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Sample records for alamos hot dry

  1. Hot Dry Rock Overview at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Michael; Hendron, Robert H.

    1989-03-21

    The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy program is a renewable energy program that can contribute significantly to the nation's balanced and diversified energy mix. Having extracted energy from the first Fenton Hill HDR reservoir for about 400 days, and from the second reservoir for 30 days in a preliminary test, Los Alamos is focusing on the Long Term Flow Test and reservoir studies. Current budget limitations have slowed preparations thus delaying the start date of that test. The test is planned to gather data for more definitive reservoir modeling with energy availability or reservoir lifetime of primary interest. Other salient information will address geochemistry and tracer studies, microseismic response, water requirements and flow impedance which relates directly to pumping power requirements. During this year of ''preparation'' we have made progress in modeling studies, in chemically reactive tracer techniques, in improvements in acoustic or microseismic event analysis.

  2. Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Model Development at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Bruce A.; Birdsell, Stephen A.

    1989-03-21

    Discrete fracture and continuum models are being developed to simulate Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs. The discrete fracture model is a two-dimensional steady state simulator of fluid flow and tracer transport in a fracture network which is generated from assumed statistical properties of the fractures. The model's strength lies in its ability to compute the steady state pressure drop and tracer response in a realistic network of interconnected fractures. The continuum approach models fracture behavior by treating permeability and porosity as functions of temperature and effective stress. With this model it is practical to model transient behavior as well as the coupled processes of fluid flow, heat transfer, and stress effects in a three-dimensional system. The model capabilities being developed will also have applications in conventional geothermal systems undergoing reinjection and in fractured geothermal reservoirs in general.

  3. Hot Dry Rock geothermal reservoir model development at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, B.A.; Birdsell, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    Discrete fracture and continuum models are being developed to simulate Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs. The discrete fracture model is a two-dimensional steady state simulator of fluid flow and tracer transport in a fracture network which is generated from assumed statistical properties of the fractures. The model's strength lies in its ability to compute the steady state pressure drop and tracer response in a realistic network of interconnected fractures. The continuum approach models fracture behavior by treating permeability and porosity as functions of temperature and effective stress. With this model it is practical to model transient behavior as well as the coupled processes of fluid flow, heat transfer, and stress effects in a three-dimensional system. The model capabilities being developed will also have applications in conventional geothermal systems undergoing reinjection and in fractured geothermal reservoirs in general. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Hot, Dry and Cloudy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of Hot, Dry and Cloudy

    This artist's concept shows a cloudy Jupiter-like planet that orbits very close to its fiery hot star. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope was recently used to capture spectra, or molecular fingerprints, of two 'hot Jupiter' worlds like the one depicted here. This is the first time a spectrum has ever been obtained for an exoplanet, or a planet beyond our solar system.

    The ground-breaking observations were made with Spitzer's spectrograph, which pries apart infrared light into its basic wavelengths, revealing the 'fingerprints' of molecules imprinted inside. Spitzer studied two planets, HD 209458b and HD 189733b, both of which were found, surprisingly, to have no water in the tops of their atmospheres. The results suggest that the hot planets are socked in with dry, high clouds, which are obscuring water that lies underneath. In addition, HD209458b showed hints of silicates, suggesting that the high clouds on that planet contain very fine sand-like particles.

    Capturing the spectra from the two hot-Jupiter planets was no easy feat. The planets cannot be distinguished from their stars and instead appear to telescopes as single blurs of light. One way to get around this is through what is known as the secondary eclipse technique. In this method, changes in the total light from a so-called transiting planet system are measured as a planet is eclipsed by its star, vanishing from our Earthly point of view. The dip in observed light can then be attributed to the planet alone.

    This technique, first used by Spitzer in 2005 to directly detect the light from an exoplanet, currently only works at infrared wavelengths, where the differences in brightness between the planet and star are less, and the planet's light is easier to pick out. For example, if the experiment had been done in visible light, the total light from the system would appear to be unchanged

  5. Use Of Lasers At The Los Alamos Hot Cell Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, Michael E.

    1983-11-01

    An optical profilometer that uses a Techmet LaserMike scanning, focused, laser-beam, optical micrometer is installed in a remote alpha-gamma containment cell at the Los Alamos Hot-Cell Facility.1 A hot-cell extension chamber provides the nominal 30-cm (12-in.) working distance required by the LaserMike and, at the same time, keeps the LaserMike components outside the high-radiation-containment environment. This system provides measurement accu-racy better than±5 pm (0.0002 in.) on diameters between 2 and 13 mm (0.08 and 0.5 in.) at a rate of 33 measurements per second. The Hot-Cell Facility also uses a Korad 20-J-output ruby pulsed laser to drill a hole in reactor fuel element cladding to sample fission gas. The laser is then used to reweld the hole so that the fuel element will not be contaminated and may be stored without an alpha-containment barrier. The wall thickness of the fuel elements sampled varies from 0.25 to 0.50 mm (0.010 to 0.020 in.).

  6. Bulk processing of radionuclide generator parents at the Los Alamos Hot Cell Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fassbender, M. E.; Nortier, F. M.; Phillips, Dennis R.; Peterson, E. J.

    2004-01-01

    Bulk radionuclide processing at Los Alamos includes isotopes with short-lived radioactive daughter nuclides ('generator parents') for medical applications. The generator radionuclide parents {sup 68}Ge, {sup 82}Sr, {sup 88}Zr and {sup 109}Cd are regularly processed at the Los Alamos Hot Cell Facility. Nuclear chemical aspects related to the production and processing of these generator parents are briefly outlined.

  7. Reservoir modeling of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock System

    SciTech Connect

    Zyvoloski, G.

    1984-01-01

    The Phase II system has been created with a series of hydraulic fracturing experiments at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock site. Experiment 2032, the largest of the fracturing operations, involved injecting 5.6 million gallons (21,200m/sup 3/) of water into wellbore EE-2 over the period December 6-9, 1983. The experiment has been modeled using geothermal simulator FEHM developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The modeling effort has produced strong evidence of a large highly fractured reservoir. Two long term heat extraction schemes for the reservoir are studied with the model.

  8. Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy

    SciTech Connect

    1990-01-01

    The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic

  9. Hot-dry-rock feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    The hot-dry-rock project tasks are covered as follows: hot-dry-rock reservoir; generation facilities; water resources; transmission requirements; environmental issues; government and community institutional factors; leasing, ownership and management of facilities; regulations, permits, and laws; and financial considerations. (MHR)

  10. Acord 1-26 hot, dry well, Roosevelt Hot Springs hot dry rock prospect, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, S.S. Jr.; Pettitt, R.; Rowley, J.; Goff, F.; Mathews, M.; Jacobson, J.J.

    1983-08-01

    The Acord 1-26 well is a hot, dry well peripheral to the Roosevelt Hot Springs known geothermal resource area (KGRA) in southwestern Utah. The bottom-hole temperature in this 3854-m-deep well is 230/sup 0/C, and the thermal gradient is 54/sup 0/C/km. The basal 685 m, comprised of biotite monzonite and quartz schist and gneiss, is a likely hot, dry rock (HDR) prospect. The hole was drilled in a structural low within the Milford Valley graben and is separated from the Roosevelt KGRA to the east by the Opal Mound Fault and other basin faults. An interpretation of seismic data approximates the subsurface structure around the well using the lithology in the Acord 1-26 well. The hole was drilled with a minimum of difficulty, and casing was set to 2411 m. From drilling and geophysical logs, it is deduced that the subsurface blocks of crystalline rock in the vicinity of the Acord 1-26 well are tight, dry, shallow, impermeable, and very hot. A hydraulic fracture test of the crystalline rocks below 3170 m is recommended. Various downhole tools and techniques could be tested in promising HDR regimes within the Acord 1-26 well.

  11. Hot-dry-rock geothermal resource 1980

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiken, G.; Goff, F.; Cremer, G.

    1980-04-01

    The work performed on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource evaluation, site characterization, and geophysical exploration techniques is summarized. The work was done by region (Far West, Pacific Northwest, Southwest, Rocky Mountain States, Midcontinent, and Eastern) and limited to the conterminous US.

  12. Hot-dry-rock geothermal resource 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Heiken, G.; Goff, F.; Cremer, G.

    1982-04-01

    The work performed on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource evaluation, site characterization, and geophysical exploration techniques is summarized. The work was done by region (Far West, Pacific Northwest, Southwest, Rocky Mountain States, Midcontinent, and Eastern) and limited to the conterminous US.

  13. Peer Review of the Hot Dry Rock Project at Fenton Hill, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This report briefly describes the history of the hot dry rock experiment project conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy and Los Alamos National Laboratory at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, from about 1971 through 1995. The authors identify the primary lessons learned and techniques developed during the course of the Fenton Hill project, and summarize the extent to which these technologies have been transferred to the U.S. geothermal industry.

  14. Drying and decontamination of raw pistachios with sequential infrared drying, tempering and hot air drying.

    PubMed

    Venkitasamy, Chandrasekar; Brandl, Maria T; Wang, Bini; McHugh, Tara H; Zhang, Ruihong; Pan, Zhongli

    2017-04-04

    Pistachio nuts have been associated with outbreaks of foodborne disease and the industry has been impacted by numerous product recalls due to contamination with Salmonella enterica. The current hot air drying of pistachios has low energy efficiency and drying rates, and also does not guarantee the microbial safety of products. In the study described herein, dehulled and water-sorted pistachios with a moisture content (MC) of 38.14% (wet basis) were dried in a sequential infrared and hot air (SIRHA) drier to <9% MC. The decontamination efficacy was assessed by inoculating pistachios with Enterococcus faecium, a surrogate of Salmonella enterica used for quality control in the almond industry. Drying with IR alone saved 105min (34.4%) of drying time compared with hot air drying. SIRHA drying of pistachios for 2h with infrared (IR) heat followed by tempering at a product temperature of 70°C for 2h and then by hot air drying shortened the drying time by 40min (9.1%) compared with drying by hot air only. This SIRHA method also reduced the E. faecium cell population by 6.1-logCFU/g kernel and 5.41-logCFU/g shell of pistachios. The free fatty acid contents of SIRHA dried pistachios were on par with that of hot air dried samples. Despite significant differences in peroxide values (PV) of pistachio kernels dried with the SIRHA method compared with hot air drying at 70°C, the PV were within the permissible limit of 5Meq/kg for edible oils. Our findings demonstrate the efficacy of SIRHA drying in achieving simultaneous drying and decontamination of pistachios.

  15. Hot dry rock venture risks investigation:

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This study assesses a promising resource in central Utah as the potential site of a future commerical hot dry rock (HDR) facility for generating electricity. The results indicate that, if the HDR reservoir productivity equals expectations based on preliminary results from research projects to date, a 50 MWe HDR power facility at Roosevelt Hot Springs could generate power at cost competitive with coal-fired plants. However, it is imperative that the assumed productivity be demonstrated before funds are committed for a commercial facility. 72 refs., 39 figs., 38 tabs.

  16. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Donald W.

    1997-01-01

    A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

  17. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOEpatents

    Brown, D.W.

    1997-11-11

    A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

  18. Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; Murphy, H.D.; Wilson, M.G.

    1989-12-01

    During Fiscal Year 1987, emphasis in the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program was on preparations for a Long-Term Flow Test'' of the Phase II'' or Engineering'' hot dry rock energy system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. A successful 30-day flow test of the system during FY86 indicated that such a system would produce heat at a temperature and rate that could support operation of a commercial electrical power plant. However, it did not answer certain questions basic to the economics of long-term operation, including the rate of depletion of the thermal reservoir, the rate of water loss from the system, and the possibility of operating problems during extended continuous operation. Preparations for a one-year flow test of the system to answer these and more fundamental questions concerning hot dry rock systems were made in FY87: design of the required surface facilities; procurement and installation of some of their components; development and testing of slimline logging tools for use through small-diameter production tubing; research on temperature-sensitive reactive chemical tracers to monitor thermal depletion of the reservoir; and computer simulations of the 30-day test, extended to modeling the planned Long-Term Flow Test. 45 refs., 34 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Hot dry rock heat mining: An alternative energy progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Duchane, D.V.

    1991-01-01

    Mining Heat from the hot dry rock (HDR) resource that lies beneath the earth's crust may provide an almost inexhaustible supply of energy for mankind with minimal environmental effects. In the heat mining process, water is pumped down an injection well into a mass of hydraulically fractured hot rock. As the water flows under high pressure through the opened rock joints, it becomes heated by the rock. It is returned to the surface through a production well (or wells) located some distance from the injector where its thermal energy is recovered by a heat exchanger. The same water is then recirculated through the system to extract more thermal energy. In this closed-loop process, nothing but heat is released to the environment during normal operation. The technical feasibility of HDR heat mining already has been proven by field testing. A long-term flow test is scheduled to begin in 1991 at the world's largest HDR heat mine in New Mexico, USA, to demonstrate that energy can be produced from HDR on a continuous basis over an extended time period. Significant HDR programs are also underway in several other countries. The paper describes the HDR resource, the heat mining concept, environmental characteristics, economics, developments at Los Alamos to date, and HDR development outside the US. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Drying and decontamination of pistachios with sequential infrared drying, tempering and hot air drying

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pistachio industry is in need of improved drying technology as the current hot air drying has low energy efficiency and drying rate and high labor cost and also does not produce safe products against microbial contamination. In the current study, dehulled and water- sorted pistachios with a mois...

  1. Water geochemistry and hydrogeology of the shallow aquifer at Roosevelt Hot Springs, southern Utah: A hot dry rock prospect

    SciTech Connect

    Vuataz, F.D.; Goff, F.

    1987-12-01

    On the western edge of the geothermal field, three deep holes have been drilled that are very hot but mostly dry. Two of them (Phillips 9-1 and Acord 1-26 wells) have been studied by Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) resources evaluation program. A review of data and recommendations have been formulated to evaluate the HDR geothermal potential at Roosevelt. The present report is directed toward the study of the shallow aquifer of the Milford Valley to determine if the local groundwater would be suitable for use as make-up water in an HDR system. This investigation is the result of a cooperative agreement between Los Alamos and Phillips Petroleum Co., formerly the main operator of the Roosevelt Hot Springs Unit. The presence of these hot dry wells and the similar setting of the Roosevelt area to the prototype HDR site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, make Roosevelt a very good candidate site for creation of another HDR geothermal system. This investigation has two main objectives: to assess the water geochemistry of the valley aquifer, to determine possible problems in future make-up water use, such as scaling or corrosion in the wells and surface piping, and to assess the hydrogeology of the shallow groundwaters above the HDR zone, to characterize the physical properties of the aquifer. These two objectives are linked by the fact that the valley aquifer is naturally contaminated by geothermal fluids leaking out of the hydrothermal reservoir. In an arid region where good-quality fresh water is needed for public water supply and irrigation, nonpotable waters would be ideal for an industrial use such as injection into an HDR energy extraction system. 50 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  2. Cumulative experience of the US Hot Dry Rock Program

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.W.

    1993-01-01

    In over 20 years of research on the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy concept at Los Alamos National Laboratory, no obstacle has yet been found that would prevent its development as a major new energy source for the nation. To put the continuing development of the HDR concept in perspective, the most appropriate comparison is with fusion energy, the only other nonrenewable energy resource of the magnitude of HDR geothermal energy. In this context, research on fusion energy is currently so far from the demonstration stage that obstacles to its ultimate commercial development, such as induced radiation or neutron damage to structural materials, cannot yet be addressed from the standpoint of engineered solutions. For the commercialization of the HDR concept, on the other hand, we know what technical problems remain and are presently developing engineered solutions to address each of them. This document presents learned information on: the formation of HDR reservoirs; the structure of the deep precambrian basement; the mechanics of creating an HDR geothermal reservoir; peripheral water loss from deep HDR reservoirs; the determination of the size, orientation, and internal structure of the stimulated HDR region; and results from geochemical analyses and tracer testing.

  3. Cumulative experience of the US Hot Dry Rock Program

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.W.

    1993-04-01

    In over 20 years of research on the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy concept at Los Alamos National Laboratory, no obstacle has yet been found that would prevent its development as a major new energy source for the nation. To put the continuing development of the HDR concept in perspective, the most appropriate comparison is with fusion energy, the only other nonrenewable energy resource of the magnitude of HDR geothermal energy. In this context, research on fusion energy is currently so far from the demonstration stage that obstacles to its ultimate commercial development, such as induced radiation or neutron damage to structural materials, cannot yet be addressed from the standpoint of engineered solutions. For the commercialization of the HDR concept, on the other hand, we know what technical problems remain and are presently developing engineered solutions to address each of them. This document presents learned information on: the formation of HDR reservoirs; the structure of the deep precambrian basement; the mechanics of creating an HDR geothermal reservoir; peripheral water loss from deep HDR reservoirs; the determination of the size, orientation, and internal structure of the stimulated HDR region; and results from geochemical analyses and tracer testing.

  4. Data Review of the Hot Dry Rock Project at Fenton Hill, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    GeothermEx, Inc.

    1998-12-01

    This report reviews the data collected during the hot dry rock experimental project conducted by the US Department of Energy and Los Alamos National Laboratory at Fenton Hill, New Mexico from about 1971 through 1995. Five main categories of data were reviewed: (1) geologic data; (2) flow test data; (3) reservoir modeling data; (4) chemical tracer data; and (5) seismic data. The review determines the important data sets from the project, determines where and how these data are stored, and evaluates whether further analyses of the data might be likely to yield additional information valuable to the geothermal industry or to the further development of enhanced geothermal systems.

  5. Hot dry rock geothermal prospects, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, F.E.; Laughlin, A.W.; Aldrich, J.

    1981-01-01

    The hot dry rock (HDR) site selection and resource evaluation team has been assessing roughly 24 sites within the USA as candidates for development of a second HDR geothermal system. Potential sites examined fall broadly into three categories according to the nature of their thermal anomalies: (1) Quaternary magmahydrothermal (volcanic or igneous) systems such as The Geysers-Clear Lake region, California; (2) regional thermal anomalies of tectonic origin such as the Basin and Range Province of the Southwest; and (3) pre-Quaternary plutonic and metamorphic complexes such as the Conway Granite, New Hampshire. Although sites with both electrical generation and direct use potential have been considered, efforts were concentrated on electrical sites. Criteria for a successful HDR electrical generation site utilizing current technology require temperatures greater than or equal to 200/sup 0/C, depths less than or equal to 5/km, and impermeable reservoir rocks. Sites with these characteristics only exist in the western USA. The significance of other criteria such as environmental issues, water rights, public visability, and pre-existing power networks have not yet been evaluated.

  6. Physiological responses during continuous work in hot dry and hot humid environments in Indians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen Gupta, J.; Swamy, Y. V.; Pichan, G.; Dimri, G. P.

    1984-06-01

    Studies have been conducted on six young healthy heat acclimatised Indians to determine the physiological changes in prolonged continuous work in thermally neutral and in hot dry and hot humid environments. Physiological responses in maximal efforts i.e. Vo2 max, VE max and Cf max were noted. In addition, duration in continuous work at three sub-maximal rate of work in three simulated environments were also noted. Physiological responses like Vo2, VE and Cf were noted every 15 minutes of work. Besides these responses, rectal temperature (Tre), mean skin temperature (Ts) and mean sweat rate were also recorded during continuous work. Results indicated a significant decrease in maximum oxygen uptake capacity (Vo2 max) in heat with no change in maximum exercise ventilation (VE max) and maximum cardiac frequency. However, the fall in Vo2 max was more severe in the hot humid environment than in the hot dry climate. Cardiac frequency at fixed oxygen consumption of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 l/min was distinctly higher in the hot humid environment than in the hot dry and comfortable temperature. The duration in continuous physical effort in various grades of activities decreased in hot dry environment from that in the-comfortable climate and further decreased significantly in hot humid environment. The highest rate of sweating was observed during work in humid heat. The mean skin temperature (Ts) showed a fall in all the three rates of work in comfortable and hot dry conditions whereas in hot humid environment it showed a linear rise during the progress of work. The rectal temperature on the other hand maintained a near steady state while working at 65 and 82 watts in comfortable and hot dry environments but kept on rising during work in hot humid environment. At the highest work rate of 98 watts, the rectal temperature showed a steady increase even in the hot dry condition. It was thus concluded from the study that a hot humid climate imposes more constraints on the

  7. Hot dry rock energy: Hot dry rock geothermal development program. Progress report. Fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, J.; Brown, M.

    1995-03-01

    Extended flow testing at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) test facility concluded in Fiscal Year 1993 with the completion of Phase 2 of the long-term flow test (LTFT) program. As is reported in detail in this report, the second phase of the LTFT, although only 55 days in duration, confirmed in every way the encouraging test results of the 112-day Phase I LTFT carried out in Fiscal Year 1992. Interim flow testing was conducted early in FY 1993 during the period between the two LTFT segments. In addition, two brief tests involving operation of the reservoir on a cyclic schedule were run at the end of the Phase 2 LTFT. These interim and cyclic tests provided an opportunity to conduct evaluations and field demonstrations of several reservoir engineering concepts that can now be applied to significantly increase the productivity of HDR systems. The Fenton Hill HDR test facility was shut down and brought into standby status during the last part of FY 1993. Unfortunately, the world`s largest, deepest, and most productive HDR reservoir has gone essentially unused since that time.

  8. The furnace in the basement: Part 1, The early days of the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Program, 1970--1973

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.C.

    1995-09-01

    This report presents the descriptions of the background information and formation of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Geothermal Energy Group. It discusses the organizational, financial, political, public-relations,geologic, hydrologic, physical, and mechanical problems encountered by the group during the period 1970--1973. It reports the failures as well as the successes of this essential first stage in the development of hot dry rock geothermal energy systems.

  9. Dry soldering with hot filament produced atomic hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Panitz, Janda K. G.; Jellison, James L.; Staley, David J.

    1995-01-01

    A system for chemically transforming metal surface oxides to metal that is especially, but not exclusively, suitable for preparing metal surfaces for dry soldering and solder reflow processes. The system employs one or more hot, refractory metal filaments, grids or surfaces to thermally dissociate molecular species in a low pressure of working gas such as a hydrogen-containing gas to produce reactive species in a reactive plasma that can chemically reduce metal oxides and form volatile compounds that are removed in the working gas flow. Dry soldering and solder reflow processes are especially applicable to the manufacture of printed circuit boards, semiconductor chip lead attachment and packaging multichip modules. The system can be retrofitted onto existing metal treatment ovens, furnaces, welding systems and wave soldering system designs.

  10. Dry soldering with hot filament produced atomic hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Panitz, J.K.G.; Jellison, J.L.; Staley, D.J.

    1995-04-25

    A system is disclosed for chemically transforming metal surface oxides to metal that is especially, but not exclusively, suitable for preparing metal surfaces for dry soldering and solder reflow processes. The system employs one or more hot, refractory metal filaments, grids or surfaces to thermally dissociate molecular species in a low pressure of working gas such as a hydrogen-containing gas to produce reactive species in a reactive plasma that can chemically reduce metal oxides and form volatile compounds that are removed in the working gas flow. Dry soldering and solder reflow processes are especially applicable to the manufacture of printed circuit boards, semiconductor chip lead attachment and packaging multichip modules. The system can be retrofitted onto existing metal treatment ovens, furnaces, welding systems and wave soldering system designs. 1 fig.

  11. Hot dry rock geothermal potential of Roosevelt Hot Springs area: review of data and recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    East, J.

    1981-05-01

    The Roosevelt Hot Springs area in west-central Utah possesses several features indicating potential for hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal development. The area is characterized by extensional tectonics and a high regional heat flow of greater than 105 mW/m/sup 2/. The presence of silicic volcanic rocks as young as 0.5 to 0.8 Myr and totaling 14 km/sup 3/ in volume indicates underlying magma reservoirs may be the heat source for the thermal anomaly. Several hot dry wells have been drilled on the periphery of the geothermal field. Information obtained on three of these deep wells shows that they have thermal gradients of 55 to 60/sup 0/C/km and bottom in impermeable Tertiary granitic and Precambrian gneissic units. The Tertiary granite is the preferred HDR reservoir rock because Precambrian gneissic rocks possess a well-developed banded foliation, making fracture control over the reservoir more difficult. Based on a fairly conservative estimate of 160 km/sup 2/ for the thermal anomaly present at Roosevelt Hot Springs, the area designated favorable for HDR geothermal exploration may be on the order of seven times or more than the hydrogeothermal area currently under development.

  12. Experimental verification of the load-following potential of a Hot Dry Rock geothermal reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Donald

    1996-01-24

    A recent 6-day flow experiment conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) test site in north-central New Mexico has verified that an HDR reservoir has the capability for a significant, and very rapid, increase in power output upon demand. The objective of this cyclic load-following experiment was to investigate the performance of the reservoir in a nominal high-backpressure (2200 psi) baseload operating condition upon which was superimposed greatly increased power production for a 4-hour period each day. In practice, this enhanced production was accomplished by dropping the production well backpressure from the preexisting level of 2200 psi down to about 500 psi to rapidly drain the fluid stored in the pressure-dilated joints surrounding the production well. During the last cycle of this six-cycle test, the mean production conditions were 146.6 gpm for 4 hours at a temperature of 189°C followed by 92.4 gpm for 20 hours at a temperature of 183°C. These flow and temperature values indicate a flow enhancement of 59%, and a power enhancement of 65% during the high-production period. The time required to increase the reservoir power output from the baseload to the peaking rate was about 2 minutes.

  13. Experimental verification of the load-following potential of a hot dry rock geothermal reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.

    1996-12-31

    A recent 6-day flow experiment conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) test site in north-central New Mexico has verified that an HDR reservoir has the capability for a significant, and very rapid, increase in power output upon demand. The objective of this cyclic load-following experiment was to investigate the performance of the reservoir in a nominal high-backpressure (2200 psi) baseload operating condition upon which was superimposed greatly increased power production for a 4-hour period each day. In practice, this enhanced production was accomplished by dropping the production well backpressure from the preexisting level of 2200 psi down to about 500 psi to rapidly drain the fluid stored in the pressure-dilated joints surrounding the production well. During the last cycle of this six-cycle test, the mean production conditions were 146.6 gpm for 4 hours at a temperature of 189{degrees}C, followed by 92.4 gpm for 20 hours at a temperature of 183{degrees}C. These flow and temperature values indicate a flow enhancement of 59%, and a power enhancement of 65% during the high-production period. The time required to increase the reservoir power output from the baseload to the peaking rate was about 2 minutes.

  14. 46 CFR 148.250 - Direct reduced iron (DRI); hot-molded briquettes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Direct reduced iron (DRI); hot-molded briquettes. 148.250 Section 148.250 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS... Materials § 148.250 Direct reduced iron (DRI); hot-molded briquettes. (a) Before loading DRI...

  15. 46 CFR 148.250 - Direct reduced iron (DRI); hot-molded briquettes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Direct reduced iron (DRI); hot-molded briquettes. 148.250 Section 148.250 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS... Materials § 148.250 Direct reduced iron (DRI); hot-molded briquettes. (a) Before loading DRI...

  16. 46 CFR 148.250 - Direct reduced iron (DRI); hot-molded briquettes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Direct reduced iron (DRI); hot-molded briquettes. 148.250 Section 148.250 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS... Materials § 148.250 Direct reduced iron (DRI); hot-molded briquettes. (a) Before loading DRI...

  17. 46 CFR 148.250 - Direct reduced iron (DRI); hot-molded briquettes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Direct reduced iron (DRI); hot-molded briquettes. 148.250 Section 148.250 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS... Materials § 148.250 Direct reduced iron (DRI); hot-molded briquettes. (a) Before loading DRI...

  18. Drying kinetics and mathematical modeling of hot air drying of coconut coir pith.

    PubMed

    Fernando, J A K M; Amarasinghe, A D U S

    2016-01-01

    Drying kinetics of coir pith was studied and the properties of compressed coir pith discs were analyzed. Coir pith particles were oven dried in the range of temperatures from 100 to 240 °C and the rehydration ability of compressed coir pith was evaluated by finding the volume expansion. The optimum drying temperature was found to be 140 °C. Hot air drying was carried out to examine the drying kinetics by allowing the coir pith particles to fluidize and circulate inside the drying chamber. Particle motion within the drying chamber closely resembled the particle motion in a flash dryer. The effective moisture diffusivity was found to increase from 1.18 × 10(-8) to 1.37 × 10(-8) m(2)/s with the increase of air velocity from 1.4 to 2.5 m/s respectively. Correlation analysis and residual plots were used to determine the adequacy of existing mathematical models for describing the drying behavior of coir pith. The empirical models, Wang and Singh model and Linear model, were found to be adequate for accurate prediction of drying behavior of coir pith. A new model was proposed by modifying the Wang and Singh model and considering the effect of air velocity. It gave the best correlation between observed and predicted moisture ratio with high value of coefficient of determination (R(2)) and lower values of root mean square error, reduced Chi square (χ(2)) and mean relative deviation (E%).

  19. Hot-dry-rock energy: review of environmental aspects

    SciTech Connect

    O'Banion, K.

    1981-10-13

    The potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts of the production of energy contained in hot dry rock (HDR) is surveyed here. In general, careful siting and timing and routine control measures should be adequate to prevent significant environmental harm; sites of particular ecological or visual and recreational value, however, may require more extensive (and more expensive) precautions such as using multiwell pads to reduce land disturbance and dry or wet and dry cooling towers to reduce or eliminate the consumptive use of water. The most important uncertainty among the environmental concerns is the seismic response of HDR formations to short-duration fluid injections at pressures above fracture thresholds; continued monitoring at HDR development sites is necessary. The direct socioeconomic impacts of HDR development should be relatively minor, owing to its capital-intensive nature. Of greater potential importance are the indirect jobs resulting from such development, which could cause significant demographic (and thus fiscal and social) impacts in sparsely populated regions. However, such indirect growth is not expected to begin until a large, stable HDR industry is established in a region, and thus its impacts are expected to be permanent rather than transient.

  20. Hot Dry Rock energy annual report fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Winchester, W.W.; Duchane, D.V.

    1993-04-01

    Hot Dry Rock technology took a giant leap forward this year as the long-awaited long-term flow test (LTFT) of the Phase 2 HDR reservoir at Fenton Hill got underway. Energy was produced on a twenty-four hour a day basis for a continuous period of nearly four months of steady-state testing. Hot water was brought to the surface at 90--100 gallons per minute (gpm) with temperatures of 180{degrees}C (356{degrees}F) and higher. During that time, the HDR plant achieved an on-line record of 98.8%. Surface temperature measurements and temperature logging deep within the wellbore confirmed that no decline in the average temperature of fluid produced from the reservoir occurred. Tracer experiments indicated that flow paths within the reservoir were undergoing continuous change during the test. Remarkably, it appeared that longer flow paths carried a larger proportion of the flow as the test proceeded, while more direct fluid pathways disappeared or carried a significantly reduced flow. In sum, access to hot rock appeared to improve over the span of the test. Water losses during the test averaged 10--12% and showed a slow long-term decline. These results confirmed what had been previously discovered in static pressurization testing: Water consumption declines significantly during extended operation of an HDR reservoir. In combination with a recent demonstration by the Japanese that water losses can be greatly reduced by the proper placement of multiple production wells, the recent results at Fenton Hill have effectively demonstrated that excessive water consumption should not be an issue for a properly engineered HDR facility at a well chosen site.

  1. Hot Dry Rock energy annual report fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Duchane, D.V.; Winchester, W.W.

    1993-04-01

    Hot Dry Rock technology took a giant leap forward this year as the long-awaited long-term flow test (LTFT) of the Phase II HDR reservoir at Fenton Hill got underway. Energy was produced on a twenty-four hour a day basis for a continuous period of nearly four months of steady-state testing. Hot water was brought to the surface at 90-100 gallons per minute (gpm) with temperatures of 180[degrees]C (356[degrees]F) and higher. During that time, the HDR plant achieved an on-line record of 98.8%. Surface temperature measurements and temperature logging deep within the wellbore confirmed that no decline in the average temperature of fluid produced from the reservoir occurred. Tracer experiments indicated that flow paths within the reservoir were undergoing continuous change during the test. Remarkably, it appeared that longer flow paths carried a larger proportion of the flow as the test proceeded, while more direct fluid pathways disappeared or carried a significantly reduced flow. In sum, access to hot rock appeared to improve over the span of the test. Water losses during the test averaged 10-12% and showed a slow long-term decline. These results confirmed what had been previously discovered in static pressurization testing: Water consumption declines significantly during extended operation of an HDR reservoir. In combination with a recent demonstration by the Japanese that water losses can be greatly reduced by the proper placement of multiple production wells, the recent results at Fenton Hill have effectively demonstrated that excessive water consumption should not be an issue for a properly engineered HDR facility at a well chosen site.

  2. Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program Annual Report Fiscal Year 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Dash, Zora V.; Murphy, Hugh D.; Smith, Morton C.

    1988-01-01

    The complete list of HDR objectives is provided in Reference 10, and is tabulated below in Tables 1 and 2 for the reader's convenience. The primary, level 1, objective for HDR is ''to improve the technology to the point where electricity could be produced commercially from a substantial number of known HDR resource sites in a cost range of 5 to 8 cents/kWh by 1997''. A critically important milestone in attaining this cost target is the level II objective: ''Evaluate the performance of the Fenton Hill Phase II reservoir''. To appreciate the significance of this objective, a brief background is helpful. During the past 14 years the US DOE has invested $123 million to develop the technology required to make Hot Dry Rock geothermal energy commercially useful. The Governments of Japan and the Federal Republic of Germany have contributed an additional $32 million to the US program. The initial objectives of the program were met by the successful development and long-term operation of a heat-extraction loop in hydraulically-fractured hot dry rock. This Phase I reservoir produced pressurized hot water at temperatures and flow rates suitable for many commercial uses such as space heating and food processing. It operated for more than a year with no major problems or detectable environmental effect. With this accomplished and the technical feasibility of HDR energy systems demonstrated, the program undertook the more difficult task of developing a larger, deeper, hotter reservoir, called ''Phase II'', capable of supporting pilot-plant-scale operation of a commercial electricity-generating power plant. As described earlier in ''History of Research'', such a system was created and operated successfully in a preliminary 30-day flow test. However, to justify capital investment in HDR geothermal technology, industry now requires assurance that the reservoir can be operated for a long time without major problems or a significant decrease in the rate and quality of energy

  3. Hot melt extrusion versus spray drying: hot melt extrusion degrades albendazole.

    PubMed

    Hengsawas Surasarang, Soraya; Keen, Justin M; Huang, Siyuan; Zhang, Feng; McGinity, James W; Williams, Robert O

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to enhance the dissolution properties of albendazole (ABZ) by the use of amorphous solid dispersions. Phase diagrams of ABZ-polymer binary mixtures generated from Flory-Huggins theory were used to assess miscibility and processability. Forced degradation studies showed that ABZ degraded upon exposure to hydrogen peroxide and 1 N NaOH at 80 °C for 5 min, and the degradants were albendazole sulfoxide (ABZSX), and ABZ impurity A, respectively. ABZ was chemically stable following exposure to 1 N HCl at 80 °C for one hour. Thermal degradation profiles show that ABZ, with and without Kollidon(®) VA 64, degraded at 180 °C and 140 °C, respectively, which indicated that ABZ could likely be processed by thermal processing. Following hot melt extrusion, ABZ degraded up to 97.4%, while the amorphous ABZ solid dispersion was successfully prepared by spray drying. Spray-dried ABZ formulations using various types of acids (methanesulfonic acid, sulfuric acid and hydrochloric acid) and polymers (Kollidon(®) VA 64, Soluplus(®) and Eudragit(®) E PO) were studied. The spray-dried ABZ with methanesulfonic acid and Kollidon(®) VA 64 substantially improved non-sink dissolution in acidic media as compared to bulk ABZ (8-fold), physical mixture of ABZ:Kollidon(®) VA 64 (5.6-fold) and ABZ mesylate salt (1.6-fold). No degradation was observed in the spray-dried product for up to six months and less than 5% after one-year storage. In conclusion, amorphous ABZ solid dispersions in combination with an acid and polymer can be prepared by spray drying to enhance dissolution and shelf-stability, whereas those made by melt extrusion are degraded.

  4. Hot dry rock geothermal energy. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This second EPRI workshop on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy, held in May 1994, focused on the status of worldwide HDR research and development and used that status review as the starting point for discussions of what could and should be done next: by U.S. federal government, by U.S. industry, by U.S. state governments, and by international organizations or through international agreements. The papers presented and the discussion that took place indicate that there is a community of researchers and industrial partners that could join forces, with government support, to begin a new effort on hot dry rock geothermal development. This new heat mining effort would start with site selection and confirmatory studies, done concurrently. The confirmatory studies would test past evaluations against the most current results (from the U.S. site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, and from the two sites in Japan, the one in Russia, and the two in western Europe) and the best models of relevant physical and economic aspects. Site selection would be done in the light of the confirmatory studies and would be influenced by the need to find a site where success is probable and which is representative enough of other sites so that its success would imply good prospects for success at numerous other sites. The test of success would be circulation between a pair of wells, or more wells, in a way that confirmed, with the help of flow modeling, that a multi-well system would yield temperatures, flows and lifetimes that support economically feasible power generation. The flow modeling would have to have previously achieved its own confirmation from relevant data taken from both heat mining and conventional hydrothermal geothermal experience. There may be very relevant experience from the enhancement of ''hot wet rock'' sites, i.e., sites where hydrothermal reservoirs lack, or have come to lack, enough natural water or steam and are helped by water injected cold and produced hot. The new

  5. Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools: Hot and Dry Climates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

    This guide contains recommendations for designing high performance, energy efficient schools located in hot and dry climates. A high performance checklist for designers is included along with several case studies of projects that successfully demonstrated high performance design solutions for hot and dry climates. The guide's 10 sections…

  6. Prospects for hot dry rock in the future

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, M.E.; Murphy, H.D.

    1988-01-01

    The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy program is a renewable energy program that can contribute significantly to the nation's balanced and diversified energy mix. The program was reviewed five times in the past three years. Three of these reviews were done by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and a fourth was conducted by the National Research Council at the request of DOE. In addition, HDR was evaluated in the Energy Research Advisory Board's Solid Earth Sciences Report. Recent economic studies for HDR have been performed by Bechtel National, Inc., the Electric Power Research Institute, and the United Kingdom. These studies are reviewed in light of recent progress at Fenton Hill in reducing drilling costs, and mapping and in identifying drilling targets. All of the attention focused on HDR has resulted in evaluating the way in which HDR fits within the nation's energy mix and in estimating when HDR will contribute to energy security. To establish a framework for evaluating the future of HDR, the status and progress of HDR are reviewed and the remaining Fenton Hill program is outlined. Recommendations are also made for follow-on activities that will lead to achieving full development of HDR technologies in the appropriate time frame.

  7. The U.S. Hot Dry Rock Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hendron, Robert H.

    1987-01-22

    The Hot Dry Rock geothermal energy project began in the early 1970’s with the objective of developing a technology to make economically available the large ubiquitous thermal energy of the upper earth crust. The program has been funded by the Department of Energy (and its predecessors) and for a few years with participation by West Germany and Japan. An energy reservoir was accessed by drilling and hydraulically fracturing in the Precambrian basement rock outside the Valles Caldera of north-central New Mexico. Water was circulated through the reservoir (Phase I, 1978-1980) producing up to 5 MWt at 132ºC. A second (Phase II) reservoir has been established with a deeper pair of holes and an initial flow test completed producing about 10 MWt at 190ºC. These accomplishments have been supported and paralleled by developments in drilling, well completion and instrumentation hardware. Acoustic or microseismic fracture mapping and geochemistry studies in addition to hydraulic and thermal data contribute to reservoir analyses. Studies of some of the estimated 430,000 quads of HDR resources in the United States have been made with special attention focused on sites most advantageous for early development. 3 figs., 1 tab., 12 refs.

  8. Hot-dry-rock geothermal-reservoir fracturing initial field operations - 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, J.C.; Pettitt, R.A.; Matsunaga, I.; Dreesen, D.S.; Nicholson, R.W.; Sinclair, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    Initial fracturing operations were conducted during 1982 to create a hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal reservoir at the Los Alamos Fenton Hill site. A preliminary work-over/cleaning operation in November to December 1981 had cleared the injection well, EE-2, and a detailed, comprehensive plan was prepared to accomplish the objectives of hydraulically connecting the injection and production wells. In January 1982, open-hole reservoir sections of both the production and injection wells were pressurized below the 9-5/8 in. casing. The injection well, EE-2, did not take fluid at 2200 psi, but the production well, EE-3, had a lost circulation zone and took water over a 240 ft zone immediately below the production casing. Subsequent field operations from May through December 14, 1982 involved ten major hydraulic injection and/or equipment tests. These ranged from 14,180 ft (4322 m) deep open-hole packer tests to installation of a cemented-in liner/PBR system. Injections of up to 1.3 x 10 gals. were performed in the injection well. Both wells were fractured in zones just below the production casings. Although several large volume injections were accomplished, hydraulic communication between wells was not achieved. Severe hardware problems were encountered due to temperature limitations, the high fracture gradient (breakdown and injection pressures), and the presence of CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S during fracture back-flow and well venting. On-line and post-test analyses of seismic monitoring confirmed that fractures were created in each well that converged on, but did not intersect, the neighboring well.

  9. Microwave energy versus convected hot air for rapidly drying ceramic tile

    SciTech Connect

    Earl, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to determine if microwave energy could provide advantages over the conventional hot air method currently used for rapidly drying ceramic tile. Tiles consisting of a typical fast-fire body formula were dried to 0.5% moisture using a 2.45 GHz, 950W microwave oven and a natural gas-fired roller dryer. Statistical methods were employed to develop equations for predicting microwave energy consumption, tile % moisture and surface temperature given drying time, tile volume and % relative humidity. Microwave drying was found to require 36% less energy than hot air drying. Moisture was removed and surface temperature elevated at faster rates using microwave energy.

  10. The UK geothermal hot dry rock R&D programme

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Paul; Stedman, Ann; Symons, Geoff

    1992-01-01

    The UK hot dry rock research and development programme is funded by the Department of Energy and aims to demonstrate the feasibility of commercial exploitation of HDR in the UK. The philosophy of the UK programme has been to proceed to a full-scale prototype HDR power station via a number of stages: Phase 1--Experiments at shallow depth (300 m) to assess the feasibility of enhancing the permeability of the rock. Phase 2--Studies at intermediate depth (2500 m) to determine the feasibility of creating a viable HDR subsurface heat exchanger. Phase 3--Establishment of an HDR prototype at commercial depth. The programme has run over a 15 year period, and has been formally reviewed at stages throughout its progress. The 1987 review towards the end of Phase 2 identified a number of technical objectives for continuing research and proposed that the initial design stage of the deep HDR prototype should start. Phase 3A is now complete. It addressed: the feasibility of creating an underground HDR heat exchanger suitable for commercial operation; techniques for improving hydraulic performance and correcting short circuits in HDR systems; modeling of the performance, resource size and economic aspects of HDR systems. The work has been conducted by a number of contractors, including Cambome School of Mines, Sunderland and Sheffield City Polytechnics and RTZ Consultants Limited. This paper focuses upon the experimental work at Rosemanowes in Cornwall and the recently completed conceptual design of a prototype HDR power station. The economics of HDR-generated electricity are also discussed and the conclusions of a 1990 program review are presented. Details of the HDR program to 1994, as announced by the UK Department of Energy in February 1991, are included.

  11. Effect of ultrasound and blanching pretreatments on polyacetylene and carotenoid content of hot air and freeze dried carrot discs.

    PubMed

    Rawson, A; Tiwari, B K; Tuohy, M G; O'Donnell, C P; Brunton, N

    2011-09-01

    The effect of ultrasound and blanching pretreatments on polyacetylene (falcarinol, falcarindiol and falcarindiol-3-acetate) and carotenoid compounds of hot air and freeze dried carrot discs was investigated. Ultrasound pretreatment followed by hot air drying (UPHD) at the highest amplitude and treatment time investigated resulted in higher retention of polyacetylenes and carotenoids in dried carrot discs than blanching followed by hot air drying. Freeze dried samples had a higher retention of polyacetylene and carotenoid compounds compared to hot air dried samples. Color parameters were strongly correlated with carotenoids (p<0.05). This study shows that ultrasound pretreatment is a potential alternative to conventional blanching treatment in the drying of carrots.

  12. Building America Residential System Research Results. Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.; Hendron, R.; Eastment, M.; Jalalzadeh-Azar, A.

    2006-01-01

    This report summarizes Building America research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in the Hot-Dry/Mixed-Dry Climate Region on a cost-neutral basis.

  13. Progress of the LASL dry hot rock geothermal energy project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. C.

    1974-01-01

    The possibilities and problems of extracting energy from geothermal reservoirs which do not spontaneously yield useful amounts of steam or hot water are discussed. The system for accomplishing this which is being developed first is a pressurized-water circulation loop intended for use in relatively impermeable hot rock. It will consist of two holes connected through the hot rock by a very large hydraulic fracture and connected at the surface through the primary heat exchanger of an energy utilization system. Preliminary experiments in a hole 2576 ft (0.7852 km) deep, extending about 470 ft (143 m) into the Precambrian basement rock underlying the Jemez Plateau of north-central New Mexico, revealed no unexpected difficulties in drilling or hydraulically fracturing such rock at a temperature of approximately 100 C, and demonstrated a permeability low enough so that it appeared probable that pressurized water could be contained by the basement rock. Similar experiments are in progress in a second hole, now 6701 ft (2.043 km) deep, about 1.5 miles (2.4 km) south of the first one.

  14. Comparative study of two drying techniques used in radioactive source preparation: freeze-drying and evaporation using hot dry nitrogen jets.

    PubMed

    Branger, T; Bobin, C; Iroulart, M-G; Lépy, M-C; Le Garrères, I; Morelli, S; Lacour, D; Plagnard, J

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative solid sources are used widely in the field of radionuclide metrology. With the aim to improve the detection efficiency for electrons and x-rays, a comparative study between two source drying techniques has been undertaken at LNE-Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNE-LNHB, France). In this paper, freeze-drying using commercial equipment is compared with a system of drying using hot jets of nitrogen developed at Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM, Belgium). In order to characterize the influence of self-absorption, the detection efficiencies for (51)Cr sources have been measured by coincidence counting and photon spectrometry.

  15. Using HDR (Hot Dry Rock) technology to recharge The Geysers

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.W.; Robinson, B.A.

    1990-01-01

    The main reason for the productivity decline at The Geysers geothermal field is obvious: more fluid is being withdrawn from the reservoir than is being returned by reinjection and natural recharge. However, there is another factor that may be contributing to this decline --- the method of reinjection. By reinjecting cold condensate directly into the steam dome as is the current practice, the very large pressure difference between the injected condensate and the underpressured reservoir guarantees that the reinjected fluid will fall rapidly to the bottom of the reservoir, with very little residence time for heat transfer. This point is very important since the vast majority of the heat contained in The Geysers geothermal field is stored in the hot rock comprising the reservoir. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Drying kinetics, rehydration and colour characteristics of convective hot-air drying of carrot slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doymaz, İbrahim

    2017-01-01

    The effects of air drying temperature, slice thickness and pre-treatment application on the drying kinetics of carrot slices during convective drying in the range 50-70 °C were investigated. Results indicated that drying time, rehydration ratio and colour characteristics of carrot slices were more affected by drying air temperature, followed by pre-treatment applications. Five thin-layer drying models were applied to describe the drying kinetics. Midilli et al. model was the best model to characterize the drying kinetics of carrot slices. The moisture effective diffusivity calculated from the second Fick's law of diffusion ranged from 3.46 × 10-10 to 1.02 × 10-9 m2/s. The values of activation energy determined from the slope of the Arrhenius plot, ln( D eff ) versus 1/(T + 273.15), were 35.53, 43.42, and 37.75 kJ/mol for blanch, potas and control samples, respectively.

  17. Dry heat and hot water treatments for disinfesting cottonseed of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential of low- and high-temperature dry heat, and hot water treatments, for disinfesting cottonseed of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum was investigated. Naturally infected seeds from Louisiana were air-heated in incubators set at temperatures of 30, 35, and 40 degrees C for up to 24 we...

  18. Developing hot air assisted radio frequency drying for in-shell Macadamia nuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dehydration offers a means of preserving foods in a stable and safe condition as it reduces water activity and extends shelf-life of perishable agricultural products. The purpose of this study was to develop radio frequency (RF) drying protocols for in-shell macadamia nuts based on conventional hot ...

  19. 30 CFR 77.305 - Access to drying chambers, hot gas inlet chambers and ductwork; installation and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... chambers and ductwork; installation and maintenance. 77.305 Section 77.305 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY... drying chambers, hot gas inlet chambers and ductwork; installation and maintenance. Drying chambers, hot gas inlet chambers and all ductwork in which coal dust may accumulate shall be equipped with...

  20. Final Report - Membranes and MEA's for Dry, Hot Operating Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hamrock, Steven J

    2011-06-30

    The focus of this program was to develop a new Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) which can operate under hotter, dryer conditions than the state of the art membranes today and integrate it into a Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA). These MEA's should meet the performance and durability requirements outlined in the solicitation, operating under low humidification conditions and at temperatures ranging from -20ºC to 120ºC, to meet 2010 DOE technical targets for membranes. This membrane should operate under low humidification conditions and at temperatures ranging from -20ºC to 120ºC in order to meet DOE HFCIT 2010 commercialization targets for automotive fuel cells. Membranes developed in this program may also have improved durability and performance characteristics making them useful in stationary fuel cell applications. The new membranes, and the MEA's comprising them, should be manufacturable at high volumes and at costs which can meet industry and DOE targets. This work included: A) Studies to better understand factors controlling proton transport within the electrolyte membrane, mechanisms of polymer degradation (in situ and ex situ) and membrane durability in an MEA; B) Development of new polymers with increased proton conductivity over the range of temperatures from -20ºC to 120ºC and at lower levels of humidification and with improved chemical and mechanical stability; C) Development of new membrane additives for increased durability and conductivity under these dry conditions; D) Integration of these new materials into membranes and membranes into MEA's, including catalyst and gas diffusion layer selection and integration; E) Verification that these materials can be made using processes which are scalable to commercial volumes using cost effective methods; F) MEA testing in single cells using realistic automotive testing protocols. This project addresses technical barriers A (Durability) and C (Performance) from the Fuel Cells section of the 2005 Hydrogen

  1. Drying kinetics of apricot halves in a microwave-hot air hybrid oven

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horuz, Erhan; Bozkurt, Hüseyin; Karataş, Haluk; Maskan, Medeni

    2017-01-01

    Drying behavior and kinetics of apricot halves were investigated in a microwave-hot air domestic hybrid oven at 120, 150 and 180 W microwave power and 50, 60 and 70 °C air temperature. Drying operation was finished when the moisture content reached to 25% (wet basis) from 77% (w.b). Increase in microwave power and air temperature increased drying rates and reduced drying time. Only falling rate period was observed in drying of apricot halves in hybrid oven. Eleven mathematical models were used for describing the drying kinetics of apricots. Modified logistic model gave the best fitting to the experimental data. The model has never been used to explain drying behavior of any kind of food materials up to now. Fick's second law was used for determination of both effective moisture diffusivity and thermal diffusivity values. Activation energy values of dried apricots were calculated from Arrhenius equation. Those that obtained from effective moisture diffusivity, thermal diffusivity and drying rate constant values ranged from 31.10 to 39.4 kJ/mol, 29.56 to 35.19 kJ/mol, and 26.02 to 32.36 kJ/mol, respectively.

  2. Robust increase in concurrent hot and dry periods at the global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zscheischler, Jakob; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2016-04-01

    Ongoing climate change is largely affecting the frequency and magnitude of climate extremes in many areas of the world. Most studies investigating extreme events focus on a single variable such as, for instance, extreme temperature, drought, and heavy precipitation. Often, however, it is compound extremes that have the strongest impacts on ecosystems and society. For example, extreme rainfall in combination with high soil moisture causes floods with severe impacts. Similarly, droughts combined with extreme hot temperatures have particularly devastating impacts on ecosystem functioning. The magnitude of an extreme event can be reflected in its return period. Recently, the concept of copulas has been adapted to estimate multivariate return periods of, e.g., drought extent and duration, peak flow and peak volume, or extreme precipitation events at nearby stations. We use this concept here and estimate bivariate return periods of concurrent hot and dry, and concurrent cold and wet periods of 3 months length on gridded temperature and precipitation data from 1901 onwards. We find a strong increase of concurrent dry and hot periods over the recent decades, in particular in the northern hemisphere. At the same time we detect a decrease in concurrent wet and cold periods. This can be primarily attributed to the strong increase in temperature in many land areas. Averaged over the land surface, the variations of concurrently dry and hot, and cold and wet periods over the 20th century can be related to changes in surface radiation (global dimming and global brightening), which affected both temperature and the hydrological cycle.

  3. Generation of Hot Water from Hot-Dry for Heavy-Oil Recovery in Northern Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, V.; Babadagli, T.; Majorowicz, J. A.; Unsworth, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    The focus of prior applications of hot-dry-rock (HDR) technology was mostly aimed at generating electricity. In northern Alberta, the thermal gradient is low and, therefore, this technology is not suitable for electricity generation. On the other hand, the cost of steam and hot water, and environmental impacts, are becoming critical issues in heavy-oil and bitumen recovery in Alberta. Surface generation of steam or hot-water accounts for six percent of Canada's natural gas consumption and about 50 million tons of CO2 emission. Lowered cost and environmental impacts are critical in the widespread use of steam (for in-situ recovery) and hot-water (for surface extraction of bitumen) in this region. This paper provides an extensive analysis of hot-water generation to be used in heavy-oil/bitumen recovery. We tested different modeling approaches used to determine the amount of energy produced during HDR by history matching to example field data. The most suitable numerical and analytical models were used to apply the data obtained from different regions containing heavy-oil/bitumen deposits in northern Alberta. The heat generation capacity of different regions was determined and the use of this energy (in the form of hot-water) for surface extraction processes was evaluated. Original temperature gradients were applied as well as realistic basement formation characteristics through an extensive hydro thermal analysis in the region including an experimental well drilled to the depth of 2,500m. Existing natural fractures and possible hydraulic fracturing scenarios were evaluated from the heat generation capacity and the economics points of view. The main problem was modeling difficulties, especially determination and representation of fracture network characteristics. A sensitivity analysis was performed for the selected high temperature gradient regions in Alberta. In this practice, the characteristics of hydraulic fractures, injection rate, depth, the distance between

  4. Biomimicry as an approach for sustainable architecture case of arid regions with hot and dry climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouabdallah, Nabila; M'sellem, Houda; Alkama, Djamel

    2016-07-01

    This paper aims to study the problem of thermal comfort inside buildings located in hot and arid climates. The principal idea behind this research is using concepts based on the potential of nature as an instrument that helps creating appropriate facades with the environment "building skin". The biomimetic architecture imitates nature through the study of form, function, behaviour and ecosystems of biological organisms. This research aims to clarify the possibilities that can be offered by biomimicry architecture to develop architectural bio-inspired building's design that can help to enhance indoor thermal ambiance in buildings located in hot and dry climate which helps to achieve thermal comfort for users.

  5. Impedance spectra of hot, dry silicate minerals and rocks: qualitative interpretation of spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huebner, J.S.; Dillenburg, R.G.

    1995-01-01

    Impedance spectroscopy helps distinguish the contributions that grain interiors and grain boundaries make to electrical resistance of silicate minerals and rocks. Olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxenes, and both natural and synthetic clinopyroxenite were measured. A network of electrical elements is presented for use in interpreting impedance spectra and conductive paths in hot or cold, wet or dry, minerals and rocks at any pressure. In dry rocks, a series network path predominates; in wet rocks, aqueous pore fluid and crystals both conduct. Finite resistance across the sample-electrode interface is evidence that electronic charge carriers are present at the surface, and presumably within, the silicate minerals and rocks measured. -from Authors

  6. Microwave drying of granules containing a moisture-sensitive drug: a promising alternative to fluid bed and hot air oven drying.

    PubMed

    Chee, Sze Nam; Johansen, Anne Lene; Gu, Li; Karlsen, Jan; Heng, Paul Wan Sia

    2005-07-01

    The impact of microwave drying and binders (copolyvidone and povidone) on the degradation of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and physical properties of granules were compared with conventional drying methods. Moist granules containing ASA were prepared using a high shear granulator and dried with hot air oven, fluid bed or microwave (static or dynamic bed) dryers. Percent ASA degradation, size and size distribution, friability and flow properties of the granules were determined. Granules dried with the dynamic bed microwave dryer showed the least amount of ASA degradation, followed by fluid bed dryer, static bed microwave oven and hot air oven. The use of microwave drying with a static granular bed adversely affected ASA degradation and drying capability. Dynamic bed microwave dryer had the highest drying capability followed by fluid bed, static bed microwave dryer and conventional hot air oven. The intensity of microwave did not affect ASA degradation, size distribution, friability and flow properties of the granules. Mixing/agitating of granules during drying affected the granular physical properties studied. Copolyvidone resulted in lower amount of granular residual moisture content and ASA degradation on storage than povidone, especially for static bed microwave drying. In conclusion, microwave drying technology has been shown to be a promising alternative for drying granules containing a moisture-sensitive drug.

  7. Hot dry rock and the U.S. geological survey: a question of priorities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, John H.

    1996-01-01

    The enactment of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 saw the assignment of definite responsibilities relating to hot dry rock (HDR) to the US Geological Survey (USGS). This mandate provided some explicit guidelines and individual tasks in areas in which the USGS already had close ties to the Department of Energy and a number of its national laboratories. This paper discusses various tasks in terms of priorities being conducted by USGS as response to the Act.

  8. Body temperature responses of Savanna Brown goat to the harmattan and hot-dry season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igono, M. O.; Molokwu, E. C. I.; Aliu, Y. O.

