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Sample records for alamos gas shock

  1. Shock and Detonation Physics at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, David L; Dattelbaum, Dana M; Sheffield, Steve A

    2012-08-22

    WX-9 serves the Laboratory and the Nation by delivering quality technical results, serving customers that include the Nuclear Weapons Program (DOE/NNSA), the Department of Defense, the Department of Homeland Security and other government agencies. The scientific expertise of the group encompasses equations-of-state, shock compression science, phase transformations, detonation physics including explosives initiation, detonation propagation, and reaction rates, spectroscopic methods and velocimetry, and detonation and equation-of-state theory. We are also internationally-recognized in ultra-fast laser shock methods and associated diagnostics, and are active in the area of ultra-sensitive explosives detection. The facility capital enabling the group to fulfill its missions include a number of laser systems, both for laser-driven shocks, and spectroscopic analysis, high pressure gas-driven guns and powder guns for high velocity plate impact experiments, explosively-driven techniques, static high pressure devices including diamond anvil cells and dilatometers coupled with spectroscopic probes, and machine shops and target fabrication facilities.

  2. Fabrication of Optical Fiber Mechanical Shock Sensors for the Los Alamos HERT (High Explosive Radio Telemetry) Project

    SciTech Connect

    P. E. Klingsporn

    2005-11-14

    This document lists the requirements for the fiber optic mechanical shock sensor for the Los Alamos HERT (High Explosive Radio Telemetry) project and provides detailed process steps for fabricating, testing, and assembling the fiber shock sensors for delivery to Los Alamos.

  3. Shock-wave equation-of-state studies at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    A history of the shock-wave equation-of-state (EOS) studies at Los Alamos is given. Particular emphasis is placed on the pioneering research in the 1950s where many of the experimental techniques and methods of analysis were developed, which we now take for granted. A brief review of shock-wave physics is given, which illustrates important hydrodynamic and thermodynamic concepts. Recent studies on the EOS of Ti are presented with emphasis on the {alpha}-to-{omega} phase transition. VISAR wave profiles on polycrystalline Ni and single-crystal Ni are presented to determine the strengths of these materials at pressure. Low-density polystyrene foam Hugoniot experiments are described and results analyzed. 21 refs., 14 figs.

  4. Single-interface Richtmyer-Meshkov turbulent mixing at the Los Alamos Vertical Shock Tube

    DOE PAGES

    Wilson, Brandon Merrill; Mejia Alvarez, Ricardo; Prestridge, Katherine Philomena

    2016-04-12

    We studied Mach number and initial conditions effects on Richtmyer–Meshkov (RM) mixing by the vertical shock tube (VST) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). At the VST, a perturbed stable light-to-heavy (air–SF6, A=0.64) interface is impulsively accelerated with a shock wave to induce RM mixing. We investigate changes to both large and small scales of mixing caused by changing the incident Mach number (Ma=1.3 and 1.45) and the three-dimensional (3D) perturbations on the interface. Simultaneous density (quantitative planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF)) and velocity (particle image velocimetry (PIV)) measurements are used to characterize preshock initial conditions and the dynamic shocked interface.more » Initial conditions and fluid properties are characterized before shock. Using two types of dynamic measurements, time series (N=5 realizations at ten locations) and statistics (N=100 realizations at a single location) of the density and velocity fields, we calculate several mixing quantities. Mix width, density-specific volume correlations, density–vorticity correlations, vorticity, enstrophy, strain, and instantaneous dissipation rate are examined at one downstream location. Results indicate that large-scale mixing, such as the mix width, is strongly dependent on Mach number, whereas small scales are strongly influenced by initial conditions. Lastly, the enstrophy and strain show focused mixing activity in the spike regions.« less

  5. Single-interface Richtmyer-Meshkov turbulent mixing at the Los Alamos Vertical Shock Tube

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Brandon Merrill; Mejia Alvarez, Ricardo; Prestridge, Katherine Philomena

    2016-04-12

    We studied Mach number and initial conditions effects on Richtmyer–Meshkov (RM) mixing by the vertical shock tube (VST) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). At the VST, a perturbed stable light-to-heavy (air–SF6, A=0.64) interface is impulsively accelerated with a shock wave to induce RM mixing. We investigate changes to both large and small scales of mixing caused by changing the incident Mach number (Ma=1.3 and 1.45) and the three-dimensional (3D) perturbations on the interface. Simultaneous density (quantitative planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF)) and velocity (particle image velocimetry (PIV)) measurements are used to characterize preshock initial conditions and the dynamic shocked interface. Initial conditions and fluid properties are characterized before shock. Using two types of dynamic measurements, time series (N=5 realizations at ten locations) and statistics (N=100 realizations at a single location) of the density and velocity fields, we calculate several mixing quantities. Mix width, density-specific volume correlations, density–vorticity correlations, vorticity, enstrophy, strain, and instantaneous dissipation rate are examined at one downstream location. Results indicate that large-scale mixing, such as the mix width, is strongly dependent on Mach number, whereas small scales are strongly influenced by initial conditions. Lastly, the enstrophy and strain show focused mixing activity in the spike regions.

  6. Verification of 2-D Detonation Shock Dynamics in conjunction with Los Alamos Lagrangian hydrocode

    SciTech Connect

    Aida, Toru; Walter, John W.; Aslam, Tariq D.; Short, Mark

    2013-01-29

    As the latest version of the fast-tube Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) solver is linked with the Los Alamos Lagrangian hydrocode, verification problems from a 2006 DSD report (LA-14277 [1]) have been duplicated with some of the verification criteria changed to more quantitative ones. The observed error convergence is as good as or better than reported in [1], quite possibly due to the careful treatment of floating point numbers to ensure that their precision level is maintained throughout the code. This report duplicates the three sample verification problems in LA-14277 [1] using the Los Alamos ASC Lagrangian hydrocode (FLAG), official release of 3.2 Alpha6 with a few modifications. This version of FLAG is linked with the latest fast-tube Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) version beta 2 solver released in 2011 as part of the LanlDSD software product [2]. New verification criteria are used for the arcwave problem where two specific locations are chosen for burn arrival time comparison. For this report FLAG's internal driver code prepares the distance function ({Psi}) and material ID fields from its hydro setup, instead of the stand-alone driver that is being utilized by the other LANL hydrocodes currently interfaced to LanlDSD. As it is implemented in version 3.2 Alpha6, the {Psi} and material ID fields and other parameters are passed from FLAG to the DSD solver directly, and the burn table is directly passed back to FLAG as part of the calling arguments. The burn-front arrival time 'exact' solutions, mentioned in the sequel for the rate-stick and 'arc-wave' problems, are computed using a pair of special-purpose Fortran codes provided by Aslam [3]. In each case an ansatz for the form of the solution is made in which the radius from the detonator center point is used as the independent space coordinate. This leads to a simplified, problem-specific, 1D form of the governing equation. This equation is solved using 2nd-order spatial differencing and the forward Euler

  7. Fiber Bragg grating sensing of detonation and shock experiments at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Sandberg, R. L.; Jackson, S. I.; Dattelbaum, D. M.; Vincent, S. W.; McCulloch, Q.; Martinez, R. M.; Gilbertson, S. M.; Udd, E.

    2013-05-01

    An all optical-fiber-based approach to measuring high explosive detonation front position and velocity is described. By measuring total light return using an incoherent light source reflected from a fiber Bragg grating sensor in contact with the explosive, dynamic mapping of the detonation front position and velocity versus time is obtained. We demonstrate two calibration procedures and provide several examples of detonation front measurements: PBX 9502 cylindrical rate stick, radial detonation front in PBX 9501, and PBX 9501 detonation along a curved meridian line. In the cylindrical rate stick measurement, excellent agreement with complementary diagnostics (electrical pins and streak camera imaging) is achieved, demonstrating accuracy in the detonation front velocity to below the 0.3% level when compared to the results from the pin data. In a similar approach, we use embedded fiber grating sensors for dynamic pressure measurements to test the feasibility of these sensors for high pressure shock wave research in gas gun driven flyer plate impact experiments. By applying well-controlled steady shock wave pressure profiles to soft materials such as PMMA, we study the dynamic pressure response of embedded fiber Bragg gratings to extract pressure amplitude of the shock wave. Comparison of the fiber sensor results is then made with traditional methods (velocimetry and electro-magnetic particle velocity gauges) to gauge the accuracy of the approach.

  8. Shock wave structure in a lattice gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadwell, James E.; Han, Donghee

    2007-05-01

    The motion and structure of shock and expansion waves in a simple particle system, a lattice gas and cellular automaton, are determined in an exact computation. Shock wave solutions, also exact, of a continuum description, a model Boltzmann equation, are compared with the lattice results. The comparison demonstrates that, as proved by Caprino et al. ["A derivation of the Broadwell equation," Commun. Math. Phys. 135, 443 (1991)] only when the lattice processes are stochastic is the model Boltzmann description accurate. In the strongest shock wave, the velocity distribution function is the bimodal function proposed by Mott-Smith.

  9. Compressible gas properties of UF/sub 6/ for isentropic, normal shock, and oblique shock conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Harloff, G.J.

    1984-11-01

    Isentropic, normal shock, and oblique shock tables are given for the real gas UF/sub 6/ for Mach numbers up to 22. An evaluation of the real gas effects is given. A computer program listing is included.

  10. Time Dependent Studies of Reactive Shocks in the Gas Phase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-11-16

    1 LEVEL NRL Memorandum Report 3W tO Time Dependent Studies of Reactive Shocks in the Gas Phase E.S. ORAN, ’T.R. YOUNG and J.P. BORIS Laboratory for...34-• TIME DEPENDENT STUDIES OF REACTIVE SHOCKS IN THE GAS PHASE I. Introduction This paper presents results obtained from a detailed numerical...chemical kinetics, reaction products, and intermediates produced in reactive gas mixtures ignited by the propagation of a shock front. The model is based

  11. Intense shock waves and shock-compressed gas flows in the channels of rail accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobashev, S. V.; Zhukov, B. G.; Kurakin, R. O.; Ponyaev, S. A.; Reznikov, B. I.; Tverdokhlebov, K. V.

    2015-01-01

    Shock wave generation and shock-compressed gas flows attendant on the acceleration of an striker-free plasma piston in the channels of electromagnetic rail accelerators (railguns) are studied. Experiments are carried out in channels filled with helium or argon to an initial pressure of 25-500 Torr. At a pressure of 25 Torr, Mach numbers equal 32 in argon and 16 in helium. It is found that with the initial currents and gas initial densities in the channels being the same, the shock wave velocities in both gases almost coincide. Unlike standard shock tubes, a high electric field (up to 300 V/cm) present in the channel governs the motion of a shock-compressed layer. Once the charged particle concentration behind the shock wave becomes sufficiently high, the field causes part of the discharge current to pass through the shock-compressed layer. As a result, the glow of the layer becomes much more intense.

  12. Equation of state measurements of shocked ammonia gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, John; Dattelbaum, Dana; Goodwin, Peter; Coe, Joshua; Garcia, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Ammonia is one of the constituents of the fluid product mixture arising from explosives detonation. Few shock compression experiments have been performed on NH3 in either the gas or condensed phase. Earlier work by Dick (J. Chem. Phys. 74, 4053) and Mitchell, et al. (J. Chem. Phys. 76, 6273) examined the shock compressibility of liquid NH3. Nellis, et al. (Science 240, 781) also performed experiments on liquid mixtures of NH3 with water and isopropanol (a ``synthetic Uranus'') to develop an equation of state (EOS) for the outer planets. Here, we present the results from a series of gas gun-driven plate impact experiments on NH3 gas at elevated initial density. PDV and VISAR optical diagnostics were used to directly measure shock velocities and particle velocities in the shocked gas, used in quantifying the principal Hugoniot locus, and pressure and density of the shocked gas. Emission was measured using both 5-color pyrometry and streak spectroscopy, from which we estimated the temperature of the shocked gas. The pressure and density measurements were in good agreement with results from simulations using the SESAME EOS for NH3, however the measured temperatures were found to be consistently lower than in the simulations, and lower than shocked atomic gas species such as Ar.

  13. Shock interactions with a dense-gas wall layer

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A.L.; Reichenbach, H.; Ferguson, R.E.

    1991-11-19

    Described here are experiments and calculations of the interaction of a planar shock with a dense-gas layer located on the floor of the shock tube test section. The shock front deposited vorticity in the layer by the baroclynic mechanism. The wall shear layer was unstable and rapidly evolved into a turbulent boundary layer with a wide spectrum of mixing scales. Density effects dominated the dynamics in the wall region.

  14. Radiative transfer effects on reflected shock waves. II - Absorbing gas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, F. Y.; Olfe, D. B.

    1972-01-01

    Radiative cooling effects behind a reflected shock wave are calculated for an absorbing-emitting gas by means of an expansion procedure in the small density ratio across the shock front. For a gray gas shock layer with an optical thickness of order unity or less the absorption integral is simplified by use of the local temperature approximation, whereas for larger optical thicknesses a Rosseland diffusion type of solution is matched with the local temperature approximation solution. The calculations show that the shock wave will attenuate at first and then accelerate to a constant velocity. Under appropriate conditions the gas enthalpy near the wall may increase at intermediate times before ultimately decreasing to zero. A two-band absorption model yields end-wall radiant-heat fluxes which agree well with available shock-tube measurements.

  15. Test plan for headspace gas sampling of remote-handled transuranic waste containers at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Field, L.R.; Villarreal, R.

    1998-02-24

    Seventeen remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste canisters currently are stored in vertical, underground shafts at Technical Area (TA)-54, Area G, at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). These 17 RH TRU waste canisters are destined to be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for permanent disposal in the geologic repository. As the RH TRU canister is likely to be the final payload container prior to placement into the 72-B cask and shipment to the WIPP, these waste canisters provide a unique opportunity to ascertain representative flammable gas concentrations in packaged RH-TRU waste. Hydrogen, which is produced by the radiolytic decomposition of hydrogenous constituents in the waste matrix, is the primary flammable gas of concern with RH TRU waste. The primary objectives of the experiment that is described by this test plan are to sample and analyze the waste canister headspace gases to determine the concentration of hydrogen in the headspace gas and to calculate the hydrogen gas generation rate for comparison to the applicable maximum allowable hydrogen generation rate (mole/sec) limits. It is a goal of this experiment to determine the headspace gas concentrations of other gases (e.g., oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with molecular weights less than 60 g/mole) that are produced by radiolysis or present when the waste was packaged. Additionally, the temperature, pressure, and flow rate of the headspace gas will be measured.

  16. Plane shock wave structure in a dilute granular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, M. H. Lakshminarayana; Alam, Meheboob

    2016-11-01

    We analyse the early time evolution of the Riemann problem of planar shock wave structures for a dilute granular gas by solving Navier-Stokes equations numerically. The one-dimensional reduced Navier-Stokes equations for plane shock wave problem are solved numerically using a relaxation-type numerical scheme. The results on the shock structures in granular gases are presented for different Mach numbers and restitution coefficients. Based on our analysis on early time shock dynamics we conclude that the density and temperature profiles are "asymmetric"; the density maximum and the temperature maximum occur within the shock layer; the absolute magnitudes of longitudinal stress and heat flux which are initially zero at both end states attain maxima in a very short time and thereafter decrease with time.

  17. Experimental study of a shock accelerated thin gas layer

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, J.W.; Jenkins, D.G.; Klein, D.L.; Benjamin, R.F.

    1993-08-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging is utilized in shock-tube experiments to visualize the development of a shock-accelerated thin gas layer. The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of both sides of the heavy gas layer causes perturbations initially imposed on the two interfaces to develop into one of three distinct flow patterns. Two of the patterns exhibit vortex pairs which travel either upstream or downstream in the shock tube, while the third is a sinuous pattern that shows no vortex development until late in its evolution. The development of the observed patterns as well as the growth in the layer thickness is modeled by considering the dynamics of vorticity deposited in the layer by the shock interaction process. This model yields an expression for the layer growth which is in good agreement with measurements.

  18. Stripping of H- beams by residual gas in the linac at the Los Alamos neutron science center

    SciTech Connect

    Mccrady, Rodney C; Ito, Takeyasu; Cooper, Martin D; Alexander, Saunders

    2010-09-07

    The linear accelerator at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerates both protons and H{sup -} ions using Cockroft-Walton-type injectors, a drift-tube linac and a coupled-cavity linac. The vacuum is maintained in the range of 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -7} Torr; the residual gas in the vacuum system results in some stripping of the electrons from the H{sup -} ions resulting in beam spill and the potential for unwanted proton beams delivered to experiments. We have measured the amount of fully-stripped H{sup -} beam (protons) that end up at approximately 800 MeV in the beam switchyard at LANSCE using image plates as very sensitive detectors. We present here the motivation for the measurement, the measurement technique and results.

  19. Interaction of a shock with elliptical gas bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgievskiy, P. Yu.; Levin, V. A.; Sutyrin, O. G.

    2015-07-01

    The interaction of a shock with spherical and elliptical bubbles of light or heavy gas is numerically studied using the axisymmetric Euler equations. A model with a single heat capacity ratio is implemented, where bubbles are modeled by areas of the same gas with lower or higher density. Details of the general shock refraction patterns—diverging and converging—are described. The formation and development of secondary, focusing shocks are discussed. A computational parameter study for different Atwood numbers , shock strengths , where is the Mach number, and bubble geometries is performed. A basic classification for the shock focusing (cumulation) regimes is suggested, with the division of the internal, external and transitional focusing regimes determined by the position of the shock focusing point relative to the bubble. It is shown that the focusing pattern is governed not only by the Atwood number but also heavily by the Mach number and bubble shape. The qualitative dependence of cumulative intensity on bubble geometry is determined. The theoretical possibility of realizing an extremely intense shock collapse with a relatively small variation in bubble shape is demonstrated for the heavy-bubble scenario.

  20. Shock-wave structure in a partially ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, C. S.; Huang, A. B.

    1974-01-01

    The structure of a steady plane shock in a partially ionized gas has been investigated using the Boltzmann equation with a kinetic model as the governing equation and the discrete ordinate method as a tool. The effects of the electric field induced by the charge separation on the shock structure have also been studied. Although the three species of an ionized gas travel with approximately the same macroscopic velocity, the individual distribution functions are found to be very different. In a strong shock the atom distribution function may have double peaks, while the ion distribution function has only one peak. Electrons are heated up much earlier than ions and atoms in a partially ionized gas. Because the interactions of electrons with atoms and with ions are different, the ion temperature can be different from the atom temperature.

  1. Gas turbine power plant with supersonic shock compression ramps

    DOEpatents

    Lawlor, Shawn P.; Novaresi, Mark A.; Cornelius, Charles C.

    2008-10-14

    A gas turbine engine. The engine is based on the use of a gas turbine driven rotor having a compression ramp traveling at a local supersonic inlet velocity (based on the combination of inlet gas velocity and tangential speed of the ramp) which compresses inlet gas against a stationary sidewall. The supersonic compressor efficiently achieves high compression ratios while utilizing a compact, stabilized gasdynamic flow path. Operated at supersonic speeds, the inlet stabilizes an oblique/normal shock system in the gasdynamic flow path formed between the rim of the rotor, the strakes, and a stationary external housing. Part load efficiency is enhanced by use of a lean pre-mix system, a pre-swirl compressor, and a bypass stream to bleed a portion of the gas after passing through the pre-swirl compressor to the combustion gas outlet. Use of a stationary low NOx combustor provides excellent emissions results.

  2. Shocked Outflows and Gas Disks in Local Merging Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Kurt; Martin, C. L.; Prescott, M. K. M.; Armus, L.

    2012-01-01

    We have mapped the kinematic and physical properties of gas emitting optical emission lines across 39 gas-rich mergers, which were previously shown to host tidally-induced gas inflows, with deep ESI spectroscopy. In our unique analysis of these longslit spectra, we fitted multiple kinematic components to forbidden lines and recombination lines simultaneously, enabling an examination of the excitation mechanism in different kinematic components. We identify many rotating gas disks in systems whose stellar component is no longer a disk due to the merger. Many of these disks present gas excited by hot stars, but some of the disks present shock-like ratios of diagnostic emission lines, an observation we attribute to the collision of the two galaxies. In another subset of galaxies, we find very broad (sigma > 150 km/s) emission components that also present shock-like emission-line ratios. The large spatial extent of this emission favors shocks over the narrow-line region of a hidden AGN as the excitation mechanism. The high star formation rate, high dust content, and blueshift of the broad emission further suggest an origin in a galactic outflow. If this interpretation is correct, then our study of these nearby galaxies provides important insight for interpreting the broad emission lines associated with giant star-forming clumps in z 2 galaxies. It also shows that galactic outflows can be recognized via resolved emission lines, in addition to absorption lines, even in integrated spectra; and this technique could prove very powerful for studying galactic outflows in infrared spectra of high-redshift galaxies in the future. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under contract 0808161.

  3. Oblique Shock Wave Effects on Impulsively Accelerated Heavy Gas Column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmstead, Dell T.

    An experimental study was performed to elucidate the fundamental physics of shock-induced mixing for a simple three-dimensional interface. The interface studied consists of a gravity stabilized SF6-based heavy gas jet that produced a circular column with a diffuse interface into the surrounding air. The effects of density gradient (Atwood number, A), shock strength (Mach number, M), and column inclination angle (theta) were examined. Concentration was measured using Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) of an acetone vapor tracer mixed with the heavy gas jet and illuminated by a pulsed Nd-YAG laser. Shocks with Mach numbers of 1.13, 1.5, 1.7, and 2.0 were used for inclinations of 0° (planar normal shock wave), 20° and 30°. Columns with Atwood numbers of 0.25, 0.4, and 0.60 were tested at Mach 1.7 for inclinations of 0° and 20°. The oblique shock-accelerated cylindrical interface produced a typical Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) consisting of a primary counter-rotating vortices. The streamwise extent of the vortex pair in the centerline plane (cross-section) images of the column is proportional to √A/√ M, regardless of oblique shock angle for theta < 20. A heretofore unseen manifestation of Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) waves on the upstream edge of the column appear for oblique shock acceleration. The upstream edge K-H waves were observed in images from a vertical plane through the center of the column. The wavelength of the upstream edge K-H waves is proportional to theta/M ˙ √A. This upstream edge K-H instability (KHI) caused earlier onset of secondary instabilities in the primary RMI vortices seen in the centerline plane images. The combination of more rapid onset of secondary instabilities in the RMI and upstream edge KHI accelerated transition to turbulence and thus reduced the time to achieve well-mixed flow. Time to reach well-mixed flow was inversely related to Atwood number, and had a weak correlation with Mach number for M>1.13. Transition to

  4. Heavy gas relaxation in a light gas shock wave at small Prandtl number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Feria, R.

    2016-09-01

    The shock wave structure of a binary mixture with very different molecular weights is analyzed using a two-fluid theory in the limit of small Prandtl (Pr) number of the light gas. In particular, the case in which both the density ratio and Λ =Pr/δ Sc are order unity or below is considered, where δ ≪1 is the molecular mass ratio and Sc is the Schmidt number. Approximate analytical solutions are given for weak, and for moderately strong, shock waves. In the former case the solution is continuous, while in the latter case the light gas shock exhibits a discontinuity and the heavy gas relaxes towards the final equilibrium state.

  5. 'GAIM' - Gas-addition, impedance-matched arc driver. [shock tube gas dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dannenberg, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    A conceptual view for a GAIM energy/driver system to maximize shock-tube performance through efficient interfacing of the energy source with the gas dynamics of the arc driver is presented. Electrical and arc-chamber requirements are evaluated utilizing two new computer codes. One code calculates the shock wave generated for a selected time rate and magnitude of arc-energy input; the other computes the values of external circuit elements required to produce the selected energy input, with the driver represented as the load element of the electrical discharge circuit. Results indicate that the energy-storage capability and the driver arrangement needed to produce the highest shock Mach number can be achieved by means of driver gas addition and by impedance matching (GAIM). Design criteria are presented for arc energy requirements necessary to produce given shock-wave speeds. Shock velocities as high as the 70 km/sec required for simulating Jovian entry now seem possible in shock-tube operation. Practical implementation of a GAIM system is discussed.

  6. Instability evolution in shock-accelerated inclined heavy gas cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmstead, Dell; Wayne, Patrick; Vorobieff, Peter; Davis, Daniel; Truman, C. Randall

    2014-11-01

    A heavy gas cylinder interacts with a normal or oblique shockwave at Mach numbers M ranging from 1.13 to 2.0. The angle between the shock front and cylinder axis is varied between 0 and 30°, while the Atwood numbers A range from 0.25 (SF6-N2 mix) to 0.67 (pure SF6). The evolution of the column is imaged in two perpendicular planes with Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF). For oblique shock interactions, the nature of the flow is fully three-dimensional, with several instabilities developing in separate directions. In the plane that captures a cross-section of the column, Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) leads to formation of a pair of counter-rotating vortex columns. A uniform scaling appears to govern the primary instability growth in this plane across the M and A ranges, when the length scale is normalized by a product of the minimum streamwise scale after shock compression and M0.5. In the vertical plane through the column, Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices form with regular spacing along the column. The dominant wavelength of the structures in the vertical plane also appears to scale with the minimum compressed streamwise length. This research is supported by the US DOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Grant DE-NA0002220.

  7. Experimental Plans for Subsystems of a Shock Wave Driven Gas Core Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazeminezhad, F.; Anghai, S.

    2008-01-01

    This Contractor Report proposes a number of plans for experiments on subsystems of a shock wave driven pulsed magnetic induction gas core reactor (PMI-GCR, or PMD-GCR pulsed magnet driven gas core reactor). Computer models of shock generation and collision in a large-scale PMI-GCR shock tube have been performed. Based upon the simulation results a number of issues arose that can only be addressed adequately by capturing experimental data on high pressure (approx.1 atmosphere or greater) partial plasma shock wave effects in large bore shock tubes ( 10 cm radius). There are three main subsystems that are of immediate interest (for appraisal of the concept viability). These are (1) the shock generation in a high pressure gas using either a plasma thruster or pulsed high magnetic field, (2) collision of MHD or gas dynamic shocks, their interaction time, and collision pile-up region thickness, and (3) magnetic flux compression power generation (not included here).

  8. Aspect ratio effect on shock-accelerated elliptic gas cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Liyong; Liao, Shenfei; Liu, Cangli; Wang, Yanping; Zhai, Zhigang

    2016-03-01

    The evolution of an elliptic heavy-gas (SF6) cylinder accelerated by a planar weak shock wave is investigated experimentally using particle image velocimetry (PIV) diagnostics, and the emphasis is on the aspect ratio effect on shock-elliptic cylinder interaction. Experiments are conducted at five different aspect ratios (the ratio of length in streamwise and spanwise directions) varied from 0.25 to 4.0. PIV raw images and quantitative flow field data are obtained at t = 0.6 ms after the shock impact. As the aspect ratio increases, the interface morphology develops faster owing to more vorticity produced along the interface and smaller vortex spacing between the two vortex cores. For each case in this study, the maximal fluctuating velocity locates at the middle point of the two counter-vortices. The histograms of fluctuating velocity reveal that a distinct double-peak structure appears in the largest aspect ratio case in comparison with a single-peak structure in the smallest aspect ratio case. The vortex velocities predicted by the theoretical model [G. Rudinger and L. M. Somers, "Behaviour of small regions of different gases carried in accelerated gas flows," J. Fluid Mech. 7, 161-176 (1960)] agree well with the experimental ones. With the increase of aspect ratio, the maximal value of vorticity increases as well as the circulation, and more low-magnitude quantities are generated, which indicates the formation of multi-scale flow structure in the late mixing process. It is found that the experimental circulation of the vortex motion is reasonably estimated by the ideal point vortex-pair model.

  9. High-Resolution Shock-Capturing Schemes For A Real Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montagne, L. L.; Yee, H. C.; Vinokur, M.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents comparative study of several high-resolution explicit numerical-simulation schemes capturing shocks in one-dimensional flows of real gas. One-dimensional schemes compared with respect to: ability to capture shocks, resolution of shocks, overall accuracy, and computational efficiency.

  10. Motion of the heliospheric termination shock - A gas dynamic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Aaron

    1993-01-01

    A simple quantitative model is presented for the heliospheric termination shock's anticipated movement in response to upstream solar wind condition variations, under the assumption that the termination shock is initially a strong gasdynamic shock that is at rest relative to the sun, and that there is a discontinuous increase or decrease in the dynamical pressure upstream of the shock. The model suggests that the termination shock is constantly in motion, and that the mean position of the shock lies near the mean equilibrium position which corresponds to the balance between the mean solar wind dynamical pressure and the mean interstellar pressure.

  11. The flow gradients in the vicinity of a shock wave for a thermodynamically imperfect gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uskov, V. N.; Mostovykh, P. S.

    2016-11-01

    Supersonic rotational planar and axisymmetric flows of a non-viscous, non-heat-conductive gas with arbitrary thermodynamic properties in the vicinity of a steady shock wave are studied. The differential equations describing the gas flow upstream and downstream of the discontinuity surface and the dynamic compatibility conditions at this discontinuity are used. The gas flow non-uniformity in the shock vicinity is described by the spatial derivatives of the gasdynamic parameters at a point on the shock surface. The parameters are the gas pressure, density, and velocity vector. The derivatives with respect to the directions of the streamline and normal to it, and of the shock surface and normal to it, are considered. Spatial derivatives of all gasdynamic parameters are expressed through the flow non-isobaric factor along the streamline, the streamline curvature, and the flow vorticity and non-isoenthalpy factors. An algorithm for determining these factors of the gas flow downstream of a shock wave is developed. Example calculations of these factors for imperfect oxygen and thermodynamically perfect gas are presented. The influence coefficients of the upstream flow factors on the downstream flow factors are calculated. The gas flow in the vicinity of the shock is described by the isolines of gasdynamic parameters. Uniform planar and axisymmetric flows at different distances from the axis of symmetry are examined; the isobars, isopycnics, isotachs and isoclines are used to characterize the downstream flow behind a curved shock in an imperfect gas.

  12. Sub-shock formation in Grad 10-moment equations for a binary gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisi, Marzia; Conforto, Fiammetta; Martalò, Giorgio

    2016-09-01

    The shock structure problem for Grad 10-moment equations for an inert binary mixture is investigated: necessary conditions for the formation of sub-shocks in fields of only one gas or of both components are rigorously obtained, and a detailed comparison with the shock-wave structure of its principal sub-system (deduced assuming vanishing viscous stress tensors) and of the equilibrium Euler sub-system is performed. Some numerical simulations for a mixture of argon and helium are presented.

  13. Shock Structure Analysis and Aerodynamics in a Weakly Ionized Gas Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saeks, R.; Popovic, S.; Chow, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    The structure of a shock wave propagating through a weakly ionized gas is analyzed using an electrofluid dynamics model composed of classical conservation laws and Gauss Law. A viscosity model is included to correctly model the spatial scale of the shock structure, and quasi-neutrality is not assumed. A detailed analysis of the structure of a shock wave propagating in a weakly ionized gas is presented, together with a discussion of the physics underlying the key features of the shock structure. A model for the flow behind a shock wave propagating through a weakly ionized gas is developed and used to analyze the effect of the ionization on the aerodynamics and performance of a two-dimensional hypersonic lifting body.

  14. Temperature measurements behind reflected shock waves in air. [radiometric measurement of gas temperature in self-absorbing gas flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bader, J. B.; Nerem, R. M.; Dann, J. B.; Culp, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    A radiometric method for the measurement of gas temperature in self-absorbing gases has been applied in the study of shock tube generated flows. This method involves making two absolute intensity measurements at identical wavelengths, but for two different pathlengths in the same gas sample. Experimental results are presented for reflected shock waves in air at conditions corresponding to incident shock velocities from 7 to 10 km/s and an initial driven tube pressure of 1 torr. These results indicate that, with this technique, temperature measurements with an accuracy of + or - 5 percent can be carried out. The results also suggest certain facility related problems.

  15. A Numerical and Experimental Study of a Shock-Accelerated Heavy Gas Cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Zoldi, Cindy Anne

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis we study the evolution of an SF6 gas cylinder surrounded by air when accelerated by a planar Mach 1.2 shock wave. Vorticity generated by the interaction of the shock wave's pressure gradient with the density gradient at the air/SF6 interface drives the evolution of the cylinder into a vortex pair

  16. Program computes equilibrium normal shock and stagnation point solutions for arbitrary gas mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callis, L. B.; Kemper, J. T.

    1967-01-01

    Program computes solutions for flow parameters in arbitrary gas mixtures behind a normal and a reflected normal shock, for in-flight and shock-tube stagnation conditions. Equilibrium flow calculations are made by a free-energy minimization technique coupled with the steady-flow conservation equations and a modified Newton-Raphson iterative scheme.

  17. Structure of Weak Shock Waves in a Monatomic Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, F. S.; Talbot, L.

    1959-01-01

    The profiles and thicknesses of normal shock waves in argon at Mach numbers of 1.335, 1.454, 1.576, and 1-713 were determined experimentally by means of a free-molecule probe whose equilibrium temperature is related by kinetic theory to the local flow properties and their gradients. Comparisons were made between the experimental shock profiles and the theoretical profiles calculated from the Navier-Stokes equations, the Grad 13-moment equations, and the Burnett equations. New, very accurate numerical integrations of the Burnett equations were obtained for this purpose with results quite different from those found by Zoller, to whom the solution of this problem is frequently attributed. The experimental shock profiles were predicted with approximately equal success by the Navier-Stokes and Burnett theories, while the 13-moment method was definitely less satisfactory. A surprising feature of the theoretical results is the relatively small difference in predictions between the Navier-Stokes and Burnett theories in the present range of shock strengths and the contrastingly large difference between predictions of Burnett and the 13-moment theories. It is concluded that the Navier-Stokes equations are correct for weak shocks and that within the present shock strength range the Burnett equations make no improvement which merits the trouble of solving them. For shocks of noticeably greater strength, say with a shock Mach number of more than 2.5, it remains fundamentally doubtful that any of these theories can be correct.

  18. Analytical solution of the problem of a shock wave in the collapsing gas in Lagrangian coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuropatenko, V. F.; Shestakovskaya, E. S.

    2016-10-01

    It is proposed the exact solution of the problem of a convergent shock wave and gas dynamic compression in a spherical vessel with an impermeable wall in Lagrangian coordinates. At the initial time the speed of cold ideal gas is equal to zero, and a negative velocity is set on boundary of the sphere. When t > t0 the shock wave spreads from this point into the gas. The boundary of the sphere will move under the certain law correlated with the motion of the shock wave. The trajectories of the gas particles in Lagrangian coordinates are straight lines. The equations determining the structure of the gas flow between the shock front and gas border have been found as a function of time and Lagrangian coordinate. The dependence of the entropy on the velocity of the shock wave has been found too. For Lagrangian coordinates the problem is first solved. It is fundamentally different from previously known formulations of the problem of the self-convergence of the self-similar shock wave to the center of symmetry and its reflection from the center, which was built up for the infinite area in Euler coordinates.

  19. On the method of indirectly measuring gas and particulate phase velocities in shock induced dusty-gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lock, G. D.

    A method of indirectly measuring the temporally varying velocities of the gas and particulate phases in the nonequilibrium region of a shock wave moving at constant speed in a dusty-gas flow is described, and this method is assessed by using experimental data from shock-induced air flows containing 40-micron-diameter glass beads in a dusty-gas shock-tube facility featuring a large horizontal channel (19.7-cm by 7.6-cm in cross section). Simultaneous measurements of the shock-front speed with time-of-arrival gauges, particle concentration by light extinctiometry, and gas-particle mixture density by beta-ray absorption are used in conjunction with two mass conservation laws to obtain the indirect velocity measurements of both phases. A second indirect measurement of the gas-phase velocity is obtained when the gas pressure is simultaneously recorded along with the particle concentration and shock-front speed when used in conjunction with the conservation of mixture momentum. Direct measurements of the particulate-phase velocity by laser-Doppler velocimetry are also presented as a means of assessing the indirect velocity measurement method.

  20. Quantification of initial-data uncertainty on a shock-accelerated gas cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Tritschler, V. K. Avdonin, A.; Hickel, S.; Hu, X. Y.; Adams, N. A.

    2014-02-15

    We quantify initial-data uncertainties on a shock accelerated heavy-gas cylinder by two-dimensional well-resolved direct numerical simulations. A high-resolution compressible multicomponent flow simulation model is coupled with a polynomial chaos expansion to propagate the initial-data uncertainties to the output quantities of interest. The initial flow configuration follows previous experimental and numerical works of the shock accelerated heavy-gas cylinder. We investigate three main initial-data uncertainties, (i) shock Mach number, (ii) contamination of SF{sub 6} with acetone, and (iii) initial deviations of the heavy-gas region from a perfect cylindrical shape. The impact of initial-data uncertainties on the mixing process is examined. The results suggest that the mixing process is highly sensitive to input variations of shock Mach number and acetone contamination. Additionally, our results indicate that the measured shock Mach number in the experiment of Tomkins et al. [“An experimental investigation of mixing mechanisms in shock-accelerated flow,” J. Fluid. Mech. 611, 131 (2008)] and the estimated contamination of the SF{sub 6} region with acetone [S. K. Shankar, S. Kawai, and S. K. Lele, “Two-dimensional viscous flow simulation of a shock accelerated heavy gas cylinder,” Phys. Fluids 23, 024102 (2011)] exhibit deviations from those that lead to best agreement between our simulations and the experiment in terms of overall flow evolution.

  1. Simulation of Interaction of Strong Shocks with Gas Bubbles using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puranik, Bhalchandra; Watvisave, Deepak; Bhandarkar, Upendra

    2016-11-01

    The interaction of a shock with a density interface is observed in several technological applications such as supersonic combustion, inertial confinement fusion, and shock-induced fragmentation of kidney and gall-stones. The central physical process in this interaction is the mechanism of the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability (RMI). The specific situation where the density interface is initially an isolated spherical or cylindrical gas bubble presents a relatively simple geometry that exhibits all the essential RMI processes such as reflected and refracted shocks, secondary instabilities, turbulence and mixing of the species. If the incident shocks are strong, the calorically imperfect nature needs to be modelled. In the present work, we have carried out simulations of the shock-bubble interaction using the DSMC method for such situations. Specifically, an investigation of the shock-bubble interaction with diatomic gases involving rotational and vibrational excitations at high temperatures is performed, and the effects of such high temperature phenomena will be presented.

  2. Regularized Moment Equations and Shock Waves for Rarefied Granular Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Lakshminarayana; Alam, Meheboob

    2016-11-01

    It is well-known that the shock structures predicted by extended hydrodynamic models are more accurate than the standard Navier-Stokes model in the rarefied regime, but they fail to predict continuous shock structures when the Mach number exceeds a critical value. Regularization or parabolization is one method to obtain smooth shock profiles at all Mach numbers. Following a Chapman-Enskog-like method, we have derived the "regularized" version 10-moment equations ("R10" moment equations) for inelastic hard-spheres. In order to show the advantage of R10 moment equations over standard 10-moment equations, the R10 moment equations have been employed to solve the Riemann problem of plane shock waves for both molecular and granular gases. The numerical results are compared between the 10-moment and R10-moment models and it is found that the 10-moment model fails to produce continuous shock structures beyond an upstream Mach number of 1 . 34 , while the R10-moment model predicts smooth shock profiles beyond the upstream Mach number of 1 . 34 . The density and granular temperature profiles are found to be asymmetric, with their maxima occurring within the shock-layer.

  3. Shock wave-boundary layer interactions in rarefied gas flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, G. A.

    1991-01-01

    A numerical study is presented, using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, of shock wave-boundary layer interactions in low density supersonic flows. Test cases include two-dimensional, axially-symmetric and three-dimensional flows. The effective displacement angle of the boundary layer is calculated for representative flat plate, wedge, and cone flows. The maximum pressure, shear stress, and heat transfer in the shock formation region is determined in each case. The two-dimensional reflection of an oblique shock wave from a flat plate is studied, as is the three-dimensional interaction of such a wave with a sidewall boundary layer.

  4. Shock

    MedlinePlus

    ... Many organs can be damaged as a result. Shock requires immediate treatment and can get worse very rapidly. As many 1 in 5 people who suffer shock will die from it. Considerations The main types ...

  5. Internship at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, Ryan Q.

    2012-07-11

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is located in Los Alamos, New Mexico. It provides support for our country's nuclear weapon stockpile as well as many other scientific research projects. I am an Undergraduate Student Intern in the Systems Design and Analysis group within the Nuclear Nonproliferation division of the Global Security directorate at LANL. I have been tasked with data analysis and modeling of particles in a fluidized bed system for the capture of carbon dioxide from power plant flue gas.

  6. When galaxy clusters collide: the impact of merger shocks on cluster gas and galaxy evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroe, A.

    2015-09-01

    Galaxy clusters mainly grow through mergers with other clusters and groups. Major mergers give rise to cluster-wide traveling shocks, which can be detected at radio wavelengths as relics: elongated, diffuse synchrotron emitting areas located at the periphery of merging clusters. The 'Sausage' cluster hosts an extraordinary Mpc-wide relic, which enables us to study to study particle acceleration and the effects of shocks on cluster galaxies. We derive shock properties and the magnetic field structure for the relic. Our results indicate that particles are shock-accelerated, but turbulent re-acceleration or unusually efficient transport of particles in the downstream area are important effects. We demonstrate the feasibility of high-frequency observations of radio relics, by presenting a 16 GHz detection of the 'Sausage' relic. Halpha mapping of the cluster provides the first direct test as to whether the shock drives or prohibits star formation. We find numerous galaxies in! close proximity to the radio relic which are extremely massive, metal-rich, star-forming with evidence for gas mass loss though outflows. We speculate that the complex interaction between the merger, the shock wave and gas is a fundamental driver in the evolution of cluster galaxies from gas rich spirals to gas-poor ellipticals.

  7. Sampling and Analysis of the Headspace Gas in 3013 Type Plutonium Storage Containers at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Jay M.; Berg, John M.; Hill, Dallas D.; Worl, Laura A.; Veirs, Douglas K.

    2012-07-11

    Department of Energy (DOE) sites have packaged approximately 5200 3013 containers to date. One of the requirements specified in DOESTD-3013, which specifies requirements for packaging plutonium bearing materials, is that the material be no greater than 0.5 weight percent moisture. The containers are robust, nested, welded vessels. A shelf life surveillance program was established to monitor these cans over their 50 year design life. In the event pressurization is detected by radiography, it will be necessary to obtain a head space gas sample from the pressurized container. This technique is also useful to study the head space gas in cans selected for random destructive evaluation. The atmosphere is sampled and the hydrogen to oxygen ratio is measured to determine the effects of radiolysis on the moisture in the container. A system capable of penetrating all layers of a 3013 container assembly and obtaining a viable sample of the enclosed gas and an estimate of internal pressure was designed.

  8. Experimental studies of a strongly shocked gas bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Devesh; Oakley, Jason; Anderson, Mark; Bonazza, Riccardo

    2004-11-01

    The interaction of a planar shock wave (M=1.34, 2.84 and 3.34) propagating in nitrogen with a free-falling spherical soap bubble (5 cm diameter) filled with argon leads initially to the compression of the bubble into a disk-like object and, at later times, to the formation of a vortex ring at the periphery of the disk which entrains outside fluid into the argon. The evolution of some of the relevant geometrical properties of the bubble and the vortex ring are studied in the laboratory with a vertical shock tube with a square internal cross section; a retractable injector releases an argon bubble in the shock tube and a downward-propagating, planar shock wave reaches the bubble within 70 ms of its release from the injector. The flow is imaged with a laser sheet illuminated across the shock-accelerated bubble and collecting the Mie scattering signal from the soap film, which acts as a flow tracer. The planar image represents a 2D slice of the flow, however, the shocked bubble geometry evolution is in fact 3D due to an azimuthal instability (Widnall). The presence of a droplet of film results in additional Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilites due to an observed jet; this may help to explain the jetting observed following core-collapse in a supernova. Experimental results are compared with numerical simulations using the Raptor code (LLNL) which solves the full Navier-Stokes equations using the Piecewise Linear Method (PLM) with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR).

  9. Prediction of Shock Wave Structure in Weakly Ionized Gas Flow by Solving MGD Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deng, Z. T.; Oviedo-Rojas, Ruben; Chow, Alan; Litchford, Ron J.; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports the recent research results of shockwave structure predictions using a new developed code. The modified Rankine-Hugoniot relations across a standing normal shock wave are discussed and adopted to obtain jump conditions. Coupling a electrostatic body force to the Burnett equations, the weakly ionized flow field across the shock wave was solved. Results indicated that the Modified Rankine-Hugoniot equations for shock wave are valid for a wide range of ionization fraction. However, this model breaks down with small free stream Mach number and with large ionization fraction. The jump conditions also depend on the value of free stream pressure, temperature and density. The computed shock wave structure with ionization provides results, which indicated that shock wave strength may be reduced by existence of weakly ionized gas.

  10. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Gaseous Argon Shock Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Daniel; Dattelbaum, Dana; Goodwin, Peter; Morris, John; Sheffield, Stephen; Burkett, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The lack of published Argon gas shock data motivated an evaluation of the Argon Equation of State (EOS) in gas phase initial density regimes never before reached. In particular, these regimes include initial pressures in the range of 200-500 psi (0.025 - 0.056 g/cc) and initial shock velocities around 0.2 cm/ μs. The objective of the numerical evaluation was to develop a physical understanding of the EOS behavior of shocked and subsequently multiply re-shocked Argon gas initially pressurized to 200-500 psi through Pagosa numerical hydrodynamic simulations utilizing the SESAME equation of state. Pagosa is a Los Alamos National Laboratory 2-D and 3-D Eulerian hydrocode capable of modeling high velocity compressible flow with multiple materials. The approach involved the use of gas gun experiments to evaluate the shock and multiple re-shock behavior of pressurized Argon gas to validate Pagosa simulations and the SESAME EOS. Additionally, the diagnostic capability within the experiments allowed for the EOS to be fully constrained with measured shock velocity, particle velocity and temperature. The simulations demonstrate excellent agreement with the experiments in the shock velocity/particle velocity space, but note unanticipated differences in the ionization front temperatures.

  11. A Complete 2D Stability Analysis of Fast MHD Shocks in an Ideal Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trakhinin, Yuri

    An algorithm of numerical testing of the uniform Lopatinski condition for linearized stability problems for 1-shocks is suggested. The algorithm is used for finding the domains of uniform stability, neutral stability, and instability of planar fast MHD shocks. A complete stability analysis of fast MHD shock waves is first carried out in two space dimensions for the case of an ideal gas. Main results are given for the adiabatic constant γ=5/3 (mono-atomic gas), that is most natural for the MHD model. The cases γ=7/5 (two-atomic gas) and γ>5/3 are briefly discussed. Not only the domains of instability and linear (in the usual sense) stability, but also the domains of uniform stability, for which a corresponding linearized stability problem satisfies the uniform Lopatinski condition, are numerically found for different given angles of inclination of the magnetic field behind the shock to the planar shock front. As is known, uniform linearized stability implies the nonlinear stability, that is local existence of discontinuous shock front solutions of a quasilinear system of hyperbolic conservation laws.

  12. Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammel, Edward F., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Current and post World War II scientific research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (New Mexico) is discussed. The operation of the laboratory, the Los Alamos consultant program, and continuation education, and continuing education activities at the laboratory are also discussed. (JN)

  13. Magnetogasdynamic shock waves in a nonideal gas with heat conduction and radiation heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K. K.; Nath, B.

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to obtain a self-similar solution of the problem of propagation of a magnetogasdynamic shock wave in a nonideal gas with heat conduction and radiation heat flux in the presence of a spatially decreasing azimuthal magnetic field strength. The initial density of the medium is assumed to be constant. The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law, and the radiation is considered to be of a diffusion type for an optically thick gray gas model. The thermal conductivity and absorption coefficients are assumed to vary with temperature and density. The shock is assumed to be driven by a piston moving with a variable velocity. Similarity solutions are obtained, and the effects of variation of the gas nonidealness parameter and Alfven-Mach number on the flow field behind the shock are investigated.

  14. Gas-grain energy transfer in solar nebula shock waves: Implications for the origin of chondrules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.; Horanyi, M.

    1993-01-01

    Meteoritic chondrules provide evidence for the occurrence of rapid transient heating events in the protoplanetary nebula. Astronomical evidence suggests that gas dynamic shock waves are likely to be excited in protostellar accretion disks by processes such as protosolar mass ejections, nonaxisymmetric structures in an evolving disk, and impact on the nebula surface of infalling 'clumps' of circumstellar gas. Previous detailed calculations of gas-grain energy and momentum transfer have supported the possibility that such shock waves could have melted pre-existing chondrule-sized grains. The main requirement for grains to reach melting temperatures in shock waves with plausibly low Mach numbers is that grains existed in dust-rich zones (optical depth greater than 1) where radiative cooling of a given grain can be nearly balanced by radiation from surrounding grains. Localized dust-rich zones also provide a means of explaining the apparent small spatial scale of heating events. For example, the scale size of at least some optically thick dust-rich zones must have been relatively small (less than 10 kilometers) to be consistent with petrologic evidence for accretion of hot material onto cold chondrules. The implied number density of mm-sized grains for these zones would be greater than 30 m(exp -3). In this paper, we make several improvements of our earlier calculations to include radiation self-consistently in the shock jump conditions, and we include heating of grains due to radiation from the shocked gas. In addition, we estimate the importance of momentum feedback of dust concentrations onto the shocked gas which would tend to reduce the efficiency of gas dynamic heating of grains in the center of the dust cloud.

  15. Effect of temperature shock and inventory surprises on natural gas and heating oil futures returns.

    PubMed

    Hu, John Wei-Shan; Hu, Yi-Chung; Lin, Chien-Yu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the impact of temperature shock on both near-month and far-month natural gas and heating oil futures returns by extending the weather and storage models of the previous study. Several notable findings from the empirical studies are presented. First, the expected temperature shock significantly and positively affects both the near-month and far-month natural gas and heating oil futures returns. Next, significant temperature shock has effect on both the conditional mean and volatility of natural gas and heating oil prices. The results indicate that expected inventory surprises significantly and negatively affects the far-month natural gas futures returns. Moreover, volatility of natural gas futures returns is higher on Thursdays and that of near-month heating oil futures returns is higher on Wednesdays than other days. Finally, it is found that storage announcement for natural gas significantly affects near-month and far-month natural gas futures returns. Furthermore, both natural gas and heating oil futures returns are affected more by the weighted average temperature reported by multiple weather reporting stations than that reported by a single weather reporting station.

  16. An indirect method of measuring gas- and particulate-phase velocities of shock-induced dusty-gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlieb, James J.

    1992-03-01

    A method of indirectly measuring the temporally varying velocities of both the particulate and gas phases in the nonequilibrium region of a shock wave moving at constant speed in a dusty-gas mixture is described. This method is implemented by using experimental data from shock-induced air flows containing glass beads 40 microns in diameter in a dusty-gas shock-tube facility featuring a large horizontal channel 197 mm high by 76 mm wide with a special dust-injection device. Simultaneous measurements of the shock-front speed with time-of-arrival gauges, particulate concentration by light extinctiometry, and combined particulate concentration and gas density by beta-ray absorption are used in conjunction with two mass conservation laws to provide these indirect two-phase velocity measurements. Direct measurements of the particulate-phase velocity by laser-Doppler velocimetry are also presented for comparison, and the capability of the indirect velocity-measurement method is assessed.

  17. Numerical Studies of the Application of Shock Tube Technology for Cold Gas Dynamic Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickel, R.; Bobzin, K.; Lugscheider, E.; Parkot, D.; Varava, W.; Olivier, H.; Luo, X.

    2007-12-01

    A new method for a combustion-free spraying is studied fundamentally by modeling and simulation in comparison with first experiments. The article focuses on the numerical simulation of the gas-particle nozzle flow, which is generated by the shock reflection at the end wall section of a shock tube. To study the physical fundamentals of this process, at present only a single shot operation is considered. The particles are injected downstream of the nozzle throat into a supersonic nozzle flow. The measurements of the particle velocity made by a laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) set up show that the maximum velocity amounts to 1220 m/s for stainless steel particles of 15 μm diameter. The CFD-Code (Fluent) is first verified by a comparison with available numerical and experimental data for gas and gas-particle flow fields in a long Laval-nozzle. The good agreement implied the great potential of the new dynamic process concept for cold-gas coating applications. Then the flow fields in the short Laval nozzle designed and realized by the Shock Wave Laboratory (SWL) are investigated. The gas flow for experimentally obtained stagnation conditions is simulated. The gas-particle flow without and with the influence of the particles on the gas flow is calculated by the Surface Engineering Institute (IOT) and compared with experiments. The influence of the injection parameters on the particle velocities is investigated, as well.

  18. Shock formation in Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe on deuterium gas puff implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Narkis, J.; Rahman, H. U.; Ney, P.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Wessel, F. J.; Conti, F.; Valenzuela, J. C.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-12-29

    1- and 2-D simulations of 1-cm radius, gas-puff liners of Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe imploding onto a deuterium target are conducted using the discharge parameters for the Zebra (1 MA, 130 ns) driver using the resistive MHD code MACH2. This is an implementation of the Staged Z-pinch concept, in which the target is driven to high-energy-density first by shock compression launched by a diffused azimuthal magnetic field (J×B force), and then by the adiabatic compression as the liner converges on axis. During the run-in phase, the initial shock heating preheats the deuterium plasma, with a subsequent stable, adiabatic compression heating the target to high energy density. Shock compression of the target coincides with the development of a J×B force at the target/liner interface. Stronger B-field transport and earlier shock compression increases with higher-Z liners, which results in an earlier shock arrival on axis. As a result, delayed shock formation in lower-Z liners yields a relative increase in shock heating, however, the 2-D simulations show an increased target isolation from magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability penetration, suggesting that an optimal balance between these two effects is reached in an Ar or Kr liner, rather than with Xe.

  19. Shock formation in Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe on deuterium gas puff implosions

    DOE PAGES

    Narkis, J.; Rahman, H. U.; Ney, P.; ...

    2016-12-29

    1- and 2-D simulations of 1-cm radius, gas-puff liners of Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe imploding onto a deuterium target are conducted using the discharge parameters for the Zebra (1 MA, 130 ns) driver using the resistive MHD code MACH2. This is an implementation of the Staged Z-pinch concept, in which the target is driven to high-energy-density first by shock compression launched by a diffused azimuthal magnetic field (J×B force), and then by the adiabatic compression as the liner converges on axis. During the run-in phase, the initial shock heating preheats the deuterium plasma, with a subsequent stable, adiabatic compressionmore » heating the target to high energy density. Shock compression of the target coincides with the development of a J×B force at the target/liner interface. Stronger B-field transport and earlier shock compression increases with higher-Z liners, which results in an earlier shock arrival on axis. As a result, delayed shock formation in lower-Z liners yields a relative increase in shock heating, however, the 2-D simulations show an increased target isolation from magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability penetration, suggesting that an optimal balance between these two effects is reached in an Ar or Kr liner, rather than with Xe.« less

  20. Stockpile Stewardship: Los Alamos

    ScienceCinema

    McMillan, Charlie; Morgan, Nathanial; Goorley, Tom; Merrill, Frank; Funk, Dave; Korzekwa, Deniece; Laintz, Ken

    2016-07-12

    "Heritage of Science" is a short video that highlights the Stockpile Stewardship program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Stockpile Stewardship was conceived in the early 1990s as a national science-based program that could assure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear deterrent without the need for full-scale underground nuclear testing. This video was produced by Los Alamos National Laboratory for screening at the Lab's Bradbury Science Museum in Los Alamos, NM and is narrated by science correspondent Miles O'Brien.

  1. Shock Waves in the BEC to BCS Crossover of a Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, Lorin; Joseph, James; Thomas, John

    2016-05-01

    We observe shock waves in a Fermi gas near a Feshbach resonance, using a micro-mirror array to create a spatially controlled, blue-detuned, repulsive optical potential. We separate an optically-trapped gas of 6 Li into two clouds with steep density profiles. When the repulsive potential beam is extinguished, the two halves of the cloud collide in the optical trap, producing shock waves. Using in-situ imaging, we find that the steep density gradients associated with shockwaves are most pronounced near resonance and become less pronounced as the magnetic field is tuned above resonance to create a weakly interacting Fermi gas or below resonance to create a weakly interacting Bose gas of dimers. Using this method, we study the crossover from dispersive to dissipative non-linear hydrodynamics as a function of interaction strength and temperature. Funding by: NSF, DOE, ARO, and AFOSR.

  2. Interrelated structures of the transport shock and collisional relaxation layer in a multitemperature, multilevel ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinolo, A. R.; Clarke, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    The gas dynamic structures of the transport shock and the downstream collisional relaxation layer are evaluated for partially ionized monatomic gases. Elastic and inelastic collisional nonequilibrium effects are taken into consideration. Three electronic levels are accounted for in the microscopic model of the atom. Nonequilibrium processes with respect to population of levels and species plus temperature are considered. By using an asymptotic technique the shock morphology is found on a continuum flow basis. The asymptotic procedure gives two distinct layers in which the nonequilibrium effects to be considered are different. A transport shock appears as the inner solution to an outer collisional relaxation layer in which the gas reaches local equilibrium. A family of numerical examples is displayed for different flow regimes. Argon and helium models are used in these examples.

