalence typically represent misconception of study design. In this paper important data interpretation issues are discussed, common pitfalls are addressed and directions for sound data processing and interpretation

  5. Directing Diarrhoeal Disease Research towards Disease-burden Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Lanata, Claudio F.; Black, Robert E.; Walker, Damian G.; Snyder, John D.; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Mahalanabis, Dilip; Fontaine, Olivier; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Bhatnagar, Shinjini; Rudan, Igor

    2009-01-01

    Despite gains in controlling mortality relating to diarrhoeal disease, the burden of disease remains unacceptably high. To refocus health research to target disease-burden reduction as the goal of research in child health, the Child Health and Nutrition Research Initiative developed a systematic strategy to rank health research options. This priority-setting exercise included listing of 46 competitive research options in diarrhoeal disease and their critical and quantitative appraisal by 10 experts based on five criteria for research that reflect the ability of the research to be translated into interventions and achieved disease-burden reduction. These criteria included the answerability of the research questions; the efficacy and effectiveness of the intervention resulting from the research; the maximal potential for disease-burden reduction of the interventions derived from the research; the affordability, deliverability, and sustainability of the intervention supported by the research; and the overall effect of the research-derived intervention on equity. Experts scored each research option independently to delineate the best investments for diarrhoeal disease control in the developing world to reduce the burden of disease by 2015. Priority scores obtained for health policy and systems research obtained eight of the top 10 rankings in overall scores, indicating that current investments in health research are significantly different from those estimated to be the most effective in reducing the global burden of diarrhoeal disease by 2015. PMID:19507747

  6. Environmental assessment for the proposed CMR Building upgrades at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. Final document

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-04

    In order to maintain its ability to continue to conduct uninterrupted radioactive and metallurgical research in a safe, secure, and environmentally sound manner, the US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to upgrade the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Building. The building was built in the early 1950s to provide a research and experimental facility for analytical chemistry, plutonium and uranium chemistry, and metallurgy. Today, research and development activities are performed involving nuclear materials. A variety of radioactive and chemical hazards are present. The CMR Building is nearing the end of its original design life and does not meet many of today`s design codes and standards. The Proposed Action for this Environmental Assessment (EA) includes structural modifications to some portions of the CMR Building which do not meet current seismic criteria for a Hazard Category 2 Facility. Also included are upgrades and improvements in building ventilation, communications, monitoring, and fire protection systems. This EA analyzes the environmental effects of construction of the proposed upgrades. The Proposed Action will have no adverse effects upon agricultural and cultural resources, wetlands and floodplains, endangered and threatened species, recreational resources, or water resources. The Proposed Action would have negligible effects on human health and transportation, and would not pose a disproportionate adverse health or environmental impact on minority or low-income populations within an 80 kilometer (50 mile) radius of the CMR Building.

  7. Integrating Safety with Science,Technology and Innovation at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, Bethany M

    2012-04-02

    The mission of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is to develop and apply science, technology and engineering solutions to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve emerging national security challenges. The most important responsibility is to direct and conduct efforts to meet the mission with an emphasis on safety, security, and quality. In this article, LANL Environmental, Safety, and Health (ESH) trainers discuss how their application and use of a kinetic learning module (learn by doing) with a unique fall arrest system is helping to address one the most common industrial safety challenges: slips and falls. A unique integration of Human Performance Improvement (HPI), Behavior Based Safety (BBS) and elements of the Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) combined with an interactive simulator experience is being used to address slip and fall events at Los Alamos.

  8. The Characterization of Biotic and Abiotic Media Upgradient and Downgradient of the Los Alamos Canyon Weir

    SciTech Connect

    P.R. Fresquez

    2006-01-15

    As per the Mitigation Action Plan for the Special Environmental Analysis of the actions taken in response to the Cerro Grande Fire, sediments, vegetation, and small mammals were collected directly up- and downgradient of the Los Alamos Canyon weir, a low-head sediment control structure located on the northeastern boundary of Los Alamos National Laboratory, to determine contaminant impacts, if any. All radionuclides ({sup 3}H, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 241}Am, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U) and trace elements (Ag, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, and Tl) in these media were low and most were below regional upper level background concentrations (mean plus three sigma). The very few constituents that were above regional background concentrations were far below screening levels (set from State and Federal standards) for the protection of the human food chain and the terrestrial environment.

  9. An analysis of precipitation occurrences in Los Alamos, New Mexico, for long-term predictions of waste repository behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Nyhan, J.; Beckman, R.; Bowen, B.

    1989-02-01

    This study describes precipitation as an uncontrolled natural input influencing the hydrology of waste repositories in terms of their ultimate long-term closure. The general climatology of the western states, including that of New Mexico and Los Alamos, is first described. An analysis of the precipitation patterns at Los Alamos is then presented to be used for predicting long-term precipitation occurrences and shallow land burial site behavior. The waste management implications of this precipitation analysis are then discussed and future meteorological research needs are identified. 13 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos during 2007

    SciTech Connect

    2008-09-30

    Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos reports are prepared annually by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) Environmental Directorate, as required by US Department of Energy Order 450.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and US Department of Energy Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. These annual reports summarize environmental data that are used to determine compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and departmental policies. Additional data, beyond the minimum required, are also gathered and reported as part of the Laboratory’s efforts to ensure public safety and to monitor environmental quality at and near the Laboratory. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the Laboratory’s major environmental programs and explains the risks and the actions taken to reduce risks at the Laboratory from environmental legacies and waste management operations. Chapter 2 reports the Laboratory’s compliance status for 2007. Chapter 3 provides a summary of the maximum radiological dose the public and biota populations could have potentially received from Laboratory operations and discusses chemical exposures. The environmental surveillance and monitoring data are organized by environmental media (Chapter 4, air; Chapters 5 and 6, water and sediments; Chapter 7, soils; and Chapter 8, foodstuffs and biota) in a format to meet the needs of a general and scientific audience. Chapter 9 provides a summary of the status of environmental restoration work around LANL. A glossary and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are in the back of the report. Appendix A explains the standards for environmental contaminants, Appendix B explains the units of measurements used in this report, Appendix C describes the laboratory’s technical areas and their associated programs, and Appendix D provides web links to more information. In printed copies of this report or Executive Summary, we have

  11. The Los Alamos Science Pillars The Science of Signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Joshua E.; Peterson, Eugene J.

    2012-09-13

    imagination of many LANL staff and managers and resulted in a strategy which focuses on our strengths while recognizing that the science of signatures is dynamic. This report highlights the interdependence between SoS, advances in materials science, and advances in information technology. The intent is that SoS shape and inform Los Alamos investments in nuclear forensics, nuclear diagnostics, climate, space, energy, and biosurveillence; the areas of leadership that you will read about in this strategy document. The Science of Signatures is still a relatively new strategic direction for the Laboratory. The primary purpose of this document is tell Laboratory staff how SoS is being managed and give them a chance to get involved. A second important purpose is to inform the Department of Energy and our customers of our capability growth in this important scientific area. Questions concerning the SoS strategy and input to it are welcomed and may be directed to any member of the SoS Leadership Council or to the Chemistry, Life, and Earth Science Directorate Office.

  12. The Behavioral Economics of Education: New Directions for Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jabbar, Huriya

    2011-01-01

    Over the past several decades, researchers have used economics to understand a number of issues in education policy. This article argues that some education researchers have defined economics too narrowly, neglecting several areas of economics research that cut across disciplinary boundaries. One subdiscipline of economics that might be of use in…

  13. Dissemination of Research to Parents: Issues, Barriers and Future Directions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winton, Pamela J.

    Intended for educational researchers, the paper stresses the importance of disseminating research knowledge to parents, particularly to parents of handicapped children. Barriers to disseminating research knowledge to parents include the low priority of this activity among members of the academic community, the trickles down theory of dissemination…

  14. Geographic Information System (GIS) Emergency Support for the May 2000 Cerro Grande Wildfire, Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA

    SciTech Connect

    C.R.Mynard; G.N.Keating; P.M.Rich; D.R. Bleakly

    2003-05-01

    In May 2000 the Cerro Grande wildfire swept through Los Alamos, New Mexico, burning approximately 17,400 ha (43,000 acres) and causing evacuation of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the communities of Los Alamos and White Rock. An integral part of emergency response during the fire was the use of geographic information system (GIS) technology, which continues to be used in support of post-fire restoration and environmental monitoring. During the fire Laboratory GIS staff and volunteers from other organizations worked to produce maps and provide support for emergency managers, including at an emergency GIS facility in Santa Fe. Subsequent to the fire, Laboratory GIS teams supported the multiagency Burned Area Emergency Rehabilitation (BAER) team to provide GIS data and maps for planning mitigation efforts. The GIS teams continue to help researchers, operations personnel, and managers deal with the tremendous changes caused by the fire. Much of the work is under the auspices of the Cerro Grande Rehabilitation Project (CGRP) to promote recovery from fire damage, improve information exchange, enhance emergency management, and conduct mitigation activities. GIS efforts during the fire provided important lessons about institutional matters, working relationships, and emergency preparedness. These lessons include the importance of (1) an integrated framework for assessing natural and human hazards in a landscape context; (2) a strong GIS capability for emergency response; (3) coordinated emergency plans for GIS operations; (4) a method for employees to report their whereabouts and receive authoritative information during an evacuation; (5) GIS data that are complete, backed-up, and available during an emergency; (6) adaptation of GIS to the circumstances of the emergency; (7) better coordination in the GIS community; (8) better integration of GIS into LANL operations; and (9) a central data warehouse for data and metadata. These lessons are important for planning

  15. Isotopic Composition of Natural Nitrate in Groundwater in Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrystal, A. E.; Heikoop, J. M.; Longmire, P.; Dale, M.; Larson, T. E.; Perkins, G.; Fabyrka-Martin, J.; Simmons, A. M.; Fessenden-Rahn, J.

    2009-12-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has established background concentrations for various dissolved constituents in local groundwater from perched-intermediate and regional aquifers in the vicinity of Los Alamos in north-central New Mexico. Typical background concentrations of nitrate (NO3-) are on the order of 0.31 mg/L as N (0.02 mM/L). In addition to natural sources, anthropogenic sources of NO3- in local groundwaters include industrial and treated sewage discharges released from LANL facilities, and treated sewage effluent discharges from Los Alamos County. We are using stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in NO3- to distinguish among these sources, define groundwater flow paths, and evaluate groundwater mixing. Following the approach of McMahon and Böhlke (2006), we have explored the δ18O[NO3-] of water samples taken from background wells and springs in the Los Alamos area. NO3- from a spring and a well located in the Valles caldera, upgradient and upwind (relative to prevailing winds) of Los Alamos has δ15N and δ18O values of approximately 4.8 ‰ and -2.6 ‰, respectively. Tritium and unadjusted radiocarbon analyses indicate that these caldera waters predate LANL operations commencing in 1943. NO3- from groundwater locations in Los Alamos that exhibit background conditions has isotopic values similar to those of the caldera groundwater. Because local groundwater is relatively oxidizing, denitrification is not expected to be a factor in altering isotopic compositions of NO3-. Results indicate that there is little direct atmospheric contribution to dissolved NO3-, and that most NO3- is derived from bacterial nitrification in which one oxygen atom comes from atmospheric oxygen and two oxygen atoms come from soil porewater. Oxygen isotope values plot slightly below the expected isotopic trend for a 1:2 mix of these two sources, indicating either slight fractionation of oxygen isotopes during nitrification, or potential mixing with geological sources of

  16. Los Alamos National Laboratory Prepares for Fire Season

    SciTech Connect

    L’Esperance, Manny

    2016-07-18

    Through the establishment of a Wildland Fire Program Office, and the Interagency Fire Base located on Laboratory property, Los Alamos National Laboratory is continuing and improving a program to prepare for wildland fire.

  17. Explosive Flux Compression: 50 Years of Los Alamos Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, C.M.; Thomson, D.B.; Garn, W.B.

    1998-10-18

    Los Alamos flux compression activities are surveyed, mainly through references in view of space limitations. However, two plasma physics programs done with Sandia National Laboratory are discussed in more detail.

  18. Los Alamos National Laboratory Prepares for Fire Season

    ScienceCinema

    L’Esperance, Manny

    2016-08-10

    Through the establishment of a Wildland Fire Program Office, and the Interagency Fire Base located on Laboratory property, Los Alamos National Laboratory is continuing and improving a program to prepare for wildland fire.

  19. Explosive Flux Compression:. 50 Years of LOS Alamos Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, C.; Thomson, D.; Garn, W.

    2004-11-01

    Los Alamos flux compression activities are surveyed, mainly through references in view of space limitations. However, two plasma physics programs done with Sandia National Laboratory are discussed in more detail.

  20. Strategic defense initiatives at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Rockwood, S.D.

    1985-01-01

    This presentation reviews the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) programs at Los Alamos National Laboratory, noting especially the needs for and applications of optics and optical technologies. Table I lists the various activities at Los Alamos contributing to SDI programs. The principal, nonnuclear SDI programs are: (1) the free-electron laser, and (2) neutral particle beams. Both should be considered as potential long-range-kill systems, but still in the futuristic category.

  1. Los Alamos upgrade in metallographic capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ledbetter, J.M.; Dowler, K.E.; Cook, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Los Alamos Wing 9 Hot Cell Facility is in the process of upgrading their metallographic sample preparation and examination capability. The present capability to grind, polish and etch samples from reactor fuels and materials has been in operation for 18 years. Macro photography and alpha and beta-gamma autoradiography are an important part of this capability. Some of the fast breeder reactor experiments have contained sodium as a coolant. Therefore, the capability to distill sodium from some samples scheduled for microstructural examinations is a requirement. Since the reactor fuel samples are highly radioactive and contain plutonium, either as fabricated or as a result of breeding during reactor service, these samples must be handled in shielded hot cells containing alpha boxes to isolate the plutonium and hazardous fission products from personnel and the environment. The present equipment that was designed and built into those alpha boxes has functioned very well for the past 18 years. During that time the technicians have thought of ways to improve the equipment to do the work faster and safer. These ideas and ideas that have been developed during the design of new alpha boxes and new equipment for microstructural sample preparation have provided the concepts for the capability to perform the work faster and maintain the equipment in a safer manner.

  2. Saving Water at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    ScienceCinema

    Erickson, Andy

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory decreased its water usage by 26 percent in 2014, with about one-third of the reduction attributable to using reclaimed water to cool a supercomputing center. The Laboratory's goal during 2014 was to use only re-purposed water to support the mission at the Strategic Computing Complex. Using reclaimed water from the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility, or SERF, substantially decreased water usage and supported the overall mission. SERF collects industrial wastewater and treats it for reuse. The reclamation facility contributed more than 27 million gallons of re-purposed water to the Laboratory's computing center, a secured supercomputing facility that supports the Laboratory’s national security mission and is one of the institution’s larger water users. In addition to the strategic water reuse program at SERF, the Laboratory reduced water use in 2014 by focusing conservation efforts on areas that use the most water, upgrading to water-conserving fixtures, and repairing leaks identified in a biennial survey.

  3. Oxidative lime pretreatment of Alamo switchgrass.

    PubMed

    Falls, Matthew; Holtzapple, Mark T

    2011-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that oxidative lime pretreatment is an effective delignification method that improves the enzymatic digestibility of many biomass feedstocks. The purpose of this work is to determine the recommended oxidative lime pretreatment conditions (reaction temperature, time, pressure, and lime loading) for Alamo switchgrass (Panicum virgatum). Enzymatic hydrolysis of glucan and xylan was used to determine the performance of the 52 studied pretreatment conditions. The recommended condition (110°C, 6.89 bar O(2), 240 min, 0.248 g Ca(OH)(2)/g biomass) achieved glucan and xylan overall yields (grams of sugar hydrolyzed/100 g sugar in raw biomass, 15 filter paper units (FPU)/g raw glucan) of 85.9 and 52.2, respectively. In addition, some glucan oligomers (2.6 g glucan recovered/100 g glucan in raw biomass) and significant levels of xylan oligomers (26.0 g xylan recovered/100 g xylan in raw biomass) were recovered from the pretreatment liquor. Combining a decrystallization technique (ball milling) with oxidative lime pretreatment further improved the overall glucan yield to 90.0 (7 FPU/g raw glucan).

  4. Historic Manhattan Project Sites at Los Alamos

    ScienceCinema

    McGehee, Ellen

    2016-07-12

    The Manhattan Project laboratory constructed at Los Alamos, New Mexico, beginning in 1943, was intended from the start to be temporary and to go up with amazing speed. Because most of those WWII-era facilities were built with minimal materials and so quickly, much of the original infrastructure was torn down in the late '40s and early '50s and replaced by more permanent facilities. However, a few key facilities remained, and are being preserved and maintained for historic significance. Four such sites are visited briefly in this video, taking viewers to V-Site, the buildings where the first nuclear explosive device was pre-assembled in preparation for the Trinity Test in Southern New Mexico. Included is another WWII area, Gun Site. So named because it was the area where scientists and engineers tested the so-called "gun method" of assembling nuclear materials -- the fundamental design of the Little Boy weapon that was eventually dropped on Hiroshima. The video also goes to Pajarito Site, home of the "Slotin Building" and "Pond Cabin." The Slotin Building is the place where scientist Louis Slotin conducted a criticality experiment that went awry in early 1946, leading to his unfortunate death, and the Pond Cabin served the team of eminent scientist Emilio Segre who did early chemistry work on plutonium that ultimately led to the Fat Man weapon.

  5. Historic Manhattan Project Sites at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    McGehee, Ellen

    2014-05-22

    The Manhattan Project laboratory constructed at Los Alamos, New Mexico, beginning in 1943, was intended from the start to be temporary and to go up with amazing speed. Because most of those WWII-era facilities were built with minimal materials and so quickly, much of the original infrastructure was torn down in the late '40s and early '50s and replaced by more permanent facilities. However, a few key facilities remained, and are being preserved and maintained for historic significance. Four such sites are visited briefly in this video, taking viewers to V-Site, the buildings where the first nuclear explosive device was pre-assembled in preparation for the Trinity Test in Southern New Mexico. Included is another WWII area, Gun Site. So named because it was the area where scientists and engineers tested the so-called "gun method" of assembling nuclear materials -- the fundamental design of the Little Boy weapon that was eventually dropped on Hiroshima. The video also goes to Pajarito Site, home of the "Slotin Building" and "Pond Cabin." The Slotin Building is the place where scientist Louis Slotin conducted a criticality experiment that went awry in early 1946, leading to his unfortunate death, and the Pond Cabin served the team of eminent scientist Emilio Segre who did early chemistry work on plutonium that ultimately led to the Fat Man weapon.

  6. Saving Water at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Andy

    2015-03-16

    Los Alamos National Laboratory decreased its water usage by 26 percent in 2014, with about one-third of the reduction attributable to using reclaimed water to cool a supercomputing center. The Laboratory's goal during 2014 was to use only re-purposed water to support the mission at the Strategic Computing Complex. Using reclaimed water from the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility, or SERF, substantially decreased water usage and supported the overall mission. SERF collects industrial wastewater and treats it for reuse. The reclamation facility contributed more than 27 million gallons of re-purposed water to the Laboratory's computing center, a secured supercomputing facility that supports the Laboratory’s national security mission and is one of the institution’s larger water users. In addition to the strategic water reuse program at SERF, the Laboratory reduced water use in 2014 by focusing conservation efforts on areas that use the most water, upgrading to water-conserving fixtures, and repairing leaks identified in a biennial survey.

  7. Results from the Argonne, Los Alamos, JAERI collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Meadows, J.; Smith, D.; Greenwood, L.; Haight, R.; Ikeda, Y.; Konno, C.

    1993-07-01

    Four sample packets containing elemental Ti, Fe, Ni, Cu, Nb, Ag, Eu, Tb and Hf have been irradiated in three distinct accelerator neutron fields, at Argonne National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA, and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Japan. The acquired experimental data include differential cross sections and integral cross sections for the continuum neutron spectrum produced by 7-MeV deuterons incident on thick Be-metal target. The U-238(n,f) cross section was also measured at 10.3 MeV as a consistency check on the experimental technique. This the third progress report on a project which has been carried out under the auspices of an IAEA Coordinated Research Program entitled ``Activation Cross Sections for the Generation Of Long-lived Radionuclides of Importance in Fusion Reactor Technology``. The present report provides the latest results from this work. Comparison is made between the 14.7-MeV cross-section values obtained from the separate investigations at Argonne and JAERI. Generally, good agreement observed within the experimental errors when consistent sample parameters, radioactivity decay data and reference cross values are employed. A comparison is also made between the experimental results and those derived from calculations using a nuclear model. Experimental neutron information on the Be(d,n) neutron spectrum was incorporated in the comparisons for the integral results. The agreement is satisfactory considering the various uncertainties that are involved.

