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Sample records for alamos radiation transport

  1. Los Alamos radiation transport code system on desktop computing platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Briesmeister, J.F.; Brinkley, F.W.; Clark, B.A.; West, J.T. )

    1990-01-01

    The Los Alamos Radiation Transport Code System (LARTCS) consists of state-of-the-art Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates transport codes and data libraries. These codes were originally developed many years ago and have undergone continual improvement. With a large initial effort and continued vigilance, the codes are easily portable from one type of hardware to another. The performance of scientific work-stations (SWS) has evolved to the point that such platforms can be used routinely to perform sophisticated radiation transport calculations. As the personal computer (PC) performance approaches that of the SWS, the hardware options for desk-top radiation transport calculations expands considerably. The current status of the radiation transport codes within the LARTCS is described: MCNP, SABRINA, LAHET, ONEDANT, TWODANT, TWOHEX, and ONELD. Specifically, the authors discuss hardware systems on which the codes run and present code performance comparisons for various machines.

  2. Recent developments in the Los Alamos radiation transport code system

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, R.A.; Parsons, K.

    1997-06-01

    A brief progress report on updates to the Los Alamos Radiation Transport Code System (LARTCS) for solving criticality and fixed-source problems is provided. LARTCS integrates the Diffusion Accelerated Neutral Transport (DANT) discrete ordinates codes with the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code. The LARCTS code is being developed with a graphical user interface for problem setup and analysis. Progress in the DANT system for criticality applications include a two-dimensional module which can be linked to a mesh-generation code and a faster iteration scheme. Updates to MCNP Version 4A allow statistical checks of calculated Monte Carlo results.

  3. Radiation Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Urbatsch, Todd James

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  4. DETERMINISTIC TRANSPORT METHODS AND CODES AT LOS ALAMOS

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. MOREL

    1999-06-01

    The purposes of this paper are to: Present a brief history of deterministic transport methods development at Los Alamos National Laboratory from the 1950's to the present; Discuss the current status and capabilities of deterministic transport codes at Los Alamos; and Discuss future transport needs and possible future research directions. Our discussion of methods research necessarily includes only a small fraction of the total research actually done. The works that have been included represent a very subjective choice on the part of the author that was strongly influenced by his personal knowledge and experience. The remainder of this paper is organized in four sections: the first relates to deterministic methods research performed at Los Alamos, the second relates to production codes developed at Los Alamos, the third relates to the current status of transport codes at Los Alamos, and the fourth relates to future research directions at Los Alamos.

  5. Radiation transport. Progress report, October 1, 1982-March 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    O'Dell, R.D.

    1984-05-01

    Research and development progress in radiation transport by the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Group X-6 for the first half of FY 83 is reported. Included are tasks in the areas of Fission Reactor Neutronics, Deterministic Transport Methods, and Monte Carlo Radiation Transport.

  6. Radiation transport. Progress report, April 1-December 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    O'Dell, R.D.

    1984-10-01

    Research and development progress in radiation transport by the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Group X-6 for the last nine months of CY 83 is reported. Included are unclassified tasks in the areas of Fission Reactor Neutronics, Deterministic Transport Methods, Monte Carlo Radiation Transport, and Cross Sections and Physics.

  7. Inner Radiation Belt Representation of the Energetic Electron Environment: Model and Data Synthesis Using the Salammbo Radiation Belt Transport Code and Los Alamos Geosynchronous and GPS Energetic Particle Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedel, R. H. W.; Bourdarie, S.; Fennell, J.; Kanekal, S.; Cayton, T. E.

    2004-01-01

    The highly energetic electron environment in the inner magnetosphere (GEO inward) has received a lot of research attention in resent years, as the dynamics of relativistic electron acceleration and transport are not yet fully understood. These electrons can cause deep dielectric charging in any space hardware in the MEO to GEO region. We use a new and novel approach to obtain a global representation of the inner magnetospheric energetic electron environment, which can reproduce the absolute environment (flux) for any spacecraft orbit in that region to within a factor of 2 for the energy range of 100 KeV to 5 MeV electrons, for any levels of magnetospheric activity. We combine the extensive set of inner magnetospheric energetic electron observations available at Los Alamos with the physics based Salammbo transport code, using the data assimilation technique of "nudging". This in effect input in-situ data into the code and allows the diffusion mechanisms in the code to interpolate the data into regions and times of no data availability. We present here details of the methods used, both in the data assimilation process and in the necessary inter-calibration of the input data used. We will present sample runs of the model/data code and compare the results to test spacecraft data not used in the data assimilation process.

  8. Introduction to radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, G.L.

    1998-12-31

    This lecture will present time-dependent radiation transport where the radiation is coupled to a static medium, i.e., the material is not in motion. In reality, radiation exerts a pressure on the materials it propagates through and will accelerate the material in the direction of the radiation flow. This fully coupled problem with radiation transport and materials in motion is referred to as radiation-hydrodynamics (or in a shorthand notation: rad-hydro) and is beyond the scope of this lecture.

  9. Transportation of pyrochemical salts from Rocky Flats to Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, S.B.

    1997-02-01

    Radioactive legacy wastes or residues are currently being stored on numerous Sites around the former Department of Energy`s (DOE) Nuclear Weapons Complex. Since most of the operating facilities were shut down and have not operated since before the declared end to the Cold War in 1993, the historical method for treating these residues no longer exists. The risk associated with continued storage of these residues will dramatically increase with time. Thus, the DOE was directed by the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board in its Recommendation 94-1 to address and stabilize these residues and established an eight year time frame for doing so. There are only two options available to respond to this requirement: (1) restart existing facilities to treat and package the residues for disposal or (2) transport the residues to another operating facility within the Complex where they can be treated and packaged for disposal. This paper focuses on one such residue type, pyrochemical salts, produced at one Complex site, the Rocky Flats Plant located northwest of Denver, Colorado. One option for treating the salts is their shipment to Los Alamos, New Mexico, for handling at the Plutonium Facility. The safe transportation of these salts can be accomplished at present with several shipping containers including a DOT 6M, a DOE 9968, Type A or Type B quantity 55-gallon drum overpacks, or even the TRUPACT II. The tradeoffs between each container is examined with the conclusion that none of the available shipping containers is fully satisfactory. Thus, the advantageous aspects of each container must be utilized in an integrated and efficient way to effectively manage the risk involved. 1 fig.

  10. Penetrating radiation: applications at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Scott; Hunter, James; Morris, Christopher

    2013-09-01

    Los Alamos has used penetrating radiography extensively throughout its history dating back to the Manhattan Project where imaging dense, imploding objects was the subject of intense interest. This interest continues today as major facilities like DARHT1 have become the mainstay of the US Stockpile Stewardship Program2 and the cornerstone of nuclear weapons certification. Meanwhile, emerging threats to national security from cargo containers and improvised explosive devices (IEDs) have invigorated inspection efforts using muon tomography, and compact x-ray radiography. Additionally, unusual environmental threats, like those from underwater oil spills and nuclear power plant accidents, have caused renewed interest in fielding radiography in severe operating conditions. We review the history of penetrating radiography at Los Alamos and survey technologies as presently applied to these important problems.

  11. Radiation transport in inhomogeneous media

    SciTech Connect

    Keiter, Paul; Gunderson, Mark; Foster, John; Rosen, Paula; Comley, Andrew; Taylor, Mark; Perry, Ted

    2008-05-15

    Calculations of radiation transport in heated materials are greatly complicated by the presence of regions in which two or more materials are inhomogeneously mixed. This phenomenon is important in many systems, such as astrophysical systems where density clumps can be found in star-forming regions and molecular clouds. Laboratory experiments have been designed to test the modeling of radiation transport through inhomogeneous plasmas. A laser-heated hohlraum is used as a thermal source to drive radiation through polymer foam containing randomly distributed gold particles. Experimental measurements of radiation transport in foams with gold particle sizes ranging from 5-9 {mu}m to submicrometer diameters as well as the homogeneous foam case are presented. The simulation results of the radiation transport are compared to the experiment and show that an inhomogeneous transport model must be applied to explain radiation transport in foams loaded with 5 {mu}m diameter gold particles.

  12. THE LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT AND DIFFUSION MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    M. WILLIAMS

    1999-08-01

    The LANL atmospheric transport and diffusion models are composed of two state-of-the-art computer codes. The first is an atmospheric wind model called HOThlAC, Higher Order Turbulence Model for Atmospheric circulations. HOTMAC generates wind and turbulence fields by solving a set of atmospheric dynamic equations. The second is an atmospheric diffusion model called RAPTAD, Random Particle Transport And Diffusion. RAPTAD uses the wind and turbulence output from HOTMAC to compute particle trajectories and concentration at any location downwind from a source. Both of these models, originally developed as research codes on supercomputers, have been modified to run on microcomputers. Because the capability of microcomputers is advancing so rapidly, the expectation is that they will eventually become as good as today's supercomputers. Now both models are run on desktop or deskside computers, such as an IBM PC/AT with an Opus Pm 350-32 bit coprocessor board and a SUN workstation. Codes have also been modified so that high level graphics, NCAR Graphics, of the output from both models are displayed on the desktop computer monitors and plotted on a laser printer. Two programs, HOTPLT and RAPLOT, produce wind vector plots of the output from HOTMAC and particle trajectory plots of the output from RAPTAD, respectively. A third CONPLT provides concentration contour plots. Section II describes step-by-step operational procedures, specifically for a SUN-4 desk side computer, on how to run main programs HOTMAC and RAPTAD, and graphics programs to display the results. Governing equations, boundary conditions and initial values of HOTMAC and RAPTAD are discussed in Section III. Finite-difference representations of the governing equations, numerical solution procedures, and a grid system are given in Section IV.

  13. Automatic beam position control at Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF)

    SciTech Connect

    Oothoudt, M.; Pillai, C.; Zumbro, M.

    1997-08-01

    Historically the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) has used manual methods to control the position of the 800 kW, 800 MeV proton beam on targets. New experiments, however, require more stringent position control more frequently than can be done manually for long periods of time. Data from an existing harp is used to automatically adjust steering magnets to maintain beam position to required tolerances.

  14. Preliminary results from the Los Alamos TA54 complex terrain Atmospheric Transport Study (ATS)

    SciTech Connect

    Vold, E.; Chan, M.; Sanders, L.

    1995-09-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) disposal site at TA54, Area G la located on a mesa top amidst a complex terrain of finger like mesas typically 30 motors or more In height above canyons of widths varying from 100 to 300 motors. Atmospheric dispersion from this site is of concern for routine operations and for potential Incidents during waste retrieval operations. Indian lands are located In the dominant downwind direction within 500 m from the site and provide further incentive to understand the potential and actual impacts of waste disposal operations. The permanent network of meteorological towers at LANL have been located primarily at mesa-top locations to coincide with most laboratory facilities and as such do not resolve the effects of channeling in the canyons and the influence this has on potential surface releases. An Atmospheric Transport Study (ATS) was initiated to better understand the wind flow fields and dispersion from the LANL Waste Storage and Disposal facilities at TA-54, Area G. As part of this effort, a series of six portable meteorological towers were sited in the vicinity of Area G, two at mesa top locations, one just east of the site where the mesas have dissipated to mild ridges, and three in the canyons adjacent to the disposal site mesa as indicated on the topographic representation of the local terrain. Since 1994, the towers have collected horizontal wind velocities, pressure, temperature, relative humidity and a radiation gamma reading every fifteen minutes. The data bass is being analyzed for trends and to provide a basis for comparison to computational modeling efforts to predict the flow fields.

  15. Deterministic methods in radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, A.F.; Roussin, R.W.

    1992-06-01

    The Seminar on Deterministic Methods in Radiation Transport was held February 4--5, 1992, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Eleven presentations were made and the full papers are published in this report, along with three that were submitted but not given orally. These papers represent a good overview of the state of the art in the deterministic solution of radiation transport problems for a variety of applications of current interest to the Radiation Shielding Information Center user community.

  16. Radiation transport calculations for cosmic radiation.

    PubMed

    Endo, A; Sato, T

    2012-01-01

    The radiation environment inside and near spacecraft consists of various components of primary radiation in space and secondary radiation produced by the interaction of the primary radiation with the walls and equipment of the spacecraft. Radiation fields inside astronauts are different from those outside them, because of the body's self-shielding as well as the nuclear fragmentation reactions occurring in the human body. Several computer codes have been developed to simulate the physical processes of the coupled transport of protons, high-charge and high-energy nuclei, and the secondary radiation produced in atomic and nuclear collision processes in matter. These computer codes have been used in various space radiation protection applications: shielding design for spacecraft and planetary habitats, simulation of instrument and detector responses, analysis of absorbed doses and quality factors in organs and tissues, and study of biological effects. This paper focuses on the methods and computer codes used for radiation transport calculations on cosmic radiation, and their application to the analysis of radiation fields inside spacecraft, evaluation of organ doses in the human body, and calculation of dose conversion coefficients using the reference phantoms defined in ICRP Publication 110. PMID:23089013

  17. Applying GIS characterizing and modeling contaminant transport in surface water at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, N.M.; Van Eeckhout, E.; David, N.A.; Irvine, J.M.

    1995-10-01

    During World War II, Los Alamos, New Mexico was chosen as the site for the secret development of the first atomic bomb. The remote location in the southwestern United States was ideal for such a project. After the war, research activities continued at the Los Alamos installation, focusing on new nuclear weapons models as well as greater effectiveness and reliability of existing weapons. Due to the emphasis on nuclear and non-nuclear weapons development as well as associated nuclear research, a large inventory of radionuclides and heavy metals have been tested, expended, and disposed of in the local environment, a high plateau of tuffaceous volcanic rocks incised by deep canyons in a semi-arid climate. In recent years an intensive evaluation of the environmental, impact of weapons testing at Los Alamos and elsewhere has been undertaken. GIS system utilization and image processing of past and current data has been an important part of this evaluation. Important problems can be more easily displayed and understood using this methodology. The main objective in this paper is to illustrate how transport of depleted uranium and associated heavy metals (copper in this case) used in dynamic testing of weapons components at open air firing sites can be evaluated and visualized. In our studies, surface water has been found to be the predominant transport mechanism. We have sampled soils, sediments, fallout, runoff water and snowmelt over a number of years in order to understand contaminant transport on- and offsite. Statistical analyses of these data have assisted in our characterization of issues such as contaminant variability, spatially and temporally, as well as in development of transport rates.

  18. Geochemical Processes Controlling Chromium Transport in the Vadose Zone and Regional Aquifer, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longmire, P.; Ding, M.; Rearick, M.; Vaniman, D.; Katzman, D.

    2008-12-01

    The environmental aqueous geochemistry of Cr is of considerable interest to physical scientists and toxicologists in quantifying the fate and transport of this metal in surface and subsurface environments. Chromium(VI) solutions were released from cooling towers to a stream channel within Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM from 1956 to 1971. These solutions have migrated 293 m depth through the vadose zone, containing several saturated zones, to the regional water table. Concentrations of total dissolved Cr, mainly as Cr(VI), in the regional aquifer range between 0.17 to 8.46 mM. The regional aquifer is characterized by calcium-sodium-bicarbonate solution, contains dissolved oxygen (0.09 to 0.22 mM), and has a circumneutral pH (6.8 to 8.3). Geochemical processes controlling the fate and transport of Cr in groundwater at Los Alamos include a combination of adsorption and precipitation reactions within aquifer systems. Vadose zone material containing hydrous ferric oxide, smectite, silica glass, and calcite widely range in their ability to adsorb Cr(VI) under basic pH conditions. Overall, the vadose zone at Los Alamos is relatively oxidizing, however, basalt flows are locally reducing with respect to Fe. Ferrous iron concentrated within the Cerros del Rio basalt has been shown through batch experiments to reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) resulting in precipitation of chromium(III) hydroxide. Regional aquifer material, consisting of silicates, oxides, and calcite, vary in the amount of Fe(II) available in reactive minerals to effectively reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The results of our studies (1) directly assess the relationship between mineralogical characterization and transport behavior of Cr using site-specific hydrogeologic material and (2) provide site-specific adsorption and precipitation parameters obtained through the experiments to refine the fate and transport modeling of Cr within the vadose zone and regional aquifer. Natural attenuation of Cr at Los

  19. Radiation transport in numerical astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, C.M.

    1983-02-01

    In this article, we discuss some of the numerical techniques developed by Jim Wilson and co-workers for the calculation of time-dependent radiation flow. Difference equations for multifrequency transport are given for both a discrete-angle representation of radiation transport and a Fick's law-like representation. These methods have the important property that they correctly describe both the streaming and diffusion limits of transport theory in problems where the mean free path divided by characteristic distances varies from much less than one to much greater than one. They are also stable for timesteps comparable to the changes in physical variables, rather than being limited by stability requirements.

  20. Transport and deposition of plutonium-contaminated sediments by fluvial processes, Los Alamos Canyon, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, W.L.

    1996-10-01

    Between 1945 and 1952 the development of nuclear weapons at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, resulted in the disposal of plutonium into the alluvium of nearby Acid and (to a lesser degree) DP Canyons. The purpose of this paper is to explore the connection between the disposal sites and the main river, a 20 km link formed by the fluvial system of Acid, Pueblo, DP, and Los Alamos Canyons. Empirical data from 15 yr of annual sediment sampling throughout the canyon system has produced 458 observations of plutonium concentration in fluvial sediments. These data show that, overall, mean plutonium concentrations in fluvial sediment decline from 10,000 fCi/g near the disposal area to 100 fCi/g at the confluence of the canyon system and the Rio Grande. Simulations using a computer model for water, sediment, and plutonium routing in the canyon system show that discharges as large as the 25 yr event would fail to develop enough transport capacity to completely remove the contaminated sediments from Pueblo Canyon. Lesser flows would move some materials to the Rio Grande by remobilization of stored sediments. The simulations also show that the deposits and their contaminants have a predictable geography because they occur where stream power is low, hydraulic resistance is high, and the geologic and/or geomorphic conditions provide enough space for storage. 38 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  1. The Los Alamos dynamic radiation environment assimilation model (DREAM) for space weather specification and forecasting

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, Geoffrey D; Friedel, Reiner H W; Chen, Yue; Koller, Josef; Henderson, Michael G

    2008-01-01

    The Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to assess, quantify, and predict the hazards from the natural space environment and the anthropogenic environment produced by high altitude nuclear explosions (HANE). DREAM was initially developed as a basic research activity to understand and predict the dynamics of the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts. It uses Kalman filter techniques to assimilate data from space environment instruments with a physics-based model of the radiation belts. DREAM can assimilate data from a variety of types of instruments and data with various levels of resolution and fidelity by assigning appropriate uncertainties to the observations. Data from any spacecraft orbit can be assimilated but DREAM was designed to function with as few as two spacecraft inputs: one from geosynchronous orbit and one from GPS orbit. With those inputs, DREAM can be used to predict the environment at any satellite in any orbit whether space environment data are available in those orbits or not. Even with very limited data input and relatively simple physics models, DREAM specifies the space environment in the radiation belts to a high level of accuracy. DREAM has been extensively tested and evaluated as we transition from research to operations. We report here on one set of test results in which we predict the environment in a highly-elliptical polar orbit. We also discuss long-duration reanalysis for spacecraft design, using DREAM for real-time operations, and prospects for 1-week forecasts of the radiation belt environment.

  2. FY2008 Report on GADRAS Radiation Transport Methods.

    SciTech Connect

    Mattingly, John K.; Mitchell, Dean James; Harding, Lee; Varley, Eric S.; Hilton, Nathan R.

    2008-10-01

    The primary function of the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) is the solution of inverse radiation transport problems, by which the con-figuration of an unknown radiation source is inferred from one or more measured radia-tion signatures. GADRAS was originally developed for the analysis of gamma spec-trometry measurements. During fiscal years 2007 and 2008, GADRAS was augmented to implement the simultaneous analysis of neutron multiplicity measurements. This report describes the radiation transport methods developed to implement this new capability. This work was performed at the direction of the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Nonproliferation Research and Development. It was executed as an element of the Proliferation Detection Program's Simulation, Algorithm, and Modeling element. Acronyms BNL Brookhaven National Laboratory CSD Continuous Slowing-Down DU depleted uranium ENSDF Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data Files GADRAS Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software HEU highly enriched uranium LANL Los Alamos National Laboratory LLNL Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory NA-22 Office of Nonproliferation Research and Development NNDC National Nuclear Data Center NNSA National Nuclear Security Administration ODE ordinary differential equation ONEDANT One-dimensional diffusion accelerated neutral particle transport ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory PARTISN Parallel time-dependent SN PDP Proliferation Detection Program RADSAT Radiation Scenario Analysis Toolkit RSICC Radiation Safety Information Computational Center SAM Simulation, Algorithms, and Modeling SNL Sandia National Laboratories SNM special nuclear material ToRI Table of Radioactive Isotopes URI uniform resource identifier XML Extensible Markup Language

  3. Biomedical program leading to therapeutic trials on pion radiation at Los Alamos.

    PubMed

    Kligerman, M M; Knapp, E A; Petersen, D F

    1975-11-01

    Hypoxia and variations in cell cycle phase protect tumor cells being treated with x rays or gamma rays (cobalt). Heavy particles can overcome these protective effects, because of the dense ionization they deposit in tissues. Pions (negative pi mesons) can be directed to and stopped in a specific area, where they are captured by the nuclei of atoms, rendering the nuclei unstable. The nuclei disintegrate, releasing densely ionizing radiation. By confining the dense ionization to the tumor-bearing volume, pions have the potential of increasing the tolerance of the area under treatment to radiation, thus increasing the probability of destroying the tumor. A special channel at the proton factory at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is producing pions for biomedical research. Considerable physical dosimetry has been completed. Cellular studies are underway to provide depth-dose-biological-effect curves. Animal studies will provide information on acute and late effects, which will permit the safe application of pions to a series of anatomical sites established by protocols for radiotherapy clinical trials. PMID:1192358

  4. Hydrologic transport of depleted uranium associated with open air dynamic range testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, and Eglin Air Force Base, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, N.M.; Vanta, E.B.

    1995-05-01

    Hydrologic investigations on depleted uranium fate and transport associated with dynamic testing activities were instituted in the 1980`s at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Eglin Air Force Base. At Los Alamos, extensive field watershed investigations of soil, sediment, and especially runoff water were conducted. Eglin conducted field investigations and runoff studies similar to those at Los Alamos at former and active test ranges. Laboratory experiments complemented the field investigations at both installations. Mass balance calculations were performed to quantify the mass of expended uranium which had transported away from firing sites. At Los Alamos, it is estimated that more than 90 percent of the uranium still remains in close proximity to firing sites, which has been corroborated by independent calculations. At Eglin, we estimate that 90 to 95 percent of the uranium remains at test ranges. These data demonstrate that uranium moves slowly via surface water, in both semi-arid (Los Alamos) and humid (Eglin) environments.

  5. Los Alamos Science: Number 23, 1995. Radiation protection and the human radiation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, N.G.

    1995-12-31

    There are a variety of myths and misconceptions about the ionizing radiation that surrounds and penetrates us all. Dispel a few of these by taking a leisurely tour of radiation and its properties, of the natural and man-made sources of ionizing radiation, and of the way doses are calculated. By damaging DNA and inducing genetic mutations, ionizing radiation can potentially initiate a cell on the road to cancer. The authors review what is currently known about regulation of cellular reproduction, DNA damage and repair, cellular defense mechanisms, and the specific cancer-causing genes that are susceptible to ionizing radiation. A rapid survey of the data on radiation effects in humans shows that high radiation doses increase the risk of cancer, whereas the effects of low doses are very difficult to detect. The hypothetical risks at low doses, which are estimated from the atomic-bomb survivors, are compared to the low-dose data so that the reader can assess the present level of uncertainty. As part of the openness initiative, ten individuals who have worked with plutonium during various periods in the Laboratory`s history were asked to share their experiences including their accidental intakes. The history and prognosis of people who have had plutonium exposures is discussed by the Laboratory`s leading epidemiologist.

  6. Transportation of a 451 ton generator stator and a 234 ton generator rotor from Hartsville, TN, to Los Alamos, NM

    SciTech Connect

    Boenig, H.J.; Rogers, J.D.; McLelland, G.R.; Pelts, C.T.; McLelland Engineering, Dallas, TX; Reliance Crane and Rigging, Inc., Phoenix, AZ )

    1989-01-01

    A 1430 MVA steam turbine generator was acquired from a cancelled nuclear power plant in Tennessee to be used as the pulsed power and energy storage unit for the Confinement Physics Research Facility being built at Los Alamos, NM. The transportation from Hartsville, near Nashville, TN, to Los Alamos, NM, of the two largest single pieces of the generator, a 451 t stator and a 234 t rotor presented a special challenge. Details of the move, by barge from Hartsville to Catoosa, near Tulsa, OK, by rail from Catoosa to Lamy, near Santa Fe, NM, and by road from Lamy to Los Alamos are described. The greatest difficulty of the successful move was the crossing of the Rio Grande river on an existing reinforced concrete bridge. The two-lane wide road transporters for the stator and rotor were fitted with outriggers to provide a four-lane wide vehicle, thus spreading the load over the entire bridge width and meeting acceptable load distribution and bridge safety factors. 2 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Space Radiation Transport Methods Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J.; Tripathi, R.; Qualls, G.; Cucinotta, F.; Prael, R.; Norbury, J.

    Early space radiation shield code development relied on Monte Carlo methods for proton, neutron and pion transport and made important contributions to the space program. More recently Monte Carlo code LAHET has been upgraded to include high-energy multiple-charged light ions for GCR simulations and continues to be expanded in capability. To compensate for low computational efficiency, Monte Carlo methods have resorted to restricted one-dimensional problems leading to imperfect representations of appropriate boundary conditions. Even so, intensive computational requirements resulted and shield evaluation was made near the end of the design process and resolving shielding issues usually had a negative impact on the design. We evaluate the implications of these common one-dimensional assumptions on the evaluation of the Shuttle internal radiation field. Improved spacecraft shield design requires early entry of radiation constraints into the design process to maximize performance and minimize costs. As a result, we have been investigating high-speed computational procedures to allow shield analysis from the preliminary design concepts to the final design. In particular, we will discuss the progress towards a full three-dimensional and computationally efficient deterministic code for which the current HZETRN evaluates the lowest order asymptotic term. HZETRN is the first deterministic solution to the Boltzmann equation allowing field mapping within the International Space Station (ISS) in tens of minutes using standard Finite Element Method (FEM) geometry common to engineering design practice enabling development of integrated multidisciplinary design optimization methods. A single ray trace in ISS FEM geometry requires 14 milliseconds and severely limits application of Monte Carlo methods to such engineering models. A potential means of improving the Monte Carlo efficiency in coupling to spacecraft geometry is given in terms of reconfigurable computing and could be

  8. The Radiation Transport Conundrum in Radiation Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Castor, J I

    2005-03-18

    The summary of this paper is: (1) The conundrum in the title is whether to treat radiation in the lab frame or the comoving frame in a radiation-hydrodynamic problem; (2) Several of the difficulties are associated with combining a somewhat relativistic treatment of radiation with a non-relativistic treatment of hydrodynamics; (3) The principal problem is a tradeoff between easily obtaining the correct diffusion limit and describing free-streaming radiation with the correct wave speed; (4) The computational problems of the comoving-frame formulation in more than one dimension, and the difficulty of obtaining both exact conservation and full u/c accuracy argue against this method; (5) As the interest in multi-D increases, as well as the power of computers, the lab-frame method is becoming more attractive; and (6) The Monte Carlo method combines the advantages of both lab-frame and comoving-frame approaches, its only disadvantage being cost.

  9. Coupled electron-photon radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Lorence, L.; Kensek, R.P.; Valdez, G.D.; Drumm, C.R.; Fan, W.C.; Powell, J.L.

    2000-01-17

    Massively-parallel computers allow detailed 3D radiation transport simulations to be performed to analyze the response of complex systems to radiation. This has been recently been demonstrated with the coupled electron-photon Monte Carlo code, ITS. To enable such calculations, the combinatorial geometry capability of ITS was improved. For greater geometrical flexibility, a version of ITS is under development that can track particles in CAD geometries. Deterministic radiation transport codes that utilize an unstructured spatial mesh are also being devised. For electron transport, the authors are investigating second-order forms of the transport equations which, when discretized, yield symmetric positive definite matrices. A novel parallelization strategy, simultaneously solving for spatial and angular unknowns, has been applied to the even- and odd-parity forms of the transport equation on a 2D unstructured spatial mesh. Another second-order form, the self-adjoint angular flux transport equation, also shows promise for electron transport.

  10. Status of Monte Carlo at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, W.L.; Cashwell, E.D.

    1980-01-01

    At Los Alamos the early work of Fermi, von Neumann, and Ulam has been developed and supplemented by many followers, notably Cashwell and Everett, and the main product today is the continuous-energy, general-purpose, generalized-geometry, time-dependent, coupled neutron-photon transport code called MCNP. The Los Alamos Monte Carlo research and development effort is concentrated in Group X-6. MCNP treats an arbitrary three-dimensional configuration of arbitrary materials in geometric cells bounded by first- and second-degree surfaces and some fourth-degree surfaces (elliptical tori). Monte Carlo has evolved into perhaps the main method for radiation transport calculations at Los Alamos. MCNP is used in every technical division at the Laboratory by over 130 users about 600 times a month accounting for nearly 200 hours of CDC-7600 time.

  11. Comparison of beam transport simulations to measurements at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, C.; Neri, F.; Fitzgerald, D.H.; Blind, B.; Macek, R.; Plum, M.; Sander, O.; Thiessen, H.A.

    1997-10-01

    The ability to model and simulate beam behavior in the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is an important diagnostic and predictive tool. This paper gives the results of an effort to model the ring apertures and lattice and use beam simulation programs to track the beam. The results are then compared to measured activation levels from beam loss in the ring. The success of the method determines its usefulness in evaluating the effects of planned upgrades to the Proton Storage Ring.

  12. Radiation transport in dust in disk geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, Ming Leung

    1986-01-01

    The main objective of the research program is twofold: (1) to develop a computer code to solve the problem of scattering, absorption and emission of photons by dust grains in a dusty medium with 2 dimensional disk geometry, and (2) to study the various physical and geometrical effects of 2 dimensional radiation transport on the thermal structure and radiation field. These tasks were accomplished and are briefly summarized. The method for solving the radiation transport problem in disk geometry is a generalization of the quasi-diffusion method (QDM) previously developed by the author.

  13. Radiation Transport Calculations and Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Fasso, Alberto; Ferrari, A.; /CERN

    2011-06-30

    This article is an introduction to the Monte Carlo method as used in particle transport. After a description at an elementary level of the mathematical basis of the method, the Boltzmann equation and its physical meaning are presented, followed by Monte Carlo integration and random sampling, and by a general description of the main aspects and components of a typical Monte Carlo particle transport code. In particular, the most common biasing techniques are described, as well as the concepts of estimator and detector. After a discussion of the different types of errors, the issue of Quality Assurance is briefly considered.

  14. Radiative Transport Based Frequency Domain Fluorescence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Amit; Rasmussen, John C.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Wareing, Todd A.; McGhee, John

    2011-01-01

    We report the development of radiative transport model based fluorescence optical tomography from frequency domain boundary measurements. The coupled radiative transport model for describing NIR fluorescence propagation in tissue is solved by a novel software based on the established Attila™ particle transport simulation platform. The proposed scheme enables the prediction of fluorescence measurements with non-contact sources and detectors at minimal computational cost. An adjoint transport solution based fluorescence tomography algorithm is implemented on dual grids to efficiently assemble the measurement sensitivity Jacobian matrix. Finally, we demonstrate fluorescence tomography on a realistic computational mouse model to locate nM to μM fluorophore concentration distributions in simulated mouse organs. PMID:18364555

  15. 3D unstructured-mesh radiation transport codes

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, J.

    1997-12-31

    Three unstructured-mesh radiation transport codes are currently being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The first code is ATTILA, which uses an unstructured tetrahedral mesh in conjunction with standard Sn (discrete-ordinates) angular discretization, standard multigroup energy discretization, and linear-discontinuous spatial differencing. ATTILA solves the standard first-order form of the transport equation using source iteration in conjunction with diffusion-synthetic acceleration of the within-group source iterations. DANTE is designed to run primarily on workstations. The second code is DANTE, which uses a hybrid finite-element mesh consisting of arbitrary combinations of hexahedra, wedges, pyramids, and tetrahedra. DANTE solves several second-order self-adjoint forms of the transport equation including the even-parity equation, the odd-parity equation, and a new equation called the self-adjoint angular flux equation. DANTE also offers three angular discretization options: $S{_}n$ (discrete-ordinates), $P{_}n$ (spherical harmonics), and $SP{_}n$ (simplified spherical harmonics). DANTE is designed to run primarily on massively parallel message-passing machines, such as the ASCI-Blue machines at LANL and LLNL. The third code is PERICLES, which uses the same hybrid finite-element mesh as DANTE, but solves the standard first-order form of the transport equation rather than a second-order self-adjoint form. DANTE uses a standard $S{_}n$ discretization in angle in conjunction with trilinear-discontinuous spatial differencing, and diffusion-synthetic acceleration of the within-group source iterations. PERICLES was initially designed to run on workstations, but a version for massively parallel message-passing machines will be built. The three codes will be described in detail and computational results will be presented.