    1982-09-01

    Rectal and vaginal temperature responses of the Savanna Brown goat indigenous to the Nigerian guinea savanna were determined during the harmattan and the hot-dry season. Measurements were made at 06:00h and at 14:00h after 8h exposure to field conditions. At the 06:00h measurements during the harmattan, all animals were observed to shiver. A significant (P<0.01) positive correlation was found between rectal (Tre) and vaginal temperatures. During the harmattan, mean Tre was 38.2‡C at 06:00h and 39.7‡C at 14:00h; the mean difference, δTre was 1.5‡C. During the hot-dry season, Tre at 06:00h was 38.1‡C, and at 14:00h, 38.7; δTre was 0.6‡C. It is concluded that the harmattan is thermally more stressful than the hot-dry season and that passive thermolability may not be an important mechanism in the Savanna Brown goat in adaptation to thermal stress.

  9. Estimation of whole lemon mass transfer parameters during hot air drying using different modelling methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torki-Harchegani, Mehdi; Ghanbarian, Davoud; Sadeghi, Morteza

    2015-08-01

    To design new dryers or improve existing drying equipments, accurate values of mass transfer parameters is of great importance. In this study, an experimental and theoretical investigation of drying whole lemons was carried out. The whole lemons were dried in a convective hot air dryer at different air temperatures (50, 60 and 75 °C) and a constant air velocity (1 m s-1). In theoretical consideration, three moisture transfer models including Dincer and Dost model, Bi- G correlation approach and conventional solution of Fick's second law of diffusion were used to determine moisture transfer parameters and predict dimensionless moisture content curves. The predicted results were then compared with the experimental data and the higher degree of prediction accuracy was achieved by the Dincer and Dost model.

  10. The evaporative drying of sludge by immersion in hot oil: Effects of oil type and temperature.

    PubMed

    Ohm, Tae-In; Chae, Jong-Seong; Lim, Kwang-Soo; Moon, Seung-Hyun

    2010-06-15

    We investigated the evaporative drying by immersion in hot oil (EDIHO) method for drying sludge. This involved heating oil to a temperature higher than that needed for moisture to be evaporated from the sludge by turbulent heat and mass transfer. We fry-dried sewage and leather plant sludge for 10 min in each of four different oils (waste engine, waste cooking, refined waste, and B-C heavy) and three different temperatures (140 degrees C, 150 degrees C, and 160 degrees C). Drying efficiency was found to be greater for higher temperatures. However, giving consideration to energy efficiency we suggest that the optimal temperature for fry-drying sludge is 150 degrees C. At 150 degrees C, the water content of sewage sludge reduced from 78.9% to between 1.5% (with waste cooking oil) and 3.8% (with waste engine oil). The reduction in water content for leather plant sludge fry-dried at 150 degrees C was from 81.6% to between 1% (with waste cooking oil) and 6.5% (with refined waste oil). The duration of the constant rate-drying period was also influenced by the type of oil used: refined waste oil>waste engine oil>B-C heavy oil>waste cooking oil. The duration at 150 degrees C with waste cooking oil was 3 min for sewage sludge and 2 min for leather plant sludge. It is likely that the drying characteristics of oil are influenced by its thermal properties, including its specific heat, and molecular weight.

  11. The hot dry rock geothermal potential of the Susanville (CA) area

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.W.

    1996-10-01

    A portion of northeastern California that lies within the Basin and Range Province represents a large, untapped geothermal energy resource in the form of hot, but essential impermeable, rock. If a means of developing sufficient permeability in the deep, granitic basement can be demonstrated, the electric power generation potential would be considerable. The objective of this study is to look at the specific geographical region extending from northeast to southeast of the village of Litchfield to the Nevada border as a target area for the first commercial application of Hot Dry Rock reservoir stimulation techniques. The ultimate goal is to provide background information that could lead to the creation of a commercial-scale, engineered geothermal reservoir in granitic basement rock of low permeability.

  12. Candidate sites for future hot-dry-rock development in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, F.; Decker, E.R.

    1982-12-01

    Generalized geologic and other data are tabulated for 24 potential hot dry rock (HDR) sites in the contiguous United States. The data show that HDR resources occur in many geologic and tectonic settings. Potential reservoir rocks at each prospect are described and each system is cateogrized accoridng to inferred heat sources. The Fenton Hill area in New Mexico is discussed in detail because this region may be considered ideal for HDR development. Three other prospectively valuable localities are described: The Geysers-Clear lake region in California, the Roosevelt Hot Springs area in Utah, and the White Mountains region in New Hampshire. These areas are singled out to illustrate the roles of significantly different geology and geophysics, reservoir rocks, and reservoir heat contents in possible HDR developments.

  13. Inert and Reacting Tracers for Reservoir Sizing in Fractured, Hot Dry Rock Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tester, J.W.; Robinson, B.A.; Ferguson, J.H.

    1986-01-21

    Flow characterization and volumetric sizing techniques using tracers in fractured hot dry rock reservoirs are discussed. Statistical methods for analyzing the residence time distribution (RTD) are presented. Tracer modal volumes and RTD shape are correlated with reservoir performance parameters such as active heat transfer area and dispersion levels. Chemically reactive tracers are proposed for mapping advance rates of cooled regions in HDR reservoirs, providing early warning of thermal drawdown. Important reaction rate parameters are identified for screening potential tracers. Current laboratory research and field work is reviewed.

  14. The xerolithic geothermal (``hot dry rock``) energy resource of the United States: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Nunz, G.J.

    1993-07-01

    This report presents revised estimates, based upon the most current geothermal gradient data, of the xerolithic geothermal (``hot dry rock`` or HDR) energy resources of the United States. State-by-state tabular listings are provided of the HDR energy resource base, the accessible resource base, and the potentially useful resource base. The latter further subdivided into components with potential for electricity generation, process heat, and space heat. Comparisons are made with present estimates of fossil fuel reserves. A full-sized geothermal gradient contour map is provided as a supplement in a pocket inside the back cover of the report.

  15. Results from a discrete fracture network model of a Hot Dry Rock system

    SciTech Connect

    Lanyon, G.W.; Batchelor, A.S.; Ledingham, P.

    1993-01-28

    The work described represents a move towards better representations of the natural fracture system. The discrete fracture network model used during the study was the NAPSAC code (Grindrod et al, 1992). The goals of the work were to investigate the application of discrete fracture network models to Hot Dry Rock systems, increase the understanding of the basic thermal extraction process and more specifically the understanding of the Rosemanowes Phase 2B system. The aim in applying the work to the Rosemanowes site was to use the discrete fracture network approach to integrate a diverse set of field measurements into as simple a model as possible.

  16. Development of hot dry rock technology at Hijiori test site: Program for a long-term circulation test

    SciTech Connect

    Tenma, Norio; Iwakiri, Shunichi; Matsunaga, Isao

    1998-10-01

    Since 1985, the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) has continued the development of hot dry rock power generation in Hijiori Hot Dry Rock test site, Yamagata prefecture, Japan, as part of the Sunshine Project and succeeding New Sunshine Project sponsored by the Agency of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), a branch of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI). The objective of this project is to identify the feasibility of a Hot Dry Rock power generation system in Japan. Thus, the research and development being undertaken at Hijiori HDR test site is aiming to establish hot rock drilling technology, logging borehole technology for evaluating the state of the rock around the well, hydraulic fracturing technology for creating artificial fractures in rock, fracture mapping technology for surveying the reservoir area, and reservoir evaluation technology for predicting reservoir longevity.

  17. Economic Predictions for Heat Mining: A Review and Analysis of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Energy Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Tester, Jefferson W.; Herzog, Howard J.

    1990-07-01

    The main objectives of this study were first, to review and analyze several economic assessments of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy systems, and second, to reformulate an economic model for HDR with revised cost components. The economic models reviewed include the following studies sponsored by Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)-Cummings and Morris (1979), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)-Murphy, et al. (1982), United Kingdom (UK)-Shock (1986), Japan-Hori, et al. (1986), Meridian-Entingh (1987) and Bechtel (1988). A general evaluation of the technical feasibility of HDR technology components was also conducted in view of their importance in establishing drilling and reservoir performance parameters required for any economic assessment. In this review, only economic projections for base load electricity produced from HDR systems were considered. Bases of 1989 collars ($) were selected to normalize costs. Following the evaluation of drilling and reservoir performance, power plant choices and cost estimates are discussed in section 6 of the report. In Section 7, the six economics studies cited above are reviewed and compared in terms of their key resource, reservoir and plant performance, and cost assumptions. Based on these comparisons, the report estimates parameters for three composite cases. Important parameters include: (1) resource quality-average geothermal gradient (C/km) and well depth, (2) reservoir performance-effective productivity, flow impedance, and lifetime (thermal drawdown rate), (3) cost components-drilling, reservoir formation, and power plant costs and (4) economic factors-discount and interest rates, taxes, etc. In Section 8, composite case conditions were used to reassess economic projections for HDR-produced electricity. In Section 9, a generalized economic model for HDR-produced electricity is presented to show the effects of resource grade, reservoir performance parameters, and other important factors on projected costs. A

  18. Hot Melt Extrusion and Spray Drying of Co-amorphous Indomethacin-Arginine With Polymers.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Elisabeth; Löbmann, Korbinian; Rades, Thomas; Knop, Klaus; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Co-amorphous drug-amino acid systems have gained growing interest as an alternative to common amorphous formulations which contain polymers as stabilizers. Several preparation methods have recently been investigated, including vibrational ball milling on a laboratory scale or spray drying in a larger scale. In this study, the feasibility of hot melt extrusion for continuous manufacturing of co-amorphous drug-amino acid formulations was examined, challenging the fact that amino acids melt with degradation at high temperatures. Furthermore, the need for an addition of a polymer in this process was evaluated. After a polymer screening via the solvent evaporation method, co-amorphous indomethacin-arginine was prepared by a melting-solvent extrusion process without and with copovidone. The obtained products were characterized with respect to their solid-state properties, non-sink dissolution behavior, and stability. Results were compared to those of spray-dried formulations with the same compositions and to spray-dried indomethacin-copovidone. Overall, stable co-amorphous systems could be prepared by extrusion without or with copovidone, which exhibited comparable molecular interaction properties to the respective spray-dried products, while phase separation was detected by differential scanning calorimetry in several cases. The formulations containing indomethacin in combination with arginine and copovidone showed enhanced dissolution behavior over the formulations with only copovidone or arginine.

  19. Summary of talks third annual hot dry rock geothermal information conference

    SciTech Connect

    Gaddy, James

    1980-10-29

    Three basic comparisons can be made between weapon system development and energy system development in the US--driving factors, system lifetime, and development time. Weapon system development and response is determined by a perceived threat to national security. Because the threat can change radically in this high technology atmosphere, weapon systems are usually designed for a 5 to 20 year lifetime. Development time from idea to capability is about 20 years on the average. In contrast, energy system development has been influenced by economics--demand, supply, return on investment--until the recent threat created by our dependence on oil. Energy systems are expected to operate 20 to 50 years and even longer. Development time is correspondingly long, i.e., 40 years from idea to large-scale use. The US needs to adopt a ''defense-oriented'' approach to protect its threatened energy security. Geothermal energy from hot dry rock is a new concept. The Hot Dry Rock Program is designed to minimize development time and may become a prime example of how a recognized threat to energy security can be answered by combined government/industry effort.

  20. Hot dry rock geothermal energy for U.S. electric utilities. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    In order to bring an electric utility component into the study of hot dry rock geothermal energy called for in the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), EPRI organized a one-day conference in Philadelphia on January 14,1993. The conference was planned as the first day of a two-day sequence, by coordinating with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These two federal agencies were charged under EPAct with the development of a report on the potential for hot dry rock geothermal energy production in the US, especially the eastern US. The USGS was given lead responsibility for a report to be done in association with DOE. The EPRI conference emphasized first the status of technology development and testing in the U.S. and abroad, i.e., in western Europe, Russia and Japan. The conference went on to address the extent of knowledge regarding the resource base in the US, especially in the eastern half of the country, and then to address some practical business aspects of organizing projects or industries that could bring these resources into use, either for thermal applications or for electric power generation.

  1. Irradiation Maintains Functional Components of Dry Hot Peppers (Capsicum annuum L.) under Ambient Storage

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Qumer; Amjad, Muhammad; Asi, Muhammad Rafique; Nawaz, Aamir; Khan, Samiya Mahmood; Ariño, Agustin; Ahmad, Tanveer

    2016-01-01

    Hot peppers used as natural flavoring and coloring agents are usually irradiated in prepacked form for decontamination. The effects of gamma radiation on the stability of functional components such as capsaicinoids and antioxidant compounds (carotenoids, ascorbic acid and total phenolics) were investigated in hot peppers (Capsicum annuum). Whole dried peppers packed in polyethylene bags were gamma irradiated at 0 (control), 2, 4, and 6 kGy and subsequently stored at 25 °C for 90 days. The irradiation dose did not substantially affect the initial contents of capsaicinoids, ascorbic acid and total phenolics, though the concentration of carotenoids declined by 8% from the control (76.9 mg/100 g) to 6 kGy radiation dose (70.7 mg/100 g). Similarly, during storage for 90 days at ambient temperature the concentrations of capsaicinoids and total phenolics remained fairly stable with mean percent reductions from 3.3% to 4.2%, while the levels of total carotenoids and ascorbic acid significantly (p < 0.05) declined by 12% and 14%, respectively. Overall, neither irradiation nor subsequent ambient storage could appreciably influence the contents of functional components in hot peppers. These results revealed that gamma irradiation up to 6 kGy can be safely used for decontamination to meet the needs for overseas markets without compromising product quality. PMID:28231158

  2. Effectiveness of sanitizers, dry heat, hot water, and gas catalytic infrared heat treatments to inactivate Salmonella on almonds.

    PubMed

    Bari, Md Latiful; Nei, Daisuke; Sotome, Itaru; Nishina, Ikuo; Isobe, Seiichi; Kawamoto, Shinnichi

    2009-10-01

    The majority of almond-related foodborne outbreaks have been associated with Salmonella. Therefore, it is necessary to find an effective method to inactivate these organisms on raw almond prior to market distribution. This study was conducted to assess the effectiveness of sanitizers (strong or mild electrolyzed water, ozonated water, and distilled water), dry heat treatment, and hot water treatments followed by catalytic infrared (IR) heat treatment to inactivate Salmonella populations on raw almond. Raw almonds inoculated with four-strain cocktails of Salmonella were treated either by soaking in different chemical sanitizers or with dry heat and/or hot water for various periods of time followed by catalytic IR heat treatment for 70 seconds. The treated seeds were then assessed for the efficacy of the treatment in reducing populations of the pathogens. After inoculation and air-drying, 5.73 +/- 0.12 log colony-forming units (CFU)/g Salmonella were detected in nonselective medium. Sanitizer treatment alone did not show significant reduction in the Salmonella population, but in combination with IR drying it reduced the population to 3.0 log CFU/g. Dry heating at 60 degrees C for 4 days followed by IR drying for 70 seconds reduced the Salmonella population an additional 1.0 log CFU/g. Hot water treatments at 85 degrees C for 40 seconds followed by IR drying for 70 seconds reduced pathogens to an undetectable level by direct plating, but not by enrichment.

  3. Precision directional drilling of hot-dry-rock geothermal production well EE-3

    SciTech Connect

    Carden, R.S.; Rowley, J.C.; Helmick, C.

    1982-01-01

    The deviated directional drilling of the hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal production well EE-3 (Energy Extraction No. 3) was successfully completed on August 1981. The injection well, EE-2, previously had been drilled with its lower part at an inclination of 35/sup 0/ to the vertical. It reached an on-line depth of 15,292 feet and its bottom-hole temperature was 608/sup 0/F (320/sup 0/C). The production well EE-3 was required to be drilled 1200 feet (370 m) above and parallel to the injection well. This necessitated high precision, controlled-trajectory directional drilling operations. The directional drilling of EE-3 was accomplished within the required tolerances at a depth of 13,933 feet and a bottom-hole temperature of 580/sup 0/F (280/sup 0/C).

  4. Technology Solutions Case Study: High-Performance Ducts in Hot-Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect

    M. Hoeschele, A. German, E. Weitzel, R. Chitwood

    2015-08-01

    Ducts in conditioned space (DCS) represent a high priority measure for moving the next generation of new homes to the Zero Net Energy performance level. Various strategies exist for incorporating ducts within the conditioned thermal envelope. To support this activity, in 2013 the Pacific Gas & Electric Company initiated a project with Davis Energy Group (lead for the Building America team, Alliance for Residential Building Innovation) to solicit builder involvement in California to participate in field demonstrations of various DCS strategies. Builders were given incentives and design support in exchange for providing site access for construction observation, diagnostic testing, and builder survey feedback. Information from the project was designed to feed into California's 2016 Title 24 process, but also to serve as an initial mechanism to engage builders in more high performance construction strategies. This Building America project complemented information collected in the California project with BEopt simulations of DCS performance in hot/dry climate regions.

  5. Hot dry rock resources of the Clear Lake Area, Northern California

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, K.L.

    1994-10-01

    The Geysers-Clear Lake geothermal area of northern California is underlain by an asthenospheric upwarp. The upwarp was generated at a slabless window trailing the northward-moving Mendocino triple junction. The geothermal area lies immediately east of the Rodgers Creek rather than the San Andreas fault because of a transform jump in progress. Decompression melting of the mantle has led to basaltic underplating, and crustal anatexis. The high heat flow is due to conduction through a thin lithosphere and the latent heat of solidifying basalt, while the uniformity is due to the distribution of sources over a wide area of large flatlying sills, The Hot Dry Rock resource has heat flow exceeding 4 HFU over an area exceeding 800 km2.

  6. Investigation of a shallow aquifer near the Fenton Hill hot dry rock site using DC resistivity

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, C.F.

    1981-10-01

    A shallow aquifer in the base of the Tertiary volcanic sequence was investigated using a series of 9 DC Schlumberger soundings taken within 10 km of the Fenton Hill hot dry rock geothermal site. The aquifer dips to the southwest following the top of the Abo formation, which acts as an aquiclude. Depth increases from 130 m in the eastern part of the study area to 260 m at 1.5 km west of the Fenton Hill site. Aquifer resistivities varied from 13..cap omega..-m to 126..cap omega..-m, which could be caused by variable permeability in the aquifer. Using results from empirical studies permeabilities ranging from 40 darcies to less than 0.3 darcies were estimated with the highest values occurring nearest to the Fenton Hill site.

  7. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 2; Builders and Buyers Handbook for Improving New Home Efficiency, Comfort, and Durability in the Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-01

    This guidebook is a resource to help builders large and small build high-quality, energy-efficient homes that achieve 30% energy savings in space conditioning and water heating in the hot-dry and mixed-dry climates.

  8. Performance of a Hot-Dry Climate Whole-House Retrofit

    SciTech Connect

    Weitzel, E.; German, A.; Porse, E.

    2014-06-01

    The Stockton house retrofit is a two-story tudor style single family deep retrofit in the hot-dry climate of Stockton, CA. The home is representative of a deep retrofit option of the scaled home energy upgrade packages offered to targeted neighborhoods under the pilot Large-Scale Retrofit Program (LSRP) administered by the Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI). Deep retrofit packages expand on the standard package by adding HVAC, water heater and window upgrades to the ducting, attic and floor insulation, domestic hot water insulation, envelope sealing, lighting and ventilation upgrades. Site energy savings with the deep retrofit were 23% compared to the pre-retrofit case, and 15% higher than the savings estimated for the standard retrofit package. Energy savings were largely a result of the water heater upgrade, and a combination of the envelope sealing, insulation and HVAC upgrade. The HVAC system was of higher efficiency than the building code standard. Overall the financed retrofit would have been more cost effective had a less expensive HVAC system been selected and barriers to wall insulation remedied. The homeowner experienced improved comfort throughout the monitored period and was satisfied with the resulting utility bill savings.

  9. Performance of a Hot-Dry Climate Whole-House Retrofit

    SciTech Connect

    Weitzel, E.; German, A.; Porse, E.

    2014-06-01

    The Stockton house retrofit is a two-story Tudor style single family deep retrofit in the hot-dry climate of Stockton, CA. The home is representative of a deep retrofit option of the scaled home energy upgrade packages offered to targeted neighborhoods under the pilot Large-Scale Retrofit Program (LSRP) administered by the Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI). Deep retrofit packages expand on the standard package by adding HVAC, water heater and window upgrades to the ducting, attic and floor insulation, domestic hot water insulation, envelope sealing, lighting and ventilation upgrades. Site energy savings with the deep retrofit were 23% compared to the pre-retrofit case, and 15% higher than the savings estimated for the standard retrofit package. Energy savings were largely a result of the water heater upgrade, and a combination of the envelope sealing, insulation and HVAC upgrade. The HVAC system was of higher efficiency than the building code standard. Overall the financed retrofit would have been more cost effective had a less expensive HVAC system been selected and barriers to wall insulation remedied. The homeowner experienced improved comfort throughout the monitored period and was satisfied with the resulting utility bill savings.

  10. Late Jurassic weather forecast, Four Corners area: Dry, hot, and partly sunny

    SciTech Connect

    Turner-Peterson, C.E.; Fishman, N.S. )

    1989-09-01

    Interfingering between members of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation and inferences based on their various environments of deposition permit interpretation of a persistent paleoclimate during the Late Jurassic in the Colorado Plateau region. Paleoclimate interpretation is based on evaporites in the Tidwell member, at the base of the Morrison; eolian deposits in the Recapture and Bluff Sandstone members; and saline, alkaline-lake deposits (which indicate high evaporation rates) in the Brushy Basin member at the top of the Morrison. Interfingering of these members with all other members of the Morrison Formation implies that a semiarid to arid climate was likely throughout Morrison time. The semiarid to arid interpretation is consistent with the global climatic zone inferred from the paleogeographic/paleotectonic setting. The Four Corners area during the Late Jurassic was in the middle latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere and thus was affected by prevailing westerly winds. A magmatic arc located several hundred kilometers to the west of the Morrison depositional basin may have caused a broad rain-shadow effect, which contributed to a dry continental climate downwind. A typical Late Jurassic day in the Four Corners area is predicted to have been hot and dry, although seasonally heavy rains probably fed intermittent streams that transported sediments into the region. Explosive eruptions of silicic volcanic ash may have darkened the skies episodically, and thus partly sunny would have been a conservative forecast.

  11. Petrologic considerations for hot dry rock geothermal site selection in the Clear Lake Region, California

    SciTech Connect

    Stimac, J.; Goff, F. ); Hearn, B.C. Jr. )

    1992-01-01

    The Clear Lake area is well known for anomalous heat flow, thermal springs, hydrothermal mineral deposits, and Quaternary volcanism. These factors, along with the apparent lack of a large reservoir of geothermal fluid north of Collayomi fault make the Clear Lake area an attractive target for hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal development. Petrologic considerations provide some constraints on site selection for HDR development. Spatial and temporal trends in volcanism in the Coast Ranges indicate that magmatism has migrated to the north with time, paralleling passage of the Mendocino triple junction and propagation of the San Andreas fault. Volcanism in the region may have resulted from upwelling of hot asthenosphere along the southern margin of the subducted segment of the Gorda plate. Spatial and temporal trends of volcanism within the Clear Lake volcanic field are similar to larger-scale trends of Neogene volcanism in the Cost Ranges. Volcanism (especially for silicic compositions) shows a general migration to the north over the {approximately}2 Ma history of the field, with the youngest two silicic centers located at Mt. Konocti and Borax Lake. The Mt. Konocti system (active from {approximately} 0.6 to 0.3 Ma) was large and long-lived, whereas the Borax Lake system is much smaller but younger (0.09 Ma). Remnants of silicic magma bodies under Mt. Konocti may be in the latter stages of cooling, whereas a magma body centered under Borax Lake may be in the early stages of development. The existence of an upper crustal silicic magma body of under Borax Lake has yet to be demonstrated by passive geophysics, however, subsurface temperatures in the area as high (> 200{degrees}C at 2000 m) as those beneath the Mt. Konocti area. Based on petrologic considerations alone, the Mt. Konocti-Borax Lake area appears to be the most logical choice for HDR geothermal development in the region.

  12. Hot air drying characteristics of mango ginger: Prediction of drying kinetics by mathematical modeling and artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Thirupathihalli Pandurangappa Krishna; Manohar, Balaraman

    2014-12-01

    Mango ginger (Curcuma amada) was dried in a through-flow dryer system at different temperatures (40-70 °C) and air velocities (0.84 - 2.25 m/s) to determine the effect of drying on drying rate and effective diffusivity. As the temperature and air velocity increased, drying time significantly decreased. Among the ten different thin layer drying models considered to determine the kinetic drying parameters, semi empirical Midilli et al., model gave the best fit for all drying conditions. Effective moisture diffusivity varied from 3.7 × 10(-10) m(2)/s to 12.5 × 10(-10) m(2)/s over the temperature and air velocity range of study. Effective moisture diffusivity regressed well with Arrhenius model and activation energy of the model was found to be 32.6 kJ/mol. Artificial neural network modeling was also employed to predict the drying behaviour and found suitable to describe the drying kinetics with very high correlation coefficient of 0.998.

  13. [Soil labile organic carbon contents and their allocation characteristics under different land uses at dry-hot valley].

    PubMed

    Tang, Guo-yong; Li, Kun; Sun, Yong-yu; Zhang, Chun-hua

    2010-05-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC), readily oxidation organic carbon (ROC), microbial biomass carbon (MBC)and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) contents and their allocation ratios were comparatively investigated under Leucaena leucocephala woodland, Acacia auriculiformis woodland, dry cropland and wasteland in dry-hot valley. Results showed that SOC contents were not significant differences among the four land uses with the range of 4.22-5.19 g x kg(-1). ROC contents under L. leucocephala (2.14 g x kg(-1)) and A. auriculiformis woodland (2.03 g x kg(-1)) were both significantly higher than those under dry cropland (1.38 g x kg(-1)) and wasteland (1.34 g x kg(-1)). The highest MBC and DOC contents both presented under dry cropland among the four land uses, whereas the lowest occurred under wasteland. ROC allocation ratios under woodlands were 1.3 to 1.6 times to those under dry cropland and wasteland. MBC and DOC allocation ratios under cropland were higher than those under other three land uses, and the ratios were closely among woodlands and wasteland. Plant residue amounts and management were primarily determined ROC contents, and soil water content and plant residue quantity were mainly affected the variation of MBC and DOC contents under the four land uses. The change of ROC contents could sensitively indicate SOC dynamics in dry-hot valley, but the change of MBC or DOC could not.

  14. Stimulation of a hot dry rock geothermal reservoir in the Cornubian Granite, England

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, A.S.

    1982-01-01

    A hot dry rock geothermal reservoir has been created at a depth of 2000 m in granite. The stimulation was carried out using 40,000 m/sup 3/ (10 million US gal) from a 350 m open hole section that had been treated with a purpose-designed explosive tool. On-line seismic mapping has shown that the reservoir has developed in the direction of the maximum principal stress despite the fact tht the joint directions are not orientated in that direction. Photographic and television inspection has been used to correlate acoustic seisviewer and conventional wire logging results including observations of fracture width at the wellbore during pressurization. Downward growth of the reservoir has been observed despite the fact that the stimulation fluid was fresh water. This has been explained tentatively as predominantly shear growth because the shear stress gradient is sub-hydrostatic due to the highly anisotropic stress field. Preliminary calculations have shown that the reservoir structure has a volume of 100 to 200 million m/sup 3/ but there is no direct, low resistance flow path between the wells and the residence time is in excess of 5 days.

  15. Characterization and performance assessment of solid dispersions prepared by hot melt extrusion and spray drying process.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Anjali M; Dudhedia, Mayur S; Patel, Ashwinkumar D; Raikes, Michelle S

    2013-11-30

    The present study investigated effect of manufacturing methods such as hot melt extrusion (HME) and spray drying (SD) on physicochemical properties, manufacturability, physical stability and product performance of solid dispersion. Solid dispersions of compound X and PVP VA64 (1:2) when prepared by SD and HME process were amorphous by polarized light microscopy, powder X-ray diffractometry, and modulated differential scanning calorimetry analyses with a single glass transition temperature. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopic analyses revealed similar molecular level interactions between compound X and PVP VA64 as evident by overlapping FT-IR and FT Raman spectra in SD and HME solid dispersions. The compactibility, tabletability, disintegration and dissolution performance were similar for solid dispersions prepared by both processing techniques. Differences in material properties such as surface area, morphological structure, powder densities, and flow characteristics were observed between SD and HME solid dispersion. The SD solid dispersion was physically less stable compared to HME solid dispersion under accelerated stability conditions. Findings from this study suggest that similar product performance could be obtained if the molecular properties of the solid dispersion processed by two different techniques are similar. However differences in material properties might affect the physical stability of the solid dispersions.

  16. Hot dry rock geothermal energy development program. Annual report, fiscal year 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.C.; Nunz, G.J.; Ponder, G.M.

    1983-09-01

    Emphasis in the Hot Dry Rock Program was on development of methods to produce the hydraulic fractures required to connect the deep, inclined wells of the Phase II system at Fenton Hill. Environmental surveillance, instrument development, laboratory and modeling studies, and other supporting activities were continued. After two unsuccessful attempts to fracture hydraulically through inflatable packers, formation breakdown was produced in an uncased section near the bottom of well EE-2 by pumping water through a cemented-in steel liner. Breakdon occurred at a wellhead pressure of 33.1 MPa and a total of 8539 m/sup 3/ of water was injected. Mapping of source locations of microseismic events indicated opening of an extensive set of planar features dipping about 40/sup 0/W, striking about N20/sup 0/W, and apparently passing beneath the bottom of well EE-3. An attempt was then made to fracture at a higher level where the relative positions of the two wells increased the probability that an inclined fracture would connect them. Repeated failures of drill pipe, tubing, couplings, and packers terminated most pumping experiments prematurely. Important advances were made in thermal protection of downhole instruments, real-time mapping source locations of microseismic signals, modeling of heat and mass transport, and the mechanics of hydraulic fracturing.

  17. Surface water supply for the Clearlake, California Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Project

    SciTech Connect

    Jager, A.R.

    1996-03-01

    It is proposed to construct a demonstration Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal plant in the vicinity of the City of Clearlake. An interim evaluation has been made of the availability of surface water to supply the plant. The evaluation has required consideration of the likely water consumption of such a plant. It has also required consideration of population, land, and water uses in the drainage basins adjacent to Clear Lake, where the HDR demonstration project is likely to be located. Five sources were identified that appear to be able to supply water of suitable quality in adequate quantity for initial filling of the reservoir, and on a continuing basis, as makeup for water losses during operation. Those sources are California Cities Water Company, a municipal supplier to the City of Clearlake; Clear Lake, controlled by Yolo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District; Borax Lake, controlled by a local developer; Southeast Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant, controlled by Lake County; and wells, ponds, and streams on private land. The evaluation involved the water uses, water rights, stream flows, precipitation, evaporation, a water balance, and water quality. In spite of California`s prolonged drought, the interim conclusion is that adequate water is available at a reasonable cost to supply the proposed HDR demonstration project.

  18. Hot Dry Rock geothermal energy--- A new energy agenda for the twenty-first century

    SciTech Connect

    Tester, J.W.; Brown, D.W.; Potter, R.M.

    1989-07-01

    Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy, which utilizes the natural heat contained in the earth's crust, can provide a widely available source of nonpolluting energy. It can help mitigate the continued warming of the earth through the ''greenhouse effect,'' and the accelerating destruction of forests and crops by acid rain, two of the major environmental consequences of our ever-increasing use of fossil fuels for heating and power generation. In addition, HDR, as a readily available source of indigenous energy, can reduce our nation's dependence on imported oil, enhancing national security and reducing our trade deficit. The earth's heat represents an almost unlimited source of energy that can begin to be exploited within the next decade through the HDR heat-mining concept being actively developed in the United States and in several other countries. On a national scale, we can begin to develop this new energy source, using it directly for geothermal power or indirectly in hybrid geothermal/fossil-fueled systems, in diverse applications such as: baseload power generation, direct heat use, feedwater heating in conventional power plants, and pumped storage/load leveling power generation. This report describes the nature of the HDR resource and the technology required to implement the heat-mining concept in several applications. An assessment of the requirements for establishing HDR feasibility is presented in the context of providing a commercially competitive energy source. 37 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Shrinkage modeling of concrete reinforced by palm fibres in hot dry environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akchiche, Hamida; Kriker, Abdelouahed

    2017-02-01

    The cement materials, such as concrete and conventional mortar present very little resistance to traction and cracking, these hydraulic materials which induces large withdrawals on materials and cracks in structures. The hot dry environments such as: the Saharan regions of Algeria, Indeed, concrete structures in these regions are very fragile, and present high shrinkage. Strengthening of these materials by fibers can provide technical solutions for improving the mechanical performance. The aim of this study is firstly, to reduce the shrinkage of conventional concrete with its reinforcement with date palm fibers. In fact, Algeria has an extraordinary resources in natural fibers (from Palm, Abaca, Hemp) but without valorization in practical areas, especially in building materials. Secondly, to model the shrinkage behavior of concrete was reinforced by date palm fibers. In the literature, several models for still fiber concrete were founded but few are offers for natural fiber concretes. To do so, a still fiber concretes model of YOUNG - CHERN was used. According to the results, a reduction of shrinkage with reinforcement by date palm fibers was showed. A good ability of molding of shrinkage of date palm reinforced concrete with YOUNG - CHERN Modified model was obtained. In fact, a good correlation between experimental data and the model data was recorded.

  20. Remediation of muddy tidal flat sediments using hot air-dried crushed oyster shells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tamiji; Kondo, Shunsuke; Kim, Kyung-Hoi; Asaoka, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Hironori; Tokuoka, Makoto; Hibino, Tadashi

    2012-11-01

    In order to prove that hot air-dried crushed oyster shells (HACOS) are effective in reducing hydrogen sulfide in muddy tidal flat sediments and increasing the biomass, field experiments were carried out. The concentration of hydrogen sulfide in the interstitial water, which was 16 mg SL(-1) before the application of HACOS, decreased sharply and maintained almost zero in the experimental sites (HACOS application sites) for one year, whereas it was remained at ca. 5 mg SL(-1) in the control sites. The number of macrobenthos individuals increased to 2-4.5 times higher than that in the control site. Using a simple numerical model, the effective periods for suppression of hydrogen sulfide were estimated to be 3.2-7.6 and 6.4-15.2 years for the experimental sites with 4 and 8 tons per 10 × 10 × 0.2m area, respectively. From these results, it is concluded that HACOS is an effective material to remediate muddy tidal flats.

  1. Environmental studies conducted at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock geothermal development site

    SciTech Connect

    Miera, F.R. Jr.; Langhorst, G.; McEllin, S.; Montoya, C.

    1984-05-01

    An environmental investigation of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal development was conducted at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, during 1976-1979. Activities at the Fenton Hill Site included an evaluation of baseline data for biotic and abiotic ecosystem components. Identification of contaminants produced by HDR processes that had the potential for reaching the surrounding environment is also discussed. Three dominant vegetative communities were identified in the vicinity of the site. These included grass-forb, aspen, and mixed conifer communities. The grass-forb area was identified as having the highest number of species encountered, with Phleum pratense and Dactylis glomerata being the dominant grass species. Frequency of occurrence and mean coverage values are also given for other species in the three main vegetative complexes. Live trapping of small mammals was conducted to determine species composition, densities, population, and diversity estimates for this component of the ecosystem. The data indicate that Peromyscus maniculatus was the dominant species across all trapping sites during the study. Comparisons of relative density of small mammals among the various trapping sites show the grass-forb vegetative community to have had the highest overall density. Comparisons of small mammal diversity for the three main vegetative complexes indicate that the aspen habitat had the highest diversity and the grass-forb habitat had the lowest. Analyses of waste waters from the closed circulation loop indicate that several trace contaminants (e.g., arsenic, cadmium, fluoride, boron, and lithium) were present at concentrations greater than those reported for surface waters of the region.

  2. Impact of an extreme dry and hot summer on water supply security in an alpine region.

    PubMed

    Vanham, D; Fleischhacker, E; Rauch, W

    2009-01-01

    Climate change will induce an increasing drought risk in western and southern Europe and a resulting increase in water stress. This paper investigates the impact of both the extreme hot and dry summer of 2003 and the PRUDENCE CHRM climate change scenario summer for 2071-2100 on the monthly water balance (available water resources versus water demand) within the Kitzbueheler Region in the Austrian Alps. As a baseline period the climate normal period from 1961 to 1990 was chosen. In both summer scenarios total flow and ground water recharge decrease substantially, due to the decrease in precipitation and increase in evapotranspiration However, regional water availability is still sufficient to serve all water demand stakeholders. As a result of decreased snow cover duration, flow seasonality changes within the CHRM scenario. Especially springs are very vulnerable to these climatological conditions; average local groundwater recharge is reduced by 20% up to 70% within both scenarios. Due to the hydrogeological characteristics of the case study area and the typical small structured alpine water supply infrastructure, local deficits can occur. But also groundwater aquifers in the valleys show a decrease in water availability. These results are supported by observations made in 2003 throughout Austria and Switzerland.

  3. Building America Best Practices Series, Volume 9: Builders Challenge Guide to 40% Whole-House Energy Savings in the Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Baechler, Michael C.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Hefty, Marye G.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Ruiz, Kathleen A.; Bartlett, Rosemarie; Love, Pat M.

    2009-10-23

    This best practices guide is the ninth in a series of guides for builders produced by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America Program. This guide book is a resource to help builders design and construct homes that are among the most energy-efficient available, while addressing issues such as building durability, indoor air quality, and occupant health, safety, and comfort. With the measures described in this guide, builders in the hot-dry and mixed-dry climates can achieve homes that have whole house energy savings of 40% over the Building America benchmark (a home built to mid-1990s building practices roughly equivalent to the 1993 Model Energy Code) with no added overall costs for consumers. These best practices are based on the results of research and demonstration projects conducted by Building America’s research teams. The guide includes information for managers, designers, marketers, site supervisors, and subcontractors, as well as case studies of builders who are successfully building homes that cut energy use by 40% in the hot-dry and mixed-dry climates.

  4. Body heat storage during intermittent work in hot-dry and warm-wet environments.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Jill M; Wright, Heather E; Hardcastle, Stephen G; Kenny, Glen P

    2012-10-01

    We examined heat balance using an American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists threshold limit value allocated exercise protocol in hot-dry (HD; 46 °C, 10% relative humidity (RH)) and warm-wet (WW; 33 °C, 60% RH) environments of equivalent WBGT (29 °C) for different clothing ensembles. Whole-body heat exchange and changes in body heat content (ΔH(b)) were measured using simultaneous direct whole-body and indirect calorimetry. Eight males performed six 15-min cycling periods at a constant rate of metabolic heat production (360 W) interspersed by 5-min rest periods for six experimental trials: HD and WW environments for a seminude control (CON), modified work uniform (MWU, moisture permeable top and work pants), and standard work uniform (SWU, work coveralls and cotton undergarments). Whole-body evaporative and dry heat exchange, rectal temperature (T(re)), and heart rate were measured continuously. The cumulative ΔH(b) during the 2 h intermittent exercise protocol was similar between HD and WW environments for each of the clothing ensembles (CON, 387 ± 55 vs. 435 ± 49 kJ; MWU, 485 ± 58 vs. 531 ± 61 kJ; SWU, 585 ± 74 vs. 660 ± 54 kJ, respectively). Similarly, no differences in T(re) (CON, 37.67 ± 0.07 vs. 37.48 ± 0.08 °C; MWU, 37.73 ± 0.08 vs. 37.53 ± 0.09 °C; SWU, 38.01 ± 0.09 vs. 37.94 ± 0.05 °C) or heat rate (CON, 93 ± 3 vs. 84 ± 3 beats·min⁻¹; MWU, 102 ± 5 vs. 95 ± 9 beats·min⁻¹; SWU, 119 ± 8 vs. 110 ± 9 beats·min⁻¹) were observed at the end of the 2 h intermittent exercise protocol in HD vs. WW environments, respectively. We showed similar levels of thermal and cardiovascular strain for intermittent work performed in high heat stress conditions of varying environmental conditions but similar WBGT.

  5. Orientation of minimum principal stress in the hot dry rock geothermal reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, K.L.

    1991-01-01

    The stress field at the source of microearthquakes in the interior of the hot dry rock geothermal reservoir at Fenton Hill appears to be different to the far field stress outside the reservoir. The stress field seems to be re-oriented prior to failure, during the course of processes that inflate the reservoir. The state of stress, both inside and outside, the hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal reservoir at Fenton Hill, is important in predicting the course of stress-dependent processes, and in transferring HDR technology developed at Fenton Hill, to sites, such as at Clearlake in California, where the stress field is expected to be substantially different. The state of stress at Fenton Hill is not well known because of limitations in stress measuring technology. It is necessary to use a variety of indirect methods and seek an estimate of the stress. 5 refs.

  6. Hot dry rock geothermal energy -- a renewable energy resource that is ready for development now

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.W.; Potter, R.M.; Myers, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    Hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy, which utilizes the natural heat contained in the earth's crust, is a very large and well-distributed resource of nonpolluting, and essentially renewable, energy that is available globally. Its use could help mitigate climatic change and reduce acid rain, two of the major environmental consequences of our ever-increasing use of fossil fuels for heating and power generation. In addition, HDR, as a readily available source of indigenous energy, can reduce our nations's dependence on imported oil, enhancing national security and reducing our trade deficit. The earth's heat represents an almost unlimited source of energy that can begin to be exploited within the next decade through the HDR heat-mining concept being actively developed in the United States, Great Britain, Japan, and several other countries. On a national scale we can begin to develop this new source, using it directly for power generation or for direct-heat applications, or indirectly in hybrid geothermal/fossil-fuel power plants. In the HDR concept, which has been demonstrated in the field in two different applications and flow- tested for periods up to one year, heat is recovered from the earth by pressurized water in a closed-loop circulation system. As a consequence, minimal effluents are released to the atmosphere, and no wastes are produced. This paper describes the nature of the HDR resource and the technology required to implement the heat-mining concept. An assessment of the requirements for establishing HDR feasibility is presented in the context of providing a commercially competitive energy source.

  7. Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program. Annual report, fiscal year 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Cremer, G.M.; Duffield, R.B.; Smith, M.C.; Wilson, M.G.

    1980-08-01

    The Fenton Hill Project is still the principal center for developing methods, equipment, and instrumentation for creating and utilizing HDR geothermal reservoirs. The search for a second site for a similar experimental system in a different geological environment has been intensified, as have the identification and characterization of other HDR areas that may prove suitable for either experimental or commercial development. The Phase I fracture system was enlarged during FY79. Drilling of the injection well of the Phase II system began at Fenton Hill in April 1979. Environmental monitoring of the Fenton Hill area continued through FY79. The environmental studies indicate that the hot dry rock operations have caused no significant environmental impact. Other supporting activities included rock physics, rock mechanics, fracture mapping, and instrumentation development. Two closely related activities - evaluation of the potential HDR energy resource of the US and the selection of a site for development of a second experimental heat-extraction system generally similar to that at Fenton Hill - have resulted in the collection of geology, hydrology, and heat-flow data on some level of field activity in 30 states. The resource-evaluation activity included reconnaissance field studies and a listing and preliminary characterization of US geothermal areas in which HDR energy extraction methods may be applicable. The selection of Site 2 has taken into account such legal, institutional, and economic factors as land ownership and use, proximity to possible users, permitting and licensing requirements and procedures, environmental issues, areal extent of the geothermal area, and visibility to and apparent interest by potential industrial developers.

  8. Quartz dissolution and silica deposition in hot-dry-rock geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, B.A.

    1982-07-01

    The kinetics of quartz dissolution control the produced fluid dissolved silica concentration in geothermal systems in which the downhole residence time is finite. The produced fluid of the Phase I, Run Segment 5 experimental Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal system at Fenton Hill, NM, was undersaturated with respect to quartz in one pass through the reservoir, suggesting that the rate of granite dissolution governed the outlet dissolved silica concentration in this system. The literature data for the rate of quartz dissolution in water from 65 to 625/sup 0/C is correlated using an empirical rate law which is first order in quartz surface area and degree of undersaturation of the fluid. The Arrhenius plot (ln k vs T/sup -1/) is linear over eight orders of magnitude of the rate constant, verifying the validity of the proposed rate expression. Carefully performed quartz dissolution experiments in the present study duplicated the literature data and completed the data base in the temperature range from 150 to 250/sup 0/C. Identical experiments using crushed granite indicate that the rate of quartz dissolution in the presence of granite could be as much as 1 to 2 orders of magnitude faster than the rates observed in the pure quartz experiments. A temperature dependent HDR reservoir model incorporates the quartz dissolution rate law to simulate the dissolved silica behavior during the Fenton Hill Run Segment 5 experiment. For this low-permeability, fracture-dominated reservoir, the assumptions of one-dimensional plug flow through a vertically-inclined rectangular fracture and one-dimensional rock heat conduction perpendicular to the direction of flow are employed. These simplifications lead to an analytical solution for the temperature field in the reservoir.

  9. Hot dry rock geothermal energy development program: Annual operating plan, fiscal year 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, P.R.; Hendron, R.H.; Murphy, H.D.

    1988-09-01

    With completion of the repairs of EE-2 wellbore in FY88, the major effort in FY89 will be directed toward the remaining preparations for the Long-Term Flow Test (LTFT) now scheduled to begin in September 1990. Procurement of components and equipment and installation of the surface system will continue through this and the next fiscal year to be ready for the LTFT in September 1990. Reservoir experiments will consist of pressurization and flow tests to establish further characteristics of the Phase II reservoir, particularly operating water losses. Laboratory studies will continue work on fracture healing and complete adsorption tests for chemically-reactive tracer work. Cleaning and relining of the EE-I pond to meet New Mexico State requirements, started in FY88, will be completed. Reanalysis of seismic data and automation of seismic data techniques will continue. Monitoring for environmental information, routine operations, security, health and safety training, and reporting activities will continue. The program's objectives are: (1) To develop HDR drilling, hardware and instrumentation technology for energy extraction and conduct a successful energy extraction field experiment of the Phase II reservoir. (2) To verify that the environmental consequences of HDR development are acceptable. (3) To improve HDR technology to the point where electricity could be produced commercially from a substantial number of known hot dry rock resource sites in a cost range of 5 to 8 cents/kWh. (4) To evaluate the performance of the Fenton Hill Phase II reservoir by 1992. That performance consists of system operating characteristics, including thermal drawdown, energy output, reservoir impedance, and water consumption.

  10. Hot dry rock geothermal energy development program. Annual report, fiscal year 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Cremer, G.M.

    1981-07-01

    Investigation and flow testing of the enlarged Phase I heat-extraction system at Fenton Hill continued throughout FY80. Temperature drawdown observed at that time indicated an effective fracture of approximately 40,000 to 60,000 m/sup 2/. In May 1980, hot dry rock (HDR) technology was used to produce electricity in an interface demonstration experiment at Fenton Hill. A 60-kVA binary-cycle electrical generator was installed in the Phase I surface system and heat from about 3 kg/s of geothermal fluid at 132/sup 0/C was used to boil Freon R-114, whose vapor drove a turboalternator. A Phase II system was designed and is now being constructed at Fenton Hill that should approach commercial requirements. Borehole EE-2, the injection well, was completed on May 12, 1980. It was drilled to a vertical depth of about 4500 m, where the rock temperature is approximately 320/sup 0/C. The production well, EE-3 had been drilled to a depth of 3044 m and drilling was continuing. Environmental monitoring of Fenton Hill site continued. Development of equipment, instruments, and materials for technical support at Fenton Hill continued during FY80. Several kinds of models were also developed to understand the behavior of the Phase I system and to develop a predictive capability for future systems. Data from extensive resource investigations were collected, analyzed, and assembled into a geothermal gradient map of the US, and studies were completed on five specific areas as possible locations for HDR Experimental Site 2.

  11. HDR (Hot Dry Rock) technology transfer activities in the Clear Lake Area, California

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, K.; Potter, R.

    1990-01-01

    A large Hot Dry Rock resource has been recognized in northern California. It underlies the region extending NE of The Geysers to N of the City of Clearlake. The long-range productive potential is thousands of megawatts. The geothermal resource is heterogeneous. There are two mechanisms of heat flow occurring together. One is fluid transport, up natural zones of permeability, to outflows as surface springs. The other is conductive heat flow through impermeable rock. The temperature isotherms are thought to be nearly level surfaces, for example, the 300{degree}C isotherm is at about 8000 ft depth, with spikes'' or ridges'' occurring around narrow zones of fluid flow. While there is accessible heat at shallow depth in the naturally permeable rocks, the really substantial resource is in the impermeable rock. This is the HDR resource. The potential reservoir rocks are Franciscan greywackes and greenstones. Recorded drilling problems appear to be mainly due to intersection with serpentinites or to the effects of stimulation, so are potentially avoidable. Greywacke is favoured as a reservoir rock, and is expected to fail by brittle fracture. The water shortages in Northern California appear to be surmountable. Leakoff rates are expected to be low. Sewerage water may be available for fill and makeup. There is a possibility of combining HDR heat power production with sewerage disposal. To establish the first HDR producer in Northern California offers challenges in technology transfer. Two significant challenges will be creation of dispersed permeability in a greywacke reservoir, and pressure management in the vicinity of naturally permeable zones. A successful demonstration of HDR production technology will improve the long-term prospects for the geothermal power industry in California. 29 refs., 20 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Heat flow and hot dry rock geothermal resources of the Clearlake Region, northern California

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, K.L.

    1996-08-01

    The Geysers-Clear Lake geothermal anomaly is an area of high heat flow in northern California. The anomaly is caused by abnormally high heat flows generated by asthenospheric uplift and basaltic magmatic underplating at a slabless window created by passage of the Mendocino Triple Junction. The Clear Lake volcanic field is underlain by magmatic igneous bodies in the form of a stack of sill-form intrusions with silicic bodies generally at the top and basic magmas at the bottom. The tabular shape and wide areal extent of the heat sources results in linear temperature gradients and near-horizontal isotherms in a broad region at the center of the geothermal anomaly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) portion of The Geysers-Clear Lake geothermal field is that part of the geothermal anomaly that is external to the steamfield, bounded by geothermal gradients of 167 mW/m2 (4 heat flow units-hfu) and 335 mW/m2 (8 hfu). The HDR resources, to a depth of 5 km, were estimated by piece-wise linear summation based on a sketch map of the heat flow. Approximately, the geothermal {open_quotes}accessible resource base{close_quotes} (Qa) is 1.68E+21 J; the {open_quotes}HDR resource base{close_quotes} (Qha) is 1.39E+21 J; and the {open_quotes}HDR power production resource{close_quotes} (Qhp) is 1.01E+21 J. The HDR power production resource (Qhp) is equivalent to 2.78E+ 11 Mwht (megawatt hours thermal), or 1.72E+11 bbls of oil.

  13. Preliminary Hot Dry Rock geothermal evaluation of Long Valley Caldera, California

    SciTech Connect

    Gambill, D.T.

    1981-03-01

    Long Valley Caldera, formed during the catastrophic eruption of the Bishop Tuff 0.7 Myr ago, straddles the border between the Sierra Nevada and the Basin and Range tectonic provinces in eastern California. The caldera contains rhyolitic to basaltic flows, tuffs, and domes from 3.2 Myr to 450 yr old. Sierra Nevada frontal faults intersect the northwest and southeast parts of the caldera. The dominant feature within the caldera is a resurgent dome in the west-central section, which formed between about 0.7 and 0.5 Myr b.p. Teleseismic data indicate a low P-wave velocity zone below the western part of the caldera, indicating a magma chamber between 7 and 25 km depth. This conclusion is supported by gravity data. Heat flow just west of the caldera is 3.75 HFU. Just east of the caldera, measured heat flow is about 2 HFU. However, a deep well on the eastern edge of the resurgent dome has a gradient of 38/sup 0/C/km from 0.66 to 1.2 km suggesting that the magma chamber, which produced Long Valley, is largely crystallized below the resurgent dome. The high heat flow beneath the western caldera may be a manifestation of shallow silicic magma associated with the recent Inyo Craters. These data indicate a smaller magma source may lie below the western caldera. The resurgent dome and the area just west of the caldera are cited for additional Hot Dry Rock prospection. The higher temperature gradient and lack of caldera fill beyond the west margin of the caldera combine to make this area promising for future HDR evaluation.

  14. Effect of freezing, hot tumble drying and washing with eucalyptus oil on house dust mites in soft toys.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chin-Fu; Wu, Francis Fu-Sheng; Chen, Chi-Ying; Crane, Julian; Siebers, Rob

    2011-09-01

    Soft toys are a major source of house dust mites (HDM) and HDM allergens, and sleeping with soft toys is a significant risk factor for HDM sensitization. We studied three techniques to eliminate HDM from soft toys, namely freezing, hot tumble drying and washing with eucalyptus oil. Thirty-six toys (12 in each treatment group) were enumerated for live HDM by the heat escape method before and after freezing overnight, hot tumble drying for 1 h and washing in 0.2% to 0.4% eucalyptus oil. Freezing, hot tumble drying and washing with eucalyptus oil resulted in significant reductions in live HDM, an average reduction of 95.1%, 89.1% and 95.1%, respectively. Additionally, washing with eucalyptus oil resulted in a significant reduction in HDM allergens as well from a geometric mean of 9.12 μg/g to 0.37 μg/g (p = 0.033). These three HDM elimination techniques give parents of infants effective and acceptable methods of limiting HDM exposure.

  15. Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammel, Edward F., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Current and post World War II scientific research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (New Mexico) is discussed. The operation of the laboratory, the Los Alamos consultant program, and continuation education, and continuing education activities at the laboratory are also discussed. (JN)

  16. Effect of high-humidity hot air impingement blanching (HHAIB) on drying and quality of red pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Fang, Xiao-Ming; Mujumdar, A S; Qian, Jing-Ya; Zhang, Qian; Yang, Xu-Hai; Liu, Yan-Hong; Gao, Zhen-Jiang; Xiao, Hong-Wei

    2017-04-01

    Effects of high-humidity hot air impingement blanching (HHAIB) under different times (30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, 210, and 240s) on drying characteristics and quality attributes of red peppers in terms of surface colour, red pigment content, microstructure and texture were investigated. Results showed that polyphenol oxidase (PPO) residual activity of the samples decreased with increasing blanching time; it was decreased to 7% after 120s. A first-order fraction model described PPO inactivation well. Suitable HHAIB time can reduce drying time extensively. Pepper surface colour was influenced by different treatments. In terms of red pigment content, there was no significant difference for blanching time under 120s, whereas over blanching (blanching time ⩾150s) can significantly reduce the red pigment content. Microstructure observations indicate that superficial micro-cracks occur, which explain, why HHAIB enhances drying rate. The firmness, hardness, and gumminess of the samples decreased with increase of HHAIB time.

  17. Hot Dry Rock Heat Mining Geothermal Energy Development Program - Annual Report Fiscal Year 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Duchane, David

    1991-01-01

    This was a year of significant accomplishment in the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Program. Most importantly, the design, construction, and installation of the surface plant for the Phase II system neared completion by the end of the year. Basic process design work has been completed, and all major components of the system except the gas/particle separator have been procured. For this component, previous design problems have been resolved, and purchase during the first half of FY91 is anticipated. Installation of the surface plant is well underway. The system will be completed and ready for operation by the end of FY91 under the current funding scenario. The operational schedule to be followed will then depend upon the program funding level. Our goal is to start long-term flow testing as soon as possible. Of equal importance, from the standpoint of the long-term viability of HDR technology, during this year, for the first time, it has been demonstrated in field testing that it should be possible to operate HDR reservoirs with water losses of 1-3%, or even less. Our experience in the deep, hot, Phase II reservoir at Fenton Hill is in sharp contrast to the significant water losses seen by Japanese and British scientists working in shallower, cooler, HDR reservoirs. Calculations and modeling based on field data have shown that water consumption declines with the log of time in a manner related to water storage in the reservoir. This work may be crucial in proving that HDR can be an economically viable means for producing energy, and that it is useful even in areas where water is in short supply. In addition, an engineering model was developed to predict and explain water consumption in HDR reservoirs under pressure, the collection and processing of seismic information was more highly automated, and the detection limits for reactive tracers were lowered to less than 1 part per billion. All of these developments will add greatly to our ability to conduct, analyze, and understand

  18. Stockpile Stewardship: Los Alamos

    ScienceCinema

    McMillan, Charlie; Morgan, Nathanial; Goorley, Tom; Merrill, Frank; Funk, Dave; Korzekwa, Deniece; Laintz, Ken

    2016-07-12

    "Heritage of Science" is a short video that highlights the Stockpile Stewardship program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Stockpile Stewardship was conceived in the early 1990s as a national science-based program that could assure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear deterrent without the need for full-scale underground nuclear testing. This video was produced by Los Alamos National Laboratory for screening at the Lab's Bradbury Science Museum in Los Alamos, NM and is narrated by science correspondent Miles O'Brien.

  19. Drying characteristics of garlic ( Allium sativum L) slices in a convective hot air dryer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demiray, Engin; Tulek, Yahya

    2014-06-01

    The effects of drying temperatures on the drying kinetics of garlic slices were investigated using a cabinet-type dryer. The experimental drying data were fitted best to the Page and Modified Page models apart from other theoretical models to predict the drying kinetics. The effective moisture diffusivities varied from 4.214 × 10-10 to 2.221 × 10-10 m2 s-1 over the temperature range studied, and activation energy was 30.582 kJ mol-1.

  20. Hot air drying of apple slices: dehydration characteristics and quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beigi, Mohsen

    2016-08-01

    The main objectives of the present study were to investigate the drying characteristics and quality attributes of apple slices. The samples were dried at different air temperature levels (50, 60 and 70 °C) and a constant air velocity (1.5 m s-1). It was observed that the drying air temperature affected the dehydration rate significantly. The usefulness of eight different mathematical models to simulate the experimental drying curves was evaluated and the Midilli model provided the best simulation of the samples drying kinetics. The effective moisture diffusivity was determined to be 7.03 × 10-10, 8.48 × 10-10 and 1.08 × 10-9 m2 s-1 for drying air temperatures of 50, 60 and 70 °C, respectively. The shrinkage values of the dried samples at air temperatures of 50, 60 and 70 °C were 74.70, 82.35 and 80.78 %, respectively. The maximum value of rehydration ratio (4.527) and also the minimum value of ∆E (11.27) were obtained for the slices dried at 70 °C.