  8. 77 FR 46805 - Small Business Innovation Research Program Policy Directive

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-06

    ... improve the application process, including streamlining that process. B. Section 2--Summary of Statutory... assistance, and make recommendations on ways to improve the program. SBA has amended the directive to...

  9. Audit of consultant agreements at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-23

    The Department of Energy`s (Department) Albuquerque Operations Office (Albuquerque) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) are responsible for acquiring consulting services in a manner most advantageous to the Government by ensuring adequate competition. Although the Department prefers competitively awarding subcontracts, including consultant agreements, to ensure the lowest possible cost, it allows sole sourcing a subcontract if the sole source is fully justified. The objective of the audit was to determine whether Los Alamos` consultant agreements contained adequate sole source justifications. The audit showed that Los Alamos may not have acquired some of its consultant agreements at the lowest possible cost because it did not prepare adequate sole source justifications for 17 sole source consultant agreements valued at $842,900. This condition existed because: (1) requesters did not follow policies and procedures when preparing sole source justifications, (2) Los Alamos did not have an internal mechanism to reject consultant agreements that were not adequately justified, and (3) the Department did not review consultant agreements to evaluate the adequacy of sole source justifications. Without adequate justifications, the Department cannot be assured that consultant services were obtained at the lowest possible cost. We therefore recommended that the Manager, Albuquerque Operations Office require Los Alamos to ensure proper sole source justifications and enhance internal controls over consultant agreements. Management agreed to implement the recommendations.

  10. Los Alamos low-level waste performance assessment status

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, W.J.; Purtymun, W.D.; Dewart, J.M.; Rodgers, J.E.

    1986-06-01

    This report reviews the documented Los Alamos studies done to assess the containment of buried hazardous wastes. Five sections logically present the environmental studies, operational source terms, transport pathways, environmental dosimetry, and computer model development and use. This review gives a general picture of the Los Alamos solid waste disposal and liquid effluent sites and is intended for technical readers with waste management and environmental science backgrounds but without a detailed familiarization with Los Alamos. The review begins with a wide perspective on environmental studies at Los Alamos. Hydrology, geology, and meteorology are described for the site and region. The ongoing Laboratory-wide environmental surveillance and waste management environmental studies are presented. The next section describes the waste disposal sites and summarizes the current source terms for these sites. Hazardous chemical wastes and liquid effluents are also addressed by describing the sites and canyons that are impacted. The review then focuses on the transport pathways addressed mainly in reports by Healy and Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. Once the source terms and potential transport pathways are described, the dose assessment methods are addressed. Three major studies, the waste alternatives, Hansen and Rogers, and the Pantex Environmental Impact Statement, contributed to the current Los Alamos dose assessment methodology. Finally, the current Los Alamos groundwater, surface water, and environmental assessment models for these mesa top and canyon sites are described.

  11. At Sea: What Direction for Critical Early Childhood Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    In this paper I reflect on the dilemma critical early childhood research finds itself in today. In order to distinguish and distance ourselves from the certainties and seemingly unquestionable truths of post-political, mainstream, "normalised" research and its entanglement with neoliberal agendas and corporate interests, have we rendered…

  12. Relationship Education Research: Current Status and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markman, Howard J.; Rhoades, Galena K.

    2012-01-01

    The overarching aim of this article is to review the research on relationship education programs and approaches that has been published or accepted for publication since the last review article in 2003. This article provides a critical overview of the relationship education field and sets an agenda for research and practice for the next decade. A…

  13. The Research on School Marketing: Current Issues and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oplatka, Izhar; Hemsley-Brown, Jane

    2004-01-01

    This review provides a synthesis of the scholarship that has sought to expand the understanding of educational marketing practice in schools. The following research questions guided this review. What are the common themes and characteristics that emerge from research about marketing in schools? What remains underdeveloped in the characterization…

  14. Future Directions in Community Power Research: A Colloquium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wirt, Frederick M., Ed.

    This compilation of symposium papers on community power structure research focuses on the theme that community power structure research must shift away from case study methods and move toward aggregate data analysis. Advocating comparative analysis, seven authors present their views under the following topics: (1) Charles R. Adrian, "Several Loose…

  15. Making an Impact: New Directions for Arts and Humanities Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazelkorn, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    The severity of the global economic crisis has put the spotlight firmly on measuring academic and research performance and productivity and assessing its contribution, value, impact and benefit. While, traditionally, research output and impact were measured by peer-publications and citations, there is increased emphasis on a "market-driven…

  16. Mind, brain, and teaching: Some directions for future research.

    PubMed

    Pasquinelli, Elena; Zalla, Tiziana; Gvodzic, Katarina; Potier-Watkins, Cassandra; Piazza, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    In line with Kline's taxonomy, highlighting teaching as an array of behaviors with different cognitive underpinnings, we advocate the expansion of a specific line of research on mind, brain, and teaching. This research program is devoted to the understanding of the neurocognitive mechanisms and the evolutionary determinants of teaching skills, with the ultimate goal of helping teachers improve teaching quality.

  17. Primary care providers’ bereavement care practices: Recommendations for research directions

    PubMed Central

    Ghesquiere, Angela R.; Patel, Sapana R.; Kaplan, Daniel B.; Bruce, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Bereaved patients are often seen in primary care settings. While most do not require formal support, physicians may be called upon to provide support to some bereaved, particularly those with bereavement-related mental health disorders like complicated grief and bereavement-related depression. Research evidence on physician bereavement care is scant. We make recommendations for future research in this area. Design Literature review, focusing on studies conducted between 1996 and 2013 in the United States. Searches of Medline and PsychInfo, along with hand searches of reference sections, was conducted. Results The limited existing research indicates substantial gaps in the research literature, especially in the areas of primary care physician skill and capacity, patient-level outcomes, and the quality of research methodology. No U.S. studies have focused specifically on care for bereavement-related mental health disorders. We provide recommendations about how to improve research about primary care bereavement care. Conclusions The primary care sector offers ample opportunities for research on bereavement care. With greater research efforts, there may be improvements to quality of bereavement care in primary care, in general, and also to the accurate detection and appropriate referral for bereavement-related mental health conditions. PMID:24955568

  18. Qualitative psychotherapy research: the journey so far and future directions.

    PubMed

    Levitt, Heidi M

    2015-03-01

    This article documents the evolution of qualitative psychotherapy research over the past 3 decades. Clients' and therapists' accounts of their experiences in psychotherapy provide a window into the psychotherapy relationship and its mechanisms of change. A sizable body of literature has been generated that uses qualitative methods to collect and analyze these accounts and to shed light on the psychotherapy process. It notes changes in the field such as growing numbers of dissertations and publications using qualitative methods as well as a strengthening emphasis on qualitative research within graduate education and research funding bodies. Future recommendations include developing principles for practice from qualitative methods and conducting qualitative meta-analyses. Other recommendations include forming journal review policies that support the publication of qualitative research and that focus on coherence in adapting methods to meet research goals, in light of a study's characteristics and epistemological framework, rather than focusing on sets of procedures.

  19. Final Progress Report: Internship at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, Ryan Q.

    2012-08-10

    Originally I was tasked fluidized bed modeling, however, I changed projects. While still working with ANSYS Fluent, I performed a study of particle tracks in glove boxes. This is useful from a Health-Physics perspective, dealing respirable particles that can be hazardous to the human body. I iteratively tested different amounts of turbulent particles in a steady-state flow. The goal of this testing was to discover how Fluent handles built-in Rosin-Rammler distributions for particle injections. I worked on the health physics flow problems and distribution analysis under the direction of two mentors, Bruce Letellier and Dave Decroix. I set up and ran particle injection calculations using Fluent. I tried different combinations of input parameters to produce sets of 500,000, 1 million, and 1.5 million particles to determine what a good test case would be for future experiments. I performed a variety of tasks in my work as an Undergraduate Student Intern at LANL this summer, and learned how to use a powerful CFD application in addition to expanding my skills in MATLAB. I enjoyed my work at LANL and hope to be able to use the experience here to further my career in the future working in a security-conscious environment. My mentors provided guidance and help with all of my projects and I am grateful for the opportunity to work at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  20. Directions in implementation research methods for behavioral and social science.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Molly; Supplee, Lauren H

    2012-10-01

    There is a growing interest, by researchers, policymakers, and practitioners, in evidence-based policy and practice. As a result, more dollars are being invested in program evaluation in order to establish "what works," and in some cases, funding is specifically tied to those programs found to be effective. However, reproducing positive effects found in research requires more than simply adopting an evidence-based program. Implementation research can provide guidance on which components of an intervention matter most for program impacts and how implementation components can best be implemented. However, while the body of rigorous research on effective practices continues to grow, research on implementation lags behind. To address these issues, the Administration for Children and Families and federal partners convened a roundtable meeting entitled, Improving Implementation Research Methods for Behavioral and Social Science, in the fall of 2010. This special section of the Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research includes papers from the roundtable and highlights the role implementation science can play in shedding light on the difficult task of taking evidence-based practices to scale.

  1. Half-century research developments in maritime accidents: Future directions.

    PubMed

    Luo, Meifeng; Shin, Sung-Ho

    2016-04-19

    Over the past 50 years, research in maritime accidents has undergone a series of fundamental changes. Understanding the evolution of these changes can help maritime communities to know what has been done in the past, how maritime safety can be improved in the future, and how to reduce or eliminate the risks to ships, the lives aboard them, the cargo they carry, and the marine environment. This study conducts a comprehensive literature review on research in maritime accidents, comprising 572 papers published in 125 journals over the 50 years from 1965 to 2014. The patterns of evolution of the researchers, the journals, the disciplines involved, the research methods, the major issues and causes, and the data sources are identified, and the changes explained. We find that the main focus of research in maritime accidents has shifted over the past 50 years from naval architecture to human error, and may continue to expand into socio-economic factors. In addition, future research in maritime accidents will be multi-disciplinary, use multiple data sources, and adopt advanced research methods, to account for complex interactions between the natural environment, the development of naval technology, human behavior, and shipping market conditions.

  2. Laboratory directed research development annual report. Fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This document comprises Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s report for Fiscal Year 1996 on research and development programs. The document contains 161 project summaries in 16 areas of research and development. The 16 areas of research and development reported on are: atmospheric sciences, biotechnology, chemical instrumentation and analysis, computer and information science, ecological science, electronics and sensors, health protection and dosimetry, hydrological and geologic sciences, marine sciences, materials science and engineering, molecular science, process science and engineering, risk and safety analysis, socio-technical systems analysis, statistics and applied mathematics, and thermal and energy systems. In addition, this report provides an overview of the research and development program, program management, program funding, and Fiscal Year 1997 projects.

  3. Experimental High Energy Physics Research: Direct Detection of Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Witherell, Michael S.

    2014-10-02

    The grant supported research on an experimental search for evidence of dark matter interactions with normal matter. The PI carried out the research as a member of the LUX and LZ collaborations. The LUX research team collected a first data set with the LUX experiment, a large liquid xenon detector installed in the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF). The first results were published in Physical Review Letters on March 4, 2014. The journal Nature named the LUX result a scientific highlight of the year for 2013. In addition, the LZ collaboration submitted the full proposal for the Lux Zeplin experiment, which has since been approved by DOE-HEP as a second-generation dark matter experiment. Witherell is the Level 2 manager for the Outer Detector System on the LUX-Zeplin experiment.

  4. Future Directions in Rotorcraft Technology at Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiken, Edwin W.; Ormiston, Robert A; Young, Larry A.

    2000-01-01

    Members of the NASA and Army rotorcraft research community at Ames Research Center have developed a vision for 'Vertical Flight 2025'. This paper describes the development of that vision and the steps being taken to implement it. In an effort to realize the vision, consistent with both NASA and Army Aviation strategic plans, two specific technology development projects have been identified: (1) one focused on a personal transportation system capable of vertical flight (the 'Roto-Mobile') and (2) the other on small autonomous rotorcraft (which is inclusive of vehicles which range in grams of gross weight for 'MicroRotorcraft' to thousands of kilograms for rotorcraft uninhabited aerial vehicles). The paper provides a status report on these projects as well as a summary of other revolutionary research thrusts being planned and executed at Ames Research Center.

  5. Recent UCN source developments at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Seestrom, S.J.; Anaya, J.M.; Bowles, T.J.

    1998-12-01

    The most intense sources of ultra cold neutrons (UCN) have bee built at reactors where the high average thermal neutron flux can overcome the low UCN production rate to achieve usable densities of UCN. At spallation neutron sources the average flux available is much lower than at a reactor, though the peak flux can be comparable or higher. The authors have built a UCN source that attempts to take advantage of the high peak flux available at the short pulse spallation neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) to generate a useful number of UCN. In the source UCN are produced by Doppler-shifted Bragg scattering of neutrons to convert 400-m/s neutrons down into the UCN regime. This source was initially tested in 1996 and various improvements were made based on the results of the 1996 running. These improvements were implemented and tested in 1997. In sections 2 and 3 they discuss the improvements that have been made and the resulting source performance. Recently an even more interesting concept was put forward by Serebrov et al. This involves combining a solid Deuterium UCN source, previously studied by Serebrov et al., with a pulsed spallation source to achieve world record UCN densities. They have initiated a program of calculations and measurements aimed at verifying the solid Deuterium UCN source concept. The approach has been to develop an analytical capability, combine with Monte Carlo calculations of neutron production, and perform benchmark experiments to verify the validity of the calculations. Based on the calculations and measurements they plan to test a modified version of the Serebrov UCN factory. They estimate that they could produce over 1,000 UCN/cc in a 15 liter volume, using 1 {micro}amp of 800 MeV protons for two seconds every 500 seconds. They will discuss the result UCN production measurements in section 4.

  6. World's Largest Gold Crystal Studied at Los Alamos

    ScienceCinema

    Vogel, Sven; Nakotte, Heinz

    2016-07-12

    When geologist John Rakovan needed better tools to investigate whether a dazzling 217.78-gram piece of gold was in fact the world's largest single-crystal specimen - a distinguishing factor that would not only drastically increase its market value but also provide a unique research opportunity - he traveled to Los Alamos National Laboratory's Lujan Neutron Scattering Center to peer deep inside the mineral using neutron diffractometry. Neutrons, different from other probes such as X-rays and electrons, are able to penetrate many centimeters deep into most materials. Revealing the inner structure of a crystal without destroying the sample - imperative, as this one is worth an estimated $1.5 million - would allow Rakovan and Lujan Center collaborators Sven Vogel and Heinz Nakotte to prove that this exquisite nugget, which seemed almost too perfect and too big to be real, was a single crystal and hence a creation of nature. Its owner, who lives in the United States, provided the samples to Rakovan to assess the crystallinity of four specimens, all of which had been found decades ago in Venezuela.

  7. Lessons learned from decommissioning projects at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, M.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes lessons learned over the last 20 years from 12 decommissioning projects at Los Alamos National Laboratory. These lessons relate both to overall program management and to management of specific projects during the planning and operations phases. The issues include waste management; the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA); the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); contracting; public involvement; client/customer interface; and funding. Key elements of our approach are to be proactive; follow the observation method; perform field activities concurrently; develop strategies to keep reportable incidents from delaying work; seek and use programs, methods, etc., in existence to shorten learning curves; network to help develop solutions; and avoid overstudying and overcharacterizing. This approach results in preliminary plans that require very little revision before implementation, reasonable costs and schedules, early acquisition of permits and NEPA documents, preliminary characterization reports, and contracting documents. Our track record is good -- the last four projects (uranium and plutonium-processing facility and three research reactors) have been on budget and on schedule.

  8. World's Largest Gold Crystal Studied at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, Sven; Nakotte, Heinz

    2014-04-03

    When geologist John Rakovan needed better tools to investigate whether a dazzling 217.78-gram piece of gold was in fact the world's largest single-crystal specimen - a distinguishing factor that would not only drastically increase its market value but also provide a unique research opportunity - he traveled to Los Alamos National Laboratory's Lujan Neutron Scattering Center to peer deep inside the mineral using neutron diffractometry. Neutrons, different from other probes such as X-rays and electrons, are able to penetrate many centimeters deep into most materials. Revealing the inner structure of a crystal without destroying the sample - imperative, as this one is worth an estimated $1.5 million - would allow Rakovan and Lujan Center collaborators Sven Vogel and Heinz Nakotte to prove that this exquisite nugget, which seemed almost too perfect and too big to be real, was a single crystal and hence a creation of nature. Its owner, who lives in the United States, provided the samples to Rakovan to assess the crystallinity of four specimens, all of which had been found decades ago in Venezuela.

  9. Installation of passive-active shufflers at Los Alamos plant environments

    SciTech Connect

    Hurd, J.R.; Hsue, F.; Rinard, P.M.; Wachter, J.R.; Davidson, C.

    1994-08-01

    Two Canberra-built passive-active {sup 252}Cf shufflers of Los Alamos hardware and software design have been installed and are presently undergoing calibration and certification at Los Alamos National Laboratory. These instruments fulfill important safeguards and accountability measurement requirements for special nuclear material in matrices too dense or otherwise not appropriate for typical gamma-ray techniques. The ability of the shuffler to obtain precise assays under conditions of intense passive emissions of neutrons and gamma rays is a valuable asset in plant environments. This paper reports on the procurement process and the various steps involved in the installation of two shufflers at Los Alamos, one at the Chemical Metallurgical Research (CMR) Building Waste Assay Facility at TA-3 and the other at the PF4 Plutonium Facility at TA-55. Details are given on the certification procedure including the development of standards, various expected matrices, and calibration. Some safety issues are addressed, and some preliminary performance characteristics are presented based on measured background rates in the plant environments.

  10. Current Directions in Videoconferencing Tele-Mental Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Lisa K.; Frueh, B. Christopher; Grubaugh, Anouk L.; Egede, Leonard; Elhai, Jon D.

    2009-01-01

    The provision of mental health services via videoconferencing tele-mental health has become an increasingly routine component of mental health service delivery throughout the world. Emphasizing the research literature since 2003, we examine: 1) the extent to which the field of tele-mental health has advanced the research agenda previously suggested; and 2) implications for tele-mental health care delivery for special clinical populations. Previous findings have demonstrated that tele-mental health services are satisfactory to patients, improve outcomes, and are probably cost effective. In the very small number of randomized controlled studies that have been conducted to date, tele-mental health has demonstrated equivalent efficacy compared to face-to-face care in a variety of clinical settings and with specific patient populations. However, methodologically flawed or limited research studies are the norm, and thus the research agenda for tele-mental health has not been fully maximized. Implications for future research and practice are discussed. PMID:20161010

  11. Water management: Current and future challenges and research directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosgrove, William J.; Loucks, Daniel P.

    2015-06-01

    Water distinguishes our planet compared to all the others we know about. While the global supply of available freshwater is more than adequate to meet all current and foreseeable water demands, its spatial and temporal distributions are not. There are many regions where our freshwater resources are inadequate to meet domestic, economic development and environmental needs. In such regions, the lack of adequate clean water to meet human drinking water and sanitation needs is indeed a constraint on human health and productivity and hence on economic development as well as on the maintenance of a clean environment and healthy ecosystems. All of us involved in research must find ways to remove these constraints. We face multiple challenges in doing that, especially given a changing and uncertain future climate, and a rapidly growing population that is driving increased social and economic development, globalization, and urbanization. How best to meet these challenges requires research in all aspects of water management. Since 1965, the journal Water Resources Research has played an important role in reporting and disseminating current research related to managing the quantity and quality and cost of this resource. This paper identifies the issues facing water managers today and future research needed to better inform those who strive to create a more sustainable and desirable future.

  12. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen , Todd

    2007-03-08

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness.

  13. Science and Technology Research Directions for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is a unique and unprecedented space research facility. Never before have scientists and engineers had access to such a robust, multidisciplinary, long-duration microgravity laboratory. To date, the research community has enjoyed success aboard such platforms as Skylab, the Space Shuttle, and the Russian Mir space station. However, these platforms were and are limited in ways that the ISS is not. Encompassing four times the volume of Mir, the ISS will support dedicated research facilities for at least a dozen scientific and engineering disciplines. Unlike the Space Shuttle, which must return to Earth after less than three weeks in space, the ISS will accommodate experiments that require many weeks even months to complete. Continual access to a microgravity laboratory will allow selected scientific disciplines to progress at a rate far greater than that obtainable with current space vehicles.