  3. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: The Proposed Issuance of an Easement to Public Service Company of New Mexico for the Construction and Operation of a 12-inch Natural Gas Pipeline within Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2002-07-30

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has assigned a continuing role to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in carrying out NNSAs national security mission. To enable LANL to continue this enduring responsibility requires that NNSA maintain the capabilities and capacities required in support of its national mission assignments at LANL. To carry out its Congressionally assigned mission requirements, NNSA must maintain a safe and reliable infrastructure at LANL. Upgrades to the various utility services at LANL have been ongoing together with routine maintenance activities over the years. However, the replacement of a certain portion of natural gas service transmission pipeline is now necessary as this delivery system element has been operating well beyond its original design life for the past 20 to 30 years and components of the line are suffering from normal stresses, strains, and general failures. The Proposed Action is to grant an easement to the Public Service Company of New Mexico (PNM) to construct, operate, and maintain approximately 15,000 feet (4,500 meters) of 12-inch (in.) (30-centimeter [cm]) coated steel natural gas transmission mainline on NNSA-administered land within LANL along Los Alamos Canyon. The new gas line would begin at the existing valve setting located at the bottom of Los Alamos Canyon near the Los Alamos County water well pump house and adjacent to the existing 12-in. (30-cm) PNM gas transmission mainline. The new gas line (owned by PNM) would then cross the streambed and continue east in a new easement obtained by PNM from the NNSA, paralleling the existing electrical power line along the bottom of the canyon. The gas line would then turn northeast near State Road (SR) 4 and be connected to the existing 12-in. (30-cm) coated steel gas transmission mainline, located within the right-of-way (ROW) of SR 502. The Proposed Action would also involve crossing a streambed twice. PNM would bore under the streambed for pipe

  4. Testing for Shock-Heated X-Ray Gas around Compact Steep Spectrum Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel-Storr, Jacob; O'Dea, Christopher; Worrall, Diana M.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Tremblay, Grant; Baum, Stefi; Christiansen, Kevin; Mullarkey, Christopher; Mittal, Rupal

    2017-01-01

    We present Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray, VLA radio, and optical observations of two CSS radio galaxies. B3 1445+410 is a low excitation emission line galaxy with possibly a hybrid FRI/II (or Fat Double) radio morphology. The Chandra observations are point-like and well fit with a power-law consistent with emission from a Doppler boosted core. PKS B1017-325 is a galaxy with a bent double radio morphology. The XMM-Newton observations are consistent with an ISM with a contribution from hot shocked gas. We compile selected radio and X-ray properties of the nine CSS radio galaxies with X-ray detections so far. We find that 1/3 show evidence for hot shocked gas. We note that the counts in the sources are low and the properties of the 3 sources with evidence for hot shocked gas are typical of the other CSS radio galaxies. We suggest that hot shocked gas may be typical of CSS radio galaxies due to their propagation through their host galaxies.

  5. Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in dilute gas-particle mixtures with re-shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, J. C.; Gottiparthi, K. C.; Menon, S.

    2013-11-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is investigated in a dilute gas-particle mixture using three-dimensional numerical simulations. This work extends an earlier two-dimensional study [S. Ukai, K. Balakrishnan, and S. Menon, "On Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in dilute gas-particle mixtures," Phys. Fluids 22, 104103 (2010)] to a larger parameter space consisting of variations in the mass loading and the particle size as well as considering both single-mode and multi-mode interface initializations. In addition, the effect of the presence of particles on re-shock RMI is also investigated. Single-phase numerical predictions of the mixing layer growth-rate are shown to compare well to both experimental and theoretical results. In a dilute gas-particle mixture, the initial growth-rate of RMI shows similar trends compared to previous work; however, the current numerical predictions show that there is an observable increase, not previously predicted, in the growth of the mixing layer at higher mass loadings. For the range of cases considered, an increase as much as 56% is observed. This increase is attributed to additional vorticity production in the mixing layer resulting from inter-phase momentum coupling. Moreover, the presence of particles introduces a continuous drag on the gas-phase resulting in a delay in the time at which re-shock occurs. This delay, which is observed to be as much as 6%, is largest for higher initial mass loadings and smaller particle radii and has a corresponding effect on both the growth-rate of the mixing-layer after re-shock and the final width of the mixing layer. A new semi-analytical correlation is developed and verified against the numerical data to predict the re-shocked RMI growth-rate in dilute gas-particle flows. The correlation shows that the re-shock RMI growth-rate is linearly proportional to the velocity jump at re-shock, the molecular mixing fraction, and the multi-phase Atwood number. Depending on the initial mass loading and

  6. Spontaneous intrahepatic gas gangrene and fatal septic shock.

    PubMed

    Meyns, E; Vermeersch, N; Ilsen, B; Hoste, W; Delooz, H; Hubloue, I

    2009-01-01

    Gas gangrene of the liver is a rare clinical syndrome associated with a high rate of mortality. It is mostly associated with malignancy and immunosuppression. We report on a male patient who presented at the department of emergency medicine with high fever but no localised complaints. CT scan revealed a cavitary lesion filled with air in the liver. Clostridium perfringens was proved to be present in the hepatic lesion and the blood, and clostridium perfringens sepsis with gas gangrene of the liver was diagnosed. Despite early diagnosis and treatment the patient died. The importance of "an aggressive treatment policy" in this kind of life-threatening disease is emphasised.

  7. On the formation of Friedlander waves in a compressed-gas-driven shock tube

    PubMed Central

    Tasissa, Abiy F.; Hautefeuille, Martin; Fitek, John H.; Radovitzky, Raúl A.

    2016-01-01

    Compressed-gas-driven shock tubes have become popular as a laboratory-scale replacement for field blast tests. The well-known initial structure of the Riemann problem eventually evolves into a shock structure thought to resemble a Friedlander wave, although this remains to be demonstrated theoretically. In this paper, we develop a semi-analytical model to predict the key characteristics of pseudo blast waves forming in a shock tube: location where the wave first forms, peak over-pressure, decay time and impulse. The approach is based on combining the solutions of the two different types of wave interactions that arise in the shock tube after the family of rarefaction waves in the Riemann solution interacts with the closed end of the tube. The results of the analytical model are verified against numerical simulations obtained with a finite volume method. The model furnishes a rational approach to relate shock tube parameters to desired blast wave characteristics, and thus constitutes a useful tool for the design of shock tubes for blast testing. PMID:27118888

  8. On the formation of Friedlander waves in a compressed-gas-driven shock tube.

    PubMed

    Tasissa, Abiy F; Hautefeuille, Martin; Fitek, John H; Radovitzky, Raúl A

    2016-02-01

    Compressed-gas-driven shock tubes have become popular as a laboratory-scale replacement for field blast tests. The well-known initial structure of the Riemann problem eventually evolves into a shock structure thought to resemble a Friedlander wave, although this remains to be demonstrated theoretically. In this paper, we develop a semi-analytical model to predict the key characteristics of pseudo blast waves forming in a shock tube: location where the wave first forms, peak over-pressure, decay time and impulse. The approach is based on combining the solutions of the two different types of wave interactions that arise in the shock tube after the family of rarefaction waves in the Riemann solution interacts with the closed end of the tube. The results of the analytical model are verified against numerical simulations obtained with a finite volume method. The model furnishes a rational approach to relate shock tube parameters to desired blast wave characteristics, and thus constitutes a useful tool for the design of shock tubes for blast testing.

  9. Interrelated structures of the transport shock and collisional relaxation layer in a multitemperature, multilevel ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinolo, A. R.; Clarke, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    The gas dynamic structures of the transport shock and the downstream collisional relaxation layer are evaluated for partially ionized monatomic gases. Elastic and inelastic collisional nonequilibrium effects are taken into consideration. In the microscopic model of the atom, three electronic levels are accounted for. By using an asymptotic technique, the shock morphology is found on a continuum flow basis. This procedure gives two distinct layers in which the nonequilibrium effects to be considered are different. A transport shock appears as the inner solution to an outer collisional relaxation layer. The results show four main interesting points: (1) on structuring the transport shock, ionization and excitation rates must be included in the formulation, since the flow is not frozen with respect to the population of the different electronic levels; (2) an electron temperature precursor appears at the beginning of the transport shock; (3) the collisional layer is rationally reduced to quadrature for special initial conditions, which (4) are obtained from new Rankine-Hugoniot relations for the inner shock.

  10. Shock Ignition in Non-Cryogenic Metal-Gas Targets on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, L. John; Cerjan, C.; Smalyuk, V.; Bailey, D.; Comley, A.; Garbett, W.; McKenty, P.; Cheng, B.

    2011-10-01

    Shock ignition offers the possibility of volumetric ignition and burn in single-shell, room-temperature gas targets on the National Ignition Facility. We are investigating whether the high fusion energy gains potentially available with shock ignition in cryogenic DT targets on NIF (L.J.Perkins et al, PRL 103 (2009)) can be traded for modest gains and yields in such platforms. If so, being non-cryogenic with simple single-shell construction and medium-pressure gas fill, they should easier to field and diagnose. The targets are characterized by a thick, graded-density Be-Au ablator-pusher shell with low in-flight-aspect-ratios. Because the high-Z Au shell reflects Bremsstrahlung, such targets are capable of volumetric ignition at temperatures of around 4 keV with low shell velocities around 1.5e7cm/s. Gas targets are inherently low gain (<=10) so they are probably not IFE relevant. The ultimate performance will be determined by degree and control of high-Z mix in the gas. Simulations indicate that we can potentially trade fusion yield for good ignition fall-line behavior by tuning gas pressure and shock launch time. This work performed under the auspices of U.S. DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Observation of monoenergetic protons from a near-critical gas target tailored by a hydrodynamic shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-H.; Helle, M. H.; Ting, A.; Gordon, D. F.; Polyanskiy, M. N.; Pogorelsky, I.; Babzien, M.; Najmudin, Z.

    2015-05-01

    We present our recent experimental results of monoenergetic protons accelerated from the interaction of an intense terawatt CO2 laser pulse with a near-critical hydrogen gas target, with its density profile tailored by a hydrodynamic shock. A 5-ns Nd:YAG laser pulse is focused onto a piece of stainless steel foil mounted at the front edge of the gas jet nozzle orifice. The ablation launches a spherical shock into the near-critical gas column, which creates a sharp density gradient at the front edge of the target, with ~ 6X local density enhancement up to several times of critical density within ~<100 microns. With such density profile, we have obtained monoenergetic proton beams with good shot-to-shot reproducibility and energies up to 1.2 MeV.

  12. Plasma properties of driver gas following interplanetary shocks observed by ISEE-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwickl, R. D.; Ashbridge, J. R.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Gosling, J. T.; Smith, E. J.

    1982-01-01

    Plasma fluid parameters calculated from solar wind and magnetic field data obtained on ISEE 3 were studied. The characteristic properties of driver gas following interplanetary shocks was determined. Of 54 shocks observed from August 1978 to February 1980, nine contained a well defined driver gas that was clearly identifiable by a discontinuous decrease in the average proton temperature across a tangential discontinuity. While helium enhancements were present in all of nine of these events, only about half of them contained simultaneous changes in the two quantities. Often the He/H ratio changed over a period of minutes. Simultaneous with the drop in proton temperature the helium and electron temperature decreased abruptly. In some cases the proton temperature depression was accompanied by a moderate increase in magnetic field magnitude with an unusually low variance and by an increase in the ratio of parallel to perpendicular temperature. The drive gas usually displayed a bidirectional flow of suprathermal solar wind electrons at higher energies.

  13. Shock-induced PT-symmetric potentials in gas-filled photonic-crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Mohammed F.; Marini, Andrea; Biancalana, Fabio

    2014-02-01

    We have investigated the interaction between a strong soliton and a weak probe with certain configurations that allow optical trapping in gas-filled hollow-core photonic-crystal fibers in the presence of the shock effect. We have shown theoretically and numerically that the shock term can lead to an unbroken parity-time- (PT-) symmetric potential in these kinds of fibers. Time irreversible behavior, a signature feature of the PT symmetry, is also demonstrated numerically. Our results will open different configurations and avenues for observing PT-symmetry breaking in optical fibers, without the need to resort to complex optical systems.

  14. CAS22 - FORTRAN program for fast design and analysis of shock-free airfoil cascades using fictitious-gas concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, D. S.; Sobieczky, H.

    1982-01-01

    A user-oriented computer program, CAS22, was developed that is applicable to aerodynamic analysis and transonic shock-free redesign of existing two-dimensional cascades of airfoils. This FORTRAN program can be used: (1) as an analysis code for full-potential, transonic, shocked or shock-free cascade flows; (2) as a design code for shock-free cascades that uses Sobieczky's fictitious-gas concept; and (3) as a shock-free design code followed automatically by the analysis in order to confirm that the newly obtained cascade shape provides for an entirely shock-free transonic flow field. A four-level boundary-conforming grid of an O type is generated. The shock-free design is performed by implementing Sobieczky's fictitious-gas concept of elliptic continuation from subsonic into supersonic flow domains. Recomputation inside each supersonic zone is performed by the method of characteristics in the rheograph plane by using isentropic gas relations. Besides converting existing cascade shapes with multiple shocked supersonic regions into shock-free cascades, CAS22 can also unchoke previously choked cascades and make them shock free.

  15. Effect of the dynamic pressure on the shock wave structure in a rarefied polyatomic gas

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Shigeru Sugiyama, Masaru; Arima, Takashi; Ruggeri, Tommaso

    2014-01-15

    We study the shock wave structure in a rarefied polyatomic gas based on a simplified model of extended thermodynamics in which the dissipation is due only to the dynamic pressure. In this case the differential system is very simple because it is a variant of Euler system with a new scalar equation for the dynamic pressure [T. Arima, S. Taniguchi, T. Ruggeri, and M. Sugiyama, Phys. Lett. A 376, 2799–2803 (2012)]. It is shown that this theory is able to describe the three types of the shock wave structure observed in experiments: the nearly symmetric shock wave structure (Type A, small Mach number), the asymmetric structure (Type B, moderate Mach number), and the structure composed of thin and thick layers (Type C, large Mach number)

  16. Shock-wave proton acceleration from a hydrogen gas jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Nathan; Pogorelsky, Igor; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Babzien, Marcus; Tresca, Olivier; Maharjan, Chakra; Shkolnikov, Peter; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2013-04-01

    Typical laser acceleration experiments probe the interaction of intense linearly-polarized solid state laser pulses with dense metal targets. This interaction generates strong electric fields via Transverse Normal Sheath Acceleration and can accelerate protons to high peak energies but with a large thermal spectrum. Recently, the advancement of high pressure amplified CO2 laser technology has allowed for the creation of intense (10^16 Wcm^2) pulses at λ˜10 μm. These pulses may interact with reproducible, high rep. rate gas jet targets and still produce plasmas of critical density (nc˜10^19 cm-3), leading to the transference of laser energy via radiation pressure. This acceleration mode has the advantage of producing narrow energy spectra while scaling well with pulse intensity. We observe the interaction of an intense CO2 laser pulse with an overdense hydrogen gas jet. Using two pulse optical probing in conjunction with interferometry, we are able to obtain density profiles of the plasma. Proton energy spectra are obtained using a magnetic spectrometer and scintillating screen.

  17. Cooking a `Sausage': the impact of merger shocks in cluster gas and galaxy evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroe, Andra; Sobral, David; Harwood, Jeremy; Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Rumsey, Clare; Intema, Huib; Röttgering, Huub; Brüggen, Marcus; Saunders, Richard; Hardcastle, Martin; Hoeft, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy clusters mainly grow through mergers with other clusters and groups. Major mergers give rise to important astrophysical phenomena such as the segregation of dark and luminous matter and the formation of cluster-wide traveling shocks and also drive galaxy evolution. The observable effects of shock waves can be seen at radio wavelengths as relics: elongated, diffuse synchrotron emitting areas located at the periphery of merging clusters. Despite the great interest in relics, candidates with simple geometry, undisturbed morphology and high surface brightness are scarce. The `Sausage' cluster hosts an extraordinary Mpc-wide relic, which enables us to study to study particle acceleration and the effects of shocks on cluster galaxies. We use a unique combination of facilities (INT, WHT, Keck, Subaru, CFHT, GMRT, WSRT, AMI) to obtain the first cluster-wide, multi-wavelength, multi-method analysis aimed at giving a complete picture of a merging cluster with relics. Using the radio data, we derive shock properties and the magnetic field structure for the relic. Using spectral modeling, we test acceleration and electron energy-loss mechanisms and resolve the discrepancy between the Mach number calculated from the radio and X-rays. Our results indicate that particles are shock-accelerated, but turbulent re-acceleration or unusually efficient transport of particles in the downstream area and line-of-sight mixing are important effects. We demonstrate the feasibility of high-frequency observations of radio relics, by presenting a 16 GHz detection of the `Sausage' relic. The radio analysis is complemented by Hα mapping of the cluster volume, aimed at providing the first direct test as to whether the shock drives or prohibits star formation. We find numerous Hα emitting galaxies in close proximity to the radio relic which are extremely massive, metal-rich, mostly star-forming with evidence for gas mass loss though outflows. We speculate that the complex interaction

  18. Propagation of exponential shock wave in an axisymmetric rotating non-ideal dusty gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.

    2016-09-01

    One-dimensional unsteady isothermal and adiabatic flow behind a strong exponential shock wave propagating in a rotational axisymmetric mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles, which has variable azimuthal and axial fluid velocities, is analyzed. The shock wave is driven out by a piston moving with time according to exponential law. The azimuthal and axial components of the fluid velocity in the ambient medium are assumed to be varying and obeying exponential laws. In the present work, small solid particles are considered as pseudo-fluid with the assumption that the equilibrium flow-conditions are maintained in the flow-field, and the viscous-stress and heat conduction of the mixture are negligible. Solutions are obtained in both the cases, when the flow between the shock and the piston is isothermal or adiabatic by taking into account the components of vorticity vector and compressibility. It is found that the assumption of zero temperature gradient brings a profound change in the density, axial component of vorticity vector and compressibility distributions as compared to that of the adiabatic case. To investigate the behavior of the flow variables and the influence on the shock wave propagation by the parameter of non-idealness of the gas overline{b} in the mixture as well as by the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture Kp and by the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas G1 are worked out in detail. It is interesting to note that the shock strength increases with an increase in G1 ; whereas it decreases with an increase in overline{b} . Also, a comparison between the solutions in the cases of isothermal and adiabatic flows is made.

  19. Comparative study of high-resolution shock-capturing schemes for a real gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montagne, J.-L.; Yee, H. C.; Vinokur, M.

    1988-01-01

    Recently developed second-order explicit shock-capturing methods, in conjunction with generalized flux-vector splittings, and a generalized approximate Riemann solver for a real gas are studied. The comparisons are made on different one-dimensional Riemann (shock-tube) problems for equilibrium air with various ranges of Mach numbers, densities and pressures. Six different Riemann problems are considered. These tests provide a check on the validity of the generalized formulas, since theoretical prediction of their properties appears to be difficult because of the non-analytical form of the state equation. The numerical results in the supersonic and low-hypersonic regimes indicate that these produce good shock-capturing capability and that the shock resolution is only slightly affected by the state equation of equilibrium air. The difference in shock resolution between the various methods varies slightly from one Riemann problem to the other, but the overall accuracy is very similar. For the one-dimensional case, the relative efficiency in terms of operation count for the different methods is within 30 percent. The main difference between the methods lies in their versatility in being extended to multidimensional problems with efficient implicit solution procedures.

  20. Nonstandard Analysis and Shock Wave Jump Conditions in a One-Dimensional Compressible Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Roy S. Baty, F. Farassat, John A. Hargreaves

    2007-05-25

    Nonstandard analysis is a relatively new area of mathematics in which infinitesimal numbers can be defined and manipulated rigorously like real numbers. This report presents a fairly comprehensive tutorial on nonstandard analysis for physicists and engineers with many examples applicable to generalized functions. To demonstrate the power of the subject, the problem of shock wave jump conditions is studied for a one-dimensional compressible gas. It is assumed that the shock thickness occurs on an infinitesimal interval and the jump functions in the thermodynamic and fluid dynamic parameters occur smoothly across this interval. To use conservations laws, smooth pre-distributions of the Dirac delta measure are applied whose supports are contained within the shock thickness. Furthermore, smooth pre-distributions of the Heaviside function are applied which vary from zero to one across the shock wave. It is shown that if the equations of motion are expressed in nonconservative form then the relationships between the jump functions for the flow parameters may be found unambiguously. The analysis yields the classical Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions for an inviscid shock wave. Moreover, non-monotonic entropy jump conditions are obtained for both inviscid and viscous flows. The report shows that products of generalized functions may be defined consistently using nonstandard analysis; however, physically meaningful products of generalized functions must be determined from the physics of the problem and not the mathematical form of the governing equations.

  1. Nonstandard Analysis and Shock Wave Jump Conditions in a One-Dimensional Compressible Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baty, Roy S.; Farassat, Fereidoun; Hargreaves, John

    2007-01-01

    Nonstandard analysis is a relatively new area of mathematics in which infinitesimal numbers can be defined and manipulated rigorously like real numbers. This report presents a fairly comprehensive tutorial on nonstandard analysis for physicists and engineers with many examples applicable to generalized functions. To demonstrate the power of the subject, the problem of shock wave jump conditions is studied for a one-dimensional compressible gas. It is assumed that the shock thickness occurs on an infinitesimal interval and the jump functions in the thermodynamic and fluid dynamic parameters occur smoothly across this interval. To use conservations laws, smooth pre-distributions of the Dirac delta measure are applied whose supports are contained within the shock thickness. Furthermore, smooth pre-distributions of the Heaviside function are applied which vary from zero to one across the shock wave. It is shown that if the equations of motion are expressed in nonconservative form then the relationships between the jump functions for the flow parameters may be found unambiguously. The analysis yields the classical Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions for an inviscid shock wave. Moreover, non-monotonic entropy jump conditions are obtained for both inviscid and viscous flows. The report shows that products of generalized functions may be defined consistently using nonstandard analysis; however, physically meaningful products of generalized functions must be determined from the physics of the problem and not the mathematical form of the governing equations.

  2. Comparative study of high-resolution shock-capturing schemes for a real gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montagne, J.-L.; Yee, H. C.; Vinokur, M.

    1987-01-01

    Recently developed second-order explicit shock-capturing methods, in conjunction with generalized flux-vector splittings, and a generalized approximate Riemann solver for a real gas are studied. The comparisons are made on different one-dimensional Riemann (shock-tube) problems for equilibrium air with various ranges of Mach numbers, densities and pressures. Six different Riemann problems are considered. These tests provide a check on the validity of the generalized formulas, since theoretical prediction of their properties appears to be difficult because of the non-analytical form of the state equation. The numerical results in the supersonic and low-hypersonic regimes indicate that these produce good shock-capturing capability and that the shock resolution is only slightly affected by the state equation of equilibrium air. The difference in shock resolution between the various methods varies slightly from one Riemann problem to the other, but the overall accuracy is very similar. For the one-dimensional case, the relative efficiency in terms of operation count for the different methods is within 30%. The main difference between the methods lies in their versatility in being extended to multidimensional problems with efficient implicit solution procedures.

  3. CHANDRA Observations OF The Shock Heated Gas Around 3c 288 And 3c 449

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, Dharam V.; Kraft, R. P.; Evans, D. A.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Croston, J. H.; Forman, W. R.; Jones, C.; Lee, J. C.

    2010-03-01

    The inflation of radio bubbles in the hot gas atmospheres of clusters of galaxies plays an important role in the overall energy budget of the ICM. Regular gentle (i.e. subsonic) nuclear outbursts may be able to provide sufficient energy to the gas in the cool cores of clusters to offset radiative losses and regulate large cooling flows; and one method to supplement the total energy input into the gas is for the lobes to initially drive strong shocks into the gas. We present results from Chandra/ACIS-S observations of the hot gas atmospheres of two powerful, nearby radio galaxies in poor clusters: 3C 288 and 3C 449. We measure the total energy of the current outburst to be a few times 10^{59} ergs for 3C 288 (T = 2.8 keV, L_X = 1.4 × 10^{44} ergs) and ˜10^{58} ergs for 3C 449 (T = 1.5 keV, L_X = 2.0 × 10^{42} ergs). We find multiple surface brightness discontinuities in the gas, which are probably shocks and are indicative of supersonic heating by the inflation of the radio lobe. We do not find X-ray cavity in 3C 288, whereas cavities are associated with both the radio lobes in 3C 449.

  4. Shock initiation behavior of PBXN-9 determined by gas gun experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Nathaniel; Gustavsen, Richard; Hooks, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    The shock to detonation transition was evaluated in the HMX based explosive PBXN-9 by a series of light-gas gun experiments. PBXN-9 consists of 92 wt% HMX, 2wt% Hycar 4054 & 6 wt% dioctyl adipate with a density of 1.75 g/cm^3 and 0.8% voids. The experiments were designed to understand the specifics of wave evolution and the run distance to detonation as a function of input shock pressure. These experiments were conducted on gas guns in order to vary the input shock pressure accurately. The primary diagnostics are embedded magnetic gauges which are based on Faraday's law of induction along with photon Doppler velocimetry (PDV). The run distance to detonation vs. shock pressure, or ``Pop plot,'' was redefined as log (X*) = 2.14 -- 1.82 log (P), which is substantially different than previous data. The Hugoniot was refined as Us = 2.32 + 2.21 Up. This data will be useful for the development of predictive models for the safety and performance of PBXN-9 in addition to providing an increased understanding of HMX based explosives in varying formulations.

  5. Shock Initiation Behavior of PBXN-9 Determined by Gas Gun Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, N. J.; Gustavsen, R. L.; Hooks, D. E.

    2009-12-01

    The shock to detonation transition was evaluated in the HMX based explosive PBXN-9 by a series of light-gas gun experiments. PBXN-9 consists of 92 wt% HMX, 2wt% Hycar 4054 & 6 wt&percent; dioctyl adipate with a density of 1.75 g/cm3 and 0.8&% voids. The experiments were designed to understand the specifics of wave evolution and the run distance to detonation as a function of input shock pressure. These experiments were conducted on gas guns in order to vary the input shock pressure accurately. The primary diagnostics were embedded magnetic gauges, which are based on Faraday's law of induction, and Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV). The run distance to detonation vs. shock pressure, or "Pop plot," was redefined as log(X) = 2.14-1.82 log (P), which is substantially different than previous data. The Hugoniot was refined as Us = 2.32+2.211 Up. This data will be useful for the development of predictive models for the safety and performance of PBXN-9 along with providing increased understanding of HMX based explosives in varying formulations.

  6. Shock initiation behavior of PBXN-9 determined by gas gun experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Nathaniel J; Gustavsen, Richard L; Hooks, Daniel E

    2009-01-01

    The shock to detonation transition was evaluated in the HMX based explosive PBXN-9 by a series of light-gas gun experiments. PBXN-9 consists of 92 wt% HMX, 2wt% Hycar 4054 & 6 wt% dioctyl adipate with a density of 1.75 g/cm{sup 3} and 0.8% voids. The experiments were designed to understand the specifics of wave evolution and the run distance to detonation as a function of input shock pressure. These experiments were conducted on gas guns in order to vary the input shock pressure accurately. The primary diagnostics were embedded magnetic gauges, which are based on Faraday's law of induction, and Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV). The run distance to detonation vs. shock pressure, or 'Pop plot,' was redefined as log(X*) = 2.14-1.82 log(P), which is substantially different than previous data. The Hugoniot was refined as U{sub s} = 2.32 + 2.21 U{sub p}. This data will be useful for the development of predictive models for the safety and performance of PBXN-9 along with providing increased understanding of HMX based explosives in varying formulations.

  7. Los Alamos offers Fellowships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico is calling for applications for postdoctoral appointments and research fellowships. The positions are available in geoscience as well as other scientific disciplines.The laboratory, which is operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy, awards J. Robert Oppenheimer Research Fellowships to scientists that either have or will soon complete doctoral degrees. The appointments are for two years, are renewable for a third year, and carry a stipend of $51,865 per year. Potential applicants should send a resume or employment application and a statement of research goals to Carol M. Rich, Div. 89, Human Resources Development Division, MS P290, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 by mid-November.

  8. Shock.

    PubMed

    Wacker, David A; Winters, Michael E

    2014-11-01

    Critically ill patients with undifferentiated shock are complex and challenging cases in the ED. A systematic approach to assessment and management is essential to prevent unnecessary morbidity and mortality. The simplified, systematic approach described in this article focuses on determining the presence of problems with cardiac function (the pump), intravascular volume (the tank), or systemic vascular resistance (the pipes). With this approach, the emergency physician can detect life-threatening conditions and implement time-sensitive therapy.

  9. Hydrodynamic simulations of gaseous Argon shock compression experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Daniel B.; Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Sheffield, Stephen A.; Morris, John S.; Gustavsen, Richard L.; Burkett, Michael W.

    2017-01-01

    The lack of published Ar gas shock data motivated an evaluation of the Ar Equation of State (EOS) in gas phase initial density regimes. In particular, these regimes include initial pressures in the range of 13.8 - 34.5 bar (0.025 - 0.056 g/ cm3) and initial shock velocities around 0.2 cm/μs. The objective of the numerical evaluation was to develop a physical understanding of the EOS behavior of shocked and subsequently multiply re-shocked Ar gas through Pagosa numerical simulations utilizing the SESAME equation of state. Pagosa is a Los Alamos National Laboratory 2-D and 3-D Eulerian continuum dynamics code capable of modeling high velocity compressible flow with multiple materials. The approach involved the use of gas gun experiments to evaluate the shock and multiple re-shock behavior of pressurized Ar gas to validate Pagosa simulations and the SESAME EOS. Additionally, the diagnostic capability within the experiments allowed for the EOS to be fully constrained with measured shock velocity, particle velocity and temperature. The simulations demonstrate excellent agreement with the experiments in the shock velocity/particle velocity space, and reasonable comparisons for the ionization temperatures.

  10. Viscous shock layer solutions for turbulent flow of radiating gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, E. C.; Moss, J. N.

    1975-01-01

    The viscous shock layer equations for hypersonic laminar and turbulent flows of radiating or nonradiating gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium are presented for two-dimensional and axially symmetric flow fields. Solutions are obtained using an implicit finite difference scheme and results are presented for hypersonic flow over spherically blunted cone configurations at free stream conditions representative of entry into the atmosphere of Venus. These data are compared with solutions obtained using other methods of analysis.

  11. Viscous-shock-layer solutions for turbulent flow of radiating gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, E. C.; Moss, J. N.

    1975-01-01

    The viscous-shock-layer equations for hypersonic laminar and turbulent flows of radiating or nonradiating gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium are presented for two-dimensional and axially-symmetric flow fields. Solutions were obtained using an implicit finite-difference scheme and results are presented for hypersonic flow over spherically-blunted cone configurations at freestream conditions representative of entry into the atmosphere of Venus. These data are compared with solutions obtained using other methods of analysis.

  12. Investigation of Dalton and Amagat's laws for gas mixtures with shock propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayne, Patrick; Trueba Monje, Ignacio; Yoo, Jason H.; Truman, C. Randall; Vorobieff, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Two common models describing gas mixtures are Dalton's Law and Amagat's Law (also known as the laws of partial pressures and partial volumes, respectively). Our work is focused on determining the suitability of these models to prediction of effects of shock propagation through gas mixtures. Experiments are conducted at the Shock Tube Facility at the University of New Mexico (UNM). To validate experimental data, possible sources of uncertainty associated with experimental setup are identified and analyzed. The gaseous mixture of interest consists of a prescribed combination of disparate gases - helium and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6). The equations of state (EOS) considered are the ideal gas EOS for helium, and a virial EOS for SF6. The values for the properties provided by these EOS are then used used to model shock propagation through the mixture in accordance with Dalton's and Amagat's laws. Results of the modeling are compared with experiment to determine which law produces better agreement for the mixture. This work is funded by NNSA Grant DE-NA0002913.

  13. Molecular hydrogen line ratios in four regions of shock-excited gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, M. G.; Brand, P. W. J. L.; Geballe, T. R.; Webster, A. S.

    1989-01-01

    Five emission lines of molecular hydrogen, with wavelengths in the ranges of 2.10-2.25 and 3.80-3.85 microns, have been observed in four objects of different type in which the line emission is believed to be excited by shocks. The relative intensities of the lines 1 - 0 S(1):1 - 0 S(O):2 - 1 S(1) are approximately 10.5:2.5:1.0 in all four objects. The 0 - 0 S(13):1 - 0 O(7) line ratio, however, varies from 1.05 in OMC-1 to about 2.3 in the Herbig-Haro object HH 7. The excitation temperature derived from the S(13) and O(7) lines is higher than that derived from the 1 - 0 and 2 - 1 S(1) lines in all four objects, so the shocked gas in these objects cannot be characterized by a single temperature. The constancy of the (1-0)/(2-1) S(1) line ratio between sources suggests that the post-shock gas is 'thermalized' in each source. The S(13)/O(7) ratio is particularly sensitive to the density and temperature conditions in the gas.

  14. An Experimental and Computational Study of a Shock-Accelerated Heavy Gas Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoldi, Cindy; Prestridge, Katherine; Tomkins, Christopher; Marr-Lyon, Mark; Rightley, Paul; Benjamin, Robert; Vorobieff, Peter

    2002-11-01

    We present updated results of an experimental and computational study that examines the evolution of a heavy gas (SF_6) cylinder surrounded by air when accelerated by a planar Mach 1.2 shock wave. From each shock tube experiment, we obtain one image of the experimental initial conditions and six images of the time evolution of the cylinder. Moreover, the implementation of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) also allows us to determine the velocity field at the last experimental time. Simulations incorporating the two-dimensional image of the experimental initial conditions are performed using the adaptive-mesh Eulerian code, RAGE. A computational study shows that agreement between the measured and computed velocities is achieved by decreasing the peak SF6 concentration to 60%, which was measured in the previous "gas curtain" experiments, and diffusing the air/SF6 interface in the experimental initial conditions. These modifications are consistent with the observation that the SF6 gas diffuses faster than the fog particles used to track the gas. Images of the experimental initial conditions, obtained using planar laser Rayleigh scattering, quantifies the diffusion lag between the SF6 gas and the fog particles.

  15. Gas dynamic and force effects of a solid particle in a shock wave in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obruchkova, L. R.; Baldina, E. G.; Efremov, V. P.

    2017-03-01

    Shock wave interaction with an adiabatic solid microparticle is numerically simulated. In the simulation, the shock wave is initiated by the Riemann problem with instantaneous removal of a diaphragm between the high- and low-pressure chambers. The calculation is performed in the two-dimensional formulation using the ideal gas equation of state. The left end of the tube is impermeable, while outflow from the right end is permitted. The particle is assumed to be motionless, impermeable, and adiabatic, and the simulation is performed for time intervals shorted than the time of velocity and temperature relaxation of the particle. The numerical grid is chosen for each particle size to ensure convergence. For each particle size, the calculated hydraulic resistance coefficient describing the particle force impact on the flow is compared with that obtained from the analytical Stokes formula. It is discovered that the Stokes formula can be used for calculation of hydraulic resistance of a motionless particle in a shock wave flow. The influence of the particle diameter on the flow perturbation behind the shock front is studied. Specific heating of the flow in front of the particle is calculated and a simple estimate is proposed. The whole heated region is divided by the acoustic line into the subsonic and supersonic regions. It is demonstrated that the main heat generated by the particle in the flow is concentrated in the subsonic region. The calculations are performed using two different 2D hydro codes. The energy release in the flow induced by the particle is compared with the maximum possible heating at complete termination of the flow. The results can be used for estimating the possibility of gas ignition in front of the particle by a shock wave whose amplitude is insufficient for initiating detonation in the absence of a particle.

  16. The Los Alamos primer

    SciTech Connect

    Serber, R.

    1992-01-01

    This book contains the 1943 lecture notes of Robert Serber. Serber was a protege of J. Robert Oppenheimer and member of the team that built the first atomic bomb - reveal what the Los Alamos scientists knew, and did not know, about the terrifying weapon they were building.

  17. Numerical Investigation into the Performance of a Rarefaction Shock Wave Cutter for Offshore Oil-Gas Platform Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J P; Glenn, L A; Antoun, T H; Lomov, I N

    2001-06-14

    The phase change in iron at 13 GPa results in the formation of rarefaction shock waves upon release. The interaction of multiple rarefaction shock waves induces high tensile stresses within a narrow zone, causing smooth spall. This effect can be exploited to sever cylindrical cross-section pipes, such as those supporting decommissioned offshore oil and gas platforms, using a minimal amount of explosive. Consequently, costs can be reduced and environmental impact minimized. They discuss the numerical techniques used to simulate rarefaction shock waves and the damage to steel resulting from the interaction of multiple rarefaction shock waves.

  18. Turbulent Molecular Gas and Star Formation in the Shocked Intergalactic Medium of Stephan's Quintet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillard, P.; Boulanger, F.; Pineau des Forêts, G.; Falgarone, E.; Gusdorf, A.; Cluver, M. E.; Appleton, P. N.; Lisenfeld, U.; Duc, P.-A.; Ogle, P. M.; Xu, C. K.

    2012-04-01

    The Stephan's Quintet (hereafter SQ) is a template source to study the impact of galaxies interaction on the physical state and energetics of their gas. We report on IRAM single-dish CO observations of the SQ compact group of galaxies. These observations follow up the Spitzer discovery of bright mid-IR H2 rotational line emission (L(H2) ≈ 1035 W) from warm (102 - 3 K) molecular gas, associated with a 30 kpc long shock between a galaxy, NGC 7318b, and NGC 7319's tidal arm. We detect CO(1-0), (2-1) and (3-2) line emission in the inter-galactic medium (IGM) with complex profiles, spanning a velocity range of ≈1000 km s-1. The spectra exhibit the pre-shock recession velocities of the two colliding gas systems (5700 and 6700 km s-1), but also intermediate velocities. This shows that much of the molecular gas has formed out of diffuse gas accelerated by the galaxy-tidal arm collision. CO emission is also detected in a bridge feature that connects the shock to the Seyfert member of the group, NGC 7319, and in the northern star forming region, SQ-A, where a new velocity component is identified at 6900 km s-1, in addition to the two velocity components already known. Assuming a Galactic CO(1-0) emission to H2 mass conversion factor, a total H2 mass of ≈5 × 109 M ⊙ is detected in the shock. The ratio between the warm H2 mass derived from Spitzer spectroscopy, and the H2 mass derived from CO fluxes is ≈0.3 in the IGM of SQ, which is 10--100 times higher than in star-forming galaxies. The molecular gas carries a large fraction of the gas kinetic energy involved in the collision, meaning that this energy has not been thermalized yet. The kinetic energy of the H2 gas derived from CO observations is comparable to that of the warm H2 gas from Spitzer spectroscopy, and a factor ≈5 greater than the thermal energy of the hot plasma heated by the collision. In the shock and bridge regions, the ratio of the PAH-to-CO surface luminosities, commonly used to measure the star

  19. Search for O VI Emission from the Shocked Circurmstellar Gas of SN 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, G.; Iping, R. C.; Lundqvist, P.; Fransson, C.

    2008-01-01

    The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) was used to search for broad O VI emission from the shock interaction zones produced by the collision of high-velocity supernova ejecta with the dense inner circumstellar ring of SN 1987A. Since the shock interaction with the inner ring began in 1997, broad (FWHM = 300 km/sec) emission from optical coronal lines (e.g. [Fe X], [Fe XI], and [Fe XIV]) has emerged and increased exponentially in strength. O VI 1032-1038 Angstrom emission is expected to track the coronal lines. O VI is also expected to be the primary cooling transition for the million-degree shocked gas. An accurate measurement of the O VI line strength would significantly improve current models of the shock interaction. FUSE observations of SN 1987A in 2000 and 2001 did not detect broad O VI due to spectral contamination fiom two earlytype stars within a few arc seconds of the SN. However, O VI emission was detected with narrow line widths (FWHM less than 35 km/sec) and a heliocentric radial velocity of +280 km/sec. This places the emitting gas at rest relative to the supernova and is interpreted as emission from unshocked circumstellar gas. A new FUSE observation of SN 1987A obtained in May 2007 used a narrow slit (1.25 x 20 arcsec) to significantly reduce the spectral contamination from the two early-type stars. Yet the 2007 spectrum does not reveal any significant O VI emission. The implications of these results are discussed.

  20. Experimental investigation of the propagation of a planar shock wave through a two-phase gas-liquid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvin, A.; Jourdan, G.; Daniel, E.; Houas, L.; Tosello, R.

    2011-11-01

    We conducted a series of shock tube experiments to study the influence of a cloud of water droplets on the propagation of a planar shock wave. In a vertically oriented shock tube, the cloud of droplets was released downwards into the air at atmospheric pressure while the shock wave propagated upwards. Two shock wave Mach numbers, 1.3 and 1.5, and three different heights of clouds, 150 mm, 400 mm, and 700 mm, were tested with an air-water volume fraction and a droplet diameter fixed at 1.2% and 500 μm, respectively. From high-speed visualization and pressure measurements, we analyzed the effect of water clouds on the propagation of the shock wave. It was shown that the pressure histories recorded in the two-phase gas-liquid mixture are different from those previously obtained in the gas-solid case. This different behavior is attributed to the process of atomization of the droplets, which is absent in the gas-solid medium. Finally, it was observed that the shock wave attenuation was dependent on the exchange surface crossed by the shock combined with the breakup criterion.

  1. Shock formation in Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe on DD gas puff implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narkis, J.; Rahman, H. U.; Wessel, F. J.; Ney, P.; Beg, F.

    2016-10-01

    1- and 2-D simulations of a 1-cm radius, gas-puff implosion of Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe liners onto a DD target are conducted using the discharge parameters for the Univ. Nevada, Reno, Zebra (1 MA, 125 ns) voltage driver and the resistive MHD code MACH2. During the run-in phase, initial†shock heating preheats the DD plasma, with subsequent stable, adiabatic compression heating the target to high energy density. The dynamics of the former in both the liner and target are investigated. It is shown that magnetic field transport to the liner/target interface does not occur prior to the run-in phase in Ne and Ar liners, yet does occur in Kr and Xe liners, and that magnetic field transport to the interface is a requirement for shock initiation, thus demonstrating the necessity for using a high-Z material in the Staged Z-pinch. Shock reflection off the axis and subsequent collision with the interface results in partial transmission into the liner, which manifests as current reversal, and consequently an enhanced Bθ gradient. 2-D simulations show that magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth decreases with increasing Z, with shock formation providing sufficient isolation to reproduce the current reversal and enhanced Bθ gradient observed in 1-D simulations. Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy, DE-AR0000569.

  2. Improvement of pump tubes for gas guns and shock tube drivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, D. W.

    1990-01-01

    In a pump tube, a gas is mechanically compressed, producing very high pressures and sound speeds. The intensely heated gas produced in such a tube can be used to drive light gas guns and shock tubes. Three concepts are presented that have the potential to allow substantial reductions in the size and mass of the pump tube to be achieved. The first concept involves the use of one or more diaphragms in the pump tube, thus replacing a single compression process by multiple, successive compressions. The second concept involves a radical reduction in the length-to-diameter ratio of the pump tube and the pump tube piston. The third concept involves shock heating of the working gas by high explosives in a cyclindrical geometry reusable device. Preliminary design analyses are performed on all three concepts and they appear to be quite feasible. Reductions in the length and mass of the pump tube by factors up to about 11 and about 7, respectively, are predicted, relative to a benchmark conventional pump tube.

  3. Spectral modification of shock accelerated ions using a hydrodynamically shaped gas target

    SciTech Connect

    Tresca, O.; Polyanskiy, M. N.; Dover, N. P.; Cook, N.; Maharjan, C.; Najmudin, Z.; Shkolnikov, P.; Pogorelsky, I.

    2015-08-28

    We report on reproducible shock acceleration from irradiation of a λ=10 μm CO2 laser on optically shaped H2 and He gas targets. A low energy laser prepulse (I≲1014 W cm–2) is used to drive a blast wave inside the gas target, creating a steepened, variable density gradient. This is followed, after 25 ns, by a high intensity laser pulse (I>1016 W cm–2) that produces an electrostatic collisionless shock. Upstream ions are accelerated for a narrow range of prepulse energies. For long density gradients (≳40 μm), broadband beams of He+ and H+ were routinely produced, whilst for shorter gradients (≲20 μm), quasimonoenergetic acceleration of protons is observed. These measurements indicate that the properties of the accelerating shock and the resultant ion energy distribution, in particular the production of narrow energy spread beams, is highly dependent on the plasma density profile. These findings are corroborated by 2D particle-in-cell simulations.

  4. Spectral modification of shock accelerated ions using a hydrodynamically shaped gas target

    DOE PAGES

    Tresca, O.; Polyanskiy, M. N.; Dover, N. P.; ...

    2015-08-28

    We report on reproducible shock acceleration from irradiation of a λ=10 μm CO2 laser on optically shaped H2 and He gas targets. A low energy laser prepulse (I≲1014 W cm–2) is used to drive a blast wave inside the gas target, creating a steepened, variable density gradient. This is followed, after 25 ns, by a high intensity laser pulse (I>1016 W cm–2) that produces an electrostatic collisionless shock. Upstream ions are accelerated for a narrow range of prepulse energies. For long density gradients (≳40 μm), broadband beams of He+ and H+ were routinely produced, whilst for shorter gradients (≲20 μm),more » quasimonoenergetic acceleration of protons is observed. These measurements indicate that the properties of the accelerating shock and the resultant ion energy distribution, in particular the production of narrow energy spread beams, is highly dependent on the plasma density profile. These findings are corroborated by 2D particle-in-cell simulations.« less

  5. Computational study of the shock driven instability of a multiphase particle-gas system

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2016-02-01

    This paper considers the interaction of a shock wave with a multiphase particle-gas system which creates an instability somewhat similar to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability but with a larger parameter space. Because this parameter space is large, we only present an introductory survey of the effects of many of these parameters. We highlight the effects of particle-gas coupling, incident shock strength, particle size, effective system density differences, and multiple particle relaxation time effects. We focus on dilute flows with mass loading up to 40% and do not attempt to cover all parametric combinations. Instead, we vary one parameter at a time leaving additional parametric combinations for future work. The simulations are run with the Ares code, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, which uses a multiphase particulate transport method to model two-way momentum and energy coupling. A brief validation of these models is presented and coupling effects are explored. It is shown that even for small particles, on the order of 1μm, multi-phase coupling effects are important and diminish the circulation deposition on the interface by up to 25%. These coupling effects are shown to create large temperature deviations from the dusty gas approximation, up to 20% greater, especially at higher shock strengths. It is also found that for a multiphase instability, the vortex sheet deposited at the interface separates into two sheets. In conclusion, depending on the particle and particle-gas Atwood numbers, the instability may be suppressed or enhanced by the interactions of these two vortex sheets.

  6. Computational study of the shock driven instability of a multiphase particle-gas system

    DOE PAGES

    None, None

    2016-02-01

    This paper considers the interaction of a shock wave with a multiphase particle-gas system which creates an instability somewhat similar to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability but with a larger parameter space. Because this parameter space is large, we only present an introductory survey of the effects of many of these parameters. We highlight the effects of particle-gas coupling, incident shock strength, particle size, effective system density differences, and multiple particle relaxation time effects. We focus on dilute flows with mass loading up to 40% and do not attempt to cover all parametric combinations. Instead, we vary one parameter at a timemore » leaving additional parametric combinations for future work. The simulations are run with the Ares code, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, which uses a multiphase particulate transport method to model two-way momentum and energy coupling. A brief validation of these models is presented and coupling effects are explored. It is shown that even for small particles, on the order of 1μm, multi-phase coupling effects are important and diminish the circulation deposition on the interface by up to 25%. These coupling effects are shown to create large temperature deviations from the dusty gas approximation, up to 20% greater, especially at higher shock strengths. It is also found that for a multiphase instability, the vortex sheet deposited at the interface separates into two sheets. In conclusion, depending on the particle and particle-gas Atwood numbers, the instability may be suppressed or enhanced by the interactions of these two vortex sheets.« less

  7. Gas temperature layer visualization in hypersonic shock tunnel using electric discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadeesh, Gopalan; Nagashetty, K.; Srinivasa Rao, B. R.; Reddy, K. P. J.

    2001-04-01

    A novel technique for visualizing the gas temperature layer around bodies flying at hypersonic speeds is presented. The high temperature zone is visualized by photographing the light emitted from the electric discharge generated over a model exposed to hypersonic flow in a shock tunnel. The technique is based on electrical discharge phenomena, where the frequency of radiation emitted by the discharge path passing through the flow field varies with the temperature of the gas medium in the discharge path. The experiments are carried out in the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bangalore, India, hypersonic shock tunnel HST-1 at a nominal Mach number of 5.75 using helium as the driver gas, with free stream velocity of 1.38 km/s and free stream molecular density of 2.3396 X 1016 molecules/cm3. The electric discharge is generated across a line electrode embedded in the model surface and a point electrode suspended in the free stream. A high voltage discharge device (1.6 kV and 1 A) along with a micro-controller based pulse delay control module is integrated with the shock tunnel for generating and controlling electric discharge which lasts for approximately 2 microseconds. The gas temperature layer at zero angle of incidence around a flat plate and slightly blunted (5 mm bluntness radius) 20 degree apex angle slender cone model are visualized in this study. The visualized thickness of the high temperature layer around the flat plate is approximately 2 mm, which agrees well with numerical simulation, carried out using 2-D Navier-Stokes equations.

  8. Computational study of the shock driven instability of a multiphase particle-gas system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, Jacob A.; Black, Wolfgang J.; Dahal, Jeevan; Morgan, Brandon E.

    2016-02-01

    This paper considers the interaction of a shock wave with a multiphase particle-gas system which creates an instability similar in some ways to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability but with a larger parameter space. As this parameter space is large, we only present an introductory survey of the effects of many of these parameters. We highlight the effects of particle-gas coupling, incident shock strength, particle size, effective system density differences, and multiple particle relaxation time effects. We focus on dilute flows with mass loading up to 40% and do not attempt to cover all parametric combinations. Instead, we vary one parameter at a time leaving additional parametric combinations for future work. The simulations are run with the Ares code, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, which uses a multiphase particulate transport method to model two-way momentum and energy coupling. A brief validation of these models is presented and coupling effects are explored. It is shown that even for small particles, on the order of 1 μm, multi-phase coupling effects are important and diminish the circulation deposition on the interface by up to 25%. These coupling effects are shown to create large temperature deviations from the dusty gas approximation, up to 20% greater, especially at higher shock strengths. It is also found that for a multiphase instability, the vortex sheet deposited at the interface separates into two sheets. Depending on the particle and particle-gas Atwood numbers, the instability may be suppressed or enhanced by the interactions of these two vortex sheets.

  9. Los Alamos Programming Models

    SciTech Connect

    Bergen, Benjamin Karl

    2016-07-07

    This is the PDF of a powerpoint presentation from a teleconference on Los Alamos programming models. It starts by listing their assumptions for the programming models and then details a hierarchical programming model at the System Level and Node Level. Then it details how to map this to their internal nomenclature. Finally, a list is given of what they are currently doing in this regard.

  10. Plasma properties of driver gas following interplanetary shocks observed by ISEE-3

    SciTech Connect

    Zwickl, R.D.; Asbridge, J.R.; Bame, S.J.; Feldman, W.C.; Gosling, J.T.; Smith, E.J.

    1982-01-01

    Plasma fluid parameters calculated from solar wind and magnetic field data obtained on ISEE 3 were studied to determine the characteristic properties of driver gas following interplanetary shocks. Of 54 shocks observed from August 1978 to February 1980, 9 contained a well defined driver gas that was clearly identifiable by a discontinuous decrease in the average proton temperature across a tangential discontinuity. While helium enhancements were present in all of 9 of these events, only about half of them contained simultaneous changes in the two quantities. Often the He/H ratio changed over a period of minutes. Simultaneous with the drop in proton temperature the helium and electron temperature decreased abruptly. In some cases the proton temperature depression was accompanied by a moderate increase in magnetic field magnitude with an unusually low variance and by an increase in the ratio of parallel to perpendicular temperature. The drive gas usually displayed a bi-directional flow of suprathermal solar wind electrons at higher energies (>137 eV).

  11. KINEMATICS OF SHOCKED MOLECULAR GAS ADJACENT TO THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT W44

    SciTech Connect

    Sashida, Tomoro; Oka, Tomoharu; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Aono, Kazuya; Matsumura, Shinji; Nagai, Makoto; Seta, Masumichi

    2013-09-01

    We mapped molecular gas toward the supernova remnant W44 in the HCO{sup +} J = 1-0 line with the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m telescope and in the CO J = 3-2 line with the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment 10 m telescope. High-velocity emission wings were detected in both lines over the area where the radio shell of W44 overlaps with the molecular cloud in the plane of the sky. We found that the average velocity distributions of the wing emission can be fit by a uniform expansion model. The best-fit expansion velocities are 12.2 {+-} 0.3 km s{sup -1} and 13.2 {+-} 0.2 km s{sup -1} in HCO{sup +} and CO, respectively. The non-wing CO J = 3-2 component is also fit by the same model with an expansion velocity of 4.7 {+-} 0.1 km s{sup -1}. This component might be dominated by a post-shock higher-density region where the shock velocity had slowed down. The kinetic energy of the shocked molecular gas is estimated to be (3.5 {+-} 1.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 49} erg. Adding this and the energy of the previously identified H I shell, we conclude that (1.2 {+-} 0.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 50} erg has been converted into gas kinetic energy from the initial baryonic energy of the W44 supernova. We also found ultra-high-velocity CO J = 3-2 wing emission with a velocity width of {approx}100 km s{sup -1} at (l, b) = (+34. Degree-Sign 73, -0. Degree-Sign 47). The origin of this extremely high velocity wing is a mystery.

  12. Propagation of a strong spherical shock wave in a gravitating or non-gravitating dusty gas with exponentially varying density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.; Vishwakarma, J. P.

    2016-06-01

    The propagation of a strong spherical shock wave in a dusty gas with or without self-gravitational effects is investigated in the case of isothermal and adiabatic flows. The dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of small solid particles and perfect gas. The equilibrium flow conditions are assumed to be maintained, and the density of the mixture is assumed to be varying and obeying an exponential law. Non-similarity solutions are obtained and the effects of variations of the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture and the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas, and the presence of self-gravitational field on the flow variables are investigated at given times. Our analysis reveals that after inclusion of gravitational field effects surprisingly the shock strength increases and remarkable differences are found in the distribution of flow variables. An increase in time also, increases the shock strength. Further, it is investigated that the consideration of isothermal flow increases the shock strength, and removes the singularity in the density distribution. Also, the presence of gravitational field increases the compressibility of the medium, due to which it is compressed and therefore the distance between the inner contact surface and the shock surface is reduced. The shock waves in self-gravitating dusty gas can be important for description of shocks in supernova explosions, in the study of central part of star burst galaxies, star formation and shocks in stellar explosion, nuclear explosion, in industry, rupture of a pressurized vessel and explosion in the ionosphere. Other potential applications of this study include analysis of data from exploding wire experiments and cylindrically symmetric hypersonic flow problems associated with meteors or re-entry of vehicles etc. A comparison is made between the solutions in the cases of the gravitating and the non-gravitating media. The obtained solutions are applicable for

  13. Observation of ShockWaves in a Strongly Interacting Fermi Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, M.; Joseph, J.A.; Thomas, J.E.; Abanov, A.G.

    2011-04-11

    We study collisions between two strongly interacting atomic Fermi gas clouds. We observe exotic nonlinear hydrodynamic behavior, distinguished by the formation of a very sharp and stable density peak as the clouds collide and subsequent evolution into a boxlike shape. We model the nonlinear dynamics of these collisions by using quasi-1D hydrodynamic equations. Our simulations of the time-dependent density profiles agree very well with the data and provide clear evidence of shock wave formation in this universal quantum hydrodynamic system.

  14. Gas Evolution Dynamics in Godunov-Type Schemes and Analysis of Numerical Shock Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Kun

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we are going to study the gas evolution dynamics of the exact and approximate Riemann solvers, e.g., the Flux Vector Splitting (FVS) and the Flux Difference Splitting (FDS) schemes. Since the FVS scheme and the Kinetic Flux Vector Splitting (KFVS) scheme have the same physical mechanism and similar flux function, based on the analysis of the discretized KFVS scheme the weakness and advantage of the FVS scheme are closely observed. The subtle dissipative mechanism of the Godunov method in the 2D case is also analyzed, and the physical reason for shock instability, i.e., carbuncle phenomena and odd-even decoupling, is presented.

  15. Detection of Shock-Heated Gas Using the Sz Effect in Rxj 1347-1145

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Brian S.; Dicker, S.; Korngut, P.; Devlin, M.; Cotton, W.; Koch, P.; Molnar, S.; Aguirre, J.; Benford, D.; Staguhn, J.; Moseley, H.; Irwin, K.; Sievers, J.; Ade, P.

    2010-01-01

    Using the MUSTANG 3.3 mm bolometer array on the GBT we have measured the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE) in the most x-ray luminous cluster known, RXJ 1 347-1145 (z=0.45) at a resolution of 10" (fwhm). This is the highest resolution image of the SZE to date and confirms previous indications of a localized departure from pressure equilibrium in the form of a small, very hot (>0 keV) parcel of gas, presumably resulting from a merger shock. We discuss the measurements, their interpretation, and future work.

  16. Magnetogasdynamic spherical shock wave in a non-ideal gas under gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.; Vishwakarma, J. P.

    2016-11-01

    Similarity solutions are obtained for the flow behind a spherical shock wave in a non-ideal gas under gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes, in the presence of a spatially decreasing azimuthal magnetic field. The shock wave is driven by a piston moving with time according to power law. The radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model and the heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law for heat conduction. Similarity solutions exist only when the surrounding medium is of constant density. The gas is assumed to have infinite electrical conductivity and to obey a simplified van der Waals equation of state. It is shown that an increase of the gravitational parameter or the Alfven-Mach number or the parameter of the non-idealness of the gas decreases the compressibility of the gas in the flow-field behind the shock, and hence there is a decrease in the shock strength. The pressure and density vanish at the inner surface (piston) and hence a vacuum is formed at the center of symmetry. The shock waves in conducting non-ideal gas under gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes can be important for description of shocks in supernova explosions, in the study of a flare produced shock in the solar wind, central part of star burst galaxies, nuclear explosion etc. The solutions obtained can be used to interpret measurements carried out by space craft in the solar wind and in neighborhood of the Earth's magnetosphere.

  17. Thermodynamic theory of the shock wave structure in a rarefied polyatomic gas: beyond the Bethe-Teller theory.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Shigeru; Arima, Takashi; Ruggeri, Tommaso; Sugiyama, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    The structure of a shock wave in a rarefied polyatomic gas is studied on the basis of the theory of extended thermodynamics. Three types of the shock wave structure observed in experiments, that is, the nearly symmetric shock wave structure (type A, small Mach number), the asymmetric structure (type B, moderate Mach number), and the structure composed of thin and thick layers (type C, large Mach number), are explained by the theory in a unified way. The theoretical prediction of the profile of the mass density agrees well with the experimental data. The well-known Bethe-Teller theory of the shock wave structure in a polyatomic gas is reexamined in the light of the present theory.