  1. Mass transfer characteristics of bisporus mushroom ( Agaricus bisporus) slices during convective hot air drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, Davoud; Baraani Dastjerdi, Mojtaba; Torki-Harchegani, Mehdi

    2016-05-01

    An accurate understanding of moisture transfer parameters, including moisture diffusivity and moisture transfer coefficient, is essential for efficient mass transfer analysis and to design new dryers or improve existing drying equipments. The main objective of the present study was to carry out an experimental and theoretical investigation of mushroom slices drying and determine the mass transfer characteristics of the samples dried under different conditions. The mushroom slices with two thicknesses of 3 and 5 mm were dried at air temperatures of 40, 50 and 60 °C and air flow rates of 1 and 1.5 m s-1. The Dincer and Dost model was used to determine the moisture transfer parameters and predict the drying curves. It was observed that the entire drying process took place in the falling drying rate period. The obtained lag factor and Biot number indicated that the moisture transfer in the samples was controlled by both internal and external resistance. The effective moisture diffusivity and the moisture transfer coefficient increased with increasing air temperature, air flow rate and samples thickness and varied in the ranges of 6.5175 × 10-10 to 1.6726 × 10-9 m2 s-1 and 2.7715 × 10-7 to 3.5512 × 10-7 m s-1, respectively. The validation of the Dincer and Dost model indicated a good capability of the model to describe the drying curves of the mushroom slices.

  2. Development of predictive modelling approaches for surface temperature and associated microbiological inactivation during hot dry air decontamination.

    PubMed

    Valdramidis, V P; Belaubre, N; Zuniga, R; Foster, A M; Havet, M; Geeraerd, A H; Swain, M J; Bernaerts, K; Van Impe, J F; Kondjoyan, A

    2005-04-15

    This research deals with the development of predictive modelling approaches in the field of heat transfer and microbial inactivation. Upon making some backstage microbiological considerations, surface temperature predictions during hot dry air decontaminations are incorporated in a microbial inactivation model, in order to describe inactivation kinetics under realistic (time-varying) temperature conditions. In the present study, the following parts are presented. (i) First, a one-dimensional heat transfer model is developed taking into account exchanges by convection, radiation and evaporation. The model is subsequently validated on a laboratory setup and on a test rig, assuming no water activity changes. This test rig is developed for studying-at a later stage-surface pasteurisation treatment on food products with the use of hot dry air. (ii) Isothermal inactivation data of Escherichia coli K12 MG1655 have been collected and inactivation parameters are accurately estimated by using a primary and a secondary model in a global modelling approach. (iii) Microbiological considerations such as microbial growth effects during come-up times, initial temperature of inactivation, and heat resistance effects, based on experimental observations and on literature studies, are formulated in order to evaluate possible microbial effects arising under the dynamic temperature conditions modelled in step (i). (iv) Microbial inactivation simulations with the incorporation of surface temperature predictions are presented. (v) Finally, the level of the microbial decontamination in an example based on the design of an industrial installation is presented, outlining the importance of the combination of surface temperature and microbial inactivation modelling approaches.

  3. Standardization of spray-dried powder of Piper betle hot water extract.

    PubMed

    Arawwawala, Liyanage Dona Ashanthi Menuka; Hewageegana, Horadugoda Gamage Sujatha Pushpakanthi; Arambewela, Lakshmi Sriyani Rajapaksha; Ariyawansa, Hettiarachchige Sami

    2011-04-01

    The leaves of Piper betle Linn. (Family: Piperaceae) possess several bioactivities and are used in the Traditional Medical systems of Sri Lanka. The present investigation was carried out to standardize the spray-dried powder of P. betle by (a) determination of physicochemical parameters, presence or absence of heavy metals, and microbial contamination; (b) screening for phytochemicals; and (c) development of High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) fingerprint and densitogram. The percentages of moisture content, total ash, acid insoluble ash, water-soluble ash, and ethanol extractable matter of spray-dried powder of P. betle were 2.2-2.5, 6.8-7.0, 0.003-0.005, 4.1-4.3, and 15.8-16.2, respectively. The concentrations of all the tested heavy metals were below the WHO acceptable limits and bacterial species, such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeroginosa were not present in the P. betle spray-dried powder. Phenolic compounds, tannins, flavonoids steroids, and alkaloids were found to be present in the spray-dried powder of P. betle and HPLC fingerprint and densitogram clearly demonstrated the proportional differences of these chemical constituents. In conclusion, the results obtained from this study can be used to standardize the spray-dried powder of P. betle.

  4. Standardization of spray-dried powder of Piper betle hot water extract

    PubMed Central

    Arawwawala, Liyanage Dona Ashanthi Menuka; Hewageegana, Horadugoda Gamage Sujatha Pushpakanthi; Arambewela, Lakshmi Sriyani Rajapaksha; Ariyawansa, Hettiarachchige Sami

    2011-01-01

    The leaves of Piper betle Linn. (Family: Piperaceae) possess several bioactivities and are used in the Traditional Medical systems of Sri Lanka. The present investigation was carried out to standardize the spray-dried powder of P. betle by (a) determination of physicochemical parameters, presence or absence of heavy metals, and microbial contamination; (b) screening for phytochemicals; and (c) development of High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) fingerprint and densitogram. The percentages of moisture content, total ash, acid insoluble ash, water-soluble ash, and ethanol extractable matter of spray-dried powder of P. betle were 2.2-2.5, 6.8-7.0, 0.003-0.005, 4.1-4.3, and 15.8-16.2, respectively. The concentrations of all the tested heavy metals were below the WHO acceptable limits and bacterial species, such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeroginosa were not present in the P. betle spray-dried powder. Phenolic compounds, tannins, flavonoids steroids, and alkaloids were found to be present in the spray-dried powder of P. betle and HPLC fingerprint and densitogram clearly demonstrated the proportional differences of these chemical constituents. In conclusion, the results obtained from this study can be used to standardize the spray-dried powder of P. betle. PMID:21716924

  5. Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in the Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Building Industry Research Alliance; Building Science Consortium; Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings; Davis Energy Group; Florida Solar Energy Center; IBACOS; National Association of Home Builders Research Center; National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    2006-01-01

    The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in the Hot-Dry/Mixed-Dry Climate Region on a cost neutral basis.

  6. Los Alamos offers Fellowships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico is calling for applications for postdoctoral appointments and research fellowships. The positions are available in geoscience as well as other scientific disciplines.The laboratory, which is operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy, awards J. Robert Oppenheimer Research Fellowships to scientists that either have or will soon complete doctoral degrees. The appointments are for two years, are renewable for a third year, and carry a stipend of $51,865 per year. Potential applicants should send a resume or employment application and a statement of research goals to Carol M. Rich, Div. 89, Human Resources Development Division, MS P290, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 by mid-November.

  7. Numerical Study on the Stomatal Responses to Dry-Hot Wind Episodes and Its Effects on Land-Atmosphere Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Liu, Shuhua; Miao, Yucong; Li, Jing

    2016-01-01

    The wheat production in midland China is under serious threat by frequent Dry-Hot Wind (DHW) episodes with high temperature, low moisture and specific wind as well as intensive heat transfer and evapotranspiration. The numerical simulations of these episodes are important for monitoring grain yield and estimating agricultural water demand. However, uncertainties still remain despite that enormous experiments and modeling studies have been conducted concerning this issue, due to either inaccurate synoptic situation derived from mesoscale weather models or unrealistic parameterizations of stomatal physiology in land surface models. Hereby, we investigated the synoptic characteristics of DHW with widely-used mesoscale model Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) and the effects of leaf physiology on surface evapotranspiration by comparing two land surface models: The Noah land surface model, and Peking University Land Model (PKULM) with stomata processes included. Results show that the WRF model could well replicate the synoptic situations of DHW. Two types of DHW were identified: (1) prevailing heated dry wind stream forces the formation of DHW along with intense sensible heating and (2) dry adiabatic processes overflowing mountains. Under both situations, the PKULM can reasonably model the stomatal closure phenomena, which significantly decreases both evapotranspiration and net ecosystem exchange of canopy, while these phenomena cannot be resolved in the Noah simulations. Therefore, our findings suggest that the WRF-PKULM coupled method may be a more reliable tool to investigate and forecast DHW as well as be instructive to crop models. PMID:27648943

  8. The Los Alamos primer

    SciTech Connect

    Serber, R.

    1992-01-01

    This book contains the 1943 lecture notes of Robert Serber. Serber was a protege of J. Robert Oppenheimer and member of the team that built the first atomic bomb - reveal what the Los Alamos scientists knew, and did not know, about the terrifying weapon they were building.

  9. Mosquito records from a hot and dry climatic area experiencing frequent outbreaks of Japanese encephalitis, Bellary district, Karnataka, India.

    PubMed

    Kanojia, P C; Jamgaonkar, A V

    2008-03-01

    Mosquito species occurring in Bellary district, Karnataka, India were surveyed for Japanese encephalitis (JE) and West Nile virus (WNV) from 2001 to 2003. A total of 37 mosquito species in 6 genera were recovered from larval and adult habitats. Aedes, Anopheles and Culex were represented by 11 species each, Mansonia by 2 species, and Armigeres and Lutzia by a single species. A total of 68,506 mosquitoes belonging to 20 species were collected at dusk. Most (74.6%) were Cx. tritaeniorhynchus and occurred in 2 peaks of abundance in February (304 per man hour density [PMHD]) and October (465 PMHD). The mosquito fauna of Bellary district is not diverse, possibly because of the hot and dry climatic conditions in the area.

  10. Building America Case Study: Performance of a Hot-Dry Climate Whole House Retrofit, Stockton, California (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    ARBI

    2014-09-01

    The Stockton house retrofit is a two-story tudor style single family deep retrofit in the hot-dry climate of Stockton, CA. The home is representative of a deep retrofit option of the scaled home energy upgrade packages offered to targeted neighborhoods under the pilot Large-Scale Retrofit Program (LSRP) administered by the Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI). Deep retrofit packages expand on the standard package by adding HVAC, water heater and window upgrades to the ducting, attic and floor insulation, domestic hot water insulation, envelope sealing, lighting and ventilation upgrades. Site energy savings with the deep retrofit were 23% compared to the pre-retrofit case, and 15% higher than the savings estimated for the standard retrofit package. Energy savings were largely a result of the water heater upgrade, and a combination of the envelope sealing, insulation and HVAC upgrade. The HVAC system was of higher efficiency than the building code standard. Overall the financed retrofit would have been more cost effective had a less expensive HVAC system been selected and barriers to wall insulation remedied. The homeowner experienced improved comfort throughout the monitored period and was satisfied with the resulting utility bill savings.

  11. Transport and deposition of pyroclasts from hot, dry eruptions and the sizes of high-grade ignimbrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, B. S.; Wolff, J. A.; Mark, D. F.; Olin, P. H.; Schmitz, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    High-grade welded ignimbrites are the result of rapid emplacement of hot pyroclasts. Given that such eruptions have never been observed, all information about them must be derived from analysis of the geological record and modelling of eruption scenarios. The rhyolitic ignimbrites of the Snake River Plain (ID and NV, USA) serve as prime examples. They are commonly intensely welded and lava-like in hand specimen despite metaluminous chemistry. The parental magmas of the ignimbrites are inferred to have been 'hot and dry' (>900 °C, < 2 wt.% H2O). The resultant deposits are intriguing for a number of reasons: 1) they have much better sorting than typical ignimbrites (from rare non-welded facies); and 2) they rarely contain lithic clasts. This unusual combination of attributes is inferred to reflect an usual suite of processes occurring during transport and deposition. The hot pyroclasts are sufficiently 'sticky' to fully coalesce upon emplacement but correlation (facilitated by geochemical and field observations) suggests that individual deposits extend for up to 100 km from any viable source, so agglutination during transport appears to be limited. The lack of agglutination during transit may be explained by extremely low concentration 'fully dilute' currents in which individual pyroclasts rarely come into contact with one another but if so, prolonged events would be required to emplace deposits > 1,000 km3. Alternatively, agglutination may be impeded if the timescales of pyroclast contact are sufficiently short to prevent the sintering of glass particles together. Experimental work using high-silica glasses in the ceramics industry suggests that for temperatures appropriate for Snake River Plain ignimbrites, sintering of particles together occurs on timescales of a few minutes, orders of magnitude longer than particle:particle interactions within the density current. Further modeling using more realistic compositions, accurate grain sizes and pyroclast geometries

  12. Constraints in the hot-dry-rock resources of the united states

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, John; Guffanti, Marianne; ,

    1993-01-01

    As with hydrothermal systems, the western U.S has higher HDR potential overall than the eastern U.S. because geothermal gradients on average are higher in the west. Nevertheless, some attractive exploration targets occur in the eastern U.S. The most favorable target in the eastern U.S. (defined here to include the Great Plains province) is one in which the heat flow from the basement rocks is higher than average, either due to heat generation from highly radioactive rocks or to a plume of hot water driven upwards from greater depths by convection, and where such basement rocks are blanketed by one or more kilometers of sedimentary material having a low thermal conductivity.

  13. Thermal destruction of dried vegetative yeast cells and dried bacterial spores in a convective hot air flow: strong influence of initial water activity.

    PubMed

    Fine, Frédéric; Gervais, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Thermal treatment of Bacillus subtilis spores and Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells dried on glass beads was performed at various initial water activities (in the range 0.10-0.90). Experiments were carried out at 150 degrees C, 200 degrees C and 250 degrees C for 5-120 s. Significant destruction of up to 10(7) vegetative cells and up to 10(5) spores g(-1) was achieved, depending upon treatment conditions. This study demonstrated that the initial water activity (a(w)) value of a sample is very important in the destruction or survival of microorganisms treated with hot air stresses. As described previously, the heat resistance of spores and vegetative cells was strongly enhanced by low initial a(w) values until an optimal a(w) value between 0.30 and 0.50, with maximal viability at 0.35 for both S. cerevisiae and B. subtilis. However, our results highlighted for the first time that very low initial a(w) values (close to 0.10) greatly improved the destruction of spores and vegetative cells. Factors and possible mechanisms involved in the death of vegetative cells and spores are discussed.

  14. Applicability of a ``shower`` passive cooling tower in a hot dry climate

    SciTech Connect

    Givoni, B.; Al-Hemiddi, N.

    1995-11-01

    This cooling system has originally been developed by Givoni for cooling outdoor rest areas for the EXPO`92 in Seville, Spain. However, it can also be applied, and has been tested, as a cooling system for building and enclosed and shaded courtyards. It consists of an open shaft with showers at the top and a collecting ``pond`` at the bottom. Water is recirculated by a pump. The falling water entrain a large volume of air, creating a flow of cooled air down the shaft and into a building. A wind catcher can be installed above the shaft to enhance the air flow rate. The paper presents data on the performance of the system, tested by Al Hemiddi, including experimental data obtained first in a ``patio`` test cell at UCLA in Los Angeles, and later in a full size room in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The testing in Riyadh has demonstrated that with outdoor air maximum temperature of about 45 C the indoor air maximum of the cooled room was bout 29 C. This system can use brackish and sea water, in addition to fresh water. Thus it is applicable and capable of providing indoor comfort even in very hot desert regions, where any kind of water, even sea water, is available.

  15. Evaluating two different evaporative cooling management systems for dairy cows in a hot, dry climate.

    PubMed

    Ryan, D P; Boland, M P; Kopel, E; Armstrong, D; Munyakazi, L; Godke, R A; Ingraham, R H

    1992-04-01

    Milk production, rectal temperature, live weight gain, reproductive performance, and weather data were obtained on 150 Holstein cows managed under two cooling systems on a large dairy farm in Saudi Arabia during the summer months. Cows were paired at the onset of the trial according to days postpartum, lactation number, and current milk production. Females were then allocated either to a system that forced air, precooled by evaporative cooling, over the cows or to a system that alternately showered a fine mist onto the surface of the cows and then forced air at ambient temperature over them. The cows receiving evaporative cooling and those with spray and fan cooling were on sand and on slatted concrete floor, respectively, during the periods of cooling. The onset of estrus was observed during the night when the cows preferred the unshaded corral. For the 120-d trial period, 84% (62 of 75) of the cows receiving evaporative cooling and 60% (44 of 75) of the cows receiving spray and fan cooling became pregnant. In the evaporative cooling system, the pregnancy rate per insemination was 35.2% (179 inseminations) versus 23.2% (194 inseminations) for spray and fan cooling. The mean postpartum interval to pregnancy was 117.6 d for the evaporative cooling cows and 146.7 d for spray and fan cooling cows. The evaporative cooling system, with its open shades and sand bedding, enhanced reproductive performance and milk production compared with that of cows cooled with a spray and fan system with slatted flooring in this hot climate.

  16. Los Alamos Programming Models

    SciTech Connect

    Bergen, Benjamin Karl

    2016-07-07

    This is the PDF of a powerpoint presentation from a teleconference on Los Alamos programming models. It starts by listing their assumptions for the programming models and then details a hierarchical programming model at the System Level and Node Level. Then it details how to map this to their internal nomenclature. Finally, a list is given of what they are currently doing in this regard.

  17. The influence of mid-latitude storm tracks on hot, cold, dry and wet extremes.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Jascha; Coumou, Dim

    2015-12-11

    Changes in mid-latitude circulation can strongly affect the number and intensity of extreme weather events. In particular, high-amplitude quasi-stationary planetary waves have been linked to prolonged weather extremes at the surface. In contrast, analyses of fast-traveling synoptic-scale waves and their direct influence on heat and cold extremes are scarce though changes in such waves have been detected and are projected for the 21st century. Here we apply regression analyses of synoptic activity with surface temperature and precipitation in monthly gridded observational data. We show that over large parts of mid-latitude continental regions, summer heat extremes are associated with low storm track activity. In winter, the occurrence of cold spells is related to low storm track activity over parts of eastern North America, Europe, and central- to eastern Asia. Storm tracks thus have a moderating effect on continental temperatures. Pronounced storm track activity favors monthly rainfall extremes throughout the year, whereas dry spells are associated with a lack thereof. Trend analyses reveal significant regional changes in recent decades favoring the occurrence of cold spells in the eastern US, droughts in California and heat extremes over Eurasia.

  18. The influence of mid-latitude storm tracks on hot, cold, dry and wet extremes

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Jascha; Coumou, Dim

    2015-01-01

    Changes in mid-latitude circulation can strongly affect the number and intensity of extreme weather events. In particular, high-amplitude quasi-stationary planetary waves have been linked to prolonged weather extremes at the surface. In contrast, analyses of fast-traveling synoptic-scale waves and their direct influence on heat and cold extremes are scarce though changes in such waves have been detected and are projected for the 21st century. Here we apply regression analyses of synoptic activity with surface temperature and precipitation in monthly gridded observational data. We show that over large parts of mid-latitude continental regions, summer heat extremes are associated with low storm track activity. In winter, the occurrence of cold spells is related to low storm track activity over parts of eastern North America, Europe, and central- to eastern Asia. Storm tracks thus have a moderating effect on continental temperatures. Pronounced storm track activity favors monthly rainfall extremes throughout the year, whereas dry spells are associated with a lack thereof. Trend analyses reveal significant regional changes in recent decades favoring the occurrence of cold spells in the eastern US, droughts in California and heat extremes over Eurasia. PMID:26657163

  19. Geologic framework and hot dry rock geothermal potential of the Castle Dome area, Yuma County, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Gutmann, J.T.

    1981-02-01

    The Castle Dome Mountains and surrounding ranges constitute a voluminous pile of silicic volcanic rocks within the Basin and Range province of southwestern Arizona. Previously reported as Cretaceous and Quaternary in age, these volcanics all are of late Oligocene to early Miocene age as indicated by five new K-Ar dates. Reconnaissance field studies indicate that the volcanic section locally has undergone large rotations that contrast with the usual structural style of the Basin and Range and resemble the thin-skinned rotational tectonics documented for earlier, mid-Tertiary extensional deformation in ranges to the north and northeast. Significant geothermal potential of the Castle Dome area is suggested by a shallow depth to the Curie isotherm and by the apparent presence of a good electrical conductor at anomalously shallow depth in the crust. Warm wells exist in the area and Shearer (1979) reported a geothermal gradient of about 70/sup 0/C/km in a dry well near the center of the gravity low. Radiogenic heat production in the silicic batholith inferred above constitutes a reasonable candidate for a shallow regional heat source.

  20. The influence of mid-latitude storm tracks on hot, cold, dry and wet extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Jascha; Coumou, Dim

    2015-12-01

    Changes in mid-latitude circulation can strongly affect the number and intensity of extreme weather events. In particular, high-amplitude quasi-stationary planetary waves have been linked to prolonged weather extremes at the surface. In contrast, analyses of fast-traveling synoptic-scale waves and their direct influence on heat and cold extremes are scarce though changes in such waves have been detected and are projected for the 21st century. Here we apply regression analyses of synoptic activity with surface temperature and precipitation in monthly gridded observational data. We show that over large parts of mid-latitude continental regions, summer heat extremes are associated with low storm track activity. In winter, the occurrence of cold spells is related to low storm track activity over parts of eastern North America, Europe, and central- to eastern Asia. Storm tracks thus have a moderating effect on continental temperatures. Pronounced storm track activity favors monthly rainfall extremes throughout the year, whereas dry spells are associated with a lack thereof. Trend analyses reveal significant regional changes in recent decades favoring the occurrence of cold spells in the eastern US, droughts in California and heat extremes over Eurasia.

  1. Evaluation on the air-borne ultrasound-assisted hot air convection thin-layer drying performance of municipal sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Sun, G Y; Chen, M Q; Huang, Y W

    2017-01-01

    The thin-layer drying behavior of the municipal sewage sludge in a laboratory-scale hot air forced convective dryer assisted with air-borne ultrasound was investigated in between 70 and 130°C hot air temperatures. The drying kinetics in the convective process alone were compared to that for ultrasound-assist process at three ultrasound powers (30, 90, 150W). The average drying rates within whole drying temperature range at ultrasound powers of 30, 90 and 150W increased by about 22.6%, 27.8% and 32.2% compared with the convective drying alone (without ultrasound). As the temperature increasing from 70°C to 130°C, there were maximum increasing ratios for the effective moisture diffusivities of the sewage sludge in both falling rate periods at ultrasonic power of 30W in comparison with other two high powers. In between the ultrasound powers of 0 and 30W, the effect of the power on the drying rate was significant, while its effect was not obvious over 30W. Therefore, the low ultrasonic power can be just set in the drying process. The values of the apparent activation energy in the first falling rate period were down from 13.52 to 12.78kJmol(-1), and from 17.21 to 15.10kJmol(-1) for the second falling rate period with increasing the ultrasonic power from 30 to 150W. The values of the apparent activation energy in two falling rate periods with the ultrasound-assist were less than that for the hot air convective drying alone.

  2. Biophysical and Morphological Evaluation of Human Normal and Dry Eye Meibum Using Hot Stage Polarized Light Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Butovich, Igor A.; Lu, Hua; McMahon, Anne; Ketelson, Howard; Senchyna, Michelle; Meadows, David; Campbell, Elaine; Molai, Mike; Linsenbardt, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To study melting characteristics and the morphology of human and mouse meibum. Methods. Hot stage cross-polarized light microscopy (HSPM) and immunohistochemical approaches were used. Results. Isolated human meibum, and meibum of mice (either isolated or within the meibomian ducts of mice), were found to be in liquid-crystal state at physiological temperatures. Melting of both types of meibum started at approximately 10°C and was completed at approximately 40°C. Melting curves of isolated meibum and meibum inside the meibomian ducts were multiphasic with at least two or three clearly defined phase transition temperatures, typically at approximately 12 ± 2°C (minor transition), 21 ± 3°C, and 32 ± 3°C, regardless the source of meibum. Melting was highly cooperative in nature. Samples of abnormal human meibum collected from dry eye patients with meibomian gland dysfunction often showed an increased presence of nonlipid, nonmelting, nonbirefringent, chloroform-insoluble inclusions of a protein nature. The inclusions were positively stained for cytokeratins. The presence of these inclusions was semiquantitatively characterized using a newly proposed 0 to 4 scale. In the presence of large amounts of these inclusions, melting characteristics of meibum and its structural integrity were altered. Conclusions. HSPM is an effective tool that is suitable for biophysical and morphological evaluation of meibum. Morphological properties and melting characteristics of human meibum were found to be similar to those of mice. Abnormal meibum of many dry eye patients contained large quantities of nonlipid, protein-like inclusions, which were routinely absent in meibum of normal controls. PMID:24282231

  3. Proteomics of hot-wet and cold-dry temperaments proposed in Iranian traditional medicine: a Network-based Study

    PubMed Central

    Rezadoost, Hassan; Karimi, Mehrdad; Jafari, Mohieddin

    2016-01-01

    Lack of molecular biology evidence has led clinical success of alternative and complementary medicine (CAM) to be marginalized. In turn, a large portion of life Science researchers could not communicate and help to develop therapeutic potential laid in these therapeutic approaches. In this study, we began to quantify descriptive classification theory in one of the CAM branches i.e. Iranian traditional medicine (ITM). Using proteomic tools and network analysis, the expressed proteins and their relationships were studied in mitochondrial lysate isolated from PBMCs from two different temperaments i.e. Hot-wet (HW) and Cold-dry (CD). The 82% of the identified proteins are over- or under-represented in distinct temperaments. Also, our result showed the different protein-protein interaction networks (PPIN) represented in these two temperaments using centrality and module finding analysis. Following the gene ontology and pathway enrichment analysis, we have found enriched biological terms in each group which are in conformity with the physiologically known evidence in ITM. In conclusion, we argued that the network biology which naturally consider life at the system level along with the different omics data will pave the way toward explicit delineation of the CAM activities. PMID:27452083

  4. A study of pumps for the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy extraction experiment (LTFT (Long Term Flow Test))

    SciTech Connect

    Tatro, C.A.

    1986-10-01

    A set of specifications for the hot dry rock (HDR) Phase II circulation pumping system is developed from a review of basic fluid pumping mechanics, a technical history of the HDR Phase I and Phase II pumping systems, a presentation of the results from experiment 2067 (the Initial Closed-Loop Flow Test or ICFT), and consideration of available on-site electrical power limitations at the experiment site. For the Phase II energy extraction experiment (the Long Term Flow Test or LTFT) it is necessary to provide a continuous, low maintenance, and highly efficient pumping capability for a period of twelve months at variable flowrates up to 420 gpm and at surface injection pressures up to 5000 psi. The pumping system must successfully withstand attacks by corrosive and embrittling gases, erosive chemicals and suspended solids, and fluid pressure and temperature fluctuations. In light of presently available pumping hardware and electric power supply limitations, it is recommended that positive displacement multiplex plunger pumps, driven by variable speed control electric motors, be used to provide the necessary continuous surface injection pressures and flowrates for LTFT. The decision of whether to purchase the required circulation pumping hardware or to obtain contractor provided pumping services has not been made.

  5. Air quality assessment in the periurban area of Mexico Megacity during dry hot season in 2011 and 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Reynoso, Agustin; Santos Garcia-Yee, Jose; Barrera-Huertas, Hugo; Gerardo Ruiz-Suárez, Luis

    2016-04-01

    Air quality is a human health threat not only in urbanized areas, it also affects the surrounding zones. Interaction between urban and rural areas can be evaluated by measurements and using models for regional areas that includes in its domain the peri-urban regions. The use of monitoring sites in remote areas is useful however it is not possible to cover all the region the use of models can provide valuable information about the source and fate of the pollution and its transformation. In order to evaluate the influence of the Mexico Megacity in the air quality of the region, two field campaigns were performed during the dry hot season during 2011 and 2012. Meterological and pollutant measurements were made during February and march 2011, in three sites towards the south east of Mexico Megacity, and from march to April 2012 towards the west after the Popocatepetl-Iztaccihuatl mountain range. Air quality modeling were performed by using the National Emissions Inventory 2008 during the studied periods, a comparison between measurements and the air quality model was performed. This type of studies can offer information about the pollutant distribution, the meteorological conditions and the exactness of emissions inventories. The latest can be useful for emissions inventory developers and policy makers.

  6. An improved high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detection-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry method for determination of chlorophylls and their derivatives in freeze-dried and hot-air-dried Rhinacanthus nasutus (L.) Kurz.

    PubMed

    Kao, Tsai Hua; Chen, Chia Ju; Chen, Bing Huei

    2011-10-30

    Rhinacanthus nasutus (L.) Kurz, a traditional Chinese herb possessing antioxidant and anti-cancer activities, has been reported to contain functional components like carotenoids and chlorophylls. However, the variety and amount of chlorophylls remain uncertain. The objectives of this study were to develop a high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detection-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-APCI-MS) method for determination of chlorophylls and their derivatives in hot-air-dried and freeze-dried R. nasutus. An Agilent Eclipse XDB-C18 column and a gradient mobile phase composed of methanol/N,N-dimethylformamide (97:3, v/v), acetonitrile and acetone were employed to separate internal standard zinc-phthalocyanine plus 12 cholorophylls and their derivatives within 21 min, including chlorophyll a, chlorophyll a', hydroxychlorophyll a, 15-OH-lactone chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, chlorophyll b', hydroxychlorophyll b, pheophytin a, pheophytin a', hydroxypheophytin a, hydroxypheophytin a' and pheophytin b in hot-air-dried R. nasutus with flow rate at 1 mL/min and detection at 660 nm. But, in freeze-dried R. nasutus, only 4 chlorophylls and their derivatives, including chlorophyll a, chlorophyll a', chlorophyll b and pheophytin a were detected. Zinc-phthalocyanine was found to be an appropriate internal standard to quantify all the chlorophyll compounds. After quantification by HPLC-DAD, both chlorophyll a and pheophytin a were the most abundant in hot-air-dried R. nasutus, while in freeze-dried R. nasutus, chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b dominated.

  7. Effects of hot air and freeze drying methods on antioxidant activity, colour and some nutritional characteristics of strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo L) fruit.

    PubMed

    Orak, H H; Aktas, T; Yagar, H; İsbilir, S Selen; Ekinci, N; Sahin, F Hasturk

    2012-08-01

    Antioxidant activity, colour and some nutritional properties of hot air and freeze-dried strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo L.) fruits were investigated. Additionally, the effects of two pre-treatments, namely ethyl oleate and water blanching, were compared in terms of drying characteristics. For determination of antioxidant activities in ethanol extracts, two different analytical methods were used: 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl scavenging activity and β-carotene bleaching activity. As a result, the ethyl oleate pre-treatment shortened the drying time by hot air method and gave a higher 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl scavenging activity (82.16 ± 0.34%), total phenolic content (7.62 ± 1.09 µg GAE/g extract), ascorbic acid content (236.93 ± 20.14 mg/100 g), besides hydromethylfurfural was not observed. Freeze-dried fruits exhibited higher ascorbic acid content (368.63 ± 17.16 mg/100 g) than those fresh fruits (231.33 ± 19.51 mg/100 g) and nearly 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl activity (93.52 ± 0.41 %) to fresh fruits (94.03 ± 1.18%). Colour characteristics, sugar content and mineral contents of fruits were significantly affected by pre-treatments and drying methods (p < 0.05). It is concluded that the drying of strawberry tree fruits should bring a valuable and attractive foodstuff to food industry due to the rich nutritional components, antioxidant activity and colour. Another conclusion from this study is that the freeze-drying is the best drying method to keep the nutritional value, antioxidant activity and sensory properties of fruits.

  8. Thermal modeling of the Clear Lake magmatic system, California: Implications for conventional and hot dry rock geothermal development

    SciTech Connect

    Stimac, J.; Goff, F.; Wohletz, K.

    1997-06-01

    The combination of recent volcanism, high heat flow ({ge} HFU or 167 mW/m{sup 2}), and high conductive geothermal gradient (up to 120{degree} C/km) makes the Clear Lake region of northern California one of the best prospects for hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal development in the US. The lack of permeability in exploration wells and lack of evidence for widespread geothermal reservoirs north of the Collayomi fault zone are not reassuring indications for conventional geothermal development. This report summarizes results of thermal modeling of the Clear Lake magmatic system, and discusses implications for HDR site selection in the region. The thermal models incorporate a wide range of constraints including the distribution and nature of volcanism in time and space, water and gas geochemistry, well data, and geophysical surveys. The nature of upper crustal magma bodies at Clear Lake is inferred from studying sequences of related silicic lavas, which tell a story of multistage mixing of silicic and mafic magma in clusters of small upper crustal chambers. Thermobarometry on metamorphic xenoliths yield temperature and pressure estimates of {approximately}780--900 C and 4--6 kb respectively, indicating that at least a portion of the deep magma system resided at depths from 14 to 21 km (9 to 12 mi). The results of thermal modeling support previous assessments of the high HDR potential of the area, and suggest the possibility that granitic bodies similar to The Geysers felsite may underlie much of the Clear Lake region at depths as little as 3--6 km. This is significant because future HDR reservoirs could potentially be sited in relatively shallow granitoid plutons rather than in structurally complex Franciscan basement rocks.

  9. Assessment of thermal load on transported goats administered with ascorbic acid during the hot-dry conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minka, N. S.; Ayo, J. O.

    2012-03-01

    The major factor in the induction of physiological stress during road transportation of livestock is the complex fluctuations of the thermal transport microenvironment, encountered when animals are transported across different ecological zones. Recommended guidelines on optimum "on-board" conditions in which goats should be transported are lacking, and there are no acceptable ranges and limits for the thermal loads to which goats may be subjected during long-distance road transportation in hot-dry conditions. Panting score (PS), rectal temperature (RT), heart rate (HR) and respiratory rate (RR) were employed as reliable stress indices to assess the effects of different thermal loads, measured as temperature humidity index (THI), encountered in the vehicle during 12 h of road transportation of 40 goats, and to suggest the administration of 100 mg/kg body weight of ascorbic acid (AA) as an ameliorating agent. The results obtained showed that the PS, RT, HR and RR rose above normal reference values with increase in the THI and journey duration. The rise in PS value, which is a visual indicator of the severity of thermal load, was the most pronounced. The results suggest that values of THI in the vehicle up to 94.6 constitute no risk, while at of 100 it presents a moderate risk and above 100 may result in severe stress. The relationships between the thermal load and the physiological variables were positive and significant ( P < 0.05). They reflect the degree of stress imposed by each THI value during the transportation, and may be used as recommended ranges and limit thermal load values in transported goats. The results demonstrated that administration of 100 mg/kg body weight of AA before road transportation mitigated the risk of adverse effects of high THI values and other stress factors due to road transportation in goats.

  10. Geochemistry of thermal/mineral waters in the Clear Lake region, California, and implications for hot dry rock geothermal development

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, F.; Adams, A.I.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Mansfield, J.

    1993-02-01

    Thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region are broadly classified as thermal meteoric and connote types based on chemical and isotopic criteria. Ratios of conservative components such as B/Cl are extremely different among all thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region except for clusters of waters emerging from specific areas such as the Wilbur Springs district and the Agricultural Park area south of Mt. Konocti. In contrast, ratios of conservative components in large, homogeneous geothermal reservoirs are constant. Stable isotope values of Clear Lake region waters show a mixing trend between thermal meteoric and connote end-members. The latter end-member has enriched [delta]D as well as enriched d[sup l8]O, very different from typical high-temperature geothermal reservoir waters. Tritium data and modeling of ages indicate most Clear Lake region waters are 500 to > 10,000 yr., although mixing of old and young components is implied by the data. The age of end-member connate water is probably > 10,000 yr. Subsurface equilibration temperature of most thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region is [le] 150[degrees]C based on chemical geothermometers but it is recognized that Clear Lake region waters are not typical geothermal fluids and that they violate rules of application of many geothermometers. The combined data indicate that no large geothermal reservoir underlies the Clear Lake region and that small localized reservoirs have equilibration temperatures [le] 150[degrees]C (except for Sulphur Bank Mine). Hot dry rock technologies are the best way to commercially exploit the known high temperatures existing beneath the Clear Lake region, particularly within the main Clear Lake volcanic field.

  11. Hydrogeochemical evaluation of conventional and hot dry rock geothermal resource potential in the Clear Lake region, California

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, F.; Adams, A.I.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.

    1993-05-01

    Chemistry, stable isotope, and tritium contents of thermal/mineral waters in the Clear Lake region were used to evaluate conventional and hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal potential for electrical generation. Thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region are broadly classified as thermal meteoric and connate types based on chemical and isotopic criteria. Ratios of conservative components such as B/Cl are extremely different among all thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region except for clusters of waters emerging from specific areas such as the Wilbur Springs district and the Agricultural Park area south of Mt. Konocti. In contrast ratios of conservative components in large, homogeneous geothermal reservoirs are constant. Stable isotope values of Clear Lake region waters show a mixing trend between thermal meteoric and connate (generic) end-members. The latter end-member has enriched {delta}D as well as enriched {delta}{sup 18}O, from typical high-temperature geothermal reservoir waters. Tritium data indicate most Clear Lake region waters are mixtures of old and young fluid components. Subsurface equilibration temperature of most thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region is {le}150{degree}C based on chemical geothermometers but it is recognized that Clear Lake region waters are not typical geothermal fluids and that they violate rules of application of many geothermometers. The combined data indicate that no large geothermal reservoir underlies the Clear Lake region and that small localized reservoirs have equilibration temperatures {le}150{degree}C (except for Sulphur Bank mine). HDR technologies are probably the best way to commercially exploit the known high-temperatures existing beneath the Clear Lake region particularly within and near the main Clear Lake volcanic field.

  12. The dependence of permeability on effective stress from flow tests at hot dry rock reservoirs at Rosemanowes (Cornwall) and Fenton Hill (New Mexico)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nathenson, M.

    1999-01-01

    Effective stress is the primary control on permeability and thus on flow and water loss for two-well hot dry rock systems involving injection and production that have been tested to date. Theoretical relations are derived for the flow between an injector and producer, including the dependence of permeability on effective stress. Four relations for permeability as a function of effective stress are used to match field data for the hot dry rock systems at Rosemanowes, Cornwall, and Fenton Hill, New Mexico. The flow and water loss behavior of these systems are well explained by the influence of effective stress on permeability. All four relations for permeability as a function of effective stress are successful in matching the field data, but some have difficulty in determining unique values for elastic and hydrologic parameters.Effective stress is the primary control on permeability and thus on flow and water loss for two-well hot dry rock systems involving injection and production that have been tested to date. Theoretical relations are derived for the flow between an injector and producer, including the dependence of permeability on effective stress. Four relations for permeability as a function of effective stress are used to match field data for the hot dry rock systems at Rosemanowes, Cornwall, and Fenton Hill, New Mexico. The flow and water loss behavior of these systems are well explained by the influence of effective stress on permeability. All four relations for permeability as a function of effective stress are successful in matching the field data, but some have difficulty in determining unique values for elastic and hydrologic parameters.

  13. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dogliani, Harold O

    2011-01-19

    The purpose of the briefing is to describe general laboratory technical capabilities to be used for various groups such as military cadets or university faculty/students and post docs to recruit into a variety of Los Alamos programs. Discussed are: (1) development and application of high leverage science to enable effeictive, predictable and reliability outcomes; (2) deter, detect, characterize, reverse and prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their use by adversaries and terrorists; (3) modeling and simulation to define complex processes, predict outcomes, and develop effective prevention, response, and remediation strategies; (4) energetic materials and hydrodynamic testing to develop materials for precise delivery of focused energy; (5) materials cience focused on fundamental understanding of materials behaviors, their quantum-molecular properties, and their dynamic responses, and (6) bio-science to rapidly detect and characterize pathogens, to develop vaccines and prophylactic remedies, and to develop attribution forensics.

  14. Effect of Hot Water Blanching Time and Drying Temperature on the Thin Layer Drying Kinetics of and Anthocyanin Degradation in Black Carrot (Daucus carota L.) Shreds

    PubMed Central

    Garba, Umar; Gurumayum, Sushma; Rasane, Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Summary This study was conducted to investigate the effect of blanching treatment (98 °C for 3 and 6 min) and air drying temperature of 40, 50 and 60 °C on the thin layer drying characteristics such as drying time, drying rate constant, effective moisture diffusivity and activation energy, as well as on anthocyanin content of black carrot shreds. It was observed that drying temperature affected the drying rate but blanching did not have an effect on drying time. Three thin layer drying models, i.e. Page, Lewis and Henderson-Pabis were evaluated. The goodness of these models was evaluated based on the coefficient of determination (R2), root mean square error, reduced chi square (χ2) and standard error. Page model showed the best fit to the drying data. The effective diffusivity ranges of 1.4·10–9 to 2.6·10–9 m2/s, 1.3·10–9 to 2.1·10–9 m2/s and 1.5·10–9 to 2.2·10–9 m2/s after 3 or 6 min of blanching and control samples respectively were calculated using Fick’s second law. The activation energy of 37.5, 26.0 and 34.6 kJ/(mol·K) of the control samples and samples blanched for 3 or 6 min respectively was determined from the Arrhenius plot. The blanching treatment affected the anthocyanin content to a great extent. The anthocyanin content of (231.7±2.9) and (278.8±7.8) mg per 100 g was recorded in samples blanched for 3 and 6 min and then dried at 60 °C, and (153.0±4.3) and (247.0±5.5) mg per 100 g was recorded at 40 °C as compared to the control of (580.1±1.3) at 60 °C and (466.7±1.1) mg per 100 g at 40 °C. PMID:27904364

  15. Thin-layer drying of tomato ( Lycopersicum esculentum Mill. cv. Rio Grande) slices in a convective hot air dryer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demiray, Engin; Tulek, Yahya

    2012-05-01

    The effects of different drying temperatures on the drying kinetics of tomato slices were investigated using a cabinet-type dryer. The experimental drying data were fitted best to the to the Page and Modified Page models apart from other theoretical models to predict the drying kinetics. The effective moisture diffusivities varied from 1.015 × 10-9 to 2.650 × 10-9 m2 s-1over the temperature range studied, and activation energy was 22.981 kJ mol-1.

  16. An Archaeological Sample Survey of the Alamo Reservoir Mohave and Yuma Counties, Arizona,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-09-01

    about one-thid of the annual rainfall. This rainfall pattern is characteristic of the Lover Colorado section of the Sonoran Desert (Love 1964:24). 3Ř...Vegetation The Alamo Lake area is characterized by Southwestern Desert Scrub vegetation (Lowe 1964:18). Such vegetation occurs in the Lower Sonoran life...zone, an association covering elevations ranging up to 1220 a (4,000 ft). Alamo Lake is located in the Sonoran Desert, the hot desert covering most of

  17. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 2. Builders and Buyers Handbook for Improving New Home Efficiency, Comfort, and Durability in the Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Baechler, M. C.; Taylor, Z. T.; Bartlett, R.; Gilbride, T.; Hefty, M.; Love, P. M.

    2005-09-01

    This best practices guide is part of a series produced by Building America. The guidebook is a resource to help builders large and small build high-quality, energy-efficient homes that achieve 30% energy savings in space conditioning and water heating in the hot-dry and mixed-dry climates. The savings are in comparison with the 1993 Model Energy Code. The guide contains chapters for every member of the builder's team—from the manager to the site planner to the designers, site supervisors, the trades, and marketers. There is also a chapter for homeowners on how to use the book to provide help in selecting a new home or builder.

  18. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 2. Builders and Buyers Handbook for Improving New Home Efficiency, Comfort, and Durability in the Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Baechler, M. C.; Taylor, Z. T.; Bartlett, R.; Gilbride, T.; Hefty, M.; Love, P. M.

    2005-06-01

    This best practices guide is part of a series produced by Building America. The guidebook is a resource to help builders large and small build high-quality, energy-efficient homes that achieve 30% energy savings in space conditioning and water heating in the hot-dry and mixed-dry climates. The savings are in comparison with the 1993 Model Energy Code. The guide contains chapters for every member of the builder's team-from the manager to the site planner to the designers, site supervisors, the trades, and marketers. There is also a chapter for homeowners on how to use the book to provide help in selecting a new home or builder.

  19. Acid-base interactions in amorphous solid dispersions of lumefantrine prepared by spray-drying and hot-melt extrusion using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Chen, Xin; Su, Ziyang; Nie, Haichen; Lubach, Joseph W; Smith, Daniel; Byrn, Stephen; Pinal, Rodolfo

    2016-12-05

    This study investigates drug-excipient interactions in amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) of the model basic compound lumefantrine (LMN), with five acidic polymers. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to measure the extent of the protonation of the tertiary amine in LMN by the five acidic polymers. The extent/efficiency of protonation of the ASDs was assessed a function of polymer type, manufacturing process (hot-melt extrusion vs. spray drying), and drug loading (DL). The most strongly acidic polymer, polystyrene sulfonic acid (PSSA) was found to be the most efficient polymer in protonating LMN, independently of manufacturing method and DL. The rank order for the protonation extent of LMN by each polymer is roughtly the same for both manufacturing processes. However, protonation efficiency of polymers of similar acidic strength ranged from ∼0% to 75% (HPMCAS and Eudragit L100-55, respectively), suggesting an important role of molecular/mixing effects. For some polymers, including Eudragit L100 55 and HPMCP, spray-drying resulted in higher protonation efficiency compared to hot-melt extrusion. This result is attributable to a more favorable encounter between acid and base groups, when exposed to each other in solution phase. Increasing DL led to decreased protonation efficiency in most cases, particularly for polyacrylic acid, despite having the highest content of acidic groups per unit mass. These results indicate that the combined effects of acid strength and mixing phenomena regulate the efficiency of acid-base interactions in the ASDs.

  20. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Performance of a Hot-Dry Climate Whole-House Retrofit, Stockton, California

    SciTech Connect

    2014-09-01

    The Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) team conducted a deep retrofit project within Stockton’s Large-Scale Retrofit Program that expanded on the standard package by adding HVAC, water heater and window upgrades to the ducting, attic and floor insulation, domestic hot water insulation, envelope sealing, lighting and ventilation upgrades. Post-retrofit site energy savings were 23% compared to the pre-retrofit case.

  1. Los Alamos upgrade in metallographic capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ledbetter, J.M.; Dowler, K.E.; Cook, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Los Alamos Wing 9 Hot Cell Facility is in the process of upgrading their metallographic sample preparation and examination capability. The present capability to grind, polish and etch samples from reactor fuels and materials has been in operation for 18 years. Macro photography and alpha and beta-gamma autoradiography are an important part of this capability. Some of the fast breeder reactor experiments have contained sodium as a coolant. Therefore, the capability to distill sodium from some samples scheduled for microstructural examinations is a requirement. Since the reactor fuel samples are highly radioactive and contain plutonium, either as fabricated or as a result of breeding during reactor service, these samples must be handled in shielded hot cells containing alpha boxes to isolate the plutonium and hazardous fission products from personnel and the environment. The present equipment that was designed and built into those alpha boxes has functioned very well for the past 18 years. During that time the technicians have thought of ways to improve the equipment to do the work faster and safer. These ideas and ideas that have been developed during the design of new alpha boxes and new equipment for microstructural sample preparation have provided the concepts for the capability to perform the work faster and maintain the equipment in a safer manner.

  2. Damage escape and repair in dried Chroococcidiopsis spp. from hot and cold deserts exposed to simulated space and martian conditions.

    PubMed

    Billi, Daniela; Viaggiu, Emanuela; Cockell, Charles S; Rabbow, Elke; Horneck, Gerda; Onofri, Silvano

    2011-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis, overlain by 3 mm of Antarctic sandstone, was exposed as dried multilayers to simulated space and martian conditions. Ground-based experiments were conducted in the context of Lichens and Fungi Experiments (EXPOSE-E mission, European Space Agency), which were performed to evaluate, after 1.5 years on the International Space Station, the survival of cyanobacteria (Chroococcidiopsis), lichens, and fungi colonized on Antarctic rock. The survival potential and the role played by protection and repair mechanisms in the response of dried Chroococcidiopsis cells to ground-based experiments were both investigated. Different methods were employed, including evaluation of the colony-forming ability, single-cell analysis of subcellular integrities based on membrane integrity molecular and redox probes, evaluation of the photosynthetic pigment autofluorescence, and assessment of the genomic DNA integrity with a PCR-based assay. Desiccation survivors of strain CCMEE 123 (coastal desert, Chile) were better suited than CCMEE 134 (Beacon Valley, Antarctica) to withstand cellular damage imposed by simulated space and martian conditions. Exposed dried cells of strain CCMEE 123 formed colonies, maintained subcellular integrities, and, depending on the exposure conditions, also escaped DNA damage or repaired the induced damage upon rewetting.

  3. Damage Escape and Repair in Dried Chroococcidiopsis spp. from Hot and Cold Deserts Exposed to Simulated Space and Martian Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billi, Daniela; Viaggiu, Emanuela; Cockell, Charles S.; Rabbow, Elke; Horneck, Gerda; Onofri, Silvano

    2011-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis, overlain by 3mm of Antarctic sandstone, was exposed as dried multilayers to simulated space and martian conditions. Ground-based experiments were conducted in the context of Lichens and Fungi Experiments (EXPOSE-E mission, European Space Agency), which were performed to evaluate, after 1.5 years on the International Space Station, the survival of cyanobacteria (Chroococcidiopsis), lichens, and fungi colonized on Antarctic rock. The survival potential and the role played by protection and repair mechanisms in the response of dried Chroococcidiopsis cells to ground-based experiments were both investigated. Different methods were employed, including evaluation of the colony-forming ability, single-cell analysis of subcellular integrities based on membrane integrity molecular and redox probes, evaluation of the photosynthetic pigment autofluorescence, and assessment of the genomic DNA integrity with a PCR-based assay. Desiccation survivors of strain CCMEE 123 (coastal desert, Chile) were better suited than CCMEE 134 (Beacon Valley, Antarctica) to withstand cellular damage imposed by simulated space and martian conditions. Exposed dried cells of strain CCMEE 123 formed colonies, maintained subcellular integrities, and, depending on the exposure conditions, also escaped DNA damage or repaired the induced damage upon rewetting.

  4. Isolation and Characterization of Microsatellite Loci for Hibiscus aridicola (Malvaceae), an Endangered Plant Endemic to the Dry-Hot Valleys of Jinsha River in Southwest China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Le; Sun, Weibang; Wang, Zhonglang; Guan, Kaiyun; Yang, Junbo

    2011-01-01

    Hibiscus aridicola (Malvaceae) is an endangered ornamental shrub endemic to the dry-hot valleys of Jinsha River in southwest China. Only four natural populations of H. aridicola exist in the wild according to our field investigation. It can be inferred that H. aridicola is facing a very high risk of extinction in the wild and an urgent conservation strategy is required. By using a modified biotin-streptavidin capture method, a total of 40 microsatellite markers were developed and characterized in H. aridicola for the first time. Polymorphisms were evaluated in 39 individuals from four natural populations. Fifteen of the markers showed polymorphisms with two to six alleles per locus; the observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.19 to 0.72. These microsatellite loci would be useful tools for population genetics studies on H. aridicola and other con-generic species which are important to the conservation and development of endangered species. PMID:22016620

  5. Building America Case Study: High Performance Ducts in Hot-Dry Climates; Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    ?Ducts in conditioned space (DCS) represent a high priority measure for moving the next generation of new homes to the Zero Net Energy performance level. Various strategies exist for incorporating ducts within the conditioned thermal envelope. To support this activity, in 2013 the Pacific Gas & Electric Company initiated a project with Davis Energy Group (lead for the Building America team, Alliance for Residential Building Innovation) to solicit builder involvement in California to participate in field demonstrations of various DCS strategies. Builders were given incentives and design support in exchange for providing site access for construction observation, diagnostic testing, and builder survey feedback. Information from the project was designed to feed into California's 2016 Title 24 process, but also to serve as an initial mechanism to engage builders in more high performance construction strategies. This Building America project complemented information collected in the California project with BEopt simulations of DCS performance in hot/dry climate regions.

  6. Comparative Study of 28 and 18 Years Field Aged Siemens-Arco M55 Modules in Temperate and Hot-Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Chicca, Matthew; Wohlgemuth, John; TamizhMani, GovindaSamy

    2016-11-21

    The primary objective of this research work is two-fold: (i) determine the degradation rates of Siemens-Arco M55 modules exposed over 18 and 28 years in a hot-dry climate of Arizona and a temperate climate of California, and; (ii) identify the potential modes responsible for these degradation losses. The degradation rates were determined based on the I-V data obtained on exposed modules and on the corresponding control modules which were not exposed in the fields. The degradation modes responsible for these degradations were determined using several nondestructive tests and destructive tests performed on these control and exposed modules. The nondestructive tests included: current-voltage, visual inspection, cell-module quantum efficiency, and module level reflectance spectroscopy. The destructive tests included: transmittance spectroscopy of glass superstrates, and FTIR, DSC and TGA of encapsulant materials.

  7. Satellites monitor Los Alamos fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalluri, Satya; White, Benjamin

    A man-made fire that was intended to be a “controlled burn” for clearing brush and wilderness at the Bandelier National Monument, New Mexico, became an inferno that devastated significant portions of Los Alamos during the first week of May 2000. Now known as the Cerro Grande fire, it was not confined to Los Alamos alone. The fire spread to 15% of the Santa Clara Indian Reservation and a substantial area of the surrounding national parks and U.S. forests.The National Weather Service estimates that more than 100,000 fires occur in the natural environment each year within the United States alone, of which about 90% are manmade. Remote sensing images from satellites could be used to detect and monitor these active fires and biomass burning. Forest fires have a significant environmental and economic impact, and timely information about their location and magnitude is essential to contain them.

  8. Large-scale processes relevant to extreme hot and dry summer conditions in the South Central U.S.: Comparing observations with CMIP5 simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, J. H.; Hayhoe, K.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, record high temperatures combined with extreme precipitation deficits have led to record-breaking droughts that have affected the Southern Plains. The 2011 drought and heat wave caused over $12B in damages across the SP region. Here, we combine station data with reanalysis to identify the hottest summers in the last 30 years. Consistent with previous analysis, we find that very hot temperatures over the region are highly correlated both precipitation as well as soil moisture deficits. Atmospheric circulation in the SP region during summer is generally dominated by the North Atlantic Subtropical High (NASH), which extends westward from its winter position over the Atlantic. The anticyclonic circulation could play a role in reducing convective precipitation as well as preventing disturbances from moving into the SP region. Examining the NARR reanalysis for the hottest summers of record, we find that the anticyclonic circulation associated with the NASH extends over the SP region relatively earlier in the summer and results in a comparatively stronger anticyclonic circulation, which in turn seems to be influenced by the large-scale climate variability. Specifically, the negative phase of the Pacific/North American (PNA) teleconnection pattern is characterized by high pressure anomalies across the southeastern and south central U.S. during summer. The two hottest years in the last three decades (1980 and 2011) also correlate with the two strongest negative PNA phases over that time. One of the anticipated impacts of human-induced climate change is the increased risk of hot and potentially dry summers across the SP region. For that reason, we also assess to what extent CMIP5 models are able simulate the large-scale processes that, according to reanalysis, are closely related to extreme hot and dry summer conditions over the Southern Plains. Composite maps of extreme heat years simulated in the models do display a stronger-than-average anticyclonic

  9. Hot topic: prevention of parturient paresis and subclinical hypocalcemia in dairy cows by zeolite A administration in the dry period.

    PubMed

    Thilsing-Hansen, T; Jørgensen, R J

    2001-03-01

    To test the effects of a zeolite feed supplement on parturient calcium status and milk fever, two groups of dry cows were treated with either 1 kg of zeolite/d or none for 4 wk prepartum. At calving and d 1 and 2 after calving all cows were given 250 g of calcium carbonate as a drench, and a blood sample was taken. Serum calcium analysis revealed a greater calcium concentration in zeolite-treated cows. While three control cows contracted milk fever, necessitating intravenous calcium therapy, and six out of eight control cows experienced serum calcium levels below 2 mmol/L in one or more samples taken, none of the zeolite-treated cows contracted milk fever or experienced subclinical hypocalcemia.

  10. Exploration for Hot Dry Rock geothermal resources in the Midcontinent USA. Volume 1. Introduction, geologic overview, and data acquisition and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Hinze, W.J.; Braile, L.W.; von Frese, R.R.B.; Lidiak, E.G.; Denison, R.E.; Keller, G.R.; Roy, R.F.; Swanberg, C.A.; Aiken, C.L.V.; Morgan, P.

    1986-02-01

    The Midcontinent of North America is commonly characterized as a stable cratonic area which has undergone only slow, broad vertical movements over the past several hundreds of millions of years. This tectonically stable crust is an unfertile area for hot dry rock (HDR) exploration. However, recent geophysical and geological studies provide evidence for modest contemporary tectonic activity in limited areas within the continent and, therefore, the possibility of localized thermal anomalies which may serve as sites for HDR exploration. HDR, as an energy resource in the Midcontinent, is particularly appealing because of the high population density and the demand upon conventional energy sources. Five generalized models of exploration targets for possible Midcontinent HDR sites are identified: (1) radiogenic heat sources, (2) conductivity-enhanced normal geothermal gradients, (3) residual magnetic heat, (4) sub-upper crustal sources, and (5) hydrothermal generated thermal gradients. Three potential sources of HDR, each covering approximately a 2/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ area, were identified and subjected to preliminary evaluation. In the Mississippi Embayment test site, lateral thermal conductivity variations and subcrustal heat sources may be involved in producing abnormally high subsurface temperatures. Studies indicate that enhanced temperatures are associated primarily with basement rift features where vertical displacement of aquifers and faults cause the upward migration of hot waters leading to anomalously high local upper crustal temperatures. The Western Nebraska test site is a potential low temperature HDR source also related, at least in part, to groundwater movement. The Southeast Michigan test site was selected for study because of the possible presence of radiogenic plutons overlain by a thickened sedimentary blanket.