  14. Direct dark matter searches and the CDEX research program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Henry T.; Yue, Qian; Kang, Kejun

    2016-07-01

    We sketch the landscape which gives rise to the missing energy density problem and highlight the direct experimental searches of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) dark matter. An overview of the China Jinping underground laboratory as well as the China dark matter experiment (CDEX) dark matter program based on germanium detectors with sub-keV sensitivities is presented. The achieved results, status as well as the R&D and technology acquisition efforts towards a ton-scale experiment are reported.

  15. Preparing Los Alamos National Laboratory's Waste Management Program for the Future - 12175

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Scotty W.; Dorries, Alison M.; Singledecker, Steven; Henckel, George

    2012-07-01

    The waste management program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is undergoing significant transition to establish a lean highly functioning waste management program that will succeed the large environmental cleanup waste management program. In the coming years, the environmental cleanup activities will be mostly completed and the effort will change to long-term stewardship. What will remain in waste management is a smaller program focused on direct off-site shipping to cost-effectively enable the enduring mission of the laboratory in support of the national nuclear weapons program and fundamental science and research. It is essential that LANL implement a highly functioning efficient waste management program in support of the core missions of the national weapons program and fundamental science and research - and LANL is well on the way to that goal. As LANL continues the transition process, the following concepts have been validated: - Business drivers including the loss of onsite disposal access and completion of major environmental cleanup activities will drive large changes in waste management strategies and program. - A well conceived organizational structure; formal management systems; a customer service attitude; and enthusiastic managers are core to a successful waste management program. - During times of organizational transition, a project management approach to managing change in a complex work place with numerous complex deliverables is successful strategy. - Early and effective engagement with waste generators, especially Project Managers, is critical to successful waste planning. - A well-trained flexible waste management work force is vital. Training plans should include continuous training as a strategy. - A shared fate approach to managing institutional waste decisions, such as the LANL Waste Management Recharge Board is effective. - An efficient WM program benefits greatly from modern technology and innovation in managing waste data and

  16. Federal enclaves: The community culture of Department of Energy cities Livermore, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Patrick Kerry

    During the Second World War, the United States Government funded the research of nuclear fusion to create the first atomic weapons. To accomplish this task, the Manhattan Engineering District recruited scientists and engineers to remote sites in New Mexico, Tennessee, and Washington. During the five decades of the Cold War, the congressionally created Atomic Energy Commission, and later the Department of Energy (DOE), funded and operated numerous facilities throughout the United States. The mission of the facilities was to design and stockpile atomic weapons and to further the understanding of nuclear energy. This dissertation examines the influences of the United States federal government on three communities associated with these facilities, Los Alamos, New Mexico, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and Livermore, California. As isolated secret cities, these environments each created complex community structures. This work identifies how, unlike other community settings, the influences of the federal government, both directly and indirectly, created distinctive patterns of behavior within the residents of each city. Examining these behaviors within the framework of the dissertation's chapters provides the necessary context to understand fully the community culture of these Department of Energy cities. This work addresses contemporary community settings in new ways. It approaches the topic broadly by examining five specific areas of community interaction: social, political, business and economic, educational, and ethical. Through the use of oral history methodology and techniques, the researcher captured significant information from respondents. This approach provides valuable insights to the behavior and interaction of the individual populations while revealing important insights all aspects of each town's community culture.

  17. Confronting AIDS. Directions for Public Health, Health Care, and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute of Medicine (NAS), Washington, DC.

    This book is addressed to anyone involved with or affected by the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic, including legislators, researchers, health care personnel, insurance providers, educators, health officials, executives in the pharmaceutical industry, blood bank administrators, and other concerned individuals. The following…

  18. Focus on environmental justice: new directions in international research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Jayajit

    2017-03-01

    More than three decades since the emergence of the environmental justice (EJ) movement in the U.S., environmental injustices continue to unfold across the world to include new narratives of air and water pollution, as well as new forms of injustices associated with climate change, energy use, natural disasters, urban greenspaces, and public policies that adversely affect socially disadvantaged communities and future generations. This focus issue of Environmental Research Letters provides an interdisciplinary forum for conceptual, methodological, and empirical scholarship on EJ activism, research, and policy that highlights the continuing salience of an EJ perspective to understanding nature-society linkages. The 16 letters published in this focus issue address a variety of environmental issues and social injustices in multiple countries across the world, and advance EJ research by: (1) demonstrating how environmental injustice emerges through particular policies and political processes; (2) exploring environmental injustices associated with industrialization and industrial pollution; and (3) documenting unjust exposure to various environmental hazards in specific urban landscapes. As the discourse of EJ continues to evolve both topically and geographically, we hope that this focus issue will help establish research agendas for the next generation of EJ scholarship on distributive, procedural, participatory, and other forms of injustices, as well as their interrelationships.

  19. Future research directions in seeking countermeasures to weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Kenneth M.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to briefly review the state of knowledge concerning the adaptive properties of mammalian skeletal muscle in response to varying duration in weightlessness, to identify voids in the understanding of this adaptive process, and to provide some insight for undertaking future research on this important topic.

  20. Measuring Change: Current Trends and Future Directions in Microgenetic Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Emma; Siegler, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This special issue is dedicated to research that adopts the microgenetic method in order to investigate change as it is happening. In this commentary we reflect on the diversity of the articles included in this special issue, and examine how the findings from these articles relate to five critical features of change: path, rate, breadth,…

  1. Future Directions for NCI’s Surveillance Research Program

    Cancer.gov

    Since the early 1970s, NCI’s SEER program has been an invaluable resource for statistics on cancer in the United States. For the past several years, SEER researchers have been working toward a much broader and comprehensive goal for providing cancer stati

  2. Trends and Directions in Family Research in the 1980s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berardo, Felix M.

    1990-01-01

    Introduces special journal issue devoted to a review of research on marriage and the family over the past decade. Provides overview of marital issues, feminism, parent-child relationships, day care, divorce, remarriage, stepfamilies, adolescence, later life families, religion, Blacks, Hispanics, adolescent childbearing, health, employment,…

  3. Help for the Reading Teacher: New Directions in Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, William D., Ed.

    This book is designed to be a bridge between teachers and research in such topics as the cloze procedure, readability formulas, miscue analysis, reading strategies, informal reading inventories, and concepts and reading in the content areas. "Children's Behavior While Reading" by H. Robinson serves as a bridge between Huey's early beginning and…

  4. Women in Management: Leadership Theories, Research Results, and Future Directions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putnam, Linda L.

    This review of the literature about women in management advocates the pursuit of research on women executives as unique components in the organizational setting, with the warning that careful and unremitting attention be paid to the selection of theoretical perspectives. It examines trait and role theory, and discusses such factors as…

  5. Crashdynamics with DYNA3D: Capabilities and research directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whirley, Robert G.; Engelmann, Bruce E.

    1993-01-01

    The application of the explicit nonlinear finite element analysis code DYNA3D to crashworthiness problems is discussed. Emphasized in the first part of this work are the most important capabilities of an explicit code for crashworthiness analyses. The areas with significant research promise for the computational simulation of crash events are then addressed.

  6. Immigrant Families over the Life Course: Research Directions and Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Rebecca L.; Glick, Jennifer E.; Bures, Regina M.

    2009-01-01

    Family researchers and policy makers are giving increasing attention to the consequences of immigration for families. Immigration affects the lives of family members who migrate as well as those who remain behind and has important consequences for family formation, kinship ties, living arrangements, and children's outcomes. We present a selective…

  7. New Directions in Mass Communications Research: Physiological Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, James E.

    Psychophysiological research into the effects of mass media, specifically the music of the masses, promises increased insight into the control the media exert on all their consumers. Attention and retention of mass media messages can be tested by measuring the receiver's electrodernal activity, pupil dilation, peripheral vasodilation, and heart…

  8. Research Directions Suggested by the A.C.L.U.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triandis, Harry C.

    1975-01-01

    Translates questions submitted by Alan Reitman, Associate Executive Director of the American Civil Liberties Union which the practitioners of civil liberties would like behavioral scientists to answer into researchable topics. Reviews some of the literature relevant to each, and suggests the kinds of studies needed to provide some answers.…

  9. Symposium--Accentuating the Positive: Directions in Pronunciation Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derwing, Tracey M.; Munro, Murray J.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past few decades perspectives on second language (L2) pronunciation have evolved from pessimistic appraisals of the capabilities of L2 learners and doubts about the value of instruction to a view of pronunciation teaching as an effective and important part of language pedagogy. Earlier research on the teaching of pronunciation dwelt…

  10. Studying Science Teacher Identity: Current Insights and Future Research Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avraamidou, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 10?years an increasing number of articles have been published in leading science education journals that report on research about teacher identity and describe interventions that support teacher identity development. My purpose in this review paper is to examine how the construct of science teacher identity has been conceptualised…

  11. Waste processing cost recovery at Los Alamos National Laboratory--analysis and recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, Steven Richard

    2008-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is implementing full cost recovery for waste processing in fiscal year 2009 (FY2009), after a transition year in FY2008. Waste processing cost recovery has been implemented in various forms across the nuclear weapons complex and in corporate America. The fundamental reasoning of sending accurate price signals to waste generators is economically sound, and leads to waste minimization and reduced waste expense over time. However, Los Alamos faces significant implementation challenges because of its status as a government-owned, contractor-operated national scientific institution with a diverse suite of experimental and environmental cleanup activities, and the fact that this represents a fundamental change in how waste processing is viewed by the institution. This paper describes the issues involved during the transition to cost recovery and the ultimate selection of the business model. Of the six alternative cost recovery models evaluated, the business model chosen to be implemented in FY2009 is Recharge Plus Generators Pay Distributed Direct. Under this model, all generators who produce waste must pay a distributed direct share associated with their specific waste type to use a waste processing capability. This cost share is calculated using the distributed direct method on the fixed cost only, i.e., the fixed cost share is based on each program's forecast proportion of the total Los Alamos volume forecast of each waste type. (Fixed activities are those required to establish the waste processing capability, i.e., to make the process ready, permitted, certified, and prepared to handle the first unit ofwaste. Therefore, the fixed cost ends at the point just before waste begins 'to be processed. The activities to actually process the waste are considered variable.) The volume of waste actually sent for processing is charged a unit cost based solely on the variable cost of disposing of that waste. The total cost recovered each year is the

  12. Environmental assessment for the scintillation vial crusher TA-54, Area L, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    Research and development projects conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory produce scintillation vials as waste from normal operations. These vials contain radioisotopes such as tritium, carbon-14, and isotopes of transuranic elements such as americium-241, plutonium-238 and -239. The scintillation fluids contain some solvents defined as hazardous waste. The vials are thus classed as mixed waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Laboratory has in storage some 520 drums of stored vials and is accumulating some 70 to 140 more drums annually. The drained vial fragments can be disposed of at TA-54 as low-level radioactive waste (LLW). The bulked liquid will be stored at TA-54 as RCRA mixed waste until treatment/disposal options are developed. Other waste from the vial crushing operation will also be stored at TA-54 as mixed waste. By operating the scintillation vial crusher, the storage space needed for this RCRA mixed waste stream can be reduced to about 5% of that currently being used. The other 95% will be vial fragments that can be disposed immediately as LLW.

  13. Bulgarian Megaliths - Present State and Future Research Directions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsonev, L. V.; Kolev, D. Z.

    A first attempt is made to provide a global picture of the megaliths in Thrace (South East Europe); also the problems related to their dating are explicated. The location and the conventional (indirect) dating of the menhirs and dolmens mainly in Bulgaria, but partially also in Greece and Turkey are summarized. The necessity of direct dating - preferably by luminescence means - is discussed. International collaboration is proposed for creating a full and precise picture of the Thracian megaliths within the chronological framework of the pan-European (Mediterranean) megalithic region.

  14. Status and future directions for advanced accelerator research - conventional and non-conventional collider concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between advanced accelerator research and future directions for particle physics is discussed. Comments are made about accelerator research trends in hadron colliders, muon colliders, and e{sup +}3{sup {minus}} linear colliders.

  15. ZERT Final Scientific Report Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Pawar, Rajesh J.

    2011-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) activities for the Center for Zero Emission Research and Technology (ZERT) have fallen into three broad research areas: (1) How do you reduce uncertainty in assuring prior to operation that an engineered geologic site will meet a specific performance goal (e.g., <0.01% leak per year)? (2) What are key monitoring needs for verifying that an engineered geologic site is meeting a performance goal? (3) What are potential vulnerabilities for breeches in containment of CO{sub 2}, and how could they be mitigated either prior to operation or in the event that a threshold is exceeded? We have utilized LANL's multi-disciplinary expertise and an integrated approach combining laboratory experiments, field observations and numerical simulations to address various research issues related to above-mentioned areas. While there have been a number of major milestones achieved as described in past quarterly reports, two of the major accomplishments resulting from LANL's efforts include: (1) Development of the CO{sub 2}-PENS systems framework for long-term performance analysis of geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration sites. CO{sub 2}-PENS is first-ever systems analysis tool designed for assessment of CO{sub 2} sequestration sites. (2) One of the few field studies to-date focused on understanding impact of CO{sub 2} leakage on shallow groundwater chemistry. Two major conclusions of the study are as follows: the impact of co-contaminants transported with deeper brine on shallow groundwater quality is likely to be much larger than that of the CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}-induced geochemical reactions and in certain geochemical environment the reactivity of pure CO{sub 2} will not be sufficient to mobilize metals beyond background levels.

  16. Recent directions taken in water, energy, and biogeochemical budgets research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lins, Harry F.

    1994-01-01

    Understanding and predicting global change is a major scientific focus of the late 20th century. Although atmospheric scientists have made substantial progress in developing models that account for many components of the climate system, significant progress is needed in understanding processes associated with the exchange of water, energy, and carbon between terrestrial systems and the atmosphere.To strengthen terrestrial process research, especially research associated with the interactions of water, energy, gases, nutrients, and vegetation, the U.S. Geological Survey initiated an intensive study of Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budgets (WEBB). WEBB is aimed at improving understanding of processes controlling terrestrial water, energy, and biogeochemical fluxes, their interactions, and their relations to climatic variables; and the ability to predict continental water, energy, and biogeochemical budgets over a range of spatial and temporal scales.

  17. Climate strength: a new direction for climate research.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Benjamin; Salvaggio, Amy Nicole; Subirats, Montse

    2002-04-01

    Climate strength was conceptualized within D. Chan's (1998) discussion of compositional models and the concept of culture strength from the organizational culture literature. Climate strength was operationalized in terms of within-group variability in climate perceptions-the less within-group variability, the stronger the climate. The authors studied climate strength in the context of research linking employee service climate perceptions to customer satisfaction. The hypothesis was tested that climate strength moderates the relationship between employee perceptions of service climate and customer satisfaction experiences. Partial support for the hypothesis was reported in both a concurrent and predictive (3-year) test across 118 branches of a bank. In the predictive study only the interaction of climate and climate strength predicted customer satisfaction. Implications for future research on climate and climate strength are discussed.

  18. Future Directions in Malignant Hyperthermia Research and Patient Care

    PubMed Central

    Hirshey Dirksen, Sharon J.; Larach, Marilyn Green; Rosenberg, Henry; Brandom, Barbara W.; Parness, Jerome; Lang, Robert Scott; Gangadharan, Meera; Pezalski, Tyler

    2011-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a complex pharmacogenetic disorder of muscle metabolism. To more closely examine the complexities of MH and other related muscle disorders, the Malignant Hyperthermia Association of the United States recently sponsored a scientific conference at which an interdisciplinary group of experts gathered to share new information and ideas. In this Special Article, we highlight key concepts and theories presented at the conference along with exciting new trends and challenges in MH research and patient care. PMID:21709147

  19. The microball and Gammasphere: Research highlights and future directions

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, M.; Sarantites, D.G.; LaFosse, D.R.; Lerma, F.

    1996-12-31

    The Microball, a compact, 4{pi} charged-particle detector array, has been used in conjunction with Gammasphere for numerous physics experiments, and more are planned in the near future. A summary of this research program is presented, and the device and its capabilities are described. An example of its use in the study of the population and entry state excitation energy distributions of normal and superdeformed bands in {sup 82}Sr is presented.

  20. US Army Research Laboratory Directed Energy Internship Program 2014

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    titanium sapphire (Ti:sapph) laser was used that was pumped with a frequency doubled Spectra-Physics neodymium -doped yttrium vanadate laser. The 8...efficiency of several neodymium (Nd):yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) samples of different concentrations and therefore, the technique will continue to be...Nd neodymium NPs nanoparticles NRL US Naval Research Laboratory O oxygen PMT photomultiplier tube SBS stimulated Brillouin scattering SD

  1. Future directions of CAM research in pediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Post-White, Janice; Hawks, Ria; O'Mara, Ann; Ott, Mary Jane

    2006-01-01

    Children with cancer are using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to relieve symptoms, reduce side effects of treatment, and cope with the emotional aspects of having a life-threatening illness. Parental decisions about using CAM should be based on studies of efficacy and safety. Unfortunately, little evidence of efficacy is available for the majority of CAM therapies. This article discusses the methodological challenges to conducting CAM research in children and the evidence needed to support integrative medicine in pediatric oncology.

  2. Future Directions in Rotorcraft Technology at Ames Research Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    being pursued within the Army/NASA Rotorcraft Division. High Lift Airfoils and the Stall Free Rotor Unlike fixed wing aircraft, helicopter rotors have...pitch angle control inputs, a revolutionary new concept will become a reality - the Stall- Free Rotor. The implications for rotorcraft, beyond the...Rotorcraft Algorithm Development and Integrated Control Laws ( RADICL ) program, the U.S. Army, Sikorsky, ZF Luftfahrttechnik, and NASA Ames Research Center

  3. FY 1999 Laboratory Directed Research and Development annual report

    SciTech Connect

    PJ Hughes

    2000-06-13

    A short synopsis of each project is given covering the following main areas of research and development: Atmospheric sciences; Biotechnology; Chemical and instrumentation analysis; Computer and information science; Design and manufacture engineering; Ecological science; Electronics and sensors; Experimental technology; Health protection and dosimetry; Hydrologic and geologic science; Marine sciences; Materials science; Nuclear science and engineering; Process science and engineering; Sociotechnical systems analysis; Statistics and applied mathematics; and Thermal and energy systems.

  4. Citizen science: a new direction in canine behavior research.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Julie; Spicer Rice, Eleanor

    2015-01-01

    Researchers increasingly rely on members of the public to contribute to scientific projects-from collecting or identifying, to analyzing and disseminating data. The "citizen science" model proves useful to many thematically distinctive fields, like ornithology, astronomy, and phenology. The recent formalization of citizen science projects addresses technical issues related to volunteer participation--like data quality--so that citizen scientists can make longstanding, meaningful contributions to scientific projects. Since the late 1990s, canine science research has relied with greater frequency on the participation of the general public, particularly dog owners. These researchers do not typically consider the methods and technical issues that those conducting citizen science projects embrace and continue to investigate. As more canine science studies rely on public input, an in-depth knowledge of the benefits and challenges of citizen science can help produce relevant, high-quality data while increasing the general public's understanding of canine behavior and cognition as well as the scientific process. We examine the benefits and challenges of current citizen science models in an effort to enhance canine citizen science project preparation, execution, and dissemination. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Canine Behavior.

  5. Future directions of sickle cell disease research: the NIH perspective.

    PubMed

    Hoots, W Keith; Shurin, Susan B

    2012-08-01

    Efforts to enhance therapy for children and adults with sickle cell disease (SCD) have proven more challenging than might have been predicted from the fact that an understanding of the underlying pathogenesis antedated that of many other diseases for which good treatments presently exist. The multi-organ injury that occurs with SCD certainly contributes to this clinical reality. Research over decades indicates that the primary defect in hemoglobin that results in polymerization of the protein under low oxygen conditions and resultant cellular deformity of the red blood cell initiates a complex downstream pathogenesis associated with vascular injury and organ ischemia. Deciphering this in a manner that informs successful therapies that improve all target organs continues to challenge hematologists. The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) is dedicated to support research across the basic science, translational and clinical spectrum to achieve these clinical outcomes. The following provides a brief summary of the research strategies which NHLBI is presently supporting and will support in the future to enhance care and ultimately, to effect cure of this hemoglobin disease that causes such suffering to those who inherit this monogenic disease.

  6. Historical Perspective and Future Directions in Platelet Research

    PubMed Central

    Coller, Barry S.