  18. Shocks, Superbubbles, and Filaments: Investigations into Large Scale Gas Motions in Giant Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pon, Andrew Richard

    2013-12-01

    Giant molecular clouds (GMCs), out of which stars form, are complex, dynamic systems, which both influence and are shaped by the process of star formation. In this dissertation, I examine three different facets of the dynamical motions within GMCs. Collapse modes in different dimensional objects. Molecular clouds contain lower dimensional substructures, such as filaments and sheets. The collapse properties of finite filaments and sheets differ from those of spherical objects as well as infinite sheets and filaments. I examine the importance of local collapse modes of small central perturbations, relative to global collapse modes, in different dimensional objects to elucidate whether strong perturbations are required for molecular clouds to fragment to form stars. I also calculate the dependence of the global collapse timescale upon the aspect ratio of sheets and filaments. I find that lower dimensional objects are more readily fragmented, and that for a constant density, lower dimensional objects and clouds with larger aspect ratios collapse more slowly. An edge-driven collapse mode also exists in sheets and filaments and is most important in elongated filaments. The failure to consider the geometry of a gas cloud is shown to lead to an overestimation of the star formation rate by up to an order of magnitude. Molecular tracers of turbulent energy dissipation. Molecular clouds contain supersonic turbulence that simulations predict will decay rapidly via shocks. I use shock models to predict which species emit the majority of the turbulent energy dissipated in shocks and find that carbon monoxide, CO, is primarily responsible for radiating away this energy. By combining these shock models with estimates for the turbulent energy dissipation rate of molecular clouds, I predict the expected shock spectra of CO from molecular clouds. I compare the results of these shock models to predictions for the emission from the unshocked gas in GMCs and show that mid

  19. Simulations of 2-shock Convergence Scan Shots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Paul; Olson, R. E.; Kline, J. L.; MacLaren, S. A.; Ma, T.; Salmonson, J. D.; Kyrala, G. A.; Pino, J.; Dewald, E.; Khan, S.; Sayre, D.; Ralph, J.; Turnbull, D.

    2016-10-01

    The 2-shock campaign is a joint Los Alamos/Livermore project to investigate the role of shock timing, asymmetry, and shock convergence on the performance of ignition relevant capsules. This campaign uses a simple two step pulse that makes it easier to correlate the effect of changing the laser pulse on the performance of the capsule. The 680 micron outer radius capsule has a CH +1 at% Si ablator approximately 175 microns thick surrounding a DD or HT gas region with fill densities between 0.0085 and 0.00094 g/cc. The capsules are indirectly driven inside a gold hohlraum that is 9.2 mm long by 5.75 mm in diameter. Some capsules had about 3 microns of CD on the inner surface. The CD inner surface capsules utilized HT fuel so that the DT yield arises from mixing of CD shell material into the tritium of the gas region. Our simulated results compare well to the experimental yield, ion temperature, burn width, x-ray size, convergence ratio, and radius versus time data. Work performed by Los Alamos National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396 for the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  20. Laser-Accelerated Ions from a Shock-Compressed Gas Foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helle, M. H.; Gordon, D. F.; Kaganovich, D.; Chen, Y.; Palastro, J. P.; Ting, A.

    2016-10-01

    We present results of energetic laser-ion acceleration from a tailored, near solid density gas target. Colliding hydrodynamic shocks compress a pure hydrogen gas jet into a 70 μ m thick target prior to the arrival of the ultraintense laser pulse. A density scan reveals the transition from a regime characterized by a wide angle, low-energy beam (target normal sheath acceleration) to one of a more focused beam with a high-energy halo (magnetic vortex acceleration). In the latter case, three-dimensional simulations show the formation of a Z pinch driven by the axial current resulting from laser wakefield accelerated electrons. Ions at the rear of the target are then accelerated by a combination of space charge fields from accelerated electrons and Coulombic repulsion as the pinch dissipates.

  1. The physics of grain-grain collisions and gas-grain sputtering in interstellar shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Mckee, C. F.; Seab, C. G.; Hollenbach, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    Grain-grain collisions and ion sputtering destroy dust grains in interstellar shocks. An analytical theory is developed for the propagation of shock waves in solids driven by grain-grain collisions, which compares very favorably with detailed numerical calculations. This theory is used to determine the fraction of grain vaporized by a grain-grain collision. Our results predict much less vaporization of colliding grains in interstellar shocks than previous estimates. This theory can also be used to determine the fraction of a colliding grain that melts, shatter, or undergoes a phase transformation to a higher density phase. In particular, the latter two processes can be much more important in interstellar shocks than vaporization. The sputtering of grains by impacting gas ions is reanalyzed based upon extensive laboratory studies and a theoretically derived 'universal'sputtering relation. The analytical results are compared to available experimental studies of sputtering of graphite/amorphous carbon, SiO2, SiC, Fe, and H2O. Sputtering yields for astrophysically relevant materials as a function of impact energy and ion mass are derived. These yields are also averaged over thermal impact spectrum and simple polynomial fits to the resulting yields as a function of temperature are presented. The derived sputtering yields are similar to those adopted in previous studies, except for graphite near threshold where the new yields are much larger due to a lower adopted binding energy. The ion bombardment will amorphitize the surface layers of interstellar grains. It will also convert graphite into hydrogenated amorphous carbon (HAC) to a depth of 10-20 A. It is suggested that these HAC surfaces are the carriers of the 3.4 micrometer absorption feature in the interstellar medium.

  2. A Parametric Approach to Shape Field-Relevant Blast Wave Profiles in Compressed-Gas-Driven Shock Tube

    PubMed Central

    Sundaramurthy, Aravind; Chandra, Namas

    2014-01-01

    Detonation of a high-explosive produces shock-blast wave, shrapnel, and gaseous products. While direct exposure to blast is a concern near the epicenter, shock-blast can affect subjects, even at farther distances. When a pure shock-blast wave encounters the subject, in the absence of shrapnels, fall, or gaseous products the loading is termed as primary blast loading and is the subject of this paper. The wave profile is characterized by blast overpressure, positive time duration, and impulse and called herein as shock-blast wave parameters (SWPs). These parameters in turn are uniquely determined by the strength of high explosive and the distance of the human subjects from the epicenter. The shape and magnitude of the profile determine the severity of injury to the subjects. As shown in some of our recent works (1–3), the profile not only determines the survival of the subjects (e.g., animals) but also the acute and chronic biomechanical injuries along with the following bio-chemical sequelae. It is extremely important to carefully design and operate the shock tube to produce field-relevant SWPs. Furthermore, it is vital to identify and eliminate the artifacts that are inadvertently introduced in the shock-blast profile that may affect the results. In this work, we examine the relationship between shock tube adjustable parameters (SAPs) and SWPs that can be used to control the blast profile; the results can be easily applied to many of the laboratory shock tubes. Further, replication of shock profile (magnitude and shape) can be related to field explosions and can be a standard in comparing results across different laboratories. Forty experiments are carried out by judiciously varying SAPs such as membrane thickness, breech length (66.68–1209.68 mm), measurement location, and type of driver gas (nitrogen, helium). The effects SAPs have on the resulting shock-blast profiles are shown. Also, the shock-blast profiles of a TNT explosion from ConWep software is

  3. Propagation of a cylindrical shock wave in a mixture of a non-ideal gas and small solid particles under the action of monochromatic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Praveen Kumar; Nath, Gorakh

    2016-07-01

    Cylindrical shock wave in a dusty gas is discussed under the action of monochromatic radiation into stellar atmosphere with a constant intensity on unit area. The gas is assumed to be grey and opaque and shock to be transparent. The dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles. To obtain some essential features of the shock propagation, small solid particles are taken as pseudo-fluid and it is assumed that the equilibrium flow condition is maintained in the flow-field. The effects of variation of the parameters of the non-idealness of the gas, the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture, the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas and the radiation parameter are investigated. It is shown that an increase in the parameters of the non-idealness of the gas and the radiation parameter have decaying effect on the shock waves; whereas with an increase in the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas the shock strength increases. It is found that an increase in the parameter non-idealness of the gas and the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas have opposite behaviour on fluid velocity, pressure and shock strength. Also, it is shown that an increase in the radiation parameter has effect to decrease the flow variables and the shock strength.

  4. Inertial-Fusion-Related Hydrodynamic Instabilities in a Spherical Gas Bubble Accelerated by a Planar Shock Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Niederhaus, John; Ranjan, Devesh; Anderson, Mark; Oakley, Jason; Bonazza, Riccardo; Greenough, Jeff

    2005-05-15

    Experiments studying the compression and unstable growth of a dense spherical bubble in a gaseous medium subjected to a strong planar shock wave (2.8 < M < 3.4) are performed in a vertical shock tube. The test gas is initially contained in a free-falling spherical soap-film bubble, and the shocked bubble is imaged using planar laser diagnostics. Concurrently, simulations are carried out using a compressible hydrodynamics code in r-z axisymmetric geometry.Experiments and computations indicate the formation of characteristic vortical structures in the post-shock flow, due to Richtmyer-Meshkov and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, and smaller-scale vortices due to secondary effects. Inconsistencies between experimental and computational results are examined, and the usefulness of the current axisymmetric approach is evaluated.

  5. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dogliani, Harold O

    2011-01-19

    The purpose of the briefing is to describe general laboratory technical capabilities to be used for various groups such as military cadets or university faculty/students and post docs to recruit into a variety of Los Alamos programs. Discussed are: (1) development and application of high leverage science to enable effeictive, predictable and reliability outcomes; (2) deter, detect, characterize, reverse and prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their use by adversaries and terrorists; (3) modeling and simulation to define complex processes, predict outcomes, and develop effective prevention, response, and remediation strategies; (4) energetic materials and hydrodynamic testing to develop materials for precise delivery of focused energy; (5) materials cience focused on fundamental understanding of materials behaviors, their quantum-molecular properties, and their dynamic responses, and (6) bio-science to rapidly detect and characterize pathogens, to develop vaccines and prophylactic remedies, and to develop attribution forensics.

  6. Shocked POststarburst Galaxy Survey. II. The Molecular Gas Content and Properties of a Subset of SPOGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alatalo, Katherine; Lisenfeld, Ute; Lanz, Lauranne; Appleton, Philip N.; Ardila, Felipe; Cales, Sabrina L.; Kewley, Lisa J.; Lacy, Mark; Medling, Anne M.; Nyland, Kristina; Rich, Jeffrey A.; Urry, C. Meg

    2016-08-01

    We present CO(1-0) observations of objects within the Shocked POststarburst Galaxy Survey taken with the Institut de Radioastronomie Millimétrique 30 m single dish and the Combined Array for Research for Millimeter Astronomy interferometer. Shocked poststarburst galaxies (SPOGs) represent a transitioning population of galaxies, with deep Balmer absorption ({{EW}}{{H}δ }\\gt 5 {\\mathring{{A}}} ), consistent with an intermediate-age (A-star) stellar population, and ionized gas line ratios inconsistent with pure star formation. The CO(1-0) subsample was selected from SPOGs detected by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer with 22 μm flux detected at a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) > 3. Of the 52 objects observed in CO(1-0), 47 are detected with S/N > 3. A large fraction (37%-46% ± 7%) of our CO-SPOG sample were visually classified as morphologically disrupted. The H2 masses detected were between {10}8.7-10.8 {M}⊙ , consistent with the gas masses found in normal galaxies, though approximately an order of magnitude larger than the range seen in poststarburst galaxies. When comparing the 22 μm and CO(1-0) fluxes, SPOGs diverge from the normal star-forming relation, having 22 μm fluxes in excess of the relation by a factor of < {ɛ }{{MIR}}> ={4.91}-0.39+0.42, suggestive of the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The Na i D characteristics of CO-SPOGs show that it is likely that many of these objects host interstellar winds. Objects with large Na i D enhancements also tend to emit in the radio, suggesting possible AGN driving of neutral winds.

  7. Nonexistence of a shock layer in gas dynamics with a nonconvex equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pego, Robert L.

    1986-06-01

    A classical result of Gilbarg states that a simple shock wave solution of Euler's equations is compressive if and only if a corresponding shock layer solution of the Navier-Stokes equations exists, assuming, among other things, that the equation of state is convex. An “entropy condition” appropriate for weeding out “unphysical” shocks in the nonconvex case has been introduced by T.-P. Liu. For shocks satisfying his entropy condition, Liu showed that purely viscous shock layers exist (with zero heat conduction). Dropping the convexity assumption, but retaining many other reasonable restrictions on the equation of state, we construct an example of a (large amplitude) shock which satisfies Liu's entropy condition but for which a shock layer does not exist if heat conduction dominates viscosity. We also give a simple restriction, weaker than convexity, which does guarantee that shocks which satisfy Liu's entropy condition always admit shock layers.

  8. Nonexistence of a shock layer in gas dynamics with a nonconvex equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pego, R. L.

    1983-04-01

    A classical result of Gilbarg states that a simple shock wave solution of Euler's equations in compressive if and only if a corresponding shock layer solution of the Navier-Stokes equations exists, assuming, among other things, that the equation of state is convex. An entropy condition appropriate for weeding out unphysical shocks in the nonconvex case has been introduced by Liu. For shocks satisfying his entropy condition, Liu showed that purely viscous shock layers exist (with zero heat conduction). Dropping the convexity assumption, but retaining many other reasonable restrictions on the equation of state, Pego, the author constructs an example of a (large amplitude) shock which satisfies Liu's entropy condition but for which a shock layer does not exist if heat conduction dominates viscosity. Pego also gives a simple restriction, weaker than convexity, which does guarantee that shocks which satisfy Liu's entropy condition always admit shock layers.

  9. The shocked gas of the BHR71 outflow observed by Herschel: indirect evidence for an atomic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedettini, M.; Gusdorf, A.; Nisini, B.; Lefloch, B.; Anderl, S.; Busquet, G.; Ceccarelli, C.; Codella, C.; Leurini, S.; Podio, L.

    2017-01-01

    Context. In the BHR71 region, two low-mass protostars IRS1 and IRS2 drive two distinguishable outflows. They constitute an ideal laboratory to investigate both the effects of shock chemistry and the mechanisms that led to their formation. Aims: We aim to define the global morphology of the warm gas component of the BHR71 outflow and at modelling its shocked component. Methods: We present the first far infrared Herschel images of the BHR71 outflows system in the CO (14-13), H2O (221-110), H2O (212-101) and [O i] 145 μm transitions, revealing the presence of several knots of warm, shocked gas associated with the fast outflowing gas. In two of these knots we performed a detailed study of the physical conditions by comparing a large set of transitions from several molecules to a grid of shock models. Results: The Herschel lines ratios in the outflow knots are quite similar, showing that the excitation conditions of the fast moving gas do not change significantly within the first 0.068 pc of the outflow, apart at the extremity of the southern blue-shifted lobe that is expanding outside the parental molecular cloud. Rotational diagram, spectral line profile and LVG analysis of the CO lines in knot A show the presence of two gas components: one extended, cold (T 80 K) and dense (n(H2) = 3 × 105-4 × 106 cm-3) and another compact (18''), warm (T = 1700-2200 K) with slightly lower density (n(H2) = 2 × 104-6 × 104 cm-3). In the two brightest knots (where we performed shock modelling) we found that H2 and CO are well fitted with non-stationary (young) shocks. These models, however, significantly underestimate the observed fluxes of [O i] and OH lines, but are not too far off those of H2O, calling for an additional, possibly dissociative, J-type shock component. Conclusions: Our modelling indirectly suggests that an additional shock component exists, possibly a remnant of the primary jet. Direct, observational evidence for such a jet must be searched for. Herschel is an

  10. Unsteady isothermal flow behind a magnetogasdynamic shock wave in a self-gravitating gas with exponentially varying density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.

    2014-06-01

    The propagation of spherical (or cylindrical) shock wave in an ideal gas with or without gravitational effects in the presence of a constant azimuthal magnetic field is investigated. Non-similarity solutions are obtained for isothermal flow between the shock and the piston. The numerical solutions are obtained using the Runge-Kutta method of the fourth order. The density of the gas is assumed to be varying and obeying an exponential law. The shock wave moves with variable velocity, and the total energy of the wave is non-constant and varies with time. The effects of variation of the Alfven-Mach number, gravitational parameter and time are obtained. It is investigated that the presence of gravitational field reduces the effect of the magnetic field. Also, the presence of gravitational field increases the compressibility of the medium, due to which it is compressed and, therefore, the distance between the inner contact surface and the shock surface is reduced. The shock waves in conducting perfect gas can be important for description of shocks in supernova explosions, in the study of central part of star burst galaxies, nuclear explosion, rupture of a pressurized vessel and explosion in the ionosphere. Other potential applications of this study include analysis of data from exploding wire experiments and cylindrically symmetric hypersonic flow problems associated with meteors or re-entry vehicles etc. A comparison is made between the solutions in the cases of the gravitating and the non-gravitating medium with or without magnetic field. The obtained solutions are applicable for arbitrary values of time.

  11. ALMA observations of the dense and shocked gas in the nuclear region of NGC 4038 (Antennae galaxies)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Junko; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Iono, Daisuke; Wilner, David J.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Ohashi, Satoshi; Kawabe, Ryohei; Saito, Toshiki; Komugi, Shinya

    2017-02-01

    We present 1″(<100 pc) resolution maps of millimeter emission from five molecules-CN, HCN, HCO+, CH3OH, and HNCO-obtained towards NGC 4038, which is the northern galaxy of the mid-stage merger, Antennae galaxies, with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. Three molecules (CN, CH3OH, and HNCO) were detected for the first time in the nuclear region of NGC 4038. High-resolution mapping reveals a systematic difference in distributions of different molecular species and continuum emission. Active star-forming regions identified by the 3 mm and 850 μm continuum emission are offset from the gas-rich region associated with the HCN (1-0) and CO (3-2) peaks. The CN (1-0)/HCN (1-0) line ratios are enhanced (CN/HCN ≃ 0.8-1.2) in the star-forming regions, suggesting that the regions are photon dominated. The large molecular gas mass (108 M⊙) within a 0{^''.}6 (˜60 pc) radius of the CO (3-2) peak and a high dense gas fraction (>20%) suggested by the HCN (1-0)/CO (3-2) line ratio may signify a future burst of intense star formation there. The shocked gas traced in the CH3OH and HNCO emission indicates sub-kpc-scale molecular shocks. We suggest that the molecular shocks may be driven by collisions between inflowing gas and the central massive molecular complex.

  12. Simple Model for Vibration-Translation Exchange at High Temperatures: Effects of Multiquantum Transitions on the Relaxation Of A N2 Gas Flow Behind a Shock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-22

    relaxation of a N2 gas flow behind a shock A. Aliat,1,* P. Vedula,1,* and E. Josyula2 1School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of...influence on the relaxation of the macroscopic parameters of the gas flow behind the shock, especially on vibrational distributions of high levels. All...simulate hypersonic gas flows are based on the assumption of quasistationary distributions (Boltzmann or Treanor) over vibrational energies [2–5]. These

  13. Propagation of a cylindrical shock wave in a rotating dusty gas with heat conduction and radiation heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwakarma, J. P.; Nath, G.

    2010-04-01

    A self-similar solution for the propagation of a cylindrical shock wave in a dusty gas with heat conduction and radiation heat flux, which is rotating about the axis of symmetry, is investigated. The shock is assumed to be driven out by a piston (an inner expanding surface) and the dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles. The density of the ambient medium is assumed to be constant. The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law and radiation is considered to be of diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity K and the absorption coefficient αR are assumed to vary with temperature and density. Similarity solutions are obtained, and the effects of variation of the parameter of non-idealness of the gas in the mixture, the mass concentration of solid particles and the ratio of density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas are investigated.

  14. Magnetogasdynamic shock wave generated by a moving piston in a rotational axisymmetric isothermal flow of perfect gas with variable density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.

    2011-05-01

    The propagation of a strong cylindrical shock wave in an ideal gas with azimuthal magnetic field, and with or without axisymmetric rotational effects, is investigated. The shock wave is driven out by a piston moving with time according to power law. The ambient medium is assumed to have radial, axial and azimuthal component of fluid velocities. The fluid velocities, the initial density and the initial magnetic field of the ambient medium are assumed to be varying and obey power laws. Solutions are obtained, when the flow between the shock and the piston is isothermal. The gas is assumed to have infinite electrical conductivity and the angular velocity of the ambient medium is assumed to be decreasing as the distance from the axis increases. It is expected that such an angular velocity may occur in the atmospheres of rotating planets and stars. The shock wave moves with variable velocity and the total energy of the wave is non-constant. The effects of variation of the initial density and the Alfven-Mach number on the flow-field are obtained. A comparison is also made between rotating and non-rotating cases.

  15. Mass spectrometer measurements of test gas composition in a shock tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, K. A.; Stalker, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    Shock tunnels afford a means of generating hypersonic flow at high stagnation enthalpies, but they have the disadvantage that thermochemical effects make the composition of the test flow different to that of ambient air. The composition can be predicted by numerical calculations of the nozzle flow expansion, using simplified thermochemical models and, in the absence of experimental measurements, it has been necessary to accept the results given by these calculations. This note reports measurements of test gas composition, at stagnation enthalpies up to 12.5 MJ.kg(exp -1), taken with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Limited results have been obtained in previous measurements. These were taken at higher stagnation enthalpies, and used a quadruple mass spectrometer. The time-of-flight method was preferred here because it enabled a number of complete mass spectra to be obtained in each test, and because it gives good mass resolution over the range of interest with air (up to 50 a.m.a.).

  16. LASNEX simulations of supernova-residual gas shocks on the Nova laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estabrook, Kent; Remington, Bruce; Glendinning, Gail; Alley, W. E.; Munro, D. H.; Suter, L. J.; Harte, J. H.; Zimmerman, G. B.; Bailey, D. S.; Kane, Jave; Wallace, Russel; London, R. A.; Rubenchik, A. M.; Drake, R. Paul; McCray, R.

    1997-11-01

    We simulate an astrophysical supernova collision with the residual gas from the initial red or blue giant on the LLNL Nova laser which produces x rays in a hohlraum as a driver[1]. Two dimensional LASNEX simulations follow the Tr ~220 eV x ray ablation and acceleration of 200 microns of C_8H_7Br1 across a 150 micron gap into SiO2 foam (mass density .04). The C_8H_7Br1 collides with the SiO2 at ~ 10^7 cm/sec and drives forward and reverse shocks[2]. We initiate Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities with 50-100 micron wavelength, 1 micron amplitude perturbations or with random noise and investigate magnetic fields[3]. We compare experimental x ray back lighted streaks to computer generated streaks. Related papers by Bruce Remington, Gail Glendinning, Paul Drake and Jave Kane are at this meeting. [1] B.A.Remington et al. PRL 67, 3259 (1991). [2] B.A.Remington et al. Phys.Plasmas 4, 1994 (1997). [3] K.Mima, T.Tajima and J.N.Leboeuf PRL 41, 1715 (1978). Auspices U.S.D.O.E. by LLNL Contract W-7405-ENG-48

  17. Thrust shock vector control of an axisymmetric conical supersonic nozzle via secondary transverse gas injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zmijanovic, V.; Lago, V.; Sellam, M.; Chpoun, A.

    2014-01-01

    Transverse secondary gas injection into the supersonic flow of an axisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzle is investigated to describe the effects of the fluidic thrust vectoring within the framework of a small satellite launcher. Cold-flow dry-air experiments are performed in a supersonic wind tunnel using two identical supersonic conical nozzles with the different transverse injection port positions. The complex three-dimensional flow field generated by the supersonic cross-flows in these test nozzles was examined. Valuable experimental data were confronted and compared with the results obtained from the numerical simulations. Different nozzle models are numerically simulated under experimental conditions and then further investigated to determine which parameters significantly affect thrust vectoring. Effects which characterize the nozzle and thrust vectoring performances are established. The results indicate that with moderate secondary to primary mass flow rate ratios, ranging around 5 %, it is possible to achieve pertinent vector side forces. It is also revealed that injector positioning and geometry have a strong effect on the shock vector control system and nozzle performances.

  18. Experimental and numerical investigation of shock wave propagation through complex geometry, gas continuous, two-phase media

    SciTech Connect

    Chien-Chih Liu, James

    1993-01-01

    The work presented here investigates the phenomenon of shock wave propagation in gas continuous, two-phase media. The motivation for this work stems from the need to understand blast venting consequences in the HYLIFE inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor. The HYLIFE concept utilizes lasers or heavy ion beams to rapidly heat and compress D-T targets injected into the center of a reactor chamber. A segmented blanket of falling molten lithium or Li2BeF4 (Flibe) jets encircles the reactor`s central cavity, shielding the reactor structure from radiation damage, absorbing the fusion energy, and breeding more tritium fuel. X-rays from the fusion microexplosion will ablate a thin layer of blanket material from the surfaces which face toward the fusion site. This generates a highly energetic vapor, which mostly coalesces in the central cavity. The blast expansion from the central cavity generates a shock which propagates through the segmented blanket - a complex geometry, gas-continuous two-phase medium. The impulse that the blast gives to the liquid as it vents past, the gas shock on the chamber wall, and ultimately the liquid impact on the wall are all important quantities to the HYLIFE structural designers.

  19. Computational modelling of the interaction of shock waves with multiple gas-filled bubbles in a liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betney, M. R.; Tully, B.; Hawker, N. A.; Ventikos, Y.

    2015-03-01

    This study presents a computational investigation of the interactions of a single shock wave with multiple gas-filled bubbles in a liquid medium. This work illustrates how multiple bubbles may be used in shock-bubble interactions to intensify the process on a local level. A high resolution front-tracking approach is used, which enables explicit tracking of the gas-liquid interface. The collapse of two identical bubbles, one placed behind the other is investigated in detail, demonstrating that peak pressures in a two bubble arrangement can exceed those seen in single bubble collapse. Additionally, a parametric investigation into the effect of bubble separation is presented. It is found that the separation distance has a significant effect on both the shape and velocity of the main transverse jet of the second bubble. Extending this analysis to effects of relative bubble size, we show that if the first bubble is sufficiently small relative to the second, it may become entirely entrained in the second bubble main transverse jet. In contrast, if the first bubble is substantially larger than the second, it may offer it significant protection from the incident shock. This protection is utilised in the study of a triangular array of three bubbles, with the central bubble being significantly smaller than the outer bubbles. It is demonstrated that, through shielding of bubbles until later in the collapse process, pressures over five times higher than the maximum pressure observed in the single bubble case may be achieved. This corresponds to a peak pressure that is approximately 40 times more intense than the incident shock wave. This work has applications in a number of different fields, including cavitation erosion, explosives, targeted drug delivery/intensification, and shock wave lithotripsy.

  20. Nonexistence of a Shock Layer in Gas Dynamics with a Nonconvex Equation of State.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    solution of the Navier-Stokes equations exists, assuming, among other things, that the equation of state is convex. An entropy condition appropriate... equation of state , Pego, the author constructs an example of a (large amplitude) shock which satisfies Liu’s entropy condition but for which a shock

  1. Double shock front formation in cylindrical radiative blast waves produced by laser irradiation of krypton gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, I.; Quevedo, H. J.; Feldman, S.; Bang, W.; Serratto, K.; McCormick, M.; Aymond, F.; Dyer, G.; Bernstein, A. C.; Ditmire, T.

    2013-12-01

    Radiative blast waves were created by irradiating a krypton cluster source from a supersonic jet with a high intensity femtosecond laser pulse. It was found that the radiation from the shock surface is absorbed in the optically thick upstream medium creating a radiative heat wave that travels supersonically ahead of the main shock. As the blast wave propagates into the heated medium, it slows and loses energy, and the radiative heat wave also slows down. When the radiative heat wave slows down to the transonic regime, a secondary shock in the ionization precursor is produced. This paper presents experimental data characterizing both the initial and secondary shocks and numerical simulations to analyze the double-shock dynamics.

  2. Double shock front formation in cylindrical radiative blast waves produced by laser irradiation of krypton gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, I.; Quevedo, H. J.; Feldman, S.; Bang, W.; Serratto, K.; McCormick, M.; Aymond, F.; Dyer, G.; Bernstein, A. C.; Ditmire, T.

    2013-12-15

    Radiative blast waves were created by irradiating a krypton cluster source from a supersonic jet with a high intensity femtosecond laser pulse. It was found that the radiation from the shock surface is absorbed in the optically thick upstream medium creating a radiative heat wave that travels supersonically ahead of the main shock. As the blast wave propagates into the heated medium, it slows and loses energy, and the radiative heat wave also slows down. When the radiative heat wave slows down to the transonic regime, a secondary shock in the ionization precursor is produced. This paper presents experimental data characterizing both the initial and secondary shocks and numerical simulations to analyze the double-shock dynamics.

  3. CHEMICALLY DISTINCT NUCLEI AND OUTFLOWING SHOCKED MOLECULAR GAS IN Arp 220

    SciTech Connect

    Tunnard, R.; Greve, T. R.; Garcia-Burillo, S.; Fuente, A.; Usero, A.; Planesas, P.; Carpio, J. Graciá; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Sturm, E.; Fischer, J.; González-Alfonso, E.; Neri, R.

    2015-02-10

    We present the results of interferometric spectral line observations of Arp 220 at 3.5 mm and 1.2 mm from the Plateau de Bure Interferometer, imaging the two nuclear disks in H{sup 13}CN(1-0) and (3-2), H{sup 13}CO{sup +}(1-0) and (3-2), and HN{sup 13}C(3-2) as well as SiO(2-1) and (6-5), HC{sup 15}N(3-2), and SO(6{sub 6}-5{sub 5}). The gas traced by SiO(6-5) has a complex and extended kinematic signature including a prominent P Cygni profile, almost identical to previous observations of HCO{sup +}(3-2). Spatial offsets 0.''1 north and south of the continuum center in the emission and absorption of the SiO(6-5) P Cygni profile in the western nucleus (WN) imply a bipolar outflow, delineating the northern and southern edges of its disk and suggesting a disk radius of ∼40 pc, consistent with that found by ALMA observations of Arp 220. We address the blending of SiO(6-5) and H{sup 13}CO{sup +}(3-2) by considering two limiting cases with regards to the H{sup 13}CO{sup +} emission throughout our analysis. Large velocity gradient modeling is used to constrain the physical conditions of the gas and to infer abundance ratios in the two nuclei. Our most conservative lower limit on the [H{sup 13}CN]/[H{sup 13}CO{sup +}] abundance ratio is 11 in the WN, compared with 0.10 in the eastern nucleus (EN). Comparing these ratios to the literature we argue on chemical grounds for an energetically significant active galactic nucleus in the WN driving either X-ray or shock chemistry, and a dominant starburst in the EN.

  4. C IV and He II line emission of Lyman α blobs: powered by shock-heated gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabot, Samuel; Cen, Renyue; Zheng, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Utilizing ab initio ultrahigh resolution hydrodynamical simulations, we investigate the properties of the interstellar and circumgalactic medium of Lyα blobs (LABs) at z = 3, focusing on three important emission lines: Lyα 1216 Å, He II 1640 Å and C IV 1549 Å. Their relative strengths provide a powerful probe of the thermodynamic properties of the gas when confronted with observations. By adjusting the dust attenuation effect using one parameter and matching the observed size-luminosity relation of LABs using another parameter, we show that our simulations can reproduce the observed C IV/Lyα and He II/Lyα ratios adequately. This analysis provides the first successful physical model to account for simultaneously the LAB luminosity function, luminosity-size relation and the C IV/Lyα and He II/Lyα ratios, with only two parameters. The physical underpinning for this model is that, in addition to the stellar component for the Lyα emission, the Lyα and C IV emission lines due to shock-heated gas are primarily collisional excitation driven and the He II emission line collisional ionization driven. We find that the density, temperature and metallicity of the gas responsible for each emission line is significantly distinct, in a multiphase interstellar and circumgalactic medium that is shock heated primarily by supernovae and secondarily by gravitational accretion of gas.

  5. The VIRUS-P Exploration of Nearby Galaxies (VENGA): Radial Gas Inflow and Shock Excitation in NGC 1042

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Rongxin; Hao, Lei; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Jogee, Shardha; van den Bosch, Remco C. E.; Weinzirl, Tim

    2016-06-01

    NGC 1042 is a late-type bulgeless disk galaxy that hosts low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) coincident with a massive nuclear star cluster. In this paper, we present the integral field spectroscopy studies of this galaxy, based on the data obtained with the Mitchell spectrograph on the 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith telescope. In the central 100-300 pc region of NGC 1042, we find a circumnuclear ring structure of gas with enhanced ionization, which we suggest is mainly induced by shocks. Combining this with the harmonic decomposition analysis of the velocity field of the ionized gas, we propose that the shocked gas is the result of gas inflow driven by the inner spiral arms. The inflow velocity is ˜ 32+/- 10 {km} {{{s}}}-1, and the estimated mass-inflow rate is ˜ 1.1+/- 0.3× {10}-3 {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1. The mass-inflow rate is about one hundred times the black hole’s mass-accretion rate (˜ 1.4× {10}-5 {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1) and slightly larger than the star-formation rate in the nuclear star cluster (7.94× {10}-4 {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1), implying that the inflow material is enough to feed both the AGN activity and star formation in the nuclear star cluster. Our study highlights that secular evolution can be important in late-type unbarred galaxies like NGC 1042.

  6. Interaction of a weak shock wave with a discontinuous heavy-gas cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiansheng; Yang, Dangguo; Wu, Junqiang; Luo, Xisheng

    2015-06-15

    The interaction between a cylindrical inhomogeneity and a weak planar shock wave is investigated experimentally and numerically, and special attention is given to the wave patterns and vortex dynamics in this scenario. A soap-film technique is realized to generate a well-controlled discontinuous cylinder (SF{sub 6} surrounded by air) with no supports or wires in the shock-tube experiment. The symmetric evolving interfaces and few disturbance waves are observed in a high-speed schlieren photography. Numerical simulations are also carried out for a detailed analysis. The refracted shock wave inside the cylinder is perturbed by the diffracted shock waves and divided into three branches. When these shock branches collide, the shock focusing occurs. A nonlinear model is then proposed to elucidate effects of the wave patterns on the evolution of the cylinder. A distinct vortex pair is gradually developing during the shock-cylinder interaction. The numerical results show that a low pressure region appears at the vortex core. Subsequently, the ambient fluid is entrained into the vortices which are expanding at the same time. Based on the relation between the vortex motion and the circulation, several theoretical models of circulation in the literature are then checked by the experimental and numerical results. Most of these theoretical circulation models provide a reasonably good prediction of the vortex motion in the present configuration.

  7. Interaction of a weak shock wave with a discontinuous heavy-gas cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiansheng; Yang, Dangguo; Wu, Junqiang; Luo, Xisheng

    2015-06-01

    The interaction between a cylindrical inhomogeneity and a weak planar shock wave is investigated experimentally and numerically, and special attention is given to the wave patterns and vortex dynamics in this scenario. A soap-film technique is realized to generate a well-controlled discontinuous cylinder (SF6 surrounded by air) with no supports or wires in the shock-tube experiment. The symmetric evolving interfaces and few disturbance waves are observed in a high-speed schlieren photography. Numerical simulations are also carried out for a detailed analysis. The refracted shock wave inside the cylinder is perturbed by the diffracted shock waves and divided into three branches. When these shock branches collide, the shock focusing occurs. A nonlinear model is then proposed to elucidate effects of the wave patterns on the evolution of the cylinder. A distinct vortex pair is gradually developing during the shock-cylinder interaction. The numerical results show that a low pressure region appears at the vortex core. Subsequently, the ambient fluid is entrained into the vortices which are expanding at the same time. Based on the relation between the vortex motion and the circulation, several theoretical models of circulation in the literature are then checked by the experimental and numerical results. Most of these theoretical circulation models provide a reasonably good prediction of the vortex motion in the present configuration.

  8. Nonsimilar Solution for Shock Waves in a Rotational Axisymmetric Perfect Gas with a Magnetic Field and Exponentially Varying Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.; Sinha, A. K.

    2017-01-01

    The propagation of a cylindrical shock wave in an ideal gas in the presence of a constant azimuthal magnetic field with consideration for the axisymmetric rotational effects is investigated. The ambient medium is assumed to have the radial, axial, and azimuthal velocity components. The fluid velocities and density of the ambient medium are assumed to vary according to an exponential law. Nonsimilar solutions are obtained by taking into account the vorticity vector and its components. The dependences of the characteristics of the problem on the Alfven-Mach number and time are obtained. It is shown that the presence of a magnetic field has a decaying effect on the shock wave. The pressure and density are shown to vanish at the inner surface (piston), and hence a vacuum forms at the line of symmetry.

  9. 1D GAS-DYNAMIC SIMULATION OF SHOCK-WAVE PROCESSES VIA INTERNET

    SciTech Connect

    Khishchenko, K. V.; Levashov, P. R.; Povarnitsyn, M. E.; Zakharenkov, A. S.

    2009-12-28

    We present a Web-interface for 1D simulation of different shock-wave experiments. The choosing of initial parameters, the modeling itself and output data treatment can be made directly via the Internet. The interface is based upon the expert system on shock-wave data and equations of state and contains both the Eulerian and Lagrangian Godunov hydrocodes. The availability of equations of state for a broad set of substances makes this system a useful tool for planning and interpretation of shock-wave experiments. As an example of simulation with the system, results of modeling of multistep shock loading of potassium between polytetrafluoroethylene and stainless steel plates are presented in comparison with experimental data from Shakhray et al.(2005).

  10. Similarity solution for a cylindrical shock wave in a rotational axisymmetric dusty gas with heat conduction and radiation heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwakarma, J. P.; Nath, G.

    2012-01-01

    The propagation of shock waves in a rotational axisymmetric dusty gas with heat conduction and radiation heat flux, which has a variable azimuthally fluid velocity together with a variable axial fluid velocity, is investigated. The dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of non-ideal (or perfect) gas and small solid particles, in which solid particles are continuously distributed. It is assumed that the equilibrium flow-condition is maintained and variable energy input is continuously supplied by the piston (or inner expanding surface). The fluid velocities in the ambient medium are assume to be vary and obey power laws. The density of the ambient medium is assumed to be constant, the heat conduction is express in terms of Fourier's law and the radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity K and the absorption coefficient αR are assumed to vary with temperature and density. In order to obtain the similarity solutions the angular velocity of the ambient medium is assume to be decreasing as the distance from the axis increases. The effects of the variation of the heat transfer parameter and non-idealness of the gas in the mixture are investigated. The effects of an increase in (i) the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture and (ii) the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas on the flow variables are also investigated.

  11. Shock-wave heating model for chondrule formation: Hydrodynamic simulation of molten droplets exposed to gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Hitoshi; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2007-05-01

    Millimeter-sized, spherical silicate grains abundant in chondritic meteorites, which are called as chondrules, are considered to be a strong evidence of the melting event of the dust particles in the protoplanetary disk. One of the most plausible scenarios is that the chondrule precursor dust particles are heated and melt in the high-velocity gas flow (shock-wave heating model). We developed the non-linear, time-dependent, and three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation code for analyzing the dynamics of molten droplets exposed to the gas flow. We confirmed that our simulation results showed a good agreement in a linear regime with the linear solution analytically derived by Sekyia et al. [Sekyia, M., Uesugi, M., Nakamoto, T., 2003. Prog. Theor. Phys. 109, 717-728]. We found that the non-linear terms in the hydrodynamical equations neglected by Sekiya et al. [Sekiya, M., Uesugi, M., Nakamoto, T., 2003. Prog. Theor. Phys. 109, 717-728] can cause the cavitation by producing negative pressure in the droplets. We discussed that the fragmentation through the cavitation is a new mechanism to determine the upper limit of chondrule sizes. We also succeeded to reproduce the fragmentation of droplets when the gas ram pressure is stronger than the effect of the surface tension. Finally, we compared the deformation of droplets in the shock-wave heating with the measured data of chondrules and suggested the importance of other effects to deform droplets, for example, the rotation of droplets. We believe that our new code is a very powerful tool to investigate the hydrodynamics of molten droplets in the framework of the shock-wave heating model and has many potentials to be applied to various problems.

  12. Propagation of a spherical shock wave in mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles under gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Gorakh

    Self-similar solutions are obtained for one-dimensional unsteady adiabatic flow behind a spherical shock wave propagating in a dusty gas with conductive and radiative heat fluxes under a gravitational field. The shock is assumed to be driven out by a moving piston and the dusty gas to be a mixture of non-ideal (or perfect) gas and small solid particles, in which solid particles are continuously distributed. It is assumed that the equilibrium flow-conditions are maintained and variable energy input is continuously supplied by the piston. The heat conduction is express in terms of Fourier’s law and the radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity and the absorption coefficient are assumed to vary with temperature and density. The medium is assumed to be under a gravitational field due to heavy nucleus at the origin (Roche Model). The unsteady model of Roche consists of a dusty gas distributed with spherical symmetry around a nucleus having large mass It is assumed that the gravitational effect of the mixture itself can be neglected compared with the attraction of the heavy nucleus. The density of the ambient medium is taken to be constant. Our analysis reveals that after inclusion of gravitational field effect surprisingly the shock strength increases and remarkable difference can be found in the distribution of flow variables. The effects of the variation of the heat transfer parameters, the gravitational parameter and non-idealness of the gas in the mixture are investigated. Also, the effects of an increase in (i) the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture and (ii) the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas on the flow variables are investigated. It is found that the shock strength is increased with an increase in the value of gravitational parameter. Further, it is investigated that the presence of gravitational field increases the

  13. Experimental and numerical investigation of shock wave propagation through complex geometry, gas continuous, two-phase media

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, James Chien-Chih

    1993-01-01

    The work presented here investigates the phenomenon of shock wave propagation in gas continuous, two-phase media. The motivation for this work stems from the need to understand blast venting consequences in the HYLIFE inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor. The HYLIFE concept utilizes lasers or heavy ion beams to rapidly heat and compress D-T targets injected into the center of a reactor chamber. A segmented blanket of failing molten lithium or Li2BeF4 (Flibe) jets encircles the reactors central cavity, shielding the reactor structure from radiation damage, absorbing the fusion energy, and breeding more tritium fuel.

  14. Analysis of a two-dimensional type 6 shock-interference pattern using a perfect-gas code and a real-gas code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertin, J. J.; Graumann, B. W.

    1973-01-01

    Numerical codes were developed to calculate the two dimensional flow field which results when supersonic flow encounters double wedge configurations whose angles are such that a type 4 pattern occurs. The flow field model included the shock interaction phenomena for a delta wing orbiter. Two numerical codes were developed, one which used the perfect gas relations and a second which incorporated a Mollier table to define equilibrium air properties. The two codes were used to generate theoretical surface pressure and heat transfer distributions for velocities from 3,821 feet per second to an entry condition of 25,000 feet per second.

  15. Herschel* Far-infrared Spectroscopy of the Galactic Center. Hot Molecular Gas: Shocks versus Radiation near Sgr A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goicoechea, Javier R.; Etxaluze, M.; Cernicharo, J.; Gerin, M.; Neufeld, D. A.; Contursi, A.; Bell, T. A.; De Luca, M.; Encrenaz, P.; Indriolo, N.; Lis, D. C.; Polehampton, E. T.; Sonnentrucker, P.

    2013-05-01

    We present a ~52-671 μm spectral scan toward Sgr A* taken with the PACS and SPIRE spectrometers on board Herschel. The achieved angular resolution allows us to separate, for the first time at far-IR wavelengths, the emission toward the central cavity (gas in the inner central parsec of the galaxy) from that of the surrounding circumnuclear disk. The spectrum toward Sgr A* is dominated by strong [O III], [O I], [C II], [N III], [N II], and [C I] fine-structure lines (in decreasing order of luminosity) arising in gas irradiated by UV photons from the central stellar cluster. In addition, rotationally excited lines of 12CO (from J = 4-3 to 24-23), 13CO, H2O, OH, H3O+, HCO+, and HCN, as well as ground-state absorption lines of OH+, H2O+, H3O+, CH+, H2O, OH, HF, CH, and NH are detected. The excitation of the 12CO ladder is consistent with a hot isothermal component at T k ~= 103.1 K and n(H2) <~ 104 cm-3. It is also consistent with a distribution of temperature components at higher density with most CO at T k <~ 300 K. The detected molecular features suggest that, at present, neither very enhanced X-ray nor cosmic-ray fluxes play a dominant role in the heating of the hot molecular gas. The hot CO component (either the bulk of the CO column or just a small fraction depending on the above scenario) results from a combination of UV- and shock-driven heating. If irradiated dense clumps/clouds do not exist, shocks likely dominate the heating of the hot molecular gas. This is consistent with the high-velocity gas detected toward Sgr A*. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  16. Satellites monitor Los Alamos fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalluri, Satya; White, Benjamin

    A man-made fire that was intended to be a “controlled burn” for clearing brush and wilderness at the Bandelier National Monument, New Mexico, became an inferno that devastated significant portions of Los Alamos during the first week of May 2000. Now known as the Cerro Grande fire, it was not confined to Los Alamos alone. The fire spread to 15% of the Santa Clara Indian Reservation and a substantial area of the surrounding national parks and U.S. forests.The National Weather Service estimates that more than 100,000 fires occur in the natural environment each year within the United States alone, of which about 90% are manmade. Remote sensing images from satellites could be used to detect and monitor these active fires and biomass burning. Forest fires have a significant environmental and economic impact, and timely information about their location and magnitude is essential to contain them.

  17. Similarity solution for the flow behind a shock wave in a non-ideal gas with heat conduction and radiation heat-flux in magnetogasdynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.; Vishwakarma, J. P.

    2014-05-01

    The propagation of a spherical (or cylindrical) shock wave in a non-ideal gas with heat conduction and radiation heat-flux, in the presence of a spacially decreasing azimuthal magnetic field, driven out by a moving piston is investigated. The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law and the radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity K and the absorption coefficient αR are assumed to vary with temperature and density. The gas is assumed to have infinite electrical conductivity and to obey a simplified van der Waals equation of state. The shock wave moves with variable velocity and the total energy of the wave is non-constant. Similarity solutions are obtained for the flow-field behind the shock and the effects of variation of the heat transfer parameters, the parameter of the non-idealness of the gas, both, decreases the compressibility of the gas and hence there is a decrease in the shock strength. Further, it is investigated that with an increase in the parameters of radiative and conductive heat transfer the tendency of formation of maxima in the distributions of heat flux, density and isothermal speed of sound decreases. The pressure and density vanish at the inner surface (piston) and hence a vacuum is form at the center of symmetry. The shock waves in conducting non-ideal gas with conductive and radiative heat fluxes can be important for description of shocks in supernova explosions, in the study of central part of star burst galaxies, nuclear explosion, chemical detonation, rupture of a pressurized vessels, in the analysis of data from exploding wire experiments, and cylindrically symmetric hypersonic flow problems associated with meteors or reentry vehicles, etc. The findings of the present works provided a clear picture of whether and how the non-idealness parameter, conductive and radiative heat transfer parameters and the magnetic field affect the flow behind the shock

  18. Passage of a shock wave through inhomogeneous media and its impact on gas-bubble deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowski, A. F.; Ballil, A.; Nicolleau, F. C. G. A.

    2015-08-01

    The paper investigates shock-induced vortical flows within inhomogeneous media of nonuniform thermodynamic properties. Numerical simulations are performed using a Eulerian type mathematical model for compressible multicomponent flow problems. The model, which accounts for pressure nonequilibrium and applies different equations of state for individual flow components, shows excellent capabilities for the resolution of interfaces separating compressible fluids as well as for capturing the baroclinic source of vorticity generation. The developed finite volume Godunov type computational approach is equipped with an approximate Riemann solver for calculating fluxes and handles numerically diffused zones at flow component interfaces. The computations are performed for various initial conditions and are compared with available experimental data. The initial conditions promoting a shock-bubble interaction process include weak to high planar shock waves with a Mach number ranging from 1.2 to 3 and isolated cylindrical bubble inhomogeneities of helium, argon, nitrogen, krypton, and sulphur hexafluoride. The numerical results reveal the characteristic features of the evolving flow topology. The impulsively generated flow perturbations are dominated by the reflection and refraction of the shock, the compression, and acceleration as well as the vorticity generation within the medium. The study is further extended to investigate the influence of the ratio of the heat capacities on the interface deformation.

  19. Observation of interaction of shock wave with gas bubble by image converter camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshii, M.; Tada, M.; Tsuji, T.; Isuzugawa, Kohji

    1995-05-01

    When a spark discharge occurs at the first focal point of a semiellipsoid or a reflector located in water, a spherical shock wave is produced. A part of the wave spreads without reflecting on the reflector and is called direct wave in this paper. Another part reflects on the semiellipsoid and converges near the second focal point, that is named the focusing wave, and locally produces a high pressure. This phenomenon is applied to disintegrators of kidney stone. But it is concerned that cavitation bubbles induced in the body by the expansion wave following the focusing wave will injure human tissue around kidney stone. In this paper, in order to examine what happens when shock waves strike bubbles on human tissue, the aspect that an air bubble is truck by the spherical shock wave or its behavior is visualized by the schlieren system and its photographs are taken using an image converter camera. Besides,the variation of the pressure amplitude caused by the shock wave and the flow of water around the bubble is measured with a pressure probe.

  20. Magnetogasdynamics shock waves in a rotational axisymmetric non-ideal gas with increasing energy and conductive and radiative heat-fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Gorakh

    2016-07-01

    Self-similar solutions are obtained for one-dimensional adiabatic flow behind a magnetogasdynamics cylindrical shock wave propagating in a rotational axisymmetric non ideal gas with increasing energy and conductive and radiative heat fluxes in presence of an azimuthal magnetic field. The fluid velocities and the azimuthal magnetic field in the ambient medium are assume to be varying and obeying power laws. In order to find the similarity solutions the angular velocity of the ambient medium is taken to be decreasing as the distance from the axis increases. The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law and the radiation is considered to be the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity and the absorption coefficient are assumed to vary with temperature and density. The effects of the presence of radiation and conduction, the non-idealness of the gas and the magnetic field on the shock propagation and the flow behind the shock are investigated.

  1. Optimization of an electromagnetic generator for strong shocks in low pressure gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larour, Jean; Singh, Raj Laxmi; Stehlé, Chantal; Ciardi, Andrea; Chaulagain, Uddhab; Suzuki-Vidal, Francisco

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present the design and optimization of an electromagnetic generator, able to produce strong shocks in noble gases, relevant to astrophysical conditions. It is a powerful accelerating device which ejects a quasi-planar plasma sheath out of a set of coaxial conical electrodes where a pulsed 100-kA current is passing. A simple model is used to optimize the operation parameters. Preliminary experiments show that the generator is capable of launching supersonic shocks in Argon, in the form of a thin plasma layer with the speed of ∼1-30 km/s. A three-dimension MHD simulation gives a description consistent with the model and with the observations.

  2. Analysis and design of numerical schemes for gas dynamics. 2: Artificial diffusion and discrete shock structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Antony

    1994-01-01

    The effect of artificial diffusion on discrete shock structures is examined for a family of schemes which includes scalar diffusion, convective upwind and split pressure (CUSP) schemes, and upwind schemes with characteristics splitting. The analysis leads to conditions on the diffusive flux such that stationary discrete shocks can contain a single interior point. The simplest formulation which meets these conditions is a CUSP scheme in which the coefficients of the pressure differences is fully determined by the coefficient of convective diffusion. It is also shown how both the characteristic and CUSP schemes can be modified to preserve constant stagnation enthalpy in steady flow, leading to four variants, the E and H-characteristic schemes, and the E and H-CUSP schemes. Numerical results are presented which confirm the properties of these schemes.

  3. Ratios of molecular hydrogen line intensities in shocked gas - Evidence for cooling zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, P. W. J. L.; Moorhouse, A.; Bird, M.; Burton, M. G.; Geballe, T. R.

    1988-01-01

    Column densities of molecular hydrogen have been calculated from 19 infrared vibration-rotation and pure rotational line intensities measured at peak 1 of the Orion molecular outflow. The run of column density with energy level is similar to a simple coolng zone model of the line-emitting region, but is not well fitted by predictions of C-shock models current in the literature.

  4. Los Alamos Science: Number 16

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, N.G.

    1988-01-01

    It was an unusually stimulating day and a half at Los Alamos when two Nobel Laureates in physiology, a leading paleontologist, and a leading bio-astrophysicist came together to discuss ''Unsolved Problems in the Science of Life,'' the topic of the second in a series of special meetings sponsored by the Fellows of the Laboratory. Just like the first one on ''Creativity in Science,'' this colloquium took us into a broader arena of ideas and viewpoints than is our usual daily fare. To contemplate the evolution and mysteries of intelligent life from the speakers' diverse points of view at one time, in one place was indeed a rare experience.

  5. HERSCHEL* FAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF THE GALACTIC CENTER. HOT MOLECULAR GAS: SHOCKS VERSUS RADIATION NEAR Sgr A

    SciTech Connect

    Goicoechea, Javier R.; Etxaluze, M.; Cernicharo, J.; Bell, T. A.; Gerin, M.; De Luca, M.; Encrenaz, P.; Neufeld, D. A.; Indriolo, N.; Contursi, A.; Lis, D. C.; Polehampton, E. T.; Sonnentrucker, P.

    2013-05-20

    We present a {approx}52-671 {mu}m spectral scan toward Sgr A* taken with the PACS and SPIRE spectrometers on board Herschel. The achieved angular resolution allows us to separate, for the first time at far-IR wavelengths, the emission toward the central cavity (gas in the inner central parsec of the galaxy) from that of the surrounding circumnuclear disk. The spectrum toward Sgr A* is dominated by strong [O III], [O I], [C II], [N III], [N II], and [C I] fine-structure lines (in decreasing order of luminosity) arising in gas irradiated by UV photons from the central stellar cluster. In addition, rotationally excited lines of {sup 12}CO (from J = 4-3 to 24-23), {sup 13}CO, H{sub 2}O, OH, H{sub 3}O{sup +}, HCO{sup +}, and HCN, as well as ground-state absorption lines of OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, H{sub 3}O{sup +}, CH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O, OH, HF, CH, and NH are detected. The excitation of the {sup 12}CO ladder is consistent with a hot isothermal component at T{sub k} {approx_equal} 10{sup 3.1} K and n(H{sub 2}) {approx}< 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}. It is also consistent with a distribution of temperature components at higher density with most CO at T{sub k} {approx}< 300 K. The detected molecular features suggest that, at present, neither very enhanced X-ray nor cosmic-ray fluxes play a dominant role in the heating of the hot molecular gas. The hot CO component (either the bulk of the CO column or just a small fraction depending on the above scenario) results from a combination of UV- and shock-driven heating. If irradiated dense clumps/clouds do not exist, shocks likely dominate the heating of the hot molecular gas. This is consistent with the high-velocity gas detected toward Sgr A*.

  6. Bi-directional streaming of solar wind electrons greater than 80 eV - ISEE evidence for a closed-field structure within the driver gas of an interplanetary shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bame, S. J.; Asbridge, J. R.; Feldman, W. C.; Gosling, J. T.; Zwickl, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    In near time coincidence with the arrival of helium enriched plasma driving the shock wave disturbance of November 12-13, 1978, strong bi-directional streaming of solar wind electrons greater than about 80 eV was observed with Los Alamos instrumentation on ISEE 3. The streaming persisted for many hours simultaneously parallel and anti-parallel to the interplanetary magnetic field which was directed roughly perpendicular to the sun-satellite line. This example of bidirectional streaming cannot be explained by field line connection to the earth's bow shock or the outward propagating interplanetary shock which passed ISEE 3 approximately 16 hours earlier. The event is explained if the local interplanetary field was a part of a magnetic bottle rooted at the sun or a disconnected loop propagating outward.

  7. Laser absorption, power transfer, and radiation symmetry during the first shock of inertial confinement fusion gas-filled hohlraum experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, A.; Dewald, E. L.; Landen, O. L.; Milovich, J.; Strozzi, D. J.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bradley, D. K.; Divol, L.; Ho, D. D.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Schneider, M. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Temporally resolved measurements of the hohlraum radiation flux asymmetry incident onto a bismuth coated surrogate capsule have been made over the first two nanoseconds of ignition relevant laser pulses. Specifically, we study the P2 asymmetry of the incoming flux as a function of cone fraction, defined as the inner-to-total laser beam power ratio, for a variety of hohlraums with different scales and gas fills. This work was performed to understand the relevance of recent experiments, conducted in new reduced-scale neopentane gas filled hohlraums, to full scale helium filled ignition targets. Experimental measurements, matched by 3D view factor calculations, are used to infer differences in symmetry, relative beam absorption, and cross beam energy transfer (CBET), employing an analytic model. Despite differences in hohlraum dimensions and gas fill, as well as in laser beam pointing and power, we find that laser absorption, CBET, and the cone fraction, at which a symmetric flux is achieved, are similar to within 25% between experiments conducted in the reduced and full scale hohlraums. This work demonstrates a close surrogacy in the dynamics during the first shock between reduced-scale and full scale implosion experiments and is an important step in enabling the increased rate of study for physics associated with inertial confinement fusion.

  8. Prepulse-induced shock waves in the gas jet target of a laser plasma EUV radiation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbaruk, A. V.; Gritskevich, M. S.; Kalmykov, S. G.; Mozharov, A. M.; Sasin, M. E.

    2017-01-01

    In experiments with a laser-plasma EUV-radiation source, the main IR Nd:YAG laser pulse was preceded by that of a UV KrF excimer laser. Dramatic modulations of EUV plasma emissivity have been observed at long interpulse times, from hundreds of nanoseconds up to microseconds. To discover the nature of these prepulse-produced long-living perturbations of the target, a fluid dynamics numerical simulation of the Xe gas jet has been carried out. The prepulse has been found to generate a quasi-spherical shock wave with a thin dense front layer and a vast rarefied inside area. In the course of time, the front expands and simultaneously drifts downstream along with the gas. Depending on the interpulse time, the IR laser beam either intersects the dense layer or propagates within the rarefied gas cavity whereby the above-mentioned variations in the plasma emission can be explained. The possibilities of making use of the discovered phenomena to enhance the observed EUV plasma brightness are discussed.

  9. Laser absorption, power transfer, and radiation symmetry during the first shock of inertial confinement fusion gas-filled hohlraum experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pak, A.; Dewald, E. L.; Landen, O. L.; Milovich, J.; Strozzi, D. J.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bradley, D. K.; Divol, L.; Ho, D. D.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Schneider, M. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-12-15

    Temporally resolved measurements of the hohlraum radiation flux asymmetry incident onto a bismuth coated surrogate capsule have been made over the first two nanoseconds of ignition relevant laser pulses. Specifically, we study the P2 asymmetry of the incoming flux as a function of cone fraction, defined as the inner-to-total laser beam power ratio, for a variety of hohlraums with different scales and gas fills. This work was performed to understand the relevance of recent experiments, conducted in new reduced-scale neopentane gas filled hohlraums, to full scale helium filled ignition targets. Experimental measurements, matched by 3D view factor calculations, are used to infer differences in symmetry, relative beam absorption, and cross beam energy transfer (CBET), employing an analytic model. Despite differences in hohlraum dimensions and gas fill, as well as in laser beam pointing and power, we find that laser absorption, CBET, and the cone fraction, at which a symmetric flux is achieved, are similar to within 25% between experiments conducted in the reduced and full scale hohlraums. This work demonstrates a close surrogacy in the dynamics during the first shock between reduced-scale and full scale implosion experiments and is an important step in enabling the increased rate of study for physics associated with inertial confinement fusion.