  16. Finite element radiation transport in one dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Painter, J.F.

    1997-05-09

    A new physics package solves radiation transport equations in one space dimension, multiple energy groups and directions. A discontinuous finite element method discretizes radiation intensity with respect to space and angle, and a continuous finite element method discretizes electron temperature `in space. A splitting method solves the resulting linear equations. This is a one-dimensional analog of Kershaw and Harte`s two-dimensional package. This package has been installed in a two-dimensional inertial confinement fusion code, and has given excellent results for both thermal waves and highly directional radiation. In contrast, the traditional discrete ordinate and spherical harmonic methods show less accurate results in both cases.

  17. Coupled Deterministic-Monte Carlo Transport for Radiation Portal Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Leon E.; Miller, Erin A.; Wittman, Richard S.; Shaver, Mark W.

    2008-01-14

    Radiation portal monitors are being deployed, both domestically and internationally, to detect illicit movement of radiological materials concealed in cargo. Evaluation of the current and next generations of these radiation portal monitor (RPM) technologies is an ongoing process. 'Injection studies' that superimpose, computationally, the signature from threat materials onto empirical vehicle profiles collected at ports of entry, are often a component of the RPM evaluation process. However, measurement of realistic threat devices can be both expensive and time-consuming. Radiation transport methods that can predict the response of radiation detection sensors with high fidelity, and do so rapidly enough to allow the modeling of many different threat-source configurations, are a cornerstone of reliable evaluation results. Monte Carlo methods have been the primary tool of the detection community for these kinds of calculations, in no small part because they are particularly effective for calculating pulse-height spectra in gamma-ray spectrometers. However, computational times for problems with a high degree of scattering and absorption can be extremely long. Deterministic codes that discretize the transport in space, angle, and energy offer potential advantages in computational efficiency for these same kinds of problems, but the pulse-height calculations needed to predict gamma-ray spectrometer response are not readily accessible. These complementary strengths for radiation detection scenarios suggest that coupling Monte Carlo and deterministic methods could be beneficial in terms of computational efficiency. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and its collaborators are developing a RAdiation Detection Scenario Analysis Toolbox (RADSAT) founded on this coupling approach. The deterministic core of RADSAT is Attila, a three-dimensional, tetrahedral-mesh code originally developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory, and since expanded and refined by Transpire, Inc. [1

  18. Radiative heat transport instability in ICF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozmus, W.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    A laser produced high-Z plasma in which an energy balance is achieved due to radiation losses and radiative heat transfer supports ion acoustic wave instability. A linear dispersion relation is derived and instability is compared to the radiation cooling instability. This instability develops in the wide range of angles and wavenumbers with the typical growth rate on the order of cs/LT (cs is the sound speed, LT is the temperature scale length). In addition to radiation dominated systems, a similar thermal transport driven ion acoustic instability was found before in plasmas where the thermal transport coefficient depends on electron density. However, under conditions of indirect drive ICF experiments the driving term for the instability is the radiative heat flux and in particular, the density dependence of the radiative heat conductivity. A specific example of thermal Bremsstrahlung radiation source has been considered corresponding to a thermal conductivity coefficient that is inversely proportional to the square of local particle density. In the nonlinear regime this instability may lead to plasma jet formation and anisotropic x-ray generation.

  19. Shielding calculations and verifications for the new Radiation Instrument Calibration Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    George, G. L.; Olsher, R. H.; Seagraves, D. T.

    2002-01-01

    MCNP-4C1 was used to perform the shielding design for the new Central Health Physics Calibration Facility (CHPCF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The problem of shielding the facility was subdivided into three separate components: (1) Transmission; (2) Skyshine; and (3) Maze Streaming/ Transmission. When possible, actual measurements were taken to verify calculation results. The comparison of calculation versus measurement results shows excellent agreement for neutron calculations. For photon comparisons, calculations resulted in conservative estimates of the Effective Dose Equivalent (EDE) compared to measured results. This disagreement in the photon measurements versus calculations is most likely due to several conservative assumptions regarding shield density and composition. For example, reinforcing steel bars (Rebar) in the concrete shield walls were not included in the shield model.

  20. Space Radiation Transport Methods Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Tripathi, R. K.; Qualls, G. D.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Prael, R. E.; Norbury, J. W.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Tweed, J.

    2002-01-01

    Improved spacecraft shield design requires early entry of radiation constraints into the design process to maximize performance and minimize costs. As a result, we have been investigating high-speed computational procedures to allow shield analysis from the preliminary design concepts to the final design. In particular, we will discuss the progress towards a full three-dimensional and computationally efficient deterministic code for which the current HZETRN evaluates the lowest order asymptotic term. HZETRN is the first deterministic solution to the Boltzmann equation allowing field mapping within the International Space Station (ISS) in tens of minutes using standard Finite Element Method (FEM) geometry common to engineering design practice enabling development of integrated multidisciplinary design optimization methods. A single ray trace in ISS FEM geometry requires 14 milliseconds and severely limits application of Monte Carlo methods to such engineering models. A potential means of improving the Monte Carlo efficiency in coupling to spacecraft geometry is given in terms of reconfigurable computing and could be utilized in the final design as verification of the deterministic method optimized design.

  1. Radiation Transport in Type IA Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Eastman, R

    1999-11-16

    It has been said more than once that the critical link between explosion models and observations is the ability to accurately simulate cooling and radiation transport in the expanding ejecta of Type Ia supernovae. It is perhaps frustrating to some of the theorists who study explosion mechanisms, and to some of the observers too, that more definitive conclusions have not been reached about the agreement, or lack thereof, between various Type Ia supernova models and the data. Although claims of superlative accuracy in transport simulations are sometimes made, I will argue here that there are outstanding issues of critical importance and in need of addressing before radiation transport calculations are accurate enough to discriminate between subtly different explosion models.

  2. Monte Carlo radiation transport: A revolution in science

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, J.

    1993-04-01

    When Enrico Fermi, Stan Ulam, Nicholas Metropolis, John von Neuman, and Robert Richtmyer invented the Monte Carlo method fifty years ago, little could they imagine the far-flung consequences, the international applications, and the revolution in science epitomized by their abstract mathematical method. The Monte Carlo method is used in a wide variety of fields to solve exact computational models approximately by statistical sampling. It is an alternative to traditional physics modeling methods which solve approximate computational models exactly by deterministic methods. Modern computers and improved methods, such as variance reduction, have enhanced the method to the point of enabling a true predictive capability in areas such as radiation or particle transport. This predictive capability has contributed to a radical change in the way science is done: design and understanding come from computations built upon experiments rather than being limited to experiments, and the computer codes doing the computations have become the repository for physics knowledge. The MCNP Monte Carlo computer code effort at Los Alamos is an example of this revolution. Physicians unfamiliar with physics details can design cancer treatments using physics buried in the MCNP computer code. Hazardous environments and hypothetical accidents can be explored. Many other fields, from underground oil well exploration to aerospace, from physics research to energy production, from safety to bulk materials processing, benefit from MCNP, the Monte Carlo method, and the revolution in science.

  3. RADIATION TRANSPORT FOR EXPLOSIVE OUTFLOWS: OPACITY REGROUPING

    SciTech Connect

    Wollaeger, Ryan T.; Van Rossum, Daniel R. E-mail: daan@flash.uchicago.edu

    2014-10-01

    Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) and Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) are methods used to stochastically solve the radiative transport and diffusion equations, respectively. These methods combine into a hybrid transport-diffusion method we refer to as IMC-DDMC. We explore a multigroup IMC-DDMC scheme that in DDMC, combines frequency groups with sufficient optical thickness. We term this procedure ''opacity regrouping''. Opacity regrouping has previously been applied to IMC-DDMC calculations for problems in which the dependence of the opacity on frequency is monotonic. We generalize opacity regrouping to non-contiguous groups and implement this in SuperNu, a code designed to do radiation transport in high-velocity outflows with non-monotonic opacities. We find that regrouping of non-contiguous opacity groups generally improves the speed of IMC-DDMC radiation transport. We present an asymptotic analysis that informs the nature of the Doppler shift in DDMC groups and summarize the derivation of the Gentile-Fleck factor for modified IMC-DDMC. We test SuperNu using numerical experiments including a quasi-manufactured analytic solution, a simple 10 group problem, and the W7 problem for Type Ia supernovae. We find that opacity regrouping is necessary to make our IMC-DDMC implementation feasible for the W7 problem and possibly Type Ia supernova simulations in general. We compare the bolometric light curves and spectra produced by the SuperNu and PHOENIX radiation transport codes for the W7 problem. The overall shape of the bolometric light curves are in good agreement, as are the spectra and their evolution with time. However, for the numerical specifications we considered, we find that the peak luminosity of the light curve calculated using SuperNu is ∼10% less than that calculated using PHOENIX.

  4. Radiation Transport for Explosive Outflows: Opacity Regrouping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollaeger, Ryan T.; van Rossum, Daniel R.

    2014-10-01

    Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) and Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) are methods used to stochastically solve the radiative transport and diffusion equations, respectively. These methods combine into a hybrid transport-diffusion method we refer to as IMC-DDMC. We explore a multigroup IMC-DDMC scheme that in DDMC, combines frequency groups with sufficient optical thickness. We term this procedure "opacity regrouping." Opacity regrouping has previously been applied to IMC-DDMC calculations for problems in which the dependence of the opacity on frequency is monotonic. We generalize opacity regrouping to non-contiguous groups and implement this in SuperNu, a code designed to do radiation transport in high-velocity outflows with non-monotonic opacities. We find that regrouping of non-contiguous opacity groups generally improves the speed of IMC-DDMC radiation transport. We present an asymptotic analysis that informs the nature of the Doppler shift in DDMC groups and summarize the derivation of the Gentile-Fleck factor for modified IMC-DDMC. We test SuperNu using numerical experiments including a quasi-manufactured analytic solution, a simple 10 group problem, and the W7 problem for Type Ia supernovae. We find that opacity regrouping is necessary to make our IMC-DDMC implementation feasible for the W7 problem and possibly Type Ia supernova simulations in general. We compare the bolometric light curves and spectra produced by the SuperNu and PHOENIX radiation transport codes for the W7 problem. The overall shape of the bolometric light curves are in good agreement, as are the spectra and their evolution with time. However, for the numerical specifications we considered, we find that the peak luminosity of the light curve calculated using SuperNu is ~10% less than that calculated using PHOENIX.

  5. Radiation-shielding transport and storage container

    SciTech Connect

    Baatz, H.; Ritsscher, D.; Wriegt, J.

    1985-07-09

    A container for the storage and transportation of radioactive material comprises an elongated vessel adapted to receive the material and has a wall thickness and composition attenuating radioactive transmission therefrom. The vessel has an open end formed with an annular thickened portion defining a mouth communicating with the interior of the vessel; a radiation-shielding cover received in the mouth and having a plug-forming portion juxtaposed with a complimentary seat-forming portion of the vessel at the mouth, and a flange extending outwardly from the plug-forming portion, the vessel is provided with a wall bore communicating at one end with the interior of the vessel and terminating at its opposite end within the outline of the radiation-shielding cover, the radiation-shielding cover is provided with a connecting bore registering with the wall bore; an obturating element received in the connecting bore and adapted to block the wall bore; and a further cover secured directly to the vessel outwardly of the radiation-shielding cover and overlying the wall bore and the radiation-shielding cover.

  6. Monte Carlo radiation transport¶llelism

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, L. J.; Post, S. E.

    2002-01-01

    This talk summarizes the main aspects of the LANL ASCI Eolus project and its major unclassified code project, MCNP. The MCNP code provide a state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiation transport to approximately 3000 users world-wide. Almost all hardware platforms are supported because we strictly adhere to the FORTRAN-90/95 standard. For parallel processing, MCNP uses a mixture of OpenMp combined with either MPI or PVM (shared and distributed memory). This talk summarizes our experiences on various platforms using MPI with and without OpenMP. These platforms include PC-Windows, Intel-LINUX, BlueMountain, Frost, ASCI-Q and others.

  7. Transport methods and interactions for space radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Schimmerling, Walter S.; Khandelwal, Govind S.; Khan, Ferdous S.; Nealy, John E.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Simonsen, Lisa C.; Shinn, Judy L.; Norbury, John W.

    1991-01-01

    A review of the program in space radiation protection at the Langley Research Center is given. The relevant Boltzmann equations are given with a discussion of approximation procedures for space applications. The interaction coefficients are related to solution of the many-body Schroedinger equation with nuclear and electromagnetic forces. Various solution techniques are discussed to obtain relevant interaction cross sections with extensive comparison with experiments. Solution techniques for the Boltzmann equations are discussed in detail. Transport computer code validation is discussed through analytical benchmarking, comparison with other codes, comparison with laboratory experiments and measurements in space. Applications to lunar and Mars missions are discussed.

  8. Effects of Nuclear Interactions in Space Radiation Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei; Barghouty, A. F.

    2004-01-01

    Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate radiation effects behind materials in human missions to the Moon, Mars or beyond. We study how nuclear fragmentation processes affect predictions from such radiation transport codes. In particular, we investigate the effects of fragmentation cross sections at different energies on fluxes, dose and dose-equivalent from galactic cosmic rays behind typical shielding materials.

  9. Effects of Nuclear Interactions in Space Radiation Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei; Barghouty, A. F.

    2005-01-01

    Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate radiation effects behind materials in human mission to the Moon, Mars or beyond. We study how nuclear fragmentation processes affect predictions from such radiation transport codes. In particular, we investigate the effects of fragmentation cross sections at different energies on fluxes, dose and dose-equivalent from galactic cosmic rays behind typical shielding materials.

  10. High Performance Radiation Transport Simulations on TITAN

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Christopher G; Davidson, Gregory G; Evans, Thomas M; Hamilton, Steven P; Jarrell, Joshua J; Joubert, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe the Denovo code system. Denovo solves the six-dimensional, steady-state, linear Boltzmann transport equation, of central importance to nuclear technology applications such as reactor core analysis (neutronics), radiation shielding, nuclear forensics and radiation detection. The code features multiple spatial differencing schemes, state-of-the-art linear solvers, the Koch-Baker-Alcouffe (KBA) parallel-wavefront sweep algorithm for inverting the transport operator, a new multilevel energy decomposition method scaling to hundreds of thousands of processing cores, and a modern, novel code architecture that supports straightforward integration of new features. In this paper we discuss the performance of Denovo on the 10--20 petaflop ORNL GPU-based system, Titan. We describe algorithms and techniques used to exploit the capabilities of Titan's heterogeneous compute node architecture and the challenges of obtaining good parallel performance for this sparse hyperbolic PDE solver containing inherently sequential computations. Numerical results demonstrating Denovo performance on early Titan hardware are presented.

  11. Radiation heat transport in disordered media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strieder, William

    Radiation heat transport through the internal void spaces of particle beds, fiber beds, packed beds, reactors and porous media with opaque, diffusely reflecting, gray body surfaces and large solid dimensions ( πd/ λth > 100) is considered. A the local particle surface radiosity, differential view factor and solid temperature, permits a rigorous solution of the dependent, long range multiple scattering problem. The conductivity results, applied to a bed of randomly overlapping spheres, agree exactly with pseudohomogeneous results in both the isotropic and anisotropic scattering limits and shed rigorous light on the anisotropic phase function expansion theory. Explicit calculations, performed for several other standard packings, e.g. fiber beds, exhibit a parallll upper and series lower bound over the various particle shapes and dispersion structures. Results show that an empirical equation first suggested by Vortmeyer (German Chem. Engng, 3, (1980) 124-137), but generalized herein from one P to four P0, P1, P2, P3 coefficients, which vary substantially with the various industrial packings, will provide a suitable generalization of the emissivity factor of krad for engineering conductivity modeling of radiation heat transport.

  12. Rare event simulation in radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Kollman, C.

    1993-10-01

    This dissertation studies methods for estimating extremely small probabilities by Monte Carlo simulation. Problems in radiation transport typically involve estimating very rare events or the expected value of a random variable which is with overwhelming probability equal to zero. These problems often have high dimensional state spaces and irregular geometries so that analytic solutions are not possible. Monte Carlo simulation must be used to estimate the radiation dosage being transported to a particular location. If the area is well shielded the probability of any one particular particle getting through is very small. Because of the large number of particles involved, even a tiny fraction penetrating the shield may represent an unacceptable level of radiation. It therefore becomes critical to be able to accurately estimate this extremely small probability. Importance sampling is a well known technique for improving the efficiency of rare event calculations. Here, a new set of probabilities is used in the simulation runs. The results are multiple by the likelihood ratio between the true and simulated probabilities so as to keep the estimator unbiased. The variance of the resulting estimator is very sensitive to which new set of transition probabilities are chosen. It is shown that a zero variance estimator does exist, but that its computation requires exact knowledge of the solution. A simple random walk with an associated killing model for the scatter of neutrons is introduced. Large deviation results for optimal importance sampling in random walks are extended to the case where killing is present. An adaptive ``learning`` algorithm for implementing importance sampling is given for more general Markov chain models of neutron scatter. For finite state spaces this algorithm is shown to give with probability one, a sequence of estimates converging exponentially fast to the true solution.

  13. Direct Penetrating Radiation Monitoring Systems: Technical Evaluation for Use at Area G, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    D. Kraig; W. A. Treadaway; R. J. Wechsler

    1999-10-01

    Recent advances and commercialization of electret-ion-chamber (EIC) technology for photon measurements prompted us to consider EKs as a replacement for our TLD system. After laboratory tests indicated that both systems gave adequate results for controlled exposures, throughout 1998 we conducted field tests with paired TLDs and EICS, in LANL technical areas and in public areas. We had approximately 30 paired sampling sites at Area G. At each sampling site, we deployed three TLDs and three EICS. The EICS were contained in air-tight jars, each of which was placed in a Tyvek envelope and hung about 1 m above the ground. The dosimeters were read (and, if necessary, replaced) every three months. At the sites outside Area G, the TLD readings for the first two quarters were statistically significantly higher than those of the EICS: group average exposures were 38 and 36, compared with 33 mR (both quarters) for the EICS; during quarter 3, the EIC average (40 mR) was higher than the TLD average (34 mR); and during quarter 4, the two systems were statistically the same: EIC = 42, TLD = 41 with a p-value of 0.61. We are still evaluating these differences and performing additional laboratory studies to determine causes. At the Area G sites,we noticed that several of the TLDs gave much higher readings than their co-located EICS; we believe that the TLDs were over-responding by {approx}50% to the low-energy (60-keV) gamma radiation associated with {sup 241}Am, whereas the EICS were responding accurately. We conclude that EICS are more accurate at a wide range of gamma energies and are preferable to TLDs in environments where a significant fraction of the photons are low energy.

  14. THE MCNPX MONTE CARLO RADIATION TRANSPORT CODE

    SciTech Connect

    WATERS, LAURIE S.; MCKINNEY, GREGG W.; DURKEE, JOE W.; FENSIN, MICHAEL L.; JAMES, MICHAEL R.; JOHNS, RUSSELL C.; PELOWITZ, DENISE B.

    2007-01-10

    MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) is a general-purpose Monte Carlo radiation transport code with three-dimensional geometry and continuous-energy transport of 34 particles and light ions. It contains flexible source and tally options, interactive graphics, and support for both sequential and multi-processing computer platforms. MCNPX is based on MCNP4B, and has been upgraded to most MCNP5 capabilities. MCNP is a highly stable code tracking neutrons, photons and electrons, and using evaluated nuclear data libraries for low-energy interaction probabilities. MCNPX has extended this base to a comprehensive set of particles and light ions, with heavy ion transport in development. Models have been included to calculate interaction probabilities when libraries are not available. Recent additions focus on the time evolution of residual nuclei decay, allowing calculation of transmutation and delayed particle emission. MCNPX is now a code of great dynamic range, and the excellent neutronics capabilities allow new opportunities to simulate devices of interest to experimental particle physics; particularly calorimetry. This paper describes the capabilities of the current MCNPX version 2.6.C, and also discusses ongoing code development.

  15. Validation of comprehensive space radiation transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Shinn, J.L.; Simonsen, L.C.; Cucinotta, F.A.

    1998-12-01

    The HZETRN code has been developed over the past decade to evaluate the local radiation fields within sensitive materials on spacecraft in the space environment. Most of the more important nuclear and atomic processes are now modeled and evaluation within a complex spacecraft geometry with differing material components, including transition effects across boundaries of dissimilar materials, are included. The atomic/nuclear database and transport procedures have received limited validation in laboratory testing with high energy ion beams. The codes have been applied in design of the SAGE-III instrument resulting in material changes to control injurious neutron production, in the study of the Space Shuttle single event upsets, and in validation with space measurements (particle telescopes, tissue equivalent proportional counters, CR-39) on Shuttle and Mir. The present paper reviews the code development and presents recent results in laboratory and space flight validation.

  16. Transport of infrared radiation in cuboidal clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    HARSHVARDHAN; Weinman, J. A.; Davies, R.

    1981-01-01

    The transport of infrared radiation in a single cuboidal cloud using a vertical two steam approximation was modeled. The emittance of the top face of the model cloud is always less than that for a plane parallel cloud of the same optical depth. The hemisphere flux escaping from the cloud top has a gradient from the center to the edges which brighten when the cloud is over warmer ground. Cooling rate calculations in the 8 to 13.6 micrometer region show that there is cooling from the sides of the cloud at all levels even when there is heating of the core from the ground below. The radiances exiting from model cuboidal clouds were computed by path integration over the source function obtained with the two stream approximation. It is suggested that the brightness temperature measured from finite clouds will overestimate the cloud top temperature.

  17. Space Radiation Transport Code Development: 3DHZETRN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Slaba, Tony C.; Badavi, Francis F.; Reddell, Brandon D.; Bahadori, Amir A.

    2015-01-01

    The space radiation transport code, HZETRN, has been used extensively for research, vehicle design optimization, risk analysis, and related applications. One of the simplifying features of the HZETRN transport formalism is the straight-ahead approximation, wherein all particles are assumed to travel along a common axis. This reduces the governing equation to one spatial dimension allowing enormous simplification and highly efficient computational procedures to be implemented. Despite the physical simplifications, the HZETRN code is widely used for space applications and has been found to agree well with fully 3D Monte Carlo simulations in many circumstances. Recent work has focused on the development of 3D transport corrections for neutrons and light ions (Z < 2) for which the straight-ahead approximation is known to be less accurate. Within the development of 3D corrections, well-defined convergence criteria have been considered, allowing approximation errors at each stage in model development to be quantified. The present level of development assumes the neutron cross sections have an isotropic component treated within N explicit angular directions and a forward component represented by the straight-ahead approximation. The N = 1 solution refers to the straight-ahead treatment, while N = 2 represents the bi-directional model in current use for engineering design. The figure below shows neutrons, protons, and alphas for various values of N at locations in an aluminum sphere exposed to a solar particle event (SPE) spectrum. The neutron fluence converges quickly in simple geometry with N > 14 directions. The improved code, 3DHZETRN, transports neutrons, light ions, and heavy ions under space-like boundary conditions through general geometry while maintaining a high degree of computational efficiency. A brief overview of the 3D transport formalism for neutrons and light ions is given, and extensive benchmarking results with the Monte Carlo codes Geant4, FLUKA, and

  18. Simulating Radiation Transport in Curved Spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endeve, Eirik; Hauck, Cory; Xing, Yulong; Cardall, Christian; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2014-03-01

    We are developing methods for simulation of radiation transport in systems governed by strong gravity (e.g., neutrino transport in core-collapse supernovae). By employing conservative formulations of the general relativistic Boltzmann equation, we aim to develop methods that are (i) high-order accurate for computational efficiency; (ii) robust in the sense that the phase space density f preserves the maximum principle of the physical model (f ∈ [ 0 , 1 ] for fermions); and (iii) applicable to curvilinear coordinate systems to accommodate curved spacetimes, which result in gravity-induced frequency shift and angular aberration. Our approach is based on the Runge-Kutta discontinuous Galerkin method, which has many attractive properties, including high-order accuracy on a compact stencil. We present the physical model, describe our numerical methods, and show results from implementations in spherical and axial symmetry. Our tests show that the method is high-order accurate and strictly preserves the maximum principle on f. We also demonstrate the ability of our method to accurately include effects of a strong gravitational field.

  19. Transport and radiation in complex LTE mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Jesper; Peerenboom, Kim; Suijker, Jos; Gnybida, Mykhailo; van Dijk, Jan

    2014-10-01

    Complex LTE mixtures are for example encountered in re-entry, welding, spraying and lighting. These mixtures typically contain a rich chemistry in combination with large temperature gradients. LTE conditions are also interesting because they can aid in the validation of NLTE algorithms. An example is the calculation of transport properties. In this work a mercury free high intensity discharge lamp is considered. The investigation focusses on using salts like InI or SnI as a buffer species. By using these species a dominant background gas like mercury is no longer present. As a consequence the diffusion algorithms based on Fick's law are no longer applicable and the Stefan-Maxwell equations must be solved. This system of equations is modified with conservation rules to set a coldspot pressure for saturated species and enforce the mass dosage for unsaturated species. The radiative energy transport is taken into account by raytracing. Quantum mechanical simulations have been used to calculate the potential curves and the transition dipole moments for indium with iodine and tin with iodine. The results of these calculations have been used to predict the quasistatic broadening by iodine. The work was supported by the project SCHELP from the Belgium IWT (Project Number 110003) and the CATRENE SEEL Project (CA502).

  20. An Integrated Radiation Transport Particle-in-Cell Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. J.; Verboncoeur, J. P.; Smith, H. B.; Parker, G. J.; Birdsall, C. K.

    2000-10-01

    The study of radiation transport is important to understand the basic physics and to calculate the efficiency in a lamp discharge or laser induced plasma. Many models neglect radiation transport effects in evolving the steady state. In this study, we established a basic model to calculate radiation transport, including the effects of nonuniform ground state density and atomic collisions in one dimensional cylindrical and planar geometries. We coupled radiation transport with the self-consistent kinetic particle-in-cell codes, XPDP1 and XPDC1[1]. We treat electrons and ions with a particle-in-cell method, and the neutral ground and excited states with a fluid model to calculate radiation transport and atomic collisions. The steady state result of this model compares well with the solution of Holstein equation[2]. [1] J. P. Verboncoeur, M. V. Alves, V. Vahedi, and C. K. Birdsall, Journal of Computational Physics 104, 321 (1993). [2] T. Holstein, Phys. Rev. 72, 1213 (1947).

  1. Description of Transport Codes for Space Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation describes transport codes and their use for studying and designing space radiation shielding. When combined with risk projection models radiation transport codes serve as the main tool for study radiation and designing shielding. There are three criteria for assessing the accuracy of transport codes: (1) Ground-based studies with defined beams and material layouts, (2) Inter-comparison of transport code results for matched boundary conditions and (3) Comparisons to flight measurements. These three criteria have a very high degree with NASA's HZETRN/QMSFRG.

  2. Transport of infrared radiation in cuboidal clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harshvardhan, MR.; Weinman, J. A.; Davies, R.

    1981-01-01

    The transport of infrared radiation in a single cuboidal cloud is modeled using a variable azimuth two-stream approximation. Computations are made at 10 microns for a Deirmendjian (1969) C-1 water cloud where the single scattering albedo is equal to 0.638 and the asymmetry parameter is 0.865. The results indicate that the emittance of the top face of the model cloud is always less than that for a plane parallel cloud of the same optical depth. The hemispheric flux escaping from the cloud top possesses a gradient from the center to the edges which are warmer when the cloud is over warmer ground. Cooling rate calculations in the 8-13.6 micron region demonstrate that there is cooling out of the sides of the cloud at all levels even when there is heating of the core from the ground below. The radiances exiting from model cuboidal clouds are computed by path integration over the source function obtained with the two-stream approximation. Results indicate that the brightness temperature measured from finite clouds will overestimate the cloud-top temperature.

  3. Radiation energy transport through hydrodynamically evolving slits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, J. M.; Graham, P.; Taylor, M.; Moore, A.; Sorce, C.; Reighard, A.; MacLaren, S.; Young, P.; Glendinning, G.; Blue, B.; Back, C.; Hund, J.

    2008-11-01

    Radiation transport through enclosed spaces with inwardly moving walls is a key component of the physics of laser-heated hohlraums. It arises in the cavity itself (where inward motion of the wall results in late-time stagnation of dense plasma on the hohlraum axis), and also in the laser-entry and diagnostic holes (where an understanding of hole-closure is important to hohlraum design and the interpretation of diagnostic data). To understand these phenomena better, we have carried out a series of experiments at the Omega laser facility. A laser-heated hohlraum is used to illuminate linear and annular slits machined in samples of solid-density tantalum and low-density, tantalum-oxide foam. Measurements of the transmitted energy are made indirectly (by measuring the temperature rise of a ``calorimeter'' hohlraum) and directly (by measuring the emission from the slit component, using a target in which the calorimeter hohlraum was omitted). The hydrodynamics is investigated by self-emission and absorption (backlighting) x-ray imaging of the closing slits. Simulations (using a 2-D Eulerian hydrocode) reproduce the overall energetics, the detail of the deceleration shock and axial stagnation region at the centre of the slit, and the complex shock interactions that occur at corners of the slits.

  4. Environmental analysis of Lower Pueblo/Lower Los Alamos Canyon, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Buhl, T.E.; Stoker, A.K.; Becker, N.M.; Rodgers, J.C.; Hansen, W.R.

    1994-12-01

    The radiological survey of the former radioactive waste treatment plant site (TA-45), Acid Canyon, Pueblo Canyon, and Los Alamos Canyon found residual contamination at the site itself and in the channel and banks of Acid, Pueblo, and lower Los Alamos Canyons all the way to the Rio Grande. The largest reservoir of residual radioactivity is in lower Pueblo Canyon, which is on DOE property. However, residual radioactivity does not exceed proposed cleanup criteria in either lower Pueblo or lower Los Alamos Canyons. The three alternatives proposed are (1) to take no action, (2) to construct a sediment trap in lower Pueblo Canyon to prevent further transport of residual radioactivity onto San Ildefonso Indian Pueblo land, and (3) to clean the residual radioactivity from the canyon system. Alternative 2, to cleanup the canyon system, is rejected as a viable alternative. Thousands of truckloads of sediment would have to be removed and disposed of, and this effort is unwarranted by the low levels of contamination present. Residual radioactivity levels, under either present conditions or projected future conditions, will not result in significant radiation doses to persons exposed. Modeling efforts show that future transport activity will not result in any residual radioactivity concentrations higher than those already existing. Thus, although construction of a sediment trap in lower Pueblo Canyon is a viable alternative, this effort also is unwarranted, and the no-action alternative is the preferred alternative.

  5. Radiation transport phenomena and modeling - part A: Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Lorence, L.J.

    1997-06-01

    The need to understand how particle radiation (high-energy photons and electrons) from a variety of sources affects materials and electronics has motivated the development of sophisticated computer codes that describe how radiation with energies from 1.0 keV to 100.0 GeV propagates through matter. Predicting radiation transport is the necessary first step in predicting radiation effects. The radiation transport codes that are described here are general-purpose codes capable of analyzing a variety of radiation environments including those produced by nuclear weapons (x-rays, gamma rays, and neutrons), by sources in space (electrons and ions) and by accelerators (x-rays, gamma rays, and electrons). Applications of these codes include the study of radiation effects on electronics, nuclear medicine (imaging and cancer treatment), and industrial processes (food disinfestation, waste sterilization, manufacturing.) The primary focus will be on coupled electron-photon transport codes, with some brief discussion of proton transport. These codes model a radiation cascade in which electrons produce photons and vice versa. This coupling between particles of different types is important for radiation effects. For instance, in an x-ray environment, electrons are produced that drive the response in electronics. In an electron environment, dose due to bremsstrahlung photons can be significant once the source electrons have been stopped.

  6. Experimental Characterization of Chromium Fate and Transport in the Vadose Zone and Regional Aquifer at Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, M.; Longmire, P.; Vaniman, D.; Broxton, D.; Rearick, M.; Ware, S.; Katzman, D.; Bargar, J.; Webb, S.