    2011-01-01

    Platelets are a remarkable mammalian adaptation that are required for human survival by virtue of their ability to prevent and arrest bleeding. Ironically, however, in the past century, the platelets’ hemostatic activity became maladaptive for the increasingly large percentage of individuals who develop age-dependent progressive atherosclerosis. As a result, platelets also make a major contribution to ischemic thrombotic vascular disease, the leading cause of death worldwide. In this brief review, I provide historical descriptions of a highly selected group of topics to provide a framework for understanding our current knowledge and the trends that are likely to continue into the future of platelet research. For convenience, I separate the eras of platelet research into the “Descriptive Period” extending from ~1880-1960 and the “Mechanistic Period” encompassing the past ~50 years since 1960. We currently are reaching yet another inflection point, as there is a major shift from a focus on traditional biochemistry and cell and molecular biology to an era of single molecule biophysics, single cell biology, single cell molecular biology, structural biology, computational simulations, and the high-throughput, data-dense techniques collectively named with the “omics” postfix. Given the progress made in understanding, diagnosing, and treating many rare and common platelet disorders during the past 50 years, I think it appropriate to consider it a Golden Age of Platelet Research and to recognize all of the investigators who have made important contributions to this remarkable achievement. PMID:21781274

  7. Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Project Publications (1979-1996)

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhala, E.R.; Klein, S.H.

    1997-06-01

    This over-350 title publication list reflects the accomplishments of Los Alamos Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project researchers, who, since 1979, have been conducting multidisciplinary research to help determine if Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is a suitable site for a high-level waste repository. The titles can be accessed in two ways: by year, beginning with 1996 and working back to 1979, and by subject area: mineralogy/petrology/geology, volcanism, radionuclide solubility/ground-water chemistry; radionuclide sorption and transport; modeling/validation/field studies; summary/status reports, and quality assurance.

  8. Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Project publications (1979--1994)

    SciTech Connect

    Bowker, L.M.; Espinosa, M.L.; Klein, S.H.

    1995-11-01

    This over-300 title publication list reflects the accomplishments of Los Alamos Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project researchers, who, since 1979, have been conducting multidisciplinary research to help determine if Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is a suitable site for a high-level waste repository. The titles can be accessed in two ways: by year, beginning with 1994 and working back to 1979, and by subject area: mineralogy/petrology/geology, volcanism, radionuclide solubility/groundwater chemistry; radionuclide sorption and transport; modeling/validation/field studies; summary/status reports, and quality assurance.

  9. New facility for ion beam materials characterization and modification at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Tesmer, J.R.; Maggiore, C.J.; Parkin, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    The Ion Beam Materials Laboratory (IBML) is a new Los Alamos laboratory devoted to the characterization and modification of the near surfaces of materials. The primary instruments of the IBML are a tandem electrostatic accelerator, a National Electrostatics Corp. Model 9SDH, coupled with a Varian CF-3000 ion implanter. The unique organizational structure of the IBML as well as the operational characteristics of the 9SDH (after approximately 3000 h of operation) and the laboratories' research capabilities will be discussed. Examples of current research results will also be presented. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  10. 1993 Northern goshawk inventory on portions of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, D.T.; Kennedy, P.L.

    1994-06-01

    Northern goshawks (Accipiter gentilis) (hereafter referred to as goshawk) is a large forest dwelling hawk. Goshawks may be declining in population and reproduction in the southwestern United States. Reasons for the possible decline in goshawk populations include timber harvesting resulting in the loss of nesting habitat, toxic chemicals, and the effects of drought, fire, and disease. Thus, there is a need to determine their population status and assess impacts of management activities in potential goshawk habitat. Inventory for the goshawk was conducted on 2,254 ha of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to determine the presence of nesting goshawks on LANL lands. This information can be incorporated into LANL`s environmental management program. The inventory was conducted by Colorado State University personnel from May 12 to July 30, 1993. This report summarizes the results of this inventory.

  11. The cyber threat landscape: Challenges and future research directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Santiago; Kott, Alexander; Barabási, Albert-László

    2014-07-01

    While much attention has been paid to the vulnerability of computer networks to node and link failure, there is limited systematic understanding of the factors that determine the likelihood that a node (computer) is compromised. We therefore collect threat log data in a university network to study the patterns of threat activity for individual hosts. We relate this information to the properties of each host as observed through network-wide scans, establishing associations between the network services a host is running and the kinds of threats to which it is susceptible. We propose a methodology to associate services to threats inspired by the tools used in genetics to identify statistical associations between mutations and diseases. The proposed approach allows us to determine probabilities of infection directly from observation, offering an automated high-throughput strategy to develop comprehensive metrics for cyber-security.

  12. Deaf children and bullying: directions for future research.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Mary T; Miller, Margery

    2006-01-01

    U.S. SCHOOLS are currently addressing bullying and its effects on children. Bullying is characterized as repetitive verbal teasing, threatening, physical intimidation, demeaning others, violent acts, torture, and other forms of verbal and physical aggression (Smith and Sharp, 1994a). Little is known about bullying and its impact on deaf children. Measures to describe and quantify bullying factors in this population should be developed and validated that address characteristics of deaf victims and bullies, various types of school settings deaf children attend, bullying dynamics that may be unique to this population and its peers, and other environmental factors. The presence of disabilities besides deafness, social support systems of deaf children and their families, sociocultural background, degree of hearing loss, parental educational levels and occupations, socioeconomic status, and linguistic backgrounds should also be considered. This discussion highlights issues and precautions concerning future directions for studying bullying with deaf children.

  13. ACCELERATION OF LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY TRANSURANIC WASTE DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect

    O'LEARY, GERALD A.

    2007-01-04

    Energy Los Alamos Site Office, Carlsbad Field Office and the Department of Energy Headquaeters. Rather than simply processing containers as retrieved, the plan places priority on efficient curie disposition, a direct correlation to reducing risk. Key elements of the approch include balancing inventory and operational risks, tailoring methods to meet requirements, optimizing existing facilities, equipment and staff, and incorporating best practices from other Department of Energy sites. With sufficient funding this will enable LANL to ship the above-ground high activity contact-handled transuranic waste offsite by the end of Fiscal Year (FY) 2007 and to disposition the remaining above- and below-ground contact-handled and remote-handled transuranic waste inventory by December 2010. Nearly 70% of the contact-handled transuranic waste containers, including the high activity waste, require processing and repackaging before characterization and certification for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. LANL is employing a balanced risk approach that accomplishes significant long-term risk reduction by accepting short-term increased facility operations risk under well-developed and justified interim controls. Reviews of facility conditions and additional analyses show that the Waste Characterization, Reduction and Repackaging Facility and the Radioassay and Nondestructive Testing Facility are the most appropriate facilities to safetly remediate, repackage, and ship lower activity and the remaining high activity drums. Updated safety documentation supporting limited Hazard Category 2 operations in these facilities has been developed. Once approved, limited-term operations to process the high activity drums can begin in early 2007, building upon the experience base established performing Hazard Category 3 operations processing lower activity waste in these facilities. LANL is also implementing a series of actions to improve and sustain operations for processing contact

  14. Researches on direct injection in internal-combustion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuscher, Jean E

    1941-01-01

    These researches present a solution for reducing the fatigue of the Diesel engine by permitting the preservation of its components and, at the same time, raising its specific horsepower to a par with that of carburetor engines, while maintaining for the Diesel engine its perogative of burning heavy fuel under optimum economical conditions. The feeding of Diesel engines by injection pumps actuated by engine compression achieves the required high speeds of injection readily and permits rigorous control of the combustible charge introduced into each cylinder and of the peak pressure in the resultant cycle.

  15. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. FY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of fiscal year 1993. This report describes the projects supported and summarizes their accomplishments. The program advances the Laboratory`s core competencies, foundations, scientific capability, and permits exploration of exciting new opportunities. Reports are given from the following divisions: Accelerator and Fusion Research, Chemical Sciences, Earth Sciences, Energy and Environment, Engineering, Environment -- Health and Safety, Information and Computing Sciences, Life Sciences, Materials Sciences, Nuclear Science, Physics, and Structural Biology. (GHH)

  16. Chemistry and materials science progress report. Weapons-supporting research and laboratory directed research and development: FY 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This report covers different materials and chemistry research projects carried out a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during 1995 in support of nuclear weapons programs and other programs. There are 16 papers supporting weapons research and 12 papers supporting laboratory directed research.

  17. Perspectives on Research: Recent Findings and Future Directions: A Report of the Iowa Research Consortium for Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollinger, Timothy, Ed.; And Others

    The monograph addresses the issue of research on learning disabilities (LD) and proposes directions for research in Iowa by means of four articles, a report of a survey of needed research, and six brief response papers. The first paper, "Issues on the Identification of Learning Disabled Children" (S.W. Ehly), discusses the problems of…

  18. 50 years of Arabidopsis research: highlights and future directions.

    PubMed

    Provart, Nicholas J; Alonso, Jose; Assmann, Sarah M; Bergmann, Dominique; Brady, Siobhan M; Brkljacic, Jelena; Browse, John; Chapple, Clint; Colot, Vincent; Cutler, Sean; Dangl, Jeff; Ehrhardt, David; Friesner, Joanna D; Frommer, Wolf B; Grotewold, Erich; Meyerowitz, Elliot; Nemhauser, Jennifer; Nordborg, Magnus; Pikaard, Craig; Shanklin, John; Somerville, Chris; Stitt, Mark; Torii, Keiko U; Waese, Jamie; Wagner, Doris; McCourt, Peter

    2016-02-01

    922 I. 922 II. 922 III. 925 IV. 925 V. 926 VI. 927 VII. 928 VIII. 929 IX. 930 X. 931 XI. 932 XII. 933 XIII. Natural variation and genome-wide association studies 934 XIV. 934 XV. 935 XVI. 936 XVII. 937 937 References 937 SUMMARY: The year 2014 marked the 25(th) International Conference on Arabidopsis Research. In the 50 yr since the first International Conference on Arabidopsis Research, held in 1965 in Göttingen, Germany, > 54 000 papers that mention Arabidopsis thaliana in the title, abstract or keywords have been published. We present herein a citational network analysis of these papers, and touch on some of the important discoveries in plant biology that have been made in this powerful model system, and highlight how these discoveries have then had an impact in crop species. We also look to the future, highlighting some outstanding questions that can be readily addressed in Arabidopsis. Topics that are discussed include Arabidopsis reverse genetic resources, stock centers, databases and online tools, cell biology, development, hormones, plant immunity, signaling in response to abiotic stress, transporters, biosynthesis of cells walls and macromolecules such as starch and lipids, epigenetics and epigenomics, genome-wide association studies and natural variation, gene regulatory networks, modeling and systems biology, and synthetic biology.

  19. The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders. VI: future directions.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Gary C; Gonzalez, Yoly M; Ohrbach, Richard; Truelove, Edmond L; Sommers, Earl; Look, John O; Schiffman, Eric L

    2010-01-01

    The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) Validation Project has provided the first comprehensive assessment of reliability and validity of the original Axis I and II. In addition, Axis I of the RDC/TMD was revised with estimates of reliability and validity. These findings are reported in the five preceding articles in this series. The aim of this article is to present further revisions of Axis I and II for consideration by the TMD research and clinical communities. Potential Axis I revisions include addressing concerns with orofacial pain differential diagnosis and changes in nomenclature in an attempt to provide improved consistency with other musculoskeletal diagnostic systems. In addition, expansion of the RDC/TMD to include the less common TMD conditions and disorders would make it more comprehensive and clinically useful. The original standards for diagnostic sensitivity ( < or = 0.70) and specificity (< or = 0.95) should be reconsidered to reflect changes in the field since the RDC/TMD was published in 1992. Pertaining to Axis II, current recommendations for all chronic pain conditions include standardized instruments and expansion of the domains assessed. In addition, there is need for improved clinical efficiency of Axis II instruments and for exploring methods to better integrate Axis I and II in clinical settings.

  20. The international migration of dentists: directions for research and policy.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Madhan; Brennan, David Simon; Spencer, A John; Short, Stephanie Doris

    2016-08-01

    In 2010, the World Health Organization Global Code of Practice for International Recruitment of Health Personnel (the WHO Code) was adopted by the 193 Member States of the WHO. The WHO Code is a tool for global diplomacy, providing a policy framework to address the challenges involved in managing dentist migration, as well as improving the retention of dental personnel in source countries. The WHO Code recognizes the importance of migrant dentist data to support migration polices; minimum data on the inflows, outflows and stock of dentists are vital. Data on reasons for dentist migration, job satisfaction, cultural adaptation issues, geographic distribution and practice patterns in the destination country are important for any policy analysis on dentist migration. Key challenges in the implementation of the WHO Code include the necessity to coordinate with multiple stakeholders and the lack of integrated data on dentist migration and the lack of shared understanding of the interrelatedness of workforce migration, needs and planning. The profession of dentistry also requires coordination with a number of private and nongovernmental organizations. Many migrant dentist source countries, in African and the South-Asian WHO Regions, are in the early stages of building capacity in dentist migration data collection and research systems. Due to these shortcomings, it is prudent that developed countries take the initiative to pursue further research into the migration issue and respond to this global challenge.

  1. Fatigue in Multiple Sclerosis: Misconceptions and Future Research Directions

    PubMed Central

    Rudroff, Thorsten; Kindred, John H.; Ketelhut, Nathaniel B.

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue is one of the most disabling side effects in people with multiple sclerosis. While this fact is well known, there has been a remarkable lack of progress in determining the pathophysiological mechanisms behind fatigue and the establishment of effective treatments. The main barrier has been the lack of a unified definition of fatigue that can be objectively tested with validated experimental models. In this “perspective article” we propose the use of the following model and definition of fatigue: the decrease in physical and/or mental performance that results from changes in central, psychological, and/or peripheral factors. These changes depend on the task being performed, the environmental conditions it is performed in, and the physical and mental capacity of the individual. Our definition and model of fatigue outlines specific causes of fatigue and how it affects task performance. We also outline the strengths and weaknesses of commonly used measures of fatigue and suggest, based on our model and definition, new research strategies, which should include multiple measures. These studies should be mechanistic with validated experimental models to determine changes in central, psychological, and/or peripheral factors that explain fatigue. The proposed new research strategies may lead to the identification of the origins of MS related fatigue and the development of new, more effective treatments. PMID:27531990

  2. Latino Immigrants, Acculturation, and Health: Promising New Directions in Research

    PubMed Central

    Abraído-Lanza, Ana F.; Echeverría, Sandra E.; Flórez, Karen R.

    2017-01-01

    This article provides an analysis of novel topics emerging in recent years in research on Latino immigrants, acculturation, and health. In the past ten years, the number of studies assessing new ways to conceptualize and understand how acculturation-related processes may influence health has grown. These new frameworks draw from integrative approaches testing new ground to acknowledge the fundamental role of context and policy. We classify the emerging body of evidence according to themes that we identify as promising directions—intrapersonal, interpersonal, social environmental, community, political, and global contexts, cross-cutting themes in life course and developmental approaches, and segmented assimilation—and discuss the challenges and opportunities each theme presents. This body of work, which considers acculturation in context, points to the emergence of a new wave of research that holds great promise in driving forward the study of Latino immigrants, acculturation, and health. We provide suggestions to further advance the ideologic and methodologic rigor of this new wave. PMID:26735431

  3. A progress report on UNICOS misuse detection at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.L.; Jackson, K.A.; Stallings, C.A.; Simmonds, D.D.; Siciliano, C.L.B.; Pedicini, G.A.

    1995-10-01

    An effective method for detecting computer misuse is the automatic monitoring and analysis of on-line user activity. During the past year, Los Alamos enhanced its Network Anomaly Detection and Intrusion Reporter (NADIR) to include analysis of user activity on Los Alamos` UNICOS Crays. In near real-time, NADIR compares user activity to historical profiles and tests activity against expert rules. The expert rules express Los Alamos` security policy and define improper or suspicious behavior. NADIR reports suspicious behavior to security auditors and provides tools to aid in follow-up investigations. This paper describes the implementation to date of the UNICOS component of NADIR, along with the operational experiences and future plans for the system.

  4. Water Supply at Los Alamos 1998-2001

    SciTech Connect

    Richard J. Koch; David B. Rogers

    2003-03-01

    For the period 1998 through 2001, the total water used at Los Alamos from all sources ranged from 1325 million gallons (Mg) in 1999 to 1515 Mg in 2000. Groundwater production ranged from 1323 Mg in 1999 to 1506 Mg in 2000 from the Guaje, Pajarito, and Otowi fields. Nonpotable surface water used from Los Alamos reservoir ranged from zero gallons in 2001 to 9.3 Mg in 2000. For years 1998 through 2001, over 99% of all water used at Los Alamos was groundwater. Water use by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) between 1998 and 2001 ranged from 379 Mg in 2000 to 461 Mg in 1998. The LANL water use in 2001 was 393 Mg or 27% of the total water use at Los Alamos. Water use by Los Alamos County ranged from 872 Mg in 1999 to 1137 Mg in 2000, and averaged 1006 Mg/yr. Four new replacement wells in the Guaje field (G-2A, G-3A, G-4A, and G-5A) were drilled in 1998 and began production in 1999; with existing well G-1A, the Guaje field currently has five producing wells. Five of the old Guaje wells (G-1, G-2, G-4, G-5, and G-6) were plugged and abandoned in 1999, and one well (G-3) was abandoned but remains as an observation well for the Guaje field. The long-term water level observations in production and observation (test) wells at Los Alamos are consistent with the formation of a cone of depression in response to water production. The water level decline is gradual and at most has been about 0.7 to 2 ft per year for production wells and from 0.4 to 0.9 ft/yr for observation (test) wells. The largest water level declines have been in the Guaje field where nonpumping water levels were about 91 ft lower in 2001 than in 1951. The initial water levels of the Guaje replacement wells were 32 to 57 ft lower than the initial water levels of adjacent original Guaje wells. When production wells are taken off-line for pump replacement or repair, water levels have returned to within about 25 ft of initial static levels within 6 to 12 months. Thus, the water-level trends suggest no adverse

  5. Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2014 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, H. A.

    2015-04-22

    The reports contained herein are for project activities that occurred from October 2013 through September 2014. Project life cycle is indicated under the title as well as the original proposal number (in the following format: site abbreviation--ID #--originating fiscal year; e.g., STL-03-14). Each of the reports describes in detail the discoveries, achievements, and challenges encountered by our principal investigators. As SDRD, by definition, invests in “high-risk” and hopefully “high-payoff” research, the element of uncertainty is inherent. While many of our efforts are “successful” and result in positive outcomes or technology utilization, some fall short of expectations, but cannot be construed as “failure” in the negative sense. The latter is a natural and valid part of the process of advanced research and often leads to unforeseen new pathways to future discovery. Regardless, either result advances our knowledge base and increases our ability to identify solutions and/or avoid costly and unwarranted paths for future challenges. In summary, the SDRD program continues to provide an unfettered mechanism for innovation that returns multifold to our customers, to national security, and to the general public. The program is a vibrant R&D innovation engine, benefited by its discretionary pedigree, enhanced mission spectrum, committed resources, and sound competitiveness to yield maximum taxpayer benefit. The 25 projects described exemplify the creativity and ability of a diverse scientific and engineering talent base. The efforts also showcase an impressive capability and resource that can be brought to find solutions to a broad array of technology needs and applications relevant to the NNSS mission and national security. Further SDRD performance metrics can be found in the appendix at the end of this report.

  6. Current research and future directions in pattern identification: Results of an international symposium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myeong Soo; Lee, Ju Ah; Alraek, Terje; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Birch, Stephen; Goto, Hirozo; Jung, Jeeyoun; Kao, Shung-Te; Moon, Sang-Kwan; Park, Bongki; Park, Kyung-Mo; You, Sooseong; Yun, Kyung-Jin; Zaslawski, Chris

    2016-12-01

    A symposium on pattern identification (PI) was held at the Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine (KIOM) on October 2, 2013, in Daejeon, South Korea. This symposium was convened to provide information on the current research in PI as well as suggest future research directions. The participants discussed the nature of PI, possible research questions, strategies and future international collaborations in pattern research. With eight presentations and an extensive panel discussion, the symposium allowed participants to discuss research methods in traditional medicine for PI. One speaker presented the topic, 'Clinical pattern differentiation and contemporary research in PI.' Two speakers presented current trends in research on blood stasis while the remaining five other delegates discussed the research methods and future directions of PI research. The participants engaged in in-depth discussions regarding the nature of PI, potential research questions, strategies and future international collaborations in pattern research.