  10. The Chandra Delta Ori Large Project: Occultation Measurements of the Shocked Gas tn the Nearest Eclipsing O-Star Binary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, Michael F.; Nichols, Joy; Naze, Yael; Rauw, Gregor; Pollock, Andrew; Moffat, Anthony; Richardson, Noel; Evans, Nancy; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Oskinova, Lida; Hamann, W. -R.; Gull, Ted; Ignace, Rico; Hole, Tabetha; Iping, Rosina; Walborn, Nolan; Hoffman, Jennifer; Lomax, Jamie; Waldron, Wayne; Owocki, Stan; Maiz-Apellaniz, Jesus; Leutenegger, Maurice; Hole, Tabetha; Gayley, Ken; Russell, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Delta Ori is the nearest massive, single-lined eclipsing binary (O9.5 II + B0.5III). As such it serves as a fundamental calibrator of the mass-radius-luminosity relation in the upper HR diagram. It is also the only eclipsing O-type binary system which is bright enough to be observable with the CHANDRA gratings in a reasonable exposure. Studies of resolved X-ray line complexes provide tracers of wind mass loss rate and clumpiness; occultation by the X-ray dark companion of the line emitting region can provide direct spatial information on the location of the X-ray emitting gas produced by shocks embedded in the wind of the primary star. We obtained phase-resolved spectra with Chandra in order to determine the level of phase-dependent vs. secular variability in the shocked wind. Along with the Chandra observations we obtained simultaneous photometry from space with the Canadian MOST satellite to help understand the relation between X-ray and photospheric variability.

  11. CH as a Molecular Gas Tracer and C-shock Tracer Across a Molecular Cloud Boundary in Taurus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Duo; Li, Di

    2016-12-01

    We present new observations of all three ground-state transitions of the methylidyne (CH) radical and all four ground-state transitions of the hydroxyl (OH) radical toward a sharp boundary region of the Taurus molecular cloud. These data were analyzed in conjunction with existing CO and dust images. The derived CH abundance is consistent with previous observations of translucent clouds (0.8 ≤ A v ≤ 2.1 mag). The X(CH)-factor is nearly a constant (1.0 ± 0.06) × 1022 cm-2 K-1 km-1 s in this extinction range, with less dispersion than that of the more widely used molecular tracers CO and OH. CH turns out be a better tracer of total column density in such an intermediate extinction range than CO or OH. Compared with previous observations, CH is overabundant below 1 mag extinction. Such an overabundance of CH is consistent with the presence of a C-shock. CH has two kinematic components, one of which shifts from 5.3 to 6 km s-1, while the other stays at 6.8 km s-1 when moving from outside toward inside of the cloud. These velocity behaviors exactly match previous OH observation. The shifting of the two kinematic components indicates colliding streams or gas flow at the boundary region, which could be the cause of the C-shock.

  12. Resistance and resilience of removal efficiency and bacterial community structure of gas biofilters exposed to repeated shock loads.

    PubMed

    Cabrol, Léa; Malhautier, Luc; Poly, Franck; Roux, Xavier Le; Lepeuple, Anne-Sophie; Fanlo, Jean-Louis

    2012-11-01

    Since full-scale biofilters are often operated under fluctuating conditions, it is critical to understand their response to transient states. Four pilot-scale biofilters treating a composting gas mixture and undergoing repeated substrate pulses of increasing intensity were studied. A systematic approach was proposed to quantify the resistance and resilience capacity of their removal efficiency, which enabled to distinguish between recalcitrant (ammonia, DMDS, ketones) and easily degradable (esters and aldehyde) compounds. The threshold of disturbing shock intensity and the influence of disturbance history depended on the contaminant considered. The spatial and temporal distribution of the bacterial community structure in response to the perturbation regime was analysed by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE). Even if the substrate-pulses acted as a driving force for some community characteristics (community stratification), the structure-function relationships were trickier to evidence: the distributions of resistance and composition were only partially coupled, with contradictory results depending on the contaminant considered.

  13. Application of TVD schemes for the Euler equations of gas dynamics. [method of Total Variation Diminishing for shock wave computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Warming, R. F.; Harten, A.

    1985-01-01

    Highly accurate and yet stable shock-capturing finite difference schemes have been designed for the computation of the Euler equations of gas dynamics. Four different principles for the construction of high resolution total variation diminishing (TVD) schemes are available, including hybrid schemes, a second-order extension of Godunov's scheme by van Leer (1979), the modified flux approach of Harten (1983, 1984), and the numerical fluctuation approach of Roe (1985). The present paper has the objective to review the class of second-order TVD schemes via the modified flux approach. Attention is given to first-order TVD schemes, a second-order accurate explicit TVD scheme, the global order of accuracy of the second-order TVD scheme, extensions to systems and two-dimensional conservation laws, numerical experiments with a second-order explicit TVD scheme, implicit TVD schemes, and second-order implicit TVD schemes.

  14. Thermal Shock Damage and Microstructure Evolution of Thermal Barrier Coatings on Mar-M247 Superalloy in a Combustion Gas Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Hui

    2012-06-01

    The effect of preoxidation on the thermal shock of air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was completely investigated in a combustion gas environment by burning jet fuel with high speed air. Results show that with increasing cycles, the as-oxidized TBCs lost more weight and enlarged larger spallation area than the as-sprayed ones. Thermally grown oxide (TGO) growth and thermal mismatch stress were proven to play critical roles on the as-oxidized TBC failure. Two types of significant cracks were identified: the type I crack was vertical to the TGO interface and the type II crack was parallel to the TGO interface. The former accelerated the TGO growth to develop the latter as long as the oxidizing gas continuously diffused inward and then oxidized the more bond coat (BC). The preoxidation treatment directly increased the TGO thickness, formed the parallel cracks earlier in the TGO during the thermal shocks, and eventually resulted in the worse thermal shock resistance.

  15. Ammonia excitation imaging of shocked gas towards the W28 gamma-ray source HESS J1801-233

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxted, Nigel I.; de Wilt, Phoebe; Rowell, Gavin P.; Nicholas, Brent P.; Burton, Michael. G.; Walsh, Andrew; Fukui, Yasuo; Kawamura, Akiko

    2016-10-01

    We present 12 mm Mopra observations of the dense (>103 cm-3) molecular gas towards the north-east of the W28 supernova remnant (SNR). This cloud is spatially well matched to the TeV gamma-ray source HESS J1801-233 and is known to be an SNR-molecular cloud interaction region. Shock-disruption is evident from broad NH3 (1,1) spectral linewidths in regions towards the W28 SNR, while strong detections of spatially extended NH3 (3,3), NH3(4,4) and NH3(6,6) inversion emission towards the cloud strengthen the case for the existence of high temperatures within the cloud. Velocity dispersion measurements and NH3(n,n)/(1,1) ratio maps, where n = 2, 3, 4 and 6, indicate that the source of disruption is from the side of the cloud nearest to the W28 SNR, suggesting that it is the source of cloud-disruption. Towards part of the cloud, the ratio of ortho to para-NH3 is observed to exceed 2, suggesting gas-phase NH3 enrichment due to NH3 liberation from dust-grain mantles. The measured NH3 abundance with respect to H2 is ˜(1.2 ± 0.5) × 10-9, which is not high, as might be expected for a hot, dense molecular cloud enriched by sublimated grain-surface molecules. The results are suggestive of NH3 sublimation and destruction in this molecular cloud, which is likely to be interacting with the W28 SNR shock.

  16. Los Alamos PC estimating system

    SciTech Connect

    Stutz, R.A.; Lemon, G.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Los Alamos Cost Estimating System (QUEST) is being converted to run on IBM personal computers. This very extensive estimating system is capable of supporting cost estimators from many different and varied fields. QUEST does not dictate any fixed method for estimating. QUEST supports many styles and levels of detail estimating. QUEST can be used with or without data bases. This system allows the estimator to provide reports based on levels of detail defined by combining work breakdown structures. QUEST provides a set of tools for doing any type of estimate without forcing the estimator to use any given method. The level of detail in the estimate can be mixed based on the amount of information known about different parts of the project. The system can support many different data bases simultaneously. Estimators can modify any cost in any data base.

  17. Self-similar Solution of a Cylindrical Shock Wave under the Action of Monochromatic Radiation in a Rotational Axisymmetric Dusty Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.; Sahu, P. K.

    2017-03-01

    A self-similar flow behind a cylindrical shock wave is studied under the action of monochromatic radiation in a rotational axisymmetric dusty gas. The dusty gas is taken to be a mixture of small solid particles and perfect gas, and solid particles are continuously distributed in the mixture. The similarity solutions are obtained and the effects of the variation of the radiation parameter, the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas, the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture and the index for the time dependent energy law are investigated. It is observed that an increase in the radiation parameter has decaying effect on the shock waves; whereas the shock strength increases with an increase in the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas or the index for the time dependent energy law. Also, it is found that an increase in the radiation parameter has effect to decrease the flow variables except the density and the azimuthal component of fluid velocity. A comparison is also made between rotating and non-rotating cases.

  18. Similarity Solutions for the Flow Behind an Exponential Shock in a Rotating Nonideal Gas with Heat Conduction and Radiation Heat Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K. K.; Nath, B.

    2014-07-01

    A self-similar solution for the propagation of a shock wave driven by a cylindrical piston moving according to exponential temporal law in a nonideal rotating gas with heat conduction and radiation heat fluxes is investigated. The density and angular velocity of the ambient medium are assumed to be constant. Heat conduction is expressed in terms of the Fourier law, and radiation is considered to be of diffusion type for an optically thick gray gas model. The thermal conductivity and absorption coefficient are assumed to vary with temperature and density. Similarity solutions are obtained, and the effects of variations in the heat transfer parameters and gas nonidealness on the flow variables in the region behind the shock are investigated.

  19. Self-similar solution of cylindrical shock wave propagation in a rotational axisymmetric mixture of a non-ideal gas and small solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Gorakh

    Similarity solutions are obtained for one-dimensional isothermal and adiabatic unsteady flow behind a strong cylindrical shock wave propagating in a rotational axisymmetric dusty gas, which has a variable azimuthal fluid velocity together with a variable axial fluid velocity. The experimental studies and astrophysical observations show that the outer atmosphere of the planets rotates due to rotation of the planets. Macroscopic motion with supersonic speed occurs in an interplanetary atmosphere and shock waves are generated. Thus rotation of planets or stars significantly affect the process taking place in their outer layers, therefore question connected with the explosions in rotating gas atmospheres are of definite astrophysical interest. The shock is assumed to be driven out by a moving piston and the dusty gas to be a mixture of non-ideal (or perfect) gas and small solid particles, in which solid particles are continuously distributed. It is assumed that the equilibrium flow-condition is maintained and variable energy input is continuously supplied by the piston. The shock Mach number is not infinite, but has a finite value. The azimuthal and axial component of the fluid velocity in the ambient medium are assume to be vary and obey power laws, and the density of the ambient medium is assumed to be constant. In order to obtain the similarity solutions the angular velocity of the ambient medium is assume to be decreasing as the distance from the axis increases. Effects of the variation of the parameter of non-idealness of the gas in the mixture, the mass concentration of solid particles and the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas are investigated.

  20. Large-eddy and unsteady RANS simulations of a shock-accelerated heavy gas cylinder

    DOE PAGES

    Morgan, B. E.; Greenough, J. A.

    2015-04-08

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations of the Richtmyer–Meshkov unstable “shock-jet” problem are conducted using both large-eddy simulation (LES) and unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (URANS) approaches in an arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian hydrodynamics code. Turbulence statistics are extracted from LES by running an ensemble of simulations with multimode perturbations to the initial conditions. Detailed grid convergence studies are conducted, and LES results are found to agree well with both experiment and high-order simulations conducted by Shankar et al. (Phys Fluids 23, 024102, 2011). URANS results using a k–L approach are found to be highly sensitive to initialization of the turbulence lengthscale L and to the timemore » at which L becomes resolved on the computational mesh. As a result, it is observed that a gradient diffusion closure for turbulent species flux is a poor approximation at early times, and a new closure based on the mass-flux velocity is proposed for low-Reynolds-number mixing.« less

  1. Large-eddy and unsteady RANS simulations of a shock-accelerated heavy gas cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, B. E.; Greenough, J. A.

    2015-04-08

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations of the Richtmyer–Meshkov unstable “shock-jet” problem are conducted using both large-eddy simulation (LES) and unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (URANS) approaches in an arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian hydrodynamics code. Turbulence statistics are extracted from LES by running an ensemble of simulations with multimode perturbations to the initial conditions. Detailed grid convergence studies are conducted, and LES results are found to agree well with both experiment and high-order simulations conducted by Shankar et al. (Phys Fluids 23, 024102, 2011). URANS results using a k–L approach are found to be highly sensitive to initialization of the turbulence lengthscale L and to the time at which L becomes resolved on the computational mesh. As a result, it is observed that a gradient diffusion closure for turbulent species flux is a poor approximation at early times, and a new closure based on the mass-flux velocity is proposed for low-Reynolds-number mixing.

  2. Statistical comparison between experiments and numerical simulations of shock-accelerated gas cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, William; Kamm, J. R.; Zoldi, C. A.; Tomkins, C. D.

    2002-01-01

    We present detailed spatial analysis comparing experimental data and numerical simulation results for Richtmyer-Meshkov instability experiments of Prestridge et al. and Tomkins et al. These experiments consist, respectively, of one and two diffuse cylinders of sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) impulsively accelerated by a Mach 1.2 shockwave in air. The subsequent fluid evolution and mixing is driven by the deposition of baroclinic vorticity at the interface between the two fluids. Numerical simulations of these experiments are performed with three different versions of high resolution finite volume Godunov methods, including a new weighted adaptive Runge-Kutta (WARK) scheme. We quantify the nature of the mixing using using integral measures as well as fractal analysis and continuous wavelet transforms. Our investigation of the gas cylinder configurations follows the path of our earlier studies of the geometrically and dynamically more complex gas 'curtain' experiment. In those studies, we found significant discrepancies in the details of the experimentally measured mixing and the details of the numerical simulations. Here we evaluate the effects of these hydrodynamic integration techniques on the diffuse gas cylinder simulations, which we quantitatively compare with experimental data.

  3. Sunset at the ALaMO

    NASA Video Gallery

    A new color all-sky camera has opened its eyes at the ALaMO, or Automated Lunar and Meteor Observatory, at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Watch its inaugural video below, s...

  4. Publications of Los Alamos research 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Varjabedian, K.; Dussart, S.A.; McClary, W.J.; Rich, J.A.

    1989-12-01

    This bibliography lists unclassified publications of work done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for 1988. The entries, which are subdivided by broad subject categories, are cross-referenced with an author index and a numeric index.

  5. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    This report describes environmental monitoring activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory for 1994. Data were collected to assess external penetrating radiation, airborne emissions, liquid effluents, radioactivity of environmental materials and food stuffs, and environmental compliance.

  6. New Rad Lab for Los Alamos

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The topping out ceremony for a key construction stage in the Los Alamos National Laboratory's newest facility, the Radiological Laboratory Utility & Office Building. This is part of the National Nu...  

  7. New Rad Lab for Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    2008-08-06

    The topping out ceremony for a key construction stage in the Los Alamos National Laboratory's newest facility, the Radiological Laboratory Utility & Office Building. This is part of the National Nu...  

  8. Edward Teller Returns to LOS Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker, Siegfried S.

    2010-01-01

    I was asked to share some reflections of Edward Teller's return to Los Alamos during my directorship. I met Teller late in his life. My comments focus on that time and they will be mostly in the form of stories of my interactions and those of my colleagues with Teller. Although the focus of this symposium is on Teller's contributions to science, at Los Alamos it was never possible to separate Teller's science from policy and controversy ...

  9. Los Alamos Laser Eye Investigation.

    SciTech Connect

    Odom, C. R.

    2005-01-01

    A student working in a laser laboratory at Los Alamos National Laboratory sustained a serious retinal injury to her left eye when she attempted to view suspended particles in a partially evacuated target chamber. The principle investigator was using the white light from the flash lamp of a Class 4 Nd:YAG laser to illuminate the particles. Since the Q-switch was thought to be disabled at the time of the accident, the principal investigator assumed it would be safe to view the particles without wearing laser eye protection. The Laboratory Director appointed a team to investigate the accident and to report back to him the events and conditions leading up to the accident, equipment malfunctions, safety management causal factors, supervisory and management action/inaction, adequacy of institutional processes and procedures, emergency and notification response, effectiveness of corrective actions and lessons learned from previous similar events, and recommendations for human and institutional safety improvements. The team interviewed personnel, reviewed documents, and characterized systems and conditions in the laser laboratory during an intense six week investigation. The team determined that the direct and primary failures leading to this accident were, respectively, the principle investigator's unsafe work practices and the institution's inadequate monitoring of worker performance. This paper describes the details of the investigation, the human and institutional failures, and the recommendations for improving the laser safety program.

  10. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    SciTech Connect

    Kippen, Karen Elizabeth

    2016-11-08

    For more than 30 years the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has provided the scientific underpinnings in nuclear physics and material science needed to ensure the safety and surety of the nuclear stockpile into the future. In addition to national security research, the LANSCE User Facility has a vibrant research program in fundamental science, providing the scientific community with intense sources of neutrons and protons to perform experiments supporting civilian research and the production of medical and research isotopes. Five major experimental facilities operate simultaneously. These facilities contribute to the stockpile stewardship program, produce radionuclides for medical testing, and provide a venue for industrial users to irradiate and test electronics. In addition, they perform fundamental research in nuclear physics, nuclear astrophysics, materials science, and many other areas. The LANSCE User Program plays a key role in training the next generation of top scientists and in attracting the best graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, and early-career scientists. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) —the principal sponsor of LANSCE—works with the Office of Science and the Office of Nuclear Energy, which have synergistic long-term needs for the linear accelerator and the neutron science that is the heart of LANSCE.

  11. Neptune inbound bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, Adam; Lepping, Ronald P.

    1995-01-01

    Voyager 2 crossed the inbound or upstream Neptunian bow shock at 1430 spacecraft event time on August 24 in 1989 (Belcher et al., 1989). The plasma and magnetic field measurements allow us to study the solar wind interaction with the outermost gas giant. To fully utilize all of the spacecraft observations, an improved nonlinear least squares, 'Rankine-Hugoniot' magnetohydrodynamic shock-fitting technique has been developed (Szabo, 1994). This technique is applied to the Neptunian data set. We find that the upstream bow shock normal points nearly exactly toward the Sun consistent with any reasonable large-scale model of the bow shock for a near subsolar crossing. The shock was moving outward with a speed of 14 +/- 12 km/s. The shock can be characterized as a low beta, high Mach number, strong quasi-perpendicular shock. Finally, the shock microstructure features are resolved and found to scale well with theoretical expectations.

  12. Modeling of reflection of detonation and shock waves from a rigid wall in mixtures of a reactive gas and chemically inert particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, A. V.; Fomin, P. A.; Tropin, D. A.; Chen, J.-R.

    2012-05-01

    An algorithm of approximate calculation of the reflection of detonation waves in mixtures of a reactive gas and chemically inert microparticles has been proposed. Consideration has been given to the case where the gas behind the wave front is in chemical equilibrium (D → D reflection). It has been shown that the presence of the condensed phase can substantially decrease the parameters of the reflected wave (its velocity, pressure, and temperature). Within the framework of a one-dimensional nonstationary approach and with allowance for the detailed kinetics of chemical reactions, the evolution of the shock wave in a stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen mixture with sand particles in its reflection from a rigid wall has been calculated. The limiting particle concentration below which the reflected wave is of the detonation type and above which it is of the shock type has been found.

  13. Effect of a gas on the ejection of particles from the free surface of a sample subjected to a shock wave with various intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogorodnikov, V. A.; Mikhailov, A. L.; Sasik, V. S.; Erunov, S. V.; Syrunin, M. A.; Fedorov, A. V.; Nevmerzhitskii, N. V.; Kulakov, E. V.; Kleshchevnikov, O. A.; Antipov, M. V.; Yurtov, I. V.; Rudnev, A. V.; Chapaev, A. V.; Pupkov, A. S.; Sen'kovskii, E. D.; Sotskov, E. A.; Glushikhin, V. V.; Kalashnik, I. A.; Finyushin, S. A.; Chudakov, E. A.; Kalashnikov, D. A.

    2016-08-01

    In view of the possible effect of contamination of a plasma by metal particles on the operation of a number of facilities or on the detection of the motion of liners by Doppler methods, a particular attention has been recently focused on the problem of the ejection of particles from the shock-loaded free surface of a sample or on the "dusting" problem. Most information concerns the dusting source associated with the roughness of the surface, manufacturing technology, and the defectiveness and aging of a material. Factors affecting this process such as the profile and amplitude of the pressure on the front of the shock wave arriving at the free surface of the sample, the presence of the gas in front of the free surface, and the pressure in this gas are less studied.

  14. Simulations of the 3-Shock HDC gas-filled hohlraum experiments at the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovich, Jose; Ross, J. S.; Ho, D.; Weber, C.; Sepke, S.; Khan, S.; Cerjan, C.; Meezan, N.; MacKinnon, A.

    2015-11-01

    We describe simulation efforts to design and field a series of high-density-carbon (HDC) capsule tuning experiments in 1.6 mg/cc gas-filled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), culminating in two DT-layered shots. The radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA coupled to an off-line power transfer model was employed to ascertain the optimal laser pulse that minimizes radiation asymmetries and implosion adiabat for a given stability margin. We found that these HDC targets have similar sensitivity as their CH ``high-foot'' counterparts when laser cone-fraction and power as well as ablator thickness are varied, leading to comparable implosions. A point of divergence, however, is the measured neutron down-scatter-ratio (DSR) that typically gauges the degree of compression obtained in a DT implosion, with HDC targets having approximately half the CH value. Concerted efforts are underway to understand and ascertain the causes of this discrepancy. Simulations and comparisons with data will be presented. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Status of Monte Carlo at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, W.L.; Cashwell, E.D.

    1980-01-01

    At Los Alamos the early work of Fermi, von Neumann, and Ulam has been developed and supplemented by many followers, notably Cashwell and Everett, and the main product today is the continuous-energy, general-purpose, generalized-geometry, time-dependent, coupled neutron-photon transport code called MCNP. The Los Alamos Monte Carlo research and development effort is concentrated in Group X-6. MCNP treats an arbitrary three-dimensional configuration of arbitrary materials in geometric cells bounded by first- and second-degree surfaces and some fourth-degree surfaces (elliptical tori). Monte Carlo has evolved into perhaps the main method for radiation transport calculations at Los Alamos. MCNP is used in every technical division at the Laboratory by over 130 users about 600 times a month accounting for nearly 200 hours of CDC-7600 time.

  16. Publications of Los Alamos research 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, C.A.; Willis, J.K.

    1981-09-01

    This bibliography is a compilation of unclassified publications of work done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for 1980. Papers published in 1980 are included regardless of when they were actually written. Publications received too late for inclusion in earlier compilations have also been listed. Declassification of previously classified reports is considered to constitute publication. All classified issuances are omitted-even those papers, themselves unclassified, which were published only as part of a classified document. If a paper was pubished more than once, all places of publication are included. The bibliography includes Los Alamos National Laboratory reports, papers released as non-laboratory reports, journal articles, books, chapters of books, conference papers published either separately or as part of conference proceedings issued as books or reports, papers published in congressional hearings, theses, and US patents. Publications by Los Alamos authors that are not records of Laboratory-sponsored work are included when the Library becomes aware of them.

  17. Publications of Los Alamos Research, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, C.J.; McClary, W.J.; Rich, J.A.; Rodriguez, L.L.

    1984-10-01

    This bibliography is a compilation of unclassified publications of work done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for 1983. Papers published in 1982 are included regardless of when they were actually written. Publications received too late for inclusion in earlier compilations have also been listed. Declassification of previously classified reports is considered to constitute publication. All classified issuances are omitted - even those papers, themselves unclassified, which were published only as part of a classified document. If a paper was published more than once, all places of publication are included. The bibliography includes Los Alamos National Laboratory reports, papers released as non-Laboratory reports, journal articles, books, chapters of books, conference papers either published separately or as part of conference proceedings issued as books or reports, papers publishd in congressional hearings, theses, and US patents. Publications by Los Alamos authors that are not records of Laboratory-sponsored work are included when the Library becomes aware of them.

  18. Water supply at Los Alamos during 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Purtymun, W.D.; McLin, S.G.; Stoker, A.K.; Maes, M.N.

    1995-09-01

    Municipal potable water supply during 1992 was 1,516 {times} 10{sup 6} gallons from wells in the Guaje and Pajarito well fields. About 13 {times} 10{sup 6} gallons were pumped from the Los Alamos Well Field and used in the construction of State Road 501 adjacent to the Field. The last year the Las Alamos Field was used for municipal supply was 1991. The nonpotable water supply used for steam plant support was about 0.12 {times} 10{sup 6} gallons from the spring gallery in Water Canyon. No nonpotable water was used for irrigation from Guaje and Los Alamos Reservoirs. Thus, the total water usage in 1992 was about 1,529 {times} 10{sup 6} gallons. Neither of the two new wells in the Otowi Well Field were operational in 1992.

  19. New constraints on the sulfur reservoir in the dense interstellar medium provided by Spitzer observations of S I in shocked gas

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Dana E.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Maret, Sébastien

    2013-12-20

    We present observations of fine-structure line emission of atomic sulfur, iron, and rotational lines of molecular hydrogen in shocks associated with several Class 0 protostars obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph of the Spitzer Space Telescope. We use these observations to investigate the 'missing sulfur problem', that significantly less sulfur is found in dense regions of the interstellar medium (ISM) than in diffuse regions. For sources where the sulfur fine-structure line emission is co-spatial with the detected molecular hydrogen emission and in the presence of weak iron emission, we derive sulfur and H{sub 2} column densities for the associated molecule-dominated C-shocks. We find the S I abundance to be ≳5%-10% of the cosmic sulfur abundance, indicating that atomic sulfur is a major reservoir of sulfur in shocked gas. This result suggests that in the quiescent dense ISM sulfur is present in some form that is released from grains as atoms, perhaps via sputtering, within the shock.

  20. Gas gun shock experiments with single-pulse x-ray phase contrast imaging and diffraction at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, S. N.; Jensen, B. J.; Hooks, D. E.; Fezzaa, K.; Ramos, K. J.; Yeager, J. D.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Shimada, T.

    2012-07-01

    The highly transient nature of shock loading and pronounced microstructure effects on dynamic materials response call for in situ, temporally and spatially resolved, x-ray-based diagnostics. Third-generation synchrotron x-ray sources are advantageous for x-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI) and diffraction under dynamic loading, due to their high photon fluxes, high coherency, and high pulse repetition rates. The feasibility of bulk-scale gas gun shock experiments with dynamic x-ray PCI and diffraction measurements was investigated at the beamline 32ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source. The x-ray beam characteristics, experimental setup, x-ray diagnostics, and static and dynamic test results are described. We demonstrate ultrafast, multiframe, single-pulse PCI measurements with unprecedented temporal (<100 ps) and spatial (˜2 μm) resolutions for bulk-scale shock experiments, as well as single-pulse dynamic Laue diffraction. The results not only substantiate the potential of synchrotron-based experiments for addressing a variety of shock physics problems, but also allow us to identify the technical challenges related to image detection, x-ray source, and dynamic loading.

  1. Gas gun shock experiments with single-pulse x-ray phase contrast imaging and diffraction at the Advanced Photon Source.

    PubMed

    Luo, S N; Jensen, B J; Hooks, D E; Fezzaa, K; Ramos, K J; Yeager, J D; Kwiatkowski, K; Shimada, T

    2012-07-01

    The highly transient nature of shock loading and pronounced microstructure effects on dynamic materials response call for in situ, temporally and spatially resolved, x-ray-based diagnostics. Third-generation synchrotron x-ray sources are advantageous for x-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI) and diffraction under dynamic loading, due to their high photon fluxes, high coherency, and high pulse repetition rates. The feasibility of bulk-scale gas gun shock experiments with dynamic x-ray PCI and diffraction measurements was investigated at the beamline 32ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source. The x-ray beam characteristics, experimental setup, x-ray diagnostics, and static and dynamic test results are described. We demonstrate ultrafast, multiframe, single-pulse PCI measurements with unprecedented temporal (<100 ps) and spatial (∼2 μm) resolutions for bulk-scale shock experiments, as well as single-pulse dynamic Laue diffraction. The results not only substantiate the potential of synchrotron-based experiments for addressing a variety of shock physics problems, but also allow us to identify the technical challenges related to image detection, x-ray source, and dynamic loading.

  2. Research of dynamic properties of alloys of AMg6BM and AMg6M in shock-wave experiment on a gas gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokrushin, S. S.; Karnaukhov, E. I.; Malugina, S. N.; Kazakov, D. N.; Kozelkov, O. E.; Pavlenko, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    Spall strength and elastoplastic parameters of aluminum alloys AMg6BM and AMg6M were studied in shock wave experiments with light gas guns LGG-1200 and LGG-2500 and results of these experiments are provided. Strength wave profiles were registered simultaneously by VISAR and interferometer PDV. Consideration was given to dependences of spall strength and strength parameters of aluminum alloys AMg6BM and AMg6M on the amplitude of the shock-wave loading in the range of 1.1 to 14.2 GPa and on deformation rate in the range of 0.2 to 3.6 · 105 s-1. Threshold damage levels for alloys AMg6M and AMg6BM are determined. It was shown that alloy AMg6BM softens under the pressure more than 5 GPa.

  3. Fabrication of graded density impactor via underwater shock wave and quasi-isentropic compression testing at two-stage gas gun facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wei; Li, Xiaojie; Hokamoto, Kazuyuki

    2014-12-01

    We show direct evidence that underwater shock wave enables us to bond multithin plates with flat, parallel, and high-strength interfaces, which are key requirements for functionally graded material (also called graded density impactor). This phenomenon is ascribed to the super short duration of the high-speed underwater shock wave, reducing the surface tension, diffusion, evaporation, deposition, and viscous flow of matter. Thin magnesium, aluminum, titanium, copper, and molybdenum foils were welded together and designed with the increase in density. Experimental evidence and numerical simulation show that well bonding between the multilayer structures. Microstructure examinations reveal that the dominant interfacial form shifts from waviness to linearity. Graded density impactor with multilayer structure is proved that can produce quasi-isentropic compression in two-stage gas gun experiment with a designed pressure loading profile, which suggests a feasible method to simulate the conditions we want to study that were previously inaccessible in a precisely controlled laboratory environment.

  4. Fast and Furious: Shock Heated Gas as the Origin of Spatially Resolved Hard X-Ray Emission in the Central 5 kpc of the Galaxy Merger NGC 6240

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junfeng; Nardini, Emanuele; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Karovska, Margarita; Elvis, Martin; Pellegrini, Silvia; Max, Claire; Risaliti, Guido; U, Vivian; Zezas, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    We have obtained a deep, subarcsecond resolution X-ray image of the nuclear region of the luminous galaxy merger NGC 6240 with Chandra, which resolves the X-ray emission from the pair of active nuclei and the diffuse hot gas in great detail. We detect extended hard X-ray emission from kT ~ 6 keV (~70 MK) hot gas over a spatial scale of 5 kpc, indicating the presence of fast shocks with a velocity of ~2200 km s-1. For the first time, we obtain the spatial distribution of this highly ionized gas emitting Fe XXV, which shows a remarkable correspondence to the large-scale morphology of H2(1-0) S(1) line emission and Hα filaments. Propagation of fast shocks originating in the starburst-driven wind into the ambient dense gas can account for this morphological correspondence. With an observed L 0.5-8 keV = 5.3 × 1041 erg s-1, the diffuse hard X-ray emission is ~100 times more luminous than that observed in the classic starburst galaxy M82. Assuming a filling factor of 1% for the 70 MK temperature gas, we estimate its total mass (M hot = 1.8 × 108 M ⊙) and thermal energy (E th = 6.5 × 1057 erg). The total iron mass in the highly ionized plasma is M Fe = 4.6 × 105 M ⊙. Both the energetics and the iron mass in the hot gas are consistent with the expected injection from the supernovae explosion during the starburst that is commensurate with its high star formation rate. No evidence for fluorescent Fe I emission is found in the CO filament connecting the two nuclei.

  5. Fast and Furious: Shock heated gas as the origin of spatially resolved hard X-ray emission in the central 5 kpc of the galaxy merger NGC 6240

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Junfeng; Nardini, Emanuele; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Karovska, Margarita; Elvis, Martin; Risaliti, Guido; Zezas, Andreas; Pellegrini, Silvia; Max, Claire; U, Vivian

    2014-01-20

    We have obtained a deep, subarcsecond resolution X-ray image of the nuclear region of the luminous galaxy merger NGC 6240 with Chandra, which resolves the X-ray emission from the pair of active nuclei and the diffuse hot gas in great detail. We detect extended hard X-ray emission from kT ∼ 6 keV (∼70 MK) hot gas over a spatial scale of 5 kpc, indicating the presence of fast shocks with a velocity of ∼2200 km s{sup –1}. For the first time, we obtain the spatial distribution of this highly ionized gas emitting Fe XXV, which shows a remarkable correspondence to the large-scale morphology of H{sub 2}(1-0) S(1) line emission and Hα filaments. Propagation of fast shocks originating in the starburst-driven wind into the ambient dense gas can account for this morphological correspondence. With an observed L {sub 0.5-8} {sub keV} = 5.3 × 10{sup 41} erg s{sup –1}, the diffuse hard X-ray emission is ∼100 times more luminous than that observed in the classic starburst galaxy M82. Assuming a filling factor of 1% for the 70 MK temperature gas, we estimate its total mass (M {sub hot} = 1.8 × 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉}) and thermal energy (E {sub th} = 6.5 × 10{sup 57} erg). The total iron mass in the highly ionized plasma is M {sub Fe} = 4.6 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}. Both the energetics and the iron mass in the hot gas are consistent with the expected injection from the supernovae explosion during the starburst that is commensurate with its high star formation rate. No evidence for fluorescent Fe I emission is found in the CO filament connecting the two nuclei.

  6. Induction inserts at the Los Alamos PSR

    SciTech Connect

    King-Yuen Ng

    2002-09-30

    Ferrite-loaded induction tuners installed in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring have been successful in compensating space-charge effects. However, the resistive part of the ferrite introduces unacceptable microwave instability and severe bunch lengthening. An effective cure was found by heating the ferrite cores up to {approx} 130 C. An understanding of the instability and cure is presented.

  7. A Sailor in the Los Alamos Navy

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, D. L.

    2016-12-20

    As part of the War Department’s Manhattan Engineer District (MED), Los Alamos was an Army installation during World War II, complete with a base commander and a brace of MPs. But it was a unique Army installation, having more civilian then military personnel. Even more unique was the work performed by the civilian population, work that required highly educated scientists and engineers. As the breadth, scope, and complexity of the Laboratory’s work increased, more and more technically educated and trained personnel were needed. But, the manpower needs of the nation’s war economy had created a shortage of such people. To meet its manpower needs, the MED scoured the ranks of the Army for anyone who had technical training and reassigned these men to its laboratories, including Los Alamos, as part of its Special Engineer Detachment (SED). Among the SEDs assigned to Los Alamos was Val Fitch, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1980. Another was Al Van Vessem, who helped stack the TNT for the 100 ton test, bolted together the Trinity device, and rode shotgun with the bomb has it was driven from Los Alamos to ground zero.

  8. Radiative Shock Waves In Emerging Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, R. Paul; Doss, F.; Visco, A.

    2011-05-01

    In laboratory experiments we produce radiative shock waves having dense, thin shells. These shocks are similar to shocks emerging from optically thick environments in astrophysics in that they are strongly radiative with optically thick shocked layers and optically thin or intermediate downstream layers through which radiation readily escapes. Examples include shocks breaking out of a Type II supernova (SN) and the radiative reverse shock during the early phases of the SN remnant produced by a red supergiant star. We produce these shocks by driving a low-Z plasma piston (Be) at > 100 km/s into Xe gas at 1.1 atm. pressure. The shocked Xe collapses to > 20 times its initial density. Measurements of structure by radiography and temperature by several methods confirm that the shock wave is strongly radiative. We observe small-scale perturbations in the post-shock layer, modulating the shock and material interfaces. We describe a variation of the Vishniac instability theory of decelerating shocks and an analysis of associated scaling relations to account for the growth of these perturbations, identify how they scale to astrophysical systems such as SN 1993J, and consider possible future experiments. Collaborators in this work have included H.F. Robey, J.P. Hughes, C.C. Kuranz, C.M. Huntington, S.H. Glenzer, T. Doeppner, D.H. Froula, M.J. Grosskopf, and D.C. Marion ________________________________ * Supported by the US DOE NNSA under the Predictive Sci. Academic Alliance Program by grant DE-FC52-08NA28616, the Stewardship Sci. Academic Alliances program by grant DE-FG52-04NA00064, and the Nat. Laser User Facility by grant DE-FG03-00SF22021.

  9. Self-similar flow of a rotating dusty gas behind the shock wave with increasing energy, conduction and radiation heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.

    2012-01-01

    A self-similar solution is obtained for one dimensional adiabatic flow behind a cylindrical shock wave propagating in a rotating dusty gas in presence of heat conduction and radiation heat flux with increasing energy. The dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of non-ideal (or perfect) gas and small solid particles, in which solid particles are continuously distributed. It is assumed that the equilibrium flow-condition is maintained and variable energy input is continuously supplied by the piston (or inner expanding surface). The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law and the radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity K and the absorption coefficient αR are assumed to vary with temperature only. In order to obtain the similarity solutions the initial density of the ambient medium is assumed to be constant and the angular velocity of the ambient medium is assumed to be decreasing as the distance from the axis increases. The effects of the variation of the heat transfer parameters and non-idealness of the gas in the mixture are investigated. The effects of an increase in (i) the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture and (ii) the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas on the flow variables are also investigated.

  10. Structure in Radiating Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, Forrest

    2010-11-01

    The basic radiative shock experiment is a shock launched into a gas of high-atomic-number material at high velocities, which fulfills the conditions for radiative losses to collapse the post-shock material to over 20 times the initial gas density. This has been accomplished using the OMEGA Laser Facility by illuminating a Be ablator for 1 ns with a total of 4 kJ, launching the requisite shock, faster than 100 km/sec, into a polyimide shock tube filled with Xe. The experiments have lateral dimensions of 600 μm and axial dimensions of 2-3 mm, and are diagnosed by x-ray backlighting. Repeatable structure beyond the one-dimensional picture of a shock as a planar discontinuity was discovered in the experimental data. One form this took was that of radial boundary effects near the tube walls, extended approximately seventy microns into the system. The cause of this effect - low density wall material which is heated by radiation transport ahead of the shock, launching a new converging shock ahead of the main shock - is apparently unique to high-energy-density experiments. Another form of structure is the appearance of small-scale perturbations in the post-shock layer, modulating the shock and material interfaces and creating regions of enhanced and diminished aerial density within the layer. The authors have applied an instability theory, a variation of the Vishniac instability of decelerating shocks, to describe the growth of these perturbations. We have also applied Bayesian statistical methods to better understand the uncertainties associated with measuring shocked layer thickness in the presence of tilt. Collaborators: R. P. Drake, H. F. Robey, C. C. Kuranz, C. M. Huntington, M. J. Grosskopf, D. C. Marion.

  11. Shock initiation of nitromethane

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.S.; Holmes, N.C.

    1993-12-31

    The shock initiation processes of nitromethane have been examined by using a fast time-resolved emission spectroscopy at a two-stage gas gun. a broad, but strong emission has been observed in a spectral range between 350 and 700 nm from shocked nitromethane above 9 GPa. The temporal profile suggests that shocked nitromethane detonates through three characteristic periods, namely an induction period, a hock initiation period, and a thermal explosion period. This paper discusses temporal and chemical characteristics of these periods and present the temperature of the shock-detonating nitromethane at pressures between 9 and 15 GPa.

  12. Numerical solution of the hypersonic viscous-shock-layer equations for laminar, transitional, and turbulent flows of a perfect gas over blunt axially symmetric bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, E. C.; Moss, J. N.

    1975-01-01

    The viscous shock layer equations applicable to hypersonic laminar, transitional, and turbulent flows of a perfect gas over two-dimensional plane or axially symmetric blunt bodies are presented. The equations are solved by means of an implicit finite difference scheme, and the results are compared with a turbulent boundary layer analysis. The agreement between the two solution procedures is satisfactory for the region of flow where streamline swallowing effects are negligible. For the downstream regions, where streamline swallowing effects are present, the expected differences in the two solution procedures are evident.

  13. Los Alamos Explosives Performance Key to Stockpile Stewardship

    ScienceCinema

    Dattelbaum, Dana

    2016-07-12

    As the U.S. Nuclear Deterrent ages, one essential factor in making sure that the weapons will continue to perform as designed is understanding the fundamental properties of the high explosives that are part of a nuclear weapons system. As nuclear weapons go through life extension programs, some changes may be advantageous, particularly through the addition of what are known as "insensitive" high explosives that are much less likely to accidentally detonate than the already very safe "conventional" high explosives that are used in most weapons. At Los Alamos National Laboratory explosives research includes a wide variety of both large- and small-scale experiments that include small contained detonations, gas and powder gun firings, larger outdoor detonations, large-scale hydrodynamic tests, and at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site, underground sub-critical experiments.

  14. Los Alamos Explosives Performance Key to Stockpile Stewardship

    SciTech Connect

    Dattelbaum, Dana

    2014-11-03

    As the U.S. Nuclear Deterrent ages, one essential factor in making sure that the weapons will continue to perform as designed is understanding the fundamental properties of the high explosives that are part of a nuclear weapons system. As nuclear weapons go through life extension programs, some changes may be advantageous, particularly through the addition of what are known as "insensitive" high explosives that are much less likely to accidentally detonate than the already very safe "conventional" high explosives that are used in most weapons. At Los Alamos National Laboratory explosives research includes a wide variety of both large- and small-scale experiments that include small contained detonations, gas and powder gun firings, larger outdoor detonations, large-scale hydrodynamic tests, and at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site, underground sub-critical experiments.

  15. Decommissioning the UHTREX Reactor Facility at Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, M.; Elder, J.

    1992-08-01

    The Ultra-High Temperature Reactor Experiment (UHTREX) facility was constructed in the late 1960s to advance high-temperature and gas-cooled reactor technology. The 3-MW reactor was graphite moderated and helium cooled and used 93% enriched uranium as its fuel. The reactor was run for approximately one year and was shut down in February 1970. The decommissioning of the facility involved removing the reactor and its associated components. This document details planning for the decommissioning operations which included characterizing the facility, estimating the costs of decommissioning, preparing environmental documentation, establishing a system to track costs and work progress, and preplanning to correct health and safety concerns in the facility. Work to decommission the facility began in 1988 and was completed in September 1990 at a cost of $2.9 million. The facility was released to Department of Energy for other uses in its Los Alamos program.

  16. Recent Infrasound Calibration Activity at Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, R. W.; Marcillo, O. E.

    2014-12-01

    Absolute infrasound sensor calibration is necessary for estimating source sizes from measured waveforms. This can be an important function in treaty monitoring. The Los Alamos infrasound calibration chamber is capable of absolute calibration. Early in 2014 the Los Alamos infrasound calibration chamber resumed operations in its new location after an unplanned move two years earlier. The chamber has two sources of calibration signals. The first is the original mechanical piston, and the second is a CLD Dynamics Model 316 electro-mechanical unit that can be digitally controlled and provide a richer set of calibration options. During 2008-2010 a number of upgrades were incorporated for improved operation and recording. In this poster we give an overview of recent chamber work on sensor calibrations, calibration with the CLD unit, some measurements with different porous hoses and work with impulse sources.

  17. Nuclear Forensics at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Podlesak, David W; Steiner, Robert E.; Burns, Carol J.; LaMont, Stephen P.; Tandon, Lav

    2012-08-09

    The overview of this presentation is: (1) Introduction to nonproliferation efforts; (2) Scope of activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (3) Facilities for radioanalytical work at LANL; (4) Radiochemical characterization capabilities; and (5) Bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities. Some conclusions are: (1) Analytical chemistry measurements on plutonium and uranium matrices are critical to numerous defense and non-defense programs including safeguards accountancy verification measurements; (2) Los Alamos National Laboratory operates capable actinide analytical chemistry and material science laboratories suitable for nuclear material forensic characterization; (3) Actinide analytical chemistry uses numerous means to validate and independently verify that measurement data quality objectives are met; and (4) Numerous LANL nuclear facilities support the nuclear material handling, preparation, and analysis capabilities necessary to evaluate samples containing nearly any mass of an actinide (attogram to kilogram levels).

  18. Water Supply at Los Alamos during 1997

    SciTech Connect

    M. N. Maes; S. G. McLin; W. D. Purtymun

    1998-12-01

    Production of potable municipal water supplies during 1997 totaled about 1,285.9 million gallons from wells in the Guaje, Pajarito, and Otowi well fields. There was no water used from the spring gallery in Water Canyon or from Guaje Reservoir during 1997. About 2.4 million gallons of water from Los Alamos Reservoir was used to irrigate public parks and recreational lands. The total water usage in 1997 was about 1,288.3 million gallons, or about 135 gallons per day per person living in Los Alamos County. Groundwater pumpage was down about 82.2 million gallons in 1997 compared with the pumpage in 1996. Four new replacement wells were drilled and cased in Guaje Canyon between October 1997 and March 1998. These wells are currently being developed and aquifer tests are being performed. A special report summarizing the geological, geophysical, and well construction logs will be issued in the near future for these new wells.

  19. Los Alamos Novel Rocket Design Flight Tested

    ScienceCinema

    Tappan, Bryce

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists recently flight tested a new rocket design that includes a high-energy fuel and a motor design that also delivers a high degree of safety. Researchers will now work to scale-up the design, as well as explore miniaturization of the system, in order to exploit all potential applications that would require high-energy, high-velocity, and correspondingly high safety margins.

  20. Risk management at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, D.G.; Stack, D.W.

    1993-11-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has risk management programs at a number of administrative levels. Each line organization has responsibility for risk management for routine operations. The Facility Risk Management group (HS-3) is the Los Alamos organization with the primary responsibility for risk management including providing input and expertise to facilities and line managers in the management and documentation of ES&H hazards and risks associated with existing and new activities. One of the major contributions this group has made to laboratory risk management program is to develop and implement a hazard identification and classification methodology that is readily adaptable to continuously changing classification guidelines such as DOE-STD-1027. The increased emphasis on safety at Los Alamos has led to the formation of additional safety oversight organization such as the Integration and Coordination Office (ICO), which is responsible for prioritization of risk management activities. In the fall of 1991, nearly 170 DOE inspectors spent 6 weeks analyzing the environmental, safety, and health activities at Los Alamos. The result of this audit was a list of over 1000 findings, each indicating some deficiency in current Laboratory operations relative to DOE and other government regulation. The audit team`s findings were consolidated and ``action plans`` were developed to address the findings. This resulted in over 200 action plans with a total estimated cost of almost $1 billion. The Laboratory adopted a risk-based prioritization process to attempt to achieve as much risk reduction as possible with the available resources. This paper describes the risk based prioritization model that was developed.

  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory Facility Review

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ronald Owen

    2015-06-05

    This series of slides depicts the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The Center's 800-MeV linac produces H+ and H- beams as well as beams of moderated (cold to 1 MeV) and unmoderated (0.1 to 600 MeV) neutrons. Experimental facilities and their capabilities and characteristics are outlined. Among these are LENZ, SPIDER, and DANCE.

  2. Los Alamos Team Demonstrates Bottle Scanner Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle; Schultz, Larry

    2014-05-06

    Los Alamos scientists are demonstrating a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMR) technology that may provide a breakthrough for screening liquids at airport security. By adding low-power X-ray data to the NMR mix, scientists believe they have unlocked a new detection technology. Funded in part by the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate, the new technology is called MagRay.

  3. Los Alamos Team Demonstrates Bottle Scanner Technology

    ScienceCinema

    Espy, Michelle; Schultz, Larry

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos scientists are demonstrating a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMR) technology that may provide a breakthrough for screening liquids at airport security. By adding low-power X-ray data to the NMR mix, scientists believe they have unlocked a new detection technology. Funded in part by the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate, the new technology is called MagRay.

  4. Amphibians and Reptiles of Los Alamos County

    SciTech Connect

    Teralene S. Foxx; Timothy K. Haarmann; David C. Keller

    1999-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that amphibians and reptiles are good indicators of environmental health. They live in terrestrial and aquatic environments and are often the first animals to be affected by environmental change. This publication provides baseline information about amphibians and reptiles that are present on the Pajarito Plateau. Ten years of data collection and observations by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the University of New Mexico, the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish, and hobbyists are represented.

  5. Los Alamos Novel Rocket Design Flight Tested

    SciTech Connect

    Tappan, Bryce

    2014-10-23

    Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists recently flight tested a new rocket design that includes a high-energy fuel and a motor design that also delivers a high degree of safety. Researchers will now work to scale-up the design, as well as explore miniaturization of the system, in order to exploit all potential applications that would require high-energy, high-velocity, and correspondingly high safety margins.

  6. Critical partnerships: Los Alamos, universities, and industry

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.L.

    1997-04-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, situated 35 miles northwest of Santa Fe, NM, is one of the Department of Energy`s three Defense Programs laboratories. It encompasses 43 square miles, employees approximately 10,000 people, and has a budget of approximately $1.1B in FY97. Los Alamos has a strong post-cold war mission, that of reducing the nuclear danger. But even with that key role in maintaining the nation`s security, Los Alamos views partnerships with universities and industry as critical to its future well being. Why is that? As the federal budget for R&D comes under continued scrutiny and certain reduction, we believe that the triad of science and technology contributors to the national system of R&D must rely on and leverage each others capabilities. For us this means that we will rely on these partners to help us in 5 key ways: We expect that partnerships will help us maintain and enhance our core competencies. In doing so, we will be able to attract the best scientists and engineers. To keep on the cutting edge of research and development, we have found that partnerships maintain the excellence of staff through new and exciting challenges. Additionally, we find that from our university and corporate partners we often learn and incorporate {open_quotes}best practices{close_quotes} in organizational management and operations. Finally, we believe that a strong national system of R&D will ensure and enhance our ability to generate revenues.

  7. Los Alamos National Laboratory Building Cost Index

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, H.D.; Lemon, G.D.

    1983-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Building Cost Index indicates that actual escalation since 1970 is near 10% per year. Therefore, the Laboratory will continue using a 10% per year escalation rate for construction estimates through 1985 and a slightly lower rate of 8% per year from 1986 through 1990. The computerized program compares the different elements involved in the cost of a typical construction project, which for our purposes, is a complex of office buildings and experimental laboratores. The input data used in the program consist primarily of labor costs and material and equipment costs. The labor costs are the contractural rates of the crafts workers in the Los Alamos area. For the analysis, 12 field-labor draft categories are used; each is weighted corresponding to the labor craft distribution associated with the typical construction project. The materials costs are current Los Alamos prices. Additional information sources include material and equipment quotes obtained through conversations with vendors and from trade publications. The material and equipment items separate into 17 categories for the analysis and are weighted corresponding to the material and equipment distribution associated with the typical construction project. The building cost index is compared to other national building cost indexes.

  8. Los Alamos National Laboratory building cost index

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, H.D.; Lemon, G.D.

    1982-10-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Building Cost Index indicates that actual escalation since 1970 is near 10% per year. Therefore, the Laboratory will continue using a 10% per year escalation rate for construction estimates through 1985 and a slightly lower rate of 8% per year from 1986 through 1990. The computerized program compares the different elements involved in the cost of a typical construction project, which for our purposes, is a complex of office buildings and experimental laboratories. The input data used in the program consist primarily of labor costs and material and equipment costs. The labor costs are the contractual rates of the crafts workers in the Los Alamos area. For the analysis, 12 field-labor craft categories are used; each is weighted corresponding to the labor craft distribution associated with the typical construction project. The materials costs are current Los Alamos prices. Additional information sources include material and equipment quotes obtained through conversations with vendors and from trade publications. The material and equipment items separate into 17 categories for the analysis and are weighted corresponding to the material and equipment distribution associated with the typical construction project. The building cost index is compared to other national building cost indexes.

  9. A single-pulse shock tube coupled with high-repetition-rate time-of-flight mass spectrometry and gas chromatography for high-temperature gas-phase kinetics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sela, P.; Shu, B.; Aghsaee, M.; Herzler, J.; Welz, O.; Fikri, M.; Schulz, C.

    2016-10-01

    Shock tubes are frequently used to investigate the kinetics of chemical reactions in the gas phase at high temperatures. Conventionally, two complementary arrangements are used where either time-resolved intermediate species measurements are conducted after the initiation of the reaction or where the product composition is determined after rapid initiation and quenching of the reaction through gas-dynamic processes. This paper presents a facility that combines both approaches to determine comprehensive information. A single-pulse shock tube is combined with high-sensitivity gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for product composition and concentration measurement as well as high-repetition-rate time-of-flight mass spectrometry for time-dependent intermediate concentration determination with 10 μs time resolution. Both methods can be applied simultaneously. The arrangement is validated with investigations of the well-documented thermal unimolecular decomposition of cyclohexene towards ethylene and 1,3-butadiene at temperatures between 1000 and 1500 K and pressures ranging from 0.8 to 2.4 bars. The comparison shows that the experimental results for both detections are in very good agreement with each other and with literature data.

  10. Molecular gas chemistry in AGN. II. High-resolution imaging of SiO emission in NGC 1068: shocks or XDR?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Burillo, S.; Usero, A.; Fuente, A.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Boone, F.; Aalto, S.; Krips, M.; Neri, R.; Schinnerer, E.; Tacconi, L. J.

    2010-09-01

    Context. This paper is part of a multi-species survey of line emission from the molecular gas in the circum-nuclear disk (CND) of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068. Unlike in other active galaxies, the intensely star-forming regions in NGC 1068 and the CND can be resolved with current instrumentation. This makes this galaxy an optimal test-bed to probe the effects of AGN on the molecular medium at ~100 pc scales. Aims: Single-dish observations have provided evidence that the abundance of silicon monoxide (SiO) in the CND of NGC 1068 is enhanced by 3-4 orders of magnitude with respect to the values typically measured in quiescent molecular gas in the Galaxy. We aim at unveiling the mechanism(s) underlying the SiO enhancement. Methods: We have imaged the emission of the SiO(2-1) (86.8 GHz) and CN(2-1) (226.8 GHz) lines in NGC 1068 at ~150 pc and 60 pc spatial resolution with the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer (PdBI). We have also obtained complementary IRAM 30 m observations of HNCO and methanol (CH3OH) lines. These species are known as tracers of shocks in the Galaxy. Results: SiO is detected in a disk of ~400 pc size around the AGN. SiO abundances in the CND of ~(1-5) × 10-9 are about 1-2 orders of magnitude above those measured in the starburst ring. The overall abundance of CN in the CND is high: ~(0.2-1) × 10-7. The abundances of SiO and CN are enhanced at the extreme velocities of gas associated with non-circular motions close to the AGN (r < 70 pc). On average, HNCO/SiO and CH3OH/SiO line ratios in the CND are similar to those measured in prototypical shocked regions in our Galaxy. Yet the strength and abundance of CN in NGC 1068 can be explained neither by shocks nor by photon-dominated region (PDR) chemistry. Abundances measured for CN and SiO and the correlation of CN/CO and SiO/CO ratios with hard X-ray irradiation suggest that the CND of NGC 1068 has become a giant X-ray-dominated region (XDR). Conclusions: The extreme properties of molecular gas in

  11. Propagation of a spherical shock wave in mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles under the influence of gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.

    2016-01-01

    Self-similar solutions are obtained for one-dimensional unsteady adiabatic flow behind a spherical shock wave propagating in a dusty gas with conductive and radiative heat fluxes under the influence of a gravitational field. The shock is assumed to be driven out by a moving piston and the dusty gas to be a mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles, in which solid particles are uniformly distributed. It is assumed that the equilibrium flow-conditions are maintained and variable energy input is continuously supplied by the piston. The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law and the radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity K and the absorption coefficient αR are assumed to vary with temperature and density. The medium is assumed to be under the influence of a gravitational field due to central mass ( bar{m} ) at the origin (Roche Model). It is assumed that the gravitational effect of the mixture itself can be neglected compared with the attraction of the central mass. The initial density of the ambient medium is taken to be always constant. The effects of the variation of the gravitational parameter and nonidealness of the gas in the mixture are investigated. Also, the effects of an increase in (i) the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture and (ii) the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas on the flow variables are investigated. It is shown that due to an increase in the gravitational parameter the compressibility of the medium at any point in the flow-field behind the shock decreases and all other flow variables and the shock strength are increased. Further, it is found that the presence of gravitational field increases the compressibility of the medium, due to which it is compressed and therefore the distance between the piston and the shock surface is reduced. The shock waves in dusty gas under the influence of a

  12. Shock tunnel measurement of the interaction amplification factor for a hot gas side jet in a supersonic cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havermann, M.; Ende, H.; Seiler, F.; Schwenzer, M.

    An efficient method for the steering of bodies flying at high Mach numbers is the lateral jet control. Compared to fins, no drag is induced when the jet is inactive and there is no risk of aerothermal problems. Additionally, conventional fins are quite inefficient at high altitudes due to the low stagnation pressures. A disadvantage of the lateral control jet, however, is the complex flow pattern that is formed around the active jet. In front of the lateral jet, a bow shock in conjunction with a separation shock is formed. Behind the jet, a wake with a low-pressure zone exists (Fig. 1). In addition to the jet thrust, an aerodynamic force resulting from the flow interactions around the jet is acting on the body, which makes an accurate side force prediction very difficult. It is common to define an interaction amplification factor that takes into account both types of forces: the jet thrust as well as the interaction force.

  13. When shock waves collide

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, D.; Hartigan, P.; Frank, A.; Hansen, E.; Yirak, K.; Liao, A. S.; Graham, P.; Foster, J.; Wilde, B.; Blue, B.; Rosen, P.; Farley, D.; Paguio, R.

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. Furthermore, the experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.

  14. When shock waves collide

    DOE PAGES

    Martinez, D.; Hartigan, P.; Frank, A.; ...

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed tomore » quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. Furthermore, the experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.« less

  15. Gas Cylinder Safety, Course 9518

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, George

    2016-10-27

    This course, Gas Cylinder Safety (#9518), presents an overview of the hazards and controls associated with handling, storing, using, and transporting gas cylinders. Standard components and markings of gas cylinders are also presented, as well as the process for the procurement, delivery, and return of gas cylinders at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  16. Los Alamos National Laboratory computer benchmarking 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.L.