  11. Los Alamos Science: Number 16

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, N.G.

    1988-01-01

    It was an unusually stimulating day and a half at Los Alamos when two Nobel Laureates in physiology, a leading paleontologist, and a leading bio-astrophysicist came together to discuss ''Unsolved Problems in the Science of Life,'' the topic of the second in a series of special meetings sponsored by the Fellows of the Laboratory. Just like the first one on ''Creativity in Science,'' this colloquium took us into a broader arena of ideas and viewpoints than is our usual daily fare. To contemplate the evolution and mysteries of intelligent life from the speakers' diverse points of view at one time, in one place was indeed a rare experience.

  12. Failure and Degradation Modes of PV modules in a Hot Dry Climate: Results after 4 and 12 years of field exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallineni, Jaya krishna

    This study evaluates two photovoltaic (PV) power plants based on electrical performance measurements, diode checks, visual inspections and infrared scanning. The purpose of this study is to measure degradation rates of performance parameters (Pmax, Isc, Voc, Vmax, Imax and FF) and to identify the failure modes in a "hot-dry desert" climatic condition along with quantitative determination of safety failure rates and reliability failure rates. The data obtained from this study can be used by module manufacturers in determining the warranty limits of their modules and also by banks, investors, project developers and users in determining appropriate financing or decommissioning models. In addition, the data obtained in this study will be helpful in selecting appropriate accelerated stress tests which would replicate the field failures for the new modules and would predict the lifetime for new PV modules. The study was conducted at two, single axis tracking monocrystalline silicon (c-Si) power plants, Site 3 and Site 4c of Salt River Project (SRP). The Site 3 power plant is located in Glendale, Arizona and the Site 4c power plant is located in Mesa, Arizona both considered a "hot-dry" field condition. The Site 3 power plant has 2,352 modules (named as Model-G) which was rated at 250 kW DC output. The mean and median degradation of these 12 years old modules are 0.95%/year and 0.96%/year, respectively. The major cause of degradation found in Site 3 is due to high series resistance (potentially due to solder-bond thermo-mechanical fatigue) and the failure mode is ribbon-ribbon solder bond failure/breakage. The Site 4c power plant has 1,280 modules (named as Model-H) which provide 243 kW DC output. The mean and median degradation of these 4 years old modules are 0.96%/year and 1%/year, respectively. At Site 4c, practically, none of the module failures are observed. The average soiling loss is 6.9% in Site 3 and 5.5% in Site 4c. The difference in soiling level is attributed

  13. Fluid inclusion evidence for recent temperature increases at Fenton Hill hot dry rock test site west of the Valles Caldera, New Mexico, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasada, Masakatsu

    1989-02-01

    The fluid inclusions in calcite veins and those in quartz of the host Precambrian rocks from the GT-2 drill hole have been studied microthermometrically to determine the recent thermal history of the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock test site west of the Valles caldera, New Mexico. The calcite veins were collected from 1876 m and 2624 m depth. They contain primary liquid-rich inclusions and secondary liquid-rich and monophase liquid inclusions. The homogenization temperature ( T h) and final melting point of ice ( T m) of these inclusions and the secondary inclusions in quartz from the host Precambrian rocks were measured using α USGS-type gas flow heating/freezing stage. The CO 2 content was also determined semiquantitatively using a microscope crushing stage. The trapping temperature was determined on the isochore under the assumption of lithostatic pressure. NaCl eq. salinity was also determined from T m after correction for CO 2. Microthermometry of primary inclusions in calcite and secondary inclusions in quartz indicates that the calcite veins precipitated from low-salinity geothermal fluids at temperatures at least 10-15°C lower than the thermal maximum recorded in the secondary inclusions in quartz of the Precambrian rocks. The lowest temperature determined from the minimum trapping temperature of secondary inclusions in calcite is 26°C lower than the present borehole temperature of 178°C at 2624 m. After this cooling the temperature increased again up to the present geothermal profile.

  14. Thermal and mechanical properties of cellular polystyrene and polyurethane insulation materials aged on a flat roof in hot-dry climate

    SciTech Connect

    Ozkan, E. . Faculty of Architecture)

    1994-03-01

    Cellular polymers, which have been increasingly used for thermal insulation of external walls and roofs since the 1970s, degrade in some cases. The heat transmission of a cellular polymer insulator, the k value, is predominantly dependent on the heat conduction of the air or gas remaining in the cells. An insulator may be aged and start transmitting more energy due to replacement of cell content with different gases or moisture or both, changes in size, softening and creeping under pressure and heat, or penetration of water or mineral particles into cells, or a combination thereof. The solid face also degrades due to ultraviolet light, heat and atmospheric oxygen. A research project was carried out from January 1988 to December 1991 to investigate the performance of flat roofs, waterproofing, and thermal insulation materials in the hot-dry climatic region of Saudi Arabia. In this context a field station was built and operated for weathering of roofing and insulation materials and for monitoring the surface and the inner temperatures of the applied roof systems. Basically, two types of cellular polymer, expanded polystyrene and foamed polyurethane, were installed on the roof of the station for insulation. Specimens taken from the fresh, stored, and weathered polystyrene and polyurethane foams were tested to evaluate them according to the selected properties of thermal conductivity, compressive strength at relative deformation, and dimensional stability at elevated temperature. The test results were compared with the requirements presented in the literature and the standard specifications.

  15. Los Alamos PC estimating system

    SciTech Connect

    Stutz, R.A.; Lemon, G.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Los Alamos Cost Estimating System (QUEST) is being converted to run on IBM personal computers. This very extensive estimating system is capable of supporting cost estimators from many different and varied fields. QUEST does not dictate any fixed method for estimating. QUEST supports many styles and levels of detail estimating. QUEST can be used with or without data bases. This system allows the estimator to provide reports based on levels of detail defined by combining work breakdown structures. QUEST provides a set of tools for doing any type of estimate without forcing the estimator to use any given method. The level of detail in the estimate can be mixed based on the amount of information known about different parts of the project. The system can support many different data bases simultaneously. Estimators can modify any cost in any data base.

  16. Clinical observations made in nonheat acclimated horses performing treadmill exercise in cool (20 degrees C/40%RH), hot, dry (30 degrees C/40%RH) or hot, humid (30 degrees C/80%RH) conditions.

    PubMed

    Harris, P A; Marlin, D J; Mills, P C; Roberts, C A; Scott, C M; Harris, R C; Orme, C E; Schroter, R C; Marr, C M; Barrelet, F

    1995-11-01

    Four horses (H, J, N and M) undertook a treadmill competition exercise test (CET), designed to simulate the physiological and metabolic stresses of the Speed and Endurance phase of a 3-day-event, under 3 different environmental conditions: 20 degrees C/40% relative humidity (RH) (cool, dry [CD]: 2 sessions); 30 degrees C/40%RH (hot, dry [HD]) and 30 degrees C/80%RH (hot, humid [HH]) (Marlin et al. 1995). A number of subjective clinical observations were made at designated time points throughout the exercise test and initial recovery period including buccal mucous membrane colouration, capillary refill time, neck and point of shoulder skin pinch recovery time, grade of abdominal sounds; anal sphincter tone as well as the presence or absence of fatigue and ataxia. The aim was to investigate their value in predicting performance in the final canter phase of the CET equivalent to the cross-country or Phase D of a field competition. In addition, the use of a more objective assessment, the cardiac recovery index (CRI), was investigated together with the heart rate, rectal temperature and respiratory frequency at the end of Phase C and at the 8 min point of the 10 Minute Box (8'X). The CRI was calculated according to the formula CRI = P2-P1 where P2 = the heart rate in beats/min at the 8 min point of the '10 Minute Box' (Phase X) of the CET. P1 = the heart rate (beats/min) at the 7 min point just before the horse was made to trot over a distance of 80 m at a speed of 3.7 m/s (at a 3 degrees incline) before returning to a walk. The study suggested that the subjective tests carried out at the 'End-C' and/or '8'X' time points were not useful in predicting subsequent performance in the final canter phase (Phase D) and neither were heart rate, rectal temperature or respiratory frequency. However, the only horse (Horse H) to complete the full CET under HH conditions was the only animal to show a decrease in respiratory frequency between the End-C and 8'X time points. All others

  17. Ductile shear zones can induce hydraulically over-pressured fractures in deep hot-dry rock reservoirs: a new target for geothermal exploration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrank, C. E.; Karrech, A.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2014-12-01

    It is notoriously difficult to create and maintain permeability in deep hot-dry rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs with engineering strategies. However, we predict that long-lived, slowly deforming HDR reservoirs likely contain hydraulically conductive, over-pressured fracture systems, provided that (a) the underlying lower crust and/or mantle are not entirely depleted of fluids and (b) the fracture system has not been drained into highly permeable overlying rocks. Such fracture systems could be targeted for the extraction of geothermal energy. Our prediction hinges on the notion that polycrystalline creep through matter transfer by a liquid phase (dissolution-precipitation creep) is a widespread mechanism for extracting fluids from the lower crust and mantle. Such processes - where creep cavities form during the slow, high-temperature deformation of crystalline solids, e.g., ceramics, metals, and rocks - entail the formation of (intergranular) fluid-assisted creep fractures. They constitute micron-scale voids formed along grain boundaries due to incompatibilities arising from diffusion or dislocation creep. Field and laboratory evidence suggest that the process leading to creep fractures may generate a dynamic permeability in the ductile crust, thus extracting fluids from this domain. We employed an elasto-visco-plastic material model that simulates creep fractures with continuum damage mechanics to model the slow contraction of high-heat-producing granites overlain by sedimentary rocks in 2D. The models suggest that deformation always leads to the initiation of a horizontal creep-damage front in the lower crust. This front propagates upwards towards the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) during protracted deformation where it collapses into highly damaged brittle-ductile shear zones. If the BDT is sufficiently shallow or finite strain sufficiently large, these shear zones trigger brittle faults emerging from their tips, which connect to the sub-horizontal damage

  18. Ameliorative effects of melatonin administration and photoperiods on diurnal fluctuations in cloacal temperature of Marshall broiler chickens during the hot dry season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinkalu, Victor O.; Ayo, Joseph O.; Adelaiye, Alexander B.; Hambolu, Joseph O.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments were performed with the aim of determining the effect of melatonin administration on diurnal fluctuations in cloacal temperature (CT) of Marshall broiler chickens during the hot dry season. Birds in group I (12L:12D cycle) were raised under natural photoperiod of 12-h light and 12-h darkness, without melatonin supplementation, while those in group II (LL) were kept under 24-h continuous lighting, without melatonin administration. Broiler chickens in group III (LL + melatonin) were raised under 24-h continuous lighting, with melatonin supplementation at 0.5 mg/kg per os. The cloacal temperatures of 15 labeled broiler chickens from each group were measured at 6:00, 13:00, and 19:00 h, 7 days apart, from days 14-42. Temperature-humidity index was highest at day 14 of the study, with the value of 36.72 ± 0.82 °C but lowest at day 28 with the value of 30.91 ± 0.80 °C ( P < 0.0001). The overall mean hourly cloacal temperature value of 41.51 ± 0.03 °C obtained in the 12L:12D cycle birds was significantly higher ( P < 0.001) than the value of 41.16 ± 0.03 °C recorded in the melatonin-treated group but lower than that of 41.65 ± 0.03 °C obtained in the LL birds. Mortality due to hyperthermia commenced at day 28 in both 12L:12D cycle and LL broiler chickens but was delayed till day 42 in LL + MEL broiler chickens. In conclusion, melatonin administration alleviated the deleterious effects of heat stress on broiler chickens by maintaining their cloacal temperature at relatively low values.

  19. Ameliorative effects of melatonin administration and photoperiods on diurnal fluctuations in cloacal temperature of Marshall broiler chickens during the hot dry season.

    PubMed

    Sinkalu, Victor O; Ayo, Joseph O; Adelaiye, Alexander B; Hambolu, Joseph O

    2015-01-01

    Experiments were performed with the aim of determining the effect of melatonin administration on diurnal fluctuations in cloacal temperature (CT) of Marshall broiler chickens during the hot dry season. Birds in group I (12L:12D cycle) were raised under natural photoperiod of 12-h light and 12-h darkness, without melatonin supplementation, while those in group II (LL) were kept under 24-h continuous lighting, without melatonin administration. Broiler chickens in group III (LL + melatonin) were raised under 24-h continuous lighting, with melatonin supplementation at 0.5 mg/kg per os. The cloacal temperatures of 15 labeled broiler chickens from each group were measured at 6:00, 13:00, and 19:00 h, 7 days apart, from days 14-42. Temperature-humidity index was highest at day 14 of the study, with the value of 36.72 ± 0.82 °C but lowest at day 28 with the value of 30.91 ± 0.80 °C (P < 0.0001). The overall mean hourly cloacal temperature value of 41.51 ± 0.03 °C obtained in the 12L:12D cycle birds was significantly higher (P < 0.001) than the value of 41.16 ± 0.03 °C recorded in the melatonin-treated group but lower than that of 41.65 ± 0.03 °C obtained in the LL birds. Mortality due to hyperthermia commenced at day 28 in both 12L:12D cycle and LL broiler chickens but was delayed till day 42 in LL + MEL broiler chickens. In conclusion, melatonin administration alleviated the deleterious effects of heat stress on broiler chickens by maintaining their cloacal temperature at relatively low values.

  20. [Vegetation biomass allocation and its spatial distribution after 20 years ecological restoration in a dry-hot valley in Yuanmou, Yunnan Province of Southwest China].

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Tang, Guo-Yong; Li, Kun; Gao, Cheng-Jie; Liu, Fang-Yan; Wang, Xiao-Fei

    2013-06-01

    By using layering harvest method, a comparative study was conducted on the biomass allocation and its spatial distribution of 20-year-old Eucalyptus camaldulensis plantation, Leucaena leucocephala plantation, and E. camaldulensis-L. leucocephala plantation in Yuanmou dry-hot valley of Yunnan Province, Southwest China. The stand biomass in the mixed E. camaldulensis-L. leucocephala plantation (82.99 t x hm(-2)) was between that of monoculture E. camaldulensis plantation (60.64 t x hm(-2)) and L. leucocephala plantation (127.79 t x hm(-2)). The individual tree biomass of E. camaldulensis in the mixed plantation (44.32 kg) was 49.8% higher than that in monoculture plantation (29.58 kg). The branch and leaf biomass of L. leucocephala (25.4%) in monoculture plantation was larger than that of E. camaldulensis (8.9%) in monoculture plantation, and the aboveground biomass distribution ratio (78.0%) of L. leucocephala (25.4%) was also higher than that of E. camaldulensis (73.4%). The roots of L. leucocephala in both monoculture and mixed plantations were mainly distributed in 0-40 cm soil layer, while those of E. camaldulensis in monoculture and mixed plantations were mainly found in 0-80 cm and 0-60 cm, respectively. The proportion of biomass allocated to roots including medium roots, small roots, and fine roots of L. leucocephala in mixed plantation was higher than that in monoculture plantation, but it was contrary for E. camaldulensis. It was suggested that introducing L. leucocephala in E. camaldulensis plantation promoted the growth of E. camaldulensis, especially for its aboveground biomass, and increased the amount of lateral roots in 0-20 cm soil layer, which had significance in soil and water conservation in the study area.

  1. Up-regulation of milk secretion with modified microclimate through manipulating plasminogen-plasmin system in Murrah buffaloes during hot dry season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, N.; Singh, M.; Hossain, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    The present study was aimed at determining changes in milk yield and composition along with the plasminogen-plasmin system of milk, plasma hormones, and metabolites of buffaloes during hot dry season (air temperature range 39.7 to 44.8 °C) under two different management systems. Buffaloes were divided in two groups of six animals each: control and treatment, where treatment group animals accessed benefit of mist and fan cooling from 9:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., while control group animals were devoid of it. Duration of experiment was 6 weeks. Under mist and fan cooling system, buffaloes experienced better comfort by alleviating environmental stress as their physiological responses such as rectal temperature, respiration rate, pulse rate, and forehead and middorsal temperatures were significantly ( P < 0.05) reduced compared to control, which subsequently resulted higher milk yield by 4.44 % ( P < 0.001). Analysis of milk samples revealed higher concentration of plasminogen (7.99 vs 6.27 μg/ml; P < 0.01) and β-casein (1.09 vs 0.92 g/dl; P < 0.001) and lower plasmin level (0.178 vs 0.194 μg/ml; P < 0.05) in buffaloes under the treatment group compared to that under the control. Plasma glucose level was higher ( P < 0.001) by 21.08 %, whereas cortisol, norepinephrine, and NEFA levels were lower ( P < 0.001) by 19.19, 15.38, and 11.41 %, respectively, in treatment animals. However, exposure of buffaloes to cooling system did not alter composition and calcium content of milk, GH, and epinephrine level in plasma. Hence, it may be concluded that provision of cooling system during summer was effective to minimize environmental stress and improve milk production by manipulation of the PG-PL system in buffaloes.

  2. The conversion of biomass to ethanol using geothermal energy derived from hot dry rock to supply both the thermal and electrical power requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.W.

    1997-10-01

    The potential synergism between a hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy source and the power requirements for the conversion of biomass to fuel ethanol is considerable. In addition, combining these two renewable energy resources to produce transportation fuel has very positive environmental implications. One of the distinct advantages of wedding an HDR geothermal power source to a biomass conversion process is flexibility, both in plant location and in operating process is flexibility, both in plant location and in operating conditions. The latter obtains since an HDR system is an injection conditions of flow rate, pressure, temperature, and water chemistry are under the control of the operator. The former obtains since, unlike a naturally occurring geothermal resource, the HDR resource is very widespread, particularly in the western US, and can be developed near transportation and plentiful supplies of biomass. Conceptually, the pressurized geofluid from the HDR reservoir would be produced at a temperature in the range of 200{degrees} to 220{degrees}c. The higher enthalpy portion of the geofluid thermal energy would be used to produce a lower-temperature steam supply in a countercurrent feedwater-heater/boiler. The steam, following a superheating stage fueled by the noncellulosic waste fraction of the biomass, would be expanded through a turbine to produce electrical power. Depending on the lignin fraction of the biomass, there would probably be excess electrical power generated over and above plant requirements (for slurry pumping, stirring, solids separation, etc.) which would be available for sale to the local power grid. In fact, if the hybrid HDR/biomass system were creatively configured, the power plant could be designed to produce daytime peaking power as well as a lower level of baseload power during off-peak hours.

  3. Sunset at the ALaMO

    NASA Video Gallery

    A new color all-sky camera has opened its eyes at the ALaMO, or Automated Lunar and Meteor Observatory, at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Watch its inaugural video below, s...

  4. Publications of Los Alamos research 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Varjabedian, K.; Dussart, S.A.; McClary, W.J.; Rich, J.A.

    1989-12-01

    This bibliography lists unclassified publications of work done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for 1988. The entries, which are subdivided by broad subject categories, are cross-referenced with an author index and a numeric index.

  5. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    This report describes environmental monitoring activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory for 1994. Data were collected to assess external penetrating radiation, airborne emissions, liquid effluents, radioactivity of environmental materials and food stuffs, and environmental compliance.

  6. New Rad Lab for Los Alamos

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The topping out ceremony for a key construction stage in the Los Alamos National Laboratory's newest facility, the Radiological Laboratory Utility & Office Building. This is part of the National Nu...  

  7. New Rad Lab for Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    2008-08-06

    The topping out ceremony for a key construction stage in the Los Alamos National Laboratory's newest facility, the Radiological Laboratory Utility & Office Building. This is part of the National Nu...  

  8. Edward Teller Returns to LOS Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker, Siegfried S.

    2010-01-01

    I was asked to share some reflections of Edward Teller's return to Los Alamos during my directorship. I met Teller late in his life. My comments focus on that time and they will be mostly in the form of stories of my interactions and those of my colleagues with Teller. Although the focus of this symposium is on Teller's contributions to science, at Los Alamos it was never possible to separate Teller's science from policy and controversy ...

  9. Internship at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, Ryan Q.

    2012-07-11

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is located in Los Alamos, New Mexico. It provides support for our country's nuclear weapon stockpile as well as many other scientific research projects. I am an Undergraduate Student Intern in the Systems Design and Analysis group within the Nuclear Nonproliferation division of the Global Security directorate at LANL. I have been tasked with data analysis and modeling of particles in a fluidized bed system for the capture of carbon dioxide from power plant flue gas.

  10. Los Alamos Laser Eye Investigation.

    SciTech Connect

    Odom, C. R.

    2005-01-01

    A student working in a laser laboratory at Los Alamos National Laboratory sustained a serious retinal injury to her left eye when she attempted to view suspended particles in a partially evacuated target chamber. The principle investigator was using the white light from the flash lamp of a Class 4 Nd:YAG laser to illuminate the particles. Since the Q-switch was thought to be disabled at the time of the accident, the principal investigator assumed it would be safe to view the particles without wearing laser eye protection. The Laboratory Director appointed a team to investigate the accident and to report back to him the events and conditions leading up to the accident, equipment malfunctions, safety management causal factors, supervisory and management action/inaction, adequacy of institutional processes and procedures, emergency and notification response, effectiveness of corrective actions and lessons learned from previous similar events, and recommendations for human and institutional safety improvements. The team interviewed personnel, reviewed documents, and characterized systems and conditions in the laser laboratory during an intense six week investigation. The team determined that the direct and primary failures leading to this accident were, respectively, the principle investigator's unsafe work practices and the institution's inadequate monitoring of worker performance. This paper describes the details of the investigation, the human and institutional failures, and the recommendations for improving the laser safety program.

  11. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    SciTech Connect

    Kippen, Karen Elizabeth

    2016-11-08

    For more than 30 years the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has provided the scientific underpinnings in nuclear physics and material science needed to ensure the safety and surety of the nuclear stockpile into the future. In addition to national security research, the LANSCE User Facility has a vibrant research program in fundamental science, providing the scientific community with intense sources of neutrons and protons to perform experiments supporting civilian research and the production of medical and research isotopes. Five major experimental facilities operate simultaneously. These facilities contribute to the stockpile stewardship program, produce radionuclides for medical testing, and provide a venue for industrial users to irradiate and test electronics. In addition, they perform fundamental research in nuclear physics, nuclear astrophysics, materials science, and many other areas. The LANSCE User Program plays a key role in training the next generation of top scientists and in attracting the best graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, and early-career scientists. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) —the principal sponsor of LANSCE—works with the Office of Science and the Office of Nuclear Energy, which have synergistic long-term needs for the linear accelerator and the neutron science that is the heart of LANSCE.

  12. Up-regulation of milk secretion with modified microclimate through manipulating plasminogen-plasmin system in Murrah buffaloes during hot dry season.

    PubMed

    Haque, N; Singh, M; Hossain, S A

    2016-12-01

    The present study was aimed at determining changes in milk yield and composition along with the plasminogen-plasmin system of milk, plasma hormones, and metabolites of buffaloes during hot dry season (air temperature range 39.7 to 44.8 °C) under two different management systems. Buffaloes were divided in two groups of six animals each: control and treatment, where treatment group animals accessed benefit of mist and fan cooling from 9:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., while control group animals were devoid of it. Duration of experiment was 6 weeks. Under mist and fan cooling system, buffaloes experienced better comfort by alleviating environmental stress as their physiological responses such as rectal temperature, respiration rate, pulse rate, and forehead and middorsal temperatures were significantly (P < 0.05) reduced compared to control, which subsequently resulted higher milk yield by 4.44 % (P < 0.001). Analysis of milk samples revealed higher concentration of plasminogen (7.99 vs 6.27 μg/ml; P < 0.01) and β-casein (1.09 vs 0.92 g/dl; P < 0.001) and lower plasmin level (0.178 vs 0.194 μg/ml; P < 0.05) in buffaloes under the treatment group compared to that under the control. Plasma glucose level was higher (P < 0.001) by 21.08 %, whereas cortisol, norepinephrine, and NEFA levels were lower (P < 0.001) by 19.19, 15.38, and 11.41 %, respectively, in treatment animals. However, exposure of buffaloes to cooling system did not alter composition and calcium content of milk, GH, and epinephrine level in plasma. Hence, it may be concluded that provision of cooling system during summer was effective to minimize environmental stress and improve milk production by manipulation of the PG-PL system in buffaloes.

  13. Simple Solutions for Dry Eye

    MedlinePlus

    ... are more concentrated in the tear film of dry eye patients. In hot weather, sleep with the windows shut and keep cool with air conditioning. • Dry eye patients often develop or aggravate allergies. An ...

  14. Los Alamos Discovers Super Efficient Solar Using Perovskite Crystals

    ScienceCinema

    Mohite, Aditya; Nie, Wanyi

    2016-07-12

    State-of-the-art photovoltaics using high-purity, large-area, wafer-scale single-crystalline semiconductors grown by sophisticated, high temperature crystal-growth processes offer promising routes for developing low-cost, solar-based clean global energy solutions for the future. Solar cells composed of the recently discovered material organic-inorganic perovskites offer the efficiency of silicon, yet suffer from a variety of deficiencies limiting the commercial viability of perovskite photovoltaic technology. In research to appear in Science, Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers reveal a new solution-based hot-casting technique that eliminates these limitations, one that allows for the growth of high-quality, large-area, millimeter-scale perovskite crystals and demonstrates that highly efficient and reproducible solar cells with reduced trap assisted recombination can be realized.

  15. Los Alamos Discovers Super Efficient Solar Using Perovskite Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Mohite, Aditya; Nie, Wanyi

    2015-01-29

    State-of-the-art photovoltaics using high-purity, large-area, wafer-scale single-crystalline semiconductors grown by sophisticated, high temperature crystal-growth processes offer promising routes for developing low-cost, solar-based clean global energy solutions for the future. Solar cells composed of the recently discovered material organic-inorganic perovskites offer the efficiency of silicon, yet suffer from a variety of deficiencies limiting the commercial viability of perovskite photovoltaic technology. In research to appear in Science, Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers reveal a new solution-based hot-casting technique that eliminates these limitations, one that allows for the growth of high-quality, large-area, millimeter-scale perovskite crystals and demonstrates that highly efficient and reproducible solar cells with reduced trap assisted recombination can be realized.

  16. Fuels Inventories in the Los Alamos National Laboratory Region: 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Balice, R.G.; Oswald, B.P.; Martin, C.

    1999-03-01

    Fifty-four sites were surveyed for fuel levels, vegetational structures, and topographic characteristics. Most of the surveyed sites were on Los Alamos National Laboratory property, however, some surveys were also conducted on U.S. Forest Service property. The overall vegetation of these sites ranged from pinon-juniper woodlands to ponderosa pine forests to mixed conifer forests, and the topographic positions included canyons, mesas, and mountains. The results of these surveys indicate that the understory fuels are the greatest in mixed conifer forests and that overstory fuels are greatest in both mixed conifer forests and ponderosa pine forests on mesas. The geographic distribution of these fuels would suggest a most credible wildfire scenario for the Los Alamos region. Three major fires have occurred since 1954 and these fires behaved in a manner that is consistent with this scenario. The most credible wildfire scenario was also supported by the results of BEHAVE modeling that used the fuels inventory data as inputs. Output from the BEHAVE model suggested that catastrophic wildfires would continue to occur during any season with sufficiently dry, windy weather.

  17. Status of Monte Carlo at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, W.L.; Cashwell, E.D.

    1980-01-01

    At Los Alamos the early work of Fermi, von Neumann, and Ulam has been developed and supplemented by many followers, notably Cashwell and Everett, and the main product today is the continuous-energy, general-purpose, generalized-geometry, time-dependent, coupled neutron-photon transport code called MCNP. The Los Alamos Monte Carlo research and development effort is concentrated in Group X-6. MCNP treats an arbitrary three-dimensional configuration of arbitrary materials in geometric cells bounded by first- and second-degree surfaces and some fourth-degree surfaces (elliptical tori). Monte Carlo has evolved into perhaps the main method for radiation transport calculations at Los Alamos. MCNP is used in every technical division at the Laboratory by over 130 users about 600 times a month accounting for nearly 200 hours of CDC-7600 time.

  18. Publications of Los Alamos research 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, C.A.; Willis, J.K.

    1981-09-01

    This bibliography is a compilation of unclassified publications of work done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for 1980. Papers published in 1980 are included regardless of when they were actually written. Publications received too late for inclusion in earlier compilations have also been listed. Declassification of previously classified reports is considered to constitute publication. All classified issuances are omitted-even those papers, themselves unclassified, which were published only as part of a classified document. If a paper was pubished more than once, all places of publication are included. The bibliography includes Los Alamos National Laboratory reports, papers released as non-laboratory reports, journal articles, books, chapters of books, conference papers published either separately or as part of conference proceedings issued as books or reports, papers published in congressional hearings, theses, and US patents. Publications by Los Alamos authors that are not records of Laboratory-sponsored work are included when the Library becomes aware of them.

  19. Publications of Los Alamos Research, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, C.J.; McClary, W.J.; Rich, J.A.; Rodriguez, L.L.

    1984-10-01

    This bibliography is a compilation of unclassified publications of work done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for 1983. Papers published in 1982 are included regardless of when they were actually written. Publications received too late for inclusion in earlier compilations have also been listed. Declassification of previously classified reports is considered to constitute publication. All classified issuances are omitted - even those papers, themselves unclassified, which were published only as part of a classified document. If a paper was published more than once, all places of publication are included. The bibliography includes Los Alamos National Laboratory reports, papers released as non-Laboratory reports, journal articles, books, chapters of books, conference papers either published separately or as part of conference proceedings issued as books or reports, papers publishd in congressional hearings, theses, and US patents. Publications by Los Alamos authors that are not records of Laboratory-sponsored work are included when the Library becomes aware of them.

  20. Water supply at Los Alamos during 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Purtymun, W.D.; McLin, S.G.; Stoker, A.K.; Maes, M.N.

    1995-09-01

    Municipal potable water supply during 1992 was 1,516 {times} 10{sup 6} gallons from wells in the Guaje and Pajarito well fields. About 13 {times} 10{sup 6} gallons were pumped from the Los Alamos Well Field and used in the construction of State Road 501 adjacent to the Field. The last year the Las Alamos Field was used for municipal supply was 1991. The nonpotable water supply used for steam plant support was about 0.12 {times} 10{sup 6} gallons from the spring gallery in Water Canyon. No nonpotable water was used for irrigation from Guaje and Los Alamos Reservoirs. Thus, the total water usage in 1992 was about 1,529 {times} 10{sup 6} gallons. Neither of the two new wells in the Otowi Well Field were operational in 1992.

  1. Induction inserts at the Los Alamos PSR

    SciTech Connect

    King-Yuen Ng

    2002-09-30

    Ferrite-loaded induction tuners installed in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring have been successful in compensating space-charge effects. However, the resistive part of the ferrite introduces unacceptable microwave instability and severe bunch lengthening. An effective cure was found by heating the ferrite cores up to {approx} 130 C. An understanding of the instability and cure is presented.

  2. A Sailor in the Los Alamos Navy

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, D. L.

    2016-12-20

    As part of the War Department’s Manhattan Engineer District (MED), Los Alamos was an Army installation during World War II, complete with a base commander and a brace of MPs. But it was a unique Army installation, having more civilian then military personnel. Even more unique was the work performed by the civilian population, work that required highly educated scientists and engineers. As the breadth, scope, and complexity of the Laboratory’s work increased, more and more technically educated and trained personnel were needed. But, the manpower needs of the nation’s war economy had created a shortage of such people. To meet its manpower needs, the MED scoured the ranks of the Army for anyone who had technical training and reassigned these men to its laboratories, including Los Alamos, as part of its Special Engineer Detachment (SED). Among the SEDs assigned to Los Alamos was Val Fitch, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1980. Another was Al Van Vessem, who helped stack the TNT for the 100 ton test, bolted together the Trinity device, and rode shotgun with the bomb has it was driven from Los Alamos to ground zero.

  3. Hot study: Investigating the risk for violative meat residues in bob veal calves fed colostrum from cows treated at dry-off with cephapirin benzathine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to complete a pilot study to investigate if violative meat residues are detected in very young bob veal calves that are fed first milking colostrum harvested from cows that were dry treated, on label, with cephapirin benzathine. First milking colostrum was collected from cows that...

  4. Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Dry Mouth What Is Dry Mouth? Dry mouth is the feeling that there is ... when a person has dry mouth. How Dry Mouth Feels Dry mouth can be uncomfortable. Some people ...

  5. Recent Infrasound Calibration Activity at Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, R. W.; Marcillo, O. E.

    2014-12-01

    Absolute infrasound sensor calibration is necessary for estimating source sizes from measured waveforms. This can be an important function in treaty monitoring. The Los Alamos infrasound calibration chamber is capable of absolute calibration. Early in 2014 the Los Alamos infrasound calibration chamber resumed operations in its new location after an unplanned move two years earlier. The chamber has two sources of calibration signals. The first is the original mechanical piston, and the second is a CLD Dynamics Model 316 electro-mechanical unit that can be digitally controlled and provide a richer set of calibration options. During 2008-2010 a number of upgrades were incorporated for improved operation and recording. In this poster we give an overview of recent chamber work on sensor calibrations, calibration with the CLD unit, some measurements with different porous hoses and work with impulse sources.

  6. Nuclear Forensics at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Podlesak, David W; Steiner, Robert E.; Burns, Carol J.; LaMont, Stephen P.; Tandon, Lav

    2012-08-09

    The overview of this presentation is: (1) Introduction to nonproliferation efforts; (2) Scope of activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (3) Facilities for radioanalytical work at LANL; (4) Radiochemical characterization capabilities; and (5) Bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities. Some conclusions are: (1) Analytical chemistry measurements on plutonium and uranium matrices are critical to numerous defense and non-defense programs including safeguards accountancy verification measurements; (2) Los Alamos National Laboratory operates capable actinide analytical chemistry and material science laboratories suitable for nuclear material forensic characterization; (3) Actinide analytical chemistry uses numerous means to validate and independently verify that measurement data quality objectives are met; and (4) Numerous LANL nuclear facilities support the nuclear material handling, preparation, and analysis capabilities necessary to evaluate samples containing nearly any mass of an actinide (attogram to kilogram levels).

  7. Water Supply at Los Alamos during 1997

    SciTech Connect

    M. N. Maes; S. G. McLin; W. D. Purtymun

    1998-12-01

    Production of potable municipal water supplies during 1997 totaled about 1,285.9 million gallons from wells in the Guaje, Pajarito, and Otowi well fields. There was no water used from the spring gallery in Water Canyon or from Guaje Reservoir during 1997. About 2.4 million gallons of water from Los Alamos Reservoir was used to irrigate public parks and recreational lands. The total water usage in 1997 was about 1,288.3 million gallons, or about 135 gallons per day per person living in Los Alamos County. Groundwater pumpage was down about 82.2 million gallons in 1997 compared with the pumpage in 1996. Four new replacement wells were drilled and cased in Guaje Canyon between October 1997 and March 1998. These wells are currently being developed and aquifer tests are being performed. A special report summarizing the geological, geophysical, and well construction logs will be issued in the near future for these new wells.

  8. Los Alamos Novel Rocket Design Flight Tested

    ScienceCinema

    Tappan, Bryce

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists recently flight tested a new rocket design that includes a high-energy fuel and a motor design that also delivers a high degree of safety. Researchers will now work to scale-up the design, as well as explore miniaturization of the system, in order to exploit all potential applications that would require high-energy, high-velocity, and correspondingly high safety margins.

  9. Risk management at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, D.G.; Stack, D.W.

    1993-11-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has risk management programs at a number of administrative levels. Each line organization has responsibility for risk management for routine operations. The Facility Risk Management group (HS-3) is the Los Alamos organization with the primary responsibility for risk management including providing input and expertise to facilities and line managers in the management and documentation of ES&H hazards and risks associated with existing and new activities. One of the major contributions this group has made to laboratory risk management program is to develop and implement a hazard identification and classification methodology that is readily adaptable to continuously changing classification guidelines such as DOE-STD-1027. The increased emphasis on safety at Los Alamos has led to the formation of additional safety oversight organization such as the Integration and Coordination Office (ICO), which is responsible for prioritization of risk management activities. In the fall of 1991, nearly 170 DOE inspectors spent 6 weeks analyzing the environmental, safety, and health activities at Los Alamos. The result of this audit was a list of over 1000 findings, each indicating some deficiency in current Laboratory operations relative to DOE and other government regulation. The audit team`s findings were consolidated and ``action plans`` were developed to address the findings. This resulted in over 200 action plans with a total estimated cost of almost $1 billion. The Laboratory adopted a risk-based prioritization process to attempt to achieve as much risk reduction as possible with the available resources. This paper describes the risk based prioritization model that was developed.

  10. Los Alamos National Laboratory Facility Review

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ronald Owen

    2015-06-05

    This series of slides depicts the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The Center's 800-MeV linac produces H+ and H- beams as well as beams of moderated (cold to 1 MeV) and unmoderated (0.1 to 600 MeV) neutrons. Experimental facilities and their capabilities and characteristics are outlined. Among these are LENZ, SPIDER, and DANCE.

  11. Los Alamos Team Demonstrates Bottle Scanner Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle; Schultz, Larry

    2014-05-06

    Los Alamos scientists are demonstrating a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMR) technology that may provide a breakthrough for screening liquids at airport security. By adding low-power X-ray data to the NMR mix, scientists believe they have unlocked a new detection technology. Funded in part by the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate, the new technology is called MagRay.

  12. Los Alamos Team Demonstrates Bottle Scanner Technology

    ScienceCinema

    Espy, Michelle; Schultz, Larry

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos scientists are demonstrating a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMR) technology that may provide a breakthrough for screening liquids at airport security. By adding low-power X-ray data to the NMR mix, scientists believe they have unlocked a new detection technology. Funded in part by the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate, the new technology is called MagRay.

  13. Amphibians and Reptiles of Los Alamos County

    SciTech Connect

    Teralene S. Foxx; Timothy K. Haarmann; David C. Keller

    1999-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that amphibians and reptiles are good indicators of environmental health. They live in terrestrial and aquatic environments and are often the first animals to be affected by environmental change. This publication provides baseline information about amphibians and reptiles that are present on the Pajarito Plateau. Ten years of data collection and observations by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the University of New Mexico, the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish, and hobbyists are represented.

  14. Los Alamos Novel Rocket Design Flight Tested

    SciTech Connect

    Tappan, Bryce

    2014-10-23

    Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists recently flight tested a new rocket design that includes a high-energy fuel and a motor design that also delivers a high degree of safety. Researchers will now work to scale-up the design, as well as explore miniaturization of the system, in order to exploit all potential applications that would require high-energy, high-velocity, and correspondingly high safety margins.

  15. Critical partnerships: Los Alamos, universities, and industry

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.L.

    1997-04-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, situated 35 miles northwest of Santa Fe, NM, is one of the Department of Energy`s three Defense Programs laboratories. It encompasses 43 square miles, employees approximately 10,000 people, and has a budget of approximately $1.1B in FY97. Los Alamos has a strong post-cold war mission, that of reducing the nuclear danger. But even with that key role in maintaining the nation`s security, Los Alamos views partnerships with universities and industry as critical to its future well being. Why is that? As the federal budget for R&D comes under continued scrutiny and certain reduction, we believe that the triad of science and technology contributors to the national system of R&D must rely on and leverage each others capabilities. For us this means that we will rely on these partners to help us in 5 key ways: We expect that partnerships will help us maintain and enhance our core competencies. In doing so, we will be able to attract the best scientists and engineers. To keep on the cutting edge of research and development, we have found that partnerships maintain the excellence of staff through new and exciting challenges. Additionally, we find that from our university and corporate partners we often learn and incorporate {open_quotes}best practices{close_quotes} in organizational management and operations. Finally, we believe that a strong national system of R&D will ensure and enhance our ability to generate revenues.

  16. Los Alamos National Laboratory Building Cost Index

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, H.D.; Lemon, G.D.

    1983-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Building Cost Index indicates that actual escalation since 1970 is near 10% per year. Therefore, the Laboratory will continue using a 10% per year escalation rate for construction estimates through 1985 and a slightly lower rate of 8% per year from 1986 through 1990. The computerized program compares the different elements involved in the cost of a typical construction project, which for our purposes, is a complex of office buildings and experimental laboratores. The input data used in the program consist primarily of labor costs and material and equipment costs. The labor costs are the contractural rates of the crafts workers in the Los Alamos area. For the analysis, 12 field-labor draft categories are used; each is weighted corresponding to the labor craft distribution associated with the typical construction project. The materials costs are current Los Alamos prices. Additional information sources include material and equipment quotes obtained through conversations with vendors and from trade publications. The material and equipment items separate into 17 categories for the analysis and are weighted corresponding to the material and equipment distribution associated with the typical construction project. The building cost index is compared to other national building cost indexes.

  17. Los Alamos National Laboratory building cost index

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, H.D.; Lemon, G.D.

    1982-10-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Building Cost Index indicates that actual escalation since 1970 is near 10% per year. Therefore, the Laboratory will continue using a 10% per year escalation rate for construction estimates through 1985 and a slightly lower rate of 8% per year from 1986 through 1990. The computerized program compares the different elements involved in the cost of a typical construction project, which for our purposes, is a complex of office buildings and experimental laboratories. The input data used in the program consist primarily of labor costs and material and equipment costs. The labor costs are the contractual rates of the crafts workers in the Los Alamos area. For the analysis, 12 field-labor craft categories are used; each is weighted corresponding to the labor craft distribution associated with the typical construction project. The materials costs are current Los Alamos prices. Additional information sources include material and equipment quotes obtained through conversations with vendors and from trade publications. The material and equipment items separate into 17 categories for the analysis and are weighted corresponding to the material and equipment distribution associated with the typical construction project. The building cost index is compared to other national building cost indexes.

  18. Factors affecting radionuclide availability to vegetables grown at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    White, G.C.; Hakonson, T.E.; Ahlquist, A.J.

    1981-07-01

    A field study was conducted in 1977 on /sup 238/ /sup 239/Pu and /sup 137/Cs availability to zucchini squash (Curcurbita melopepo, hybrid seneca) and green bush beans (Phaseolus vulgaris, Landreths stringless) grown under home-garden conditions in an area at Los Alamos National Laboratory used for treated radioactive liquid waste disposal. Radionuclide concentrations were measured as a function of tissue type, height above the soil, fertilization regime, and for the squash, food-cleansing procedures. Analysis of variance procedures was used to analyze the data. Ratios of the concentration of a radionuclide in oven-dried vegetation to dry soil ranged from 0.0004 to 0.116 for the Pu isotopes, and from 0.051 to 0.255 for /sup 137/Cs. Fertilization with cattle manure reduced the Pu concentration ratios by 30% and /sup 137/Cs by 50%. Vegetative parts sampled within 20 cm of the ground surface were contaminated about four times as much as those parts growing further from the ground surface. About 65% of the contamination was removed by washing, indicating the presence of surficial contamination. The 50-year radiation dose commitment to humans consuming vegetables from the garden plot would be less than 0.05 mrem and would be due almost entirely to /sup 137/Cs.

  19. Los Alamos National Laboratory computer benchmarking 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.L.

    1983-06-01

    Evaluating the performance of computing machinery is a continual effort of the Computer Research and Applications Group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This report summarizes the results of the group's benchmarking activities performed between October 1981 and September 1982, presenting compilation and execution times as well as megaflop rates for a set of benchmark codes. Tests were performed on the following computers: Cray Research, Inc. (CRI) Cray-1S; Control Data Corporation (CDC) 7600, 6600, Cyber 73, Cyber 825, Cyber 835, Cyber 855, and Cyber 205; Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) VAX 11/780 and VAX 11/782; and Apollo Computer, Inc., Apollo.

  20. Los Alamos National Laboratory strategic directions

    SciTech Connect

    Hecker, S.

    1995-10-01

    It is my pleasure to welcome you to Los Alamos. I like the idea of bringing together all aspects of the research community-defense, basic science, and industrial. It is particularly important in today`s times of constrained budgets and in fields such as neutron research because I am convinced that the best science and the best applications will come from their interplay. If we do the science well, then we will do good applications. Keeping our eye focused on interesting applications will spawn new areas of science. This interplay is especially critical, and it is good to have these communities represented here today.

  1. Environmental Programs at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Patricia

    2012-07-11

    Summary of this project is: (1) Teamwork, partnering to meet goals - (a) Building on cleanup successes, (b) Solving legacy waste problems, (c) Protecting the area's environment; (2) Strong performance over the past three years - (a) Credibility from four successful Recovery Act Projects, (b) Met all Consent Order milestones, (c) Successful ramp-up of TRU program; (3) Partnership between the National Nuclear Security Administration's Los Alamos Site Office, DOE Carlsbad Field Office, New Mexico Environment Department, and contractor staff enables unprecedented cleanup progress; (4) Continued focus on protecting water resources; and (5) All consent order commitments delivered on time or ahead of schedule.

  2. Biological assessment for the effluent reduction program, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, S.P.

    1996-08-01

    This report describes the biological assessment for the effluent recution program proposed to occur within the boundaries of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Potential effects on wetland plants and on threatened and endangered species are discussed, along with a detailed description of the individual outfalls resulting from the effluent reduction program.

  3. LAMPF II workshop, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, February 1-4, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Thiessen, H.A.

    1982-01-01

    This report contains the proceedings of the first LAMPF II Workshop held at Los Alamos February 1 to 4, 1982. Included are the talks that were available in written form. The conclusion of the participants was that there are many exciting areas of physics that will be addressed by such a machine.

  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Escobedo, G.M.; Hargis, K.M.; Douglass, C.R.

    2007-07-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) waste management program is responsible for disposition of waste generated by many of the LANL programs and operations. LANL generates liquid and solid waste that can include radioactive, hazardous, and other constituents. Where practical, LANL hazardous and mixed wastes are disposed through commercial vendors; low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and radioactive asbestos-contaminated waste are disposed on site at LANL's Area G disposal cells, transuranic (TRU) waste is disposed at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), and high-activity mixed wastes are disposed at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) after treatment by commercial vendors. An on-site radioactive liquid waste treatment facility (RLWTF) removes the radioactive constituents from liquid wastes and treated water is released through an NPDES permitted outfall. LANL has a very successful waste minimization program. Routine hazardous waste generation has been reduced over 90% since 1993. LANL has a DOE Order 450.1-compliant environmental management system (EMS) that is ISO 14001 certified; waste minimization is integral to setting annual EMS improvement objectives. Looking forward, under the new LANL management and operating contractor, Los Alamos National Security (LANS) LLC, a Zero Liquid Discharge initiative is being planned that should eliminate flow to the RLWTF NPDES-permitted outfall. The new contractor is also taking action to reduce the number of permitted waste storage areas, to charge generating programs directly for the cost to disposition waste, and to simplify/streamline the waste system. (authors)

  5. DOE Los Alamos National Laboratory – PV Feasibility Assessment, 2015 Update, NREL Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, Jesse; Witt, Monica Rene

    2016-04-06

    This report summarizes solar and wind potential for Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This report is part of the “Los Alamos National Laboratory and Los Alamos County Renewable Generation” study.

  6. Physiological responses in nonheat acclimated horses performing treadmill exercise in cool (20 degrees C/40% RH), hot dry (30 degrees C/40% RH) and hot humid (30 degrees C/80% RH) conditions.

    PubMed

    Marlin, D J; Scott, C M; Schroter, R C; Mills, P C; Harris, R C; Harris, P A; Orme, C E; Roberts, C A; Marr, C M; Dyson, S J; Barrelet, F

    1996-07-01

    HD, the increase in VE was achieved mainly through an increase in frequency, whilst in HH it was achieved through an increase in tidal volume (VT). The horses demonstrated a high degree of tolerance to environmental heat load, suggesting a high thermoregulatory capacity. However, for unacclimatised animals exercising in severely hot and humid conditions, performance may be limited.

  7. Forest surveys and wildfire assessment in the Los Alamos Region; 1998-1999

    SciTech Connect

    Randy G. Balice; Jay D. Miller; Brian P. Oswald; Carl Edminster; Stephen R. Yool

    2000-06-01

    To better understand the structural characteristics of vegetation in the Los Alamos region, the authors conducted two years of field surveys and associated analyses. This report introduces field methods, lists the summarized field data, and discusses the results of preliminary spatial analyses. During 1998 and 1999, seventy-six terrestrial plant communities were sampled for topographic characteristics, soil surface features, and vegetational conditions. A nested, randomized design was used to select the plot locations and to guide the sampling of the plot. The samples included a variety of fuel types, including surface fuels and ground fuels, shrubby and small tree fuels, and overstory fuels. Species composition data were also collected. The fuels data were summarized by vegetation type and evaluated for the topographic and spatial relationships of major field categories. The results of these analyses indicate that many of the fuels categories depend on topographic factors in a linear and curvilinear fashion. In particular, middle elevations within the Los Alamos region tend to support more surface fuels and ground fuels, whereas large-diameter trees are most dense at higher elevations and are specific to community types at these elevations. Small-diameter trees occur in more dense stands at lower and middle elevations and on specific soil and topographic conditions. Areas that burned in 1954 were found to be relatively free of fuels. The implications are that the western portions of the Los Alamos region are at risk from wildfire during dry, summer periods.

  8. Los Alamos personnel and area criticality dosimeter systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilik, D.G.; Martin, R.W.

    1981-06-01

    Fissionable materials are handled and processed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Although the probability of a nuclear criticality accident is very remote, it must be considered. Los Alamos maintains a broad spectrum of dose assessment capabilities. This report describes the methods employed for personnel neutron, area neutron, and photon dose evaluations with passive dosimetry systems.

  9. The Climate at Los Alamos; Are we measurement changes?

    SciTech Connect

    Dewart, Jean Marie

    2015-04-16

    A new report shows new graphic displays of the weather trends in Los Alamos, New Mexico, and at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The graphs show trends of average, minimum average, and maximum average temperature for summer and winter months going back decades. Records of summer and winter precipitation are also included in the report.

  10. Audit of personal property management at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-07

    The Department of Energy`s (Department) Albuquerque Operations Office (Albuquerque) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) are responsible for ensuring that Los Alamos maintains an efficient and effective personal property management system that protects, identifies, and controls Government-owned personal property in accordance with applicable regulations. Albuquerque is responsible for reviewing and approving Los Alamos` personal property management system. Los Alamos is responsible for ensuring that personal property is properly protected, identified, and controlled. The audit disclosed that Los Alamos did not have an efficient and effective personal property management system to ensure that personal property was adequately protected, identified, and controlled. In addition, Albuquerque did not approve or disapprove Los Alamos` personal property management system consistent with Federal and Department regulations. Specifically, the audit showed that Los Alamos did not account for $11.6 million of personal property. In addition, $22.2 million of personal property was not properly recorded in the database, $61.7 million of personal property could not be inventoried, and loans to employees and other entities were not adequately justified. As a result, from a total personal property inventory of approximately $1 billion, it is estimated that $100 million of personal property may not be accounted for, and $207 million may not be correctly recorded in the database. Moreover, substantial amounts of personal property on loan to employees and other entities were at risk of unauthorized use. Albuquerque concurred with the finding and agreed to implement the corrective actions recommended in the report.

  11. Gully erosion processes impacted by vegetation on gully beds based on an in situ scouring experiment in a Dry-hot Valley of Southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yifan; Xiong, Donghong; Su, Zhengan

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation can protect soil from water erosion. Some previous researches on the subjects of vegetation and gully erosion were mainly focused on the topography changes cause by vegetation and the conservation effects and techniques. While the mechanics of vegetation effects on the hydraulic processes of gully bed to influence the erosion processes were still not very clear. In this study, an in situ scouring experiment was conducted 11 times assuming a consistent flow condition (7 times with a flow discharge of 83.3L/min and 4 times with a flow discharge of 166.7 L/min on five gully head plots with gully bed lengths of 20 m, which were constructed with similar initial topography (height of the headcuts were 0.5m, the slope of gully beds were from 18.2% to 19.1%) and same soil type (Dry red soil which classified as Rhodoxeralfs in USDA Soil Taxonomy ). Five vegetation condition levels were set on gully bed (the same vegetation density and different lengths of the vegetation sites as 0 m, 4m, 8m, 12m and 16m). Each scouring last 1h and the flow rate, flow depth and flow width were recorded every 10 minutes, after each scouring the topography changes were measured by RTK GPS. The total gully bed erosion volume (TEV) exhibited a significant exponentially decreasing relationship with increasing length of the vegetation sites (VL) due to the similar relationship between the VL and the runoff erosion capacity. The hydrodynamic parameters in the vegetation sites were clearly lower than those in bare sites and caused the average TEV of the vegetation sites to be approximately 3.3 times lower than that of the bare gully bed. However, the vegetation protection efficiency did not increase as the length of the vegetation sites increased. The hydrodynamics of the bare site sections showed a good relationship with TEV, while in the vegetation sites, the relationship was quite weak, indicating that hydraulics conditions were not the main factors influencing gully bed erosion in the

  12. Thermoregulation and water balance in fat-tailed sheep and Kacang goat under sunlight exposure and water restriction in a hot and dry area.

    PubMed

    Rahardja, D P; Toleng, A L; Lestari, V S

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze differences in thermoregulation and water balance under conditions of heat load and water restriction between fat-tailed sheep (S) and Kacang goats (G). The daily intakes of food and water, daily outputs of urine and feces, rectal temperature, respiration rates, hematocrit values and plasma volumes of five shorn S and five G were determined over 10 days of four consecutive experimental conditions: (1) indoor--unrestricted water; (2) indoor--restricted water; (3) 10 h sunlight exposure--unrestricted water; and (4) 10 h sunlight exposure--restricted water. There was a 6- to 7-day adjustment period between two consecutive conditions. The study was conducted during the dry season. The animals were placed in individual cages, fed chopped native grass ad libitum and had free access to a urea-molasses multi-nutrient block. Under sunlight exposure with unrestricted water availability, S and G record an increase in the maximum rectal temperatures from 39.2°C to 40.2°C and from 39.9°C to 41.8°C, respectively. The thermoregulatory strategy used by S for maintaining a lower rectal temperature mostly depends on increasing the respiration rate as the main cooling mechanism. On the other hand, G apparently used sweating as the predominant mechanism for cooling. Moreover, G seemed to be more tolerable to higher heat storage and body temperature than S with a significant increase in plasma volume (P<0.01), and this may be beneficial to the animals for the prevention of water loss. Under restricted water condition in either indoor or outdoor environment, both species decreased their plasma volume significantly, but rectal temperatures were relatively maintained. In all experimental conditions, the daily total water exchanges (ml/kg0.82 per day) of S were significantly higher than G (P<0.01). However, when the percentages of the total daily water exchange were considered, the water lost through urination (38% to 39%), defecation (11% to

  13. Portable MRI developed at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle

    2015-04-22

    Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory are developing an ultra-low-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system that could be low-power and lightweight enough for forward deployment on the battlefield and to field hospitals in the World's poorest regions. "MRI technology is a powerful medical diagnostic tool," said Michelle Espy, the Battlefield MRI (bMRI) project leader, "ideally suited for imaging soft-tissue injury, particularly to the brain." But hospital-based MRI devices are big and expensive, and require considerable infrastructure, such as large quantities of cryogens like liquid nitrogen and helium, and they typically use a large amount of energy. "Standard MRI machines just can't go everywhere," said Espy. "Soldiers wounded in battle usually have to be flown to a large hospital and people in emerging nations just don't have access to MRI at all. We've been in contact with doctors who routinely work in the Third World and report that MRI would be extremely valuable in treating pediatric encephalopathy, and other serious diseases in children." So the Los Alamos team started thinking about a way to make an MRI device that could be relatively easy to transport, set up, and use in an unconventional setting. Conventional MRI machines use very large magnetic fields that align the protons in water molecules to then create magnetic resonance signals, which are detected by the machine and turned into images. The large magnetic fields create exceptionally detailed images, but they are difficult and expensive to make. Espy and her team wanted to see if images of sufficient quality could be made with ultra-low-magnetic fields, similar in strength to the Earth's magnetic field. To achieve images at such low fields they use exquisitely sensitive detectors called Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices, or SQUIDs. SQUIDs are among the most sensitive magnetic field detectors available, so interference with the signal is the primary stumbling block. "SQUIDs are

  14. Portable MRI developed at Los Alamos

    ScienceCinema

    Espy, Michelle

    2016-07-12

    Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory are developing an ultra-low-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system that could be low-power and lightweight enough for forward deployment on the battlefield and to field hospitals in the World's poorest regions. "MRI technology is a powerful medical diagnostic tool," said Michelle Espy, the Battlefield MRI (bMRI) project leader, "ideally suited for imaging soft-tissue injury, particularly to the brain." But hospital-based MRI devices are big and expensive, and require considerable infrastructure, such as large quantities of cryogens like liquid nitrogen and helium, and they typically use a large amount of energy. "Standard MRI machines just can't go everywhere," said Espy. "Soldiers wounded in battle usually have to be flown to a large hospital and people in emerging nations just don't have access to MRI at all. We've been in contact with doctors who routinely work in the Third World and report that MRI would be extremely valuable in treating pediatric encephalopathy, and other serious diseases in children." So the Los Alamos team started thinking about a way to make an MRI device that could be relatively easy to transport, set up, and use in an unconventional setting. Conventional MRI machines use very large magnetic fields that align the protons in water molecules to then create magnetic resonance signals, which are detected by the machine and turned into images. The large magnetic fields create exceptionally detailed images, but they are difficult and expensive to make. Espy and her team wanted to see if images of sufficient quality could be made with ultra-low-magnetic fields, similar in strength to the Earth's magnetic field. To achieve images at such low fields they use exquisitely sensitive detectors called Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices, or SQUIDs. SQUIDs are among the most sensitive magnetic field detectors available, so interference with the signal is the primary stumbling block. "SQUIDs are

  15. Los Alamos National Laboratory transuranic database analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, D.V.; Rogers, P.S.Z.; Kosiewicz, S.T.; LeBrun, D.B.