  7. Water supply at Los Alamos during 1993. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Purtymun, W.D.; Stoker, A.K.; McLin, S.G.; Maes, M.N.; Glasco, T.A.

    1995-10-01

    This report summarizes production and aquifer conditions for water wells in the Guaje, Pajarito, and Otowi Well Fields. These wells supplied all of the potable water used for municipal and some industrial purposes in Los Alamos County and the Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1993. The wells in the Los Alamos Well Field were transferred to San Ildefonso Pueblo in 1992. Four of the wells in the Los Alamos Well Field were plugged in 1993. One of the two new wells in the Otowi Well Field became operational in 1993. The spring gallery in Water Canyon supplied nonpotable water for industrial use, while surface water from the Los Alamos Reservoir was diverted for irrigation. In 1993 no water was used from the Guaje Reservoir. Due to the maintenance and operating cost of diverting water from the reservoirs, it is not economically feasible to continue their use for irrigation. This report fulfills some of the requirements of the Los Alamos Groundwater Protection Management Program by documenting use of the groundwater for water supply and providing information hydrologic characteristics of the main aquifer. This report is a joint effort between the Laboratory Water Quality and Hydrology Group and the Utilities Department of Johnson Controls World Services Inc. (JCI). The purpose of this report is to ensure a continuing historical record and to provide guidance for management of water resources in long-range planning for the water supply system. We have issued one summary report for the period of 1947 to 1971 and 22 annual reports that contain the results of our studies of these water supplies. An additional report summarized the hydrology of the main aquifer with reference to future development of groundwater supplies. A report was issued in 1988 that examined the status of wells and future water supply.

  8. Current trends and future directions in flower development research

    PubMed Central

    Scutt, Charlie P.; Vandenbussche, Michiel

    2014-01-01

    Flowers, the reproductive structures of the approximately 400 000 extant species of flowering plants, exist in a tremendous range of forms and sizes, mainly due to developmental differences involving the number, arrangement, size and form of the floral organs of which they consist. However, this tremendous diversity is underpinned by a surprisingly robust basic floral structure in which a central group of carpels forms on an axis of determinate growth, almost invariably surrounded by two successive zones containing stamens and perianth organs, respectively. Over the last 25 years, remarkable progress has been achieved in describing the molecular mechanisms that control almost all aspects of flower development, from the phase change that initiates flowering to the final production of fruits and seeds. However, this work has been performed almost exclusively in a small number of eudicot model species, chief among which is Arabidopsis thaliana. Studies of flower development must now be extended to a much wider phylogenetic range of flowering plants and, indeed, to their closest living relatives, the gymnosperms. Studies of further, more wide-ranging models should provide insights that, for various reasons, cannot be obtained by studying the major existing models alone. The use of further models should also help to explain how the first flowering plants evolved from an unknown, although presumably gymnosperm-like ancestor, and rapidly diversified to become the largest major plant group and to dominate the terrestrial flora. The benefits for society of a thorough understanding of flower development are self-evident, as human life depends to a large extent on flowering plants and on the fruits and seeds they produce. In this preface to the Special Issue, we introduce eleven articles on flower development, representing work in both established and further models, including gymnosperms. We also present some of our own views on current trends and future directions of the

  9. Current trends and future directions in flower development research.

    PubMed

    Scutt, Charlie P; Vandenbussche, Michiel

    2014-11-01

    Flowers, the reproductive structures of the approximately 400 000 extant species of flowering plants, exist in a tremendous range of forms and sizes, mainly due to developmental differences involving the number, arrangement, size and form of the floral organs of which they consist. However, this tremendous diversity is underpinned by a surprisingly robust basic floral structure in which a central group of carpels forms on an axis of determinate growth, almost invariably surrounded by two successive zones containing stamens and perianth organs, respectively. Over the last 25 years, remarkable progress has been achieved in describing the molecular mechanisms that control almost all aspects of flower development, from the phase change that initiates flowering to the final production of fruits and seeds. However, this work has been performed almost exclusively in a small number of eudicot model species, chief among which is Arabidopsis thaliana. Studies of flower development must now be extended to a much wider phylogenetic range of flowering plants and, indeed, to their closest living relatives, the gymnosperms. Studies of further, more wide-ranging models should provide insights that, for various reasons, cannot be obtained by studying the major existing models alone. The use of further models should also help to explain how the first flowering plants evolved from an unknown, although presumably gymnosperm-like ancestor, and rapidly diversified to become the largest major plant group and to dominate the terrestrial flora. The benefits for society of a thorough understanding of flower development are self-evident, as human life depends to a large extent on flowering plants and on the fruits and seeds they produce. In this preface to the Special Issue, we introduce eleven articles on flower development, representing work in both established and further models, including gymnosperms. We also present some of our own views on current trends and future directions of the

  10. A physicists guide to The Los Alamos Primer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, B. Cameron

    2016-11-01

    In April 1943, a group of scientists at the newly established Los Alamos Laboratory were given a series of lectures by Robert Serber on what was then known of the physics and engineering issues involved in developing fission bombs. Serber’s lectures were recorded in a 24 page report titled The Los Alamos Primer, which was subsequently declassified and published in book form. This paper describes the background to the Primer and analyzes the physics contained in its 22 sections. The motivation for this paper is to provide a firm foundation of the background and contents of the Primer for physicists interested in the Manhattan Project and nuclear weapons.

  11. The development of the atomic bomb, Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, R.W.

    1993-11-01

    The historical presentation begins with details of the selection of Los Alamos as the site of the Army installation. Wartime efforts of the Army Corps of Engineers, and scientists to include the leader of Los Alamos, Robert Oppenheimer are presented. The layout and construction of the facilities are discussed. The monumental design requirements of the bombs are discussed, including but not limited to the utilization of the second choice implosion method of detonation, and the production of bomb-grade nuclear explosives. The paper ends with a philosophical discussion on the use of nuclear weapons.

  12. Alcohol and NMDA receptor: current research and future direction.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekar, Raman

    2013-01-01

    The brain is one of the major targets of alcohol actions. Most of the excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system is mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. However, one of the most devastating effects of alcohol leads to brain shrinkage, loss of nerve cells at specific regions through a mechanism involving excitotoxicity, oxidative stress. Earlier studies have indicated that chronic exposure to ethanol both in vivo and in vitro, increases NR1 and NR2B gene expression and their polypeptide levels. The effect of alcohol and molecular changes on the regulatory process, which modulates NMDAR functions including factors altering transcription, translation, post-translational modifications, and protein expression, as well as those influencing their interactions with different regulatory proteins (downstream effectors) are incessantly increasing at the cellular level. Further, I discuss the various genetically altered mice approaches that have been used to study NMDA receptor subunits and their functional implication. In a recent countable review, epigenetic dimension (i.e., histone modification-induced chromatin remodeling and DNA methylation, in the process of alcohol related neuroadaptation) is one of the key molecular mechanisms in alcohol mediated NMDAR alteration. Here, I provide a recount on what has already been achieved, current trends and how the future research/studies of the NMDA receptor might lead to even greater engagement with many possible new insights into the neurobiology and treatment of alcoholism.

  13. Gestational diabetes mellitus. Unresolved issues and future research directions.

    PubMed Central

    Okun, N.; Verma, A.; Demianczuk, N.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize the controversial aspects of gestational diabetes (GDM) and introduce readers to possible relevant research questions that could be examined to provide clinicians with good-quality data on which to base decisions about this relatively common pregnancy-related issue. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SELECTION: Ongoing review of the English literature related to GDM. Sources were not restricted to prospective, controlled trials, as these are severely limited in number. SYNTHESIS: Controversial issues include the relevance of GDM to clinically meaningful outcomes in the index pregnancy, the effectiveness of current therapy in altering these outcomes, and the resultant questionable relevance of routine screening and diagnosis of an entity with as yet uncertain significance in pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: Suggested questions to be addressed in multicentre controlled trials include randomization with respect to screening and with respect to treatment. Until such trials are completed, continuing with a standard approach to screening, diagnosis, and treatment, such as that suggested by the third international workshop on GDM, is recommended. PMID:9626427

  14. Alcohol and NMDA receptor: current research and future direction

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekar, Raman

    2013-01-01

    The brain is one of the major targets of alcohol actions. Most of the excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system is mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. However, one of the most devastating effects of alcohol leads to brain shrinkage, loss of nerve cells at specific regions through a mechanism involving excitotoxicity, oxidative stress. Earlier studies have indicated that chronic exposure to ethanol both in vivo and in vitro, increases NR1 and NR2B gene expression and their polypeptide levels. The effect of alcohol and molecular changes on the regulatory process, which modulates NMDAR functions including factors altering transcription, translation, post-translational modifications, and protein expression, as well as those influencing their interactions with different regulatory proteins (downstream effectors) are incessantly increasing at the cellular level. Further, I discuss the various genetically altered mice approaches that have been used to study NMDA receptor subunits and their functional implication. In a recent countable review, epigenetic dimension (i.e., histone modification-induced chromatin remodeling and DNA methylation, in the process of alcohol related neuroadaptation) is one of the key molecular mechanisms in alcohol mediated NMDAR alteration. Here, I provide a recount on what has already been achieved, current trends and how the future research/studies of the NMDA receptor might lead to even greater engagement with many possible new insights into the neurobiology and treatment of alcoholism. PMID:23754976

  15. Congressionally Directed Project for Passive NOx Removal Catalysts Research

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, William

    2014-12-29

    The Recipient proposes to produce new scientific and technical knowledge and tools to enable the discovery and deployment of highly effective materials for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from lean combustion exhaust. A second goal is to demonstrate a closely coupled experimental and computational approach to heterogeneous catalysis research. These goals will be met through the completion of four primary technical objectives: First, an in-depth kinetic analysis will be performed on two prominent classes of NOx SCR catalysts, Fe- and Cu-exchanged beta and ZSM-5 zeolites, over a wide range of catalyst formulation and under identical, high conversion conditions as a function of gas phase composition. Second, the nanoscale structure and adsorption chemistry of these high temperature (HT) and low temperature (LT) catalysts will be determined using in situ and operando spectroscopy under the same reaction conditions. Third, first-principles molecular simulations will be used to model the metal-zeolite active sites, their adsorption chemistry, and key steps in catalytic function. Fourth, this information will be integrated into chemically detailed mechanistic and kinetic descriptions and models of the operation of these well- defined NOx SCR catalysts under practically relevant reaction conditions. The new knowledge and models that derive from this work will be published in the scientific literature.

  16. Research directed toward improved echelles for the ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Research was undertaken to demonstrate that improved efficiencies for low frequency gratings are obtainable with the careful application of present technology. The motivation for the study was the desire to be assured that the grating-efficiency design goals for potential Space Telescope spectrographs can be achieved. The work was organized to compare gratings made with changes in the three specific parameters: the ruling tool profile, the coating material, and the lubricants used during the ruling process. A series of coatings and test gratings were fabricated and were examined for surface smoothness with a Nomarski Differential Interference Microscope and an electron microscope. Photomicrographs were obtained to show the difference in smoothness of the various coatings and rulings. Efficiency measurements were made for those test rulings that showed good groove characteristics: smoothness, proper ruling depth, and absence of defects. The intuitive feeling that higher grating efficiency should be correlated with the degree of smoothness of both the coating and the grating is supported by the results.

  17. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Ogeka, G.J.; Romano, A.J.

    1992-12-01

    This report briefly discusses the following research: Advances in Geoexploration; Transvenous Coronary Angiography with Synchrotron X-Rays; Borehole Measurements of Global Warming; Molecular Ecology: Development of Field Methods for Microbial Growth Rate and Activity Measurements; A New Malaria Enzyme - A Potential Source for a New Diagnostic Test for Malaria and a Target for a New Antimalarial Drug; Basic Studies on Thoron and Thoron Precursors; Cloning of the cDNA for a Human Serine/Threonine Protein Kinase that is Activated Specifically by Double-Stranded DNA; Development of an Ultra-Fast Laser System for Accelerator Applications; Cluster Impact Fusion; Effect of a Bacterial Spore Protein on Mutagenesis; Structure and Function of Adenovirus Penton Base Protein; High Resolution Fast X-Ray Detector; Coherent Synchrotron Radiation Longitudinal Bunch Shape Monitor; High Grain Harmonic Generation Experiment; BNL Maglev Studies; Structural Investigations of Pt-Based Catalysts; Studies on the Cellular Toxicity of Cocaine and Cocaethylene; Human Melanocyte Transformation; Exploratory Applications of X-Ray Microscopy; Determination of the Higher Ordered Structure of Eukaryotic Chromosomes; Uranium Neutron Capture Therapy; Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Nanoscale Structures; Nuclear Techiques for Study of Biological Channels; RF Sources for Accelerator Physics; Induction and Repair of Double-Strand Breaks in the DNA of Human Lymphocytes; and An EBIS Source of High Charge State Ions up to Uranium.

  18. Rodent models in depression research: classical strategies and new directions.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Daniela D; Rey, Carlos E; Monje, Francisco J

    2010-05-06

    Depression, among other mood disorders, represents one of the most common health problems worldwide, with steadily increasing incidence and major socio-economic consequences. However, since the knowledge about the underlying pathophysiological principles is still very scanty, depression and other mood disorders are currently diagnosed solely on clinical grounds. Currently used treatment modalities would therefore benefit enormously from the development of alternative therapeutic interventions. The implementation of proper animal models is a prerequisite for increasing the understanding of the neurobiological basis of mood disorders and is paving the way for the discovery of novel therapeutic targets. In the past thirty years, since the seminal description of the Forced Swim Test as a system to probe antidepressant activity in rodents, the use of animals to model depression and antidepressant activity has come a long way. In this review we describe some of the most commonly used strategies, ranging from screening procedures, such as the Forced Swim Test and the Tail Suspension Test and animal models, such as those based upon chronic stress procedures, to genetic approaches. Finally we also discuss some of the inherent limitations and caveats that need to be considered when using animals as models for mental disorders in basic research.

  19. Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2012 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    ,

    2013-04-01

    The reports included in this report are for project activities that occurred from October 2011 through September 2012. These reports describe in detail the discoveries, achievements, and challenges encountered by our talented and enthusiastic principal investigators (PIs). Many of the reports describe R&D efforts that were “successful” in their pursuits and resulted in a positive outcome or technology realization. As we’ve stated before, and continue to stress, in some cases the result is a “negative” finding, for instance a technology is currently impractical or out of reach. This can often be viewed erroneously as a “failure,” but is actually a valid outcome in the pursuit of high-risk research, which often leads to unforeseen new paths of discovery. Either result advances our knowledge and increases our ability to identify solutions and/or likewise avoid costly paths not appropriate for the challenges presented. The SDRD program continues to provide an unfettered mechanism for innovation and development that returns multifold to the NNSS mission. Overall the program is a strong R&D innovation engine, benefited by an enhanced mission, committed resources, and sound competitiveness to yield maximum benefit. The 23 projects described exemplify the creativity and ability of a diverse scientific and engineering talent base. The efforts also showcase an impressive capability and resource that can be brought to find solutions to a broad array of technology needs and applications relevant to the NNSS mission and national security.

  20. Some Recent Advances and Future Directions in Permafrost Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanovsky, V. E.; Grosse, G.; Marchenko, S. S.

    2010-12-01

    The impact of climate warming on permafrost and the potential of climate feedbacks resulting from permafrost thawing have recently received a great deal of attention. Field-based studies, remote sensing and modeling are revealing complex feedbacks of permafrost degradation to terrestrial and offshore environments in Polar Regions and the Earth’s atmosphere. Major research questions that remain to be adequately answered involve uncertainties about the vulnerability of permafrost to thaw, a projected decline in permafrost extent during the coming decades, ecosystem feedbacks, and the global consequences to climate change of mobilizing ancient carbon from permafrost as it thaws. Some of these important questions are: How resilient is permafrost to climate change and external disturbance, and what are the feedbacks to permafrost stability? How will permafrost degradation and landform changes alter hydrology and ecosystems? How large are carbon pools in and beneath permafrost including subsea permafrost, how vulnerable are they to disturbance related to degradation of permafrost, and to what extent will altered carbon and energy cycles affect the global climate? Ground temperatures are a primary indicator of permafrost stability. The monitoring network of the Thermal State of Permafrost (TSP) program under the Fourth International Polar Year (IPY) has more than 550 sites across the circumpolar region. TSP measurements, combined with numerical thermal modeling, now provide a relatively comprehensive assessment of panarctic permafrost dynamics during the last ~100 years. However, current numerical models project the future state of permafrost largely based on subsurface thermal dynamics driven by regional or global climate model projections and internal surface and ground properties. These models largely ignore complicated sub-grid scale feedbacks associated with dynamic ecological components and disturbance. Disturbances of the ground thermal regime can be triggered by

  1. Needs assessment for fire department services and resources for the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-15

    This report has been developed in response to a request from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to evaluate the need for fire department services so as to enable the Laboratory to plan effective fire protection and thereby: meet LANL`s regulatory and contractual obligations; interface with the Department of Energy (DOE) and other agencies on matters relating to fire and emergency services; and ensure appropriate protection of the community and environment. This study is an outgrowth of the 1993 Fire Department Needs Assessment (prepared for DOE) but is developed from the LANL perspective. Input has been received from cognizant and responsible representatives at LANL, DOE, Los Alamos County (LAC) and the Los Alamos Fire Department (LAFD).

  2. Development of high magnetic fields for energy research

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.D.; Campbell, L.J.; Modler, R.; Movshovich, R.; Lawrence, J.M.; Awschalom, D.D.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The primary purpose of work has been to develop the scientific basis for DOE support of a program that would build a novel, nondestructive 100-tesla magnet that would be available as a user facility for cutting-edge, energy-related research and technology at very high magnetic fields.

  3. 75 FR 1115 - Invitation for Public Comment on Strategic Research Direction, Research Priority Areas and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ... Doc No: E9-30944] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Research and Innovative Technology Administration... Metrics To Guide Departmental Strategic Plan for Research, Development and Technology Activities (2010--2015) AGENCY: Research and Innovative Technology Administration, DOT. ACTION: Notice, request...

  4. Materials capability review Los Alamos National Laboratory, May 3-6, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Antoinette

    2010-01-01

    conducting science, technology and engineering. The specific charge for the Materials Capability Review is to assess the Los Alamos Laboratory Directed Research and Development project titled, 'First Principles Predictive Capabilities for Transuranic Materials: Mott Insulators to Correlated Metals' using the criteria performance, quality, and relevance for the current status of the project. The committee is requested to provide advice on future direction of the project.

  5. Experience at Los Alamos with use of the optical model for applied nuclear data calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Young, P.G.

    1994-10-01

    While many nuclear models are important in calculations of nuclear data, the optical model usually provides the basic underpinning of analyses directed at data for applications. An overview is given here of experience in the Nuclear Theory and Applications Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the use of the optical model for calculations of nuclear cross section data for applied purposes. We consider the direct utilization of total, elastic, and reaction cross sections for neutrons, protons, deuterons, tritons, {sup 3}He and alpha particles in files of evaluated nuclear data covering the energy range of 0 to 200 MeV, as well as transmission coefficients for reaction theory calculations and neutron and proton wave functions direct-reaction and Feshbach-Kerman-Koonin analyses. Optical model codes such as SCAT and ECIS and the reaction theory codes COMNUC, GNASH FKK-GNASH, and DWUCK have primarily been used in our analyses. A summary of optical model parameterizations from past analyses at Los Alamos will be given, including detailed tabulations of the parameters for a selection of nuclei.

  6. A survey of macromycete diversity at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Bandelier National Monument, and Los Alamos County; A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Jarmie, N.; Rogers, F.J.

    1997-11-01

    The authors have completed a 5-year survey (1991--1995) of macromycetes found in Los Alamos County, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Bandelier National Monument. The authors have compiled a database of 1,048 collections, their characteristics, and identifications. The database represents 123 (98%) genera and 175 (73%) species reliably identified. Issues of habitat loss, species extinction, and ecological relationships are addressed, and comparisons with other surveys are made. With this baseline information and modeling of this baseline data, one can begin to understand more about the fungal flora of the area.

  7. A Los Alamos concept for accelerator transmutation of waste and energy production (ATW)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This document contains the diagrams presented at the ATW (Accelerator Transmutation of Waste and Energy Production) External Review, December 10-12, 1990, held at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Included are the charge to the committee and the presentations for the committee`s review. Topics of the presentations included an overview of the concept, LINAC technology, near-term application -- high-level defense wastes (intense thermal neutron source, chemistry and materials), advanced application of the ATW concept -- fission energy without a high-level waste stream (overview, advanced technology, and advanced chemistry), and a summary of the research issues.

