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Sample records for alamos national security

  1. Welcome to Los Alamos National Laboratory: A premier national security science laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Terry

    2012-06-25

    Dr Wallace presents visitors with an overview of LANL's national security science mission: stockpile stewardship, protecting against the nuclear threat, and energy security & emerging threats, which are underpinned by excellence in science/technology/engineering capabilities. He shows visitors a general Lab overview of budget, staff, and facilities before providing a more in-depth look at recent Global Security accomplishments and current programs.

  2. Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammel, Edward F., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Current and post World War II scientific research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (New Mexico) is discussed. The operation of the laboratory, the Los Alamos consultant program, and continuation education, and continuing education activities at the laboratory are also discussed. (JN)

  3. Analysis of physical training of security inspectors at Los Alamos National Laboratory: A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhalter, H.E.; Tietjen, G.L.; Sessions, J.C.; Hook, T.R.

    1989-11-01

    One-half and one-mile runs and 40-yard dash times were analyzed for security inspectors (SIs) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The effectiveness of grip-strength conditioning was also determined. Both males and females met running sprint standards well within the limits established by the Department of Energy, and there were no adverse effects among any age decades or either gender. Reducing training from three to two days per week resulted in a statistically significant decrease in qualification performance. Increase in grip strength was noted in the left hand only when SIs trained two days per week for nine weeks. Further analysis should determine the appropriate training frequency for this population. These results suggest that no significant improvement is derived from aerobic training occurring less than three days per week. 7 refs., 19 figs.

  4. Los Alamos National Security, LLC Request for Information from industrial entities that desire to commercialize Laboratory-developed Extremely Low Resource Optical Identifier (ELROI) tech

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Michael Charles

    2015-11-10

    Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) is the manager and operator of the Los Alamos National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. LANS is a mission-centric Federally Funded Research and Development Center focused on solving the most critical national security challenges through science and engineering for both government and private customers.

  5. Timely integration of safeguards and security with projects at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.; Blount, P. M.; Garcia, S. W.; Gonzales, R. L.; Salazar, J. B.; Campbell, C. H.

    2004-01-01

    The Safeguards and Security (S&S) Requirements Integration Team at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has developed and implemented an innovative management process that will be described in detail. This process systematically integrates S&S planning into construction, facility modifications or upgrades, mission changes, and operational projects. It extends and expands the opportunities provided by the DOE project management manual, DOE M 413.3-1. Through a series of LANL documents, a process is defined and implemented that formally identifies an S&S professional to oversee, coordinate, facilitate, and communicate among the identified S&S organizations and the project organizations over the life cycle of the project. The derived benefits, namely (1) elimination/reduction of re-work or costly retrofitting, (2) overall project cost savings because of timely and improved planning, (3) formal documentation, and (4) support of Integrated Safeguards and Security Management at LANL, will be discussed. How many times, during the construction of a new facility or the modification of an existing facility, have the persons responsible for the project waited until the last possible minute or until after construction is completed to approach the security organizations for their help in safeguarding and securing the facility? It's almost like, 'Oh, by the way, do we need access control and a fence around this building and just what are we going to do with our classified anyway?' Not only is it usually difficult; it's also typically expensive to retrofit or plan for safeguards and security after the fact. Safeguards and security organizations are often blamed for budget overruns and delays in facility occupancy and program startup, but these problems are usually due to poor front-end planning. In an effort to help projects engage safeguards and security in the pre-conceptual or conceptual stages, we implemented a high level formality of operations. We established institutional

  6. Measurements at Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility in Support of Global Security Mission Space

    SciTech Connect

    Stange, Sy; Mayo, Douglas R.; Herrera, Gary D.; McLaughlin, Anastasia D.; Montoya, Charles M.; Quihuis, Becky A.; Trujillo, Julio B.; Van Pelt, Craig E.; Wenz, Tracy R.

    2012-07-13

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility at Technical Area (TA) 55 is one of a few nuclear facilities in the United States where Research & Development measurements can be performed on Safeguards Category-I (CAT-I) quantities of nuclear material. This capability allows us to incorporate measurements of CAT-IV through CAT-I materials as a component of detector characterization campaigns and training courses conducted at Los Alamos. A wider range of measurements can be supported. We will present an overview of recent measurements conducted in support of nuclear emergency response, nuclear counterterrorism, and international and domestic safeguards. This work was supported by the NNSA Office of Counterterrorism.

  7. Internship at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, Ryan Q.

    2012-07-11

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is located in Los Alamos, New Mexico. It provides support for our country's nuclear weapon stockpile as well as many other scientific research projects. I am an Undergraduate Student Intern in the Systems Design and Analysis group within the Nuclear Nonproliferation division of the Global Security directorate at LANL. I have been tasked with data analysis and modeling of particles in a fluidized bed system for the capture of carbon dioxide from power plant flue gas.

  8. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dogliani, Harold O

    2011-01-19

    The purpose of the briefing is to describe general laboratory technical capabilities to be used for various groups such as military cadets or university faculty/students and post docs to recruit into a variety of Los Alamos programs. Discussed are: (1) development and application of high leverage science to enable effeictive, predictable and reliability outcomes; (2) deter, detect, characterize, reverse and prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their use by adversaries and terrorists; (3) modeling and simulation to define complex processes, predict outcomes, and develop effective prevention, response, and remediation strategies; (4) energetic materials and hydrodynamic testing to develop materials for precise delivery of focused energy; (5) materials cience focused on fundamental understanding of materials behaviors, their quantum-molecular properties, and their dynamic responses, and (6) bio-science to rapidly detect and characterize pathogens, to develop vaccines and prophylactic remedies, and to develop attribution forensics.

  9. Los Alamos National Laboratory Facilities, Security and Safeguards Division, Safeguards and Security Program Office, Protective Force Oversight Program

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-30

    The purpose of this document is to identify and describe the duties and responsibilities of Facility Security and Safeguards (FSS) Safeguards and Security (SS) organizations (groups/offices) with oversight functions over the Protection Force (PF) subcontractor. Responsible organizations will continue their present PF oversight functions under the Cost Plus Award Fee (CPAF) assessment, but now will be required to also coordinate, integrate, and interface with other FSS S and S organizations and with the PF subcontractor to measure performance, assess Department of Energy (DOE) compliance, reduce costs, and minimize duplication of effort. The role of the PF subcontractor is to provide the Laboratory with effective and efficient protective force services. PF services include providing protection for the special nuclear material, government property and classified or sensitive information developed and/or consigned to the Laboratory, as well as protection for personnel who work or participate in laboratory activities. FSS S and S oversight of both performance and compliance standards/metrics is essential for these PF objectives to be met.

  10. Environmental Programs at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Patricia

    2012-07-11

    Summary of this project is: (1) Teamwork, partnering to meet goals - (a) Building on cleanup successes, (b) Solving legacy waste problems, (c) Protecting the area's environment; (2) Strong performance over the past three years - (a) Credibility from four successful Recovery Act Projects, (b) Met all Consent Order milestones, (c) Successful ramp-up of TRU program; (3) Partnership between the National Nuclear Security Administration's Los Alamos Site Office, DOE Carlsbad Field Office, New Mexico Environment Department, and contractor staff enables unprecedented cleanup progress; (4) Continued focus on protecting water resources; and (5) All consent order commitments delivered on time or ahead of schedule.

  11. Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Escobedo, G.M.; Hargis, K.M.; Douglass, C.R.

    2007-07-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) waste management program is responsible for disposition of waste generated by many of the LANL programs and operations. LANL generates liquid and solid waste that can include radioactive, hazardous, and other constituents. Where practical, LANL hazardous and mixed wastes are disposed through commercial vendors; low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and radioactive asbestos-contaminated waste are disposed on site at LANL's Area G disposal cells, transuranic (TRU) waste is disposed at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), and high-activity mixed wastes are disposed at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) after treatment by commercial vendors. An on-site radioactive liquid waste treatment facility (RLWTF) removes the radioactive constituents from liquid wastes and treated water is released through an NPDES permitted outfall. LANL has a very successful waste minimization program. Routine hazardous waste generation has been reduced over 90% since 1993. LANL has a DOE Order 450.1-compliant environmental management system (EMS) that is ISO 14001 certified; waste minimization is integral to setting annual EMS improvement objectives. Looking forward, under the new LANL management and operating contractor, Los Alamos National Security (LANS) LLC, a Zero Liquid Discharge initiative is being planned that should eliminate flow to the RLWTF NPDES-permitted outfall. The new contractor is also taking action to reduce the number of permitted waste storage areas, to charge generating programs directly for the cost to disposition waste, and to simplify/streamline the waste system. (authors)

  12. Saving Water at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    ScienceCinema

    Erickson, Andy

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory decreased its water usage by 26 percent in 2014, with about one-third of the reduction attributable to using reclaimed water to cool a supercomputing center. The Laboratory's goal during 2014 was to use only re-purposed water to support the mission at the Strategic Computing Complex. Using reclaimed water from the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility, or SERF, substantially decreased water usage and supported the overall mission. SERF collects industrial wastewater and treats it for reuse. The reclamation facility contributed more than 27 million gallons of re-purposed water to the Laboratory's computing center, a secured supercomputing facility that supports the Laboratory’s national security mission and is one of the institution’s larger water users. In addition to the strategic water reuse program at SERF, the Laboratory reduced water use in 2014 by focusing conservation efforts on areas that use the most water, upgrading to water-conserving fixtures, and repairing leaks identified in a biennial survey.

  13. Saving Water at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Andy

    2015-03-16

    Los Alamos National Laboratory decreased its water usage by 26 percent in 2014, with about one-third of the reduction attributable to using reclaimed water to cool a supercomputing center. The Laboratory's goal during 2014 was to use only re-purposed water to support the mission at the Strategic Computing Complex. Using reclaimed water from the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility, or SERF, substantially decreased water usage and supported the overall mission. SERF collects industrial wastewater and treats it for reuse. The reclamation facility contributed more than 27 million gallons of re-purposed water to the Laboratory's computing center, a secured supercomputing facility that supports the Laboratory’s national security mission and is one of the institution’s larger water users. In addition to the strategic water reuse program at SERF, the Laboratory reduced water use in 2014 by focusing conservation efforts on areas that use the most water, upgrading to water-conserving fixtures, and repairing leaks identified in a biennial survey.

  14. Los Alamos National Laboratory: 21st century solutions to urgent national challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Mcbranch, Duncan

    2008-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has been called upon to meet urgent national challenges for more than 65 years. The people, tools, and technologies at Los Alamos are a world class resource that has proved decisive through our history, and are needed in the future. We offer expertise in nearly every science, technology, and engineering discipline, a unique integrated capability for large-scale computing and experimentation, and the proven ability to deliver solutions involving the most complex and difficult technical systems. This white paper outlines some emerging challenges and why the nation needs Los Alamos, the premier National Security Science Laboratory, to meet these challenges.

  15. Los Alamos National Security, LLC Request for Interest (RFI) for Investment Mentors to participate in the Laboratory’s Entrepreneurial Postdoctoral Pilot.

    SciTech Connect

    Clow, Shandra Deann

    2016-12-15

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is committed to understanding how the role of venture funding, new investment mechanisms, and fostering the development of a culture of entrepreneurship may enhance the Laboratory and bring strength and creativity to its people. LANL, in partnership with the University of California (UC), has created the Entrepreneurial Postdoctoral Fellowship Pilot (Pilot) to provide an immersion-based learning opportunity to post-doctoral researchers to develop and practice skills in entrepreneurship and comercialization.

  16. Nuclear Forensics at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Podlesak, David W; Steiner, Robert E.; Burns, Carol J.; LaMont, Stephen P.; Tandon, Lav

    2012-08-09

    The overview of this presentation is: (1) Introduction to nonproliferation efforts; (2) Scope of activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (3) Facilities for radioanalytical work at LANL; (4) Radiochemical characterization capabilities; and (5) Bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities. Some conclusions are: (1) Analytical chemistry measurements on plutonium and uranium matrices are critical to numerous defense and non-defense programs including safeguards accountancy verification measurements; (2) Los Alamos National Laboratory operates capable actinide analytical chemistry and material science laboratories suitable for nuclear material forensic characterization; (3) Actinide analytical chemistry uses numerous means to validate and independently verify that measurement data quality objectives are met; and (4) Numerous LANL nuclear facilities support the nuclear material handling, preparation, and analysis capabilities necessary to evaluate samples containing nearly any mass of an actinide (attogram to kilogram levels).

  17. The engineering institute of Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, Charles R; Park, Gyuhae; Cornwell, Phillip J; Todd, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) have taken the unprecedented step of creating a collaborative, multi-disciplinary graduate education program and associated research agenda called the Engineering Institute. The mission of the Engineering Institute is to develop a comprehensive approach for conducting LANL mission-driven, multidisciplinary engineering research and to improve recruiting, revitalization, and retention of the current and future staff necessary to support the LANL' s national security responsibilities. The components of the Engineering Institute are (1) a joint LANL/UCSD degree program, (2) joint LANL/UCSD research projects, (3) the Los Alamos Dynamic Summer School, (4) an annual workshop, and (5) industry short courses. This program is a possible model for future industry/government interactions with university partners.

  18. Los Alamos National Laboratory Building Cost Index

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, H.D.; Lemon, G.D.

    1983-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Building Cost Index indicates that actual escalation since 1970 is near 10% per year. Therefore, the Laboratory will continue using a 10% per year escalation rate for construction estimates through 1985 and a slightly lower rate of 8% per year from 1986 through 1990. The computerized program compares the different elements involved in the cost of a typical construction project, which for our purposes, is a complex of office buildings and experimental laboratores. The input data used in the program consist primarily of labor costs and material and equipment costs. The labor costs are the contractural rates of the crafts workers in the Los Alamos area. For the analysis, 12 field-labor draft categories are used; each is weighted corresponding to the labor craft distribution associated with the typical construction project. The materials costs are current Los Alamos prices. Additional information sources include material and equipment quotes obtained through conversations with vendors and from trade publications. The material and equipment items separate into 17 categories for the analysis and are weighted corresponding to the material and equipment distribution associated with the typical construction project. The building cost index is compared to other national building cost indexes.

  19. Los Alamos National Laboratory building cost index

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, H.D.; Lemon, G.D.

    1982-10-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Building Cost Index indicates that actual escalation since 1970 is near 10% per year. Therefore, the Laboratory will continue using a 10% per year escalation rate for construction estimates through 1985 and a slightly lower rate of 8% per year from 1986 through 1990. The computerized program compares the different elements involved in the cost of a typical construction project, which for our purposes, is a complex of office buildings and experimental laboratories. The input data used in the program consist primarily of labor costs and material and equipment costs. The labor costs are the contractual rates of the crafts workers in the Los Alamos area. For the analysis, 12 field-labor craft categories are used; each is weighted corresponding to the labor craft distribution associated with the typical construction project. The materials costs are current Los Alamos prices. Additional information sources include material and equipment quotes obtained through conversations with vendors and from trade publications. The material and equipment items separate into 17 categories for the analysis and are weighted corresponding to the material and equipment distribution associated with the typical construction project. The building cost index is compared to other national building cost indexes.

  20. Bradbury science museum: your window to Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Deck, Linda Theresa

    2009-03-05

    The Bradbury Science Museum is the public's window to Los Alamos National Laboratory and supports the Community Program Office's mission to develop community support to accomplish LANL's national security and science mission. It does this by stimulating interest in and increasing basic knowledge of science and technology in northern New Mexico audiences, and increasing public understanding and appreciation of how LANL science and technology solve our global problems. In performing these prime functions, the Museum also preserves the history of scientific accomplishment at the Lab by collecting and preserving artifacts of scientific and historical importance.

  1. Risk management at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, D.G.; Stack, D.W.

    1993-11-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has risk management programs at a number of administrative levels. Each line organization has responsibility for risk management for routine operations. The Facility Risk Management group (HS-3) is the Los Alamos organization with the primary responsibility for risk management including providing input and expertise to facilities and line managers in the management and documentation of ES&H hazards and risks associated with existing and new activities. One of the major contributions this group has made to laboratory risk management program is to develop and implement a hazard identification and classification methodology that is readily adaptable to continuously changing classification guidelines such as DOE-STD-1027. The increased emphasis on safety at Los Alamos has led to the formation of additional safety oversight organization such as the Integration and Coordination Office (ICO), which is responsible for prioritization of risk management activities. In the fall of 1991, nearly 170 DOE inspectors spent 6 weeks analyzing the environmental, safety, and health activities at Los Alamos. The result of this audit was a list of over 1000 findings, each indicating some deficiency in current Laboratory operations relative to DOE and other government regulation. The audit team`s findings were consolidated and ``action plans`` were developed to address the findings. This resulted in over 200 action plans with a total estimated cost of almost $1 billion. The Laboratory adopted a risk-based prioritization process to attempt to achieve as much risk reduction as possible with the available resources. This paper describes the risk based prioritization model that was developed.

  2. Penetrating radiation: applications at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Scott; Hunter, James; Morris, Christopher

    2013-09-01

    Los Alamos has used penetrating radiography extensively throughout its history dating back to the Manhattan Project where imaging dense, imploding objects was the subject of intense interest. This interest continues today as major facilities like DARHT1 have become the mainstay of the US Stockpile Stewardship Program2 and the cornerstone of nuclear weapons certification. Meanwhile, emerging threats to national security from cargo containers and improvised explosive devices (IEDs) have invigorated inspection efforts using muon tomography, and compact x-ray radiography. Additionally, unusual environmental threats, like those from underwater oil spills and nuclear power plant accidents, have caused renewed interest in fielding radiography in severe operating conditions. We review the history of penetrating radiography at Los Alamos and survey technologies as presently applied to these important problems.

  3. Los Alamos National Laboratory computer benchmarking 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.L.

    1983-06-01

    Evaluating the performance of computing machinery is a continual effort of the Computer Research and Applications Group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This report summarizes the results of the group's benchmarking activities performed between October 1981 and September 1982, presenting compilation and execution times as well as megaflop rates for a set of benchmark codes. Tests were performed on the following computers: Cray Research, Inc. (CRI) Cray-1S; Control Data Corporation (CDC) 7600, 6600, Cyber 73, Cyber 825, Cyber 835, Cyber 855, and Cyber 205; Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) VAX 11/780 and VAX 11/782; and Apollo Computer, Inc., Apollo.

  4. Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The purpose of the safety and health assessment was to determine the effectiveness of representative safety and health programs at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Within the safety and health programs at LANL, performance was assessed in the following technical areas: Organization and Administration, Quality Verification, Operations, Maintenance, Training and Certification, Auxiliary Systems, Emergency Preparedness, Technical Support, Packaging and Transportation, Nuclear Criticality Safety, Security/Safety Interface, Experimental Activities, Site/Facility Safety Review, Radiological Protection, Personnel Protection, Worker Safety and Health (OSHA) Compliance, Fire Protection, Aviation Safety, Explosives Safety, Natural Phenomena, and Medical Services.

  5. Los Alamos National Laboratory transuranic database analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, D.V.; Rogers, P.S.Z.; Kosiewicz, S.T.; LeBrun, D.B.

    1997-02-01

    This paper represents an overview of analyses conducted on the TRU database maintained by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This evaluation was conducted to support the ``TRU Waste Workoff Strategies`` document and provides an estimation of the waste volume that potentially could be certified and ready for shipment to (WIPP) in April of 1998. Criteria defined in the WIPP WAC, including container type, weight limits, plutonium fissile gram equivalents and decay heat, were used to evaluated the waste for compliance. LANL evaluated the containers by facility and by waste stream to determining the most efficient plan for characterization and certification of the waste. Evaluation of the waste presently in storage suggested that 40- 60% potentially meets the WIPP WAC Rev. 5 criteria.

  6. Audit Report, "Fire Protection Deficiencies at Los Alamos National Laboratory"

    SciTech Connect

    2009-06-01

    The Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) maintains some of the Nation's most important national security assets, including nuclear materials. Many of Los Alamos' facilities are located in close proximity to one another, are occupied by large numbers of contract and Federal employees, and support activities ranging from nuclear weapons design to science-related activities. Safeguarding against fires, regardless of origin, is essential to protecting employees, surrounding communities, and national security assets. On June 1, 2006, Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS), became the managing and operating contractor for Los Alamos, under contract with the Department's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). In preparation for assuming its management responsibilities at Los Alamos, LANS conducted walk-downs of the Laboratory's facilities to identify pre-existing deficiencies that could give rise to liability, obligation, loss or damage. The walk-downs, which identified 812 pre-existing fire protection deficiencies, were conducted by subject matter professionals, including fire protection experts. While the Los Alamos Site Office has overall responsibility for the effectiveness of the fire protection program, LANS, as the Laboratory's operating contractor, has a major, day-to-day role in minimizing fire-related risks. The issue of fire protection at Los Alamos is more than theoretical. In May 2000, the 'Cerro Grande' fire burned about 43,000 acres, including 7,700 acres of Laboratory property. Due to the risk posed by fire to the Laboratory's facilities, workforce, and surrounding communities, we initiated this audit to determine whether pre-existing fire protection deficiencies had been addressed. Our review disclosed that LANS had not resolved many of the fire protection deficiencies that had been identified in early 2006: (1) Of the 296 pre-existing deficiencies we selected for audit, 174 (59 percent) had not been corrected

  7. Los Alamos National Laboratory A National Science Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, Mark B.

    2012-07-20

    Our mission as a DOE national security science laboratory is to develop and apply science, technology, and engineering solutions that: (1) Ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the US nuclear deterrent; (2) Protect against the nuclear threat; and (3) Solve Energy Security and other emerging national security challenges.

  8. Los Alamos National Laboratory 1995 self assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-30

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Safeguards and Security (S and S) Assurance Program (AP) is designed to ensure the adequacy and effectiveness of the LANL S and S program. The Assurance Program provides a mechanism for discovering deficiencies, determining causes, conducting risk assessments, implementing corrective actions, and documenting the assessment process. Selection of organizations for self assessments is based on the criteria established in the LANL S and S Assurance Program. For FY 1995, 12 organizations were selected for self assessments, these organizations are identified fin the schedule at Appendix A. The S and S topical areas selected for review in each organization varied depending on their security interests and included: Program Planning and Management (PPM); Protection Program Operations (PPO); Material Control and Accountability (MC and A); Computer and Communications Security (COMPSEC and COMSEC); Information Security (INFOSEC); Personnel Security (PERSEC); and Operational Security (OPSEC). The objective was to ascertain the effectiveness of S and S programs in each organization, its formality of operations, and its integration with the overall Laboratory S and S program. The goal was to meet both the DOE self-assessment requirements and the UC performance criteria and document the results.

  9. 77 FR 3257 - Transfer of Land Tracts Located at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ... Doc No: 2012-1208] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Transfer of Land Tracts Located at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico AGENCY: National Nuclear Security Administration, U.S. Department of Energy. ACTION... for the Conveyance and Transfer of Certain Land Tracts Administered by the Department of Energy...

  10. Los Alamos National Laboratory capability reviews - FY 2011 status

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, Everett P

    2011-01-12

    Capability reviews are the Los Alamos National Laboratory approach to assess the quality of its science, technology, and engineering (STE), and its integration across the Laboratory. There are seven capability reviews in FY 2011 reviews. The Weapons Science and Engineering review will be replaced by the National Nuclear Security Administration's Predictive Science Panel for 2011 . Beginning in 2011, third-year LORD projects will be reviewed by capability review committees rather than the first-year LORD projects that have been performed for the last three years. This change addresses concerns from committees about reviewing a project before it had made any substantive progress. The current schedule, and chairs for the 2011 capability reviews is presented. The three-year cycle (2011-2013) for capability reviews are presented for planning purposes.

  11. 2013 Los Alamos National Laboratory Hazardous Waste Minimization Report

    SciTech Connect

    Salzman, Sonja L.; English, Charles J.

    2015-08-24

    Waste minimization and pollution prevention are inherent goals within the operating procedures of Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS). The US Department of Energy (DOE) and LANS are required to submit an annual hazardous waste minimization report to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) in accordance with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit. The report was prepared pursuant to the requirements of Section 2.9 of the LANL Hazardous Waste Facility Permit. This report describes the hazardous waste minimization program (a component of the overall Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention [WMin/PP] Program) administered by the Environmental Stewardship Group (ENV-ES). This report also supports the waste minimization and pollution prevention goals of the Environmental Programs Directorate (EP) organizations that are responsible for implementing remediation activities and describes its programs to incorporate waste reduction practices into remediation activities and procedures. LANS was very successful in fiscal year (FY) 2013 (October 1-September 30) in WMin/PP efforts. Staff funded four projects specifically related to reduction of waste with hazardous constituents, and LANS won four national awards for pollution prevention efforts from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). In FY13, there was no hazardous, mixedtransuranic (MTRU), or mixed low-level (MLLW) remediation waste generated at the Laboratory. More hazardous waste, MTRU waste, and MLLW was generated in FY13 than in FY12, and the majority of the increase was related to MTRU processing or lab cleanouts. These accomplishments and analysis of the waste streams are discussed in much more detail within this report.

  12. DOE Los Alamos National Laboratory – PV Feasibility Assessment, 2015 Update, NREL Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, Jesse; Witt, Monica Rene

    2016-04-06

    This report summarizes solar and wind potential for Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This report is part of the “Los Alamos National Laboratory and Los Alamos County Renewable Generation” study.

  13. 2016 Los Alamos National Laboratory Hazardous Waste Minimization Report

    SciTech Connect

    Salzman, Sonja L.; English, Charles Joe

    2016-12-02

    Waste minimization and pollution prevention are goals within the operating procedures of Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS). The US Department of Energy (DOE), inclusive of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Office of Environmental Management, and LANS are required to submit an annual hazardous waste minimization report to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) in accordance with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit. The report was prepared pursuant to the requirements of Section 2.9 of the LANL Hazardous Waste Facility Permit. This report describes the hazardous waste minimization program, which is a component of the overall Pollution Prevention (P2) Program, administered by the Environmental Stewardship Group (EPC-ES). This report also supports the waste minimization and P2 goals of the Associate Directorate of Environmental Management (ADEM) organizations that are responsible for implementing remediation activities and describes its programs to incorporate waste reduction practices into remediation activities and procedures. This report includes data for all waste shipped offsite from LANL during fiscal year (FY) 2016 (October 1, 2015 – September 30, 2016). LANS was active during FY2016 in waste minimization and P2 efforts. Multiple projects were funded that specifically related to reduction of hazardous waste. In FY2016, there was no hazardous, mixed-transuranic (MTRU), or mixed low-level (MLLW) remediation waste shipped offsite from the Laboratory. More non-remediation hazardous waste and MLLW was shipped offsite from the Laboratory in FY2016 compared to FY2015. Non-remediation MTRU waste was not shipped offsite during FY2016. These accomplishments and analysis of the waste streams are discussed in much more detail within this report.

  14. Los Alamos National Laboratory Prepares for Fire Season

    SciTech Connect

    L’Esperance, Manny

    2016-07-18

    Through the establishment of a Wildland Fire Program Office, and the Interagency Fire Base located on Laboratory property, Los Alamos National Laboratory is continuing and improving a program to prepare for wildland fire.

  15. Los Alamos National Laboratory Prepares for Fire Season

    ScienceCinema

    L’Esperance, Manny

    2016-08-10

    Through the establishment of a Wildland Fire Program Office, and the Interagency Fire Base located on Laboratory property, Los Alamos National Laboratory is continuing and improving a program to prepare for wildland fire.

  16. Audit of personal property management at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-07

    The Department of Energy`s (Department) Albuquerque Operations Office (Albuquerque) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) are responsible for ensuring that Los Alamos maintains an efficient and effective personal property management system that protects, identifies, and controls Government-owned personal property in accordance with applicable regulations. Albuquerque is responsible for reviewing and approving Los Alamos` personal property management system. Los Alamos is responsible for ensuring that personal property is properly protected, identified, and controlled. The audit disclosed that Los Alamos did not have an efficient and effective personal property management system to ensure that personal property was adequately protected, identified, and controlled. In addition, Albuquerque did not approve or disapprove Los Alamos` personal property management system consistent with Federal and Department regulations. Specifically, the audit showed that Los Alamos did not account for $11.6 million of personal property. In addition, $22.2 million of personal property was not properly recorded in the database, $61.7 million of personal property could not be inventoried, and loans to employees and other entities were not adequately justified. As a result, from a total personal property inventory of approximately $1 billion, it is estimated that $100 million of personal property may not be accounted for, and $207 million may not be correctly recorded in the database. Moreover, substantial amounts of personal property on loan to employees and other entities were at risk of unauthorized use. Albuquerque concurred with the finding and agreed to implement the corrective actions recommended in the report.

  17. Biological assessment for the effluent reduction program, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, S.P.

    1996-08-01

    This report describes the biological assessment for the effluent recution program proposed to occur within the boundaries of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Potential effects on wetland plants and on threatened and endangered species are discussed, along with a detailed description of the individual outfalls resulting from the effluent reduction program.

  18. National security

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This paper summarizes the views presented on October 31, 1991, at a GAO-sponsored conference on worldwide threats to U.S. national security. The conference was designed to provide insight into potential military threats to U.S. security interests and necessary modifications to current and planned U.S. forces to meet those threats. Conference participants, including defense analysts and retired military officers, discussed and analyzed the possibility of U.S. and allied involvement in various regional contingencies in Europe and the Soviet Union, Eat Asia and the Pacific, and the Near East and South Asia. Topics ranged from the possibility of nuclear war to a general discussion of low-intensity conflict. To serve as a starting point for discussion, we asked several of the participants to provide papers representing a wide range of views. The participants agreed that for many years the Soviet/Warsaw Pact threat to Europe shaped U.S. force planning but that the Soviet union no longer posed a conventional threat. Nuclear weapons held by the former Soviet republics and other nations, however, remain a concern. There was no agreement of the methodology for sizing U.S. forces. Some argued for sizing based on specific threats; other argued for flexibility to meet any and all contingencies and cited the Gulf War as a example.

  19. Strategic defense initiatives at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Rockwood, S.D.

    1985-01-01

    This presentation reviews the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) programs at Los Alamos National Laboratory, noting especially the needs for and applications of optics and optical technologies. Table I lists the various activities at Los Alamos contributing to SDI programs. The principal, nonnuclear SDI programs are: (1) the free-electron laser, and (2) neutral particle beams. Both should be considered as potential long-range-kill systems, but still in the futuristic category.

  20. Enabling completion of the material disposition area G closure at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenhorn, James Allen; Bishop, Milton L

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) and the Los Alamos Site Office (LASO) have developed and are implementing an integrated strategy to accelerate the disposition of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) legacy transuranic waste inventory currently stored in Technical Area 54, Material Disposition Area (MDA) G. As that strategy has been implemented the easier waste streams have been certified and shipped leaving the harder more challenging wastes to be dispositioned. Lessons learned from around the complex and a partnership with the National Transuranic Program located in Carlsbad, New Mexico, are enabling this acceleration. The Waste Disposition Program is responsible for the removal of both the above ground and below grade, retrievably stored transuranic waste in time to support the negotiated consent order with the State of New Mexico which requires closure of MDA G by the year 2015. The solutions and strategy employed at LANL are applicable to any organization that is currently managing legacy transuranic waste.

  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory Facility Review

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ronald Owen

    2015-06-05

    This series of slides depicts the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The Center's 800-MeV linac produces H+ and H- beams as well as beams of moderated (cold to 1 MeV) and unmoderated (0.1 to 600 MeV) neutrons. Experimental facilities and their capabilities and characteristics are outlined. Among these are LENZ, SPIDER, and DANCE.

  2. Los Alamos National Laboratory strategic directions

    SciTech Connect

    Hecker, S.

    1995-10-01

    It is my pleasure to welcome you to Los Alamos. I like the idea of bringing together all aspects of the research community-defense, basic science, and industrial. It is particularly important in today`s times of constrained budgets and in fields such as neutron research because I am convinced that the best science and the best applications will come from their interplay. If we do the science well, then we will do good applications. Keeping our eye focused on interesting applications will spawn new areas of science. This interplay is especially critical, and it is good to have these communities represented here today.

  3. Integrating Safety with Science,Technology and Innovation at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, Bethany M

    2012-04-02

    The mission of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is to develop and apply science, technology and engineering solutions to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve emerging national security challenges. The most important responsibility is to direct and conduct efforts to meet the mission with an emphasis on safety, security, and quality. In this article, LANL Environmental, Safety, and Health (ESH) trainers discuss how their application and use of a kinetic learning module (learn by doing) with a unique fall arrest system is helping to address one the most common industrial safety challenges: slips and falls. A unique integration of Human Performance Improvement (HPI), Behavior Based Safety (BBS) and elements of the Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) combined with an interactive simulator experience is being used to address slip and fall events at Los Alamos.

  4. Audit of consultant agreements at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-23

    The Department of Energy`s (Department) Albuquerque Operations Office (Albuquerque) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) are responsible for acquiring consulting services in a manner most advantageous to the Government by ensuring adequate competition. Although the Department prefers competitively awarding subcontracts, including consultant agreements, to ensure the lowest possible cost, it allows sole sourcing a subcontract if the sole source is fully justified. The objective of the audit was to determine whether Los Alamos` consultant agreements contained adequate sole source justifications. The audit showed that Los Alamos may not have acquired some of its consultant agreements at the lowest possible cost because it did not prepare adequate sole source justifications for 17 sole source consultant agreements valued at $842,900. This condition existed because: (1) requesters did not follow policies and procedures when preparing sole source justifications, (2) Los Alamos did not have an internal mechanism to reject consultant agreements that were not adequately justified, and (3) the Department did not review consultant agreements to evaluate the adequacy of sole source justifications. Without adequate justifications, the Department cannot be assured that consultant services were obtained at the lowest possible cost. We therefore recommended that the Manager, Albuquerque Operations Office require Los Alamos to ensure proper sole source justifications and enhance internal controls over consultant agreements. Management agreed to implement the recommendations.

  5. Los Alamos Shows Airport Security Technology at Work

    ScienceCinema

    Espy, Michelle; Schultz, Larry; Hunter, James

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos scientists have advanced a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technology that may provide a breakthrough for screening liquids at airport security. They've added low-power X-ray data to the mix, and as a result have unlocked a new detection technology. Funded in part by the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate, the new system is named MagRay. The goal is to quickly and accurately distinguish between liquids that visually appear identical. For example, what appears to be a bottle of white wine could potentially be nitromethane, a liquid that could be used to make an explosive. Both are clear liquids, one would be perfectly safe on a commercial aircraft, the other would be strictly prohibited. How to tell them apart quickly without error at an airport security area is the focus of Michelle Espy, Larry Schultz and their team. In this video, Espy and the MagRay team explain how the new technology works, how they've developed an easy operator interface, and what the next steps might be in transitioning this technology to the private sector.

  6. Los Alamos Shows Airport Security Technology at Work

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle; Schultz, Larry; Hunter, James

    2013-11-25

    Los Alamos scientists have advanced a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technology that may provide a breakthrough for screening liquids at airport security. They've added low-power X-ray data to the mix, and as a result have unlocked a new detection technology. Funded in part by the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate, the new system is named MagRay. The goal is to quickly and accurately distinguish between liquids that visually appear identical. For example, what appears to be a bottle of white wine could potentially be nitromethane, a liquid that could be used to make an explosive. Both are clear liquids, one would be perfectly safe on a commercial aircraft, the other would be strictly prohibited. How to tell them apart quickly without error at an airport security area is the focus of Michelle Espy, Larry Schultz and their team. In this video, Espy and the MagRay team explain how the new technology works, how they've developed an easy operator interface, and what the next steps might be in transitioning this technology to the private sector.

  7. A survey of macromycete diversity at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Bandelier National Monument, and Los Alamos County; A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Jarmie, N.; Rogers, F.J.

    1997-11-01

    The authors have completed a 5-year survey (1991--1995) of macromycetes found in Los Alamos County, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Bandelier National Monument. The authors have compiled a database of 1,048 collections, their characteristics, and identifications. The database represents 123 (98%) genera and 175 (73%) species reliably identified. Issues of habitat loss, species extinction, and ecological relationships are addressed, and comparisons with other surveys are made. With this baseline information and modeling of this baseline data, one can begin to understand more about the fungal flora of the area.

  8. Aqueous Nitrate Recovery Line at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Finstad, Casey Charles

    2016-06-15

    This powerpoint is part of the ADPSM Plutonium Engineering Lecture Series, which is an opportunity for new hires at LANL to get an overview of work done at TA55. It goes into detail about the aqueous nitrate recovery line at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  9. Final Progress Report: Internship at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, Ryan Q.

    2012-08-10

    Originally I was tasked fluidized bed modeling, however, I changed projects. While still working with ANSYS Fluent, I performed a study of particle tracks in glove boxes. This is useful from a Health-Physics perspective, dealing respirable particles that can be hazardous to the human body. I iteratively tested different amounts of turbulent particles in a steady-state flow. The goal of this testing was to discover how Fluent handles built-in Rosin-Rammler distributions for particle injections. I worked on the health physics flow problems and distribution analysis under the direction of two mentors, Bruce Letellier and Dave Decroix. I set up and ran particle injection calculations using Fluent. I tried different combinations of input parameters to produce sets of 500,000, 1 million, and 1.5 million particles to determine what a good test case would be for future experiments. I performed a variety of tasks in my work as an Undergraduate Student Intern at LANL this summer, and learned how to use a powerful CFD application in addition to expanding my skills in MATLAB. I enjoyed my work at LANL and hope to be able to use the experience here to further my career in the future working in a security-conscious environment. My mentors provided guidance and help with all of my projects and I am grateful for the opportunity to work at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  10. [Los Alamos National Laboratory industrial applications and technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-30

    In October 1989, the Los Alamos Economic Development Corporation (LAEDC) entered into a contract with the Industrial Applications office (IAO) of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) whereby the LAEDC was to provide support services to IAO. More specifically, according to the Statement of Work in this contract The Los Alamos Economic Development Corporation shall assist the Los Alamos National Laboratory Industrial Applications Office in establishing and strengthening connections between potential entrepreneurs at the Laboratory and the business assistance community throughout New Mexico, directed toward enhancing the number, of successful start up businesses spinning off the Laboratory's technology base.'' As part of this contract and subsequent modifications thereof, the LAEDC was to perform seven tasks: 1. Provide business planning assistance to potential entrepreneurs. 2. (Assist IAO in preparing and distributing) informational materials on technology transfer. 3. (Organize and manage) meetings and seminars on technology transfer and entrepreneurship. 4. Identify new opportunities for technology transfer. 5. (Identify and implement programs for the) recognition of Laboratory Entrepreneurs. 6. Training Lab personnel, in the area of technology transfer and Laboratory industrial interactions. 7. Review and summarize prior New Mexico economic development studies. The purpose of this report, is to summarize the accomplishments of the LAEDC under its contract with IAO, and to fulfill its reporting requirements. This report covers the period from October 1989 to September 1992.

  11. Commercialization of Los Alamos National Laboratory technologies via small businesses. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brice, R.; Cartron, D.; Rhyne, T.; Schulze, M.; Welty, L.

    1997-06-01

    Over the past decade, numerous companies have been formed to commercialize research results from leading U.S. academic and research institutions. Emerging small businesses in areas such as Silicon Valley, Boston`s Route 128 corridor, and North Carolina`s Research Triangle have been especially effective in moving promising technologies from the laboratory bench to the commercial marketplace--creating new jobs and economic expansion in the process. Unfortunately, many of the U.S. national laboratories have not been major participants in this technology/commercialization activity, a result of a wide variety of factors which, until recently, acted against successful commercialization. This {open_quotes}commercialization gap{close_quotes} exists partly due to a lack, within Los Alamos in particular and the DOE in general, of in-depth expertise and experience in such business areas as new business development, securities regulation, market research and the determination of commercial potential, the identification of entrepreneurial management, marketing and distribution, and venture capital sources. The immediate consequence of these factors is the disappointingly small number of start-up companies based on technologies from Los Alamos National Laboratory that have been attempted, the modest financial return Los Alamos has received from these start-ups, and the lack of significant national recognition that Los Alamos has received for creating and commercializing these technologies.

  12. Los Alamos National Laboratory's high-performance data system

    SciTech Connect

    Mercier, C.; Chorn, G.; Christman, R.; Collins, B.

    1991-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is designing a High-Performance Data System (HPDS) that will provide storage for supercomputers requiring large files and fast transfer speeds. The HPDS will meet the performance requirements by managing data transfers from high-speed storage systems connected directly to a high-speed network. File and storage management software will be distributed in workstations. Network protocols will ensure reliable, wide-area network data delivery to support long-distance distributed processing. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Inertial Confinement Fusion Research at LOS Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batha, S. H.; Albright, B. J.; Alexander, D. J.; Barnes, Cris W.; Bradley, P. A.; Cobble, J. A.; Cooley, J. C.; Cooley, J. H.; Day, R. D.; DeFriend, K. A.; Delamater, N. D.; Dodd, E. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Fernandez, J. C.; Flippo, K. A.; Grim, G. P.; Goldman, S. R.; Greenfield, S. R.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hoffman, N. M.; Holmes, R. L.; Johnson, R. P.; Keiter, P. A.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Lanier, N. E.; Loomis, E.; Lopez, F. E.; Luo, S.; Mack, J. M.; Magelssen, G. R.; Montgomery, D. S.; Nobile, A.; Oertel, J. A.; Reardon, P.; Rose, H. A.; Schmidt, D.; Schmitt, M. J.; Seifter, A.; Shimada, T.; Swift, D. C.; Tierney, T. E.; Welser-Sherrill, L.; Wilke, M. D.; Wilson, D. C.; Workman, J.; Yin, L.

    2009-07-01

    Inertial confinement fusion research at Los Alamos National Laboratory is focused on high-leverage areas of thermonuclear ignition to which LANL can apply its historic strengths and that are complementary to high-energy-density-physics topics. Using the Trident and Omega laser facilities, experiments are pursued in laser-plasma instabilities, symmetry, Be technologies, neutron and fusion-product diagnostics, and defect hydrodynamics.

  14. ACCELERATION OF LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY TRANSURANIC WASTE DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect

    O'LEARY, GERALD A.

    2007-01-04

    One of Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL's) most significant risks is the site's inventory of transuranic waste retrievably stored above and below-ground in Technical Area (TA) 54 Area G, particularly the dispersible high-activity waste stored above-ground in deteriorating facilities. The high activity waste represents approximately 50% (by activity) of the total 292,000 PE-Ci inventory remaining to be disposed. The transuramic waste inventory includes contact-handled and remote-handled waste packaged in drums, boxes, and oversized containers which are retrievably stored both above and below-ground. Although currently managed as transuranic waste, some of the inventory is low-level waste that can be disposed onsite or at approved offsite facilities. Dispositioning the transuranic waste inventory requires retrieval of the containers from above and below-ground storage, examination and repackaging or remediation as necessary, characterization, certification and loading for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad New Mexico, all in accordance with well-defined requirements and controls. Although operations are established to process and characterize the lower-activity contact-handled transuranic waste containers, LAN L does not currently have the capability to repack high activity contact-handled transuranic waste containers (> 56 PE-Ci) or to process oversized containers with activity levels over 0.52 PE-Ci. Operational issues and compliance requirements have resulted in less than optimal processing capabilities for lower activity contact-handled transuranic waste containers, limiting preparation and reducing dependability of shipments to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Since becoming the Los Alamos National Laboratory contract in June 2006, Los Alamos National Security (LANS) L.L.C. has developed a comprehensive, integrated plan to effectively and efficiently disposition the transuranic waste inventory, working in concert with the Department of

  15. Keeping the Momentum and Nuclear Forensics at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Robert Ernest; Dion, Heather M.; Dry, Donald E.; Kinman, William Scott; LaMont, Stephen Philip; Podlesak, David; Tandon, Lav

    2016-07-22

    LANL has 70 years of experience in nuclear forensics and supports the community through a wide variety of efforts and leveraged capabilities: Expanding the understanding of nuclear forensics, providing training on nuclear forensics methods, and developing bilateral relationships to expand our understanding of nuclear forensic science. LANL remains highly supportive of several key organizations tasked with carrying forth the Nuclear Security Summit messages: IAEA, GICNT, and INTERPOL. Analytical chemistry measurements on plutonium and uranium matrices are critical to numerous programs including safeguards accountancy verification measurements. Los Alamos National Laboratory operates capable actinide analytical chemistry and material science laboratories suitable for nuclear material and environmental forensic characterization. Los Alamos National Laboratory uses numerous means to validate and independently verify that measurement data quality objectives are met. Numerous LANL nuclear facilities support the nuclear material handling, preparation, and analysis capabilities necessary to evaluate samples containing nearly any mass of an actinide (attogram to kilogram levels).