    2009-12-01

    Routine groundwater monitoring conducted in 2005 identified significant chromium(Cr) contamination within the regional aquifer at Los Alamos, New Mexico. Site-specific Cr(III)/Cr(VI) transport characterization is needed (1) to refine conceptual and numerical models; (2) to evaluate long-term stability of Cr(III)/Cr(VI) in the Sandia Canyon groundwater system along the flow path from the source to the regional aquifer; and (3) to forecast natural attenuation and assess remediation possibilities. We have conducted both static (batch) and flowing (column) experiments using water chemistries and geological materials representative of potential flow pathways in Sandia Canyon. We also conducted synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements for determining Cr(III)/Cr(VI) speciation and oxidation state of Cr surface complexes in vadose zone and regional aquifer materials. In addition, characterization of materials used in experiments was performed using SEM, XRD, and BET Surface Area Measurement. Results of adsorption and flow-through experiments suggest that vadose zone and regional aquifer materials have different retention capacities for Cr(VI), reflecting large variations in measured adsorption coefficients (Kd values). Additionally, higher Kd values tend to be associated with crushed rocks and reduced particle sizes, where increased surface area and exposure of fresh mineral provides surfaces containing ferrous iron that acts as a chemical reductant. Nevertheless, X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) measurements suggest that reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) occurred after Cr(VI) containing solution was exposed to alluvial and rock materials, both uncrushed and crushed. The results indicate that natural attenuation of anthropogenic chromium occurs within the Sandia Canyon vadose zone and in the regional aquifer. Findings from this study provide data necessary to reveal the nature and extent of site-specific long-term fate and transport of

  7. Path Toward a Unifid Geometry for Radiation Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kerry; Barzilla, Janet; Davis, Andrew; Zachmann

    2014-01-01

    The Direct Accelerated Geometry for Radiation Analysis and Design (DAGRAD) element of the RadWorks Project under Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) within the Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) of NASA will enable new designs and concepts of operation for radiation risk assessment, mitigation and protection. This element is designed to produce a solution that will allow NASA to calculate the transport of space radiation through complex computer-aided design (CAD) models using the state-of-the-art analytic and Monte Carlo radiation transport codes. Due to the inherent hazard of astronaut and spacecraft exposure to ionizing radiation in low-Earth orbit (LEO) or in deep space, risk analyses must be performed for all crew vehicles and habitats. Incorporating these analyses into the design process can minimize the mass needed solely for radiation protection. Transport of the radiation fields as they pass through shielding and body materials can be simulated using Monte Carlo techniques or described by the Boltzmann equation, which is obtained by balancing changes in particle fluxes as they traverse a small volume of material with the gains and losses caused by atomic and nuclear collisions. Deterministic codes that solve the Boltzmann transport equation, such as HZETRN [high charge and energy transport code developed by NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC)], are generally computationally faster than Monte Carlo codes such as FLUKA, GEANT4, MCNP(X) or PHITS; however, they are currently limited to transport in one dimension, which poorly represents the secondary light ion and neutron radiation fields. NASA currently uses HZETRN space radiation transport software, both because it is computationally efficient and because proven methods have been developed for using this software to analyze complex geometries. Although Monte Carlo codes describe the relevant physics in a fully three-dimensional manner, their computational costs have thus far prevented their

  8. Path Toward a Unified Geometry for Radiation Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kerry

    The Direct Accelerated Geometry for Radiation Analysis and Design (DAGRAD) element of the RadWorks Project under Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) within the Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) of NASA will enable new designs and concepts of operation for radiation risk assessment, mitigation and protection. This element is designed to produce a solution that will allow NASA to calculate the transport of space radiation through complex CAD models using the state-of-the-art analytic and Monte Carlo radiation transport codes. Due to the inherent hazard of astronaut and spacecraft exposure to ionizing radiation in low-Earth orbit (LEO) or in deep space, risk analyses must be performed for all crew vehicles and habitats. Incorporating these analyses into the design process can minimize the mass needed solely for radiation protection. Transport of the radiation fields as they pass through shielding and body materials can be simulated using Monte Carlo techniques or described by the Boltzmann equation, which is obtained by balancing changes in particle fluxes as they traverse a small volume of material with the gains and losses caused by atomic and nuclear collisions. Deterministic codes that solve the Boltzmann transport equation, such as HZETRN (high charge and energy transport code developed by NASA LaRC), are generally computationally faster than Monte Carlo codes such as FLUKA, GEANT4, MCNP(X) or PHITS; however, they are currently limited to transport in one dimension, which poorly represents the secondary light ion and neutron radiation fields. NASA currently uses HZETRN space radiation transport software, both because it is computationally efficient and because proven methods have been developed for using this software to analyze complex geometries. Although Monte Carlo codes describe the relevant physics in a fully three-dimensional manner, their computational costs have thus far prevented their widespread use for analysis of complex CAD models, leading

  9. Effects of Nuclear Interactions on Accuracy of Space Radiation Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei; Barghouty, A. F.

    2005-01-01

    Space radiation risk to astronauts and electronic equipments is one major obstacle in long term human space explorations. Space radiation transport codes have been developed to calculate radiation effects behind materials in human missions to the Moon, Mars or beyond. We study how nuclear fragmentation processes affect the accuracy of predictions from such radiation transport. In particular, we investigate the effects of fragmentation cross sections at different energies on fluxes, dose and dose-equivalent from galactic cosmic rays behind typical shielding materials. These results tell us at what energies nuclear cross sections are the most important for radiation risk evaluations, and how uncertainties in our knowledge about nuclear fragmentations relate to uncertainties in space transport predictions.

  10. Near-field radiative thermal transport: From theory to experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bai Fiorino, Anthony; Meyhofer, Edgar; Reddy, Pramod

    2015-05-15

    Radiative thermal transport via the fluctuating electromagnetic near-field has recently attracted increasing attention due to its fundamental importance and its impact on a range of applications from data storage to thermal management and energy conversion. After a brief historical account of radiative thermal transport, we summarize the basics of fluctuational electrodynamics, a theoretical framework for the study of radiative heat transfer in terms of thermally excited propagating and evanescent electromagnetic waves. Various approaches to modeling near-field thermal transport are briefly discussed, together with key results and proposals for manipulation and utilization of radiative heat flow. Subsequently, we review the experimental advances in the characterization of both near-field heat flow and energy density. We conclude with remarks on the opportunities and challenges for future explorations of radiative heat transfer at the nanoscale.

  11. Description of transport codes for space radiation shielding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y; Wilson, John W; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2012-11-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation in the space environment is one of the hazards faced by crews in space missions. As space radiations traverse spacecraft, habitat shielding, or tissues, their energies and compositions are altered by interactions with the shielding. Modifications to the radiation fields arise from atomic interactions of charged particles with orbital electrons and nuclear interactions leading to projectile and target fragmentation, including secondary particles such as neutrons, protons, mesons, and nuclear recoils. The transport of space radiation through shielding can be simulated using Monte Carlo techniques or deterministic solutions of the Boltzmann equation. To determine shielding requirements and to resolve radiation constraints for future human missions, the shielding evaluation of a spacecraft concept is required as an early step in the design process. To do this requires (1) accurate knowledge of space environmental models to define the boundary condition for transport calculations, (2) transport codes with detailed shielding and body geometry models to determine particle transmission into areas of internal shielding and at each critical body organ, and (3) the assessment of organ dosimetric quantities and biological risks by applying the corresponding response models for space radiation against the particle spectra that have been accurately determined from the transport code. This paper reviews current transport codes and analyzes their accuracy through comparison to laboratory and spaceflight data. This paper also introduces a probabilistic risk assessment approach for the evaluation of radiation shielding. PMID:23032892

  12. On the derivation of vector radiative transfer equation for polarized radiative transport in graded index media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. M.; Tan, J. Y.; Liu, L. H.

    2012-02-01

    Light transport in graded index media follows a curved trajectory determined by Fermat's principle. Besides the effect of variation of the refractive index on the transport of radiative intensity, the curved ray trajectory will induce geometrical effects on the transport of polarization ellipse. This paper presents a complete derivation of vector radiative transfer equation for polarized radiation transport in absorption, emission and scattering graded index media. The derivation is based on the analysis of the conserved quantities for polarized light transport along curved trajectory and a novel approach. The obtained transfer equation can be considered as a generalization of the classic vector radiative transfer equation that is only valid for uniform refractive index media. Several variant forms of the transport equation are also presented, which include the form for Stokes parameters defined with a fixed reference and the Eulerian forms in the ray coordinate and in several common orthogonal coordinate systems.

  13. Comparison and analysis of 2-D simulation results with two implosion radiation experiments on the Los Alamos Pegasus I and Pegasus II capacitor banks

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.L.; Bowers, R.L.; Lebeda, C.F.; Matuska, W.; Benage, J.; Idzorek, G.; Oona, H.; Stokes, J.; Roderick, N.F.

    1995-09-01

    Two experiments, PegI-41, conducted on the Los Alamos Pegasus I capacitor bank, and PegII-25, on the Pegasus II bank, consisted of the implosions of 13 mg (nominal), 5 cm radius, 2 cm high thin cylindrical aluminum foils resulting in soft x-ray radiation pulses from the plasma thermalization on axis. The implosions were conducted in direct-drive (no intermediate switching) mode with peak currents of about 4 MA and 5 MA respectively, and implosion times of about 2.5 {micro}s and 2.0 {micro}s. A radiation yield of about 250 kJ was measured for PegII-25. The purpose of these experiments was to examine the physics of the implosion and relate this physics to the production of the radiation pulse and to provide detailed experimental data which could be compared with 2-D radiation-magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) simulations. Included in the experimental diagnostic suites were faraday rotation and dB/dt current measurements, a visible framing camera, an x-ray stripline camera, time-dependent spectroscopy, bolometers and XRD`S. A comparison of the results from these experiments shows agreement with 2-D simulation results in the instability development, current, and radiation pulse data, including the pulsewidth, shape, peak power and total radiation yield as measured by bolometry. Instabilities dominate the behavior of the implosion and largely determine the properties of the resulting radiation pulse. The 2-D simulations can be seen to be an important tool in understanding the implosion physics.

  14. Improved geometry representations for Monte Carlo radiation transport.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Matthew Ryan

    2004-08-01

    ITS (Integrated Tiger Series) permits a state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-integrated coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. ITS allows designers to predict product performance in radiation environments.

  15. TORUS: Radiation transport and hydrodynamics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harries, Tim

    2014-04-01

    TORUS is a flexible radiation transfer and radiation-hydrodynamics code. The code has a basic infrastructure that includes the AMR mesh scheme that is used by several physics modules including atomic line transfer in a moving medium, molecular line transfer, photoionization, radiation hydrodynamics and radiative equilibrium. TORUS is useful for a variety of problems, including magnetospheric accretion onto T Tauri stars, spiral nebulae around Wolf-Rayet stars, discs around Herbig AeBe stars, structured winds of O supergiants and Raman-scattered line formation in symbiotic binaries, and dust emission and molecular line formation in star forming clusters. The code is written in Fortran 2003 and is compiled using a standard Gnu makefile. The code is parallelized using both MPI and OMP, and can use these parallel sections either separately or in a hybrid mode.

  16. Relativistic radiation transport in dispersive media

    SciTech Connect

    Kichenassamy, S.; Krikorian, R.A.

    1985-10-15

    A general-relativistic radiative transfer equation in an isotropic, weakly absorbing, nonmagnetized dispersive medium is derived using the kinetic-theoretical approach and the relativistic Hamiltonian theory of geometrical optics in those media. It yields the generally accepted classical equation in the special-relativistic approximation and in stationary conditions. The influence of the gravitational field and of space-time variations of the refractive index n on the radiation distribution is made explicit in the case of spherical symmetry.

  17. Radiation transport Part B: Applications with examples

    SciTech Connect

    Beutler, D.E.

    1997-06-01

    In the previous sections Len Lorence has described the need, theory, and types of radiation codes that can be applied to model the results of radiation effects tests or working environments for electronics. For the rest of this segment, the author will concentrate on the specific ways the codes can be used to predict device response or analyze radiation test results. Regardless of whether one is predicting responses in a working or test environment, the procedures are virtually the same. The same can be said for the use of 1-, 2-, or 3-dimensional codes and Monte Carlo or discrete ordinates codes. No attempt is made to instruct the student on the specifics of the code. For example, the author will not discuss the details, such as the number of meshes, energy groups, etc. that are appropriate for a discrete ordinates code. For the sake of simplicity, he will restrict himself to the 1-dimensional code CEPXS/ONELD. This code along with a wide variety of other radiation codes can be obtained form the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) for a nominal handling fee.

  18. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    This report describes environmental monitoring activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory for 1994. Data were collected to assess external penetrating radiation, airborne emissions, liquid effluents, radioactivity of environmental materials and food stuffs, and environmental compliance.

  19. Radiation transport in ultrafast heated high Z solid targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraschiv, Ioana; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Mancini, Roberto; Johzaki, Tomoyuki

    2013-10-01

    Ultra-intense laser-target interactions generate hot, dense, and radiating plasmas, especially in the case of high-Z target materials. In order to evaluate the effect of radiation and its transport on the laser-produced plasmas we have developed a radiation transport (RT) code and implemented it in a collisional particle-in-cell code, PICLS. The code uses a database of emissivities and opacities as functions of photon frequency, created for given densities and temperatures by the non-equilibrium, collisional-radiative atomic kinetics 0-D code FLYCHK together with its postprocessor FLYSPECTRA. Using the two-dimensional RT-PICLS code we have studied the X-ray transport in an ultrafast heated copper target, the X-ray conversion efficiency, and the exchange of energy between the radiation field and the target. The details of these results obtained from the implementation of the radiation transport model into the PICLS calculations will be reported in this presentation. Work supported by the DOE Office of Science grant no. DE-SC0008827 and by the NNSA/DOE grant no. DE-FC52-06NA27616.

  20. A new, coupled transport-diffusion method for radiative transfer calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wollaber, A. B.; Warsa, J. S.

    2013-07-01

    We derive and present a new frequency- and angle-integrated low-order system of equations designed to enhance the accuracy of a coupled, high-order (transport) solution of the thermal radiative transfer equations. In particular, our new low-order system is designed to use intensity-weighted opacities and anisotropic diffusion coefficients generated by a solution of the Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) equations in order to predict the spatial dependence of the material temperature and radiation energies in the ensuing time cycle. The predicted temperature solution can then be exploited to generate appropriately time-centered opacities, specific heats, and Planck emission spectra for the upcoming IMC solution. Additionally, the relatively inexpensive solution of the low-order system can be iteratively solved to recommend an adaptive time step size before the IMC solution is computed. A test implementation has been implemented using existing software available from the Jayenne and Capsaicin projects at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We present initial results from a new driver code that has integrated these stochastic and deterministic software packages. (authors)

  1. Comparison of Space Radiation Calculations from Deterministic and Monte Carlo Transport Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H.; Lin, Z. W.; Nasser, A. F.; Randeniya, S.; Tripathi, r. K.; Watts, J. W.; Yepes, P.

    2010-01-01

    The presentation outline includes motivation, radiation transport codes being considered, space radiation cases being considered, results for slab geometry, results from spherical geometry, and summary. ///////// main physics in radiation transport codes hzetrn uprop fluka geant4, slab geometry, spe, gcr,

  2. Method for modeling radiative transport in luminescent particulate media.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Michael D; Borca-Tasciuc, Diana-Andra; Kaminski, Deborah A

    2016-04-20

    Modeling radiative transport in luminescent particulate media is important to a variety of applications, from biomedical imaging to solar power harvesting. When absorption and scattering from individual particles must be considered, the description of radiative transport is not straightforward. For large particles and interparticle spacing, geometrical optics can be employed. However, this approach requires accurate knowledge of several particle properties, such as index of refraction and absorption coefficient, along with particle geometry and positioning. Because the determination of these variables is often nontrivial, we developed an approach for modeling radiative transport in such media, which combines two simple experiments with Monte Carlo simulations to determine the particle extinction coefficient (Γ) and the probability of absorption of light by a particle (PA). The method is validated on samples consisting of luminescent phosphor powder dispersed in a silicone matrix. PMID:27140095

  3. The essential linearity of thermal radiation net transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, J. J.

    1991-06-01

    Thermal radiation net transport is proportional to the difference in the fourth powers of the absolute temperatures of the radiator and the receiver. During a study of heat transfer mechanisms in the underground storage tanks for the radioactive wastes at the Hanford Site in Washington, it was discovered that the fourth power difference is approximated by a linear function of the temperature difference between the radiator and the receiver, with astounding fidelity. This linearity makes satisfying boundary conditions for analytical and numerical calculations much simpler and simplifies comparisons with other modes of heat transfer. The paper derives the relationship and illustrates its use by demonstrating that radiation transports more heat through the air space in the tank than does natural convection.

  4. Radiative transport-based frequency-domain fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Amit; Rasmussen, John C.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Wareing, Todd A.; McGhee, John

    2008-04-01

    We report the development of radiative transport model-based fluorescence optical tomography from frequency-domain boundary measurements. The coupled radiative transport model for describing NIR fluorescence propagation in tissue is solved by a novel software based on the established Attila™ particle transport simulation platform. The proposed scheme enables the prediction of fluorescence measurements with non-contact sources and detectors at a minimal computational cost. An adjoint transport solution-based fluorescence tomography algorithm is implemented on dual grids to efficiently assemble the measurement sensitivity Jacobian matrix. Finally, we demonstrate fluorescence tomography on a realistic computational mouse model to locate nM to µM fluorophore concentration distributions in simulated mouse organs.

  5. Discontinuous Galerkin Methods for Neutrino Radiation Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endeve, Eirik; Hauck, Cory; Xing, Yulong; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2015-04-01

    We are developing new computational methods for simulation of neutrino transport in core-collapse supernovae, which is challenging since neutrinos evolve from being diffusive in the proto-neutron star to nearly free streaming in the critical neutrino heating region. To this end, we consider conservative formulations of the Boltzmann equation, and aim to develop robust, high-order accurate methods. Runge-Kutta discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods, offer several attractive properties, including (i) high-order accuracy on a compact stencil and (ii) correct asymptotic behavior in the diffusion limit. We have recently developed a new DG method for the advection part for the transport solve, which is high-order accurate and strictly preserves the physical bounds of the distribution function; i.e., f ∈ [ 0 , 1 ] . We summarize the main ingredients of our bound-preserving DG method and discuss ongoing work to include neutrino-matter interactions in the scheme. Research sponsored in part by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U. S. Department of Energy

  6. New Algorithms for Large-scale 3D Radiation Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentz, Eric J.

    2009-05-01

    Radiation transport is critical not only for analysis of astrophysical objects but also for the dynamical transport of energy within. Increased fidelity and dimensionality of the other components of such models requires a similar improvement in the radiation transport. Modern astrophysical simulations can be large enough that the values for a single variable for the entire computational domain cannot be stored on a single compute node. The natural solution is to decompose the physical domain into pieces with each node responsible for a single sub-domain. Using localized plus "ghost" zone data works well for problems like explicit hydrodynamics or nuclear reaction networks with modest impact from inter-process communication. Unfortunately, radiation transport is an inherently non-local process that couples the entire model domain together and efficient algorithms are needed to conquer this problem. In this poster, I present the early development of a new parallel, 3-D transport code using ray tracing to formally solve the transport equation across numerically decomposed domains. The algorithm model takes advantage of one-sided communication to develop a scalable, parallel formal solver. Other aspects and future direction of the parallel code development such as scalability and the inclusion of scattering will also be discussed.

  7. Diagnosing ocean energy transports from earth radiation budget measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, Byung-Ju; Smith, Eric A.

    1992-01-01

    The maximum energy production (MEP) principle suggested by Paltridge (1975) is applied to separate the satellite-inferred required total transports into the atmospheric and the oceanic components within a two-dimensional (2D) framework. For this purpose, the required 2D energy transports (Sohn and Smith, 1991) are imposed on Paltridge's energy balance model which is then solved as a variational problem. The results provide separated atmospheric and oceanic transports on a 2D basis such that the total divergence is equal to the net radiation measured from a satellite.

  8. Radiation transport on unstructured mesh with parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, W.C.; Drumm, C.R.

    2000-07-01

    This paper summarizes the developmental work on a deterministic transport code that provides multidimensional radiation transport capabilities on an unstructured mesh. The second-order form of the Boltzmann transport equation is solved utilizing the discrete ordinates angular differencing and the Galerkin finite element spatial differencing. The discretized system, which couples the spatial-angular dependence, is solved simultaneously using a parallel conjugate-gradient (CG) iterative solver. This approach eliminates the need for the conventional inner iterations over the discrete directions and is well-suited for massively parallel computers.

  9. RADIATION EFFECTS ON TRANSPORT AND BUBBLE FORMATION IN SILICATE GLASSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the research is to discover the molecular details of chemistry induced by -, γ-, and neutron-irradiation of silicate glasses. The ionization and ballistic effects of radiation will be studied from the viewpoint of defect formation and transport properties. D...

  10. A space radiation transport method development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Tripathi, R. K.; Qualls, G. D.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Prael, R. E.; Norbury, J. W.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Tweed, J.

    2004-01-01

    Improved spacecraft shield design requires early entry of radiation constraints into the design process to maximize performance and minimize costs. As a result, we have been investigating high-speed computational procedures to allow shield analysis from the preliminary design concepts to the final design. In particular, we will discuss the progress towards a full three-dimensional and computationally efficient deterministic code for which the current HZETRN evaluates the lowest-order asymptotic term. HZETRN is the first deterministic solution to the Boltzmann equation allowing field mapping within the International Space Station (ISS) in tens of minutes using standard finite element method (FEM) geometry common to engineering design practice enabling development of integrated multidisciplinary design optimization methods. A single ray trace in ISS FEM geometry requires 14 ms and severely limits application of Monte Carlo methods to such engineering models. A potential means of improving the Monte Carlo efficiency in coupling to spacecraft geometry is given in terms of re-configurable computing and could be utilized in the final design as verification of the deterministic method optimized design. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  11. A space radiation transport method development.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J W; Tripathi, R K; Qualls, G D; Cucinotta, F A; Prael, R E; Norbury, J W; Heinbockel, J H; Tweed, J

    2004-01-01

    Improved spacecraft shield design requires early entry of radiation constraints into the design process to maximize performance and minimize costs. As a result, we have been investigating high-speed computational procedures to allow shield analysis from the preliminary design concepts to the final design. In particular, we will discuss the progress towards a full three-dimensional and computationally efficient deterministic code for which the current HZETRN evaluates the lowest-order asymptotic term. HZETRN is the first deterministic solution to the Boltzmann equation allowing field mapping within the International Space Station (ISS) in tens of minutes using standard finite element method (FEM) geometry common to engineering design practice enabling development of integrated multidisciplinary design optimization methods. A single ray trace in ISS FEM geometry requires 14 ms and severely limits application of Monte Carlo methods to such engineering models. A potential means of improving the Monte Carlo efficiency in coupling to spacecraft geometry is given in terms of re-configurable computing and could be utilized in the final design as verification of the deterministic method optimized design. PMID:15880919

  12. Numerical solution of the radiation transport equation in disk geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spagna, George F., Jr.; Leung, Chun Ming

    1987-01-01

    An efficient numerical method for solving the problem of radiation transport in a dusty medium with two dimensional (2-D) disk geometry is described. It is a generalization of the one-dimensional quasi-diffusion method in which the transport equation is cast in diffusion form and then solved as a boundary value problem. The method should be applicable to a variety of astronomical sources, the dynamics of which are angular-momentum dominated and hence not accurately treated by spherical geometry, e.g., protoplanetary nebulae, circumstellar disks, interstellar molecular clouds, accretion disks, and disk galaxies. The computational procedure and practical considerations for implementing the method are described in detail. To illustrate the effects of 2-D radiation transport, some model results (dust temperature distributions and IR flux spectra) for externally heated, interstellar dust clouds with spherically symmetric and disk geometry are compared.

  13. Radiation Belt Transport Driven by Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, B. T.; Hudson, M. K.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Mueller, H.

    2012-12-01

    The creation of the Earth's outer zone radiation belts is attributed to earthward transport and adiabatic acceleration of electrons by drift-resonant interactions with electromagnetic fluctuations in the magnetosphere. Three types of radial transport driven by solar wind dynamic pressure fluctuations that have been identified are: (1) radial diffusion [Falthammer, 1965], (2) significant changes in the phase space density radial profile due to a single or few ULF drift-resonant interactions [Ukhorskiy et al., 2006; Degeling et al., 2008], and (3) shock associated injections of radiation belt electrons occurring in less than a drift period [Li et al., 1993]. A progress report will be given on work to fully characterize different forms of radial transport and their effect on the Earth's radiation belts. The work is being carried out by computing test-particle trajectories in electric and magnetic fields from a simple analytic ULF field model and from global MHD simulations of the magnetosphere. Degeling, A. W., L. G. Ozeke, R. Rankin, I. R. Mann, and K. Kabin (2008), Drift resonant generation of peaked relativistic electron distributions by Pc 5 ULF waves, textit{J. Geophys. Res., 113}, A02208, doi:10.1029/2007JA012411. Fälthammar, C.-G. (1965), Effects of Time-Dependent Electric Fields on Geomagnetically Trapped Radiation, J. Geophys. Res., 70(11), 2503-2516, doi:10.1029/JZ070i011p02503. Li, X., I. Roth, M. Temerin, J. R. Wygant, M. K. Hudson, and J. B. Blake (1993), Simulation of the prompt energization and transport of radiation belt particles during the March 24, 1991 SSC, textit{Geophys. Res. Lett., 20}(22), 2423-2426, doi:10.1029/93GL02701. Ukhorskiy, A. Y., B. J. Anderson, K. Takahashi, and N. A. Tsyganenko (2006), Impact of ULF oscillations in solar wind dynamic pressure on the outer radiation belt electrons, textit{Geophys. Res. Lett., 33}(6), L06111, doi:10.1029/2005GL024380.

  14. Instabilities and the transport of polarized astrophysical maser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallin, Bradley K.; Watson, William D.

    1995-01-01

    Time-dependent, radiative instabilities in the creation and transport of polarized astrophysical maser radiation in the presence of a magnetic field are calculated. The instabilities are similar to and occur under the same conditions as those found previously by Scappaticci & Watson for unpolarized maser radiation. The common limits in which the Zeeman splitting is much greater than, and much less than, the spectral line breadths are both considered in the current investigation. The resulting fluctuations in the emergent radiation are potentially relevant for the OH 1665 MHz masers which have been reported to fluctuate on timescales of 1000 s and which tend to be polarized. Instabilities occur and alter the transport of maser radiation only under a quite limited range of conditions. In particular, we find here that the instabilities do not occur for conditions that are appropriate for astrophysical masers with small Zeeman splittings such as the SiO and H2O masers. The time-independent, numerical solutions to the GKK equations of radiative transfer that have been obtained in previous investigations are thus essentially always valid except within a narrow range of conditions relevant for the OH masers.

  15. Thermal radiation transport in a fluidized dry water system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylan, Onur; Berberoglu, Halil

    2013-05-01

    This paper reports a numerical study on thermal radiation transport in a novel material called dry water. Dry water is a water-in-air inverse foam which consists of micrometer-sized water droplets encapsulated by hydrophobic fumed-silica nanoparticles. First, the size distribution of dry water was measured using a particle size analyzer. Then, the radiation characteristics of dry water were obtained using the Mie theory for coated spheres. One-dimensional, steady radiative transport in fluidized dry water system was modeled using the radiative transport equation (RTE) and was solved spectrally with the discrete ordinates method. The effects of silica coating and water droplet size as well as the volume fraction of dry water particles on reducing radiative heat transfer were studied parametrically. The results obtained using the size distributions from experimental measurements at a volume fraction of 10-4 showed that dry water reduced the local radiative heat flux by more than 60% with respect to that by silica particles alone whereas its performance was comparable to that of fine water mists. Moreover, reduction of the diameter of dry water particles from 150 to 50 μm and increasing their volume fraction from 10-4 to 10-3 decreased the radiative heat flux by 45% and 67%, respectively. Dry water is a novel and unique material that does not require high pressure fluid lines for producing fine mists and features a silica shell that can serve to encapsulate water soluble compounds, retard water evaporation from the core as well as increase scattering. With these unique features, dry water finds diverse engineering applications serving as a base for photo-catalytic nanoreactors, gas and chemical storage and delivery systems, as well as alternative mist systems in firefighting.

  16. Simulations of Groundwater Flow and Radionuclide Transport in the Vadose and Saturated Zones beneath Area G, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kay H. Birdsell; Kathleen M. Bower; Andrew V. Wolfsberg; Wendy E. Soll; Terry A. Cherry; Tade W. Orr

    1999-07-01

    Numerical simulations are used to predict the migration of radionuclides from the disposal units at Material Disposal Area G through the vadose zone and into the main aquifer in support of a radiological performance assessment and composite analysis for the site. The calculations are performed with the finite element code, FEHM. The transport of nuclides through the vadose zone is computed using a three-dimensional model that describes the complex mesa top geology of the site. The model incorporates the positions and inventories of thirty-four disposal pits and four shaft fields located at Area G as well as those of proposed future pits and shafts. Only three nuclides, C-14, Tc-99, and I-129, proved to be of concern for the groundwater pathway over a 10,000-year period. The spatial and temporal flux of these three nuclides from the vadose zone is applied as a source term for the three-dimensional saturated zone model of the main aquifer that underlies the site. The movement of these nuclides in the aquifer to a downstream location is calculated, and aquifer concentrations are converted to doses. Doses related to aquifer concentrations are six or more orders of magnitude lower than allowable Department of Energy performance objectives for low-level radioactive waste sites. Numerical studies were used to better understand vadose-zone flow through the dry mesa-top environment at Area G. These studies helped define the final model used to model flow and transport through the vadose zone. The study of transient percolation indicates that a steady flow vadose-zone model is adequate for computing contaminant flux to the aquifer. The fracture flow studies and the investigation of the effect of basalt and pumice properties helped us define appropriate hydrologic properties for the modeling. Finally, the evaporation study helped to justify low infiltration rates.

  17. Radiosity Modeling of Radiation Transport in Z Hohlraum Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesey, R. A.; Mehlhorn, T. A.

    1998-11-01

    Vacuum radiation transport in three-dimensional geometry has been modeled, with simple physics assumptions, using the Lightscape^TM commercial radiosity code. This code utilizes progressive, hierarchical radiosity techniques and adaptive mesh refinement to allow greater spatial resolution and unlimited geometric model complexity compared to traditional radiosity methods. Applications to current Z experiments at Sandia will be presented, including (a) uniformity of the radiation flux driving shock physics samples in offset and direct-viewing secondary hohlraums, (b) radiation temperature gradients and capsule illumination in on-axis secondaries driven by static-walled primary hohlraums, and (c) radiation loss from primary hohlraums into the Z anode-cathode gap and feed hardware.

  18. Radiation Transport through cylindrical foams with heated walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Kevin; MacLaren, Steve; Kallman, Joshua; Heinz, Ken; Hsing, Warren

    2012-10-01

    Radiation transport through low density SiO2 foams has been experimentally studied on the Omega laser. In particular these experiments examined the effects on radiation transport when the boundaries of the SiO2 foam are heated such that energy loss to the boundaries is minimized. The initial density of the SiO2 foams was determined by taking an x-ray radiograph of the foams using a monochromatic Henke source at multiple x-ray energies. The radiation drive used to both study the transport in the SiO2 foam as well as to heat the higher density CRF wall was generated in a laser-heated gold hohlraum using ˜7.5 kJ of the laser energy. The time-dependent spatial profile of the heat wave breaking out of the SiO2 foam was detected with an x-ray streak camera coupled with a soft x-ray transmission grating. The Omega DANTE diagnostic measured the radiation drive in the hohlraum and the Omega VISAR diagnostic monitored the spatial temperature gradient in the foam section of the hohlraum.

  19. Radiation inactivation target size of rat adipocyte glucose transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, C.Y.; Jacobs, D.B.; Berenski, C.J.; Spangler, R.A.

    1987-05-01

    In situ assembly states of rat adipocyte glucose transport protein in plasma membrane (PM) and in microsomal pool (MM) were assessed by measuring target size (TS) of D glucose-sensitive, cytochalasin B binding activity. High energy radiation inactivated the binding in both PM and MM by reducing the total capacity of the binding (B/sub T/) without affecting the dissociation constant (K/sub D/). The reduction in B/sub T/ as a function of radiation dose was analyzed based on classical target theory, from which TS was calculated. TS in the PM of insulin-treated adipocytes was 58 KDa. TS in the MM of noninsulin-treated and insulin-treated adipocytes were 112 and 109 KDa, respectively. With MM, however, inactivation data showed anomalously low radiation sensitivities at low radiation doses showing a shoulder in the semilog plots, which may be due to an interaction with a radiation sensitive inhibitor. With these results, they propose the following model: Adipocyte glucose transporter, while exists as a monomer (T) in PM, occurs in MM either as a homodimer (T/sub 2/) or as a heterodimer (TX) with a protein X of a similar size. These dimers (T/sub 2/ or TX) in MM, furthermore, may form a multi-molecular assembly with another, large (300-400 KDa) protein Y, and insulin increases this assembly formation. These putative, transporter-associated proteins X and Y may play an important role in control of transporter distribution between PM and MM, particularly in response to insulin.

  20. Radiation Transport and Shielding for Space Exploration and High Speed Flight Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maung, Khin Maung; Trapathi, R. K.

    1997-01-01

    Transportation of ions and neutrons in matter is of direct interest in several technologically important and scientific areas, including space radiation, cosmic ray propagation studies in galactic medium, nuclear power plants and radiological effects that impact industrial and public health. For the proper assessment of radiation exposure, both reliable transport codes and accurate data are needed. Nuclear cross section data is one of the essential inputs into the transport codes. In order to obtain an accurate parametrization of cross section data, theoretical input is indispensable especially for processes where there is little or no experimental data available. In this grant period work has been done on the studies of the use of relativistic equations and their one-body limits. The results will be useful in choosing appropriate effective one-body equation for reaction calculations. Work has also been done to improve upon the data base needed for the transport codes used in the studies of radiation transport and shielding for space exploration and high speed flight transportation. A phenomenological model was developed for the total absorption cross sections valid for any system of charged and/or uncharged collision pairs for the entire energy range. The success of the model is gratifying. It is being used by other federal agencies, national labs and universities. A list of publications based on the work during the grant period is given below and copies are enclosed with this report.