  8. Working with Fermi at Chicago and Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garwin, Richard L.

    2010-02-01

    I discuss my experience with Enrico Fermi as student and fellow faculty member at Chicago and with him as consultants to the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory in 1950-1952. The talk shares observations about this great physicist and exemplary human being. )

  9. The Controlled-Air Incinerator at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Newmyer, J.N.

    1994-04-01

    The Controlled-Air Incinerator (CAI) at Los Alamos is being modified and upgraded to begin routine operations treating low-level mixed waste (LLMW), radioactively contaminated polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) wastes, low-level liquid wastes, and possibly transuranic (TRU) wastes. This paper describes those modifications. Routine waste operations should begin in late FY95.

  10. Mercury: The Los Alamos ICF KrF laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Czuchlewski, S.J.; York, G.W.; Bigio, I.J.; Brucker, J.; Hanson, D.; Honig, E.M.; Kurnit, N.; Leland, W.; McCown, A.W.; McLeod, J.; Rose, E.; Thomas, S.; Thompson, D.

    1993-01-19

    The Mercury KrF laser facility at Los Alamos is being built with the benefit of lessons learned from the Aurora system. An increased understanding of KrF laser engineering, and the designed implementation of system flexibility, will permit Mercury to serve as a tested for a variety of advanced KrF technology concepts.

  11. The Los Alamos nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation technology development program

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.A. Jr.; Menlove, H.O.; Reilly, T.D.; Bosler, G.E.; Hakkila, E.A.; Eccleston, G.W.

    1994-04-01

    For nearly three decades, Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed and implemented nuclear measurement technology and training in support of national and international nuclear safeguards. This paper outlines the major elements of those technologies and highlights some of the latest developments.

  12. Plasma and ion beam processing at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Davis, H.A.; Henins, I.

    1994-07-01

    Efforts are underway at Los Alamos National Laboratory to utilize plasma and intense ion beam science and technology of the processing of advanced materials. A major theme involves surface modification of materials, e.g., etching, deposition, alloying, and implantation. In this paper, we concentrate on two programs, plasma source ion implantation and high-intensity pulsed ion beam deposition.

  13. Aqueous Nitrate Recovery Line at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Finstad, Casey Charles

    2016-06-15

    This powerpoint is part of the ADPSM Plutonium Engineering Lecture Series, which is an opportunity for new hires at LANL to get an overview of work done at TA55. It goes into detail about the aqueous nitrate recovery line at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  14. Brief review of Rover fuel development at Los Alamos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Keith V.

    1991-01-01

    A brief review of the graphite matrix uranium fuel development efforts at Los Alamos from 1955 through 1972 is presented. The uses of graphite flour carbon black, various binders, uranium dioxide, coated UC2 particles, and zirconium carbide in this development are described.

  15. Summary of environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    Linking the Rio Grande Valley and the Jemez Mountains, New Mexico`s Pajarito Plateau is home to a world-class scientific institution. Los Alamos National Laboratory (or the Laboratory), managed by the Regents of the University of California, is a government-owned, Department of Energy-supervised complex investigating all areas of modern science for the purposes of national defense, health, conservation, and ecology. The Laboratory was founded in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project, whose members assembled to create the first nuclear weapon. Occupying the campus of the Los Alamos Ranch School, American and British scientists gathered on the isolated mesa tops to harness recently discovered nuclear power with the hope of ending World War II. In July 1945, the initial objective of the Laboratory, a nuclear device, was achieved in Los Alamos and tested in White Sands, New Mexico. Today the Laboratory continues its role in defense, particularly in nuclear weapons, including developing methods for safely handling weapons and managing waste. For the past twenty years, the Laboratory has published an annual environmental report. This pamphlet offers a synopsis that briefly explains important concepts, such as radiation and provides a summary of the monitoring results and regulatory compliance status that are explained at length in the document entitled Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos during 1995.

  16. Environmental assessment for effluent reduction, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-11

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to eliminate industrial effluent from 27 outfalls at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The Proposed Action includes both simple and extensive plumbing modifications, which would result in the elimination of industrial effluent being released to the environment through 27 outfalls. The industrial effluent currently going to about half of the 27 outfalls under consideration would be rerouted to LANL`s sanitary sewer system. Industrial effluent from other outfalls would be eliminated by replacing once-through cooling water systems with recirculation systems, or, in a few instances, operational changes would result in no generation of industrial effluent. After the industrial effluents have been discontinued, the affected outfalls would be removed from the NPDES Permit. The pipes from the source building or structure to the discharge point for the outfalls may be plugged, or excavated and removed. Other outfalls would remain intact and would continue to discharge stormwater. The No Action alternative, which would maintain the status quo for LANL`s outfalls, was also analyzed. An alternative in which industrial effluent would be treated at the source facilities was considered but dismissed from further analysis because it would not reasonably meet the DOE`s purpose for action, and its potential environmental effects were bounded by the analysis of the Proposed Action and the No Action alternatives.

  17. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), conducted March 29, 1987 through April 17, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the LANL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the LANL, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the LANL Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the Survey for the LANL. 65 refs., 68 figs., 73 tabs.

  18. Environmental Assessment for the High Explosives Wastewater Treatment Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-03

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has identified a need to improve the management of wastewater resulting from high explosives (HE) research and development work at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). LANL`s current methods off managing HE-contaminated wastewater cannot ensure that discharged HE wastewater would consistently meet the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) standards for wastewater discharge. The DOE needs to enhance He wastewater management to e able to meet both present and future regulatory standards for wastewater discharge. The DOE also proposes to incorporate major pollution prevention and waste reduction features into LANL`s existing HE production facilities. Currently, wastewater from HE processing buildings at four Technical Areas (TAs) accumulates in sumps where particulate HE settles out and barium is precipitated. Wastewater is then released from the sumps to the environment at 15 permitted outfalls without treatment. The released water may contain suspended and dissolved contaminants, such as HE and solvents. This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes two alternatives, the Proposed Action and the Alternative Action, that would meet the purpose and need for agency action. Both alternatives would treat all HE process wastewater using sand filters to remove HE particulates and activated carbon to adsorb organic solvents and dissolved HE. Under either alternative, LANL would burn solvents and flash dried HE particulates and spent carbon following well-established procedures. Burning would produce secondary waste that would be stored, treated, and disposed of at TA-54, Area J. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact and Floodplain Statement of Findings for the High Explosives Wastewater Treatment Facility.

  19. SEPEC conference proceedings: Hypermedia and Information Reconstruction. Aerospace applications and research directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Papers presented at the conference on hypermedia and information reconstruction are compiled. The following subject areas are covered: real-world hypermedia projects, aerospace applications, and future directions in hypermedia research and development.

  20. Disease Diagnostics Research at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    ScienceCinema

    Mukundan, Harshini

    2016-07-12

    Human evolution and persistent diseases have existed side-by-side. A recent concern is the re-emergence of tuberculosis, one of the oldest and most challenging diseases known to man. Effective diagnosis can save lives and prevent its spread. This talk will cover how our immune system discriminates between itself and foreign entities and how a new laboratory and nature inspired strategy can detect tuberculosis equally well in human and animal populations. The approach is being extended to other applications such as the identification of strep throat and respiratory infections.

  1. H/sup -/ ion source research at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, P.; Smith, H.V. Jr.; Sherman, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    Up to 160 mA of H/sup -/ ions has been extracted at 20 kV from a 10 by 0.5-mm/sup 2/ slit in a Penning surface-plasma source. Typically, 70% of the beam can be transported through a bending magnet to a Faraday cup or emittance scanner. Up to 90% transmission has been observed for some neutralizing gases. Average and pulsed cesium flows from the source were measured with a surface-ionization gauge. Operating parameters of the source and measurements of the emittance are reported.

  2. Disease Diagnostics Research at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Mukundan, Harshini

    2015-04-10

    Human evolution and persistent diseases have existed side-by-side. A recent concern is the re-emergence of tuberculosis, one of the oldest and most challenging diseases known to man. Effective diagnosis can save lives and prevent its spread. This talk will cover how our immune system discriminates between itself and foreign entities and how a new laboratory and nature inspired strategy can detect tuberculosis equally well in human and animal populations. The approach is being extended to other applications such as the identification of strep throat and respiratory infections.

  3. Commercialization of Los Alamos National Laboratory technologies via small businesses. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brice, R.; Carton, D.; Rhyne, T.

    1997-06-01

    Appendices are presented from a study performed on a concept model system for the commercialization of Los Alamos National Laboratory technologies via small businesses. Topics include a summary of information from the joint MCC/Los Alamos technology conference; a comparison of New Mexico infrastructure to other areas; a typical licensing agreement; technology screening guides; summaries of specific DOE/UC/Los Alamos documents; a bibliography; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory TCRD; The Ames Center for Advanced Technology Development; Los Alamos licensing procedures; presentation of slides from monthly MCC/Los Alamos review meetings; generalized entrepreneurship model; and a discussion on receiving equity for technology.

  4. Igniting the Light Elements: The Los Alamos Thermonuclear Weapon Project, 1942-1952

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, Anne C.

    1999-07-01

    The American system of nuclear weapons research and development was conceived and developed not as a result of technological determinism, but by a number of individual architects who promoted the growth of this large technologically-based complex. While some of the technological artifacts of this system, such as the fission weapons used in World War II, have been the subject of many historical studies, their technical successors--fusion (or hydrogen) devices--are representative of the largely unstudied highly secret realms of nuclear weapons science and engineering. In the postwar period a small number of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's staff and affiliates were responsible for theoretical work on fusion weapons, yet the program was subject to both the provisions and constraints of the US Atomic Energy Commission, of which Los Alamos was a part. The Commission leadership's struggle to establish a mission for its network of laboratories, least of all to keep them operating, affected Los Alamos's leaders' decisions as to the course of weapons design and development projects. Adapting Thomas P. Hughes's ''large technological systems'' thesis, I focus on the technical, social, political, and human problems that nuclear weapons scientists faced while pursuing the thermonuclear project, demonstrating why the early American thermonuclear bomb project was an immensely complicated scientific and technological undertaking. I concentrate mainly on Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's Theoretical, or T, Division, and its members' attempts to complete an accurate mathematical treatment of the ''Super''--the most difficult problem in physics in the postwar period--and other fusion weapon theories. Although tackling a theoretical problem, theoreticians had to address technical and engineering issues as well. I demonstrate the relative value and importance of H-bomb research over time in the postwar era to scientific, politician, and military participants in this project. I

  5. Occurrences at Los Alamos National Laboratory: What can they tell us?

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A. Reichelt; A. Jeffery Eichorst; Marc E. Clay; Rita J. Henins; Judith D. DeHaven; Richard J. Brake

    2000-03-01

    The authors analyzed the evolution of institutional and facility response to groups of abnormal incidents at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The analysis is divided into three stages: (1) the LANL response to severe accidents from 1994 to 1996, (2) the LANL response to facility-specific clusters of low-consequence incidents from 1997 to 1999, and (3) the ongoing development of and response to a Laboratory-wide trending and analysis program. The first stage is characterized by five severe accidents at LANL--a shooting fatality, a forklift accident, two electrical shock incidents, and an explosion in a nuclear facility. Each accident caused LANL and the Department of Energy (DOE) to launch in-depth investigations. A recurrent theme of the investigations was the failure of LANL and DOE to identify and act on precursor or low-consequence events that preceded the severe accidents. The second stage is characterized by LANL response to precursor or low-consequence incidents over a two-year period. In this stage, the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility, the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility, and the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center responded to an increase in low-consequence events by standing down their facilities. During the restart process, each facility collectively analyzed the low-consequence events and developed systemic corrective actions. The third stage is characterized by the development of a Laboratory-wide trending and analysis program, which involves proactive division-level analysis of incidents and development of systemic actions. The authors conclude that, while the stages show an encouraging evolution, the facility standdowns and restarts are overly costly and that the institutional trending and analysis program is underutilized. The authors therefore recommend the implementation of an institutional, mentored program of trending and analysis that identifies clusters of related low-consequence events, analyzes those events, and

  6. Scientific Merit Review of Directed Research Tasks Within the NASA Human Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, John B.

    2010-01-01

    The Human Research Program is instrumental in developing and delivering research findings, health countermeasures, and human systems technologies for spacecraft. :HRP is subdivided into 6 research entities, or Elements. Each Element is charged with providing the Program with knowledge and capabilities to conduct research to address the human health and performance risks as well as advance the readiness levels of technology and countermeasures. Project: An Element may be further subdivided into Projects, which are defined as an integrated set of tasks undertaken to deliver a product or set of products

  7. Final environmental assessment: TRU waste drum staging building, Technical Area 55, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-09

    Much of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) research on plutonium metallurgy and plutonium processing is performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), in Los Alamos, New Mexico. LANL`s main facility for plutonium research is the Plutonium Facility, also referred to as Technical Area 55 (TA-55). The main laboratory building for plutonium work within the Plutonium Facility (TA-55) is the Plutonium Facility Building 4, or PF-4. This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes the potential environmental effects that would be expected to occur if DOE were to stage sealed containers of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste in a support building at the Plutonium Facility (TA-55) that is adjacent to PF-4. At present, the waste containers are staged in the basement of PF-4. The proposed project is to convert an existing support structure (Building 185), a prefabricated metal building on a concrete foundation, and operate it as a temporary staging facility for sealed containers of solid TRU and TRU mixed waste. The TRU and TRU mixed wastes would be contained in sealed 55-gallon drums and standard waste boxes as they await approval to be transported to TA-54. The containers would then be transported to a longer term TRU waste storage area at TA-54. The TRU wastes are generated from plutonium operations carried out in PF-4. The drum staging building would also be used to store and prepare for use new, empty TRU waste containers.

  8. Single-Word Reading: Behavioral and Biological Perspectives. New Directions in Communication Disorders Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grigorenko, Elena L., Ed.; Naples, Adam J., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    As the first title in the new series, "New Directions in Communication Disorders Research: Integrative Approaches", this volume discusses a unique phenomenon in cognitive science, single-word reading, which is an essential element in successful reading competence. Single-word reading is an interdisciplinary area of research that incorporates…

  9. Learner Contributions to Language Learning: New Directions in Research. Applied Linguistics and Language Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breen, Michael P., Ed.

    This book provides both a review of what has been discovered from earlier research and identifies trends and future directions for future research on learner contributions to language learning. The book has an introduction, a postscript, and eight chapters and includes the following: "Introduction: Conceptualization, affect, and action in…

  10. Status and future directions for advanced accelerator research-conventional and non-conventional collider concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, R.H.

    1997-03-01

    The relationship between advanced accelerator research and future directions for particle physics is discussed. Comments are made about accelerator research trends in hadron colliders, muon colliders, and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear colliders. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Understanding and Preventing Violence Directed against Teachers: Recommendations for a National Research, Practice, and Policy Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espelage, Dorothy; Anderman, Eric M.; Brown, Veda Evanell; Jones, Abraham; Lane, Kathleen Lynne; McMahon, Susan D.; Reddy, Linda A.; Reynolds, Cecil R.

    2013-01-01

    Violence directed against K-12 teachers is a serious problem that demands the immediate attention of researchers, providers of teacher pre-service and in-service training, school administrators, community leaders, and policymakers. Surprisingly, little research has been conducted on this growing problem despite the broad impact teacher…

  12. Hiring and Retaining Direct-Care Staff: After Fifty Years of Research, What Do We Know?.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Philip S.; Hall, Nancy D.

    2002-01-01

    This literature review finds that efforts since the 1950s to develop research-based selection tools for recruiting direct-care staff to work with people with developmental disabilities have not been successful. However, researchers have identified practices that can reduce staff turnover, such as articulating the mission and improving human…

  13. Cabbages--And Kings: Research Directions in Integrated/Interdisciplinary Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kain, Daniel L.

    1993-01-01

    Examines past research into integrated or interdisciplinary studies and explores future directions for research. Discusses reasons for integrating curricula, characteristics of integrated studies, benefits of curriculum integration, and pedagogical changes accompanying integrated studies. Predicts an unstable future for integrated studies.…

  14. The First Big Wave of Astronomy Education Research Dissertations and Some Directions for Future Research Efforts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Timothy F.

    2008-01-01

    The past several years have presented the astronomy education research community with a host of foundational research dissertations in the teaching and learning of astronomy. These PhD candidates have been studying the impact of instructional innovations on student learning and systematically validating astronomy learning assessment instruments,…

  15. Suicide and Sexual Orientation: A Critical Summary of Recent Research and Directions for Future Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muehrer, Peter

    1995-01-01

    Research on the hypothesized relationship between sexual orientation and suicide is limited. National or statewide data on frequency and causes of completed suicide in gay and lesbian people do not exist. Methodological limitations in research literature include lack of consensus on definition of key terms, nonrepresentative samples, and lack of…

  16. Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program. Annual report to the Department of Energy, Revised December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Ogeka, G.J.; Romano, A.J.

    1993-12-01

    At Brookhaven National Laboratory the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program is a discretionary research and development tool critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the laboratory. It is also a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence, and a means to address national needs, within the overall mission of the Department of Energy and Brookhaven National Laboratory. This report summarizes research which was funded by this program during fiscal year 1993. The research fell in a number of broad technical and scientific categories: new directions for energy technologies; global change; radiation therapies and imaging; genetic studies; new directions for the development and utilization of BNL facilities; miscellaneous projects. Two million dollars in funding supported 28 projects which were spread throughout all BNL scientific departments.

  17. Penetrating radiation: applications at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Scott; Hunter, James; Morris, Christopher

    2013-09-01

    Los Alamos has used penetrating radiography extensively throughout its history dating back to the Manhattan Project where imaging dense, imploding objects was the subject of intense interest. This interest continues today as major facilities like DARHT1 have become the mainstay of the US Stockpile Stewardship Program2 and the cornerstone of nuclear weapons certification. Meanwhile, emerging threats to national security from cargo containers and improvised explosive devices (IEDs) have invigorated inspection efforts using muon tomography, and compact x-ray radiography. Additionally, unusual environmental threats, like those from underwater oil spills and nuclear power plant accidents, have caused renewed interest in fielding radiography in severe operating conditions. We review the history of penetrating radiography at Los Alamos and survey technologies as presently applied to these important problems.

  18. A NEW GENERATION OF LOS ALAMOS OPACITY TABLES

    SciTech Connect

    Colgan, J.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Magee, N. H.; Sherrill, M. E.; Abdallah, J. Jr.; Hakel, P.; Fontes, C. J.; Guzik, J. A.; Mussack, K. A.

    2016-02-01

    We present a new, publicly available set of Los Alamos OPLIB opacity tables for the elements hydrogen through zinc. Our tables are computed using the Los Alamos ATOMIC opacity and plasma modeling code, and make use of atomic structure calculations that use fine-structure detail for all the elements considered. Our equation of state model, known as ChemEOS, is based on the minimization of free energy in a chemical picture and appears to be a reasonable and robust approach to determining atomic state populations over a wide range of temperatures and densities. In this paper we discuss in detail the calculations that we have performed for the 30 elements considered, and present some comparisons of our monochromatic opacities with measurements and other opacity codes. We also use our new opacity tables in solar modeling calculations and compare and contrast such modeling with previous work.

  19. A New Generation of Los Alamos Opacity Tables

    SciTech Connect

    Colgan, James Patrick; Kilcrease, David Parker; Magee, Jr., Norman H.; Sherrill, Manolo Edgar; Abdallah, Joseph; Hakel, Peter; Fontes, Christopher John; Guzik, Joyce Ann; Mussack Tamashiro, Kathleen Anita

    2016-01-26

    We present a new, publicly available, set of Los Alamos OPLIB opacity tables for the elements hydrogen through zinc. Our tables are computed using the Los Alamos ATOMIC opacity and plasma modeling code, and make use of atomic structure calculations that use fine-structure detail for all the elements considered. Our equation-of-state (EOS) model, known as ChemEOS, is based on the minimization of free energy in a chemical picture and appears to be a reasonable and robust approach to determining atomic state populations over a wide range of temperatures and densities. In this paper we discuss in detail the calculations that we have performed for the 30 elements considered, and present some comparisons of our monochromatic opacities with measurements and other opacity codes. We also use our new opacity tables in solar modeling calculations and compare and contrast such modeling with previous work.

  20. A New Generation of Los Alamos Opacity Tables

    DOE PAGES

    Colgan, James Patrick; Kilcrease, David Parker; Magee, Jr., Norman H.; ...