  16. Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) located in Los Alamos, New Mexico. LANL is operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by the University of California. The Tiger Team Assessment was conducted from September 23 to November 8, 1991, under the auspices of the DOE Office of Special Projects, Office of Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health. The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing environmental, safety, and health (ES H) disciplines; management; and contractor and DOE self-assessments. Compliance with applicable Federal, state, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal LANL site requirements was assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and the site contractors' management of ES H/quality assurance programs was conducted. This volume discusses findings concerning the environmental assessment.

  17. 1993 Northern goshawk inventory on portions of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, D.T.; Kennedy, P.L.

    1994-06-01

    Northern goshawks (Accipiter gentilis) (hereafter referred to as goshawk) is a large forest dwelling hawk. Goshawks may be declining in population and reproduction in the southwestern United States. Reasons for the possible decline in goshawk populations include timber harvesting resulting in the loss of nesting habitat, toxic chemicals, and the effects of drought, fire, and disease. Thus, there is a need to determine their population status and assess impacts of management activities in potential goshawk habitat. Inventory for the goshawk was conducted on 2,254 ha of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to determine the presence of nesting goshawks on LANL lands. This information can be incorporated into LANL`s environmental management program. The inventory was conducted by Colorado State University personnel from May 12 to July 30, 1993. This report summarizes the results of this inventory.

  18. Overview of laser technology at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, G. K.; Cremers, D. A.

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has had a long history of involvement in laser sciences and has been recognized both for its large laser programs and smaller scale developments in laser technology and applications. The first significant program was with the Rover nuclear-based rocket propulsion system in 1968 to study laser initiated fusion. From here applications spread to programs in laser isotope separation and development of large lasers for fusion. These programs established the technological human resource base of highly trained laser physicists, engineers, and chemists that remain at the Laboratory today. Almost every technical division at Los Alamos now has some laser capability ranging from laser development, applications, studies on nonlinear processes, modeling and materials processing. During the past six years over eight R&D-100 Awards have been received by Los Alamos for development of laser-based techniques and instrumentation. Outstanding examples of technology developed include LIDAR applications to environmental monitoring, single molecule detection using fluorescence spectroscopy, a laser-based high kinetic energy source of oxygen atoms produced by a laser-sustained plasma, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for compositional, analysis, thin film high temperature superconductor deposition, multi-station laser welding, and direct metal deposition and build-up of components by fusing powder particles with a laser beam.

  19. Overview of laser technology at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, G.K.; Cremers, D.A.

    1994-09-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has had a long history of involvement in laser sciences and has been recognized both for its large laser programs and smaller scale developments in laser technology and applications. The first significant program was with the Rover nuclear-based rocket propulsion system in 1968 to study laser initiated fusion. From here applications spread to programs in laser isotope separation and development of large lasers for fusion. These programs established the technological human resource base of highly trained laser physicists, engineers, and chemists that remain at the Laboratory today. Almost every technical division at Los Alamos now has some laser capability ranging from laser development, applications, studies on nonlinear processes, modeling and materials processing. During the past six years over eight R&D-100 Awards have been received by Los Alamos for development of laser-based techniques and instrumentation. Outstanding examples of technology developed include LIDAR applications to environmental monitoring, single molecule detection using fluorescence spectroscopy, a laser-based high kinetic energy source of oxygen atoms produced by a laser-sustained plasma, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for compositional, analysis, thin film high temperature superconductor deposition, multi-station laser welding, and direct metal deposition and build-up of components by fusing powder particles with a laser beam.

  20. Commercialization of Los Alamos National Laboratory technologies via small businesses. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brice, R.; Carton, D.; Rhyne, T.

    1997-06-01

    Appendices are presented from a study performed on a concept model system for the commercialization of Los Alamos National Laboratory technologies via small businesses. Topics include a summary of information from the joint MCC/Los Alamos technology conference; a comparison of New Mexico infrastructure to other areas; a typical licensing agreement; technology screening guides; summaries of specific DOE/UC/Los Alamos documents; a bibliography; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory TCRD; The Ames Center for Advanced Technology Development; Los Alamos licensing procedures; presentation of slides from monthly MCC/Los Alamos review meetings; generalized entrepreneurship model; and a discussion on receiving equity for technology.

  1. Groundwater level status report for 2009, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

    2010-03-01

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2009 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 179 monitoring wells, including 55 regional aquifer wells (including 11 regional/intermediate wells), 26 intermediate wells, 98 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 161 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells.

  2. Los Alamos National Laboratory Economic Analysis Capability Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Boero, Riccardo; Edwards, Brian Keith; Pasqualini, Donatella; Rivera, Michael Kelly

    2016-04-19

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed two types of models to compute the economic impact of infrastructure disruptions. FastEcon is a fast running model that estimates first-­order economic impacts of large scale events such as hurricanes and floods and can be used to identify the amount of economic activity that occurs in a specific area. LANL’s Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model estimates more comprehensive static and dynamic economic impacts of a broader array of events and captures the interactions between sectors and industries when estimating economic impacts.

  3. Groundwater level status report for 2010, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

    2011-03-01

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2010 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 194 monitoring wells, including 63 regional aquifer wells (including 10 regional/intermediate wells), 34 intermediate wells, 97 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 162 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells and seasonal responses to snowmelt runoff observed in intermediate wells.

  4. Groundwater level status report for 2008, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

    2009-03-01

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2008 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 179 monitoring wells, including 45 regional aquifer wells, 28 intermediate wells, 8 regional/intermediate wells, 106 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 166 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells.

  5. Groundwater Level Status Report for 2005 Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    S.P. Allen; R.J. Koch

    2006-05-15

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 2005 is provided in this report. The Groundwater Level Monitoring Project was instituted in 2005 to provide a framework for the collection and processing of quality controlled groundwater level data. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 137 monitoring wells, including 41 regional aquifer wells, 22 intermediate wells, and 74 alluvial wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 118 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well.

  6. The Los Alamos National Laboratory Nuclear Vision Project

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, E.D.; Wagner, R.L. Jr.

    1996-09-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has initiated a project to examine possible futures associated with the global nuclear enterprise over the course of the next 50 years. All major components are included in this study--weapons, nonproliferation, nuclear power, nuclear materials, and institutional and public factors. To examine key issues, the project has been organized around three main activity areas--workshops, research and analyses, and development of linkages with other synergistic world efforts. This paper describes the effort--its current and planned activities--as well as provides discussion of project perspectives on nuclear weapons, nonproliferation, nuclear energy, and nuclear materials focus areas.

  7. Mac configuration management at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, Allan B

    2010-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) had a need for central configuration management of non-Windows computers. LANL has three to five thousand Macs and an equal number of Linux based systems. The primary goal was to be able to inventory all non-windows systems and patch Mc OS X systems. LANL examined a number of commercial and open source solutions and ultimately selected Puppet. This paper will discuss why we chose Puppet, how we implemented it, and some lessons we learned along the way.

  8. Stockpile Stewardship: Los Alamos

    ScienceCinema

    McMillan, Charlie; Morgan, Nathanial; Goorley, Tom; Merrill, Frank; Funk, Dave; Korzekwa, Deniece; Laintz, Ken

    2016-07-12

    "Heritage of Science" is a short video that highlights the Stockpile Stewardship program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Stockpile Stewardship was conceived in the early 1990s as a national science-based program that could assure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear deterrent without the need for full-scale underground nuclear testing. This video was produced by Los Alamos National Laboratory for screening at the Lab's Bradbury Science Museum in Los Alamos, NM and is narrated by science correspondent Miles O'Brien.

  9. Environmental Assessment for Proposed Access Control and Traffic Improvements at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2002-08-23

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has assigned a continuing role to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in carrying out NNSA's national security mission. It is imperative that LANL continue this enduring responsibility and that NNSA adequately safeguard LANL capabilities. NNSA has identified the need to restrict vehicular access to certain areas within LANL for the purpose of permanently enhancing the physical security environment at LANL. It has also identified the need to change certain traffic flow patterns for the purpose of enhancing physical safety at LANL. The Proposed Action would include the construction of eastern and western bypass roads around the LANL Technical Area (TA) 3 area and the installation of vehicle access controls and related improvements to enhance security along Pajarito Road and in the LANL core area. This Proposed Action would modify the current roadway network and traffic patterns. It would also result in traversing Areas of Environmental Interest identified in the LANL Habitat Management Plan, demolition of part of an historic structure at Building 3-40, and traversing several potential release sites and part of the Los Alamos County landfill. The No Action Alternative was also considered. Under this alternative NNSA would not construct the eastern or western bypass roads, any access-control stations, or related improvements. Diamond Drive would continue to serve as the primary conduit for most vehicle traffic within the LANL core area regardless of actual trip destinations. The No Action Alternative does not meet NNSA's purpose and need for action. The proposed bypass road corridors traverse both developed and undeveloped areas. Several potential release sites are present. These would either be sampled and remediated in accordance with New Mexico Environment Department requirements before construction or avoided to allow for future remediation. In some cases, contaminant levels may fall below remediation thresholds

  10. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), conducted March 29, 1987 through April 17, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the LANL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the LANL, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the LANL Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the Survey for the LANL. 65 refs., 68 figs., 73 tabs.

  11. Energy supply and environmental issues: The Los Alamos National Laboratory experience in regional and international programs

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory, operated by the University of California, encompasses more than forty-three square miles of mesas and canyons in northern New Mexico. A Department of Energy national laboratory, Los Alamos is one of the largest multidisciplinary, multiprogram laboratories in the world. Our mission, to apply science and engineering capabilities to problems of national security, has expanded to include a broad array of programs. We conduct extensive research in energy, nuclear safeguards and security, biomedical science, computational science, environmental protection and cleanup, materials science, and other basic sciences. The Energy Technology Programs Office is responsible for overseeing and developing programs in three strategic areas: energy systems and the environment, transportation and infrastructure, and integrated chemicals and materials processing. Our programs focus on developing reliable, economic and environmentally sound technologies that can help ensure an adequate supply of energy for the nation. To meet these needs, we are involved in programs that range from new and enhanced oil recovery technologies and tapping renewable energy sources, through efforts in industrial processes, electric power systems, clean coal technologies, civilian radioactive waste, high temperature superconductivity, to studying the environmental effects of energy use.

  12. Addressing the Highest Risk: Environmental Programs at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, Elaine E

    2012-06-08

    Report topics: Current status of cleanup; Shift in priorities to address highest risk; Removal of above-ground waste; and Continued focus on protecting water resources. Partnership between the National Nuclear Security Administration's Los Alamos Site Office, DOE Carlsbad Field Office, New Mexico Environment Department, and contractor staff has enabled unprecedented cleanup progress. Progress on TRU campaign is well ahead of plan. To date, have completed 130 shipments vs. 104 planned; shipped 483 cubic meters of above-ground waste (vs. 277 planned); and removed 11,249 PE Ci of material at risk (vs. 9,411 planned).

  13. Environmental assessment for effluent reduction, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-11

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to eliminate industrial effluent from 27 outfalls at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The Proposed Action includes both simple and extensive plumbing modifications, which would result in the elimination of industrial effluent being released to the environment through 27 outfalls. The industrial effluent currently going to about half of the 27 outfalls under consideration would be rerouted to LANL`s sanitary sewer system. Industrial effluent from other outfalls would be eliminated by replacing once-through cooling water systems with recirculation systems, or, in a few instances, operational changes would result in no generation of industrial effluent. After the industrial effluents have been discontinued, the affected outfalls would be removed from the NPDES Permit. The pipes from the source building or structure to the discharge point for the outfalls may be plugged, or excavated and removed. Other outfalls would remain intact and would continue to discharge stormwater. The No Action alternative, which would maintain the status quo for LANL`s outfalls, was also analyzed. An alternative in which industrial effluent would be treated at the source facilities was considered but dismissed from further analysis because it would not reasonably meet the DOE`s purpose for action, and its potential environmental effects were bounded by the analysis of the Proposed Action and the No Action alternatives.

  14. Smoking patterns among Los Alamos National Laboratory employees

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, M.C.; Wilkinson, G.S.

    1987-06-01

    Smoking patterns among 5507 employees at Los Alamos National Laboratory were investigated for those who underwent physical examinations by occupational physicians from 1978 to 1983. More male than female employees smoked, although differences in smoking rates between the sexes were not as large as differences observed for national smoking rates. Employees over 40 were more likely to smoke than younger employees, males consumed more cigarettes than did females, and Anglo employees smoked more cigarettes than did Hispanic employees. Highly educated employees smoked less than did less-educated workers, and staff members exhibited the lowest rates of smoking. Smoking cessation programs for Laboratory employees should be directed toward those subpopulations with the highest rates of smoking. 31 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Environmental assessment for the proposed CMR Building upgrades at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. Final document

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-04

    In order to maintain its ability to continue to conduct uninterrupted radioactive and metallurgical research in a safe, secure, and environmentally sound manner, the US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to upgrade the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Building. The building was built in the early 1950s to provide a research and experimental facility for analytical chemistry, plutonium and uranium chemistry, and metallurgy. Today, research and development activities are performed involving nuclear materials. A variety of radioactive and chemical hazards are present. The CMR Building is nearing the end of its original design life and does not meet many of today`s design codes and standards. The Proposed Action for this Environmental Assessment (EA) includes structural modifications to some portions of the CMR Building which do not meet current seismic criteria for a Hazard Category 2 Facility. Also included are upgrades and improvements in building ventilation, communications, monitoring, and fire protection systems. This EA analyzes the environmental effects of construction of the proposed upgrades. The Proposed Action will have no adverse effects upon agricultural and cultural resources, wetlands and floodplains, endangered and threatened species, recreational resources, or water resources. The Proposed Action would have negligible effects on human health and transportation, and would not pose a disproportionate adverse health or environmental impact on minority or low-income populations within an 80 kilometer (50 mile) radius of the CMR Building.

  16. Fuels Inventories in the Los Alamos National Laboratory Region: 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Balice, R.G.; Oswald, B.P.; Martin, C.

    1999-03-01

    Fifty-four sites were surveyed for fuel levels, vegetational structures, and topographic characteristics. Most of the surveyed sites were on Los Alamos National Laboratory property, however, some surveys were also conducted on U.S. Forest Service property. The overall vegetation of these sites ranged from pinon-juniper woodlands to ponderosa pine forests to mixed conifer forests, and the topographic positions included canyons, mesas, and mountains. The results of these surveys indicate that the understory fuels are the greatest in mixed conifer forests and that overstory fuels are greatest in both mixed conifer forests and ponderosa pine forests on mesas. The geographic distribution of these fuels would suggest a most credible wildfire scenario for the Los Alamos region. Three major fires have occurred since 1954 and these fires behaved in a manner that is consistent with this scenario. The most credible wildfire scenario was also supported by the results of BEHAVE modeling that used the fuels inventory data as inputs. Output from the BEHAVE model suggested that catastrophic wildfires would continue to occur during any season with sufficiently dry, windy weather.

  17. Cleanup at Los Alamos National Laboratory - the challenges - 9493

    SciTech Connect

    Stiger, Susan G; Hargis, Kenneth M; Graham, Michael J; Rael, George J

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of environmental cleanup at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and some of the unique aspects and challenges. Cleanup of the 65-year old Department of Energy Laboratory is being conducted under a RCRA Consent Order with the State of New Mexico. This agreement is one of the most recent cleanup agreements signed in the DOE complex and was based on lessons learned at other DOE sites. A number of attributes create unique challenges for LANL cleanup -- the proximity to the community and pueblos, the site's topography and geology, and the nature of LANL's on-going missions. This overview paper will set the stage for other papers in this session, including papers that present: Plans to retrieve buried waste at Material Disposal Area B, across the street from oen of Los Alamos' commercial districts and the local newspaper; Progress to date and joint plans with WIPP for disposal of the remaining inventory of legacy transuranic waste; Reviews of both groundwater and surface water contamination and the factors complicating both characterization and remediation; Optimizing the disposal of low-level radioactive waste from ongoing LANL missions; A stakeholder environmental data transparency project (RACER), with full public access to all available information on contamination at LANL, and A description of the approach to waste processing cost recovery from the programs that generate hazardous and radioactive waste at LANL.

  18. Needs assessment for fire department services and resources for the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-15

    This report has been developed in response to a request from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to evaluate the need for fire department services so as to enable the Laboratory to plan effective fire protection and thereby: meet LANL`s regulatory and contractual obligations; interface with the Department of Energy (DOE) and other agencies on matters relating to fire and emergency services; and ensure appropriate protection of the community and environment. This study is an outgrowth of the 1993 Fire Department Needs Assessment (prepared for DOE) but is developed from the LANL perspective. Input has been received from cognizant and responsible representatives at LANL, DOE, Los Alamos County (LAC) and the Los Alamos Fire Department (LAFD).

  19. Common ground: An environmental ethic for Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, F.L.

    1991-01-01

    Three predominant philosophies have characterized American business ethical thinking over the past several decades. The first phase is the ethics of self-interest'' which argues that maximizing self-interest coincidentally maximizes the common good. The second phase is legality ethics.'' Proponents argue that what is important is knowing the rules and following them scrupulously. The third phase might be called stake-holder ethics.'' A central tenant is that everyone affected by a decision has a moral hold on the decision maker. This paper will discuss one recent initiative of the Los Alamos National Laboratory to move beyond rules and regulations toward an environmental ethic that integrates the values of stakeholder ethics'' into the Laboratory's historical culture and value systems. These Common Ground Principles are described. 11 refs.

  20. Root lengths of plants on Los Alamos National Laboratory lands

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, G.D.; Foxx, T.S.

    1987-01-01

    Maximum root lengths of 22 plant species occurring on Los Alamos National Laboratory lands were measured. An average of two longest roots from each species were dug up and their lengths, typical shapes, and qualitative morphologics were noted along with the overstory dimensions of the plant individual with which the roots were associated. Maximum root lengths were compared with overstory (height times width) dimensions. Among the life forms studied, the shrubs tend to show the longest roots in relation to overstory size. Forbs show the shortest roots in relation to overstory size. Measurements of tree roots suggest only that immature trees on the Pajarito Plateau may have root-length to overstory-size ratios near one. 30 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. HELIOS: applications at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, R.T.; Mosteller, R.D.; Chodak, Paul III; Charlton, W.; Adams, B.T.

    1997-10-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is involved in the analysis of many different types of nuclear systems. The nuclear systems that we have analyzed have included subcritical accelerator driven systems for the transmutation of waste, fusion systems, critical experiment systems, and space propulsion and power systems. We have also analyzed special purpose reactors such as the LANL Omega West reactor, production reactors, and conventional commercial light- and heavy-water reactors. Thus the systems that we analyze and the type of results desired, often vary considerably from those of a power company normally analyzing their PWR or BWR for fissile fuel burnup and production. The reactor geometries that we model are often quite complicated such as those of an RBMK or Savannah River Production Reactor. Rather than fissile fuel production and burnup, the goal of a calculation could be the production rate of some obscure isotope which has medical applications.

  2. Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The Management Subteam conducted a management and organization assessment of environment, safety, and health (ES H) activities performed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and onsite contractor personnel. The objectives of the assessment were to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of management systems and practices in terms of ensuring environmental compliance and the safety and health of workers and the general public, (2) identify key findings, and (3) identify root causes for all ES H findings and concerns. The scope of the assessment included examinations of the following from an ES H perspective: (1) strategic and program planning; (2) organizational structure and management configuration; (3) human resource management, including training and staffing; (4) management systems, including performance monitoring and assessment; (5) conduct of operations; (6) public and institutional interactions; and (7) corporate'' parent support.

  3. Los Alamos National Laboratory support to IAEA environmental safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Robert E; Dry, Don E; Roensch, Fred R; Kinman, Will S; Roach, Jeff L; La Mont, Stephen P

    2010-12-01

    The nuclear and radiochemistry group provides sample preparation and analysis support to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Network of Analytical Laboratories (NWAL). These analyses include both non-destructive (alpha and gamma-ray spectrometry) and destructive (thermal ionization mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) methods. On a bi-annual basis the NWAL laboratories are invited to meet to discuss program evolution and issues. During this meeting each participating laboratory summarizes their efforts over the previous two years. This presentation will present Los Alamos National Laboratories efforts in support of this program. Data showing results from sample and blank analysis will be presented along with capability enhancement and issues that arose over the previous two years.

  4. The Laser Safety Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hyer, R.

    1997-02-01

    The Laser Safety Program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory was formalized in April, 1991, with the publication of a document, {open_quotes}Lasers,{close_quotes} modeled on the ANSIZ136.1 standard. This program has received such wide acceptance by the laser community and line managers that the original Laser Safety Program document has become a Laboratory standard on lasers. As a benchmark of the success of this program is that the Laboratory has experienced no disabling eye injuries because of laser operations since July, 1990, to be compared with a disabling laser eye injury that used to average one every eighteen months prior to the time the formal program was established. The Laboratory Laser Safety Program and program elements will be presented and discussed.

  5. Study of polyelectrolytes for Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Labonne, N.

    1994-11-01

    To assess the safety of a potential radioactive waste repository, analysis of the fluid solution containing low levels of activity need to be performed. In some cases, the radioactivity would be so weak (3--30 pCi/L) that the solution must be concentrated for measurement. For this purpose, Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists are synthesizing some water soluble polyelectrolytes, which, because they are strong complexing agents for inorganic cations, can concentrate the radioelements in solution. To assist in characterization of these polyelectrolytes, the author has performed experiments to determine physico-chemical constants, such as pKa values and stability constants. The complexation constants between both polyelectrolytes and europium were determined by two methods: solvent extraction and ion exchange. Results are presented.

  6. LAMPF II workshop, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, February 1-4, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Thiessen, H.A.

    1982-01-01

    This report contains the proceedings of the first LAMPF II Workshop held at Los Alamos February 1 to 4, 1982. Included are the talks that were available in written form. The conclusion of the participants was that there are many exciting areas of physics that will be addressed by such a machine.

  7. Pinon Pine Tree Study, Los Alamos National Laboratory: Source document

    SciTech Connect

    P. R. Fresquez; J. D. Huchton; M. A. Mullen; L. Naranjo, Jr.

    2000-01-01

    One of the dominant tree species growing within and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM, lands is the pinon pine (Pinus edulis) tree. Pinon pine is used for firewood, fence posts, and building materials and is a source of nuts for food--the seeds are consumed by a wide variety of animals and are also gathered by people in the area and eaten raw or roasted. This study investigated the (1) concentration of {sup 3}H, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup tot}U, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am in soils (0- to 12-in. [31 cm] depth underneath the tree), pinon pine shoots (PPS), and pinon pine nuts (PPN) collected from LANL lands and regional background (BG) locations, (2) concentrations of radionuclides in PPN collected in 1977 to present data, (3) committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) from the ingestion of nuts, and (4) soil to PPS to PPN concentration ratios (CRs). Most radionuclides, with the exception of {sup 3}H in soils, were not significantly higher (p < 0.10) in soils, PPS, and PPN collected from LANL as compared to BG locations, and concentrations of most radionuclides in PPN from LANL have decreased over time. The maximum net CEDE (the CEDE plus two sigma minus BG) at the most conservative ingestion rate (10 lb [4.5 kg]) was 0.0018 mrem (0.018 {micro}Sv). Soil-to-nut CRs for most radionuclides were within the range of default values in the literature for common fruits and vegetables.

  8. Architect and engineering costs at Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    The objective of this audit was to determine whether architect and engineering (A-E) costs at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories were reasonable in comparison with industry standards.

  9. The NHMFL Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos National Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke, Chuck

    2014-03-01

    National user facilities provide scientists and industrial development companies with access to specialized experimental capabilities to enable development of materials and solve long standing technical problems. Magnetic fields have become an indispensable tool for researchers to better understand and manipulate ground states of electronic materials. As magnetic field intensities are increased the quantum nature of these materials become exponentially more likely to be observed and this is but one of the drivers to go further in high magnetic field generation. At the Los Alamos branch of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory we have significant efforts in extremely high magnetic field generation and experimentation. In direct opposition with our efforts are the tremendous electro-mechanical forces exerted on our magnets and the electromagnetic interference that couples to the sample under study and the diagnostic equipment. Challenges in magnetic field generation and research will be presented. Various methods of pulsed high magnetic field generation and experimentation capabilities will be reviewed, including our recent ``World Record'' for the highest non-destructive magnetic field. NSF-DMR 1157490.

  10. Wildlife use of NPDES outfalls at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Foxx, T.; Blea-Edeskuty, B.

    1995-09-01

    From July through October of 1991, the Biological Resources Evaluation Team (BRET) surveyed 133 of the 140 National Pollutant Discharge and Elimination System outfalls at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of the survey was to determine the use of these wastewater outfalls by wildlife. BRET observed wildlife or evidence of wildlife (scat, tracks, or bedding) by 35 vertebrate species in the vicinity of the outfalls, suggesting these animals could be using water from outfalls. Approximately 56% of the outfalls are probably used or are suitable for use by large mammals as sources of drinking water. Additionally, hydrophytic vegetation grows in association with approximately 40% of the outfalls-a characteristic that could make these areas eligible for wetland status. BRET recommends further study to accurately characterize the use of outfalls by small and medium-sized mammals and amphibians. The team also recommends systematic aquatic macroinvertebrate studies to provide information on resident communities and water quality. Wetland assessments may be necessary to ensure compliance with wetland regulations if LANL activities affect any of the outfalls supporting hydrophytic vegetation.

  11. Lessons learned from decommissioning projects at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, M.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes lessons learned over the last 20 years from 12 decommissioning projects at Los Alamos National Laboratory. These lessons relate both to overall program management and to management of specific projects during the planning and operations phases. The issues include waste management; the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA); the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); contracting; public involvement; client/customer interface; and funding. Key elements of our approach are to be proactive; follow the observation method; perform field activities concurrently; develop strategies to keep reportable incidents from delaying work; seek and use programs, methods, etc., in existence to shorten learning curves; network to help develop solutions; and avoid overstudying and overcharacterizing. This approach results in preliminary plans that require very little revision before implementation, reasonable costs and schedules, early acquisition of permits and NEPA documents, preliminary characterization reports, and contracting documents. Our track record is good -- the last four projects (uranium and plutonium-processing facility and three research reactors) have been on budget and on schedule.

  12. The economic impact of Los Alamos National Laboratory on North-Central New Mexico and the state of New Mexico. Fiscal Year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Lansford, R.R.; Adcock, L.D.; Gentry, L.M.; Ben-David, S.

    1996-08-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a multidisciplinary, multiprogram laboratory with a mission to enhance national military and economic security through science and technology. Its mission is to reduce the nuclear danger through stewardship of the nation`s nuclear stockpile and through its nonproliferation and verification activities. An important secondary mission is to promote U.S. industrial competitiveness by working with U.S. companies in technology transfer and technology development partnerships. Los Alamos has provided technical assistance to over 70 small New Mexico businesses enabling economic development activities in the region and state.

  13. Los Alamos National Laboratory compliance with cultural resource management legislation

    SciTech Connect

    Olinger, C.E.; Rea, K.H.

    1984-01-01

    Cultural resources management is one aspect of NEPA-induced legislation increasingly affecting federal land managers. A number of regulations, some of them recent, outline management criteria for protecting cultural resources on federal land. Nearly all construction projects at the 11,135 hectare Los Alamos National Laboratory in northern New Mexico are affected by cultural resource management requirements. A substantial prehistoric Puebloan population occupied the Laboratory area from the 13th to the early 16th centuries. Grazing, timbering, and homesteading followed Indian occupation. Therefore, archaeological and historical ruins and artifacts are abundant. The Laboratory has developed a cultural resources management program which meets both legal and project planning requirements. The program operates in coordination with the New Mexico State Historical Preservation Office. Major elements of the Laboratory program are illustrated by a current project involving relocation of a homesteader's cabin located on land required for a major new facility. The Laboratory cultural resource management program couples routine oversight of all engineering design projects with onsite resource surveys and necessary mitigation prior to construction. The Laboratory has successfully protected major archaeological and historical ruins, although some problems remain. The cultural resource program is intended to be adjustable to new needs. A cultural resource management plan will provide long-term management guidance.

  14. Los Alamos National Laboratory considers the use of biodiesel.

    SciTech Connect

    Matlin, M. K.

    2002-01-01

    A new EPA-approved alternative fuel, called biodiesel, may soon be used at Los Alamos National Laboratory in everything from diesel trucks to laboratory equipment. Biodiesel transforms vegetable oils into a renewable, cleaner energy source that can be used in any machinery that uses diesel fuel. For the past couple years, the Laboratory has been exploring the possibility of switching over to soybean-based biodiesel. This change could lead to many health and environmental benefits, as well as help reduce the nation's dependence on foreign oil. Biodiesel is a clean, renewable diesel fuel substitute made from soybean and other vegetable oil crops, as well as from recycled cooking oils. A chemical process breaks down the vegetable oil into a usable form. Vegetable oil has a chain of about 18 carbons and ordinary diesel has about 12 or 13 carbons. The process breaks the carbon chains of the vegetable oil and separates out the glycerin (a fatty substance used in creams and soaps). The co-product of glycerin can be used by pharmaceutical and cosmetic companies, as well as many other markets. Once the chains are shortened and the glycerin is removed from the oil, the remaining liquid is similar to petroleum diesel fuel. It can be burned in pure form or in a blend of any proportion with petroleum diesel. To be considered an alternative fuel source by the EPA, the blend must be at least 20 percent biodiesel (B20). According to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), biodiesel is America's fastest growing alternative fuel.

  15. Los Alamos National Laboratory Science Education Programs. Quarterly progress report, April 1--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, D.

    1995-09-01

    This report is quarterly progress report on the Los Alamos National Laboratory Science Education Programs. Included in the report are dicussions on teacher and faculty enhancement, curriculum improvement, student support, educational technology, and institutional improvement.

  16. Capabilities for high explosive pulsed power research at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Goforth, James H; Oona, Henn; Tasker, Douglas G; Kaul, A M

    2008-01-01

    Research on topics requiring high magnetic fields and high currents have been pursued using high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) techniques since the 1950s at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We have developed many sophisticated HEPr systems through the years, and most of them depend on technology available from the nuclear weapons program. Through the 1980s and 1990s, our budgets would sustain parallel efforts in zpinch research using both HEPr and capacitor banks. In recent years, many changes have occurred that are driven by concerns such as safety, security, and environment, as well as reduced budgets and downsizing of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) complex due to the end of the cold war era. In this paper, we review the teclmiques developed to date, and adaptations that are driven by changes in budgets and our changing complex. One new Ranchero-based solid liner z-pinch experimental design is also presented. Explosives that are cast to shape instead of being machined, and initiation systems that depend on arrays of slapper detonators are important new tools. Some materials that are seen as hazardous to the environment are avoided in designs. The process continues to allow a wide range of research however, and there are few, if any, experiments that we have done in the past that could not be perform today. The HErr firing facility at Los Alamos continues to have a 2000 lb. high explosive limit, and our 2.4 MJ capacitor bank remains a mainstay of the effort. Modem diagnostic and data analysis capabilities allow fewer personnel to achieve better results, and in the broad sense we continue to have a robust capability.

  17. Energy and national security.

    SciTech Connect

    Karas, Thomas H.

    2003-09-01

    On May 19 and 20, 2003, thirty-some members of Sandia staff and management met to discuss the long-term connections between energy and national security. Three broad security topics were explored: I. Global and U.S. economic dependence on oil (and gas); II. Potential security implications of global climate change; and III. Vulnerabilities of the U.S. domestic energy infrastructure. This report, rather than being a transcript of the workshop, represents a synthesis of background information used in the workshop, ideas that emerged in the discussions, and ex post facto analysis of the discussions. Each of the three subjects discussed at this workshop has significant U.S. national security implications. Each has substantial technology components. Each appears a legitimate area of concern for a national security laboratory with relevant technology capabilities. For the laboratory to play a meaningful role in contributing to solutions to national problems such as these, it needs to understand the political, economic, and social environments in which it expects its work to be accepted and used. In addition, it should be noted that the problems of oil dependency and climate change are not amenable to solution by the policies of any one nation--even the one that is currently the largest single energy consumer. Therefore, views, concerns, policies, and plans of other countries will do much to determine which solutions might work and which might not.

  18. Los Alamos National Laboratory W76 Pit Tube Lifetime Study

    SciTech Connect

    Abeln, Terri G.

    2012-04-25

    A metallurgical study was requested as part of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) W76-1 life-extension program (LEP) involving a lifetime analysis of type 304 stainless steel pit tubes subject to repeat bending loads during assembly and disassembly operations at BWXT/Pantex. This initial test phase was completed during the calendar years of 2004-2006 and the report not issued until additional recommended tests could be performed. These tests have not been funded to this date and therefore this report is considered final. Tubes were reportedly fabricated according to Rocky Flats specification P14548 - Seamless Type 304 VIM/VAR Stainless Steel Tubing. Tube diameter was specified as 0.125 inches and wall thickness as 0.028 inches. A heat treat condition is not specified and the hardness range specification can be characteristic of both 1/8 and 1/4 hard conditions. Properties of all tubes tested were within specification. Metallographic analysis could not conclusively determine a specified limit to number of bends allowable. A statistical analysis suggests a range of 5-7 bends with a 99.95% confidence limit. See the 'Statistical Analysis' section of this report. The initial phase of this study involved two separate sets of test specimens. The first group was part of an investigation originating in the ESA-GTS [now Gas Transfer Systems (W-7) Group]. After the bend cycle test parameters were chosen (all three required bends subjected to the same amount of bend cycles) and the tubes bent, the investigation was transferred to Terri Abeln (Metallurgical Science and Engineering) for analysis. Subsequently, another limited quantity of tubes became available for testing and were cycled with the same bending fixture, but with different test parameters determined by T. Abeln.

  19. ZERT Final Scientific Report Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Pawar, Rajesh J.

    2011-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) activities for the Center for Zero Emission Research and Technology (ZERT) have fallen into three broad research areas: (1) How do you reduce uncertainty in assuring prior to operation that an engineered geologic site will meet a specific performance goal (e.g., <0.01% leak per year)? (2) What are key monitoring needs for verifying that an engineered geologic site is meeting a performance goal? (3) What are potential vulnerabilities for breeches in containment of CO{sub 2}, and how could they be mitigated either prior to operation or in the event that a threshold is exceeded? We have utilized LANL's multi-disciplinary expertise and an integrated approach combining laboratory experiments, field observations and numerical simulations to address various research issues related to above-mentioned areas. While there have been a number of major milestones achieved as described in past quarterly reports, two of the major accomplishments resulting from LANL's efforts include: (1) Development of the CO{sub 2}-PENS systems framework for long-term performance analysis of geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration sites. CO{sub 2}-PENS is first-ever systems analysis tool designed for assessment of CO{sub 2} sequestration sites. (2) One of the few field studies to-date focused on understanding impact of CO{sub 2} leakage on shallow groundwater chemistry. Two major conclusions of the study are as follows: the impact of co-contaminants transported with deeper brine on shallow groundwater quality is likely to be much larger than that of the CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}-induced geochemical reactions and in certain geochemical environment the reactivity of pure CO{sub 2} will not be sufficient to mobilize metals beyond background levels.

  20. The Los Alamos, Sandia, and Livermore Laboratories: Integration and collaboration solving science and technology problems for the nation

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    More than 40 years ago, three laboratories were established to take on scientific responsibility for the nation`s nuclear weapons - Los Alamos, Sandia, and Livermore. This triad of laboratories has provided the state-of-the-art science and technology to create America`s nuclear deterrent and to ensure that the weapons are safe, secure, and to ensure that the weapons are safe, secure, and reliable. These national security laboratories carried out their responsibilities through intense efforts involving almost every field of science, engineering, and technology. Today, they are recognized as three of the world`s premier research and development laboratories. This report sketches the history of the laboratories and their evolution to an integrated three-laboratory system. The characteristics that make them unique are described and some of the major contributions they have made over the years are highlighted.

  1. Energy and National Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abelson, Philip H.

    1973-01-01

    Discussed in this editorial is the need for a broad and detailed government policy on energy use. Oil companies can not be given complete responsibility to demonstrate usage of different energy sources. The government should construct plants because energy is connected with national security. (PS)

  2. Isentropic Compression Studies at the Los Alamos National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    actinide samples in extremes of high magnetic field (to 300 Tesla) [1, 2]. A simple modification to the single-turn magnet has converted it to a fast...Isentropic Compression Studies At The Los Alamos National High Magnetic Field Laboratory 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT ...Laboratory (NHMFL) at Los Alamos was originally designed to study actinide samples in extremes of high magnetic field (to 300 Tesla) [1, 2]. A simple

  3. Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 1995 water year. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Barks, R.; Shaull, D.A.; Alexander, M.R.; Reynolds, R.P.

    1996-08-01

    The principle investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 15 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory. The United States Department of Interior Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, operates two of the stations under a subcontract; these are identified in the station manuscripts. Included in this report are data from one seepage run conducted in Los Alamos Canyon during the 1995 water year.

  4. Monitoring Sensitive Bat Species at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenberg, Kari M.

    2014-01-15

    Bats play a critical role in ecosystems and are vulnerable to disturbance and disruption by human activities. In recent decades, bat populations in the United States and elsewhere have decreased tremendously. There are 47 different species of bat in the United States and 28 of these occur in New Mexico with 15 different species documented at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and surrounding areas. Euderma maculatum(the spotted bat) is listed as “threatened” by the state of New Mexico and is known to occur at LANL. Four other species of bats are listed as “sensitive” and also occur here. In 1995, a four year study was initiated at LANL to assess the status of bat species of concern, elucidate distribution and relative abundance, and obtain information on roosting sites. There have been no definitive studies since then. Biologists in the Environmental Protection Division at LANL initiated a multi-year monitoring program for bats in May 2013 to implement the Biological Resources Management Plan. The objective of this ongoing study is to monitor bat species diversity and seasonal activity over time at LANL. Bat species diversity and seasonal activity were measured using an acoustic bat detector, the Pettersson D500X. This ultrasound recording unit is intended for long-term, unattended recording of bat and other high frequency animal calls. During 2013, the detector was deployed at two locations around LANL. Study sites were selected based on proximity to water where bats may be foraging. Recorded bat calls were analyzed using Sonobat, software that can help determine specific species of bat through their calls. A list of bat species at the two sites was developed and compared to lists from previous studies. Species diversity and seasonal activity, measured as the number of call sequences recorded each month, were compared between sites and among months. A total of 17,923 bat calls were recorded representing 15 species. Results indicate that there is a

  5. Materials Capability Review Los Alamos National Laboratory May 4-7, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Antoniette J

    2009-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses external peer review to measure and continuously improve the quality of its science, technology and engineering (STE). LANL uses capability reviews to assess the STE quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. STE capabilities are define to cut across directorates providing a more holistic view of the STE quality, integration to achieve mission requirements, and mission relevance. The scope of these capabilities necessitate that there will be significant overlap in technical areas covered by capability reviews (e.g ., materials research and weapons science and engineering). In addition, LANL staff may be reviewed in different capability reviews because of their varied assignments and expertise. LANL plans to perform a complete review of the Laboratory's STE capabilities (hence staff) in a three-year cycle. The principal product of an external review is a report that includes the review committee's assessments, commendations, and recommendations for STE. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). This report will be used by Laboratory Management for STE assessment and planning. The report is also provided to the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of LANL's Annual Performance Plan and to the Los Alamos National Security (LANS) LLC's Science and Technology Committee (STC) as part of its responsibilities to the LANS Board of Governors. LANL has defined fourteen STE capabilities. Table 1

  6. Audit of the radioactive liquid waste treatment facility operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-19

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) generates radioactive and liquid wastes that must be treated before being discharged to the environment. Presently, the liquid wastes are treated in the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (Treatment Facility), which is over 30 years old and in need of repair or replacement. However, there are various ways to satisfy the treatment need. The objective of the audit was to determine whether Los Alamos cost effectively managed its Treatment Facility operations. The audit determined that Los Alamos` treatment costs were significantly higher when compared to similar costs incurred by the private sector. This situation occurred because Los Alamos did not perform a complete analysis of privatization or prepare a {open_quotes}make-or-buy{close_quotes} plan for its treatment operations, although a {open_quotes}make-or-buy{close_quotes} plan requirement was incorporated into the contract in 1996. As a result, Los Alamos may be spending $2.15 million more than necessary each year and could needlessly spend $10.75 million over the next five years to treat its radioactive liquid waste. In addition, Los Alamos has proposed to spend $13 million for a new treatment facility that may not be needed if privatization proves to be a cost effective alternative. We recommended that the Manager, Albuquerque Operations Office (Albuquerque), (1) require Los Alamos to prepare a {open_quotes}make-or-buy{close_quotes} plan for its radioactive liquid waste treatment operations, (2) review the plan for approval, and (3) direct Los Alamos to select the most cost effective method of operations while also considering other factors such as mission support, reliability, and long-term program needs. Albuquerque concurred with the recommendations.

  7. [Los Alamos National Laboratory industrial applications and technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-31

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of the Los Alamos Economic Development Corporation (LAEDC) under its contract with the Industrial Applications Office (IAO). The LAEDC has: provided business planning assistance to potential entrepreneurs, assisted IAO in preparing and distributing informational materials on technology, organized and managed meetings and seminars on technology transfer and entrepreneurship, identified new opportunities for technology transfer, and identified and implemented programs for the recognition of Laboratory entrepreneurs.

  8. NEPA and NHPA- successful decommissioning of historic Manhattan Project properties at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    McGehee, E.D.; Pendergrass, A.K.

    1997-05-21

    This paper describes experiences at Los Alamos National Laboratory during the process of planning and executing decommissioning and decontamination activities on a number of properties constructed as part of the Manhattan project. Many of these buildings had been abandoned for many years and were in deteriorating condition, in addition to being contaminated with asbestos, lead based paints and high explosive residues. Due to the age and use of the structures they were evaluated against criteria for the National Register of Historic Places. This process is briefly reviewed, along with the results, as well as actions implemented as a result of the condition and safety of the structures. A number of the structures have been decontaminated and demolished. Planning is still ongoing for the renovation of one structure, and the photographic and drawing records of the properties is near completion.

  9. Los Alamos National Laboratory Human and Intellectual Capital for Sustaining Nuclear Deterrence

    SciTech Connect

    McAlpine, Bradley

    2015-04-01

    This paper provides an overview of the current human and intellectual capital at Los Alamos National Laboratory, through specific research into the statistics and demographics as well as numerous personal interviews at all levels of personnel. Based on this information, a series of recommendations are provided to assist Los Alamos National Laboratory in ensuring the future of the human and intellectual capital for the nuclear deterrence mission. While the current human and intellectual capital is strong it stands on the precipice and action must be taken to ensure Los Alamos National Laboratory maintains leadership in developing and sustaining national nuclear capabilities. These recommendations may be applicable to other areas of the nuclear enterprise, including the Air Force, after further research and study.

  10. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory 2006 Water Year

    SciTech Connect

    R.P. Romero, D. Ortiz, G. Kuyumjian

    2007-08-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 44 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs--two that flow into Canon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon--and peak flow data for 44 stations.

  11. Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 2009 water year

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz, David; McCullough, Betsy

    2010-05-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 73 stream-gage stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs— two that flow into Cañon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon.

  12. Environmental Assessment for Electrical Power System Upgrades at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico - Final Document

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2000-03-09

    The ''National Environmental Policy Act of 1969'' (NEPA) requires Federal agency officials to consider the environmental consequences of their proposed actions before decisions are made. In complying with NEPA, the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) follows the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 1500-1508) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021). The purpose of an Environmental Assessment (EA) is to provide Federal decision makers with sufficient evidence and analysis to determine whether to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) or issue a Finding of No Significant Impact. In this case, the DOE decision to be made is whether to construct and operate a 19.5-mile (mi) (31-kilometer [km]) electric transmission line (power line) reaching from the Norton Substation, west across the Rio Grande, to locations within the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Areas (TAs) 3 and 5 at Los Alamos, New Mexico. The construction of one electric substation at LANL would be included in the project as would the construction of two line segments less than 1,200 feet (ft) (366 meters [m]) long that would allow for the uncrossing of a portion of two existing power lines. Additionally, a fiber optics communications line would be included and installed concurrently as part of the required overhead ground conductor for the power line. The new power line would improve the reliability of electric service in the LANL and Los Aktrnos County areas as would the uncrossing of the crossed segments of the existing lines. Additionally, installation of the new power line would enable the LANL and the Los Alamos County electric grid, which is a shared resource, to be adapted to accommodate the future import of increased power when additional power service becomes available in the northern New Mexico area. Similarly, the fiber optics line would allow DOE to take advantage of future opportunities in

  13. Energy Security is National Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-11

    reactors p.nd even opened up drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge ( ANWR ). However, the reality is, "Oil company experts believe ... in at...best 10 years time, ANWR could boost American production by 600,000 barrels a day.ŝ Additionally, it will take decades to build nuclear power plants...naturally make·the altermitive fuels cheaper and thus more attractive. Finally, further domestic drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge ( ANWR ) and

  14. 17 CFR 240.17a-1 - Recordkeeping rule for national securities exchanges, national securities associations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... national securities exchanges, national securities associations, registered clearing agencies and the... Certain Stabilizing Activities § 240.17a-1 Recordkeeping rule for national securities exchanges, national...) Every national securities exchange, national securities association, registered clearing agency and......