  1. COMPARISON OF MONTE CARLO METHODS FOR NONLINEAR RADIATION TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    W. R. MARTIN; F. B. BROWN

    2001-03-01

    Five Monte Carlo methods for solving the nonlinear thermal radiation transport equations are compared. The methods include the well-known Implicit Monte Carlo method (IMC) developed by Fleck and Cummings, an alternative to IMC developed by Carter and Forest, an ''exact'' method recently developed by Ahrens and Larsen, and two methods recently proposed by Martin and Brown. The five Monte Carlo methods are developed and applied to the radiation transport equation in a medium assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium. Conservation of energy is derived and used to define appropriate material energy update equations for each of the methods. Details of the Monte Carlo implementation are presented, both for the random walk simulation and the material energy update. Simulation results for all five methods are obtained for two infinite medium test problems and a 1-D test problem, all of which have analytical solutions. Conclusions regarding the relative merits of the various schemes are presented.

  2. Shift: A Massively Parallel Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Package

    SciTech Connect

    Pandya, Tara M; Johnson, Seth R; Davidson, Gregory G; Evans, Thomas M; Hamilton, Steven P

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the massively-parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport package, Shift, developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It reviews the capabilities, implementation, and parallel performance of this code package. Scaling results demonstrate very good strong and weak scaling behavior of the implemented algorithms. Benchmark results from various reactor problems show that Shift results compare well to other contemporary Monte Carlo codes and experimental results.

  3. Predicting radiative transport properties of plasma sprayed porous ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B. X.; Zhao, C. Y.

    2016-03-01

    The typical yttria-stabilized zirconia material for making the thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) is intrinsically semitransparent to thermal radiation, and the unique disordered microstructures in TBCs make them surprisingly highly scattering. To quantitatively understand the influence of disordered microstructures, this paper presents a quantitative prediction on the radiative properties, especially the transport scattering coefficient of plasma sprayed TBC based on microstructure analysis and rigorous electromagnetic theory. The impact of the porosity, shape, size, and orientation of different types of voids on transport scattering coefficient is comprehensively investigated under the discrete dipole approximation. An inverse model integrating these factors together is then proposed to quantitatively connect transport scattering coefficient with microstructural information, which is also validated by available experimental data. Afterwards, an optimization procedure is carried out based on this model to obtain the optimal size and orientation distribution of the microscale voids to achieve the maximal radiation insulation performance at different operating temperatures, providing guidelines for practical coating design and fabrication. This work suggests that the current model is effective and also efficient for connecting scattering properties to microstructures and can be implemented as a quantitative tool for further studies like non-destructive infrared imaging as well as micro/nanoscale thermal design of TBCs.

  4. NERO- a post-maximum supernova radiation transport code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, I.; Jerkstrand, A.; Mazzali, P. A.; Taubenberger, S.; Hachinger, S.; Kromer, M.; Sim, S.; Hillebrandt, W.

    2011-12-01

    The interpretation of supernova (SN) spectra is essential for deriving SN ejecta properties such as density and composition, which in turn can tell us about their progenitors and the explosion mechanism. A very large number of atomic processes are important for spectrum formation. Several tools for calculating SN spectra exist, but they mainly focus on the very early or late epochs. The intermediate phase, which requires a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) treatment of radiation transport has rarely been studied. In this paper, we present a new SN radiation transport code, NERO, which can look at those epochs. All the atomic processes are treated in full NLTE, under a steady-state assumption. This is a valid approach between roughly 50 and 500 days after the explosion depending on SN type. This covers the post-maximum photospheric and the early and the intermediate nebular phase. As a test, we compare NERO to the radiation transport code of Jerkstrand, Fransson & Kozma and to the nebular code of Mazzali et al. All three codes have been developed independently and a comparison provides a valuable opportunity to investigate their reliability. Currently, NERO is one-dimensional and can be used for predicting spectra of synthetic explosion models or for deriving SN properties by spectral modelling. To demonstrate this, we study the spectra of the 'normal' Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2005cf between 50 and 350 days after the explosion and identify most of the common SN Ia line features at post-maximum epochs.

  5. Efficient, Automated Monte Carlo Methods for Radiation Transport

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Rong; Ambrose, Martin; Spanier, Jerome

    2012-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations provide an indispensible model for solving radiative transport problems, but their slow convergence inhibits their use as an everyday computational tool. In this paper, we present two new ideas for accelerating the convergence of Monte Carlo algorithms based upon an efficient algorithm that couples simulations of forward and adjoint transport equations. Forward random walks are first processed in stages, each using a fixed sample size, and information from stage k is used to alter the sampling and weighting procedure in stage k + 1. This produces rapid geometric convergence and accounts for dramatic gains in the efficiency of the forward computation. In case still greater accuracy is required in the forward solution, information from an adjoint simulation can be added to extend the geometric learning of the forward solution. The resulting new approach should find widespread use when fast, accurate simulations of the transport equation are needed. PMID:23226872

  6. Modeling Aeolian Transport of Contaminated Sediments at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Technical Area 54, Area G: Sensitivities to Succession, Disturbance, and Future Climate

    SciTech Connect

    Whicker, Jeffrey J.; Kirchner, Thomas B.; Breshears, David D.; Field, Jason P.

    2012-03-27

    The Technical Area 54 (TA-54) Area G disposal facility is used for the disposal of radioactive waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 (DOE, 2001) requires that radioactive waste be managed in a manner that protects public health and safety and the environment. In compliance with that requirement, DOE field sites must prepare and maintain site-specific radiological performance assessments for facilities that receive waste after September 26, 1988. Sites are also required to conduct composite analyses for facilities that receive waste after this date; these analyses account for the cumulative impacts of all waste that has been (and will be) disposed of at the facilities and other sources of radioactive material that may interact with these facilities. LANL issued Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis in 2008. In support of those analyses, vertical and horizontal sediment flux data were collected at two analog sites, each with different dominant vegetation characteristics, and used to estimate rates of vertical resuspension and wind erosion for Area G. The results of that investigation indicated that there was no net loss of soil at the disposal site due to wind erosion, and suggested minimal impacts of wind on the long-term performance of the facility. However, that study did not evaluate the potential for contaminant transport caused by the horizontal movement of soil particles over long time frames. Since that time, additional field data have been collected to estimate wind threshold velocities for initiating sediment transport due to saltation and rates of sediment transport once those thresholds are reached. Data such as these have been used in the development of the Vegetation Modified Transport (VMTran) model. This model is designed to estimate patterns and long-term rates of contaminant redistribution caused by winds at the site, taking into account the impacts of plant

  7. Stormtime transport of ring current and radiation belt ions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.W.; Schulz, M.; Lyons, L.R.; Gorney, D.J.

    1993-04-01

    This is an investigation of stormtime particle transport that leads to formation of the ring current. The method is to trace the guiding-center motion of representative ions (having selected first adiabatic invariants [mu]) in response to model substorm-associated impulses in the convection electric field. The simulation results are compared qualitatively with existing analytically tractable idealizations of particle transport (direct convective access and radial diffusion) in order to assess the limits of validity of these approximations. For [mu] approximately less than 10 MeV/G (E approximately less than 10 keV at L equivalent to 3) the ion drift period on the final (ring-current) drift shell of interest (L equivalent to 3) exceeds the duration of the main phase of the model storm, and the authors find that the transport of ions to this drift shell is appropriately idealized as direct convective access, typically from open drift paths. Ion transport to a final closed drift path from an open (plasma-sheet) drift trajectory is possible for those portions of that drift path that lie outside the mean stormtime separatrix between closed and open drift trajectories, For [mu] approximately 10-25 MeV/G (110 keV approximately less than E approximately less than 280 keV at L equivalent to 3) the drift period at L equivalent to 3 is comparable to the postulated 3-hr duration of the storm, and the mode of transport is transitional between direct convective access and transport that resembles radial diffusion. (This particle population is transitional between the ring current and radiation belt). For [mu] approximately greater than 25 MeV/G (radiation-belt ions having E approximately greater than 280 keV at L equivalent to 3) the ion drift period is considerably shorter than the main phase of a typical storm, and ions gain access to the ring-current region essentially via radial diffusion.

  8. Atmospheric transport, clouds and the Arctic longwave radiation paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlar, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Clouds interact with radiation, causing variations in the amount of electromagnetic energy reaching the Earth's surface, or escaping the climate system to space. While globally clouds lead to an overall cooling radiative effect at the surface, over the Arctic, where annual cloud fractions are high, the surface cloud radiative effect generally results in a warming. The additional energy input from absorption and re-emission of longwave radiation by the clouds to the surface can have a profound effect on the sea ice state. Anomalous atmospheric transport of heat and moisture into the Arctic, promoting cloud formation and enhancing surface longwave radiation anomalies, has been identified as an important mechanism in preconditioning Arctic sea ice for melt. Longwave radiation is emitted equally in all directions, and changes in the atmospheric infrared emission temperature and emissivity associated with advection of heat and moisture over the Arctic should correspondingly lead to an anomalous signal in longwave radiation at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). To examine the role of atmospheric heat and moisture transport into the Arctic on TOA longwave radiation, infrared satellite sounder observations from AIRS during 2003-2014 are analyzed for summer (JJAS). Thermodynamic metrics are developed to identify months characterized by a high frequency of warm and moist advection into the Arctic, and segregate the 2003-14 time period into climatological and anomalously warm, moist summer months. We find that anomalously warm, moist months result in a significant TOA longwave radiative cooling, which is opposite the forcing signal that the surface experiences during these months. At the timescale of the advective events, 3-10 days, the TOA cooling can be as large as the net surface energy budget during summer. When averaged on the monthly time scale, and over the full Arctic basin (poleward of 75°N), summer months experiencing frequent warm, moist advection events are

  9. Radiative transport in fluorescence-enhanced frequency domain photon migration.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, John C; Joshi, Amit; Pan, Tianshu; Wareing, Todd; McGhee, John; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2006-12-01

    Small animal optical tomography has significant, but potential application for streamlining drug discovery and pre-clinical investigation of drug candidates. However, accurate modeling of photon propagation in small animal volumes is critical to quantitatively obtain accurate tomographic images. Herein we present solutions from a robust fluorescence-enhanced, frequency domain radiative transport equation (RTE) solver with unique attributes that facilitate its deployment within tomographic algorithms. Specifically, the coupled equations describing time-dependent excitation and emission light transport are solved using discrete ordinates (SN) angular differencing along with linear discontinuous finite-element spatial differencing on unstructured tetrahedral grids. Source iteration in conjunction with diffusion synthetic acceleration is used to iteratively solve the resulting system of equations. This RTE solver can accurately and efficiently predict ballistic as well as diffusion limited transport regimes which could simultaneously exist in small animals. Furthermore, the solver provides accurate solutions on unstructured, tetrahedral grids with relatively large element sizes as compared to commonly employed solvers that use step differencing. The predictions of the solver are validated by a series of frequency-domain, phantom measurements with optical properties ranging from diffusion limited to transport limited propagation. Our results demonstrate that the RTE solution consistently matches measurements made under both diffusion and transport-limited conditions. This work demonstrates the use of an appropriate RTE solver for deployment in small animal optical tomography. PMID:17278821

  10. Applications of the Monte Carlo radiation transport toolkit at LLNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sale, Kenneth E.; Bergstrom, Paul M., Jr.; Buck, Richard M.; Cullen, Dermot; Fujino, D.; Hartmann-Siantar, Christine

    1999-09-01

    Modern Monte Carlo radiation transport codes can be applied to model most applications of radiation, from optical to TeV photons, from thermal neutrons to heavy ions. Simulations can include any desired level of detail in three-dimensional geometries using the right level of detail in the reaction physics. The technology areas to which we have applied these codes include medical applications, defense, safety and security programs, nuclear safeguards and industrial and research system design and control. The main reason such applications are interesting is that by using these tools substantial savings of time and effort (i.e. money) can be realized. In addition it is possible to separate out and investigate computationally effects which can not be isolated and studied in experiments. In model calculations, just as in real life, one must take care in order to get the correct answer to the right question. Advancing computing technology allows extensions of Monte Carlo applications in two directions. First, as computers become more powerful more problems can be accurately modeled. Second, as computing power becomes cheaper Monte Carlo methods become accessible more widely. An overview of the set of Monte Carlo radiation transport tools in use a LLNL will be presented along with a few examples of applications and future directions.

  11. Radiation safety of crew and passengers of air transportation in civil aviation. Provisional standards

    SciTech Connect

    Aksenov, A.F.; Burnazyan, A.I.

    1985-03-01

    The purpose and application of the provisional standards for radiation safety of crew and passengers in civil aviation are given. The radiation effect of cosmic radiation in flight on civil aviation air transport is described. Standard levels of radiation and conditions of radiation safety are discussed.

  12. Radiation safety of crew and passengers of air transportation in civil aviation. Provisional standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aksenov, A. F.; Burnazyan, A. I.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose and application of the provisional standards for radiation safety of crew and passengers in civil aviation are given. The radiation effect of cosmic radiation in flight on civil aviation air transport is described. Standard levels of radiation and conditions of radiation safety are discussed.

  13. Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammel, Edward F., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Current and post World War II scientific research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (New Mexico) is discussed. The operation of the laboratory, the Los Alamos consultant program, and continuation education, and continuing education activities at the laboratory are also discussed. (JN)

  14. Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Ralph G.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Pagh, Richard T.

    2006-10-31

    Computational modeling of radiation transport problems including homeland security, radiation shielding and protection, and criticality safety all depend upon material definitions. This document has been created to serve two purposes: 1) to provide a quick reference of material compositions for analysts and 2) a standardized reference to reduce the differences between results from two independent analysts. Analysts are always encountering a variety of materials for which elemental definitions are not readily available or densities are not defined. This document provides a location where unique or hard to define materials will be located to reduce duplication in research for modeling purposes. Additionally, having a common set of material definitions helps to standardize modeling across PNNL and provide two separate researchers the ability to compare different modeling results from a common materials basis.

  15. Radiation safety aspects of commercial high-speed flight transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John W.; Nealy, John E.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Shinn, Judy L.; Hajnal, Ferenc; Reginatto, Marcel; Goldhagen, Paul

    1995-05-01

    High-speed commercial flight transportation is being studied for intercontinental operations in the 21st century, the projected operational characteristics for these aircraft are examined, the radiation environment as it is now known is presented, and the relevant health issues are discussed. Based on a critical examination of the data, a number of specific issues need to be addressed to ensure an adequate knowledge of the ionizing radiation health risks of these aircraft operations. Large uncertainties in our knowledge of the physical fields for high-energy neutrons and multiply-charged ion components need to be reduced. Improved methods for estimating risks in prenatal exposure need to be developed. A firm basis for solar flare monitoring and forecasting needs to be developed with means of exposure abatement.

  16. Radiation safety aspects of commercial high-speed flight transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Nealy, John E.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Shinn, Judy L.; Hajnal, Ferenc; Reginatto, Marcel; Goldhagen, Paul

    1995-01-01

    High-speed commercial flight transportation is being studied for intercontinental operations in the 21st century, the projected operational characteristics for these aircraft are examined, the radiation environment as it is now known is presented, and the relevant health issues are discussed. Based on a critical examination of the data, a number of specific issues need to be addressed to ensure an adequate knowledge of the ionizing radiation health risks of these aircraft operations. Large uncertainties in our knowledge of the physical fields for high-energy neutrons and multiply-charged ion components need to be reduced. Improved methods for estimating risks in prenatal exposure need to be developed. A firm basis for solar flare monitoring and forecasting needs to be developed with means of exposure abatement.

  17. A FORMALISM FOR COVARIANT POLARIZED RADIATIVE TRANSPORT BY RAY TRACING

    SciTech Connect

    Gammie, Charles F.; Leung, Po Kin

    2012-06-20

    We write down a covariant formalism for polarized radiative transfer appropriate for ray tracing through a turbulent plasma. The polarized radiation field is represented by the polarization tensor (coherency matrix) N{sup {alpha}{beta}} {identical_to} (a{sup {alpha}}{sub k} a*{sup {beta}}{sub k}), where a{sub k} is a Fourier coefficient for the vector potential. Using Maxwell's equations, the Liouville-Vlasov equation, and the WKB approximation, we show that the transport equation in vacuo is k{sup {mu}}{nabla}{sub {mu}} N{sup {alpha}{beta}} = 0. We show that this is equivalent to Broderick and Blandford's formalism based on invariant Stokes parameters and a rotation coefficient, and suggest a modification that may reduce truncation error in some situations. Finally, we write down several alternative approaches to integrating the transfer equation.

  18. Radiation transport modeling using extended quadrature method of moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikas, V.; Hauck, C. D.; Wang, Z. J.; Fox, R. O.

    2013-08-01

    The radiative transfer equation describes the propagation of radiation through a material medium. While it provides a highly accurate description of the radiation field, the large phase space on which the equation is defined makes it numerically challenging. As a consequence, significant effort has gone into the development of accurate approximation methods. Recently, an extended quadrature method of moments (EQMOM) has been developed to solve univariate population balance equations, which also have a large phase space and thus face similar computational challenges. The distinct advantage of the EQMOM approach over other moment methods is that it generates moment equations that are consistent with a positive phase space density and has a moment inversion algorithm that is fast and efficient. The goal of the current paper is to present the EQMOM method in the context of radiation transport, to discuss advantages and disadvantages, and to demonstrate its performance on a set of standard one-dimensional benchmark problems that encompass optically thin, thick, and transition regimes. Special attention is given in the implementation to the issue of realizability—that is, consistency with a positive phase space density. Numerical results in one dimension are promising and lay the foundation for extending the same framework to multiple dimensions.

  19. High thermal-transport capacity heat pipes for space radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Albert W.; Gustafson, Eric; Roukis, Susan L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the results of performance tests of several dual-slot heat pipe test articles. The dual-slot configuration has a very high thermal transport capability and has been identified as a very promising candidate for the radiator system for the NASA Space Station solar dynamic power modules. Two six-foot long aluminum heat pipes were built and tested with ammonia and acetone. A 20-ft long heat pipe was also built and tested with ammonia. The test results have been compared with performance predictions. A thermal transport capacity of 2000 W at an adverse tilt of 1 in. and a 1000 W capacity at an adverse tilt of 2 in. were achieved on the 20-ft long heat pipe. These values are in close agreement with the predicted performance limits.

  20. Radiation Transport in the Atmosphere - Sea Ice - Ocean System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Zhonghai

    1995-01-01

    A comprehensive radiative transfer model for the coupled atmosphere-sea ice-ocean system has been developed. The theoretical work required for constructing such a coupled model is described first. This work extends the discrete ordinate method, which has been proven to be effective in studies of radiative transfer in the atmosphere, to solve the radiative transfer problem pertaining to a system consisting of two strata with different indices of refraction, such as the atmosphere-ocean system and the atmosphere -sea ice-ocean system. The relevant changes (as compared to the standard problem with constant index of refraction throughout the medium) in formulation and solution of the radiative transfer equation, including the proper application of interface and boundary conditions, are presented. This solution is then applied to the atmosphere -sea ice-ocean system to study the solar energy balance in this coupled system. The input parameters required by the model are observable physical properties (e.g., the profiles of temperature and gas concentrations in the atmosphere, and the profiles of temperature, density, and salinity in the ice). The atmosphere, sea ice and ocean are each divided into a sufficient number of layers in the vertical to adequately resolve changes in their optical properties. This model rigorously accounts for the multiple scattering and absorption by atmospheric molecules, clouds, snow and sea water, as well as inclusions in the sea ice, such as brine pockets and air bubbles. The effects of various factors on the solar energy distribution in the entire system have been studied quantitatively. These factors include the ice salinity and density variations, cloud microphysics as well as variations in melt ponds and snow cover on the ice surface. Finally, the coupled radiative transfer model is used to study the impacts of clouds, snow and ice algae on the light transport in sea ice and in the ocean, as well as to simulate spectral irradiance and

  1. New Parallel computing framework for radiation transport codes

    SciTech Connect

    Kostin, M.A.; Mokhov, N.V.; Niita, K.; /JAERI, Tokai

    2010-09-01

    A new parallel computing framework has been developed to use with general-purpose radiation transport codes. The framework was implemented as a C++ module that uses MPI for message passing. The module is significantly independent of radiation transport codes it can be used with, and is connected to the codes by means of a number of interface functions. The framework was integrated with the MARS15 code, and an effort is under way to deploy it in PHITS. Besides the parallel computing functionality, the framework offers a checkpoint facility that allows restarting calculations with a saved checkpoint file. The checkpoint facility can be used in single process calculations as well as in the parallel regime. Several checkpoint files can be merged into one thus combining results of several calculations. The framework also corrects some of the known problems with the scheduling and load balancing found in the original implementations of the parallel computing functionality in MARS15 and PHITS. The framework can be used efficiently on homogeneous systems and networks of workstations, where the interference from the other users is possible.

  2. Hierarchical Adaptive Solution of Radiation Transport Problems on Unstructured Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Cassiano R. E de Oliveira

    2008-06-30

    Computational radiation transport has steadily gained acceptance in the last decade as a viable modeling tool due to the rapid advancements in computer software and hardware technologies. It can be applied for the analysis of a wide range of problems which arise in nuclear reactor physics, medical physics, atmospheric physics, astrophysics and other areas of engineering physics. However, radiation transport is an extremely chanllenging computational problem since the governing equation is seven-deimensional (3 in space, 2 in direction, 1 in energy, and 1 in time) with a high degree of coupleing betwen these variables. If not careful, this relatively large number of independent variables when discretized can potentially lead to sets of linear equations of intractable size. Though parallel computing has allowed the solution of very large problems, avaliable computational resources will always be finite due to the fact that every more sophisticated multiphysics models are being demanded by industry. There is thus the pressing requirement to optimize the discretizations so as to minimize the effort and maximize the accuracy.

  3. Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    McConn, Ronald J.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Pagh, Richard T.; Rucker, Robert A.; Williams III, Robert

    2011-03-04

    Introduction Meaningful simulations of radiation transport applications require realistic definitions of material composition and densities. When seeking that information for applications in fields such as homeland security, radiation shielding and protection, and criticality safety, researchers usually encounter a variety of materials for which elemental compositions are not readily available or densities are not defined. Publication of the Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling, Revision 0, in 2006 was the first step toward mitigating this problem. Revision 0 of this document listed 121 materials, selected mostly from the combined personal libraries of staff at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and thus had a scope that was recognized at the time to be limited. Nevertheless, its creation did provide a well-referenced source of some unique or hard-to-define material data in a format that could be used directly in radiation transport calculations being performed at PNNL. Moreover, having a single common set of material definitions also helped to standardize at least one aspect of the various modeling efforts across the laboratory by providing separate researchers the ability to compare different model results using a common basis of materials. The authors of the 2006 compendium understood that, depending on its use and feedback, the compendium would need to be revised to correct errors or inconsistencies in the data for the original 121 materials, as well as to increase (per users suggestions) the number of materials listed. This 2010 revision of the compendium has accomplished both of those objectives. The most obvious change is the increased number of materials from 121 to 372. The not-so-obvious change is the mechanism used to produce the data listed here. The data listed in the 2006 document were compiled, evaluated, entered, and error-checked by a group of individuals essentially by hand, providing no library

  4. Stockpile Stewardship: Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, Charlie; Morgan, Nathanial; Goorley, Tom; Merrill, Frank; Funk, Dave; Korzekwa, Deniece; Laintz, Ken

    2012-01-26

    "Heritage of Science" is a short video that highlights the Stockpile Stewardship program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Stockpile Stewardship was conceived in the early 1990s as a national science-based program that could assure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear deterrent without the need for full-scale underground nuclear testing. This video was produced by Los Alamos National Laboratory for screening at the Lab's Bradbury Science Museum in Los Alamos, NM and is narrated by science correspondent Miles O'Brien.

  5. Stockpile Stewardship: Los Alamos

    ScienceCinema

    McMillan, Charlie; Morgan, Nathanial; Goorley, Tom; Merrill, Frank; Funk, Dave; Korzekwa, Deniece; Laintz, Ken

    2014-08-12

    "Heritage of Science" is a short video that highlights the Stockpile Stewardship program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Stockpile Stewardship was conceived in the early 1990s as a national science-based program that could assure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear deterrent without the need for full-scale underground nuclear testing. This video was produced by Los Alamos National Laboratory for screening at the Lab's Bradbury Science Museum in Los Alamos, NM and is narrated by science correspondent Miles O'Brien.

  6. Development and Implementation of Photonuclear Cross-Section Data for Mutually Coupled Neutron-Photon Transport Calculations in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Radiation Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan C. White

    2000-07-01

    The fundamental motivation for the research presented in this dissertation was the need to development a more accurate prediction method for characterization of mixed radiation fields around medical electron accelerators (MEAs). Specifically, a model is developed for simulation of neutron and other particle production from photonuclear reactions and incorporated in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code. This extension of the capability within the MCNP code provides for the more accurate assessment of the mixed radiation fields. The Nuclear Theory and Applications group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory has recently provided first-of-a-kind evaluated photonuclear data for a select group of isotopes. These data provide the reaction probabilities as functions of incident photon energy with angular and energy distribution information for all reaction products. The availability of these data is the cornerstone of the new methodology for state-of-the-art mutually coupled photon-neutron transport simulations. The dissertation includes details of the model development and implementation necessary to use the new photonuclear data within MCNP simulations. A new data format has been developed to include tabular photonuclear data. Data are processed from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Format (ENDF) to the new class ''u'' A Compact ENDF (ACE) format using a standalone processing code. MCNP modifications have been completed to enable Monte Carlo sampling of photonuclear reactions. Note that both neutron and gamma production are included in the present model. The new capability has been subjected to extensive verification and validation (V&V) testing. Verification testing has established the expected basic functionality. Two validation projects were undertaken. First, comparisons were made to benchmark data from literature. These calculations demonstrate the accuracy of the new data and transport routines to better than 25 percent. Second, the ability to

  7. P1 Nonconforming Finite Element Method for the Solution of Radiation Transport Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Kab S.

    2002-01-01

    The simulation of radiation transport in the optically thick flux-limited diffusion regime has been identified as one of the most time-consuming tasks within large simulation codes. Due to multimaterial complex geometry, the radiation transport system must often be solved on unstructured grids. In this paper, we investigate the behavior and the benefits of the unstructured P(sub 1) nonconforming finite element method, which has proven to be flexible and effective on related transport problems, in solving unsteady implicit nonlinear radiation diffusion problems using Newton and Picard linearization methods. Key words. nonconforrning finite elements, radiation transport, inexact Newton linearization, multigrid preconditioning

  8. Validation of a comprehensive space radiation transport code.

    PubMed

    Shinn, J L; Cucinotta, F A; Simonsen, L C; Wilson, J W; Badavi, F F; Badhwar, G D; Miller, J; Zeitlin, C; Heilbronn, L; Tripathi, R K; Clowdsley, M S; Heinbockel, J H; Xapsos, M A

    1998-12-01

    The HZETRN code has been developed over the past decade to evaluate the local radiation fields within sensitive materials on spacecraft in the space environment. Most of the more important nuclear and atomic processes are now modeled and evaluation within a complex spacecraft geometry with differing material components, including transition effects across boundaries of dissimilar materials, are included. The atomic/nuclear database and transport procedures have received limited validation in laboratory testing with high energy ion beams. The codes have been applied in design of the SAGE-III instrument resulting in material changes to control injurious neutron production, in the study of the Space Shuttle single event upsets, and in validation with space measurements (particle telescopes, tissue equivalent proportional counters, CR-39) on Shuttle and Mir. The present paper reviews the code development and presents recent results in laboratory and space flight validation. PMID:11542474

  9. Space radiation transport properties of polyethylene-based composites.

    PubMed

    Kaul, R K; Barghouty, A F; Dahche, H M

    2004-11-01

    Composite materials that can serve as both effective shielding materials against cosmic-ray and energetic solar particles in deep space, as well as structural materials for habitat and spacecraft, remain a critical and mission enabling component in mission planning and exploration. Polyethylene is known to have excellent shielding properties due to its low density, coupled with high hydrogen content. Polyethylene-fiber reinforced composites promise to combine this shielding effectiveness with the required mechanical properties of structural materials. Samples of polyethylene-fiber reinforced epoxy matrix composite 1-5 cm thick were prepared at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and tested against a 500 MeV/nucleon Fe beam at the HIMAC facility of NIRS in Chiba, Japan. This paper presents measured and calculated results for the radiation transport properties of these samples. PMID:15644352

  10. Radiation Transport Properties of Polyethylene-Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Raj K.; Barghouty, A. F.; Dahche, H. M.

    2003-01-01

    Composite materials that can both serve as effective shielding materials against cosmic-ray and energetic solar particles in deep space as well as structural materials for habitat and spacecraft remain a critical and mission enabling piece in mission planning and exploration. Polyethylene is known to have excellent shielding properties due to its low density coupled with high hydrogen content. Polyethylene fiber reinforced composites promise to combine this shielding effectiveness with the required mechanical properties of structural materials. Samples of Polyethylene-fiber reinforced epoxy matrix composite 1-5 cm thick were prepared at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and tested against 500 MeV/nucleon Fe beam at the HIMAC facility of NIRS in Chiba, Japan. This paper presents measured and calculated results for the radiation transport properties of these samples.

  11. Space radiation transport properties of polyethylene-based composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, R. K.; Barghouty, A. F.; Dahche, H. M.

    2004-01-01

    Composite materials that can serve as both effective shielding materials against cosmic-ray and energetic solar particles in deep space, as well as structural materials for habitat and spacecraft, remain a critical and mission enabling component in mission planning and exploration. Polyethylene is known to have excellent shielding properties due to its low density, coupled with high hydrogen content. Polyethylene-fiber reinforced composites promise to combine this shielding effectiveness with the required mechanical properties of structural materials. Samples of polyethylene-fiber reinforced epoxy matrix composite 1-5 cm thick were prepared at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and tested against a 500 MeV/nucleon Fe beam at the HIMAC facility of NIRS in Chiba, Japan. This paper presents measured and calculated results for the radiation transport properties of these samples.

  12. Charge transport properties of CdMnTe radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim K.; Rafiel, R.; Boardman, M.; Reinhard, I.; Sarbutt, A.; Watt, G.; Watt, C.; Uxa, S.; Prokopovich, D.A.; Belas, E.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; James, R.B.

    2012-04-11

    Growth, fabrication and characterization of indium-doped cadmium manganese telluride (CdMnTe)radiation detectors have been described. Alpha-particle spectroscopy measurements and time resolved current transient measurements have yielded an average charge collection efficiency approaching 100 %. Spatially resolved charge collection efficiency maps have been produced for a range of detector bias voltages. Inhomogeneities in the charge transport of the CdMnTe crystals have been associated with chains of tellurium inclusions within the detector bulk. Further, it has been shown that the role of tellurium inclusions in degrading chargecollection is reduced with increasing values of bias voltage. The electron transit time was determined from time of flight measurements. From the dependence of drift velocity on applied electric field the electron mobility was found to be n = (718 55) cm2/Vs at room temperature.