    2016-01-26

    We present a new, publicly available, set of Los Alamos OPLIB opacity tables for the elements hydrogen through zinc. Our tables are computed using the Los Alamos ATOMIC opacity and plasma modeling code, and make use of atomic structure calculations that use fine-structure detail for all the elements considered. Our equation-of-state (EOS) model, known as ChemEOS, is based on the minimization of free energy in a chemical picture and appears to be a reasonable and robust approach to determining atomic state populations over a wide range of temperatures and densities. In this paper we discuss in detail the calculations thatmore » we have performed for the 30 elements considered, and present some comparisons of our monochromatic opacities with measurements and other opacity codes. We also use our new opacity tables in solar modeling calculations and compare and contrast such modeling with previous work.« less

  1. A new generation of Los Alamos opacity tables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgan, J.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Magee, N. H.; Abdallah, J.; Sherrill, M. E.; Fontes, C. J.; Hakel, P.; Guzik, J. A.; Mussack, K. A.; Walczak, P.

    2017-03-01

    We review a recently completed set of Los Alamos OPLIB opacity tables for the elements hydrogen through zinc. Our tables have been computed using the Los Alamos ATOMIC code, which makes use of atomic structure calculations that include fine-structure detail for all the elements considered. We utilize an equation-of-state model, known as ChemEOS, that is based on the minimization of free energy in a chemical picture. Recent publications by us have compared our calculations to available experimental opacity data and to other opacity calculations. Our tables are publicly available via our website, and have already been used in solar modeling calculations as well as the modeling of pulsating B-type stars. This proceedings submission will give an overview of our opacity calculations and briefly review the conclusions from the astrophysical modeling.

  2. Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) located in Los Alamos, New Mexico. LANL is operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by the University of California. The Tiger Team Assessment was conducted from September 23 to November 8, 1991, under the auspices of the DOE Office of Special Projects, Office of Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health. The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing environmental, safety, and health (ES H) disciplines; management; and contractor and DOE self-assessments. Compliance with applicable Federal, state, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal LANL site requirements was assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and the site contractors' management of ES H/quality assurance programs was conducted. This volume discusses findings concerning the environmental assessment.

  3. Final report on the radiological surveys of designated DX firing sites at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-09

    CHEMRAD was contracted by Los Alamos National Laboratory to perform USRADS{reg_sign} (UltraSonic Ranging And Data System) radiation scanning surveys at designated DX Sites at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The primary purpose of these scanning surveys was to identify the presence of Depleted Uranium (D-38) resulting from activities at the DX Firing Sites. This effort was conducted to update the most recent surveys of these areas. This current effort was initiated with site orientation on August 12, 1996. Surveys were completed in the field on September 4, 1996. This Executive Summary briefly presents the major findings of this work. The detail survey results are presented in the balance of this report and are organized by Technical Area and Site number in section 2. This organization is not in chronological order. USRADS and the related survey methods are described in section 3. Quality Control issues are addressed in section 4. Surveys were conducted with an array of radiation detectors either mounted on a backpack frame for man-carried use (Manual mode) or on a tricycle cart (RadCart mode). The array included radiation detectors for gamma and beta surface near surface contamination as well as dose rate at 1 meter above grade. The radiation detectors were interfaced directly to an USRADS 2100 Data Pack.

  4. Los Alamos x-ray characterization facilities for plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Day, R.H.; Blake, R.L.; Stradling, G.L.; Trela, W.J.; Bartlett, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    A summary is given of characteristics of x-ray sources used by Los Alamos National Laboratory to calibrate various x-ray diagnostic packages and components. Included are D.C. sourcs in electron impact and fluorescence modes, a pulsed laser source for soft x rays with 100 ps time resolution, Febetron pulsed electron impact sources, and both EUV and x-ray synchrotron beamlines.

  5. Recent results in the Los Alamos compact torus program

    SciTech Connect

    Tuszewski, M.; Armstrong, W.T.; Barnes, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    A Compact Toroid is a toroidal magnetic-plasma-containment geometry in which no conductors or vacuum-chamber walls pass through the hole in the torus. Two types of compact toroids are studied experimentally and theoretically at Los Alamos: spheromaks that are oblate in shape and contain both toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields, and field-reversed configurations (FRC) that are very prolate and contain poloidal field only.

  6. [Los Alamos National Laboratory industrial applications and technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-31

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of the Los Alamos Economic Development Corporation (LAEDC) under its contract with the Industrial Applications Office (IAO). The LAEDC has: provided business planning assistance to potential entrepreneurs, assisted IAO in preparing and distributing informational materials on technology, organized and managed meetings and seminars on technology transfer and entrepreneurship, identified new opportunities for technology transfer, and identified and implemented programs for the recognition of Laboratory entrepreneurs.

  7. Los Alamos Canyon Ice Rink Parking Flood Plain Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hathcock, Charles Dean

    2015-02-10

    The project location is in Los Alamos Canyon east of the ice rink facility at the intersection of West and Omega roads (Figure 1). Forty eight parking spaces will be constructed on the north and south side of Omega Road, and a lighted walking path will be constructed to the ice rink. Some trees will be removed during this action. A guardrail of approximately 400 feet will be constructed along the north side of West Road to prevent unsafe parking in that area.

  8. Los Alamos sequence analysis package for nucleic acids and proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kanehisa, M I

    1982-01-01

    An interactive system for computer analysis of nucleic acid and protein sequences has been developed for the Los Alamos DNA Sequence Database. It provides a convenient way to search or verify various sequence features, e.g., restriction enzyme sites, protein coding frames, and properties of coded proteins. Further, the comprehensive analysis package on a large-scale database can be used for comparative studies on sequence and structural homologies in order to find unnoted information stored in nucleic acid sequences. PMID:6174934

  9. Los Alamos, Toshiba probing Fukushima with cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Christopher

    2014-06-16

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has announced an impending partnership with Toshiba Corporation to use a Los Alamos technique called muon tomography to safely peer inside the cores of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors and create high-resolution images of the damaged nuclear material inside without ever breaching the cores themselves. The initiative could reduce the time required to clean up the disabled complex by at least a decade and greatly reduce radiation exposure to personnel working at the plant. Muon radiography (also called cosmic-ray radiography) uses secondary particles generated when cosmic rays collide with upper regions of Earth's atmosphere to create images of the objects that the particles, called muons, penetrate. The process is analogous to an X-ray image, except muons are produced naturally and do not damage the materials they contact. Muon radiography has been used before in imaginative applications such as mapping the interior of the Great Pyramid at Giza, but Los Alamos's muon tomography technique represents a vast improvement over earlier technology.

  10. Los Alamos, Toshiba probing Fukushima with cosmic rays

    ScienceCinema

    Morris, Christopher

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has announced an impending partnership with Toshiba Corporation to use a Los Alamos technique called muon tomography to safely peer inside the cores of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors and create high-resolution images of the damaged nuclear material inside without ever breaching the cores themselves. The initiative could reduce the time required to clean up the disabled complex by at least a decade and greatly reduce radiation exposure to personnel working at the plant. Muon radiography (also called cosmic-ray radiography) uses secondary particles generated when cosmic rays collide with upper regions of Earth's atmosphere to create images of the objects that the particles, called muons, penetrate. The process is analogous to an X-ray image, except muons are produced naturally and do not damage the materials they contact. Muon radiography has been used before in imaginative applications such as mapping the interior of the Great Pyramid at Giza, but Los Alamos's muon tomography technique represents a vast improvement over earlier technology.

  11. Water supply at Los Alamos during 1996. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McLin, S.G.; Purtymun, W.D.; Maes, M.N.; Longmire, P.A.

    1997-12-01

    Production of potable municipal water supplies during 1996 totaled about 1,368.1 million gallons from wells in the Guaje, Pajarito, and Otowi well fields. There was no water used from either the spring gallery in Water Canyon or from Guaje Reservoir during 1996. About 2.6 million gallons of water from Los Alamos Reservoir was used for lawn irrigation. The total water usage in 1996 was about 1,370.7 million gallons, or about 131 gallons per day per person living in Los Alamos County. Groundwater pumpage was up about 12.0 million gallons in 1996 compared with the pumpage in 1995. This report fulfills requirements specified in US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 (Groundwater Protection Management Program), which requires the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to monitor and document groundwater conditions below Pajarito Plateau and to protect the regional aquifer from contamination associated with Laboratory operations. Furthermore, this report also fulfills special conditions by providing information on hydrologic characteristics of the regional aquifer, including operating conditions of the municipal water supply system.

  12. Grid generation software engineering at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G.L.; Ankeny, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    We have collected and re-engineered a small library of computer codes for general-purpose grid generation in one-, two-, and three-dimensional domains. The design intent was to produce easy-to-use general purpose codes that are portable to as many different hardware and software environments as practical, that are consistent in programming style and user interface, and that cover a gamut of applications. The paper describes some of the features of the codes, emphasizing the perspective of the potential user or programmer, rather than that of the researcher interested in mathematical techniques. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  13. From comparative effectiveness research to patient-centered outcomes research: policy history and future directions.

    PubMed

    D'Arcy, Laura P; Rich, Eugene C

    2012-07-01

    Containing growth in health care expenditures is considered to be essential to improving both the long-term fiscal outlook of the federal government and the future affordability of health care in the US. As health care expenditures have increased, so too have concerns about the quality of health care. Better information on the clinical effectiveness of alternative treatments and other interventions is needed to improve the quality of care and restrain growth in expenditures. This article explains the key role played by the federal government in defining the context and process of comparative effectiveness research as well as its funding. Subsequently, the article explores the mission, priorities, and research agenda of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, which is an independent, nonprofit corporation established in 2010 by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

  14. Energy supply and environmental issues: The Los Alamos National Laboratory experience in regional and international programs

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory, operated by the University of California, encompasses more than forty-three square miles of mesas and canyons in northern New Mexico. A Department of Energy national laboratory, Los Alamos is one of the largest multidisciplinary, multiprogram laboratories in the world. Our mission, to apply science and engineering capabilities to problems of national security, has expanded to include a broad array of programs. We conduct extensive research in energy, nuclear safeguards and security, biomedical science, computational science, environmental protection and cleanup, materials science, and other basic sciences. The Energy Technology Programs Office is responsible for overseeing and developing programs in three strategic areas: energy systems and the environment, transportation and infrastructure, and integrated chemicals and materials processing. Our programs focus on developing reliable, economic and environmentally sound technologies that can help ensure an adequate supply of energy for the nation. To meet these needs, we are involved in programs that range from new and enhanced oil recovery technologies and tapping renewable energy sources, through efforts in industrial processes, electric power systems, clean coal technologies, civilian radioactive waste, high temperature superconductivity, to studying the environmental effects of energy use.

  15. Development of a Medical Research Institute Directed At Basic and Clinical Research Immunology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-30

    receptor interactions, and RNA and DNA tumor virus leukemagenesis. Summary of Research Results: GP41 Interaction with nonCD4 proteins on Human Cells...recombinant form of gp41 show that it blocks CS3 binding with an affinity (pseudoaffinity) constant 100 fold greater than peptide itself. The ability

  16. Recent developments in the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility Waste Tracking System-automated data collection pilot project

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, B.; Montoya, A.; Klein, W.

    1999-02-01

    The waste management and environmental compliance group (NMT-7) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory has initiated a pilot project for demonstrating the feasibility and utility of automated data collection as a solution for tracking waste containers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility. This project, the Los Alamos Waste Tracking System (LAWTS), tracks waste containers during their lifecycle at the facility. LAWTS is a two-tiered system consisting of a server/workstation database and reporting engine and a hand-held data terminal-based client program for collecting data directly from tracked containers. New containers may be added to the system from either the client unit or from the server database. Once containers are in the system, they can be tracked through one of three primary transactions: Move, Inventory, and Shipment. Because LAWTS is a pilot project, it also serves as a learning experience for all parties involved. This paper will discuss many of the lessons learned in implementing a data collection system in the restricted environment. Specifically, the authors will discuss issues related to working with the PPT 4640 terminal system as the data collection unit. They will discuss problems with form factor (size, usability, etc.) as well as technical problems with wireless radio frequency functions. They will also discuss complications that arose from outdoor use of the terminal (barcode scanning failures, screen readability problems). The paper will conclude with a series of recommendations for proceeding with LAWTS based on experience to date.

  17. Neuroscience-related research in Ghana: a systematic evaluation of direction and capacity.

    PubMed

    Quansah, Emmanuel; Karikari, Thomas K

    2016-02-01

    Neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases account for considerable healthcare, economic and social burdens in Ghana. In order to effectively address these burdens, appropriately-trained scientists who conduct high-impact neuroscience research will be needed. Additionally, research directions should be aligned with national research priorities. However, to provide information about current neuroscience research productivity and direction, the existing capacity and focus need to be identified. This would allow opportunities for collaborative research and training to be properly explored and developmental interventions to be better targeted. In this study, we sought to evaluate the existing capacity and direction of neuroscience-related research in Ghana. To do this, we examined publications reporting research investigations authored by scientists affiliated with Ghanaian institutions in specific areas of neuroscience over the last two decades (1995-2015). 127 articles that met our inclusion criteria were systematically evaluated in terms of research foci, annual publication trends and author affiliations. The most actively-researched areas identified include neurocognitive impairments in non-nervous system disorders, depression and suicide, epilepsy and seizures, neurological impact of substance misuse, and neurological disorders. These studies were mostly hospital and community-based surveys. About 60% of these articles were published in the last seven years, suggesting a recent increase in research productivity. However, data on experimental and clinical research outcomes were particularly lacking. We suggest that future investigations should focus on the following specific areas where information was lacking: large-scale disease epidemiology, effectiveness of diagnostic platforms and therapeutic treatments, and the genetic, genomic and molecular bases of diseases.

  18. The neurobiology of psychopathy: recent developments and new directions in research and treatment.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Michael A

    2015-06-01

    Psychopathic individuals account for substantial predatory and impulsive violence. To the present, the principal intervention used to decrease the harm inflicted by psychopaths has been confinement. Nevertheless, most confined psychopathic persons return to the community. Recent advances in the understanding of the neurobiology of psychopathy hold promise for new research directions and more effective treatments. In this article, we will explore recent advances in genetics, electrophysiology, brain imaging, and psychopharmacology, as well as, in brief, their implications for new directions in research and treatment.

  19. Wireless Sensor Network Security Enhancement Using Directional Antennas: State of the Art and Research Challenges.

    PubMed

    Curiac, Daniel-Ioan

    2016-04-07

    Being often deployed in remote or hostile environments, wireless sensor networks are vulnerable to various types of security attacks. A possible solution to reduce the security risks is to use directional antennas instead of omnidirectional ones or in conjunction with them. Due to their increased complexity, higher costs and larger sizes, directional antennas are not traditionally used in wireless sensor networks, but recent technology trends may support this method. This paper surveys existing state of the art approaches in the field, offering a broad perspective of the future use of directional antennas in mitigating security risks, together with new challenges and open research issues.

  20. Wireless Sensor Network Security Enhancement Using Directional Antennas: State of the Art and Research Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Curiac, Daniel-Ioan

    2016-01-01

    Being often deployed in remote or hostile environments, wireless sensor networks are vulnerable to various types of security attacks. A possible solution to reduce the security risks is to use directional antennas instead of omnidirectional ones or in conjunction with them. Due to their increased complexity, higher costs and larger sizes, directional antennas are not traditionally used in wireless sensor networks, but recent technology trends may support this method. This paper surveys existing state of the art approaches in the field, offering a broad perspective of the future use of directional antennas in mitigating security risks, together with new challenges and open research issues. PMID:27070601

  1. Harriet Hardy and the workers of Los Alamos: a campus-community historical investigation.

    PubMed

    Silver, Ken; Bird, Rick; Smith, Alex; Valerio, Daniel; Romero, Hilario

    2014-11-01

    Harriet Hardy, protégé of Alice Hamilton, spent 1948 in the Health Division of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. The contemporary campaign for federal legislation to compensate nuclear workers brought to the fore living retirees in whose cases of occupational illness Hardy had a role in diagnosis or case management. A third case is documented in archival records. Methods of participatory action research were used to better document the cases and strategize in light of the evidence, thereby assisting the workers with compensation claims. Medical and neuropsychological exams of the mercury case were conducted. Hardy's diary entries and memoirs were interpreted in light of medicolegal documentation and workers' recollections. Through these participatory research activities, Harriet Hardy's role and influence both inside and outside the atomic weapons complex have been elucidated. An important lesson learned is the ongoing need for a system of protective medical evaluations for nuclear workers with complex chemical exposures.

  2. University of California Directed Research and Development (UCDRD) Activities for Fiscal Year 1997`

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, J.

    1999-03-25

    Strong magnetic fields are a powerful tool for studying physical properties of low-dimensional semiconductor structures. The pulsed magnet facilities at the Los Alamos National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) have provided an unique opportunity to explore new correlated electronic phases of quantum Hall devices in ultra-high magnetic fields. We have performed both magneto-transport and photoluminescence experiments in the pulsed magnet for fields up to 50 T and temperatures down to 500 mK to study several types of GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures. The findings of our exploratory experiments are summarized.

  3. Abraham Pais Prize for History of Physics Lecture: Big, Bigger, Too Big? From Los Alamos to Fermilab and the SSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoddeson, Lillian

    2012-03-01

    The modern era of big science emerged during World War II. Oppenheimer's Los Alamos laboratory offered the quintessential model of a government-funded, mission-oriented facility directed by a strong charismatic leader. The postwar beneficiaries of this model included the increasingly ambitious large laboratories that participated in particle physics--in particular, Brookhaven, SLAC, and Fermilab. They carried the big science they practiced into a new realm where experiments eventually became as large and costly as entire laboratories had been. Meanwhile the available funding grew more limited causing the physics research to be concentrated into fewer and bigger experiments that appeared never to end. The next phase in American high-energy physics was the Superconducting Super Collider, the most costly pure physics project ever attempted. The SSC's termination was a tragedy for American science, but for historians it offers an opportunity to understand what made the success of earlier large high-energy physics laboratories possible, and what made the continuation of the SSC impossible. The most obvious reason for the SSC's failure was its enormous and escalating budget, which Congress would no longer support. Other factors need to be recognized however: no leader could be found with directing skills as strong as those of Wilson, Panofsky, Lederman, or Richter; the scale of the project subjected it to uncomfortable public and Congressional scrutiny; and the DOE's enforcement of management procedures of the military-industrial complex that clashed with those typical of the scientific community led to the alienation and withdrawal of many of the most creative scientists, and to the perception and the reality of poor management. These factors, exacerbated by negative pressure from scientists in other fields and a post-Cold War climate in which physicists had little of their earlier cultural prestige, discouraged efforts to gain international support. They made the SSC

  4. Workshop on future directions for plant research at NASA: a report.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Fundamental Space Biology Division and the Advanced Human Support Technology Program convened a workshop in December 2003 [correction of 2004] at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, to chart future directions for plant research at NASA. The purpose of the workshop was to bring together key managers and principal investigators in NASA's plant research community as well as non-NASA funded researchers to formulate a strategy to guide future plant research for the Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR). Subsequent to the workshop, on Wednesday, January 14, 2004, President George W. Bush announced a proposal for NASA to go back to the moon and later send a manned mission to Mars. The following is a summary of workshop recommendations provided by the plant research community within the framework of the new exploration vision as set for by NASA.

  5. Development of a prototype plan for the effective closure of a waste disposal site in Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Nyhan, J.; Barnes, F.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a prototype plan for the effective closure and stabilization of a semiarid low-level waste disposal site. This prototype plan will provide demonstrated closure techniques for a trench in a disposal site at Los Alamos based on previous shallow land burial (SLB) field research both at the Los Alamos Experimental Engineered Test Facility (EETF), and at a waste disposal area at Los Alamos. The accuracy of modeling soil water storage by two hydrologic models was tested by comparing simulation results with field measurements of soil moisture in eight experimental landfill cover systems at Waste Disposal Area B having a range of well-defined soil profiles and vegetative covers. Regression analysis showed that one of the two models tested represented soil moisture more accurately than the second model. The accuracy of modeling all of the parameters of the water balance equation was then evaluated using field data from the Integrated Systems Demonstration plots at the EETF. Optimized parameters were developed for one model to describe observed values of deep percolation, evapotranspiration, and runoff from the field plots containing an SLB trench cap configuration.