  15. 17 CFR 240.17a-1 - Recordkeeping rule for national securities exchanges, national securities associations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... national securities exchanges, national securities associations, registered clearing agencies and the... Certain Stabilizing Activities § 240.17a-1 Recordkeeping rule for national securities exchanges, national...) Every national securities exchange, national securities association, registered clearing agency and......

  16. 17 CFR 240.17a-1 - Recordkeeping rule for national securities exchanges, national securities associations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... national securities exchanges, national securities associations, registered clearing agencies and the... Certain Stabilizing Activities § 240.17a-1 Recordkeeping rule for national securities exchanges, national...) Every national securities exchange, national securities association, registered clearing agency and......

  17. 17 CFR 240.17a-1 - Recordkeeping rule for national securities exchanges, national securities associations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... national securities exchanges, national securities associations, registered clearing agencies and the... Certain Stabilizing Activities § 240.17a-1 Recordkeeping rule for national securities exchanges, national...) Every national securities exchange, national securities association, registered clearing agency and......

  18. 17 CFR 240.17a-1 - Recordkeeping rule for national securities exchanges, national securities associations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... national securities exchanges, national securities associations, registered clearing agencies and the... Certain Stabilizing Activities § 240.17a-1 Recordkeeping rule for national securities exchanges, national...) Every national securities exchange, national securities association, registered clearing agency and......

  19. Los Alamos contribution to target diagnostics on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, J.M.; Baker, D.A.; Caldwell, S.E.

    1994-07-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will have a large suite of sophisticated target diagnostics. This will allow thoroughly diagnosed experiments to be performed both at the ignition and pre-ignition levels. As part of the national effort Los Alamos National Laboratory will design, construct and implement a number of diagnostics for the NIF. This paper describes Los Alamos contributions to the ``phase I diagnostics.`` Phase I represents the most fundamental and basic measurement systems that will form the core for most work on the NIF. The Los Alamos effort falls into four categories: moderate to hard X-ray (time resolved imaging neutron spectroscopy- primarily with neutron time of flight devices; burn diagnostics utilizing gamma ray measurements; testing measurement concepts on the TRIDENT laser system at Los Alamos. Because of the high blast, debris and radiation environment, the design of high resolution X-ray imaging systems present significant challenges. Systems with close target proximity require special protection and methods for such protection is described. The system design specifications based on expected target performance parameters is also described. Diagnosis of nuclear yield and burn will be crucial to the NIF operation. Nuclear reaction diagnosis utilizing both neutron and gamma ray detection is discussed. The Los Alamos TRIDENT laser system will be used extensively for the development of new measurement concepts and diagnostic instrumentation. Some its potential roles in the development of diagnostics for NIF are given.

  20. Shock and Detonation Physics at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, David L; Dattelbaum, Dana M; Sheffield, Steve A

    2012-08-22

    WX-9 serves the Laboratory and the Nation by delivering quality technical results, serving customers that include the Nuclear Weapons Program (DOE/NNSA), the Department of Defense, the Department of Homeland Security and other government agencies. The scientific expertise of the group encompasses equations-of-state, shock compression science, phase transformations, detonation physics including explosives initiation, detonation propagation, and reaction rates, spectroscopic methods and velocimetry, and detonation and equation-of-state theory. We are also internationally-recognized in ultra-fast laser shock methods and associated diagnostics, and are active in the area of ultra-sensitive explosives detection. The facility capital enabling the group to fulfill its missions include a number of laser systems, both for laser-driven shocks, and spectroscopic analysis, high pressure gas-driven guns and powder guns for high velocity plate impact experiments, explosively-driven techniques, static high pressure devices including diamond anvil cells and dilatometers coupled with spectroscopic probes, and machine shops and target fabrication facilities.

  1. Climate Change and National Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. a. REPORT Climate Change and National...Security 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Does climate change constitute a national security threat to the United States? What is climate ...resources for an in-depth discussion on national security and climate change . 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES

  2. Radionuclide concentrations in pinto beans, sweet corn, and zucchini squash grown in Los Alamos Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Fresquez, P.R.; Mullen, M.A.; Naranjo, L. Jr.; Armstrong, D.R.

    1997-05-01

    Pinto beans, sweet corn, and zucchini squash (Cucurbita pepo var. black beauty) were grown in a randomized complete-block field/pot experiment at a site that contained the highest observed levels of surface gross gamma radioactivity within Los Alamos Canyon (LAC) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Soils as well as washed edible and nonedible crop tissues were analyzed for various radionuclides and heavy metals . Most radionuclides, with the exception of {sup 3}H and {sup tot}U, in soil from LAC were detected in significantly higher concentrations (p <0.01) than in soil collected from regional background (RBG) locations. Similarly, most radionuclides in edible crop portions of beans, squash, and corn were detected in significantly higher (p <0.01 and 0.05) concentrations than RBG. Most soil-to-plant concentration ratios for radionuclides in edible and nonedible crop tissues from LAC were within the default values given by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Environmental Protection Agency. All heavy metals in soils, as well as edible and nonedible crop tissues grown in soils from LAC, were within RBG concentrations. Overall, the total maximum net positive committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE)--the CEDE plus two sigma for each radioisotope minus background and then all positive doses summed--to a hypothetical 50-year resident that ingested 160 kg of beans, corn, and squash in equal proportions, was 74 mrem y{sup -1}. This dose was below the International Commission on Radiological Protection permissible dose limit (PDL) of 100 mrem y{sup -1} from all pathways; however, the addition of other internal and external exposure route factors may increase the overall dose over the PDL. Also, the risk of an excess cancer fatality, based on 74 mrem y{sup -1}, was 3.7 x 10{sup -5} (37 in a million), which is above the Environmental Protection Agency`s (acceptable) guideline of one in a million. 31 refs., 15 tabs.

  3. Proposed Future Disposition of Certain Cerro Grande Fire Flood and Sediment Retention Structures at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2002-08-07

    This environmental assessment (EA) has been prepared to analyze the environmental consequences resulting from the future disposition of certain flood retention structures built in the wake of the Cerro Grande Fire within the boundaries of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). In May 2000, a prescription burn, started on Federally-administered land to the northwest of LANL, blew out of control and was designated as a wildfire. This wildfire, which became known as the Cerro Grande Fire, burned approximately 7,650 acres (3,061 hectares) within the boundaries of LANL before it was extinguished. During the fire a number of emergency actions were undertaken by the Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to suppress and extinguish the fire within LANL; immediately thereafter, NNSA undertook additional emergency actions to address the post-fire conditions. Due to hydrophobic soils (non-permeable soil areas created as a result of very high temperatures often associated with wild fires) and the loss of vegetation from steep canyon sides caused by the fire, surface runoff and soil erosion on hillsides above LANL were greatly increased over prefire levels. The danger to LANL facilities and structures and homes located down-canyon from the burned area was magnified.

  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project 1995 quality program status report

    SciTech Connect

    Bolivar, S.L.

    1996-07-01

    This status report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project`s (YMP`s) quality assurance program for January 1 to September 30, 1995. The report includes major sections on program activities and trend analysis.

  5. Produce and fish sampling program of Los Alamos National Laboratory's Environmental Surveillance Group

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, J.G.

    1984-09-01

    This report describes produce and fish sampling procedures of the Environmental Surveillance Group at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The program monitors foodstuffs and fish for possible radioactive contamination from Laboratory operations. Data gathered in this program on radionuclide concentrations help to estimate radiation doses to Laboratory personnel and the public. 3 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

  6. IMPACTS OF DRILLING ADDITIVES ON DATA OBTAINED FROM HYDROGEOLOGIC CHARACTERIZATION WELLS AT LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Personnel at the EPA Ground Water and Ecosystems Restoration Division (GWERD) were requested by EPA Region 6 to evaluate the impacts of well drilling practices at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The focus of this review involved analysis of the impacts of bentonite- a...

  7. Los Alamos National Laboratory Training Capabilities (Possible Applications in the Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Olga

    2012-06-04

    The briefing provides an overview of the training capabilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory that can be applied to nonproliferation/responsible science education at nuclear institutes in the Former Soviet Union, as part of the programmatic effort under the Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention program (GIPP).

  8. Simplifying Complexity: Miriam Blake--Los Alamos National Laboratory Research Library, NM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The holy grail for many research librarians is one-stop searching: seamless access to all the library's resources on a topic, regardless of the source. Miriam Blake, Library Without Walls Project Leader at Los Alamos National laboratory (LANL), is making this vision a reality. Blake is part of a growing cadre of experts: a techie who is becoming a…

  9. Mapping the future of CIC Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes three scenario-based strategic planning workshops run for the CIC Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory during November and December, 1995. Each of the two-day meetings was facilitated by Northeast Consulting Resources, Inc. (NCRI) of Boston, MA. using the Future Mapping{reg_sign} methodology.

  10. Evaluation of Macroinvertebrate Communities and Habitat for Selected Stream Reaches at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    L.J. Henne; K.J. Buckley

    2005-08-12

    This is the second aquatic biological monitoring report generated by Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL's) Water Quality and Hydrology Group. The study has been conducted to generate impact-based assessments of habitat and water quality for LANL waterways. The monitoring program was designed to allow for the detection of spatial and temporal trends in water and habitat quality through ongoing, biannual monitoring of habitat characteristics and benthic aquatic macroinvertebrate communities at six key sites in Los Alamos, Sandia, Water, Pajarito, and Starmer's Gulch Canyons. Data were collected on aquatic habitat characteristics, channel substrate, and macroinvertebrate communities during 2001 and 2002. Aquatic habitat scores were stable between 2001 and 2002 at all locations except Starmer's Gulch and Pajarito Canyon, which had lower scores in 2002 due to low flow conditions. Channel substrate changes were most evident at the upper Los Alamos and Pajarito study reaches. The macroinvertebrate Stream Condition Index (SCI) indicated moderate to severe impairment at upper Los Alamos Canyon, slight to moderate impairment at upper Sandia Canyon, and little or no impairment at lower Sandia Canyon, Starmer's Gulch, and Pajarito Canyon. Habitat, substrate, and macroinvertebrate data from the site in upper Los Alamos Canyon indicated severe impacts from the Cerro Grande Fire of 2000. Impairment in the macroinvertebrate community at upper Sandia Canyon was probably due to effluent-dominated flow at that site. The minimal impairment SCI scores for the lower Sandia site indicated that water quality improved with distance downstream from the outfall at upper Sandia Canyon.

  11. National Strategy for Aviation Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-26

    for Aviation Security (hereafter referred to as the Strategy") to protect the Nation and its interests from threats in the Air Domain. The Secretary of... Aviation security is best achieved by integrating public and private aviation security global activities into a coordinated effort to detect, deter...might occur. The Strategy aligns Federal government aviation security programs and initiatives into a comprehensive and cohesive national effort

  12. Chemical decontamination technical resources at Los Alamos National Laboratory (2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Murray E

    2008-01-01

    This document supplies information resources for a person seeking to create planning or pre-planning documents for chemical decontamination operations. A building decontamination plan can be separated into four different sections: Pre-planning, Characterization, Decontamination (Initial response and also complete cleanup), and Clearance. Of the identified Los Alamos resources, they can be matched with these four sections: Pre-planning -- Dave Seidel, EO-EPP, Emergency Planning and Preparedness; David DeCroix and Bruce Letellier, D-3, Computational fluids modeling of structures; Murray E. Moore, RP-2, Aerosol sampling and ventilation engineering. Characterization (this can include development projects) -- Beth Perry, IAT-3, Nuclear Counterterrorism Response (SNIPER database); Fernando Garzon, MPA-11, Sensors and Electrochemical Devices (development); George Havrilla, C-CDE, Chemical Diagnostics and Engineering; Kristen McCabe, B-7, Biosecurity and Public Health. Decontamination -- Adam Stively, EO-ER, Emergency Response; Dina Matz, IHS-IP, Industrial hygiene; Don Hickmott, EES-6, Chemical cleanup. Clearance (validation) -- Larry Ticknor, CCS-6, Statistical Sciences.

  13. 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory Riparian Inventory Results

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, Elizabeth J.; Hansen, Leslie A.; Hathcock, Charles D.; Keller, David C.; Zemlick, Catherine M.

    2012-03-29

    A total length of 36.7 kilometers of riparian habitat were inventoried within LANL boundaries between 2007 and 2011. The following canyons and lengths of riparian habitat were surveyed and inventoried between 2007 and 2011. Water Canyon (9,669 m), Los Alamos Canyon (7,131 m), Pajarito Canyon (6,009 m), Mortandad Canyon (3,110 m), Two-Mile Canyon (2,680 m), Sandia Canyon (2,181 m), Three-Mile Canyon (1,883 m), Canyon de Valle (1,835 m), Ancho Canyon (1,143 m), Canada del Buey (700 m), Sandia Canyon (221 m), DP Canyon (159 m) and Chaquehui Canyon (50 m). Effluent Canyon, Fence Canyon and Potrillo Canyon were surveyed but no areas of riparian habitat were found. Stretches of inventoried riparian habitat were classified for prioritization of treatment, if any was recommended. High priority sites included stretches of Mortandad Canyon, LA Canyon, Pajarito Canyon, Two-Mile Canyon, Sandia Canyon and Water Canyon. Recommended treatment for high priority sites includes placement of objects into the stream channel to encourage sediment deposition, elimination of channel incision, and to expand and slow water flow across the floodplain. Additional stretches were classified as lower priority, and, for other sites it was recommended that feral cattle and exotic plants be removed to aid in riparian habitat recovery. In June 2011 the Las Conchas Wildfire burned over 150,000 acres of land in the Jemez Mountains and surrounding areas. The watersheds above LA Canyon, Water Canyon and Pajarito Canyon were burned in the Las Conchas Wildfire and flooding and habitat alteration were observed in these canyon bottoms (Wright 2011). Post fire status of lower priority areas may change to higher priority for some of the sites surveyed prior to the Las Conchas Wildfire, due to changes in vegetation cover in the adjacent upland watershed.

  14. Environmental assessment for the scintillation vial crusher TA-54, Area L, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    Research and development projects conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory produce scintillation vials as waste from normal operations. These vials contain radioisotopes such as tritium, carbon-14, and isotopes of transuranic elements such as americium-241, plutonium-238 and -239. The scintillation fluids contain some solvents defined as hazardous waste. The vials are thus classed as mixed waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Laboratory has in storage some 520 drums of stored vials and is accumulating some 70 to 140 more drums annually. The drained vial fragments can be disposed of at TA-54 as low-level radioactive waste (LLW). The bulked liquid will be stored at TA-54 as RCRA mixed waste until treatment/disposal options are developed. Other waste from the vial crushing operation will also be stored at TA-54 as mixed waste. By operating the scintillation vial crusher, the storage space needed for this RCRA mixed waste stream can be reduced to about 5% of that currently being used. The other 95% will be vial fragments that can be disposed immediately as LLW.

  15. 76 FR 34761 - Classified National Security Information

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ... Classified National Security Information AGENCY: Marine Mammal Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... information, as directed by Information Security Oversight Office regulations. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT..., ``Classified National Security Information,'' and 32 CFR part 2001, ``Classified National Security...

  16. Management of nuclear materials in an R D environment at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, R.G.; Roth, S.B.; Jones, S.R.

    1991-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a multidisciplinary R D organization and, as such, its nuclear materials inventory is diverse. Accordingly, major inventories of isotopes such as Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-242, U-235, Th, tritium, and deuterium, and lesser amounts of isotopes of Am, Cm, Np and exotic isotopes such as berkelium must be managed in accordance with Department of Energy Orders and Laboratory policies. Los Alamos also acts as a national resource for many one-of-a-kind materials which are supplied to universities, industry, and other government agencies within the US and throughout the world. Management of these materials requires effective interaction and communication with many nuclear materials custodians residing in over forty technical groups as well as effective interaction with numerous outside organizations. This paper discusses the role, philosophy, and organizational structure of Nuclear Materials Management at Los Alamos and also briefly presents results of two special nuclear materials management projects: 1- Revision of Item Description Codes for use in the Los Alamos nuclear material data base and 2- The recommendation of new economic discard limits for Pu-239. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Management of nuclear materials in a R and D environment at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, R.G.; Roth, S.B.; Jones, S.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a multidisciplinary R and D organization and, as such, its nuclear materials inventory is diverse. Accordingly, major inventories of isotopes such as Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-242, U-235, Th, tritium, and deuterium, and lesser amounts of isotopes of Am, Cm, Np and exotic isotopes such as berkelium must be managed in accordance with Department of Energy Orders and Laboratory policies. Los Alamos also acts as a national resource for many one-of-a-kind materials which are supplied to universities, industry, and other government agencies within the U.S. and throughout the world. Management of these materials requires effective interaction and communication with many nuclear materials custodians residing in over forty technical groups as well as effective interaction with numerous outside organizations. This paper discusses the role, philosophy, and organizational structure of Nuclear Materials Management at Los Alamos and also briefly presents results of two special nuclear materials management projects: Revision of Item Description Codes for use in the Los Alamos nuclear material data base and The recommendation of new economic discard limits for Pu-239.

  18. Floodplain Assessment for the Proposed Outdoor Fire Range Upgrades at TA-72 in Lower Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hathcock, Charles D.

    2012-08-27

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is preparing to implement actions in Sandia Canyon at Technical Area (TA) 72. Los Alamos National Security (LANS) biologists conducted a floodplain determination and this project is partially located within a 100-year floodplain. The proposed project is to upgrade the existing outdoor shooting range facilities at TA-72. These upgrades will result in increased safety and efficiencies in the training for Protective Force personnel. In order to remain current on training requirements, the firing ranges at TA-72 will be upgraded which will result in increased safety and efficiencies in the training for Protective Force personnel (Figure 1). These upgrades will allow for an increase in class size and more people to be qualified at the ranges. Some of these upgrades will be built within the 100-year floodplain. The upgrades include: concrete pads for turning target systems and shooting positions, new lighting to illuminate the firing range for night fire, a new speaker system for range operations, canopies at two locations, an impact berm at the far end of the 300-yard mark, and a block wall for road protection.

  19. Floodplain Assessment for the Proposed Engineered Erosion Controls at TA-72 in Lower Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hathcock, Charles D.

    2012-08-27

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is preparing to implement engineering controls in Sandia Canyon at Technical Area (TA) 72. Los Alamos National Security (LANS) biologists conducted a floodplain determination and this project is located within a 100-year floodplain. The proposed project is to rehabilitate the degraded channel in lower Sandia Canyon where it crosses through the outdoor firing range at TA-72 to limit the loss of sediment and dissipate floodwater leaving LANL property (Figure 1). The proposed construction of these engineered controls is part of the New Mexico Environment Department's (NMED) approved LANL Individual Storm Water Permit. The purpose of this project is to install storm water controls at Sandia Watershed Site Monitoring Area 6 (S-SMA-6). Storm water controls will be designed and installed to meet the requirements of NPDES Permit No. NM0030759, commonly referred to as the LANL Individual Storm Water Permit (IP). The storm water control measures address storm water mitigation for the area within the boundary of Area of Concern (AOC) 72-001. This action meets the requirements of the IP for S-SMA-6 for storm water controls by a combination of: preventing exposure of upstream storm water and storm water generated within the channel to the AOC and totally retaining storm water falling outside the channel but within the AOC.

  20. Los Alamos National Laboratory emergency management plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, G.F.

    1998-07-15

    The Laboratory has developed this Emergency Management Plan (EMP) to assist in emergency planning, preparedness, and response to anticipated and actual emergencies. The Plan establishes guidance for ensuring safe Laboratory operation, protection of the environment, and safeguarding Department of Energy (DOE) property. Detailed information and specific instructions required by emergency response personnel to implement the EMP are contained in the Emergency Management Plan Implementing Procedure (EMPIP) document, which consists of individual EMPIPs. The EMP and EMPIPs may be used to assist in resolving emergencies including but not limited to fires, high-energy accidents, hazardous material releases (radioactive and nonradioactive), security incidents, transportation accidents, electrical accidents, and natural disasters.

  1. Seismic hazards investigations at Los Alamos National Laboratory, 1984 to 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, J.N.; House, L.

    1987-10-01

    The Pajarito fault system, part of which skirts the western boundary of Los Alamos National Laboratory, is a major, active structural element of the Rio Grande rift. We have mapped over 100 km of interrelated fault zones and traces that constitute the fault systmem in the vicinity of Los Alamos. The style of deformation in the fault system gradually transforms from normal slip, to normal oblique slip, to dominantly right lateral strike-slip motions from south to north. Most significant movements (>100 m) on the fault system in the vicinity of Los Alamos have occurred within the last 1.1 million years. Portions of the fault system may have associated microseismic activity. Available evidence indicates tha major movements have occurred on the fault system in the last 500,000 years and as recently as 350,000 years ago, 240,000 years ago, 42,000 years ago, possibly <10,000 years ago, and 2000 years ago. Some limited, inferential field data imply the fault system generates characteristic earthquakes in the magnitude (Richter) range 6.5 to 7.8. Extrapolation of frequency-magnitude relations, derived from the 10 years of data from the Los Alamos seismograph net, to estimate large expectable earthquakes is unrealistic, and based on the findings of other workers the result is most likely a substantial underestimate. 77 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. A Wildfire Behavior Modeling System at Los Alamos National Laboratory for Operational Applications

    SciTech Connect

    S.W. Koch; R.G.Balice

    2004-11-01

    To support efforts to protect facilities and property at Los Alamos National Laboratory from damages caused by wildfire, we completed a multiyear project to develop a system for modeling the behavior of wildfires in the Los Alamos region. This was accomplished by parameterizing the FARSITE wildfire behavior model with locally gathered data representing topography, fuels, and weather conditions from throughout the Los Alamos region. Detailed parameterization was made possible by an extensive monitoring network of permanent plots, weather towers, and other data collection facilities. We also incorporated a database of lightning strikes that can be used individually as repeatable ignition points or can be used as a group in Monte Carlo simulation exercises and in other randomization procedures. The assembled modeling system was subjected to sensitivity analyses and was validated against documented fires, including the Cerro Grande Fire. The resulting modeling system is a valuable tool for research and management. It also complements knowledge based on professional expertise and information gathered from other modeling technologies. However, the modeling system requires frequent updates of the input data layers to produce currently valid results, to adapt to changes in environmental conditions within the Los Alamos region, and to allow for the quick production of model outputs during emergency operations.

  3. Compliance program for 40 CFR 61, Subpart H at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    McNamara, Eric A.

    1997-01-01

    Effective on March 15, 1990, the Environmental Protection Agency established regulations controlling the emission of radionuclides to the air from Department of Energy facilities to limit the dose to the public to 10 mrem/yr. These regulations are detailed in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, "National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities". Part of these regulations require the operation of sampling systems on stacks meeting certain requirements. Although Los Alamos National Laboratory has a long history of stack sampling, the systems in place at the time the regulation became effective did not meet the specific design requirements of the new regulation. In addition, certain specific program elements did not exist or were not adequately documented. The Los Alamos National Laboratory has undertaken a major effort to upgrade its compliance program to meet the requirements of USEPA. This effort involved: developing new and technically superior sampling methods and obtaining approval from the Environmental Protection Agency for their use; negotiating specific methodologies with the Environmental Protection Agency to implement certain requirements of the regulation: implementing a complete, quality assured, compliance program; and upgrading sampling systems. After several years of effort, Los Alamos National Laboratory now meets all requirements of the USEPA.

  4. Environmental Assessment for the High Explosives Wastewater Treatment Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-03

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has identified a need to improve the management of wastewater resulting from high explosives (HE) research and development work at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). LANL`s current methods off managing HE-contaminated wastewater cannot ensure that discharged HE wastewater would consistently meet the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) standards for wastewater discharge. The DOE needs to enhance He wastewater management to e able to meet both present and future regulatory standards for wastewater discharge. The DOE also proposes to incorporate major pollution prevention and waste reduction features into LANL`s existing HE production facilities. Currently, wastewater from HE processing buildings at four Technical Areas (TAs) accumulates in sumps where particulate HE settles out and barium is precipitated. Wastewater is then released from the sumps to the environment at 15 permitted outfalls without treatment. The released water may contain suspended and dissolved contaminants, such as HE and solvents. This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes two alternatives, the Proposed Action and the Alternative Action, that would meet the purpose and need for agency action. Both alternatives would treat all HE process wastewater using sand filters to remove HE particulates and activated carbon to adsorb organic solvents and dissolved HE. Under either alternative, LANL would burn solvents and flash dried HE particulates and spent carbon following well-established procedures. Burning would produce secondary waste that would be stored, treated, and disposed of at TA-54, Area J. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact and Floodplain Statement of Findings for the High Explosives Wastewater Treatment Facility.

  5. Materials capability review Los Alamos National Laboratory, May 3-6, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Antoinette

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 'Capability Review' process at LANL significantly differs from the Division reviews of prior years. The Capabilities being reviewed (some 4-8 per year) are deliberately chosen to be crosscutting over the Laboratory, and therefore will include not only several experimental, theoretical and simulation disciplines, but also contributions from multiple line organizations. This approach is consistent with the new Laboratory organizational structure, focusing on agile and integrated capabilities applied to present national security missions, and also nurtured to be available for rapid application to future missions. The overall intent is that the Committee assess the quality of the science, engineering, and technology identified in the agenda, and advise the LANS Board of Governors and Laboratory management. Specifically, the Committees will: (1) Assess the quality of science, technology and engineering within the Capability in the areas defined in the agenda. Identify issues to develop or enhance the core competencies within this capability. (2) Evaluate the integration of this capability across the Laboratory organizations that are listed in the agenda in terms of joint programs, projects, proposals, and/or publications. Describe the integration of this capability in the wider scientific community using the recognition as a leader within the community, ability to set research agendas, and attraction and retention of staff. (3) Assess the quality and relevance of this capability's science, technology and engineering contributions to current and emerging Laboratory programs, including Nuclear Weapons, Threat Reduction/Homeland Security, and Energy Security. (4) Advise the Laboratory Director/Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering on the health of the Capability including the current and future (5 year) science, technology and engineering staff needs, mix of research and development activities, program opportunities, environment for

  6. Customer service model for waste tracking at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dorries, Alison M; Montoya, Andrew J; Ashbaugh, Andrew E

    2010-11-10

    The deployment of any new software system in a production facility will always face multiple hurtles in reaching a successful acceptance. However, a new waste tracking system was required at the plutonium processing facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) where waste processing must be integrated to handle Special Nuclear Materials tracking requirements. Waste tracking systems can enhance the processing of waste in production facilities when the system is developed with a focus on customer service throughout the project life cycle. In March 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Technical Services (WTS) replaced the aging systems and infrastructure that were being used to support the plutonium processing facility. The Waste Technical Services (WTS) Waste Compliance and Tracking System (WCATS) Project Team, using the following customer service model, succeeded in its goal to meet all operational and regulatory requirements, making waste processing in the facility more efficient while partnering with the customer.

  7. Plan for increasing public participation in cleanup decisions for the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    This document describes a plan for involving the public in decisions related to cleaning up sites suspected of being contaminated with chemicals or radioactivity at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In this section we describe the purpose of the Environmental Remediation Project, our past efforts to communicate with the northern New Mexico community, and the events that brought about our realization that less traditional, more innovative approaches to public involvement are needed.

  8. Summary of New Los Alamos National Laboratory Groundwater Data Loaded in July 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Paris, Steven M.

    2015-04-07

    This report provides information concerning groundwater monitoring data obtained by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under its interim monitoring plan and contains results for chemical constituents that meet seven screening criteria laid out in the Compliance Order on Consent. Tables are included in the report to organize the findings from the samples. The report covers groundwater samples taken from wells or springs that provide surveillance of the groundwater zones indicated in the table.

  9. 2003 Los Alamos National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-04

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for Los Alamos National Lab. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  10. Los Alamos National Laboratory scientific interactions with the Former Soviet Union

    SciTech Connect

    White, P.C.

    1995-12-31

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has a wide-ranging set of scientific interactions with technical institutes in the Former Soviet Union (FSU). Many of these collaborations, especially those in pure science, began long before the end of the Cold War and the breakup of the Soviet Union. This overview will, however, focus for the most part on those activities that were initiated in the last few years. This review may also serve both to indicate the broad spectrum of US government interests that are served, at least in part, through these laboratory initiatives, and to suggest ways in which additional collaborations with the FSU may be developed to serve similar mutual interests of the countries involved. While most of the examples represent programs carried out by Los Alamos, they are also indicative of similar efforts by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories. There are indeed other Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories, and many of them have active collaborative programs with FSU institutes. However, the laboratories specifically identified above are those with special nuclear weapons responsibilities, and thus have unique technical capabilities to address certain issues of some importance to the continuing interests of the United States and the states of the Former Soviet Union. Building on pre-collapse scientific collaborations and contacts, Los Alamos has used the shared language of science to build institutional and personal relationships and to pursue common interests. It is important to understand that Los Alamos, and the other DOE weapons laboratories are federal institutions, working with federal funds, and thus every undertaking has a definite relationship to some national objective. The fertile areas for collaboration are obviously those where US and Russian interests coincide.

  11. 75 FR 707 - Classified National Security Information

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... National Security Information Memorandum of December 29, 2009--Implementation of the Executive Order ``Classified National Security Information'' Order of December 29, 2009--Original Classification Authority #0... 13526 of December 29, 2009 Classified National Security Information This order prescribes a...

  12. An aerial radiological survey of Technical Areas 2, 21, and 53 and surroundings, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzsche, A.E.

    1990-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the entire Los Alamos National Laboratory was flown in September 1982. The data from a part of the survey, Technical Areas 2, 21, and 53, are presented here along with pertinent data from an October 1975 survey of limited areas of Los Alamos. The data from Technical Area 15, another part of the survey, will be published in another report. Contour maps of the gamma survey data show some Cs-137 activity in Los Alamos Canyon as well as in DP Canyon beside TA-21. Some Be-7, Sb-124, and Co-58 apparently exist in the canyon immediately below the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) ponds. Estimates on the Cs-137 inventory in the canyons range from 210 mCi to 1270 mCi. An exposure rate contour map at 1 meter above ground level (AGL) was constructed from the gamma data and overlaid on an aerial photograph and map of the area. The terrestrial exposure rates ranged from 6{mu}R/h to about 18{mu}R/h. 25 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Low Energy Accelerator Laboratory Technical Area 53, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes the potential environmental impacts that would be expected to occur if the Department of Energy (DOE) were to construct and operate a small research and development laboratory building at Technical Area (TA) 53 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, New Mexico. DOE proposes to construct a small building to be called the Low Energy Accelerator Laboratory (LEAL), at a previously cleared, bladed, and leveled quarter-acre site next to other facilities housing linear accelerator research activities at TA-53. Operations proposed for LEAL would consist of bench-scale research, development, and testing of the initial section of linear particle accelerators. This initial section consists of various components that are collectively called an injector system. The anticipated life span of the proposed development program would be about 15 years.

  14. Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) located in Los Alamos, New Mexico. LANL is operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by the University of California. The Tiger Team Assessment was conducted from September 23 to November 8, 1991, under the auspices of the DOE Office of Special Projects, Office of Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health. The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing environmental, safety, and health (ES & H) disciplines; management; and contractor and DOE self-assessments. Compliance with applicable Federal, state, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal LANL site requirements was assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and the site contractors` management of ES & H/quality assurance programs was conducted. This volume discusses findings concerning the environmental assessment.

  15. DOE/EA-1515: Final Environmental Assessment for Proposed Closure of the Airport Landfills Within Technical Area 73 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (May 2005)

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2005-05-01

    Chapter 1 presents the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) requirements under the ''National Environmental Policy Act of 1969'' (NEPA), background information on the proposal, the purpose and need for agency action, and a summary of public involvement activities. This Environmental Assessment (EA) incorporates information (tiers) from the ''Environmental Impact Statement for the Conveyance and Transfer of Certain Land Tracts Administered by the U.S. Department of Energy and Located at Los Alamos National Laboratory'' (LANL) (DOE 1999a), the ''Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory'' (SWEIS; DOE 1999b), the ''RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) Report for Potential Release Sites 73-001(a)-99 and 73-001(b)-99 (LANL 1998a)'', and the ''Voluntary Corrective Measure (VCM) Plan for Potential Release Sites 73-001(a)-99 and 73-001(b)-99 (LANL 2002)'', and other environmental documents listed in Chapter 7, References.

  16. A brief history of Sandia's National security missions.

    SciTech Connect

    Drewien, Celeste A.; O'Canna, Myra Lynn; Stikar, John Anthony.

    2014-09-01

    To help members of the workforce understand what factors contribute to Sandia National Laboratories national security mission, the authors describe the evolution of Sandias core mission and its other mission components. The mission of Sandia first as a division of Los Alamos and later as Sandia Corporation underlies our core nuclear weapon mission of today. Sandias mission changed in 1963 and twice more in the 1970s. This report should help staff and management appreciate the need for mission evolution. A clear definition and communication of a consistent corporate mission statement is still needed.

  17. From Bombs to Breast Cancer Imaging: Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Martineau, Rebecca M

    2012-07-26

    . Currently, there is fierce debate surrounding the age at which breast cancer screening should begin, and once begun, how often it should occur. The American Cancer Society recommends yearly mammograms starting at age 40. On the other hand, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends against routine so early. Rather, the Task Force recommends biennial mammography screening for women aged 50 to 74 years. The ten-year discrepancy in the onset of screening results from recent data suggesting that the frequent use of X-ray radiation during screenings could potentially increase the likelihood of developing cancer. This danger is increased by the low sensitivity and accuracy of mammograms, which sometimes require multiple screenings to yield results. Furthermore, mammograms are often not only inaccurate, but average appalling misdiagnoses rates: about 80% false positives and 15% false negatives. These misdiagnoses lead to unwarranted biopsies at an estimated health care cost of $2 billion per year, while at the same time, resulting in excessive cases of undetected cancer. As such, the National Cancer Institute recommends more studies on the advantages of types and frequency of screenings, as well as alternative screening options. The UST technology developed at LANL could be an alternative option to greatly improve the specificity and sensitivity of breast cancer screening without using ionizing radiation. LANL is developing high-resolution ultrasound tomography algorithms and a clinical ultrasound tomography scanner to conduct patient studies at the UNM Hospital. During UST scanning, the patient lies face-down while her breast, immersed in a tank of warm water, is scanned by phased-transducer arrays. UST uses recorded ultrasound signals to reconstruct a high-resolution three-dimensional image of the breast, showing the spatial distribution of mechanical properties within the breast. Breast cancers are detected by higher values of mechanical properties compared to

  18. Tritium concentrations in bees and honey at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Fresquez, P.R.; Armstrong, D.R.; Salazar, J.G.

    1994-12-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has maintained a network of honey bee colonies at LANL, perimeter (Los Alamos townsite and White Rock/Pajarito Acres) and regional (background) areas for over 15 years; the main objective of this honey bee network was to help determine the bioavailability of certain radionuclides in the environment. Of all the radionuclides studied ({sup 3}H, {sup 57}Co, {sup 7}Be, {sup 22}Na, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 83}Rb, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 90}Sr and total U), tritium was consistently detected in bees and was most readily transferred to the honey. In fact, honey collected from hives located at TA-21, TA-33, TA-50, TA-53, and TA-54 and from White Rock/Pajarito Acres contained significantly higher concentrations of {sup 3}H than regional background hives. Based on the average concentration of all radionuclides measured over the years, the effective dose equivalent (EDE) from consuming 5 kg (11 lb) of honey collected from Los Alamos (townsite) and White Rock/Pajarito Acres, after regional background has been subtracted, was 0.0186 ({+-}0.0507) and 0.0016 ({+-}0.0010) mrem/yr, respectively. The highest EDE, based on the mean + 2SD (95% confidence level), was 0.1200 mrem/y; this was <0.2% of the International Commission on Radiological Protection permissible dose limit of 100 mrem/yr from all pathways.

  19. New Mexicans` perceptions of Los Alamos National Laboratory: Awareness and evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    1990-11-01

    This report uses survey data to profile New Mexico residents`perceptions of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The survey results are the responses of a representative, randomly selected sample of New Mexico households to a set of questions asked in September and October 1990. The data allow statistical inference to the general population`s responses to the same set of questions at the time the survey was administered. The results provide an overview of New Mexico residents` current perceptions of LANL. The sample margin of error is slightly less than plus or minus five percent. Because our sample frame is designed to be proportionate to population, counties with the smallest populations, such as Mora and Los Alamos, tend to have very few respondents in a standard sample. In order to have sample sizes sufficiently large to discern statistically significant differences across these counties, we took additional, non-proportionate random samples from Los Alamos County and its neighboring counties, including Rio Arriba, Taos, San Miguel, Mora and Sandoval Counties. This required the specification of new sample frames for each of the six counties and an additional sample of 300 respondents (50 in each county). Therefore, the analysis for this report is somewhat more complex than usual in that two separate samples will be analyzed, the state-wide random sample and the oversample.

  20. Ingenuity and National Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    result of poor joint integration in Operation Eagle Claw (Iranian Hostage Rescue), Operation Urgent Fury (Invasion of Grenada ), combined with the...American forces invaded the Caribbean island nation of Grenada . Operation Urgent Fury began at 0500 on October 25, 1983. Grenada’s Marxist government...Soviet bloc government planting seeds of revolutionary warfare in Central America concerned President Reagan and the leaders of the island nations of the

  1. Lessons learned from occurrences involving procedures at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Frostenson, C.K.

    1995-07-01

    This study used the Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) data to investigate occurrences reported during one year at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). ORPS provides a centralized database and computerized support for the Collection, distribution, updating, analysis, and validation of information in occurrence reports about abnormal events related to facility operation. Human factors causes for occurrences are not always defined in ORPS. Content analysis of narrative data revealed that 33% of all LANL 1994 adverse operational events have human factors causes related to procedures. Procedure-caused occurrences that resulted in injury to workers, damage to facilities or equipment, or a near-miss are analyzed.

  2. New Mexicans` images and perceptions of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Winter, 1992--1993

    SciTech Connect

    1993-01-01

    This report uses survey data to profile New Mexico residents` images and perceptions of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The survey results are the responses of a representative, stratified random sample of 992 New Mexico households to a set of questions asked in October, 1992. The data allow statistical inference to the general population`s responses to the same set of questions at the time the survey was administered. The results provide an overview of New Mexico residents` current images and perceptions of the Laboratory. The sample margin of error is plus or minus 3.5% at the 95% confidence level.

  3. Groundwater Level Status Report for Fiscal Year 2007 - Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon P. Allen, Richard J. Koch

    2008-03-17

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in Fiscal Year 2007 is provided in this report. The Groundwater Level Monitoring Project was instituted in 2005 to provide a framework for the collection and processing of quality controlled groundwater level data. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 166 monitoring wells, including 45 regional aquifer wells, 25 intermediate wells, and 96 alluvial wells, and 11 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 133 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well.

  4. Groundwater Level Status Report for Fiscal Year 2006 Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon P. Allen, Richard J. Koch

    2007-03-30

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in Fiscal Year 2006 is provided in this report. The Groundwater Level Monitoring Project was instituted in 2005 for providing a framework for the collection and processing of quality controlled groundwater level data. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 158 monitoring wells, including 43 regional aquifer wells, 23 intermediate wells, and 92 alluvial wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 132 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well.

  5. Climate Change and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Adaptation Challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Kimberly M.; Hjeresen, Dennis; Silverman, Josh

    2015-02-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been adapting to climate change related impacts that have been occurring on decadal time scales. The region where LANL is located has been subject to a cascade of climate related impacts: drought, devastating wildfires, and historic flooding events. Instead of buckling under the pressure, LANL and the surrounding communities have integrated climate change mitigation strategies into their daily operations and long-term plans by increasing coordination and communication between the Federal, State, and local agencies in the region, identifying and aggressively managing forested areas in need of near-term attention, addressing flood control and retention issues, and more.

  6. Additive manufacturing capabilities applied to inertial confinement confusion at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Cardenas, Tana; Schmidt, Derek William; Peterson, Dominic S.

    2016-08-01

    We describe the use at Los Alamos National Laboratory of additive manufacturing (AM) for a variety of jigs and coating, assembly, and radiography fixtures. Additive manufacturing has also been used to produce shipping containers of complex design that would be too costly to have fabricated using traditional techniques. The current goal for AM use in target fabrication is to increase target accuracy and rigidity. This has been realized by implementing AM into target stalk fabrication, allowing increased complexity to address target strength and the addition of features for alignment at facilities. As a result, we will describe the fabrication of these components and our plans to utilize AM in the future.

  7. Ambient air monitoring for organic compounds, acids, and metals at Los Alamos National Laboratory, January 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.H.; Eberhart, C.F.

    1992-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) contracted Radian Corporation (Radian) to conduct a short-term, intensive air monitoring program whose goal was to estimate the impact of chemical emissions from LANL on the ambient air environment. A comprehensive emission inventory had identified more than 600 potential air contaminants in LANL`s emissions. A subset of specific target chemicals was selected for monitoring: 20 organic vapors, 6 metals and 5 inorganic acid vapors. These were measured at 5 ground level sampling sites around LANL over seven consecutive days in January 1991. The sampling and analytical strategy used a combination of EPA and NIOSH methods modified for ambient air applications.

  8. Ambient air monitoring for organic compounds, acids, and metals at Los Alamos National Laboratory, January 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.H. ); Eberhart, C.F. )

    1992-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) contracted Radian Corporation (Radian) to conduct a short-term, intensive air monitoring program whose goal was to estimate the impact of chemical emissions from LANL on the ambient air environment. A comprehensive emission inventory had identified more than 600 potential air contaminants in LANL's emissions. A subset of specific target chemicals was selected for monitoring: 20 organic vapors, 6 metals and 5 inorganic acid vapors. These were measured at 5 ground level sampling sites around LANL over seven consecutive days in January 1991. The sampling and analytical strategy used a combination of EPA and NIOSH methods modified for ambient air applications.

  9. Radonuclide concentrations in bees and honey in the vicinity of Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Fresquez, P.R.; Armstrong, D.R.

    1996-06-01

    Honeybees are effective monitors of environmental pollution; they forage for P len and nectar over a large area ({congruent}7 km{sup 2}), accumulate contaminants from air, water, plants, and soil, and return to a fixed location (the hive) for sampling. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), in fact, has maintained a network of honeybee colonies within and around LANL for 16 years (1979 to 1994); the objectives for maintaining this honeybee network were to (1) determine the bioavailability of radionuclides in the environment, and (2) the committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) to people who may consume honey from these beehives (Los Alamos and White Rock/Pajarito Acres lownsites). Of all the radionuclides studied over the years, tritium (314) was consistently picked up by the bees and was most readily transferred to the honey. Tritium in honey collected from hives located within LANL, for example, ranged in concentration from 0.07 Bq mL{sup -1} (1.9 pCi mL{sup -1}) to 27.75 Bq mL{sup -1} (749.9 pCi mL{sup -1}) (LANL Neutron Science Center); the average concentration of {sup 3}H in honey Collected from hives located around the LANL area (perimeter) ranged in concentration from 0.34 Bq mL{sup -1} (9.3 pCi mL{sup -1}) (White Rock/Pajarito Acres townsite) to 3.67 Bq mL{sup -1} (99.3 pCi mL{sup -1}) (Los Alamos townsite). Overall, the CEDE-based on the average concentration of all radionuclides measured over the years-from consuming 5 kg (11 lbs) of honey collected from hives located within the townsites of Los Alamos and White Rock/Pajarito Acres, after regional (background) as been subtracted, was 0.074 {mu}Sv y{sup -1} (0.0074 mrem y{sup -1}) and 0.024 pSv y{sup -1} (0.0024 mrem y{sup -1}), respectively. The highest CEDE, based on the mean + 2 standard deviations (95% confidence level), was 0.334 fiSv y{sup -1} (0.0334 mrem y{sup -1}) (Los Alamos townsitc).

  10. Saudi National Security. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ayed, I.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this research paper is to focus on Saudi National Security. The author highlights geographic and historic factors that impact on threats to Saudi Arabia, and the objectives for providing security. He discusses how to achieve these objectives, including military readiness and cooperation with other countries to guarantee Saudi security. This is to ensure interests which are vital to the industrial world as the result of a continued flow of oil with a reasonable price. Given is the author`s opinion about U.S. political strategy in the region to achieve stability in the Gulf Region.