    1983-06-01

    Evaluating the performance of computing machinery is a continual effort of the Computer Research and Applications Group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This report summarizes the results of the group's benchmarking activities performed between October 1981 and September 1982, presenting compilation and execution times as well as megaflop rates for a set of benchmark codes. Tests were performed on the following computers: Cray Research, Inc. (CRI) Cray-1S; Control Data Corporation (CDC) 7600, 6600, Cyber 73, Cyber 825, Cyber 835, Cyber 855, and Cyber 205; Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) VAX 11/780 and VAX 11/782; and Apollo Computer, Inc., Apollo.

  17. Los Alamos National Laboratory strategic directions

    SciTech Connect

    Hecker, S.

    1995-10-01

    It is my pleasure to welcome you to Los Alamos. I like the idea of bringing together all aspects of the research community-defense, basic science, and industrial. It is particularly important in today`s times of constrained budgets and in fields such as neutron research because I am convinced that the best science and the best applications will come from their interplay. If we do the science well, then we will do good applications. Keeping our eye focused on interesting applications will spawn new areas of science. This interplay is especially critical, and it is good to have these communities represented here today.

  18. Environmental Programs at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Patricia

    2012-07-11

    Summary of this project is: (1) Teamwork, partnering to meet goals - (a) Building on cleanup successes, (b) Solving legacy waste problems, (c) Protecting the area's environment; (2) Strong performance over the past three years - (a) Credibility from four successful Recovery Act Projects, (b) Met all Consent Order milestones, (c) Successful ramp-up of TRU program; (3) Partnership between the National Nuclear Security Administration's Los Alamos Site Office, DOE Carlsbad Field Office, New Mexico Environment Department, and contractor staff enables unprecedented cleanup progress; (4) Continued focus on protecting water resources; and (5) All consent order commitments delivered on time or ahead of schedule.

  19. Biological assessment for the effluent reduction program, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, S.P.

    1996-08-01

    This report describes the biological assessment for the effluent recution program proposed to occur within the boundaries of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Potential effects on wetland plants and on threatened and endangered species are discussed, along with a detailed description of the individual outfalls resulting from the effluent reduction program.

  20. LAMPF II workshop, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, February 1-4, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Thiessen, H.A.

    1982-01-01

    This report contains the proceedings of the first LAMPF II Workshop held at Los Alamos February 1 to 4, 1982. Included are the talks that were available in written form. The conclusion of the participants was that there are many exciting areas of physics that will be addressed by such a machine.

  1. Effects of vibration and shock on the performance of gas-bearing space-power Brayton cycle turbomachinery. 2: Sinusoidal and random vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tessarzik, J. M.; Chiang, T.; Badgley, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    The vibration response of a gas-bearing rotor-support system was analyzed experimentally documented for sinusoidal and random vibration environments. The NASA Brayton Rotating Unit (BRU), 36,000 rpm; 10 KWe turbogenerator; was subjected in the laboratory to sinusoidal and random vibrations to evaluate the capability of the BRU to (1) survive the vibration levels expected to be encountered during periods of nonoperation and (2) operate satisfactorily (that is, without detrimental bearing surface contacts) at the vibration levels expected during normal BRU operation. Response power spectral density was calculated for specified input random excitation, with particular emphasis upon the dynamic motions of the thrust bearing runner and stator. A three-mass model with nonlinear representation of the engine isolator mounts was used to calculate axial rotor-bearing shock response.

  2. Shock absorber servicing tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koepler, Jack L. (Inventor); Hill, Robert L. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A tool to assist in the servicing of a shock absorber wherein the shock absorber is constructed of a pair of aligned gas and liquid filled chambers. Each of the chambers is separated by a movable separator member. Maximum efficiency of the shock absorber is achieved in the locating of a precise volume of gas within the gas chamber and a precise volume of liquid within the liquid chamber. The servicing tool of this invention employs a rod which is to connect with the separator and by observation of the position of the rod with respect to the gauge body, the location of the separator is ascertained even though it is not directly observable.

  3. Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Escobedo, G.M.; Hargis, K.M.; Douglass, C.R.

    2007-07-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) waste management program is responsible for disposition of waste generated by many of the LANL programs and operations. LANL generates liquid and solid waste that can include radioactive, hazardous, and other constituents. Where practical, LANL hazardous and mixed wastes are disposed through commercial vendors; low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and radioactive asbestos-contaminated waste are disposed on site at LANL's Area G disposal cells, transuranic (TRU) waste is disposed at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), and high-activity mixed wastes are disposed at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) after treatment by commercial vendors. An on-site radioactive liquid waste treatment facility (RLWTF) removes the radioactive constituents from liquid wastes and treated water is released through an NPDES permitted outfall. LANL has a very successful waste minimization program. Routine hazardous waste generation has been reduced over 90% since 1993. LANL has a DOE Order 450.1-compliant environmental management system (EMS) that is ISO 14001 certified; waste minimization is integral to setting annual EMS improvement objectives. Looking forward, under the new LANL management and operating contractor, Los Alamos National Security (LANS) LLC, a Zero Liquid Discharge initiative is being planned that should eliminate flow to the RLWTF NPDES-permitted outfall. The new contractor is also taking action to reduce the number of permitted waste storage areas, to charge generating programs directly for the cost to disposition waste, and to simplify/streamline the waste system. (authors)

  4. DOE Los Alamos National Laboratory – PV Feasibility Assessment, 2015 Update, NREL Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, Jesse; Witt, Monica Rene

    2016-04-06

    This report summarizes solar and wind potential for Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This report is part of the “Los Alamos National Laboratory and Los Alamos County Renewable Generation” study.

  5. Dissolved pesticides in the Alamo River and the Salton Sea, California, 1996-97

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crepeau, Kathryn L.; Kuivila, Kathryn; Bergamaschi, Brian A.

    2002-01-01

    Water samples were collected from the Alamo River and the Salton Sea, California, in autumn 1996 and late winter/early spring 1997 and analyzed for dissolved pesticides. The two seasons chosen for sampling were during pesticide application periods in the Imperial Valley. Pesticide concentrations were measured in filtered water samples using solid-phase extraction and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Generally, the highest concentrations were measured in the Alamo River. The concentrations of carbaryl, chlorpyrifos, cycloate, dacthal, diazinon, and eptam were highest in samples collected in autumn 1996. In contrast, the concentrations of atrazine, carbofuran, and malathion were highest in samples collected in late winter/early spring 1997. The highest concentrations measured of atrazine, carbofuran, dacthal, eptam, and malathion all exceeded 1,000 nanograms per liter.

  6. Los Alamos personnel and area criticality dosimeter systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilik, D.G.; Martin, R.W.

    1981-06-01

    Fissionable materials are handled and processed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Although the probability of a nuclear criticality accident is very remote, it must be considered. Los Alamos maintains a broad spectrum of dose assessment capabilities. This report describes the methods employed for personnel neutron, area neutron, and photon dose evaluations with passive dosimetry systems.

  7. The Climate at Los Alamos; Are we measurement changes?

    SciTech Connect

    Dewart, Jean Marie

    2015-04-16

    A new report shows new graphic displays of the weather trends in Los Alamos, New Mexico, and at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The graphs show trends of average, minimum average, and maximum average temperature for summer and winter months going back decades. Records of summer and winter precipitation are also included in the report.

  8. Audit of personal property management at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-07

    The Department of Energy`s (Department) Albuquerque Operations Office (Albuquerque) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) are responsible for ensuring that Los Alamos maintains an efficient and effective personal property management system that protects, identifies, and controls Government-owned personal property in accordance with applicable regulations. Albuquerque is responsible for reviewing and approving Los Alamos` personal property management system. Los Alamos is responsible for ensuring that personal property is properly protected, identified, and controlled. The audit disclosed that Los Alamos did not have an efficient and effective personal property management system to ensure that personal property was adequately protected, identified, and controlled. In addition, Albuquerque did not approve or disapprove Los Alamos` personal property management system consistent with Federal and Department regulations. Specifically, the audit showed that Los Alamos did not account for $11.6 million of personal property. In addition, $22.2 million of personal property was not properly recorded in the database, $61.7 million of personal property could not be inventoried, and loans to employees and other entities were not adequately justified. As a result, from a total personal property inventory of approximately $1 billion, it is estimated that $100 million of personal property may not be accounted for, and $207 million may not be correctly recorded in the database. Moreover, substantial amounts of personal property on loan to employees and other entities were at risk of unauthorized use. Albuquerque concurred with the finding and agreed to implement the corrective actions recommended in the report.

  9. Laboratory simulations of supernova shockwaves: Formation of a second shock ahead of a radiative shock

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J.F.; Edwards, M.J.; Froula, D.; Gregori, G.; Edens, A.; Ditmire, T.

    2005-09-28

    Supernovae launch spherical shocks into the circumstellar medium (CSM). These shocks may interact with both the intergalactic magnetic field (IGM) and local mass accumulations (possibly with their own local magnetic fields). The latter interaction may trigger star formation. The shocks have high Mach numbers and may be radiative. We have created similar shocks in the laboratory by focusing laser pulses onto the tip of a solid pin surrounded by ambient gas; ablated material from the pin rapidly expands and launches a shock through the surrounding gas. The shock may then be allowed to interact with (a) mass accumulations, (b) magnetic fields, or (c) allowed to expand freely. We will present examples of each type of experiment, but mainly discuss a new phenomena observed first in (c); at the edge of the radiatively heated gas ahead of the shock, a second shock forms. The two expanding shocks are simultaneously visible for a time, until the original shock stalls from running into the heated gas. The second shock remains visible and continues to expand. A minimum condition for the formation of the second shock is that the original shock is super-critical, i.e., the temperature distribution ahead of the original shock has an inflexion point. In a non-radiative control experiment the second shock does not form.

  10. Laboratory simulations of supernova shockwaves: Formation of a second shock ahead of a radiative shock

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J F; Edwards, M J; Froula, D; Gregori, G; Edens, A; Ditmire, T

    2005-01-28

    Supernovae launch spherical shocks into the circumstellar medium (CSM). These shocks may interact with both the intergalactic magnetic field (IGM) and local mass accumulations (possibly with their own local magnetic fields). The latter interaction may trigger star formation. The shocks have high Mach numbers and may be radiative. We have created similar shocks in the laboratory by focusing laser pulses onto the tip of a solid pin surrounded by ambient gas; ablated material from the pin rapidly expands and launches a shock through the surrounding gas. The shock may then be allowed to interact with (a) mass accumulations, (b) magnetic fields, or (c) allowed to expand freely. We will present examples of each type of experiment, but mainly discuss a new phenomena observed first in (c); at the edge of the radiatively heated gas ahead of the shock, a second shock forms. The two expanding shocks are simultaneously visible for a time, until the original shock stalls from running into the heated gas. The second shock remains visible and continues to expand. A minimum condition for the formation of the second shock is that the original shock is super-critical, i.e., the temperature distribution ahead of the original shock has an inflexion point. In a non-radiative control experiment the second shock does not form.

  11. Portable MRI developed at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle

    2015-04-22

    Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory are developing an ultra-low-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system that could be low-power and lightweight enough for forward deployment on the battlefield and to field hospitals in the World's poorest regions. "MRI technology is a powerful medical diagnostic tool," said Michelle Espy, the Battlefield MRI (bMRI) project leader, "ideally suited for imaging soft-tissue injury, particularly to the brain." But hospital-based MRI devices are big and expensive, and require considerable infrastructure, such as large quantities of cryogens like liquid nitrogen and helium, and they typically use a large amount of energy. "Standard MRI machines just can't go everywhere," said Espy. "Soldiers wounded in battle usually have to be flown to a large hospital and people in emerging nations just don't have access to MRI at all. We've been in contact with doctors who routinely work in the Third World and report that MRI would be extremely valuable in treating pediatric encephalopathy, and other serious diseases in children." So the Los Alamos team started thinking about a way to make an MRI device that could be relatively easy to transport, set up, and use in an unconventional setting. Conventional MRI machines use very large magnetic fields that align the protons in water molecules to then create magnetic resonance signals, which are detected by the machine and turned into images. The large magnetic fields create exceptionally detailed images, but they are difficult and expensive to make. Espy and her team wanted to see if images of sufficient quality could be made with ultra-low-magnetic fields, similar in strength to the Earth's magnetic field. To achieve images at such low fields they use exquisitely sensitive detectors called Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices, or SQUIDs. SQUIDs are among the most sensitive magnetic field detectors available, so interference with the signal is the primary stumbling block. "SQUIDs are

  12. Portable MRI developed at Los Alamos

    ScienceCinema

    Espy, Michelle

    2016-07-12

    Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory are developing an ultra-low-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system that could be low-power and lightweight enough for forward deployment on the battlefield and to field hospitals in the World's poorest regions. "MRI technology is a powerful medical diagnostic tool," said Michelle Espy, the Battlefield MRI (bMRI) project leader, "ideally suited for imaging soft-tissue injury, particularly to the brain." But hospital-based MRI devices are big and expensive, and require considerable infrastructure, such as large quantities of cryogens like liquid nitrogen and helium, and they typically use a large amount of energy. "Standard MRI machines just can't go everywhere," said Espy. "Soldiers wounded in battle usually have to be flown to a large hospital and people in emerging nations just don't have access to MRI at all. We've been in contact with doctors who routinely work in the Third World and report that MRI would be extremely valuable in treating pediatric encephalopathy, and other serious diseases in children." So the Los Alamos team started thinking about a way to make an MRI device that could be relatively easy to transport, set up, and use in an unconventional setting. Conventional MRI machines use very large magnetic fields that align the protons in water molecules to then create magnetic resonance signals, which are detected by the machine and turned into images. The large magnetic fields create exceptionally detailed images, but they are difficult and expensive to make. Espy and her team wanted to see if images of sufficient quality could be made with ultra-low-magnetic fields, similar in strength to the Earth's magnetic field. To achieve images at such low fields they use exquisitely sensitive detectors called Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices, or SQUIDs. SQUIDs are among the most sensitive magnetic field detectors available, so interference with the signal is the primary stumbling block. "SQUIDs are

  13. Technology-Based Oil and Natural Gas Plays: Shale Shock! Could There Be Billions in the Bakken?

    EIA Publications

    2006-01-01

    This report presents information about the Bakken Formation of the Williston Basin: its location, production, geology, resources, proved reserves, and the technology being used for development. This is the first in a series intending to share information about technology-based oil and natural gas plays.

  14. Los Alamos National Laboratory transuranic database analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, D.V.; Rogers, P.S.Z.; Kosiewicz, S.T.; LeBrun, D.B.

    1997-02-01

    This paper represents an overview of analyses conducted on the TRU database maintained by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This evaluation was conducted to support the ``TRU Waste Workoff Strategies`` document and provides an estimation of the waste volume that potentially could be certified and ready for shipment to (WIPP) in April of 1998. Criteria defined in the WIPP WAC, including container type, weight limits, plutonium fissile gram equivalents and decay heat, were used to evaluated the waste for compliance. LANL evaluated the containers by facility and by waste stream to determining the most efficient plan for characterization and certification of the waste. Evaluation of the waste presently in storage suggested that 40- 60% potentially meets the WIPP WAC Rev. 5 criteria.

  15. Los Alamos Advanced Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.C.D.; Kraus, R.H.; Ledford, J.; Meier, K.L.; Meyer, R.E.; Nguyen, D.; Sheffield, R.L.; Sigler, F.L.; Young, L.M.; Wang, T.S.; Wilson, W.L.; Wood, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    At Los Alamos, we are building a free-electron laser (FEL) for industrial, medical, and research applications. This FEL, which will incorporate many of the new technologies developed over the last decade, will be compact in size, robust, and user-friendly. Electrons produced by a photocathode will be accelerated to 20 MeV by a high-brightness accelerator and transported using permanent-magnet quadrupoles and dipoles. They will form an electron beam with an excellent instantaneous beam quality of 10 {pi} mm mrad in transverse emittance and 0.3% in energy spread at a peak current up to 300 A. Including operation at higher harmonics, the laser wavelength extends form 3.7 {mu}m to 0.4 {mu}m. In this paper, we will describe the project and the programs to date. 10 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    This report documents the environmental surveillance program conducted by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) in 1979. Routine monitoring for radiation and radioactive or chemical substances was conducted on the Laboratory site and in the surrounding region to determine compliance with appropriate standards and permit early identification of possible undesirable trends. Results and interpretation of the data for 1979 on penetrating radiation, chemical and radiochemical quality of ambient air, surface and ground water, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, food, and airborne and liquid effluents are included. Comparisons with appropriate standards and regulations or with background levels from natural or other non-LASL sources provide a basis for concluding that environmental effects attributable to LASL operations are minor and cannot be considered likely to result in any hazard to the population of the area. Results of several special studies provide documentation of some unique environmental conditions in the LASL environs.

  17. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1987. Routine monitoring for radiation and radioactive or chemical materials is conducted on the Laboratory site as well as in the surrounding region. Monitoring results are used to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to permit early identification of potentially undesirable trends. Results and interpretation of data for 1987 cover: external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and liquid effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface and ground waters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Comparisons with appropriate standards, regulations, and background levels provide the basis for concluding that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are insignificant and do not pose a threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment. 113 refs., 33 figs., 120 tabs.

  18. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1989. Routine monitoring for radiation and radioactive or chemical materials is conducted on the Laboratory site as well as in the surrounding region. Monitoring results are used to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to permit early identification of potentially undesirable trends. Results and interpretation of data for 1989 cover external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface and ground waters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Comparisons with appropriate standards, regulations, and background levels provide the basis for concluding that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment. 58 refs., 31 figs., 39 tabs.

  19. Information about Practicums at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Paul A.

    2012-07-24

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center is the premier facility for neutron science experiments ranging from cross section measurements, neutron scattering experiments, proton radiography, cold neutrons, actinide neutronic properties, and many other exciting topics. The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory is home to several powerful magnets, including the one that created the first non-destructive 100 Tesla field in March 2012. They probe the electronic structure of superconductors, magnetic properties of materials (including magneto-quantum effects). Research is also conducted in correlated materials, thermoacoustics, and magnetic properties of actinides. The Trident Laser has a unique niche with very high power, short pulse experiments, with a peak power of 10{sup 20} W in short pulse mode. Discoveries range from production of monoenergetic MeV ion beam, nonlinear kinetic plasma waves, the transition between kinetic and fluid nonlinear behavior and other laser-plasma interaction processes.

  20. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) during 1995. The Laboratory routinely monitors for radiation and for radioactive and nonradioactive materials at (or on) Laboratory sites as well as in the surrounding region. LANL uses the monitoring result to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to identify potentially undesirable trends. Data were collected in 1995 to assess external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and liquid effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface waters and groundwaters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Using comparisons with standards, regulations, and background levels, this report concludes that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a demonstrable threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment.

  1. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Kohen, K.; Stoker, A.; Stone, G.

    1994-07-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program at Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1992. The Laboratory routinely monitors for radiation and for radioactive and nonradioactive materials at (or on) Laboratory sites as well as in the surrounding region. LANL uses the monitoring results to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to identify potentially undesirable trends. Data were collected in 1992 to assess external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and liquid effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface waters and groundwaters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Using comparisons with standards, regulations, and background levels, this report concludes that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a demonstrable threat to the public, laboratory employees, or the environment.

  2. Hot Dry Rock Overview at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Michael; Hendron, Robert H.

    1989-03-21

    The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy program is a renewable energy program that can contribute significantly to the nation's balanced and diversified energy mix. Having extracted energy from the first Fenton Hill HDR reservoir for about 400 days, and from the second reservoir for 30 days in a preliminary test, Los Alamos is focusing on the Long Term Flow Test and reservoir studies. Current budget limitations have slowed preparations thus delaying the start date of that test. The test is planned to gather data for more definitive reservoir modeling with energy availability or reservoir lifetime of primary interest. Other salient information will address geochemistry and tracer studies, microseismic response, water requirements and flow impedance which relates directly to pumping power requirements. During this year of ''preparation'' we have made progress in modeling studies, in chemically reactive tracer techniques, in improvements in acoustic or microseismic event analysis.

  3. Molecular diagnostics of interstellar shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartquist, T. W.; Dalgarno, A.; Oppenheimer, M.

    1980-02-01

    The chemistry of molecules in shocked regions of the interstellar gas is considered and calculations are carried out for a region subjected to a shock at a velocity of 8 km/sec. Substantial enhancements are predicted in the concentrations of the molecules H2S, SO, and SiO compared to those anticipated in cold interstellar clouds.

  4. Molecular diagnostics of interstellar shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartquist, T. W.; Dalgarno, A.; Oppenheimer, M.

    1980-01-01

    The chemistry of molecules in shocked regions of the interstellar gas is considered and calculations are carried out for a region subjected to a shock at a velocity of 8 km/sec. Substantial enhancements are predicted in the concentrations of the molecules H2S, SO, and SiO compared to those anticipated in cold interstellar clouds.

  5. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Fuehne, David; Gallagher, Pat; Hjeresen, Denny; Isaacson, John; Johson, Scot; Morgan, Terry; Paulson, David; Rogers, David

    2009-09-30

    Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos reports are prepared annually by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) Environmental Programs Directorate, as required by US Department of Energy Order 450.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and US Department of Energy Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. These annual reports summarize environmental data that are used to determine compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and departmental policies. Additional data, beyond the minimum required, are also gathered and reported as part of the Laboratory’s efforts to ensure public safety and to monitor environmental quality at and near the Laboratory. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the Laboratory’s major environmental programs and explains the risks and the actions taken to reduce risks at the Laboratory from environmental legacies and waste management operations. Chapter 2 reports the Laboratory’s compliance status for 2007. Chapter 3 provides a summary of the maximum radiological dose the public and biota populations could have potentially received from Laboratory operations and discusses chemical exposures. The environmental surveillance and monitoring data are organized by environmental media (Chapter 4, air; Chapters 5 and 6, water and sediments; Chapter 7, soils; and Chapter 8, foodstuffs and biota) in a format to meet the needs of a general and scientific audience. Chapter 9 provides a summary of the status of environmental restoration work around LANL. A glossary and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are in the back of the report. Appendix A explains the standards for environmental contaminants, Appendix B explains the units of measurements used in this report, Appendix C describes the Laboratory’s technical areas and their associated programs, and Appendix D provides web links to more information.

  6. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Fuehne, David; Poff, Ben; Hjeresen, Denny; Isaacson, John; Johnson, Scot; Morgan, Terry; Paulson, David; Salzman, Sonja; Rogers, David

    2010-09-30

    Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos reports are prepared annually by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) environmental organization, as required by US Department of Energy Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and US Department of Energy Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. These annual reports summarize environmental data that are used to determine compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and departmental policies. Additional data, beyond the minimum required, are also gathered and reported as part of the Laboratory’s efforts to ensure public safety and to monitor environmental quality at and near the Laboratory. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the Laboratory’s major environmental programs and explains the risks and the actions taken to reduce risks at the Laboratory from environmental legacies and waste management operations. Chapter 2 reports the Laboratory’s compliance status for 2009. Chapter 3 provides a summary of the maximum radiological dose the public and biota populations could have potentially received from Laboratory operations and discusses chemical exposures. The environmental surveillance and monitoring data are organized by environmental media (air in Chapter 4; water and sediments in Chapters 5 and 6; soils in Chapter 7; and foodstuffs and biota in Chapter 8) in a format to meet the needs of a general and scientific audience. Chapter 9 provides a summary of the status of environmental restoration work around LANL. The new Chapter 10 describes the Laboratory’s environmental stewardship efforts and provides an overview of the health of the Rio Grande. A glossary and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are in the back of the report. Appendix A explains the standards for environmental contaminants, Appendix B explains the units of measurements used in this report, Appendix C describes the Laboratory’s technical

  7. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 2005

    SciTech Connect

    2006-09-30

    Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos reports are prepared annually by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) environmental organization, as required by US Department of Energy Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and US Department of Energy Order 231.IA, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. These annual reports summarize environmental data that are used to determine compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and departmental policies. Additional data, beyond the minimum required, are also gathered and reported as part of the Laboratory's efforts to ensure public safety and to monitor environmental quality at and near the Laboratory. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the Laboratory's major environmental programs. Chapter 2 reports the Laboratory's compliance status for 2005. Chapter 3 provides a summary of the maximum radiological dose the public and biota populations could have potentially received from Laboratory operations. The environmental surveillance and monitoring data are organized by environmental media (Chapter 4, Air; Chapters 5 and 6, Water and Sediments; Chapter 7, Soils; and Chapter 8, Foodstuffs and Biota) in a format to meet the needs of a general and scientific audience. Chapter 9, new for this year, provides a summary of the status of environmental restoration work around LANL. A glossary and a list ofacronyms and abbreviations are in the back of the report. Appendix A explains the standards for environmental contaminants, Appendix B explains the units of measurements used in this report, Appendix C describes the Laboratory's technical areas and their associated programs, and Appendix D provides web links to more information.

  8. Environmental analysis of Lower Pueblo/Lower Los Alamos Canyon, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Buhl, T.E.; Stoker, A.K.; Becker, N.M.; Rodgers, J.C.; Hansen, W.R.

    1994-12-01

    The radiological survey of the former radioactive waste treatment plant site (TA-45), Acid Canyon, Pueblo Canyon, and Los Alamos Canyon found residual contamination at the site itself and in the channel and banks of Acid, Pueblo, and lower Los Alamos Canyons all the way to the Rio Grande. The largest reservoir of residual radioactivity is in lower Pueblo Canyon, which is on DOE property. However, residual radioactivity does not exceed proposed cleanup criteria in either lower Pueblo or lower Los Alamos Canyons. The three alternatives proposed are (1) to take no action, (2) to construct a sediment trap in lower Pueblo Canyon to prevent further transport of residual radioactivity onto San Ildefonso Indian Pueblo land, and (3) to clean the residual radioactivity from the canyon system. Alternative 2, to cleanup the canyon system, is rejected as a viable alternative. Thousands of truckloads of sediment would have to be removed and disposed of, and this effort is unwarranted by the low levels of contamination present. Residual radioactivity levels, under either present conditions or projected future conditions, will not result in significant radiation doses to persons exposed. Modeling efforts show that future transport activity will not result in any residual radioactivity concentrations higher than those already existing. Thus, although construction of a sediment trap in lower Pueblo Canyon is a viable alternative, this effort also is unwarranted, and the no-action alternative is the preferred alternative.

  9. Use Of Lasers At The Los Alamos Hot Cell Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, Michael E.

    1983-11-01

    An optical profilometer that uses a Techmet LaserMike scanning, focused, laser-beam, optical micrometer is installed in a remote alpha-gamma containment cell at the Los Alamos Hot-Cell Facility.1 A hot-cell extension chamber provides the nominal 30-cm (12-in.) working distance required by the LaserMike and, at the same time, keeps the LaserMike components outside the high-radiation-containment environment. This system provides measurement accu-racy better than±5 pm (0.0002 in.) on diameters between 2 and 13 mm (0.08 and 0.5 in.) at a rate of 33 measurements per second. The Hot-Cell Facility also uses a Korad 20-J-output ruby pulsed laser to drill a hole in reactor fuel element cladding to sample fission gas. The laser is then used to reweld the hole so that the fuel element will not be contaminated and may be stored without an alpha-containment barrier. The wall thickness of the fuel elements sampled varies from 0.25 to 0.50 mm (0.010 to 0.020 in.).

  10. Theoretical Insight into Shocked Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Leiding, Jeffery Allen

    2016-09-29

    I present the results of statistical mechanical calculations on shocked molecular gases. This work provides insight into the general behavior of shock Hugoniots of gas phase molecular targets with varying initial pressures. The dissociation behavior of the molecules is emphasized. Impedance matching calculations are performed to determine the maximum degree of dissociation accessible for a given flyer velocity as a function of initial gas pressure.

  11. Occurrences at Los Alamos National Laboratory: What can they tell us?

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A. Reichelt; A. Jeffery Eichorst; Marc E. Clay; Rita J. Henins; Judith D. DeHaven; Richard J. Brake

    2000-03-01

    The authors analyzed the evolution of institutional and facility response to groups of abnormal incidents at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The analysis is divided into three stages: (1) the LANL response to severe accidents from 1994 to 1996, (2) the LANL response to facility-specific clusters of low-consequence incidents from 1997 to 1999, and (3) the ongoing development of and response to a Laboratory-wide trending and analysis program. The first stage is characterized by five severe accidents at LANL--a shooting fatality, a forklift accident, two electrical shock incidents, and an explosion in a nuclear facility. Each accident caused LANL and the Department of Energy (DOE) to launch in-depth investigations. A recurrent theme of the investigations was the failure of LANL and DOE to identify and act on precursor or low-consequence events that preceded the severe accidents. The second stage is characterized by LANL response to precursor or low-consequence incidents over a two-year period. In this stage, the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility, the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility, and the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center responded to an increase in low-consequence events by standing down their facilities. During the restart process, each facility collectively analyzed the low-consequence events and developed systemic corrective actions. The third stage is characterized by the development of a Laboratory-wide trending and analysis program, which involves proactive division-level analysis of incidents and development of systemic actions. The authors conclude that, while the stages show an encouraging evolution, the facility standdowns and restarts are overly costly and that the institutional trending and analysis program is underutilized. The authors therefore recommend the implementation of an institutional, mentored program of trending and analysis that identifies clusters of related low-consequence events, analyzes those events, and

  12. Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos during 2007

    SciTech Connect

    2008-09-30

    Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos reports are prepared annually by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) Environmental Directorate, as required by US Department of Energy Order 450.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and US Department of Energy Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. These annual reports summarize environmental data that are used to determine compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and departmental policies. Additional data, beyond the minimum required, are also gathered and reported as part of the Laboratory’s efforts to ensure public safety and to monitor environmental quality at and near the Laboratory. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the Laboratory’s major environmental programs and explains the risks and the actions taken to reduce risks at the Laboratory from environmental legacies and waste management operations. Chapter 2 reports the Laboratory’s compliance status for 2007. Chapter 3 provides a summary of the maximum radiological dose the public and biota populations could have potentially received from Laboratory operations and discusses chemical exposures. The environmental surveillance and monitoring data are organized by environmental media (Chapter 4, air; Chapters 5 and 6, water and sediments; Chapter 7, soils; and Chapter 8, foodstuffs and biota) in a format to meet the needs of a general and scientific audience. Chapter 9 provides a summary of the status of environmental restoration work around LANL. A glossary and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are in the back of the report. Appendix A explains the standards for environmental contaminants, Appendix B explains the units of measurements used in this report, Appendix C describes the laboratory’s technical areas and their associated programs, and Appendix D provides web links to more information. In printed copies of this report or Executive Summary, we have

  13. Review of liquid metal heat pipe work at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.S.; Merrigan, M.A.; Sena, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    A survey of space-power related liquid metal heat pipe work at Los Alamos National Laboratory is presented. Heat pipe development at Los Alamos has been on-going since 1963. Heat pipes were initially developed for thermionic nuclear-electrical power production in space. Since then Los Alamos has developed liquid metal heat pipes for numerous applications related to high temperature systems in both the space and terrestrial environments. Some of these applications include thermionic electrical generators, thermoelectric energy conversion (both in-core and direct radiation), thermal energy storage, hypersonic vehicle leading edge cooling, and heat pipe vapor laser cells. Some of the work performed at Los Alamos has been documented in internal reports that are often little-known. A representative description and summary of progress in space-related liquid metal heat pipe technology is provided followed by a reference section citing sources where these works may be found. 53 refs.

  14. Review of liquid metal heat pipe work at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.S.; Merrigan, M.A.; Sena, J.T. )

    1991-01-10

    A survey of space-power related liquid metal heat pipe work at Los Alamos National Laboratory is presented. Heat pipe development at Los Alamos has been on-going since 1963. Heat pipes were initially developed for thermionic nuclear-electrical power production in space. Since then Los Alamos has developed liquid metal heat pipes for numerous applications related to high temperature systems in both the space and terrestrial environments. Some of these applications include thermionic electrical generators, thermoelectric energy conversion (both in-core and direct radiation), thermal energy storage, hypersonic vehicle leading edge cooling, and heat pipe vapor laser cells. Some of the work performed at Los Alamos has been documented in internal reports that are often little-known. A representative description and summary of progress in space-related liquid metal heat pipe technology is provided followed by a reference section citing sources where these works may be found.

  15. Los Alamos National Laboratory Prepares for Fire Season

    SciTech Connect

    L’Esperance, Manny

    2016-07-18

    Through the establishment of a Wildland Fire Program Office, and the Interagency Fire Base located on Laboratory property, Los Alamos National Laboratory is continuing and improving a program to prepare for wildland fire.

  16. Explosive Flux Compression: 50 Years of Los Alamos Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, C.M.; Thomson, D.B.; Garn, W.B.

    1998-10-18

    Los Alamos flux compression activities are surveyed, mainly through references in view of space limitations. However, two plasma physics programs done with Sandia National Laboratory are discussed in more detail.

  17. Los Alamos National Laboratory Prepares for Fire Season

    ScienceCinema

    L’Esperance, Manny

    2016-08-10

    Through the establishment of a Wildland Fire Program Office, and the Interagency Fire Base located on Laboratory property, Los Alamos National Laboratory is continuing and improving a program to prepare for wildland fire.

  18. Explosive Flux Compression:. 50 Years of LOS Alamos Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, C.; Thomson, D.; Garn, W.

    2004-11-01

    Los Alamos flux compression activities are surveyed, mainly through references in view of space limitations. However, two plasma physics programs done with Sandia National Laboratory are discussed in more detail.

  19. Flammable Gas Safety Self-Study 52827

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, George

    2016-03-17

    This course, Flammable Gas Safety Self-Study (COURSE 52827), presents an overview of the hazards and controls associated with commonly used, compressed flammable gases at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  20. Ion-chamber-based loss monitor system for the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.A.; Brown, D.; Browman, A.; Macek, R.J.

    1995-05-01

    A new loss monitor system has been designed and installed at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). The detectors are ion chambers filled with N{sub 2} gas. The electronics modules have a threshold range of 1:100, and they can resolve changes in beam loss of about 2% of the threshold settings. They can generate a trip signal in 2 {mu}s if the beam loss is large enough; if the response time of the Fast Protect System is included the beam will be shut off in about 37 {mu}s.

  1. Strategic defense initiatives at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Rockwood, S.D.

    1985-01-01

    This presentation reviews the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) programs at Los Alamos National Laboratory, noting especially the needs for and applications of optics and optical technologies. Table I lists the various activities at Los Alamos contributing to SDI programs. The principal, nonnuclear SDI programs are: (1) the free-electron laser, and (2) neutral particle beams. Both should be considered as potential long-range-kill systems, but still in the futuristic category.

  2. Los Alamos upgrade in metallographic capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ledbetter, J.M.; Dowler, K.E.; Cook, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Los Alamos Wing 9 Hot Cell Facility is in the process of upgrading their metallographic sample preparation and examination capability. The present capability to grind, polish and etch samples from reactor fuels and materials has been in operation for 18 years. Macro photography and alpha and beta-gamma autoradiography are an important part of this capability. Some of the fast breeder reactor experiments have contained sodium as a coolant. Therefore, the capability to distill sodium from some samples scheduled for microstructural examinations is a requirement. Since the reactor fuel samples are highly radioactive and contain plutonium, either as fabricated or as a result of breeding during reactor service, these samples must be handled in shielded hot cells containing alpha boxes to isolate the plutonium and hazardous fission products from personnel and the environment. The present equipment that was designed and built into those alpha boxes has functioned very well for the past 18 years. During that time the technicians have thought of ways to improve the equipment to do the work faster and safer. These ideas and ideas that have been developed during the design of new alpha boxes and new equipment for microstructural sample preparation have provided the concepts for the capability to perform the work faster and maintain the equipment in a safer manner.

  3. Saving Water at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    ScienceCinema

    Erickson, Andy

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory decreased its water usage by 26 percent in 2014, with about one-third of the reduction attributable to using reclaimed water to cool a supercomputing center. The Laboratory's goal during 2014 was to use only re-purposed water to support the mission at the Strategic Computing Complex. Using reclaimed water from the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility, or SERF, substantially decreased water usage and supported the overall mission. SERF collects industrial wastewater and treats it for reuse. The reclamation facility contributed more than 27 million gallons of re-purposed water to the Laboratory's computing center, a secured supercomputing facility that supports the Laboratory’s national security mission and is one of the institution’s larger water users. In addition to the strategic water reuse program at SERF, the Laboratory reduced water use in 2014 by focusing conservation efforts on areas that use the most water, upgrading to water-conserving fixtures, and repairing leaks identified in a biennial survey.

  4. Oxidative lime pretreatment of Alamo switchgrass.

    PubMed

    Falls, Matthew; Holtzapple, Mark T

    2011-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that oxidative lime pretreatment is an effective delignification method that improves the enzymatic digestibility of many biomass feedstocks. The purpose of this work is to determine the recommended oxidative lime pretreatment conditions (reaction temperature, time, pressure, and lime loading) for Alamo switchgrass (Panicum virgatum). Enzymatic hydrolysis of glucan and xylan was used to determine the performance of the 52 studied pretreatment conditions. The recommended condition (110°C, 6.89 bar O(2), 240 min, 0.248 g Ca(OH)(2)/g biomass) achieved glucan and xylan overall yields (grams of sugar hydrolyzed/100 g sugar in raw biomass, 15 filter paper units (FPU)/g raw glucan) of 85.9 and 52.2, respectively. In addition, some glucan oligomers (2.6 g glucan recovered/100 g glucan in raw biomass) and significant levels of xylan oligomers (26.0 g xylan recovered/100 g xylan in raw biomass) were recovered from the pretreatment liquor. Combining a decrystallization technique (ball milling) with oxidative lime pretreatment further improved the overall glucan yield to 90.0 (7 FPU/g raw glucan).

  5. Historic Manhattan Project Sites at Los Alamos

    ScienceCinema

    McGehee, Ellen

    2016-07-12

    The Manhattan Project laboratory constructed at Los Alamos, New Mexico, beginning in 1943, was intended from the start to be temporary and to go up with amazing speed. Because most of those WWII-era facilities were built with minimal materials and so quickly, much of the original infrastructure was torn down in the late '40s and early '50s and replaced by more permanent facilities. However, a few key facilities remained, and are being preserved and maintained for historic significance. Four such sites are visited briefly in this video, taking viewers to V-Site, the buildings where the first nuclear explosive device was pre-assembled in preparation for the Trinity Test in Southern New Mexico. Included is another WWII area, Gun Site. So named because it was the area where scientists and engineers tested the so-called "gun method" of assembling nuclear materials -- the fundamental design of the Little Boy weapon that was eventually dropped on Hiroshima. The video also goes to Pajarito Site, home of the "Slotin Building" and "Pond Cabin." The Slotin Building is the place where scientist Louis Slotin conducted a criticality experiment that went awry in early 1946, leading to his unfortunate death, and the Pond Cabin served the team of eminent scientist Emilio Segre who did early chemistry work on plutonium that ultimately led to the Fat Man weapon.

  6. Historic Manhattan Project Sites at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    McGehee, Ellen

    2014-05-22

    The Manhattan Project laboratory constructed at Los Alamos, New Mexico, beginning in 1943, was intended from the start to be temporary and to go up with amazing speed. Because most of those WWII-era facilities were built with minimal materials and so quickly, much of the original infrastructure was torn down in the late '40s and early '50s and replaced by more permanent facilities. However, a few key facilities remained, and are being preserved and maintained for historic significance. Four such sites are visited briefly in this video, taking viewers to V-Site, the buildings where the first nuclear explosive device was pre-assembled in preparation for the Trinity Test in Southern New Mexico. Included is another WWII area, Gun Site. So named because it was the area where scientists and engineers tested the so-called "gun method" of assembling nuclear materials -- the fundamental design of the Little Boy weapon that was eventually dropped on Hiroshima. The video also goes to Pajarito Site, home of the "Slotin Building" and "Pond Cabin." The Slotin Building is the place where scientist Louis Slotin conducted a criticality experiment that went awry in early 1946, leading to his unfortunate death, and the Pond Cabin served the team of eminent scientist Emilio Segre who did early chemistry work on plutonium that ultimately led to the Fat Man weapon.

  7. Saving Water at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Andy

    2015-03-16

    Los Alamos National Laboratory decreased its water usage by 26 percent in 2014, with about one-third of the reduction attributable to using reclaimed water to cool a supercomputing center. The Laboratory's goal during 2014 was to use only re-purposed water to support the mission at the Strategic Computing Complex. Using reclaimed water from the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility, or SERF, substantially decreased water usage and supported the overall mission. SERF collects industrial wastewater and treats it for reuse. The reclamation facility contributed more than 27 million gallons of re-purposed water to the Laboratory's computing center, a secured supercomputing facility that supports the Laboratory’s national security mission and is one of the institution’s larger water users. In addition to the strategic water reuse program at SERF, the Laboratory reduced water use in 2014 by focusing conservation efforts on areas that use the most water, upgrading to water-conserving fixtures, and repairing leaks identified in a biennial survey.

  8. Injection of oilfield produced water into water aquifiers - the Ojo Alamo project

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, C.S.; Hazlett, W.G.

    1996-11-01

    This paper shows the feasibility of using the Ojo Alamo Sandstone (OAS) aquifer of the San Juan Basin (SJB) to store produced water from oil and gas operations. Included are data analysis and reservoir modeling. To perform this study, we have constructed a reservoir (aquifer) simulation model that allows us to estimate the effect of injecting low salinity produced water from oil and gas wells into the Ojo Alamo Sandstone. Using the simulation model, we have the ability to select sites for both the injection and discharge of water within the reservoir boundaries and predict water quality at any point in the aquifer. The OAS`s in-situ water and formation properties were compiled from recent studies. In areas of the OAS which have insufficient data, electric log correlations from oil and gas wells were utilized to increase the accuracy of the model. The injected water quality is based on current production water analyses available from area operators. Realistic variations of injected water quality and flow rates are simulated in the model to create potential water quality distributions within the reservoir. The short range benefits of this project will be to provide readily available storage for production water for later use in agricultural and urban areas. Certain low salinity production water that is currently considered a {open_quotes}waste product{close_quotes} could be turned into a valuable resource. A benefit for New Mexico is more usable water and less unused {open_quotes}waste water{close_quotes}.

  9. Audit of consultant agreements at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-23

    The Department of Energy`s (Department) Albuquerque Operations Office (Albuquerque) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) are responsible for acquiring consulting services in a manner most advantageous to the Government by ensuring adequate competition. Although the Department prefers competitively awarding subcontracts, including consultant agreements, to ensure the lowest possible cost, it allows sole sourcing a subcontract if the sole source is fully justified. The objective of the audit was to determine whether Los Alamos` consultant agreements contained adequate sole source justifications. The audit showed that Los Alamos may not have acquired some of its consultant agreements at the lowest possible cost because it did not prepare adequate sole source justifications for 17 sole source consultant agreements valued at $842,900. This condition existed because: (1) requesters did not follow policies and procedures when preparing sole source justifications, (2) Los Alamos did not have an internal mechanism to reject consultant agreements that were not adequately justified, and (3) the Department did not review consultant agreements to evaluate the adequacy of sole source justifications. Without adequate justifications, the Department cannot be assured that consultant services were obtained at the lowest possible cost. We therefore recommended that the Manager, Albuquerque Operations Office require Los Alamos to ensure proper sole source justifications and enhance internal controls over consultant agreements. Management agreed to implement the recommendations.

  10. Los Alamos low-level waste performance assessment status

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, W.J.; Purtymun, W.D.; Dewart, J.M.; Rodgers, J.E.

    1986-06-01

    This report reviews the documented Los Alamos studies done to assess the containment of buried hazardous wastes. Five sections logically present the environmental studies, operational source terms, transport pathways, environmental dosimetry, and computer model development and use. This review gives a general picture of the Los Alamos solid waste disposal and liquid effluent sites and is intended for technical readers with waste management and environmental science backgrounds but without a detailed familiarization with Los Alamos. The review begins with a wide perspective on environmental studies at Los Alamos. Hydrology, geology, and meteorology are described for the site and region. The ongoing Laboratory-wide environmental surveillance and waste management environmental studies are presented. The next section describes the waste disposal sites and summarizes the current source terms for these sites. Hazardous chemical wastes and liquid effluents are also addressed by describing the sites and canyons that are impacted. The review then focuses on the transport pathways addressed mainly in reports by Healy and Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. Once the source terms and potential transport pathways are described, the dose assessment methods are addressed. Three major studies, the waste alternatives, Hansen and Rogers, and the Pantex Environmental Impact Statement, contributed to the current Los Alamos dose assessment methodology. Finally, the current Los Alamos groundwater, surface water, and environmental assessment models for these mesa top and canyon sites are described.

  11. Performance assessment of refractory samples in the Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchins, D.A.; Borduin, L.C.; Koenig, R.A.; Vavruska, J.S.; Warner, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    A refractory evaluation project was initiated in 1979 to study the performance of six selected refractory materials within the Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI). Determining refractory resistance to thermal shock, chemical attack, and plutonium uptake was of particular interest. The experimental refractories were subjected to a variety of waste materials, including transuranic (TRU) contaminated wastes, highly chlorinated compounds and alkaline metal salts of perchlorate, chlorate, nitrate and oxylate, over the six year period of this study. Results of this study to date indicate that the use of high alumina, and possibly specialty plastic refractories, is advisable for the lining of incinerators used for the thermal destruction of diverse chemical compounds. 12 refs., 4 tabs.

  12. Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP): Instrument and Simulation Development Status at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Arias, Angela A.; Schmierer, Eric N.; Gettemy, Donald; Howard, David W.; Wermer, Joseph R.; Tuggle, Dale G.

    2005-07-15

    The Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP) Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory has been a collaborative effort with Savannah River Site to demonstrate the Tube-in-Tube (TnT) column design and to improve TCAP science. TnT TCAP is an alternative design which uses a liquid to thermally cycle the metal hydride packed column. Inert gas displacement tests and deuterium pulse tests have been performed on the TnT TCAP column. The inert gas displacement tests are designed to measure plug flow in the column while the deuterium pulse tests determine the separation ability of the column. A residual gas analyzer measures the gases in the exit stream and the experimental results are compared with pulse test model results.

  13. Recent UCN source developments at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Seestrom, S.J.; Anaya, J.M.; Bowles, T.J.

    1998-12-01

    The most intense sources of ultra cold neutrons (UCN) have bee built at reactors where the high average thermal neutron flux can overcome the low UCN production rate to achieve usable densities of UCN. At spallation neutron sources the average flux available is much lower than at a reactor, though the peak flux can be comparable or higher. The authors have built a UCN source that attempts to take advantage of the high peak flux available at the short pulse spallation neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) to generate a useful number of UCN. In the source UCN are produced by Doppler-shifted Bragg scattering of neutrons to convert 400-m/s neutrons down into the UCN regime. This source was initially tested in 1996 and various improvements were made based on the results of the 1996 running. These improvements were implemented and tested in 1997. In sections 2 and 3 they discuss the improvements that have been made and the resulting source performance. Recently an even more interesting concept was put forward by Serebrov et al. This involves combining a solid Deuterium UCN source, previously studied by Serebrov et al., with a pulsed spallation source to achieve world record UCN densities. They have initiated a program of calculations and measurements aimed at verifying the solid Deuterium UCN source concept. The approach has been to develop an analytical capability, combine with Monte Carlo calculations of neutron production, and perform benchmark experiments to verify the validity of the calculations. Based on the calculations and measurements they plan to test a modified version of the Serebrov UCN factory. They estimate that they could produce over 1,000 UCN/cc in a 15 liter volume, using 1 {micro}amp of 800 MeV protons for two seconds every 500 seconds. They will discuss the result UCN production measurements in section 4.

  14. Simulations of flow interactions near Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Costigan, K. R.; Winterkamp, Judy; Bossert, J. E.; Langley, D. L.

    2002-01-01

    The Pajarito Plateau is located on the eastern flank of the Jemez Mountains and the west side of the Rio Grande Valley, in north-central New Mexico, where the river runs roughly north to south. On the Pajarito Plateau, a network of surface meteorological stations has been routinely maintained by Los Alamos National Laboratory. This network includes five instrumented towers, within an approximately 10 km by 15 km area. The towers stand from 23 m to 92 m tall, with multiple wind measurement heights. Investigation of the station records indicates that the wind fields can be quite complicated and may be the result of interactions of thermally and/or dynamically driven flows of many scales. Slope flows are often found on the plateau during the morning and evening transition times, but it is not unusual to find wind directions that are inconsistent with slope flows at some or all of the stations. It has been speculated that valley circulations, as well as synoptically driven winds, interact with the slope flows, but the mesonet measurements alone, with no measurements in the remainder of the valley, were not sufficient to investigate this hypothesis. Thus, during October of 1995, supplemental meteorological instrumentation was placed in the Rio Grande basin to study the complex interaction of flows in the area. A sodar was added near the 92 m tower and a radar wind profiler was placed in the Rio Grande Valley, just east of the plateau and near the river. Measurements were also added at the top of Pajarito Mountain, just west of the plateau, and across the valley, to the east, on top of Tesuque Peak (in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains). Two surface stations were also added to the north-facing slopes of Pajarito Mountain. This paper will present observations from October 1995 and results of simulations of this area that are used in the study of the complex interaction of dynamically and thermally driven flows on multiple scales.

  15. Numerical studies of diffusive shock acceleration at spherical shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyesung; Jones, T. W.

    2006-05-01

    We have developed a cosmic ray (CR) shock code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with which the particle distribution, the gas flow and their nonlinear interaction can be followed numerically in a frame comoving with an expanding shock. In order to accommodate a very wide dynamic range of diffusion length scales in the CR shock problem, we have incorporated subzone shock tracking and adaptive mesh refinement techniques. We find the spatial grid resolution required for numerical convergence is less stringent in this code compared to typical, fixed-grid Eulerian codes. The improved convergence behavior derives from maintaining the shock discontinuity inside the same grid zone in the comoving code. That feature improves numerical estimates of the compression rate experienced by CRs crossing the subshock compared to codes that allow the subshock to drift on the grid. Using this code with a Bohm-like diffusion model we have calculated the CR acceleration and the nonlinear feedback at supernova remnant shocks during the Sedov-Taylor stage. Similarly to plane-parallel shocks, with an adopted thermal leakage injection model, about 10 -3 of the particles that pass through the shock and up to 60% of the explosion energy are transferred to the CR component. These results are in good agreement with previous nonlinear spherical CR shock calculations of Berezhko and collaborators.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation of a piston driven shock wave in a hard sphere gas. Final Contractor ReportPh.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Myeung-Jouh; Greber, Isaac

    1995-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation is used to study the piston driven shock wave at Mach 1.5, 3, and 10. A shock tube, whose shape is a circular cylinder, is filled with hard sphere molecules having a Maxwellian thermal velocity distribution and zero mean velocity. The piston moves and a shock wave is generated. All collisions are specular, including those between the molecules and the computational boundaries, so that the shock development is entirely causal, with no imposed statistics. The structure of the generated shock is examined in detail, and the wave speed; profiles of density, velocity, and temperature; and shock thickness are determined. The results are compared with published results of other methods, especially the direct simulation Monte-Carlo method. Property profiles are similar to those generated by direct simulation Monte-Carlo method. The shock wave thicknesses are smaller than the direct simulation Monte-Carlo results, but larger than those of the other methods. Simulation of a shock wave, which is one-dimensional, is a severe test of the molecular dynamics method, which is always three-dimensional. A major challenge of the thesis is to examine the capability of the molecular dynamics methods by choosing a difficult task.

  17. Los Alamos National Laboratory W76 Pit Tube Lifetime Study

    SciTech Connect

    Abeln, Terri G.

    2012-04-25

    A metallurgical study was requested as part of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) W76-1 life-extension program (LEP) involving a lifetime analysis of type 304 stainless steel pit tubes subject to repeat bending loads during assembly and disassembly operations at BWXT/Pantex. This initial test phase was completed during the calendar years of 2004-2006 and the report not issued until additional recommended tests could be performed. These tests have not been funded to this date and therefore this report is considered final. Tubes were reportedly fabricated according to Rocky Flats specification P14548 - Seamless Type 304 VIM/VAR Stainless Steel Tubing. Tube diameter was specified as 0.125 inches and wall thickness as 0.028 inches. A heat treat condition is not specified and the hardness range specification can be characteristic of both 1/8 and 1/4 hard conditions. Properties of all tubes tested were within specification. Metallographic analysis could not conclusively determine a specified limit to number of bends allowable. A statistical analysis suggests a range of 5-7 bends with a 99.95% confidence limit. See the 'Statistical Analysis' section of this report. The initial phase of this study involved two separate sets of test specimens. The first group was part of an investigation originating in the ESA-GTS [now Gas Transfer Systems (W-7) Group]. After the bend cycle test parameters were chosen (all three required bends subjected to the same amount of bend cycles) and the tubes bent, the investigation was transferred to Terri Abeln (Metallurgical Science and Engineering) for analysis. Subsequently, another limited quantity of tubes became available for testing and were cycled with the same bending fixture, but with different test parameters determined by T. Abeln.

  18. Noble gas studies in vapor-growth diamonds: Comparison with shock-produced diamonds and the origin of diamonds in ureilites

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Junichi; Fukunaga, Kazuya; Ito, Keisuke )

    1991-07-01

    The authors synthesized vapor-trowth diamonds by two kinds of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) using microwave (MWCVD) and hot filament (HFCVD) ionization of gases, and examined elemental abundances and isotopic compositions of the noble gases trapped in the diamonds. It is remarkable that strong differences existed in the noble gas concentrations in the two kinds of CVD diamonds: large amounts of noble gases were trapped in the MWCVD diamonds, but not in the HFCVD diamonds. The heavy noble gases (Ar to Xe) in the MWCVD diamonds were highly fractionated compared with those in the ambient atmosphere, and are in good agreement with the calculated fractionation patterns for plasma at an electron temperature of 7,000-9,000 K. These results strongly suggest that the trapping mechanism of noble gases in CVD diamonds is ion implantation during diamond growth. The degrees of fractionation of heavy noble gases were also in good agreement with those in ureilites. The vapor-growth hypothesis is discussed in comparison with the impact-shock hypothesis as a better model for the origin of diamonds in ureilites. The diamond (and graphite, amorphous carbon, too) may have been deposited on early condensates such as Re, Ir, W, etc. This model explains the chemical features of vein material in ureilites; the refractory siderophile elements are enriched in carbon and noble gases and low in normal siderophiles. The vapor-growth model is also compatible with the oxygen isotopic data of ureilites which suggests that nebular processes are primarily responsible for the composition of ureilites.

  19. Fast molecular shocks. II - Emission from fast dissociative shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Dalgarno, A.

    1989-01-01

    The line radiations emitted in the cooling gas behind a fast dissociative shock are studied. The intensities emitted in high rotational transitions of the neutral molecules CO, SiO, HCN, CN, NO, and SO are estimated, as well as in rovibrational transitions of the molecular ions HeH(+) and OH(+) in radio recombination lines of atomic hydrogen and in fine-structure transitions of C, C(+), O, and Si(+). The predictions are compared with the observed intensities of line emission from the Orion-KL region. For Orion-KL the observations do not exclude, but probably do not require, the presence of a fast dissociative shock. Emission from SiO in high-J rotational states and from vibrationally excited OH(+), HeH(+), HeH(+), and SO(+) may be detectable from dissociative shocks under suitable conditions of preshock density and shock velocity; such emission may prove to be a useful diagnostic probe of fast shock activity.

  20. Self-sustained volume discharge in SF{sub 6}-based gas mixtures upon the development of shock-wave perturbations of the medium initiated by a pulsed CO{sub 2} laser

    SciTech Connect

    Belevtsev, A A; Kazantsev, S Yu; Kononov, I G; Firsov, K N E-mail: kazan@kapella.gpi.r

    2006-07-31

    A self-sustained volume discharge in SF{sub 6} mixtures with C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, He, and Ne preliminarily irradiated by CO{sub 2} laser pulses was investigated. The radiation energy density absorbed by SF{sub 6} in the discharge ignition region amounted to 6.5 J atm{sup -1} cm{sup -3}. The discharge structure and the current distribution in the discharge gap were found to change radically with increasing the time delay between the laser and discharge pulses. In particular, brightly glowing narrow channels are formed at the boundary of the irradiation region. The observed effect is shown to arise from the development of a shock-wave process due to a temperature jump at the boundary between the irradiated and unirradiated gas. The velocities of shock wave propagation and the main thermodynamic gas parameters in the perturbation region were calculated. A comparison was made between the calculated and measured velocities of the shock waves. (special issue devoted to the 90th anniversary of a.m. prokhorov)

  1. 1993 Northern goshawk inventory on portions of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, D.T.; Kennedy, P.L.

    1994-06-01

    Northern goshawks (Accipiter gentilis) (hereafter referred to as goshawk) is a large forest dwelling hawk. Goshawks may be declining in population and reproduction in the southwestern United States. Reasons for the possible decline in goshawk populations include timber harvesting resulting in the loss of nesting habitat, toxic chemicals, and the effects of drought, fire, and disease. Thus, there is a need to determine their population status and assess impacts of management activities in potential goshawk habitat. Inventory for the goshawk was conducted on 2,254 ha of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to determine the presence of nesting goshawks on LANL lands. This information can be incorporated into LANL`s environmental management program. The inventory was conducted by Colorado State University personnel from May 12 to July 30, 1993. This report summarizes the results of this inventory.

  2. Rayleigh-Taylor Shock Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, B J; Cook, A W

    2007-08-30

    Beginning from a state of hydrostatic equilibrium, in which a heavy gas rests atop a light gas in a constant gravitational field, Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the interface will launch a shock wave into the upper fluid. The rising bubbles of lighter fluid act like pistons, compressing the heavier fluid ahead of the fronts and generating shocklets. These shocklets coalesce in multidimensional fashion into a strong normal shock, which increases in strength as it propagates upwards. Large-eddy simulations demonstrate that the shock Mach number increases faster in three dimensions than it does in two dimensions. The generation of shocks via Rayleigh-Taylor instability could have profound implications for astrophysical flows.

  3. A progress report on UNICOS misuse detection at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.L.; Jackson, K.A.; Stallings, C.A.; Simmonds, D.D.; Siciliano, C.L.B.; Pedicini, G.A.