  13. Deriving Kubelka-Munk theory from radiative transport.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Christopher; Kim, Arnold D

    2014-03-01

    We derive Kubelka-Munk (KM) theory systematically from the radiative transport equation (RTE) by analyzing the system of equations resulting from applying the double spherical harmonics method of order one and transforming that system into one governing the positive- and negative-going fluxes. Through this derivation, we establish the theoretical basis of KM theory, identify all parameters, and determine its range of validity. Moreover, we are able to generalize KM theory to take into account general boundary sources and nonhomogeneous terms, for example. The generalized Kubelka-Munk (gKM) equations are also much more accurate at approximating the solution of the RTE. We validate this theory through comparison with numerical solutions of the RTE. PMID:24690662

  14. Acceleration of a Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Hochstedler, R.D.; Smith, L.M.

    1996-03-01

    Execution time for the Integrated TIGER Series (ITS) Monte Carlo radiation transport code has been reduced by careful re-coding of computationally intensive subroutines. Three test cases for the TIGER (1-D slab geometry), CYLTRAN (2-D cylindrical geometry), and ACCEPT (3-D arbitrary geometry) codes were identified and used to benchmark and profile program execution. Based upon these results, sixteen top time-consuming subroutines were examined and nine of them modified to accelerate computations with equivalent numerical output to the original. The results obtained via this study indicate that speedup factors of 1.90 for the TIGER code, 1.67 for the CYLTRAN code, and 1.11 for the ACCEPT code are achievable. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. The Subelement Sweeping method for radiation transport modeling on polygonal meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleicher, Frederick

    A new memory efficient way of obtaining numerical solutions to the radiation transport equation on random polygon meshes is developed and analyzed. This method is called the Subelement Sweeping method, and is applied to the discrete ordinates form of the 1-D and 2-D mono-energetic transport equations. In the Subelement Sweeping method, the coarse mesh is first subdivided into triangular subelements, and the subelement mesh is then swept to obtain subelement angular flux solutions. As the subelements are swept the scalar flux for the scattering source is interpolated from the coarse mesh. Numerical solutions on the subelements are obtained with the linear discontinuous finite element method, and the resulting angular fluxes are projected back onto the coarse mesh and accumulated into new scalar flux values. The old subelement information is then thrown away allowing the method to be memory efficient. Formulas for the interpolation from the coarse mesh fluxes to the subelement mesh fluxes and for the projection from the subelement fluxes to the coarse mesh fluxes are derived by minimizing the squared error norm between coarse mesh and subelement scalar fluxes. Asymptotic analysis is carried out in 1-D, and the Subelement Sweeping method is shown to yield a valid diffusion discretization on the coarse mesh. Asymptotic analysis is also carried out in 2-D, and the Subelement Sweeping method is shown to have the diffusion limit for orthogonal quadrilateral meshes with some simplifying assumptions. The method was implemented for the 1-D slab geometry, and numerical experiments in 1-D show that the Subelement Sweeping method is at least third order accurate and has the diffusion limit. The method was also implemented in the Capsaicin framework within the Anaheim package for 2-D polygonal meshes at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Numerical experiments in 2-D show that the Subelement Sweeping method is at least second order accurate, and suggest strongly that the diffusion

  16. Status of the MORSE multigroup Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Emmett, M.B.

    1993-06-01

    There are two versions of the MORSE multigroup Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. MORSE-CGA is the most well-known and has undergone extensive use for many years. MORSE-SGC was originally developed in about 1980 in order to restructure the cross-section handling and thereby save storage. However, with the advent of new computer systems having much larger storage capacity, that aspect of SGC has become unnecessary. Both versions use data from multigroup cross-section libraries, although in somewhat different formats. MORSE-SGC is the version of MORSE that is part of the SCALE system, but it can also be run stand-alone. Both CGA and SGC use the Multiple Array System (MARS) geometry package. In the last six months the main focus of the work on these two versions has been on making them operational on workstations, in particular, the IBM RISC 6000 family. A new version of SCALE for workstations is being released to the Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC). MORSE-CGA, Version 2.0, is also being released to RSIC. Both SGC and CGA have undergone other revisions recently. This paper reports on the current status of the MORSE code system.

  17. An Improved Neutron Transport Algorithm for Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, John H.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Wilson, John W.

    2000-01-01

    A low-energy neutron transport algorithm for use in space radiation protection is developed. The algorithm is based upon a multigroup analysis of the straight-ahead Boltzmann equation by using a mean value theorem for integrals. This analysis is accomplished by solving a realistic but simplified neutron transport test problem. The test problem is analyzed by using numerical and analytical procedures to obtain an accurate solution within specified error bounds. Results from the test problem are then used for determining mean values associated with rescattering terms that are associated with a multigroup solution of the straight-ahead Boltzmann equation. The algorithm is then coupled to the Langley HZETRN code through the evaporation source term. Evaluation of the neutron fluence generated by the solar particle event of February 23, 1956, for a water and an aluminum-water shield-target configuration is then compared with LAHET and MCNPX Monte Carlo code calculations for the same shield-target configuration. The algorithm developed showed a great improvement in results over the unmodified HZETRN solution. In addition, a two-directional solution of the evaporation source showed even further improvement of the fluence near the front of the water target where diffusion from the front surface is important.

  18. Stormtime transport of ring current and radiation belt ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Margaret W.; Schulz, Michael; Lyons, L. R.; Gorney, David J.

    1993-01-01

    This is an investigation of stormtime particle transport that leads to formation of the ring current. Our method is to trace the guiding-center motion of representative ions (having selected first adiabatic invariants mu) in response to model substorm-associated impulses in the convection electric field. We compare our simulation results qualitatively with existing analytically tractable idealizations of particle transport (direct convective access and radial diffusion) in order to assess the limits of validity of these approximations. For mu approximately less than 10 MeV/G (E approximately less than 10 keV at L equivalent to 3) the ion drift period on the final (ring-current) drift shell of interest (L equivalent to 3) exceeds the duration of the main phase of our model storm, and we find that the transport of ions to this drift shell is appropriately idealized as direct convective access, typically from open drift paths. Ion transport to a final closed drift path from an open (plasma-sheet) drift trajectory is possible for those portions of that drift path that lie outside the mean stormtime separatrix between closed and open drift trajectories, For mu approximately 10-25 MeV/G (110 keV approximately less than E approximately less than 280 keV at L equivalent to 3) the drift period at L equivalent to 3 is comparable to the postulated 3-hr duration of the storm, and the mode of transport is transitional between direct convective access and transport that resembles radial diffusion. (This particle population is transitional between the ring current and radiation belt). For mu approximately greater than 25 MeV/G (radiation-belt ions having E approximately greater than 280 keV at L equivalent to 3) the ion drift period is considerably shorter than the main phase of a typical storm, and ions gain access to the ring-current region essentially via radial diffusion. By computing the mean and mean-square cumulative changes in 1/L among (in this case) 12 representative

  19. Guidelines for effective radiation transport for cable SGEMP modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, Clifton Russell; Fan, Wesley C.; Turner, C. David

    2014-07-01

    This report describes experiences gained in performing radiation transport computations with the SCEPTRE radiation transport code for System Generated ElectroMagnetic Pulse (SGEMP) applications. SCEPTRE is a complex code requiring a fairly sophisticated user to run the code effectively, so this report provides guidance for analysts interested in performing these types of calculations. One challenge in modeling coupled photon/electron transport for SGEMP is to provide a spatial mesh that is sufficiently resolved to accurately model surface charge emission and charge deposition near material interfaces. The method that has been most commonly used to date to compute cable SGEMP typically requires a sub-micron mesh size near material interfaces, which may be difficult for meshing software to provide for complex geometries. We present here an alternative method for computing cable SGEMP that appears to substantially relax this requirement. The report also investigates the effect of refining the energy mesh and increasing the order of the angular approximation to provide some guidance on determining reasonable parameters for the energy/angular approximation needed for x-ray environments. Conclusions for -ray environments may be quite different and will be treated in a subsequent report. In the course of the energy-mesh refinement studies, a bug in the cross-section generation software was discovered that may cause under prediction of the result by as much as an order of magnitude for the test problem studied here, when the electron energy group widths are much smaller than those for the photons. Results will be presented and compared using cross sections generated before and after the fix. We also describe adjoint modeling, which provides sensitivity of the total charge drive to the source energy and angle of incidence, which is quite useful for comparing the effect of changing the source environment and for determining most stressing angle of incidence and

  20. Modeling of external radiation from the transport of radionuclides across a canyon

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, B.M.; Olsen, W.A.; Van Etten, D.; Chen, I-li

    1986-01-01

    The Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) is an 800-million electron volt, l mA intensity linear proton accelerator used for studying subatomic particles at relativistic velocities. Routine operation of the accelerator results in the formation of short-lived air activation products, primarily in the beam stop section of LAMPF. This study presents the results of monitoring and modeling external radiation levels from LAMPF emissions at three locations during 1984. Measured radiation exposures are presented for all three locations during a 49-day period. Hourly radiation levels are calculated for all sites and compared with the prevalent wind patterns during the study period. Predicted daily levels are compared with measured values at all of the sites. Accuracy of the model is compared for day and night conditions. Annual model predictions are also compared with TLD measurements.

  1. Stochastic methods for uncertainty quantification in radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Fichtl, Erin D; Prinja, Anil K; Warsa, James S

    2009-01-01

    The use of generalized polynomial chaos (gPC) expansions is investigated for uncertainty quantification in radiation transport. The gPC represents second-order random processes in terms of an expansion of orthogonal polynomials of random variables and is used to represent the uncertain input(s) and unknown(s). We assume a single uncertain input-the total macroscopic cross section-although this does not represent a limitation of the approaches considered here. Two solution methods are examined: The Stochastic Finite Element Method (SFEM) and the Stochastic Collocation Method (SCM). The SFEM entails taking Galerkin projections onto the orthogonal basis, which, for fixed source problems, yields a linear system of fully -coupled equations for the PC coefficients of the unknown. For k-eigenvalue calculations, the SFEM system is non-linear and a Newton-Krylov method is employed to solve it. The SCM utilizes a suitable quadrature rule to compute the moments or PC coefficients of the unknown(s), thus the SCM solution involves a series of independent deterministic transport solutions. The accuracy and efficiency of the two methods are compared and contrasted. The PC coefficients are used to compute the moments and probability density functions of the unknown(s), which are shown to be accurate by comparing with Monte Carlo results. Our work demonstrates that stochastic spectral expansions are a viable alternative to sampling-based uncertainty quantification techniques since both provide a complete characterization of the distribution of the flux and the k-eigenvalue. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that, unlike perturbation methods, SFEM and SCM can handle large parameter uncertainty.

  2. Two dimensional (r-theta) transport model for synchrotron radiation of FRC plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qerushi, Artan; Barnes, Dan; TAE Team

    2013-10-01

    A two dimensional (r-theta) transport model has been developed for describing the power loss in FRC reactor plasmas and the transport of energy due to synchrotron radiation as well as the transport of energy due to synchrotron radiation. The transport model uses 1d FRC equilibrium profiles and solves the equation of radiative transfer in two dimensions (r-theta) taking into account the absorption and emission of synchrotron radiation. Relativistic expressions are used for both the absorption and the emission coefficients of synchrotron radiation. The reflection of synchrotron radiation from metal walls is taken into account using the approach of Krajcik. The results of the two-dimensional calculations are compared with simpler 1d calculations, which use an approach developed by Dawson and Berk et al., and 0d calculations which use an approach developed by Trubnikov.

  3. Los Alamos offers Fellowships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico is calling for applications for postdoctoral appointments and research fellowships. The positions are available in geoscience as well as other scientific disciplines.The laboratory, which is operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy, awards J. Robert Oppenheimer Research Fellowships to scientists that either have or will soon complete doctoral degrees. The appointments are for two years, are renewable for a third year, and carry a stipend of $51,865 per year. Potential applicants should send a resume or employment application and a statement of research goals to Carol M. Rich, Div. 89, Human Resources Development Division, MS P290, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 by mid-November.

  4. Dosimetry at the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility: Past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect

    Malenfant, R.E.

    1993-10-01

    Although the primary reason for the existence of the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility is to provide basic data on the physics of systems of fissile material, the physical arrangements and ability to provide sources of radiation have led to applications for all types of radiation dosimetry. In the broad definition of radiation phenomena, the facility has provided sources to evaluate biological effects, radiation shielding and transport, and measurements of basic parameters such as the evaluation of delayed neutron parameters. Within the last 15 years, many of the radiation measurements have been directed to calibration and intercomparison of dosimetry related to nuclear criticality safety. Future plans include (1) the new applications of Godiva IV, a bare-metal pulse assembly, for dosimetry (including an evaluation of neutron and gamma-ray room return); (2) a proposal to relocate the Health Physics Research Reactor from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to Los Alamos, which will provide the opportunity to continue the application of a primary benchmark source to radiation dosimetry; and (3) a proposal to employ SHEBA, a low-enrichment solution assembly, for accident dosimetry and evaluation.

  5. Coupled radiation transport/thermal analysis of the radiation shield for a space nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barattino, W. J.

    1985-07-01

    A coupled radiation transport-heat transfer-stress analysis of the radiation shield for an SP-100 reactor was performed using a numerical code developed at the University of New Mexico and Sandia National Laboratory. For a fast reactor operating at 1.66 MW sub th, the energy deposited and resulting temperature distribution was determined for a shield consisting of tungsten and lithium hydride pressed into a stainless steel honeycomb matrix. While temperature feedback was shown to have a minor effect on energy deposition, the shielding configuration was found to have a major influence in meeting thermal requirements of the lithium hydride. It was shown that a shield optimized for radiation protection will fail because of melting. However, with minor modifications in the shield layering and material selection, the thermal integrity of the shield can be preserved. A shield design of graphite, depleted lithium hydride, tungsten, and natural lithium hydride was shown to satisfy neutron and gamma fluence requirements, maximum temperature limits, and minimize cracking in the LiH portion of the shield.

  6. Deterministic methods in radiation transport. A compilation of papers presented February 4--5, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, A.F.; Roussin, R.W.

    1992-06-01

    The Seminar on Deterministic Methods in Radiation Transport was held February 4--5, 1992, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Eleven presentations were made and the full papers are published in this report, along with three that were submitted but not given orally. These papers represent a good overview of the state of the art in the deterministic solution of radiation transport problems for a variety of applications of current interest to the Radiation Shielding Information Center user community.

  7. Implication of radiative forcing distribution for energy transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi

    2016-04-01

    Radiative forcing of a homogeneous greenhouse gas can be very inhomogeneous because the forcing is dependent on other atmospheric and surface variables. In the case of doubling CO2, the mean instantaneous forcing at the top of the atmosphere is found to vary geographically and temporally from positive to negative values, with the range being more than three times the magnitude of the global mean value. The vertical temperature change across the atmospheric column (temperature lapse rate) is found to be the best single predictor for explaining forcing variation. In addition, the masking effects of clouds and water vapor also contribute to forcing inhomogeneity. A regression model that predicts forcing from geophysical variables is constructed. This model can explain more than 90% of the variance of the forcing. Applying this model to analyzing the forcing variation in the CMIP5 models, we find that inter-model discrepancy in CO2 forcing caused by model climatology leads to considerable discrepancy in their projected change in poleward energy transport.

  8. Benchmarking multilevel, 2-D cylindrical radiation transport in a high energy density plasma environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apruzese, J. P.; Giuliani, J. L.; Hansen, S. B.

    2012-09-01

    In modeling optically thick, high energy density plasmas (HEDP), radiation transport is of comparable importance to atomic physics, hydrodynamics, and other transport processes. Radiation transport theory is the framework for calculating radiation output based on atomic kinetics, and is thus critical to designing and diagnosing experiments in which radiation production is significant. Starting in the 1960s, the astrophysics community established benchmarks for computational radiation transport, based on a parameterized two-level-atom, and mostly applicable to media with very high optical depths and low collisional quenching of radiative transitions. The purpose of the work reported here is to establish a similar computational radiation transport benchmark that is more relevant to a laboratory HEDP environment. Our model consists of 8 levels of mostly K-shell Al ions, ranging from the ground state of Li-like Al to its bare nucleus. Rates connecting the levels are given by well-known, readily reproducible analytic prescriptions. The results presented consist of level populations as a function of position within the cylindrical medium, and emitted line profiles. For the plasma conditions considered, the magnitudes and spatial variations of the populations are a sensitive indicator of the accuracy of the radiation transport model, and are critical in calculating experimentally relevant quantities such as radiative powers and line ratios.

  9. Activities of the Radiation Shielding Information Center and a report on codes/data for high energy radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Roussin, R.W.

    1993-03-01

    From the very early days in its history Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) has been involved with high energy radiation transport. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration was an early sponsor of RSIC until the completion of the Apollo Moon Exploration Program. In addition, the intranuclear cascade work of Bertini at Oak Ridge National Laboratory provided valuable resources which were made available through RSIC. Over the years, RSIC has had interactions with many of the developers of high energy radiation transport computing technology and data libraries and has been able to collect and disseminate this technology. The current status of this technology will be reviewed and prospects for new advancements will be examined.

  10. Activities of the Radiation Shielding Information Center and a report on codes/data for high energy radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Roussin, R.W.

    1993-01-01

    From the very early days in its history Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) has been involved with high energy radiation transport. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration was an early sponsor of RSIC until the completion of the Apollo Moon Exploration Program. In addition, the intranuclear cascade work of Bertini at Oak Ridge National Laboratory provided valuable resources which were made available through RSIC. Over the years, RSIC has had interactions with many of the developers of high energy radiation transport computing technology and data libraries and has been able to collect and disseminate this technology. The current status of this technology will be reviewed and prospects for new advancements will be examined.

  11. Radiative heat transport instability in a laser produced inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Rozmus, W.

    2015-08-15

    A laser produced high-Z plasma in which an energy balance is achieved due to radiation emission and radiative heat transfer supports ion acoustic instability. A linear dispersion relation is derived, and instability is compared to the radiation cooling instability [R. G. Evans, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 27, 751 (1985)]. Under conditions of indirect drive fusion experiments, the driving term for the instability is the radiative heat flux and, in particular, the density dependence of the radiative heat conductivity. A specific example of thermal Bremsstrahlung radiation source has been considered. This instability may lead to plasma jet formation and anisotropic x-ray generation, thus affecting inertial confinement fusion related experiments.

  12. The Los Alamos primer

    SciTech Connect

    Serber, R.

    1992-01-01

    This book contains the 1943 lecture notes of Robert Serber. Serber was a protege of J. Robert Oppenheimer and member of the team that built the first atomic bomb - reveal what the Los Alamos scientists knew, and did not know, about the terrifying weapon they were building.

  13. Investigation of stochastic radiation transport methods in random heterogeneous mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinert, Dustin Ray

    densely packed, optically thick kernels. A hybrid continuous energy Monte Carlo algorithm that combines homogeneous and explicit geometry models according to the energy dependent optical thickness was also developed. This resonance switch approach exhibited a remarkably high degree of accuracy in performing criticality calculations. The versatility of this hybrid modeling approach makes it an attractive acceleration strategy for a vast array of Monte Carlo radiation transport applications.

  14. Radiation Transport Computation in Stochastic Media: Method and Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chao

    Stochastic media, characterized by the stochastic distribution of inclusions in a background medium, are typical radiation transport media encountered in natural or engineering systems. In the community of radiation transport computation, there is always a demand of accurate and efficient methods that can account for the nature of the stochastic distribution. In this dissertation, we focus on methodology development for the radiation transport computation that is applied to neutronic analyses of nuclear reactor designs characterized by the stochastic distribution of particle fuel. Reactor concepts with the employment of a fuel design consisting of a random heterogeneous mixture of fissile material and non-fissile moderator are constantly proposed. Key physical quantities such as core criticality and power distribution, reactivity control design parameters, depletion and fuel burn-up need to be carefully evaluated. In order to meet these practical requirements, we first need to develop accurate and fast computational methods that can effectively account for the stochastic nature of double heterogeneity configuration. A Monte Carlo based method called Chord Length Sampling (CLS) method is considered to be a promising method for analyzing those TRISO-type fueled reactors. Although the CLS method has been proposed for more than two decades and much research has been conducted to enhance its applicability, further efforts are still needed to address some key research gaps that exist for the CLS method. (1) There is a general lack of thorough investigation of the factors that give rise to the inaccuracy of the CLS method found by many researchers. The accuracy of the CLS method depends on the optical and geometric properties of the system. In some specific scenarios, considerable inaccuracies have been reported. However, no research has been providing a clear interpretation of the reasons responsible for the inaccuracy in the reported scenarios. Furthermore, no any

  15. A user's guide to radiation transport in ALEGRA-HEDP : version 4.6.

    SciTech Connect

    Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Brunner, Thomas A.

    2005-01-01

    This manual describes the input syntax to the ALEGRA radiation transport package. All input and output variables are defined, as well as all algorithmic controls. This manual describes the radiation input syntax for ALEGRA-HEDP. The ALEGRA manual[2] describes how to run the code and general input syntax. The ALEGRA-HEDP manual[13] describes the input for other physics used in high energy density physics simulations, as well as the opacity models used by this radiation package. An emission model, which is the lowest order radiation transport approximation, is also described in the ALEGRA-HEDP manual. This document is meant to be used with these other manuals.

  16. Radiation inactivation studies of renal brush border water and urea transport

    SciTech Connect

    Verkman, A.S.; Dix, J.A.; Seifter, J.L.; Skorecki, K.L.; Jung, C.Y.; Ausiello, D.A.

    1985-12-01

    Radiation inactivation was used to determine the nature and molecular weight of water and urea transport pathways in brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) isolated from rabbit renal cortex. BBMV were frozen to -50 degrees C, irradiated with 1.5 MeV electrons, thawed, and assayed for transport or enzyme activity. The freezing process had no effect on enzyme or transport kinetics. BBMV alkaline phosphatase activity gave linear ln(activity) vs. radiation dose plots with a target size of 68 +/- 3 kDa, similar to previously reported values. Water and solute transport were measured using the stopped-flow light-scattering technique. The rates of acetamide and osmotic water transport did not depend on radiation dose (0-7 Mrad), suggesting that transport of these substances does not require a protein carrier. In contrast, urea and thiourea transport gave linear ln(activity) vs. dose curves with a target size of 125-150 kDa; 400 mM urea inhibited thiourea flux by -50% at 0 and 4.7 Mrad, showing that radiation does not affect inhibitor binding to surviving transporters. These studies suggest that BBMV urea transport requires a membrane protein, whereas osmotic water transport does not.

  17. The Los Alamos accelerator code group

    SciTech Connect

    Krawczyk, F.L.; Billen, J.H.; Ryne, R.D.; Takeda, Harunori; Young, L.M.

    1995-05-01

    The Los Alamos Accelerator Code Group (LAACG) is a national resource for members of the accelerator community who use and/or develop software for the design and analysis of particle accelerators, beam transport systems, light sources, storage rings, and components of these systems. Below the authors describe the LAACG`s activities in high performance computing, maintenance and enhancement of POISSON/SUPERFISH and related codes and the dissemination of information on the INTERNET.

  18. Los Alamos low-level waste performance assessment status

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, W.J.; Purtymun, W.D.; Dewart, J.M.; Rodgers, J.E.

    1986-06-01

    This report reviews the documented Los Alamos studies done to assess the containment of buried hazardous wastes. Five sections logically present the environmental studies, operational source terms, transport pathways, environmental dosimetry, and computer model development and use. This review gives a general picture of the Los Alamos solid waste disposal and liquid effluent sites and is intended for technical readers with waste management and environmental science backgrounds but without a detailed familiarization with Los Alamos. The review begins with a wide perspective on environmental studies at Los Alamos. Hydrology, geology, and meteorology are described for the site and region. The ongoing Laboratory-wide environmental surveillance and waste management environmental studies are presented. The next section describes the waste disposal sites and summarizes the current source terms for these sites. Hazardous chemical wastes and liquid effluents are also addressed by describing the sites and canyons that are impacted. The review then focuses on the transport pathways addressed mainly in reports by Healy and Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. Once the source terms and potential transport pathways are described, the dose assessment methods are addressed. Three major studies, the waste alternatives, Hansen and Rogers, and the Pantex Environmental Impact Statement, contributed to the current Los Alamos dose assessment methodology. Finally, the current Los Alamos groundwater, surface water, and environmental assessment models for these mesa top and canyon sites are described.

  19. Activities of the Radiation Shielding Information Center and a report on codes/data for high energy radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Roussin, R.W.

    1994-10-01

    From the very early days in its history RSIC has been involved with high energy radiation transport. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration was an early sponsor of RSIC until the completion of the Apollo Moon Exploration Program. In addition, the intranuclear cascade work of Bertini at Oak Ridge National Laboratory provided valuable resources which were made available through RSIC. Over the years, RSIC has had interactions with many of the developers of high energy radiation transport computing technology and data libraries and has been able to collect and disseminate this technology. The current status of this technology will be reviewed and prospects for new advancements will be examined.

  20. Sandia Computational Engine for Particle Transport for Radiation Effects.

    2014-09-01

    Version 00 The SCEPTRE code solves the linear Boltzmann transport equation for one-, two- and three-dimensional geometries. SCEPTRE is capable of handling any particle type for which multigroup-Legendre cross sections are available. However, the code is designed primarily to model the transport of photons, electrons, and positrons through matter. For efficiency and flexibility, SCEPTRE contains capability for both the first- and second-order forms of the Boltzmann transport equation.

  1. Coupled Deterministic/Monte Carlo Simulation of Radiation Transport and Detector Response

    SciTech Connect

    Gesh, Christopher J.; Meriwether, George H.; Pagh, Richard T.; Smith, Leon E.

    2005-09-01

    The analysis of radiation sensor systems used to detect and identify nuclear and radiological weapons materials requires detailed radiation transport calculations. Two basic steps are required to solve radiation detection scenario analysis (RDSA) problems. First, the radiation field produced by the source must be calculated. Second, the response that the radiation field produces in a detector must be determined. RDSA problems are characterized by complex geometries, the presence of shielding materials, and large amounts of scattering (or absorption/re-emission). In this paper, we will discuss the use of the Attila code [2] for RDSA.

  2. Radiation transport phenomena and modeling. Part A: Codes; Part B: Applications with examples

    SciTech Connect

    Lorence, L.J. Jr.; Beutler, D.E.

    1997-09-01

    This report contains the notes from the second session of the 1997 IEEE Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects Conference Short Course on Applying Computer Simulation Tools to Radiation Effects Problems. Part A discusses the physical phenomena modeled in radiation transport codes and various types of algorithmic implementations. Part B gives examples of how these codes can be used to design experiments whose results can be easily analyzed and describes how to calculate quantities of interest for electronic devices.

  3. Comparison of 1-, 2-, and 3-dimensional modeling of the TFTR for nuclear radiation transport analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, L.P.; Kolibal, J.G.; Liew, S.L.

    1985-09-01

    The computational models of the TFTR constructed for the radiation transport analysis for the Q approx. 1 demonstration are summarized and reviewed. These models can be characterized by the dimensionality required to describe the geometry, and by the numerical methods of solving the transport equation. Results obtained with these models in the test cell are compared and discussed.

  4. Multigroup Three-Dimensional Direct Integration Method Radiation Transport Analysis Code System.

    1987-09-18

    Version 00 TRISTAN solves the three-dimensional, fixed-source, Boltzmann transport equation for neutrons or gamma rays in rectangular geometry. The code can solve an adjoint problem as well as a usual transport problem. TRISTAN is a suitable tool to analyze radiation shielding problems such as streaming and deep penetration problems.

  5. A Photon Free Method to Solve Radiation Transport Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, B

    2006-09-05

    The multi-group discrete-ordinate equations of radiation transfer is solved for the first time by Newton's method. It is a photon free method because the photon variables are eliminated from the radiation equations to yield a N{sub group}XN{sub direction} smaller but equivalent system of equations. The smaller set of equations can be solved more efficiently than the original set of equations. Newton's method is more stable than the Semi-implicit Linear method currently used by conventional radiation codes.

  6. Novel Parallel Numerical Methods for Radiation& Neutron Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P N

    2001-03-06

    In many of the multiphysics simulations performed at LLNL, transport calculations can take up 30 to 50% of the total run time. If Monte Carlo methods are used, the percentage can be as high as 80%. Thus, a significant core competence in the formulation, software implementation, and solution of the numerical problems arising in transport modeling is essential to Laboratory and DOE research. In this project, we worked on developing scalable solution methods for the equations that model the transport of photons and neutrons through materials. Our goal was to reduce the transport solve time in these simulations by means of more advanced numerical methods and their parallel implementations. These methods must be scalable, that is, the time to solution must remain constant as the problem size grows and additional computer resources are used. For iterative methods, scalability requires that (1) the number of iterations to reach convergence is independent of problem size, and (2) that the computational cost grows linearly with problem size. We focused on deterministic approaches to transport, building on our earlier work in which we performed a new, detailed analysis of some existing transport methods and developed new approaches. The Boltzmann equation (the underlying equation to be solved) and various solution methods have been developed over many years. Consequently, many laboratory codes are based on these methods, which are in some cases decades old. For the transport of x-rays through partially ionized plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium, the transport equation is coupled to nonlinear diffusion equations for the electron and ion temperatures via the highly nonlinear Planck function. We investigated the suitability of traditional-solution approaches to transport on terascale architectures and also designed new scalable algorithms; in some cases, we investigated hybrid approaches that combined both.

  7. The flying radiation case

    SciTech Connect

    Brownell, J.H.; Bowers, R.L.

    1997-04-01

    The Los Alamos foil implosion program has the goal of producing an intense, high-energy density x-ray source by converting the energy of a magnetically imploded plasma into radiation and material energy. One of the methods for converting the plasma energy into thermal energy and radiation and utilizing it for experiments is called the flying radiation case (FRC). In this paper the authors shall model the FRC and provide a physical description of the processes involved. An analytic model of a planar FRC in the hydrodynamic approximation is used to describe the assembly and shock heating of a central cushion by a conducting liner driver. The results are also used to benchmark a hydrodynamics code for modeling an FRC. They then use a radiation-hydrodynamics computational model to explore the effects of radiation production and transport when a gold plasma assembles on a CH cushion. Results are presented for the structure and evolution of the radiation hohlraum.

  8. Review of liquid metal heat pipe work at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.S.; Merrigan, M.A.; Sena, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    A survey of space-power related liquid metal heat pipe work at Los Alamos National Laboratory is presented. Heat pipe development at Los Alamos has been on-going since 1963. Heat pipes were initially developed for thermionic nuclear-electrical power production in space. Since then Los Alamos has developed liquid metal heat pipes for numerous applications related to high temperature systems in both the space and terrestrial environments. Some of these applications include thermionic electrical generators, thermoelectric energy conversion (both in-core and direct radiation), thermal energy storage, hypersonic vehicle leading edge cooling, and heat pipe vapor laser cells. Some of the work performed at Los Alamos has been documented in internal reports that are often little-known. A representative description and summary of progress in space-related liquid metal heat pipe technology is provided followed by a reference section citing sources where these works may be found. 53 refs.

  9. Recent Developments in Three Dimensional Radiation Transport Using the Green's Function Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rockell, Candice; Tweed, John; Blattnig, Steve R.; Mertens, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    In the future, astronauts will be sent into space for longer durations of time compared to previous missions. The increased risk of exposure to dangerous radiation, such as Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Particle Events, is of great concern. Consequently, steps must be taken to ensure astronaut safety by providing adequate shielding. In order to better determine and verify shielding requirements, an accurate and efficient radiation transport code based on a fully three dimensional radiation transport model using the Green's function technique is being developed

  10. Radiation transport and density effects in non-equilibrium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Vladimir I.; Fisher, Dimitri V.; Maron, Yitzhak

    2007-05-01

    We describe a model for self-consistent computations of ionic level populations and the radiation field in transient non-equilibrium plasmas. In this model, the plasma density effects are described using the effective-statistical-weights (ESW) formalism based on the statistics of the microscopic environment of individual ions. In comparison to earlier work, the ESW formalism is expanded to a self-consistent treatment of the radiative transfer. For non-Maxwellian plasmas, the atomic-kinetics and radiative transfer computations may be performed for an arbitrary distribution of the free electrons. A plasma is presented by a finite number of cells, each with uniform thermodynamic parameters. The radiation field in each cell is computed by accounting for the radiation of entire plasma and of external sources. To demonstrate the predictions of the ESW approach and their difference from those of the traditional approach we apply the model to high-density plasmas. Based on hydrodynamic simulations of a laser-matter interaction, we use the model to analyze spectral line shapes, where the effects caused by the spatial dependence of the plasma flow velocity are demonstrated. In single-cell simulations, for acceleration of the computations, the model utilizes recently derived formula for the cell volume-average and direction-average specific intensity of radiation.

  11. Transport analysis of high radiation and high density plasmas in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casali, L.; Bernert, M.; Dux, R.; Fischer, R.; Kallenbach, A.; Kurzan, B.; Lang, P.; Mlynek, A.; McDermott, R. M.; Ryter, F.; Sertoli, M.; Tardini, G.; Zohm, H.

    2014-12-01

    Future fusion reactors, foreseen in the "European road map" such as DEMO, will operate under more demanding conditions compared to present devices. They will require high divertor and core radiation by impurity seeding to reduce heat loads on divertor target plates. In addition, DEMO will have to work at high core densities to reach adequate fusion performance. The performance of fusion reactors depends on three essential parameters: temperature, density and energy confinement time. The latter characterizes the loss rate due to both radiation and transport processes. The DEMO foreseen scenarios described above were not investigated so far, but are now addressed at the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. In this work we present the transport analysis of such scenarios. Plasma with high radiation by impurity seeding: transport analysis taking into account the radiation distribution shows no change in transport during impurity seeding. The observed confinement improvement is an effect of higher pedestal temperatures which extend to the core via stiffness. A non coronal radiation model was developed and compared to the bolometric measurements in order to provide a reliable radiation profile for transport calculations. High density plasmas with pellets: the analysis of kinetic profiles reveals a transient phase at the start of the pellet fuelling due to a slower density build up compared to the temperature decrease. The low particle diffusion can explain the confinement behaviour.

  12. On the Development of a Deterministic Three-Dimensional Radiation Transport Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rockell, Candice; Tweed, John

    2011-01-01

    Since astronauts on future deep space missions will be exposed to dangerous radiations, there is a need to accurately model the transport of radiation through shielding materials and to estimate the received radiation dose. In response to this need a three dimensional deterministic code for space radiation transport is now under development. The new code GRNTRN is based on a Green's function solution of the Boltzmann transport equation that is constructed in the form of a Neumann series. Analytical approximations will be obtained for the first three terms of the Neumann series and the remainder will be estimated by a non-perturbative technique . This work discusses progress made to date and exhibits some computations based on the first two Neumann series terms.