  11. Waste processing cost recovery at Los Alamos National Laboratory--analysis and recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, Steven Richard

    2008-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is implementing full cost recovery for waste processing in fiscal year 2009 (FY2009), after a transition year in FY2008. Waste processing cost recovery has been implemented in various forms across the nuclear weapons complex and in corporate America. The fundamental reasoning of sending accurate price signals to waste generators is economically sound, and leads to waste minimization and reduced waste expense over time. However, Los Alamos faces significant implementation challenges because of its status as a government-owned, contractor-operated national scientific institution with a diverse suite of experimental and environmental cleanup activities, and the fact that this represents a fundamental change in how waste processing is viewed by the institution. This paper describes the issues involved during the transition to cost recovery and the ultimate selection of the business model. Of the six alternative cost recovery models evaluated, the business model chosen to be implemented in FY2009 is Recharge Plus Generators Pay Distributed Direct. Under this model, all generators who produce waste must pay a distributed direct share associated with their specific waste type to use a waste processing capability. This cost share is calculated using the distributed direct method on the fixed cost only, i.e., the fixed cost share is based on each program's forecast proportion of the total Los Alamos volume forecast of each waste type. (Fixed activities are those required to establish the waste processing capability, i.e., to make the process ready, permitted, certified, and prepared to handle the first unit ofwaste. Therefore, the fixed cost ends at the point just before waste begins 'to be processed. The activities to actually process the waste are considered variable.) The volume of waste actually sent for processing is charged a unit cost based solely on the variable cost of disposing of that waste. The total cost recovered each year is the

  12. National Security Policy: Mexico.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    President Lazaro Cardenas expropriated the 2 assets of seventeen foreign oil companies to include major United States companies and formed a national oil...Ironically, it was a military man General Lazaro Cardenas , who as president from 1935 to 1940 eliminated the preeminence of the military in...offices to fill. Other accomplishments of President Cardenas were his stripping power from rival general officers and his successful efforts to

  13. Los Alamos National Laboratory Science Education Program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, D.H.

    1997-01-01

    The National Teacher Enhancement program (NTEP) is a three-year, multi-laboratory effort funded by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy to improve elementary school science programs. The Los Alamos National Laboratory targets teachers in northern New Mexico. FY96, the third year of the program, involved 11 teams of elementary school teachers (grades 4-6) in a three-week summer session, four two-day workshops during the school year and an on-going planning and implementation process. The teams included twenty-one teachers from 11 schools. Participants earned a possible six semester hours of graduate credit for the summer institute and two hours for the academic year workshops from the University of New Mexico. The Laboratory expertise in the earth and environmental science provided the tie between the Laboratory initiatives and program content, and allowed for the design of real world problems.

  14. Destructive analysis capabilities for plutonium and uranium characterization at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Tandon, Lav; Kuhn, Kevin J; Drake, Lawrence R; Decker, Diana L; Walker, Laurie F; Colletti, Lisa M; Spencer, Khalil J; Peterson, Dominic S; Herrera, Jaclyn A; Wong, Amy S

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) Actinide Analytical Chemistry (AAC) group has been in existence since the Manhattan Project. It maintains a complete set of analytical capabilities for performing complete characterization (elemental assay, isotopic, metallic and non metallic trace impurities) of uranium and plutonium samples in different forms. For a majority of the customers there are strong quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) objectives including highest accuracy and precision with well defined uncertainties associated with the analytical results. Los Alamos participates in various international and national programs such as the Plutonium Metal Exchange Program, New Brunswick Laboratory's (NBL' s) Safeguards Measurement Evaluation Program (SME) and several other inter-laboratory round robin exercises to monitor and evaluate the data quality generated by AAC. These programs also provide independent verification of analytical measurement capabilities, and allow any technical problems with analytical measurements to be identified and corrected. This presentation will focus on key analytical capabilities for destructive analysis in AAC and also comparative data between LANL and peer groups for Pu assay and isotopic analysis.

  15. Los Alamos National Laboratory transuranic waste quality assurance project plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-14

    This Transuranic (TRU) Waste Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) serves as the quality management plan for the characterization of transuranic waste in preparation for certification and transportation. The Transuranic Waste Characterization/Certification Program (TWCP) consists of personnel who sample and analyze waste, validate and report data; and provide project management, quality assurance, audit and assessment, and records management support, all in accordance with established requirements for disposal of TRU waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility. This QAPjP addresses how the TWCP meets the quality requirements of the Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD) and the technical requirements of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP). The TWCP characterizes and certifies retrievably stored and newly generated TRU waste using the waste selection, testing, sampling, and analytical techniques and data quality objectives (DQOs) described in the QAPP, the Los Alamos National Laboratory Transuranic Waste Certification Plan (Certification Plan), and the CST Waste Management Facilities Waste Acceptance Criteria and Certification [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC)]. At the present, the TWCP does not address remote-handled (RH) waste.

  16. Final report on the radiological surveys of designated DX firing sites at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-09

    CHEMRAD was contracted by Los Alamos National Laboratory to perform USRADS{reg_sign} (UltraSonic Ranging And Data System) radiation scanning surveys at designated DX Sites at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The primary purpose of these scanning surveys was to identify the presence of Depleted Uranium (D-38) resulting from activities at the DX Firing Sites. This effort was conducted to update the most recent surveys of these areas. This current effort was initiated with site orientation on August 12, 1996. Surveys were completed in the field on September 4, 1996. This Executive Summary briefly presents the major findings of this work. The detail survey results are presented in the balance of this report and are organized by Technical Area and Site number in section 2. This organization is not in chronological order. USRADS and the related survey methods are described in section 3. Quality Control issues are addressed in section 4. Surveys were conducted with an array of radiation detectors either mounted on a backpack frame for man-carried use (Manual mode) or on a tricycle cart (RadCart mode). The array included radiation detectors for gamma and beta surface near surface contamination as well as dose rate at 1 meter above grade. The radiation detectors were interfaced directly to an USRADS 2100 Data Pack.

  17. 14 CFR 1260.31 - National security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false National security. 1260.31 Section 1260.31... Provisions § 1260.31 National security. National Security October 2000 Normally, NASA grants do not involve... who will have access to the information must obtain the appropriate security clearance in advance...

  18. 14 CFR 1260.31 - National security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true National security. 1260.31 Section 1260.31... Provisions § 1260.31 National security. National Security October 2000 Normally, NASA grants do not involve... who will have access to the information must obtain the appropriate security clearance in advance...

  19. 14 CFR 1260.31 - National security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false National security. 1260.31 Section 1260.31... Provisions § 1260.31 National security. National Security October 2000 Normally, NASA grants do not involve... who will have access to the information must obtain the appropriate security clearance in advance...

  20. 14 CFR 1260.31 - National security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false National security. 1260.31 Section 1260.31... Provisions § 1260.31 National security. National Security October 2000 Normally, NASA grants do not involve... who will have access to the information must obtain the appropriate security clearance in advance...

  1. National Security Management Correspondence Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Industrial Coll. of the Armed Forces (DOD), Washington, DC.

    A course of study on the fundamental aspects of the areas of knowledge which are essential to effective management of national security is presented. The course presents the substance of the Industrial College resident curriculum adapted to the correspondence method of study. The subject matter is designed to impart knowledge and understanding of…

  2. Diversity Intersects with National Security.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chew, Cassie

    2003-01-01

    Describes how the United Negro College Fund's Institute for International Public Policy is preparing to host a series of open-ended discussions with top government and business officials on the importance of a diverse work force as a national security imperative, as well as a competitive advantage in a global economy. (EV)

  3. Occurrences at Los Alamos National Laboratory: What can they tell us?

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A. Reichelt; A. Jeffery Eichorst; Marc E. Clay; Rita J. Henins; Judith D. DeHaven; Richard J. Brake

    2000-03-01

    The authors analyzed the evolution of institutional and facility response to groups of abnormal incidents at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The analysis is divided into three stages: (1) the LANL response to severe accidents from 1994 to 1996, (2) the LANL response to facility-specific clusters of low-consequence incidents from 1997 to 1999, and (3) the ongoing development of and response to a Laboratory-wide trending and analysis program. The first stage is characterized by five severe accidents at LANL--a shooting fatality, a forklift accident, two electrical shock incidents, and an explosion in a nuclear facility. Each accident caused LANL and the Department of Energy (DOE) to launch in-depth investigations. A recurrent theme of the investigations was the failure of LANL and DOE to identify and act on precursor or low-consequence events that preceded the severe accidents. The second stage is characterized by LANL response to precursor or low-consequence incidents over a two-year period. In this stage, the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility, the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility, and the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center responded to an increase in low-consequence events by standing down their facilities. During the restart process, each facility collectively analyzed the low-consequence events and developed systemic corrective actions. The third stage is characterized by the development of a Laboratory-wide trending and analysis program, which involves proactive division-level analysis of incidents and development of systemic actions. The authors conclude that, while the stages show an encouraging evolution, the facility standdowns and restarts are overly costly and that the institutional trending and analysis program is underutilized. The authors therefore recommend the implementation of an institutional, mentored program of trending and analysis that identifies clusters of related low-consequence events, analyzes those events, and

  4. Geological site characterization for the proposed Mixed Waste Disposal Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Reneau, S.L.; Raymond, R. Jr.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents the results of geological site characterization studies conducted from 1992 to 1994 on Pajarito Mesa for a proposed Los Alamos National Laboratory Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (MWDF). The MWDF is being designed to receive mixed waste (waste containing both hazardous and radioactive components) generated during Environmental Restoration Project cleanup activities at Los Alamos. As of 1995, there is no Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted disposal site for mixed waste at the Laboratory, and construction of the MWDF would provide an alternative to transport of this material to an off-site location. A 2.5 km long part of Pajarito Mesa was originally considered for the MWDF, extending from an elevation of about 2150 to 2225 m (7060 to 7300 ft) in Technical Areas (TAs) 15, 36, and 67 in the central part of the Laboratory, and planning was later concentrated on the western area in TA-67. The mesa top lies about 60 to 75 m (200 to 250 ft) above the floor of Pajarito Canyon on the north, and about 30 m (100 ft) above the floor of Threemile Canyon on the south. The main aquifer used as a water supply for the Laboratory and for Los Alamos County lies at an estimated depth of about 335 m (1100 ft) below the mesa. The chapters of this report focus on surface and near-surface geological studies that provide a basic framework for siting of the MWDF and for conducting future performance assessments, including fulfillment of specific regulatory requirements. This work includes detailed studies of the stratigraphy, mineralogy, and chemistry of the bedrock at Pajarito Mesa by Broxton and others, studies of the geological structure and of mesa-top soils and surficial deposits by Reneau and others, geologic mapping and studies of fracture characteristics by Vaniman and Chipera, and studies of potential landsliding and rockfall along the mesa-edge by Reneau.

  5. Climate Change and National Security

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, Elizabeth L.

    2013-02-01

    Climate change is increasingly recognized as having national security implications, which has prompted dialogue between the climate change and national security communities – with resultant advantages and differences. Climate change research has proven useful to the national security community sponsors in several ways. It has opened security discussions to consider climate as well as political factors in studies of the future. It has encouraged factoring in the stresses placed on societies by climate changes (of any kind) to help assess the potential for state stability. And it has shown that, changes such as increased heat, more intense storms, longer periods without rain, and earlier spring onset call for building climate resilience as part of building stability. For the climate change research community, studies from a national security point of view have revealed research lacunae, for example, such as the lack of usable migration studies. This has also pushed the research community to consider second- and third-order impacts of climate change, such as migration and state stability, which broadens discussion of future impacts beyond temperature increases, severe storms, and sea level rise; and affirms the importance of governance in responding to these changes. The increasing emphasis in climate change science toward research in vulnerability, resilience, and adaptation also frames what the intelligence and defense communities need to know, including where there are dependencies and weaknesses that may allow climate change impacts to result in security threats and where social and economic interventions can prevent climate change impacts and other stressors from resulting in social and political instability or collapse.

  6. Abortion: a national security issue.

    PubMed

    Mumford, S D

    1982-04-15

    The national security implications of abortion have not been addressed in a public forum but could come to be the single most important facet of the abortion debate. Abortion has been and will continue to be an essential variable in fertility control. Any serious effort at population growth control in the next few decades will have to recognize the role abortion has in birth rate decline. At this time an estimated 40-50 million abortions are performed worldwide each year; 1/2 of them are illegal. In the absence of abortion, annual growth would approach approximately 120 million. Growth of this magnitude would probably place intolerable strains on the economics and environments of some nations. To recognize the role of abortion in fertility control is to emphasize the inescapable need for abortion as 1 element in any comprehensive family planning service. Excessive population growth leads to chronic unemployment and the frustration of the goals of hundreds of millions of people. While this new threat to the security of individual nations and ultimately to global security has not been widely acknowledged, it is beginning to gain the attention of people of different professions and distinctive political persuasions. In many ways, rampant population growth is an even more dangerous and subtle threat to the world than thermonuclear war, for it is intrinsically less subject to rational safeguards and less amenable to organized control. Possibly the greatest and most pervasive problem is the declining ability to meet human needs in the areas of food, raw material, and resources, counterpoised against what are clearly rising expectations of growing populations. The following facts cannot be disputed: world population is a threat to the security of all nations, including the U.S.; abortion is essential to any effective population growth control effort; abortion is a national security issue; and as the availability of legal abortion in the U.S. goes, so goes the availability

  7. Quality Assurance Baseline Assessment Report to Los Alamos National Laboratory Analytical Chemistry Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, R. A.

    1998-09-01

    This report summarizes observations that were made during a Quality Assurance (QA) Baseline Assessment of the Nuclear Materials Technology Analytical Chemistry Group (NMT-1). The Quality and Planning personnel, for NMT-1, are spending a significant amount of time transitioning out of their roles of environmental oversight into production oversight. A team from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Defense Program Environmental Surety Program performed an assessment of the current status of the QA Program. Several Los Alamos National Laboratory Analytical Chemistry procedures were reviewed, as well as Transuranic Waste Characterization Program (TWCP) QA documents. Checklists were developed and the assessment was performed according to an Implementation Work Plan, INEEL/EXT-98-00740.

  8. Status of the National Security Workforce

    SciTech Connect

    2008-03-31

    This report documents the status of the national security workforce as part of the National Security Preparedness Project, being performed by the Arrowhead Center of New Mexico State University under a DOE/NNSA grant. This report includes an assessment of the current workforce situation. The national security workforce is an important component of national security for our country. With the increase of global threats of terrorism, this workforce is being called upon more frequently. This has resulted in the need for an increasing number of national security personnel. It is imperative to attract and retain a skilled and competitive national security workforce.

  9. High-speed electronic imaging applications at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, T.E.; Albright, K.L.; King, N.S.P.; Yates, G.G.; Turko, B.T.

    1992-03-01

    An overview is presented of high-speed imaging technology developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. High-speed imaging is used by Los Alamos primarily in the underground testing of nuclear devices at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The first camera system developed, which is still the ``work horse`` of this application, uses focus projection scan (FPS) vidicon imaging technology operating at an effective pixel readout rate of approximately 40 Mpixels/s. In an effort to take advantage of charge-coupled devices (CCD) technology, a CCD camera is under development that currently operates at approximately 25 Mpixels/s, but, with an improved CCD sensor, has the prospect of operating at 70-100 Mpixel/s. A possible application of the technology to the detection of military ordnance is discussed. Also, a flexible test station is described that has been assembled for testing CCDs at high pixel readout rates. The station can operate at clock rates of up to 100 MHz and can accommodate a wide variety of single and multiport sensors.

  10. Final environmental assessment: TRU waste drum staging building, Technical Area 55, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-09

    Much of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) research on plutonium metallurgy and plutonium processing is performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), in Los Alamos, New Mexico. LANL`s main facility for plutonium research is the Plutonium Facility, also referred to as Technical Area 55 (TA-55). The main laboratory building for plutonium work within the Plutonium Facility (TA-55) is the Plutonium Facility Building 4, or PF-4. This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes the potential environmental effects that would be expected to occur if DOE were to stage sealed containers of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste in a support building at the Plutonium Facility (TA-55) that is adjacent to PF-4. At present, the waste containers are staged in the basement of PF-4. The proposed project is to convert an existing support structure (Building 185), a prefabricated metal building on a concrete foundation, and operate it as a temporary staging facility for sealed containers of solid TRU and TRU mixed waste. The TRU and TRU mixed wastes would be contained in sealed 55-gallon drums and standard waste boxes as they await approval to be transported to TA-54. The containers would then be transported to a longer term TRU waste storage area at TA-54. The TRU wastes are generated from plutonium operations carried out in PF-4. The drum staging building would also be used to store and prepare for use new, empty TRU waste containers.

  11. Setting priorities for action plans at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, A.C.

    1992-09-30

    This report summarizes work done by Applied Decision Analysis (ADA) for Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) under Subcontract Number 9-XQ2-Y3837-1 with the University of California. The purpose of this work was to develop a method of setting priorities for environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) deficiencies at Los Alamos. The deficiencies were identified by a DOE Tiger Team that visited LANL in the fall of 1991, and by self assessments done by the Laboratory. ADA did the work described here between October 1991 and the end of September 1992. The ADA staff working on this project became part of a Risk Management Team in the Laboratory`s Integration and Coordination Office (ICO). During the project, the Risk Management Team produced a variety of documents describing aspects of the action-plan prioritization system. Some of those documents are attached to this report. Rather than attempt to duplicate their contents, this report provides a guide to those documents, and references them whenever appropriate.

  12. Los Alamos National Laboratory Science Education Programs. Progress report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, D.H.

    1995-02-01

    During the 1994 summer institute NTEP teachers worked in coordination with LANL and the Los Alamos Middle School and Mountain Elementary School to gain experience in communicating on-line, to gain further information from the Internet and in using electronic Bulletin Board Systems (BBSs) to exchange ideas with other teachers. To build on their telecommunications skills, NTEP teachers participated in the International Telecommunications In Education Conference (Tel*ED `94) at the Albuquerque Convention Center on November 11 & 12, 1994. They attended the multimedia keynote address, various workshops highlighting many aspects of educational telecommunications skills, and the Telecomm Rodeo sponsored by Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Rodeo featured many presentations by Laboratory personnel and educational institutions on ways in which telecommunications technologies can be use din the classroom. Many were of the `hands-on` type, so that teachers were able to try out methods and equipment and evaluate their usefulness in their own schools and classrooms. Some of the presentations featured were the Geonet educational BBS system, the Supercomputing Challenge, and the Sunrise Project, all sponsored by LANL; the `CU-seeMe` live video software, various simulation software packages, networking help, and many other interesting and useful exhibits.

  13. Los Alamos National Laboratory SAVY-4000 Field Surveillance Plan Update for 2016

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Elizabeth J.; Stone, Timothy Amos; Smith, Paul Herrick; Prochnow, David Adrian; Weis, Eric M.

    2016-06-17

    The Packaging Surveillance Program section of the Department of Energy (DOE) Manual 441.1-1, Nuclear Material Packaging Manual (DOE 2008), requires DOE contractors to “ensure that a surveillance program is established and implemented to ensure the nuclear material storage package continues to meet its design criteria.” The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) SAVY-4000 Field Surveillance Plan was first issued in FY 2013 (Kelly et al. 2013). The surveillance plan is reviewed annually and updated as necessary based on SAVY-4000 surveillance and other surveillance findings, as well as results of the lifetime extension studies (Blair et al. 2012, Weis et al. 2015a). The LANL SAVY-4000 Field Surveillance Plan Update was issued in 2014 (Kelly et al. 2014). This 2016 update reflects changes to the surveillance plan resulting from restrictions on handling residue materials greater than 500 g, the addition of specific engineering judgment containers, and 2015 surveillance findings. The SAVY-4000 container has a design life of five years, which was chosen as a conservative estimate of the functional properties of the materials used in the construction of the SAVY 4000 when exposed to the potential insults including temperature, corrosive materials and gases, and radiation. The SAVY-4000 container design basis is described in a safety analysis report (Anderson et al. 2013). In the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA’s) approval of the safety analysis report, it was recommended that the design life clock begin on March 2014 (Nez et al. 2014). However, it is expected that a technical basis can be developed to extend the design life of the SAVY-4000 containers to approximately 40 years (Blair et al. 2012, Weis et al. 2015a). This surveillance plan update covers five years (2015–2019) and is developed to ensure SAVY-4000 containers meet their design criteria over the current five-year design life and to gather data that can be used in developing the

  14. Biosafety Practices and Emergency Response at the Idaho National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Frank F. Roberto; Dina M. Matz

    2008-03-01

    Strict federal regulations govern the possession, use, and transfer of pathogens and toxins with potential to cause harm to the public, either through accidental or deliberate means. Laboratories registered through either the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture (USDA), or both, must prepare biosafety, security, and incident response plans, conduct drills or exercises on an annual basis, and update plans accordingly. At the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), biosafety, laboratory, and emergency management staff have been working together for 2 years to satisfy federal and DOE/NNSA requirements. This has been done through the establishment of plans, training, tabletop and walk-through exercises and drills, and coordination with local and regional emergency response personnel. Responding to the release of infectious agents or toxins is challenging, but through familiarization with the nature of the hazardous biological substances or organisms, and integration with laboratory-wide emergency response procedures, credible scenarios are being used to evaluate our ability to protect workers, the public, and the environment from agents we must work with to provide for national biodefense.

  15. Comparison of Uncertainty of Two Precipitation Prediction Models at Los Alamos National Lab Technical Area 54

    SciTech Connect

    Shield, Stephen Allan; Dai, Zhenxue

    2015-08-18

    Meteorological inputs are an important part of subsurface flow and transport modeling. The choice of source for meteorological data used as inputs has significant impacts on the results of subsurface flow and transport studies. One method to obtain the meteorological data required for flow and transport studies is the use of weather generating models. This paper compares the difference in performance of two weather generating models at Technical Area 54 of Los Alamos National Lab. Technical Area 54 is contains several waste pits for low-level radioactive waste and is the site for subsurface flow and transport studies. This makes the comparison of the performance of the two weather generators at this site particularly valuable.

  16. Preliminary modeling of moisture movement in the tuff beneath Mortandad Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Geddis, A.M.

    1992-08-05

    An area of upper/middle Mortandad Canyon on the Los Alamos National Laboratory is modeled in cross-section. UNSAT2, a finite element model (FEM) is used to predict moisture movement. Hydraulic characteristics of the tuff are described by van Genuchten parameters determined from laboratory tests on cores taken from a borehole within the cross-section. Material properties are distributed horizontal planar in space to cover the solution domain with required initial conditions. An estimate of seepage flux from a thin perched alluvial aquifer into the upper surface of the tuff is taken from a lumped parameter model. Moisture redistribution for a ponded boundary condition and a larger flux is investigated. A composite simulation using material properties from two separate coreholes is also evaluated.

  17. Real-time alpha monitoring of a radioactive liquid waste stream at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.D.; Whitley, C.R.; Rawool-Sullivan, M.

    1995-12-31

    This poster display concerns the development, installation, and testing of a real-time radioactive liquid waste monitor at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The detector system was designed for the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility so that influent to the plant could be monitored in real time. By knowing the activity of the influent, plant operators can better monitor treatment, better segregate waste (potentially), and monitor the regulatory compliance of users of the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Collection System. The detector system uses long-range alpha detection technology, which is a nonintrusive method of characterization that determines alpha activity on the liquid surface by measuring the ionization of ambient air. Extensive testing has been performed to ensure long-term use with a minimal amount of maintenance. The final design was a simple cost-effective alpha monitor that could be modified for monitoring influent waste streams at various points in the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Collection System.

  18. Waste minimization value engineering workshop for the Los Alamos National Laboratory Omega West Reactor Decommissioning Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hartnett, S.; Seguin, N.; Burns, M.

    1995-12-31

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Pollution Prevention Program Office sponsored a Value Engineering (VE) Workshop to evaluate recycling options and other pollution prevention and waste minimization (PP/WMin) practices to incorporate into the decommissioning of the Omega West Reactor (OWR) at the laboratory. The VE process is an organized, systematic approach for evaluating a process or design to identify cost saving opportunities, or in this application, waste reduction opportunities. This VE Workshop was a facilitated process that included a team of specialists in the areas of decontamination, decommissioning, PP/WMin, cost estimating, construction, waste management, recycling, Department of Energy representatives, and others. The uniqueness of this VE Workshop was that it used an interdisciplinary approach to focus on PP/WMin practices that could be included in the OWR Decommissioning Project Plans and specifications to provide waste reduction. This report discusses the VE workshop objectives, summarizes the OWR decommissioning project, and describes the VE workshop activities, results, and lessons learned.

  19. Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP): Instrument and Simulation Development Status at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Arias, Angela A.; Schmierer, Eric N.; Gettemy, Donald; Howard, David W.; Wermer, Joseph R.; Tuggle, Dale G.

    2005-07-15

    The Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP) Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory has been a collaborative effort with Savannah River Site to demonstrate the Tube-in-Tube (TnT) column design and to improve TCAP science. TnT TCAP is an alternative design which uses a liquid to thermally cycle the metal hydride packed column. Inert gas displacement tests and deuterium pulse tests have been performed on the TnT TCAP column. The inert gas displacement tests are designed to measure plug flow in the column while the deuterium pulse tests determine the separation ability of the column. A residual gas analyzer measures the gases in the exit stream and the experimental results are compared with pulse test model results.

  20. Structural testing of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Heat Source/Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generator shipping container

    SciTech Connect

    Bronowski, D.R.; Madsen, M.M.

    1991-06-01

    The Heat Source/Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generator shipping container is a Type B packaging design currently under development by Los Alamos National Laboratory. Type B packaging for transporting radioactive material is required to maintain containment and shielding after being exposed to the normal and hypothetical accident environments defined in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 71. A combination of testing and analysis is used to verify the adequacy of this package design. This report documents the test program portion of the design verification, using several prototype packages. Four types of testing were performed: 30-foot hypothetical accident condition drop tests in three orientations, 40-inch hypothetical accident condition puncture tests in five orientations, a 21 psi external overpressure test, and a normal conditions of transport test consisting of a water spray and a 4 foot drop test. 18 refs., 104 figs., 13 tabs.

  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory Environmental Restoration Project quarterly technical report, April--June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-18

    This quarterly report describes the technical status of activities in the Los Alamos National Laboratory Environmental Restoration (ER) Project. Each activity is identified by an activity data sheet number, a brief title describing the activity or the technical area where the activity is located, and the name of the project leader. The Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) portion of the facility operating permit requires the submission of a technical progress report on a quarterly basis. This report, submitted to fulfill the permit`s requirement, summarizes the work performed and the results of sampling and analysis in the ER Project. Suspect waste found include: Radionuclides, high explosives, metals, solvents and organics. The data provided in this report have not been validated. These data are considered ``reviewed data.``

  2. Siting study for a consolidated waste capability at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, Steven Richard

    2011-01-26

    Decision analysis was used to rank alternative sites for a new Consolidated Waste Capability (CWC) to replace current hazardous solid waste operations (hazardous/chemical, mixed lowlevel, transuranic, and low-level waste) at Los Alamos National Laboratory's TA-54 Area G. An original list of 21 site alternatives was pre-screened to ten sites that were assessed using the analytical hierarchy process with five top-level criteria and fifteen sub-criteria. Three passes of the analysis were required to assess different site scenarios: 1) a fully consolidated CWC with both transfer/storage and LL W disposal in one location (45 acre minimum), 2) CWC transfer/storage only (12 acre minimum), and 3) LLW disposal only (33 acre minimum). The top site choice for all three options is TA-63/52/46; the second choice is TA-18/36. TA-54 East, Zone 4 also deserves consideration as a LLW disposal site.

  3. A checklist of plant and animal species at Los Alamos National Laboratory and surrounding areas

    SciTech Connect

    Hinojosa, H.

    1998-02-01

    Past and current members of the Biology Team (BT) of the Ecology Group have completed biological assessments (BAs) for all of the land that comprises Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Within these assessments are lists of plant and animal species with the potential to exist on LANL lands and the surrounding areas. To compile these lists, BT members examined earlier published and unpublished reports, surveys, and data bases that pertained to the biota of this area or to areas that are similar. The species lists that are contained herein are compilations of the lists from these BAs, other lists that were a part of the initial research for the performance of these BAs, and more recent surveys.

  4. Evaluation of aircraft crash hazard at Los Alamos National Laboratory facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Selvage, R.D.

    1996-07-01

    This report selects a method for use in calculating the frequency of an aircraft crash occurring at selected facilities at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory). The Solomon method was chosen to determine these probabilities. Each variable in the Solomon method is defined and a value for each variable is selected for fourteen facilities at the Laboratory. These values and calculated probabilities are to be used in all safety analysis reports and hazards analyses for the facilities addressed in this report. This report also gives detailed directions to perform aircraft-crash frequency calculations for other facilities. This will ensure that future aircraft-crash frequency calculations are consistent with calculations in this report.

  5. Materials Capability Review Los Alamos National Laboratory April 29-May 2, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Antoinette J

    2012-04-20

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses Capability Reviews to assess the quality and institutional integration of science, technology and engineering (STE) and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of LANL STE. The capabilities are deliberately chosen to be crosscutting over the Laboratory and therefore will include experimental, theoretical and simulation disciplines from multiple line organizations. Capability Reviews are designed to provide a more holistic view of the STE quality, integration to achieve mission requirements, and mission relevance. The scope of these capabilities necessitate that there will be significant overlap in technical areas covered by capability reviews (e.g., materials research and weapons science and engineering). In addition, LANL staff may be reviewed in different capability reviews because of their varied assignments and expertise. The principal product of the Capability Review is the report that includes the review committee's assessments, recommendations, and recommendations for STE.

  6. DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF THE LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY INDEPENDENT SAR REVIEW PROCESS.

    SciTech Connect

    J. BUECK; T. MARTH

    2001-05-01

    Contractor independent review of contractor prepared safety documents has ceased as a requirement under DOE orders. However, a recent study to determine root causes of the poor quality and extremely long approval times for Los Alamos National Laboratory nuclear safety document has identified such a review as a crucial step in ensuring quality. LANL has teamed with the DOE Field Office to reinstate an independent review process modeled after DOE-STD-1104. A review guide has been prepared predicated on the content of DOE-STD-3009. Discipline has been enforced to ensure that comments reflect important issues and that resolution of the comment is possible. Safety management at both LANL and DOE have embraced this concept. This process has been exercised and has resulted in improvements in safety analysis quality and a degree of uniformity between DOE and LANL reviews.

  7. Threatened and Endangered Species Habitat Management Plan for Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, David Charles; Hathcock, Charles Dean

    2015-11-17

    Los Alamos National Laboratory’s (LANL) Threatened and Endangered Species Habitat Management Plan (HMP) fulfills a commitment made to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the “Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility Mitigation Action Plan” (DOE 1996). The HMP received concurrence from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in 1999 (USFWS consultation numbers 2-22-98-I-336 and 2-22-95-I-108). This 2015 update retains the management guidelines from the 1999 HMP for listed species, updates some descriptive information, and adds the New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus) and Yellow-billed Cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus) which were federally listed in 2014 (Keller 2015: USFWS consultation number 02ENNM00- 2015-I-0538).

  8. Derivation of Authorized Limits for Land Transfer at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Perona, Ralph; Whicker, Jeffrey Jay; Mirenda, Richard J.

    2016-09-14

    This report documents the calculation of Authorized Limits for radionuclides in soil to be used in the transfer of property by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The Authorized Limits support the evaluation process to clear land for release under different uses even though the soil contains small residual amounts of radioactivity. The Authorized Limits are developed for four exposure scenarios: residential, commercial/industrial, construction worker, and recreational. Exposure to radionuclides in soil under these scenarios is assessed for exposure routes that include incidental ingestion of soil; inhalation of soil particulates; ingestion of homegrown produce (residential only); and external irradiation from soil. Inhalation and dermal absorption of tritiated water vapor in air are also assessed.

  9. Certification testing of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Heat Source/Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generator shipping container

    SciTech Connect

    Bronowski, D.R.; Madsen, M.M.

    1991-09-01

    The Heat Source/Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generator shipping counter is a Type B packaging currently under development by Los Alamos National Laboratory. Type B packaging for transporting radioactive material is required to maintain containment and shielding after being exposed to normal and hypothetical accident environments defined in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 71. A combination of testing and analysis is used to verify the adequacy of this packaging design. This report documents the testing portion of the design verification. Six tests were conducted on a prototype package: a water spray test, a 4-foot normal conditions drop test, a 30-foot drop test, a 40-inch puncture test, a 30-minute thermal test, and an 8-hour immersion test.

  10. Options assessment report: Treatment of nitrate salt waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Bruce Alan; Stevens, Patrice Ann

    2015-09-16

    This report documents the methodology used to select a method of treatment for the remediated nitrate salt (RNS) and unremediated nitrate salt (UNS) waste containers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The method selected should treat the containerized waste in a manner that renders the waste safe and suitable for transport and final disposal in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository, under specifications listed in the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (DOE/CBFO, 2013). LANL recognized that the results must be thoroughly vetted with the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) and the a modification to the LANL Hazardous Waste Facility Permit is a necessary step before implementation of this or any treatment option. Likewise, facility readiness and safety basis approvals must be received from the Department of Energy (DOE). This report presents LANL's preferred option, and the documentation of the process for reaching the recommended treatment option for RNS and UNS waste, and is presented for consideration by NMED and DOE.

  11. Additive manufacturing capabilities applied to inertial confinement confusion at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    DOE PAGES

    Cardenas, Tana; Schmidt, Derek William; Peterson, Dominic S.

    2016-08-01

    We describe the use at Los Alamos National Laboratory of additive manufacturing (AM) for a variety of jigs and coating, assembly, and radiography fixtures. Additive manufacturing has also been used to produce shipping containers of complex design that would be too costly to have fabricated using traditional techniques. The current goal for AM use in target fabrication is to increase target accuracy and rigidity. This has been realized by implementing AM into target stalk fabrication, allowing increased complexity to address target strength and the addition of features for alignment at facilities. As a result, we will describe the fabrication ofmore » these components and our plans to utilize AM in the future.« less

  12. Population array and agricultural data arrays for the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, K.W.; Duffy, S.; Kowalewsky, K.

    1998-07-01

    To quantify or estimate the environmental and radiological impacts from man-made sources of radioactive effluents, certain dose assessment procedures were developed by various government and regulatory agencies. Some of these procedures encourage the use of computer simulations (models) to calculate air dispersion, environmental transport, and subsequent human exposure to radioactivity. Such assessment procedures are frequently used to demonstrate compliance with Department of Energy (DOE) and US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) regulations. Knowledge of the density and distribution of the population surrounding a source is an essential component in assessing the impacts from radioactive effluents. Also, as an aid to calculating the dose to a given population, agricultural data relevant to the dose assessment procedure (or computer model) are often required. This report provides such population and agricultural data for the area surrounding Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  13. Los Alamos National Laboratory DOE M441.1-1 implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Worl, Laura A; Veirs, D Kirk; Smith, Paul H; Yarbro, Tresa F; Stone, Timothy A

    2010-01-01

    Loss of containment of nuclear material stored in containers such as food-pack cans, paint cans, or taped slip lid cans has generated concern about packaging requirements for interim storage of nuclear materials in working facilities such as the plutonium facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The Department of Energy (DOE) issued DOE M 441.1-1, Nuclear Materials Packaging Manual on March 7, 2008 in response to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2005-1. The Manual directs DOE facilities to follow detailed packaging requirements to protect workers from exposure to nuclear materials stored outside of approved engineered-contamination barriers. Los Alamos National Laboratory has identified the activities that will be performed to bring LANL into compliance with DOE M 441.1-1. These include design, qualification and procurement of new containers, repackaging based on a risk-ranking methodology, surveillance and maintenance of containers, and database requirements. The primary purpose is to replace the out-dated nuclear material storage containers with more robust containers that meet present day safety and quality standards. The repackaging campaign is supported by an integrated risk reduction methodology to prioritize the limited resources to the highest risk containers. This methodology is systematically revised and updated based on the collection of package integrity data. A set of seven nested packages with built-in filters have been designed. These range in size from 1 qt. to 10 gallon. Progress of the testing to meet Manual requirements will be given. Due to the number of packages at LANL, repackaging to achieve full compliance will take five to seven years.

  14. The economic impact of Los Alamos National Laboratory on north-central New Mexico and the state of New Mexico fiscal year 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Lansford, R.R.; Adcock, L.D.; Gentry, L.M.; Ben-David, S.; Temple, J.

    1999-08-05

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is a multidisciplinary, multiprogram laboratory with a mission to enhance national military and economic security through science and technology. Its mission is to reduce the nuclear danger through stewardship of the nation`s nuclear stockpile and through its nonproliferation and verification activities. An important secondary mission is to promote US industrial competitiveness by working with US companies in technology transfer and technology development partnerships. Los Alamos is involved in partnerships and collaborations with other federal agencies, with industry (including New Mexico businesses), and with universities worldwide. For this report, the reference period is FY 1998 (October 1, 1997, through September 30, 1998). It includes two major impact analysis: the impact of LANL activities on north-central New Mexico and the economic impacts of LANL on the state of New Mexico. Total impact represents both direct and indirect responding by business, including induced effects (responding by households). The standard multipliers used in determining impacts result from the inter-industry, input-output models developed for the three-county region and the state of New Mexico.

  15. The economic impact of Los Alamos National Laboratory on north-central New Mexico and the state of New Mexico fiscal year 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Lansford, R.R.; Nielsen, T.G.; Schultz, J.; Adcock, L.D.; Gentry, L.M.; Ben-David, S.; Temple, J.

    1998-05-29

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is a multidisciplinary, multiprogram laboratory with a mission to enhance national military and economic security through science and technology. Its mission is to reduce the nuclear danger through stewardship of the nation`s nuclear stockpile and through its nonproliferation and verification activities. An important secondary mission is to promote US industrial competitiveness by working with US companies in technology transfer and technology development partnerships. Los Alamos is involved in partnerships and collaborations with other federal agencies, with industry (including New Mexico businesses), and with universities worldwide. For this report, the reference period is FY 1997 (October 1, 1996, through September 30, 1997) and includes two major impact analysis: the impact of LANL activities on north-central New Mexico and the economic impacts of LANL on the state of New Mexico. Total impact represents both direct and indirect respending by business, including induced effects (respending by households). The standard multipliers used in determining impacts result from the inter-industry, input-output models developed for the three-county region and the state of New Mexico. 5 figs., 12 tabs.

  16. 76 FR 81359 - National Security Personnel System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ... MANAGEMENT 5 CFR Chapter XCIX RIN 3206-AM 53 National Security Personnel System AGENCY: Department of Defense... Defense and Office of Personnel Management regulations concerning the National Security Personnel System... the Department of Defense (DOD) authority to establish a National Security Personnel System (NSPS)...

  17. 10 CFR 602.16 - National security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false National security. 602.16 Section 602.16 Energy DEPARTMENT... ASSISTANCE PROGRAM § 602.16 National security. Activities under the Epidemiology and Other Health Studies..., Formerly Restricted Data, National Security Information). However, if in the opinion of the recipient...

  18. 10 CFR 605.18 - National security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false National security. 605.18 Section 605.18 Energy DEPARTMENT... PROGRAM § 605.18 National security. Activities under ER's Financial Assistance Program shall not involve classified information (i.e., Restricted Data, formerly Restricted Data, National Security...

  19. 10 CFR 602.16 - National security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false National security. 602.16 Section 602.16 Energy DEPARTMENT... ASSISTANCE PROGRAM § 602.16 National security. Activities under the Epidemiology and Other Health Studies..., Formerly Restricted Data, National Security Information). However, if in the opinion of the recipient...

  20. 10 CFR 605.18 - National security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false National security. 605.18 Section 605.18 Energy DEPARTMENT... PROGRAM § 605.18 National security. Activities under ER's Financial Assistance Program shall not involve classified information (i.e., Restricted Data, formerly Restricted Data, National Security...

  1. 10 CFR 605.18 - National security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false National security. 605.18 Section 605.18 Energy DEPARTMENT... PROGRAM § 605.18 National security. Activities under ER's Financial Assistance Program shall not involve classified information (i.e., Restricted Data, formerly Restricted Data, National Security...

  2. 10 CFR 602.16 - National security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false National security. 602.16 Section 602.16 Energy DEPARTMENT... ASSISTANCE PROGRAM § 602.16 National security. Activities under the Epidemiology and Other Health Studies..., Formerly Restricted Data, National Security Information). However, if in the opinion of the recipient...

  3. 10 CFR 602.16 - National security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false National security. 602.16 Section 602.16 Energy DEPARTMENT... ASSISTANCE PROGRAM § 602.16 National security. Activities under the Epidemiology and Other Health Studies..., Formerly Restricted Data, National Security Information). However, if in the opinion of the recipient...

  4. 10 CFR 602.16 - National security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false National security. 602.16 Section 602.16 Energy DEPARTMENT... ASSISTANCE PROGRAM § 602.16 National security. Activities under the Epidemiology and Other Health Studies..., Formerly Restricted Data, National Security Information). However, if in the opinion of the recipient...

  5. Los Alamos National Laboratory summary plan to fabricate mixed oxide lead assemblies for the fissile material disposition program

    SciTech Connect

    Buksa, J.J.; Eaton, S.L.; Trellue, H.R.; Chidester, K.; Bowidowicz, M.; Morley, R.A.; Barr, M.

    1997-12-01

    This report summarizes an approach for using existing Los Alamos National Laboratory (Laboratory) mixed oxide (MOX) fuel-fabrication and plutonium processing capabilities to expedite and assure progress in the MOX/Reactor Plutonium Disposition Program. Lead Assembly MOX fabrication is required to provide prototypic fuel for testing in support of fuel qualification and licensing requirements. It is also required to provide a bridge for the full utilization of the European fabrication experience. In part, this bridge helps establish, for the first time since the early 1980s, a US experience base for meeting the safety, licensing, safeguards, security, and materials control and accountability requirements of the Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission. In addition, a link is needed between the current research and development program and the production of disposition mission fuel. This link would also help provide a knowledge base for US regulators. Early MOX fabrication and irradiation testing in commercial nuclear reactors would provide a positive demonstration to Russia (and to potential vendors, designers, fabricators, and utilities) that the US has serious intent to proceed with plutonium disposition. This report summarizes an approach to fabricating lead assembly MOX fuel using the existing MOX fuel-fabrication infrastructure at the Laboratory.

  6. Upgrade and Certification of the Los Alamos National Laboratory SHENC 2011 - 12270

    SciTech Connect

    Stanfield, S.B.; Villani, M.; Barton, P.T.; Gerlock, C.; Nakazawa, D.; Baumann, R.C.; Mowry, R.; Harvill, J.P.

    2012-07-01

    Nondestructive assay measurements of Transuranic (TRU) waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) required the addition of a standard waste box (SWB) assay system. A Super High Efficiency Neutron Counter (SHENC) located at Hanford was identified to be relocated to LANL. After careful evaluation of waste streams at LANL, it was determined that the current configuration of the SHENC was not sufficient to quantify certain waste streams. At LANL, there is still a large amount of waste that needs to be retrieved and repackaged within SWB's to meet agreements with the State of New Mexico. Prior to relocating the SHENC, the only assay systems available were High Efficiency Neutron Counters having only a 55-gallon drum capacity. Further analyses indicated that the SHENC system should be capable of quantitative gamma measurements that are to be linked, and combined, with the neutron measurements. The SHENC system was therefore augmented with a new high-resolution gamma spectroscopy system using BE5030 detectors and upgraded gamma electronics. The neutron side of the system was also upgraded with an advanced shift register (JSR-15), an improved Programmable Logic Controller and NDA-2000 software. This report will include calibration of both the neutron and gamma modalities of the SHENC system and how the modality results are combined to produce a single assay result. Preliminary performance results will be discussed based on both mock and real waste measurements. Discussions will also include a complete description of the adjustable parameters as well as the calibration plan, techniques and validations including calibration confirmation based on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Acceptance Criteria (WIPP-WAC). The SHENC was successfully upgraded to efficiently measure the complex waste streams at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A new PLC was successfully added to the system for Add-A-Source control. A new shift register was added to the SHENC (JSR-15) which provides

  7. Nuclear criticality safety staff training and qualifications at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, S.P.; McLaughlin, T.P.