    1995-10-01

    An effective method for detecting computer misuse is the automatic monitoring and analysis of on-line user activity. During the past year, Los Alamos enhanced its Network Anomaly Detection and Intrusion Reporter (NADIR) to include analysis of user activity on Los Alamos` UNICOS Crays. In near real-time, NADIR compares user activity to historical profiles and tests activity against expert rules. The expert rules express Los Alamos` security policy and define improper or suspicious behavior. NADIR reports suspicious behavior to security auditors and provides tools to aid in follow-up investigations. This paper describes the implementation to date of the UNICOS component of NADIR, along with the operational experiences and future plans for the system.

  4. Publications of Los Alamos research, 1977-1981

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, C.J.; Garcia, C.A.

    1983-03-01

    This bibliography is a compilation of unclassified publications of work done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for 1977-1981. Papers published in those years are included regardless of when they were actually written. Publications received too late for inclusion in earlier compilations have also been listed. Declassification of previously classified reports is considered to constitute publication. All classified issuances are omitted - even those papers, themselves unclassified, which were published only as part of a classified document. If a paper was published more than once, all places of publication are included. The bibliography includes Los Alamos National Laboratory reports, papers released as non-Laboratory reports, journal articles, books, chapters of books, conference papers either published separately or as part of conference proceedings issued as books or reports, papers published in congressional hearings, theses, and US patents. Publications by Los Alamos authors that are not records of Laboratory-sponsored work are included when the Library becomes aware of them.

  5. Water Supply at Los Alamos 1998-2001

    SciTech Connect

    Richard J. Koch; David B. Rogers

    2003-03-01

    For the period 1998 through 2001, the total water used at Los Alamos from all sources ranged from 1325 million gallons (Mg) in 1999 to 1515 Mg in 2000. Groundwater production ranged from 1323 Mg in 1999 to 1506 Mg in 2000 from the Guaje, Pajarito, and Otowi fields. Nonpotable surface water used from Los Alamos reservoir ranged from zero gallons in 2001 to 9.3 Mg in 2000. For years 1998 through 2001, over 99% of all water used at Los Alamos was groundwater. Water use by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) between 1998 and 2001 ranged from 379 Mg in 2000 to 461 Mg in 1998. The LANL water use in 2001 was 393 Mg or 27% of the total water use at Los Alamos. Water use by Los Alamos County ranged from 872 Mg in 1999 to 1137 Mg in 2000, and averaged 1006 Mg/yr. Four new replacement wells in the Guaje field (G-2A, G-3A, G-4A, and G-5A) were drilled in 1998 and began production in 1999; with existing well G-1A, the Guaje field currently has five producing wells. Five of the old Guaje wells (G-1, G-2, G-4, G-5, and G-6) were plugged and abandoned in 1999, and one well (G-3) was abandoned but remains as an observation well for the Guaje field. The long-term water level observations in production and observation (test) wells at Los Alamos are consistent with the formation of a cone of depression in response to water production. The water level decline is gradual and at most has been about 0.7 to 2 ft per year for production wells and from 0.4 to 0.9 ft/yr for observation (test) wells. The largest water level declines have been in the Guaje field where nonpumping water levels were about 91 ft lower in 2001 than in 1951. The initial water levels of the Guaje replacement wells were 32 to 57 ft lower than the initial water levels of adjacent original Guaje wells. When production wells are taken off-line for pump replacement or repair, water levels have returned to within about 25 ft of initial static levels within 6 to 12 months. Thus, the water-level trends suggest no adverse

  6. Shock tubes and waves; Proceedings of the Thirteenth International Symposium, Niagara Falls, NY, July 6-9, 1981

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treanor, C. E.; Hall, J. G.

    1982-10-01

    The present conference on shock tubes and waves considers shock tube drivers, luminous shock tubes, shock tube temperature and pressure measurement, shock front distortion in real gases, nonlinear standing waves, transonic flow shock wave turbulent boundary interactions, wall roughness effects on reflected shock bifurcation, argon thermal conductivity, pattern generation in gaseous detonations, cylindrical resonators, shock tunnel-produced high gain lasers, fluid dynamic aspects of laser-metal interaction, and the ionization of argon gas behind reflected shock waves. Also discussed are the ionization relaxation of shock-heated plasmas and gases, discharge flow/shock tube studies of singlet oxygen, rotational and vibrational relaxation, chemiluminescence thermal and shock wave decomposition of hydrogen cyanide and hydrogen azide, shock wave structure in gas-particle mixtures at low Mach numbers, binary nucleation in a Ludwieg tube, shock liquefaction experiments, pipeline explosions, the shock wave ignition of pulverized coal, and shock-initiated methane combustion.

  7. Water supply at Los Alamos during 1993. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Purtymun, W.D.; Stoker, A.K.; McLin, S.G.; Maes, M.N.; Glasco, T.A.

    1995-10-01

    This report summarizes production and aquifer conditions for water wells in the Guaje, Pajarito, and Otowi Well Fields. These wells supplied all of the potable water used for municipal and some industrial purposes in Los Alamos County and the Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1993. The wells in the Los Alamos Well Field were transferred to San Ildefonso Pueblo in 1992. Four of the wells in the Los Alamos Well Field were plugged in 1993. One of the two new wells in the Otowi Well Field became operational in 1993. The spring gallery in Water Canyon supplied nonpotable water for industrial use, while surface water from the Los Alamos Reservoir was diverted for irrigation. In 1993 no water was used from the Guaje Reservoir. Due to the maintenance and operating cost of diverting water from the reservoirs, it is not economically feasible to continue their use for irrigation. This report fulfills some of the requirements of the Los Alamos Groundwater Protection Management Program by documenting use of the groundwater for water supply and providing information hydrologic characteristics of the main aquifer. This report is a joint effort between the Laboratory Water Quality and Hydrology Group and the Utilities Department of Johnson Controls World Services Inc. (JCI). The purpose of this report is to ensure a continuing historical record and to provide guidance for management of water resources in long-range planning for the water supply system. We have issued one summary report for the period of 1947 to 1971 and 22 annual reports that contain the results of our studies of these water supplies. An additional report summarized the hydrology of the main aquifer with reference to future development of groundwater supplies. A report was issued in 1988 that examined the status of wells and future water supply.

  8. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Interaction of an optical pulsed discharge with a gas: conditions for stable generation and merging of shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tishchenko, V. N.; Apollonov, V. V.; Grachev, Gennadii N.; Gulidov, A. I.; Zapryagaev, V. I.; Men'shikov, Ya G.; Smirnov, A. L.; Sobolev, A. V.

    2004-10-01

    The conditions under which an optical pulsed discharge stably generates periodic shock waves are determined theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that the mechanism of merging shock waves into a low-frequency quasi-stationary wave is operative in various gases (and vapours) in a wide range of laser spark energies. The application of such a wave for increasing the coupling factor in a laser engine is considered.

  9. Powerful H2 Line Cooling in Stephan’s Quintet. II. Group-wide Gas and Shock Modeling of the Warm H2 and a Comparison with [C II] 157.7 μm Emission and Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleton, P. N.; Guillard, P.; Togi, A.; Alatalo, K.; Boulanger, F.; Cluver, M.; Pineau des Forêts, G.; Lisenfeld, U.; Ogle, P.; Xu, C. K.

    2017-02-01

    We map for the first time the two-dimensional H2 excitation of warm intergalactic gas in Stephan's Quintet on group-wide (50 × 35 kpc2) scales to quantify the temperature, mass, and warm H2 mass fraction as a function of position using Spitzer. Molecular gas temperatures are seen to rise (to T > 700 K) and the slope of the power-law density–temperature relation flattens along the main ridge of the filament, defining the region of maximum heating. We also performed MHD modeling of the excitation properties of the warm gas, to map the velocity structure and energy deposition rate of slow and fast molecular shocks. Slow magnetic shocks were required to explain the power radiated from the lowest-lying rotational states of H2, and strongly support the idea that energy cascades down to small scales and low velocities from the fast collision of NGC 7318b with group-wide gas. The highest levels of heating of the warm H2 are strongly correlated with the large-scale stirring of the medium as measured by [C ii] spectroscopy with Herschel. H2 is also seen associated with a separate bridge that extends toward the Seyfert nucleus in NGC 7319, from both Spitzer and CARMA CO observations. This opens up the possibility that both galaxy collisions and outflows from active galactic nuclei can turbulently heat gas on large scales in compact groups. The observations provide a laboratory for studying the effects of turbulent energy dissipation on group-wide scales, which may provide clues about the heating and cooling of gas at high z in early galaxy and protogalaxy formation.

  10. HERSCHEL FAR-INFRARED SPECTRAL-MAPPING OF ORION BN/KL OUTFLOWS: SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF EXCITED CO, H{sub 2}O, OH, O, AND C{sup +} IN SHOCKED GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Goicoechea, Javier R.; Cernicharo, José; Cuadrado, Sara; Etxaluze, Mireya; Chavarría, Luis; Neufeld, David A.; Vavrek, Roland; Encrenaz, Pierre; Melnick, Gary J.; Polehampton, Edward

    2015-01-20

    We present ∼2' × 2' spectral-maps of Orion Becklin-Neugebauer/Kleinmann-Low (BN/KL) outflows taken with Herschel at ∼12'' resolution. For the first time in the far-IR domain, we spatially resolve the emission associated with the bright H{sub 2} shocked regions ''Peak 1'' and ''Peak 2'' from that of the hot core and ambient cloud. We analyze the ∼54-310 μm spectra taken with the PACS and SPIRE spectrometers. More than 100 lines are detected, most of them rotationally excited lines of {sup 12}CO (up to J = 48-47), H{sub 2}O, OH, {sup 13}CO, and HCN. Peaks 1/2 are characterized by a very high L(CO)/L {sub FIR} ≈ 5 × 10{sup –3} ratio and a plethora of far-IR H{sub 2}O emission lines. The high-J CO and OH lines are a factor of ≈2 brighter toward Peak 1 whereas several excited H{sub 2}O lines are ≲50% brighter toward Peak 2. Most of the CO column density arises from T {sub k} ∼ 200-500 K gas that we associate with low-velocity shocks that fail to sputter grain ice mantles and show a maximum gas-phase H{sub 2}O/CO ≲ 10{sup –2} abundance ratio. In addition, the very excited CO (J > 35) and H{sub 2}O lines reveal a hotter gas component (T {sub k} ∼ 2500 K) from faster (v {sub S} > 25 km s{sup –1}) shocks that are able to sputter the frozen-out H{sub 2}O and lead to high H{sub 2}O/CO ≳ 1 abundance ratios. The H{sub 2}O and OH luminosities cannot be reproduced by shock models that assume high (undepleted) abundances of atomic oxygen in the preshock gas and/or neglect the presence of UV radiation in the postshock gas. Although massive outflows are a common feature in other massive star-forming cores, Orion BN/KL seems more peculiar because of its higher molecular luminosities and strong outflows caused by a recent explosive event.

  11. A physicists guide to The Los Alamos Primer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, B. Cameron

    2016-11-01

    In April 1943, a group of scientists at the newly established Los Alamos Laboratory were given a series of lectures by Robert Serber on what was then known of the physics and engineering issues involved in developing fission bombs. Serber’s lectures were recorded in a 24 page report titled The Los Alamos Primer, which was subsequently declassified and published in book form. This paper describes the background to the Primer and analyzes the physics contained in its 22 sections. The motivation for this paper is to provide a firm foundation of the background and contents of the Primer for physicists interested in the Manhattan Project and nuclear weapons.

  12. Fifty-one years of Los Alamos Spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Fenimore, Edward E.

    2014-09-04

    From 1963 to 2014, the Los Alamos National Laboratory was involved in at least 233 spacecraft. There are probably only one or two institutions in the world that have been involved in so many spacecraft. Los Alamos space exploration started with the Vela satellites for nuclear test detection, but soon expanded to ionospheric research (mostly barium releases), radioisotope thermoelectric generators, solar physics, solar wind, magnetospheres, astrophysics, national security, planetary physics, earth resources, radio propagation in the ionosphere, and cubesats. Here, we present a list of the spacecraft, their purpose, and their launch dates for use during RocketFest

  13. Los Alamos Using Neutrons to Stop Nuclear Smugglers

    ScienceCinema

    Favalli, Andrea; Swinhoe, Martyn

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers have successfully demonstrated for the first time that laser-generated neutrons can be enlisted as a useful tool in the War on Terror. The international research team used the short-pulse laser at Los Alamos's TRIDENT facility to generate a neutron beam with novel characteristics that interrogated a closed container to confirm the presence and quantity of nuclear material inside. The successful experiment paves the way for creation of a table-top-sized or truck-mounted neutron generator that could be installed at strategic locations worldwide to thwart smugglers trafficking in nuclear materials.

  14. Los Alamos Using Neutrons to Stop Nuclear Smugglers

    SciTech Connect

    Favalli, Andrea; Swinhoe, Martyn

    2013-06-03

    Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers have successfully demonstrated for the first time that laser-generated neutrons can be enlisted as a useful tool in the War on Terror. The international research team used the short-pulse laser at Los Alamos's TRIDENT facility to generate a neutron beam with novel characteristics that interrogated a closed container to confirm the presence and quantity of nuclear material inside. The successful experiment paves the way for creation of a table-top-sized or truck-mounted neutron generator that could be installed at strategic locations worldwide to thwart smugglers trafficking in nuclear materials.

  15. The development of the atomic bomb, Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, R.W.

    1993-11-01

    The historical presentation begins with details of the selection of Los Alamos as the site of the Army installation. Wartime efforts of the Army Corps of Engineers, and scientists to include the leader of Los Alamos, Robert Oppenheimer are presented. The layout and construction of the facilities are discussed. The monumental design requirements of the bombs are discussed, including but not limited to the utilization of the second choice implosion method of detonation, and the production of bomb-grade nuclear explosives. The paper ends with a philosophical discussion on the use of nuclear weapons.

  16. Measurement of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity in the Bandelier Tuff at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Conca, J.; Mockler, T.J.

    1995-04-01

    Hydraulic conductivities, K, were experimentally determined as a function of volumetric water content, {theta}, in Bandelier Tuff cores from Los Alamos, New Mexico. These data were used to determine the feasibility of applying a new unsaturated flow technology (UFA{trademark}) to further hydrologic studies of tuffaceous rocks at Los Alamos. The K({theta}) relationships for eight cores of Bandelier Tuff from boreholes AAA and AAB were measured using the UFA and, together with their in situ water contents, were used to determine transient water flux into these samples at the time of sampling. If the system is at steady-state, then these flux values correspond to the recharge through those points, a situation often encountered in semi-arid to arid regions such as Los Alamos and other sites in the western United States. Samples AAA 9956, AAB 0011, AAB 0012 and AAB 0040 exhibited fluxes of 6 x 10{sup -8} cm/s, 4.8 x 10{sup -7} cm/s, 2.8 x 10{sup -7} cm/s and 2.4 x 10{sup -8} cm/s, respectively, indicating significant flux. Samples AAB 0063, AAB 0065, AAB 0072 and AAB 0081 had very low water contents suggesting fluxes less than 10{sup -10} cm/s, and appear to be close to their residual water contents. Assuming that the samples AAB 0063, AAB 0065, AAB 0072 and AAB 0081 were not accidentally dried out during handling, these results imply that these samples have zero recharge and that redistribution of moisture at these horizons is controlled more by vapor diffusion than by advection. The vapor diffusivities in these cores can be determined using the new UFA gas permeameter. Samples AAA 9956, AAB 0011, AAB 0012 and AAB 0040 appear to be controlled by advection.

  17. Needs assessment for fire department services and resources for the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-15

    This report has been developed in response to a request from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to evaluate the need for fire department services so as to enable the Laboratory to plan effective fire protection and thereby: meet LANL`s regulatory and contractual obligations; interface with the Department of Energy (DOE) and other agencies on matters relating to fire and emergency services; and ensure appropriate protection of the community and environment. This study is an outgrowth of the 1993 Fire Department Needs Assessment (prepared for DOE) but is developed from the LANL perspective. Input has been received from cognizant and responsible representatives at LANL, DOE, Los Alamos County (LAC) and the Los Alamos Fire Department (LAFD).

  18. Shock induced cavity collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skidmore, Jonathan; Doyle, Hugo; Tully, Brett; Betney, Matthew; Foster, Peta; Ringrose, Tim; Ramasamy, Rohan; Parkin, James; Edwards, Tom; Hawker, Nicholas

    2016-10-01

    Results from the experimental investigation of cavity collapse driven by a strong planar shock (>6km/s) are presented. Data from high speed framing cameras, laser backlit diagnostics and time-resolved pyromety are used to validate the results of hydrodynamic front-tracking simulations. As a code validation exercise, a 2-stage light gas gun was used to accelerate a 1g Polycarbonate projectile to velocities exceeding 6km/s; impact with a PMMA target containing a gas filled void results in the formation of a strong shockwave with pressures exceeding 1Mbar. The subsequent phenomena associated with the collapse of the void and excitation of the inert gas fill are recorded and compared to simulated data. Variation of the mass density and atomic number of the gas fill is used to alter the plasma parameters furthering the extent of the code validation.

  19. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pullin, D. I.; Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.

    2014-09-15

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R=√(μ{sub 0}/p{sub 0}) I/(2 π) where I is the current, μ{sub 0} is the permeability, and p{sub 0} is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The

  20. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullin, D. I.; Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.

    2014-09-01

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R=sqrt{μ _0/p_0} I/(2 π ) where I is the current, μ0 is the permeability, and p0 is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The diverging magnetic field

  1. Dust processing and its feedback on interstellar shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillet, Vincent; Jones, Anthony; Pineau Des Forets, Guillaume

    Shocks in the interstellar medium (ISM) have a fundamental impact on the dust that they encounter. Supernova-generated shocks in the warm intercloud medium are the principal lifetimedetermining agents for dust evolution in the ISM. However, the presence of dust can also have a major influence on the structure of the shocks themselves. In this review we focus on the important role of dust in shocks and present the results of numerical models that simulate dust destruction and processing, and the effect of the dust on, shocks in molecular clouds and in the warm intercloud medium. A proper treatment of grain charging, gyration and coupling to the magnetic field determines the details of the dust dynamics and therefore the nature of the gas-grain and grain-grain interactions. The resultant processing of dust by shocks in the ISM can lead to changes in the dust-to-gas mass ratio through sputtering and vaporisation, and also to an evolution of the dust size distribution through the competition between coagulation and shattering in graingrain collisions. The presence of dust, and its processing, can also alter the shock structure and the gas composition. In high velocity shocks propagating through the warm intercloud medium, dust is the main coolant in the regions where hydrogen is ionized, until it is fully destroyed by sputtering. The reformation of H2 in the cooling gas depends on the level of dust destruction and shattering in the shock. In shocked molecular clouds, the destruction of silicate grains produces shock tracers like SiO. Dust grains and their fragments produced by shattering in the shock also affect the coupling between the magnetic field and the neutral gas in multi-fluid shocks. We emphasize the necessity of a detailed modelling of grain charging and dynamics through the shock in order to determine the impact of shocks on the dust size distribution, and its feedback on the shock structure and the evolution of the shocked gas.

  2. A survey of macromycete diversity at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Bandelier National Monument, and Los Alamos County; A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Jarmie, N.; Rogers, F.J.

    1997-11-01

    The authors have completed a 5-year survey (1991--1995) of macromycetes found in Los Alamos County, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Bandelier National Monument. The authors have compiled a database of 1,048 collections, their characteristics, and identifications. The database represents 123 (98%) genera and 175 (73%) species reliably identified. Issues of habitat loss, species extinction, and ecological relationships are addressed, and comparisons with other surveys are made. With this baseline information and modeling of this baseline data, one can begin to understand more about the fungal flora of the area.

  3. Working with Fermi at Chicago and Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garwin, Richard L.

    2010-02-01

    I discuss my experience with Enrico Fermi as student and fellow faculty member at Chicago and with him as consultants to the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory in 1950-1952. The talk shares observations about this great physicist and exemplary human being. )

  4. The Controlled-Air Incinerator at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Newmyer, J.N.

    1994-04-01

    The Controlled-Air Incinerator (CAI) at Los Alamos is being modified and upgraded to begin routine operations treating low-level mixed waste (LLMW), radioactively contaminated polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) wastes, low-level liquid wastes, and possibly transuranic (TRU) wastes. This paper describes those modifications. Routine waste operations should begin in late FY95.

  5. Mercury: The Los Alamos ICF KrF laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Czuchlewski, S.J.; York, G.W.; Bigio, I.J.; Brucker, J.; Hanson, D.; Honig, E.M.; Kurnit, N.; Leland, W.; McCown, A.W.; McLeod, J.; Rose, E.; Thomas, S.; Thompson, D.

    1993-01-19

    The Mercury KrF laser facility at Los Alamos is being built with the benefit of lessons learned from the Aurora system. An increased understanding of KrF laser engineering, and the designed implementation of system flexibility, will permit Mercury to serve as a tested for a variety of advanced KrF technology concepts.

  6. The Los Alamos nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation technology development program

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.A. Jr.; Menlove, H.O.; Reilly, T.D.; Bosler, G.E.; Hakkila, E.A.; Eccleston, G.W.

    1994-04-01

    For nearly three decades, Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed and implemented nuclear measurement technology and training in support of national and international nuclear safeguards. This paper outlines the major elements of those technologies and highlights some of the latest developments.

  7. Plasma and ion beam processing at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Davis, H.A.; Henins, I.

    1994-07-01

    Efforts are underway at Los Alamos National Laboratory to utilize plasma and intense ion beam science and technology of the processing of advanced materials. A major theme involves surface modification of materials, e.g., etching, deposition, alloying, and implantation. In this paper, we concentrate on two programs, plasma source ion implantation and high-intensity pulsed ion beam deposition.

  8. [Los Alamos National Laboratory industrial applications and technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-30

    In October 1989, the Los Alamos Economic Development Corporation (LAEDC) entered into a contract with the Industrial Applications office (IAO) of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) whereby the LAEDC was to provide support services to IAO. More specifically, according to the Statement of Work in this contract The Los Alamos Economic Development Corporation shall assist the Los Alamos National Laboratory Industrial Applications Office in establishing and strengthening connections between potential entrepreneurs at the Laboratory and the business assistance community throughout New Mexico, directed toward enhancing the number, of successful start up businesses spinning off the Laboratory's technology base.'' As part of this contract and subsequent modifications thereof, the LAEDC was to perform seven tasks: 1. Provide business planning assistance to potential entrepreneurs. 2. (Assist IAO in preparing and distributing) informational materials on technology transfer. 3. (Organize and manage) meetings and seminars on technology transfer and entrepreneurship. 4. Identify new opportunities for technology transfer. 5. (Identify and implement programs for the) recognition of Laboratory Entrepreneurs. 6. Training Lab personnel, in the area of technology transfer and Laboratory industrial interactions. 7. Review and summarize prior New Mexico economic development studies. The purpose of this report, is to summarize the accomplishments of the LAEDC under its contract with IAO, and to fulfill its reporting requirements. This report covers the period from October 1989 to September 1992.

  9. Aqueous Nitrate Recovery Line at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Finstad, Casey Charles

    2016-06-15

    This powerpoint is part of the ADPSM Plutonium Engineering Lecture Series, which is an opportunity for new hires at LANL to get an overview of work done at TA55. It goes into detail about the aqueous nitrate recovery line at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  10. Brief review of Rover fuel development at Los Alamos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Keith V.

    1991-01-01

    A brief review of the graphite matrix uranium fuel development efforts at Los Alamos from 1955 through 1972 is presented. The uses of graphite flour carbon black, various binders, uranium dioxide, coated UC2 particles, and zirconium carbide in this development are described.

  11. Summary of environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    Linking the Rio Grande Valley and the Jemez Mountains, New Mexico`s Pajarito Plateau is home to a world-class scientific institution. Los Alamos National Laboratory (or the Laboratory), managed by the Regents of the University of California, is a government-owned, Department of Energy-supervised complex investigating all areas of modern science for the purposes of national defense, health, conservation, and ecology. The Laboratory was founded in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project, whose members assembled to create the first nuclear weapon. Occupying the campus of the Los Alamos Ranch School, American and British scientists gathered on the isolated mesa tops to harness recently discovered nuclear power with the hope of ending World War II. In July 1945, the initial objective of the Laboratory, a nuclear device, was achieved in Los Alamos and tested in White Sands, New Mexico. Today the Laboratory continues its role in defense, particularly in nuclear weapons, including developing methods for safely handling weapons and managing waste. For the past twenty years, the Laboratory has published an annual environmental report. This pamphlet offers a synopsis that briefly explains important concepts, such as radiation and provides a summary of the monitoring results and regulatory compliance status that are explained at length in the document entitled Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos during 1995.

  12. Airport-Noise Levels and Annoyance Model (ALAMO) system's reference manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, R.; Donaldson, J. L.; Johnson, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The airport-noise levels and annoyance model (ALAMO) is described in terms of the constituent modules, the execution of ALAMO procedure files, necessary for system execution, and the source code documentation associated with code development at Langley Research Center. The modules constituting ALAMO are presented both in flow graph form, and through a description of the subroutines and functions that comprise them.

  13. Environmental assessment for effluent reduction, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-11

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to eliminate industrial effluent from 27 outfalls at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The Proposed Action includes both simple and extensive plumbing modifications, which would result in the elimination of industrial effluent being released to the environment through 27 outfalls. The industrial effluent currently going to about half of the 27 outfalls under consideration would be rerouted to LANL`s sanitary sewer system. Industrial effluent from other outfalls would be eliminated by replacing once-through cooling water systems with recirculation systems, or, in a few instances, operational changes would result in no generation of industrial effluent. After the industrial effluents have been discontinued, the affected outfalls would be removed from the NPDES Permit. The pipes from the source building or structure to the discharge point for the outfalls may be plugged, or excavated and removed. Other outfalls would remain intact and would continue to discharge stormwater. The No Action alternative, which would maintain the status quo for LANL`s outfalls, was also analyzed. An alternative in which industrial effluent would be treated at the source facilities was considered but dismissed from further analysis because it would not reasonably meet the DOE`s purpose for action, and its potential environmental effects were bounded by the analysis of the Proposed Action and the No Action alternatives.

  14. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), conducted March 29, 1987 through April 17, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the LANL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the LANL, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the LANL Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the Survey for the LANL. 65 refs., 68 figs., 73 tabs.

  15. Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Lansing, Allan M.

    1963-01-01

    Septic shock may be defined as hypotension caused by bacteremia and accompanied by decreased peripheral blood flow, evidenced by oliguria. Clinically, a shaking chill is the warning signal. The immediate cause of hypotension is pooling of blood in the periphery, leading to decreased venous return: later, peripheral resistance falls and cardiac failure may occur. Irreversible shock is comparable to massive reactive hyperemia. Reticuloendothelial failure, histamine release, and toxic hypersensitivity may be factors in the pathogenesis of septic shock. Adrenal failure does not usually occur, but large doses of corticosteroid are employed therapeutically to counteract the effect of histamine release or hypersensitivity to endotoxin. The keys to successful therapy are time, antibiotics, vasopressors, cortisone and correction of acidosis. PMID:14063936

  16. On the effect of conductivity of a shock-compressed gas on interferometric recording of parameters of motion of a liner

    SciTech Connect

    Ogorodnikov, V. A. Mikhailov, A. L.; Peshkov, V. V.; Bogdanov, E. N.; Rodionov, A. V.; Sedov, A. A.; Fedorov, A. V.; Nazarov, D. V.; Finyushin, S. A.; Dudoladov, V. I.; Erunov, S. V.; Blikov, A. O.

    2012-01-15

    We report on the results of a study of the acceleration dynamics of an aluminum liner to a velocity of 5.5 km/s using continuous recording of velocity (velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) and Fabry-Perot interferometer) and motion trajectory (radiointerferometer and resistive transducer) in air and in a helium atmosphere. It is found that for liner velocities exceeding 4.0 and 5.0 km/s, the displacement of the shock wave front is recorded by the radiointerferometer in air and helium, respectively. At these velocities, the conductivities of air and helium behind the shock wave front are estimated.

  17. Review of Rover fuel element protective coating development at Los Alamos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, Terry C.

    1991-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) entered the nuclear propulsion field in 1955 and began work on all aspects of a nuclear propulsion program with a target exhaust temperature of about 2750 K. A very extensive chemical vapor deposition coating technology for preventing catastrophic corrosion of reactor core components by the high temperature, high pressure hydrogen propellant gas was developed. Over the 17-year term of the program, more than 50,000 fuel elements were coated and evaluated. Advances in performance were achieved only through closely coupled interaction between the developing fuel element fabrication and protective coating technologies. The endurance of fuel elements in high temperature, high pressure hydrogen environment increased from several minutes at 2000 K exit gas temperature to 2 hours at 2440 K exit gas temperature in a reactor test and 10 hours at 2350 K exit gas temperature in a hot gas test. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the rationale for selection of coating materials used (NbC and ZrC), identify critical fuel element-coat interactions that had to be modified to increase system performance, and review the evolution of protective coating technology.

  18. Commercialization of Los Alamos National Laboratory technologies via small businesses. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brice, R.; Carton, D.; Rhyne, T.

    1997-06-01

    Appendices are presented from a study performed on a concept model system for the commercialization of Los Alamos National Laboratory technologies via small businesses. Topics include a summary of information from the joint MCC/Los Alamos technology conference; a comparison of New Mexico infrastructure to other areas; a typical licensing agreement; technology screening guides; summaries of specific DOE/UC/Los Alamos documents; a bibliography; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory TCRD; The Ames Center for Advanced Technology Development; Los Alamos licensing procedures; presentation of slides from monthly MCC/Los Alamos review meetings; generalized entrepreneurship model; and a discussion on receiving equity for technology.

  19. Chondrule Destruction in Nebular Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquet, Emmanuel; Thompson, Christopher

    2014-12-01

    Chondrules are millimeter-sized silicate spherules ubiquitous in primitive meteorites, but whose origin remains mysterious. One of the main proposed mechanisms for producing them is melting of solids in shock waves in the gaseous protoplanetary disk. However, evidence is mounting that chondrule-forming regions were enriched in solids well above solar abundances. Given the high velocities involved in shock models, destructive collisions would be expected between differently sized grains after passage of the shock front as a result of differential drag. We investigate the probability and outcome of collisions of particles behind a one-dimensional shock using analytic methods as well as a full integration of the coupled mass, momentum, energy, and radiation equations. Destruction of protochondrules seems unavoidable for solid/gas ratios epsilon >~ 0.1, and possibly even for solar abundances because of "sandblasting" by finer dust. A flow with epsilon >~ 10 requires much smaller shock velocities (~2 versus 8 km s-1) in order to achieve chondrule-melting temperatures, and radiation trapping allows slow cooling of the shocked fragments. Initial destruction would still be extensive; although re-assembly of millimeter-sized particles would naturally occur by grain sticking afterward, the compositional heterogeneity of chondrules may be difficult to reproduce. We finally note that solids passing through small-scale bow shocks around few kilometer-sized planetesimals might experience partial melting and yet escape fragmentation.

  20. Dehydration kinetics of shocked serpentine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyburczy, James A.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental rates of dehydration of shocked and unshocked serpentine were determined using a differential scanning calorimetric technique. Dehydration rates in shocked serpentine are enhanced by orders of magnitude over corresponding rates in unshocked material, even though the impact experiments were carried out under conditions that inhibited direct impact-induced devolatilization. Extrapolation to temperatures of the Martian surface indicates that dehydration of shocked material would occur 20 to 30 orders of magnitude more rapidly than for unshocked serpentine. The results indicate that impacted planetary surfaces and associated atmospheres would reach chemical equilibrium much more quickly than calculations based on unshocked material would indicate, even during the earliest, coldest stages of accretion. Furthermore, it is suggested that chemical weathering of shocked planetary surfaces by solid-gas reactions would be sufficiently rapid that true equilibrium mineral assemblages should form.

  1. Study of effect of the newly developed artificial blood "Neo Red Cells (NRC)" on hemodynamics and blood gas transport in canine hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Usuba, A; Motoki, R; Suzuki, K; Sakaguchi, K; Takahashi, A

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the newly developed liposome-encapsulated hemoglobin, named Neo Red Cells (NRC), in the treatment of hemorrhagic shock. The particle size of NRC is 180 +/- 88 nm, the hemoglobin concentration is 5.6 g/dl, the viscosity is 2 cp and P50 is 49.5 mmHg. The experiment was carried out on six mongrel dogs suffering hemorrhagic shock. Blood was extracted from the femoral artery and blood pressure became lower than 60 mmHg. NRC in amount equal to the amount of blood extracted was transfused immediately. Inhalating normal room air, the above manipulation was repeated 3-5 times. After 59% to 88% blood exchange using NRC, the total peripheral vascular resistance index (TPRI) was reduced and the cardiac index (CI) was increased, thereby alleviating the burden on the heart. The reduction of TPRI in the presence of hemorrhagic shock is presumed to be due to the small size of the NRC granules and their low viscosity. As the exchange rate increased, the oxygen consumption (VO2) increased remarkably, presumably due to the increase of CI and A-V difference of oxygen content. The conclusion of the study is that NRC is more suitable than natural blood for the treatment of hemorrhagic shock.

  2. Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research - JASPER

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Commonly known as JASPER the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research facility is a two stage light gas gun used to study the behavior of plutonium and other materials under high pressures, temperatures, and strain rates.

  3. Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research - JASPER

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-31

    Commonly known as JASPER the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research facility is a two stage light gas gun used to study the behavior of plutonium and other materials under high pressures, temperatures, and strain rates.

  4. Pressure effects on the ejection of material from shocked tin surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Zellner, M. B.; Hammerberg, J. E.; Hixson, R. S.; Morley, K. B.; Obst, A. W.; Olson, R. T.; Payton, J. R.; Rigg, P. A.; Buttler, W. T.; Grover, M.; Iverson, A. J.; Macrum, G. S.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; Veeser, L.; Routley, N.

    2007-12-12

    Los Alamos National Lab (LANL) is actively engaged in the development of a model to predict the formation of micron-scale fragments ejected (ejecta) from shocked metals that have surface defects. The LANL ejecta model considers that the amount of ejecta is mainly related to the material's phase on shock release at the free-surface. This effort investigates the relation between ejecta production and shock-breakout pressure for Sn shocked with high explosives to pressures near the solid-on-release/partial-liquid-on-release phase transition region. We found that the amount of ejecta produced for shock-breakout pressures that resulted in partial-liquid-on-release increased significantly compared to that which resulted in solid-on-release. Additionally, we found that the amount of ejecta remained relatively constant within the partial-liquid-on-release, regardless of shock-breakout pressure.

  5. Shock finding on a moving-mesh - II. Hydrodynamic shocks in the Illustris universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaal, Kevin; Springel, Volker; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Pfrommer, Christoph; Nelson, Dylan; Vogelsberger, Mark; Genel, Shy; Pillepich, Annalisa; Sijacki, Debora; Hernquist, Lars

    2016-10-01

    Hydrodynamical shocks are a manifestation of the non-linearity of the Euler equations and play a fundamental role in cosmological gas dynamics. In this work, we identify and analyse shocks in the Illustris simulation, and contrast the results with those of non-radiative runs. We show that simulations with more comprehensive physical models of galaxy formation pose new challenges for shock finding algorithms due to radiative cooling and star-forming processes, prompting us to develop a number of methodology improvements. We find in Illustris a total shock surface area which is about 1.4 times larger at the present epoch compared to non-radiative runs, and an energy dissipation rate at shocks which is higher by a factor of around 7. Remarkably, shocks with Mach numbers above and below mathcal {M}≈ 10 contribute about equally to the total dissipation across cosmic time. This is in sharp contrast to non-radiative simulations, and we demonstrate that a large part of the difference arises due to strong black hole radio-mode feedback in Illustris. We also provide an overview of the large diversity of shock morphologies, which includes complex networks of halo-internal shocks, shocks on to cosmic sheets, feedback shocks due to black holes and galactic winds, as well as ubiquitous accretion shocks. In high-redshift systems more massive than 1012 M⊙, we discover the existence of a double accretion shock pattern in haloes. They are created when gas streams along filaments without being shocked at the outer accretion shock, but then forms a second, roughly spherical accretion shock further inside.

  6. Penetrating radiation: applications at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Scott; Hunter, James; Morris, Christopher

    2013-09-01

    Los Alamos has used penetrating radiography extensively throughout its history dating back to the Manhattan Project where imaging dense, imploding objects was the subject of intense interest. This interest continues today as major facilities like DARHT1 have become the mainstay of the US Stockpile Stewardship Program2 and the cornerstone of nuclear weapons certification. Meanwhile, emerging threats to national security from cargo containers and improvised explosive devices (IEDs) have invigorated inspection efforts using muon tomography, and compact x-ray radiography. Additionally, unusual environmental threats, like those from underwater oil spills and nuclear power plant accidents, have caused renewed interest in fielding radiography in severe operating conditions. We review the history of penetrating radiography at Los Alamos and survey technologies as presently applied to these important problems.

  7. The engineering institute of Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, Charles R; Park, Gyuhae; Cornwell, Phillip J; Todd, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) have taken the unprecedented step of creating a collaborative, multi-disciplinary graduate education program and associated research agenda called the Engineering Institute. The mission of the Engineering Institute is to develop a comprehensive approach for conducting LANL mission-driven, multidisciplinary engineering research and to improve recruiting, revitalization, and retention of the current and future staff necessary to support the LANL' s national security responsibilities. The components of the Engineering Institute are (1) a joint LANL/UCSD degree program, (2) joint LANL/UCSD research projects, (3) the Los Alamos Dynamic Summer School, (4) an annual workshop, and (5) industry short courses. This program is a possible model for future industry/government interactions with university partners.

  8. A NEW GENERATION OF LOS ALAMOS OPACITY TABLES

    SciTech Connect

    Colgan, J.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Magee, N. H.; Sherrill, M. E.; Abdallah, J. Jr.; Hakel, P.; Fontes, C. J.; Guzik, J. A.; Mussack, K. A.

    2016-02-01

    We present a new, publicly available set of Los Alamos OPLIB opacity tables for the elements hydrogen through zinc. Our tables are computed using the Los Alamos ATOMIC opacity and plasma modeling code, and make use of atomic structure calculations that use fine-structure detail for all the elements considered. Our equation of state model, known as ChemEOS, is based on the minimization of free energy in a chemical picture and appears to be a reasonable and robust approach to determining atomic state populations over a wide range of temperatures and densities. In this paper we discuss in detail the calculations that we have performed for the 30 elements considered, and present some comparisons of our monochromatic opacities with measurements and other opacity codes. We also use our new opacity tables in solar modeling calculations and compare and contrast such modeling with previous work.

  9. A New Generation of Los Alamos Opacity Tables

    SciTech Connect

    Colgan, James Patrick; Kilcrease, David Parker; Magee, Jr., Norman H.; Sherrill, Manolo Edgar; Abdallah, Joseph; Hakel, Peter; Fontes, Christopher John; Guzik, Joyce Ann; Mussack Tamashiro, Kathleen Anita

    2016-01-26

    We present a new, publicly available, set of Los Alamos OPLIB opacity tables for the elements hydrogen through zinc. Our tables are computed using the Los Alamos ATOMIC opacity and plasma modeling code, and make use of atomic structure calculations that use fine-structure detail for all the elements considered. Our equation-of-state (EOS) model, known as ChemEOS, is based on the minimization of free energy in a chemical picture and appears to be a reasonable and robust approach to determining atomic state populations over a wide range of temperatures and densities. In this paper we discuss in detail the calculations that we have performed for the 30 elements considered, and present some comparisons of our monochromatic opacities with measurements and other opacity codes. We also use our new opacity tables in solar modeling calculations and compare and contrast such modeling with previous work.

  10. A New Generation of Los Alamos Opacity Tables

    DOE PAGES

    Colgan, James Patrick; Kilcrease, David Parker; Magee, Jr., Norman H.; ...

    2016-01-26

    We present a new, publicly available, set of Los Alamos OPLIB opacity tables for the elements hydrogen through zinc. Our tables are computed using the Los Alamos ATOMIC opacity and plasma modeling code, and make use of atomic structure calculations that use fine-structure detail for all the elements considered. Our equation-of-state (EOS) model, known as ChemEOS, is based on the minimization of free energy in a chemical picture and appears to be a reasonable and robust approach to determining atomic state populations over a wide range of temperatures and densities. In this paper we discuss in detail the calculations thatmore » we have performed for the 30 elements considered, and present some comparisons of our monochromatic opacities with measurements and other opacity codes. We also use our new opacity tables in solar modeling calculations and compare and contrast such modeling with previous work.« less

  11. A new generation of Los Alamos opacity tables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgan, J.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Magee, N. H.; Abdallah, J.; Sherrill, M. E.; Fontes, C. J.; Hakel, P.; Guzik, J. A.; Mussack, K. A.; Walczak, P.

    2017-03-01

    We review a recently completed set of Los Alamos OPLIB opacity tables for the elements hydrogen through zinc. Our tables have been computed using the Los Alamos ATOMIC code, which makes use of atomic structure calculations that include fine-structure detail for all the elements considered. We utilize an equation-of-state model, known as ChemEOS, that is based on the minimization of free energy in a chemical picture. Recent publications by us have compared our calculations to available experimental opacity data and to other opacity calculations. Our tables are publicly available via our website, and have already been used in solar modeling calculations as well as the modeling of pulsating B-type stars. This proceedings submission will give an overview of our opacity calculations and briefly review the conclusions from the astrophysical modeling.

  12. Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) located in Los Alamos, New Mexico. LANL is operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by the University of California. The Tiger Team Assessment was conducted from September 23 to November 8, 1991, under the auspices of the DOE Office of Special Projects, Office of Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health. The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing environmental, safety, and health (ES H) disciplines; management; and contractor and DOE self-assessments. Compliance with applicable Federal, state, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal LANL site requirements was assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and the site contractors' management of ES H/quality assurance programs was conducted. This volume discusses findings concerning the environmental assessment.

  13. Airport-Noise Levels and Annoyance Model (ALAMO) user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, R.; Donaldson, J. L.; Johnson, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    A guide for the use of the Airport-Noise Level and Annoyance MOdel (ALAMO) at the Langley Research Center computer complex is provided. This document is divided into 5 primary sections, the introduction, the purpose of the model, and an in-depth description of the following subsystems: baseline, noise reduction simulation and track analysis. For each subsystem, the user is provided with a description of architecture, an explanation of subsystem use, sample results, and a case runner's check list. It is assumed that the user is familiar with the operations at the Langley Research Center (LaRC) computer complex, the Network Operating System (NOS 1.4) and CYBER Control Language. Incorporated within the ALAMO model is a census database system called SITE II.

  14. Los Alamos x-ray characterization facilities for plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Day, R.H.; Blake, R.L.; Stradling, G.L.; Trela, W.J.; Bartlett, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    A summary is given of characteristics of x-ray sources used by Los Alamos National Laboratory to calibrate various x-ray diagnostic packages and components. Included are D.C. sourcs in electron impact and fluorescence modes, a pulsed laser source for soft x rays with 100 ps time resolution, Febetron pulsed electron impact sources, and both EUV and x-ray synchrotron beamlines.

  15. Los Alamos National Laboratory's high-performance data system

    SciTech Connect

    Mercier, C.; Chorn, G.; Christman, R.; Collins, B.

    1991-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is designing a High-Performance Data System (HPDS) that will provide storage for supercomputers requiring large files and fast transfer speeds. The HPDS will meet the performance requirements by managing data transfers from high-speed storage systems connected directly to a high-speed network. File and storage management software will be distributed in workstations. Network protocols will ensure reliable, wide-area network data delivery to support long-distance distributed processing. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Recent results in the Los Alamos compact torus program

    SciTech Connect

    Tuszewski, M.; Armstrong, W.T.; Barnes, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    A Compact Toroid is a toroidal magnetic-plasma-containment geometry in which no conductors or vacuum-chamber walls pass through the hole in the torus. Two types of compact toroids are studied experimentally and theoretically at Los Alamos: spheromaks that are oblate in shape and contain both toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields, and field-reversed configurations (FRC) that are very prolate and contain poloidal field only.

  17. [Los Alamos National Laboratory industrial applications and technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-31

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of the Los Alamos Economic Development Corporation (LAEDC) under its contract with the Industrial Applications Office (IAO). The LAEDC has: provided business planning assistance to potential entrepreneurs, assisted IAO in preparing and distributing informational materials on technology, organized and managed meetings and seminars on technology transfer and entrepreneurship, identified new opportunities for technology transfer, and identified and implemented programs for the recognition of Laboratory entrepreneurs.

  18. Los Alamos Canyon Ice Rink Parking Flood Plain Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hathcock, Charles Dean

    2015-02-10

    The project location is in Los Alamos Canyon east of the ice rink facility at the intersection of West and Omega roads (Figure 1). Forty eight parking spaces will be constructed on the north and south side of Omega Road, and a lighted walking path will be constructed to the ice rink. Some trees will be removed during this action. A guardrail of approximately 400 feet will be constructed along the north side of West Road to prevent unsafe parking in that area.

  19. Inertial Confinement Fusion Research at LOS Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batha, S. H.; Albright, B. J.; Alexander, D. J.; Barnes, Cris W.; Bradley, P. A.; Cobble, J. A.; Cooley, J. C.; Cooley, J. H.; Day, R. D.; DeFriend, K. A.; Delamater, N. D.; Dodd, E. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Fernandez, J. C.; Flippo, K. A.; Grim, G. P.; Goldman, S. R.; Greenfield, S. R.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hoffman, N. M.; Holmes, R. L.; Johnson, R. P.; Keiter, P. A.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Lanier, N. E.; Loomis, E.; Lopez, F. E.; Luo, S.; Mack, J. M.; Magelssen, G. R.; Montgomery, D. S.; Nobile, A.; Oertel, J. A.; Reardon, P.; Rose, H. A.; Schmidt, D.; Schmitt, M. J.; Seifter, A.; Shimada, T.; Swift, D. C.; Tierney, T. E.; Welser-Sherrill, L.; Wilke, M. D.; Wilson, D. C.; Workman, J.; Yin, L.

    2009-07-01

    Inertial confinement fusion research at Los Alamos National Laboratory is focused on high-leverage areas of thermonuclear ignition to which LANL can apply its historic strengths and that are complementary to high-energy-density-physics topics. Using the Trident and Omega laser facilities, experiments are pursued in laser-plasma instabilities, symmetry, Be technologies, neutron and fusion-product diagnostics, and defect hydrodynamics.

  20. Los Alamos sequence analysis package for nucleic acids and proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kanehisa, M I

    1982-01-01

    An interactive system for computer analysis of nucleic acid and protein sequences has been developed for the Los Alamos DNA Sequence Database. It provides a convenient way to search or verify various sequence features, e.g., restriction enzyme sites, protein coding frames, and properties of coded proteins. Further, the comprehensive analysis package on a large-scale database can be used for comparative studies on sequence and structural homologies in order to find unnoted information stored in nucleic acid sequences. PMID:6174934

  1. Simulations of Turbulent Flows with Strong Shocks and Density Variations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Xiaolin

    2012-12-13

    In this report, we present the research efforts made by our group at UCLA in the SciDAC project Simulations of turbulent flows with strong shocks and density variations. We use shock-fitting methodologies as an alternative to shock-capturing schemes for the problems where a well defined shock is present. In past five years, we have focused on development of high-order shock-fitting Navier-Stokes solvers for perfect gas flow and thermochemical non-equilibrium flow and simulation of shock-turbulence interaction physics for very strong shocks. Such simulation has not been possible before because the limitation of conventional shock capturing methods. The limitation of shock Mach number is removed by using our high-order shock-fitting scheme. With the help of DOE and TeraGrid/XSEDE super computing resources, we have obtained new results which show new trends of turbulence statistics behind the shock which were not known before. Moreover, we are also developing tools to consider multi-species non-equilibrium flows. The main results are in three areas: (1) development of high-order shock-fitting scheme for perfect gas flow, (2) Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of interaction of realistic turbulence with moderate to very strong shocks using super computing resources, and (3) development and implementation of models for computation of mutli-species non-quilibrium flows with shock-fitting codes.

  2. The role of granular shocks in dust-layer dispersal by shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houim, Ryan; Ugarte, Orlando; Oran, Elaine

    2016-11-01

    Exactly how dust-layers are lifted and dispersed by shocks has been a longstanding question in compressible multiphase flow. Understanding the mechanism for this, however, is extremely important for early control of dust explosions. We address this problem by numerically solving a set of equations that couples a fully compressible representation of a gas with a kinetic-theory model for a granular medium (see) to simulate a shock propagating along the surface of a dust layer. The results show that the majority of the dispersed dust is lifted by hydrodynamic shear directly behind the shock wave. Simultaneously, large forces are produced behind the shock that compact the dust layer and create a granular shock. The effects from this granular shock on the surface of the dust layer destabilize the gas-dust boundary layer, which, in turn, enhances turbulence and the rate of dust dispersal.

  3. Explosively driven two-shockwave tools with application to ejecta formation at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Proton Radiography Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttler, William

    2013-06-01

    We present the development of an explosively driven physics tool to generate two mostly uniaxial shockwaves. The tool is being used to extend single shockwave ejecta models to a subsequent shockwave event separated by a time interval on the order of a few microseconds. We explore the possibility of varying the amplitude of both the first and second shockwaves, and we apply the tool in experimental geometries on Sn with a surface roughness of Ra = 0 . 8 μ m. We then evaluate the tool further at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Proton Radiography (pRad) Facility in an application to Sn with larger scale perturbations of wavelength 550 μ m, and various amplitudes that gave wave-number amplitude products of η0 2 π / λ = { 3 / 4 , 1 / 2 , 1 / 4 , 1 / 8 } , where the perturbation amplitude is η0, and the wave-number k = 2 π / λ . The pRad data and velocimetry imply it should be possible to develop a second shock ejecta model based on unstable Richtmyer-Meshkov physics. In collaboration with David Oro, Fesseha Mariam, Alexander Saunders, Malcolm Andrews, Frank Cherne, James Hammerberg. Robert Hixson, Christopher Morris, Russell Olson, Dean Preston, Joseph Stone, Dale Tupa, and Wendy Vogan-McNeil, Los Alamos National Laboratory,

  4. Effect of neo red cells on hemodynamics and blood gas transport in canine hemorrhagic shock and its safety for vital organs.

    PubMed

    Usuba, A; Motoki, R; Sakaguchi, K; Suzuki, K; Kamitani, T

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of liposome encapsulated hemoglobin named "Neo Red Cells (NRC)" on canine hemorrhagic shock model and its safety for the vital organs in a whole blood exchange model. HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK: Nine adult mongrel dogs were used. Under mechanical ventilation inhaling room air, blood was withdrawn via an artery at a rate of 40 ml/min in order to induce hemorrhagic shock (systolic pressure below 60 mm Hg) and then NRC was transfused. For each animal, three to five cycles of bloodletting and NRC transfusion were performed. After blood exchange, total peripheral resistance index (TPRI) decreased and cardiac index (CI) increased. These changes were more marked in the high exchange group (exchange rate over 88%; five animals) than in the low exchange group (less than 88%; four animals), indicating that the low viscosity NRC reduced the load on the circulatory system. The A-V difference in oxygen content per lg hemoglobin was greater after blood exchange, indicating that oxygen binding capacity of NRC is higher than that of red blood cells. WHOLE BLOOD EXCHANGE: Five beagles were used for the blood exchange. The blood was withdrawn from an artery at a rate of 15 ml/min and NRC was infused at the same time. A dog whose blood was exchanged with hydroxyethylstarch instead of NRC died within 15 hours after blood exchange. Three dogs whose blood was exchanged with NRC (exchange rate was from 82 to 90%) have been living over a year without any side effects. A dog sacrificed on the 15th postoperative day for autopsy, microscopically showed no side effects in vital organs. We conclude that NRC is more suitable than natural blood for treatment of hemorrhagic shock and safe for vital organs.

  5. Grain Destruction in a Supernova Remnant Shock Wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, John C.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Sankrit, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Dust grains are sputtered away in the hot gas behind shock fronts in supernova remnants, gradually enriching the gas phase with refractory elements. We have measured emission in C IV (lambda)1550 from C atoms sputtered from dust in the gas behind a non-radiative shock wave in the northern Cygnus Loop. Overall, the intensity observed behind the shock agrees approximately with predictions from model calculations that match the Spitzer 24 micron and the X-ray intensity profiles. Thus these observations confirm the overall picture of dust destruction in SNR shocks and the sputtering rates used in models. However, there is a discrepancy in that the CIV intensity 10'' behind the shock is too high compared to the intensities at the shock and 25'' behind it. Variations in the density, hydrogen neutral fraction and the dust properties over parsec scales in the pre- shock medium limit our ability to test dust destruction models in detail.

  6. Grain destruction in a supernova remnant shock wave

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, John C.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Sankrit, Ravi

    2013-12-01

    Dust grains are sputtered away in the hot gas behind shock fronts in supernova remnants (SNRs), gradually enriching the gas phase with refractory elements. We have measured emission in C IV λ1550 from C atoms sputtered from dust in the gas behind a non-radiative shock wave in the northern Cygnus Loop. Overall, the intensity observed behind the shock agrees approximately with predictions from model calculations that match the Spitzer 24 μm and the X-ray intensity profiles. Thus, these observations confirm the overall picture of dust destruction in SNR shocks and the sputtering rates used in models. However, there is a discrepancy in that the C IV intensity 10'' behind the shock is too high compared with the intensities at the shock and 25'' behind it. Variations in the density, hydrogen neutral fraction, and the dust properties over parsec scales in the pre-shock medium limit our ability to test dust destruction models in detail.

  7. Grain Destruction in a Supernova Remnant Shock Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, John C.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Sankrit, Ravi

    2013-12-01

    Dust grains are sputtered away in the hot gas behind shock fronts in supernova remnants (SNRs), gradually enriching the gas phase with refractory elements. We have measured emission in C IV λ1550 from C atoms sputtered from dust in the gas behind a non-radiative shock wave in the northern Cygnus Loop. Overall, the intensity observed behind the shock agrees approximately with predictions from model calculations that match the Spitzer 24 μm and the X-ray intensity profiles. Thus, these observations confirm the overall picture of dust destruction in SNR shocks and the sputtering rates used in models. However, there is a discrepancy in that the C IV intensity 10'' behind the shock is too high compared with the intensities at the shock and 25'' behind it. Variations in the density, hydrogen neutral fraction, and the dust properties over parsec scales in the pre-shock medium limit our ability to test dust destruction models in detail.

  8. Overview of laser technology at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, G. K.; Cremers, D. A.

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has had a long history of involvement in laser sciences and has been recognized both for its large laser programs and smaller scale developments in laser technology and applications. The first significant program was with the Rover nuclear-based rocket propulsion system in 1968 to study laser initiated fusion. From here applications spread to programs in laser isotope separation and development of large lasers for fusion. These programs established the technological human resource base of highly trained laser physicists, engineers, and chemists that remain at the Laboratory today. Almost every technical division at Los Alamos now has some laser capability ranging from laser development, applications, studies on nonlinear processes, modeling and materials processing. During the past six years over eight R&D-100 Awards have been received by Los Alamos for development of laser-based techniques and instrumentation. Outstanding examples of technology developed include LIDAR applications to environmental monitoring, single molecule detection using fluorescence spectroscopy, a laser-based high kinetic energy source of oxygen atoms produced by a laser-sustained plasma, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for compositional, analysis, thin film high temperature superconductor deposition, multi-station laser welding, and direct metal deposition and build-up of components by fusing powder particles with a laser beam.

  9. Los Alamos, Toshiba probing Fukushima with cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Christopher

    2014-06-16

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has announced an impending partnership with Toshiba Corporation to use a Los Alamos technique called muon tomography to safely peer inside the cores of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors and create high-resolution images of the damaged nuclear material inside without ever breaching the cores themselves. The initiative could reduce the time required to clean up the disabled complex by at least a decade and greatly reduce radiation exposure to personnel working at the plant. Muon radiography (also called cosmic-ray radiography) uses secondary particles generated when cosmic rays collide with upper regions of Earth's atmosphere to create images of the objects that the particles, called muons, penetrate. The process is analogous to an X-ray image, except muons are produced naturally and do not damage the materials they contact. Muon radiography has been used before in imaginative applications such as mapping the interior of the Great Pyramid at Giza, but Los Alamos's muon tomography technique represents a vast improvement over earlier technology.

  10. Los Alamos Science: The Human Genome Project. Number 20, 1992

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cooper, N. G.; Shea, N. eds.

    1992-01-01

    This document provides a broad overview of the Human Genome Project, with particular emphasis on work being done at Los Alamos. It tries to emphasize the scientific aspects of the project, compared to the more speculative information presented in the popular press. There is a brief introduction to modern genetics, including a review of classic work. There is a broad overview of the Genome Project, describing what the project is, what are some of its major five-year goals, what are major technological challenges ahead of the project, and what can the field of biology, as well as society expect to see as benefits from this project. Specific results on the efforts directed at mapping chromosomes 16 and 5 are discussed. A brief introduction to DNA libraries is presented, bearing in mind that Los Alamos has housed such libraries for many years prior to the Genome Project. Information on efforts to do applied computational work related to the project are discussed, as well as experimental efforts to do rapid DNA sequencing by means of single-molecule detection using applied spectroscopic methods. The article introduces the Los Alamos staff which are working on the Genome Project, and concludes with brief discussions on ethical, legal, and social implications of this work; a brief glimpse of genetics as it may be practiced in the next century; and a glossary of relevant terms.

  11. Los Alamos Science: The Human Genome Project. Number 20, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, N G; Shea, N

    1992-01-01

    This article provides a broad overview of the Human Genome Project, with particular emphasis on work being done at Los Alamos. It tries to emphasize the scientific aspects of the project, compared to the more speculative information presented in the popular press. There is a brief introduction to modern genetics, including a review of classic work. There is a broad overview of the Genome Project, describing what the project is, what are some of its major five-year goals, what are major technological challenges ahead of the project, and what can the field of biology, as well as society expect to see as benefits from this project. Specific results on the efforts directed at mapping chromosomes 16 and 5 are discussed. A brief introduction to DNA libraries is presented, bearing in mind that Los Alamos has housed such libraries for many years prior to the Genome Project. Information on efforts to do applied computational work related to the project are discussed, as well as experimental efforts to do rapid DNA sequencing by means of single-molecule detection using applied spectroscopic methods. The article introduces the Los Alamos staff which are working on the Genome Project, and concludes with brief discussions on ethical, legal, and social implications of this work; a brief glimpse of genetics as it may be practiced in the next century; and a glossary of relevant terms.