  13. Enhanced radial transport and energization of radiation belt electrons due to drift orbit bifurcations

    PubMed Central

    Ukhorskiy, A Y; Sitnov, M I; Millan, R M; Kress, B T; Smith, D C

    2014-01-01

    [1]Relativistic electron intensities in Earth's outer radiation belt can vary by multiple orders of magnitude on the time scales ranging from minutes to days. One fundamental process contributing to dynamic variability of radiation belt intensities is the radial transport of relativistic electrons across their drift shells. In this paper we analyze the properties of three-dimensional radial transport in a global magnetic field model driven by variations in the solar wind dynamic pressure. We use a test particle approach which captures anomalous effects such as drift orbit bifurcations. We show that the bifurcations lead to an order of magnitude increase in radial transport rates and enhance the energization at large equatorial pitch angles. Even at quiet time fluctuations in dynamic pressure, radial transport at large pitch angles exhibits strong deviations from the diffusion approximation. The radial transport rates are much lower at small pitch angle values which results in a better agreement with the diffusion approximation. PMID:26167431

  14. Prospect on the Atomic and Molecular Processes in Plasmas 4. Transport Code 4.1 Radiation Transport Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takabe, Hideaki

    A brief review is given of the physics of radiation transport, a topic that is important in the study of astrophysics, laser-plasmas, divertor-plasmas, etc. In general, we must solve non-local thermodynamic equilibrium processes using an appropriate atomic model. The resultant data related to the spectral emissivity and opacity of partially ionized plasmas are then used to solve the radiation transfer equation. In this note, I briefly overview a variety of ways to carry out such a calculation. In addition, similarities and differences in the physical process between laser-plasmas and divertor-plasmas are briefly described.

  15. The Roles of Transport and Wave-Particle Interactions on Radiation Belt Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Glocer, Alex; Zheng, Qiuhua

    2011-01-01

    Particle fluxes in the radiation belts can vary dramatically during geomagnetic active periods. Transport and wave-particle interactions are believed to be the two main types of mechanisms that control the radiation belt dynamics. Major transport processes include substorm dipolarization and injection, radial diffusion, convection, adiabatic acceleration and deceleration, and magnetopause shadowing. Energetic electrons and ions are also subjected to pitch-angle and energy diffusion when interact with plasma waves in the radiation belts. Important wave modes include whistler mode chorus waves, plasmaspheric hiss, electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, and magnetosonic waves. We investigate the relative roles of transport and wave associated processes in radiation belt variations. Energetic electron fluxes during several storms are simulated using our Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model. The model includes important transport and wave processes such as substorm dipolarization in global MHD fields, chorus waves, and plasmaspheric hiss. We discuss the effects of these competing processes at different phases of the storms and validate the results by comparison with satellite and ground-based observations. Keywords: Radiation Belts, Space Weather, Wave-Particle Interaction, Storm and Substorm

  16. Energy distributions and radiation transport in uranium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miley, G. H.; Bathke, C.; Maceda, E.; Choi, C.

    1976-01-01

    An approximate analytic model, based on continuous electron slowing, has been used for survey calculations. Where more accuracy is required, a Monte Carlo technique is used which combines an analytic representation of Coulombic collisions with a random walk treatment of inelastic collisions. The calculated electron distributions have been incorporated into another code that evaluates both the excited atomic state densities within the plasma and the radiative flux emitted from the plasma.

  17. Radiation Effects on Transport and Bubble Formation in Silicate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Trifunac, A.D.; Shkrob, I.A.; Werst, D.W.

    2001-12-31

    Using advanced magnetic resonance spectroscopies and small-cluster modeling, atomic structure of radiation-induced point defects in alkali borate, silicate, and borosilicate glasses is fully characterized. It is shown that in boron-containing glasses, most of these point defects are electrons/holes trapped by cation/anion vacancies, such as O1 - - O3 + valence-alternation pairs. In microscopically phase-separated borosilicate glasses, radiation-induced defects are found to cluster at the interface between the borate and silicate phases. Reaction and diffusion dynamics of defect-annealing interstitial hydrogen atoms in boron and silica oxide glasses are studied. The yield of radiolytic O2 is estimated. This oxygen is shown to be the final product of triplet exciton decay. Plausible mechanisms for the oxygen bubble formation are put forward. Two practical conclusions relevant for the EMSP mission are made: First, the yield of radiolytic oxygen is shown to be too low to interfere with the storage of vitrified radioactive waste in the first 10 Kyr. Second, microscopic phase separation is demonstrated to increase both the chemical and radiation stability of borosilicate glass.

  18. Analytical Radiation Transport Benchmarks for The Next Century

    SciTech Connect

    B.D. Ganapol

    2005-01-19

    Verification of large-scale computational algorithms used in nuclear engineering and radiological applications is an essential element of reliable code performance. For this reason, the development of a suite of multidimensional semi-analytical benchmarks has been undertaken to provide independent verification of proper operation of codes dealing with the transport of neutral particles. The benchmarks considered cover several one-dimensional, multidimensional, monoenergetic and multigroup, fixed source and critical transport scenarios. The first approach, called the Green's Function. In slab geometry, the Green's function is incorporated into a set of integral equations for the boundary fluxes. Through a numerical Fourier transform inversion and subsequent matrix inversion for the boundary fluxes, a semi-analytical benchmark emerges. Multidimensional solutions in a variety of infinite media are also based on the slab Green's function. In a second approach, a new converged SN method is developed. In this method, the SN solution is ''minded'' to bring out hidden high quality solutions. For this case multigroup fixed source and criticality transport problems are considered. Remarkably accurate solutions can be obtained with this new method called the Multigroup Converged SN (MGCSN) method as will be demonstrated.

  19. MESTRN: A Deterministic Meson-Muon Transport Code for Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blattnig, Steve R.; Norbury, John W.; Norman, Ryan B.; Wilson, John W.; Singleterry, Robert C., Jr.; Tripathi, Ram K.

    2004-01-01

    A safe and efficient exploration of space requires an understanding of space radiations, so that human life and sensitive equipment can be protected. On the way to these sensitive sites, the radiation fields are modified in both quality and quantity. Many of these modifications are thought to be due to the production of pions and muons in the interactions between the radiation and intervening matter. A method used to predict the effects of the presence of these particles on the transport of radiation through materials is developed. This method was then used to develop software, which was used to calculate the fluxes of pions and muons after the transport of a cosmic ray spectrum through aluminum and water. Software descriptions are given in the appendices.

  20. Radiation transport and energetics of laser-driven half-hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, A. S. Graham, P.; Comley, A. J.; Foster, J.; Cooper, A. B. R.; Schneider, M. B.; MacLaren, S.; Lu, K.; Seugling, R.; Satcher, J.; Klingmann, J.; Marrs, R.; May, M.; Widmann, K.; Glendinning, G.; Castor, J.; Sain, J.; Baker, K.; Hsing, W. W.; Young, B.; and others

    2014-06-15

    Experiments that characterize and develop a high energy-density half-hohlraum platform for use in benchmarking radiation hydrodynamics models have been conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Results from the experiments are used to quantitatively compare with simulations of the radiation transported through an evolving plasma density structure, colloquially known as an N-wave. A half-hohlraum is heated by 80 NIF beams to a temperature of 240 eV. This creates a subsonic diffusive Marshak wave, which propagates into a high atomic number Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} aerogel. The subsequent radiation transport through the aerogel and through slots cut into the aerogel layer is investigated. We describe a set of experiments that test the hohlraum performance and report on a range of x-ray measurements that absolutely quantify the energetics and radiation partition inside the target.

  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dogliani, Harold O

    2011-01-19

    The purpose of the briefing is to describe general laboratory technical capabilities to be used for various groups such as military cadets or university faculty/students and post docs to recruit into a variety of Los Alamos programs. Discussed are: (1) development and application of high leverage science to enable effeictive, predictable and reliability outcomes; (2) deter, detect, characterize, reverse and prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their use by adversaries and terrorists; (3) modeling and simulation to define complex processes, predict outcomes, and develop effective prevention, response, and remediation strategies; (4) energetic materials and hydrodynamic testing to develop materials for precise delivery of focused energy; (5) materials cience focused on fundamental understanding of materials behaviors, their quantum-molecular properties, and their dynamic responses, and (6) bio-science to rapidly detect and characterize pathogens, to develop vaccines and prophylactic remedies, and to develop attribution forensics.

  2. Radiation shielding and transport codes and data libraries for personal computers available from the Radiation Shielding Information Center

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, B.L. )

    1990-01-01

    In nuclear applications, the conversion of mainframe software to the personal computer (PC) environment has seen an accelerated pace. Credit has to be extended to the software companies that have made the scientific language FORTRAN available on PCs. Not to be neglected are the scientists who dedicate their time in the conversion of codes and are challenged by the limited PC memory and disk space. The Radiation shielding Information Center (RSIC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has encouraged these developments, and the shielding community has cooperated by making these new tools available via RSIC. The PC codes in the shielding and radiation transport area are divided into five categories (these categories are not mutually exclusive): (1) gamma-ray scattering; (2) neutron and gamma-ray transport (also coupled); (3) environmental dose; (4) medical applications; and (5) reactor physics. Each category is discussed.

  3. HETC radiation transport code development for cosmic ray shielding applications in space.

    PubMed

    Townsend, L W; Miller, T M; Gabriel, Tony A

    2005-01-01

    In order to facilitate three-dimensional analyses of space radiation shielding scenarios for future space missions, the Monte Carlo radiation transport code HETC is being extended to include transport of energetic heavy ions, such as are found in the galactic cosmic ray spectrum in space. Recently, an event generator capable of providing nuclear interaction data for use in HETC was developed and incorporated into the code. The event generator predicts the interaction product yields and production angles and energies using nuclear models and Monte Carlo techniques. Testing and validation of the extended transport code has begun. In this work, the current status of code modifications, which enable energetic heavy ions and their nuclear reaction products to be transported through thick shielding, are described. Also, initial results of code testing against available laboratory beam data for energetic heavy ions interacting in thick targets are presented. PMID:16604614

  4. Cloud-radiative effects on implied oceanic energy transports as simulated by atmospheric general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Gleckler, P.J.; Randall, D.A.; Boer, G.

    1994-03-01

    This paper reports on energy fluxes across the surface of the ocean as simulated by fifteen atmospheric general circulation models in which ocean surface temperatures and sea-ice boundaries are prescribed. The oceanic meridional energy transport that would be required to balance these surface fluxes is computed, and is shown to be critically sensitive to the radiative effects of clouds, to the extent that even the sign of the Southern Hemisphere ocean energy transport can be affected by the errors in simulated cloud-radiation interactions.

  5. Radiation transport around axisymmetric blunt body vehicles using a modified differential approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartung, Lin C.; Hassan, H. A.

    1992-01-01

    A moment method for computing 3D radiative transport in axisymmetric thermochemical nonequilibrium flows is developed. The method uses the P-1 approximation to reduce the governing system of integro-differential equations to a coupled set of partial differential equations. The numerical solution of these equations for realistic variations of the radiation properties is discussed. Representative results from the method are shown and compared to tangent slab calculations. The agreement between the transport methods is found to be about 10 percent in the stagnation region, with the difference increasing along the flank of the vehicle.

  6. Basic knowledge on radiative and transport properties to begin in thermal plasmas modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Cressault, Y.

    2015-05-15

    This paper has for objectives to present the radiative and the transport properties for people beginning in thermal plasmas. The first section will briefly recall the equations defined in numerical models applied to thermal plasmas; the second section will particularly deal with the estimation of radiative losses; the third part will quickly present the thermodynamics properties; and the last part will concern the transport coefficients (thermal conductivity, viscosity and electrical conductivity of the gas or mixtures of gases). We shall conclude the paper with a discussion about the validity of these results the lack of data for some specific applications, and some perspectives concerning these properties for non-equilibrium thermal plasmas.

  7. Towards a 3D Space Radiation Transport Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Tripathl, R. K.; Cicomptta, F. A.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Tweed, J.

    2002-01-01

    High-speed computational procedures for space radiation shielding have relied on asymptotic expansions in terms of the off-axis scatter and replacement of the general geometry problem by a collection of flat plates. This type of solution was derived for application to human rated systems in which the radius of the shielded volume is large compared to the off-axis diffusion limiting leakage at lateral boundaries. Over the decades these computational codes are relatively complete and lateral diffusion effects are now being added. The analysis for developing a practical full 3D space shielding code is presented.

  8. The implication of radiative forcing and feedback for meridional energy transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi; Zhang, Minghong

    2014-03-01

    The distributions of radiative forcing and feedback in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 abrupt4xCO2 and Historical experiments are diagnosed, with a focus on their effects on the zonal mean structure of the top-of-the-atmosphere radiation anomalies and implications for the meridional energy transport. It is found that because the greenhouse gas longwave forcing peaks in the low latitudes, it reinforces the equator-to-pole net radiation gradient and accounts for the increase in the poleward energy transport in both hemispheres under global warming. The shortwave forcing by aerosol, ozone, etc. peaks in the Northern Hemisphere and instead implies an interhemispheric energy transport. Although the water vapor feedback also reinforces the equator-to-pole gradient of the net radiation, the temperature and albedo feedback act against it. The feedback tend to offset the zonal mean radiation anomaly caused by the forcing, although the overall feedback effect on the energy transport is rather uncertain, mainly due to the uncertainty in the cloud feedback.

  9. A Radiation Transport Coupled Particle-In-Cell Model for Hg-Ar Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hae June; Verboncoeur, J. P.; Smith, H. B.; Parker, G. J.; Birdsall, C. K.

    2000-10-01

    We simulate a radial slice of the fluorescent lamp discharge in the positive column with a radiation transport coupled particle-in-cell (RT-PIC) code. In this model, the radiative and meta stable excited states of Hg-Ar mixture and their collisions as well as radiation transport are simulated by the fluid equations. The motions of electrons and ions and collisions with neutral or excited states are simulated by the conventional particle-in-cell method. We consider radiation transport of excited states using the Holstein equation[1] including the time varying nonuniform background gas density. The background gas density is calculated from the temperature profile by solving the heat transfer equation. The motion of charged particles are simulated by using the 1-D cylindrical particle-in-cell code, XPDC1[2]. Separate time scales are used for the charged particles, the excited states, and the neutral gas, respectively, and parallel processing can be used for the expensive calculation including radiation transport. This work was supported in part by General Electric Company contract GE-20000181. [1] T. Holstein, Phys. Rev. 72, 1213 (1947). [2] J. P. Verboncoeur, M. V. Alves, V. Vahedi, and C. K. Birdsall, Journal of Computational Physics 104(2), 321, (1993).

  10. Experiences with radiation portal detectors for international rail transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stromswold, D. C.; McCormick, K.; Todd, L.; Ashbaker, E. D.; Evans, J. C.

    2006-08-01

    Radiation detectors monitored trains at two international borders to evaluate the performance of NaI(Tl) and plastic (polyvinyltoluene: PVT) gamma-ray detectors to characterize rail cargo. The detectors included a prototype NaI(Tl) radiation-portal-monitor panel having four large detectors (10-cm × 10-cm × 41-cm) and a PVT panel with a 41 cm × 173 cm × 3.8-cm detector. Spectral data from the NaI(Tl) and PVT detectors were recorded. Of particular emphasis was the identification of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) and the resultant frequency of nuisance alarms. For rail monitoring, the difficulty in stopping trains to perform secondary inspection on alarming cars creates a need for reliable identification of NORM during initial screening. Approximately 30 trains were monitored, and the commodities in individual railcars were ascertained from manifest information. At one test site, the trains carried inter-modal containers that had been unloaded from ships, and at the other site, the trains contained bulk cargo in tanker cars and hopper cars or individual items in boxcars or flatbeds. NORM encountered included potash, liquefied petroleum gas, fireworks, televisions, and clay-based products (e.g., pottery). Analysis of the spectral data included the use of the template-fitting portion of the program GADRAS developed at Sandia National Laboratories. For most of the NORM, the NaI(Tl) data produced a correct identification of the radionuclides present in the railcars. The same analysis was also used for PVT data in which the spectral information (no peaks but only gradual spectral changes including Compton edges) was limited. However, the PVT analysis provided correct identification of 40K and 226Ra in many cases.

  11. Experiences with radiation portal detectors for international rail transport

    SciTech Connect

    Stromswold, David C.; McCormick, Kathleen R.; Todd, Lindsay C.; Ashbaker, Eric D.; Evans, J. C.

    2006-08-30

    Radiation detectors monitored trains at two international borders to evaluate the performance of NaI(Tl) and plastic (polyvinyltoluene: PVT) gamma-ray detectors to characterize rail cargo. The detectors included a prototype NaI(Tl) radiation-portal-monitor panel having four large detectors (10-cm × 10-cm × 41-cm) and a PVT panel with a 41 cm × 173 cm × 3.8-cm detector. Spectral data from the NaI(Tl) and PVT detectors were recorded. Of particular emphasis was the identification of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) and the resultant frequency of nuisance alarms. For rail monitoring, the difficulty in stopping trains to perform secondary inspection on alarming cars creates a need for reliable identification of NORM during initial screening. Approximately 30 trains were monitored, and the commodities in individual railcars were ascertained from manifest information. At one test site the trains carried inter-modal containers that had been unloaded from ships, and at the other site the trains contained bulk cargo or individual items in boxcars or flatbeds. NORM encountered included potash, liquefied petroleum gas, fireworks, televisions, and clay-based products (e.g., pottery). Analysis of the spectral data included the use of the template-fitting program GADRAS/FitToDB from Sandia National Laboratories. For much of the NORM the NaI(Tl) data produced a correct identification of the radionuclides present in the railcars. The same analysis was also used for PVT data in which the spectral information (no peaks but only gradual spectral changes including Compton edges) was limited. However, the PVT analysis provided correct identification of 40K and 226Ra in many cases.

  12. A General Hybrid Radiation Transport Scheme for Star Formation Simulations on an Adaptive Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, Mikhail; Kuiper, Rolf; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, Robi; Buntemeyer, Lars

    2014-12-01

    Radiation feedback plays a crucial role in the process of star formation. In order to simulate the thermodynamic evolution of disks, filaments, and the molecular gas surrounding clusters of young stars, we require an efficient and accurate method for solving the radiation transfer problem. We describe the implementation of a hybrid radiation transport scheme in the adaptive grid-based FLASH general magnetohydrodyanmics code. The hybrid scheme splits the radiative transport problem into a raytracing step and a diffusion step. The raytracer captures the first absorption event, as stars irradiate their environments, while the evolution of the diffuse component of the radiation field is handled by a flux-limited diffusion solver. We demonstrate the accuracy of our method through a variety of benchmark tests including the irradiation of a static disk, subcritical and supercritical radiative shocks, and thermal energy equilibration. We also demonstrate the capability of our method for casting shadows and calculating gas and dust temperatures in the presence of multiple stellar sources. Our method enables radiation-hydrodynamic studies of young stellar objects, protostellar disks, and clustered star formation in magnetized, filamentary environments.

  13. Radiation inactivation target size of rat adipocyte glucose transporters in the plasma membrane and intracellular pools

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, D.B.; Berenski, C.J.; Spangler, R.A.; Jung, C.Y.

    1987-06-15

    The in situ assembly states of the glucose transport carrier protein in the plasma membrane and in the intracellular (microsomal) storage pool of rat adipocytes were assessed by studying radiation-induced inactivation of the D-glucose-sensitive cytochalasin B binding activities. High energy radiation inactivated the glucose-sensitive cytochalasin B binding of each of these membrane preparations by reducing the total number of the binding sites without affecting the dissociation constant. The reduction in total number of binding sites was analyzed as a function of radiation dose based on target theory, from which a radiation-sensitive mass (target size) was calculated. When the plasma membranes of insulin-treated adipocytes were used, a target size of approximately 58,000 daltons was obtained. For adipocyte microsomal membranes, we obtained target sizes of approximately 112,000 and 109,000 daltons prior to and after insulin treatment, respectively. In the case of microsomal membranes, however, inactivation data showed anomalously low radiation sensitivities at low radiation doses, which may be interpreted as indicating the presence of a radiation-sensitive inhibitor. These results suggest that the adipocyte glucose transporter occurs as a monomer in the plasma membrane while existing in the intracellular reserve pool either as a homodimer or as a stoichiometric complex with a protein of an approximately equal size.

  14. A general hybrid radiation transport scheme for star formation simulations on an adaptive grid

    SciTech Connect

    Klassen, Mikhail; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Kuiper, Rolf; Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, Robi; Buntemeyer, Lars

    2014-12-10

    Radiation feedback plays a crucial role in the process of star formation. In order to simulate the thermodynamic evolution of disks, filaments, and the molecular gas surrounding clusters of young stars, we require an efficient and accurate method for solving the radiation transfer problem. We describe the implementation of a hybrid radiation transport scheme in the adaptive grid-based FLASH general magnetohydrodyanmics code. The hybrid scheme splits the radiative transport problem into a raytracing step and a diffusion step. The raytracer captures the first absorption event, as stars irradiate their environments, while the evolution of the diffuse component of the radiation field is handled by a flux-limited diffusion solver. We demonstrate the accuracy of our method through a variety of benchmark tests including the irradiation of a static disk, subcritical and supercritical radiative shocks, and thermal energy equilibration. We also demonstrate the capability of our method for casting shadows and calculating gas and dust temperatures in the presence of multiple stellar sources. Our method enables radiation-hydrodynamic studies of young stellar objects, protostellar disks, and clustered star formation in magnetized, filamentary environments.

  15. Dust Transport, Deposition and Radiative Effects Observed from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Koren, I.; Remer, L. A.; Tanre, D.; Ginoux, P.; Fan, S.

    2003-01-01

    Carlson (1977) used satellite (AVHRR) observation of dust episodes 3 estimate that 90 tg of dust are emitted from Africa (0-30 N) to the Atlantic Ocean between June and August. MODIS systematic measurements of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and the fraction of the AOT (f) due to the fine mode (see Remer et al abstract), are used to derive the column concentration, flux and deposition of African dust over the Atlantic Ocean. The main data set is for 2001 but the results are consistent with MODIS measurements from 2002. The analysis first determines the properties of maritime baseline aerosol (AOT=0.06, f=0.5); followed by linear scaling of the dust AOT and the anthropogenic AOT, based on MODIS measured values of the fraction "f" being 0.9 for anthropogenic aerosol and 0.5 for dust. NCEP winds are used in the analysis and are evaluated against observed dust movements between the Terra and Aqua passes (see Koren et al. abstract). Monthly values of dust transport and deposition are calculated. Preliminary results show that 280 tg of dust are emitted annually from Africa to the Atlantic Ocean between 20s and 30N, with 40 tg returning to Africa and Europe between 30N and 50N. 85 tg reach the Americas, with 130-150 tg are deposited in the Atlantic Ocean. The results are compared with dust transport models that indicate 110-230 tg of dust being deposited in the Ocean. It is interesting to note that the early estimates of Carlson (1977) and Carlson & Prosper0 (1972) are very close to our estimate from MODIS of 100 tg for the same latitude range and monthly period.

  16. Transport simulations of ITER with broad density profiles and high radiative fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, G.

    1995-08-01

    Special versions of the 1.5-D BALDUR predictive transport code are used to explore the confinement in the ignited ITER EDA by self-consistent calculations. The code computes 2-D equilibria and solves 1-D transport equations in the bulk and scrape-off layer with empirical transport coefficients for the ohmic, L and ELMy H mode regimes. The emphasis is on scenarios with flat density profiles and high, fixed radiative power in the main chamber due to the seeded impurities argon and neon. It is shown that self-sustained steady state thermonuclear burn is achieved for 370 s and is compatible with the flat density profiles and strong radiative cooling. The necessary local energy and particle transport are presented. In the argon and neon scenarios, the required radiation corrected energy confinement times are 4.1 and 3.5 s, respectively, which are achievable according to the ITER ELMy H mode scaling. The advantage of neon originates from its smaller radiative loss within the separatrix of 37% of the total radiation in the main chamber, compared with 60% in the case of argon. A significant radiative loss from the confinement zone, mainly by bremsstrahlung, cannot be avoided. It raises the required energy confinement time and is the price to be paid for reduction of the divertor heat load by radiative cooling in the main chamber. In steady state, a helium fraction of 5% is computed. The fractions of helium, argon and neon and the resulting fuel dilution are considerably lower than with peaked density profiles

  17. Advantages of Analytical Transformations in Monte Carlo Methods for Radiation Transport

    SciTech Connect

    McKinley, M S; Brooks III, E D; Daffin, F

    2004-12-13

    Monte Carlo methods for radiation transport typically attempt to solve an integral by directly sampling analog or weighted particles, which are treated as physical entities. Improvements to the methods involve better sampling, probability games or physical intuition about the problem. We show that significant improvements can be achieved by recasting the equations with an analytical transform to solve for new, non-physical entities or fields. This paper looks at one such transform, the difference formulation for thermal photon transport, showing a significant advantage for Monte Carlo solution of the equations for time dependent transport. Other related areas are discussed that may also realize significant benefits from similar analytical transformations.

  18. Benchmarking Space Radiation Transport Codes Using Measured LET Spectra from the Crater Instrument on LRO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Porter, J.; Spence, H. E.; Golightly, M. J.; Smith, S. S.; Schwadron, N.; Kasper, J. C.; Case, A. W.; Blake, J. B.; Mazur, J. E.; Looper, M. D.; Zeitlin, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) instrument on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft measures the energy depositions by solar and galactic cosmic radiations in its silicon detectors. These energy depositions are converted to linear energy transfer (LET) spectra, which can contribute to benchmarking space radiation transport codes and also used to estimate doses for the Lunar environment. In this work the Monte Carlo transport code HETC-HEDS (High Energy Transport Code - Human Exploration and Development in Space) and the deterministic NASA space radiation transport code HZETRN2010 are used to estimate LET and dose contributions from the incident primary ions and their charged secondaries produced in nuclear collisions within the components of the CRaTER instrument. Comparisons of the calculated LET spectra with measurements of LET from the CRaTER instrument are made and clearly show the importance of including corrections to the calculated average energy deposition spectra in the silicon detectors using a Vavilov distribution function.

  19. The use of symbolic computation in radiative, energy, and neutron transport calculations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Frankel, J.I.

    1997-09-01

    This investigation used sysmbolic manipulation in developing analytical methods and general computational strategies for solving both linear and nonlinear, regular and singular integral and integro-differential equations which appear in radiative and mixed-mode energy transport. Contained in this report are seven papers which present the technical results as individual modules.

  20. Time-dependent radiation transport in a one-dimensional medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagel, W.; Meszaros, P.

    1985-01-01

    An analytic solution of the time-dependent radiation transport problem in a one-dimensional, stationary and homogeneous medium of finite thickness is presented. The solution is found by the method of images, and is compared with an eigenfunction expansion. Previous conjectures about the structure of such an expansion are clarified. The Green's function of this problem is also expanded in scattering orders.

  1. Methods of treating complex space vehicle geometry for charged particle radiation transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, C. W.

    1973-01-01

    Current methods of treating complex geometry models for space radiation transport calculations are reviewed. The geometric techniques used in three computer codes are outlined. Evaluations of geometric capability and speed are provided for these codes. Although no code development work is included several suggestions for significantly improving complex geometry codes are offered.

  2. Los Alamos National Laboratory Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Neu, Mary

    2010-06-02

    Mary Neu, Associate Director for Chemistry, Life and Earth Sciences at Los Alamos National Laboratory, delivers opening remarks at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  3. Applications Of Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Simulation Techniques For Predicting Single Event Effects In Microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Kevin; Reed, Robert; Weller, Robert; Mendenhall, Marcus; Sierawski, Brian; Schrimpf, Ronald

    2011-06-01

    MRED (Monte Carlo Radiative Energy Deposition) is Vanderbilt University's Geant4 application for simulating radiation events in semiconductors. Geant4 is comprised of the best available computational physics models for the transport of radiation through matter. In addition to basic radiation transport physics contained in the Geant4 core, MRED has the capability to track energy loss in tetrahedral geometric objects, includes a cross section biasing and track weighting technique for variance reduction, and additional features relevant to semiconductor device applications. The crucial element of predicting Single Event Upset (SEU) parameters using radiation transport software is the creation of a dosimetry model that accurately approximates the net collected charge at transistor contacts as a function of deposited energy. The dosimetry technique described here is the multiple sensitive volume (MSV) model. It is shown to be a reasonable approximation of the charge collection process and its parameters can be calibrated to experimental measurements of SEU cross sections. The MSV model, within the framework of MRED, is examined for heavy ion and high-energy proton SEU measurements of a static random access memory.

  4. Radiation transport and energetics of laser-driven half-hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, A. S.; Cooper, A. B.R.; Schneider, M. B.; MacLaren, S.; Graham, P.; Lu, K.; Seugling, R.; Satcher, J.; Klingmann, J.; Comley, A. J.; Marrs, R.; May, M.; Widmann, K.; Glendinning, G.; Castor, J.; Sain, J.; Back, C. A.; Hund, J.; Baker, K.; Hsing, W. W.; Foster, J.; Young, B.; Young, P.

    2014-06-01

    Experiments that characterize and develop a high energy-density half-hohlraum platform for use in bench-marking radiation hydrodynamics models have been conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Results from the experiments are used to quantitatively compare with simulations of the radiation transported through an evolving plasma density structure, colloquially known as an N-wave. A half-hohlraum is heated by 80 NIF beams to a temperature of 240 eV. This creates a subsonic di usive Marshak wave which propagates into a high atomic number Ta2O5 aerogel. The subsequent radiation transport through the aerogel and through slots cut into the aerogel layer is investigated. We describe a set of experiments that test the hohlraum performance and report on a range

  5. Cloud-radiative effects on implied oceanic energy transport as simulated by atmospheric general circulation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleckler, P. J.; Randall, D. A.; Boer, G.; Colman, R.; Dix, M.; Galin, V.; Helfand, M.; Kiehl, J.; Kitoh, A.; Lau, W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes the ocean surface net energy flux simulated by fifteen atmospheric general circulation models constrained by realistically-varying sea surface temperatures and sea ice as part of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project. In general, the simulated energy fluxes are within the very large observational uncertainties. However, the annual mean oceanic meridional heat transport that would be required to balance the simulated surface fluxes is shown to be critically sensitive to the radiative effects of clouds, to the extent that even the sign of the Southern Hemisphere ocean heat transport can be affected by the errors in simulated cloud-radiation interactions. It is suggested that improved treatment of cloud radiative effects should help in the development of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models.

  6. Comparison of Stopping Power and Range Databases for Radiation Transport Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, H.; Bichsel, Hans; Wilson, John W.; Shinn, Judy L.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Badavi, Francis F.

    1997-01-01

    The codes used to calculate stopping power and range for the space radiation shielding program at the Langley Research Center are based on the work of Ziegler but with modifications. As more experience is gained from experiments at heavy ion accelerators, prudence dictates a reevaluation of the current databases. Numerical values of stopping power and range calculated from four different codes currently in use are presented for selected ions and materials in the energy domain suitable for space radiation transport. This study of radiation transport has found that for most collision systems and for intermediate particle energies, agreement is less than 1 percent, in general, among all the codes. However, greater discrepancies are seen for heavy systems, especially at low particle energies.

  7. Radiative or neutron transport modeling using a lattice Boltzmann equation framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindra, H.; Patil, D. V.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE)-based framework is used to obtain the solution for the linear radiative or neutron transport equation. The LBE framework is devised for the integrodifferential forms of these equations which arise due to the inclusion of the scattering terms. The interparticle collisions are neglected, hence omitting the nonlinear collision term. Furthermore, typical representative examples for one-dimensional or two-dimensional geometries and inclusion or exclusion of the scattering term (isotropic and anisotropic) in the Boltzmann transport equation are illustrated to prove the validity of the method. It has been shown that the solution from the LBE methodology is equivalent to the well-known Pn and Sn methods. This suggests that the LBE can potentially provide a more convenient and easy approach to solve the physical problems of neutron and radiation transport.

  8. Asymptotic diffusion limit of cell temperature discretisation schemes for thermal radiation transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedley-Stevenson, Richard P.; McClarren, Ryan G.

    2015-04-01

    This paper attempts to unify the asymptotic diffusion limit analysis of thermal radiation transport schemes, for a linear-discontinuous representation of the material temperature reconstructed from cell centred temperature unknowns, in a process known as 'source tilting'. The asymptotic limits of both Monte Carlo (continuous in space) and deterministic approaches (based on linear-discontinuous finite elements) for solving the transport equation are investigated in slab geometry. The resulting discrete diffusion equations are found to have nonphysical terms that are proportional to any cell-edge discontinuity in the temperature representation. Based on this analysis it is possible to design accurate schemes for representing the material temperature, for coupling thermal radiation transport codes to a cell centred representation of internal energy favoured by ALE (arbitrary Lagrange-Eulerian) hydrodynamics schemes.

  9. Asymptotic diffusion limit of cell temperature discretisation schemes for thermal radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Smedley-Stevenson, Richard P.; McClarren, Ryan G.

    2015-04-01

    This paper attempts to unify the asymptotic diffusion limit analysis of thermal radiation transport schemes, for a linear-discontinuous representation of the material temperature reconstructed from cell centred temperature unknowns, in a process known as ‘source tilting’. The asymptotic limits of both Monte Carlo (continuous in space) and deterministic approaches (based on linear-discontinuous finite elements) for solving the transport equation are investigated in slab geometry. The resulting discrete diffusion equations are found to have nonphysical terms that are proportional to any cell-edge discontinuity in the temperature representation. Based on this analysis it is possible to design accurate schemes for representing the material temperature, for coupling thermal radiation transport codes to a cell centred representation of internal energy favoured by ALE (arbitrary Lagrange–Eulerian) hydrodynamics schemes.