    1997-05-01

    Operations involving significant quantities of fissile material have been conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory continuously since 1943. Until the advent of the Laboratory`s Nuclear Criticality Safety Committee (NCSC) in 1957, line management had sole responsibility for controlling criticality risks. From 1957 until 1961, the NCSC was the Laboratory body which promulgated policy guidance as well as some technical guidance for specific operations. In 1961 the Laboratory created the position of Nuclear Criticality Safety Office (in addition to the NCSC). In 1980, Laboratory management moved the Criticality Safety Officer (and one other LACEF staff member who, by that time, was also working nearly full-time on criticality safety issues) into the Health Division office. Later that same year the Criticality Safety Group, H-6 (at that time) was created within H-Division, and staffed by these two individuals. The training and education of these individuals in the art of criticality safety was almost entirely self-regulated, depending heavily on technical interactions between each other, as well as NCSC, LACEF, operations, other facility, and broader criticality safety community personnel. Although the Los Alamos criticality safety group has grown both in size and formality of operations since 1980, the basic philosophy that a criticality specialist must be developed through mentoring and self motivation remains the same. Formally, this philosophy has been captured in an internal policy, document ``Conduct of Business in the Nuclear Criticality Safety Group.`` There are no short cuts or substitutes in the development of a criticality safety specialist. A person must have a self-motivated personality, excellent communications skills, a thorough understanding of the principals of neutron physics, a safety-conscious and helpful attitude, a good perspective of real risk, as well as a detailed understanding of process operations and credible upsets.

  8. The restructuring of the Environmental Restoration Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, J.

    1995-09-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (Laboratory) has supported this country through 50 years of research and development primarily in the area of nuclear weapons and energy. As a result of the Laboratory`s activities, contamination of the environment occurred. The cleanup of contaminated areas and the prevention of further contamination has become an important part of the Laboratory`s new mission: the reduction of the nuclear danger. The cleanup of the Laboratory is somewhat unique. It is a very large site. It includes 43 square miles of Laboratory land that will continue to be in industrial use or under institutional control for decades or centuries to come. It also includes about 25 square miles of former Laboratory land that has been converted to residential use, the Los Alamos townsite. The unusual topography and hydrogeology of the site was shaped during the last million years through the eruption of a huge volcano and the ensuing erosion of the tuff-basalt plateau into 19 canyons and associated finger-like mesas. During the early phase of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program, 2,100 sites were identified as potential release sites. Sites range from a few hundred square feet to a few acres in area. Contamination depths range from a few to 100 feet. Typical contaminants are chemicals, heavy metals, radioactive constituents, and high explosives. Of greatest concern are surface contamination, migration of the contaminants along the surface into creeks and arroyos of the canyons and ultimately into the Rio Grande, and migration through the earth into the drinking water aquifers.

  9. Design, construction, and initial operation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory salt-gradient solar pond

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G.F.; Meyer, K.A.; Hedstrom, J.C.; Dreicer, J.S.; Grimmer, D.P.

    1983-01-01

    A 232 m/sup 2/ solar pond was constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the purpose of studying pond hydrodynamics on a large scale and to complement the flow visualization and one-dimensional pond simulator experiments that are ongoing at the Laboratory. Design methods and construction techniques, some of which are unique to this pond, are described in detail. The pond was excavated from a soft volcanic rock known as tuff; such rock forms a large fraction of the Los Alamos area surface geology. Because tuff has a small thermal conductivity, little insulation was required to reduce perimeter energy losses. In addition, the strength of tuff permitted the pond to be built with vertical side walls; this design eliminated local side wall convection in the gradient zone that is possible with sloping side walls. Instrumentation in the pond consists of traversing and fixed rakes of thermometers and salinity probes, an underwater pyranometer, and a weather station. The traversing rake is a wheeled trolley driven vertically on a rectangular rail. Installed on the trolley are coplanar platinum RTDs, a point conductivity probe, and an induction salinometer. The stationary rake supports 28 thermocouples and 28 sample-fluid withdrawal taps located every 10 cm. About 127 T of sodium chloride has been introduced and is nearly dissolved. A 120-cm-thick salinity gradient was established and the pond is heating. Preliminary results indicate a lower-convective-zone heating rate of 1.2/sup 0/C/day during the pond's first month of operation. Recommendations on pond design, construction, and instrumentation are presented.

  10. Office of Inspector General report on audit of environmental restoration at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    Los Alamos` Environmental Restoration Program is charged with cost effectively remediating contaminated sites. To monitor progress toward this goal, the University of California, the contractor operating Los Alamos, and the Department negotiated eight performance measures. The objective of this audit was to determine whether the contract performance criteria were reasonable, measurable, and complete, thereby allowing the Department to determine if Los Alamos had expeditiously and cost effectively remediated contaminated sites. The audit determined that Los Alamos did not generate the information needed to assess the cost effectiveness of remediation on a site-by-site basis. This situation occurred because the performance criteria used to evaluate cost effectiveness were not always reasonable, measurable, and complete. As a result, neither Los Alamos nor the Department could evaluate the cost effectiveness or progress of the remediation program or accurately budget for upcoming remediation activities. The audit also determined that Los Alamos` sample validation procedures were too costly because Los Alamos validated more samples than called for by Federal and New Mexico standard practices. While the Office of Inspector General recognizes the importance of prudent sample validation, Los Alamos paid $540,000 more than necessary to validate sample results. These funds could have been used to remediate contaminated sites.

  11. 77 FR 6813 - President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-09

    ... SECURITY President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee AGENCY: National Protection... Committee Teleconference. SUMMARY: The President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee..., National Protection and Programs Directorate, Department of Homeland Security, 245 Murray Lane, Mail...

  12. 77 FR 65393 - President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... SECURITY President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee AGENCY: National Protection... Committee Teleconference. SUMMARY: The President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee... national security and emergency preparedness (NS/EP) telecommunications policy. Agenda: The NSTAC...

  13. 78 FR 63232 - President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... SECURITY President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee AGENCY: National Protection... Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee (NSTAC... related to national security and emergency preparedness (NS/EP) telecommunications policy. During...

  14. The Integrated Cloud-based Environmental Data Management System at Los Alamos National Laboratory - 13391

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz Paige, Karen; Gomez, Penny; Patel, Nita P.; EchoHawk, Chris; Dorries, Alison M.

    2013-07-01

    In today's world, instant access to information is taken for granted. The national labs are no exception; our data users expect immediate access to their data. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has collected over ten million records, and the data needs to be accessible to scientists as well as the public. The data span a wide range of media, analytes, time periods, formats, and quality and have traditionally existed in scattered databases, making comprehensive work with the data impossible. Recently, LANL has successfully integrated all their environmental data into a single, cloud-based, web-accessible data management system. The system combines data transparency to the public with immediate access required by the technical staff. The use of automatic electronic data validation has been critical to immediate data access while saving millions of dollars and increasing data consistency and quality. The system includes a Google Maps based GIS tool that is simple enough for people to locate potentially contaminated sites near their home or workplace, and complex enough to allow scientists to plot and trend their data at the surface and at depth as well as over time. A variety of formatted reports can be run at any desired frequency to report the most current data available in the data base. The advanced user can also run free form queries of the data base. This data management system has saved LANL time and money, an increasingly important accomplishment during periods of budget cuts with increasing demand for immediate electronic services. (authors)

  15. SULFUR POLYMER STABILIZATION/SOLIDIFICATION (SPSS) TREATABILITY OF LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY MERCURY WASTE.

    SciTech Connect

    ADAMS,J.W.; KALB,P.D.

    2001-11-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory's Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) process was used to treat approximately 90kg of elemental mercury mixed waste from Los Alamos National Laboratory. Treatment was carried out in a series of eight batches using a 1 ft{sup 3} pilot-scale mixer, where mercury loading in each batch was 33.3 weight percent. Although leach performance is currently not regulated for amalgamated elemental mercury (Hg) mixed waste, Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure (TCLP) testing of SPSS treated elemental mercury waste indicates that leachability is readily reduced to below the TCLP limit of 200 ppb (regulatory requirement following treatment by retort for wastes containing > 260 ppb Hg), and with process optimization, to levels less than the stringent Universal Treatment Standard (UTS) limit of 25 ppb that is applied to waste containing < 260 ppm Hg. In addition, mercury-contaminated debris, consisting of primary glass and plastic containers, as well as assorted mercury thermometers, switches, and labware, was first reacted with SPSS components to stabilize the mercury contamination, then macroencapsulated in the molten SPSS product. This treatment was done by vigorous agitation of the sulfur polymer powder and the comminuted debris. Larger plastic and metal containers were reacted to stabilize internal mercury contamination, and then filled with molten sulfur polymer to encapsulate the treated product.

  16. Measurements of air contaminants during the Cerro Grande fire at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhart, Craig

    2010-08-01

    Ambient air sampling for radioactive air contaminants was continued throughout the Cerro Grande fire that burned part of Los Alamos National Laboratory. During the fire, samples were collected more frequently than normal because buildup of smoke particles on the filters was decreasing the air flow. Overall, actual sampling time was 96% of the total possible sampling time for the May 2000 samples. To evaluate potential human exposure to air contaminants, the samples were analyzed as soon as possible and for additional specific radionuclides. Analyses showed that the smoke from the fire included resuspended radon decay products that had been accumulating for many years on the vegetation and the forest floor that burned. Concentrations of plutonium, americium, and depleted uranium were also measurable, but at locations and concentrations comparable to non-fire periods. A continuous particulate matter sampler measured concentrations that exceeded the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for PM-10 (particles less than 10 micrometers in diameter). These high concentrations were caused by smoke from the fire when it was close to the sampler.

  17. DECOMMISSIONING THE HIGH PRESSURE TRITIUM LABORATORY AT LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Peifer, M.J.; Rendell, K.; Hearnsberger, D.W.

    2003-02-27

    In May 0f 2000, the Cerro Grande wild land fire burned approximately 48,000 acres in and around Los Alamos. In addition to the many buildings that were destroyed in the town site, many structures were also damaged and destroyed within the 43 square miles that comprise the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A special Act of Congress provided funding to remove Laboratory structures that were damaged by the fire, or that could be threatened by subsequent catastrophic wild land fires. The High Pressure Tritium Laboratory (HPTL) is located at Technical Area (TA) 33, building 86 in the far southeast corner of the Laboratory property. It is immediately adjacent to Bandelier National Park. Because it was threatened by both the Cerro Grande fire in 2000, and the 16,000- acre Dome fire in 1996, the former tritium processing facility was placed on the list of facilities scheduled for Decontamination and Decommissioning under the Cerro Grande Rehabilitation Project. The work was performed through the Facilities and Waste Operations (FWO) Division and is integrated with other Laboratory D&D efforts. The primary demolition contractor was Clauss Construction of San Diego, California. Earth Tech Global Environmental Services of San Antonio, Texas was sub-contracted to Clauss Construction, and provided radiological decontamination support to the project. Although the forty-seven year old facility had been in a state of safe-shutdown since operations ceased in 1990, a significant amount of tritium remained in the rooms where process systems were located. Tritium was the only radiological contaminant associated with this facility. Since no specific regulatory standards have been set for the release of volumetrically contaminated materials, concentration guidelines were derived in order to meet other established regulatory criteria. A tritium removal system was developed for this project with the goal of reducing the volume of tritium concentrated in the concrete of the building

  18. Contributions to Human Errors and Breaches in National Security Applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Pond, D. J.; Houghton, F. K.; Gilmore, W. E.

    2002-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has recognized that security infractions are often the consequence of various types of human errors (e.g., mistakes, lapses, slips) and/or breaches (i.e., deliberate deviations from policies or required procedures with no intention to bring about an adverse security consequence) and therefore has established an error reduction program based in part on the techniques used to mitigate hazard and accident potentials. One cornerstone of this program, definition of the situational and personal factors that increase the likelihood of employee errors and breaches, is detailed here. This information can be used retrospectively (as in accident investigations) to support and guide inquiries into security incidents or prospectively (as in hazard assessments) to guide efforts to reduce the likelihood of error/incident occurrence. Both approaches provide the foundation for targeted interventions to reduce the influence of these factors and for the formation of subsequent 'lessons learned.' Overall security is enhanced not only by reducing the inadvertent releases of classified information but also by reducing the security and safeguards resources devoted to them, thereby allowing these resources to be concentrated on acts of malevolence.

  19. Bioethics and the national security state.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Jonathan D

    2004-01-01

    In previous work, I have described the history and ethics of human experiments for national security purposes during he cold war and developed the bioethical issues that will be apparent in the "war on terror". This paper is an attempt to bring these two previous lines of work together under the rubric of the "national security state," a concept familiar to Cold War historians and political scientists. The founding of the national security state was associated with the first articulations of informed consent requirements by national security agencies. My analysis indicates that strengthened consent standards, though conventionally thought to be antithetical crisis, can be seen as an attempt by the postwar national security state to protect itself from critics of expanded governmental power. During the coming years the renewed mission of the national security state in the war on terror should impel students of bioethics to consider its implications for the field.

  20. Student Experiential Opportunities in National Security Careers

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2007-12-31

    This report documents student experiential opportunities in national security careers as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), being performed under a Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) grant. This report includes a brief description of how experiential opportunities assist students in the selection of a career and a list of opportunities in the private sector and government. The purpose of the NSPP is to promote national security technologies through business incubation, technology demonstration and validation, and workforce development. Workforce development activities will facilitate the hiring of students to work with professionals in both the private and public sectors, as well as assist in preparing a workforce for careers in national security. The goal of workforce development under the NSPP grant is to assess workforce needs in national security and implement strategies to develop the appropriate workforce.

  1. Preparing Los Alamos National Laboratory's Waste Management Program for the Future - 12175

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Scotty W.; Dorries, Alison M.; Singledecker, Steven; Henckel, George

    2012-07-01

    The waste management program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is undergoing significant transition to establish a lean highly functioning waste management program that will succeed the large environmental cleanup waste management program. In the coming years, the environmental cleanup activities will be mostly completed and the effort will change to long-term stewardship. What will remain in waste management is a smaller program focused on direct off-site shipping to cost-effectively enable the enduring mission of the laboratory in support of the national nuclear weapons program and fundamental science and research. It is essential that LANL implement a highly functioning efficient waste management program in support of the core missions of the national weapons program and fundamental science and research - and LANL is well on the way to that goal. As LANL continues the transition process, the following concepts have been validated: - Business drivers including the loss of onsite disposal access and completion of major environmental cleanup activities will drive large changes in waste management strategies and program. - A well conceived organizational structure; formal management systems; a customer service attitude; and enthusiastic managers are core to a successful waste management program. - During times of organizational transition, a project management approach to managing change in a complex work place with numerous complex deliverables is successful strategy. - Early and effective engagement with waste generators, especially Project Managers, is critical to successful waste planning. - A well-trained flexible waste management work force is vital. Training plans should include continuous training as a strategy. - A shared fate approach to managing institutional waste decisions, such as the LANL Waste Management Recharge Board is effective. - An efficient WM program benefits greatly from modern technology and innovation in managing waste data and

  2. Tritium concentrations in bees and honey at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 1979-1996

    SciTech Connect

    Fresquez, P.R.; Armstrong, D.R.; Pratt, L.H.

    1997-01-01

    Honeybees are effective monitors of environmental pollution. The objective of this study was to summarize tritium ({sup 3}H) concentrations in bees and honey collected from within and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) over an 18-year period. Based on the long-term average, bees from nine out of eleven hives and honey from six out of eleven hives on LANL lands contained {sup 3}H that was significantly higher (p <0.05) than background. The highest average concentration of {sup 3}H in bees (435 pCi mL{sup -1}) collected over the years was from LANL`s Technical Area (TA) 54-a low-level radioactive waste disposal site (Area G). Similarly, the highest average concentration of {sup 3}H in honey (709 pCi mL{sup - 1}) was collected from a hive located near three {sup 3}H storage ponds at LANL TA-53. The average concentrations of {sup 3}H in bees and honey from background hives was 1.0 pCi mL{sup -1} and 1.5 pCi ML{sup -1}, respectively. Although the concentrations of 3H in bees and honey from most LANL and perimeter (White Rock/Pajarito Acres) areas were significantly higher than background, most areas, with the exception of TA-53 and TA-54, generally exhibited decreasing 3H concentrations over time.

  3. Site Characterization and Monitoring of Technical Area 49 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Levitt, D. G.; Kisiel, K. C.; Newell, D. L; Hopkins, J. K.; Criswell, C. W.; Woodworth, L. A.

    2003-02-25

    In 1959-1961, subcritical hydronuclear safety experiments were conducted at Technical Area (TA) 49 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). These underground experiments were designed and conducted to investigate safety issues. Seventy hydronuclear safety, tracer, and containment test experiments were conducted in 1-m or 2-m diameter shafts at depths ranging between 9 m and 33 m. The subsurface radiological and metals inventory consists of about 40 kg of plutonium, 93 kg of uranium-235, 170 kg of uranium-238, 11 kg of beryllium, and possibly more than 90,000 kg of lead. Explosives used in the experiments consisted largely of TNT, RDX, HMX, and barium nitrate. It is highly likely that the explosives, except for the barium component, were completely consumed by the detonations. Hydronuclear safety test shafts were drilled, test materials were placed at the bottom of the shafts, shafts were backfilled with sand or local crushed tuff, tests were detonated, subsidence in the shafts were backfilled, and cement caps were poured over the test shafts. The diameter of the affected detonation zones is believed to be less than 6 m. Most test shafts were drilled on an 8-m grid spacing in four main areas within TA-49.

  4. Acoustic Analysis of Plutonium and Nuclear Weapon Components at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, T. A.; Reynolds, J. J.; Rowe, C. A.; Freibert, F. J.; Ten Cate, J. A.; Ulrich, T. J.; Farrow, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    One of the primary missions of Los Alamos National Laboratory is to use science based techniques to certify the nuclear weapons stockpile of the United States. As such we use numerous NDE techniques to monitor materials and systems properties in weapons. Two techniques will be discussed in this presentation, Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) and Acoustic Emission (AE). ARS is used to observe manufacturing variations or changes in the plutonium containing component (pit) of the weapon system. Both quantitative and qualitative comparisons can be used to determine variation in the pit components. Piezoelectric transducer driven acoustic resonance experiments will be described along with initial qualitative and more complex analysis and comparison techniques derived from earthquake analysis performed at LANL. Similarly, AE is used to measure the time of arrival of acoustic signals created by mechanical events that can occur in nuclear weapon components. Both traditional time of arrival techniques and more advanced techniques are used to pinpoint the location and type of acoustic emission event. Similar experiments on tensile tests of brittle phases of plutonium metal will be described.

  5. Linear induction accelerators at the Los Alamos National Laboratory DARHT facility

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, Subrata

    2010-09-07

    The Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility (DARHT) at Los Alamos National Laboratory consists of two linear induction accelerators at right angles to each other. The First Axis, operating since 1999, produces a nominal 20-MeV, 2-kA single beam-pulse with 60-nsec width. In contrast, the DARHT Second Axis, operating since 2008, produces up to four pulses in a variable pulse format by slicing micro-pulses out of a longer {approx}1.6-microseconds (flat-top) pulse of nominal beam-energy and -current of 17 MeV and 2 kA respectively. Bremsstrahlung x-rays, shining on a hydro-dynamical experimental device, are produced by focusing the electron beam-pulses onto a high-Z target. Variable pulse-formats allow for adjustment of the pulse-to-pulse doses to record a time sequence of x-ray images of the explosively driven imploding mock device. Herein, we present a sampling of the numerous physics and engineering aspects along with the current status of the fully operational dual axes capability. First successful simultaneous use of both the axes for a hydrodynamic experiment was achieved in 2009.

  6. Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Mobile Real Time Radiography System

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, J.; Taggart, D.; Betts, S.; Mendez, J.; Rael, C.; Martinez, F.

    1997-01-01

    A 450-KeV Mobile Real Time Radiography (RTR) System was delivered to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in January 1996. It was purchased to inspect containers of radioactive waste produced at (LANL). Since its delivery it has been used to radiograph greater than 600 drums of radioactive waste at various LANL sites. It has the capability of inspecting waste containers of various sizes. It has three independent X-Ray acquisition formats. The primary system used is a 12 in. image intensifier, the second is a 36 in. linear diode array (LDA) and the last is an open system. It is fully self contained with on board generator, HVAC and a fire suppression system. It is on a 53 ft long X 8 ft. wide X 14 ft. high trailer that can be moved over any highway requiring only a easily obtainable overweight permit because it weighs approximately 38 tons. It was built to conform to industry standards for a cabinet system which does not require an exclusion zone. The fact that this unit is mobile has allowed us to operate where the waste is stored, rather than having to move the waste to a fixed facility.

  7. Final Report - Los Alamos National Laboratory Compuational Physics Summer Student Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Lung, Tyler B.; Roe, Phil; Morgan, Nathaniel R.

    2012-08-15

    The numerical solution of highly compressible, multi-material flows is an ongoing research area. These types of flows can be solved with a Lagrangian type mesh which moves with the material in a simulation to allow precise material interface tracking. Currently, researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory and elsewhere are investigating cell-centered Lagrangian algorithms with the aim of producing methods that have second-order accuracy, preserve symmetry, and do not generate spurious vorticity. The new cell-centered algorithms solve a Riemann-like problem at the vertex of a cell. Professor Phil Roe at the University of Michigan has proposed a new struture for Lagrangian hydrodynamic algorithms that does not rely on the solution of the Riemann problem. The new approach utilizes Flux Corrected Transport (FCT) and it implements a form of vorticity control. The first step in the development of this method has been to construct an algorithm that solves the acoustic equations on an Eulerian mesh. The algorithm, which builds on the work of Morton and Roe [1], calculates fluxes at cell vertices, attains second-order accuracy using FCT, and has the special property of preserving vorticity. Results are presented that confirm the second order accuracy of the scheme and the vorticity preserving properties. The results are compared to the output produced by a MUSCL-Hancock algorithm. Some discussion of limiting methods for the FCT algorithm is also given.

  8. An In Situ Radiological Survey of Three Canyons at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Maurer

    1999-06-01

    An in situ radiological survey of Mortandad, Ten Site, and DP Canyons at the Los Alamos National Laboratory was conducted during August 19-30, 1996. The purpose of this survey was to measure the quantities of radionuclides that remain in the canyons from past laboratory operations. A total of 65 in situ measurements were conducted using high-resolution gamma radiation detectors at 1 meter above the ground. The measurements were obtained in the streambeds of the canyons beginning near the water-release points at the laboratories and extending to the ends of the canyons. Three man-made gamma-emitting radionuclides were detected in the canyons: americium-241 ({sup 241}Am), cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs), and cobalt-60 ({sup 60}Co). Estimated contamination levels ranged from 13.3-290.4 picocuries per gram (pCi/g)for {sup 241}Am, 4.4-327.8 pCi/g for {sup 137}Cs, and 0.4-2.6 pCi/g for {sup 60}Co.

  9. Material handling for the Los Alamos National Laboratory Nuclear Material Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pittman, P.; Roybal, J.; Durrer, R.; Gordon, D.

    1999-04-01

    This paper will present the design and application of material handling and automation systems currently being developed for the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Nuclear Material Storage Facility (NMSF) renovation project. The NMSF is a long-term storage facility for nuclear material in various forms. The material is stored within tubes in a rack called a basket. The material handling equipment range from simple lift assist devices to more sophisticated fully automated robots, and are split into three basic systems: a Vault Automation System, an NDA automation System, and a Drum handling System. The Vault Automation system provides a mechanism to handle a basket of material cans and to load/unload storage tubes within the material vault. In addition, another robot is provided to load/unload material cans within the baskets. The NDA Automation System provides a mechanism to move material within the small canister NDA laboratory and to load/unload the NDA instruments. The Drum Handling System consists of a series of off the shelf components used to assist in lifting heavy objects such as pallets of material or drums and barrels.

  10. Emissions Inventory Report Summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Ecology and Air Quality Group

    2007-09-28

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department, Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. Modification Number 1 to this Title V Operating Permit was issued on June 15, 2006 (Permit No P-100M1) and includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semi-annual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semi-annual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2006. LANL's 2006 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

  11. Non-Traditional In Situ Vitrification - A Technology Demonstration at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Coel-Roback, B.; Springer, M.; Lowery, P.; Thompson, L.; Huddleston, G.

    2003-02-25

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Subsurface Contamination Focus Area (SCFA) sponsored a technology demonstration of non-traditional in situ vitrification (NTISV) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project team for this demonstration included MSE Technology Applications, Inc., Geosafe Corporation, and LANL. The technology demonstration involved the performance of two large-scale test melts. The first, referred to as the ''cold'' test, was performed on a simulated absorption bed that contained surrogate contaminants. The cold test was conducted in April 1999. The second demonstration, referred to as the ''hot'' test, took place at LANL's Material Disposal Area (MDA) V in April 2000. The hot test was conducted on a portion of an absorption bed that received radionuclide and metal-contaminated wastewater from a laundry facility and a research laboratory from the mid-1940s to the early 1960s. This paper presents the results of drilling and sampling following the hot test at LANL's MDA V. The objectives of the sample collection were to characterize the vitrified mass and the effects of the hot test on the surrounding bedrock. Glass samples were analyzed for total radionuclide and metal content by standard EPA methods, and leachable radionuclide and metal content using Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and Product Consistency Test (PCT) methods.

  12. Emissions inventory report summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for calendar year 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Ecology and Air Quality Group

    2009-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory’s potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department/Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. This permit was modified and reissued on July 16, 2007. This Title V Operating Permit (Permit No. P-100M2) includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semiannual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semiannual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2008. LANL’s 2008 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

  13. CEPPAD, CAMMICE, and RAPID (CCR) Data from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Comprehensive Energetic Particle and Pitch Angle Distribution (CEPPAD) Experiment, the Charge and Mass Magnetospheric Ion Composition Experiment (CAMMICE), and the experiment for Research with Adaptive Particle Imaging Detectors (RAPID) refer to specific instruments mounted on the Polar satellite launched by NASA in February of 1996 and the Cluster II spacecraft launched in 2000 under the auspices of the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC), Germany. All three instruments are participating in the International Solar Terrestrial Physics Program (ISTP), to which the Global Geospace Science Program (GGSP) is the U.S. contribution. The CCR Science Team is composed of members of three instrument teams on the ISTP satellites POLAR and CLUSTER. DOE's Los Alamos National Laboratory is part of that team, and the CCR website is maintained at LANL. CCR Summary Data Plots are available from the LANL website through either the specialized browser or as digitized data from an anonymous FTP. ISTP data of various kinds can be obtained from NASA at http://pwg.gsfc.nasa.gov/istp/

  14. The Influence of Ergonomics Training on Employee Behavior at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Puckett, Leslie Guthrie

    2001-01-01

    A survey of employee behavior was conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of ergonomic behavior that decreased the chance of having a work-related musculoskeletal disorder (WMSD) among employees. The null hypothesis was tested to determine if there was a significant difference in ergonomic behavior between trained and untrained employees. The LANL employees were stratified by job series and then randomly selected to participate. The data were gathered using an electronic self-administered behavior questionnaire. The study population was composed of 6931 employees, and the response rate was 48%. The null hypothesis was rejected for twelve out of fifteen questions on the questionnaire. Logistic regression results indicate that the trained participants were more likely to report the risk-avoiding behavior, which supported the rejection of the null hypothesis for 60% of the questions. There was a higher frequency that the beneficial or risk-avoiding behavior was reported by the uninjured participants. Job series analysis revealed that ergonomics is an important issue among participants from all the job series. It also identified the occupational specialist classification (an administrative job), as the job series with the most occurrences of undesired ergonomic behaviors. In conclusion, there was a significant difference between the trained and untrained participants of the beneficial ergonomic behavior in the reported risk reducing behaviors.

  15. Aquatic macroinvertebrates and water quality of Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory, November 1993--October 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, S.

    1995-08-01

    The Ecological Studies Team (EST) of ESH-20 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has collected samples from the stream within Sandia Canyon since the summer of 1990. These field studies gather water quality measurements and collect aquatic macroinvertebrates from permanent sampling sites. Reports by Bennett (1994) and Cross (1994) discuss previous EST aquatic studies in Sandia Canyon. This report updates and expands those findings. EST collected water quality data and aquatic macroinvertebrates at five permanent stations within the canyon from November 1993 through October 1994. The two upstream stations are located below outfalls that discharge industrial and sanitary waste effluent into the stream, thereby maintaining year-round flow. Some water quality parameters are different at the first three stations from those expected of natural streams in the area, indicating degraded water quality due to effluent discharges. The aquatic habitat at the upper stations has also been degraded by sedimentation and channelization. The macroinvertebrate communities at these stations are characterized by low diversities and unstable communities. In contrast, the two downstream stations appear to be in a zone of recovery, where water quality parameters more closely resemble those found in natural streams of the area. The two lower stations have increased macroinvertebrate diversity and stable communities, further indications of downstream water quality improvement.

  16. Validation test for CAP88 predictions of tritium dispersion at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Michelotti, Erika; Green, Andrew; Whicker, Jeffrey; Eisele, William; Fuehne, David; McNaughton, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Gaussian plume models, such as CAP88, are used regularly for estimating downwind concentrations from stack emissions. At many facilities, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) requires that CAP88 be used to demonstrate compliance with air quality regulations for public protection from emissions of radionuclides. Gaussian plume models have the advantage of being relatively simple and their use pragmatic; however, these models are based on simplifying assumptions and generally they are not capable of incorporating dynamic meteorological conditions or complex topography. These limitations encourage validation tests to understand the capabilities and limitations of the model for the specific application. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has complex topography but is required to use CAP88 for compliance with the Clean Air Act Subpart H. The purpose of this study was to test the accuracy of the CAP88 predictions against ambient air measurements using released tritium as a tracer. Stack emissions of tritium from two LANL stacks were measured and the dispersion modeled with CAP88 using local meteorology. Ambient air measurements of tritium were made at various distances and directions from the stacks. Model predictions and ambient air measurements were compared over the course of a full year's data. Comparative results were consistent with other studies and showed the CAP88 predictions of downwind tritium concentrations were on average about three times higher than those measured, and the accuracy of the model predictions were generally more consistent for annual averages than for bi-weekly data.

  17. The Management of Silica in Los Alamos National Laboratory Tap Water - A Study of Silica Solubility

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlberg, C.; Worland, V.P.; Kozubal, M.A.; Erickson, G.F.; Jacobson, H.M.; McCarthy, K.T.

    1999-07-01

    Well water at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has a silica (SiO{sub 2}) content of 60 to 100 mg/L, with 4 mg/L of magnesium, 13 mg/L calcium and lesser concentrations of other ions. On evaporation in cooling towers, when the silica concentration reaches 150 to 220 mg/L, silica deposits on heat transfer surfaces. When the high silica well water is used in the reprocessing of plutonium, silica remains in solution at the end of the process and creates a problem of removal from the effluent prior to discharge or evaporation. The work described in this Report is divided into two major parts. The first part describes the behavior of silica when the water is evaporated at various conditions of pH and in the presence of different classes of anions: inorganic and organic. In the second part of this work it was found that precipitation (floccing) of silica was a function of solution pH and mole ratio of metal to silica.

  18. Multisphere neutron spectroscopy measurements at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, W.F.; Hajnal, F.

    1993-06-01

    Multisphere neutron spectroscopy methods are applied to measure representative working fields within the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Plutonium Facility. This facility hosts dynamic processes, which include the fabrication of {sup 238}Pu heat sources for radioisotope generators used to power space equipment and a variety of plutonium research programs that involve recovery, hydrofluorination, and metal production. Neutron fluence per unit lethargy, as a function of neutron energy measured for locations throughout this facility, are described. Dosimeter/remmeter response functions [e.g., determined for a 22.8-cm-diameter neutron rem detector (NRD), an Anderson/Braun-type neutron ``Snoopy`` monitor, track-etch CR-39, BDI-100 bubble detectors, and Kodak type A nuclear track emulsion film, (NTA)] are folded into these spectra to calculate absolute response values of counts, tracks, or bubbles per unit-dose equivalent. The relative response values per unit- dose equivalent for bare and albedo {sup 6}LiF-based thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are also calculated to estimate response scenarios encountered with use of the LANL-TLD. These results are further compared to more conventional methods of estimating neutron spectral energies such as the ``9-to-3 ratio`` method.

  19. Radionuclide concentrations in elk that winter on Los Alamos National Laboratory lands. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Fresquez, P.R.; Armstrong, D.A.; Salazar, J.G.

    1994-07-01

    Elk spend the winter in areas at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) that may contain radioactivity above natural and/or worldwide fallout levels. This study was initiated to determine the levels of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and total uranium in various tissues (brain, hair, heart, jawbone, kidneys, leg bone, liver, and muscle) of adult cow elk that use LANL lands during the fall/winter months. No significant differences in radionuclide contents were detected in any of the tissue samples collected from elk on LANL lands as compared with elk collected from off-site locations. The total effective (radiation) dose equivalent a person would receive from consuming 3.2 lb of heart, 5.6 lb of liver, and 226 lb of muscle from elk that winter on LANL lands, after natural background has been subtracted, was 0.00008, 0.0001, and 0.008 mrem/yr, respectively. The highest dose was less than 0.01% of the International Commission on Radiological Protection permissible dose limit for protecting the public.

  20. Radionuclide concentrations in elk that winter on Los Alamos National Laboratory lands

    SciTech Connect

    Fresquez, P.R.; Armstrong, D.A.; Salazar, J.G.

    1994-07-01

    Elk spend the winter in areas at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) that may contain radioactivity above natural and/or worldwide fallout levels. This study was initiated to determine the levels of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and total uranium in various tissues (brain, hair, heart, jawbone, kidneys, leg bone, liver, and muscle) of adult cow elk that use LANL lands during the fall/winter months. No significant differences in radionuclide contents were detected in any of the tissue samples collected from elk on LANL lands as compared with elk collected from off-site locations. The total effective (radiation) dose equivalent a person would receive from consuming 3.2 lb of heart, 5.6 lb of liver, and 226 lb of muscle from elk that winter on LANL lands, after natural background has been subtracted, was 0.00008, 0.0001, and 0.008 mrem/yr, respectively. The highest dose was less than 0.01% of the International Commission of Radiological Protection permissible dose limit for protecting the public.

  1. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at selected burning grounds at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, B.W.; Minor, L.K.M.; Flucas, B.J.

    1998-02-01

    A commercial immunoassay field test (IFT) was used to rapidly assess the total concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the soil at selected burning grounds within the explosives corridor at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Results were compared with analyses obtained from LANL Analytical Laboratory and from a commercial laboratory. Both used the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Methods 8270 and 8310. EPA`s Method 8270 employs gas chromatography and mass spectral analyses, whereas EPA`s Method 8310 uses an ultraviolet detector in a high-performance liquid chromatography procedure. One crude oil sample and one diesel fuel sample, analyzed by EPA Method 8270, were included for references. On an average the IFT results were lower for standard samples and lower than the analytical laboratory results for the unknown samples. Sites were selected to determine whether the PAHs came from the material burned or the fuel used to ignite the burn, or whether they are produced by a high-temperature chemical reaction during the burn. Even though the crude oil and diesel fuel samples did contain measurable quantities of PAHs, there were no significant concentrations of PAHs detected in the ashes and soil at the burning grounds. Tests were made on fresh soil and ashes collected after a large burn and on aged soil and ashes known to have been at the site more than three years. Also analyzed were twelve-year-old samples from an inactive open burn cage.

  2. Hazards and accident analyses, an integrated approach, for the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, P.Y.; Goen, L.K.; Letellier, B.C.; Sasser, M.K.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes an integrated approach to perform hazards and accident analyses for the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A comprehensive hazards analysis methodology was developed that extends the scope of the preliminary/process hazard analysis methods described in the AIChE Guidelines for Hazard Evaluations. Results fro the semi-quantitative approach constitute a full spectrum of hazards. For each accident scenario identified, there is a binning assigned for the event likelihood and consequence severity. In addition, each accident scenario is analyzed for four possible sectors (workers, on-site personnel, public, and environment). A screening process was developed to link the hazard analysis to the accident analysis. Specifically the 840 accident scenarios were screened down to about 15 accident scenarios for a more through deterministic analysis to define the operational safety envelope. The mechanics of the screening process in the selection of final scenarios for each representative accident category, i.e., fire, explosion, criticality, and spill, is described.

  3. Assessment of Options for the Treatment of Nitrate Salt Wastes at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Bruce Alan; Funk, David John; Stevens, Patrice Ann

    2016-03-17

    This paper summarizes the methodology used to evaluate options for treatment of the remediated nitrate salt waste containers at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The method selected must enable treatment of the waste drums, which consist of a mixture of complex nitrate salts (oxidizer) improperly mixed with sWheat Scoop®1, an organic kitty litter and absorbent (fuel), in a manner that renders the waste safe, meets the specifications of waste acceptance criteria, and is suitable for transport and final disposal in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant located in Carlsbad, New Mexico. A Core Remediation Team was responsible for comprehensively reviewing the options, ensuring a robust, defensible treatment recommendation. The evaluation process consisted of two steps. First, a prescreening process was conducted to cull the list on the basis for a decision of feasibility of certain potential options with respect to the criteria. Then, the remaining potential options were evaluated and ranked against each of the criteria in a consistent methodology. Numerical scores were established by consensus of the review team. Finally, recommendations were developed based on current information and understanding of the scientific, technical, and regulatory situation. A discussion of the preferred options and documentation of the process used to reach the recommended treatment options are presented.

  4. Options Assessment Report: Treatment of Nitrate Salt Waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Bruce Alan; Stevens, Patrice Ann

    2015-12-17

    This report documents the methodology used to select a method of treatment for the remediated nitrate salt (RNS) and unremediated nitrate salt (UNS) waste containers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The method selected should treat the containerized waste in a manner that renders the waste safe and suitable for transport and final disposal in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository, under specifications listed in the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (DOE/CBFO, 2013). LANL recognizes that the results must be thoroughly vetted with the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) and that a modification to the LANL Hazardous Waste Facility Permit is a necessary step before implementation of this or any treatment option. Likewise, facility readiness and safety basis approvals must be received from the Department of Energy (DOE). This report presents LANL’s preferred option, and the documentation of the process for reaching the recommended treatment option for RNS and UNS waste, and is presented for consideration by NMED and DOE.

  5. Distribution and diversity of fungal species in and adjacent to the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Balice, R.G.; Jarmie, N.; Rogers, F.J.

    1997-12-01

    Fungi have demonstrated their ability to diversify and specialize to take advantage of new environments (Murphy 1996). These species are essential to the normal functioning of ecosystems and the impacts of human activities may be harmful to fungi. There is a need to inventory fungi throughout the range of their environments. Previously archived information representing 43 sample locations was used to perform a preliminary evaluation of the distributions and diversity of fungal species at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and in adjacent environments. Presence-absence data for 71 species of fungi in five habitats, pinon-juniper, canyon-bottom ponderosa pine, ponderosa pine, canyon-bottom mixed conifer, and mixed conifer were analyzed. The results indicate that even though fungi occur in each of the habitats, fungal species are not distributed evenly among these habitats. The richness of fungal species is greater in the canyon-bottom mixed conifer and mixed conifer habitats than in the pinon-juniper, canyon-bottom ponderosa pine or ponderosa pine habitats. All but three of the fungal species were recorded in either the canyon-bottom mixed conifer or the mixed conifer habitats, and all but seven of the fungal species were found in the mixed conifer habitat.

  6. Los Alamos neutron science center nuclear weapons stewardship and unique national scientific capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenberg, Kurt F

    2010-12-15

    This presentation gives an overview of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) and its contributions to science and the nuclear weapons program. LANSCE is made of multiple experimental facilities (the Lujan Center, the Weapons Neutron Research facility (WNR), the Ultra-Cold Neutron facility (UCN), the proton Radiography facility (pRad) and the Isotope Production Facility (IPF)) served by the its kilometer long linear accelerator. Several research areas are supported, including materials and bioscience, nuclear science, materials dynamics, irradiation response and medical isotope production. LANSCE is a national user facility that supports researchers worldwide. The LANSCE Risk Mitigation program is currently in progress to update critical accelerator equipment to help extend the lifetime of LANSCE as a key user facility. The Associate Directorate of Business Sciences (ADBS) plays an important role in the continued success of LANSCE. This includes key procurement support, human resource support, technical writing support, and training support. LANSCE is also the foundation of the future signature facility MARIE (Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes).

  7. Emissions Inventory Report Summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Environmental Stewardship Group

    2010-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department/Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. This permit was modified and reissued on July 16, 2007. This Title V Operating Permit (Permit No. P-100M2) includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semiannual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semiannual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2009. LANL's 2009 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

  8. Emissions Inventory Report Summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2004

    SciTech Connect

    M. Stockton

    2005-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), ''Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements''. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department, Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. This Title V Operating Permit (Permit No. P-100) includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semi-annual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semi-annual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2004. LANL's 2004 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

  9. Disposal of tritium residues at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Audit repost

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    The objective of this audit was to determine whether Los Alamos disposed of wastewater containing tritium residues in a safe and cost-effective manner subsequent to an October 1991 report reviewing tritium facility management practices.

  10. Oppenheimer's Box of Chocolates: Remediation of the Manhattan Project Landfill at Los Alamos National Laboratory - 12283

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Donald L.; Ramsey, Susan S.; Finn, Kevin P.; Chaloupka, Allan B.

    2012-07-01

    Material Disposal Area B (MDA B) is the oldest radioactive waste disposal facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Operated from 1944-48, MDA B was the disposal facility for the Manhattan Project. Recognized as one of the most challenging environmental remediation projects at Los Alamos, the excavation of MDA B received $110 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 to accelerate this complex remediation work. Several factors combined to create significant challenges to remediating the landfill known in the 1940's as the 'contaminated dump'. The secrecy surrounding the Manhattan Project meant that no records were kept of radiological materials and chemicals disposed or of the landfill design. An extensive review of historical documents and interviews with early laboratory personnel resulted in a list of hundreds of hazardous chemicals that could have been buried in MDA B. Also, historical reports of MDA B spontaneously combusting on three occasions -with 50-foot flames and pink smoke spewing across the mesa during the last incident in 1948-indicated that hazardous materials were likely present in MDA B. To complicate matters further, though MDA B was located on an isolated mesa in the 1940's, the landfill has since been surrounded by a Los Alamos commercial district. The local newspaper, hardware store and a number of other businesses are located directly across the street from MDA B. This close proximity to the public and the potential for hazardous materials in MDA B necessitated conducting remediation work within protective enclosures. Potential chemical hazards and radiological inventory were better defined using a minimally intrusive sampling method called direct push technology (DPT) prior to excavation. Even with extensive sampling and planning the project team encountered many surprises and challenges during the project. The one area where planning did not fail to meet reality was safety. There were no serious worker injuries and

  11. Biological Assessment of the Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory on Federally Listed Threatened and Endangered Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Leslie A.

    2006-09-19

    This biological assessment considers the effects of continuing to operate Los Alamos National Laboratory on Federally listed threatened or endangered species, based on current and future operations identified in the 2006 Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory (SWEIS; DOE In Prep.). We reviewed 40 projects analyzed in the SWEIS as well as two aspects on ongoing operations to determine if these actions had the potential to affect Federally listed species. Eighteen projects that had not already received U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) consultation and concurrence, as well as the two aspects of ongoing operations, ecological risk from legacy contaminants and the Outfall Reduction Project, were determined to have the potential to affect threatened or endangered species. Cumulative impacts were also analyzed.

  12. Floodplain statement of findings for corrective actions in Potrillo Canyon technical area-36, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, David Charles

    2016-05-18

    In 2014, baseline storm water monitoring samples for Potrillo Canyon Sample Management Area at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) exceeded the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Individual Permit No. NM0030759 target action level (TAL) of 15 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) for gross-alpha radioactivity (393 pCi/L) and a TAL of 30 pCi/L for radium-226 and radium-228 (95.9 pCi/L). Consequently, erosion control measures within the management area are proposed to minimize sediment migration, a corrective action under the permit that is a requirement of the New Mexico Environment Department consent decree and a good management practice to limit off-site sediment migration. The area proposed for erosion controls consists of portions of Technical Area 36 that were used as firing sites primarily involving high explosives (HE) and metal (e.g., depleted uranium, lead, copper, aluminum, and steel), small-explosives experiments and burn pits (burn pits were used for burning and disposal of test debris). In addition, underground explosive tests at an approximate depth of 100 feet were also conducted. These watershed-based storm water controls will focus on addressing erosion occurring within the floodplain through mitigating and reducing both current and future channelization and head cutting.

  13. 75 FR 16159 - President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... SECURITY National Communications System President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee...: The President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee (NSTAC) will hold its annual... Management Branch, Department of Homeland Security, 245 Murray Lane, SW., Washington, DC 20598-0615....

  14. 78 FR 29145 - President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... SECURITY President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee AGENCY: National Protection... Advisory Committee Meeting; Correction. SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security published a document...'s National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee (NSTAC). The document contained...

  15. 75 FR 3913 - President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... SECURITY National Communications System President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee...: The President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee (NSTAC) will be meeting by... Communications System (Government Industry Planning and Management Branch), Department of Homeland Security,...