  12. Los Alamos, Toshiba probing Fukushima with cosmic rays

    ScienceCinema

    Morris, Christopher

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has announced an impending partnership with Toshiba Corporation to use a Los Alamos technique called muon tomography to safely peer inside the cores of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors and create high-resolution images of the damaged nuclear material inside without ever breaching the cores themselves. The initiative could reduce the time required to clean up the disabled complex by at least a decade and greatly reduce radiation exposure to personnel working at the plant. Muon radiography (also called cosmic-ray radiography) uses secondary particles generated when cosmic rays collide with upper regions of Earth's atmosphere to create images of the objects that the particles, called muons, penetrate. The process is analogous to an X-ray image, except muons are produced naturally and do not damage the materials they contact. Muon radiography has been used before in imaginative applications such as mapping the interior of the Great Pyramid at Giza, but Los Alamos's muon tomography technique represents a vast improvement over earlier technology.

  13. Overview of laser technology at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, G.K.; Cremers, D.A.

    1994-09-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has had a long history of involvement in laser sciences and has been recognized both for its large laser programs and smaller scale developments in laser technology and applications. The first significant program was with the Rover nuclear-based rocket propulsion system in 1968 to study laser initiated fusion. From here applications spread to programs in laser isotope separation and development of large lasers for fusion. These programs established the technological human resource base of highly trained laser physicists, engineers, and chemists that remain at the Laboratory today. Almost every technical division at Los Alamos now has some laser capability ranging from laser development, applications, studies on nonlinear processes, modeling and materials processing. During the past six years over eight R&D-100 Awards have been received by Los Alamos for development of laser-based techniques and instrumentation. Outstanding examples of technology developed include LIDAR applications to environmental monitoring, single molecule detection using fluorescence spectroscopy, a laser-based high kinetic energy source of oxygen atoms produced by a laser-sustained plasma, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for compositional, analysis, thin film high temperature superconductor deposition, multi-station laser welding, and direct metal deposition and build-up of components by fusing powder particles with a laser beam.

  14. Water supply at Los Alamos during 1996. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McLin, S.G.; Purtymun, W.D.; Maes, M.N.; Longmire, P.A.

    1997-12-01

    Production of potable municipal water supplies during 1996 totaled about 1,368.1 million gallons from wells in the Guaje, Pajarito, and Otowi well fields. There was no water used from either the spring gallery in Water Canyon or from Guaje Reservoir during 1996. About 2.6 million gallons of water from Los Alamos Reservoir was used for lawn irrigation. The total water usage in 1996 was about 1,370.7 million gallons, or about 131 gallons per day per person living in Los Alamos County. Groundwater pumpage was up about 12.0 million gallons in 1996 compared with the pumpage in 1995. This report fulfills requirements specified in US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 (Groundwater Protection Management Program), which requires the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to monitor and document groundwater conditions below Pajarito Plateau and to protect the regional aquifer from contamination associated with Laboratory operations. Furthermore, this report also fulfills special conditions by providing information on hydrologic characteristics of the regional aquifer, including operating conditions of the municipal water supply system.

  15. Development of microcapsules for shock wave DDS and angiogenesis using shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamagawa, M.; Yamanoi, I.; Iwakura, S.

    2006-05-01

    This paper describes the trial of making microcapsules including a bubble for shock wave drug delivery systems, evaluation of their mechanical properties and angiogenesis using plane shock waves. We have proposed drug delivery systems (DDS) using shock waves. In this system, a microcapsule including a gas bubble is flown in the blood vessel, and finally broken by shock induced microjet, then drug is reached to the affected part. In this paper, the mechanism for deformation and disintegration of capsules in our previous works is reviewed, and the trials of making special microcapsules are discussed. To determine Young's modulus of capsule membrane, the membrane is deformed by the aspiration device and compared with computational result by FEM. As for angiogenesis using shock wave, the effects of shock waves under 0.4 MPa on cell growth rate is investigated. It is found that increasing rate of cell population by working shock waves is faster than the control cells.

  16. Audit Report, "Fire Protection Deficiencies at Los Alamos National Laboratory"

    SciTech Connect

    2009-06-01

    The Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) maintains some of the Nation's most important national security assets, including nuclear materials. Many of Los Alamos' facilities are located in close proximity to one another, are occupied by large numbers of contract and Federal employees, and support activities ranging from nuclear weapons design to science-related activities. Safeguarding against fires, regardless of origin, is essential to protecting employees, surrounding communities, and national security assets. On June 1, 2006, Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS), became the managing and operating contractor for Los Alamos, under contract with the Department's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). In preparation for assuming its management responsibilities at Los Alamos, LANS conducted walk-downs of the Laboratory's facilities to identify pre-existing deficiencies that could give rise to liability, obligation, loss or damage. The walk-downs, which identified 812 pre-existing fire protection deficiencies, were conducted by subject matter professionals, including fire protection experts. While the Los Alamos Site Office has overall responsibility for the effectiveness of the fire protection program, LANS, as the Laboratory's operating contractor, has a major, day-to-day role in minimizing fire-related risks. The issue of fire protection at Los Alamos is more than theoretical. In May 2000, the 'Cerro Grande' fire burned about 43,000 acres, including 7,700 acres of Laboratory property. Due to the risk posed by fire to the Laboratory's facilities, workforce, and surrounding communities, we initiated this audit to determine whether pre-existing fire protection deficiencies had been addressed. Our review disclosed that LANS had not resolved many of the fire protection deficiencies that had been identified in early 2006: (1) Of the 296 pre-existing deficiencies we selected for audit, 174 (59 percent) had not been corrected

  17. Multiple shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenker, Stephen H.; Stanford, Douglas

    2014-12-01

    Using gauge/gravity duality, we explore a class of states of two CFTs with a large degree of entanglement, but with very weak local two-sided correlation. These states are constructed by perturbing the thermofield double state with thermal-scale operators that are local at different times. Acting on the dual black hole geometry, these perturbations create an intersecting network of shock waves, supporting a very long wormhole. Chaotic CFT dynamics and the associated fast scrambling time play an essential role in determining the qualitative features of the resulting geometries.

  18. Shock waves in noble gases and their mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratos, M.; Herczynski, R.

    The shock wave structures in pure monatomic gases and in binary gas mixtures are investigated in this paper using a variational approach. The idea of Mott-Smith's distribution function (generalized in the case of a gas mixture) was combined with Tamm's method of solving the Boltzmann equation. The intermolecular potential used is of the Lennard-Jones type. The relation between the dimensionless shock wave thickness and Mach number in front of the shock wave is analyzed. Special attention was paid to the determination of shock wave structures in mixtures of gases with disparate molecular masses. The calculation performed for the shock wave in the binary gas mixture, xenon-helium, confirm the existence of a 'hump' of the density profile of the lighter component. The heavy gas component temperature overshoots its downstream equilibrium value in the case of a mixture of gases with disparate molecular masses and for a small mole fraction of the heavy gas component.

  19. Ion Beam and Plasma Technology Development for Surface Modification at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, H.A.; Munson, C.P.; Wood, B.P.; Bitteker, L.J.; Nastasi, M.A.; Rej, D.J.; Waganaar, W.J.; Walter, K.C.; Coates, D.M.; Schleinitz, H.M.

    1997-12-31

    We are developing two high-throughput technologies for materials modification. The first is a repetitive intense ion beam source for materials modification through rapid surface melt and resolidification (up to 10{sup 10} deg/sec cooling rates) and for ablative deposition of coatings. The short range of the ions (typically 0.1 to 5 micrometers) allows vaporization or melting at moderate beam energy density (typically 1-50 J/cm{sup 2}). A new repetitive intense ion beam accelerator called CHAMP is under development at Los Alamos. The design beam parameters are: E=200 keV, I=15 kA, {tau}=1 {micro}s, and 1 Hz. This accelerator will enable applications such as film deposition, alloying and mixing, cleaning and polishing, corrosion and wear resistance, polymer surface treatments, and nanophase powder synthesis. The second technology is plasma source ion implantation (PSII) using plasmas generated from both gas phase (using radio frequency excitation) and solid phase (using a cathodic arc) sources. We have used PSII to directly implant ions for surface modification or as method for generating graded interfaces to enhance the adhesion of surface coatings. Surfaces with areas of up to 16 m{sup 2} and weighing more than a thousand kilograms have been treated in the Los Alamos PSII chamber. In addition, PSII in combination with cathodic source deposition has been used to form highly adherent, thick Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings on steel for reactive metal containment in casting. These coatings resist delamination under extreme mechanical and thermal stress.

  20. Reconnaissance investigation of volatile and semivolatile organic compounds in the Memphis Aquifer at Alamo, Crockett County, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutson, Susan S.; Haugh, Connor J.

    1992-01-01

    Samples of ground water and soil gas were analyzed to study the occurrence of volatile and semivolatile organic compounds in the Memphis aquifer at Alamo in western Tennessee in 1989. At Alamo, the aquifer is locally unconfined. Four wells screened in the Memphis aquifer provided Alamo with 0.3 million gallons of water per day. Trichloroethylene (TCE), dichloroethylene, trichloroethane, and tetrachloroethylene were detected in water samples from two of the wells. In September 1989, the TCE concentration in a sample from well 1 was 45 micrograms per liter (mg/L); Tennessee?s maximum contaminant level for TCE in drinking water is 5 mg/L Concentrations of TCE in water from this well ranged from 40 to 113 mg/L during I988 and 1989. TCE concentration in water collected from well 2 in September 1989 was 0.7 mg/L During I988 and 1989, TCE concentrations in this well ranged from less than 0.5 to 5.1 mg/L None of the semivolatile organic compounds on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s priority-pollutant list were detected in water from well 1. Soil gas was sampled at a depth of 3.5 feet below land surface in areas of suspected ground-water contamination. Analyses by gas chromatography indicated the presence of TCE in soils about 230 feet east of well 1 in the area of a former industrial site where solvents were handled. TCE concentrations in the soil gas of this area ranged from 0.2 to 30 mg/L TCE was not detected in soil gas near any of the wells. Depth to water at the wells ranged from 39 to 49 feet. The regional direction of ground-water flow is to the west-southwest, which would cause contaminants dissolved in ground water below the former industrial-site area to be transported toward the public-supply wells. Probable reasons contributing to the lack of TCE detection in soil gas at wells 1 and 2 are the relatively low concentrations of TCE in ground water at the wells and the vertical distance between sampling points and the water table.

  1. Shock Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The electrician pictured is installing a General Electric Ground Fault Interrupter (GFI), a device which provides protection against electrical shock in the home or in industrial facilities. Shocks due to defective wiring in home appliances or other electrical equipment can cause severe burns, even death. As a result, the National Electrical Code now requires GFIs in all new homes constructed. This particular type of GFI employs a sensing element which derives from technology acquired in space projects by SCI Systems, Inc., Huntsville, Alabama, producer of sensors for GE and other manufacturers of GFI equipment. The sensor is based on the company's experience in developing miniaturized circuitry for space telemetry and other spacecraft electrical systems; this experience enabled SCI to package interruptor circuitry in the extremely limited space available and to produce sensory devices at practicable cost. The tiny sensor measures the strength of the electrical current and detects current differentials that indicate a fault in the functioning of an electrical system. The sensing element then triggers a signal to a disconnect mechanism in the GFI, which cuts off the current in the faulty circuit.

  2. Shock compression of simulated adobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braithwaite, C. H.; Church, P. D.; Gould, P. J.; Stewart, B.; Jardine, A. P.

    2017-01-01

    A series of plate impact experiments were conducted to investigate the shock response of a simulant for adobe, a traditional form of building material widely used around the world. Air dried bricks were sourced from the London brick company, dry machined and impacted at a range of velocities in a single stage gas gun. The shock Hugoniot was determined (Us =2.26up+0.37) as well as release information. The material was found to behave in a manner which was similar to that of loose sand and considerably less stiff than a weak porous sandstone. The effect of any cementing of the grains was examined by shocking powdered samples contained within a cell arrangement.

  3. Plasma Stratification by Planar Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, Brett; Simakov, Andrei; Taitano, William; Chacon, Luis; Daughton, William

    2016-10-01

    A number of experimental observables in neutron yield and capsule compression in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments have been evading explanation by standard, single-fluid, hydrodynamic (hydro) numerical simulations. Fuel stratification - resulting from particle diffusion, multi-ion temperature separation (in the case of OMEGA experiments with gas filled capsules), and certain kinetic effects - is a likely culprit. As a preliminary step to elucidate these effects, we consider mass fraction and temperature stratification by shocks in plasmas with two ion species. We present an analytical solution valid for very weak shocks (M - 1 << 1). Employing the state-of-the-art Vlasov-Fokker-Planck code, iFP, we describe the stratification for shocks with arbitrary mach number, and we rigorously delineate the kinetic and hydrodynamic regimes in terms of Mach number, relative species concentration, and ion species mass ratio - thereby clarifying the conditions under which significant departure from single-fluid hydrodynamics may occur.

  4. Groundwater level status report for 2009, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

    2010-03-01

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2009 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 179 monitoring wells, including 55 regional aquifer wells (including 11 regional/intermediate wells), 26 intermediate wells, 98 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 161 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells.

  5. Los Alamos National Laboratory Economic Analysis Capability Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Boero, Riccardo; Edwards, Brian Keith; Pasqualini, Donatella; Rivera, Michael Kelly

    2016-04-19

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed two types of models to compute the economic impact of infrastructure disruptions. FastEcon is a fast running model that estimates first-­order economic impacts of large scale events such as hurricanes and floods and can be used to identify the amount of economic activity that occurs in a specific area. LANL’s Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model estimates more comprehensive static and dynamic economic impacts of a broader array of events and captures the interactions between sectors and industries when estimating economic impacts.

  6. Bradbury science museum: your window to Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Deck, Linda Theresa

    2009-03-05

    The Bradbury Science Museum is the public's window to Los Alamos National Laboratory and supports the Community Program Office's mission to develop community support to accomplish LANL's national security and science mission. It does this by stimulating interest in and increasing basic knowledge of science and technology in northern New Mexico audiences, and increasing public understanding and appreciation of how LANL science and technology solve our global problems. In performing these prime functions, the Museum also preserves the history of scientific accomplishment at the Lab by collecting and preserving artifacts of scientific and historical importance.

  7. Groundwater level status report for 2010, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

    2011-03-01

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2010 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 194 monitoring wells, including 63 regional aquifer wells (including 10 regional/intermediate wells), 34 intermediate wells, 97 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 162 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells and seasonal responses to snowmelt runoff observed in intermediate wells.

  8. Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The purpose of the safety and health assessment was to determine the effectiveness of representative safety and health programs at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Within the safety and health programs at LANL, performance was assessed in the following technical areas: Organization and Administration, Quality Verification, Operations, Maintenance, Training and Certification, Auxiliary Systems, Emergency Preparedness, Technical Support, Packaging and Transportation, Nuclear Criticality Safety, Security/Safety Interface, Experimental Activities, Site/Facility Safety Review, Radiological Protection, Personnel Protection, Worker Safety and Health (OSHA) Compliance, Fire Protection, Aviation Safety, Explosives Safety, Natural Phenomena, and Medical Services.

  9. Recent developments in the Los Alamos radiation transport code system

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, R.A.; Parsons, K.

    1997-06-01

    A brief progress report on updates to the Los Alamos Radiation Transport Code System (LARTCS) for solving criticality and fixed-source problems is provided. LARTCS integrates the Diffusion Accelerated Neutral Transport (DANT) discrete ordinates codes with the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code. The LARCTS code is being developed with a graphical user interface for problem setup and analysis. Progress in the DANT system for criticality applications include a two-dimensional module which can be linked to a mesh-generation code and a faster iteration scheme. Updates to MCNP Version 4A allow statistical checks of calculated Monte Carlo results.

  10. Groundwater level status report for 2008, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

    2009-03-01

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2008 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 179 monitoring wells, including 45 regional aquifer wells, 28 intermediate wells, 8 regional/intermediate wells, 106 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 166 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells.

  11. Groundwater Level Status Report for 2005 Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    S.P. Allen; R.J. Koch

    2006-05-15

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 2005 is provided in this report. The Groundwater Level Monitoring Project was instituted in 2005 to provide a framework for the collection and processing of quality controlled groundwater level data. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 137 monitoring wells, including 41 regional aquifer wells, 22 intermediate wells, and 74 alluvial wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 118 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well.

  12. The Los Alamos National Laboratory Nuclear Vision Project

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, E.D.; Wagner, R.L. Jr.

    1996-09-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has initiated a project to examine possible futures associated with the global nuclear enterprise over the course of the next 50 years. All major components are included in this study--weapons, nonproliferation, nuclear power, nuclear materials, and institutional and public factors. To examine key issues, the project has been organized around three main activity areas--workshops, research and analyses, and development of linkages with other synergistic world efforts. This paper describes the effort--its current and planned activities--as well as provides discussion of project perspectives on nuclear weapons, nonproliferation, nuclear energy, and nuclear materials focus areas.

  13. Los Alamos Science, Number 25 -- 1997: Celebrating the Neutrino

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cooper, N. G. ed.

    1997-01-01

    This issue is devoted to the neutrino and its remaining mysteries. It is divided into the following areas: (1) The Reines-Cowan experiment -- detecting the poltergeist; (2) The oscillating neutrino -- an introduction to neutrino masses and mixing; (3) A brief history of neutrino experiments at LAMPF; (4) A thousand eyes -- the story of LSND (Los Alamos neutrino oscillation experiment); (5) The evidence for oscillations; (6) The nature of neutrinos in muon decay and physics beyond the Standard Model; (7) Exorcising ghosts -- in pursuit of the missing solar neutrinos; (8) MSW -- a possible solution to the solar neutrino problem; (8) Neutrinos and supernovae; and (9) Dark matter and massive neutrinos.

  14. Mac configuration management at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, Allan B

    2010-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) had a need for central configuration management of non-Windows computers. LANL has three to five thousand Macs and an equal number of Linux based systems. The primary goal was to be able to inventory all non-windows systems and patch Mc OS X systems. LANL examined a number of commercial and open source solutions and ultimately selected Puppet. This paper will discuss why we chose Puppet, how we implemented it, and some lessons we learned along the way.

  15. Los Alamos Science, Number 25 -- 1997: Celebrating the neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, N.G.

    1997-12-31

    This issue is devoted to the neutrino and its remaining mysteries. It is divided into the following areas: (1) The Reines-Cowan experiment -- detecting the poltergeist; (2) The oscillating neutrino -- an introduction to neutrino masses and mixing; (3) A brief history of neutrino experiments at LAMPF; (4) A thousand eyes -- the story of LSND (Los Alamos neutrino oscillation experiment); (5) The evidence for oscillations; (6) The nature of neutrinos in muon decay and physics beyond the Standard Model; (7) Exorcising ghosts -- in pursuit of the missing solar neutrinos; (8) MSW -- a possible solution to the solar neutrino problem; (8) Neutrinos and supernovae; and (9) Dark matter and massive neutrinos.

  16. Los Alamos safeguards program overview and NDA in safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Keepin, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    Over the years the Los Alamos safeguards program has developed, tested, and implemented a broad range of passive and active nondestructive analysis (NDA) instruments (based on gamma and x-ray detection and neutron counting) that are now widely employed in safeguarding nuclear materials of all forms. Here very briefly, the major categories of gamma ray and neutron based NDA techniques, give some representative examples of NDA instruments currently in use, and cite a few notable instances of state-of-the-art NDA technique development. Historical aspects and a broad overview of the safeguards program are also presented.

  17. Water supply at Los Alamos during 1995. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McLin, S.G.; Purtymun, W.D.; Maes, M.N.

    1997-04-01

    Production of potable municipal water supplies during 1995 totaled about 1,356.1 million gallons from wells in the Guaje and Pajarito well fields. Wells in the Otowi field were not operational during 1995. The nonpotable water supply for industrial use was about 1.6 million gallons from the spring gallery in Water Canyon, and another 1.6 million gallons from Los Alamos Reservoir was used for lawn irrigation. There was no water used from Guaje Reservoir in 1995. The total water usage in 1995 was about 1,359.3 million gallons. Groundwater pumpage during 1995 was the lowest on record since 1966.

  18. Water supply at Los Alamos during 1985: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Purtymun, W.D.; Becker, N.M.; Maes, M.N.

    1986-10-01

    Well field operations during 1985 were satisfactory with municipal and industrial supplies consisting of 1587 x 10/sup 6/ gal from wells in three well fields and 37 x 10/sup 6/ gal from the gallery in Water Canyon. About 2.8 x 10/sup 6/ gal of water from Guaje Reservoir and 0.9 x 10/sup 6/ gal from Los Alamos Reservoir were used for irrigation; thus the total water usage in 1985 was about 1628 x 10/sup 6/ gal. Primary and secondary chemical quality of water in the distribution system is in compliance with federal regulations.

  19. Stability of undercompressive shock profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Peter; Zumbrun, Kevin

    , Stability of large-amplitude shock profiles of general relaxation systems, SIAM J. Math. Anal., in press], and for special "weakly coupled" (respectively scalar diffusive-dispersive) undercompressive profiles in [T.P. Liu, K. Zumbrun, Nonlinear stability of an undercompressive shock for complex Burgers equation, Comm. Math. Phys. 168 (1) (1995) 163-186; T.P. Liu, K. Zumbrun, On nonlinear stability of general undercompressive viscous shock waves, Comm. Math. Phys. 174 (2) (1995) 319-345] (respectively [P. Howard, K. Zumbrun, Pointwise estimates for dispersive-diffusive shock waves, Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 155 (2000) 85-169]). In particular, together with spectral results of [K. Zumbrun, Dynamical stability of phase transitions in the p-system with viscosity-capillarity, SIAM J. Appl. Math. 60 (2000) 1913-1924], our results yield nonlinear stability of large-amplitude undercompressive phase-transitional profiles near equilibrium of Slemrod's model [M. Slemrod, Admissibility criteria for propagating phase boundaries in a van der Waals fluid, Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 81 (4) (1983) 301-315] for van der Waal gas dynamics or elasticity with viscosity-capillarity.

  20. The Physics of Molecular Shocks in Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David; Cuzzi, Jeffrey (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Molecular shocks are produced by the impact of the supersonic infall of gas and dust onto protostars and by the interaction of the supersonic outflow from the protostar with the circumstellar material. Infalling gas creates an accretion shock around the circumstellar disk which emits a unique infrared spectrum and which processes the interstellar dust as it enters the disk. The winds and jets from protostars also impact the disk, the infalling material, and the ambient molecular cloud core creating shocks whose spectrum and morphology diagnose the mass loss processes of the protostar and the orientation and structure of the star forming system. We discuss the physics of these shocks, the model spectra derived from theoretical models, and comparisons with observations of H2O masers, H2 emission, as well as other shocks tracers. We show the strong effect of magnetic fields on molecular shock structure, and elucidate the chemical changes induced by the shock heating and compression.

  1. Geometrical shock dynamics of fast magnetohydrodynamic shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostert, Wouter; Pullin, Dale I.; Samtaney, Ravi; Wheatley, Vincent

    2016-11-01

    We extend the theory of geometrical shock dynamics (GSD, Whitham 1958), to two-dimensional fast magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks moving in the presence of nonuniform magnetic fields of general orientation and strength. The resulting generalized area-Mach number rule is adapted to MHD shocks moving in two spatial dimensions. A partially-spectral numerical scheme developed from that of Schwendeman (1993) is described. This is applied to the stability of plane MHD fast shocks moving into a quiescent medium containing a uniform magnetic field whose field lines are inclined to the plane-shock normal. In particular, we consider the time taken for an initially planar shock subject to an initial perturbed magnetosonic Mach number distribution, to first form shock-shocks. Supported by KAUST OCRF Award No. URF/1/2162-01.

  2. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF SHOCK WAVE DYNAMICS IN MAGNETIZED PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Nirmol K. Podder

    2009-03-17

    In this four-year project (including one-year extension), the project director and his research team built a shock-wave-plasma apparatus to study shock wave dynamics in glow discharge plasmas in nitrogen and argon at medium pressure (1–20 Torr), carried out various plasma and shock diagnostics and measurements that lead to increased understanding of the shock wave acceleration phenomena in plasmas. The measurements clearly show that in the steady-state dc glow discharge plasma, at fixed gas pressure the shock wave velocity increases, its amplitude decreases, and the shock wave disperses non-linearly as a function of the plasma current. In the pulsed discharge plasma, at fixed gas pressure the shock wave dispersion width and velocity increase as a function of the delay between the switch-on of the plasma and shock-launch. In the afterglow plasma, at fixed gas pressure the shock wave dispersion width and velocity decrease as a function of the delay between the plasma switch-off and shock-launch. These changes are found to be opposite and reversing towards the room temperature value which is the initial condition for plasma ignition case. The observed shock wave properties in both igniting and afterglow plasmas correlate well with the inferred temperature changes in the two plasmas.

  3. Sub-photospheric Shocks in Relativistic Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2017-04-01

    This paper examines the mechanism of internal shocks in opaque relativistic outflows, in particular in cosmological gamma-ray bursts. The shocks produce neutrino emission and affect the observed photospheric radiation from the explosion. They develop from internal compressive waves and can be of different types depending on the composition of the outflow. (1) Shocks in “photon gas,” with negligible plasma inertia, have a unique structure determined by the force-free condition—zero radiation flux in the plasma rest frame. Radiation dominance over plasma inertia suppresses the formation of collisionless shocks mediated by collective electromagnetic fields. (2) If the outflow is sufficiently magnetized, a strong collisionless subshock develops, which is embedded in a thicker radiation-mediated structure. (3) Waves in outflows with a free neutron component lead to dissipation through nuclear collisions. At large optical depths, shocks have a thickness comparable to the neutron free path, with embedded radiation-mediated and collisionless subshocks. The paper also presents first-principles simulations of magnetized flows filled with photons, demonstrating the formation of shocks and their structure. Simple estimates show that magnetized sub-photospheric shocks are efficient producers of photons and have a great impact on the observed photospheric radiation. The shock structure changes as the outflow expands toward its photosphere. The dissipation is accompanied by strong {e}+/- pair creation, and the {e}+/- -dressed shock carries the photosphere with it up to two decades in radius, emitting a strong pulse of nonthermal radiation.

  4. Study over thermal state of gas turbine engine metal-ceramic rotor blades and nozzle guide vanes under thermal shock and thermal-cyclic loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soudarev, A. V.; Souryaninov, A. A.; Podgorets, V. Ya.; Grishaev, V. V.; Tikhoplav, V. Yu; Molchanov, A. S.; Soudarev, B. V.

    2004-05-01

    To ensure a reliable operation of the 2.5 MW gas turbine engine (GTE- 2.5)[1] with the inlet gas temperature TIT=1623 K, studies were performed over the thermal state of the nozzle guide vanes and rotor blades with the temperatures, rates and flows of the working media and cooling air simulating all the potential turbine stage operating duties. The steady state and thermal-cyclic tests having been accomplished, there was no visible defect on the rotor blades and the nozzle vanes. Afterwards, they survived the endurance tests at the rated cooling. Therefore, the functionality of the shell thin-wall hybrid nozzle vanes and rotor blades under the variable operating duties of the gas turbine at the “shock” and “cyclic” loads of the working media temperature variations has been demonstrated.

  5. Capsule Design for Hybrid Shock Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgaertel, J. A.; Dodd, E. S.; Loomis, E. N.

    2014-10-01

    Hybrid Shock-Ignition (HSI) is an alternate fusion energy concept that combines indirect drive and shock ignition schemes in order to access new regimes in National Ignition Facility (NIF) hohlraum physics. Building off of tetrahedral hohlraum experiments at the OMEGA laser facility, we have preliminary designs for spherical hohlraums that combine symmetrically arranged laser entrance holes for indirect-drive beams (to initially compress the capsule) and holes for direct-drive beams to drive a strong ignitor shock (to further compress and ignite the fuel). A LANL Eulerian hydrodynamic code is being used to find optimal laser drive, hohlraum, and capsule specifications, via criteria such as implosion symmetry, implosion time, and neutron yield. At first, drive will be modeled using a radiation source to mimic the hohlraum drive, and later, ignitor beams will be added. Initial capsule designs will be presented for experiments to develop the HSI platform on the sub-ignition scale OMEGA laser facility in FY15. Supported under the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. LA-UR-14-25071.

  6. Shock treatment of corn stover.

    PubMed

    Bond, Austin; Rughoonundun, Hema; Petersen, Eric; Holtzapple, Carol; Holtzapple, Mark

    2017-01-27

    Corn stover digestibility was enhanced via shock treatment. A slurry of lime-treated corn stover was placed in a partially filled closed vessel. From the ullage space, either a shotgun shell was fired into the slurry, or a gas mixture was detonated. Various conditions were tested (i.e., pressures, depth, solids concentrations, gas mixtures). A high pressurization rate (108,000 MPa/s shotgun shells; 4,160,000 MPa/s hydrogen/oxygen detonation) was the only parameter that improved enzymatic digestibility. Stoichiometric propane/air deflagration had a low pressurization rate (37.2 MPa/s) and did not enhance enzymatic digestibility. Without shock, enzymatic conversion of lime-treated corn stover was 0.80 g glucan digested/g glucan fed with an enzyme loading of 46.7 mg protein/g glucan. With shock, the enzyme loading was reduced by ∼2× while maintaining the same conversion. Detonations are extraordinarily fast; rapidly cycling three small vessels (0.575 m(3) each) every 7.5 s enables commercially relevant shock treatment (2,000 tone/day). © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2017.

  7. Viscous Shear Layers Formed by Non-Bifurcating Shock Waves in Shock-Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grogan, Kevin; Ihme, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    Shock-tubes are test apparatuses that are used extensively for chemical kinetic measurements. Under ideal conditions, shock-tubes provide a quiescent region behind a reflected shock wave where combustion may take place without complications arising from gas-dynamic effects. However, due to the reflected shock wave encountering a boundary layer, significant inhomogeneity may be introduced into the test region. The bifurcation of the reflected shock-wave is well-known to occur under certain conditions; however, a viscous shear layer may form behind a non-bifurcating reflected shock wave as well and may affect chemical kinetics and ignition of certain fuels. The focus of this talk is on the development of the viscous shear layer and the coupling to the ignition in the regime corresponding to the negative temperature conditions.

  8. Industrial application for the Los Alamos Materials Modeling Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Lesar, R.; Charbon, C.; Kothe, D.; Wu, D.; Reddy, A.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Casting and solidification of molten metals and metal alloys is a critical step in the production of high-quality metal stock and in the fabrication of finished parts. Control of the casting process can be the determining factor in both the quality and cost of the final metal product. Major problems with the quality of cast stock or finished parts can arise because of the difficulty of preventing variations in the alloy content, the generation of porosity or poor surface finish, and the loss of microstructure controlled strength and toughness resulting from the poor understanding and design of the mold filling and solidification processes. In this project, we sought to develop a new set of applications focused on adding the ability to accurately model solidification and grain growth to casting simulations. We implemented these applications within the Los Alamos Materials Modeling Platform, LAMMP, a graphical-based materials, and materials modeling environment being created at the Computational Testbed for Industry.

  9. Exploding metallic foil fuse modeling at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Lindemuth, I.R.; Reinovsky, R.E.; Goforth, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    A ''first-principles'' computational model of exploding metallic foil behavior has been developed at Los Alamos. The model couples zero-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics with ohmic heating and electrical circuit equations and uses the Los Alamos SESAME atomic data base computer library to determine the foil material's temperature- and density-dependent pressure, specific energy, and electrical conductivity. The model encompasses many previously successful empirical models and offers plausible physical explanations of phenomena not treated by the empirical models. In addition to addressing the electrical circuit performance of an exploding foil, the model provides information on the temporal evolution of the foil material's density, temperature, pressure, electrical conductivity, and expansion and translational velocities. In this paper, we report the physical insight gained by computational studies of two opening switch concepts being developed for application in an FCG-driven 1-MJ-class imploding plasma z-pinch experiment. The first concept considered is a ''conventional'' electrically exploded fuse, which has been demonstrated to operate at 16 MA driven by the 15-MJ-class FCG to be used in the 1 MJ implosion experiment. The second concept considered is a Type 2 explosively formed fuse (EFF), which has been demonstrated to operate at the 8 MA level by a 1-MJ-class FCG.

  10. An organizational survey of the Los Alamos Site

    SciTech Connect

    Shurberg, D.A.; Haber, S.B.

    1991-11-01

    An Organizational Survey (OS) was administered at the Los Alamos Site that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental, safety, and health concern, hazardous nature of work, safety and overall job satisfaction. The purpose of the OS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the notion of culture;'' that is, the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In addition, through the OS, a broad sample of individuals can be reached that would probably not be interviewed or observed during the course of a typical assessment. The OS also provides a descriptive profile of the organization at one point in time that can then be compared to a profile taken at a different point in time to assess changes in the culture of the organization. While comparisons among groups are made, it is not the purpose of this report to make evaluative statements of which profile may be positive or negative. However, using the data presented in this report in conjunction with other evaluative activities, may provide useful insight into the organization. The OS administration at the Los Alamos Site was the ninth to occur at a Department of Energy (DOE) facility. All data from the OS is presented in group summaries, by organization, department or directorate within organization, supervisory level both overall and within organization, and staff classification within organization. Statistically significant differences between groups are identified and discussed. 9 refs., 94 figs., 11 tabs.

  11. An organizational survey of the Los Alamos Site

    SciTech Connect

    Shurberg, D.A.; Haber, S.B.

    1991-11-01

    An Organizational Survey (OS) was administered at the Los Alamos Site that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental, safety, and health concern, hazardous nature of work, safety and overall job satisfaction. The purpose of the OS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the notion of ``culture;`` that is, the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In addition, through the OS, a broad sample of individuals can be reached that would probably not be interviewed or observed during the course of a typical assessment. The OS also provides a descriptive profile of the organization at one point in time that can then be compared to a profile taken at a different point in time to assess changes in the culture of the organization. While comparisons among groups are made, it is not the purpose of this report to make evaluative statements of which profile may be positive or negative. However, using the data presented in this report in conjunction with other evaluative activities, may provide useful insight into the organization. The OS administration at the Los Alamos Site was the ninth to occur at a Department of Energy (DOE) facility. All data from the OS is presented in group summaries, by organization, department or directorate within organization, supervisory level both overall and within organization, and staff classification within organization. Statistically significant differences between groups are identified and discussed. 9 refs., 94 figs., 11 tabs.

  12. Fuels Inventories in the Los Alamos National Laboratory Region: 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Balice, R.G.; Oswald, B.P.; Martin, C.

    1999-03-01

    Fifty-four sites were surveyed for fuel levels, vegetational structures, and topographic characteristics. Most of the surveyed sites were on Los Alamos National Laboratory property, however, some surveys were also conducted on U.S. Forest Service property. The overall vegetation of these sites ranged from pinon-juniper woodlands to ponderosa pine forests to mixed conifer forests, and the topographic positions included canyons, mesas, and mountains. The results of these surveys indicate that the understory fuels are the greatest in mixed conifer forests and that overstory fuels are greatest in both mixed conifer forests and ponderosa pine forests on mesas. The geographic distribution of these fuels would suggest a most credible wildfire scenario for the Los Alamos region. Three major fires have occurred since 1954 and these fires behaved in a manner that is consistent with this scenario. The most credible wildfire scenario was also supported by the results of BEHAVE modeling that used the fuels inventory data as inputs. Output from the BEHAVE model suggested that catastrophic wildfires would continue to occur during any season with sufficiently dry, windy weather.

  13. Cleanup at Los Alamos National Laboratory - the challenges - 9493

    SciTech Connect

    Stiger, Susan G; Hargis, Kenneth M; Graham, Michael J; Rael, George J

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of environmental cleanup at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and some of the unique aspects and challenges. Cleanup of the 65-year old Department of Energy Laboratory is being conducted under a RCRA Consent Order with the State of New Mexico. This agreement is one of the most recent cleanup agreements signed in the DOE complex and was based on lessons learned at other DOE sites. A number of attributes create unique challenges for LANL cleanup -- the proximity to the community and pueblos, the site's topography and geology, and the nature of LANL's on-going missions. This overview paper will set the stage for other papers in this session, including papers that present: Plans to retrieve buried waste at Material Disposal Area B, across the street from oen of Los Alamos' commercial districts and the local newspaper; Progress to date and joint plans with WIPP for disposal of the remaining inventory of legacy transuranic waste; Reviews of both groundwater and surface water contamination and the factors complicating both characterization and remediation; Optimizing the disposal of low-level radioactive waste from ongoing LANL missions; A stakeholder environmental data transparency project (RACER), with full public access to all available information on contamination at LANL, and A description of the approach to waste processing cost recovery from the programs that generate hazardous and radioactive waste at LANL.

  14. The Los Alamos suite of relativistic atomic physics codes

    DOE PAGES

    Fontes, C. J.; Zhang, H. L.; Jr, J. Abdallah; ...

    2015-05-28

    The Los Alamos SuitE of Relativistic (LASER) atomic physics codes is a robust, mature platform that has been used to model highly charged ions in a variety of ways. The suite includes capabilities for calculating data related to fundamental atomic structure, as well as the processes of photoexcitation, electron-impact excitation and ionization, photoionization and autoionization within a consistent framework. These data can be of a basic nature, such as cross sections and collision strengths, which are useful in making predictions that can be compared with experiments to test fundamental theories of highly charged ions, such as quantum electrodynamics. The suitemore » can also be used to generate detailed models of energy levels and rate coefficients, and to apply them in the collisional-radiative modeling of plasmas over a wide range of conditions. Such modeling is useful, for example, in the interpretation of spectra generated by a variety of plasmas. In this work, we provide a brief overview of the capabilities within the Los Alamos relativistic suite along with some examples of its application to the modeling of highly charged ions.« less

  15. Recent progress in the Los Alamos KrF Program

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, T.E.; Cartwright, D.C.; Coggeshall, S.V.; Fenstermacher, C.A.; Figueira, J.F.; Foreman, L.R.; Goldstone, P.D.; Hanson, D.E.; Harris, D.B.; Hauer, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the Inertial Confinement Fusion Program (ICF) is to develop the ability to ignite and burn small masses of thermonuclear fuel. Although the present near-term objectives of the program are directed toward defense applications, ICF research continues to be carried out with a view to the longer term goal of commercial power production. The characteristics of a KrF laser make it an attractive candidate as an ICF driver. The KrF wavelength of 248 nm provides a target coupling that is very high at intensities of 10/sup 14/w/cm/sup 2/. In addition, the KrF laser can be repetitively operated at frequencies appropriate for a power reactor and has an intrinsically high efficiency, which allows projections to the long-term goal of energy production. The ICF program at Los Alamos consists of driver development, target design and fabrication, and target experimentation. The major effort at present is the investigation and development of KrF technology to determine its applicability for use in a laboratory driver at Los Alamos. Such a driver would be used in defense related technology studies and in areas of scientific study such as highly ionized materials and high-energy-density physics.

  16. The Los Alamos universe: Using multimedia to promote laboratory capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kindel, J.

    2000-03-01

    This project consists of a multimedia presentation that explains the technological capabilities of Los Alamos National Laboratory. It takes the form of a human-computer interface built around the metaphor of the universe. The project is intended promote Laboratory capabilities to a wide audience. Multimedia is simply a means of communicating information through a diverse set of tools--be they text, sound, animation, video, etc. Likewise, Los Alamos National Laboratory is a collection of diverse technologies, projects, and people. Given the ample material available at the Laboratory, there are tangible benefits to be gained by communicating across media. This paper consists of three parts. The first section provides some basic information about the Laboratory, its mission, and its needs. The second section introduces this multimedia presentation and the metaphor it is based on along with some basic concepts of color and user interaction used in the building of this project. The final section covers construction of the project, pitfalls, and future improvements.

  17. Investigation of excess thyroid cancer incidence in Los Alamos County

    SciTech Connect

    Athas, W.F.

    1996-04-01

    Los Alamos County (LAC) is home to the Los Alamos National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear research and design facility. In 1991, the DOE funded the New Mexico Department of Health to conduct a review of cancer incidence rates in LAC in response to citizen concerns over what was perceived as a large excess of brain tumors and a possible relationship to radiological contaminants from the Laboratory. The study found no unusual or alarming pattern in the incidence of brain cancer, however, a fourfold excess of thyroid cancer was observed during the late-1980`s. A rapid review of the medical records for cases diagnosed between 1986 and 1990 failed to demonstrate that the thyroid cancer excess had resulted from enhanced detection. Surveillance activities subsequently undertaken to monitor the trend revealed that the excess persisted into 1993. A feasibility assessment of further studies was made, and ultimately, an investigation was conducted to document the epidemiologic characteristics of the excess in detail and to explore possible causes through a case-series records review. Findings from the investigation are the subject of this report.

  18. The Los Alamos suite of relativistic atomic physics codes

    SciTech Connect

    Fontes, C. J.; Zhang, H. L.; Jr, J. Abdallah; Clark, R. E. H.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Colgan, J.; Cunningham, R. T.; Hakel, P.; Magee, N. H.; Sherrill, M. E.

    2015-05-28

    The Los Alamos SuitE of Relativistic (LASER) atomic physics codes is a robust, mature platform that has been used to model highly charged ions in a variety of ways. The suite includes capabilities for calculating data related to fundamental atomic structure, as well as the processes of photoexcitation, electron-impact excitation and ionization, photoionization and autoionization within a consistent framework. These data can be of a basic nature, such as cross sections and collision strengths, which are useful in making predictions that can be compared with experiments to test fundamental theories of highly charged ions, such as quantum electrodynamics. The suite can also be used to generate detailed models of energy levels and rate coefficients, and to apply them in the collisional-radiative modeling of plasmas over a wide range of conditions. Such modeling is useful, for example, in the interpretation of spectra generated by a variety of plasmas. In this work, we provide a brief overview of the capabilities within the Los Alamos relativistic suite along with some examples of its application to the modeling of highly charged ions.

  19. Water supply at Los Alamos during 1994. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McLin, S.G.; Purtymun, W.D.; Stoker, A.K.; Maes, M.N.

    1996-10-01

    Production of potable municipal water supplies during 1994 totaled about 1,426.6 million gallons of wells in the Guaje, Pajarito, and Otowi Fields. The non-potable water supply for industrial use was about 11.6 million gallons from the spring gallery in Water Canyon. There was no water used for irrigation from Guaje or Los Alamos Reservoirs; thus, the total water usage in 1994 was about 1,438.2 million gallons. Pumps in Guaje Well 5 and Otowi Well 4 failed during the year and were not operational by the end of 1994. Water production resumed in Pajarito Well 3 in June. Wells in the Los Alamos Field, on Pueblo Land, were plugged and abandoned in 1992, or were transferred to San Ildefonso Pueblo. This report fulfills requirements which require the Laboratory to monitor and document groundwater conditions below Pajarito Plateau, and to protect the main aquifer from contamination associated with Laboratory operations by providing information on hydrologic characteristics of the main aquifer, including operating conditions of the municipal water supply system.

  20. Mixed low-level waste minimization at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Starke, T.P.

    1998-12-01

    During the first six months of University of California 98 Fiscal Year (July--December) Los Alamos National Laboratory has achieved a 57% reduction in mixed low-level waste generation. This has been accomplished through a systems approach that identified and minimized the largest MLLW streams. These included surface-contaminated lead, lead-lined gloveboxes, printed circuit boards, and activated fluorescent lamps. Specific waste minimization projects have been initiated to address these streams. In addition, several chemical processing equipment upgrades are being implemented. Use of contaminated lead is planned for several high energy proton beam stop applications and stainless steel encapsulated lead is being evaluated for other radiological control area applications. INEEL is assisting Los Alamos with a complete systems analysis of analytical chemistry derived mixed wastes at the CMR building and with a minimum life-cycle cost standard glovebox design. Funding for waste minimization upgrades has come from several sources: generator programs, waste management, the generator set-aside program, and Defense Programs funding to INEEL.

  1. Plutonium scrap processing at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Nixon, A.E.; McKerley, B.J.; Christensen, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory currently has the newest plutonium handling facility in the nation. Los Alamos has been active in the processing of plutonium almost since the discovery of this man-made element in 1941. One of the functions of the new facility is the processing of plutonium scrap generated at LASL and other sites. The feed for the scrap processing program is extremely varied, and a wide variety of contaminants are often encountered. Depending upon the scrap matrix and contaminants present, the majority of material receives a nitric acid/hydrofluoric acid or nitric acid/calcium fluoride leach. The plutonium nitrate solutions are then loaded onto an anion exchange column charged with DOWEX 1 x 4, 50 to 100 mesh, nitrate form resin. The column is eluted with 0.48 M hydroxyl amine nitrate. The Pu(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/ is then precipitated as plutonium III oxalate which is calcined at 450 to 500/sup 0/C to yield a purified PuO/sub 2/ product.

  2. Numerical simulation of MHD shock waves in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.; Dryer, M.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of the interplanetary magnetic field on the propagation speed of shock waves through an ambient solar wind are examined by numerical solutions of the time-dependent nonlinear equations of motion. The magnetic field always increases the velocity of strong shocks. Although the field may temporarily slow down weak shocks inside 1 AU, it eventually also causes weak shocks to travel faster than they would without the magnetic field at larger distances. Consistent with the increase in the shock velocity, the gas pressure ratio across a shock is reduced considerably in the presence of the magnetic field. The numerical method is used to simulate (starting at 0.3 AU) the large deceleration of a shock observed in the lower corona by ground-based radio instrumentation and the more gradual deceleration of the shock in the solar wind observed by the Pioneer 9 and Pioneer 10 spacecraft.

  3. SUBMILLIMETER ARRAY/PLATEAU DE BURE INTERFEROMETER MULTIPLE LINE OBSERVATIONS OF THE NEARBY SEYFERT 2 GALAXY NGC 1068: SHOCK-RELATED GAS KINEMATICS AND HEATING IN THE CENTRAL 100 pc?

    SciTech Connect

    Krips, M.; Neri, R.; Martin, S. E-mail: neri@iram.fr

    2011-07-20

    We present high angular resolution (0.''5-2.''0) observations of the millimeter continuum and the {sup 12}CO(J = 3-2), {sup 13}CO(J = 3-2), {sup 13}CO(J = 2-1), C{sup 18}O(J = 2-1), HCN(J = 3-2), HCO{sup +}(J = 4-3), and HCO{sup +}(J = 3-2) line emission in the circumnuclear disk (r {approx}< 100 pc) of the prototypical Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068, carried out with the Submillimeter Array. We also include in our analysis new {sup 13}CO(J = 1-0) and improved {sup 12}CO(J = 2-1) observations of NGC 1068 at high angular resolution (1.''0-2.''0) and sensitivity, conducted with the Institute de Radioastronomie Millimetrique Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Based on the complex dynamics of the molecular gas emission indicating non-circular motions in the central {approx}100 pc, we propose a scenario in which part of the molecular gas in the circumnuclear disk of NGC 1068 is blown radially outward as a result of shocks. This shock scenario is further supported by quite warm (T{sub kin} {>=} 200 K) and dense (n(H{sub 2}) {approx_equal} 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}) gas constrained from observed molecular line ratios. The HCN abundance in the circumnuclear disk is found to be [HCN]/[{sup 12}CO] {approx} 10{sup -3.5}. This is slightly higher than the abundances derived for Galactic and extragalactic star-forming/starbursting regions. This result lends further support to X-ray-enhanced HCN formation in the circumnuclear disk of NGC 1068 as suggested by earlier studies. The HCO{sup +} abundance ([HCO{sup +}]/[{sup 12}CO] {approx} 10{sup -5}) appears to be somewhat lower than that of Galactic and extragalactic star-forming/starbursting regions. When trying to fit the centimeter-to-millimeter continuum emission by different thermal and non-thermal processes, it appears that electron-scattered synchrotron emission yields the best results while thermal free-free emission seems to overpredict the millimeter continuum emission.

  4. Converging shocks in elastic-plastic solids.

    PubMed

    Ortega, A López; Lombardini, M; Hill, D J

    2011-11-01

    We present an approximate description of the behavior of an elastic-plastic material processed by a cylindrically or spherically symmetric converging shock, following Whitham's shock dynamics theory. Originally applied with success to various gas dynamics problems, this theory is presently derived for solid media, in both elastic and plastic regimes. The exact solutions of the shock dynamics equations obtained reproduce well the results obtained by high-resolution numerical simulations. The examined constitutive laws share a compressible neo-Hookean structure for the internal energy e=e(s)(I(1))+e(h)(ρ,ς), where e(s) accounts for shear through the first invariant of the Cauchy-Green tensor, and e(h) represents the hydrostatic contribution as a function of the density ρ and entropy ς. In the strong-shock limit, reached as the shock approaches the axis or origin r=0, we show that compression effects are dominant over shear deformations. For an isothermal constitutive law, i.e., e(h)=e(h)(ρ), with a power-law dependence e(h) is proportional to ρ(α), shock dynamics predicts that for a converging shock located at r=R(t) at time t, the Mach number increases as M is proportional to [log(1/R)](α), independently of the space index s, where s=2 in cylindrical geometry and 3 in spherical geometry. An alternative isothermal constitutive law with p(ρ) of the arctanh type, which enforces a finite density in the strong-shock limit, leads to M is proportional to R(-(s-1)) for strong shocks. A nonisothermal constitutive law, whose hydrostatic part e(h) is that of an ideal gas, is also tested, recovering the strong-shock limit M is proportional to R(-(s-1)/n(γ)) originally derived by Whitham for perfect gases, where γ is inherently related to the maximum compression ratio that the material can reach, (γ+1)/(γ-1). From these strong-shock limits, we also estimate analytically the density, radial velocity, pressure, and sound speed immediately behind the shock. While the

  5. Converging shocks in elastic-plastic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Ortega, A.; Lombardini, M.; Hill, D. J.

    2011-11-01

    We present an approximate description of the behavior of an elastic-plastic material processed by a cylindrically or spherically symmetric converging shock, following Whitham's shock dynamics theory. Originally applied with success to various gas dynamics problems, this theory is presently derived for solid media, in both elastic and plastic regimes. The exact solutions of the shock dynamics equations obtained reproduce well the results obtained by high-resolution numerical simulations. The examined constitutive laws share a compressible neo-Hookean structure for the internal energy e=es(I1)+eh(ρ,ς), where es accounts for shear through the first invariant of the Cauchy-Green tensor, and eh represents the hydrostatic contribution as a function of the density ρ and entropy ς. In the strong-shock limit, reached as the shock approaches the axis or origin r=0, we show that compression effects are dominant over shear deformations. For an isothermal constitutive law, i.e., eh=eh(ρ), with a power-law dependence eh∝ρα, shock dynamics predicts that for a converging shock located at r=R(t) at time t, the Mach number increases as M∝[log(1/R)]α, independently of the space index s, where s=2 in cylindrical geometry and 3 in spherical geometry. An alternative isothermal constitutive law with p(ρ) of the arctanh type, which enforces a finite density in the strong-shock limit, leads to M∝R-(s-1) for strong shocks. A nonisothermal constitutive law, whose hydrostatic part eh is that of an ideal gas, is also tested, recovering the strong-shock limit M∝R-(s-1)/n(γ) originally derived by Whitham for perfect gases, where γ is inherently related to the maximum compression ratio that the material can reach, (γ+1)/(γ-1). From these strong-shock limits, we also estimate analytically the density, radial velocity, pressure, and sound speed immediately behind the shock. While the hydrostatic part of the energy essentially commands the strong-shock behavior, the shear

  6. Organic synthesis in experimental impact shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, C. P.; Borucki, W. J.

    1997-01-01

    Laboratory simulations of shocks created with a high-energy laser demonstrate that the efficacy of organic production depends on the molecular, not just the elemental composition of the shocked gas. In a methane-rich mixture that simulates a low-temperature equilibrium mixture of cometary material, hydrogen cyanide and acetylene were produced with yields of 5 x 10(17) molecules per joule. Repeated shocking of the methane-rich mixture produced amine groups, suggesting the possible synthesis of amino acids. No organic molecules were produced in a carbon dioxide-rich mixture, which is at odds with thermodynamic equilibrium approaches to shock chemistry and has implications for the modeling of shock-produced organic molecules on early Earth.

  7. Analysis of shock-wave propagation in aqueous foams using shock tube experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdan, G.; Mariani, C.; Houas, L.; Chinnayya, A.; Hadjadj, A.; Del Prete, E.; Haas, J.-F.; Rambert, N.; Counilh, D.; Faure, S.

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports experimental results of planar shock waves interacting with aqueous foams in a horizontal conventional shock tube. Four incident shock wave Mach numbers are considered, ranging from 1.07 to 1.8, with two different foam columns of one meter thickness and expansion ratios of 30 and 80. High-speed flow visualizations are used along with pressure measurements to analyse the main physical mechanisms that govern shock wave mitigation in foams. During the shock/foam interaction, a precursor leading pressure jump was identified as the trace of the liquid film destruction stage in the foam fragmentation process. The corresponding pressure threshold is found to be invariant for a given foam. Regarding the mitigation effect, the results show that the speed of the shock is drastically reduced and that wetter is the foam, slower are the transmitted waves. The presence of the foam barrier attenuates the induced pressure impulse behind the transmitted shock, while the driest foam appears to be more effective, as it limits the pressure induced by the reflected shock off the foam front. Finally, it was found that the pressure histories in the two-phase gas-liquid mixture are different from those previously obtained within a cloud of droplets. The observed behavior is attributed to the process of foam fragmentation and to the modification of the flow topology past the shock. These physical phenomena occurring during the shock/foam interaction should be properly accounted for when elaborating new physical models.

  8. Shock Layer Radiation Measurements and Analysis for Mars Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak; Grinstead, Jay Henderson; Bogdanoff, David W.; Wright, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's In-Space Propulsion program is supporting the development of shock radiation transport models for aerocapture missions to Mars. A comprehensive test series in the NASA Antes Electric Arc Shock Tube facility at a representative flight condition was recently completed. The facility optical instrumentation enabled spectral measurements of shocked gas radiation from the vacuum ultraviolet to the near infrared. The instrumentation captured the nonequilibrium post-shock excitation and relaxation dynamics of dispersed spectral features. A description of the shock tube facility, optical instrumentation, and examples of the test data are presented. Comparisons of measured spectra with model predictions are also made.

  9. Recollections of a very junior physicist at Los Alamos, 1944-1946

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Anthony P.

    2008-04-01

    The author came to Los Alamos as a member of the British Mission after two years of making fission cross section measurements at the Cavendish Laboratory. He worked in a group headed by Egon Bretscher in Enrico Fermi's F Division. The talk presents his personal memories and experiences at Los Alamos as compared to his life and work in wartime Britain.

  10. 75 FR 1793 - Study Team for the Los Alamos Historical Document Retrieval and Assessment (LAHDRA) Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Study Team for the Los Alamos Historical...: Public Meeting of the Study Team for the Los Alamos Historical Document Retrieval and Assessment Project...://www.ohkay.com/contactus.html . Status: Open to the public, limited only by the space available....

  11. Office of Inspector General report on audit of environmental restoration at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    Los Alamos` Environmental Restoration Program is charged with cost effectively remediating contaminated sites. To monitor progress toward this goal, the University of California, the contractor operating Los Alamos, and the Department negotiated eight performance measures. The objective of this audit was to determine whether the contract performance criteria were reasonable, measurable, and complete, thereby allowing the Department to determine if Los Alamos had expeditiously and cost effectively remediated contaminated sites. The audit determined that Los Alamos did not generate the information needed to assess the cost effectiveness of remediation on a site-by-site basis. This situation occurred because the performance criteria used to evaluate cost effectiveness were not always reasonable, measurable, and complete. As a result, neither Los Alamos nor the Department could evaluate the cost effectiveness or progress of the remediation program or accurately budget for upcoming remediation activities. The audit also determined that Los Alamos` sample validation procedures were too costly because Los Alamos validated more samples than called for by Federal and New Mexico standard practices. While the Office of Inspector General recognizes the importance of prudent sample validation, Los Alamos paid $540,000 more than necessary to validate sample results. These funds could have been used to remediate contaminated sites.

  12. Bulk processing of radionuclide generator parents at the Los Alamos Hot Cell Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fassbender, M. E.; Nortier, F. M.; Phillips, Dennis R.; Peterson, E. J.

    2004-01-01

    Bulk radionuclide processing at Los Alamos includes isotopes with short-lived radioactive daughter nuclides ('generator parents') for medical applications. The generator radionuclide parents {sup 68}Ge, {sup 82}Sr, {sup 88}Zr and {sup 109}Cd are regularly processed at the Los Alamos Hot Cell Facility. Nuclear chemical aspects related to the production and processing of these generator parents are briefly outlined.

  13. 75 FR 72829 - Los Alamos Historical Document Retrieval and Assessment (LAHDRA) Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Los Alamos Historical Document Retrieval and... Los Alamos Historical Document Retrieval and Assessment (LAHDRA)Project. Time and Date: 5 p.m.-7...

  14. Los Alamos strategic defense research and the ABM (Anti-Ballistic Missile) Treaty

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, R.; Pendley, R.E.

    1988-04-01

    This report reviews the restrictions placed on Los Alamos strategic defense by current arms control treaty agreements, including controversies about the correct interpretation of the major treaty at issue, the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty; and it assesses the current status of the most significant Los Alamos strategic defense programs in terms of their compliance with that Treaty, and others. 7 tabs.

  15. Toxic Shock Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... burn to avoid getting a staph infection. Toxic shock syndrome treatment Because toxic shock syndrome gets worse quickly, you may be seriously ... toxic shock syndrome in a wound? Resources Toxic Shock Syndrome ... treatment, women's health Family Health, Women January 2017 Copyright © ...

  16. EASI - EQUILIBRIUM AIR SHOCK INTERFERENCE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, C. E.

    1994-01-01

    New research on hypersonic vehicles, such as the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP), has raised concerns about the effects of shock-wave interference on various structural components of the craft. State-of-the-art aerothermal analysis software is inadequate to predict local flow and heat flux in areas of extremely high heat transfer, such as the surface impingement of an Edney-type supersonic jet. EASI revives and updates older computational methods for calculating inviscid flow field and maximum heating from shock wave interference. The program expands these methods to solve problems involving the six shock-wave interference patterns on a two-dimensional cylindrical leading edge with an equilibrium chemically reacting gas mixture (representing, for example, the scramjet cowl of the NASP). The inclusion of gas chemistry allows for a more accurate prediction of the maximum pressure and heating loads by accounting for the effects of high temperature on the air mixture. Caloric imperfections and specie dissociation of high-temperature air cause shock-wave angles, flow deflection angles, and thermodynamic properties to differ from those calculated by a calorically perfect gas model. EASI contains pressure- and temperature-dependent thermodynamic and transport properties to determine heating rates, and uses either a calorically perfect air model or an 11-specie, 7-reaction reacting air model at equilibrium with temperatures up to 15,000 K for the inviscid flowfield calculations. EASI solves the flow field and the associated maximum surface pressure and heat flux for the six common types of shock wave interference. Depending on the type of interference, the program solves for shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction, expansion-fan/boundary-layer interaction, attaching shear layer or supersonic jet impingement. Heat flux predictions require a knowledge (from experimental data or relevant calculations) of a pertinent length scale of the interaction. Output files contain flow

  17. Condensate Accretion in Shock Tube's Expansion Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mezonlin, Ephrem-Denis; DeSilva, Upul P.; Hunte, F.; Johnson, Joseph A., III

    1997-01-01

    It has been shown that turbulence and temperature influence the droplet sizes in expansion fan induced condensation by studying the Rayleigh scattering from one port in our shock tube's test section. We have modified our set-up so as to allow, using two ports, the real time measurement of the influence of turbulence and temperature on the rate at which these droplets grow. To do this, we looked at the Rayleigh scattering from two different ports for ten Reynolds numbers at five different temperatures. We modeled the time of flight of droplets, using the equations of one-dimensional gas dynamics and the measured shock wave speed in shock tube's driven section.