  10. Calculation of radiation therapy dose using all particle Monte Carlo transport

    DOEpatents

    Chandler, W.P.; Hartmann-Siantar, C.L.; Rathkopf, J.A.

    1999-02-09

    The actual radiation dose absorbed in the body is calculated using three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport. Neutrons, protons, deuterons, tritons, helium-3, alpha particles, photons, electrons, and positrons are transported in a completely coupled manner, using this Monte Carlo All-Particle Method (MCAPM). The major elements of the invention include: computer hardware, user description of the patient, description of the radiation source, physical databases, Monte Carlo transport, and output of dose distributions. This facilitated the estimation of dose distributions on a Cartesian grid for neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and heavy charged-particles incident on any biological target, with resolutions ranging from microns to centimeters. Calculations can be extended to estimate dose distributions on general-geometry (non-Cartesian) grids for biological and/or non-biological media. 57 figs.

  11. Calculation of radiation therapy dose using all particle Monte Carlo transport

    DOEpatents

    Chandler, William P.; Hartmann-Siantar, Christine L.; Rathkopf, James A.

    1999-01-01

    The actual radiation dose absorbed in the body is calculated using three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport. Neutrons, protons, deuterons, tritons, helium-3, alpha particles, photons, electrons, and positrons are transported in a completely coupled manner, using this Monte Carlo All-Particle Method (MCAPM). The major elements of the invention include: computer hardware, user description of the patient, description of the radiation source, physical databases, Monte Carlo transport, and output of dose distributions. This facilitated the estimation of dose distributions on a Cartesian grid for neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and heavy charged-particles incident on any biological target, with resolutions ranging from microns to centimeters. Calculations can be extended to estimate dose distributions on general-geometry (non-Cartesian) grids for biological and/or non-biological media.

  12. Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation and the High Speed Civil Transport. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiden, D. L.; Wilson, J. W.; Jones, I. W.; Goldhagen, P.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric ionizing radiation is produced by extraterrestrial radiations incident on the Earth's atmosphere. These extraterrestrial radiations are of two sources: ever present galactic cosmic rays with origin outside the solar system and transient solar particle events that are at times very intense events associated with solar activity lasting several hours to a few days. Although the galactic radiation penetrating through the atmosphere to the ground is low in intensity, the intensity is more than two orders of magnitude greater at commercial aircraft altitudes. The radiation levels at the higher altitudes of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) are an additional factor of two higher. Ionizing radiation produces chemically active radicals in biological tissues that alter the cell function or result in cell death. Protection standards against low levels of ionizing radiation are based on limitation of excess cancer mortality or limitation of developmental injury resulting in permanent damage to the offspring during pregnancy. The crews of commercial air transport operations are considered as radiation workers by the EPA, the FAA, and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The annual exposures of aircrews depend on the latitudes and altitudes of operation and flight time. Flight hours have significantly increased since deregulation of the airline industry in the 1980's. The FAA estimates annual subsonic aircrew exposures to range from 0.2 to 9.1 mSv compared to 0.5 mSv exposure of the average nuclear power plant worker in the nuclear industry. The commercial aircrews of the HSCT may receive exposures above recently recommended allowable limits for even radiation workers if flying their allowable number of flight hours. An adequate protection philosophy for background exposures in HSCT commercial airtraffic cannot be developed at this time due to current uncertainty in environmental levels. In addition, if a large solar particle event

  13. Radiation Transport Properties of Potential In Situ-Developed Regolith-Epoxy Materials for Martian Habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jack; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Zeitlin, Cary J.; Wilson, John W.; Singleterry, Robert C., Jr.; Thibeault, Sheila Ann

    2003-01-01

    Mission crews in space outside the Earth s magnetic field will be exposed to high energy heavy charged particles in the galactic cosmic radiation (GCR). These highly ionizing particles will be a source of radiation risk to crews on extended missions to the Moon and Mars, and the biological effects of and countermeasures to the GCR have to be investigated as part of the planning of exploration-class missions. While it is impractical to shield spacecraft and planetary habitats against the entire GCR spectrum, biological and physical studies indicate that relatively modest amounts of shielding are effective at reducing the radiation dose. However, nuclear fragmentation in the shielding materials produces highly penetrating secondary particles, which complicates the problem: in some cases, some shielding is worse than none at all. Therefore the radiation transport properties of potential shielding materials need to be carefully investigated. One intriguing option for a Mars mission is the use of material from the Martian surface, in combination with chemicals carried from Earth and/or fabricated from elements found in the Martian atmosphere, to construct crew habitats. We have measured the transmission properties of epoxy-Martian regolith composites with respect to heavy charged particles characteristic of the GCR ions which bombard the Martian surface. The composites were prepared at NASA Langley Research Center using simulated Martian regolith, in the process also evaluating fabrication methods which could lead to technologies for in situ fabrication on Mars. Initial evaluation of the radiation shielding properties is made using radiation transport models developed at NASA-LaRC, and the results of these calculations are used to select the composites with the most favorable radiation transmission properties. These candidates are then evaluated at particle accelerators which produce beams of heavy charged particles representative in energy and charge of the radiation

  14. Solar Radiation Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere: A 3D Perspective on Observations and Climate Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Anthony B.; Marshak, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The interplay of sunlight with clouds is a ubiquitous and often pleasant visual experience, but it conjures up major challenges for weather, climate, environmental science and beyond. Those engaged in the characterization of clouds (and the clear air nearby) by remote sensing methods are even more confronted. The problem comes, on the one hand, from the spatial complexity of real clouds and, on the other hand, from the dominance of multiple scattering in the radiation transport. The former ingredient contrasts sharply with the still popular representation of clouds as homogeneous plane-parallel slabs for the purposes of radiative transfer computations. In typical cloud scenes the opposite asymptotic transport regimes of diffusion and ballistic propagation coexist. We survey the three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric radiative transfer literature over the past 50 years and identify three concurrent and intertwining thrusts: first, how to assess the damage (bias) caused by 3D effects in the operational 1D radiative transfer models? Second, how to mitigate this damage? Finally, can we exploit 3D radiative transfer phenomena to innovate observation methods and technologies? We quickly realize that the smallest scale resolved computationally or observationally may be artificial but is nonetheless a key quantity that separates the 3D radiative transfer solutions into two broad and complementary classes: stochastic and deterministic. Both approaches draw on classic and contemporary statistical, mathematical and computational physics.

  15. A hybrid transport-diffusion model for radiative transfer in absorbing and scattering media

    SciTech Connect

    Roger, M.; Caliot, C.; Crouseilles, N.; Coelho, P.J.

    2014-10-15

    A new multi-scale hybrid transport-diffusion model for radiative transfer is proposed in order to improve the efficiency of the calculations close to the diffusive regime, in absorbing and strongly scattering media. In this model, the radiative intensity is decomposed into a macroscopic component calculated by the diffusion equation, and a mesoscopic component. The transport equation for the mesoscopic component allows to correct the estimation of the diffusion equation, and then to obtain the solution of the linear radiative transfer equation. In this work, results are presented for stationary and transient radiative transfer cases, in examples which concern solar concentrated and optical tomography applications. The Monte Carlo and the discrete-ordinate methods are used to solve the mesoscopic equation. It is shown that the multi-scale model allows to improve the efficiency of the calculations when the medium is close to the diffusive regime. The proposed model is a good alternative for radiative transfer at the intermediate regime where the macroscopic diffusion equation is not accurate enough and the radiative transfer equation requires too much computational effort.

  16. Solar radiation transport in the cloudy atmosphere: a 3D perspective on observations and climate impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Anthony B.; Marshak, Alexander

    2010-02-01

    The interplay of sunlight with clouds is a ubiquitous and often pleasant visual experience, but it conjures up major challenges for weather, climate, environmental science and beyond. Those engaged in the characterization of clouds (and the clear air nearby) by remote sensing methods are even more confronted. The problem comes, on the one hand, from the spatial complexity of real clouds and, on the other hand, from the dominance of multiple scattering in the radiation transport. The former ingredient contrasts sharply with the still popular representation of clouds as homogeneous plane-parallel slabs for the purposes of radiative transfer computations. In typical cloud scenes the opposite asymptotic transport regimes of diffusion and ballistic propagation coexist. We survey the three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric radiative transfer literature over the past 50 years and identify three concurrent and intertwining thrusts: first, how to assess the damage (bias) caused by 3D effects in the operational 1D radiative transfer models? Second, how to mitigate this damage? Finally, can we exploit 3D radiative transfer phenomena to innovate observation methods and technologies? We quickly realize that the smallest scale resolved computationally or observationally may be artificial but is nonetheless a key quantity that separates the 3D radiative transfer solutions into two broad and complementary classes: stochastic and deterministic. Both approaches draw on classic and contemporary statistical, mathematical and computational physics.

  17. A hybrid transport-diffusion model for radiative transfer in absorbing and scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roger, M.; Caliot, C.; Crouseilles, N.; Coelho, P. J.

    2014-10-01

    A new multi-scale hybrid transport-diffusion model for radiative transfer is proposed in order to improve the efficiency of the calculations close to the diffusive regime, in absorbing and strongly scattering media. In this model, the radiative intensity is decomposed into a macroscopic component calculated by the diffusion equation, and a mesoscopic component. The transport equation for the mesoscopic component allows to correct the estimation of the diffusion equation, and then to obtain the solution of the linear radiative transfer equation. In this work, results are presented for stationary and transient radiative transfer cases, in examples which concern solar concentrated and optical tomography applications. The Monte Carlo and the discrete-ordinate methods are used to solve the mesoscopic equation. It is shown that the multi-scale model allows to improve the efficiency of the calculations when the medium is close to the diffusive regime. The proposed model is a good alternative for radiative transfer at the intermediate regime where the macroscopic diffusion equation is not accurate enough and the radiative transfer equation requires too much computational effort.

  18. Measurements on the shuttle of the LET spectra of galactic cosmic radiation and comparison with the radiation transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Badhwar, G.D.; Konradi, A.; Cucinotta, F.A.; Braby, L.A.

    1994-09-01

    A new class of tissue-equivalent proportional counters has been flown on two space shuttle flights. These detectors and their associated electronics cover a lineal energy range from 0.4 to 1250 keV/{mu}m with a multichannel analyzer resolution of 0.1 keV/{mu}m from 0.4 to 20 keV/{mu} and 5 keV/{mu}m from 20 to 1250 keV/{mu}m. These detectors provide the most complete dynamic range and highest resolution of any technique currently in use. On one mission, one detector was mounted in the Shuttle payload bay and another older modele in the mid-deck, thus providing information on the depth dependence of the lineal energy spectrum. A detailed comparison of the observed lineal energy and calculated LET spectra for galacic cosmic radiation shows that, although the radiation transport models provide a rather accurate description of the dose ({+-}15%) and equivalent dose ({+-}15%), the calculations significantly underestimate the frequency of events below about 100 keV/{mu}m. This difference cannot be explained by the inclusion of the contribution of splash protons. The contribution of the secondary pions, kaons and electrons produce in the Shuttle shielding, if included in the radiation transport model, may explain these differences. There are also significant differences between the model predictions and observations above 1440 keV/{mu}m, particularly for 28.5{degrees} inclination orbit. 24 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  19. On the Transport and Radiative Properties of Plasmas with Small-Scale Electromagnetic Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, Brett D.

    Plasmas with sub-Larmor-scale ("small-scale") electromagnetic fluctuations are a feature of a wide variety of high-energy-density environments, and are essential to the description of many astrophysical/laboratory plasma phenomena. Radiation from particles, whether they be relativistic or non-relativistic, moving through small-scale electromagnetic turbulence has spectral characteristics distinct from both synchrotron and cyclotron radiation. The radiation, carrying information on the statistical properties of the turbulence, is also intimately related to the particle diffusive transport. We investigate, both theoretically and numerically, the transport of non-relativistic and transrelativistic particles in plasmas with high-amplitude isotropic sub-Larmor-scale magnetic turbulence---both with and without a mean field component---and its relation to the spectra of radiation simultaneously produced by these particles. Furthermore, the transport of particles through small-scale electromagnetic turbulence---under certain conditions---resembles the random transport of particles---via Coulomb collisions---in collisional plasmas. The pitch-angle diffusion coefficient, which acts as an effective "collision" frequency, may be substantial in these, otherwise, collisionless environments. We show that this effect, colloquially referred to as the plasma "quasi-collisionality", may radically alter the expected radiative transport properties of candidate plasmas. We argue that the modified magneto-optic effects in these plasmas provide an attractive, novel, diagnostic tool for the exploration and characterization of small-scale electromagnetic turbulence. Lastly, we speculate upon the manner in which quasi-collisions may affect inertial confinement fusion (ICF), and other laser-plasma experiments. Finally, we show that mildly relativistic jitter radiation, from laser-produced plasmas, may offer insight into the underlying electromagnetic turbulence. Here we investigate the

  20. Status of the solar and infrared radiation submodels in the LLNL 1-D and 2-D chemical-transport models

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, K.E.; Taylor, K.E.; Ellis, J.S.; Wuebbles, D.J.

    1987-07-01

    The authors have implemented a series of state of the art radiation transport submodels in previously developed one dimensional and two dimensional chemical transport models of the troposphere and stratosphere. These submodels provide the capability of calculating accurate solar and infrared heating rates. They are a firm basis for further radiation submodel development as well as for studying interactions between radiation and model dynamics under varying conditions of clear sky, clouds, and aerosols. 37 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    This report documents the environmental surveillance program conducted by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) in 1979. Routine monitoring for radiation and radioactive or chemical substances was conducted on the Laboratory site and in the surrounding region to determine compliance with appropriate standards and permit early identification of possible undesirable trends. Results and interpretation of the data for 1979 on penetrating radiation, chemical and radiochemical quality of ambient air, surface and ground water, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, food, and airborne and liquid effluents are included. Comparisons with appropriate standards and regulations or with background levels from natural or other non-LASL sources provide a basis for concluding that environmental effects attributable to LASL operations are minor and cannot be considered likely to result in any hazard to the population of the area. Results of several special studies provide documentation of some unique environmental conditions in the LASL environs.

  2. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Kohen, K.; Stoker, A.; Stone, G.

    1994-07-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program at Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1992. The Laboratory routinely monitors for radiation and for radioactive and nonradioactive materials at (or on) Laboratory sites as well as in the surrounding region. LANL uses the monitoring results to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to identify potentially undesirable trends. Data were collected in 1992 to assess external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and liquid effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface waters and groundwaters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Using comparisons with standards, regulations, and background levels, this report concludes that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a demonstrable threat to the public, laboratory employees, or the environment.

  3. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1989. Routine monitoring for radiation and radioactive or chemical materials is conducted on the Laboratory site as well as in the surrounding region. Monitoring results are used to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to permit early identification of potentially undesirable trends. Results and interpretation of data for 1989 cover external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface and ground waters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Comparisons with appropriate standards, regulations, and background levels provide the basis for concluding that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment. 58 refs., 31 figs., 39 tabs.

  4. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) during 1995. The Laboratory routinely monitors for radiation and for radioactive and nonradioactive materials at (or on) Laboratory sites as well as in the surrounding region. LANL uses the monitoring result to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to identify potentially undesirable trends. Data were collected in 1995 to assess external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and liquid effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface waters and groundwaters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Using comparisons with standards, regulations, and background levels, this report concludes that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a demonstrable threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment.

  5. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1987. Routine monitoring for radiation and radioactive or chemical materials is conducted on the Laboratory site as well as in the surrounding region. Monitoring results are used to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to permit early identification of potentially undesirable trends. Results and interpretation of data for 1987 cover: external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and liquid effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface and ground waters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Comparisons with appropriate standards, regulations, and background levels provide the basis for concluding that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are insignificant and do not pose a threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment. 113 refs., 33 figs., 120 tabs.

  6. Radiation Effects on Sorption and Mobilization of Radionuclides during Transport through Geosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.M.; Ewing, R.C.; Hayes, K.F.

    2002-03-14

    Site restoration activities at DOE facilities and the permanent disposal of nuclear waste generated at DOE facilities involve working with and within various types and levels of radiation fields. Radionuclide decay and the associated radiation fields lead to physical and chemical changes that can degrade or enhance material properties. The principal sources of radiation at the DOE sites are the actinides and fission-products contained in high-level wastes currently in storage. Alpha-decay of the actinide elements and beta-decay of the fission products lead to atomic scale changes in the material (radiation damage and transmutation). During site restoration, materials will be exposed to radiation fields that exceed 104 rad/hr. The radiation exposure due to the release and sorption of long-lived actinides (e.g., 237Np) and fission products (e.g., 137Cs and 90Sr) may cause changes in important properties (e.g., cation exchange capacity) in geological materials (e.g., clays and zeolites) along transport pathways. Among these materials, clays and zeolites, which are expected to sorb and immobilize radionuclides, are known to be extremely susceptible to radiation-induced structure changes (e.g., bubble formation and solid state amorphization) through both collisional displacement and ionization processes. These changes will inevitably affect (either negatively or positively) the further sorption and the migration of radionuclides at waste sites (e.g., vadose zone at Hanford). Current models used for the longterm prediction of radionuclide transport have proven to be inadequate and unrealistic; however, these previous models did not take radiation effects into consideration.

  7. The influence of resonance radiation transport on the contraction of a glow discharge in argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubovskii, Yu B.; Maiorov, V. A.

    2015-04-01

    The role of resonance radiation transport in the contraction of a positive column in an argon glow discharge is studied numerically. The theory is based on the self-consistent solution of the ambipolar diffusion equation for electrons, the diffusion equation for metastable atoms and the Biberman-Holstein equation for resonance atoms. To calculate the ionization and excitation rates, the Boltzmann equation is solved in a local approximation taking into account elastic, inelastic and electron-electron collisions. A solution method for a boundary problem is developed which allows one to obtain a hysteresis of the parameters during a continuous transition from a diffuse mode to a contracted mode through an unstable branch. At small currents there is a diffuse discharge where the role of radiation transport is inessential because the radial distributions of electrons and excited atoms are close to the fundamental modes of the corresponding equations. Under these conditions, the traditional approximation of ‘effective lifetime’ is accurate enough. For a contracted discharge, this approximation is not applicable because the higher diffusion and radiation modes play a notable role and a more strict description of radiation transport is required. It is shown that, when radiation transport is taken into account, the width of a filament in a contracted discharge significantly exceeds that obtained in the traditional ‘effective lifetime’ approximation. The critical current, when the discharge abruptly turns into a contracted mode, is shifted towards higher current values. The results obtained in this paper can also relate to a discharge in other inert gases.

  8. Lorentz force correction to the Boltzmann radiation transport equation and its implications for Monte Carlo algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Hugo; Bielajew, Alex

    2015-07-01

    To establish a theoretical framework for generalizing Monte Carlo transport algorithms by adding external electromagnetic fields to the Boltzmann radiation transport equation in a rigorous and consistent fashion. Using first principles, the Boltzmann radiation transport equation is modified by adding a term describing the variation of the particle distribution due to the Lorentz force. The implications of this new equation are evaluated by investigating the validity of Fano’s theorem. Additionally, Lewis’ approach to multiple scattering theory in infinite homogeneous media is redefined to account for the presence of external electromagnetic fields. The equation is modified and yields a description consistent with the deterministic laws of motion as well as probabilistic methods of solution. The time-independent Boltzmann radiation transport equation is generalized to account for the electromagnetic forces in an additional operator similar to the interaction term. Fano’s and Lewis’ approaches are stated in this new equation. Fano’s theorem is found not to apply in the presence of electromagnetic fields. Lewis’ theory for electron multiple scattering and moments, accounting for the coupling between the Lorentz force and multiple elastic scattering, is found. However, further investigation is required to develop useful algorithms for Monte Carlo and deterministic transport methods. To test the accuracy of Monte Carlo transport algorithms in the presence of electromagnetic fields, the Fano cavity test, as currently defined, cannot be applied. Therefore, new tests must be designed for this specific application. A multiple scattering theory that accurately couples the Lorentz force with elastic scattering could improve Monte Carlo efficiency. The present study proposes a new theoretical framework to develop such algorithms.

  9. Lorentz force correction to the Boltzmann radiation transport equation and its implications for Monte Carlo algorithms.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Hugo; Bielajew, Alex

    2015-07-01

    To establish a theoretical framework for generalizing Monte Carlo transport algorithms by adding external electromagnetic fields to the Boltzmann radiation transport equation in a rigorous and consistent fashion. Using first principles, the Boltzmann radiation transport equation is modified by adding a term describing the variation of the particle distribution due to the Lorentz force. The implications of this new equation are evaluated by investigating the validity of Fano's theorem. Additionally, Lewis' approach to multiple scattering theory in infinite homogeneous media is redefined to account for the presence of external electromagnetic fields. The equation is modified and yields a description consistent with the deterministic laws of motion as well as probabilistic methods of solution. The time-independent Boltzmann radiation transport equation is generalized to account for the electromagnetic forces in an additional operator similar to the interaction term. Fano's and Lewis' approaches are stated in this new equation. Fano's theorem is found not to apply in the presence of electromagnetic fields. Lewis' theory for electron multiple scattering and moments, accounting for the coupling between the Lorentz force and multiple elastic scattering, is found. However, further investigation is required to develop useful algorithms for Monte Carlo and deterministic transport methods. To test the accuracy of Monte Carlo transport algorithms in the presence of electromagnetic fields, the Fano cavity test, as currently defined, cannot be applied. Therefore, new tests must be designed for this specific application. A multiple scattering theory that accurately couples the Lorentz force with elastic scattering could improve Monte Carlo efficiency. The present study proposes a new theoretical framework to develop such algorithms. PMID:26061045

  10. Gray and multigroup radiation transport models for two-dimensional binary stochastic media using effective opacities

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Olson, Gordon L.

    2015-09-24

    One-dimensional models for the transport of radiation through binary stochastic media do not work in multi-dimensions. In addition, authors have attempted to modify or extend the 1D models to work in multidimensions without success. Analytic one-dimensional models are successful in 1D only when assuming greatly simplified physics. State of the art theories for stochastic media radiation transport do not address multi-dimensions and temperature-dependent physics coefficients. Here, the concept of effective opacities and effective heat capacities is found to well represent the ensemble averaged transport solutions in cases with gray or multigroup temperature-dependent opacities and constant or temperature-dependent heat capacities. Inmore » every case analyzed here, effective physics coefficients fit the transport solutions over a useful range of parameter space. The transport equation is solved with the spherical harmonics method with angle orders of n=1 and 5. Although the details depend on what order of solution is used, the general results are similar, independent of angular order.« less

  11. Analysis of radiation doses from operation of postulated commercial spent fuel transportation systems: Main report

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, K.J.; Hostick, C.J.; Ross, W.A.; Peterson, R.W.; Smith, R.I.; Stiles, D.L.; Daling, P.M.; Weakley, S.A.; Grinde, R.B.; Young, J.R.

    1987-11-01

    This report contains a system study of estimated radiation doses to the public and workers resulting from the transport of spent fuel from commercial nuclear power reactors to a geologic repository. The report contains a detailed breakdown of activities and a description of time/distance/dose-rate estimates for each activity within the system. Collective doses are estimated for each of the major activities at the reactor site, in transit, and at the repository receiving facility. Annual individual doses to the maximally exposed individuals or groups of individuals are also estimated. A total of 17 alternatives and subalternatives to the postulated reference transportation system are identified, conceptualized, and their dose-reduction potentials and costs estimated. Resulting ratios of ..delta..cost/..delta..collective system dose for each alternative relative to the postulated reference transportation system are given. Most of the alternatives evaluated are estimated to provide both cost and dose reductions. Major reductions in transportation system dose and cost are estimated to result from using higher-capacity rail and truck casks, and particularly when replacing legalweight truck casks with ''advanced design'' overweight truck casks. The greatest annual dose reduction to the highest exposed individual workers (i.e., at the repository) is estimated to be achieved by using remote handling equipment for the cask handling operations at the repository. Additional shielding is also effective in reducing doses to both radiation workers at the reactor and repository and to transport workers. 69 refs., 36 figs., 156 tabs.

  12. Comparing calvarial transport distraction with and without radiation and fat grafting.

    PubMed

    Yuhasz, Mikell M; Koch, Felix P; Kwiatkowski, Anna; Young, Calvin; Clune, James; Travieso, Rob; Wong, Kenneth; Van Houten, Joshua; Steinbacher, Derek M

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to: a) assess transport distraction to reconstruct cranial defects in radiated and non-radiated fields b) examine adipose grafting's effect on the bony regenerate and overlying wound, and c) elucidate sources of bone formation during transport distraction osteogenesis. Twenty-three male New Zealand white rabbits (3 months; 3.5 kg) were used, 10 non-irradiated and 13 irradiated (17 treatment, 6 control) with a one-time fraction of 35 Gy. A 16 × 16 mm defect was abutted by a 10 × 16 mm transport disc 5 weeks after irradiation, and 11 animals were fat grafted at the distraction site. Latency (1 day), distraction (1.5 mm/day), and consolidation (4 weeks) followed. Fluorochromes were injected subcutaneously and microCT, fluorescence, and histology assessed. In distracted animals without fat grafting, bone density measured 701.87 mgHA/ccm and 2271.95 mgHA/ccm in irradiated and non-irradiated animals. In distracted animals with fat grafting, bone density measured 703.23 mgHA/ccm and 2254.27 mgHA/ccm in irradiated and non-irradiated animals. Fluorescence revealed ossification emanating from the dura, periosteum, and transport segment with decreased formation in irradiated animals. Transport distraction is possible for cranial reconstruction in irradiated fields but short-term osseous fill is significantly diminished. Adipose grafting enhances wound healing in previously irradiated fields but does not enhance ossification. PMID:24864072

  13. Gray and multigroup radiation transport models for two-dimensional binary stochastic media using effective opacities

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Gordon L.

    2015-09-24

    One-dimensional models for the transport of radiation through binary stochastic media do not work in multi-dimensions. In addition, authors have attempted to modify or extend the 1D models to work in multidimensions without success. Analytic one-dimensional models are successful in 1D only when assuming greatly simplified physics. State of the art theories for stochastic media radiation transport do not address multi-dimensions and temperature-dependent physics coefficients. Here, the concept of effective opacities and effective heat capacities is found to well represent the ensemble averaged transport solutions in cases with gray or multigroup temperature-dependent opacities and constant or temperature-dependent heat capacities. In every case analyzed here, effective physics coefficients fit the transport solutions over a useful range of parameter space. The transport equation is solved with the spherical harmonics method with angle orders of n=1 and 5. Although the details depend on what order of solution is used, the general results are similar, independent of angular order.

  14. Los Alamos High-Brightness Accelerator FEL (HIBAF) facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelius, W.D.; Bender, S.; Meier, K.; Thode, L.E.; Watson, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The 10-/mu/m Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL) facility is being upgraded. The conventional electron gun and bunchers have been replaced with a much more compact 6-MeV photoinjector accelerator. By adding existing parts from previous experiments, the primary beam energy will be doubled to 40 MeV. With the existing 1-m wiggler (/lambda//sub w/ = 2.7 cm) and resonator, the facility can produce photons with wavelengths from 3 to 100 /mu/m when lasing on the fundamental mode and produce photons in the visible spectrum with short-period wigglers or harmonic operation. After installation of a 150/degree/ bend, a second wiggler will be added as an amplifier. The installation of laser transport tubes between the accelerator vault and an upstairs laboratory will provide experimenters with a radiation-free environment for experiments. Although the initial experimental program of the upgraded facility will be to test the single accelerator-master oscillator/power amplifier configuration, some portion of the operational time of the facility can be dedicated to user experiments. 13 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. A NEW MONTE CARLO METHOD FOR TIME-DEPENDENT NEUTRINO RADIATION TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Ott, Christian D.; O'Connor, Evan; Burrows, Adam; Dolence, Joshua C.; Loeffler, Frank; Schnetter, Erik

    2012-08-20

    Monte Carlo approaches to radiation transport have several attractive properties such as simplicity of implementation, high accuracy, and good parallel scaling. Moreover, Monte Carlo methods can handle complicated geometries and are relatively easy to extend to multiple spatial dimensions, which makes them potentially interesting in modeling complex multi-dimensional astrophysical phenomena such as core-collapse supernovae. The aim of this paper is to explore Monte Carlo methods for modeling neutrino transport in core-collapse supernovae. We generalize the Implicit Monte Carlo photon transport scheme of Fleck and Cummings and gray discrete-diffusion scheme of Densmore et al. to energy-, time-, and velocity-dependent neutrino transport. Using our 1D spherically-symmetric implementation, we show that, similar to the photon transport case, the implicit scheme enables significantly larger timesteps compared with explicit time discretization, without sacrificing accuracy, while the discrete-diffusion method leads to significant speed-ups at high optical depth. Our results suggest that a combination of spectral, velocity-dependent, Implicit Monte Carlo and discrete-diffusion Monte Carlo methods represents a robust approach for use in neutrino transport calculations in core-collapse supernovae. Our velocity-dependent scheme can easily be adapted to photon transport.

  16. Implementation, capabilities, and benchmarking of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pandya, Tara M.; Johnson, Seth R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Davidson, Gregory G.; Hamilton, Steven P.; Godfrey, Andrew T.

    2015-12-21

    This paper discusses the implementation, capabilities, and validation of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport package developed and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It has been developed to scale well from laptop to small computing clusters to advanced supercomputers. Special features of Shift include hybrid capabilities for variance reduction such as CADIS and FW-CADIS, and advanced parallel decomposition and tally methods optimized for scalability on supercomputing architectures. Shift has been validated and verified against various reactor physics benchmarks and compares well to other state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiation transport codes such as MCNP5, CE KENO-VI, and OpenMC. Somemore » specific benchmarks used for verification and validation include the CASL VERA criticality test suite and several Westinghouse AP1000® problems. These benchmark and scaling studies show promising results.« less

  17. Implementation, capabilities, and benchmarking of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Pandya, Tara M.; Johnson, Seth R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Davidson, Gregory G.; Hamilton, Steven P.; Godfrey, Andrew T.

    2015-12-21

    This paper discusses the implementation, capabilities, and validation of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport package developed and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It has been developed to scale well from laptop to small computing clusters to advanced supercomputers. Special features of Shift include hybrid capabilities for variance reduction such as CADIS and FW-CADIS, and advanced parallel decomposition and tally methods optimized for scalability on supercomputing architectures. Shift has been validated and verified against various reactor physics benchmarks and compares well to other state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiation transport codes such as MCNP5, CE KENO-VI, and OpenMC. Some specific benchmarks used for verification and validation include the CASL VERA criticality test suite and several Westinghouse AP1000® problems. These benchmark and scaling studies show promising results.

  18. Functional Size of Photosynthetic Electron Transport Chain Determined by Radiation Inactivation 1

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Run Sun; Chien, Lee Feng; Wang, May Yun; Tsai, Mai Yu; Pan, Rong Long; Hsu, Ban Dar

    1987-01-01

    Radiation inactivation technique was employed to determine the functional size of photosynthetic electron transport chain of spinach chloroplasts. The functional size for photosystem I+II (H2O to methylviologen) was 623 ± 37 kilodaltons; for photosystem II (H2O to dimethylquinone/ferricyanide), 174 ± 11 kilodaltons; and for photosystem I (reduced diaminodurene to methylviologen), 190 ± 11 kilodaltons. The difference between 364 ± 22 (the sum of 174 ± 11 and 190 ± 11) kilodaltons and 623 ± 37 kilodaltons is partially explained to be due to the presence of two molecules of cytochrome b6/f complex of 280 kilodaltons. The molecular mass for other partial reactions of photosynthetic electron flow, also measured by radiation inactivation, is reported. The molecular mass obtained by this technique is compared with that determined by other conventional biochemical methods. A working hypothesis for the composition, stoichiometry, and organization of polypeptides for photosynthetic electron transport chain is proposed. PMID:16665649

  19. A new spherical harmonics scheme for multi-dimensional radiation transport I. Static matter configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Radice, David; Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Rezzolla, Luciano; Ott, Christian D.

    2013-06-01

    Recent work by McClarren and Hauck (2010) [31] suggests that the filtered spherical harmonics method represents an efficient, robust, and accurate method for radiation transport, at least in the two-dimensional (2D) case. We extend their work to the three-dimensional (3D) case and find that all of the advantages of the filtering approach identified in 2D are present also in the 3D case. We reformulate the filter operation in a way that is independent of the timestep and of the spatial discretization. We also explore different second- and fourth-order filters and find that the second-order ones yield significantly better results. Overall, our findings suggest that the filtered spherical harmonics approach represents a very promising method for 3D radiation transport calculations.

  20. Radiation Transport Around Axisymmetric Blunt Body Vehicles Using a Modified Differential Approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartung, Lin C.; Hassan, H. A.