  16. 75 FR 29781 - President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-27

    ... SECURITY National Communications System President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee... meeting. SUMMARY: The President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee (NSTAC) will be...), Department of Homeland Security, 245 Murray Lane, SW., Washington, DC 20598-0615; Fax:...

  17. Waste site characterization through digital analysis of historical aerial photographs at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Eglin Air Force Base

    SciTech Connect

    Van Eeckhout, E.; Pope, P.; Wells, B.; Rofer, C.; Martin, B.

    1995-05-01

    Historical aerial photographs are used to provide a physical history and preliminary mapping information for characterizing hazardous waste sites at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Eglin Air Force Base. The examples cited show how imagery was used to accurately locate and identify previous activities at a site, monitor changes that occurred over time, and document the observable of such activities today. The methodology demonstrates how historical imagery (along with any other pertinent data) can be used in the characterization of past environmental damage.

  18. Dose reconstruction for weapons experiments involving {sup 140}La at Los Alamos National Laboratory, 1944-1962

    SciTech Connect

    Kraig, D.J.

    1997-10-01

    A series of 254 weapons design experiments was conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory from 1944 through 1962 and resulted in the dispersal of approximately 11 PBq (300 kCi) of radioactive {sup 140}La. All shots occurred at Point Able in Bayo Canyon, east of the Los Alamos townsite. Public interest and the Government Accounting Office probe precipitated a dose reconstruction to assess potential exposures to members of the public. The information available for each shot included explosive charge size, date and time of explosion, and shot activity. Detailed meteorological data were not available for the majority of the shots, requiring the development of statistically representative meteorological data. A wind rose was developed specific to the afternoon-evening time of the shots, and the wind frequency in each sector was used to determine the fraction of activity dispersed towards each hypothetical receptor. HOTSPOT 7, a Gaussian plume-based dispersion model, was used to determine the average dose per sector per unit of shot activity. The dose from penetrating radiation from ground-deposited {sup 140}La was greater by several orders of magnitude than the dose from inhalation and immersion. The highest doses to a permanent resident probably occurred in the easternmost part of the Los Alamos townsite. The highest annual dose occurred in 1955 and was approximately 0.23 mSv. Assuming an individual had been at the location of maximum potential exposure in the Los Alamos townsite continuously throughout the experiments, the total dose from the 18-y series would have been approximately 1.4 mSv with an average dose of approximately 0.09 mSv y{sup -1}. Doses at nearby Totavi trailer park, San Clara Pueblo, and Santa Clara Pueblo were approximately 75%, 40%, and 15%, respectively, of those at Los Alamos. Visitors to nearby public areas received negligible doses. 11 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Large-scale demonstration and deployment project at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.; McFee, J.; Broom, C.; Dugger, H.; Stallings, E.

    1999-04-01

    Established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management program through its Office of Science and Technology, the Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area is developing answers to the technological problems that hinder Environmental Management`s extensive cleanup efforts. The optimized application of technologies to ongoing nuclear facility decontamination and dismantlement is critical in meeting the challenge of decommissioning approximately 9,000 buildings and structures within the DOE complex. The significant technical and economic concerns in this area underscore a national imperative for the qualification and timely delivery of cost-reduction technologies and management approaches to meet federal and private needs. At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), a Large-Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project (LSDDP) has been established to facilitate demonstration and deployment of technologies for the characterization, decontamination, and volume reduction of oversized metallic waste, mostly in the form of gloveboxes contaminated with transuranic radionuclides. The LANL LSDDP is being managed by an integrated contractor team (ICT) consisting of IT Corporation, ICF Incorporated, and Florida International University and includes representation from LANL`s Environmental Management Program Office. The ICT published in the Commerce Business Daily a solicitation for interest for innovative technologies capable of improving cost and performance of the baseline process. Each expression of interest response was evaluated and demonstration contract negotiations are under way for those technologies expected to be capable of meeting the project objectives. This paper discusses management organization and approach, the results of the technology search, the technology selection methodology, the results of the selection process, and future plans for the program.

  20. Nuclear Testing and National Security,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    to negotiate a CTB with the Soviets and British. In 1958, according to Dr. Edward Tell- er’s biography , Dr. York "sold out" the interests of Livermore... Robert H. Kupperman and Donald Kerr (currently Los Alamos Director), com- menting on the SALT II debate, list some "fundamentals" for negoti- ated...Bishops," in America, published by the Jesuits of the United States and Canada, 8 March 1980, pp. 183-85. 21. Robert H. Kupperman and Donald M. Kerr

  1. Hydrologic transport of depleted uranium associated with open air dynamic range testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, and Eglin Air Force Base, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, N.M.; Vanta, E.B.

    1995-05-01

    Hydrologic investigations on depleted uranium fate and transport associated with dynamic testing activities were instituted in the 1980`s at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Eglin Air Force Base. At Los Alamos, extensive field watershed investigations of soil, sediment, and especially runoff water were conducted. Eglin conducted field investigations and runoff studies similar to those at Los Alamos at former and active test ranges. Laboratory experiments complemented the field investigations at both installations. Mass balance calculations were performed to quantify the mass of expended uranium which had transported away from firing sites. At Los Alamos, it is estimated that more than 90 percent of the uranium still remains in close proximity to firing sites, which has been corroborated by independent calculations. At Eglin, we estimate that 90 to 95 percent of the uranium remains at test ranges. These data demonstrate that uranium moves slowly via surface water, in both semi-arid (Los Alamos) and humid (Eglin) environments.

  2. National Security Science and Technology Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-01-01

    Infectious Disease Threats (1994); Committee on National Security—Strategic Implementation Plan (March 1995), and Committee on International Science...country’s first comprehensive Presidential statement of national security science and technology priorities . It augments the President’s National Security...this theme is a priority on engagement with other nations . Rather than isolate a state as we did the Soviet Union, we now seek to integrate states

  3. Redefining National Security. Worldwatch Paper 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lester R.

    This paper, an adaption from the author's forthcoming book "The Twenty-Ninth Day: Accomodating Human Needs and Numbers to the Earth's Resources," deals with non-military threats to national security. Since World War II the concept of national security has acquired an overwhelmingly military character. The policy of continual preparedness has led…

  4. Recent developments in the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility Waste Tracking System-automated data collection pilot project

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, B.; Montoya, A.; Klein, W.

    1999-02-01

    The waste management and environmental compliance group (NMT-7) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory has initiated a pilot project for demonstrating the feasibility and utility of automated data collection as a solution for tracking waste containers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility. This project, the Los Alamos Waste Tracking System (LAWTS), tracks waste containers during their lifecycle at the facility. LAWTS is a two-tiered system consisting of a server/workstation database and reporting engine and a hand-held data terminal-based client program for collecting data directly from tracked containers. New containers may be added to the system from either the client unit or from the server database. Once containers are in the system, they can be tracked through one of three primary transactions: Move, Inventory, and Shipment. Because LAWTS is a pilot project, it also serves as a learning experience for all parties involved. This paper will discuss many of the lessons learned in implementing a data collection system in the restricted environment. Specifically, the authors will discuss issues related to working with the PPT 4640 terminal system as the data collection unit. They will discuss problems with form factor (size, usability, etc.) as well as technical problems with wireless radio frequency functions. They will also discuss complications that arose from outdoor use of the terminal (barcode scanning failures, screen readability problems). The paper will conclude with a series of recommendations for proceeding with LAWTS based on experience to date.

  5. Shaping the library of the future: Digital library developments at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Research Library

    SciTech Connect

    Luce, R. E.

    1994-10-01

    This paper offers an overview of current efforts at the Research Library, Los Alamos National Laboratory, (LANL), to develop digital library services. Current projects of LANL`s Library without Walls initiative are described. Although the architecture of digital libraries generally is experimental and subject to debate, one principle of LANL`s approach to delivering library information is the use of Mosaic as a client for the Research Library`s resources. Several projects under development have significant ramifications for delivering library services over the Internet. Specific efforts via Mosaic include support for preprint databases, providing access to citation databases, and access to a digital image database of unclassified Los Alamos technical reports.

  6. Best available technology for the Los Alamos National Laboratory Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Midkiff, W.S.; Romero, R.L.; Suazo, I.L.; Garcia, R.; Parsons, R.M.

    1993-10-15

    The existing Los Alamos National Laboratory TA-50 liquid radioactive waste treatment plant RLWP has been in service for over thirty years, during this period many technical, regulatory, and processing changes have occurred. The existing facility can no longer comply with the demands and requirements for continued operation, and would not be able to comply with anticipated stringent future contaminant discharge limitations. Either a major upgrading or replacement of the existing facility is required. In order to assess the most appropriate means of providing an adequate facility to comply with predicted requirements for Ta-50, this Best Available Technology (BAT) Study was conducted to compare feasible technical and economic alternatives in order to define the most favorable technology configuration. This report consists of eleven sections. Section 1 provides a general introduction and background of the TA-50 operations and the basis for this study. Section 2 provides a technical discussion of the unit processes at TA-50 and several other comparable operations at other DOE sites. Section 3 addresses the evaluation and selection of appropriate treatment processes. Section 4 provides an analysis of environmental issues and concerns. Section 5 presents the rationale for the selection of preferred process configurations. Section 6 is the evaluation of operational issues. Section 7 addresses energy and resource use topics. Section 8 provides an economic analysis, and Section 9 summarizes the evaluation and the identification of the BAT. These sections are augmented by appendices. The report identifies the construction of a new radioactive liquid waste treatment facility as the BAT. Based on the information analyzed for this study, this option appears to provide the best combination of environmental compliance, operability, and economic value.

  7. Reengineering of Analytical Data Management for the Environmental Restoration Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Bolivar, S.; Dorries, A.; Nasser, K.; Scherma, S.

    2003-02-27

    The Environmental Restoration (ER) Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is responsible for the characterization, clean up, and monitoring of over 2,124 identified potential release sites (PRS). These PRSs have resulted from operations associated with weapons and energy related research which has been conducted at LANL since 1942. To accomplish mission goals, the ER Project conducts field sampling to determine possible types and levels of chemical contamination as well as their geographic extent. Last fiscal year, approximately 4000 samples were collected during ER Project field sampling campaigns. In the past, activities associated with field sampling such as sample campaign planning, paperwork, shipping and analytical laboratory tracking; verification and order fulfillment; validation and data quality assurance were performed by multiple groups working with a variety of software applications, databases and hard copy reports. This resulted in significant management and communication difficulties, data delivery delays, and inconsistent processes; it also represented a potential threat to overall data integrity. Creation of an organization, software applications and a data process that could provide for cost-effective management of the activities and data mentioned above became a management priority, resulting in a development of a reengineering task. This reengineering effort--currently nearing completion--has resulted in personnel reorganization, the development of a centralized data repository, and a powerful web-based sample management system that allows for an appreciably streamlined and more efficient data process. These changes have collectively cut data delivery times, allowed for larger volumes of samples and data to be handled with fewer personnel, and resulted in significant cost savings. This paper will provide a case study of the reengineering effort undertaken by the ER Project of its analytical data management process. It includes

  8. Los Alamos national Laboratory overview of the SAVY-4000 design: meeting the challenge for worker safety

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Timothy Amos

    2012-06-12

    Incidents involving release of nuclear materials stored in containers of convenience such as food pack cans, slip lid taped cans, paint cans, etc. has resulted in defense board concerns over the lack of prescriptive performance requirements for interim storage of nuclear materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has shared in these incidents and in response proactively moved into developing a performance based storage container design, the SAVY-4000. The SAVY-4000 is the first vented general use nuclear material container demonstrated to meet the requirements of DOE M 441.1-1, Nuclear Material Packaging Manual. The SAVY-4000 is an innovative and creative design demonstrated by the fact that it can be opened and closed in a few seconds without torque wrenches or other tools; has a built-in, fire-rated filter that prevents the build-up of hydrogen gas, yet retains 99.97% of plutonium particulates, and prevents release of material even in a 12 foot drop. Finally, it has been tested to 500C for 2 hours, and will reduce the risk to the public in the event of an earthquake/fire scenario. This will allow major nuclear facilities to credit the container towards source term Material at Risk (MAR) reduction. The container was approved for nuclear material storage in theTA-55 Plutonium Facility on March 15, 2011, and the first order of 79 containers was received at LANL on March 21, 2011. The first four SAVY-4000 containers were packaged with plutonium on August 2, 2011. Key aspects ofthe SAVY-4000 vented storage container design will be discussed which include design qualification and testing, implementation plan development and status, risk ranking methodology for re-packaging, in use implementation with interface to LANMAS, surveillance strategy, the design life extension program as enhanced by surveillance activities and production status with the intent to extend well beyond the current five year design life.

  9. Nonradioactive Ambient Air Monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory 2001--2002

    SciTech Connect

    E. Gladney; J.Dewart, C.Eberhart; J.Lochamy

    2004-09-01

    During the spring of 2000, the Cerro Grande forest fire reached Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and ignited both above-ground vegetation and disposed materials in several landfills. During and after the fire, there was concern about the potential human health impacts from chemicals emitted by the combustion of these Laboratory materials. Consequently, short-term, intensive air-monitoring studies were performed during and shortly after the fire. Unlike the radiological data from many years of AIRNET sampling, LANL did not have an adequate database of nonradiological species under baseline conditions with which to compare data collected during the fire. Therefore, during 2001 the Meteorology and Air Quality Group designed and implemented a new air-monitoring program, entitled NonRadNET, to provide nonradiological background data under normal conditions. The objectives of NonRadNET were to: (1) develop the capability for collecting nonradiological air-monitoring data, (2) conduct monitoring to develop a database of typical background levels of selected nonradiological species in the communities nearest the Laboratory, and (3) determine LANL's potential contribution to nonradiological air pollution in the surrounding communities. NonRadNET ended in late December 2002 with five quarters of data. The purpose of this paper is to organize and describe the NonRadNET data collected over 2001-2002 to use as baseline data, either for monitoring during a fire, some other abnormal event, or routine use. To achieve that purpose, in this paper we will: (1) document the NonRadNET program procedures, methods, and quality management, (2) describe the usual origins and uses of the species measured, (3) compare the species measured to LANL and other area emissions, (4) present the five quarters of data, (5) compare the data to known typical environmental values, and (6) evaluate the data against exposure standards.

  10. Remote Handled WIPP Canisters at Los Alamos National Laboratory Characterized for Retrieval

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, J.; Gonzales, W.

    2007-07-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is pursuing retrieval, transportation, and disposal of 16 remote handled transuranic waste canisters stored below ground in shafts since 1994. These canisters were retrievably stored in the shafts to await Nuclear Regulatory Commission certification of the Model Number RH-TRU 72B transportation cask and authorization of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to accept the canisters for disposal. Retrieval planning included radiological characterization and visual inspection of the canisters to confirm historical records, verify container integrity, determine proper personnel protection for the retrieval operations, provide radiological dose and exposure rate data for retrieval operations, and to provide exterior radiological contamination data. The radiological characterization and visual inspection of the canisters was performed in May 2006. The effort required the development of remote techniques and equipment due to the potential for personnel exposure to radiological doses approaching 300 R/hr. Innovations included the use of two nested 1.5 meter (m) (5-feet [ft]) long concrete culvert pipes (1.1-m [42 inch (in.)] and 1.5-m [60-in] diameter, respectively) as radiological shielding and collapsible electrostatic dusting wands to collect radiological swipe samples from the annular space between the canister and shaft wall. Visual inspection indicated that the canisters are in good condition with little or no rust, the welded seams are intact, and ten of the canisters include hydrogen gas sampling equipment on the pintle that will have to be removed prior to retrieval. The visual inspection also provided six canister identification numbers that matched historical storage records. The exterior radiological data indicated alpha and beta contamination below LANL release criteria and radiological dose and exposure rates lower than expected based upon historical data and modeling of the canister contents. (authors)

  11. Radionuclide Concentrations in Deer and Elk from Los Alamos National Laboratory: 1991-1998

    SciTech Connect

    D. H. Kraig; J. K. Ferenbaugh; J. R. Biggs; K. D. Bennett; M. A. Mullen; P. R. Fresquez

    1998-12-01

    Mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus) forage in many areas at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) that may contain radioactivity above natural and/or worldwide fallout levels. This paper summarizes radionuclide concentrations 3H, 90Sr, 137Cs, 238Pu, 239,240Pu, 241Am, and total uranium in muscle and bone tissue of deer and elk collected from LANL lands from 1991 through 1998. Also, the committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) and the risk of excess cancer fatalities (RECF) to people who ingest muscle and bone from deer and elk collected from LANL lands were estimated. Most radionuclide concentrations in muscle and bone from individual deer and elk collected from LANL lands were either at less than detectable quantities (where the analytical result was smaller than two counting uncertainties) and/or within upper (95%) level background (BG) concentrations. As a group, most radionuclides in muscle and bone of deer and elk from LANL lands were not significantly higher (p<0.10) than in similar tissues from deer and elk collected from BG locations. Also, elk that had been radio collared and tracked for two years and spent an average time of 50% on LANL lands were not significantly different in most radionuclides from road kill elk that have been collected as part of the environmental surveillance program. Overall, the upper (95%) level net CEDES (the CEDE plus two sigma for each radioisotope minus background) at the most conservative ingestion rate (51 lbs of muscle and 13 lbs of bone) were as follows: deer muscle = 0.220, deer bone = 3.762, elk muscle = 0.117, and elk bone = 1.67 mrendy. AU CEDES were far below the International Commission on Radiological Protection guideline of 100 mrem/y, and the highest muscle plus bone CEDE (4.0 mrendy) corresponded to a RECF of 2E-06 which is far below the Environmental Protection Agency upper level guideline of 1E04.

  12. Aquatic macroinvertebrates and water quality of Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, S.; Nottelman, H.

    1997-01-01

    The Biology Team of ESH-20 (the Ecology Group) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has collected samples from the stream within Sandia Canyon since the summer of 1990. These field studies measure water quality parameters and collect aquatic macroinvertebrates from sampling sites within the upper canyon stream. Reports by Bennett and Cross discuss previous aquatic studies in Sandia Canyon. This report updates and expands the previous findings. The Biology Team collected water quality data and aquatic macroinvertebrates monthly at three sampling stations within Sandia Canyon in 1995. The two upstream stations occur near a cattail (Typha latifolia) dominated marsh downstream from outfalls that discharge industrial and sanitary waste effluent into the stream, thereby maintaining year-round flow. The third station is approximately 1.5 miles downstream from the outfalls within a mixed conifer forest. All water chemistry parameters measured in Sandia Canyon during 1995 fell within acceptable State limits and scored in the {open_quotes}good{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}excellent{close_quotes} ranges when compared to an Environmental Quality Index. However, aquatic macroinvertebrates habitats have been degraded by widespread erosion, channelization, loss of wetlands due to deposition and stream lowering, scour, limited acceptable substrates, LANL releases and spills, and other stressors. Macroinvertebrate communities at all the stations had low diversities, low densities, and erratic numbers of individuals. These results indicate that although the stream possesses acceptable water chemistry, it has reduced biotic potential. The best developed aquatic community occurs at the sampling station with the best habitat and whose downstream location partially mitigates the effects of upstream impairments.

  13. Recent advances in direct methanol fuel cells at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiaoming; Zelenay, Piotr; Thomas, Sharon; Davey, John; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    This paper describes recent advances in the science and technology of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) made at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The effort on DMFCs at LANL includes work devoted to portable power applications, funded by the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA), and work devoted to potential transport applications, funded by the US DOE. We describe recent results with a new type of DMFC stack hardware that allows to lower the pitch per cell to 2 mm while allowing low air flow and air pressure drops. Such stack technology lends itself to both portable power and potential transport applications. Power densities of 300 W/l and 1 kW/l seem achievable under conditions applicable to portable power and transport applications, respectively. DMFC power system analysis based on the performance of this stack, under conditions applying to transport applications (joint effort with U.C. Davis), has shown that, in terms of overall system efficiency and system packaging requirements, a power source for a passenger vehicle based on a DMFC could compete favorably with a hydrogen-fueled fuel cell system, as well as with fuel cell systems based on fuel processing on board. As part of more fundamental studies performed, we describe optimization of anode catalyst layers in terms of PtRu catalyst nature, loading and catalyst layer composition and structure. We specifically show that, optimized content of recast ionic conductor added to the catalyst layer is a sensitive function of the nature of the catalyst. Other elements of membrane/electrode assembly (MEA) optimization efforts are also described, highlighting our ability to resolve, to a large degree, a well-documented problem of polymer electrolyte DMFCs, namely "methanol crossover". This was achieved by appropriate cell design, enabling fuel utilization as high as 90% in highly performing DMFCs.

  14. Environmental Assessment for Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico - Final Document

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    1997-10-07

    As part of its initiative to fulfill its responsibilities to provide support for the incorporated County of Los Alamos (the County) as an Atomic Energy Community, while simultaneously fulfilling its obligations to enhance the self-sufficiency of the County under authority of the Atomic Energy Community Act of 1955 and the Defense Authorization Act, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to lease undeveloped land in Los Alamos, New Mexico, to the County for private sector use as a research park. The Proposed Action is intended to accelerate economic development activities within the County by creating regional employment opportunities through offering federal land for private sector lease and use. As a result of the proposed land lease, any government expenditures for providing infrastructure to the property would be somewhat supplemented by tenant purchase of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) expertise in research and development activities. The presence of a research park within LANL boundaries is expected to allow private sector tenants of the park to be able to quickly and efficiently call upon LANL scientific expertise and facility and equipment capabilities as part of their own research operations and LANL research personnel, in turn, would be challenged in areas complementary to their federally funded research. In this way a symbiotic relationship would be enjoyed by both parties while simultaneously promoting economic development for the County through new job opportunities at the Research Park and at LANL, new indirect support opportunities for the community at large, and through payment of the basic building space leases. A ''sliding-scale'' approach (DOE 1993) is the basis for the analysis of effects in this Environmental Assessment (EA). That is, certain aspects of the Proposed Action have a greater potential for creating adverse environmental effects than others; therefore, they are discussed in greater detail in this EA than those aspects of

  15. Determination of 100-year floodplain elevations at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    McLin, S.G.

    1992-08-01

    Under existing permit requirements. the US Environmental Protection Agency stipulates that facilities regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act must delineate all 100-yr floodplain elevations within their boundaries. At Los Alamos these floodplains are located within ungaged watersheds that drain Pajarito Plateau. This report documents the floodplain computational mapping procedure and, along with supporting maps, is untended to satisfy this permit requirement.

  16. National Security Technology Incubator Business Plan

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2007-12-31

    This document contains a business plan for the National Security Technology Incubator (NSTI), developed as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP) and performed under a Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) grant. This business plan describes key features of the NSTI, including the vision and mission, organizational structure and staffing, services, evaluation criteria, marketing strategies, client processes, a budget, incubator evaluation criteria, and a development schedule. The purpose of the NSPP is to promote national security technologies through business incubation, technology demonstration and validation, and workforce development. The NSTI will focus on serving businesses with national security technology applications by nurturing them through critical stages of early development. The vision of the NSTI is to be a successful incubator of technologies and private enterprise that assist the NNSA in meeting new challenges in national safety, security, and protection of the homeland. The NSTI is operated and managed by the Arrowhead Center, responsible for leading the economic development mission of New Mexico State University (NMSU). The Arrowhead Center will recruit business with applications for national security technologies recruited for the NSTI program. The Arrowhead Center and its strategic partners will provide business incubation services, including hands-on mentoring in general business matters, marketing, proposal writing, management, accounting, and finance. Additionally, networking opportunities and technology development assistance will be provided.

  17. The Superpowers: Nuclear Weapons and National Security. National Issues Forums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Greg; Melville, Keith

    Designed to stimulate thinking about United States-Soviet relationships in terms of nuclear weapons and national security, this document presents ideas and issues that represent differing viewpoints and positions. Chapter 1, "Rethinking the U.S.-Soviet Relationship," considers attempts to achieve true national security, and chapter 2,…

  18. National Security Technology Incubator Operations Plan

    SciTech Connect

    2008-04-30

    This report documents the operations plan for developing the National Security Technology Incubator (NSTI) program for southern New Mexico. The NSTI program will focus on serving businesses with national security technology applications by nurturing them through critical stages of early development. The NSTI program is being developed as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), funded by Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The operation plan includes detailed descriptions of the structure and organization, policies and procedures, scope, tactics, and logistics involved in sustainable functioning of the NSTI program. Additionally, the operations plan will provide detailed descriptions of continuous quality assurance measures based on recommended best practices in incubator development by the National Business Incubation Association (NBIA). Forms that assist in operations of NSTI have been drafted and can be found as an attachment to the document.

  19. National security in the third world

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Mashat, A.M.M.

    1985-01-01

    For nations of the Third World, national security poses serious dilemmas. Unlike Western nations, less-developed countries must balance the complex and often contradictory requirements of socio-economic and political development with problems of internal stability and the requirements of national defense. For these countries, a concept of national security that focuses primarily on the international threat system and its overt manifestations of wars and violence, ignoring domestic well-being, is inadequate on theoretical and pragmatic grounds. This book addresses the security problems of Third World states, arguing for new ways to define and measure national security so that the concept may be appropriately applied to the needs of developing countries. In addition, the author argues that the tranquility of a state, a concept traditionally linked with national security, cannot necessarily be associated with quality of life as measured by conventional means. Dr. Al-Mashat constructs a tranquility index for 95 developing nations and tests its relationship with the physical quality-of-life index to demonstrate this point. Attempts to improve quality of life, he suggests, may in many countries lead to a reduction in security unless simultaneous attempts are made to democratize the regime.

  20. Environmental Assessment for Leasing Land for the Siting, Construction and Operation of a Commercial AM Radio Antenna at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2000-02-16

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to lease approximately 3 acres of land at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) on the southeast tip of Technical Area (TA) 54 for the siting, construction and operation of an AM radio broadcasting antenna. This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been developed in order to assess the environmental effects of the Proposed Action and No Action alternative. The Proposed Action includes the lease of land for the siting, construction and operation of an AM radio broadcasting antenna in TA-54, just north of Pajarito Road and State Highway 4. The No Action Alternative was also considered. Under the No Action Alternative, DOE would not lease land on LANL property for the siting and operation of an AM radio broadcasting antenna; the DOE would not have a local station for emergency response use; and the land would continue to be covered in native vegetation and serve as a health and safety buffer zone for TA-54 waste management activities. Other potential sites on LANL property were evaluated but dismissed for reasons such as interference with sensitive laboratory experiments. Potential visual, health, and environmental effects are anticipated to be minimal for the Proposed Action. The radio broadcasting antenna would be visible against the skyline from some public areas, but would be consistent with other man-made objects in the vicinity that partially obstruct viewsheds (e.g. meteorological tower, power lines). Therefore, the net result would be a modest change of the existing view. Electromagnetic field (EMF) emissions from the antenna would be orders or magnitude less than permissible limits. The proposed antenna construction would not affect known cultural sites, but is located in close proximity to two archaeological sites. Construction would be monitored to ensure that the associated road and utility corridor would avoid cultural sites.

  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory new generation standard nuclear material storage container - the SAVY4000 design

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Timothy Amos

    2010-01-01

    Incidents involving release of nuclear materials stored in containers of convenience such as food pack cans, slip lid taped cans, paint cans, etc. has resulted in defense board concerns over the lack of prescriptive performance requirements for interim storage of nuclear materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has shared in these incidents and in response proactively moved into developing a performance based standard involving storage of nuclear material (RD003). This RD003 requirements document has sense been updated to reflect requirements as identified with recently issued DOE M 441.1-1 'Nuclear Material Packaging Manual'. The new packaging manual was issued at the encouragement of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board with a clear directive for protecting the worker from exposure due to loss of containment of stored materials. The Manual specifies a detailed and all inclusive approach to achieve a high level of protection; from package design & performance requirements, design life determinations of limited life components, authorized contents evaluations, and surveillance/maintenance to ensure in use package integrity over time. Materials in scope involve those stored outside an approved engineered-contamination barrier that would result in a worker exposure of in excess of 5 rem Committed Effective Does Equivalent (CEDE). Key aspects of meeting the challenge as developed around the SAVY-3000 vented storage container design will be discussed. Design performance and acceptance criteria against the manual, bounding conditions as established that the user must ensure are met to authorize contents in the package (based upon the activity of heat-source plutonium (90% Pu-238) oxide, which bounds the requirements for weapons-grade plutonium oxide), interface as a safety class system within the facility under the LANL plutonium facility DSA, design life determinations for limited life components, and a sense of design specific surveillance program

  2. Radionuclide concentrations in vegetation at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1998

    SciTech Connect

    G. J. Gonzales; P. R. Fresquez; M. A. Mullen; L. Naranjo, Jr.

    2000-03-01

    This report summarizes and evaluates the concentrations of {sup 3}H, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 90}Sr, and total U in understory and overstory vegetation collected from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), its perimeter, and regional background areas in 1998. Comparisons to conservative toxicity reference value safe limits were also made. The arithmetic mean LANL radionuclide concentrations in understory were 501 pCi L{sup {minus}1} for {sup 3}H, 0.581 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 137}Cs, 0.001 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 238}Pu, 0.008 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 239,240}Pu, 0.007 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 241}Am, 1.46 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 90}Sr, and 0.233 {micro}g ash g{sup {minus}1} for total uranium. The mean LANL radionuclide concentrations in overstory were 463 pCi L{sup {minus}1} for {sup 3}H, 1.51 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 137}Cs, 0.0004 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} {sup 238}Pu, 0.008 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 239,240}Pu, 0.014 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 241}Am, 1.97 pCi ash g{sup {minus}1} for {sup 90}Sr, and 0.388 {micro}g ash g{sup {minus}1} for total uranium. Concentrations of radionuclides and total U in both understory and overstory vegetation at LANL generally were not statistically higher than in perimeter and regional background vegetation ({alpha} = 0.05). The exceptions were LANL {sup 3}H > perimeter {sup 3}H (understory) and LANL {sup 3}H background {sup 3}H (overstory). All maximum radionuclide concentrations were lower than toxicity reference values. With the exception of total U, the relationship between contaminant concentration in soil vs. vegetation was insignificant ({alpha} = 0.05). Generally, as the concentration of total U in soil decreased, the concentration in vegetation increased. This held true for both understory and overstory and regardless of whether data were separated by general location (LANL, perimeter, and background) or not. There was no

  3. Siting study for a consolidated waste capability at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, Steven Richard

    2010-11-05

    Decision analysis was used to rank alternative sites for a potential Consolidated Waste Capability (CWC) to replace current hazardous solid waste operations (hazardous/chemical, mixed low-level, transuranic, and low-level waste) at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Technical Area (TA)-54. An original list of 21 site alternatives was pre-screened to seven sites that were assessed using the analytical hierarchy process with five top-level criteria and fifteen sub-criteria. The top site choice is TA-63/52/46; the second choice is TA-18/36. The seven sites are as follows. TA-18/36 (62 acres) is located on Potrillo Drive that intersects Pajarito Road at the bottom of a steep grade. It has some blast zone issues on its southwest side and some important archeological sites on the southeast section. TA-60 (50 acres) is located at the end of Eniwetok Road off Diamond Drive, east of TA-3. Most of the site is within a fifty foot-deep ravine (that may have contamination in the drainage), with a small section on the mesa above. TA-63/52/46 (110 acres) lies to the north of Pajarito Road along Puye Road. It is centrally located in a brown field industrial area, with good access to generators on a controlled road. TA-46 (22 acres) is a narrow site on the south side of Pajarito Road across from TA-46 office buildings. TA-48 (14 acres) is also narrow, and is located on the north side of Pajarito Road near the west vehicle access portal (VAP). TA-51 (19 acres) is located on the south side of Pajarito Road at the top of the hill above TA-18 near the current entrance to the TA-54. TA-54 West (16 acres) is just north of the entrance to TA-54 at Pajarito Road and is close to Zone 4. Although it is near the San Ildefonso Pueblo property line, there may be adequate set-back for sight screening.

  4. 76 FR 40296 - Declassification of National Security Information

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-08

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION 36 CFR Part 1260 RIN 3095-AB64 Declassification of National Security Information... would update NARA's regulations related to declassification of classified national security information... of Executive Order 13526, Classified National Security Information, and its Implementing...

  5. 76 FR 81827 - Declassification of National Security Information

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION 36 CFR Part 1260 RIN 3095-AB64 Declassification of National Security Information... classified national security information in records transferred to NARA's legal custody. The rule incorporates changes resulting from issuance of Executive Order 13526, Classified National Security...

  6. 78 FR 45255 - President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... SECURITY President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee AGENCY: National Protection... Committee Teleconference. SUMMARY: The President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee... preparedness (NS/EP) telecommunications policy. Agenda: The NSTAC members will deliberate and vote on the...

  7. 77 FR 75182 - President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-19

    ... SECURITY President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee AGENCY: National Protection... Committee Teleconference. SUMMARY: The President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee... telecommunications policy. Agenda: The NSTAC members will receive an update on progress made to date by the...

  8. 76 FR 52672 - President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... SECURITY President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee AGENCY: National Protection... Committee Teleconference. SUMMARY: The President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee... telecommunications policy. During the conference call, the NSTAC members will receive an update regarding...

  9. 78 FR 8160 - President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... SECURITY President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee AGENCY: National Protection... Committee Teleconference. SUMMARY: The President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee... telecommunications policy. Agenda: The NSTAC members will review and discuss the draft NSTAC Report to the...

  10. 77 FR 26023 - President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-02

    ... Doc No: 2012-10510] DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [Docket No. DHS-2012-0016] President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee; Correction AGENCY: National Protection and Programs... Federal Register of April 25, 2012, concerning the President's National Security...

  11. National Security Agency Accountability Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Carney, John C., Jr. [D-DE-At Large

    2014-01-15

    03/20/2014 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  12. 31 CFR 515.325 - National securities exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false National securities exchange. 515.325... Definitions § 515.325 National securities exchange. The term national securities exchange shall mean an exchange registered as a national securities exchange under section 6 of the Securities Exchange Act...

  13. 31 CFR 515.325 - National securities exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false National securities exchange. 515.325... Definitions § 515.325 National securities exchange. The term national securities exchange shall mean an exchange registered as a national securities exchange under section 6 of the Securities Exchange Act...

  14. 31 CFR 515.325 - National securities exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false National securities exchange. 515.325... Definitions § 515.325 National securities exchange. The term national securities exchange shall mean an exchange registered as a national securities exchange under section 6 of the Securities Exchange Act...

  15. 31 CFR 500.325 - National securities exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National securities exchange. 500.325... Definitions § 500.325 National securities exchange. The term national securities exchange shall mean an exchange registered as a national securities exchange under section 6 of the Securities Exchange Act...

  16. 31 CFR 515.325 - National securities exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false National securities exchange. 515.325... Definitions § 515.325 National securities exchange. The term national securities exchange shall mean an exchange registered as a national securities exchange under section 6 of the Securities Exchange Act...

  17. 31 CFR 515.325 - National securities exchange.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National securities exchange. 515.325... Definitions § 515.325 National securities exchange. The term national securities exchange shall mean an exchange registered as a national securities exchange under section 6 of the Securities Exchange Act...

  18. Impacts of the Cerro Grande fire on Homestead era and Manhattan Project properties at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    SciTech Connect

    McGehee, E. D.; Isaacson, J.

    2001-01-01

    In May of 2000, the Cerro Grande Fire burned approximately 8,000 acres of Department of Energy (DOE) managed land at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Although the fire was generally of low intensity, it impacted a significant number of LANL's cultural resources. Historic wooden properties were affected more heavily than prehistoric archaeological sites. This paper will provide an overview of the Homestead and Manhattan Project Periods at LANL and will discuss the effects of the Cerro Grande Fire on historic wooden properties. Post-fire cultural resource management issues will also be discussed.

  19. Preliminary volcanic hazards evaluation for Los Alamos National Laboratory Facilities and Operations : current state of knowledge and proposed path forward

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, Gordon N.; Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.; Miller, Elizabeth D.

    2010-09-01

    The integration of available information on the volcanic history of the region surrounding Los Alamos National Laboratory indicates that the Laboratory is at risk from volcanic hazards. Volcanism in the vicinity of the Laboratory is unlikely within the lifetime of the facility (ca. 50–100 years) but cannot be ruled out. This evaluation provides a preliminary estimate of recurrence rates for volcanic activity. If further assessment of the hazard is deemed beneficial to reduce risk uncertainty, the next step would be to convene a formal probabilistic volcanic hazards assessment.

  20. Implementation of electronic chain-of-custody, analysis requests, and data verification at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Pound, H.C.; Miglio, J.J.

    1994-09-01

    To improve the efficiency of the entire environmental data collection process from sample collection to reporting to the client, Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing an automated system to carry out as much of the process as possible. The system uses {open_quotes}off-the-shelf{close_quotes} software. Our program anticipates a drastic reduction of the amount of paper generated throughout the process. The electronic system includes spreadsheets used for field and laboratory chains-of-custody. In addition, the system is used to order analyses and to verify data for compliance.

  1. Annual Report for Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility – Fiscal Year 2015

    SciTech Connect

    French, Sean B.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Birdsell, Kay H.

    2016-02-29

    As a condition to the disposal authorization statement issued to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) on March 17, 2010, a comprehensive performance assessment and composite analysis maintenance program must be implemented for the Technical Area 54, Area G disposal facility. Annual determinations of the adequacy of the performance assessment and composite analysis (PA/CA) are to be conducted under the maintenance program to ensure that the conclusions reached by those analyses continue to be valid. This report summarizes the results of the fiscal year (FY) 2015 annual review for Area G.

  2. Evaluation of the Likelihood for Thermal Runaway for Nitrate Salt Containers in Storage at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Heatwole, Eric Mann; Gunderson, Jake Alfred; Parker, Gary Robert

    2016-03-25

    In order to handle and process the existing Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Nitrate Salt drums it is necessary to quantify the risk. One of the most obvious dangers is a repeat of the original violent reaction (2015), which would endanger nearby workers, not only with radioactive contamination, but also with large amounts of heat, dangerous corrosive gases and the physical dangers associated with a bursting drum. If there still existed a high probability of violent reaction, then these drums should only be accessed remotely. The objective of the work reported herein is to determine the likelihood of a similar violent event occurring.

  3. Center for Materials Science, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Status report, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Parkin, D.M.; Boring, A.M.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Center for Materials Science (CMS) from October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991, and is the nineth such annual report. It has been a year of remarkable progress in building the programs of the Center. The extent of this progress is described in detail. The CMS was established to enhance the contribution of materials science and technology to the Laboratory`s defense, energy and scientific missions, and the Laboratory. In carrying out these responsibilities it has accepted four demanding missions: (1) Build a core group of highly rated, established materials scientists and solid state physicists. (2) Promote and support top quality, interdisciplinary materials research programs at Los Alamos. (3) Strengthen the interactions of materials science and Los Alamos with the external materials science community. and (4) Establish and maintain modern materials research facilities in a readily accessible, central location.

  4. National Security Technology Incubation Project Continuation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    2008-09-30

    This document contains a project continuation plan for the National Security Technology Incubator (NSTI). The plan was developed as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP) funded by a Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) grant. This continuation plan describes the current status of NSTI (staffing and clients), long-term goals, strategies, and long-term financial solvency goals.The Arrowhead Center of New Mexico State University (NMSU) is the operator and manager of the NSTI. To realize the NSTI, Arrowhead Center must meet several performance objectives related to planning, development, execution, evaluation, and sustainability. This continuation plan is critical to the success of NSTI in its mission of incubating businesses with security technology products and services.

  5. 1993 Annual PCB Document for Los Alamos National Laboratory EPA Region VI, January 1, 1993 through December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Wechsler, R.J.; Sandoval, T.M.; Bryant, D.E.; Hupke, L.; Esquibel, L.

    1995-12-31

    This document, the {open_quotes}1993 Annual PCB Document for Los Alamos National Laboratory{close_quotes} was prepared to fulffill the requirements of the federal PCB (Polychlorinated Biphenyl) regulation: 40 CFR 761 Subpart J General Records and Reports. The PCB Management Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Environmental Protection Group, compiled this 1993 Annual PCB Document. The overall format generally follows the sequence of the applicable regulations. Subsection 1.2 cross references those regulatory requirements with the applicable Document Section. The scope of this document also includes status summaries of various aspects of LANL`s PCB Management Program. The intent of this approach to the Annual Document is to provide an overview of LANL`s PCB Management Program and to increase the usefulness of this document as a management tool. Section 2.0, {open_quotes}Status of the PCB Management Program{close_quotes}, discusses the use, generation of waste, and storage of PCBs at LANL. Section 3.0 is the 1993 Annual Document Log required by 761.180(a). This Section also discusses the PCB Management Program`s policies for reporting under those regulatory requirements. Sections 4.0 and 5.0 contain the 1993 Annual Records for off-site and on-site disposal as required by 761.180(b). There is a tab for each manifest and its associated continuation sheets, receipt letters, and certificates of disposal.

  6. Explosively driven two-shockwave tools with application to ejecta formation at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Proton Radiography Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttler, William

    2013-06-01

    We present the development of an explosively driven physics tool to generate two mostly uniaxial shockwaves. The tool is being used to extend single shockwave ejecta models to a subsequent shockwave event separated by a time interval on the order of a few microseconds. We explore the possibility of varying the amplitude of both the first and second shockwaves, and we apply the tool in experimental geometries on Sn with a surface roughness of Ra = 0 . 8 μ m. We then evaluate the tool further at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Proton Radiography (pRad) Facility in an application to Sn with larger scale perturbations of wavelength 550 μ m, and various amplitudes that gave wave-number amplitude products of η0 2 π / λ = { 3 / 4 , 1 / 2 , 1 / 4 , 1 / 8 } , where the perturbation amplitude is η0, and the wave-number k = 2 π / λ . The pRad data and velocimetry imply it should be possible to develop a second shock ejecta model based on unstable Richtmyer-Meshkov physics. In collaboration with David Oro, Fesseha Mariam, Alexander Saunders, Malcolm Andrews, Frank Cherne, James Hammerberg. Robert Hixson, Christopher Morris, Russell Olson, Dean Preston, Joseph Stone, Dale Tupa, and Wendy Vogan-McNeil, Los Alamos National Laboratory,

  7. FEDERAL SPENDING FOR NATIONAL SECURITY,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ECONOMICS, UNITED STATES), (* DEFENSE SYSTEMS, COSTS), (*NATIONAL DEFENSE , COSTS), UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT, GOVERNMENT PROCUREMENT, ARMS CONTROL, DISARMAMENT, NUCLEAR WEAPONS, MILITARY BUDGETS, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

  8. How Nation-States Craft National Security Strategy Documents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Africa, Sir David Omand in the United Kingdom, and in the United States, former National Security Advisor Steve Hadley provided time that he did not have...officials, Major General John Cantwell and Ms. Maria Fernandez, individually responsible for force structure, information technol- ogy, and human...about the need for an NSS.179 Speaking at the annual DEMOS security lec- ture in December 2006, Sir David Omand, former UK Security and Intelligence

  9. The Clinton National Security Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    second, promoting prosperity, outlrnes enhancing competltlveness through deficit reduction, gaining access to foreign markets , fostering free trade...murky Does domestic investment outweigh free trade? Will North American prosper@ count more than Asian advances? Are any markets more important than...Integration of emerging nations into free market systems to reslstrng genital mutilation find a home as national Interests Again, the order of

  10. It's a national security policy, stupid

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, J.

    1993-09-01

    This article discusses the first few national security decisions of the Clinton administration. The first decision was to have the United States continue to honor the nuclear testing moratorium through September, 1994 (or until another nation tested first). The second decision of the Clinton administration was the independence of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA) from the State Department. The third decision was to formally denounce the Reagan Administration's interpretation of the US/Soviet Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty. The issue of the financing of United States involvement in Somalia was also addressed. The implications of these policy decisions as related to national security are evaluated in this article.

  11. Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project 1992 quality program status report

    SciTech Connect

    Bolivar, S.L.; Burningham, A.; Chavez, P.

    1994-03-01

    This status report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the Los Alamos Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project`s quality assurance program for calendar year 1992. The report includes major sections on Program Activities and Trend Analysis. Program Activities are discussed periodically at quality meetings. The most significant issue addressed in 1992 has been the timely revision of quality administrative procedures. The procedure revision process was streamlined from 55 steps to 7. The number of forms in procedures was reduced by 38%, and the text reduced by 29%. This allowed revision in 1992 of almost half of all implementing procedures. The time necessary to complete the revision process (for a procedure) was reduced from 11 months to 3 months. Other accomplishments include the relaxation of unnecessarily strict training requirements, requiring quality assurance reviews only from affected organizations, and in general simplifying work processes. All members of the YMP received training to the new Orientation class Eleven other training classed were held. Investigators submitted 971 records to the Project and only 37 were rejected. The software program has 115 programs approved for quality-affecting work. The Project Office conducted 3 audits and 1 survey of Los Alamos activities. We conducted 14 audits and 4 surveys. Eight corrective action reports were closed, leaving only one open. Internally, 22 deficiencies were recognized. This is a decrease from 65 in 1991. Since each deficiency requires about 2 man weeks to resolve, the savings are significant. Problems with writing acceptable deficiency reports have essentially disappeared. Trend reports for 1992 were examined and are summarized herein. Three adverse trends have been closed; one remaining adverse trend will be closed when the affected procedures are revised. The number of deficiencies issued to Los Alamos compared to other participants is minimal.