  18. Spectral methods for the Euler equations: Chebyshev methods and shock-fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussaini, M. Y.; Kopriva, D. A.; Salas, M. D.; Zang, T. A.

    1984-01-01

    The Chebyshev spectral collocation method for the Euler gas-dynamic equations is described. It is used with shock fitting to compute several two-dimensional, gas-dynamic flows. Examples include a shock-acoustic wave interaction, a shock/vortex interaction, and the classical blunt body problem. With shock fitting, the spectral method has a clear advantage over second order finite differences in that equivalent accuracy can be obtained with far fewer grid points.

  19. Monte Carlo simulations of particle acceleration at oblique shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.; Ellison, Donald C.; Jones, Frank C.

    1994-01-01

    The Fermi shock acceleration mechanism may be responsible for the production of high-energy cosmic rays in a wide variety of environments. Modeling of this phenomenon has largely focused on plane-parallel shocks, and one of the most promising techniques for its study is the Monte Carlo simulation of particle transport in shocked fluid flows. One of the principal problems in shock acceleration theory is the mechanism and efficiency of injection of particles from the thermal gas into the accelerated population. The Monte Carlo technique is ideally suited to addressing the injection problem directly, and previous applications of it to the quasi-parallel Earth bow shock led to very successful modeling of proton and heavy ion spectra, as well as other observed quantities. Recently this technique has been extended to oblique shock geometries, in which the upstream magnetic field makes a significant angle Theta(sub B1) to the shock normal. Spectral resutls from test particle Monte Carlo simulations of cosmic-ray acceleration at oblique, nonrelativistic shocks are presented. The results show that low Mach number shocks have injection efficiencies that are relatively insensitive to (though not independent of) the shock obliquity, but that there is a dramatic drop in efficiency for shocks of Mach number 30 or more as the obliquity increases above 15 deg. Cosmic-ray distributions just upstream of the shock reveal prominent bumps at energies below the thermal peak; these disappear far upstream but might be observable features close to astrophysical shocks.

  20. Experiments in Numerical Studies of Low Density and Real Gas Effects on Regions of Shock Wave/Boundary Layer Interaction in Hypervelocity Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    square root of the velocity according to the Doppler line shape contribution which is dominant at the freestream pressure of the flow. At the CFD ... pressure over the adjacent curved surfaces, and reduce Reynolds number for onset of boundary layer transition. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Real Gas Chemistry...that flow over the adjacent curved surfaces was influenced by flow chemistry with a reduction in pressure relative to the flow without significant

  1. Chondrule formation in the radiative accretional shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruzmaikina, T. V.; Ip, W.

    1994-01-01

    The physical, mineralogical, and isotopic properties of chondrules strongly indicate that they were formed by the rapid melting and resolidification of preexisting solids composed of primitive material. The chondrule precursors were heated to temperatures of about 1800 K in short high-temperature events, followed by cooling with a rate of 10(exp 2)-10(exp 3) K/hr. A heat input of about 1500 J/g is required to heat chondrule precursors to such a temperature and melt them. Lightning discharges and flares in the solar nebula, and heating of the chondrule precursors by friction with gas decelerated in the accretional shock or in a shock (of unspecified origin) within the solar nebula, have been discussed as possible mechanisms for chondrule formation. One advantage of chondrule formation in large-scale shocks is that a lot of dust material can be processed. An accretional shock, which is produced by infalling gas of the presolar cloud when it collides with the solar nebula, belongs to this type of shock. In 1984 Wood considered the possibility of chondrule formation in the accretional shock by heating of chondrule precursors by gas drag. He concluded that the density in the accreting material is much lower than needed to melt silicates at the distance of the asteroid belt if the accreting matter had the cosmic ratio of dust to gas, and the mass of the solar nebula did not exceed 2 solar mass units. Melting of chondrule precursors is difficult because of their effective cooling by thermal radiation. Suppression of the radiative cooling of individual grains in dust swarms, which are opaque to thermal emission, was considered to be the only possible means of chondrule formation in solar nebula shocks. Previous models of solid grain melting in solar nebula shocks have neglected gas cooling behind the shock front, i.e., they considered adiabatic shocks. In this paper we show that large dust grains could be heated much stronger than was supposed by these authors, because of

  2. RECOLLIMATION SHOCKS IN MAGNETIZED RELATIVISTIC JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Rezzolla, Luciano; Gómez, Jose L.; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Meli, Athina; Hardee, Philip E.

    2015-08-10

    We have performed two-dimensional special-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of non-equilibrium over-pressured relativistic jets in cylindrical geometry. Multiple stationary recollimation shock and rarefaction structures are produced along the jet by the nonlinear interaction of shocks and rarefaction waves excited at the interface between the jet and the surrounding ambient medium. Although initially the jet is kinematically dominated, we have considered axial, toroidal, and helical magnetic fields to investigate the effects of different magnetic-field topologies and strengths on the recollimation structures. We find that an axial field introduces a larger effective gas pressure and leads to stronger recollimation shocks and rarefactions, resulting in larger flow variations. The jet boost grows quadratically with the initial magnetic field. On the other hand, a toroidal field leads to weaker recollimation shocks and rarefactions, significantly modifying the jet structure after the first recollimation rarefaction and shock. The jet boost decreases systematically. For a helical field, instead, the behavior depends on the magnetic pitch, with a phenomenology that ranges between the one seen for axial and toroidal magnetic fields, respectively. In general, however, a helical magnetic field yields a more complex shock and rarefaction substructure close to the inlet that significantly modifies the jet structure. The differences in shock structure resulting from different field configurations and strengths may have observable consequences for disturbances propagating through a stationary recollimation shock.

  3. Recollimation Shocks in Magnetized Relativistic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Gómez, Jose L.; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Meli, Athina; Hardee, Philip E.; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2015-08-01

    We have performed two-dimensional special-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of non-equilibrium over-pressured relativistic jets in cylindrical geometry. Multiple stationary recollimation shock and rarefaction structures are produced along the jet by the nonlinear interaction of shocks and rarefaction waves excited at the interface between the jet and the surrounding ambient medium. Although initially the jet is kinematically dominated, we have considered axial, toroidal, and helical magnetic fields to investigate the effects of different magnetic-field topologies and strengths on the recollimation structures. We find that an axial field introduces a larger effective gas pressure and leads to stronger recollimation shocks and rarefactions, resulting in larger flow variations. The jet boost grows quadratically with the initial magnetic field. On the other hand, a toroidal field leads to weaker recollimation shocks and rarefactions, significantly modifying the jet structure after the first recollimation rarefaction and shock. The jet boost decreases systematically. For a helical field, instead, the behavior depends on the magnetic pitch, with a phenomenology that ranges between the one seen for axial and toroidal magnetic fields, respectively. In general, however, a helical magnetic field yields a more complex shock and rarefaction substructure close to the inlet that significantly modifies the jet structure. The differences in shock structure resulting from different field configurations and strengths may have observable consequences for disturbances propagating through a stationary recollimation shock.

  4. Characterization of Shocked Beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Cady, Carl M; Adams, Chris D; Hull, Lawrence M; Gray III, George T; Prime, Michael B; Addessio, Francis L; Wynn, Thomas A; Brown, Eric N

    2012-08-24

    Beryllium metal has many excellent structural properties in addition to its unique radiation characteristics, including: high elastic modulus, low Poisson's ratio, low density, and high melting point. However, it suffers from several major mechanical drawbacks: 1) high anisotropy - due to its hexagonal lattice structure and its susceptibility to crystallographic texturing; 2) susceptibility to impurity-induced fracture - due to grain boundary segregation; and 3) low intrinsic ductility at ambient temperatures thereby limiting fabricability. While large ductility results from deformation under the conditions of compression, the material can exhibit a brittle behavior under tension. Furthermore, there is a brittle to ductile transition at approximately 200 C under tensile conditions. While numerous studies have investigated the low-strain-rate constitutive response of beryllium, the combined influence of high strain rate and temperature on the mechanical behavior and microstructure of beryllium has received limited attention over the last 40 years. Prior studies have focused on tensile loading behavior, or limited conditions of dynamic strain rate and/or temperature. The beryllium used in this study was Grade S200-F (Brush Wellman, Inc., Elmore, OH) material. The work focused on high strain rate deformation and examine the validity of constitutive models in deformation rate regimes, including shock, the experiments were modeled using a Lagrangian hydrocode. Two constitutive strength (plasticity) models, the Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) and Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS) models, were calibrated using the same set of quasi-static and Hopkinson bar data taken at temperatures from 77K to 873K and strain rates from 0.001/sec to 4300/sec. In spite of being calibrated on the same data, the two models give noticeably different results when compared with the measured wave profiles. These high strain rate tests were conducted using both explosive drive and a gas gun to

  5. Thermoacoustic natural gas liquefier

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, G.; Gardner, D.; Hayden, M.; Radebaugh, R.; Wollan, J.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project sought to develop a natural-gas-powered natural-gas liquefier that has absolutely no moving parts and requires no electrical power. It should have high efficiency, remarkable reliability, and low cost. The thermoacoustic natural-gas liquefier (TANGL) is based on our recent invention of the first no-moving-parts cryogenic refrigerator. In short, our invention uses acoustic phenomena to produce refrigeration from heat, with no moving parts. The required apparatus comprises nothing more than heat exchangers and pipes, made of common materials, without exacting tolerances. Its initial experimental success in a small size lead us to propose a more ambitious application: large-energy liquefaction of natural gas, using combustion of natural gas as the energy source. TANGL was designed to be maintenance-free, inexpensive, portable, and environmentally benign.

  6. Modeling the shock initiation of PBX 9501 in ALE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, Jonathan; Mas, Eric M; Leininger, Lara; Springer, H Keo

    2008-01-01

    The SMIS (Specific Munitions Impact Scenario) experimental series performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory has determined the 3-dimensional shock initiation behavior of the HMX based heterogeneous high explosive, PBX9501, which has a PMMA case and a steel impact cover. The SMIS real-world shot scenario creates a unique test-bed because many of the fragments arrive at the impact plate off-center and at an angle of impact. The goal of this model validation experiments is to demonstrate the predictive capability of the Tarver-Lee Ignition and Growth (I&G) reactive flow model in this fully 3-dimensional regime of Shock to Detonation Transition (SDT).

  7. Common ground: An environmental ethic for Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, F.L.

    1991-01-01

    Three predominant philosophies have characterized American business ethical thinking over the past several decades. The first phase is the ethics of self-interest'' which argues that maximizing self-interest coincidentally maximizes the common good. The second phase is legality ethics.'' Proponents argue that what is important is knowing the rules and following them scrupulously. The third phase might be called stake-holder ethics.'' A central tenant is that everyone affected by a decision has a moral hold on the decision maker. This paper will discuss one recent initiative of the Los Alamos National Laboratory to move beyond rules and regulations toward an environmental ethic that integrates the values of stakeholder ethics'' into the Laboratory's historical culture and value systems. These Common Ground Principles are described. 11 refs.

  8. The legacy and future of CFD at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, N.L.

    1996-06-01

    The early history is presented of the prolific development of CFD methods in the Fluid Dynamics Group (T-3) at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the years from 1958 to the late 1960`s. Many of the currently used numerical methods--PIC, MAC, vorticity-stream-function, ICE, ALE methods and the {kappa}-{var_epsilon} method for turbulence--originated during this time. The rest of the paper summarizes the current research in T-3 for CFD, turbulence and solids modeling. The research areas include reactive flows, multimaterial flows, multiphase flows and flows with spatial discontinuities. Also summarized are modern particle methods and techniques developed for large scale computing on massively parallel computing platforms and distributed processors.

  9. Los Alamos Guns Take Aim at Material's Mysteries

    SciTech Connect

    Byers, Mark; Moore, David; Dimarino, Steve

    2014-04-14

    Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists and technicians conduct thousands of experiments a year, delving into the fundamental nature of everything from supernovas to subatomic particles. One set of instruments used to better understand the fundamental nature of various materials are 10 scientific gun systems that fire various projectiles at high-tech targets to create enormous velocities, pressures, and temperatures - and using laser, x-ray, and other diagnostics - explore the very nature of metals and other materials. The hundreds of gun-based experiments conducted every year at the Laboratory require a highly-skilled staff of scientists and technicians, and has given rise to a special organization called the "gun working group" to foster open communications, cooperation, problem-solving, and a healthy safety culture.

  10. Environmental surveillance and compliance at Los Alamos during 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report presents environmental data that characterize environmental performance and addresses compliance with environmental standards and requirements at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) during 1996. The Laboratory routinely monitors for radiation and for radioactive nonradioactive materials at Laboratory sites as well as in the surrounding region. LANL uses the monitoring results to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to identify potentially undesirable trends. Data were collected in 1996 to assess external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions; and concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface waters and groundwaters, the municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs. Using comparisons with standards and regulations, this report concludes that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a demonstrable threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment. Laboratory operations were in compliance with all major environmental regulations.

  11. Root lengths of plants on Los Alamos National Laboratory lands

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, G.D.; Foxx, T.S.

    1987-01-01

    Maximum root lengths of 22 plant species occurring on Los Alamos National Laboratory lands were measured. An average of two longest roots from each species were dug up and their lengths, typical shapes, and qualitative morphologics were noted along with the overstory dimensions of the plant individual with which the roots were associated. Maximum root lengths were compared with overstory (height times width) dimensions. Among the life forms studied, the shrubs tend to show the longest roots in relation to overstory size. Forbs show the shortest roots in relation to overstory size. Measurements of tree roots suggest only that immature trees on the Pajarito Plateau may have root-length to overstory-size ratios near one. 30 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Los Alamos Discovers Super Efficient Solar Using Perovskite Crystals

    ScienceCinema

    Mohite, Aditya; Nie, Wanyi

    2016-07-12

    State-of-the-art photovoltaics using high-purity, large-area, wafer-scale single-crystalline semiconductors grown by sophisticated, high temperature crystal-growth processes offer promising routes for developing low-cost, solar-based clean global energy solutions for the future. Solar cells composed of the recently discovered material organic-inorganic perovskites offer the efficiency of silicon, yet suffer from a variety of deficiencies limiting the commercial viability of perovskite photovoltaic technology. In research to appear in Science, Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers reveal a new solution-based hot-casting technique that eliminates these limitations, one that allows for the growth of high-quality, large-area, millimeter-scale perovskite crystals and demonstrates that highly efficient and reproducible solar cells with reduced trap assisted recombination can be realized.

  13. Los Alamos National Laboratory capability reviews - FY 2011 status

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, Everett P

    2011-01-12

    Capability reviews are the Los Alamos National Laboratory approach to assess the quality of its science, technology, and engineering (STE), and its integration across the Laboratory. There are seven capability reviews in FY 2011 reviews. The Weapons Science and Engineering review will be replaced by the National Nuclear Security Administration's Predictive Science Panel for 2011 . Beginning in 2011, third-year LORD projects will be reviewed by capability review committees rather than the first-year LORD projects that have been performed for the last three years. This change addresses concerns from committees about reviewing a project before it had made any substantive progress. The current schedule, and chairs for the 2011 capability reviews is presented. The three-year cycle (2011-2013) for capability reviews are presented for planning purposes.

  14. Plans for an Ultra Cold Neutron source at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Seestrom, S.J.; Bowles, T.J.; Hill, R.; Greene, G.L.

    1996-10-01

    Ultra Cold Neutrons (UCN) can be produced at spallation sources using a variety of techniques. To date the technique used has been to Bragg scatter and Doppler shift cold neutrons into UCN from a moving crystal. This is particularly applicable to short-pulse spallation sources. We are presently constructing a UCN source at LANSCE using this method. In addition, large gains in UCN density should be possible using cryogenic UCN sources. Research is under way at Gatchina to demonstrate technical feasibility of a frozen deuterium source. If successful, a source of this type could be implemented at future spallation source, such as the long pulse source being planned at Los Alamos, with a UCN density that may be two orders of magnitude higher than that presently available at reactors.

  15. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Nuclear Science Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ronald Owen; Wender, Steve

    2015-06-19

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facilities for Nuclear Science consist of a high-energy "white" neutron source (Target 4) with 6 flight paths, three low-energy nuclear science flight paths at the Lujan Center, and a proton reaction area. The neutron beams produced at the Target 4 complement those produced at the Lujan Center because they are of much higher energy and have shorter pulse widths. The neutron sources are driven by the 800-MeV proton beam of the LANSCE linear accelerator. With these facilities, LANSCE is able to deliver neutrons with energies ranging from a milli-electron volt to several hundreds of MeV, as well as proton beams with a wide range of energy, time and intensity characteristics. The facilities, instruments and research programs are described briefly.

  16. Neutron Capture Experiments Using the DANCE Array at Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashdorj, D.; Mitchell, G. E.; Baramsai, B.; Chyzh, A.; Walker, C.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becker, J. A.; Parker, W.; Sleaford, B.; Wu, C. Y.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Krtička, M.; Bečvář, F.

    2009-03-01

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is designed for neutron capture measurements on very small and/or radioactive targets. The DANCE array of 160 BaF2 scintillation detectors is located at the Lujan Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Accurate measurements of neutron capture data are important for many current applications as well as for basic understanding of neutron capture. The gamma rays following neutron capture reactions have been studied by the time-of-flight technique using the DANCE array. The high granularity of the array allows measurements of the gamma-ray multiplicity. The gamma-ray multiplicities and energy spectra for different multiplicities can be measured and analyzed for spin and parity determination of the resolved resonances.

  17. HELIOS: applications at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, R.T.; Mosteller, R.D.; Chodak, Paul III; Charlton, W.; Adams, B.T.

    1997-10-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is involved in the analysis of many different types of nuclear systems. The nuclear systems that we have analyzed have included subcritical accelerator driven systems for the transmutation of waste, fusion systems, critical experiment systems, and space propulsion and power systems. We have also analyzed special purpose reactors such as the LANL Omega West reactor, production reactors, and conventional commercial light- and heavy-water reactors. Thus the systems that we analyze and the type of results desired, often vary considerably from those of a power company normally analyzing their PWR or BWR for fissile fuel burnup and production. The reactor geometries that we model are often quite complicated such as those of an RBMK or Savannah River Production Reactor. Rather than fissile fuel production and burnup, the goal of a calculation could be the production rate of some obscure isotope which has medical applications.

  18. Experiments on planar plasma flow switches at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Benage, J.F. Jr.; Wysocki, F.J.; Bowers, R.; Oona, H.

    1997-12-01

    The authors have performed a series of experiments on the Colt facility at Los Alamos to study the performance of plasma flow switches and to understand the important physics issues which affect that performance. These experiments were done in planar geometry on a small machine to allow for better diagnostic access and a higher repetition rate. The Colt facility is a capacitor bank which stores 300 kJ at maximum charge and produced a peak current of 1.1 MA in 2.0 microseconds for these experiments. The diagnostics used for these experiments included an array of b-dot probes, visible framing pictures, visible spectroscopy, and laser interferometry. Characteristics of the switch are determined from spatial and temporal profiles of the magnetic field and the spatial profile and temperature of the switch plasma. Here the authors present results from experiments for a variety of switch conditions.

  19. Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The Management Subteam conducted a management and organization assessment of environment, safety, and health (ES H) activities performed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and onsite contractor personnel. The objectives of the assessment were to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of management systems and practices in terms of ensuring environmental compliance and the safety and health of workers and the general public, (2) identify key findings, and (3) identify root causes for all ES H findings and concerns. The scope of the assessment included examinations of the following from an ES H perspective: (1) strategic and program planning; (2) organizational structure and management configuration; (3) human resource management, including training and staffing; (4) management systems, including performance monitoring and assessment; (5) conduct of operations; (6) public and institutional interactions; and (7) corporate'' parent support.

  20. Smoking patterns among Los Alamos National Laboratory employees

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, M.C.; Wilkinson, G.S.

    1987-06-01

    Smoking patterns among 5507 employees at Los Alamos National Laboratory were investigated for those who underwent physical examinations by occupational physicians from 1978 to 1983. More male than female employees smoked, although differences in smoking rates between the sexes were not as large as differences observed for national smoking rates. Employees over 40 were more likely to smoke than younger employees, males consumed more cigarettes than did females, and Anglo employees smoked more cigarettes than did Hispanic employees. Highly educated employees smoked less than did less-educated workers, and staff members exhibited the lowest rates of smoking. Smoking cessation programs for Laboratory employees should be directed toward those subpopulations with the highest rates of smoking. 31 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Operational status of the Los Alamos neutron science center (LANSCE)

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Kevin W; Erickson, John L; Schoenberg, Kurt F

    2010-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator and beam delivery complex generates the proton beams that serve three neutron production sources; the thermal and cold source for the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) high-energy neutron source, and a pulsed Ultra-Cold Neutron Source. These three sources are the foundation of strong and productive multi-disciplinary research programs that serve a diverse and robust user community. The facility also provides multiplexed beams for the production of medical radioisotopes and proton radiography of dynamic events. The recent operating history of these sources will be reviewed and plans for performance improvement will be discussed, together with the underlying drivers for the proposed LANSCE Refurbishment project. The details of this latter project are presented in a separate contribution.

  2. LANSCE (Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center) target data collection system

    SciTech Connect

    Kernodle, A.K. )

    1988-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) Target Data Collection System is the result of an effort to provide a base of information from which to draw conclusions on the performance and operational condition of the overall LANSCE target system. During the conceptualization of the system several purposes and goals were defined. A survey was made of custom as well as off the shelf hardware and software which was capable of meeting these goals. The first stage of this system was successfully implemented for the LANSCE run cycle 52. From the operational experience gained thus far with the LANSCE Target Data Collection System, it would appear as though this system will indeed meet all of the previously defined requirements that seem to develop after a new system is installed.

  3. Los Alamos National Laboratory support to IAEA environmental safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Robert E; Dry, Don E; Roensch, Fred R; Kinman, Will S; Roach, Jeff L; La Mont, Stephen P

    2010-12-01

    The nuclear and radiochemistry group provides sample preparation and analysis support to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Network of Analytical Laboratories (NWAL). These analyses include both non-destructive (alpha and gamma-ray spectrometry) and destructive (thermal ionization mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) methods. On a bi-annual basis the NWAL laboratories are invited to meet to discuss program evolution and issues. During this meeting each participating laboratory summarizes their efforts over the previous two years. This presentation will present Los Alamos National Laboratories efforts in support of this program. Data showing results from sample and blank analysis will be presented along with capability enhancement and issues that arose over the previous two years.

  4. The Laser Safety Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hyer, R.

    1997-02-01

    The Laser Safety Program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory was formalized in April, 1991, with the publication of a document, {open_quotes}Lasers,{close_quotes} modeled on the ANSIZ136.1 standard. This program has received such wide acceptance by the laser community and line managers that the original Laser Safety Program document has become a Laboratory standard on lasers. As a benchmark of the success of this program is that the Laboratory has experienced no disabling eye injuries because of laser operations since July, 1990, to be compared with a disabling laser eye injury that used to average one every eighteen months prior to the time the formal program was established. The Laboratory Laser Safety Program and program elements will be presented and discussed.

  5. Los Alamos Discovers Super Efficient Solar Using Perovskite Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Mohite, Aditya; Nie, Wanyi

    2015-01-29

    State-of-the-art photovoltaics using high-purity, large-area, wafer-scale single-crystalline semiconductors grown by sophisticated, high temperature crystal-growth processes offer promising routes for developing low-cost, solar-based clean global energy solutions for the future. Solar cells composed of the recently discovered material organic-inorganic perovskites offer the efficiency of silicon, yet suffer from a variety of deficiencies limiting the commercial viability of perovskite photovoltaic technology. In research to appear in Science, Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers reveal a new solution-based hot-casting technique that eliminates these limitations, one that allows for the growth of high-quality, large-area, millimeter-scale perovskite crystals and demonstrates that highly efficient and reproducible solar cells with reduced trap assisted recombination can be realized.

  6. Los Alamos Guns Take Aim at Material's Mysteries

    ScienceCinema

    Byers, Mark; Moore, David; Dimarino, Steve

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists and technicians conduct thousands of experiments a year, delving into the fundamental nature of everything from supernovas to subatomic particles. One set of instruments used to better understand the fundamental nature of various materials are 10 scientific gun systems that fire various projectiles at high-tech targets to create enormous velocities, pressures, and temperatures - and using laser, x-ray, and other diagnostics - explore the very nature of metals and other materials. The hundreds of gun-based experiments conducted every year at the Laboratory require a highly-skilled staff of scientists and technicians, and has given rise to a special organization called the "gun working group" to foster open communications, cooperation, problem-solving, and a healthy safety culture.

  7. Initial performance of Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Austin, R.H.; Chan, K.C.D.

    1993-09-01

    The Los Alamos compact Advanced FEL has lased at 4.7 and 5.2 {mu}m with a 1-cm period wiggler and a high-brightness electron beam at 16.8 and 15.8 MeV, respectively. The measured electron beam normalized emittance is 1.7 {pi}{center_dot}mm{center_dot}mrad at a peak current of 100 A, corresponding to a beam brightness greater than 2 {times} 10{sup 12} A/m{sup 2}rad{sup 2}. Initial results indicate that the AFEL small signal gain is {approximately}8% at 0.3 nC (30 A peak). The maximum output energy is 7 mJ over a 2-{mu}s macropulse. The AFEL performance can be significantly enhanced by improvements in the rf and drive laser stability.

  8. Recent progress of the Los Alamos advanced free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Austin, R.H.; Chan, K.C.D.; Feldman, D.W.; Goldstein, J.C.; Gierman, S.M.; Kinross-Wright, J.M.; Kong, S.H.; Plato, J.G.; Russell, S.J.

    1994-05-01

    Many industrial and research applications can benefit from the availability of a compact, user-friendly, broadly tunable and high average power free electron laser (FEL). Over the past four years, the Los Alamos Advanced FEL has been built with these design goals. The key to a compact FEL is the integration of advanced beam technologies such as a high-brightness photoinjector, a high-gradient compact linac, and permanent magnet beamline components. These technologies enable the authors to shrink the FEL size yet maintain its high average power capability. The Advanced FEL has been in operation in the near ir (4-6 {mu}m) since early 1993. Recent results of the Advanced FEL lasing at saturation and upgrades to improve its average power are presented.

  9. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1991. Environmental protection group

    SciTech Connect

    Dewart, J.; Kohen, K.L.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1991. Routine monitoring for radiation and for radioactive and chemical materials is conducted on the Laboratory site as well as in the surrounding region. Monitoring results are used to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to permit early identification of potentially undesirable trends. Results and interpretation of data for 1991 cover external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface waters and groundwaters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Comparisons with appropriate standards, regulations, and background levels provide the basis for concluding that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment.

  10. The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory - An Isolated Nuclear Research Establishment

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, Norris E.; Meade, Roger Allen

    2016-09-23

    Early in his twenty-five year career as the Director of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Norris Bradbury wrote at length about the atomic bomb and the many implications the bomb might have on the world. His themes were both technical and philosophical. In 1963, after nearly twenty years of leading the nation’s first nuclear weapons laboratory, Bradbury took the opportunity to broaden his writing. In a paper delivered to the International Atomic Energy Agency’s symposium on the “Criteria in the Selection of Sites for the Construction of Reactors and Nuclear Research Centers,” Bradbury took the opportunity to talk about the business of nuclear research and the human component of operating a scientific laboratory. This report is the transcript of his talk.

  11. Neutron Capture Experiments Using the DANCE Array at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Dashdorj, D.; Mitchell, G. E.; Baramsai, B.; Chyzh, A.; Walker, C.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becker, J. A.; Parker, W.; Sleaford, B.; Wu, C. Y.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Krticka, M.; Becvar, F.

    2009-03-31

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is designed for neutron capture measurements on very small and/or radioactive targets. The DANCE array of 160 BaF{sub 2} scintillation detectors is located at the Lujan Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Accurate measurements of neutron capture data are important for many current applications as well as for basic understanding of neutron capture. The gamma rays following neutron capture reactions have been studied by the time-of-flight technique using the DANCE array. The high granularity of the array allows measurements of the gamma-ray multiplicity. The gamma-ray multiplicities and energy spectra for different multiplicities can be measured and analyzed for spin and parity determination of the resolved resonances.

  12. Study of polyelectrolytes for Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Labonne, N.

    1994-11-01

    To assess the safety of a potential radioactive waste repository, analysis of the fluid solution containing low levels of activity need to be performed. In some cases, the radioactivity would be so weak (3--30 pCi/L) that the solution must be concentrated for measurement. For this purpose, Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists are synthesizing some water soluble polyelectrolytes, which, because they are strong complexing agents for inorganic cations, can concentrate the radioelements in solution. To assist in characterization of these polyelectrolytes, the author has performed experiments to determine physico-chemical constants, such as pKa values and stability constants. The complexation constants between both polyelectrolytes and europium were determined by two methods: solvent extraction and ion exchange. Results are presented.

  13. Measurement of the shock front velocity produced in a T-tube

    SciTech Connect

    Djurović, S.; Mijatović, Z.; Vujičić, B.; Kobilarov, R.; Savić, I.; Gavanski, L.

    2015-01-15

    A set of shock front velocity measurements is described in this paper. The shock waves were produced in a small electromagnetically driven shock T-tube. Most of the measurements were performed in hydrogen. The shock front velocity measurements in other gases and the velocity of the gas behind the shock front were also analyzed, as well as the velocity dependence on applied input energy. Some measurements with an applied external magnetic field were also performed. The used method of shock front velocity is simple and was shown to be very reliable. Measured values were compared with the calculated ones for the incident and reflected shock waves.

  14. 2016 Los Alamos National Laboratory Hazardous Waste Minimization Report

    SciTech Connect

    Salzman, Sonja L.; English, Charles Joe

    2016-12-02

    Waste minimization and pollution prevention are goals within the operating procedures of Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS). The US Department of Energy (DOE), inclusive of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Office of Environmental Management, and LANS are required to submit an annual hazardous waste minimization report to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) in accordance with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit. The report was prepared pursuant to the requirements of Section 2.9 of the LANL Hazardous Waste Facility Permit. This report describes the hazardous waste minimization program, which is a component of the overall Pollution Prevention (P2) Program, administered by the Environmental Stewardship Group (EPC-ES). This report also supports the waste minimization and P2 goals of the Associate Directorate of Environmental Management (ADEM) organizations that are responsible for implementing remediation activities and describes its programs to incorporate waste reduction practices into remediation activities and procedures. This report includes data for all waste shipped offsite from LANL during fiscal year (FY) 2016 (October 1, 2015 – September 30, 2016). LANS was active during FY2016 in waste minimization and P2 efforts. Multiple projects were funded that specifically related to reduction of hazardous waste. In FY2016, there was no hazardous, mixed-transuranic (MTRU), or mixed low-level (MLLW) remediation waste shipped offsite from the Laboratory. More non-remediation hazardous waste and MLLW was shipped offsite from the Laboratory in FY2016 compared to FY2015. Non-remediation MTRU waste was not shipped offsite during FY2016. These accomplishments and analysis of the waste streams are discussed in much more detail within this report.

  15. 2013 Los Alamos National Laboratory Hazardous Waste Minimization Report

    SciTech Connect

    Salzman, Sonja L.; English, Charles J.

    2015-08-24

    Waste minimization and pollution prevention are inherent goals within the operating procedures of Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS). The US Department of Energy (DOE) and LANS are required to submit an annual hazardous waste minimization report to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) in accordance with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit. The report was prepared pursuant to the requirements of Section 2.9 of the LANL Hazardous Waste Facility Permit. This report describes the hazardous waste minimization program (a component of the overall Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention [WMin/PP] Program) administered by the Environmental Stewardship Group (ENV-ES). This report also supports the waste minimization and pollution prevention goals of the Environmental Programs Directorate (EP) organizations that are responsible for implementing remediation activities and describes its programs to incorporate waste reduction practices into remediation activities and procedures. LANS was very successful in fiscal year (FY) 2013 (October 1-September 30) in WMin/PP efforts. Staff funded four projects specifically related to reduction of waste with hazardous constituents, and LANS won four national awards for pollution prevention efforts from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). In FY13, there was no hazardous, mixedtransuranic (MTRU), or mixed low-level (MLLW) remediation waste generated at the Laboratory. More hazardous waste, MTRU waste, and MLLW was generated in FY13 than in FY12, and the majority of the increase was related to MTRU processing or lab cleanouts. These accomplishments and analysis of the waste streams are discussed in much more detail within this report.

  16. Pinon Pine Tree Study, Los Alamos National Laboratory: Source document

    SciTech Connect

    P. R. Fresquez; J. D. Huchton; M. A. Mullen; L. Naranjo, Jr.

    2000-01-01

    One of the dominant tree species growing within and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM, lands is the pinon pine (Pinus edulis) tree. Pinon pine is used for firewood, fence posts, and building materials and is a source of nuts for food--the seeds are consumed by a wide variety of animals and are also gathered by people in the area and eaten raw or roasted. This study investigated the (1) concentration of {sup 3}H, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup tot}U, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am in soils (0- to 12-in. [31 cm] depth underneath the tree), pinon pine shoots (PPS), and pinon pine nuts (PPN) collected from LANL lands and regional background (BG) locations, (2) concentrations of radionuclides in PPN collected in 1977 to present data, (3) committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) from the ingestion of nuts, and (4) soil to PPS to PPN concentration ratios (CRs). Most radionuclides, with the exception of {sup 3}H in soils, were not significantly higher (p < 0.10) in soils, PPS, and PPN collected from LANL as compared to BG locations, and concentrations of most radionuclides in PPN from LANL have decreased over time. The maximum net CEDE (the CEDE plus two sigma minus BG) at the most conservative ingestion rate (10 lb [4.5 kg]) was 0.0018 mrem (0.018 {micro}Sv). Soil-to-nut CRs for most radionuclides were within the range of default values in the literature for common fruits and vegetables.

  17. Post-Cold War Science and Technology at Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, John C.

    2002-04-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory serves the nation through the development and application of leading-edge science and technology in support of national security. Our mission supports national security by: ensuring the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile; reducing the threat of weapons of mass destruction in support of counter terrorism and homeland defense; and solving national energy, environment, infrastructure, and health security problems. We require crosscutting fundamental and advanced science and technology research to accomplish our mission. The Stockpile Stewardship Program develops and applies, advanced experimental science, computational simulation, and technology to ensure the safety and reliability of U.S. nuclear weapons in the absence of nuclear testing. This effort in itself is a grand challenge. However, the terrorist attack of September 11, 2001, reminded us of the importance of robust and vibrant research and development capabilities to meet new and evolving threats to our national security. Today through rapid prototyping we are applying new, innovative, science and technology for homeland defense, to address the threats of nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons globally. Synergistically, with the capabilities that we require for our core mission, we contribute in many other areas of scientific endeavor. For example, our Laboratory has been part of the NASA effort on mapping water on the moon and NSF/DOE projects studying high-energy astrophysical phenomena, understanding fundamental scaling phenomena of life, exploring high-temperature superconductors, investigating quantum information systems, applying neutrons to condensed-matter and nuclear physics research, developing large-scale modeling and simulations to understand complex phenomena, and exploring nanoscience that bridges the atomic to macroscopic scales. In this presentation, I will highlight some of these post-cold war science and technology advances

  18. SNM holdup assessment of Los Alamos exhaust ducts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, R.S.

    1994-02-01

    Fissile material holdup in glovebox and fume hood exhaust ducting has been quantified for all Los Alamos duct systems. Gamma-based, nondestructive measurements were used to quantify holdup. The measurements were performed during three measurement campaigns. The first campaign, Phase I, provided foot-by-foot, semiquantitative measurement data on all ducting. These data were used to identify ducting that required more accurate (quantitative) measurement. Of the 280 duct systems receiving Phase I measurements, 262 indicated less than 50 g of fissile holdup and 19 indicated fissile holdup of 50 or more grams. Seven duct systems were measured in a second campaign, called Series 1, Phase II. Holdup estimates on these ducts ranged from 421 g of {sup 235}U in a duct servicing a shut-down uranium-machining facility to 39 g of {sup 239}Pu in a duct servicing an active plutonium-processing facility. Measurements performed in the second campaign proved excessively laborious, so a third campaign was initiated that used more efficient instrumentation at some sacrifice in measurement quality. Holdup estimates for the 12 duct systems measured during this third campaign ranged from 70 g of {sup 235}U in a duct servicing analytical laboratories to 1 g of {sup 235}U and 1 g of {sup 239}Pu in a duct carrying exhaust air to a remote filter building. These quantitative holdup estimates support the conclusion made at the completion of the Phase I measurements that only ducts servicing shut-down uranium operations contain about 400 g of fissile holdup. No ventilation ducts at Los Alamos contain sufficient fissile material holdup to present a criticality safety concern.

  19. Environmental Assessment for Electrical Power System Upgrades at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico - Final Document

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2000-03-09

    The ''National Environmental Policy Act of 1969'' (NEPA) requires Federal agency officials to consider the environmental consequences of their proposed actions before decisions are made. In complying with NEPA, the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) follows the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 1500-1508) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021). The purpose of an Environmental Assessment (EA) is to provide Federal decision makers with sufficient evidence and analysis to determine whether to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) or issue a Finding of No Significant Impact. In this case, the DOE decision to be made is whether to construct and operate a 19.5-mile (mi) (31-kilometer [km]) electric transmission line (power line) reaching from the Norton Substation, west across the Rio Grande, to locations within the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Areas (TAs) 3 and 5 at Los Alamos, New Mexico. The construction of one electric substation at LANL would be included in the project as would the construction of two line segments less than 1,200 feet (ft) (366 meters [m]) long that would allow for the uncrossing of a portion of two existing power lines. Additionally, a fiber optics communications line would be included and installed concurrently as part of the required overhead ground conductor for the power line. The new power line would improve the reliability of electric service in the LANL and Los Aktrnos County areas as would the uncrossing of the crossed segments of the existing lines. Additionally, installation of the new power line would enable the LANL and the Los Alamos County electric grid, which is a shared resource, to be adapted to accommodate the future import of increased power when additional power service becomes available in the northern New Mexico area. Similarly, the fiber optics line would allow DOE to take advantage of future opportunities in

  20. Comparative yield estimation via shock hydrodynamic methods

    SciTech Connect

    Attia, A.V.; Moran, B.; Glenn, L.A.

    1991-06-01

    Shock TOA (CORRTEX) from recent underground nuclear explosions in saturated tuff were used to estimate yield via the simulated explosion-scaling method. The sensitivity of the derived yield to uncertainties in the measured shock Hugoniot, release adiabats, and gas porosity is the main focus of this paper. In this method for determining yield, we assume a point-source explosion in an infinite homogeneous material. The rock is formulated using laboratory experiments on core samples, taken prior to the explosion. Results show that increasing gas porosity from 0% to 2% causes a 15% increase in yield per ms/kt{sup 1/3}. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Studies of shock induced flows in strengthless materials on Pegasus

    SciTech Connect

    Oro, D.M.; Fulton, R.D.; Stokes, J.; Guzik, J.A.; Adams, P.J.; Morgan, D.; Platts, D.; Obst, A.W.; Fell, M.

    1998-12-31

    Experiments on the Pegasus II pulsed power facility at Los Alamos are being conducted to study the evolution and flow of strengthless materials as a result of being shocked. Of particular interest is vorticity and mixing that is induced in the materials by a shock-wave passing through a non-uniform boundary. The experiments provide an important benchmark for hydrodynamic codes, and are a precursor to experiments planned on Atlas in which the materials will be pre-ionized before being shocked. For these experiments, flash radiography is used to image the position of the target boundaries at specific times. In these experiments 3 radiographs along target radii and 2 radiographs along the target axis are taken at independent times. The central cavity of the target is imaged with visible framing cameras. The Xe in this cavity radiates when shocked, and therefore the shape and timing of the shock front in the Xe can be determined from the images. Other diagnostics employed for this work include electric and magnetic field probes that are used to determine the current through the liner and when the liner impacts the target. Both the 1-d magnetohydrodynamics code RAVEN, and the 2-d/3-d adaptive grid eulerian code RAGE are used for pre-shot calculations. In this talk the authors will discuss the motivation for these experiments, compare calculations with radiographs and visible images and discuss future experiments on Pegasus and Atlas.

  2. Ecological baseline studies in Los Alamos and Guaje Canyons County of Los Alamos, New Mexico. A two-year study

    SciTech Connect

    Foxx, T.S.

    1995-11-01

    During the summers of 1993 and 1994, the Biological Resource Evaluations Team (BRET) of the Environmental Protection Group (ESH-8) conducted baseline studies within two canyon systems, Los Alamos and Guaje Canyons. Biological data was collected within each canyon to provide background and baseline information for Ecological Risk models. Baseline studies included establishment of permanent vegetation plots within each canyon along the elevational gradient. Then, in association with the various vegetation types, surveys were conducted for ground dwelling insects, birds, and small mammals. The stream channels associated with the permanent vegetation plots were characterized and aquatic macroinvertebrates collected within the stream monthly throughout a six-month period. The Geographic Position System (GPS) in combination with ARC INFO was used to map the study areas. Considerable data was collected during these surveys and are summarized in individual chapters.

  3. NEPA and NHPA- successful decommissioning of historic Manhattan Project properties at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    McGehee, E.D.; Pendergrass, A.K.

    1997-05-21

    This paper describes experiences at Los Alamos National Laboratory during the process of planning and executing decommissioning and decontamination activities on a number of properties constructed as part of the Manhattan project. Many of these buildings had been abandoned for many years and were in deteriorating condition, in addition to being contaminated with asbestos, lead based paints and high explosive residues. Due to the age and use of the structures they were evaluated against criteria for the National Register of Historic Places. This process is briefly reviewed, along with the results, as well as actions implemented as a result of the condition and safety of the structures. A number of the structures have been decontaminated and demolished. Planning is still ongoing for the renovation of one structure, and the photographic and drawing records of the properties is near completion.

  4. Ejecta particle size distributions for shock loaded Sn and Al metals.

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, D. S.; Minich, R. W.; Romero, J. L.; Tunnell, T. W.; Malone, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    When a shock wave interacts at the surface of a metal sample 'ejected matter' (ejecta) can be emitted from the surface. The mass, size, shape, and velocity of the ejecta varies depending on the initial shock conditions and the material properties of the target. To understand this phenomena, experiments have been conducted at the Pegasus Pulsed Power Facility (PPPF) located at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The facility is used to implode cylinders to velocities of many mm/{micro}sec. The driving cylinder impacts a smaller target cylinder where shock waves of a few hundreds of kilobars can be reached and ejecta formation proceeds. The ejecta particle sizes are measured for shock loaded Sn and Al metal samples using an in-line Fraunhofer holography technique. The distributions will be compared to calculations from 3 and 2 dimensional percolation theory.

  5. Shock compression experiments on Lithium Deuteride single crystals.

    SciTech Connect

    Knudson, Marcus D.; Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Lemke, Raymond W.

    2014-10-01

    S hock compression exper iments in the few hundred GPa (multi - Mabr) regime were performed on Lithium Deuteride (LiD) single crystals . This study utilized the high velocity flyer plate capability of the Sandia Z Machine to perform impact experiments at flyer plate velocities in the range of 17 - 32 km/s. Measurements included pressure, density, and temperature between %7E200 - 600 GPa along the Principal Hugoniot - the locus of end states achievable through compression by large amplitude shock waves - as well as pressure and density of re - shock states up to %7E900 GPa . The experimental measurements are compared with recent density functional theory calculations as well as a new tabular equation of state developed at Los Alamos National Labs.

  6. 2-Shock layered tuning campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masse, Laurent; Dittrich, T.; Khan, S.; Kyrala, G.; Ma, T.; MacLaren, S.; Ralph, J.; Salmonson, J.; Tipton, R.; Los Alamos Natl Lab Team; Lawrence Livermore Natl Lab Team

    2016-10-01

    The 2-Shock platform has been developed to maintain shell sphericity throughout the compression phase of an indirect-drive target implosion and produce a stagnating hot spot in a quasi 1D-like manner. A sub-scale, 1700 _m outer diameter, and thick, 200 _m, uniformly Silicon doped, gas-filled plastic capsule is driven inside a nominal size 5750 _m diameter ignition hohlraum. The hohlraum fill is near vacuum to reduce back-scatter and improve laser/drive coupling. A two-shock pulse of about 1 MJ of laser energy drives the capsule. The thick capsule prevents ablation front feed-through to the imploded core. This platform has demonstrated its efficiency to tune a predictable and reproducible 1-D implosion with a nearly round shape. It has been shown that the high foot performance was dominated by the local defect growth due to the ablation front instability and by the hohlraum radiation asymmetries. The idea here is to take advantage of this 2-Shock platform to design a 1D-like layered implosion and eliminates the deleterious effects of radiation asymmetries and ablation front instability growth. We present the design work and our first experimental results of this near one-dimensional 2-Shock layered design. This work was performed under the auspices of the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, (LLNS) under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Radionuclide concentrations in pinto beans, sweet corn, and zucchini squash grown in Los Alamos Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Fresquez, P.R.; Mullen, M.A.; Naranjo, L. Jr.; Armstrong, D.R.

    1997-05-01

    Pinto beans, sweet corn, and zucchini squash (Cucurbita pepo var. black beauty) were grown in a randomized complete-block field/pot experiment at a site that contained the highest observed levels of surface gross gamma radioactivity within Los Alamos Canyon (LAC) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Soils as well as washed edible and nonedible crop tissues were analyzed for various radionuclides and heavy metals . Most radionuclides, with the exception of {sup 3}H and {sup tot}U, in soil from LAC were detected in significantly higher concentrations (p <0.01) than in soil collected from regional background (RBG) locations. Similarly, most radionuclides in edible crop portions of beans, squash, and corn were detected in significantly higher (p <0.01 and 0.05) concentrations than RBG. Most soil-to-plant concentration ratios for radionuclides in edible and nonedible crop tissues from LAC were within the default values given by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Environmental Protection Agency. All heavy metals in soils, as well as edible and nonedible crop tissues grown in soils from LAC, were within RBG concentrations. Overall, the total maximum net positive committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE)--the CEDE plus two sigma for each radioisotope minus background and then all positive doses summed--to a hypothetical 50-year resident that ingested 160 kg of beans, corn, and squash in equal proportions, was 74 mrem y{sup -1}. This dose was below the International Commission on Radiological Protection permissible dose limit (PDL) of 100 mrem y{sup -1} from all pathways; however, the addition of other internal and external exposure route factors may increase the overall dose over the PDL. Also, the risk of an excess cancer fatality, based on 74 mrem y{sup -1}, was 3.7 x 10{sup -5} (37 in a million), which is above the Environmental Protection Agency`s (acceptable) guideline of one in a million. 31 refs., 15 tabs.

  8. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at selected burning grounds at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, B.W.; Minor, L.K.M.; Flucas, B.J.

    1998-02-01

    A commercial immunoassay field test (IFT) was used to rapidly assess the total concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the soil at selected burning grounds within the explosives corridor at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Results were compared with analyses obtained from LANL Analytical Laboratory and from a commercial laboratory. Both used the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Methods 8270 and 8310. EPA`s Method 8270 employs gas chromatography and mass spectral analyses, whereas EPA`s Method 8310 uses an ultraviolet detector in a high-performance liquid chromatography procedure. One crude oil sample and one diesel fuel sample, analyzed by EPA Method 8270, were included for references. On an average the IFT results were lower for standard samples and lower than the analytical laboratory results for the unknown samples. Sites were selected to determine whether the PAHs came from the material burned or the fuel used to ignite the burn, or whether they are produced by a high-temperature chemical reaction during the burn. Even though the crude oil and diesel fuel samples did contain measurable quantities of PAHs, there were no significant concentrations of PAHs detected in the ashes and soil at the burning grounds. Tests were made on fresh soil and ashes collected after a large burn and on aged soil and ashes known to have been at the site more than three years. Also analyzed were twelve-year-old samples from an inactive open burn cage.

  9. Audit of the radioactive liquid waste treatment facility operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-19

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) generates radioactive and liquid wastes that must be treated before being discharged to the environment. Presently, the liquid wastes are treated in the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (Treatment Facility), which is over 30 years old and in need of repair or replacement. However, there are various ways to satisfy the treatment need. The objective of the audit was to determine whether Los Alamos cost effectively managed its Treatment Facility operations. The audit determined that Los Alamos` treatment costs were significantly higher when compared to similar costs incurred by the private sector. This situation occurred because Los Alamos did not perform a complete analysis of privatization or prepare a {open_quotes}make-or-buy{close_quotes} plan for its treatment operations, although a {open_quotes}make-or-buy{close_quotes} plan requirement was incorporated into the contract in 1996. As a result, Los Alamos may be spending $2.15 million more than necessary each year and could needlessly spend $10.75 million over the next five years to treat its radioactive liquid waste. In addition, Los Alamos has proposed to spend $13 million for a new treatment facility that may not be needed if privatization proves to be a cost effective alternative. We recommended that the Manager, Albuquerque Operations Office (Albuquerque), (1) require Los Alamos to prepare a {open_quotes}make-or-buy{close_quotes} plan for its radioactive liquid waste treatment operations, (2) review the plan for approval, and (3) direct Los Alamos to select the most cost effective method of operations while also considering other factors such as mission support, reliability, and long-term program needs. Albuquerque concurred with the recommendations.

  10. Los Alamos National Laboratory: 21st century solutions to urgent national challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Mcbranch, Duncan

    2008-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has been called upon to meet urgent national challenges for more than 65 years. The people, tools, and technologies at Los Alamos are a world class resource that has proved decisive through our history, and are needed in the future. We offer expertise in nearly every science, technology, and engineering discipline, a unique integrated capability for large-scale computing and experimentation, and the proven ability to deliver solutions involving the most complex and difficult technical systems. This white paper outlines some emerging challenges and why the nation needs Los Alamos, the premier National Security Science Laboratory, to meet these challenges.

  11. NMR spectroscopy of experimentally shocked single crystal quartz: A reexamination of the NMR shock barometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiske, P. S.; Gratz, A. J.; Nellis, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    Cygan and others report a broadening of the Si-29 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) peak for synthetic quartz powders with increasing shock pressure which they propose as a shock wave barometer for natural systems. These results are expanded by studying single crystal quartz shocked to 12 and 33 GPa using the 6.5 m two-stage light-gas gun at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Our NMR results differ substantially from those of Cygan and others and suggest that the proposed shock wave barometer may require refinement. The difference in results between this study and that of Cygan and others is most likely caused by different starting materials (single crystal vs. powder) and different shock loading histories. NMR results from single crystal studies may be more applicable to natural systems.

  12. Investigations on detonation shock dynamics and related topics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, D.S.

    1993-11-01

    This document is a final report that summarizes the research findings and research activities supported by the subcontract DOE-LANL-9-XG8-3931P-1 between the University of Illinois (D. S. Stewart Principal Investigator) and the University of California (Los Alamos National Laboratory, M-Division). The main focus of the work has been on investigations of Detonation Shock Dynamics. A second emphasis has been on modeling compaction of energetic materials and deflagration to detonation in those materials. The work has led to a number of extensions of the theory of Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) and its application as an engineering design method for high explosive systems. The work also enhanced the hydrocode capabilities of researchers in M-Division by modifications to CAVEAT, an existing Los Alamos hydrocode. Linear stability studies of detonation flows were carried out for the purpose of code verification. This work also broadened the existing theory for detonation. The work in this contract has led to the development of one-phase models for dynamic compaction of porous energetic materials and laid the groundwork for subsequent studies. Some work that modeled the discrete heterogeneous behavior of propellant beds was also performed. The contract supported the efforts of D. S. Stewart and a Postdoctoral student H. I. Lee at the University of Illinois.

  13. Thermophysical properties of multi-shock compressed dense argon

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Q. F. Zheng, J.; Gu, Y. J.; Chen, Y. L.; Cai, L. C.; Shen, Z. J.

    2014-02-21

    In contrast to the single shock compression state that can be obtained directly via experimental measurements, the multi-shock compression states, however, have to be calculated with the aid of theoretical models. In order to determine experimentally the multiple shock states, a diagnostic approach with the Doppler pins system (DPS) and the pyrometer was used to probe multiple shocks in dense argon plasmas. Plasma was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The shock was produced using the flyer plate impact accelerated up to ∼6.1 km/s by a two-stage light gas gun and introduced into the plenum argon gas sample, which was pre-compressed from the environmental pressure to about 20 MPa. The time-resolved optical radiation histories were determined using a multi-wavelength channel optical transience radiance pyrometer. Simultaneously, the particle velocity profiles of the LiF window was measured with multi-DPS. The states of multi-shock compression argon plasma were determined from the measured shock velocities combining the particle velocity profiles. We performed the experiments on dense argon plasmas to determine the principal Hugonoit up to 21 GPa, the re-shock pressure up to 73 GPa, and the maximum measure pressure of the fourth shock up to 158 GPa. The results are used to validate the existing self-consistent variational theory model in the partial ionization region and create new theoretical models.

  14. How Is Cardiogenic Shock Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Cardiogenic Shock Diagnosed? The first step in diagnosing cardiogenic shock ... is cardiogenic shock. Tests and Procedures To Diagnose Shock and Its Underlying Causes Blood Pressure Test Medical ...

  15. Toxic Shock Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... toxic shock syndrome results from toxins produced by Staphylococcus aureus (staph) bacteria, but the condition may also ... a skin or wound infection. Bacteria, most commonly Staphylococcus aureus (staph), causes toxic shock syndrome. It can ...

  16. Shock & Anaphylactic Shock. Learning Activity Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hime, Kirsten

    This learning activity package on shock and anaphylactic shock is one of a series of 12 titles developed for use in health occupations education programs. Materials in the package include objectives, a list of materials needed, information sheets, reviews (self evaluations) of portions of the content, and answers to reviews. These topics are…

  17. The Los Alamos Science Pillars The Science of Signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Joshua E.; Peterson, Eugene J.

    2012-09-13

    As a national security science laboratory, Los Alamos is often asked to detect and measure the characteristics of complex systems and to use the resulting information to quantify the system's behavior. The Science of Signatures (SoS) pillar is the broad suite of technical expertise and capability that we use to accomplish this task. With it, we discover new signatures, develop new methods for detecting or measuring signatures, and deploy new detection technologies. The breadth of work at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in SoS is impressive and spans from the initial understanding of nuclear weapon performance during the Manhattan Project, to unraveling the human genome, to deploying laser spectroscopy instrumentation on Mars. Clearly, SoS is a primary science area for the Laboratory and we foresee that as it matures, new regimes of signatures will be discovered and new ways of extracting information from existing data streams will be developed. These advances will in turn drive the development of sensing instrumentation and sensor deployment. The Science of Signatures is one of three science pillars championed by the Laboratory and vital to supporting our status as a leading national security science laboratory. As with the other two pillars, Materials for the Future and Information Science and Technology for Predictive Science (IS&T), SoS relies on the integration of technical disciplines and the multidisciplinary science and engineering that is our hallmark to tackle the most difficult national security challenges. Over nine months in 2011 and 2012, a team of science leaders from across the Laboratory has worked to develop a SoS strategy that positions us for the future. The crafting of this strategy has been championed by the Chemistry, Life, and Earth Sciences Directorate, but as you will see from this document, SoS is truly an Institution-wide effort and it has engagement from every organization at the Laboratory. This process tapped the insight and

  18. Shock-free turbomachinery blade design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beauchamp, P. P.; Seebass, A. R.

    1985-01-01

    A computational method for designing shock-free, quasi-three-dimensional, transonic, turbomachinery blades is described. Shock-free designs are found by implementing Sobieczky's fictitious gas principle in the analysis of a baseline shape, resulting in an elliptic solution that is incorrect in the supersonic domain. Shock-free designs are obtained by combining the subsonic portion of this solution with a characteristic calculation of the correct supersonic flow using the sonic line data from the fictitious elliptic solution. This provides a new, shock-free blade design. Examples presented include the removal of shocks from two blades in quasi-three-dimensional flow and the development of a series of shock-free two-dimensional stators. The new designs all include modifications to the upper surface of an experimental stator blade developed at NASA Lewis Research Center. While the designs presented here are for inviscid flow, the same concepts have been successfully applied to the shock-free design of airfoils and three-dimensional wings with viscous effects. The extension of the present method to viscous flows is straightforward given a suitable analysis algorithm for the flow.

  19. Detonation in shocked homogeneous high explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.S.; Holmes, N.C.; Souers, P.C.

    1995-11-01

    We have studied shock-induced changes in homogeneous high explosives including nitromethane, tetranitromethane, and single crystals of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) by using fast time-resolved emission and Raman spectroscopy at a two-stage light-gas gun. The results reveal three distinct steps during which the homogeneous explosives chemically evolve to final detonation products. These are (1) the initiation of shock compressed high explosives after an induction period, (2) thermal explosion of shock-compressed and/or reacting materials, and (3) a decay to a steady-state representing a transition to the detonation of uncompressed high explosives. Based on a gray-body approximation, we have obtained the CJ temperatures: 3800 K for nitromethane, 2950 K for tetranitromethane, and 4100 K for PETN. We compare the data with various thermochemical equilibrium calculations. In this paper we will also show a preliminary result of single-shot time-resolved Raman spectroscopy applied to shock-compressed nitromethane.

  20. Biomass shock pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzapple, Mark T.; Madison, Maxine Jones; Ramirez, Rocio Sierra; Deimund, Mark A.; Falls, Matthew; Dunkelman, John J.

    2014-07-01

    Methods and apparatus for treating biomass that may include introducing a biomass to a chamber; exposing the biomass in the chamber to a shock event to produce a shocked biomass; and transferring the shocked biomass from the chamber. In some aspects, the method may include pretreating the biomass with a chemical before introducing the biomass to the chamber and/or after transferring shocked biomass from the chamber.