  6. Audit Report, "Fire Protection Deficiencies at Los Alamos National Laboratory"

    SciTech Connect

    2009-06-01

    The Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) maintains some of the Nation's most important national security assets, including nuclear materials. Many of Los Alamos' facilities are located in close proximity to one another, are occupied by large numbers of contract and Federal employees, and support activities ranging from nuclear weapons design to science-related activities. Safeguarding against fires, regardless of origin, is essential to protecting employees, surrounding communities, and national security assets. On June 1, 2006, Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS), became the managing and operating contractor for Los Alamos, under contract with the Department's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). In preparation for assuming its management responsibilities at Los Alamos, LANS conducted walk-downs of the Laboratory's facilities to identify pre-existing deficiencies that could give rise to liability, obligation, loss or damage. The walk-downs, which identified 812 pre-existing fire protection deficiencies, were conducted by subject matter professionals, including fire protection experts. While the Los Alamos Site Office has overall responsibility for the effectiveness of the fire protection program, LANS, as the Laboratory's operating contractor, has a major, day-to-day role in minimizing fire-related risks. The issue of fire protection at Los Alamos is more than theoretical. In May 2000, the 'Cerro Grande' fire burned about 43,000 acres, including 7,700 acres of Laboratory property. Due to the risk posed by fire to the Laboratory's facilities, workforce, and surrounding communities, we initiated this audit to determine whether pre-existing fire protection deficiencies had been addressed. Our review disclosed that LANS had not resolved many of the fire protection deficiencies that had been identified in early 2006: (1) Of the 296 pre-existing deficiencies we selected for audit, 174 (59 percent) had not been corrected

  7. Recent research related to juvenile sex offending: findings and directions for further research.

    PubMed

    Malin, H Martin; Saleh, Fabian M; Grudzinskas, Albert J

    2014-04-01

    Serious scholarly inquiry into juvenile sex offending represents a relatively new field, dating from the mid 1940s. During the next 4 decades, a mere handful of articles exploring aspects of juvenile sex offending were added to the available literature. By the 1980s, however, the literature began to increase rapidly, a trend that continues today. The purpose of this article is a focused review of the juvenile sex offender literature cited in PubMed over the last 5 years (2009-2013). The authors have chosen studies that will bring readers up to date on research they believe impacts our current understanding of best practices in the management of juvenile sex offending. For convenience, our review is organized into topical categories including research into characteristics and typologies of juvenile sex offenders, risk assessment and recidivism, assessment and treatment, the ongoing debate about mandatory registration of sex offenders as it applies to juveniles, and other thought provoking studies that do not fit neatly into the aforementioned categories. The studies included contain findings that both reinforce and challenge currently held notions about best practices concerning treatment and public policy, suggesting that our knowledge of the field continues to evolve in important ways.

  8. Stratigraphy and Geologic Structure at the Chemical and Metallurgy (CMR) Building, Technical Area 3, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Alexis Lavine; Donathan Krier; Florie Caporuscio; Jamie Gardner

    1998-10-01

    Nine shallow (c70 ft), closely spaced core holes were continuously cored in the upper units of the 1.22 Ma Tshirege Member of the Bandelier Tuff at Technical Area (TA)-3 of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The goal of the investigation was to identify faults that may have potential for earthquake-induced surface rupture at the site of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) building, a sensitive Laboratory facility that houses nuclear materials research functions. The holes were located from 25 ft to 115 ft from the building perimeter. Careful mapping of Lithologic sequences in cores, supplemented with focused sampling for geochemical analyses, yielded high confidence in the accuracy of delineating buried contacts within the Tshirege Member. Geologic analysis and investigation of the trends of surfaces interpolated from contacts in the core holes using commercially available software helped infer minor faulting in the strata beneath the building. Results show that gently north-northeast-dipping beds underlie the CMR building. The tilted beds are faulted by two small, closely spaced, parallel reverse faults with a combined vertical separation of approximately 8 ft. The faults are inferred from lithologically and geochemically repeated sections of core at about 55-ft depth in hole SHB-CMR-6. The data from nearby core holes SHB-CMR-2 and SHB-CMR-3 permit the extension of the faults, albeit with decreasing separation, toward the southwest beneath the CMR building. The fault trend is consistent with mapped lineaments from aerial photography and with nearby mapped structure, but direct evidence of the faults' orientations is lacking. No other faults were detected beneath the CMR building by this drilling and analysis method, which can detect faults with greater than about 2 ft separation.

  9. New directions in evidence-based policy research: a critical analysis of the literature.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Kathryn; Lorenc, Theo; Innvær, Simon

    2014-07-14

    Despite 40 years of research into evidence-based policy (EBP) and a continued drive from both policymakers and researchers to increase research uptake in policy, barriers to the use of evidence are persistently identified in the literature. However, it is not clear what explains this persistence - whether they represent real factors, or if they are artefacts of approaches used to study EBP. Based on an updated review, this paper analyses this literature to explain persistent barriers and facilitators. We critically describe the literature in terms of its theoretical underpinnings, definitions of 'evidence', methods, and underlying assumptions of research in the field, and aim to illuminate the EBP discourse by comparison with approaches from other fields. Much of the research in this area is theoretically naive, focusing primarily on the uptake of research evidence as opposed to evidence defined more broadly, and privileging academics' research priorities over those of policymakers. Little empirical data analysing the processes or impact of evidence use in policy is available to inform researchers or decision-makers. EBP research often assumes that policymakers do not use evidence and that more evidence - meaning research evidence - use would benefit policymakers and populations. We argue that these assumptions are unsupported, biasing much of EBP research. The agenda of 'getting evidence into policy' has side-lined the empirical description and analysis of how research and policy actually interact in vivo. Rather than asking how research evidence can be made more influential, academics should aim to understand what influences and constitutes policy, and produce more critically and theoretically informed studies of decision-making. We question the main assumptions made by EBP researchers, explore the implications of doing so, and propose new directions for EBP research, and health policy.

  10. New directions in evidence-based policy research: a critical analysis of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Despite 40 years of research into evidence-based policy (EBP) and a continued drive from both policymakers and researchers to increase research uptake in policy, barriers to the use of evidence are persistently identified in the literature. However, it is not clear what explains this persistence – whether they represent real factors, or if they are artefacts of approaches used to study EBP. Based on an updated review, this paper analyses this literature to explain persistent barriers and facilitators. We critically describe the literature in terms of its theoretical underpinnings, definitions of ‘evidence’, methods, and underlying assumptions of research in the field, and aim to illuminate the EBP discourse by comparison with approaches from other fields. Much of the research in this area is theoretically naive, focusing primarily on the uptake of research evidence as opposed to evidence defined more broadly, and privileging academics’ research priorities over those of policymakers. Little empirical data analysing the processes or impact of evidence use in policy is available to inform researchers or decision-makers. EBP research often assumes that policymakers do not use evidence and that more evidence – meaning research evidence – use would benefit policymakers and populations. We argue that these assumptions are unsupported, biasing much of EBP research. The agenda of ‘getting evidence into policy’ has side-lined the empirical description and analysis of how research and policy actually interact in vivo. Rather than asking how research evidence can be made more influential, academics should aim to understand what influences and constitutes policy, and produce more critically and theoretically informed studies of decision-making. We question the main assumptions made by EBP researchers, explore the implications of doing so, and propose new directions for EBP research, and health policy. PMID:25023520

  11. The Direction and Autonomy of Interdisciplinary Study and Research Paths in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of didactic infrastructures to direct Study and Research Paths (SRP) in teacher education within the context of interdisciplinary inquiry. The disciplines of school mathematics and school biology, and their didactics, are made to interconnect through the investigation of a generating question concerning the illness…

  12. Current controversies and future directions in basal ganglia research. Integrating basic neuroscience and clinical investigation.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Cairasco, N; Miguel, E C; Rauch, S L; Leckman, J F

    1997-12-01

    This article discusses current controversies and future directions in basal ganglia research, detailing behavioral aspects, anatomic models, neurochemistry, pharmacology, and diagnostic methods as well as surgical techniques. A neuroethologic perspective is highlighted. Furthermore, the relevant literature pertaining to contemporary molecular approaches such as brain microinjections of embryonic or genetically modified cells, for therapeutic purposes and the use of transgenic and knockout animals.

  13. Future Directions in Etiologic, Prevention, and Treatment Research for Eating Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stice, Eric; South, Kelsey; Shaw, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Significant advances have occurred regarding the understanding of etiologic processes that give rise to eating disorders and the design and evaluation of efficacious prevention programs and treatment interventions. Herein we offer suggestions regarding potentially fruitful directions for future research in these areas. We suggest it would be…

  14. The Economics of Direct versus Indirect Cost Recovery in Sponsored Research. AIR Annual 1984 Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutina, Kenneth L.; And Others

    The effect of reduced reimbursements by the federal government for indirect research costs was analyzed for the typical academic medical center. The effects of simply cutting indirect cost reimbursement were contrasted with the impact of securing compensating levels of increased direct project support. To determine if the consequences differed as…

  15. Future Directions for Research on the Development and Prevention of Early Conduct Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes our state of knowledge regarding the development and prevention of conduct problems in early childhood, then identifies directions that would benefit future basic and applied research. Our understanding about the course and risk factors associated with early-developing conduct problems has been significantly enhanced during…

  16. The Direct Use of Online Bibliographic Information Systems by Untrained End Users: A Review of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberg, Michael

    This paper reviews the current extent of, research into, and future expectations for the use of online bibliographic retrieval systems by untrained end users rather than by trained search intermediaries. Six sections cover: (1) studies of direct end user searching, done primarily with students or persons in highly technical fields; (2) problems to…

  17. Evaluation of aircraft crash hazard at Los Alamos National Laboratory facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Selvage, R.D.

    1996-07-01

    This report selects a method for use in calculating the frequency of an aircraft crash occurring at selected facilities at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory). The Solomon method was chosen to determine these probabilities. Each variable in the Solomon method is defined and a value for each variable is selected for fourteen facilities at the Laboratory. These values and calculated probabilities are to be used in all safety analysis reports and hazards analyses for the facilities addressed in this report. This report also gives detailed directions to perform aircraft-crash frequency calculations for other facilities. This will ensure that future aircraft-crash frequency calculations are consistent with calculations in this report.

  18. Generation of high-power, subpicosecond, submillimeter radiation for applications in novel device development and materials research

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A.J.; Roberts, J.P.; Kurnit, N.A.; Benicewicz, P.K.; Rodriquez, G.; Redondo, A.; Smith, D.L.G.; Carrig, T.J.

    1995-12-31

    This research exploits the high-energy, ultrafast laser technology and high voltage expertise at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to scale submillimeter-pulse generation with photoconducting antennas to large aperture sizes and high output powers. An experimental and theoretical approach was undertaken with a view towards optimizing the radiated output and determining the technology`s ultimate scalability. This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at LANL.

  19. ORNLs Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2011 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2012-03-01

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries of all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2011. The associated FY 2011 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2012/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program’s management process.

  20. ORNLs Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2010 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2011-03-01

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries of all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2010. The associated FY 2010 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2011/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program’s management process.

  1. ORNLs Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2012 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2013-03-01

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports its status to the US Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries of all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2012. The associated FY 2012 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2012/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program’s management process.

  2. ORNLs Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2008 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-03-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2008. The associated FY 2008 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2008/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program’s management process.

  3. ORNLs Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2009 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2010-03-01

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2009. The associated FY 2009 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2010/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program’s management process.

  4. ORNLs Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2013 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2014-03-01

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports its status to the US Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries of all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2013. The associated FY 2013 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2014/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program’s management process.

  5. Groundwater level status report for 2009, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

    2010-03-01

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2009 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 179 monitoring wells, including 55 regional aquifer wells (including 11 regional/intermediate wells), 26 intermediate wells, 98 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 161 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells.

  6. Los Alamos National Laboratory Economic Analysis Capability Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Boero, Riccardo; Edwards, Brian Keith; Pasqualini, Donatella; Rivera, Michael Kelly

    2016-04-19

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed two types of models to compute the economic impact of infrastructure disruptions. FastEcon is a fast running model that estimates first-­order economic impacts of large scale events such as hurricanes and floods and can be used to identify the amount of economic activity that occurs in a specific area. LANL’s Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model estimates more comprehensive static and dynamic economic impacts of a broader array of events and captures the interactions between sectors and industries when estimating economic impacts.

  7. Bradbury science museum: your window to Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Deck, Linda Theresa

    2009-03-05

    The Bradbury Science Museum is the public's window to Los Alamos National Laboratory and supports the Community Program Office's mission to develop community support to accomplish LANL's national security and science mission. It does this by stimulating interest in and increasing basic knowledge of science and technology in northern New Mexico audiences, and increasing public understanding and appreciation of how LANL science and technology solve our global problems. In performing these prime functions, the Museum also preserves the history of scientific accomplishment at the Lab by collecting and preserving artifacts of scientific and historical importance.

  8. Groundwater level status report for 2010, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

    2011-03-01

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2010 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 194 monitoring wells, including 63 regional aquifer wells (including 10 regional/intermediate wells), 34 intermediate wells, 97 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 162 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells and seasonal responses to snowmelt runoff observed in intermediate wells.

  9. Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The purpose of the safety and health assessment was to determine the effectiveness of representative safety and health programs at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Within the safety and health programs at LANL, performance was assessed in the following technical areas: Organization and Administration, Quality Verification, Operations, Maintenance, Training and Certification, Auxiliary Systems, Emergency Preparedness, Technical Support, Packaging and Transportation, Nuclear Criticality Safety, Security/Safety Interface, Experimental Activities, Site/Facility Safety Review, Radiological Protection, Personnel Protection, Worker Safety and Health (OSHA) Compliance, Fire Protection, Aviation Safety, Explosives Safety, Natural Phenomena, and Medical Services.

  10. Recent developments in the Los Alamos radiation transport code system

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, R.A.; Parsons, K.

    1997-06-01

    A brief progress report on updates to the Los Alamos Radiation Transport Code System (LARTCS) for solving criticality and fixed-source problems is provided. LARTCS integrates the Diffusion Accelerated Neutral Transport (DANT) discrete ordinates codes with the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code. The LARCTS code is being developed with a graphical user interface for problem setup and analysis. Progress in the DANT system for criticality applications include a two-dimensional module which can be linked to a mesh-generation code and a faster iteration scheme. Updates to MCNP Version 4A allow statistical checks of calculated Monte Carlo results.

  11. Groundwater level status report for 2008, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

    2009-03-01

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2008 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 179 monitoring wells, including 45 regional aquifer wells, 28 intermediate wells, 8 regional/intermediate wells, 106 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 166 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells.

  12. Groundwater Level Status Report for 2005 Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    S.P. Allen; R.J. Koch

    2006-05-15

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 2005 is provided in this report. The Groundwater Level Monitoring Project was instituted in 2005 to provide a framework for the collection and processing of quality controlled groundwater level data. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 137 monitoring wells, including 41 regional aquifer wells, 22 intermediate wells, and 74 alluvial wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 118 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well.

  13. Los Alamos Science, Number 25 -- 1997: Celebrating the Neutrino

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cooper, N. G. ed.

    1997-01-01

    This issue is devoted to the neutrino and its remaining mysteries. It is divided into the following areas: (1) The Reines-Cowan experiment -- detecting the poltergeist; (2) The oscillating neutrino -- an introduction to neutrino masses and mixing; (3) A brief history of neutrino experiments at LAMPF; (4) A thousand eyes -- the story of LSND (Los Alamos neutrino oscillation experiment); (5) The evidence for oscillations; (6) The nature of neutrinos in muon decay and physics beyond the Standard Model; (7) Exorcising ghosts -- in pursuit of the missing solar neutrinos; (8) MSW -- a possible solution to the solar neutrino problem; (8) Neutrinos and supernovae; and (9) Dark matter and massive neutrinos.

  14. Mac configuration management at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, Allan B

    2010-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) had a need for central configuration management of non-Windows computers. LANL has three to five thousand Macs and an equal number of Linux based systems. The primary goal was to be able to inventory all non-windows systems and patch Mc OS X systems. LANL examined a number of commercial and open source solutions and ultimately selected Puppet. This paper will discuss why we chose Puppet, how we implemented it, and some lessons we learned along the way.

  15. Los Alamos Science, Number 25 -- 1997: Celebrating the neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, N.G.

    1997-12-31

    This issue is devoted to the neutrino and its remaining mysteries. It is divided into the following areas: (1) The Reines-Cowan experiment -- detecting the poltergeist; (2) The oscillating neutrino -- an introduction to neutrino masses and mixing; (3) A brief history of neutrino experiments at LAMPF; (4) A thousand eyes -- the story of LSND (Los Alamos neutrino oscillation experiment); (5) The evidence for oscillations; (6) The nature of neutrinos in muon decay and physics beyond the Standard Model; (7) Exorcising ghosts -- in pursuit of the missing solar neutrinos; (8) MSW -- a possible solution to the solar neutrino problem; (8) Neutrinos and supernovae; and (9) Dark matter and massive neutrinos.

  16. Los Alamos safeguards program overview and NDA in safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Keepin, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    Over the years the Los Alamos safeguards program has developed, tested, and implemented a broad range of passive and active nondestructive analysis (NDA) instruments (based on gamma and x-ray detection and neutron counting) that are now widely employed in safeguarding nuclear materials of all forms. Here very briefly, the major categories of gamma ray and neutron based NDA techniques, give some representative examples of NDA instruments currently in use, and cite a few notable instances of state-of-the-art NDA technique development. Historical aspects and a broad overview of the safeguards program are also presented.

  17. Water supply at Los Alamos during 1995. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McLin, S.G.; Purtymun, W.D.; Maes, M.N.

    1997-04-01

    Production of potable municipal water supplies during 1995 totaled about 1,356.1 million gallons from wells in the Guaje and Pajarito well fields. Wells in the Otowi field were not operational during 1995. The nonpotable water supply for industrial use was about 1.6 million gallons from the spring gallery in Water Canyon, and another 1.6 million gallons from Los Alamos Reservoir was used for lawn irrigation. There was no water used from Guaje Reservoir in 1995. The total water usage in 1995 was about 1,359.3 million gallons. Groundwater pumpage during 1995 was the lowest on record since 1966.

  18. Water supply at Los Alamos during 1985: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Purtymun, W.D.; Becker, N.M.; Maes, M.N.

    1986-10-01

    Well field operations during 1985 were satisfactory with municipal and industrial supplies consisting of 1587 x 10/sup 6/ gal from wells in three well fields and 37 x 10/sup 6/ gal from the gallery in Water Canyon. About 2.8 x 10/sup 6/ gal of water from Guaje Reservoir and 0.9 x 10/sup 6/ gal from Los Alamos Reservoir were used for irrigation; thus the total water usage in 1985 was about 1628 x 10/sup 6/ gal. Primary and secondary chemical quality of water in the distribution system is in compliance with federal regulations.

  19. Research on Social Networking Sites and Social Support from 2004 to 2015: A Narrative Review and Directions for Future Research.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jingbo; Martinez, Lourdes; Holmstrom, Amanda; Chung, Minwoong; Cox, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    The article presents a narrative review of scholarship on social support through social networking sites (SNSs) published from 2004 to 2015. By searching keywords related to social support and SNSs in major databases for social sciences, we identified and content analyzed directly relevant articles (N = 88). The article summarizes the prevalence of theory usage; the function of theory usage (e.g., testing a theory, developing a theory); major theories referenced; and methodologies, including research designs, measurement, and the roles of social support and SNS examined in this literature. It also reports four themes identified across the studies, indicating the trends in the current research. Based on the review, the article presents a discussion about study sites, conceptualization of social support, theoretical coherence, the role of social networks, and the dynamic relationships between SNS use and social support, which points out potential avenues for shaping a future research agenda.

  20. Future Directions of Supersonic Combustion Research: Air Force/NASA Workshop on Supersonic Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tishkoff, Julian M.; Drummond, J. Philip; Edwards, Tim; Nejad, Abdollah S.

    1997-01-01

    The Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the Air Force Wright Laboratory Aero Propulsion and Power Directorate, and the NASA Langley Research Center held a joint supersonic combustion workshop on 14-16 May 1996. The intent of this meeting was to: (1) examine the current state-of-the-art in hydrocarbon and/or hydrogen fueled scramjet research; (2) define the future direction and needs of basic research in support of scramjet technology; and (3) when appropriate, help transition basic research findings to solve the needs of developmental engineering programs in the area of supersonic combustion and fuels. A series of topical sessions were planned. Opening presentations were designed to focus and encourage group discussion and scientific exchange. The last half-day of the workshop was set aside for group discussion of the issues that were raised during the meeting for defining future research opportunities and directions. The following text attempts to summarize the discussions that took place at the workshop.