  12. Systematic evaluation of options to avoid generation of noncertifiable transuranic (TRU) waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Boak, J.M.; Kosiewicz, S.T.; Triay, I.; Gruetzmacher, K.; Montoya, A.

    1998-03-01

    At present, >35% of the volume of newly generated transuranic (TRU) waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory is not certifiable for transport to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Noncertifiable waste would constitute 900--1,000 m{sup 3} of the 2,600 m{sup 3} of waste projected during the period of the Environmental Management (EM) Accelerated Cleanup: Focus on 2006 plan (DOE, 1997). Volume expansion of this waste to meet thermal limits would increase the shipped volume to {approximately}5,400 m{sup 3}. This paper presents the results of efforts to define which TRU waste streams are noncertifiable at Los Alamos, and to prioritize site-specific options to reduce the volume of certifiable waste over the period of the EM Accelerated Cleanup Plan. A team of Los Alamos TRU waste generators and waste managers reviewed historic generation rates and thermal loads and current practices to estimate the projected volume and thermal load of TRU waste streams for Fiscal Years 1999--2006. These data defined four major problem TRU waste streams. Estimates were also made of the volume expansion that would be required to meet the permissible wattages for all waste. The four waste streams defined were: (1) {sup 238}Pu-contaminated combustible waste from production of Radioactive Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) with {sup 238}Pu activity which exceeds allowable shipping limits by 10--100X. (2) {sup 241}Am-contaminated cement waste from plutonium recovery processes (nitric and hydrochloric acid recovery) are estimated to exceed thermal limits by {approximately}3X. (3) {sup 239}Pu-contaminated combustible waste, mainly organic waste materials contaminated with {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Am, is estimated to exceed thermal load requirements by a factor of {approximately}2X. (4) Oversized metal waste objects, (especially gloveboxes), cannot be shipped as is to WIPP because they will not fit in a standard waste box or drum.

  13. National Security Technology Incubator Action Plan

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2008-02-28

    This report documents the action plan for developing the National Security Technology Incubator (NSTI) program for southern New Mexico. The NSTI program is being developed as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), funded by Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). This action plan serves as a tool in measuring progress in the development process and delivery of services for the NSTI program. Continuous review and evaluation of the action plan is necessary in the development process of the NSTI. The action plan includes detailed steps in developing the NSTI program based on recommended best practices in incubator development by the National Business Incubation Association (NBIA). Included are tasks required to implement the NSTI, developed within a work breakdown structure. In addition, a timeline is identified for each task.

  14. Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Project Publications (1979-1996)

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhala, E.R.; Klein, S.H.

    1997-06-01

    This over-350 title publication list reflects the accomplishments of Los Alamos Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project researchers, who, since 1979, have been conducting multidisciplinary research to help determine if Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is a suitable site for a high-level waste repository. The titles can be accessed in two ways: by year, beginning with 1996 and working back to 1979, and by subject area: mineralogy/petrology/geology, volcanism, radionuclide solubility/ground-water chemistry; radionuclide sorption and transport; modeling/validation/field studies; summary/status reports, and quality assurance.

  15. Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Project publications (1979--1994)

    SciTech Connect

    Bowker, L.M.; Espinosa, M.L.; Klein, S.H.

    1995-11-01

    This over-300 title publication list reflects the accomplishments of Los Alamos Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project researchers, who, since 1979, have been conducting multidisciplinary research to help determine if Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is a suitable site for a high-level waste repository. The titles can be accessed in two ways: by year, beginning with 1994 and working back to 1979, and by subject area: mineralogy/petrology/geology, volcanism, radionuclide solubility/groundwater chemistry; radionuclide sorption and transport; modeling/validation/field studies; summary/status reports, and quality assurance.

  16. 77 FR 26024 - National Maritime Security Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-02

    ...: 2012-10668] DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard [USCG-2011-0975] National Maritime Security... notice announcing a National Maritime Security Advisory Committee (NMSAC) partially closed public meeting... Guard to continue deliberations and make forward progress regarding multiple maritime...

  17. Fifty-one years of Los Alamos Spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Fenimore, Edward E.

    2014-09-04

    From 1963 to 2014, the Los Alamos National Laboratory was involved in at least 233 spacecraft. There are probably only one or two institutions in the world that have been involved in so many spacecraft. Los Alamos space exploration started with the Vela satellites for nuclear test detection, but soon expanded to ionospheric research (mostly barium releases), radioisotope thermoelectric generators, solar physics, solar wind, magnetospheres, astrophysics, national security, planetary physics, earth resources, radio propagation in the ionosphere, and cubesats. Here, we present a list of the spacecraft, their purpose, and their launch dates for use during RocketFest

  18. 17 CFR 270.17f-1 - Custody of securities with members of national securities exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... members of national securities exchanges. 270.17f-1 Section 270.17f-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges....17f-1 Custody of securities with members of national securities exchanges. (a) No registered... custody of a company which is a member of a national securities exchange as defined in the...

  19. 17 CFR 270.17f-1 - Custody of securities with members of national securities exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... members of national securities exchanges. 270.17f-1 Section 270.17f-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges....17f-1 Custody of securities with members of national securities exchanges. (a) No registered... custody of a company which is a member of a national securities exchange as defined in the...

  20. 17 CFR 270.17f-1 - Custody of securities with members of national securities exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... members of national securities exchanges. 270.17f-1 Section 270.17f-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges....17f-1 Custody of securities with members of national securities exchanges. (a) No registered... custody of a company which is a member of a national securities exchange as defined in the...

  1. 17 CFR 270.17f-1 - Custody of securities with members of national securities exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... members of national securities exchanges. 270.17f-1 Section 270.17f-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges....17f-1 Custody of securities with members of national securities exchanges. (a) No registered... custody of a company which is a member of a national securities exchange as defined in the...

  2. 17 CFR 270.17f-1 - Custody of securities with members of national securities exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... members of national securities exchanges. 270.17f-1 Section 270.17f-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges....17f-1 Custody of securities with members of national securities exchanges. (a) No registered... custody of a company which is a member of a national securities exchange as defined in the...

  3. Next Generation National Security Leaders

    SciTech Connect

    Mahy, Heidi A.; Fankhauser, Jana G.; Stein, Steven L.; Toomey, Christopher

    2012-07-19

    It is generally accepted that the international security community faces an impending challenge in its changing leadership demographics. The workforce that currently addresses nonproliferation, arms control, and verification is moving toward retirement and there is a perceived need for programs to train a new set of experts for both technical- and policy-related functions to replace the retiring generation. Despite the perceived need, there are also indicators that there are not sufficient jobs for individuals we are currently training. If we had “right-sized” the training programs, there would not be a shortage of jobs. The extent and scope of the human resource crisis is unclear, and information about training programs and how they meet existing needs is minimal. This paper seeks to achieve two objectives: 1) Clarify the major human resource problem and potential consequences; and 2) Propose how to characterize the requirement with sufficient granularity to enable key stakeholders to link programs aimed at developing the next generations of experts with employment needs. In order to accomplish both these goals, this paper recommends establishing a forum comprised of key stakeholders of this issue (including universities, public and private sectors), and conducting a study of the human resources and resource needs of the global security community. If there is indeed a human resource crisis in the global security field, we cannot address the problem if we are uninformed. The solution may lie in training more (or fewer) young professions to work in this community – or it may lie in more effectively using our existing resources and training programs.

  4. Environmental assessment for transuranic waste work-off plan, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Rough draft: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-26

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) generates transuranic (TRU) waste in a variety of programs related to national defense. TRU waste is a specific class of radioactive waste requiring permanent isolation. Most defense-related TRU waste will be permanently disposed of in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). WIPP is a deep geologic repository located in southeastern New Mexico and is now in the testing phase of development. All waste received by Wipp must conform with established Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). The purpose of the proposed action is to retrieve stored TRU waste and prepare the waste for shipment to and disposal WIPP. Stored TRU waste LANL is represented by four waste forms. The facilities necessary for work-off activities are tailored to the treatment and preparation of these four waste forms. Preparation activities for newly generated TRU waste are also covered by this action.

  5. 17 CFR 240.17a-6 - Right of national securities exchange, national securities association, registered clearing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Right of national securities exchange, national securities association, registered clearing agency or the Municipal Securities... and Reports of Certain Stabilizing Activities § 240.17a-6 Right of national securities...

  6. 17 CFR 240.17a-6 - Right of national securities exchange, national securities association, registered clearing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Right of national securities exchange, national securities association, registered clearing agency or the Municipal Securities... and Reports of Certain Stabilizing Activities § 240.17a-6 Right of national securities...

  7. 17 CFR 240.17a-6 - Right of national securities exchange, national securities association, registered clearing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Right of national securities exchange, national securities association, registered clearing agency or the Municipal Securities... and Reports of Certain Stabilizing Activities § 240.17a-6 Right of national securities...

  8. 17 CFR 240.17a-6 - Right of national securities exchange, national securities association, registered clearing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Right of national securities exchange, national securities association, registered clearing agency or the Municipal Securities... and Reports of Certain Stabilizing Activities § 240.17a-6 Right of national securities...

  9. 17 CFR 240.17a-6 - Right of national securities exchange, national securities association, registered clearing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Right of national securities exchange, national securities association, registered clearing agency or the Municipal Securities... and Reports of Certain Stabilizing Activities § 240.17a-6 Right of national securities...

  10. 32 CFR 156.5 - National security positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false National security positions. 156.5 Section 156.5 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE SECURITY DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL SECURITY PROGRAM (PSP) § 156.5 National security positions. (a) Procedures. The objective of...

  11. [National health security agencies: facts and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Houssin, Didier

    2013-10-01

    Despite major changes in its composition over the past two decades, the French health security infrastructure, currently consisting of eight agencies, has endured. This infrastructure has reinforced the French state's capacity to protect the health of its population, but it did not yet provide total protection. The future of national health agencies will depend on their ability to maintain the priority given to public health security ; to preserve credible, high-level scientific expertise ; to meet the challenges of healthcare safety ; and to organize health security at the European level.

  12. Maritime Commerce Security Plan for The National Strategy for Maritime Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    MARITIME COMMERCE SECURITY PLAN FOR THE NATIONAL STRATEGY FOR MARITIME SECURITY OCTOBER 2005 Report Documentation Page Form...COVERED 00-00-2005 to 00-00-2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Maritime Commerce Security Plan for The National Strategy for Maritime Security 5a... Commerce Security Plan i FOREWORD By signing National Security Presidential Directive 41/Homeland Security Presidential Directive 13 (NSPD-41/HSPD

  13. Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Wills, C.

    2014-09-09

    This report was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) (formerly designated as the Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO]). The new field office designation occurred in March 2013. Published reports cited in this 2013 report, therefore, may bear the name or authorship of NNSA/NSO. This and previous years’ reports, called Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASERs), Nevada Test Site Environmental Reports (NTSERs), and, beginning in 2010, Nevada National Security Site Environmental Reports (NNSSERs), are posted on the NNSA/NFO website at http://www.nv.energy.gov/library/publications/aser.aspx.

  14. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-01-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NNSSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NNSS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project at (702) 295-7063 or fax to (702) 295-1153.

  15. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-09-03

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NNSSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NNSS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project at (702) 295-7063 or fax to (702) 295-1153.

  16. Argentina: Nationality, Demography and Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-22

    consciousness. This is where Argentina’s weakness lies, a weakness at the foundation of any political, economic or social plan with which we try to solve our...retained their idiom and customs unusually long; not effectively socialized as Argentines; lack of national identity. The present situation. Our...work force. They lack social coverage and earn minimum wages under the table. Some Paraguayans become "contractors", the peak of the immigrant’s

  17. AIRNET Data from Los Alamos National Laboratory: Air Concentration Data by Site and Isotope/Element

    DOE Data Explorer

    Ambient monitoring is the systematic, long-term assessment of pollutant levels by measuring the quantity and types of certain pollutants in the surrounding, outdoor air. The purpose of AIRNET, LANL's ambient air monitoring network, is to monitor locations where people live or work. The community of Los Alamos is downwind from LANL, so there are many monitoring stations in and around the town. AIRNET stations monitor 24 hours a day, 365 days of the year. Particulates are collected on a filter and analyzed every two weeks for identification of analytes and assessment of the potential impact on the public. Emissions measurement is the process of monitoring materials vented from buildings. Air samples are taken from building exhaust units, called stacks, and are then analyzed for particulate matter, tritium, and radioactive gases and vapors. A computer model uses the emission data to determine the dispersion. Stack monitoring is also used to measure emissions that cannot be measured by AIRNET stations.

  18. Ion Beam and Plasma Technology Development for Surface Modification at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, H.A.; Munson, C.P.; Wood, B.P.; Bitteker, L.J.; Nastasi, M.A.; Rej, D.J.; Waganaar, W.J.; Walter, K.C.; Coates, D.M.; Schleinitz, H.M.

    1997-12-31

    We are developing two high-throughput technologies for materials modification. The first is a repetitive intense ion beam source for materials modification through rapid surface melt and resolidification (up to 10{sup 10} deg/sec cooling rates) and for ablative deposition of coatings. The short range of the ions (typically 0.1 to 5 micrometers) allows vaporization or melting at moderate beam energy density (typically 1-50 J/cm{sup 2}). A new repetitive intense ion beam accelerator called CHAMP is under development at Los Alamos. The design beam parameters are: E=200 keV, I=15 kA, {tau}=1 {micro}s, and 1 Hz. This accelerator will enable applications such as film deposition, alloying and mixing, cleaning and polishing, corrosion and wear resistance, polymer surface treatments, and nanophase powder synthesis. The second technology is plasma source ion implantation (PSII) using plasmas generated from both gas phase (using radio frequency excitation) and solid phase (using a cathodic arc) sources. We have used PSII to directly implant ions for surface modification or as method for generating graded interfaces to enhance the adhesion of surface coatings. Surfaces with areas of up to 16 m{sup 2} and weighing more than a thousand kilograms have been treated in the Los Alamos PSII chamber. In addition, PSII in combination with cathodic source deposition has been used to form highly adherent, thick Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings on steel for reactive metal containment in casting. These coatings resist delamination under extreme mechanical and thermal stress.

  19. Los Alamos offers Fellowships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico is calling for applications for postdoctoral appointments and research fellowships. The positions are available in geoscience as well as other scientific disciplines.The laboratory, which is operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy, awards J. Robert Oppenheimer Research Fellowships to scientists that either have or will soon complete doctoral degrees. The appointments are for two years, are renewable for a third year, and carry a stipend of $51,865 per year. Potential applicants should send a resume or employment application and a statement of research goals to Carol M. Rich, Div. 89, Human Resources Development Division, MS P290, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 by mid-November.

  20. Critical partnerships: Los Alamos, universities, and industry

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.L.

    1997-04-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, situated 35 miles northwest of Santa Fe, NM, is one of the Department of Energy`s three Defense Programs laboratories. It encompasses 43 square miles, employees approximately 10,000 people, and has a budget of approximately $1.1B in FY97. Los Alamos has a strong post-cold war mission, that of reducing the nuclear danger. But even with that key role in maintaining the nation`s security, Los Alamos views partnerships with universities and industry as critical to its future well being. Why is that? As the federal budget for R&D comes under continued scrutiny and certain reduction, we believe that the triad of science and technology contributors to the national system of R&D must rely on and leverage each others capabilities. For us this means that we will rely on these partners to help us in 5 key ways: We expect that partnerships will help us maintain and enhance our core competencies. In doing so, we will be able to attract the best scientists and engineers. To keep on the cutting edge of research and development, we have found that partnerships maintain the excellence of staff through new and exciting challenges. Additionally, we find that from our university and corporate partners we often learn and incorporate {open_quotes}best practices{close_quotes} in organizational management and operations. Finally, we believe that a strong national system of R&D will ensure and enhance our ability to generate revenues.

  1. Studies of annual and seasonal variations in four species of reptiles and amphibians at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.I.; Haarmann, T.; Keller, D.C.; Foxx, T.

    1998-11-01

    Baseline studies of reptiles and amphibians of the Pajarito wetlands at Los Alamos National Laboratory have been conducted by the Ecology group since 1990. With the gathered data from 1990--1997 (excluding 1992), they plan to determine if patterns can be found in the annual and seasonal population changes of four species of reptiles and amphibians over the past seven years. The four species studied are the Woodhouse toad, the western chorus frog, the many-linked skink, and the plateau striped whiptail lizard. Statistical analysis results show that significant changes occurred on a seasonal basis for the western chorus frog and the many-lined skink. Results indicate a significant difference in the annual population of the Woodhouse toad.

  2. Studies of Annual and Seasonal Variations in Four Species of Reptiles and Amphibians at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, D.C.; Nelson, E.I.; Mullen, M.A.; Foxx, T.S.; Haarmann, T.K.

    1998-07-01

    Baseline studies of reptiles and amphibians of the Pajarito wetlands at Los Alamos National Laboratory have been conducted by the Ecology group since 1990. With the data gathered from 1990-1997 (excluding 1992), we examined the annual and seasonal population changes of four species of reptiles and amphibians over the past seven years. The four species studied are the Woodhouse toad (Bufo woodhousii), the western chorus frog (Pseudacris triseriata), the many-lined skink (Eunzeces nudtivirgatus), and the plateau striped whiptail lizard (Cnemidophorus velox). Statistical analyses indicate a significant change on a seasonal basis for the western chorus frog and the many-lined skink. Results indicate a significant difference in the annual population of the Woodhouse toad.

  3. An assessment of Microtox{trademark} as a biomonitoring tool for whole effluent testing for Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Zachritz, W.H. II; Morrow, J.

    1994-06-13

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has special discharge problems relating to potential radioactive content of the effluent discharge waters. Because of this all testing must be performed on-site and results must be rapidly determined. There is a need to examine the development of a real-time procedure for effluent biomonitoring to met these site limitations. The Microtox{trademark} unit for toxicity testing is a microbially-based test system that shows great promise to be used for WET testing. The overall goal of this study is to develop an acceptable protocol for operational biomonitoring using the Microtox {trademark} toxicity test for LANL. The specific objectives include: development of an appropriate toxicity testing protocol using the Microtox{trademark} toxicity test for whole effluent toxicity testing and evaluation of the protocol based on factors such as sensitivity, response time, cost of analysis, and simplicity of operation.

  4. Low-level radioactive waste management: transitioning to off-site disposal at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dorries, Alison M

    2010-11-09

    Facing the closure of nearly all on-site management and disposal capability for low-level radioactive waste (LLW), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is making ready to ship the majority of LLW off-site. In order to ship off-site, waste must meet the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facility's (TSDF) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). In preparation, LANL's waste management organization must ensure LANL waste generators characterize and package waste compliantly and waste characterization documentation is complete and accurate. Key challenges that must be addressed to successfully make the shift to off-site disposal of LLW include improving the detail, accuracy, and quality of process knowledge (PK) and acceptable knowledge (AK) documentation, training waste generators and waste management staff on the higher standard of data quality and expectations, improved WAC compliance for off-site facilities, and enhanced quality assurance throughout the process. Certification of LANL generators will allow direct off-site shipping of LLW from their facilities.

  5. Floristic composition and plant succession on near-surface radioactive-waste-disposal facilities in the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, G.D.; Foxx, T.S.

    1982-03-01

    Since 1946, low-level radioactive waste has been buried in shallow landfills within the confines of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Five of these sites were studied for plant composition and successional patterns by reconnaissance and vegetation mapping. The data show a slow rate of recovery for all sites, regardless of age, in both the pinon-juniper and ponderosa pine communities. The sites are not comparable in succession or composition because of location and previous land use. The two oldest sites have the highest species diversity and the only mature trees. All sites allowed to revegetate naturally tend to be colonized by the same species that originally surrounded the sites. Sites on historic fields are colonized by the old field flora, whereas those in areas disturbed only by grazing are revegetated by the local native flora.

  6. 78 FR 16699 - National Maritime Security Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-18

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard National Maritime Security Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The National Maritime Security Advisory... national maritime security. This meeting will be open to the public. DATES: The Committee will meet...

  7. National Security Strategy: What About the Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-27

    and South Korea, to seabed mining and drilling rights in countries surrounding the Caspian Sea. According to Ambassador Jan Kubis , Secretary General of...national economy, distribute wealth, and provide basic goods and services. Kubis notes, “Such environmental pressures 8 could make social polarization...the U.S. interest (Washington, D.C.: Jewish Institute for National Security Affairs, 2001), x. 21 7 Ibid. 8 Jan Kubis , “Initiative For Change,” Our

  8. Sensor Science for National Security

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, Jim E; Warmack, Robert J Bruce; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Datskos, Panos G; BRITTONJr., CHARLES L.

    2009-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has over 200 professionals engaged in measurement science research and development. This work includes transduction techniques, advanced microelectronics, signal and image processing, modeling and simulation, material synthesis and characterization, and system engineering issues for packaging, miniaturization, integration, and communications (e.g. wireless networks). ORNL is applying this expertise to detecting, preventing, and reversing the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, deploying integrated systems for incident awareness, detection, and response, providing technology for detection of explosives, and delivering enhanced protection and new capabilities to first responders and warfighters. Sensor systems include micro- and nano-arrays, optical, chemical, and biological technologies. Electronics research has focused on low-power, low-cost, and wireless functionality. Signal processing advancements encompass data flow with conversion to information and knowledge for intelligent decision making.

  9. Teaching Ethics and National Security Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harbour, Frances V.

    1987-01-01

    Covers the objectives, subject matter, and requirements of a one-semester course based on ethics and national security policy taught within the School of Public Affairs at the University of Maryland at College Park. The course is designed to give students an opportunity to develop skill in the analysis of moral and ethical issues. (JDH)

  10. New rules revamp national security prosecutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Following the collapse of recent prosecutions of Chinese-American scientists on national security grounds, the US Department of Justice (DOJ) has issued new rules on such lawsuits that will require top officials in Washington to review and supervise all cases that implicitly involve spying - rather than leaving decisions to local prosecutors.

  11. 10 CFR 605.18 - National security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false National security. 605.18 Section 605.18 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS THE OFFICE OF ENERGY RESEARCH FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE...). However, if in the opinion of the recipient or DOE such involvement becomes expected prior to the...

  12. The National Security Council: An Organizational Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-21

    Mifflin, 1991), p. 58. 39 See National Security Adviser: Role and Accountability. 40 Brzezinski acknowledges but discounts the reports that Mondale had...who had worked for Vice President Walter Mondale , who had been given a major policy role.40 The Reagan NSC, 1981-1989 Campaigning for the presidency

  13. The National Security Council: An Organizational Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-06

    staff.39 There were also reports of infighting between Carter loyalists on the NSC staff and those who had worked for Vice President Walter Mondale ...Mifflin, 1991), p. 58. 39 See National Security Adviser: Role and Accountability. 40 Brzezinski acknowledges but discounts the reports that Mondale

  14. US and Brazil: Prospective National Security Partners

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    Chapter 5, “National Security,” data as of April 1997. Maxwell, Kenneth. “George W., King Canute , and Brazil,” Article published by Council on Foreign...22. [22] Kenneth Maxwell, “George W., King Canute , and Brazil,” article published by Council on Foreign Relations, 15 Dec 2000. (Hereafter referred

  15. Water security - Nation state and international security implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tindall, James A.; Andrew A. Campbell,

    2009-01-01

    A terrorist attack such as poisoning and sabotage of the national water supply and water-quality infrastructure of the continental United States or any country, could disrupt the delivery of vital human services, threaten both public health and the environment, potentially cause mass casualties and pose grave public concern for homeland security. Most significantly, an attack on water resources would weaken social cohesion and trust in government. A threat to continuity of services is a potential threat to continuity of government since both are necessary for continuity of operations. Water infrastructure is difficult to protect, as it extends over vast areas across the U.S. and for which ownership is overwhelmingly nonfederal (approximately 85 percent). Since the 9111 attacks, federal dam operators and water and wastewater utilities have established counter measures. Similar measures have been taken in countries around the world. These include enhanced physical security, improved coordination between corporate ownership, Department of Homeland Security, and local law enforcement, and research into risk assessment and vulnerability analysis to ensure greater system safety. A key issue is the proportionate additional resources directed at public and private sector specific priorities. Agencies that have the scientific and technological ability to leverage resources, exploit integrated science approaches, focus on interdisciplinary practices, utilize informatics expertise and employ a wide use of evolving technologies should play a key role in water security and related issues.

  16. Alternate Energy for National Security.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, Bhakta

    2010-02-01

    Recent price fluctuations at the gas pump have brought our attention to the phenomenal increase of global energy consumption in recent years. It is now evident that we have almost reached a peak in global oil production. Several projections indicate that total world consumption of oil will rise by nearly 60 per cent between 1999 and 2020. In 1999 consumption was equivalent to 86 million barrels of oil per day, which has reached a peak of production extracted from most known oil reserves. These projections, if accurate, will present an unprecedented crisis to the global economy and industry. As an example, in the US, nearly 40 per cent of energy usage is provided by petroleum, of which nearly a third is used in transportation. The US Department of Defense (DOD) is the single largest buyer of fuel, amounting to, on the average, 13 million gallons per day. Additionally, these fuels have to meet different requirements that prevent use of ethanol additives and biodiesel. An aggressive search for alternate energy sources, both renewable and nonrenewable, is vital. The presentation will review national and DOD perspectives on the exploration of alternate energy with a focus on energy derivable from the ocean. )

  17. University of New Mexico-Los Alamos National Laboratory Program in Volcanology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, F.; Fischer, T.; Baldridge, W.; Wohletz, K.; Smith, G.; Heiken, G.; Valentine, G.; Elston, W.

    2002-05-01

    The UNM-LANL Program in Volcanology was a vision of Wolf Elston in the late 1980s. Finally established in mid-1992, the program takes advantage of the extensive volcanic record preserved in northern New Mexico, and of the unique expertise and exceptional research facilities existing at the two institutions. Courses are directed toward upper division and graduate level students. The Los Alamos participants are adjunct professors and they take an active role in creating courses, advising thesis candidates, and providing research support. The curriculum is flexible but has a core upper division class in Physical Volcanology. Other classes offered in various years have included Volcanology and Human Affairs; Magmatic and Geothermal Systems; Tectonics and Magma Generation; Volcanoes of North America; Instrumentation for Volcanology; and Advanced Igneous Petrology. Perhaps the most renowned class in the program is the Volcanology Summer Field Course offered in even numbered years. This 3.5-week class is based in the Jemez Mountains volcanic field, which contains the famous Valles caldera (1.2 Ma to 50 ka). All types of calc-alkaline to alkalic domes, flows, tuffs, and intrusions, plus derivative sediments, mineralized zones, and thermal fluids are available for instructional purposes. Students are required to complete nine rigorous field exercises starting with basic instruction in pyroclastic fall, flow, and surge, then progressing towards hydrothermally altered, intracaldera resurgent dome and moat deposits in an active hot spring and fumarole system. The class is open to graduate students, advanced undergraduates, and private sector employees with special needs. Enrollment is competitive with limited financial support and limited space for 17 students. Evening lectures, study time, lodging, and meals are provided at the UNM-owned Young's Ranch built in the 1920s, nestled in a canyon flanked by orange cliffs of Bandelier Tuff. About 120 students from 12 countries have

  18. Emittance studies at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.; Feldman, D.W.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Stein, W.E.; Warren, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Recent emittance studies at the Los Alamos FEL have indicated several areas of concern in the linac and beamline feeding the wiggler. Four emittance growth mechanisms of special importance have been studied. First, a rapid growth of the electron beam's emittance immediately after the spherical gridded Pierce gun resulted, in part, from the long time required for our pulsing electronics to ramp the grid voltage up at the start and down at the end of the pulse, which created a pulse with a cosine-like current distribution as a function of time. The growth was compounded by the extremely small radial beam size (almost a waist) leaving the gun. In addition, we saw evidence of electrostatic charging of the insulators in the gun, reducing the quality of the electron beam further. Second, the action of the solenoidal focusing fields in the low-voltage bunching region was studied, and criteria for a minimum emittance growth were established. Third, maximum misalignment angles and displacements for various elements of the beamline were calculated for the desired low emittance growth. Finally, emittance growth in the horizontal dimension through the nonisochronous bend caused by varying energy depression on the particles due to longitudinal wake fields was both calculated and observed. In addition, we measured energy depressions caused by the wake fields generated by various other elements in the beamline. Strategies were developed to relieve the magnitude of these wake-field effects. 10 refs., 12 figs.

  19. Class 1 Permit Modification Notification Addition of Structures within Technical Area 54, Area G, Pad 11, Dome 375 Los Alamos National Laboratory Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, July 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil-Holterman, Luciana R.; Lechel, Robert A.

    2012-08-31

    The purpose of this letter is to notify the New Mexico Environment Department-Hazardous Waste Bureau (NMED-HWB) of a Class 1 Permit Modification to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit issued to the Department of Energy (DOE) and Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) in November 2010. The modification adds structures to the container storage unit at Technical Area (TA) 54 Area G, Pad 11. Permit Section 3.1(3) requires that changes to the location of a structure that does not manage hazardous waste shall be changed within the Permit as a Class 1 modification without prior approval in accordance with Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 (40 CFR), {section}270.42(a)(1). Structures have been added within Dome 375 located at TA-54, Area G, Pad 11 that will be used in support of waste management operations within Dome 375 and the modular panel containment structure located within Dome 375, but will not be used as waste management structures. The Class 1 Permit Modification revises Figure 36 in Attachment N, Figures; and Figure G.12-1 in Attachment G.12, Technical Area 54, Area G, Pad 11 Outdoor Container Storage Unit Closure Plan. Descriptions of the structures have also been added to Section A.4.2.9 in Attachment A, TA - Unit Descriptions; and Section 2.0 in Attachment G.12, Technical Area 54, Area G, Pad 11 Outdoor Container Storage Unit Closure Plan. Full description of the permit modification and the necessary changes are included in Enclosure 1. The modification has been prepared in accordance with 40 CFR {section}270.42(a)(l). This package includes this letter and an enclosure containing a description of the permit modification, text edits of the Permit sections, and the revised figures (collectively LA-UR-12-22808). Accordingly, a signed certification page is also enclosed. Three hard copies and one electronic copy of this submittal will be delivered to the NMED-HWB.

  20. National Information Systems Security (INFOSEC) Glossary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-01

    Systems Security Engineering ISSM Information Systems Security Manager ISSO Information Systems Security Officer IT Information Technology ITAR ...Digital Net Radio Interface Unit SDNS Secure Data Network System SDR System Design Review SFA Security Fault Analysis SHA Secure Hash Algorithm

  1. 40 CFR 85.1708 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false National security exemption. 85.1708... Vehicle Engines § 85.1708 National security exemption. A manufacturer requesting a national security... agency of the Federal Government charged with responsibility for national defense....

  2. 40 CFR 85.1708 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National security exemption. 85.1708... Vehicle Engines § 85.1708 National security exemption. A manufacturer requesting a national security... agency of the Federal Government charged with responsibility for national defense....

  3. 40 CFR 85.1708 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false National security exemption. 85.1708... Vehicle Engines § 85.1708 National security exemption. A manufacturer requesting a national security... agency of the Federal Government charged with responsibility for national defense....

  4. 40 CFR 1042.635 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false National security exemption. 1042.635... Compliance Provisions § 1042.635 National security exemption. The standards and requirements of this part and... government responsible for national defense. (b) Manufacturers may request a national security exemption...

  5. 40 CFR 1042.635 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false National security exemption. 1042.635... Compliance Provisions § 1042.635 National security exemption. The standards and requirements of this part and... government responsible for national defense. (b) Manufacturers may request a national security exemption...

  6. 40 CFR 1042.635 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false National security exemption. 1042.635... Compliance Provisions § 1042.635 National security exemption. The standards and requirements of this part and... government responsible for national defense. (b) Manufacturers may request a national security exemption...

  7. 40 CFR 85.1708 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false National security exemption. 85.1708... Vehicle Engines § 85.1708 National security exemption. A manufacturer requesting a national security... agency of the Federal Government charged with responsibility for national defense....

  8. 40 CFR 85.1708 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false National security exemption. 85.1708... Vehicle Engines § 85.1708 National security exemption. A manufacturer requesting a national security... agency of the Federal Government charged with responsibility for national defense....

  9. 40 CFR 1042.635 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false National security exemption. 1042.635... Compliance Provisions § 1042.635 National security exemption. The standards and requirements of this part and... government responsible for national defense. (b) Manufacturers may request a national security exemption...

  10. Scientific Openness and National Security at the National Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McTague, John

    2000-04-01

    The possible loss to the People's Republic of China of important U.S. nuclear-weapons-related information has aroused concern about interactions of scientists employed by the national laboratories with foreign nationals. As a result, the National Academies assembled a committee to examine the roles of the national laboratories, the contribution of foreign interactions to the fulfillment of those roles, the risks and benefits of scientific openness in this context, and the merits and liabilities of the specific policies being implemented or proposed with respect to contacts with foreign nationals. The committee concluded that there are many aspects of the work at the laboratories that benefit from or even demand the opportunity for foreign interactions. The committee recommended five principles for guiding policy: (1) Maintain balance. Policy governing international dialogue by laboratory staff should seek to encourage international engagement in some areas, while tightly controlling it in others. (2) Educate staff. Security procedures should be clear, easy to follow, and serve an understandable purpose. (3) Streamline procedures. Good science is compatible with good security if there is intelligent line management both at the labs and in Washington, which applies effective tools for security in a sensible fashion. (4) Focus efforts. DOE should focus its efforts governing tightened security for information. The greatest attention should obviously be provided to the protection of classified information by appropriate physical and cybersecurity measures, and by personnel procedures and training. (5) Beware of prejudice against foreigners. Over the past half-century foreign-born individuals have contributed broadly and profoundly to national security through their work at the national laboratories.

  11. Los Alamos National Laboratory: A guide to records series supporting epidemiologic studies conducted for the Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to describe each series of records that pertains to the epidemiologic studies conducted by the Epidemiology Section of the Occupational Medicine Group (ESH-2) at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in Los Alamos, New Mexico. The records described in this guide relate to occupational studies performed by the Epidemiology Section, including those pertaining to workers at LANL, Mound Plant, Oak Ridge Reservation, Pantex Plant, Rocky Flats Plant, and Savannah River Site. Also included are descriptions of other health-related records generated or collected by the Epidemiology Section and a small set of records collected by the Industrial Hygiene and Safety Group. This guide is not designed to describe the universe of records generated by LANL which may be used for epidemiologic studies of the LANL work force. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of its work as the support services contractor for DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project, HAI`s role in the project, the history of LANL the history and functions of LANL`s Health Division and Epidemiology Section, and the various epidemiologic studies performed by the Epidemiology Section. It provides information on the methodology that HAI used to inventory and describe records housed in the offices of the LANL Epidemiology Section in Technical Area 59 and at the LANL Records Center. Other topics include the methodology used to produce the guide, the arrangement of the detailed record series descriptions, and information concerning access to records repositories.

  12. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: The Proposed Issuance of an Easement to Public Service Company of New Mexico for the Construction and Operation of a 12-inch Natural Gas Pipeline within Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2002-07-30

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has assigned a continuing role to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in carrying out NNSAs national security mission. To enable LANL to continue this enduring responsibility requires that NNSA maintain the capabilities and capacities required in support of its national mission assignments at LANL. To carry out its Congressionally assigned mission requirements, NNSA must maintain a safe and reliable infrastructure at LANL. Upgrades to the various utility services at LANL have been ongoing together with routine maintenance activities over the years. However, the replacement of a certain portion of natural gas service transmission pipeline is now necessary as this delivery system element has been operating well beyond its original design life for the past 20 to 30 years and components of the line are suffering from normal stresses, strains, and general failures. The Proposed Action is to grant an easement to the Public Service Company of New Mexico (PNM) to construct, operate, and maintain approximately 15,000 feet (4,500 meters) of 12-inch (in.) (30-centimeter [cm]) coated steel natural gas transmission mainline on NNSA-administered land within LANL along Los Alamos Canyon. The new gas line would begin at the existing valve setting located at the bottom of Los Alamos Canyon near the Los Alamos County water well pump house and adjacent to the existing 12-in. (30-cm) PNM gas transmission mainline. The new gas line (owned by PNM) would then cross the streambed and continue east in a new easement obtained by PNM from the NNSA, paralleling the existing electrical power line along the bottom of the canyon. The gas line would then turn northeast near State Road (SR) 4 and be connected to the existing 12-in. (30-cm) coated steel gas transmission mainline, located within the right-of-way (ROW) of SR 502. The Proposed Action would also involve crossing a streambed twice. PNM would bore under the streambed for pipe

  13. 77 FR 1710 - National Maritime Security Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-11

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard National Maritime Security Advisory Committee AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION... published in the Federal Register of January 9, 2012, a notice announcing a National Maritime Security... regarding multiple maritime security initiatives. If you have been adversely affected by the delay...

  14. Nuclear Arms and National Security. 1983 National Issues Forum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melville, Keith, Ed.

    Appropriate for secondary school social studies, this booklet outlines approaches for dealing with the threat of nuclear warfare in six sections. The first section, "Learning to Live with Nuclear Weapons," introduces the topic and considers what can be done to decrease the risk of nuclear warfare without jeopardizing the nation's security. "Arms…

  15. National Center for Nuclear Security - NCNS

    SciTech Connect

    2014-11-12

    As the United States embarks on a new era of nuclear arms control, the tools for treaty verification must be accurate and reliable, and must work at stand-off distances. The National Center for Nuclear Security, or NCNS, at the Nevada National Security Site, is poised to become the proving ground for these technologies. The center is a unique test bed for non-proliferation and arms control treaty verification technologies. The NNSS is an ideal location for these kinds of activities because of its multiple environments; its cadre of experienced nuclear personnel, and the artifacts of atmospheric and underground nuclear weapons explosions. The NCNS will provide future treaty negotiators with solid data on verification and inspection regimes and a realistic environment in which future treaty verification specialists can be trained. Work on warhead monitoring at the NCNS will also support future arms reduction treaties.

  16. National Center for Nuclear Security - NCNS

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    As the United States embarks on a new era of nuclear arms control, the tools for treaty verification must be accurate and reliable, and must work at stand-off distances. The National Center for Nuclear Security, or NCNS, at the Nevada National Security Site, is poised to become the proving ground for these technologies. The center is a unique test bed for non-proliferation and arms control treaty verification technologies. The NNSS is an ideal location for these kinds of activities because of its multiple environments; its cadre of experienced nuclear personnel, and the artifacts of atmospheric and underground nuclear weapons explosions. The NCNS will provide future treaty negotiators with solid data on verification and inspection regimes and a realistic environment in which future treaty verification specialists can be trained. Work on warhead monitoring at the NCNS will also support future arms reduction treaties.

  17. Selecting RMF Controls for National Security Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Witzke, Edward L.

    2015-08-01

    In 2014, the United States Department of Defense started tra nsitioning the way it performs risk management and accreditation of informatio n systems to a process entitled Risk Management Framework for DoD Information Technology or RMF for DoD IT. There are many more security and privacy contro ls (and control enhancements) from which to select in RMF, than there w ere in the previous Information Assurance process. This report is an attempt t o clarify the way security controls and enhancements are selected. After a brief overview and comparison of RMF for DoD I T with the previously used process, this report looks at the determination of systems as National Security Systems (NSS). Once deemed to be an NSS, this report addr esses the categorization of the information system with respect to impact level s of the various security objectives and the selection of an initial baseline o f controls. Next, the report describes tailoring the controls through the use of overl ays and scoping considerations. Finally, the report discusses organizatio n-defined values for tuning the security controls to the needs of the information system.

  18. 76 FR 72427 - President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ... Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate, DHS... President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee (NSTAC) will meet on Thursday, December...) telecommunications policy. During the meeting, NSTAC members will receive feedback from the Department of...

  19. 77 FR 1076 - National Maritime Security Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-09

    ...The National Maritime Security Advisory Committee (NMSAC) will meet on January 18-19, 2012 in Washington, DC to discuss various issues relating to national maritime security. This meeting will be open to the...

  20. Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Cathy Wills, ed

    2012-09-12

    This report was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This and previous years reports, called Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASERs), Nevada Test Site Environmental Reports (NTSERs), and, beginning in 2010, Nevada National Security Site Environmental Reports (NNSSERs), are posted on the NNSA/NSO website at http://www.nv.energy.gov/library/publications/aser.aspx. This NNSSER was prepared to satisfy DOE Order DOE O 231.1B, 'Environment, Safety and Health Reporting.' Its purpose is to (1) report compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, (2) present results of environmental monitoring of radiological and nonradiological effluents, (3) report estimated radiological doses to the public from releases of radioactive material, (4) summarize environmental incidents of noncompliance and actions taken in response to them, (5) describe the NNSA/NSO Environmental Management System and characterize its performance, and (6) highlight significant environmental programs and efforts. This NNSSER summarizes data and compliance status for calendar year 2011 at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (formerly the Nevada Test Site) and its two support facilities, the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF) and the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis (RSL-Nellis). It also addresses environmental restoration (ER) projects conducted at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). Through a Memorandum of Agreement, NNSA/NSO is responsible for the oversight of TTR ER projects, and the Sandia Site Office of NNSA (NNSA/SSO) has oversight of all other TTR activities. NNSA/SSO produces the TTR annual environmental report available at http://www.sandia.gov/news/publications/environmental/index.html.

  1. VICARS and MANAGERS: Organizing for National Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-01

    involvement pushes the NSC staff, and especially the NSC adviser, out of the role of neutral policy coordination and into the mainstream of daily decisions...position of either ruhber- stampin ( or challenging what for all he knew had already been approved by the President. 30 Second. there is a natural...the same time, it is highly unstable: the national security adviser will be constantly lured or pushed across the line separating his role from the

  2. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2012-02-28

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept DOE non-radioactive classified waste, DOE non-radioactive hazardous classified waste, DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW), DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW), and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste for permanent disposal. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and will be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project (WMP) at (702) 295-7063, and your call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

  3. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-06-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept the following: • DOE hazardous and non-hazardous non-radioactive classified waste • DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW) • DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW) • U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste The LLW and MLLW listed above may also be classified waste. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and shall be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. Classified waste may be sent to the NNSS as classified matter. Section 3.1.18 provides the requirements that must be met for permanent burial of classified matter. The NNSA/NFO and support contractors are available to assist the generator in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NFO Environmental Management Operations (EMO) at (702) 295-7063, and the call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

  4. 48 CFR 1352.237-72 - Security processing requirements-national security contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... requirements-national security contracts. 1352.237-72 Section 1352.237-72 Federal Acquisition Regulations... Provisions and Clauses 1352.237-72 Security processing requirements—national security contracts. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1337.110-70(d), use the following clause: Security Processing...

  5. 48 CFR 1352.237-72 - Security processing requirements-national security contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... requirements-national security contracts. 1352.237-72 Section 1352.237-72 Federal Acquisition Regulations... Provisions and Clauses 1352.237-72 Security processing requirements—national security contracts. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1337.110-70(d), use the following clause: Security Processing...

  6. 48 CFR 6.302-6 - National security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false National security. 6.302-6... COMPETITION REQUIREMENTS Other Than Full and Open Competition 6.302-6 National security. (a) Authority. (1... for when the disclosure of the agency's needs would compromise the national security unless the...

  7. 48 CFR 6.302-6 - National security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false National security. 6.302-6... COMPETITION REQUIREMENTS Other Than Full and Open Competition 6.302-6 National security. (a) Authority. (1... for when the disclosure of the agency's needs would compromise the national security unless the...

  8. 48 CFR 6.302-6 - National security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false National security. 6.302-6... COMPETITION REQUIREMENTS Other Than Full and Open Competition 6.302-6 National security. (a) Authority. (1... for when the disclosure of the agency's needs would compromise the national security unless the...

  9. 48 CFR 606.302-6 - National security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false National security. 606.302... ACQUISITION PLANNING COMPETITION REQUIREMENTS Other Than Full and Open Competition 606.302-6 National security. (b) This subsection applies to all acquisitions involving national security information,...

  10. 48 CFR 606.302-6 - National security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false National security. 606.302... ACQUISITION PLANNING COMPETITION REQUIREMENTS Other Than Full and Open Competition 606.302-6 National security. (b) This subsection applies to all acquisitions involving national security information,...