    1997-02-01

    This paper represents an overview of analyses conducted on the TRU database maintained by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This evaluation was conducted to support the ``TRU Waste Workoff Strategies`` document and provides an estimation of the waste volume that potentially could be certified and ready for shipment to (WIPP) in April of 1998. Criteria defined in the WIPP WAC, including container type, weight limits, plutonium fissile gram equivalents and decay heat, were used to evaluated the waste for compliance. LANL evaluated the containers by facility and by waste stream to determining the most efficient plan for characterization and certification of the waste. Evaluation of the waste presently in storage suggested that 40- 60% potentially meets the WIPP WAC Rev. 5 criteria.

  16. Los Alamos Advanced Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.C.D.; Kraus, R.H.; Ledford, J.; Meier, K.L.; Meyer, R.E.; Nguyen, D.; Sheffield, R.L.; Sigler, F.L.; Young, L.M.; Wang, T.S.; Wilson, W.L.; Wood, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    At Los Alamos, we are building a free-electron laser (FEL) for industrial, medical, and research applications. This FEL, which will incorporate many of the new technologies developed over the last decade, will be compact in size, robust, and user-friendly. Electrons produced by a photocathode will be accelerated to 20 MeV by a high-brightness accelerator and transported using permanent-magnet quadrupoles and dipoles. They will form an electron beam with an excellent instantaneous beam quality of 10 {pi} mm mrad in transverse emittance and 0.3% in energy spread at a peak current up to 300 A. Including operation at higher harmonics, the laser wavelength extends form 3.7 {mu}m to 0.4 {mu}m. In this paper, we will describe the project and the programs to date. 10 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    This report documents the environmental surveillance program conducted by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) in 1979. Routine monitoring for radiation and radioactive or chemical substances was conducted on the Laboratory site and in the surrounding region to determine compliance with appropriate standards and permit early identification of possible undesirable trends. Results and interpretation of the data for 1979 on penetrating radiation, chemical and radiochemical quality of ambient air, surface and ground water, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, food, and airborne and liquid effluents are included. Comparisons with appropriate standards and regulations or with background levels from natural or other non-LASL sources provide a basis for concluding that environmental effects attributable to LASL operations are minor and cannot be considered likely to result in any hazard to the population of the area. Results of several special studies provide documentation of some unique environmental conditions in the LASL environs.

  18. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1987. Routine monitoring for radiation and radioactive or chemical materials is conducted on the Laboratory site as well as in the surrounding region. Monitoring results are used to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to permit early identification of potentially undesirable trends. Results and interpretation of data for 1987 cover: external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and liquid effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface and ground waters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Comparisons with appropriate standards, regulations, and background levels provide the basis for concluding that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are insignificant and do not pose a threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment. 113 refs., 33 figs., 120 tabs.

  19. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1989. Routine monitoring for radiation and radioactive or chemical materials is conducted on the Laboratory site as well as in the surrounding region. Monitoring results are used to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to permit early identification of potentially undesirable trends. Results and interpretation of data for 1989 cover external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface and ground waters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Comparisons with appropriate standards, regulations, and background levels provide the basis for concluding that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment. 58 refs., 31 figs., 39 tabs.

  20. Information about Practicums at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Paul A.

    2012-07-24

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center is the premier facility for neutron science experiments ranging from cross section measurements, neutron scattering experiments, proton radiography, cold neutrons, actinide neutronic properties, and many other exciting topics. The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory is home to several powerful magnets, including the one that created the first non-destructive 100 Tesla field in March 2012. They probe the electronic structure of superconductors, magnetic properties of materials (including magneto-quantum effects). Research is also conducted in correlated materials, thermoacoustics, and magnetic properties of actinides. The Trident Laser has a unique niche with very high power, short pulse experiments, with a peak power of 10{sup 20} W in short pulse mode. Discoveries range from production of monoenergetic MeV ion beam, nonlinear kinetic plasma waves, the transition between kinetic and fluid nonlinear behavior and other laser-plasma interaction processes.

  1. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) during 1995. The Laboratory routinely monitors for radiation and for radioactive and nonradioactive materials at (or on) Laboratory sites as well as in the surrounding region. LANL uses the monitoring result to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to identify potentially undesirable trends. Data were collected in 1995 to assess external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and liquid effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface waters and groundwaters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Using comparisons with standards, regulations, and background levels, this report concludes that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a demonstrable threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment.

  2. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Kohen, K.; Stoker, A.; Stone, G.

    1994-07-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program at Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1992. The Laboratory routinely monitors for radiation and for radioactive and nonradioactive materials at (or on) Laboratory sites as well as in the surrounding region. LANL uses the monitoring results to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to identify potentially undesirable trends. Data were collected in 1992 to assess external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and liquid effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface waters and groundwaters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Using comparisons with standards, regulations, and background levels, this report concludes that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a demonstrable threat to the public, laboratory employees, or the environment.

  3. Hot Flashes

    MedlinePlus

    Diseases and Conditions Hot flashes By Mayo Clinic Staff Hot flashes are sudden feelings of warmth, which are usually most intense over the ... skin may redden, as if you're blushing. Hot flashes can also cause profuse sweating and may ...

  4. Hot microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroy, Klaus; Chakraborty, Dipanjan; Cichos, Frank

    2016-11-01

    Hot microswimmers are self-propelled Brownian particles that exploit local heating for their directed self-thermophoretic motion. We provide a pedagogical overview of the key physical mechanisms underlying this promising new technology. It covers the hydrodynamics of swimming, thermophoresis and -osmosis, hot Brownian motion, force-free steering, and dedicated experimental and simulation tools to analyze hot Brownian swimmers.

  5. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Fuehne, David; Gallagher, Pat; Hjeresen, Denny; Isaacson, John; Johson, Scot; Morgan, Terry; Paulson, David; Rogers, David

    2009-09-30

    Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos reports are prepared annually by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) Environmental Programs Directorate, as required by US Department of Energy Order 450.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and US Department of Energy Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. These annual reports summarize environmental data that are used to determine compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and departmental policies. Additional data, beyond the minimum required, are also gathered and reported as part of the Laboratory’s efforts to ensure public safety and to monitor environmental quality at and near the Laboratory. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the Laboratory’s major environmental programs and explains the risks and the actions taken to reduce risks at the Laboratory from environmental legacies and waste management operations. Chapter 2 reports the Laboratory’s compliance status for 2007. Chapter 3 provides a summary of the maximum radiological dose the public and biota populations could have potentially received from Laboratory operations and discusses chemical exposures. The environmental surveillance and monitoring data are organized by environmental media (Chapter 4, air; Chapters 5 and 6, water and sediments; Chapter 7, soils; and Chapter 8, foodstuffs and biota) in a format to meet the needs of a general and scientific audience. Chapter 9 provides a summary of the status of environmental restoration work around LANL. A glossary and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are in the back of the report. Appendix A explains the standards for environmental contaminants, Appendix B explains the units of measurements used in this report, Appendix C describes the Laboratory’s technical areas and their associated programs, and Appendix D provides web links to more information.

  6. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Fuehne, David; Poff, Ben; Hjeresen, Denny; Isaacson, John; Johnson, Scot; Morgan, Terry; Paulson, David; Salzman, Sonja; Rogers, David

    2010-09-30

    Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos reports are prepared annually by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) environmental organization, as required by US Department of Energy Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and US Department of Energy Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. These annual reports summarize environmental data that are used to determine compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and departmental policies. Additional data, beyond the minimum required, are also gathered and reported as part of the Laboratory’s efforts to ensure public safety and to monitor environmental quality at and near the Laboratory. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the Laboratory’s major environmental programs and explains the risks and the actions taken to reduce risks at the Laboratory from environmental legacies and waste management operations. Chapter 2 reports the Laboratory’s compliance status for 2009. Chapter 3 provides a summary of the maximum radiological dose the public and biota populations could have potentially received from Laboratory operations and discusses chemical exposures. The environmental surveillance and monitoring data are organized by environmental media (air in Chapter 4; water and sediments in Chapters 5 and 6; soils in Chapter 7; and foodstuffs and biota in Chapter 8) in a format to meet the needs of a general and scientific audience. Chapter 9 provides a summary of the status of environmental restoration work around LANL. The new Chapter 10 describes the Laboratory’s environmental stewardship efforts and provides an overview of the health of the Rio Grande. A glossary and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are in the back of the report. Appendix A explains the standards for environmental contaminants, Appendix B explains the units of measurements used in this report, Appendix C describes the Laboratory’s technical

  7. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 2005

    SciTech Connect

    2006-09-30

    Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos reports are prepared annually by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) environmental organization, as required by US Department of Energy Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and US Department of Energy Order 231.IA, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. These annual reports summarize environmental data that are used to determine compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and departmental policies. Additional data, beyond the minimum required, are also gathered and reported as part of the Laboratory's efforts to ensure public safety and to monitor environmental quality at and near the Laboratory. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the Laboratory's major environmental programs. Chapter 2 reports the Laboratory's compliance status for 2005. Chapter 3 provides a summary of the maximum radiological dose the public and biota populations could have potentially received from Laboratory operations. The environmental surveillance and monitoring data are organized by environmental media (Chapter 4, Air; Chapters 5 and 6, Water and Sediments; Chapter 7, Soils; and Chapter 8, Foodstuffs and Biota) in a format to meet the needs of a general and scientific audience. Chapter 9, new for this year, provides a summary of the status of environmental restoration work around LANL. A glossary and a list ofacronyms and abbreviations are in the back of the report. Appendix A explains the standards for environmental contaminants, Appendix B explains the units of measurements used in this report, Appendix C describes the Laboratory's technical areas and their associated programs, and Appendix D provides web links to more information.

  8. Drying rate and temperature profile for superheated steam vacuum drying and moist air drying of softwood lumber

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, S.; Dakin, M.

    1999-07-01

    Two charges of green radiata pine sapwood lumber were dried, ether using superheated steam under vacuum (90 C, 0.2 bar abs.) or conventionally using hot moist air (90/60 C). Due to low density of the drying medium under vacuum, the circulation velocity used was 10 m/s for superheated steam drying and 5.0 m/s for moist air drying, and in both cases, the flow was unidirectional. In drying, stack drying rate and wood temperatures were measured to examine the differences between the superheated steam drying and drying using hot moist air. The experimental results have shown that the stack edge board in superheated steam drying dried faster than in the hot moist air drying. Once again due to the low density of the steam under vacuum, a prolonged maximum temperature drop across load (TDAL) was observed in the superheated steam drying, however, the whole stack dried slower and the final moisture content distribution was more variable than for conventional hot moist air drying.

  9. Environmental analysis of Lower Pueblo/Lower Los Alamos Canyon, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Buhl, T.E.; Stoker, A.K.; Becker, N.M.; Rodgers, J.C.; Hansen, W.R.

    1994-12-01

    The radiological survey of the former radioactive waste treatment plant site (TA-45), Acid Canyon, Pueblo Canyon, and Los Alamos Canyon found residual contamination at the site itself and in the channel and banks of Acid, Pueblo, and lower Los Alamos Canyons all the way to the Rio Grande. The largest reservoir of residual radioactivity is in lower Pueblo Canyon, which is on DOE property. However, residual radioactivity does not exceed proposed cleanup criteria in either lower Pueblo or lower Los Alamos Canyons. The three alternatives proposed are (1) to take no action, (2) to construct a sediment trap in lower Pueblo Canyon to prevent further transport of residual radioactivity onto San Ildefonso Indian Pueblo land, and (3) to clean the residual radioactivity from the canyon system. Alternative 2, to cleanup the canyon system, is rejected as a viable alternative. Thousands of truckloads of sediment would have to be removed and disposed of, and this effort is unwarranted by the low levels of contamination present. Residual radioactivity levels, under either present conditions or projected future conditions, will not result in significant radiation doses to persons exposed. Modeling efforts show that future transport activity will not result in any residual radioactivity concentrations higher than those already existing. Thus, although construction of a sediment trap in lower Pueblo Canyon is a viable alternative, this effort also is unwarranted, and the no-action alternative is the preferred alternative.

  10. Dry root rot of chickpea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dry root rot of chickpea is a serious disease under dry hot summer conditions, particularly in the semi-arid tropics of Ethiopia, and in central and southern India. It usually occurs at reproductive stages of the plant. Symptoms include drooping of petioles and leaflets of the tips, but not the low...

  11. Non-Traditional In Situ Vitrification - A Technology Demonstration at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Coel-Roback, B.; Springer, M.; Lowery, P.; Thompson, L.; Huddleston, G.

    2003-02-25

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Subsurface Contamination Focus Area (SCFA) sponsored a technology demonstration of non-traditional in situ vitrification (NTISV) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project team for this demonstration included MSE Technology Applications, Inc., Geosafe Corporation, and LANL. The technology demonstration involved the performance of two large-scale test melts. The first, referred to as the ''cold'' test, was performed on a simulated absorption bed that contained surrogate contaminants. The cold test was conducted in April 1999. The second demonstration, referred to as the ''hot'' test, took place at LANL's Material Disposal Area (MDA) V in April 2000. The hot test was conducted on a portion of an absorption bed that received radionuclide and metal-contaminated wastewater from a laundry facility and a research laboratory from the mid-1940s to the early 1960s. This paper presents the results of drilling and sampling following the hot test at LANL's MDA V. The objectives of the sample collection were to characterize the vitrified mass and the effects of the hot test on the surrounding bedrock. Glass samples were analyzed for total radionuclide and metal content by standard EPA methods, and leachable radionuclide and metal content using Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and Product Consistency Test (PCT) methods.

  12. Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos during 2007

    SciTech Connect

    2008-09-30

    Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos reports are prepared annually by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) Environmental Directorate, as required by US Department of Energy Order 450.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and US Department of Energy Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. These annual reports summarize environmental data that are used to determine compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and departmental policies. Additional data, beyond the minimum required, are also gathered and reported as part of the Laboratory’s efforts to ensure public safety and to monitor environmental quality at and near the Laboratory. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the Laboratory’s major environmental programs and explains the risks and the actions taken to reduce risks at the Laboratory from environmental legacies and waste management operations. Chapter 2 reports the Laboratory’s compliance status for 2007. Chapter 3 provides a summary of the maximum radiological dose the public and biota populations could have potentially received from Laboratory operations and discusses chemical exposures. The environmental surveillance and monitoring data are organized by environmental media (Chapter 4, air; Chapters 5 and 6, water and sediments; Chapter 7, soils; and Chapter 8, foodstuffs and biota) in a format to meet the needs of a general and scientific audience. Chapter 9 provides a summary of the status of environmental restoration work around LANL. A glossary and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are in the back of the report. Appendix A explains the standards for environmental contaminants, Appendix B explains the units of measurements used in this report, Appendix C describes the laboratory’s technical areas and their associated programs, and Appendix D provides web links to more information. In printed copies of this report or Executive Summary, we have

  13. Review of liquid metal heat pipe work at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.S.; Merrigan, M.A.; Sena, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    A survey of space-power related liquid metal heat pipe work at Los Alamos National Laboratory is presented. Heat pipe development at Los Alamos has been on-going since 1963. Heat pipes were initially developed for thermionic nuclear-electrical power production in space. Since then Los Alamos has developed liquid metal heat pipes for numerous applications related to high temperature systems in both the space and terrestrial environments. Some of these applications include thermionic electrical generators, thermoelectric energy conversion (both in-core and direct radiation), thermal energy storage, hypersonic vehicle leading edge cooling, and heat pipe vapor laser cells. Some of the work performed at Los Alamos has been documented in internal reports that are often little-known. A representative description and summary of progress in space-related liquid metal heat pipe technology is provided followed by a reference section citing sources where these works may be found. 53 refs.

  14. Review of liquid metal heat pipe work at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.S.; Merrigan, M.A.; Sena, J.T. )

    1991-01-10

    A survey of space-power related liquid metal heat pipe work at Los Alamos National Laboratory is presented. Heat pipe development at Los Alamos has been on-going since 1963. Heat pipes were initially developed for thermionic nuclear-electrical power production in space. Since then Los Alamos has developed liquid metal heat pipes for numerous applications related to high temperature systems in both the space and terrestrial environments. Some of these applications include thermionic electrical generators, thermoelectric energy conversion (both in-core and direct radiation), thermal energy storage, hypersonic vehicle leading edge cooling, and heat pipe vapor laser cells. Some of the work performed at Los Alamos has been documented in internal reports that are often little-known. A representative description and summary of progress in space-related liquid metal heat pipe technology is provided followed by a reference section citing sources where these works may be found.

  15. Los Alamos National Laboratory Prepares for Fire Season

    SciTech Connect

    L’Esperance, Manny

    2016-07-18

    Through the establishment of a Wildland Fire Program Office, and the Interagency Fire Base located on Laboratory property, Los Alamos National Laboratory is continuing and improving a program to prepare for wildland fire.

  16. Explosive Flux Compression: 50 Years of Los Alamos Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, C.M.; Thomson, D.B.; Garn, W.B.

    1998-10-18

    Los Alamos flux compression activities are surveyed, mainly through references in view of space limitations. However, two plasma physics programs done with Sandia National Laboratory are discussed in more detail.

  17. Los Alamos National Laboratory Prepares for Fire Season

    ScienceCinema

    L’Esperance, Manny

    2016-08-10

    Through the establishment of a Wildland Fire Program Office, and the Interagency Fire Base located on Laboratory property, Los Alamos National Laboratory is continuing and improving a program to prepare for wildland fire.

  18. Explosive Flux Compression:. 50 Years of LOS Alamos Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, C.; Thomson, D.; Garn, W.

    2004-11-01

    Los Alamos flux compression activities are surveyed, mainly through references in view of space limitations. However, two plasma physics programs done with Sandia National Laboratory are discussed in more detail.

  19. Strategic defense initiatives at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Rockwood, S.D.

    1985-01-01

    This presentation reviews the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) programs at Los Alamos National Laboratory, noting especially the needs for and applications of optics and optical technologies. Table I lists the various activities at Los Alamos contributing to SDI programs. The principal, nonnuclear SDI programs are: (1) the free-electron laser, and (2) neutral particle beams. Both should be considered as potential long-range-kill systems, but still in the futuristic category.

  20. Saving Water at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    ScienceCinema

    Erickson, Andy

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory decreased its water usage by 26 percent in 2014, with about one-third of the reduction attributable to using reclaimed water to cool a supercomputing center. The Laboratory's goal during 2014 was to use only re-purposed water to support the mission at the Strategic Computing Complex. Using reclaimed water from the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility, or SERF, substantially decreased water usage and supported the overall mission. SERF collects industrial wastewater and treats it for reuse. The reclamation facility contributed more than 27 million gallons of re-purposed water to the Laboratory's computing center, a secured supercomputing facility that supports the Laboratory’s national security mission and is one of the institution’s larger water users. In addition to the strategic water reuse program at SERF, the Laboratory reduced water use in 2014 by focusing conservation efforts on areas that use the most water, upgrading to water-conserving fixtures, and repairing leaks identified in a biennial survey.

  1. Oxidative lime pretreatment of Alamo switchgrass.

    PubMed

    Falls, Matthew; Holtzapple, Mark T

    2011-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that oxidative lime pretreatment is an effective delignification method that improves the enzymatic digestibility of many biomass feedstocks. The purpose of this work is to determine the recommended oxidative lime pretreatment conditions (reaction temperature, time, pressure, and lime loading) for Alamo switchgrass (Panicum virgatum). Enzymatic hydrolysis of glucan and xylan was used to determine the performance of the 52 studied pretreatment conditions. The recommended condition (110°C, 6.89 bar O(2), 240 min, 0.248 g Ca(OH)(2)/g biomass) achieved glucan and xylan overall yields (grams of sugar hydrolyzed/100 g sugar in raw biomass, 15 filter paper units (FPU)/g raw glucan) of 85.9 and 52.2, respectively. In addition, some glucan oligomers (2.6 g glucan recovered/100 g glucan in raw biomass) and significant levels of xylan oligomers (26.0 g xylan recovered/100 g xylan in raw biomass) were recovered from the pretreatment liquor. Combining a decrystallization technique (ball milling) with oxidative lime pretreatment further improved the overall glucan yield to 90.0 (7 FPU/g raw glucan).

  2. Historic Manhattan Project Sites at Los Alamos

    ScienceCinema

    McGehee, Ellen

    2016-07-12

    The Manhattan Project laboratory constructed at Los Alamos, New Mexico, beginning in 1943, was intended from the start to be temporary and to go up with amazing speed. Because most of those WWII-era facilities were built with minimal materials and so quickly, much of the original infrastructure was torn down in the late '40s and early '50s and replaced by more permanent facilities. However, a few key facilities remained, and are being preserved and maintained for historic significance. Four such sites are visited briefly in this video, taking viewers to V-Site, the buildings where the first nuclear explosive device was pre-assembled in preparation for the Trinity Test in Southern New Mexico. Included is another WWII area, Gun Site. So named because it was the area where scientists and engineers tested the so-called "gun method" of assembling nuclear materials -- the fundamental design of the Little Boy weapon that was eventually dropped on Hiroshima. The video also goes to Pajarito Site, home of the "Slotin Building" and "Pond Cabin." The Slotin Building is the place where scientist Louis Slotin conducted a criticality experiment that went awry in early 1946, leading to his unfortunate death, and the Pond Cabin served the team of eminent scientist Emilio Segre who did early chemistry work on plutonium that ultimately led to the Fat Man weapon.

  3. Historic Manhattan Project Sites at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    McGehee, Ellen

    2014-05-22

    The Manhattan Project laboratory constructed at Los Alamos, New Mexico, beginning in 1943, was intended from the start to be temporary and to go up with amazing speed. Because most of those WWII-era facilities were built with minimal materials and so quickly, much of the original infrastructure was torn down in the late '40s and early '50s and replaced by more permanent facilities. However, a few key facilities remained, and are being preserved and maintained for historic significance. Four such sites are visited briefly in this video, taking viewers to V-Site, the buildings where the first nuclear explosive device was pre-assembled in preparation for the Trinity Test in Southern New Mexico. Included is another WWII area, Gun Site. So named because it was the area where scientists and engineers tested the so-called "gun method" of assembling nuclear materials -- the fundamental design of the Little Boy weapon that was eventually dropped on Hiroshima. The video also goes to Pajarito Site, home of the "Slotin Building" and "Pond Cabin." The Slotin Building is the place where scientist Louis Slotin conducted a criticality experiment that went awry in early 1946, leading to his unfortunate death, and the Pond Cabin served the team of eminent scientist Emilio Segre who did early chemistry work on plutonium that ultimately led to the Fat Man weapon.

  4. Saving Water at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Andy

    2015-03-16

    Los Alamos National Laboratory decreased its water usage by 26 percent in 2014, with about one-third of the reduction attributable to using reclaimed water to cool a supercomputing center. The Laboratory's goal during 2014 was to use only re-purposed water to support the mission at the Strategic Computing Complex. Using reclaimed water from the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility, or SERF, substantially decreased water usage and supported the overall mission. SERF collects industrial wastewater and treats it for reuse. The reclamation facility contributed more than 27 million gallons of re-purposed water to the Laboratory's computing center, a secured supercomputing facility that supports the Laboratory’s national security mission and is one of the institution’s larger water users. In addition to the strategic water reuse program at SERF, the Laboratory reduced water use in 2014 by focusing conservation efforts on areas that use the most water, upgrading to water-conserving fixtures, and repairing leaks identified in a biennial survey.

  5. Audit of consultant agreements at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-23

    The Department of Energy`s (Department) Albuquerque Operations Office (Albuquerque) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) are responsible for acquiring consulting services in a manner most advantageous to the Government by ensuring adequate competition. Although the Department prefers competitively awarding subcontracts, including consultant agreements, to ensure the lowest possible cost, it allows sole sourcing a subcontract if the sole source is fully justified. The objective of the audit was to determine whether Los Alamos` consultant agreements contained adequate sole source justifications. The audit showed that Los Alamos may not have acquired some of its consultant agreements at the lowest possible cost because it did not prepare adequate sole source justifications for 17 sole source consultant agreements valued at $842,900. This condition existed because: (1) requesters did not follow policies and procedures when preparing sole source justifications, (2) Los Alamos did not have an internal mechanism to reject consultant agreements that were not adequately justified, and (3) the Department did not review consultant agreements to evaluate the adequacy of sole source justifications. Without adequate justifications, the Department cannot be assured that consultant services were obtained at the lowest possible cost. We therefore recommended that the Manager, Albuquerque Operations Office require Los Alamos to ensure proper sole source justifications and enhance internal controls over consultant agreements. Management agreed to implement the recommendations.

  6. Los Alamos low-level waste performance assessment status

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, W.J.; Purtymun, W.D.; Dewart, J.M.; Rodgers, J.E.

    1986-06-01

    This report reviews the documented Los Alamos studies done to assess the containment of buried hazardous wastes. Five sections logically present the environmental studies, operational source terms, transport pathways, environmental dosimetry, and computer model development and use. This review gives a general picture of the Los Alamos solid waste disposal and liquid effluent sites and is intended for technical readers with waste management and environmental science backgrounds but without a detailed familiarization with Los Alamos. The review begins with a wide perspective on environmental studies at Los Alamos. Hydrology, geology, and meteorology are described for the site and region. The ongoing Laboratory-wide environmental surveillance and waste management environmental studies are presented. The next section describes the waste disposal sites and summarizes the current source terms for these sites. Hazardous chemical wastes and liquid effluents are also addressed by describing the sites and canyons that are impacted. The review then focuses on the transport pathways addressed mainly in reports by Healy and Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. Once the source terms and potential transport pathways are described, the dose assessment methods are addressed. Three major studies, the waste alternatives, Hansen and Rogers, and the Pantex Environmental Impact Statement, contributed to the current Los Alamos dose assessment methodology. Finally, the current Los Alamos groundwater, surface water, and environmental assessment models for these mesa top and canyon sites are described.

  7. Environmental Assessment for the High Explosives Wastewater Treatment Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-03

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has identified a need to improve the management of wastewater resulting from high explosives (HE) research and development work at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). LANL`s current methods off managing HE-contaminated wastewater cannot ensure that discharged HE wastewater would consistently meet the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) standards for wastewater discharge. The DOE needs to enhance He wastewater management to e able to meet both present and future regulatory standards for wastewater discharge. The DOE also proposes to incorporate major pollution prevention and waste reduction features into LANL`s existing HE production facilities. Currently, wastewater from HE processing buildings at four Technical Areas (TAs) accumulates in sumps where particulate HE settles out and barium is precipitated. Wastewater is then released from the sumps to the environment at 15 permitted outfalls without treatment. The released water may contain suspended and dissolved contaminants, such as HE and solvents. This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes two alternatives, the Proposed Action and the Alternative Action, that would meet the purpose and need for agency action. Both alternatives would treat all HE process wastewater using sand filters to remove HE particulates and activated carbon to adsorb organic solvents and dissolved HE. Under either alternative, LANL would burn solvents and flash dried HE particulates and spent carbon following well-established procedures. Burning would produce secondary waste that would be stored, treated, and disposed of at TA-54, Area J. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact and Floodplain Statement of Findings for the High Explosives Wastewater Treatment Facility.

  8. Recent UCN source developments at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Seestrom, S.J.; Anaya, J.M.; Bowles, T.J.

    1998-12-01

    The most intense sources of ultra cold neutrons (UCN) have bee built at reactors where the high average thermal neutron flux can overcome the low UCN production rate to achieve usable densities of UCN. At spallation neutron sources the average flux available is much lower than at a reactor, though the peak flux can be comparable or higher. The authors have built a UCN source that attempts to take advantage of the high peak flux available at the short pulse spallation neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) to generate a useful number of UCN. In the source UCN are produced by Doppler-shifted Bragg scattering of neutrons to convert 400-m/s neutrons down into the UCN regime. This source was initially tested in 1996 and various improvements were made based on the results of the 1996 running. These improvements were implemented and tested in 1997. In sections 2 and 3 they discuss the improvements that have been made and the resulting source performance. Recently an even more interesting concept was put forward by Serebrov et al. This involves combining a solid Deuterium UCN source, previously studied by Serebrov et al., with a pulsed spallation source to achieve world record UCN densities. They have initiated a program of calculations and measurements aimed at verifying the solid Deuterium UCN source concept. The approach has been to develop an analytical capability, combine with Monte Carlo calculations of neutron production, and perform benchmark experiments to verify the validity of the calculations. Based on the calculations and measurements they plan to test a modified version of the Serebrov UCN factory. They estimate that they could produce over 1,000 UCN/cc in a 15 liter volume, using 1 {micro}amp of 800 MeV protons for two seconds every 500 seconds. They will discuss the result UCN production measurements in section 4.

  9. Simulations of flow interactions near Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Costigan, K. R.; Winterkamp, Judy; Bossert, J. E.; Langley, D. L.

    2002-01-01

    The Pajarito Plateau is located on the eastern flank of the Jemez Mountains and the west side of the Rio Grande Valley, in north-central New Mexico, where the river runs roughly north to south. On the Pajarito Plateau, a network of surface meteorological stations has been routinely maintained by Los Alamos National Laboratory. This network includes five instrumented towers, within an approximately 10 km by 15 km area. The towers stand from 23 m to 92 m tall, with multiple wind measurement heights. Investigation of the station records indicates that the wind fields can be quite complicated and may be the result of interactions of thermally and/or dynamically driven flows of many scales. Slope flows are often found on the plateau during the morning and evening transition times, but it is not unusual to find wind directions that are inconsistent with slope flows at some or all of the stations. It has been speculated that valley circulations, as well as synoptically driven winds, interact with the slope flows, but the mesonet measurements alone, with no measurements in the remainder of the valley, were not sufficient to investigate this hypothesis. Thus, during October of 1995, supplemental meteorological instrumentation was placed in the Rio Grande basin to study the complex interaction of flows in the area. A sodar was added near the 92 m tower and a radar wind profiler was placed in the Rio Grande Valley, just east of the plateau and near the river. Measurements were also added at the top of Pajarito Mountain, just west of the plateau, and across the valley, to the east, on top of Tesuque Peak (in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains). Two surface stations were also added to the north-facing slopes of Pajarito Mountain. This paper will present observations from October 1995 and results of simulations of this area that are used in the study of the complex interaction of dynamically and thermally driven flows on multiple scales.

  10. Measurement of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity in the Bandelier Tuff at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Conca, J.; Mockler, T.J.

    1995-04-01

    Hydraulic conductivities, K, were experimentally determined as a function of volumetric water content, {theta}, in Bandelier Tuff cores from Los Alamos, New Mexico. These data were used to determine the feasibility of applying a new unsaturated flow technology (UFA{trademark}) to further hydrologic studies of tuffaceous rocks at Los Alamos. The K({theta}) relationships for eight cores of Bandelier Tuff from boreholes AAA and AAB were measured using the UFA and, together with their in situ water contents, were used to determine transient water flux into these samples at the time of sampling. If the system is at steady-state, then these flux values correspond to the recharge through those points, a situation often encountered in semi-arid to arid regions such as Los Alamos and other sites in the western United States. Samples AAA 9956, AAB 0011, AAB 0012 and AAB 0040 exhibited fluxes of 6 x 10{sup -8} cm/s, 4.8 x 10{sup -7} cm/s, 2.8 x 10{sup -7} cm/s and 2.4 x 10{sup -8} cm/s, respectively, indicating significant flux. Samples AAB 0063, AAB 0065, AAB 0072 and AAB 0081 had very low water contents suggesting fluxes less than 10{sup -10} cm/s, and appear to be close to their residual water contents. Assuming that the samples AAB 0063, AAB 0065, AAB 0072 and AAB 0081 were not accidentally dried out during handling, these results imply that these samples have zero recharge and that redistribution of moisture at these horizons is controlled more by vapor diffusion than by advection. The vapor diffusivities in these cores can be determined using the new UFA gas permeameter. Samples AAA 9956, AAB 0011, AAB 0012 and AAB 0040 appear to be controlled by advection.

  11. PREFACE: Hot Quarks 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antinori, Federico; Bass, Steffen A.; Bellwied, Rene; Ullrich, Thomas; Velkovska, Julia; Wiedemann, Urs

    2005-04-01

    his research and we spent an entire week talking physics and having fun from breakfast in the morning until late at night. A symbolic award was instituted for the best presentation at the workshop, dedicated to the memory of Klaus Kinder-Geiger, a sharp and brilliant young theorist who perished in the crash of Swissair Flight 111 on 2 September 1998 off the coast of Nova Scotia. It went to Denesh Molnar from Ohio State University for his outstanding talk on parton coalescence. The organizers wish to extend their gratitude to all participants for the high quality presentations making Hot Quarks 2004 a notable event. We are also very grateful for the superb hospitality of the staff of the Snakedance Inn, in particular Mitch Daniels who worked sheer miracles. Given the success of the first Hot Quarks workshop we decided to organize a second one, possibly even turning Hot Quarks into a series. The next meeting will be held in the late spring of 2006, probably in Italy. We hope it will be as memorable as the first one! Last but not least, we wish to thank all the generous sponsors of the conference: Brookhaven National Laboratory, European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Gesellschaft fA~ 1/4 r Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Institute of Physics Publishing, Los Alamos National Laboratory, National Science Foundation, and Vanderbilt University. We are grateful for their support and are particularly happy that this support came from institutions both in the US and in Europe and from all the main experimental facilities that pursue a prominent heavy-ion program. Their support was essential for the success of a workshop targeting young scientists.

  12. 1993 Northern goshawk inventory on portions of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, D.T.; Kennedy, P.L.

    1994-06-01

    Northern goshawks (Accipiter gentilis) (hereafter referred to as goshawk) is a large forest dwelling hawk. Goshawks may be declining in population and reproduction in the southwestern United States. Reasons for the possible decline in goshawk populations include timber harvesting resulting in the loss of nesting habitat, toxic chemicals, and the effects of drought, fire, and disease. Thus, there is a need to determine their population status and assess impacts of management activities in potential goshawk habitat. Inventory for the goshawk was conducted on 2,254 ha of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to determine the presence of nesting goshawks on LANL lands. This information can be incorporated into LANL`s environmental management program. The inventory was conducted by Colorado State University personnel from May 12 to July 30, 1993. This report summarizes the results of this inventory.

  13. Spray drying technique. I: Hardware and process parameters.

    PubMed

    Cal, Krzysztof; Sollohub, Krzysztof

    2010-02-01

    Spray drying is a transformation of feed from a fluid state into a dried particulate form by spraying the feed into a hot drying medium. The main aim of drying by this method in pharmaceutical technology is to obtain dry particles with desired properties. This review presents the hardware and process parameters that affect the properties of the dried product. The atomization devices, drying chambers, air-droplet contact systems, the collection of dried product, auxiliary devices, the conduct of the spray drying process, and the significance of the individual parameters in the drying process, as well as the obtained product, are described and discussed.

  14. Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... or chewing tobacco can increase dry mouth symptoms. Methamphetamine use. Methamphetamine use can cause severe dry mouth and damage to teeth, a condition also known as "meth mouth." If you don't have enough saliva ...

  15. A progress report on UNICOS misuse detection at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.L.; Jackson, K.A.; Stallings, C.A.; Simmonds, D.D.; Siciliano, C.L.B.; Pedicini, G.A.

    1995-10-01

    An effective method for detecting computer misuse is the automatic monitoring and analysis of on-line user activity. During the past year, Los Alamos enhanced its Network Anomaly Detection and Intrusion Reporter (NADIR) to include analysis of user activity on Los Alamos` UNICOS Crays. In near real-time, NADIR compares user activity to historical profiles and tests activity against expert rules. The expert rules express Los Alamos` security policy and define improper or suspicious behavior. NADIR reports suspicious behavior to security auditors and provides tools to aid in follow-up investigations. This paper describes the implementation to date of the UNICOS component of NADIR, along with the operational experiences and future plans for the system.

  16. Publications of Los Alamos research, 1977-1981

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, C.J.; Garcia, C.A.

    1983-03-01

    This bibliography is a compilation of unclassified publications of work done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for 1977-1981. Papers published in those years are included regardless of when they were actually written. Publications received too late for inclusion in earlier compilations have also been listed. Declassification of previously classified reports is considered to constitute publication. All classified issuances are omitted - even those papers, themselves unclassified, which were published only as part of a classified document. If a paper was published more than once, all places of publication are included. The bibliography includes Los Alamos National Laboratory reports, papers released as non-Laboratory reports, journal articles, books, chapters of books, conference papers either published separately or as part of conference proceedings issued as books or reports, papers published in congressional hearings, theses, and US patents. Publications by Los Alamos authors that are not records of Laboratory-sponsored work are included when the Library becomes aware of them.

  17. Water Supply at Los Alamos 1998-2001

    SciTech Connect

    Richard J. Koch; David B. Rogers

    2003-03-01

    For the period 1998 through 2001, the total water used at Los Alamos from all sources ranged from 1325 million gallons (Mg) in 1999 to 1515 Mg in 2000. Groundwater production ranged from 1323 Mg in 1999 to 1506 Mg in 2000 from the Guaje, Pajarito, and Otowi fields. Nonpotable surface water used from Los Alamos reservoir ranged from zero gallons in 2001 to 9.3 Mg in 2000. For years 1998 through 2001, over 99% of all water used at Los Alamos was groundwater. Water use by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) between 1998 and 2001 ranged from 379 Mg in 2000 to 461 Mg in 1998. The LANL water use in 2001 was 393 Mg or 27% of the total water use at Los Alamos. Water use by Los Alamos County ranged from 872 Mg in 1999 to 1137 Mg in 2000, and averaged 1006 Mg/yr. Four new replacement wells in the Guaje field (G-2A, G-3A, G-4A, and G-5A) were drilled in 1998 and began production in 1999; with existing well G-1A, the Guaje field currently has five producing wells. Five of the old Guaje wells (G-1, G-2, G-4, G-5, and G-6) were plugged and abandoned in 1999, and one well (G-3) was abandoned but remains as an observation well for the Guaje field. The long-term water level observations in production and observation (test) wells at Los Alamos are consistent with the formation of a cone of depression in response to water production. The water level decline is gradual and at most has been about 0.7 to 2 ft per year for production wells and from 0.4 to 0.9 ft/yr for observation (test) wells. The largest water level declines have been in the Guaje field where nonpumping water levels were about 91 ft lower in 2001 than in 1951. The initial water levels of the Guaje replacement wells were 32 to 57 ft lower than the initial water levels of adjacent original Guaje wells. When production wells are taken off-line for pump replacement or repair, water levels have returned to within about 25 ft of initial static levels within 6 to 12 months. Thus, the water-level trends suggest no adverse

  18. Water supply at Los Alamos during 1993. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Purtymun, W.D.; Stoker, A.K.; McLin, S.G.; Maes, M.N.; Glasco, T.A.

    1995-10-01

    This report summarizes production and aquifer conditions for water wells in the Guaje, Pajarito, and Otowi Well Fields. These wells supplied all of the potable water used for municipal and some industrial purposes in Los Alamos County and the Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1993. The wells in the Los Alamos Well Field were transferred to San Ildefonso Pueblo in 1992. Four of the wells in the Los Alamos Well Field were plugged in 1993. One of the two new wells in the Otowi Well Field became operational in 1993. The spring gallery in Water Canyon supplied nonpotable water for industrial use, while surface water from the Los Alamos Reservoir was diverted for irrigation. In 1993 no water was used from the Guaje Reservoir. Due to the maintenance and operating cost of diverting water from the reservoirs, it is not economically feasible to continue their use for irrigation. This report fulfills some of the requirements of the Los Alamos Groundwater Protection Management Program by documenting use of the groundwater for water supply and providing information hydrologic characteristics of the main aquifer. This report is a joint effort between the Laboratory Water Quality and Hydrology Group and the Utilities Department of Johnson Controls World Services Inc. (JCI). The purpose of this report is to ensure a continuing historical record and to provide guidance for management of water resources in long-range planning for the water supply system. We have issued one summary report for the period of 1947 to 1971 and 22 annual reports that contain the results of our studies of these water supplies. An additional report summarized the hydrology of the main aquifer with reference to future development of groundwater supplies. A report was issued in 1988 that examined the status of wells and future water supply.

  19. Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    Dry mouth is the feeling that there is not enough saliva in your mouth. Everyone has a dry mouth once in a while - if they are nervous, ... under stress. But if you have a dry mouth all or most of the time, it can ...

  20. A physicists guide to The Los Alamos Primer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, B. Cameron

    2016-11-01

    In April 1943, a group of scientists at the newly established Los Alamos Laboratory were given a series of lectures by Robert Serber on what was then known of the physics and engineering issues involved in developing fission bombs. Serber’s lectures were recorded in a 24 page report titled The Los Alamos Primer, which was subsequently declassified and published in book form. This paper describes the background to the Primer and analyzes the physics contained in its 22 sections. The motivation for this paper is to provide a firm foundation of the background and contents of the Primer for physicists interested in the Manhattan Project and nuclear weapons.

  1. Fifty-one years of Los Alamos Spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Fenimore, Edward E.

    2014-09-04

    From 1963 to 2014, the Los Alamos National Laboratory was involved in at least 233 spacecraft. There are probably only one or two institutions in the world that have been involved in so many spacecraft. Los Alamos space exploration started with the Vela satellites for nuclear test detection, but soon expanded to ionospheric research (mostly barium releases), radioisotope thermoelectric generators, solar physics, solar wind, magnetospheres, astrophysics, national security, planetary physics, earth resources, radio propagation in the ionosphere, and cubesats. Here, we present a list of the spacecraft, their purpose, and their launch dates for use during RocketFest

  2. Los Alamos Using Neutrons to Stop Nuclear Smugglers

    ScienceCinema

    Favalli, Andrea; Swinhoe, Martyn

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers have successfully demonstrated for the first time that laser-generated neutrons can be enlisted as a useful tool in the War on Terror. The international research team used the short-pulse laser at Los Alamos's TRIDENT facility to generate a neutron beam with novel characteristics that interrogated a closed container to confirm the presence and quantity of nuclear material inside. The successful experiment paves the way for creation of a table-top-sized or truck-mounted neutron generator that could be installed at strategic locations worldwide to thwart smugglers trafficking in nuclear materials.

  3. Los Alamos Using Neutrons to Stop Nuclear Smugglers

    SciTech Connect

    Favalli, Andrea; Swinhoe, Martyn

    2013-06-03

    Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers have successfully demonstrated for the first time that laser-generated neutrons can be enlisted as a useful tool in the War on Terror. The international research team used the short-pulse laser at Los Alamos's TRIDENT facility to generate a neutron beam with novel characteristics that interrogated a closed container to confirm the presence and quantity of nuclear material inside. The successful experiment paves the way for creation of a table-top-sized or truck-mounted neutron generator that could be installed at strategic locations worldwide to thwart smugglers trafficking in nuclear materials.

  4. The development of the atomic bomb, Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, R.W.

    1993-11-01

    The historical presentation begins with details of the selection of Los Alamos as the site of the Army installation. Wartime efforts of the Army Corps of Engineers, and scientists to include the leader of Los Alamos, Robert Oppenheimer are presented. The layout and construction of the facilities are discussed. The monumental design requirements of the bombs are discussed, including but not limited to the utilization of the second choice implosion method of detonation, and the production of bomb-grade nuclear explosives. The paper ends with a philosophical discussion on the use of nuclear weapons.

  5. Needs assessment for fire department services and resources for the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-15

    This report has been developed in response to a request from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to evaluate the need for fire department services so as to enable the Laboratory to plan effective fire protection and thereby: meet LANL`s regulatory and contractual obligations; interface with the Department of Energy (DOE) and other agencies on matters relating to fire and emergency services; and ensure appropriate protection of the community and environment. This study is an outgrowth of the 1993 Fire Department Needs Assessment (prepared for DOE) but is developed from the LANL perspective. Input has been received from cognizant and responsible representatives at LANL, DOE, Los Alamos County (LAC) and the Los Alamos Fire Department (LAFD).

  6. Hot air drum evaporator

    DOEpatents

    Black, Roger L.

    1981-01-01

    An evaporation system for aqueous radioactive waste uses standard 30 and 55 gallon drums. Waste solutions form cascading water sprays as they pass over a number of trays arranged in a vertical stack within a drum. Hot dry air is circulated radially of the drum through the water sprays thereby removing water vapor. The system is encased in concrete to prevent exposure to radioactivity. The use of standard 30 and 55 gallon drums permits an inexpensive compact modular design that is readily disposable, thus eliminating maintenance and radiation build-up problems encountered with conventional evaporation systems.

  7. Drying characteristics and quality of bananas under infrared radiation heating

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hot air (HA) drying of banana has low drying efficiency and results in undesirable product quality. The objectives of this research were to investigate the feasibility of infrared (IR) heating to improve banana drying rate, evaluate quality of the dried product, and establish models for predicting d...

  8. A survey of macromycete diversity at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Bandelier National Monument, and Los Alamos County; A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Jarmie, N.; Rogers, F.J.

    1997-11-01

    The authors have completed a 5-year survey (1991--1995) of macromycetes found in Los Alamos County, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Bandelier National Monument. The authors have compiled a database of 1,048 collections, their characteristics, and identifications. The database represents 123 (98%) genera and 175 (73%) species reliably identified. Issues of habitat loss, species extinction, and ecological relationships are addressed, and comparisons with other surveys are made. With this baseline information and modeling of this baseline data, one can begin to understand more about the fungal flora of the area.

  9. Working with Fermi at Chicago and Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garwin, Richard L.

    2010-02-01

    I discuss my experience with Enrico Fermi as student and fellow faculty member at Chicago and with him as consultants to the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory in 1950-1952. The talk shares observations about this great physicist and exemplary human being. )

  10. The Controlled-Air Incinerator at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Newmyer, J.N.

    1994-04-01

    The Controlled-Air Incinerator (CAI) at Los Alamos is being modified and upgraded to begin routine operations treating low-level mixed waste (LLMW), radioactively contaminated polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) wastes, low-level liquid wastes, and possibly transuranic (TRU) wastes. This paper describes those modifications. Routine waste operations should begin in late FY95.

  11. Mercury: The Los Alamos ICF KrF laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Czuchlewski, S.J.; York, G.W.; Bigio, I.J.; Brucker, J.; Hanson, D.; Honig, E.M.; Kurnit, N.; Leland, W.; McCown, A.W.; McLeod, J.; Rose, E.; Thomas, S.; Thompson, D.

    1993-01-19

    The Mercury KrF laser facility at Los Alamos is being built with the benefit of lessons learned from the Aurora system. An increased understanding of KrF laser engineering, and the designed implementation of system flexibility, will permit Mercury to serve as a tested for a variety of advanced KrF technology concepts.

  12. The Los Alamos nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation technology development program

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.A. Jr.; Menlove, H.O.; Reilly, T.D.; Bosler, G.E.; Hakkila, E.A.; Eccleston, G.W.

    1994-04-01

    For nearly three decades, Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed and implemented nuclear measurement technology and training in support of national and international nuclear safeguards. This paper outlines the major elements of those technologies and highlights some of the latest developments.

  13. Plasma and ion beam processing at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Davis, H.A.; Henins, I.

    1994-07-01

    Efforts are underway at Los Alamos National Laboratory to utilize plasma and intense ion beam science and technology of the processing of advanced materials. A major theme involves surface modification of materials, e.g., etching, deposition, alloying, and implantation. In this paper, we concentrate on two programs, plasma source ion implantation and high-intensity pulsed ion beam deposition.

  14. [Los Alamos National Laboratory industrial applications and technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-30

    In October 1989, the Los Alamos Economic Development Corporation (LAEDC) entered into a contract with the Industrial Applications office (IAO) of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) whereby the LAEDC was to provide support services to IAO. More specifically, according to the Statement of Work in this contract The Los Alamos Economic Development Corporation shall assist the Los Alamos National Laboratory Industrial Applications Office in establishing and strengthening connections between potential entrepreneurs at the Laboratory and the business assistance community throughout New Mexico, directed toward enhancing the number, of successful start up businesses spinning off the Laboratory's technology base.'' As part of this contract and subsequent modifications thereof, the LAEDC was to perform seven tasks: 1. Provide business planning assistance to potential entrepreneurs. 2. (Assist IAO in preparing and distributing) informational materials on technology transfer. 3. (Organize and manage) meetings and seminars on technology transfer and entrepreneurship. 4. Identify new opportunities for technology transfer. 5. (Identify and implement programs for the) recognition of Laboratory Entrepreneurs. 6. Training Lab personnel, in the area of technology transfer and Laboratory industrial interactions. 7. Review and summarize prior New Mexico economic development studies. The purpose of this report, is to summarize the accomplishments of the LAEDC under its contract with IAO, and to fulfill its reporting requirements. This report covers the period from October 1989 to September 1992.

  15. Aqueous Nitrate Recovery Line at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Finstad, Casey Charles

    2016-06-15

    This powerpoint is part of the ADPSM Plutonium Engineering Lecture Series, which is an opportunity for new hires at LANL to get an overview of work done at TA55. It goes into detail about the aqueous nitrate recovery line at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  16. Brief review of Rover fuel development at Los Alamos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Keith V.

    1991-01-01

    A brief review of the graphite matrix uranium fuel development efforts at Los Alamos from 1955 through 1972 is presented. The uses of graphite flour carbon black, various binders, uranium dioxide, coated UC2 particles, and zirconium carbide in this development are described.

  17. Summary of environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    Linking the Rio Grande Valley and the Jemez Mountains, New Mexico`s Pajarito Plateau is home to a world-class scientific institution. Los Alamos National Laboratory (or the Laboratory), managed by the Regents of the University of California, is a government-owned, Department of Energy-supervised complex investigating all areas of modern science for the purposes of national defense, health, conservation, and ecology. The Laboratory was founded in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project, whose members assembled to create the first nuclear weapon. Occupying the campus of the Los Alamos Ranch School, American and British scientists gathered on the isolated mesa tops to harness recently discovered nuclear power with the hope of ending World War II. In July 1945, the initial objective of the Laboratory, a nuclear device, was achieved in Los Alamos and tested in White Sands, New Mexico. Today the Laboratory continues its role in defense, particularly in nuclear weapons, including developing methods for safely handling weapons and managing waste. For the past twenty years, the Laboratory has published an annual environmental report. This pamphlet offers a synopsis that briefly explains important concepts, such as radiation and provides a summary of the monitoring results and regulatory compliance status that are explained at length in the document entitled Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos during 1995.

  18. Airport-Noise Levels and Annoyance Model (ALAMO) system's reference manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, R.; Donaldson, J. L.; Johnson, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The airport-noise levels and annoyance model (ALAMO) is described in terms of the constituent modules, the execution of ALAMO procedure files, necessary for system execution, and the source code documentation associated with code development at Langley Research Center. The modules constituting ALAMO are presented both in flow graph form, and through a description of the subroutines and functions that comprise them.

  19. Effect of different drying methods on moisture ratio and rehydration of pumpkin slices.

    PubMed

    Seremet Ceclu, Liliana; Botez, Elisabeta; Nistor, Oana-Viorela; Andronoiu, Doina Georgeta; Mocanu, Gabriel-Danut

    2016-03-15

    This study was carried to determine the influence of hot air drying process and combined methods on physicochemical properties of pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata) samples. The experiments in hot air chamber were lead at 50, 60 and 70 °C. The combined method consists of a triple combination of the main drying techniques. Thus, in first stage the samples were dried in hot air convection at 60 °C followed by hot air ventilation at 40 °C simultaneous with microwave. The time required to reduce the moisture content to any given level was highly dependent on the drying conditions. So, the highest value of drying time in hot air has been 540 min at 50 °C, while the lowest time has been 189 min in hot air combined by microwave at 40 °C and a power of 315 W. The samples dried by hot air shows a higher rehydration capacity than samples dried by combined method.

  20. Hot Tickets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Bette-Lee; Hoffert, Barbara; Kuzyk, Raya; McCormack, Heather; Williams, Wilda

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the highlights of this year's BookExpo America (BEA) held at the Los Angeles Convention Center. The attendees at BEA had not minded that the air was recycled, the lighting was fluorescent, and the food was bad. The first hot book sighting came courtesy of Anne Rice. Michelle Moran, author of newly published novel, "The…

  1. Hot Canyon

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This historical film footage, originally produced in the early 1950s as part of a series by WOI-TV, shows atomic research at Ames Laboratory. The work was conducted in a special area of the Laboratory known as the "Hot Canyon."

  2. Hot Canyon

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    This historical film footage, originally produced in the early 1950s as part of a series by WOI-TV, shows atomic research at Ames Laboratory. The work was conducted in a special area of the Laboratory known as the "Hot Canyon."

  3. Environmental assessment for effluent reduction, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-11

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to eliminate industrial effluent from 27 outfalls at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The Proposed Action includes both simple and extensive plumbing modifications, which would result in the elimination of industrial effluent being released to the environment through 27 outfalls. The industrial effluent currently going to about half of the 27 outfalls under consideration would be rerouted to LANL`s sanitary sewer system. Industrial effluent from other outfalls would be eliminated by replacing once-through cooling water systems with recirculation systems, or, in a few instances, operational changes would result in no generation of industrial effluent. After the industrial effluents have been discontinued, the affected outfalls would be removed from the NPDES Permit. The pipes from the source building or structure to the discharge point for the outfalls may be plugged, or excavated and removed. Other outfalls would remain intact and would continue to discharge stormwater. The No Action alternative, which would maintain the status quo for LANL`s outfalls, was also analyzed. An alternative in which industrial effluent would be treated at the source facilities was considered but dismissed from further analysis because it would not reasonably meet the DOE`s purpose for action, and its potential environmental effects were bounded by the analysis of the Proposed Action and the No Action alternatives.

  4. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), conducted March 29, 1987 through April 17, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the LANL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the LANL, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the LANL Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the Survey for the LANL. 65 refs., 68 figs., 73 tabs.

  5. Comparative Evaluation of Physicochemical Properties of Pine Needle Powders Prepared by Different Drying Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ha-Sook; Lee, Jun Ho

    2015-01-01

    Systematic study of how different drying methods, namely hot-air drying, vacuum-drying, and freeze-drying, affect color, browning index, degree of rehydration, water solubility, and vitamin C content is critical for utilizing pine needle powders (PNP) as a novel ingredient in functional foods. Samples prepared by vacuum-drying showed a significantly higher L*-value, whereas higher a*- and b*-values were detected in the hot-air dried samples (P<0.05). The browning index was significantly higher in samples prepared by vacuum-drying compared to samples prepared by freeze-drying (P<0.05). Freeze-dried PNP exhibited a significantly higher degree of rehydration than hot-air dried samples (P<0.05). Water solubilities of freeze-dried and hot-air dried samples were significantly higher than that of vacuum-dried sample (P<0.05). Vitamin C was less destroyed during freeze-drying compared to hot-air or vacuum-drying (P<0.05). Freeze-dried samples displayed a clear porous structure and appeared to have a bigger space, whereas hot-air dried samples showed lower porosity than vacuum and freeze-dried samples. PMID:26176003

  6. Commercialization of Los Alamos National Laboratory technologies via small businesses. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brice, R.; Carton, D.; Rhyne, T.

    1997-06-01

    Appendices are presented from a study performed on a concept model system for the commercialization of Los Alamos National Laboratory technologies via small businesses. Topics include a summary of information from the joint MCC/Los Alamos technology conference; a comparison of New Mexico infrastructure to other areas; a typical licensing agreement; technology screening guides; summaries of specific DOE/UC/Los Alamos documents; a bibliography; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory TCRD; The Ames Center for Advanced Technology Development; Los Alamos licensing procedures; presentation of slides from monthly MCC/Los Alamos review meetings; generalized entrepreneurship model; and a discussion on receiving equity for technology.

  7. Foam-mat Drying Technology: A Review.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Z; Jideani, V A

    2015-07-13

    This article reviews various aspects of foam-mat drying such as foam-mat drying processing technique, main additives used for foam-mat drying, foam-mat drying of liquid and solid foods, quality characteristics of foam-mat dried foods and economic and technical benefits for employing foam-mat drying. Foam-mat drying process is an alternative method which allows the removal of water from liquid materials and pureed materials. In this drying process, a liquid material is converted into foam that is stable by being whipped after adding an edible foaming agent. The stable foam is then spread out in sheet or mat and dried by using hot air (40 -90°C) at atmospheric pressure. Methyl cellulose (0.25 - 2%), egg white (3 - 20%), maltodextrin (0.5 - 05%) and gum Arabic (2 - 9%) are the commonly utilised additives for the foam-mat drying process at the given range, either combined together for their effectiveness or individual effect. The foam-mat drying process is suitable for heat sensitive, viscous and sticky products which cannot be dried using other forms of drying methods such as spray drying because of the state of product. More interest has developed for foam-mat drying because of the simplicity, cost effectiveness, high speed drying and improved product quality it provides.

  8. Penetrating radiation: applications at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Scott; Hunter, James; Morris, Christopher

    2013-09-01

    Los Alamos has used penetrating radiography extensively throughout its history dating back to the Manhattan Project where imaging dense, imploding objects was the subject of intense interest. This interest continues today as major facilities like DARHT1 have become the mainstay of the US Stockpile Stewardship Program2 and the cornerstone of nuclear weapons certification. Meanwhile, emerging threats to national security from cargo containers and improvised explosive devices (IEDs) have invigorated inspection efforts using muon tomography, and compact x-ray radiography. Additionally, unusual environmental threats, like those from underwater oil spills and nuclear power plant accidents, have caused renewed interest in fielding radiography in severe operating conditions. We review the history of penetrating radiography at Los Alamos and survey technologies as presently applied to these important problems.

  9. The engineering institute of Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, Charles R; Park, Gyuhae; Cornwell, Phillip J; Todd, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) have taken the unprecedented step of creating a collaborative, multi-disciplinary graduate education program and associated research agenda called the Engineering Institute. The mission of the Engineering Institute is to develop a comprehensive approach for conducting LANL mission-driven, multidisciplinary engineering research and to improve recruiting, revitalization, and retention of the current and future staff necessary to support the LANL' s national security responsibilities. The components of the Engineering Institute are (1) a joint LANL/UCSD degree program, (2) joint LANL/UCSD research projects, (3) the Los Alamos Dynamic Summer School, (4) an annual workshop, and (5) industry short courses. This program is a possible model for future industry/government interactions with university partners.