  11. 48 CFR 606.302-6 - National security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false National security. 606.302... ACQUISITION PLANNING COMPETITION REQUIREMENTS Other Than Full and Open Competition 606.302-6 National security. (b) This subsection applies to all acquisitions involving national security information,...

  12. 48 CFR 606.302-6 - National security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false National security. 606.302... ACQUISITION PLANNING COMPETITION REQUIREMENTS Other Than Full and Open Competition 606.302-6 National security. (b) This subsection applies to all acquisitions involving national security information,...

  13. 77 FR 9214 - National Security Education Board Members Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-16

    ... of the Secretary National Security Education Board Members Meeting AGENCY: Under Secretary of Defense... to Public Law 92-463, notice is hereby given of a forthcoming meeting of the National Security... Defense concerning requirements established by the David L. Boren National Security Education Act,...

  14. 48 CFR 6.302-6 - National security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false National security. 6.302-6... COMPETITION REQUIREMENTS Other Than Full and Open Competition 6.302-6 National security. (a) Authority. (1... for when the disclosure of the agency's needs would compromise the national security unless the...

  15. 48 CFR 606.302-6 - National security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false National security. 606.302... ACQUISITION PLANNING COMPETITION REQUIREMENTS Other Than Full and Open Competition 606.302-6 National security. (b) This subsection applies to all acquisitions involving national security information,...

  16. 14 CFR § 1260.31 - National security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false National security. § 1260.31 Section Â... AGREEMENTS General Provisions § 1260.31 National security. National Security October 2000 Normally, NASA... performing on the grant who will have access to the information must obtain the appropriate...

  17. 40 CFR 91.1008 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National security exemption. 91.1008... Engines § 91.1008 National security exemption. (a)(1) Any marine SI engine, otherwise subject to this part... for purposes of national security. No request for exemption is necessary. (2) Manufacturers...

  18. 40 CFR 89.908 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false National security exemption. 89.908... Provisions § 89.908 National security exemption. (a)(1) Any nonroad engine, otherwise subject to this part... regulations for purposes of national security. No request for exemption is necessary. (2) Manufacturers...

  19. 3 CFR 101.4 - National Security Council.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false National Security Council. 101.4 Section 101.4... PROCEDURES ACT § 101.4 National Security Council. Freedom of Information regulations for the National Security Council appear at 32 CFR Ch. XXI....

  20. 40 CFR 90.908 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true National security exemption. 90.908... Exemption of Nonroad Engines from Regulations § 90.908 National security exemption. (a)(1) Any nonroad... defense, will be considered exempt from this part for purposes of national security. No request...

  1. 40 CFR 94.908 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true National security exemption. 94.908... § 94.908 National security exemption. (a)(1) Any marine engine, otherwise subject to this part, that is... regulations in this subpart for reasons of national security. No request for this exemption is necessary....

  2. 40 CFR 94.908 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false National security exemption. 94.908... § 94.908 National security exemption. (a)(1) Any marine engine, otherwise subject to this part, that is... regulations in this subpart for reasons of national security. No request for this exemption is necessary....

  3. 28 CFR 501.2 - National security cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National security cases. 501.2 Section... ADMINISTRATION SCOPE OF RULES § 501.2 National security cases. (a) Upon direction of the Attorney General, the... unauthorized disclosure of such information would pose a threat to the national security and that there is...

  4. 40 CFR 90.908 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false National security exemption. 90.908... Exemption of Nonroad Engines from Regulations § 90.908 National security exemption. (a)(1) Any nonroad... defense, will be considered exempt from this part for purposes of national security. No request...

  5. 40 CFR 211.110-2 - National security exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false National security exemptions. 211.110... ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.110-2 National security exemptions. (a) A new product which is produced to conform with specifications developed by national security...

  6. 40 CFR 90.908 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false National security exemption. 90.908... Exemption of Nonroad Engines from Regulations § 90.908 National security exemption. (a)(1) Any nonroad... defense, will be considered exempt from this part for purposes of national security. No request...

  7. 40 CFR 80.1655 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false National security exemption. 80.1655... (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur § 80.1655 National security exemption. (a...) Tactical military vehicles, engines, or equipment having an EPA national security exemption from...

  8. 40 CFR 89.908 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false National security exemption. 89.908... Provisions § 89.908 National security exemption. (a)(1) Any nonroad engine, otherwise subject to this part... regulations for purposes of national security. No request for exemption is necessary. (2) Manufacturers...

  9. 40 CFR 94.908 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false National security exemption. 94.908... § 94.908 National security exemption. (a)(1) Any marine engine, otherwise subject to this part, that is... regulations in this subpart for reasons of national security. No request for this exemption is necessary....

  10. 40 CFR 89.908 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National security exemption. 89.908... Provisions § 89.908 National security exemption. (a)(1) Any nonroad engine, otherwise subject to this part... regulations for purposes of national security. No request for exemption is necessary. (2) Manufacturers...

  11. 40 CFR 204.5-2 - National security exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true National security exemptions. 204.5-2... PROGRAMS NOISE EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT General Provisions § 204.5-2 National security... for a national security exemption is required. (c) For purposes of section 11(d) of the Act,...

  12. 40 CFR 204.5-2 - National security exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false National security exemptions. 204.5-2... PROGRAMS NOISE EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT General Provisions § 204.5-2 National security... for a national security exemption is required. (c) For purposes of section 11(d) of the Act,...

  13. 39 CFR 267.5 - National Security Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false National Security Information. 267.5 Section 267.5... § 267.5 National Security Information. (a) Purpose and scope. The purpose of this section is to provide regulations implementing Executive Order 12356 National Security Information (hereinafter referred to as...

  14. 40 CFR 211.110-2 - National security exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true National security exemptions. 211.110-2... PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.110-2 National security exemptions. (a) A new product which is produced to conform with specifications developed by national security agency, and...

  15. 40 CFR 92.908 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false National security exemption. 92.908... Provisions § 92.908 National security exemption. A manufacturer or remanufacturer requesting a national security exemption must state the purpose for which the exemption is required and the request must...

  16. 40 CFR 91.1008 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false National security exemption. 91.1008... Engines § 91.1008 National security exemption. (a)(1) Any marine SI engine, otherwise subject to this part... for purposes of national security. No request for exemption is necessary. (2) Manufacturers...

  17. 40 CFR 89.908 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false National security exemption. 89.908... Provisions § 89.908 National security exemption. (a)(1) Any nonroad engine, otherwise subject to this part... regulations for purposes of national security. No request for exemption is necessary. (2) Manufacturers...

  18. 40 CFR 211.110-2 - National security exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false National security exemptions. 211.110... ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.110-2 National security exemptions. (a) A new product which is produced to conform with specifications developed by national security...

  19. 40 CFR 92.908 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false National security exemption. 92.908... Provisions § 92.908 National security exemption. A manufacturer or remanufacturer requesting a national security exemption must state the purpose for which the exemption is required and the request must...

  20. 40 CFR 92.908 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true National security exemption. 92.908... Provisions § 92.908 National security exemption. A manufacturer or remanufacturer requesting a national security exemption must state the purpose for which the exemption is required and the request must...

  1. 40 CFR 94.908 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false National security exemption. 94.908... § 94.908 National security exemption. (a)(1) Any marine engine, otherwise subject to this part, that is... regulations in this subpart for reasons of national security. No request for this exemption is necessary....

  2. 28 CFR 501.2 - National security cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false National security cases. 501.2 Section... ADMINISTRATION SCOPE OF RULES § 501.2 National security cases. (a) Upon direction of the Attorney General, the... unauthorized disclosure of such information would pose a threat to the national security and that there is...

  3. 3 CFR 101.4 - National Security Council.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false National Security Council. 101.4 Section 101.4... PROCEDURES ACT § 101.4 National Security Council. Freedom of Information regulations for the National Security Council appear at 32 CFR Ch. XXI....

  4. 48 CFR 6.302-6 - National security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false National security. 6.302-6... COMPETITION REQUIREMENTS Other Than Full and Open Competition 6.302-6 National security. (a) Authority. (1... for when the disclosure of the agency's needs would compromise the national security unless the...

  5. 40 CFR 90.908 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false National security exemption. 90.908... Exemption of Nonroad Engines from Regulations § 90.908 National security exemption. (a)(1) Any nonroad... defense, will be considered exempt from this part for purposes of national security. No request...

  6. 40 CFR 204.5-2 - National security exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false National security exemptions. 204.5-2... PROGRAMS NOISE EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT General Provisions § 204.5-2 National security... for a national security exemption is required. (c) For purposes of section 11(d) of the Act,...

  7. 40 CFR 91.1008 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false National security exemption. 91.1008... Engines § 91.1008 National security exemption. (a)(1) Any marine SI engine, otherwise subject to this part... for purposes of national security. No request for exemption is necessary. (2) Manufacturers...

  8. 40 CFR 204.5-2 - National security exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National security exemptions. 204.5-2... PROGRAMS NOISE EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT General Provisions § 204.5-2 National security... for a national security exemption is required. (c) For purposes of section 11(d) of the Act,...

  9. 28 CFR 501.2 - National security cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false National security cases. 501.2 Section... ADMINISTRATION SCOPE OF RULES § 501.2 National security cases. (a) Upon direction of the Attorney General, the... unauthorized disclosure of such information would pose a threat to the national security and that there is...

  10. 40 CFR 91.1008 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true National security exemption. 91.1008... Engines § 91.1008 National security exemption. (a)(1) Any marine SI engine, otherwise subject to this part... for purposes of national security. No request for exemption is necessary. (2) Manufacturers...

  11. 40 CFR 92.908 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National security exemption. 92.908... Provisions § 92.908 National security exemption. A manufacturer or remanufacturer requesting a national security exemption must state the purpose for which the exemption is required and the request must...

  12. 40 CFR 92.908 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false National security exemption. 92.908... Provisions § 92.908 National security exemption. A manufacturer or remanufacturer requesting a national security exemption must state the purpose for which the exemption is required and the request must...

  13. 3 CFR 101.4 - National Security Council.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false National Security Council. 101.4 Section 101.4... PROCEDURES ACT § 101.4 National Security Council. Freedom of Information regulations for the National Security Council appear at 32 CFR Ch. XXI....

  14. 5 CFR 9901.314 - National security compensation comparability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false National security compensation... DEFENSE NATIONAL SECURITY PERSONNEL SYSTEM (NSPS) Pay and Pay Administration Overview of Pay System § 9901.314 National security compensation comparability. (a) To the maximum extent practicable, for...

  15. 28 CFR 501.2 - National security cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false National security cases. 501.2 Section... ADMINISTRATION SCOPE OF RULES § 501.2 National security cases. (a) Upon direction of the Attorney General, the... unauthorized disclosure of such information would pose a threat to the national security and that there is...

  16. 3 CFR 101.4 - National Security Council.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false National Security Council. 101.4 Section 101.4... PROCEDURES ACT § 101.4 National Security Council. Freedom of Information regulations for the National Security Council appear at 32 CFR Ch. XXI....

  17. 40 CFR 91.1008 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false National security exemption. 91.1008... Engines § 91.1008 National security exemption. (a)(1) Any marine SI engine, otherwise subject to this part... for purposes of national security. No request for exemption is necessary. (2) Manufacturers...

  18. 40 CFR 89.908 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true National security exemption. 89.908... Provisions § 89.908 National security exemption. (a)(1) Any nonroad engine, otherwise subject to this part... regulations for purposes of national security. No request for exemption is necessary. (2) Manufacturers...

  19. 40 CFR 90.908 - National security exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National security exemption. 90.908... Exemption of Nonroad Engines from Regulations § 90.908 National security exemption. (a)(1) Any nonroad... defense, will be considered exempt from this part for purposes of national security. No request...

  20. 28 CFR 501.2 - National security cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false National security cases. 501.2 Section... ADMINISTRATION SCOPE OF RULES § 501.2 National security cases. (a) Upon direction of the Attorney General, the... unauthorized disclosure of such information would pose a threat to the national security and that there is...

  1. 3 CFR 101.4 - National Security Council.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false National Security Council. 101.4 Section 101.4... PROCEDURES ACT § 101.4 National Security Council. Freedom of Information regulations for the National Security Council appear at 32 CFR Ch. XXI....

  2. 76 FR 50719 - National Security Education Board Members Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-16

    ... of the Secretary National Security Education Board Members Meeting AGENCY: Under Secretary of Defense... 92-463, notice is hereby given of a forthcoming meeting of the National Security Education Board. The... requirements established by the David L. Boren National Security Education Act, Title VII of Public Law...

  3. 77 FR 49439 - National Security Education Board Members Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... of the Secretary National Security Education Board Members Meeting AGENCY: Under Secretary of Defense... hereby given of a forthcoming meeting of the National Security Education Board. The purpose ] of the... established by the David L. Boren National Security Education Act, Title VII of Public Law 102-183, as...

  4. 77 FR 27739 - National Security Education Board Members Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... of the Secretary National Security Education Board Members Meeting AGENCY: Under Secretary of Defense... hereby given of a forthcoming meeting of the National Security Education Board. The purpose of the... established by the David L. Boren National Security Education Act, Title VII of Public Law 102- 183,...

  5. 76 FR 28960 - National Security Education Board Members Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... of the Secretary National Security Education Board Members Meeting AGENCY: Under Secretary of Defense... hereby given of a forthcoming meeting of the National Security Education Board. The purpose of the... established by the David L. Boren National Security Education Act, Title VII of Public Law 102- 183,...

  6. Geology of the Western Part of Los Alamos National Laboratory (TA-3 to TA-16), Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    C.J.Lewis; A.Lavine; S.L.Reneau; J.N.Gardner; R.Channell; C.W.Criswell

    2002-12-01

    We present data that elucidate the stratigraphy, geomorphology, and structure in the western part of Los Alamos National Laboratory between Technical Areas 3 and 16 (TA-3 and TA-16). Data include those gathered by geologic mapping of surficial, post-Bandelier Tuff strata, conventional and high-precision geologic mapping and geochemical analysis of cooling units within the Bandelier Tuff, logging of boreholes and a gas pipeline trench, and structural analysis using profiles, cross sections, structure contour maps, and stereographic projections. This work contributes to an improved understanding of the paleoseismic and geomorphic history of the area, which will aid in future seismic hazard evaluations and other investigations. The study area lies at the base of the main, 120-m (400-ft) high escarpment formed by the Pajarito fault, an active fault of the Rio Grande rift that bounds Los Alamos National Laboratory on the west. Subsidiary fracturing, faulting, and folding associated with the Pajarito fault zone extends at least 1,500 m (5,000 ft) to the east of the main Pajarito fault escarpment. Stratigraphic units in the study area include upper units of the Tshirege Member of the early Pleistocene Bandelier Tuff, early Pleistocene alluvial fan deposits that predate incision of canyons on this part of the Pajarito Plateau, and younger Pleistocene and Holocene alluvium and colluvium that postdate drainage incision. We discriminate four sets of structures in the area between TA-3 and TA-16: (a) north-striking faults and folds that mark the main zone of deformation, including a graben in the central part of the study area; (b) north-northwest-striking fractures and rare faults that bound the eastern side of the principal zone of deformation and may be the surface expression of deep-seated faulting; (c) rare northeast-striking structures near the northern limit of the area associated with the southern end of the Rendija Canyon fault; and (d) several small east

  7. 17 CFR 249.635 - Form X-17A-19, report by national securities exchanges and registered national securities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Form X-17A-19, report by national securities exchanges and registered national securities associations of changes in the membership... Certain Exchange Members, Brokers, and Dealers § 249.635 Form X-17A-19, report by national...

  8. 17 CFR 249.635 - Form X-17A-19, report by national securities exchanges and registered national securities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Form X-17A-19, report by national securities exchanges and registered national securities associations of changes in the membership... Certain Exchange Members, Brokers, and Dealers § 249.635 Form X-17A-19, report by national...

  9. 17 CFR 249.635 - Form X-17A-19, report by national securities exchanges and registered national securities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Form X-17A-19, report by national securities exchanges and registered national securities associations of changes in the membership... Certain Exchange Members, Brokers, and Dealers § 249.635 Form X-17A-19, report by national...

  10. 17 CFR 249.635 - Form X-17A-19, report by national securities exchanges and registered national securities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Form X-17A-19, report by national securities exchanges and registered national securities associations of changes in the membership... Certain Exchange Members, Brokers, and Dealers § 249.635 Form X-17A-19, report by national...

  11. 17 CFR 249.635 - Form X-17A-19, report by national securities exchanges and registered national securities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Form X-17A-19, report by national securities exchanges and registered national securities associations of changes in the membership... Certain Exchange Members, Brokers, and Dealers § 249.635 Form X-17A-19, report by national...

  12. Water security-National and global issues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tindall, James A.; Campbell, Andrew A.

    2010-01-01

    Potable or clean freshwater availability is crucial to life and economic, environmental, and social systems. The amount of freshwater is finite and makes up approximately 2.5 percent of all water on the Earth. Freshwater supplies are small and randomly distributed, so water resources can become points of conflict. Freshwater availability depends upon precipitation patterns, changing climate, and whether the source of consumed water comes directly from desalination, precipitation, or surface and (or) groundwater. At local to national levels, difficulties in securing potable water sources increase with growing populations and economies. Available water improves living standards and drives urbanization, which increases average water consumption per capita. Commonly, disruptions in sustainable supplies and distribution of potable water and conflicts over water resources become major security issues for Government officials. Disruptions are often influenced by land use, human population, use patterns, technological advances, environmental impacts, management processes and decisions, transnational boundaries, and so forth.

  13. A spatially-dynamic preliminary risk assessment of the bald eagle at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzales, G.J.; Gallegos, A.F.; Foxx, T.S.; Fresquez, P.R.; Mullen, M.A.; Pratt, L.E.; Gomez, P.E.

    1998-04-01

    The Endangered Species Act of 1973 and the Record of Decision on the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) require that the Department of Energy protect the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), a state and federally listed species, from stressors such as contaminants. A preliminary risk assessment of the bald eagle was performed using a custom FORTRAN code, ECORSK5, and the geographical information system. Estimated exposure doses to the eagle for radionuclide, inorganic metal, and organic contaminants were derived for varying ratios of aquatic vs. terrestrial simulated diet and compared against toxicity reference values to generate hazard indices (His). HI results indicate that no appreciable impact to the bald eagle is expected from contaminants at LANL from soil ingestion and food consumption pathways. This includes a measure of cumulative effects from multiple contaminants that assumes linear additive toxicity. Improving model realism by weighting simulated eagle foraging based on distance from potential roost sites increased the HI by 76%, but still to inconsequential levels. Information on risk by specific geographical location was generated, which can be used to manage contaminated areas, eagle habitat, facility siting, and/or facility operations in order to maintain risk from contaminants at low levels.

  14. Trace Elements, With Special Reference to Mercury, in Fish Collected Upstream and Downstream of Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    P. R. Fresquez; J. D. Huchton; M. A. Mullen

    1999-11-01

    Trace elements (Ag, As, Ba, Be, Cr, Cd, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, and Tl) were determined in muscle (fillet) of average sized fish (mostly carp, catfish, and sucker) collected from the confluences of major canyons that cross Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) lands with the Rio Grande (RG). Also, trace elements were determined in fish from reservoirs upstream (Abiquiu [AR]) and downstream (Cochiti [CR]) of LANL from 1991 through 1999. In general, all of the (mean) trace elements, including Hg, were either at the limits of detection (LOD) or in low concentrations at all study sites. Of the trace elements (e.g., Ba, Cu, and Hg) that were found to be above the LOD in fish muscle collected from LANL canyons/RG, none were in significantly higher (p < 0.05) concentrations than in muscle of fish collected from background locations. Mercury concentrations (mean of means) in fish from AR (all other trace elements were at LOD) were significantly higher (p < 0.10) than Hg concentrations in fish from CR, and Hg concentrations in fish collected from both reservoirs exhibited significantly (AR = p <0.05 and CR = p < 0.10) decreasing trends over time.

  15. Mercury in Fish Collected Upstream and Downstream of Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico: 1991--2004.

    SciTech Connect

    P.R. Fresquez

    2004-10-15

    Small amounts of mercury (Hg) may exist in some canyon drainage systems within Los Alamos National Laboratory lands as a result of past discharges of untreated effluents. This paper reports on the concentrations of Hg in muscle (fillets) of various types of fish species collected downstream of LANL's influence from 1991 through 2004. The mean Hg concentration in fish from Cochiti reservoir (0.22 {micro}g/g wet weight), which is located downstream of LANL, was similar to fish collected from a reservoir upstream of LANL (Abiquiu) (0.26 {micro}g/g wet weight). Mercury concentrations in fish collected from both reservoirs exhibited significantly (Abiquiu = p < 0.05 and Cochiti = p < 0.10) decreasing trends over time. Predator fish like the northern pike (Esox lucius) contained significantly higher concentrations of Hg (0.39 {micro}g/g wet weight) than bottom-feeding fish like the white sucker (Catostomus commersoni) (0.10 {micro}g/g wet weight).

  16. Preliminary Risk Assessment of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, A.F.; Gonzales, G.J.; Bennett, K.D.; Mullen, M.A.; Foxx, T.S.

    1998-10-01

    The southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) is the fourth threatened or endangered species to undergo a preliminary assessment for estimating potential risk from environmental contaminants at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The assessments are being conducted as part of a three-year project to develop a habitat management plan for threatened and endangered species and species of concern at the Laboratory. For the preliminary assessment, estimated doses were compared against toxicity reference values to generate hazard indices (HIs). This assessment included a measure of cumulative effects from multiple contaminants (radionuclides, metals, and organic chemicals) to 100 simulated nest sites located within flycatcher potential habitat. Sources of contaminant values were 10,000-ft{sup 2} grid cells within an Ecological Exposure Unit (EEU). This EEU was estimated around the potential habitat and was based on the maximum home range for the fly catcher identified in the scientific literature. The tools used included a custom FORTRAN program, ECORSK5, and a geographic information system. Food consumption and soil ingestion contaminant pathways were addressed in the assessment. Using a four-category risk evaluation, HI results indicate no appreciable impact is expected to the southwestern willow flycatcher. Information on risk by specific geographical location was generated, which can be used to manage contaminated areas, flycatcher habitat, facility siting, and/or facility operations in order to maintain low levels of risk from contaminants.

  17. Radionuclide concentrations in game and nongame fish upstream and downstream of Los Alamos National Laboratory: 1981 to 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Fresquez, P.R.; Armstrong, D.R.; Salazar, J.G.

    1994-08-01

    Radionuclide concentrations were determined in game (surface-feeding) and nongame (bottom-feeding) fish collected from reservoirs upstream (Abiquiu, Heron, and El Vado) and downstream (Cochiti) of Los Alamos National Laboratory from 1981 to 1993. The average levels of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, and {sup 239}Pu in game and nongame fish collected from Cochiti reservoir were not significantly different in fish collected from reservoirs upstream of the Laboratory. Total uranium was the only radionuclide that was found to be significantly higher n both game and nongame fish from Cochiti as compared to fish from Abiquiu, Heron, and El Vado. Uranium concentrations in fish collected from Cochiti, however, significantly decreased from 1981 to 1993, and no evidence of depleted uranium was found in fish samples collected from Cochiti in 1993. Based on the average concentration of radionuclides over the year the effective (radiation) dose equivalent from consuming 46 lb of game fish and nongame fish from Cochiti reservoir after natural background has been subtracted was 0.005 and 0.009 mrem/yr, respectively. The highest dose was <0.01% of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) permissible dose limit for protecting members of the public.

  18. Data and Model-Driven Decision Support for Environmental Management of a Chromium Plume at Los Alamos National Laboratory - 13264

    SciTech Connect

    Vesselinov, Velimir V.; Broxton, David; Birdsell, Kay; Reneau, Steven; Harp, Dylan; Mishra, Phoolendra; Katzman, Danny; Goering, Tim; Vaniman, David; Longmire, Pat; Fabryka-Martin, June; Heikoop, Jeff; Ding, Mei; Hickmott, Don; Jacobs, Elaine

    2013-07-01

    A series of site investigations and decision-support analyses have been performed related to a chromium plume in the regional aquifer beneath the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Based on the collected data and site information, alternative conceptual and numerical models representing governing subsurface processes with different complexity and resolution have been developed. The current conceptual model is supported by multiple lines of evidence based on comprehensive analyses of the available data and modeling results. The model is applied for decision-support analyses related to estimation of contaminant- arrival locations and chromium mass flux reaching the regional aquifer, and to optimization of a site monitoring-well network. Plume characterization is a challenging and non-unique problem because multiple models and contamination scenarios are consistent with the site data and conceptual knowledge. To solve this complex problem, an advanced methodology based on model calibration and uncertainty quantification has been developed within the computational framework MADS (http://mads.lanl.gov). This work implements high-performance computing and novel, efficient and robust model analysis techniques for optimization and uncertainty quantification (ABAGUS, Squads, multi-try (multi-start) techniques), which allow for solving problems with large degrees of freedom. (authors)

  19. The Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility upgrades project - A model for waste minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, M.L.; Durrer, R.E.; Kennicott, M.A.

    1996-07-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Facility, constructed in 1952, is currently undergoing a major, multi-year construction project. Many of the operations required under this project (i.e., design, demolition, decontamination, construction, and waste management) mimic the processes required of a large scale decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) job and are identical to the requirements of any of several upgrades projects anticipated for LANL and other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. For these reasons the CMR Upgrades Project is seen as an ideal model facility - to test the application, and measure the success of - waste minimization techniques which could be brought to bear on any of the similar projects. The purpose of this paper will be to discuss the past, present, and anticipated waste minimization applications at the facility and will focus on the development and execution of the project`s {open_quotes}Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention Strategic Plan.{close_quotes}

  20. Stratigraphy and Geologic Structure at the SCC and NISC Building Sites, Technical Area 3, Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Lavine, A.; Krier, D.; Caporuscio, F.; Gardner, J.

    1998-09-01

    Ten closely spaced, shallow (<100 ft) drill cores were obtained from the 1.22-Ma-old Bandelier Tuff at a 4-acre site for proposed construction at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico. The goal of the investigation was to identify faults that may have potential for earthquake-induced surface ruptures at the site. Careful mapping of contact surfaces within the Bandelier Tuff was supplemented with results of geochemical analyses to establish unit boundaries with a high degree of accuracy. Analysis shows that the upper contact surface of Unit 3 of the Bandelier Tuff provides no evidence of faults beneath the building site, and that the subsurface structure is consistent with a shallowly dipping (< 2{degree}), unbroken block. Because no significant or cumulative faulting events have disturbed the site in the last 1.22 million years, it is unlikely that surface rupture will occur at the site in future large earthquakes. Uncertainty analysis suggests that this method would detect faults with {ge}2 ft of cumulative stratigraphic separation.

  1. Inspection of alleged design and construction deficiencies in the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-16

    On June 8, 1994, the Office of Inspections, Office of Inspector General (OIG), Department of Energy (DOE), received a letter dated May 31, 1994, from a complainant concerning the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The complainant alleged that the NMSF, completed in 1987, was so poorly designed and constructed that it was never usable and that DOE proposed to gut the entire facility and sandblast the walls. According to the complainant, ``these errors are so gross as to constitute professional malpractice in a commercial design setting.`` The complainant further stated that ``DOE proposes to renovate this facility to store large amounts of plutonium (as much as 30 metric tons, by some accounts), and it is imperative that the public receive some assurance that this waste will not recur and that the facility will be made safe.`` The purpose of our inspection was to determine if the allegations regarding the design and construction of the NMSF were accurate, and if so, to determine if the Government could recover damages from the Architect/Engineer and/or the construction contractor. We also reviewed the Department`s proposed actions to renovate the NMSF.

  2. Test plan for headspace gas sampling of remote-handled transuranic waste containers at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Field, L.R.; Villarreal, R.

    1998-02-24

    Seventeen remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste canisters currently are stored in vertical, underground shafts at Technical Area (TA)-54, Area G, at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). These 17 RH TRU waste canisters are destined to be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for permanent disposal in the geologic repository. As the RH TRU canister is likely to be the final payload container prior to placement into the 72-B cask and shipment to the WIPP, these waste canisters provide a unique opportunity to ascertain representative flammable gas concentrations in packaged RH-TRU waste. Hydrogen, which is produced by the radiolytic decomposition of hydrogenous constituents in the waste matrix, is the primary flammable gas of concern with RH TRU waste. The primary objectives of the experiment that is described by this test plan are to sample and analyze the waste canister headspace gases to determine the concentration of hydrogen in the headspace gas and to calculate the hydrogen gas generation rate for comparison to the applicable maximum allowable hydrogen generation rate (mole/sec) limits. It is a goal of this experiment to determine the headspace gas concentrations of other gases (e.g., oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with molecular weights less than 60 g/mole) that are produced by radiolysis or present when the waste was packaged. Additionally, the temperature, pressure, and flow rate of the headspace gas will be measured.

  3. Current trends for packaging transuranic waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LA-UR-07-4785)

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Kapil K.; Carson, Peter H.; Enriquez, Alejandro E.

    2007-07-01

    Transuranic (TRU) waste leaving the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is packaged using LANL's waste acceptance criteria for onsite storage. Before shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico, each payload container is subject to rigorous characterization to ensure compliance with WIPP waste acceptance criteria and Department of Transportation regulations. Techniques used for waste characterization include nondestructive examination by WIPP-certified real-time radiography (RTR) and nondestructive assay (NDA) of containers, as well as headspace gas sampling to ensure hydrogen and other flammable gases remain at safe levels during transport. These techniques are performed under a rigorous quality assurance program to confirm that results are accurate and reproducible. If containers are deemed problematic, corrective action is taken before shipment to WIPP. Currently this activity is possible only at the Laboratory's Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility. To minimize additional waste requiring remediation, WIPP waste acceptance criteria must be applied at the point of waste generation. Additional criteria stem from limitations of RTR or NDA instruments or lack of appropriate sampling and analysis. This paper presents the changes that have been implemented at the Plutonium Facility and gives readers a preview of what LANL expects to accomplish to expeditiously certify and dispose of newly generated TRU waste. (authors)

  4. Integration of computational modeling for the Los Alamos National Laboratory low level radioactive waste disposal performance assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Vold, E.L.; Birdsell, K.H.; Springer, E.P.; Hollis, D.K.; Shuman, R.

    1995-12-01

    The preliminary Performance Assessment for the Los Alamos National Laboratory Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility at Area G is drawing to completion. The disposal site is located on the top of a finger mesa in the complex terrain of a semi-arid region which leads to considerable complications in the atmospheric and subsurface transport and in the requisite modeling. Infiltration and run-off are evaluated for the proposed disposal unit closure configuration. A new analytic source release model characterizes the disposal unit performance utilizing detailed source term characterization from the inventory data base. This analysis provides input to the subsurface modeling done by the sophisticated finite element transport code, FEHM, using realistic 2-D cross-sections of the geologic units stratigraphies and the disposal units. Subsurface transport via lateral flow to intermittent alluvial waters in adjacent canyons is evaluated in addition to the usual deep aquifer. Vapor phase flow has been treated separately and calibrated to field data for tritium migration. Atmospheric transport is based on Gaussian dispersion with a correction for complex canyon terrain evaluated from on-going 3-D atmospheric transport studies. Indications to date are that the Performance Assessment objectives are met for all migration pathways.

  5. Evaluation of potential surface rupture and review of current seismic hazards program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-09

    This report summarizes the authors review and evaluation of the existing seismic hazards program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The report recommends that the original program be augmented with a probabilistic analysis of seismic hazards involving assignment of weighted probabilities of occurrence to all potential sources. This approach yields a more realistic evaluation of the likelihood of large earthquake occurrence particularly in regions where seismic sources may have recurrent intervals of several thousand years or more. The report reviews the locations and geomorphic expressions of identified fault lines along with the known displacements of these faults and last know occurrence of seismic activity. Faults are mapped and categorized into by their potential for actual movement. Based on geologic site characterization, recommendations are made for increased seismic monitoring; age-dating studies of faults and geomorphic features; increased use of remote sensing and aerial photography for surface mapping of faults; the development of a landslide susceptibility map; and to develop seismic design standards for all existing and proposed facilities at LANL.

  6. 75 FR 82037 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; President's National Security Telecommunications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... Programs Directorate; President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee AGENCY: National... Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee (NSTAC... telecommunications policy. The new NSTAC Chair, James Crowe, Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Level 3...

  7. Building Science and Technology Solutions for National Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, Alan R.

    2012-06-05

    The nation's investment in Los Alamos has fostered scientific capabilities for national security missions. As the premier national security science laboratory, Los Alamos tackles: (1) Multidisciplinary science, technology, and engineering challenges; (2) Problems demanding unique experimental and computational facilities; and (3) Highly complex national security issues requiring fundamental breakthroughs. Our mission as a DOE national security science laboratory is to develop and apply science, technology, and engineering solutions that: (1) ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the US nuclear deterrent; (2) protect against the nuclear threat; and (3) solve national security challenges.

  8. Structural Geology of the Northwestern Portion of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico: Implications for Seismic Surface Rupture Potential from TA-3 to TA-55

    SciTech Connect

    Jamie N. Gardner: Alexis Lavine; Giday WoldeGabriel; Donathon Krier; David Vaniman; Florie Caporuscio; Claudia Lewis; Peggy Reneau; Emily Kluk; M. J. Snow

    1999-03-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory lies at the western boundary of the Rio Grande rift, a major tectonic feature of the North American Continent. Three major faults locally constitute the modem rift boundary, and each of these is potentially seismogenic. In this study we have gathered structural geologic data for the northwestern portion of Los Alamos National Laboratory through high-precision geologic mapping, conventional geologic mapping, stratigraphic studies, drilling, petrologic studies, and stereographic aerial photograph analyses. Our study area encompasses TA-55 and TA-3, where potential for seismic surface rupture is of interest, and is bounded on the north and south by the townsite of Los Alamos and Twomile Canyon, respectively. The study area includes parts of two of the potentially active rift boundary faults--the Pajarito and Rendija Canyon faults-that form a large graben that we name the Diamond Drive graben. The graben embraces the western part of the townsite of Los Alamos, and its southern end is in the TA-3 area where it is defined by east-southeast-trending cross faults. The cross faults are small, but they accommodate interactions between the two major fault zones and gentle tilting of structural blocks to the north into the graben. North of Los Alamos townsite, the Rendija Canyon fault is a large normal fault with about 120 feet of down-to-the-west displacement over the last 1.22 million years. South from Los Alamos townsite, the Rendija Canyon fault splays to the southwest into a broad zone of deformation. The zone of deformation is about 2,000 feet wide where it crosses Los Alamos Canyon and cuts through the Los Alamos County Landfill. Farther southwest, the fault zone is about 3,000 feet wide at the southeastern corner of TA-3 in upper Mortandad Canyon and about 5,000 feet wide in Twomile Canyon. Net down-to-the-west displacement across the entire fault zone over the last 1.22 million years decreases to the south as the fault zone broadens as

  9. Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Wills, Cathy

    2013-09-11

    This report was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) (formerly designated as the Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO]). The new field office designation occurred in March 2013. Published reports cited in this 2012 report, therefore, may bear the name or authorship of NNSA/NSO. This and previous years’ reports, called Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASERs), Nevada Test Site Environmental Reports (NTSERs), and, beginning in 2010, Nevada National Security Site Environmental Reports (NNSSERs), are posted on the NNSA/NFO website at http://www.nv.energy.gov/library/publications/aser.aspx. This NNSSER was prepared to satisfy DOE Order DOE O 231.1B, “Environment, Safety and Health Reporting.” Its purpose is to (1) report compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, (2) present results of environmental monitoring of radiological and nonradiological effluents, (3) report estimated radiological doses to the public from releases of radioactive material, (4) summarize environmental incidents of noncompliance and actions taken in response to them, (5) describe the NNSA/NFO Environmental Management System and characterize its performance, and (6) highlight significant environmental programs and efforts. This NNSSER summarizes data and compliance status for calendar year 2012 at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (formerly the Nevada Test Site) and its two support facilities, the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF) and the Remote Sensing Laboratory–Nellis (RSL-Nellis). It also addresses environmental restoration (ER) projects conducted at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR). Through a Memorandum of Agreement, NNSA/NFO is

  10. Legacies of the recent past: The built environment at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    McGehee, E.D.

    1997-03-01

    In the early 1940s, a remote area of northern New Mexico was selected to be the site of a secret laboratory, a scientific facility whose only goal was the development of the first atomic bomb. The National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) of 1966 requires that US federal agencies address this area. Properties, both buildings and structures, older than fifty years, or if more recent, of exceptional historical importance, are to be evaluated for eligibility to the National Register of Historic Places. In compliance with this regulation, LANL has begun to identify and inventory historic properties eligible for the register. This paper will provide an overview of LANL`s WWII and postwar history and will describe recently identified LANL property types and significant historic themes associated with the years 1943--1956. Past NHPA ``Section 106`` documentation efforts will also be summarized.

  11. Chemical surety material decontamination and decommissioning of Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemical Surety Material Laboratory area TA-3, building SM-29, room 4009

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, T.E.; Smith, J.M.

    1994-04-01

    From 1982 through 1987, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) performed surety laboratory operations for the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command (MRDC). Room 4009 in building SM-29, TA-3, was used as the laboratory for work with the following chemical surety material (CSM) agents: sarin (GB), soman (GD), lewisite (L), and distilled mustard (HD) radio-labelled with H{sup 3} or C{sup 14}. The work was confined to three CSM-certified fume hoods, located in room 4009 (see diagram in Appendix C). The laboratory ceased all active operations during the late 1986 and early 1987 period. From 1987 until 1993 the laboratory was secured and the ventilation system continued to operate. During late 1992, the decision was made to utilize this laboratory space for other operations, thus a decision was made to dismantle and reconfigure this room. LANL sub-contracted Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI) to draw upon the CSM experience of the technical staff from the Hazardous Materials Research Facility (HMRF) to assist in developing a decontamination and decommissioning plan. BMI was subcontracted to devise a CSM safety training course, and a sampling and air monitoring plan for CSM material to ensure personnel safety during all disassembly operations. LANL subcontracted Johnson Controls personnel to perform all disassembly operations. Beginning in early 1993 BMI personnel from the HMRF visited the laboratory to develop both the safety plan and the sample and air monitoring plan. Execution of that plan began in September 1993 and was completed in January 1994.

  12. Estonian National Security Strategy: Current and Future Challenges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    2013 2 . REPORT TYPE STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT .33 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Estonian National Security Strategy...the existing Estonian Security Strategy and offers recommendations. 2 1. Estonian Security Environment: International Relations...Copenhagen School is understood in wider terms than the political-military and state-centered view of traditional security studies. 2 According to Buzan

  13. Underground Test Area Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Quality Assurance Report Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Krenzien, Susan; Marutzky, Sam

    2014-01-01

    This report is required by the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) and identifies the UGTA quality assurance (QA) activities for fiscal year (FY) 2013. All UGTA organizations—U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO); Desert Research Institute (DRI); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I); National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec); and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)—conducted QA activities in FY 2013. The activities included conducting assessments, identifying findings and completing corrective actions, evaluating laboratory performance, and publishing documents. In addition, integrated UGTA required reading and corrective action tracking was instituted.

  14. Underground Test Area Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Quality Assurance Report Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Farnham, Irene; Marutzky, Sam

    2013-01-01

    This report is mandated by the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) and identifies the UGTA quality assurance (QA) activities for fiscal year (FY) 2012. All UGTA organizations—U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO); Desert Research Institute (DRI); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I); National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec); and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)—conducted QA activities in FY 2012. The activities included conducting assessments, identifying findings and completing corrective actions, evaluating laboratory performance, revising the QAPP, and publishing documents. In addition, processes and procedures were developed to address deficiencies identified in the FY 2011 QAPP gap analysis.

  15. Security Economics and Critical National Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Ross; Fuloria, Shailendra

    There has been considerable effort and expenditure since 9/11 on the protection of ‘Critical National Infrastructure' against online attack. This is commonly interpreted to mean preventing online sabotage against utilities such as electricity,oil and gas, water, and sewage - including pipelines, refineries, generators, storage depots and transport facilities such as tankers and terminals. A consensus is emerging that the protection of such assets is more a matter of business models and regulation - in short, of security economics - than of technology. We describe the problems, and the state of play, in this paper. Industrial control systems operate in a different world from systems previously studied by security economists; we find the same issues (lock-in, externalities, asymmetric information and so on) but in different forms. Lock-in is physical, rather than based on network effects, while the most serious externalities result from correlated failure, whether from cascade failures, common-mode failures or simultaneous attacks. There is also an interesting natural experiment happening, in that the USA is regulating cyber security in the electric power industry, but not in oil and gas, while the UK is not regulating at all but rather encouraging industry's own efforts. Some European governments are intervening, while others are leaving cybersecurity entirely to plant owners to worry about. We already note some perverse effects of the U.S. regulation regime as companies game the system, to the detriment of overall dependability.

  16. 78 FR 19277 - National Maritime Security Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard National Maritime Security Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: United States Coast... published a notice of meeting for the National Maritime Security Advisory Committee (NMSAC) in the Federal... reported. NMSAC will now meet on April 2, 2013 via web and teleconference to discuss various...

  17. Overview of Scientific Freedom and National Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerch, Irving

    2000-04-01

    The subject of our scrutiny is very much in the news, punctuated with nouns and modifiers both inflammatory and mundane such as espionage, justice, scientific accountability and scientific freedom. And while our discussion will focus on these issues, I want to raise some of the pragmatic questions that bear on the foundation of our support for international science. Beneath questions of guilt and the loss of secrets in the Wen Ho Lee case lay the inherent tension between the tradition of open exchange in the scientific enterprise and the need to protect the nation's security. How this balance is to be achieved in a democratic society has bedeviled us ever since the Manhattan project heralded the emergence of science and technology as instruments of great national power. If we do not find this balance, we run the risk of damaging some of the most important intellectual treasures that the US has produced the Department of Energy's national laboratories and the entire system that we call the international scientific enterprise. For while the superheated charges of lax security and criminal negligence have led some to call for ``firewalls" to isolate and protect the secrets in our weapons labs, such measures may have severe consequences for weapons and non-weapons labs alike and their many associated universities. It's estimated that from 70% to as much as 80% in the expansion of our economy is technology-driven, derived from the most productive system of scientific innovation in the world. This is also true of our national security. Science is indispensable to the development and maintenance of the nation's arsenals. The Department of Energy's Nuclear Stockpile Stewardship Program is central to the safety and reliability of American nuclear weapons and to our hope for a worldwide ban on nuclear tests. But this program will fail without a continuing intense development effort based on cutting-edge science. And a great deal of the science needed is being pursued in

  18. Y-12 National Security Complex Water Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Elam, Shana E.; Bassett, P.; McMordie Stoughton, Kate

    2010-11-01

    The Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) sponsored a water assessment at the Y 12 National Security Complex (Y 12) located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Driven by mandated water reduction goals of Executive Orders 13423 and 13514, the objective of the water assessment is to develop a comprehensive understanding of the current water-consuming applications and equipment at Y 12 and to identify key areas for water efficiency improvements that could be applied not only at Y-12 but at other Federal facilities as well. FEMP selected Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to coordinate and manage the water assessment. PNNL contracted Water Savers, LLC to lead the technical aspects of the water assessment. Water Savers provided key technical expertise in water auditing, metering, and cooling systems. This is the report of that effort, which concluded that the Y-12 facility could realize considerable water savings by implementing the recommended water efficiency opportunities.

  19. Developing and Implementing an Effective National Security Strategy for Croatia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    documents. The final analysis identifies problems in the insufficient national security system and the lack of political want to efficiently deal with...national security system and the lack of political want to efficiently deal with national security issues. The essay ends with several...Croatia and abroad, and all the political parties used every available means including their lives to achieve all national goals which is obvious from

  20. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    SciTech Connect

    Kippen, Karen Elizabeth

    2016-11-08

    For more than 30 years the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has provided the scientific underpinnings in nuclear physics and material science needed to ensure the safety and surety of the nuclear stockpile into the future. In addition to national security research, the LANSCE User Facility has a vibrant research program in fundamental science, providing the scientific community with intense sources of neutrons and protons to perform experiments supporting civilian research and the production of medical and research isotopes. Five major experimental facilities operate simultaneously. These facilities contribute to the stockpile stewardship program, produce radionuclides for medical testing, and provide a venue for industrial users to irradiate and test electronics. In addition, they perform fundamental research in nuclear physics, nuclear astrophysics, materials science, and many other areas. The LANSCE User Program plays a key role in training the next generation of top scientists and in attracting the best graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, and early-career scientists. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) —the principal sponsor of LANSCE—works with the Office of Science and the Office of Nuclear Energy, which have synergistic long-term needs for the linear accelerator and the neutron science that is the heart of LANSCE.