  10. A NEW GENERATION OF LOS ALAMOS OPACITY TABLES

    SciTech Connect

    Colgan, J.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Magee, N. H.; Sherrill, M. E.; Abdallah, J. Jr.; Hakel, P.; Fontes, C. J.; Guzik, J. A.; Mussack, K. A.

    2016-02-01

    We present a new, publicly available set of Los Alamos OPLIB opacity tables for the elements hydrogen through zinc. Our tables are computed using the Los Alamos ATOMIC opacity and plasma modeling code, and make use of atomic structure calculations that use fine-structure detail for all the elements considered. Our equation of state model, known as ChemEOS, is based on the minimization of free energy in a chemical picture and appears to be a reasonable and robust approach to determining atomic state populations over a wide range of temperatures and densities. In this paper we discuss in detail the calculations that we have performed for the 30 elements considered, and present some comparisons of our monochromatic opacities with measurements and other opacity codes. We also use our new opacity tables in solar modeling calculations and compare and contrast such modeling with previous work.

  11. A New Generation of Los Alamos Opacity Tables

    SciTech Connect

    Colgan, James Patrick; Kilcrease, David Parker; Magee, Jr., Norman H.; Sherrill, Manolo Edgar; Abdallah, Joseph; Hakel, Peter; Fontes, Christopher John; Guzik, Joyce Ann; Mussack Tamashiro, Kathleen Anita

    2016-01-26

    We present a new, publicly available, set of Los Alamos OPLIB opacity tables for the elements hydrogen through zinc. Our tables are computed using the Los Alamos ATOMIC opacity and plasma modeling code, and make use of atomic structure calculations that use fine-structure detail for all the elements considered. Our equation-of-state (EOS) model, known as ChemEOS, is based on the minimization of free energy in a chemical picture and appears to be a reasonable and robust approach to determining atomic state populations over a wide range of temperatures and densities. In this paper we discuss in detail the calculations that we have performed for the 30 elements considered, and present some comparisons of our monochromatic opacities with measurements and other opacity codes. We also use our new opacity tables in solar modeling calculations and compare and contrast such modeling with previous work.

  12. A New Generation of Los Alamos Opacity Tables

    DOE PAGES

    Colgan, James Patrick; Kilcrease, David Parker; Magee, Jr., Norman H.; ...

    2016-01-26

    We present a new, publicly available, set of Los Alamos OPLIB opacity tables for the elements hydrogen through zinc. Our tables are computed using the Los Alamos ATOMIC opacity and plasma modeling code, and make use of atomic structure calculations that use fine-structure detail for all the elements considered. Our equation-of-state (EOS) model, known as ChemEOS, is based on the minimization of free energy in a chemical picture and appears to be a reasonable and robust approach to determining atomic state populations over a wide range of temperatures and densities. In this paper we discuss in detail the calculations thatmore » we have performed for the 30 elements considered, and present some comparisons of our monochromatic opacities with measurements and other opacity codes. We also use our new opacity tables in solar modeling calculations and compare and contrast such modeling with previous work.« less

  13. A new generation of Los Alamos opacity tables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgan, J.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Magee, N. H.; Abdallah, J.; Sherrill, M. E.; Fontes, C. J.; Hakel, P.; Guzik, J. A.; Mussack, K. A.; Walczak, P.

    2017-03-01

    We review a recently completed set of Los Alamos OPLIB opacity tables for the elements hydrogen through zinc. Our tables have been computed using the Los Alamos ATOMIC code, which makes use of atomic structure calculations that include fine-structure detail for all the elements considered. We utilize an equation-of-state model, known as ChemEOS, that is based on the minimization of free energy in a chemical picture. Recent publications by us have compared our calculations to available experimental opacity data and to other opacity calculations. Our tables are publicly available via our website, and have already been used in solar modeling calculations as well as the modeling of pulsating B-type stars. This proceedings submission will give an overview of our opacity calculations and briefly review the conclusions from the astrophysical modeling.

  14. Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) located in Los Alamos, New Mexico. LANL is operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by the University of California. The Tiger Team Assessment was conducted from September 23 to November 8, 1991, under the auspices of the DOE Office of Special Projects, Office of Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health. The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing environmental, safety, and health (ES H) disciplines; management; and contractor and DOE self-assessments. Compliance with applicable Federal, state, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal LANL site requirements was assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and the site contractors' management of ES H/quality assurance programs was conducted. This volume discusses findings concerning the environmental assessment.

  15. Airport-Noise Levels and Annoyance Model (ALAMO) user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, R.; Donaldson, J. L.; Johnson, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    A guide for the use of the Airport-Noise Level and Annoyance MOdel (ALAMO) at the Langley Research Center computer complex is provided. This document is divided into 5 primary sections, the introduction, the purpose of the model, and an in-depth description of the following subsystems: baseline, noise reduction simulation and track analysis. For each subsystem, the user is provided with a description of architecture, an explanation of subsystem use, sample results, and a case runner's check list. It is assumed that the user is familiar with the operations at the Langley Research Center (LaRC) computer complex, the Network Operating System (NOS 1.4) and CYBER Control Language. Incorporated within the ALAMO model is a census database system called SITE II.

  16. Los Alamos x-ray characterization facilities for plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Day, R.H.; Blake, R.L.; Stradling, G.L.; Trela, W.J.; Bartlett, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    A summary is given of characteristics of x-ray sources used by Los Alamos National Laboratory to calibrate various x-ray diagnostic packages and components. Included are D.C. sourcs in electron impact and fluorescence modes, a pulsed laser source for soft x rays with 100 ps time resolution, Febetron pulsed electron impact sources, and both EUV and x-ray synchrotron beamlines.

  17. Los Alamos National Laboratory's high-performance data system

    SciTech Connect

    Mercier, C.; Chorn, G.; Christman, R.; Collins, B.

    1991-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is designing a High-Performance Data System (HPDS) that will provide storage for supercomputers requiring large files and fast transfer speeds. The HPDS will meet the performance requirements by managing data transfers from high-speed storage systems connected directly to a high-speed network. File and storage management software will be distributed in workstations. Network protocols will ensure reliable, wide-area network data delivery to support long-distance distributed processing. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Recent results in the Los Alamos compact torus program

    SciTech Connect

    Tuszewski, M.; Armstrong, W.T.; Barnes, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    A Compact Toroid is a toroidal magnetic-plasma-containment geometry in which no conductors or vacuum-chamber walls pass through the hole in the torus. Two types of compact toroids are studied experimentally and theoretically at Los Alamos: spheromaks that are oblate in shape and contain both toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields, and field-reversed configurations (FRC) that are very prolate and contain poloidal field only.

  19. [Los Alamos National Laboratory industrial applications and technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-31

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of the Los Alamos Economic Development Corporation (LAEDC) under its contract with the Industrial Applications Office (IAO). The LAEDC has: provided business planning assistance to potential entrepreneurs, assisted IAO in preparing and distributing informational materials on technology, organized and managed meetings and seminars on technology transfer and entrepreneurship, identified new opportunities for technology transfer, and identified and implemented programs for the recognition of Laboratory entrepreneurs.

  20. Los Alamos Canyon Ice Rink Parking Flood Plain Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hathcock, Charles Dean

    2015-02-10

    The project location is in Los Alamos Canyon east of the ice rink facility at the intersection of West and Omega roads (Figure 1). Forty eight parking spaces will be constructed on the north and south side of Omega Road, and a lighted walking path will be constructed to the ice rink. Some trees will be removed during this action. A guardrail of approximately 400 feet will be constructed along the north side of West Road to prevent unsafe parking in that area.

  1. Inertial Confinement Fusion Research at LOS Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batha, S. H.; Albright, B. J.; Alexander, D. J.; Barnes, Cris W.; Bradley, P. A.; Cobble, J. A.; Cooley, J. C.; Cooley, J. H.; Day, R. D.; DeFriend, K. A.; Delamater, N. D.; Dodd, E. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Fernandez, J. C.; Flippo, K. A.; Grim, G. P.; Goldman, S. R.; Greenfield, S. R.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hoffman, N. M.; Holmes, R. L.; Johnson, R. P.; Keiter, P. A.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Lanier, N. E.; Loomis, E.; Lopez, F. E.; Luo, S.; Mack, J. M.; Magelssen, G. R.; Montgomery, D. S.; Nobile, A.; Oertel, J. A.; Reardon, P.; Rose, H. A.; Schmidt, D.; Schmitt, M. J.; Seifter, A.; Shimada, T.; Swift, D. C.; Tierney, T. E.; Welser-Sherrill, L.; Wilke, M. D.; Wilson, D. C.; Workman, J.; Yin, L.

    2009-07-01

    Inertial confinement fusion research at Los Alamos National Laboratory is focused on high-leverage areas of thermonuclear ignition to which LANL can apply its historic strengths and that are complementary to high-energy-density-physics topics. Using the Trident and Omega laser facilities, experiments are pursued in laser-plasma instabilities, symmetry, Be technologies, neutron and fusion-product diagnostics, and defect hydrodynamics.

  2. Los Alamos sequence analysis package for nucleic acids and proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kanehisa, M I

    1982-01-01

    An interactive system for computer analysis of nucleic acid and protein sequences has been developed for the Los Alamos DNA Sequence Database. It provides a convenient way to search or verify various sequence features, e.g., restriction enzyme sites, protein coding frames, and properties of coded proteins. Further, the comprehensive analysis package on a large-scale database can be used for comparative studies on sequence and structural homologies in order to find unnoted information stored in nucleic acid sequences. PMID:6174934

  3. Overview of laser technology at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, G. K.; Cremers, D. A.

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has had a long history of involvement in laser sciences and has been recognized both for its large laser programs and smaller scale developments in laser technology and applications. The first significant program was with the Rover nuclear-based rocket propulsion system in 1968 to study laser initiated fusion. From here applications spread to programs in laser isotope separation and development of large lasers for fusion. These programs established the technological human resource base of highly trained laser physicists, engineers, and chemists that remain at the Laboratory today. Almost every technical division at Los Alamos now has some laser capability ranging from laser development, applications, studies on nonlinear processes, modeling and materials processing. During the past six years over eight R&D-100 Awards have been received by Los Alamos for development of laser-based techniques and instrumentation. Outstanding examples of technology developed include LIDAR applications to environmental monitoring, single molecule detection using fluorescence spectroscopy, a laser-based high kinetic energy source of oxygen atoms produced by a laser-sustained plasma, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for compositional, analysis, thin film high temperature superconductor deposition, multi-station laser welding, and direct metal deposition and build-up of components by fusing powder particles with a laser beam.

  4. Los Alamos, Toshiba probing Fukushima with cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Christopher

    2014-06-16

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has announced an impending partnership with Toshiba Corporation to use a Los Alamos technique called muon tomography to safely peer inside the cores of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors and create high-resolution images of the damaged nuclear material inside without ever breaching the cores themselves. The initiative could reduce the time required to clean up the disabled complex by at least a decade and greatly reduce radiation exposure to personnel working at the plant. Muon radiography (also called cosmic-ray radiography) uses secondary particles generated when cosmic rays collide with upper regions of Earth's atmosphere to create images of the objects that the particles, called muons, penetrate. The process is analogous to an X-ray image, except muons are produced naturally and do not damage the materials they contact. Muon radiography has been used before in imaginative applications such as mapping the interior of the Great Pyramid at Giza, but Los Alamos's muon tomography technique represents a vast improvement over earlier technology.

  5. Los Alamos Science: The Human Genome Project. Number 20, 1992

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cooper, N. G.; Shea, N. eds.

    1992-01-01

    This document provides a broad overview of the Human Genome Project, with particular emphasis on work being done at Los Alamos. It tries to emphasize the scientific aspects of the project, compared to the more speculative information presented in the popular press. There is a brief introduction to modern genetics, including a review of classic work. There is a broad overview of the Genome Project, describing what the project is, what are some of its major five-year goals, what are major technological challenges ahead of the project, and what can the field of biology, as well as society expect to see as benefits from this project. Specific results on the efforts directed at mapping chromosomes 16 and 5 are discussed. A brief introduction to DNA libraries is presented, bearing in mind that Los Alamos has housed such libraries for many years prior to the Genome Project. Information on efforts to do applied computational work related to the project are discussed, as well as experimental efforts to do rapid DNA sequencing by means of single-molecule detection using applied spectroscopic methods. The article introduces the Los Alamos staff which are working on the Genome Project, and concludes with brief discussions on ethical, legal, and social implications of this work; a brief glimpse of genetics as it may be practiced in the next century; and a glossary of relevant terms.

  6. Los Alamos Science: The Human Genome Project. Number 20, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, N G; Shea, N

    1992-01-01

    This article provides a broad overview of the Human Genome Project, with particular emphasis on work being done at Los Alamos. It tries to emphasize the scientific aspects of the project, compared to the more speculative information presented in the popular press. There is a brief introduction to modern genetics, including a review of classic work. There is a broad overview of the Genome Project, describing what the project is, what are some of its major five-year goals, what are major technological challenges ahead of the project, and what can the field of biology, as well as society expect to see as benefits from this project. Specific results on the efforts directed at mapping chromosomes 16 and 5 are discussed. A brief introduction to DNA libraries is presented, bearing in mind that Los Alamos has housed such libraries for many years prior to the Genome Project. Information on efforts to do applied computational work related to the project are discussed, as well as experimental efforts to do rapid DNA sequencing by means of single-molecule detection using applied spectroscopic methods. The article introduces the Los Alamos staff which are working on the Genome Project, and concludes with brief discussions on ethical, legal, and social implications of this work; a brief glimpse of genetics as it may be practiced in the next century; and a glossary of relevant terms.

  7. Los Alamos, Toshiba probing Fukushima with cosmic rays

    ScienceCinema

    Morris, Christopher

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has announced an impending partnership with Toshiba Corporation to use a Los Alamos technique called muon tomography to safely peer inside the cores of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors and create high-resolution images of the damaged nuclear material inside without ever breaching the cores themselves. The initiative could reduce the time required to clean up the disabled complex by at least a decade and greatly reduce radiation exposure to personnel working at the plant. Muon radiography (also called cosmic-ray radiography) uses secondary particles generated when cosmic rays collide with upper regions of Earth's atmosphere to create images of the objects that the particles, called muons, penetrate. The process is analogous to an X-ray image, except muons are produced naturally and do not damage the materials they contact. Muon radiography has been used before in imaginative applications such as mapping the interior of the Great Pyramid at Giza, but Los Alamos's muon tomography technique represents a vast improvement over earlier technology.

  8. Overview of laser technology at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, G.K.; Cremers, D.A.

    1994-09-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has had a long history of involvement in laser sciences and has been recognized both for its large laser programs and smaller scale developments in laser technology and applications. The first significant program was with the Rover nuclear-based rocket propulsion system in 1968 to study laser initiated fusion. From here applications spread to programs in laser isotope separation and development of large lasers for fusion. These programs established the technological human resource base of highly trained laser physicists, engineers, and chemists that remain at the Laboratory today. Almost every technical division at Los Alamos now has some laser capability ranging from laser development, applications, studies on nonlinear processes, modeling and materials processing. During the past six years over eight R&D-100 Awards have been received by Los Alamos for development of laser-based techniques and instrumentation. Outstanding examples of technology developed include LIDAR applications to environmental monitoring, single molecule detection using fluorescence spectroscopy, a laser-based high kinetic energy source of oxygen atoms produced by a laser-sustained plasma, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for compositional, analysis, thin film high temperature superconductor deposition, multi-station laser welding, and direct metal deposition and build-up of components by fusing powder particles with a laser beam.

  9. Water supply at Los Alamos during 1996. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McLin, S.G.; Purtymun, W.D.; Maes, M.N.; Longmire, P.A.

    1997-12-01

    Production of potable municipal water supplies during 1996 totaled about 1,368.1 million gallons from wells in the Guaje, Pajarito, and Otowi well fields. There was no water used from either the spring gallery in Water Canyon or from Guaje Reservoir during 1996. About 2.6 million gallons of water from Los Alamos Reservoir was used for lawn irrigation. The total water usage in 1996 was about 1,370.7 million gallons, or about 131 gallons per day per person living in Los Alamos County. Groundwater pumpage was up about 12.0 million gallons in 1996 compared with the pumpage in 1995. This report fulfills requirements specified in US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 (Groundwater Protection Management Program), which requires the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to monitor and document groundwater conditions below Pajarito Plateau and to protect the regional aquifer from contamination associated with Laboratory operations. Furthermore, this report also fulfills special conditions by providing information on hydrologic characteristics of the regional aquifer, including operating conditions of the municipal water supply system.

  10. [Analysis of variation of coumarin and volatile compounds in Angelica Dahuricae radix in different drying methods and conditions].

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei; Chen, Jing; Zhou, Bing; Xu, Yuan; Qian, Da-Wei; Duan, Jin-Ao

    2014-07-01

    To explore the effect of different processing methods and conditions of coumarin and volatile compounds in Angelica Dahuricae Radix and their change regularity, in order to optimize and establish appropriate drying methods and conditions. After being cleaned, fresh Angelica Dahuricae Radix herbs were baked, sun-dried, shade-dried, sun-dried after sulfur-fumigation, dried by quick-lime embedding, freeze-dried, microwave-dried. Finally, 24 groups of samples were obtained after being mashed and passing through the 60-mesh screen. The HPLC-PDA method was adopted to simultaneously determine the content of coumarin compounds. The GC-MS method was used to determine the content of volatile compounds. The principal component analysis (PCA) was made on the standardized analysis results for the 24 groups of samples processed with different drying methods. According to the PCA results, the comprehensive scores of coumarin and volatile compounds in Angelica Dahuricae Radix herbs processed with different methods in the order from high to low were that unpeeled and dried by quicklime embedding > unpeeled and dried with hot-air at 100 degrees C > unpeeled and dried with hot-air at 40 degrees C > peeled and infrared-dried > peeled and dried with hot-air at 60 degrees C > peeled and dried with hot-air at 40 degrees C > peeled and sun-dried > peeled and dried with hot-air at 60 degrees C > peeled and dried with hot-air at 100 degrees C > peeled and microwave-dried > peeled and dried with hot-air at 80 degrees C > unpeeled and sun-dried > unpeeled and dried with sulfur-fumigation > peeled and dried with sulfur-fumigation > unpeeled and dried with hot-air at 120 degrees C > unpeeled and freeze-dried > unpeeled and infrared-dried > peeled and dried with hot-air at 120 degrees C > peeled and freeze-dried > peeled and dried by quicklime embedding > unpeeled and dried with hot-air at 80 degrees C > peeled and shade-dried > unpeeled and shade-dried > unpeeled and microwave-dried. According

  11. Are 'hot spots' hot spots?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulger, Gillian R.

    2012-07-01

    The term 'hot spot' emerged in the 1960s from speculations that Hawaii might have its origins in an unusually hot source region in the mantle. It subsequently became widely used to refer to volcanic regions considered to be anomalous in the then-new plate tectonic paradigm. It carried with it the implication that volcanism (a) is emplaced by a single, spatially restricted, mongenetic melt-delivery system, assumed to be a mantle plume, and (b) that the source is unusually hot. This model has tended to be assumed a priori to be correct. Nevertheless, there are many geological ways of testing it, and a great deal of work has recently been done to do so. Two fundamental problems challenge this work. First is the difficulty of deciding a 'normal' mantle temperature against which to compare estimates. This is usually taken to be the source temperature of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORBs). However, Earth's surface conduction layer is ˜200 km thick, and such a norm is not appropriate if the lavas under investigation formed deeper than the 40-50 km source depth of MORB. Second, methods for estimating temperature suffer from ambiguity of interpretation with composition and partial melt, controversy regarding how they should be applied, lack of repeatability between studies using the same data, and insufficient precision to detect the 200-300 °C temperature variations postulated. Available methods include multiple seismological and petrological approaches, modelling bathymetry and topography, and measuring heat flow. Investigations have been carried out in many areas postulated to represent either (hot) plume heads or (hotter) tails. These include sections of the mid-ocean spreading ridge postulated to include ridge-centred plumes, the North Atlantic Igneous Province, Iceland, Hawaii, oceanic plateaus, and high-standing continental areas such as the Hoggar swell. Most volcanic regions that may reasonably be considered anomalous in the simple plate-tectonic paradigm have been

  12. century drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Benjamin I.; Smerdon, Jason E.; Seager, Richard; Coats, Sloan

    2014-11-01

    Global warming is expected to increase the frequency and intensity of droughts in the twenty-first century, but the relative contributions from changes in moisture supply (precipitation) versus evaporative demand (potential evapotranspiration; PET) have not been comprehensively assessed. Using output from a suite of general circulation model (GCM) simulations from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, projected twenty-first century drying and wetting trends are investigated using two offline indices of surface moisture balance: the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) and the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI). PDSI and SPEI projections using precipitation and Penman-Monteith based PET changes from the GCMs generally agree, showing robust cross-model drying in western North America, Central America, the Mediterranean, southern Africa, and the Amazon and robust wetting occurring in the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes and east Africa (PDSI only). The SPEI is more sensitive to PET changes than the PDSI, especially in arid regions such as the Sahara and Middle East. Regional drying and wetting patterns largely mirror the spatially heterogeneous response of precipitation in the models, although drying in the PDSI and SPEI calculations extends beyond the regions of reduced precipitation. This expansion of drying areas is attributed to globally widespread increases in PET, caused by increases in surface net radiation and the vapor pressure deficit. Increased PET not only intensifies drying in areas where precipitation is already reduced, it also drives areas into drought that would otherwise experience little drying or even wetting from precipitation trends alone. This PET amplification effect is largest in the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes, and is especially pronounced in western North America, Europe, and southeast China. Compared to PDSI projections using precipitation changes only, the projections incorporating both

  13. Hot Meetings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Mary

    2002-01-01

    A colleague walked by my office one time as I was conducting a meeting. There were about five or six members of my team present. The colleague, a man who had been with our institution (The Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab, a.k.a. APL) for many years, could not help eavesdropping. He said later it sounded like we we re having a raucous argument, and he wondered whether he should stand by the door in case things got out of hand and someone threw a punch. Our Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) team was a hot group, to invoke the language that is fashionable today, although we never thought of ourselves in those terms. It was just our modus operandi. The tenor of the discussion got loud and volatile at times, but I prefer to think of it as animated, robust, or just plain collaborative. Mary Chiu and her "hot" team from the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory built the Advanced Composition Explorer spacecraft for NASA. Instruments on the spacecraft continue to collect data that inform us about what's happening on our most important star, the Sun.

  14. Improvement in storage stability of infrared dried rough rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to develop infrared drying (IRD) method to improve the stability of physicochemical properties of rough rice during storage. The effect of IRD on the physicochemical properties of stored rough rice was compared with that of hot air drying (HAD) and ambient air drying ...

  15. Dry cell battery poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Batteries - dry cell ... Acidic dry cell batteries contain: Manganese dioxide Ammonium chloride Alkaline dry cell batteries contain: Sodium hydroxide Potassium hydroxide Lithium dioxide dry cell batteries ...

  16. Audit Report, "Fire Protection Deficiencies at Los Alamos National Laboratory"

    SciTech Connect

    2009-06-01

    The Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) maintains some of the Nation's most important national security assets, including nuclear materials. Many of Los Alamos' facilities are located in close proximity to one another, are occupied by large numbers of contract and Federal employees, and support activities ranging from nuclear weapons design to science-related activities. Safeguarding against fires, regardless of origin, is essential to protecting employees, surrounding communities, and national security assets. On June 1, 2006, Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS), became the managing and operating contractor for Los Alamos, under contract with the Department's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). In preparation for assuming its management responsibilities at Los Alamos, LANS conducted walk-downs of the Laboratory's facilities to identify pre-existing deficiencies that could give rise to liability, obligation, loss or damage. The walk-downs, which identified 812 pre-existing fire protection deficiencies, were conducted by subject matter professionals, including fire protection experts. While the Los Alamos Site Office has overall responsibility for the effectiveness of the fire protection program, LANS, as the Laboratory's operating contractor, has a major, day-to-day role in minimizing fire-related risks. The issue of fire protection at Los Alamos is more than theoretical. In May 2000, the 'Cerro Grande' fire burned about 43,000 acres, including 7,700 acres of Laboratory property. Due to the risk posed by fire to the Laboratory's facilities, workforce, and surrounding communities, we initiated this audit to determine whether pre-existing fire protection deficiencies had been addressed. Our review disclosed that LANS had not resolved many of the fire protection deficiencies that had been identified in early 2006: (1) Of the 296 pre-existing deficiencies we selected for audit, 174 (59 percent) had not been corrected

  17. Review of Rover fuel element protective coating development at Los Alamos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, Terry C.

    1991-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) entered the nuclear propulsion field in 1955 and began work on all aspects of a nuclear propulsion program with a target exhaust temperature of about 2750 K. A very extensive chemical vapor deposition coating technology for preventing catastrophic corrosion of reactor core components by the high temperature, high pressure hydrogen propellant gas was developed. Over the 17-year term of the program, more than 50,000 fuel elements were coated and evaluated. Advances in performance were achieved only through closely coupled interaction between the developing fuel element fabrication and protective coating technologies. The endurance of fuel elements in high temperature, high pressure hydrogen environment increased from several minutes at 2000 K exit gas temperature to 2 hours at 2440 K exit gas temperature in a reactor test and 10 hours at 2350 K exit gas temperature in a hot gas test. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the rationale for selection of coating materials used (NbC and ZrC), identify critical fuel element-coat interactions that had to be modified to increase system performance, and review the evolution of protective coating technology.

  18. Creep of dry clinopyroxene aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bystricky, Misha; Mackwell, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    We have determined diffusional and dislocation creep rheologies for clinopyroxenite Ca1.0Mg0.8Fe0.2Si2O6 under dry conditions by deforming natural and hot-pressed samples at confining pressures of 300-430 MPa and temperatures of 1100°-1250°C with the oxygen fugacity buffered by either nickel-nickel oxide or iron-wüstite powders. The coarse-grained natural Sleaford Bay clinopyroxenite yielded a stress exponent of n = 4.7 ± 0.2 and an activation energy for creep of Q = 760 ± 40 kJ mol-1, consistent with deformation in the dislocation creep regime. The strength of the natural clinopyroxenite is consistent with previous high-temperature measurements of dislocation creep behavior of Sleaford Bay clinopyroxenite by Kirby and Kronenberg [1984] and Boland and Tullis [1986]. Fine-grained clinopyroxenite was prepared from ground powders of the natural clinopyroxenite. Hot-pressed samples were deformed under similar conditions to the natural samples. Mixed-mode deformation behavior was observed, with diffusional creep (n = 1) at lower differential stresses and dislocation creep (with n and Q similar to those of the natural samples) at higher differential stresses. Within the dislocation creep field the predried hot-pressed samples generally yielded creep rates that were about an order of magnitude faster than the natural samples. Thus, even at the highest differential stresses, a component of strain accommodation by grain boundary diffusion was present in the hot-pressed samples. Optical and electron microscope investigations of the deformation microstructures of the natural and hot-pressed samples show evidence for mechanical twinning and activation of dislocation slip systems. When extrapolated to geological conditions expected in the deep crust and upper mantle on Earth and other terrestrial planets, the strength of dry single-phase clinopyroxene aggregates is very high, exceeding that of dry olivine-rich rocks.

  19. Colorful drying.

    PubMed

    Lakio, Satu; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2010-03-01

    Drying is one of the standard unit operations in the pharmaceutical industry and it is important to become aware of the circumstances that dominate during the process. The purpose of this study was to test microcapsulated thermochromic pigments as heat indicators in a fluid bed drying process. The indicator powders were manually granulated with alpha-lactose monohydrate resulting in three particle-size groups. Also, pellets were coated with the indicator powders. The granules and pellets were fluidized in fluid bed dryer to observe the progress of the heat flow in the material and to study the heat indicator properties of the indicator materials. A tristimulus colorimeter was used to measure CIELAB color values. Color indicator for heat detection can be utilized to test if the heat-sensitive API would go through physical changes during the pharmaceutical drying process. Both the prepared granules and pellets can be used as heat indicator in fluid bed drying process. The colored heat indicators give an opportunity to learn new aspects of the process at real time and could be exploded, for example, for scaling-up studies.

  20. Groundwater level status report for 2009, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

    2010-03-01

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2009 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 179 monitoring wells, including 55 regional aquifer wells (including 11 regional/intermediate wells), 26 intermediate wells, 98 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 161 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells.

  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory Economic Analysis Capability Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Boero, Riccardo; Edwards, Brian Keith; Pasqualini, Donatella; Rivera, Michael Kelly

    2016-04-19

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed two types of models to compute the economic impact of infrastructure disruptions. FastEcon is a fast running model that estimates first-­order economic impacts of large scale events such as hurricanes and floods and can be used to identify the amount of economic activity that occurs in a specific area. LANL’s Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model estimates more comprehensive static and dynamic economic impacts of a broader array of events and captures the interactions between sectors and industries when estimating economic impacts.

  2. Bradbury science museum: your window to Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Deck, Linda Theresa

    2009-03-05

    The Bradbury Science Museum is the public's window to Los Alamos National Laboratory and supports the Community Program Office's mission to develop community support to accomplish LANL's national security and science mission. It does this by stimulating interest in and increasing basic knowledge of science and technology in northern New Mexico audiences, and increasing public understanding and appreciation of how LANL science and technology solve our global problems. In performing these prime functions, the Museum also preserves the history of scientific accomplishment at the Lab by collecting and preserving artifacts of scientific and historical importance.

  3. Groundwater level status report for 2010, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

    2011-03-01

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2010 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 194 monitoring wells, including 63 regional aquifer wells (including 10 regional/intermediate wells), 34 intermediate wells, 97 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 162 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells and seasonal responses to snowmelt runoff observed in intermediate wells.

  4. Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The purpose of the safety and health assessment was to determine the effectiveness of representative safety and health programs at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Within the safety and health programs at LANL, performance was assessed in the following technical areas: Organization and Administration, Quality Verification, Operations, Maintenance, Training and Certification, Auxiliary Systems, Emergency Preparedness, Technical Support, Packaging and Transportation, Nuclear Criticality Safety, Security/Safety Interface, Experimental Activities, Site/Facility Safety Review, Radiological Protection, Personnel Protection, Worker Safety and Health (OSHA) Compliance, Fire Protection, Aviation Safety, Explosives Safety, Natural Phenomena, and Medical Services.

  5. Recent developments in the Los Alamos radiation transport code system

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, R.A.; Parsons, K.

    1997-06-01

    A brief progress report on updates to the Los Alamos Radiation Transport Code System (LARTCS) for solving criticality and fixed-source problems is provided. LARTCS integrates the Diffusion Accelerated Neutral Transport (DANT) discrete ordinates codes with the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code. The LARCTS code is being developed with a graphical user interface for problem setup and analysis. Progress in the DANT system for criticality applications include a two-dimensional module which can be linked to a mesh-generation code and a faster iteration scheme. Updates to MCNP Version 4A allow statistical checks of calculated Monte Carlo results.

  6. Groundwater level status report for 2008, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

    2009-03-01

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2008 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 179 monitoring wells, including 45 regional aquifer wells, 28 intermediate wells, 8 regional/intermediate wells, 106 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 166 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells.

  7. Groundwater Level Status Report for 2005 Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    S.P. Allen; R.J. Koch

    2006-05-15

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 2005 is provided in this report. The Groundwater Level Monitoring Project was instituted in 2005 to provide a framework for the collection and processing of quality controlled groundwater level data. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 137 monitoring wells, including 41 regional aquifer wells, 22 intermediate wells, and 74 alluvial wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 118 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well.

  8. The Los Alamos National Laboratory Nuclear Vision Project

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, E.D.; Wagner, R.L. Jr.

    1996-09-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has initiated a project to examine possible futures associated with the global nuclear enterprise over the course of the next 50 years. All major components are included in this study--weapons, nonproliferation, nuclear power, nuclear materials, and institutional and public factors. To examine key issues, the project has been organized around three main activity areas--workshops, research and analyses, and development of linkages with other synergistic world efforts. This paper describes the effort--its current and planned activities--as well as provides discussion of project perspectives on nuclear weapons, nonproliferation, nuclear energy, and nuclear materials focus areas.

  9. Los Alamos Science, Number 25 -- 1997: Celebrating the Neutrino

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cooper, N. G. ed.

    1997-01-01

    This issue is devoted to the neutrino and its remaining mysteries. It is divided into the following areas: (1) The Reines-Cowan experiment -- detecting the poltergeist; (2) The oscillating neutrino -- an introduction to neutrino masses and mixing; (3) A brief history of neutrino experiments at LAMPF; (4) A thousand eyes -- the story of LSND (Los Alamos neutrino oscillation experiment); (5) The evidence for oscillations; (6) The nature of neutrinos in muon decay and physics beyond the Standard Model; (7) Exorcising ghosts -- in pursuit of the missing solar neutrinos; (8) MSW -- a possible solution to the solar neutrino problem; (8) Neutrinos and supernovae; and (9) Dark matter and massive neutrinos.

  10. Mac configuration management at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, Allan B

    2010-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) had a need for central configuration management of non-Windows computers. LANL has three to five thousand Macs and an equal number of Linux based systems. The primary goal was to be able to inventory all non-windows systems and patch Mc OS X systems. LANL examined a number of commercial and open source solutions and ultimately selected Puppet. This paper will discuss why we chose Puppet, how we implemented it, and some lessons we learned along the way.

  11. Los Alamos Science, Number 25 -- 1997: Celebrating the neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, N.G.

    1997-12-31

    This issue is devoted to the neutrino and its remaining mysteries. It is divided into the following areas: (1) The Reines-Cowan experiment -- detecting the poltergeist; (2) The oscillating neutrino -- an introduction to neutrino masses and mixing; (3) A brief history of neutrino experiments at LAMPF; (4) A thousand eyes -- the story of LSND (Los Alamos neutrino oscillation experiment); (5) The evidence for oscillations; (6) The nature of neutrinos in muon decay and physics beyond the Standard Model; (7) Exorcising ghosts -- in pursuit of the missing solar neutrinos; (8) MSW -- a possible solution to the solar neutrino problem; (8) Neutrinos and supernovae; and (9) Dark matter and massive neutrinos.

  12. Los Alamos safeguards program overview and NDA in safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Keepin, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    Over the years the Los Alamos safeguards program has developed, tested, and implemented a broad range of passive and active nondestructive analysis (NDA) instruments (based on gamma and x-ray detection and neutron counting) that are now widely employed in safeguarding nuclear materials of all forms. Here very briefly, the major categories of gamma ray and neutron based NDA techniques, give some representative examples of NDA instruments currently in use, and cite a few notable instances of state-of-the-art NDA technique development. Historical aspects and a broad overview of the safeguards program are also presented.

  13. Water supply at Los Alamos during 1995. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McLin, S.G.; Purtymun, W.D.; Maes, M.N.

    1997-04-01

    Production of potable municipal water supplies during 1995 totaled about 1,356.1 million gallons from wells in the Guaje and Pajarito well fields. Wells in the Otowi field were not operational during 1995. The nonpotable water supply for industrial use was about 1.6 million gallons from the spring gallery in Water Canyon, and another 1.6 million gallons from Los Alamos Reservoir was used for lawn irrigation. There was no water used from Guaje Reservoir in 1995. The total water usage in 1995 was about 1,359.3 million gallons. Groundwater pumpage during 1995 was the lowest on record since 1966.

  14. Water supply at Los Alamos during 1985: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Purtymun, W.D.; Becker, N.M.; Maes, M.N.

    1986-10-01

    Well field operations during 1985 were satisfactory with municipal and industrial supplies consisting of 1587 x 10/sup 6/ gal from wells in three well fields and 37 x 10/sup 6/ gal from the gallery in Water Canyon. About 2.8 x 10/sup 6/ gal of water from Guaje Reservoir and 0.9 x 10/sup 6/ gal from Los Alamos Reservoir were used for irrigation; thus the total water usage in 1985 was about 1628 x 10/sup 6/ gal. Primary and secondary chemical quality of water in the distribution system is in compliance with federal regulations.

  15. Incidental Reflector Comparison of Containerized Dry Fire Extinguishing Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Bryan Scott; Wysong, Andrew Russell

    2016-12-14

    This document addresses the incidental reflector reactivity worth of containerized fire extinguishing agents authorized for use in PF-4 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The intent of the document is to analyze dry fire extinguishing agent that remains in a container and is not actively being used in a fire emergency. The incidental reflector reactivity worth is determined by comparison to various thicknesses of close fitting water reflection which is commonly used to bound incidental reflectors in criticality safety evaluations. The conclusion is that even in unlimited quantities, when containerized the authorized dry fire extinguishing agents are bound by 0.4 inches of close fitting water.

  16. Experimental Performance of a Thermoelectric Heat-Pump Drying System for Drying Herbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongsim, K.; Jamradloedluk, J.; Lertsatitthanakorn, C.; Siriamornpun, S.; Rungsiyopas, M.; Soponronnarit, S.

    2015-06-01

    In this study we investigated thermoelectric (TE) heat-pump drying of laurel clock vine leaves, and the effect of drying-air temperature on the characteristics of the leaves. The TE drying system comprised four TE modules each with its own rectangular fin heat sink. The hot side of each TE module was fixed to its own heat sink; the cold sides were fixed to heat-pipe heat sinks and a drying chamber. The drying time depended on drying-air temperature. The heating capacity and coefficient of performance (COP) increased as the current supplied to the TE modules was increased. Calculated COP for the entire TE heat-pump drying system were 1.28 and 0.81 for drying-air temperatures of 50 and 40°C, respectively.

  17. Industrial application for the Los Alamos Materials Modeling Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Lesar, R.; Charbon, C.; Kothe, D.; Wu, D.; Reddy, A.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Casting and solidification of molten metals and metal alloys is a critical step in the production of high-quality metal stock and in the fabrication of finished parts. Control of the casting process can be the determining factor in both the quality and cost of the final metal product. Major problems with the quality of cast stock or finished parts can arise because of the difficulty of preventing variations in the alloy content, the generation of porosity or poor surface finish, and the loss of microstructure controlled strength and toughness resulting from the poor understanding and design of the mold filling and solidification processes. In this project, we sought to develop a new set of applications focused on adding the ability to accurately model solidification and grain growth to casting simulations. We implemented these applications within the Los Alamos Materials Modeling Platform, LAMMP, a graphical-based materials, and materials modeling environment being created at the Computational Testbed for Industry.

  18. Exploding metallic foil fuse modeling at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Lindemuth, I.R.; Reinovsky, R.E.; Goforth, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    A ''first-principles'' computational model of exploding metallic foil behavior has been developed at Los Alamos. The model couples zero-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics with ohmic heating and electrical circuit equations and uses the Los Alamos SESAME atomic data base computer library to determine the foil material's temperature- and density-dependent pressure, specific energy, and electrical conductivity. The model encompasses many previously successful empirical models and offers plausible physical explanations of phenomena not treated by the empirical models. In addition to addressing the electrical circuit performance of an exploding foil, the model provides information on the temporal evolution of the foil material's density, temperature, pressure, electrical conductivity, and expansion and translational velocities. In this paper, we report the physical insight gained by computational studies of two opening switch concepts being developed for application in an FCG-driven 1-MJ-class imploding plasma z-pinch experiment. The first concept considered is a ''conventional'' electrically exploded fuse, which has been demonstrated to operate at 16 MA driven by the 15-MJ-class FCG to be used in the 1 MJ implosion experiment. The second concept considered is a Type 2 explosively formed fuse (EFF), which has been demonstrated to operate at the 8 MA level by a 1-MJ-class FCG.

  19. An organizational survey of the Los Alamos Site

    SciTech Connect

    Shurberg, D.A.; Haber, S.B.

    1991-11-01

    An Organizational Survey (OS) was administered at the Los Alamos Site that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental, safety, and health concern, hazardous nature of work, safety and overall job satisfaction. The purpose of the OS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the notion of culture;'' that is, the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In addition, through the OS, a broad sample of individuals can be reached that would probably not be interviewed or observed during the course of a typical assessment. The OS also provides a descriptive profile of the organization at one point in time that can then be compared to a profile taken at a different point in time to assess changes in the culture of the organization. While comparisons among groups are made, it is not the purpose of this report to make evaluative statements of which profile may be positive or negative. However, using the data presented in this report in conjunction with other evaluative activities, may provide useful insight into the organization. The OS administration at the Los Alamos Site was the ninth to occur at a Department of Energy (DOE) facility. All data from the OS is presented in group summaries, by organization, department or directorate within organization, supervisory level both overall and within organization, and staff classification within organization. Statistically significant differences between groups are identified and discussed. 9 refs., 94 figs., 11 tabs.

  20. An organizational survey of the Los Alamos Site

    SciTech Connect

    Shurberg, D.A.; Haber, S.B.

    1991-11-01

    An Organizational Survey (OS) was administered at the Los Alamos Site that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental, safety, and health concern, hazardous nature of work, safety and overall job satisfaction. The purpose of the OS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the notion of ``culture;`` that is, the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In addition, through the OS, a broad sample of individuals can be reached that would probably not be interviewed or observed during the course of a typical assessment. The OS also provides a descriptive profile of the organization at one point in time that can then be compared to a profile taken at a different point in time to assess changes in the culture of the organization. While comparisons among groups are made, it is not the purpose of this report to make evaluative statements of which profile may be positive or negative. However, using the data presented in this report in conjunction with other evaluative activities, may provide useful insight into the organization. The OS administration at the Los Alamos Site was the ninth to occur at a Department of Energy (DOE) facility. All data from the OS is presented in group summaries, by organization, department or directorate within organization, supervisory level both overall and within organization, and staff classification within organization. Statistically significant differences between groups are identified and discussed. 9 refs., 94 figs., 11 tabs.

  1. Cleanup at Los Alamos National Laboratory - the challenges - 9493

    SciTech Connect

    Stiger, Susan G; Hargis, Kenneth M; Graham, Michael J; Rael, George J

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of environmental cleanup at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and some of the unique aspects and challenges. Cleanup of the 65-year old Department of Energy Laboratory is being conducted under a RCRA Consent Order with the State of New Mexico. This agreement is one of the most recent cleanup agreements signed in the DOE complex and was based on lessons learned at other DOE sites. A number of attributes create unique challenges for LANL cleanup -- the proximity to the community and pueblos, the site's topography and geology, and the nature of LANL's on-going missions. This overview paper will set the stage for other papers in this session, including papers that present: Plans to retrieve buried waste at Material Disposal Area B, across the street from oen of Los Alamos' commercial districts and the local newspaper; Progress to date and joint plans with WIPP for disposal of the remaining inventory of legacy transuranic waste; Reviews of both groundwater and surface water contamination and the factors complicating both characterization and remediation; Optimizing the disposal of low-level radioactive waste from ongoing LANL missions; A stakeholder environmental data transparency project (RACER), with full public access to all available information on contamination at LANL, and A description of the approach to waste processing cost recovery from the programs that generate hazardous and radioactive waste at LANL.

  2. The Los Alamos suite of relativistic atomic physics codes

    DOE PAGES

    Fontes, C. J.; Zhang, H. L.; Jr, J. Abdallah; ...

    2015-05-28

    The Los Alamos SuitE of Relativistic (LASER) atomic physics codes is a robust, mature platform that has been used to model highly charged ions in a variety of ways. The suite includes capabilities for calculating data related to fundamental atomic structure, as well as the processes of photoexcitation, electron-impact excitation and ionization, photoionization and autoionization within a consistent framework. These data can be of a basic nature, such as cross sections and collision strengths, which are useful in making predictions that can be compared with experiments to test fundamental theories of highly charged ions, such as quantum electrodynamics. The suitemore » can also be used to generate detailed models of energy levels and rate coefficients, and to apply them in the collisional-radiative modeling of plasmas over a wide range of conditions. Such modeling is useful, for example, in the interpretation of spectra generated by a variety of plasmas. In this work, we provide a brief overview of the capabilities within the Los Alamos relativistic suite along with some examples of its application to the modeling of highly charged ions.« less

  3. Recent progress in the Los Alamos KrF Program

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, T.E.; Cartwright, D.C.; Coggeshall, S.V.; Fenstermacher, C.A.; Figueira, J.F.; Foreman, L.R.; Goldstone, P.D.; Hanson, D.E.; Harris, D.B.; Hauer, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the Inertial Confinement Fusion Program (ICF) is to develop the ability to ignite and burn small masses of thermonuclear fuel. Although the present near-term objectives of the program are directed toward defense applications, ICF research continues to be carried out with a view to the longer term goal of commercial power production. The characteristics of a KrF laser make it an attractive candidate as an ICF driver. The KrF wavelength of 248 nm provides a target coupling that is very high at intensities of 10/sup 14/w/cm/sup 2/. In addition, the KrF laser can be repetitively operated at frequencies appropriate for a power reactor and has an intrinsically high efficiency, which allows projections to the long-term goal of energy production. The ICF program at Los Alamos consists of driver development, target design and fabrication, and target experimentation. The major effort at present is the investigation and development of KrF technology to determine its applicability for use in a laboratory driver at Los Alamos. Such a driver would be used in defense related technology studies and in areas of scientific study such as highly ionized materials and high-energy-density physics.

  4. The Los Alamos universe: Using multimedia to promote laboratory capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kindel, J.

    2000-03-01

    This project consists of a multimedia presentation that explains the technological capabilities of Los Alamos National Laboratory. It takes the form of a human-computer interface built around the metaphor of the universe. The project is intended promote Laboratory capabilities to a wide audience. Multimedia is simply a means of communicating information through a diverse set of tools--be they text, sound, animation, video, etc. Likewise, Los Alamos National Laboratory is a collection of diverse technologies, projects, and people. Given the ample material available at the Laboratory, there are tangible benefits to be gained by communicating across media. This paper consists of three parts. The first section provides some basic information about the Laboratory, its mission, and its needs. The second section introduces this multimedia presentation and the metaphor it is based on along with some basic concepts of color and user interaction used in the building of this project. The final section covers construction of the project, pitfalls, and future improvements.

  5. Investigation of excess thyroid cancer incidence in Los Alamos County

    SciTech Connect

    Athas, W.F.

    1996-04-01

    Los Alamos County (LAC) is home to the Los Alamos National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear research and design facility. In 1991, the DOE funded the New Mexico Department of Health to conduct a review of cancer incidence rates in LAC in response to citizen concerns over what was perceived as a large excess of brain tumors and a possible relationship to radiological contaminants from the Laboratory. The study found no unusual or alarming pattern in the incidence of brain cancer, however, a fourfold excess of thyroid cancer was observed during the late-1980`s. A rapid review of the medical records for cases diagnosed between 1986 and 1990 failed to demonstrate that the thyroid cancer excess had resulted from enhanced detection. Surveillance activities subsequently undertaken to monitor the trend revealed that the excess persisted into 1993. A feasibility assessment of further studies was made, and ultimately, an investigation was conducted to document the epidemiologic characteristics of the excess in detail and to explore possible causes through a case-series records review. Findings from the investigation are the subject of this report.

  6. The Los Alamos suite of relativistic atomic physics codes

    SciTech Connect

    Fontes, C. J.; Zhang, H. L.; Jr, J. Abdallah; Clark, R. E. H.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Colgan, J.; Cunningham, R. T.; Hakel, P.; Magee, N. H.; Sherrill, M. E.

    2015-05-28

    The Los Alamos SuitE of Relativistic (LASER) atomic physics codes is a robust, mature platform that has been used to model highly charged ions in a variety of ways. The suite includes capabilities for calculating data related to fundamental atomic structure, as well as the processes of photoexcitation, electron-impact excitation and ionization, photoionization and autoionization within a consistent framework. These data can be of a basic nature, such as cross sections and collision strengths, which are useful in making predictions that can be compared with experiments to test fundamental theories of highly charged ions, such as quantum electrodynamics. The suite can also be used to generate detailed models of energy levels and rate coefficients, and to apply them in the collisional-radiative modeling of plasmas over a wide range of conditions. Such modeling is useful, for example, in the interpretation of spectra generated by a variety of plasmas. In this work, we provide a brief overview of the capabilities within the Los Alamos relativistic suite along with some examples of its application to the modeling of highly charged ions.

  7. Water supply at Los Alamos during 1994. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McLin, S.G.; Purtymun, W.D.; Stoker, A.K.; Maes, M.N.

    1996-10-01

    Production of potable municipal water supplies during 1994 totaled about 1,426.6 million gallons of wells in the Guaje, Pajarito, and Otowi Fields. The non-potable water supply for industrial use was about 11.6 million gallons from the spring gallery in Water Canyon. There was no water used for irrigation from Guaje or Los Alamos Reservoirs; thus, the total water usage in 1994 was about 1,438.2 million gallons. Pumps in Guaje Well 5 and Otowi Well 4 failed during the year and were not operational by the end of 1994. Water production resumed in Pajarito Well 3 in June. Wells in the Los Alamos Field, on Pueblo Land, were plugged and abandoned in 1992, or were transferred to San Ildefonso Pueblo. This report fulfills requirements which require the Laboratory to monitor and document groundwater conditions below Pajarito Plateau, and to protect the main aquifer from contamination associated with Laboratory operations by providing information on hydrologic characteristics of the main aquifer, including operating conditions of the municipal water supply system.

  8. Mixed low-level waste minimization at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Starke, T.P.

    1998-12-01

    During the first six months of University of California 98 Fiscal Year (July--December) Los Alamos National Laboratory has achieved a 57% reduction in mixed low-level waste generation. This has been accomplished through a systems approach that identified and minimized the largest MLLW streams. These included surface-contaminated lead, lead-lined gloveboxes, printed circuit boards, and activated fluorescent lamps. Specific waste minimization projects have been initiated to address these streams. In addition, several chemical processing equipment upgrades are being implemented. Use of contaminated lead is planned for several high energy proton beam stop applications and stainless steel encapsulated lead is being evaluated for other radiological control area applications. INEEL is assisting Los Alamos with a complete systems analysis of analytical chemistry derived mixed wastes at the CMR building and with a minimum life-cycle cost standard glovebox design. Funding for waste minimization upgrades has come from several sources: generator programs, waste management, the generator set-aside program, and Defense Programs funding to INEEL.

  9. Plutonium scrap processing at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Nixon, A.E.; McKerley, B.J.; Christensen, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory currently has the newest plutonium handling facility in the nation. Los Alamos has been active in the processing of plutonium almost since the discovery of this man-made element in 1941. One of the functions of the new facility is the processing of plutonium scrap generated at LASL and other sites. The feed for the scrap processing program is extremely varied, and a wide variety of contaminants are often encountered. Depending upon the scrap matrix and contaminants present, the majority of material receives a nitric acid/hydrofluoric acid or nitric acid/calcium fluoride leach. The plutonium nitrate solutions are then loaded onto an anion exchange column charged with DOWEX 1 x 4, 50 to 100 mesh, nitrate form resin. The column is eluted with 0.48 M hydroxyl amine nitrate. The Pu(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/ is then precipitated as plutonium III oxalate which is calcined at 450 to 500/sup 0/C to yield a purified PuO/sub 2/ product.

  10. University of New Mexico-Los Alamos National Laboratory Program in Volcanology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, F.; Fischer, T.; Baldridge, W.; Wohletz, K.; Smith, G.; Heiken, G.; Valentine, G.; Elston, W.

    2002-05-01

    The UNM-LANL Program in Volcanology was a vision of Wolf Elston in the late 1980s. Finally established in mid-1992, the program takes advantage of the extensive volcanic record preserved in northern New Mexico, and of the unique expertise and exceptional research facilities existing at the two institutions. Courses are directed toward upper division and graduate level students. The Los Alamos participants are adjunct professors and they take an active role in creating courses, advising thesis candidates, and providing research support. The curriculum is flexible but has a core upper division class in Physical Volcanology. Other classes offered in various years have included Volcanology and Human Affairs; Magmatic and Geothermal Systems; Tectonics and Magma Generation; Volcanoes of North America; Instrumentation for Volcanology; and Advanced Igneous Petrology. Perhaps the most renowned class in the program is the Volcanology Summer Field Course offered in even numbered years. This 3.5-week class is based in the Jemez Mountains volcanic field, which contains the famous Valles caldera (1.2 Ma to 50 ka). All types of calc-alkaline to alkalic domes, flows, tuffs, and intrusions, plus derivative sediments, mineralized zones, and thermal fluids are available for instructional purposes. Students are required to complete nine rigorous field exercises starting with basic instruction in pyroclastic fall, flow, and surge, then progressing towards hydrothermally altered, intracaldera resurgent dome and moat deposits in an active hot spring and fumarole system. The class is open to graduate students, advanced undergraduates, and private sector employees with special needs. Enrollment is competitive with limited financial support and limited space for 17 students. Evening lectures, study time, lodging, and meals are provided at the UNM-owned Young's Ranch built in the 1920s, nestled in a canyon flanked by orange cliffs of Bandelier Tuff. About 120 students from 12 countries have

  11. Global aspects of the Los Alamos general circulation model hydrologic cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roads, J. O.; Chen, S.-C.; Kao, J.; Langley, D.; Glatzmaier, G.

    1992-01-01

    The global hydrologic cycle in the Los Alamos general circulation model (GCM) is compared to available global observations. Global observations of the water vapor, water-vapor flux and water-vapor flux divergence are derived from the National Meteorological Center's final analysis for the period 1986-1989. The new precipitation data set of Legates and Willmott (1990) is used for the global precipitation observations. Global evaporation is derived as a residual of the precipitation and water-vapor flux divergence. There are a number of similarities as well as discrepancies between the GCM and observations. The large-scale nondivergent and divergent GCM circulations are remarkably similar to the observed circulations; the large-scale GCM precipitation and evaporation patterns are also qualitatively similar to observations. Discrepancies are mainly quantitative and small-scale in nature: the GCM atmosphere is relatively dry which results in a slightly greater evaporation and precipitation rate than is observed; the GCM South Pacific convergence zone is displaced too far to the northwest.

  12. Recollections of a very junior physicist at Los Alamos, 1944-1946

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Anthony P.

    2008-04-01

    The author came to Los Alamos as a member of the British Mission after two years of making fission cross section measurements at the Cavendish Laboratory. He worked in a group headed by Egon Bretscher in Enrico Fermi's F Division. The talk presents his personal memories and experiences at Los Alamos as compared to his life and work in wartime Britain.

  13. 75 FR 1793 - Study Team for the Los Alamos Historical Document Retrieval and Assessment (LAHDRA) Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Study Team for the Los Alamos Historical...: Public Meeting of the Study Team for the Los Alamos Historical Document Retrieval and Assessment Project...://www.ohkay.com/contactus.html . Status: Open to the public, limited only by the space available....

  14. Office of Inspector General report on audit of environmental restoration at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    Los Alamos` Environmental Restoration Program is charged with cost effectively remediating contaminated sites. To monitor progress toward this goal, the University of California, the contractor operating Los Alamos, and the Department negotiated eight performance measures. The objective of this audit was to determine whether the contract performance criteria were reasonable, measurable, and complete, thereby allowing the Department to determine if Los Alamos had expeditiously and cost effectively remediated contaminated sites. The audit determined that Los Alamos did not generate the information needed to assess the cost effectiveness of remediation on a site-by-site basis. This situation occurred because the performance criteria used to evaluate cost effectiveness were not always reasonable, measurable, and complete. As a result, neither Los Alamos nor the Department could evaluate the cost effectiveness or progress of the remediation program or accurately budget for upcoming remediation activities. The audit also determined that Los Alamos` sample validation procedures were too costly because Los Alamos validated more samples than called for by Federal and New Mexico standard practices. While the Office of Inspector General recognizes the importance of prudent sample validation, Los Alamos paid $540,000 more than necessary to validate sample results. These funds could have been used to remediate contaminated sites.

  15. 75 FR 72829 - Los Alamos Historical Document Retrieval and Assessment (LAHDRA) Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Los Alamos Historical Document Retrieval and... Los Alamos Historical Document Retrieval and Assessment (LAHDRA)Project. Time and Date: 5 p.m.-7...

  16. Los Alamos strategic defense research and the ABM (Anti-Ballistic Missile) Treaty

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, R.; Pendley, R.E.

    1988-04-01

    This report reviews the restrictions placed on Los Alamos strategic defense by current arms control treaty agreements, including controversies about the correct interpretation of the major treaty at issue, the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty; and it assesses the current status of the most significant Los Alamos strategic defense programs in terms of their compliance with that Treaty, and others. 7 tabs.

  17. Solar-powered hot-air system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Solar-powered air heater supplies part or all of space heating requirements of residential or commercial buildings and is interfaced with air to water heat exchanger to heat domestic hot water. System has potential application in drying agricultural products such as cotton, lumber, corn, grains, and peanuts.

  18. Common ground: An environmental ethic for Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, F.L.

    1991-01-01

    Three predominant philosophies have characterized American business ethical thinking over the past several decades. The first phase is the ethics of self-interest'' which argues that maximizing self-interest coincidentally maximizes the common good. The second phase is legality ethics.'' Proponents argue that what is important is knowing the rules and following them scrupulously. The third phase might be called stake-holder ethics.'' A central tenant is that everyone affected by a decision has a moral hold on the decision maker. This paper will discuss one recent initiative of the Los Alamos National Laboratory to move beyond rules and regulations toward an environmental ethic that integrates the values of stakeholder ethics'' into the Laboratory's historical culture and value systems. These Common Ground Principles are described. 11 refs.

  19. The legacy and future of CFD at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, N.L.

    1996-06-01

    The early history is presented of the prolific development of CFD methods in the Fluid Dynamics Group (T-3) at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the years from 1958 to the late 1960`s. Many of the currently used numerical methods--PIC, MAC, vorticity-stream-function, ICE, ALE methods and the {kappa}-{var_epsilon} method for turbulence--originated during this time. The rest of the paper summarizes the current research in T-3 for CFD, turbulence and solids modeling. The research areas include reactive flows, multimaterial flows, multiphase flows and flows with spatial discontinuities. Also summarized are modern particle methods and techniques developed for large scale computing on massively parallel computing platforms and distributed processors.

  20. Los Alamos Guns Take Aim at Material's Mysteries

    SciTech Connect

    Byers, Mark; Moore, David; Dimarino, Steve

    2014-04-14

    Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists and technicians conduct thousands of experiments a year, delving into the fundamental nature of everything from supernovas to subatomic particles. One set of instruments used to better understand the fundamental nature of various materials are 10 scientific gun systems that fire various projectiles at high-tech targets to create enormous velocities, pressures, and temperatures - and using laser, x-ray, and other diagnostics - explore the very nature of metals and other materials. The hundreds of gun-based experiments conducted every year at the Laboratory require a highly-skilled staff of scientists and technicians, and has given rise to a special organization called the "gun working group" to foster open communications, cooperation, problem-solving, and a healthy safety culture.

  1. Environmental surveillance and compliance at Los Alamos during 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report presents environmental data that characterize environmental performance and addresses compliance with environmental standards and requirements at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) during 1996. The Laboratory routinely monitors for radiation and for radioactive nonradioactive materials at Laboratory sites as well as in the surrounding region. LANL uses the monitoring results to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to identify potentially undesirable trends. Data were collected in 1996 to assess external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions; and concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface waters and groundwaters, the municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs. Using comparisons with standards and regulations, this report concludes that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a demonstrable threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment. Laboratory operations were in compliance with all major environmental regulations.

  2. Root lengths of plants on Los Alamos National Laboratory lands

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, G.D.; Foxx, T.S.

    1987-01-01

    Maximum root lengths of 22 plant species occurring on Los Alamos National Laboratory lands were measured. An average of two longest roots from each species were dug up and their lengths, typical shapes, and qualitative morphologics were noted along with the overstory dimensions of the plant individual with which the roots were associated. Maximum root lengths were compared with overstory (height times width) dimensions. Among the life forms studied, the shrubs tend to show the longest roots in relation to overstory size. Forbs show the shortest roots in relation to overstory size. Measurements of tree roots suggest only that immature trees on the Pajarito Plateau may have root-length to overstory-size ratios near one. 30 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Los Alamos National Laboratory capability reviews - FY 2011 status

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, Everett P

    2011-01-12

    Capability reviews are the Los Alamos National Laboratory approach to assess the quality of its science, technology, and engineering (STE), and its integration across the Laboratory. There are seven capability reviews in FY 2011 reviews. The Weapons Science and Engineering review will be replaced by the National Nuclear Security Administration's Predictive Science Panel for 2011 . Beginning in 2011, third-year LORD projects will be reviewed by capability review committees rather than the first-year LORD projects that have been performed for the last three years. This change addresses concerns from committees about reviewing a project before it had made any substantive progress. The current schedule, and chairs for the 2011 capability reviews is presented. The three-year cycle (2011-2013) for capability reviews are presented for planning purposes.

  4. Plans for an Ultra Cold Neutron source at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Seestrom, S.J.; Bowles, T.J.; Hill, R.; Greene, G.L.

    1996-10-01

    Ultra Cold Neutrons (UCN) can be produced at spallation sources using a variety of techniques. To date the technique used has been to Bragg scatter and Doppler shift cold neutrons into UCN from a moving crystal. This is particularly applicable to short-pulse spallation sources. We are presently constructing a UCN source at LANSCE using this method. In addition, large gains in UCN density should be possible using cryogenic UCN sources. Research is under way at Gatchina to demonstrate technical feasibility of a frozen deuterium source. If successful, a source of this type could be implemented at future spallation source, such as the long pulse source being planned at Los Alamos, with a UCN density that may be two orders of magnitude higher than that presently available at reactors.

  5. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Nuclear Science Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ronald Owen; Wender, Steve

    2015-06-19

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facilities for Nuclear Science consist of a high-energy "white" neutron source (Target 4) with 6 flight paths, three low-energy nuclear science flight paths at the Lujan Center, and a proton reaction area. The neutron beams produced at the Target 4 complement those produced at the Lujan Center because they are of much higher energy and have shorter pulse widths. The neutron sources are driven by the 800-MeV proton beam of the LANSCE linear accelerator. With these facilities, LANSCE is able to deliver neutrons with energies ranging from a milli-electron volt to several hundreds of MeV, as well as proton beams with a wide range of energy, time and intensity characteristics. The facilities, instruments and research programs are described briefly.

  6. Neutron Capture Experiments Using the DANCE Array at Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashdorj, D.; Mitchell, G. E.; Baramsai, B.; Chyzh, A.; Walker, C.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becker, J. A.; Parker, W.; Sleaford, B.; Wu, C. Y.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Krtička, M.; Bečvář, F.

    2009-03-01

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is designed for neutron capture measurements on very small and/or radioactive targets. The DANCE array of 160 BaF2 scintillation detectors is located at the Lujan Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Accurate measurements of neutron capture data are important for many current applications as well as for basic understanding of neutron capture. The gamma rays following neutron capture reactions have been studied by the time-of-flight technique using the DANCE array. The high granularity of the array allows measurements of the gamma-ray multiplicity. The gamma-ray multiplicities and energy spectra for different multiplicities can be measured and analyzed for spin and parity determination of the resolved resonances.

  7. Los Alamos Explosives Performance Key to Stockpile Stewardship

    ScienceCinema

    Dattelbaum, Dana

    2016-07-12

    As the U.S. Nuclear Deterrent ages, one essential factor in making sure that the weapons will continue to perform as designed is understanding the fundamental properties of the high explosives that are part of a nuclear weapons system. As nuclear weapons go through life extension programs, some changes may be advantageous, particularly through the addition of what are known as "insensitive" high explosives that are much less likely to accidentally detonate than the already very safe "conventional" high explosives that are used in most weapons. At Los Alamos National Laboratory explosives research includes a wide variety of both large- and small-scale experiments that include small contained detonations, gas and powder gun firings, larger outdoor detonations, large-scale hydrodynamic tests, and at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site, underground sub-critical experiments.

  8. HELIOS: applications at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, R.T.; Mosteller, R.D.; Chodak, Paul III; Charlton, W.; Adams, B.T.

    1997-10-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is involved in the analysis of many different types of nuclear systems. The nuclear systems that we have analyzed have included subcritical accelerator driven systems for the transmutation of waste, fusion systems, critical experiment systems, and space propulsion and power systems. We have also analyzed special purpose reactors such as the LANL Omega West reactor, production reactors, and conventional commercial light- and heavy-water reactors. Thus the systems that we analyze and the type of results desired, often vary considerably from those of a power company normally analyzing their PWR or BWR for fissile fuel burnup and production. The reactor geometries that we model are often quite complicated such as those of an RBMK or Savannah River Production Reactor. Rather than fissile fuel production and burnup, the goal of a calculation could be the production rate of some obscure isotope which has medical applications.

  9. Experiments on planar plasma flow switches at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Benage, J.F. Jr.; Wysocki, F.J.; Bowers, R.; Oona, H.

    1997-12-01

    The authors have performed a series of experiments on the Colt facility at Los Alamos to study the performance of plasma flow switches and to understand the important physics issues which affect that performance. These experiments were done in planar geometry on a small machine to allow for better diagnostic access and a higher repetition rate. The Colt facility is a capacitor bank which stores 300 kJ at maximum charge and produced a peak current of 1.1 MA in 2.0 microseconds for these experiments. The diagnostics used for these experiments included an array of b-dot probes, visible framing pictures, visible spectroscopy, and laser interferometry. Characteristics of the switch are determined from spatial and temporal profiles of the magnetic field and the spatial profile and temperature of the switch plasma. Here the authors present results from experiments for a variety of switch conditions.

  10. Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The Management Subteam conducted a management and organization assessment of environment, safety, and health (ES H) activities performed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and onsite contractor personnel. The objectives of the assessment were to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of management systems and practices in terms of ensuring environmental compliance and the safety and health of workers and the general public, (2) identify key findings, and (3) identify root causes for all ES H findings and concerns. The scope of the assessment included examinations of the following from an ES H perspective: (1) strategic and program planning; (2) organizational structure and management configuration; (3) human resource management, including training and staffing; (4) management systems, including performance monitoring and assessment; (5) conduct of operations; (6) public and institutional interactions; and (7) corporate'' parent support.

  11. Smoking patterns among Los Alamos National Laboratory employees

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, M.C.; Wilkinson, G.S.

    1987-06-01

    Smoking patterns among 5507 employees at Los Alamos National Laboratory were investigated for those who underwent physical examinations by occupational physicians from 1978 to 1983. More male than female employees smoked, although differences in smoking rates between the sexes were not as large as differences observed for national smoking rates. Employees over 40 were more likely to smoke than younger employees, males consumed more cigarettes than did females, and Anglo employees smoked more cigarettes than did Hispanic employees. Highly educated employees smoked less than did less-educated workers, and staff members exhibited the lowest rates of smoking. Smoking cessation programs for Laboratory employees should be directed toward those subpopulations with the highest rates of smoking. 31 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Operational status of the Los Alamos neutron science center (LANSCE)

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Kevin W; Erickson, John L; Schoenberg, Kurt F

    2010-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator and beam delivery complex generates the proton beams that serve three neutron production sources; the thermal and cold source for the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) high-energy neutron source, and a pulsed Ultra-Cold Neutron Source. These three sources are the foundation of strong and productive multi-disciplinary research programs that serve a diverse and robust user community. The facility also provides multiplexed beams for the production of medical radioisotopes and proton radiography of dynamic events. The recent operating history of these sources will be reviewed and plans for performance improvement will be discussed, together with the underlying drivers for the proposed LANSCE Refurbishment project. The details of this latter project are presented in a separate contribution.

  13. LANSCE (Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center) target data collection system

    SciTech Connect

    Kernodle, A.K. )

    1988-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) Target Data Collection System is the result of an effort to provide a base of information from which to draw conclusions on the performance and operational condition of the overall LANSCE target system. During the conceptualization of the system several purposes and goals were defined. A survey was made of custom as well as off the shelf hardware and software which was capable of meeting these goals. The first stage of this system was successfully implemented for the LANSCE run cycle 52. From the operational experience gained thus far with the LANSCE Target Data Collection System, it would appear as though this system will indeed meet all of the previously defined requirements that seem to develop after a new system is installed.

  14. Los Alamos National Laboratory support to IAEA environmental safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Robert E; Dry, Don E; Roensch, Fred R; Kinman, Will S; Roach, Jeff L; La Mont, Stephen P

    2010-12-01

    The nuclear and radiochemistry group provides sample preparation and analysis support to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Network of Analytical Laboratories (NWAL). These analyses include both non-destructive (alpha and gamma-ray spectrometry) and destructive (thermal ionization mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) methods. On a bi-annual basis the NWAL laboratories are invited to meet to discuss program evolution and issues. During this meeting each participating laboratory summarizes their efforts over the previous two years. This presentation will present Los Alamos National Laboratories efforts in support of this program. Data showing results from sample and blank analysis will be presented along with capability enhancement and issues that arose over the previous two years.

  15. The Laser Safety Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hyer, R.

    1997-02-01

    The Laser Safety Program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory was formalized in April, 1991, with the publication of a document, {open_quotes}Lasers,{close_quotes} modeled on the ANSIZ136.1 standard. This program has received such wide acceptance by the laser community and line managers that the original Laser Safety Program document has become a Laboratory standard on lasers. As a benchmark of the success of this program is that the Laboratory has experienced no disabling eye injuries because of laser operations since July, 1990, to be compared with a disabling laser eye injury that used to average one every eighteen months prior to the time the formal program was established. The Laboratory Laser Safety Program and program elements will be presented and discussed.

  16. Los Alamos Explosives Performance Key to Stockpile Stewardship

    SciTech Connect

    Dattelbaum, Dana

    2014-11-03

    As the U.S. Nuclear Deterrent ages, one essential factor in making sure that the weapons will continue to perform as designed is understanding the fundamental properties of the high explosives that are part of a nuclear weapons system. As nuclear weapons go through life extension programs, some changes may be advantageous, particularly through the addition of what are known as "insensitive" high explosives that are much less likely to accidentally detonate than the already very safe "conventional" high explosives that are used in most weapons. At Los Alamos National Laboratory explosives research includes a wide variety of both large- and small-scale experiments that include small contained detonations, gas and powder gun firings, larger outdoor detonations, large-scale hydrodynamic tests, and at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site, underground sub-critical experiments.

  17. Decommissioning the UHTREX Reactor Facility at Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, M.; Elder, J.

    1992-08-01

    The Ultra-High Temperature Reactor Experiment (UHTREX) facility was constructed in the late 1960s to advance high-temperature and gas-cooled reactor technology. The 3-MW reactor was graphite moderated and helium cooled and used 93% enriched uranium as its fuel. The reactor was run for approximately one year and was shut down in February 1970. The decommissioning of the facility involved removing the reactor and its associated components. This document details planning for the decommissioning operations which included characterizing the facility, estimating the costs of decommissioning, preparing environmental documentation, establishing a system to track costs and work progress, and preplanning to correct health and safety concerns in the facility. Work to decommission the facility began in 1988 and was completed in September 1990 at a cost of $2.9 million. The facility was released to Department of Energy for other uses in its Los Alamos program.

  18. Los Alamos Guns Take Aim at Material's Mysteries

    ScienceCinema

    Byers, Mark; Moore, David; Dimarino, Steve

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists and technicians conduct thousands of experiments a year, delving into the fundamental nature of everything from supernovas to subatomic particles. One set of instruments used to better understand the fundamental nature of various materials are 10 scientific gun systems that fire various projectiles at high-tech targets to create enormous velocities, pressures, and temperatures - and using laser, x-ray, and other diagnostics - explore the very nature of metals and other materials. The hundreds of gun-based experiments conducted every year at the Laboratory require a highly-skilled staff of scientists and technicians, and has given rise to a special organization called the "gun working group" to foster open communications, cooperation, problem-solving, and a healthy safety culture.

  19. Initial performance of Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Austin, R.H.; Chan, K.C.D.

    1993-09-01

    The Los Alamos compact Advanced FEL has lased at 4.7 and 5.2 {mu}m with a 1-cm period wiggler and a high-brightness electron beam at 16.8 and 15.8 MeV, respectively. The measured electron beam normalized emittance is 1.7 {pi}{center_dot}mm{center_dot}mrad at a peak current of 100 A, corresponding to a beam brightness greater than 2 {times} 10{sup 12} A/m{sup 2}rad{sup 2}. Initial results indicate that the AFEL small signal gain is {approximately}8% at 0.3 nC (30 A peak). The maximum output energy is 7 mJ over a 2-{mu}s macropulse. The AFEL performance can be significantly enhanced by improvements in the rf and drive laser stability.

  20. Recent progress of the Los Alamos advanced free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Austin, R.H.; Chan, K.C.D.; Feldman, D.W.; Goldstein, J.C.; Gierman, S.M.; Kinross-Wright, J.M.; Kong, S.H.; Plato, J.G.; Russell, S.J.

    1994-05-01

    Many industrial and research applications can benefit from the availability of a compact, user-friendly, broadly tunable and high average power free electron laser (FEL). Over the past four years, the Los Alamos Advanced FEL has been built with these design goals. The key to a compact FEL is the integration of advanced beam technologies such as a high-brightness photoinjector, a high-gradient compact linac, and permanent magnet beamline components. These technologies enable the authors to shrink the FEL size yet maintain its high average power capability. The Advanced FEL has been in operation in the near ir (4-6 {mu}m) since early 1993. Recent results of the Advanced FEL lasing at saturation and upgrades to improve its average power are presented.

  1. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1991. Environmental protection group

    SciTech Connect

    Dewart, J.; Kohen, K.L.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1991. Routine monitoring for radiation and for radioactive and chemical materials is conducted on the Laboratory site as well as in the surrounding region. Monitoring results are used to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to permit early identification of potentially undesirable trends. Results and interpretation of data for 1991 cover external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface waters and groundwaters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Comparisons with appropriate standards, regulations, and background levels provide the basis for concluding that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment.

  2. The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory - An Isolated Nuclear Research Establishment

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, Norris E.; Meade, Roger Allen

    2016-09-23

    Early in his twenty-five year career as the Director of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Norris Bradbury wrote at length about the atomic bomb and the many implications the bomb might have on the world. His themes were both technical and philosophical. In 1963, after nearly twenty years of leading the nation’s first nuclear weapons laboratory, Bradbury took the opportunity to broaden his writing. In a paper delivered to the International Atomic Energy Agency’s symposium on the “Criteria in the Selection of Sites for the Construction of Reactors and Nuclear Research Centers,” Bradbury took the opportunity to talk about the business of nuclear research and the human component of operating a scientific laboratory. This report is the transcript of his talk.

  3. Neutron Capture Experiments Using the DANCE Array at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Dashdorj, D.; Mitchell, G. E.; Baramsai, B.; Chyzh, A.; Walker, C.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becker, J. A.; Parker, W.; Sleaford, B.; Wu, C. Y.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Krticka, M.; Becvar, F.

    2009-03-31

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is designed for neutron capture measurements on very small and/or radioactive targets. The DANCE array of 160 BaF{sub 2} scintillation detectors is located at the Lujan Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Accurate measurements of neutron capture data are important for many current applications as well as for basic understanding of neutron capture. The gamma rays following neutron capture reactions have been studied by the time-of-flight technique using the DANCE array. The high granularity of the array allows measurements of the gamma-ray multiplicity. The gamma-ray multiplicities and energy spectra for different multiplicities can be measured and analyzed for spin and parity determination of the resolved resonances.

  4. Study of polyelectrolytes for Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Labonne, N.

    1994-11-01

    To assess the safety of a potential radioactive waste repository, analysis of the fluid solution containing low levels of activity need to be performed. In some cases, the radioactivity would be so weak (3--30 pCi/L) that the solution must be concentrated for measurement. For this purpose, Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists are synthesizing some water soluble polyelectrolytes, which, because they are strong complexing agents for inorganic cations, can concentrate the radioelements in solution. To assist in characterization of these polyelectrolytes, the author has performed experiments to determine physico-chemical constants, such as pKa values and stability constants. The complexation constants between both polyelectrolytes and europium were determined by two methods: solvent extraction and ion exchange. Results are presented.

  5. Solar 'hot spots' are still hot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, Taeil

    1990-01-01

    Longitude distributions of solar flares are not random but show evidence for active zones (or hot spots) where flares are concentrated. According to a previous study, two hot spots in the northern hemisphere, which rotate with a synodic period of about 26.72 days, produced the majority of major flares, during solar cycles 20 and 21. The more prominent of these two hot spots is found to be still active during the rising part of cycle 22, producing the majority of northern hemisphere major flares. The synodic rotation period of this hot spot is 26.727 + or - 0.007 days. There is also evidence for hot spots in the southern hemisphere. Two hot spots separated by 180 deg are found to rotate with a period of 29.407 days, with one of them having persisted in the same locations during cycles 19-22 and the other, during cycles 20-22.

  6. 2016 Los Alamos National Laboratory Hazardous Waste Minimization Report

    SciTech Connect

    Salzman, Sonja L.; English, Charles Joe

    2016-12-02

    Waste minimization and pollution prevention are goals within the operating procedures of Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS). The US Department of Energy (DOE), inclusive of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Office of Environmental Management, and LANS are required to submit an annual hazardous waste minimization report to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) in accordance with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit. The report was prepared pursuant to the requirements of Section 2.9 of the LANL Hazardous Waste Facility Permit. This report describes the hazardous waste minimization program, which is a component of the overall Pollution Prevention (P2) Program, administered by the Environmental Stewardship Group (EPC-ES). This report also supports the waste minimization and P2 goals of the Associate Directorate of Environmental Management (ADEM) organizations that are responsible for implementing remediation activities and describes its programs to incorporate waste reduction practices into remediation activities and procedures. This report includes data for all waste shipped offsite from LANL during fiscal year (FY) 2016 (October 1, 2015 – September 30, 2016). LANS was active during FY2016 in waste minimization and P2 efforts. Multiple projects were funded that specifically related to reduction of hazardous waste. In FY2016, there was no hazardous, mixed-transuranic (MTRU), or mixed low-level (MLLW) remediation waste shipped offsite from the Laboratory. More non-remediation hazardous waste and MLLW was shipped offsite from the Laboratory in FY2016 compared to FY2015. Non-remediation MTRU waste was not shipped offsite during FY2016. These accomplishments and analysis of the waste streams are discussed in much more detail within this report.

  7. 2013 Los Alamos National Laboratory Hazardous Waste Minimization Report

    SciTech Connect

    Salzman, Sonja L.; English, Charles J.

    2015-08-24

    Waste minimization and pollution prevention are inherent goals within the operating procedures of Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS). The US Department of Energy (DOE) and LANS are required to submit an annual hazardous waste minimization report to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) in accordance with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit. The report was prepared pursuant to the requirements of Section 2.9 of the LANL Hazardous Waste Facility Permit. This report describes the hazardous waste minimization program (a component of the overall Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention [WMin/PP] Program) administered by the Environmental Stewardship Group (ENV-ES). This report also supports the waste minimization and pollution prevention goals of the Environmental Programs Directorate (EP) organizations that are responsible for implementing remediation activities and describes its programs to incorporate waste reduction practices into remediation activities and procedures. LANS was very successful in fiscal year (FY) 2013 (October 1-September 30) in WMin/PP efforts. Staff funded four projects specifically related to reduction of waste with hazardous constituents, and LANS won four national awards for pollution prevention efforts from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). In FY13, there was no hazardous, mixedtransuranic (MTRU), or mixed low-level (MLLW) remediation waste generated at the Laboratory. More hazardous waste, MTRU waste, and MLLW was generated in FY13 than in FY12, and the majority of the increase was related to MTRU processing or lab cleanouts. These accomplishments and analysis of the waste streams are discussed in much more detail within this report.

  8. Pinon Pine Tree Study, Los Alamos National Laboratory: Source document

    SciTech Connect

    P. R. Fresquez; J. D. Huchton; M. A. Mullen; L. Naranjo, Jr.

    2000-01-01

    One of the dominant tree species growing within and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM, lands is the pinon pine (Pinus edulis) tree. Pinon pine is used for firewood, fence posts, and building materials and is a source of nuts for food--the seeds are consumed by a wide variety of animals and are also gathered by people in the area and eaten raw or roasted. This study investigated the (1) concentration of {sup 3}H, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup tot}U, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am in soils (0- to 12-in. [31 cm] depth underneath the tree), pinon pine shoots (PPS), and pinon pine nuts (PPN) collected from LANL lands and regional background (BG) locations, (2) concentrations of radionuclides in PPN collected in 1977 to present data, (3) committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) from the ingestion of nuts, and (4) soil to PPS to PPN concentration ratios (CRs). Most radionuclides, with the exception of {sup 3}H in soils, were not significantly higher (p < 0.10) in soils, PPS, and PPN collected from LANL as compared to BG locations, and concentrations of most radionuclides in PPN from LANL have decreased over time. The maximum net CEDE (the CEDE plus two sigma minus BG) at the most conservative ingestion rate (10 lb [4.5 kg]) was 0.0018 mrem (0.018 {micro}Sv). Soil-to-nut CRs for most radionuclides were within the range of default values in the literature for common fruits and vegetables.

  9. Post-Cold War Science and Technology at Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, John C.

    2002-04-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory serves the nation through the development and application of leading-edge science and technology in support of national security. Our mission supports national security by: ensuring the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile; reducing the threat of weapons of mass destruction in support of counter terrorism and homeland defense; and solving national energy, environment, infrastructure, and health security problems. We require crosscutting fundamental and advanced science and technology research to accomplish our mission. The Stockpile Stewardship Program develops and applies, advanced experimental science, computational simulation, and technology to ensure the safety and reliability of U.S. nuclear weapons in the absence of nuclear testing. This effort in itself is a grand challenge. However, the terrorist attack of September 11, 2001, reminded us of the importance of robust and vibrant research and development capabilities to meet new and evolving threats to our national security. Today through rapid prototyping we are applying new, innovative, science and technology for homeland defense, to address the threats of nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons globally. Synergistically, with the capabilities that we require for our core mission, we contribute in many other areas of scientific endeavor. For example, our Laboratory has been part of the NASA effort on mapping water on the moon and NSF/DOE projects studying high-energy astrophysical phenomena, understanding fundamental scaling phenomena of life, exploring high-temperature superconductors, investigating quantum information systems, applying neutrons to condensed-matter and nuclear physics research, developing large-scale modeling and simulations to understand complex phenomena, and exploring nanoscience that bridges the atomic to macroscopic scales. In this presentation, I will highlight some of these post-cold war science and technology advances

  10. SNM holdup assessment of Los Alamos exhaust ducts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, R.S.

    1994-02-01

    Fissile material holdup in glovebox and fume hood exhaust ducting has been quantified for all Los Alamos duct systems. Gamma-based, nondestructive measurements were used to quantify holdup. The measurements were performed during three measurement campaigns. The first campaign, Phase I, provided foot-by-foot, semiquantitative measurement data on all ducting. These data were used to identify ducting that required more accurate (quantitative) measurement. Of the 280 duct systems receiving Phase I measurements, 262 indicated less than 50 g of fissile holdup and 19 indicated fissile holdup of 50 or more grams. Seven duct systems were measured in a second campaign, called Series 1, Phase II. Holdup estimates on these ducts ranged from 421 g of {sup 235}U in a duct servicing a shut-down uranium-machining facility to 39 g of {sup 239}Pu in a duct servicing an active plutonium-processing facility. Measurements performed in the second campaign proved excessively laborious, so a third campaign was initiated that used more efficient instrumentation at some sacrifice in measurement quality. Holdup estimates for the 12 duct systems measured during this third campaign ranged from 70 g of {sup 235}U in a duct servicing analytical laboratories to 1 g of {sup 235}U and 1 g of {sup 239}Pu in a duct carrying exhaust air to a remote filter building. These quantitative holdup estimates support the conclusion made at the completion of the Phase I measurements that only ducts servicing shut-down uranium operations contain about 400 g of fissile holdup. No ventilation ducts at Los Alamos contain sufficient fissile material holdup to present a criticality safety concern.

  11. Environmental Assessment for Electrical Power System Upgrades at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico - Final Document

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2000-03-09

    The ''National Environmental Policy Act of 1969'' (NEPA) requires Federal agency officials to consider the environmental consequences of their proposed actions before decisions are made. In complying with NEPA, the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) follows the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 1500-1508) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021). The purpose of an Environmental Assessment (EA) is to provide Federal decision makers with sufficient evidence and analysis to determine whether to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) or issue a Finding of No Significant Impact. In this case, the DOE decision to be made is whether to construct and operate a 19.5-mile (mi) (31-kilometer [km]) electric transmission line (power line) reaching from the Norton Substation, west across the Rio Grande, to locations within the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Areas (TAs) 3 and 5 at Los Alamos, New Mexico. The construction of one electric substation at LANL would be included in the project as would the construction of two line segments less than 1,200 feet (ft) (366 meters [m]) long that would allow for the uncrossing of a portion of two existing power lines. Additionally, a fiber optics communications line would be included and installed concurrently as part of the required overhead ground conductor for the power line. The new power line would improve the reliability of electric service in the LANL and Los Aktrnos County areas as would the uncrossing of the crossed segments of the existing lines. Additionally, installation of the new power line would enable the LANL and the Los Alamos County electric grid, which is a shared resource, to be adapted to accommodate the future import of increased power when additional power service becomes available in the northern New Mexico area. Similarly, the fiber optics line would allow DOE to take advantage of future opportunities in

  12. Infrared heating for dry-roasting and pasteurization of almonds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of infrared (IR) heating for improving the microbial safety and processing efficiency of dry-roasted almonds was investigated. Almonds were medium roasted at 130, 140 and 150°C with three different methods: IR roasting, sequential infrared and hot air (SIRHA) roasting, and traditional hot ai...

  13. Planning and drilling geothermal energy extraction hole EE-2: a precisely oriented and deviated hole in hot granitic rock

    SciTech Connect

    Helmick, C.; Koczan, S.; Pettitt, R.

    1982-04-01

    During the preceding work (Phase I) of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Energy Project at Fenton Hill, two holes were drilled to a depth of nearly 3048 m (10,000 ft) and connected by a vertical hydraulic fracture. In this phase, water was pumped through the underground reservoir for approximately 417 days, producing an energy equivalent of 3 to 5 MW(t). Energy Extraction Hole No. 2 (EE-2) is the first of two deep holes that will be used in the Engineering-Resource Development System (Phase II) of the ongoing HDR Project of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This phase of the work consists of drilling two parallel boreholes, inclined in their lower, open-hole sections at 35/sup 0/ to the vertical and separated by a vertical distance of 366 m (1200 ft) between the inclined parts of the drill holes. The holes will be connected by a series of vertical, hydraulically produced fractures in the Precambrian granitic rock complex. EE-2 was drilled to a depth of 4660 m (15,289 ft), where the bottom-hole temperature is approximately 320/sup 0/C (608/sup 0/F). Directional drilling techniques were used to control the azimuth and deviation of the hole. Upgrading of the temperature capability of existing hardware, and development of new equipment was necessary to complete the drilling of the hole in the extremely hot, hard, and abrasive granitic formation. The drilling history and the problems with bits, directional tools, tubular goods, cementing, and logging are described. A discussion of the problems and recommendations for overcoming them are also presented.

  14. Ecological baseline studies in Los Alamos and Guaje Canyons County of Los Alamos, New Mexico. A two-year study

    SciTech Connect

    Foxx, T.S.

    1995-11-01

    During the summers of 1993 and 1994, the Biological Resource Evaluations Team (BRET) of the Environmental Protection Group (ESH-8) conducted baseline studies within two canyon systems, Los Alamos and Guaje Canyons. Biological data was collected within each canyon to provide background and baseline information for Ecological Risk models. Baseline studies included establishment of permanent vegetation plots within each canyon along the elevational gradient. Then, in association with the various vegetation types, surveys were conducted for ground dwelling insects, birds, and small mammals. The stream channels associated with the permanent vegetation plots were characterized and aquatic macroinvertebrates collected within the stream monthly throughout a six-month period. The Geographic Position System (GPS) in combination with ARC INFO was used to map the study areas. Considerable data was collected during these surveys and are summarized in individual chapters.

  15. NEPA and NHPA- successful decommissioning of historic Manhattan Project properties at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    McGehee, E.D.; Pendergrass, A.K.

    1997-05-21

    This paper describes experiences at Los Alamos National Laboratory during the process of planning and executing decommissioning and decontamination activities on a number of properties constructed as part of the Manhattan project. Many of these buildings had been abandoned for many years and were in deteriorating condition, in addition to being contaminated with asbestos, lead based paints and high explosive residues. Due to the age and use of the structures they were evaluated against criteria for the National Register of Historic Places. This process is briefly reviewed, along with the results, as well as actions implemented as a result of the condition and safety of the structures. A number of the structures have been decontaminated and demolished. Planning is still ongoing for the renovation of one structure, and the photographic and drawing records of the properties is near completion.

  16. Radionuclide concentrations in pinto beans, sweet corn, and zucchini squash grown in Los Alamos Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Fresquez, P.R.; Mullen, M.A.; Naranjo, L. Jr.; Armstrong, D.R.

    1997-05-01

    Pinto beans, sweet corn, and zucchini squash (Cucurbita pepo var. black beauty) were grown in a randomized complete-block field/pot experiment at a site that contained the highest observed levels of surface gross gamma radioactivity within Los Alamos Canyon (LAC) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Soils as well as washed edible and nonedible crop tissues were analyzed for various radionuclides and heavy metals . Most radionuclides, with the exception of {sup 3}H and {sup tot}U, in soil from LAC were detected in significantly higher concentrations (p <0.01) than in soil collected from regional background (RBG) locations. Similarly, most radionuclides in edible crop portions of beans, squash, and corn were detected in significantly higher (p <0.01 and 0.05) concentrations than RBG. Most soil-to-plant concentration ratios for radionuclides in edible and nonedible crop tissues from LAC were within the default values given by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Environmental Protection Agency. All heavy metals in soils, as well as edible and nonedible crop tissues grown in soils from LAC, were within RBG concentrations. Overall, the total maximum net positive committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE)--the CEDE plus two sigma for each radioisotope minus background and then all positive doses summed--to a hypothetical 50-year resident that ingested 160 kg of beans, corn, and squash in equal proportions, was 74 mrem y{sup -1}. This dose was below the International Commission on Radiological Protection permissible dose limit (PDL) of 100 mrem y{sup -1} from all pathways; however, the addition of other internal and external exposure route factors may increase the overall dose over the PDL. Also, the risk of an excess cancer fatality, based on 74 mrem y{sup -1}, was 3.7 x 10{sup -5} (37 in a million), which is above the Environmental Protection Agency`s (acceptable) guideline of one in a million. 31 refs., 15 tabs.

  17. Audit of the radioactive liquid waste treatment facility operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-19

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) generates radioactive and liquid wastes that must be treated before being discharged to the environment. Presently, the liquid wastes are treated in the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (Treatment Facility), which is over 30 years old and in need of repair or replacement. However, there are various ways to satisfy the treatment need. The objective of the audit was to determine whether Los Alamos cost effectively managed its Treatment Facility operations. The audit determined that Los Alamos` treatment costs were significantly higher when compared to similar costs incurred by the private sector. This situation occurred because Los Alamos did not perform a complete analysis of privatization or prepare a {open_quotes}make-or-buy{close_quotes} plan for its treatment operations, although a {open_quotes}make-or-buy{close_quotes} plan requirement was incorporated into the contract in 1996. As a result, Los Alamos may be spending $2.15 million more than necessary each year and could needlessly spend $10.75 million over the next five years to treat its radioactive liquid waste. In addition, Los Alamos has proposed to spend $13 million for a new treatment facility that may not be needed if privatization proves to be a cost effective alternative. We recommended that the Manager, Albuquerque Operations Office (Albuquerque), (1) require Los Alamos to prepare a {open_quotes}make-or-buy{close_quotes} plan for its radioactive liquid waste treatment operations, (2) review the plan for approval, and (3) direct Los Alamos to select the most cost effective method of operations while also considering other factors such as mission support, reliability, and long-term program needs. Albuquerque concurred with the recommendations.

  18. Los Alamos National Laboratory: 21st century solutions to urgent national challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Mcbranch, Duncan

    2008-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has been called upon to meet urgent national challenges for more than 65 years. The people, tools, and technologies at Los Alamos are a world class resource that has proved decisive through our history, and are needed in the future. We offer expertise in nearly every science, technology, and engineering discipline, a unique integrated capability for large-scale computing and experimentation, and the proven ability to deliver solutions involving the most complex and difficult technical systems. This white paper outlines some emerging challenges and why the nation needs Los Alamos, the premier National Security Science Laboratory, to meet these challenges.

  19. Catalog of known hot springs and thermal place names for Honduras

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, R.C.

    1986-08-01

    Thermal place names were compiled from all 1:50,000 topographic quadrangle maps for the Republic of Honduras as of July 1986, from other published maps, and from several sources of unpublished data. Known hot spring sites include those visited by Empresa Nacional de Energia Electrica (Honduras) geologists, sites visited by Los Alamos geologists in 1985, and other sites known to R.C. Finch. The number of known hot spring sites in Honduras with temperatures >30/sup 0/C is 125. In addition, 56 thermal sites are suspected on the basis of thermal place names. The total number of geothermal sites, known and suspected, is 181.

  20. The Los Alamos Science Pillars The Science of Signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Joshua E.; Peterson, Eugene J.

    2012-09-13

    As a national security science laboratory, Los Alamos is often asked to detect and measure the characteristics of complex systems and to use the resulting information to quantify the system's behavior. The Science of Signatures (SoS) pillar is the broad suite of technical expertise and capability that we use to accomplish this task. With it, we discover new signatures, develop new methods for detecting or measuring signatures, and deploy new detection technologies. The breadth of work at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in SoS is impressive and spans from the initial understanding of nuclear weapon performance during the Manhattan Project, to unraveling the human genome, to deploying laser spectroscopy instrumentation on Mars. Clearly, SoS is a primary science area for the Laboratory and we foresee that as it matures, new regimes of signatures will be discovered and new ways of extracting information from existing data streams will be developed. These advances will in turn drive the development of sensing instrumentation and sensor deployment. The Science of Signatures is one of three science pillars championed by the Laboratory and vital to supporting our status as a leading national security science laboratory. As with the other two pillars, Materials for the Future and Information Science and Technology for Predictive Science (IS&T), SoS relies on the integration of technical disciplines and the multidisciplinary science and engineering that is our hallmark to tackle the most difficult national security challenges. Over nine months in 2011 and 2012, a team of science leaders from across the Laboratory has worked to develop a SoS strategy that positions us for the future. The crafting of this strategy has been championed by the Chemistry, Life, and Earth Sciences Directorate, but as you will see from this document, SoS is truly an Institution-wide effort and it has engagement from every organization at the Laboratory. This process tapped the insight and

  1. Microwave-assisted drying of blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) fruits: Drying kinetics, polyphenols, anthocyanins, antioxidant capacity, colour and texture.

    PubMed

    Zielinska, Magdalena; Michalska, Anna

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of hot air convective drying (HACD), microwave vacuum drying (MWVD) and their combination (HACD+MWVD) on the drying kinetics, colour, total polyphenols, anthocyanins antioxidant capacity and texture of frozen/thawed blueberries. Drying resulted in reduction of total polyphenols content and antioxidant capacity (69 and 77%, respectively). The highest content of total polyphenols was noted after HACD at 90°C. Lower air temperature and prolonged exposure to oxygen resulted in greater degradation of polyphenols and antioxidant capacity. Drying processes caused a significant decrease (from 70 to 95%) in the content of anthocyanins. The highest content of anthocyanins and the strongest antioxidant capacity was found in blueberries dried using HACD at 90°C+MWVD. Among drying methods, HACD at 90°C+MWVD satisfied significant requirements for dried fruits i.e. short drying time and improved product quality.

  2. A Journey From Sandia To Los Alamos - 12465

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, K.K.; Humphrey, B.J.; Krause, T.J.; Gluth, J.W.; Kiefer, M.L.; Haynes, S.

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) relies on laboratory experiments and computer-based models to verify the reliability of the nation's nuclear stockpile. Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) tests various materials in extreme environments designed to mimic those of nuclear explosions using the Z machine. The Z machine is a key tool in the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) stockpile stewardship mission and is used to study the dynamic properties of nuclear weapon materials. In 2006, SNL/NM and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) defining experiments to be conducted in the Z machine involving plutonium (Pu) provided by LANL. Five Pu experiments have been completed with as many as 20 more planned through 2016. The experimental containment vessel used for the experiment and containing the Pu residues, becomes transuranic (TRU) waste after the experiment and termination of safeguards and is considered a LANL waste stream. Each containment vessel is placed in a 55-gallon Type A drum or standard waste box (SWB) for shipment back to LANL for final certification and eventual disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The experimental containment vessels are greater than 99% metallic materials (ferrous and non-ferrous metals). In addition to the Pu targets, detonators with high explosives (HE) are used in the experiments to isolate the containment vessel from the Z machine as energy is delivered to the Pu samples. The characterization requirements, transportation issues, required documentation, and the approvals needed before shipments were challenging and required close coordination between SNL/NM, Sandia Site Office, LANL, Los Alamos Site Office, Washington TRU Solutions, Inc., the Central Characterization Project, and the Carlsbad Field Office. Between 2006 and 2010, representatives from SNL/NM and LANL worked to develop an approved path forward to meet the requirements of all stakeholders

  3. 2015 Los Alamos Space Weather Summer School Research Reports

    SciTech Connect

    Cowee, Misa; Chen, Yuxi; Desai, Ravindra; Hassan, Ehab; Kalmoni, Nadine; Lin, Dong; Depascuale, Sebastian; Hughes, Randall Scott; Zhou, Hong

    2015-11-24

    The fifth Los Alamos Space Weather Summer School was held June 1st - July 24th, 2015, at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). With renewed support from the Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures (IGPPS) and additional support from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science, we hosted a new class of five students from various U.S. and foreign research institutions. The summer school curriculum includes a series of structured lectures as well as mentored research and practicum opportunities. Lecture topics including general and specialized topics in the field of space weather were given by a number of researchers affiliated with LANL. Students were given the opportunity to engage in research projects through a mentored practicum experience. Each student works with one or more LANL-affiliated mentors to execute a collaborative research project, typically linked with a larger ongoing research effort at LANL and/or the student’s PhD thesis research. This model provides a valuable learning experience for the student while developing the opportunity for future collaboration. This report includes a summary of the research efforts fostered and facilitated by the Space Weather Summer School. These reports should be viewed as work-in-progress as the short session typically only offers sufficient time for preliminary results. At the close of the summer school session, students present a summary of their research efforts. Titles of the papers included in this report are as follows: Full particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation of whistler wave generation, Hybrid simulations of the right-hand ion cyclotron anisotropy instability in a sub-Alfvénic plasma flow, A statistical ensemble for solar wind measurements, Observations and models of substorm injection dispersion patterns, Heavy ion effects on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability: hybrid study, Simulating plasmaspheric electron densities with a two

  4. Small Mammal Sampling in Mortandad and Los Alamos Canyons, 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Kathy; Sherwood, Sherri; Robinson, Rhonda

    2006-08-15

    As part of an ongoing ecological field investigation at Los Alamos National Laboratory, a study was conducted that compared measured contaminant concentrations in sediment to population parameters for small mammals in the Mortandad Canyon watershed. Mortandad Canyon and its tributary canyons have received contaminants from multiple solid waste management units and areas of concern since establishment of the Laboratory in the 1940s. The study included three reaches within Effluent and Mortandad canyons (E-1W, M-2W, and M-3) that had a spread in the concentrations of metals and radionuclides and included locations where polychlorinated biphenyls and perchlorate had been detected. A reference location, reach LA-BKG in upper Los Alamos Canyon, was also included in the study for comparison purposes. A small mammal study was initiated to assess whether potential adverse effects were evident in Mortandad Canyon due to the presence of contaminants, designated as contaminants of potential ecological concern, in the terrestrial media. Study sites, including the reference site, were sampled in late July/early August. Species diversity and the mean daily capture rate were the highest for E-1W reach and the lowest for the reference site. Species composition among the three reaches in Mortandad was similar with very little overlap with the reference canyon. Differences in species composition and diversity were most likely due to differences in habitat. Sex ratios, body weights, and reproductive status of small mammals were also evaluated. However, small sample sizes of some species within some sites affected the analysis. Ratios of males to females by species of each site (n = 5) were tested using a Chi-square analysis. No differences were detected. Where there was sufficient sample size, body weights of adult small mammals were compared between sites. No differences in body weights were found. Reproductive status of species appears to be similar across sites. However, sample

  5. Growth promotion and colonization of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) cv. Alamo by bacterial endophyte Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Switchgrass is one of the most promising bioenergy crop candidates for the US. It gives relatively high biomass yield and can grow on marginal lands. However, its yields vary from year to year and from location to location. Thus it is imperative to develop a low input and sustainable switchgrass feedstock production system. One of the most feasible ways to increase biomass yields is to harness benefits of microbial endophytes. Results We demonstrate that one of the most studied plant growth promoting bacterial endophytes, Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN, is able to colonize and significantly promote growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under in vitro, growth chamber, and greenhouse conditions. In several in vitro experiments, the average fresh weight of PsJN-inoculated plants was approximately 50% higher than non-inoculated plants. When one-month-old seedlings were grown in a growth chamber for 30 days, the PsJN-inoculated Alamo plants had significantly higher shoot and root biomass compared to controls. Biomass yield (dry weight) averaged from five experiments was 54.1% higher in the inoculated treatment compared to non-inoculated control. Similar results were obtained in greenhouse experiments with transplants grown in 4-gallon pots for two months. The inoculated plants exhibited more early tillers and persistent growth vigor with 48.6% higher biomass than controls. We also found that PsJN could significantly promote growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under sub-optimal conditions. However, PsJN-mediated growth promotion in switchgrass is genotype specific. Conclusions Our results show B. phytofirmans strain PsJN significantly promotes growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under different conditions, especially in the early growth stages leading to enhanced production of tillers. This phenomenon may benefit switchgrass establishment in the first year. Moreover, PsJN significantly stimulated growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under sub-optimal conditions

  6. Modelling Hot Air Balloons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brimicombe, M. W.

    1991-01-01

    A macroscopic way of modeling hot air balloons using a Newtonian approach is presented. Misleading examples using a car tire and the concept of hot air rising are discussed. Pressure gradient changes in the atmosphere are used to explain how hot air balloons work. (KR)

  7. Hot Weather Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... FCA - A A + A You are here Home HOT Weather Tips Printer-friendly version We all suffer in hot weather. However, for elderly and disabled people and ... stress and following these tips for dealing with hot weather. Wear cool clothing: See that the person ...

  8. Effect of drying temperature and slice size on quality of dried okra (Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench).

    PubMed

    Pendre, N K; Nema, Prabhat K; Sharma, Harsh P; Rathore, S S; Kushwah, S S

    2012-06-01

    Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus (L) Moench) is an important vegetable crop of India. Dried okra pods have wide use in snacks and are in great demand for domestic as well as export market. Hence, effect of four slice sizes (1, 2, 3 and 4 cm) and four drying temperatures (50, 60, 70 and 80 °C) on quality of hot air dried okra were studied. Okra pods were dried in the form of slices cut across the length at different temperatures. Quality assessment of okra was done on the basis of protein, ascorbic acid and fibre content. Okra slice sizes and drying temperatures affected all the quality parameters significantly (p < 0.05). Maximum retention of protein, ascorbic acid and fibre content were found in 2 cm long slices dried at 60 °C temperature.

  9. Comparison of timber drying using solar energy, electrical heating and dehumidifier

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, K.S.

    1999-04-01

    The performance of three different types of dryers for the hot air drying of sawn-timber planks are compared. These were the electric resistance dryer, solar dryer, and the dehumidifier dryer. While the electric and solar dryers depended only upon hot air for drying, the dehumidifier dryer relied on hot dehumidified air. The results of investigations carried out on timber drying employing these three types of dryers in the Engineering Faculty are compiled and compared here in this paper. The results showed that the electric dryer produced the fastest drying time and lowest moisture content, followed by dehumidifier drying. The solar dryer achieved a lower moisture content and a faster drying rate compared to natural drying, although the difference in drying times was marginal.

  10. Los Alamos National Laboratory Science Education Programs. Quarterly progress report, April 1--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, D.

    1995-09-01

    This report is quarterly progress report on the Los Alamos National Laboratory Science Education Programs. Included in the report are dicussions on teacher and faculty enhancement, curriculum improvement, student support, educational technology, and institutional improvement.

  11. Architect and engineering costs at Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    The objective of this audit was to determine whether architect and engineering (A-E) costs at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories were reasonable in comparison with industry standards.

  12. Disposal of tritium residues at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Audit repost

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    The objective of this audit was to determine whether Los Alamos disposed of wastewater containing tritium residues in a safe and cost-effective manner subsequent to an October 1991 report reviewing tritium facility management practices.

  13. 74. BUILDING NO. 555, AIR DRY HOUSE FOR DOUBLE BASE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    74. BUILDING NO. 555, AIR DRY HOUSE FOR DOUBLE BASE RIFLE AND CANNON POWDERS, DETAIL OF WOODEN DRYING ROOM DOORS WITH WOODEN HINGES AND BOLTS FOR SPARK PREVENTION. RINGS BY DOORS TURN ON HOT AIR FLOW TO DRYING ROOMS. NOTE GROUNDING WIRE FROM RING BRACKETS. RECORDING MACHINES BY DOORS RECORD HUMIDITY IN DRYING ROOMS. DRYING ROOMS ILLUMINATED ONLY BY EXPLOSION-PROOF LIGHTING LOCATED OUTSIDE OF ROOMS. NOTE WOODEN RAILROAD RAILS IN BACKGROUND FOR 3 FT. GUAGE CARS. - Picatinny Arsenal, 500 Area, Powder Factory & Power House, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  14. Isentropic Compression Studies at the Los Alamos National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    actinide samples in extremes of high magnetic field (to 300 Tesla) [1, 2]. A simple modification to the single-turn magnet has converted it to a fast...Isentropic Compression Studies At The Los Alamos National High Magnetic Field Laboratory 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT ...Laboratory (NHMFL) at Los Alamos was originally designed to study actinide samples in extremes of high magnetic field (to 300 Tesla) [1, 2]. A simple

  15. Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 1995 water year. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Barks, R.; Shaull, D.A.; Alexander, M.R.; Reynolds, R.P.

    1996-08-01

    The principle investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 15 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory. The United States Department of Interior Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, operates two of the stations under a subcontract; these are identified in the station manuscripts. Included in this report are data from one seepage run conducted in Los Alamos Canyon during the 1995 water year.

  16. The Los Alamos Reservoir: A Gauge for Increased Erosion after the Cerro Grande Fire, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavine, A.; Katzman, D.; Reneau, S. L.; Kuyumjian, G. A.; Gardner, J. N.; Malmon, D. V.

    2001-12-01

    The Cerro Grande fire of May 2000 burned approximately 17,400 ha in the eastern Jemez Mountains in the vicinity of Los Alamos, New Mexico. Changes in surface characteristics caused by the fire, including the development of hydrophobic soils and the loss of vegetation and litter layers, resulted in major increases in runoff and erosion relative to pre-fire conditions. This study documents sedimentation in the Los Alamos reservoir, located in upper Los Alamos Canyon, providing a unique datum for estimating pre- and post-fire erosion rates in a montane watershed. The reservoir was built in 1943 for water storage, and had a maximum holding capacity of ~42,000 m3. The drainage basin upstream from the reservoir has an area of 16.5 km2, ranges in elevation from 2320 to 3180 m, and largely supported a mixed conifer forest prior to the fire. Thirty percent of the basin experienced moderate to high severity burn during the Cerro Grande fire, including some of the steepest parts of the basin; 33% experienced low severity burn and 37% was unburned. Draining of the reservoir to mitigate the potential for flooding down-canyon allowed for detailed surveying of the top of pre- and post-fire sediments. A total station survey in June 2000, following a single post-fire flood, showed a holding capacity of ~34,500 m3. The post-fire deposits in the reservoir were less than 0.3 m thick, and comprised ~1200 m3 of sediment deposited during 1 event. This yields an estimate of ~6200 m3 of sediment accumulation in 57 years, or an average of ~110 m3/yr prior to the fire, equivalent to an average basin-wide denudation rate of ~ 0.007 mm/yr. This low rate is consistent with the well-vegetated nature of the basin prior to the fire, and the absence of evidence for extensive surface runoff and erosion. When the total station survey was repeated in June 2001, a large delta front consisting of gravels and sands had formed a subaerial platform at the head of the reservoir. The post-fire deposits also

  17. Integrated sequence and immunology filovirus database at Los Alamos

    DOE PAGES

    Yusim, Karina; Yoon, Hyejin; Foley, Brian; ...

    2016-01-01

    The Ebola outbreak of 2013–15 infected more than 28,000 people and claimed more lives than all previous filovirus outbreaks combined. Governmental agencies, clinical teams, and the world scientific community pulled together in a multifaceted response ranging from prevention and disease control, to evaluating vaccines and therapeutics in human trials. We report that as this epidemic is finally coming to a close, refocusing on long-term prevention strategies becomes paramount. Given the very real threat of future filovirus outbreaks, and the inherent uncertainty of the next outbreak virus and geographic location, it is prudent to consider the extent and implications of knownmore » natural diversity in advancing vaccines and therapeutic approaches. To facilitate such consideration, we have updated and enhanced the content of the filovirus portion of Los Alamos Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses Database. We have integrated and performed baseline analysis of all family Filoviridae sequences deposited into GenBank, with associated immune response data, and metadata, and we have added new computational tools with web-interfaces to assist users with analysis. Here, we (i) describe the main features of updated database, (ii) provide integrated views and some basic analyses summarizing evolutionary patterns as they relate to geo-temporal data captured in the database and (iii) highlight the most conserved regions in the proteome that may be useful for a T cell vaccine strategy.« less

  18. Integrated sequence and immunology filovirus database at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Yusim, Karina; Yoon, Hyejin; Foley, Brian; Feng, Shihai; Macke, Jennifer; Dimitrijevic, Mira; Abfalterer, Werner; Szinger, James; Fischer, Will; Kuiken, Carla; Korber, Bette

    2016-01-01

    The Ebola outbreak of 2013–15 infected more than 28,000 people and claimed more lives than all previous filovirus outbreaks combined. Governmental agencies, clinical teams, and the world scientific community pulled together in a multifaceted response ranging from prevention and disease control, to evaluating vaccines and therapeutics in human trials. We report that as this epidemic is finally coming to a close, refocusing on long-term prevention strategies becomes paramount. Given the very real threat of future filovirus outbreaks, and the inherent uncertainty of the next outbreak virus and geographic location, it is prudent to consider the extent and implications of known natural diversity in advancing vaccines and therapeutic approaches. To facilitate such consideration, we have updated and enhanced the content of the filovirus portion of Los Alamos Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses Database. We have integrated and performed baseline analysis of all family Filoviridae sequences deposited into GenBank, with associated immune response data, and metadata, and we have added new computational tools with web-interfaces to assist users with analysis. Here, we (i) describe the main features of updated database, (ii) provide integrated views and some basic analyses summarizing evolutionary patterns as they relate to geo-temporal data captured in the database and (iii) highlight the most conserved regions in the proteome that may be useful for a T cell vaccine strategy.

  19. The NHMFL Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos National Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke, Chuck

    2014-03-01

    National user facilities provide scientists and industrial development companies with access to specialized experimental capabilities to enable development of materials and solve long standing technical problems. Magnetic fields have become an indispensable tool for researchers to better understand and manipulate ground states of electronic materials. As magnetic field intensities are increased the quantum nature of these materials become exponentially more likely to be observed and this is but one of the drivers to go further in high magnetic field generation. At the Los Alamos branch of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory we have significant efforts in extremely high magnetic field generation and experimentation. In direct opposition with our efforts are the tremendous electro-mechanical forces exerted on our magnets and the electromagnetic interference that couples to the sample under study and the diagnostic equipment. Challenges in magnetic field generation and research will be presented. Various methods of pulsed high magnetic field generation and experimentation capabilities will be reviewed, including our recent ``World Record'' for the highest non-destructive magnetic field. NSF-DMR 1157490.

  20. Los Alamos High-Brightness Accelerator FEL (HIBAF) facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelius, W.D.; Bender, S.; Meier, K.; Thode, L.E.; Watson, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The 10-/mu/m Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL) facility is being upgraded. The conventional electron gun and bunchers have been replaced with a much more compact 6-MeV photoinjector accelerator. By adding existing parts from previous experiments, the primary beam energy will be doubled to 40 MeV. With the existing 1-m wiggler (/lambda//sub w/ = 2.7 cm) and resonator, the facility can produce photons with wavelengths from 3 to 100 /mu/m when lasing on the fundamental mode and produce photons in the visible spectrum with short-period wigglers or harmonic operation. After installation of a 150/degree/ bend, a second wiggler will be added as an amplifier. The installation of laser transport tubes between the accelerator vault and an upstairs laboratory will provide experimenters with a radiation-free environment for experiments. Although the initial experimental program of the upgraded facility will be to test the single accelerator-master oscillator/power amplifier configuration, some portion of the operational time of the facility can be dedicated to user experiments. 13 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Chemical decontamination technical resources at Los Alamos National Laboratory (2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Murray E

    2008-01-01

    This document supplies information resources for a person seeking to create planning or pre-planning documents for chemical decontamination operations. A building decontamination plan can be separated into four different sections: Pre-planning, Characterization, Decontamination (Initial response and also complete cleanup), and Clearance. Of the identified Los Alamos resources, they can be matched with these four sections: Pre-planning -- Dave Seidel, EO-EPP, Emergency Planning and Preparedness; David DeCroix and Bruce Letellier, D-3, Computational fluids modeling of structures; Murray E. Moore, RP-2, Aerosol sampling and ventilation engineering. Characterization (this can include development projects) -- Beth Perry, IAT-3, Nuclear Counterterrorism Response (SNIPER database); Fernando Garzon, MPA-11, Sensors and Electrochemical Devices (development); George Havrilla, C-CDE, Chemical Diagnostics and Engineering; Kristen McCabe, B-7, Biosecurity and Public Health. Decontamination -- Adam Stively, EO-ER, Emergency Response; Dina Matz, IHS-IP, Industrial hygiene; Don Hickmott, EES-6, Chemical cleanup. Clearance (validation) -- Larry Ticknor, CCS-6, Statistical Sciences.

  2. Population Files for use with CAP88 at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    McNaughton, Michael W; Brock, Burgandy R

    2012-07-10

    CAP88 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package 1988) is a computer model developed for the US Environmental Protection Agency to assess the potential dose from radionuclide emissions to air and to demonstrate compliance with the Clean Air Act. It has options to calculate either individual doses, in units of mrem, or a collective dose, also called population dose, in units of person-rem. To calculate the collective dose, CAP88 uses a population file such as LANL.pop, that lists the number of people in each sector (N, NNE, NE, etc.) as a function of distance (1 to 2 km, etc.) out to a maximum radius of 80 km. Early population files are described in the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Environmental Reports for 1985 (page 14) and subsequent years. LA-13469-MS describes a population file based on the 1990 census. These files have been updated several times, most recently in 2006 for CAP88 version 3. The 2006 version used the US census for 2000. The present paper describes the 2012 updates, using the 2010 census.

  3. HELIOSEISMIC TESTS OF THE NEW LOS ALAMOS OPACITIES

    SciTech Connect

    J. GUZIK; ET AL

    2001-01-01

    We compare the helioseismic properties of two solar models, one calibrated with the OPAL opacities and the other with the recent Los Alamos LEDCOP opacities. We show that, in the radiative interior of the Sun, the small differences between the two sets of opacities (up to 6% near the base of the convection zone) lead to noticeable differences in the solar structure (up to 0.4% in sound speed), with the OPAL model being the closest to the helioseismic data. More than half of the difference between the two opacity sets results from the interpolation scheme and from the relatively widely spaced temperature grids used in the tables. The remaining 3% intrinsic difference between the OPAL and the LEDCOP opacities in the radiative interior of the Sun is well within the error bars on the opacity calculations resulting from the uncertainties on the physics. We conclude that the OPAL and LEDCOP opacity sets do about as well in the radiative interior of the Sun.

  4. Organizational cultural survey of the Los Alamos Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    An Organizational Survey (OS) was administered at the Los Alamos Site that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental, safety, and health concerns, hazardous nature of work, safety and overall job satisfaction. The purpose of the OS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the notion of culture;'' that is, the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In addition, through the OS, a broad sample of individuals can be reached that would probably not be interviewed or observed during the course of a typical assessment. The OS also provides a descriptive profile of the organization at one point in time that can then be compared to a profile taken at a different point in time to assess changes in the culture of the organization. While comparisons among groups are made, it is not the purpose of this report to make evaluative statements of which profile may be positive or negative. However, using the data presented in this report in conjunction with other evaluative activities, may provide useful insight into the organization.

  5. Organizational cultural survey of the Los Alamos Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    An Organizational Survey (OS) was administered at the Los Alamos Site that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental, safety, and health concerns, hazardous nature of work, safety and overall job satisfaction. The purpose of the OS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the notion of ``culture;`` that is, the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In addition, through the OS, a broad sample of individuals can be reached that would probably not be interviewed or observed during the course of a typical assessment. The OS also provides a descriptive profile of the organization at one point in time that can then be compared to a profile taken at a different point in time to assess changes in the culture of the organization. While comparisons among groups are made, it is not the purpose of this report to make evaluative statements of which profile may be positive or negative. However, using the data presented in this report in conjunction with other evaluative activities, may provide useful insight into the organization.

  6. Progress on the Los Alamos heavy-ion injector

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.C.; Riepe, K.B.; Ballard, E.O.; Meyer, E.A.; Shurter, R.P.; Van Haaften, F.W.; Humphries, S. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Heavy-ion fusion using an induction linac requires injection of multiple high-current beams from a pulsed electrostatic accelerator at as high a voltage as practical. Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing a 16-beam, 2-MeV, pulsed electrostatic accelerator for Al/sup +/ ions. The ion source will use a pulsed metal vapor arc plasma. A biased grid will control plasma flux into the ion extraction region. This source has achieved a normalized emittance of epsilon/sub n/ < 3.10/sup -7/..pi..-m-rad with Al/sup +/ ions. An 800 kV Marx prototype with a laser fired diverter is being assembled. The ceramic accelerating column sections have been brazed and leak tested. Voltage hold off on a brazed sample was more than doubled by selective removal of the Ticusil braze fillet extending along the ceramic. A scaled test module held 250 kV for 50 ..mu..s, giving confidence that the full module can hold 175 kV per section. The pressure vessel should be received in June 1986. High-voltage testing of a 1 MV column will begin by early 1987.

  7. ACCELERATION OF LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY TRANSURANIC WASTE DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect

    O'LEARY, GERALD A.

    2007-01-04

    One of Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL's) most significant risks is the site's inventory of transuranic waste retrievably stored above and below-ground in Technical Area (TA) 54 Area G, particularly the dispersible high-activity waste stored above-ground in deteriorating facilities. The high activity waste represents approximately 50% (by activity) of the total 292,000 PE-Ci inventory remaining to be disposed. The transuramic waste inventory includes contact-handled and remote-handled waste packaged in drums, boxes, and oversized containers which are retrievably stored both above and below-ground. Although currently managed as transuranic waste, some of the inventory is low-level waste that can be disposed onsite or at approved offsite facilities. Dispositioning the transuranic waste inventory requires retrieval of the containers from above and below-ground storage, examination and repackaging or remediation as necessary, characterization, certification and loading for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad New Mexico, all in accordance with well-defined requirements and controls. Although operations are established to process and characterize the lower-activity contact-handled transuranic waste containers, LAN L does not currently have the capability to repack high activity contact-handled transuranic waste containers (> 56 PE-Ci) or to process oversized containers with activity levels over 0.52 PE-Ci. Operational issues and compliance requirements have resulted in less than optimal processing capabilities for lower activity contact-handled transuranic waste containers, limiting preparation and reducing dependability of shipments to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Since becoming the Los Alamos National Laboratory contract in June 2006, Los Alamos National Security (LANS) L.L.C. has developed a comprehensive, integrated plan to effectively and efficiently disposition the transuranic waste inventory, working in concert with the Department of

  8. Electron clearing in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.A.; Allen, J.; Borden, M.J.; Fitzgerald, D.H.; Macek, R.J.; Wang, T.S.

    1995-05-01

    The instability observed in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) has been tentatively identified as an electron-proton instability. A source of electrons must exist for this instability to occur. The PSR injection section contains the stripper foil, and therefore provides several strong sources of electrons. An electron clearing system was installed in the injection section to clear out these electrons. The system comprised: (1) a foil biasing system to clear the SEM and thermionic electrons, (2) a pair of low-field bending magnets with a Faraday cup to clear the convoy electrons, and (3) two pairs of clearing electrodes, one upstream and one downstream of the stripper foil, to clear the remaining electrons. This paper discusses the design and performance of the Electron Clearing System, and its effect on the instability. Also presented are some results from other charge-collection experiments that suggest there is also substantial electron production in parts of the ring other than the injection section.

  9. Carbon stripper foils used in the Los Alamos PSR

    SciTech Connect

    Borden, M.J.; Plum, M.A.; Sugai, I.

    1997-12-01

    Carbon stripper foils produced by the modified controlled ACDC arc discharge method (mCADAD) at the Institute for Nuclear Study have been tested and used for high current 800-MeV beam production in the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) since 1993. Two foils approximately 110 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} each are sandwiched together to produce an equivalent 220 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} foil. The foil sandwitch is supported by 4-5 {mu}m diameter carbon filters attached to an aluminum frame. These foils have survived as long as five months during PSR normal beam production of near 70 {mu}A average current on target. Typical life-times of other foils vary from seven to fourteen days with lower on-target average current. Beam loss data also indicate that these foils have slower shrinkage rates than standard foils. Equipment has been assembled and used to produce foils by the mCADAD method at Los Alamos. These foils will be tested during 1997 operation.

  10. Los Alamos high-current proton storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, G. P.; Hardekopf, R. A.; Jason, A. J.; Clout, P. N.; Sawyer, G. A.

    1985-05-01

    The Proton Storage Ring (PSR), whose installation was recently completed at Los Alamos, is a fast-cycling high-current accumulator designed to produce intense 800 MeV proton pulses for driving a spallation neutron source. The ring converts long beam pulses from the LAMPF linear accelerator into short bunches well matched to requirements of a high-resolution neutron-scattering materials science program. The initial performance goal for this program is to provide 100-(MU)A average current at the neutron production target within a 12-Hz pulse rate. Operation at 20 (MU)A is scheduled for September 1985, with full intensity within the next year. The storage ring was originally designed to function in a second mode in which six 1-ns bunches are accumulated and separately extracted every LAMPF macropulse. Implementation of this mode, which would serve a fast-neutron nuclear-physics program, was deferred in favor of initial concentration on the neutron-scattering program. The PSR design and status is summarized. Unique machine features include high peak current, two-step charge-stripping injection, a low-impedance buncher amplifier to counter beam-loading, and a high-repetition-rate strip-line extraction kicker.

  11. Los Alamos Shows Airport Security Technology at Work

    ScienceCinema

    Espy, Michelle; Schultz, Larry; Hunter, James

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos scientists have advanced a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technology that may provide a breakthrough for screening liquids at airport security. They've added low-power X-ray data to the mix, and as a result have unlocked a new detection technology. Funded in part by the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate, the new system is named MagRay. The goal is to quickly and accurately distinguish between liquids that visually appear identical. For example, what appears to be a bottle of white wine could potentially be nitromethane, a liquid that could be used to make an explosive. Both are clear liquids, one would be perfectly safe on a commercial aircraft, the other would be strictly prohibited. How to tell them apart quickly without error at an airport security area is the focus of Michelle Espy, Larry Schultz and their team. In this video, Espy and the MagRay team explain how the new technology works, how they've developed an easy operator interface, and what the next steps might be in transitioning this technology to the private sector.

  12. Wildlife use of NPDES outfalls at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Foxx, T.; Blea-Edeskuty, B.

    1995-09-01

    From July through October of 1991, the Biological Resources Evaluation Team (BRET) surveyed 133 of the 140 National Pollutant Discharge and Elimination System outfalls at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of the survey was to determine the use of these wastewater outfalls by wildlife. BRET observed wildlife or evidence of wildlife (scat, tracks, or bedding) by 35 vertebrate species in the vicinity of the outfalls, suggesting these animals could be using water from outfalls. Approximately 56% of the outfalls are probably used or are suitable for use by large mammals as sources of drinking water. Additionally, hydrophytic vegetation grows in association with approximately 40% of the outfalls-a characteristic that could make these areas eligible for wetland status. BRET recommends further study to accurately characterize the use of outfalls by small and medium-sized mammals and amphibians. The team also recommends systematic aquatic macroinvertebrate studies to provide information on resident communities and water quality. Wetland assessments may be necessary to ensure compliance with wetland regulations if LANL activities affect any of the outfalls supporting hydrophytic vegetation.

  13. Atomic Structure Calculations from the Los Alamos Atomic Physics Codes

    DOE Data Explorer

    Cowan, R. D.

    The well known Hartree-Fock method of R.D. Cowan, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, is used for the atomic structure calculations. Electron impact excitation cross sections are calculated using either the distorted wave approximation (DWA) or the first order many body theory (FOMBT). Electron impact ionization cross sections can be calculated using the scaled hydrogenic method developed by Sampson and co-workers, the binary encounter method or the distorted wave method. Photoionization cross sections and, where appropriate, autoionizations are also calculated. Original manuals for the atomic structure code, the collisional excitation code, and the ionization code, are available from this website. Using the specialized interface, you will be able to define the ionization stage of an element and pick the initial and final configurations. You will be led through a series of web pages ending with a display of results in the form of cross sections, collision strengths or rates coefficients. Results are available in tabular and graphic form.

  14. Explorer at Los Alamos: A library for the future

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, M.; McDonald, J.

    1998-03-01

    Since 1993, Los Alamos National Laboratory, has been developing World Wide Web (WWW) applications to facilitate access to vast quantities of information critical to the successful operation of a nuclear weapons facility Explorer is a web-based tool that integrates full-text search and retrieval technology, custom user in interface faces, user-friendly navigation tools, extremely large document collections, and data collection and workflow applications. Explorer`s first major thrust was to enable quick access to regulatory and policy information used by Department of Energy facilities throughout the country. Today, Explorer users can easily search document collections containing, millions of pages of information scattered across Web sites around the country. Over fifteen large applications containing multiple collections are searchable through Explorer, and the subject areas range from DOE regulations to quality management-related resources to technology transfer opportunities. Explorer has succeeded because it provides quick and easy access to stored data across the Web; it saves time and reduces costs in comparison with traditional information distribution, access, and retrieval methods.

  15. World's Largest Gold Crystal Studied at Los Alamos

    ScienceCinema

    Vogel, Sven; Nakotte, Heinz

    2016-07-12

    When geologist John Rakovan needed better tools to investigate whether a dazzling 217.78-gram piece of gold was in fact the world's largest single-crystal specimen - a distinguishing factor that would not only drastically increase its market value but also provide a unique research opportunity - he traveled to Los Alamos National Laboratory's Lujan Neutron Scattering Center to peer deep inside the mineral using neutron diffractometry. Neutrons, different from other probes such as X-rays and electrons, are able to penetrate many centimeters deep into most materials. Revealing the inner structure of a crystal without destroying the sample - imperative, as this one is worth an estimated $1.5 million - would allow Rakovan and Lujan Center collaborators Sven Vogel and Heinz Nakotte to prove that this exquisite nugget, which seemed almost too perfect and too big to be real, was a single crystal and hence a creation of nature. Its owner, who lives in the United States, provided the samples to Rakovan to assess the crystallinity of four specimens, all of which had been found decades ago in Venezuela.

  16. Response of `Alamo` switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) to weed management practices

    SciTech Connect

    Sledge, S.L.; Walker, R.H.

    1995-11-01

    Field studies were conducted in 1992 and 1994 to evaluate herbicides that would provide weed control and biomass yield of `Alamo` switchgrass during the year of establishment. For grass weed control, bensulide was applied preplant incorporated (PPI) at 4.4 kg ai ha{sup -1}, while MSMA was applied postemergence over the top (POST) at 2.2 kg ai ha{sup -1} to switchgrass that had two to four leaves. Herbicides applied POST for control of broadleaf weed species included 2,4-D at 0.6 kg ai ha{sup -1} or metsulfuron at 0.02 kg ai ha{sup -1}. Herbicide treatments included bensulide and MSMA applied alone or in combination with s,3-D or metsulfuron. They were arranged in a randomized complete block design and replicated four times. Weed control, crop tolerance and yield data were taken over time. Bensulide or MSMA applied alone provided 80% or greater control of large crabgrass, broadleaf signalgrass and fall panicum for the two years. The addition of metsulfuron or 2,4-D provided acceptable control of smooth pigweed, prickly sida, pitted morningglory and sicklepod. MSMA treatments produced slight PANVI injury that ranged from 20 to 36%. Bensulide injury was mostly moderate ranging from 19 to 88%. Although less injury was recorded with MSMA treatments, bensulide treatments trended higher for establishment-year biomass production that averaged 5123 kg ha{sup -1} as compared to 4239 kg ha{sup -1} for MSMA treatments.

  17. Los Alamos Shows Airport Security Technology at Work

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle; Schultz, Larry; Hunter, James

    2013-11-25

    Los Alamos scientists have advanced a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technology that may provide a breakthrough for screening liquids at airport security. They've added low-power X-ray data to the mix, and as a result have unlocked a new detection technology. Funded in part by the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate, the new system is named MagRay. The goal is to quickly and accurately distinguish between liquids that visually appear identical. For example, what appears to be a bottle of white wine could potentially be nitromethane, a liquid that could be used to make an explosive. Both are clear liquids, one would be perfectly safe on a commercial aircraft, the other would be strictly prohibited. How to tell them apart quickly without error at an airport security area is the focus of Michelle Espy, Larry Schultz and their team. In this video, Espy and the MagRay team explain how the new technology works, how they've developed an easy operator interface, and what the next steps might be in transitioning this technology to the private sector.

  18. Los Alamos National Laboratory 1995 self assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-30

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Safeguards and Security (S and S) Assurance Program (AP) is designed to ensure the adequacy and effectiveness of the LANL S and S program. The Assurance Program provides a mechanism for discovering deficiencies, determining causes, conducting risk assessments, implementing corrective actions, and documenting the assessment process. Selection of organizations for self assessments is based on the criteria established in the LANL S and S Assurance Program. For FY 1995, 12 organizations were selected for self assessments, these organizations are identified fin the schedule at Appendix A. The S and S topical areas selected for review in each organization varied depending on their security interests and included: Program Planning and Management (PPM); Protection Program Operations (PPO); Material Control and Accountability (MC and A); Computer and Communications Security (COMPSEC and COMSEC); Information Security (INFOSEC); Personnel Security (PERSEC); and Operational Security (OPSEC). The objective was to ascertain the effectiveness of S and S programs in each organization, its formality of operations, and its integration with the overall Laboratory S and S program. The goal was to meet both the DOE self-assessment requirements and the UC performance criteria and document the results.

  19. Lessons learned from decommissioning projects at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, M.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes lessons learned over the last 20 years from 12 decommissioning projects at Los Alamos National Laboratory. These lessons relate both to overall program management and to management of specific projects during the planning and operations phases. The issues include waste management; the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA); the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); contracting; public involvement; client/customer interface; and funding. Key elements of our approach are to be proactive; follow the observation method; perform field activities concurrently; develop strategies to keep reportable incidents from delaying work; seek and use programs, methods, etc., in existence to shorten learning curves; network to help develop solutions; and avoid overstudying and overcharacterizing. This approach results in preliminary plans that require very little revision before implementation, reasonable costs and schedules, early acquisition of permits and NEPA documents, preliminary characterization reports, and contracting documents. Our track record is good -- the last four projects (uranium and plutonium-processing facility and three research reactors) have been on budget and on schedule.

  20. Los Alamos National Laboratory compliance with cultural resource management legislation

    SciTech Connect

    Olinger, C.E.; Rea, K.H.

    1984-01-01

    Cultural resources management is one aspect of NEPA-induced legislation increasingly affecting federal land managers. A number of regulations, some of them recent, outline management criteria for protecting cultural resources on federal land. Nearly all construction projects at the 11,135 hectare Los Alamos National Laboratory in northern New Mexico are affected by cultural resource management requirements. A substantial prehistoric Puebloan population occupied the Laboratory area from the 13th to the early 16th centuries. Grazing, timbering, and homesteading followed Indian occupation. Therefore, archaeological and historical ruins and artifacts are abundant. The Laboratory has developed a cultural resources management program which meets both legal and project planning requirements. The program operates in coordination with the New Mexico State Historical Preservation Office. Major elements of the Laboratory program are illustrated by a current project involving relocation of a homesteader's cabin located on land required for a major new facility. The Laboratory cultural resource management program couples routine oversight of all engineering design projects with onsite resource surveys and necessary mitigation prior to construction. The Laboratory has successfully protected major archaeological and historical ruins, although some problems remain. The cultural resource program is intended to be adjustable to new needs. A cultural resource management plan will provide long-term management guidance.

  1. Results from the Argonne, Los Alamos, JAERI collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Meadows, J.; Smith, D.; Greenwood, L.; Haight, R.; Ikeda, Y.; Konno, C.

    1993-07-01

    Four sample packets containing elemental Ti, Fe, Ni, Cu, Nb, Ag, Eu, Tb and Hf have been irradiated in three distinct accelerator neutron fields, at Argonne National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA, and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Japan. The acquired experimental data include differential cross sections and integral cross sections for the continuum neutron spectrum produced by 7-MeV deuterons incident on thick Be-metal target. The U-238(n,f) cross section was also measured at 10.3 MeV as a consistency check on the experimental technique. This the third progress report on a project which has been carried out under the auspices of an IAEA Coordinated Research Program entitled ``Activation Cross Sections for the Generation Of Long-lived Radionuclides of Importance in Fusion Reactor Technology``. The present report provides the latest results from this work. Comparison is made between the 14.7-MeV cross-section values obtained from the separate investigations at Argonne and JAERI. Generally, good agreement observed within the experimental errors when consistent sample parameters, radioactivity decay data and reference cross values are employed. A comparison is also made between the experimental results and those derived from calculations using a nuclear model. Experimental neutron information on the Be(d,n) neutron spectrum was incorporated in the comparisons for the integral results. The agreement is satisfactory considering the various uncertainties that are involved.

  2. Los Alamos Plutonium Facility newly generated TRU waste certification

    SciTech Connect

    Gruetzmacher, K.; Montoya, A.; Sinkule, B.; Maez, M.

    1997-02-01

    This paper presents an overview of the activities being planned and implemented to certify newly generated contact handled transuranic (TRU) waste produced by Los Alamos National Laboratory`s (LANL`s) Plutonium Facility. Certifying waste at the point of generation is the most important cost and labor saving step in the WIPP certification process. The pedigree of a waste item is best known by the originator of the waste and frees a site from expensive characterization activities such as those associated with legacy waste. Through a cooperative agreement with LANLs Waste Management Facility and under the umbrella of LANLs WIPP-related certification and quality assurance documents, the Plutonium Facility will be certifying its own newly generated waste. Some of the challenges faced by the Plutonium Facility in preparing to certify TRU waste include the modification and addition of procedures to meet WIPP requirements, standardizing packaging for TRU waste, collecting processing documentation from operations which produce TRU waste, and developing ways to modify waste streams which are not certifiable in their present form.

  3. World's Largest Gold Crystal Studied at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, Sven; Nakotte, Heinz

    2014-04-03

    When geologist John Rakovan needed better tools to investigate whether a dazzling 217.78-gram piece of gold was in fact the world's largest single-crystal specimen - a distinguishing factor that would not only drastically increase its market value but also provide a unique research opportunity - he traveled to Los Alamos National Laboratory's Lujan Neutron Scattering Center to peer deep inside the mineral using neutron diffractometry. Neutrons, different from other probes such as X-rays and electrons, are able to penetrate many centimeters deep into most materials. Revealing the inner structure of a crystal without destroying the sample - imperative, as this one is worth an estimated $1.5 million - would allow Rakovan and Lujan Center collaborators Sven Vogel and Heinz Nakotte to prove that this exquisite nugget, which seemed almost too perfect and too big to be real, was a single crystal and hence a creation of nature. Its owner, who lives in the United States, provided the samples to Rakovan to assess the crystallinity of four specimens, all of which had been found decades ago in Venezuela.

  4. Integrated sequence and immunology filovirus database at Los Alamos.

    PubMed

    Yusim, Karina; Yoon, Hyejin; Foley, Brian; Feng, Shihai; Macke, Jennifer; Dimitrijevic, Mira; Abfalterer, Werner; Szinger, James; Fischer, Will; Kuiken, Carla; Korber, Bette

    2016-01-01

    The Ebola outbreak of 2013-15 infected more than 28 000 people and claimed more lives than all previous filovirus outbreaks combined. Governmental agencies, clinical teams, and the world scientific community pulled together in a multifaceted response ranging from prevention and disease control, to evaluating vaccines and therapeutics in human trials. As this epidemic is finally coming to a close, refocusing on long-term prevention strategies becomes paramount. Given the very real threat of future filovirus outbreaks, and the inherent uncertainty of the next outbreak virus and geographic location, it is prudent to consider the extent and implications of known natural diversity in advancing vaccines and therapeutic approaches. To facilitate such consideration, we have updated and enhanced the content of the filovirus portion of Los Alamos Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses Database. We have integrated and performed baseline analysis of all family ITALIC! Filoviridaesequences deposited into GenBank, with associated immune response data, and metadata, and we have added new computational tools with web-interfaces to assist users with analysis. Here, we (i) describe the main features of updated database, (ii) provide integrated views and some basic analyses summarizing evolutionary patterns as they relate to geo-temporal data captured in the database and (iii) highlight the most conserved regions in the proteome that may be useful for a T cell vaccine strategy.Database URL:www.hfv.lanl.gov.

  5. Final Progress Report: Internship at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, Ryan Q.

    2012-08-10

    Originally I was tasked fluidized bed modeling, however, I changed projects. While still working with ANSYS Fluent, I performed a study of particle tracks in glove boxes. This is useful from a Health-Physics perspective, dealing respirable particles that can be hazardous to the human body. I iteratively tested different amounts of turbulent particles in a steady-state flow. The goal of this testing was to discover how Fluent handles built-in Rosin-Rammler distributions for particle injections. I worked on the health physics flow problems and distribution analysis under the direction of two mentors, Bruce Letellier and Dave Decroix. I set up and ran particle injection calculations using Fluent. I tried different combinations of input parameters to produce sets of 500,000, 1 million, and 1.5 million particles to determine what a good test case would be for future experiments. I performed a variety of tasks in my work as an Undergraduate Student Intern at LANL this summer, and learned how to use a powerful CFD application in addition to expanding my skills in MATLAB. I enjoyed my work at LANL and hope to be able to use the experience here to further my career in the future working in a security-conscious environment. My mentors provided guidance and help with all of my projects and I am grateful for the opportunity to work at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  6. Los Alamos climatology summary including latest normals from 1961--1990

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, B.M.

    1992-03-01

    This report contains a summary of Los Alamos climate and analyses of basic weather variables from late 1910 through 1991. The first few sections offer a description of the local geography and large-scale weather patterns that affect Los Alamos. Temperature and precipitation analyses are presented in the next few sections. Updated 30-year temperature and precipitation normals ending in 1990 are shown for Los Alamos and White Rock. Normal snowfall is also shown for Los Alamos. Extremes of temperature, precipitation, and snowfall and averages of weather variables are also given. A section then discusses the changes of the latest 30-year normals. Another section describes the winds in Los Alamos. Brief descriptions of, humidity, sunshine, atmospheric pressure, and pollutant dispersal appear in the following sections. The report ends with brief descriptions of other weather phenomena that occur in Los Alamos. Appendices include locations of weather stations, normal heating and cooling degree-days, growing-season data, and English/metric unit conversions.

  7. Environmental assessment for the proposed CMR Building upgrades at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. Final document

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-04

    In order to maintain its ability to continue to conduct uninterrupted radioactive and metallurgical research in a safe, secure, and environmentally sound manner, the US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to upgrade the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Building. The building was built in the early 1950s to provide a research and experimental facility for analytical chemistry, plutonium and uranium chemistry, and metallurgy. Today, research and development activities are performed involving nuclear materials. A variety of radioactive and chemical hazards are present. The CMR Building is nearing the end of its original design life and does not meet many of today`s design codes and standards. The Proposed Action for this Environmental Assessment (EA) includes structural modifications to some portions of the CMR Building which do not meet current seismic criteria for a Hazard Category 2 Facility. Also included are upgrades and improvements in building ventilation, communications, monitoring, and fire protection systems. This EA analyzes the environmental effects of construction of the proposed upgrades. The Proposed Action will have no adverse effects upon agricultural and cultural resources, wetlands and floodplains, endangered and threatened species, recreational resources, or water resources. The Proposed Action would have negligible effects on human health and transportation, and would not pose a disproportionate adverse health or environmental impact on minority or low-income populations within an 80 kilometer (50 mile) radius of the CMR Building.

  8. Geology and physical properties of the near-surface rocks of Mesita de los Alamos, Los Alamos County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purtymun, W.D.

    1967-01-01

    The surface of Mesita de los Alamos is formed by units 2b and 3 of the Tshirege Member of the Bandelier Tuff. These units dip gently east-southeastward at 3 to 6 degrees. The units are faulted near the center of the mesa by a north-south trending normal strike slip fault, that is downthrown about 14 feet to the east. The units east of the fault have moved about 14 feet south relative to the units on the west side of the fault. Units 2b and 3 have bulk density values ranging from 80 to 120 pounds per cubic foot. The moisture content of the tuff below the soil zone and near surface tuff was less than 5 percent by volume in five of the 25 test holes drilled during a foundation investigation for the Meson Facility. The temperature of the tuff in the bottom of three test holes (depth 16 to 43 feet) varied from 50?F to 54?F. Temperature variations were a function of density and amount of solar radiation.

  9. Environmental assessment for the scintillation vial crusher TA-54, Area L, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    Research and development projects conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory produce scintillation vials as waste from normal operations. These vials contain radioisotopes such as tritium, carbon-14, and isotopes of transuranic elements such as americium-241, plutonium-238 and -239. The scintillation fluids contain some solvents defined as hazardous waste. The vials are thus classed as mixed waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Laboratory has in storage some 520 drums of stored vials and is accumulating some 70 to 140 more drums annually. The drained vial fragments can be disposed of at TA-54 as low-level radioactive waste (LLW). The bulked liquid will be stored at TA-54 as RCRA mixed waste until treatment/disposal options are developed. Other waste from the vial crushing operation will also be stored at TA-54 as mixed waste. By operating the scintillation vial crusher, the storage space needed for this RCRA mixed waste stream can be reduced to about 5% of that currently being used. The other 95% will be vial fragments that can be disposed immediately as LLW.

  10. Thin layer drying of tomato slices.

    PubMed

    Das Purkayastha, Manashi; Nath, Amit; Deka, Bidyut Chandra; Mahanta, Charu Lata

    2013-08-01

    The hot air convective drying characteristics of blanched tomato (Lycopersicon esculantum L.) slices have been investigated. Drying experiments were carried out at four different temperatures (50, 60, 65 and 70 °C). The effect of drying temperatures on the drying behavior of the tomato slices was evaluated. All drying experiments had only falling rate period. The average effective diffusivity values varied from 0.5453 × 10(-9) to 2.3871 × 10(-9) m(2)/s over the temperature range studied and the activation energy was estimated to be 61.004 kJ/mol. In order to select a suitable form of the drying curve, six different thin layer drying models (Henderson-Pabis, Page, Diamante et al., Wang and Singh, Logarithmic and Newton models) were fitted to the experimental data. The goodness of fit tests indicated that the Logarithmic model gave the best fit to experimental results, which was closely followed by the Henderson-Pabis model. The influence of varied drying temperatures on quality attributes of the tomato slices viz. Hunter color parameters, ascorbic acid, lycopene, titratable acidity, total sugars, reducing sugars and sugar/acid ratio of dried slices was also studied. Slices dried at 50 and 60 °C had high amount of total sugars, lycopene, sugar/acid ratio, Hunter L- and a-values. Drying of slices at 50 °C revealed optimum retention of ascorbic acid, sugar/acid ratio and red hue, whereas, drying at higher temperature (65 and 70 °C) resulted in a considerable decrease in nutrients and colour quality of the slices.

  11. Dry Macular Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    Dry macular degeneration Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Dry macular degeneration is a common eye disorder among people over 65. ... vision in your direct line of sight. Dry macular degeneration may first develop in one eye and then ...

  12. An aerial radiological survey of Technical Areas 2, 21, and 53 and surroundings, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzsche, A.E.

    1990-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the entire Los Alamos National Laboratory was flown in September 1982. The data from a part of the survey, Technical Areas 2, 21, and 53, are presented here along with pertinent data from an October 1975 survey of limited areas of Los Alamos. The data from Technical Area 15, another part of the survey, will be published in another report. Contour maps of the gamma survey data show some Cs-137 activity in Los Alamos Canyon as well as in DP Canyon beside TA-21. Some Be-7, Sb-124, and Co-58 apparently exist in the canyon immediately below the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) ponds. Estimates on the Cs-137 inventory in the canyons range from 210 mCi to 1270 mCi. An exposure rate contour map at 1 meter above ground level (AGL) was constructed from the gamma data and overlaid on an aerial photograph and map of the area. The terrestrial exposure rates ranged from 6{mu}R/h to about 18{mu}R/h. 25 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. AFDB-7 Los Alamos Mooring Overhaul Holy Loch, Scotland,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-26

    55/ 30 CSelf Colored or G-401 S-401 Hot Dip Galvanized CHAIN UtmseLoad Is QUENCHED five times the Safe & TEMPERED Working Load 2-19 Fgr2-CCrosby (S...40000 7 20’ 00 772000 09000 𔄂 90000 125000 60 3% 92 21 12-%. 79v. 2y. 11300 47M0 665000, 6850MQ 959000 95800 1 359M) 7 3 7S 22 73% 82Y, 2%, 100 0000

  14. Los Alamos National Laboratory W76 Pit Tube Lifetime Study

    SciTech Connect

    Abeln, Terri G.

    2012-04-25

    A metallurgical study was requested as part of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) W76-1 life-extension program (LEP) involving a lifetime analysis of type 304 stainless steel pit tubes subject to repeat bending loads during assembly and disassembly operations at BWXT/Pantex. This initial test phase was completed during the calendar years of 2004-2006 and the report not issued until additional recommended tests could be performed. These tests have not been funded to this date and therefore this report is considered final. Tubes were reportedly fabricated according to Rocky Flats specification P14548 - Seamless Type 304 VIM/VAR Stainless Steel Tubing. Tube diameter was specified as 0.125 inches and wall thickness as 0.028 inches. A heat treat condition is not specified and the hardness range specification can be characteristic of both 1/8 and 1/4 hard conditions. Properties of all tubes tested were within specification. Metallographic analysis could not conclusively determine a specified limit to number of bends allowable. A statistical analysis suggests a range of 5-7 bends with a 99.95% confidence limit. See the 'Statistical Analysis' section of this report. The initial phase of this study involved two separate sets of test specimens. The first group was part of an investigation originating in the ESA-GTS [now Gas Transfer Systems (W-7) Group]. After the bend cycle test parameters were chosen (all three required bends subjected to the same amount of bend cycles) and the tubes bent, the investigation was transferred to Terri Abeln (Metallurgical Science and Engineering) for analysis. Subsequently, another limited quantity of tubes became available for testing and were cycled with the same bending fixture, but with different test parameters determined by T. Abeln.

  15. Los Alamos National Laboratory considers the use of biodiesel.

    SciTech Connect

    Matlin, M. K.

    2002-01-01

    A new EPA-approved alternative fuel, called biodiesel, may soon be used at Los Alamos National Laboratory in everything from diesel trucks to laboratory equipment. Biodiesel transforms vegetable oils into a renewable, cleaner energy source that can be used in any machinery that uses diesel fuel. For the past couple years, the Laboratory has been exploring the possibility of switching over to soybean-based biodiesel. This change could lead to many health and environmental benefits, as well as help reduce the nation's dependence on foreign oil. Biodiesel is a clean, renewable diesel fuel substitute made from soybean and other vegetable oil crops, as well as from recycled cooking oils. A chemical process breaks down the vegetable oil into a usable form. Vegetable oil has a chain of about 18 carbons and ordinary diesel has about 12 or 13 carbons. The process breaks the carbon chains of the vegetable oil and separates out the glycerin (a fatty substance used in creams and soaps). The co-product of glycerin can be used by pharmaceutical and cosmetic companies, as well as many other markets. Once the chains are shortened and the glycerin is removed from the oil, the remaining liquid is similar to petroleum diesel fuel. It can be burned in pure form or in a blend of any proportion with petroleum diesel. To be considered an alternative fuel source by the EPA, the blend must be at least 20 percent biodiesel (B20). According to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), biodiesel is America's fastest growing alternative fuel.

  16. ZERT Final Scientific Report Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Pawar, Rajesh J.

    2011-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) activities for the Center for Zero Emission Research and Technology (ZERT) have fallen into three broad research areas: (1) How do you reduce uncertainty in assuring prior to operation that an engineered geologic site will meet a specific performance goal (e.g., <0.01% leak per year)? (2) What are key monitoring needs for verifying that an engineered geologic site is meeting a performance goal? (3) What are potential vulnerabilities for breeches in containment of CO{sub 2}, and how could they be mitigated either prior to operation or in the event that a threshold is exceeded? We have utilized LANL's multi-disciplinary expertise and an integrated approach combining laboratory experiments, field observations and numerical simulations to address various research issues related to above-mentioned areas. While there have been a number of major milestones achieved as described in past quarterly reports, two of the major accomplishments resulting from LANL's efforts include: (1) Development of the CO{sub 2}-PENS systems framework for long-term performance analysis of geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration sites. CO{sub 2}-PENS is first-ever systems analysis tool designed for assessment of CO{sub 2} sequestration sites. (2) One of the few field studies to-date focused on understanding impact of CO{sub 2} leakage on shallow groundwater chemistry. Two major conclusions of the study are as follows: the impact of co-contaminants transported with deeper brine on shallow groundwater quality is likely to be much larger than that of the CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}-induced geochemical reactions and in certain geochemical environment the reactivity of pure CO{sub 2} will not be sufficient to mobilize metals beyond background levels.

  17. 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory Riparian Inventory Results

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, Elizabeth J.; Hansen, Leslie A.; Hathcock, Charles D.; Keller, David C.; Zemlick, Catherine M.

    2012-03-29

    A total length of 36.7 kilometers of riparian habitat were inventoried within LANL boundaries between 2007 and 2011. The following canyons and lengths of riparian habitat were surveyed and inventoried between 2007 and 2011. Water Canyon (9,669 m), Los Alamos Canyon (7,131 m), Pajarito Canyon (6,009 m), Mortandad Canyon (3,110 m), Two-Mile Canyon (2,680 m), Sandia Canyon (2,181 m), Three-Mile Canyon (1,883 m), Canyon de Valle (1,835 m), Ancho Canyon (1,143 m), Canada del Buey (700 m), Sandia Canyon (221 m), DP Canyon (159 m) and Chaquehui Canyon (50 m). Effluent Canyon, Fence Canyon and Potrillo Canyon were surveyed but no areas of riparian habitat were found. Stretches of inventoried riparian habitat were classified for prioritization of treatment, if any was recommended. High priority sites included stretches of Mortandad Canyon, LA Canyon, Pajarito Canyon, Two-Mile Canyon, Sandia Canyon and Water Canyon. Recommended treatment for high priority sites includes placement of objects into the stream channel to encourage sediment deposition, elimination of channel incision, and to expand and slow water flow across the floodplain. Additional stretches were classified as lower priority, and, for other sites it was recommended that feral cattle and exotic plants be removed to aid in riparian habitat recovery. In June 2011 the Las Conchas Wildfire burned over 150,000 acres of land in the Jemez Mountains and surrounding areas. The watersheds above LA Canyon, Water Canyon and Pajarito Canyon were burned in the Las Conchas Wildfire and flooding and habitat alteration were observed in these canyon bottoms (Wright 2011). Post fire status of lower priority areas may change to higher priority for some of the sites surveyed prior to the Las Conchas Wildfire, due to changes in vegetation cover in the adjacent upland watershed.

  18. Initial performance of Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Baca, D.M.; Chan, K.C.D.; Cheairs, R.B.; Fortgang, C.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Johnson, W.J.D.; Holcomb, D.E.; Kinross-Wright, J.; McCann, S.W.; Meier, K.L.; Plato, J.G.; Sheffield, R.L.; Sherwood, B.A.; Sigler, F.E.; Timmer, C.A.; Warren, R.W.; Weber, M.E.; Wilson, W.L.

    1992-09-01

    We report recent results on the high-brightness electron linac and initial performance of the Advanced FEL at Los Alamos. The design and construction of the Advanced FEL beamline are based upon integration of advanced technologies such as high-brightness photoinjector, high-gradient compact linac, and permanent-magnet beamline components. With the use of microwiggler, both permanent magnet and pulsed electromagnet, and compact optical resonator, the Advanced FEL will be the first of its kind small enough to be mounted on an optical table and yet capable of providing highpower optical output spanning the near-ir and visible regions. A schematic of the Advanced FEL is shown in. The source of high-current electron pulses is a laser-gated photoelectron injector which forms-an integral part of a high-gradient 1.2-m long rf linear accelerator. The latter is capable of accelerating electrons up to 20 MeV with room temperature operation and 25 MeV at 77K. The electrons are produced in 10-ps pulses with peak currents as high as 300 A. These electron pulses are transported in a brightness-preserving beamline consisting of permanent magnet dipoles and quadrupoles. The beamline has three 30{degrees} bends. The first bend allows for the photocathode drive laser input; the second allows for the FEL output and the third turns the electron beam into the floor for safety reasons. Additional information on the design physics of the Advanced FEL can be found elsewhere.

  19. Initial performance of Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Baca, D.M.; Chan, K.C.D.; Cheairs, R.B.; Fortgang, C.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Johnson, W.J.D.; Holcomb, D.E.; Kinross-Wright, J.; McCann, S.W.; Meier, K.L.; Plato, J.G.; Sheffield, R.L.; Sherwood, B.A.; Sigler, F.E.; Timmer, C.A.; Warren, R.W.; Weber, M.E.; Wilson, W.L.

    1992-01-01

    We report recent results on the high-brightness electron linac and initial performance of the Advanced FEL at Los Alamos. The design and construction of the Advanced FEL beamline are based upon integration of advanced technologies such as high-brightness photoinjector, high-gradient compact linac, and permanent-magnet beamline components. With the use of microwiggler, both permanent magnet and pulsed electromagnet, and compact optical resonator, the Advanced FEL will be the first of its kind small enough to be mounted on an optical table and yet capable of providing highpower optical output spanning the near-ir and visible regions. A schematic of the Advanced FEL is shown in. The source of high-current electron pulses is a laser-gated photoelectron injector which forms-an integral part of a high-gradient 1.2-m long rf linear accelerator. The latter is capable of accelerating electrons up to 20 MeV with room temperature operation and 25 MeV at 77K. The electrons are produced in 10-ps pulses with peak currents as high as 300 A. These electron pulses are transported in a brightness-preserving beamline consisting of permanent magnet dipoles and quadrupoles. The beamline has three 30{degrees} bends. The first bend allows for the photocathode drive laser input; the second allows for the FEL output and the third turns the electron beam into the floor for safety reasons. Additional information on the design physics of the Advanced FEL can be found elsewhere.

  20. Multimedia contaminant environmental exposure assessment methodology as applied to Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, G.; Thompson, F.L.; Yabusaki, S.B.

    1983-02-01

    The MCEA (Multimedia Contaminant Environmental Exposure Assessment) methodology assesses exposures to air, water, soil, and plants from contaminants released into the environment by simulating dominant mechanisms of contaminant migration and fate. The methodology encompasses five different pathways (i.e., atmospheric, terrestrial, overland, subsurface, and surface water) and combines them into a highly flexible tool. The flexibility of the MCEA methodology is demonstrated by encompassing two of the pathways (i.e., overland and surface water) into an effective tool for simulating the migration and fate of radionuclides released into the Los Alamos, New Mexico region. The study revealed that: (a) the /sup 239/Pu inventory in lower Los Alamos Canyon increased by approximately 1.1 times for the 50-y flood event; (b) the average contaminant /sup 239/Pu concentrations (i.e., weighted according to the depth of the respective bed layer) in lower Los Alamos Canyon for the 50-y flood event decreased by 5.4%; (c) approx. 27% of the total /sup 239/Pu contamination resuspended from the entire bed (based on the assumed cross sections) for the 50-y flood event originated from lower Pueblo Canyon; (d) an increase in the /sup 239/Pu contamination of the bed followed the general deposition patterns experienced by the sediment in Pueblo-lower Los Alamos Canyon; likewise, a decrease in the /sup 239/Pu contamination of the bed followed general sediment resuspension patterns in the canyon; (e) 55% of the /sup 239/Pu reaching the San Ildefonso Pueblo in lower Los Alamos Canyon originated from lower Los Alamos Canyon; and (f) 56% of the /sup 239/Pu contamination reaching the San Ildefonso Pueblo in lower Los Alamos Canyon was carried through towards the Rio Grande. 47 references, 41 figures, 29 tables.

  1. Spent fuel behavior in dry storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, A. B., Jr.; Pankaskie, P. J.; Gilbert, E. R.

    1982-02-01

    Dry storage is emerging as an attractive and timely alternative to complement wet storage, and assist utilities to meet interim storage needs. Spent fuel is handled and stored under dry conditions. Dry storage of irradiated Zircaloy clad fuel in metal casks, drywells, silos and vaults is demonstrated. Hot cell and laboratory studies also are underway to investigate specific phenomena related to cladding behavior in dry storage. A substantial fraction of the LWR spent fuel inventory has aged for relatively long times and has relatively low decay heats. This suggests that much of the fuel inventory can be stored at relatively low temperatures. Alternatively, rod consolidation of the older can be considered without exceeding maximum cladding temperatures.

  2. Dry-heat resistance of selected psychrophiles.

    PubMed

    Winans, L; Pflug, I J; Foster, T L

    1977-08-01

    The dry-heat resistance characteristics of spores of psychrophilic organisms isolated from soil samples from the Viking spacecraft assembly areas at Cape Kennedy Space Flight Center, Cape Canaveral, Fla., were studied. Spore suspensions were produced, and dry-heat D values were determined for the microorganisms that demonstrated growth or survival under a simulated Martian environment. The dry-heat tests were carried out by using the planchet-boat-hot plate system at 110 and 125 degrees C with an ambient relative humidity of 50% at 22 degrees C. The spores evaluated had a relatively low resistance to dry heat. D(110 degrees C) values ranged from 7.5 to 122 min, whereas the D(123 degrees C) values ranged from less than 1.0 to 9.8 min.

  3. Effects of EOS adiabat on hot spot dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Baolian; Kwan, Thomas; Wang, Yi-Ming; Batha, Steven

    2013-10-01

    Equation of state (EOS) and adiabat of the pusher play significant roles in the dynamics and formation of the hot spot of an ignition capsule. For given imploding energy, they uniquely determine the partition of internal energy, mass, and volume between the pusher and the hot spot. In this work, we apply the new scaling laws recently derived by Cheng et al. to the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) ignition capsules and study the impacts of EOS and adiabat of the pusher on the hot spot dynamics by using the EOS adiabat index as an adjustable model parameter. We compare our analysis with the NIC data, specifically, for shots N120321 and N120205, and with the numerical simulations of these shots. The predictions from our theoretical model are in good agreements with the NIC data when a hot adiabat was used for the pusher, and with code simulations when a cold adiabat was used for the pusher. Our analysis indicates that the actual adiabat of the pusher in NIC experiments may well be higher than the adiabat assumed in the simulations. This analysis provides a physical and systematic explanation to the ongoing disagreements between the NIC experimental results and the multi-dimensional numerical simulations. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under contract number W-7405-ENG-36.

  4. Hot techniques for tonsillectomy.

    PubMed

    Scott, A

    2006-11-01

    (1) Some patients experience pain and bleeding after a standard or extracapsular tonsillectomy. (2) Evidence suggests that none of the hot tonsillectomy techniques offers concurrent reductions in intra- and post-operative bleeding and pain, compared with traditional cold-steel dissection with packs or ties. (3) Little information is available on the cost effectiveness of the hot techniques. (4) Diathermy is likely to remain the most commonly practised hot tonsillectomy technique.

  5. Chemical hydrofracturing of the Hot Dry Rock reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, Leonid

    1996-01-24

    The experimental study of the water-rock interaction shows that the secondary mineral assemblage depends on the water composition. For example, granite-pure water interaction produces zeolites (relatively low-dense, Mg-poor minerals), whereas seawater yields chlorites (high-dense, Mg-rich minerals). The reactions have volumetric effects from several % to 20 % in magnitude. Volume deformations in the heterogeneous matrix cause uneven mechanical strains. Reactions with the effect of about 0,1 vol.% may cause strains of the order of 100-1000 bars being enough for destruction of rocks. Signs and magnitudes of local volume changes depend on the mineral composition of the secondary assemblage. Hence, one can provide either healing or cracking of primary fractures, as desired, by changing the composition of water in the water-felsic rock system where some elements (Mg, Fe) are in lack. The techniques of "chemical hydrofracturing" looks promising as applied to a granite HDR massif. One can regulate the permeability of fractured flow paths by changing in concord the composition and pressure of the injected water. This approach should promote efficient extraction of the petrothermal energy.

  6. Retrofitting Air Conditioning and Duct Systems in Hot, Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, C.; Aldrich, R.; Arena, L.

    2012-07-01

    This technical report describes CARB's work with Clark County Community Resources Division in Las Vegas, Nevada, to optimize procedures for upgrading cooling systems on existing homes in the area to implement health, safety, and energy improvements. Detailed monitoring of five AC systems showed that three of the five systems met or exceeded air flow rate goals.

  7. High-Performance Ducts in Hot-Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeschele, Marc; Chitwood, Rick; German, Alea; Weitzel, Elizabeth

    2015-07-30

    Duct thermal losses and air leakage have long been recognized as prime culprits in the degradation of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system efficiency. Both the U.S. Department of Energy’s Zero Energy Ready Home program and California’s proposed 2016 Title 24 Residential Energy Efficiency Standards require that ducts be installed within conditioned space or that other measures be taken to provide similar improvements in delivery effectiveness (DE). Pacific Gas & Electric Company commissioned a study to evaluate ducts in conditioned space and high-performance attics (HPAs) in support of the proposed codes and standards enhancements included in California’s 2016 Title 24 Residential Energy Efficiency Standards. The goal was to work with a select group of builders to design and install high-performance duct (HPD) systems, such as ducts in conditioned space (DCS), in one or more of their homes and to obtain test data to verify the improvement in DE compared to standard practice. Davis Energy Group (DEG) helped select the builders and led a team that provided information about HPD strategies to them. DEG also observed the construction process, completed testing, and collected cost data.

  8. High Performance Walls in Hot-Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeschele, Marc; Springer, David; Dakin, Bill; German, Alea

    2015-01-01

    High performance walls represent a high priority measure for moving the next generation of new homes to the Zero Net Energy performance level. The primary goal in improving wall thermal performance revolves around increasing the wall framing from 2x4 to 2x6, adding more cavity and exterior rigid insulation, achieving insulation installation criteria meeting ENERGY STAR's thermal bypass checklist. To support this activity, in 2013 the Pacific Gas & Electric Company initiated a project with Davis Energy Group (lead for the Building America team, Alliance for Residential Building Innovation) to solicit builder involvement in California to participate in field demonstrations of high performance wall systems. Builders were given incentives and design support in exchange for providing site access for construction observation, cost information, and builder survey feedback. Information from the project was designed to feed into the 2016 Title 24 process, but also to serve as an initial mechanism to engage builders in more high performance construction strategies. This Building America project utilized information collected in the California project.

  9. FY 1996 Summary of Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Power Project

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The report describes progress and status of the HDR project at Hijiori. The year was notable for a flow enhancement test of a system with two production wells in operation. Other items include a geochemical survey, reinterpretation of acoustic emission data from 1988 through 1995, borehole measurements to find intersections with fractures, a geological survey, preparation for modeling fractures, improvements in crack simulation in a reservoir analysis model, and environmental survey work. (DJE 2005)

  10. High Performance Walls in Hot-Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeschele, Marc; Springer, David; Dakin, Bill; German, Alea

    2015-01-01

    High performance walls represent a high priority measure for moving the next generation of new homes to the Zero Net Energy performance level. The primary goal in improving wall thermal performance revolves around increasing the wall framing from 2x4 to 2x6, adding more cavity and exterior rigid insulation, achieving insulation installation criteria meeting ENERGY STAR's thermal bypass checklist, and reducing the amount of wood penetrating the wall cavity.

  11. Revised plans for Hot Dry Rock geothermal program

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Hugh D.

    1987-03-10

    This letter is our response to your February 13 letter directing us to respond to Headquarters' request for new HDR program plans. This request was initiated by John E. Mock, CE-342, HQ. Our response is organized as three attachments.

  12. Heat and Mass Transfer Modeling of Rough Rice Under Convective and Infrared Drying

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infrared drying of rice can reduce drying time, perform disinfestations and reduce rice fissuring compared to traditional hot air drying method. Fissures in the rice kernels are caused by high moisture content gradients within the kernels. To understand the moisture distributions within a rice ker...

  13. Environmental Assessment for Proposed Access Control and Traffic Improvements at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2002-08-23

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has assigned a continuing role to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in carrying out NNSA's national security mission. It is imperative that LANL continue this enduring responsibility and that NNSA adequately safeguard LANL capabilities. NNSA has identified the need to restrict vehicular access to certain areas within LANL for the purpose of permanently enhancing the physical security environment at LANL. It has also identified the need to change certain traffic flow patterns for the purpose of enhancing physical safety at LANL. The Proposed Action would include the construction of eastern and western bypass roads around the LANL Technical Area (TA) 3 area and the installation of vehicle access controls and related improvements to enhance security along Pajarito Road and in the LANL core area. This Proposed Action would modify the current roadway network and traffic patterns. It would also result in traversing Areas of Environmental Interest identified in the LANL Habitat Management Plan, demolition of part of an historic structure at Building 3-40, and traversing several potential release sites and part of the Los Alamos County landfill. The No Action Alternative was also considered. Under this alternative NNSA would not construct the eastern or western bypass roads, any access-control stations, or related improvements. Diamond Drive would continue to serve as the primary conduit for most vehicle traffic within the LANL core area regardless of actual trip destinations. The No Action Alternative does not meet NNSA's purpose and need for action. The proposed bypass road corridors traverse both developed and undeveloped areas. Several potential release sites are present. These would either be sampled and remediated in accordance with New Mexico Environment Department requirements before construction or avoided to allow for future remediation. In some cases, contaminant levels may fall below remediation thresholds

  14. Dry mouth during cancer treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Chemotherapy - dry mouth; Radiation therapy - dry mouth; Transplant - dry mouth; Transplantation - dry mouth ... National Cancer Institute. Chemotherapy and you: support for people with cancer. Updated May 2007. ... ...

  15. RCRA facility investigation for the townsite of Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Dorries, A.M.; Conrad, R.C.; Nonno, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    During World War II, Los Alamos, New Mexico was established as an ideal location for the secrecy and safety needed for the research and development required to design a nuclear fission bomb. Experiments carried out in the 1940s generated both radioactive and hazardous waste constituents on what is presently part of the Los Alamos townsite. Under the RCRA permit issued to Los alamos national Laboratory in 1990, the Laboratory is scheduled for investigation of its solid waste management units (SWMUs). The existing information on levels of radioactivity on the townsite is principally data from soil samples taken during the last site decontamination in 1976, little information on the presence of hazardous constituents exists today. This paper addresses pathway analysis and a preliminary risk assessment for current residents of the Los Alamos townsite. The estimated dose levels, in mrem per year, show that the previously decontaminated SWMU areas on the Los Alamos townsite will not contribute a radiation dose of any concern to the current residents.

  16. Los Alamos contribution to target diagnostics on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, J.M.; Baker, D.A.; Caldwell, S.E.

    1994-07-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will have a large suite of sophisticated target diagnostics. This will allow thoroughly diagnosed experiments to be performed both at the ignition and pre-ignition levels. As part of the national effort Los Alamos National Laboratory will design, construct and implement a number of diagnostics for the NIF. This paper describes Los Alamos contributions to the ``phase I diagnostics.`` Phase I represents the most fundamental and basic measurement systems that will form the core for most work on the NIF. The Los Alamos effort falls into four categories: moderate to hard X-ray (time resolved imaging neutron spectroscopy- primarily with neutron time of flight devices; burn diagnostics utilizing gamma ray measurements; testing measurement concepts on the TRIDENT laser system at Los Alamos. Because of the high blast, debris and radiation environment, the design of high resolution X-ray imaging systems present significant challenges. Systems with close target proximity require special protection and methods for such protection is described. The system design specifications based on expected target performance parameters is also described. Diagnosis of nuclear yield and burn will be crucial to the NIF operation. Nuclear reaction diagnosis utilizing both neutron and gamma ray detection is discussed. The Los Alamos TRIDENT laser system will be used extensively for the development of new measurement concepts and diagnostic instrumentation. Some its potential roles in the development of diagnostics for NIF are given.

  17. Evaluation of Macroinvertebrate Communities and Habitat for Selected Stream Reaches at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    L.J. Henne; K.J. Buckley

    2005-08-12

    This is the second aquatic biological monitoring report generated by Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL's) Water Quality and Hydrology Group. The study has been conducted to generate impact-based assessments of habitat and water quality for LANL waterways. The monitoring program was designed to allow for the detection of spatial and temporal trends in water and habitat quality through ongoing, biannual monitoring of habitat characteristics and benthic aquatic macroinvertebrate communities at six key sites in Los Alamos, Sandia, Water, Pajarito, and Starmer's Gulch Canyons. Data were collected on aquatic habitat characteristics, channel substrate, and macroinvertebrate communities during 2001 and 2002. Aquatic habitat scores were stable between 2001 and 2002 at all locations except Starmer's Gulch and Pajarito Canyon, which had lower scores in 2002 due to low flow conditions. Channel substrate changes were most evident at the upper Los Alamos and Pajarito study reaches. The macroinvertebrate Stream Condition Index (SCI) indicated moderate to severe impairment at upper Los Alamos Canyon, slight to moderate impairment at upper Sandia Canyon, and little or no impairment at lower Sandia Canyon, Starmer's Gulch, and Pajarito Canyon. Habitat, substrate, and macroinvertebrate data from the site in upper Los Alamos Canyon indicated severe impacts from the Cerro Grande Fire of 2000. Impairment in the macroinvertebrate community at upper Sandia Canyon was probably due to effluent-dominated flow at that site. The minimal impairment SCI scores for the lower Sandia site indicated that water quality improved with distance downstream from the outfall at upper Sandia Canyon.

  18. BIOMASS DRYING TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report examines the technologies used for drying of biomass and the energy requirements of biomass dryers. Biomass drying processes, drying methods, and the conventional types of dryers are surveyed generally. Drying methods and dryer studies using superheated steam as the d...

  19. Monitoring Sensitive Bat Species at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenberg, Kari M.

    2014-01-15

    Bats play a critical role in ecosystems and are vulnerable to disturbance and disruption by human activities. In recent decades, bat populations in the United States and elsewhere have decreased tremendously. There are 47 different species of bat in the United States and 28 of these occur in New Mexico with 15 different species documented at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and surrounding areas. Euderma maculatum(the spotted bat) is listed as “threatened” by the state of New Mexico and is known to occur at LANL. Four other species of bats are listed as “sensitive” and also occur here. In 1995, a four year study was initiated at LANL to assess the status of bat species of concern, elucidate distribution and relative abundance, and obtain information on roosting sites. There have been no definitive studies since then. Biologists in the Environmental Protection Division at LANL initiated a multi-year monitoring program for bats in May 2013 to implement the Biological Resources Management Plan. The objective of this ongoing study is to monitor bat species diversity and seasonal activity over time at LANL. Bat species diversity and seasonal activity were measured using an acoustic bat detector, the Pettersson D500X. This ultrasound recording unit is intended for long-term, unattended recording of bat and other high frequency animal calls. During 2013, the detector was deployed at two locations around LANL. Study sites were selected based on proximity to water where bats may be foraging. Recorded bat calls were analyzed using Sonobat, software that can help determine specific species of bat through their calls. A list of bat species at the two sites was developed and compared to lists from previous studies. Species diversity and seasonal activity, measured as the number of call sequences recorded each month, were compared between sites and among months. A total of 17,923 bat calls were recorded representing 15 species. Results indicate that there is a

  20. The Earth's Hot Spots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vink, Gregory E.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Hot spots are isolated areas of geologic activity where volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, and upwelling currents occur far from plate boundaries. These mantle plumes are relatively stable and crustal plates drift over them. The nature and location of hot spots (with particular attention to the Hawaiian Islands and Iceland) are discussed. (DH)