    1992-01-01

    A moment method for computing 3-D radiative transport is applied to axisymmetric flows in thermochemical nonequilibrium. Such flows are representative of proposed aerobrake missions. The method uses the P-1 approximation to reduce the governing system of integro-di erential equations to a coupled set of partial di erential equations. A numerical solution method for these equations given actual variations of the radiation properties in thermochemical nonequilibrium blunt body flows is developed. Initial results from the method are shown and compared to tangent slab calculations. The agreement between the transport methods is found to be about 10 percent in the stagnation region, with the difference increasing along the flank of the vehicle.

  1. Diagrammatic and asymptotic approaches to the origins of radiative transport theory: tutorial.

    PubMed

    Cazé, A; Schotland, John C

    2015-08-01

    The radiative transport equation (RTE) is used widely to describe the propagation of multiply scattered light in disordered media. In this tutorial, we present two derivations of the RTE for scalar wave fields. The first derivation is based on diagrammatic perturbation theory, while the second stems from an asymptotic multiscale expansion. Although the two approaches are quite distinct mathematically, some common ground can be found and is discussed. PMID:26367292

  2. A Monte Carlo Code for Relativistic Radiation Transport Around Kerr Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnittman, Jeremy David; Krolik, Julian H.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new code for radiation transport around Kerr black holes, including arbitrary emission and absorption mechanisms, as well as electron scattering and polarization. The code is particularly useful for analyzing accretion flows made up of optically thick disks and optically thin coronae. We give a detailed description of the methods employed in the code and also present results from a number of numerical tests to assess its accuracy and convergence.

  3. A Monte Carlo Code for Relativistic Radiation Transport around Kerr Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnittman, Jeremy D.; Krolik, Julian H.

    2013-11-01

    We present a new code for radiation transport around Kerr black holes, including arbitrary emission and absorption mechanisms, as well as electron scattering and polarization. The code is particularly useful for analyzing accretion flows made up of optically thick disks and optically thin coronae. We give a detailed description of the methods employed in the code and also present results from a number of numerical tests to assess its accuracy and convergence.

  4. Visualization of a Deterministic Radiation Transport Model Using Standard Visualization Tools

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Galbraith; L. Eric Greenwade

    2004-05-01

    Output from a deterministic radiation transport code running on a CRAY SV1 is imported into a standard distributed, parallel, visualization tool for analysis. Standard output files, consisting of tetrahedral meshes, are imported to the visualization tool through the creation of a application specific plug-in module. Visualization samples are included, providing visualization of steady state results. Different plot types and operators are utilized to enhance the analysis and assist in reporting the results of the analysis.

  5. A MONTE CARLO CODE FOR RELATIVISTIC RADIATION TRANSPORT AROUND KERR BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Schnittman, Jeremy D.; Krolik, Julian H. E-mail: jhk@pha.jhu.edu

    2013-11-01

    We present a new code for radiation transport around Kerr black holes, including arbitrary emission and absorption mechanisms, as well as electron scattering and polarization. The code is particularly useful for analyzing accretion flows made up of optically thick disks and optically thin coronae. We give a detailed description of the methods employed in the code and also present results from a number of numerical tests to assess its accuracy and convergence.

  6. Extreme-ultraviolet radiation transport in small scale length laser-produced tin plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sequoia, Kevin Lamar Williams

    The majority of the studies on laser-produced plasmas as an efficient extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light source have focused on relatively large plasmas produced at large laser facilities. However, to develop a commercially viable light source for EUV lithography, much smaller lasers and hence much smaller plasmas must be employed. Smaller plasmas behave quite differently than large plasmas in that the temperature and density are less uniform, and lateral expansion is more important. These differences affect the energy transport and, in particular, the radiation transport. This work studies the EUV radiation transport in small scale length tin plasmas, focusing on the effects of target geometry and laser pulse duration. Both planar and spherical tin targets were irradiated with an Nd:YAG laser operating at 1.064 microm. Conversion efficiency of laser light to 13.5 nm radiation (in-band), EUV emission spectrum, two-dimensional in-band emission profile, and the plasma electron density were measured experimentally. These measurements provide insight into where the laser is absorbed, where the in-band emission is produced, and how the radiation is transmitted. The plasma evolution in these experiments were simulated with a two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic code, while the radiation transport and atomic kinetics where modeled with a collisional radiative code. Additional experiments were conducted using planar targets where the pulse duration was varied from 0.5 ns to 16 ns to understand the effects of laser pulse duration. It was found that the optimum plasma temperature for efficient generation and transmission of in-band emission is 20 eV. This is lower than the previously reported optimum temperature of 30 eV. The use of a 1.064 microm heating laser results in overheating of the plasma in a region that is much too dense to transmit the in-band emission. This overheating is necessary for the plasma to reach the optimum temperature in the region where the density is

  7. Coupled radiation transport/thermal analysis of the radiation shield for a space nuclear reactor. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Barattino, W.J.

    1985-07-01

    A coupled radiation transport-heat transfer-stress analysis of the radiation shield for an SP-100 reactor was performed using a numerical code developed at the University of New Mexico and Sandia National Laboratory. For a fast reactor operating at 1.66 MW/sub th/, the energy deposited and resulting temperature distribution was determined for a shield consisting of tungsten and lithium hydride pressed into a stainless steel honeycomb matrix. While temperature feedback was shown to have a minor effect on energy deposition, the shielding configuration was found to have a major influence in meeting thermal requirements of the lithium hydride. It was shown that a shield optimized for radiation protection will fail because of melting. However, with minor modifications in the shield layering and material selection, the thermal integrity of the shield can be preserved. A shield design of graphite, depleted lithium hydride, tungsten, and natural lithium hydride was shown to satisfy neutron and gamma fluence requirements, maximum temperature limits, and minimize cracking in the LiH portion of the shield.

  8. A coupled radiation transport-thermal analysis of the radiation shield for an SP-100 type reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barattino, William J.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.; McDaniel, Patrick J.

    A coupled radiation transport-thermal analysis of the radiation shield for an SP-100 reactor was performed using finite element codes developed at the University of New Mexico and Sandia National Laboratories. For a fast reactor operating at 1.66 MWt, the energy deposited and resulting temperature distribution were determined for a shield consisting of tungsten and lithium hydride pressed into a stainless steel honeycomb matrix. While temperature feedback was shown to have a minor effect on energy deposition, the shielding configuration was found to have a major influence in meeting thermal requirements of the lithium hydride. It was shown that a shield optimized only for radiation protection will fail because of LiH melting. However, with minor modifications in the shield layering and material selection, the thermal integrity of the shield can be preserved. A shield design of graphite, depleted lithium hydride, tungsten, and natural lithium hydride was shown to satisfy neutron and gamma fluence requirements, and maximum temperature limits, and to minimize cracking in the LiH portion of the shield.

  9. Discontinuous Galerkin Methods for the Two-Moment Model of Radiation Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endeve, Eirik; Hauck, Cory

    2016-03-01

    We are developing computational methods for simulation of radiation transport in astrophysical systems (e.g., neutrino transport in core-collapse supernovae). Here we consider the two-moment model of radiation transport, where the energy density E and flux F - angular moments of a phase space distribution function - approximates the radiation field in a computationally tractable manner. We aim to develop multi-dimensional methods that are (i) high-order accurate for computational efficiency, and (ii) robust in the sense that the solution remains in the realizable set R = { (E , F) | E >= 0 and E - | F | >= 0 } (i.e., E and F are consistent with moments of an underlying distribution). Our approach is based on the Runge-Kutta discontinuous Galerkin method, which has many attractive properties, including high-order accuracy on a compact stencil. We present the physical model and numerical method, and show results from a multi-dimensional implementation. Tests show that the method is high-order accurate and strictly preserves realizability of the moments.

  10. Explicit solutions of the radiative transport equation in the P{sub 3} approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Liemert, André Kienle, Alwin

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Explicit solutions of the monoenergetic radiative transport equation in the P{sub 3} approximation have been derived which can be evaluated with nearly the same computational effort as needed for solving the standard diffusion equation (DE). In detail, the authors considered the important case of a semi-infinite medium which is illuminated by a collimated beam of light. Methods: A combination of the classic spherical harmonics method and the recently developed method of rotated reference frames is used for solving the P{sub 3} equations in closed form. Results: The derived solutions are illustrated and compared to exact solutions of the radiative transport equation obtained via the Monte Carlo (MC) method as well as with other approximated analytical solutions. It is shown that for the considered cases which are relevant for biomedical optics applications, the P{sub 3} approximation is close to the exact solution of the radiative transport equation. Conclusions: The authors derived exact analytical solutions of the P{sub 3} equations under consideration of boundary conditions for defining a semi-infinite medium. The good agreement to Monte Carlo simulations in the investigated domains, for example, in the steady-state and time domains, as well as the short evaluation time needed suggests that the derived equations can replace the often applied solutions of the diffusion equation for the homogeneous semi-infinite medium.

  11. The role of radiation transport in the thermal response of semitransparent materials to localized laser heating

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, Jeffrey; Shestakov, Aleksei; Stolken, James; Vignes, Ryan

    2011-03-09

    Lasers are widely used to modify the internal structure of semitransparent materials for a wide variety of applications, including waveguide fabrication and laser glass damage healing. The gray diffusion approximation used in past models to describe radiation cooling is not adequate for these materials, particularly near the heated surface layer. In this paper we describe a computational model based upon solving the radiation transport equation in 1D by the Pn method with ~500 photon energy bands, and by multi-group radiationdiffusion in 2D with fourteen photon energy bands. The model accounts for the temperature-dependent absorption of infrared laser light and subsequent redistribution of the deposited heat by both radiation and conductive transport. We present representative results for fused silica irradiated with 2–12 W of 4.6 or 10.6 µm laser light for 5–10 s pulse durations in a 1 mm spot, which is small compared to the diameter and thickness of the silica slab. Furthermore, we show that, unlike the case for bulk heating, in localized infrared laser heatingradiation transport plays only a very small role in the thermal response of silica.

  12. Equilibrium structure of solar magnetic flux tubes: Energy transport with multistream radiative transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, S. S.; Kalkofen, W.

    1994-01-01

    We examine the equilibrium structure of vertical intense magnetic flux tubes on the Sun. Assuming cylindrical geometry, we solve the magnetohydrostatic equations in the thin flux-tube approximation, allowing for energy transport by radiation and convection. The radiative transfer equation is solved in the six-stream approximation, assuming gray opacity and local thermodynamic equilibrium. This constitutes a significant improvement over a previous study, in which the transfer was solved using the multidimensional generalization of the Eddington approximation. Convection in the flux tube is treated using mixing-length theory, with an additional parameter alpha, characterizing the suppression of convective energy transport in the tube by the strong magnetic field. The equations are solved using the method of partial linearization. We present results for tubes with different values of the magnetic field strength and radius at a fixed depth in the atmosphere. In general, we find that, at equal geometric heights, the temperature on the tube axis, compared to the ambient medium, is higher in the photosphere and lower in the convection zone, with the difference becoming larger for thicker tubes. At equal optical depths the tubes are generally hotter than their surroundings. The results are comparatively insensitive to alpha but depend upon whether radiative and convective energy transport operate simultaneously or in separate layers. A comparison of our results with semiempirical models shows that the temperature and intensity contrast are in broad agreement. However, the field strengths of the flux-tube models are somewhat lower than the values inferred from observations.

  13. Radiation Transport for Explosive Outflows: A Multigroup Hybrid Monte Carlo Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollaeger, Ryan T.; van Rossum, Daniel R.; Graziani, Carlo; Couch, Sean M.; Jordan, George C., IV; Lamb, Donald Q.; Moses, Gregory A.

    2013-12-01

    We explore Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) and discrete diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) for radiation transport in high-velocity outflows with structured opacity. The IMC method is a stochastic computational technique for nonlinear radiation transport. IMC is partially implicit in time and may suffer in efficiency when tracking MC particles through optically thick materials. DDMC accelerates IMC in diffusive domains. Abdikamalov extended IMC and DDMC to multigroup, velocity-dependent transport with the intent of modeling neutrino dynamics in core-collapse supernovae. Densmore has also formulated a multifrequency extension to the originally gray DDMC method. We rigorously formulate IMC and DDMC over a high-velocity Lagrangian grid for possible application to photon transport in the post-explosion phase of Type Ia supernovae. This formulation includes an analysis that yields an additional factor in the standard IMC-to-DDMC spatial interface condition. To our knowledge the new boundary condition is distinct from others presented in prior DDMC literature. The method is suitable for a variety of opacity distributions and may be applied to semi-relativistic radiation transport in simple fluids and geometries. Additionally, we test the code, called SuperNu, using an analytic solution having static material, as well as with a manufactured solution for moving material with structured opacities. Finally, we demonstrate with a simple source and 10 group logarithmic wavelength grid that IMC-DDMC performs better than pure IMC in terms of accuracy and speed when there are large disparities between the magnitudes of opacities in adjacent groups. We also present and test our implementation of the new boundary condition.

  14. Implementation and display of Computer Aided Design (CAD) models in Monte Carlo radiation transport and shielding applications

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, T.J.

    1994-03-01

    An Xwindow application capable of importing geometric information directly from two Computer Aided Design (CAD) based formats for use in radiation transport and shielding analyses is being developed at ORNL. The application permits the user to graphically view the geometric models imported from the two formats for verification and debugging. Previous models, specifically formatted for the radiation transport and shielding codes can also be imported. Required extensions to the existing combinatorial geometry analysis routines are discussed. Examples illustrating the various options and features which will be implemented in the application are presented. The use of the application as a visualization tool for the output of the radiation transport codes is also discussed.

  15. Particle radiation transport and effects models from research to space weather operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santin, Giovanni; Nieminen, Petteri; Rivera, Angela; Ibarmia, Sergio; Truscott, Pete; Lei, Fan; Desorgher, Laurent; Ivanchenko, Vladimir; Kruglanski, Michel; Messios, Neophytos

    Assessment of risk from potential radiation-induced effects to space systems requires knowledge of both the conditions of the radiation environment and of the impact of radiation on sensi-tive spacecraft elements. During sensitivity analyses, test data are complemented by models to predict how external radiation fields are transported and modified in spacecraft materials. Radiation transport is still itself a subject of research and models are continuously improved to describe the physical interactions that take place when particles pass through shielding materi-als or hit electronic systems or astronauts, sometimes down to nanometre-scale interactions of single particles with deep sub-micron technologies or DNA structures. In recent years, though, such radiation transport models are transitioning from being a research subject by itself, to being widely used in the space engineering domain and finally being directly applied in the context of operation of space weather services. A significant "research to operations" (R2O) case is offered by Geant4, an open source toolkit initially developed and used in the context of fundamental research in high energy physics. Geant4 is also being used in the space domain, e.g. for modelling detector responses in science payloads, but also for studying the radiation environment itself, with subjects ranging from cosmic rays, to solar energetic particles in the heliosphere, to geomagnetic shielding. Geant4-based tools are now becoming more and more integrated in spacecraft design procedures, also through user friendly interfaces such as SPEN-VIS. Some examples are given by MULASSIS, offering multi-layered shielding analysis capa-bilities in realistic spacecraft materials, or GEMAT, focused on micro-dosimetry in electronics, or PLANETOCOSMICS, describing the interaction of the space environment with planetary magneto-and atmospheres, or GRAS, providing a modular and easy to use interface to various analysis types in simple or

  16. Tests of Transport Theory and Reduced Impurity Influx with Highly Radiative Plasmas in TFTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K. W.

    1997-11-01

    The electron and ion temperature profiles in beam-heated plasmas were observed to be remarkably invariant when radiative losses were increased significantly through gas puffing of high-Z impurities (argon, krypton, xenon) in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. Without impurity puffing, radiative losses accounted for typically only ~ 25\\char'45 of the input power and the radiation profile was strongly peaked at the plasma edge, where the dominant carbon impurity was not fully stripped. At central electron temperatures, T_eo, of ~ 6 keV, trace concentrations of krypton and xenon (n_z/ne ~ 10-3) generated flat and centrally peaked radiation profiles respectively, and a significant fraction of the input power (45-100\\char'45 ) was lost through radiation. This loss provided a nearly ideal technique for studying local heat transport in tokamaks because it perturbed the net heating profile strongly and in a measureable way, with little effect on the density and the beam deposition profiles. In supershot plasmas, Ti >> T_e, the ion temperature profile remained constant, or even increased modestly, as the radiated power fraction was increased to 75-90\\char'45 with krypton and xenon. This observation is surprising because ion-electron coupling is the dominant power loss term for the ions in the core of supershot plasmas, and the central Ti would have decreased a factor of two if the local ion thermal diffusivity had remained constant at its value without impurity puffing. In L-mode plasmas where ion-electron power coupling is a smaller term in the power balance, the electron temperature during impurity puffing also changed only ~ 10-15\\char'45 even as the net power flow through the electrons was decreased by a factor of ~ 3. The ``stiffness" of the temperature profiles to net input power is supportive of transport mechanisms which have a marginal-stability character. Preliminary comparisons of the temperature changes with predictions of the IFS/PPPL transport model

  17. Interannual variability of the global net radiation balance and its consequence on global energy transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Sohn, B. J.

    1990-01-01

    Global cloudiness and radiation budget data from Nimbus 6 and 7 are used to investigate the role of cloud and surface radiative forcing and elements of the earth's general circulation. Although globally integrated cloud forcing is nearly zero, there are large regional imbalances and well regulated processes in the shortwave and longwave spectrum that control the meridional gradient structure of the net radiation balance and the factors modulating the east-west oriented North Africa-western Pacific energy transport dipole. The analysis demonstrates that clouds play a dual role in both the shortwave and longwave spectra in terms of tropical and midlatitude east-west gradients. The key result is that cloud forcing, although not always the principle regulator of interannual variability of the global climate, serves to reinforce the basic three-cell meridional circulation.

  18. F--Ray: A new algorithm for efficient transport of ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yi; Zhang, J.; Wandelt, B. D.; Shapiro, P. R.; Iliev, I. T.

    2014-04-01

    We present a new algorithm for the 3D transport of ionizing radiation, called F2-Ray (Fast Fourier Ray-tracing method). The transfer of ionizing radiation with long mean free path in diffuse intergalactic gas poses a special challenge to standard numerical methods which transport the radiation in position space. Standard methods usually trace each individual ray until it is fully absorbed by the intervening gas. If the mean free path is long, the computational cost and memory load are likely to be prohibitive. We have developed an algorithm that overcomes these limitations and is, therefore, significantly more efficient. The method calculates the transfer of radiation collectively, using the Fast Fourier Transform to convert radiation between position and Fourier spaces, so the computational cost will not increase with the number of ionizing sources. The method also automatically combines parallel rays with the same frequency at the same grid cell, thereby minimizing the memory requirement. The method is explicitly photon-conserving, i.e. the depletion of ionizing photons is guaranteed to equal the photoionizations they caused, and explicitly obeys the periodic boundary condition, i.e. the escape of ionizing photons from one side of a simulation volume is guaranteed to be compensated by emitting the same amount of photons into the volume through the opposite side. Together, these features make it possible to numerically simulate the transfer of ionizing photons more efficiently than previous methods. Since ionizing radiation such as the X-ray is responsible for heating the intergalactic gas when first stars and quasars form at high redshifts, our method can be applied to simulate thermal distribution, in addition to cosmic reionization, in three-dimensional inhomogeneous cosmological density field.

  19. A Novel Implementation of Massively Parallel Three Dimensional Monte Carlo Radiation Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, P. B.; Peterson, J. D. L.

    2005-12-01

    The goal of our summer project was to implement the difference formulation for radiation transport into Cosmos++, a multidimensional, massively parallel, magneto hydrodynamics code for astrophysical applications (Peter Anninos - AX). The difference formulation is a new method for Symbolic Implicit Monte Carlo thermal transport (Brooks and Szöke - PAT). Formerly, simultaneous implementation of fully implicit Monte Carlo radiation transport in multiple dimensions on multiple processors had not been convincingly demonstrated. We found that a combination of the difference formulation and the inherent structure of Cosmos++ makes such an implementation both accurate and straightforward. We developed a "nearly nearest neighbor physics" technique to allow each processor to work independently, even with a fully implicit code. This technique coupled with the increased accuracy of an implicit Monte Carlo solution and the efficiency of parallel computing systems allows us to demonstrate the possibility of massively parallel thermal transport. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48

  20. Grey transport acceleration method for time-dependent radiative transfer problems

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, E.

    1988-10-01

    A new iterative method for solving hte time-dependent multifrequency radiative transfer equations is described. The method is applicable to semi-implicit time discretizations that generate a linear steady-state multifrequency transport problem with pseudo-scattering within each time step. The standard ''lambda'' iteration method is shown to often converge slowly for such problems, and the new grey transport acceleration (GTA) method, based on accelerating the lambda method by employing a grey, or frequency-independent transport equation, is developed. The GTA method is shown, theoretically by an iterative Fourier analysis, and experimentally by numerical calculations, to converge significantly faster than the lambda method. In addition, the GTA method is conceptually simple to implement for general differencing schemes, on either Eulerian or Lagrangian meshes. copyright 1988 Academic Press, Inc.

  1. Integrated Radiation Transport and Nuclear Fuel Performance for Assembly-Level Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Clarno, Kevin T; Hamilton, Steven P; Philip, Bobby; Berrill, Mark A; Sampath, Rahul S; Allu, Srikanth; Pugmire, Dave; Dilts, Gary; Banfield, James E

    2012-02-01

    The Advanced Multi-Physics (AMP) Nuclear Fuel Performance code (AMPFuel) is focused on predicting the temperature and strain within a nuclear fuel assembly to evaluate the performance and safety of existing and advanced nuclear fuel bundles within existing and advanced nuclear reactors. AMPFuel was extended to include an integrated nuclear fuel assembly capability for (one-way) coupled radiation transport and nuclear fuel assembly thermo-mechanics. This capability is the initial step toward incorporating an improved predictive nuclear fuel assembly modeling capability to accurately account for source-terms and boundary conditions of traditional (single-pin) nuclear fuel performance simulation, such as the neutron flux distribution, coolant conditions, and assembly mechanical stresses. A novel scheme is introduced for transferring the power distribution from the Scale/Denovo (Denovo) radiation transport code (structured, Cartesian mesh with smeared materials within each cell) to AMPFuel (unstructured, hexagonal mesh with a single material within each cell), allowing the use of a relatively coarse spatial mesh (10 million elements) for the radiation transport and a fine spatial mesh (3.3 billion elements) for thermo-mechanics with very little loss of accuracy. In addition, a new nuclear fuel-specific preconditioner was developed to account for the high aspect ratio of each fuel pin (12 feet axially, but 1 4 inches in diameter) with many individual fuel regions (pellets). With this novel capability, AMPFuel was used to model an entire 17 17 pressurized water reactor fuel assembly with many of the features resolved in three dimensions (for thermo-mechanics and/or neutronics), including the fuel, gap, and cladding of each of the 264 fuel pins; the 25 guide tubes; the top and bottom structural regions; and the upper and lower (neutron) reflector regions. The final, full assembly calculation was executed on Jaguar using 40,000 cores in under 10 hours to model over 162

  2. Integrated Radiation Transport and Nuclear Fuel Performance for Assembly-Level Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Steven P; Clarno, Kevin T; Philip, Bobby; Berrill, Mark A; Sampath, Rahul S; Allu, Srikanth

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Multi-Physics (AMP) Nuclear Fuel Performance code (AMPFuel) is focused on predicting the temperature and strain within a nuclear fuel assembly to evaluate the performance and safety of existing and advanced nuclear fuel bundles within existing and advanced nuclear reactors. AMPFuel was extended to include an integrated nuclear fuel assembly capability for (one-way) coupled radiation transport and nuclear fuel assembly thermo-mechanics. This capability is the initial step toward incorporating an improved predictive nuclear fuel assembly modeling capability to accurately account for source-terms, such as neutron flux distribution, coolant conditions and assembly mechanical stresses, of traditional (single-pin) nuclear fuel performance simulation. A novel scheme is introduced for transferring the power distribution from the Scale/Denovo (Denovo) radiation transport code (structured, Cartesian mesh with smeared materials within each cell) to AMPFuel (unstructured, hexagonal mesh with a single material within each cell), allowing the use of a relatively coarse spatial mesh (10 million elements) for the radiation transport and a fine spatial mesh (3.3 billion elements) for thermo-mechanics with very little loss of accuracy. With this novel capability, AMPFuel was used to model an entire 1717 pressurized water reactor fuel assembly with many of the features resolved in three dimensions (for thermo-mechanics and/or neutronics). A full assembly calculation was executed on Jaguar using 40,000 cores in under 10 hours to model over 160 billion degrees of freedom for 10 loading steps. The single radiation transport calculation required about 50% of the time required to solve the thermo-mechanics with a single loading step, which demonstrates that it is feasible to incorporate, in a single code, a high-fidelity radiation transport capability with a high-fidelity nuclear fuel thermo-mechanics capability and anticipate acceptable computational requirements. The

  3. Simulating photon-transport in uniform media using the radiative transport equation: a study using the Neumann-series approach

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Abhinav K.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Masumura, Takahiro; Clarkson, Eric; Maslov, Alexey V.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2014-01-01

    We present the implementation, validation, and performance of a Neumann-series approach for simulating light propagation at optical wavelengths in uniform media using the radiative transport equation (RTE). The RTE is solved for an anisotropic-scattering medium in a spherical harmonic basis for a diffuse-optical-imaging setup. The main objectives of this paper are threefold: to present the theory behind the Neumann-series form for the RTE, to design and develop the mathematical methods and the software to implement the Neumann series for a diffuse-optical-imaging setup, and, finally, to perform an exhaustive study of the accuracy, practical limitations, and computational efficiency of the Neumann-series method. Through our results, we demonstrate that the Neumann-series approach can be used to model light propagation in uniform media with small geometries at optical wavelengths. PMID:23201893

  4. RFQ development at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Crandall, K.R.; Stokes, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    The basic principles of the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac are reviewed and a summary of past and present Los Alamos work is presented. Some beam-dynamics effects, important for RFQ design, are discussed. A design example is shown for xenon and a brief discussion of low-frequency RFQ structures is given.

  5. Advances in nuclear data and all-particle transport for radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.M.; Chadwick, M.B.; Chandler, W.P.; Hartmann Siantar, C.L.; Westbrook, C.K.

    1994-05-01

    Fast neutrons have been used to treat over 15,000 cancer patients worldwide and proton therapy is rapidly emerging as a treatment of choice for tumors around critical anatomical structures. Neutron therapy requires evaluated data to {approximately}70 MeV while proton therapy requires data to {approximately}250 MeV. Collaboration between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the medical physics community has revealed limitations in nuclear cross section evaluations and radiation transport capabilities that have prevented neutron and proton radiation therapy centers from using Monte Carlo calculations to accurately predict dose in patients. These evaluations require energy- and angle-dependent cross sections for secondary neutrons, charged-particles and recoil nuclei. We are expanding the LLNL nuclear databases to higher energies for biologically important elements and have developed a three-dimensional, all-particle Monte Carlo radiation transport code that uses computer-assisted-tomography (CT) images as the input mesh. This code, called PEREGRINE calculates dose distributions in the human body and can be used as a tool to determine the dependence of dose on details of the evaluated nuclear data. In this paper, we will review the status of the nuclear data required for neutron and proton therapy, describe the capabilities of the PEREGRINE package, and show the effects of tissue inhomogeneities on dose distribution.

  6. The Role of ULF Driven Radial Transport in Rebuilding the Earth's Outer Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, B. T.; Hudson, M. K.; Paral, J.; Selesnick, R.; Claudepierre, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    An outstanding question addressed by recent studies of the Earth's radiation belts is, what are the physical processes responsible rapid recovery of MeV electrons in the outer belt during geomagnetic storms? Rapid rebuilding of the ~1 MeV electron population near geosynchronous during periods of strongly southward IMF BZ is well modeled by computing test-particle trajectories in MHD magnetospheric model fields. The build up of ~2 MeV electrons at lower L, observed by the Van Allen Probes, is also reproduced in the test-particle model. It is not known however to what extent adiabatic transport is sufficient to produce the observed multi-MeV flux enhancements in the outer belt. By comparing observations with model results, we can determine the inward extent and high energy limit of radiation belt rebuilding due to ULF driven radial transport alone. Results from case studies of several recent geomagnetic storms occurring in conjunction with recovery of the outer radiation belts will be presented.

  7. Overview and applications of the Monte Carlo radiation transport kit at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Sale, K E

    1999-06-23

    Modern Monte Carlo radiation transport codes can be applied to model most applications of radiation, from optical to TeV photons, from thermal neutrons to heavy ions. Simulations can include any desired level of detail in three-dimensional geometries using the right level of detail in the reaction physics. The technology areas to which we have applied these codes include medical applications, defense, safety and security programs, nuclear safeguards and industrial and research system design and control. The main reason such applications are interesting is that by using these tools substantial savings of time and effort (i.e. money) can be realized. In addition it is possible to separate out and investigate computationally effects which can not be isolated and studied in experiments. In model calculations, just as in real life, one must take care in order to get the correct answer to the right question. Advancing computing technology allows extensions of Monte Carlo applications in two directions. First, as computers become more powerful more problems can be accurately modeled. Second, as computing power becomes cheaper Monte Carlo methods become accessible more widely. An overview of the set of Monte Carlo radiation transport tools in use a LLNL will be presented along with a few examples of applications and future directions.

  8. Combined radial diffusion and adiabatic transport of radiation belt electrons with arbitrary pitch angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Zhenpeng; Xiao, Fuliang; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Shui

    2010-10-01

    Storm-time radial diffusion of radiation belt electrons with arbitrary pitch angles in a time-varying geomagnetic field is simulated based on our recently developed STEERB code. In particular, the fully adiabatic response of energetic electrons to the variation of geomagnetic field is self-consistently incorporated. Simulation results show that the outward adiabatic transport (instead of outward radial diffusion) is primarily responsible for the main phase depletion of energetic electron fluxes at large pitch angles beyond 5Re (Re is the Earth's radius). However, combined radial diffusion and adiabatic transport contributes insignificantly to the main phase depletion of energetic electron fluxes within 5Re, or the recovery phase enhancement of energetic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt. Moreover, the simulation with both radial diffusion and adiabatic transport shows that the pitch angle distribution of energetic outer zone electrons can evolve from a rounded 90°-peaked distribution to a butterfly-shaped distribution during the main phase, and back to a rounded 90°-peaked distribution during the recovery phase. Such essential changes of pitch angle distribution may further affect the efficiency of other local loss and energization mechanisms.

  9. Current Status of Radiation Transport Tools for Proliferation and Terrorism Prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Sale, K E

    2004-09-13

    We present the current status and future plans for the set of calculational tools and data bases developed and maintained at LLNL. The calculational tools include the Monte Carlo codes TART and COG as well as the deterministic code ARDRA. In addition to these codes presently in use there is a major development effort for a new massively parallel transport code. An important part of the capability we're developing is a sophisticated user interface, based on a commercial 3-D modeling product, to improve the model development process. A major part of this user interface tool is being developed by Strela under the Nuclear Cities Initiative. Strela has developed a hub-and-spoke technology for code input interconversions (between COG, TART and MCNP) and will produce the plug-ins that extend the capabilities of the 3-D modeler for use as a radiation transport input generator. The major advantages of this approach are the built-in user interface for 3-D modeling and the ability to read a large variety of CAD-file formats. In addition to supporting our current radiation transport codes and developing new capabilities we are working on some nuclear data needs for homeland security. These projects are carried out and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88'' cyclotron and at the Institute for Nuclear Research of the National Academy of Science of Ukraine under an STCU contract.

  10. Comparisons of Integrated Radiation Transport Models with Microdosimetry Data in Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Nikjoo, H.; Kim, M. Y.; Hu, X.; Dicello, J. F.; Pisacane, V. L.

    2006-01-01

    Astronauts are exposed to galactic cosmic rays (GCR), trapped protons, and possible solar particle events (SPE) during spaceflight. For such complicated mixtures of radiation types and kinetic energies, tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPC's) represent a simple time-dependent approach for radiation monitoring. Of interest in radiation protection is the average quality factor of a radiation field defined as a function of linear energy transfer, LET, Q(sub ave)(LET). However TEPC's measure the average quality factors as a function of lineal energy (y), Q(sub ave)(y) defined as the average energy deposition in a volume divided by the average chord length of the volume. Lineal energy, y deviates from LET due to energy straggling, delta-ray escape or entry, and nuclear fragments produced in the detector. Using integrated space radiation models that includes the transport code HZETRN/BRYNTRN, the quantum nuclear interaction model, QMSFRG, and results from Monte-Carlo track simulations of TEPC's response to ions, we consider comparisons of model calculations to TEPC results from NASA missions in low Earth orbit and make predictions for lunar and Mars missions. Good agreement between the model and measured spectra from past NASA missions is found. A finding of this work is that TEPC's values for trapped or solar protons of Q(sub ave)(y) range from 1.9-2.5, overestimating Q(sub ave)(LET), which ranges from 1.4-1.6 with both quantities increasing with shielding depth due to nuclear secondaries Comparisons for the complete GCR spectra show that Q(sub ave)(LET) for GCR is approximately 3.5-4.5, while TEPC's measure 2.9-3.4 for Q(sub ave)(y) with the GCR values decreasing with depth as heavy ions are absorbed in shielding material. Our results support the use of TEPC's for space radiation environmental monitoring when computational analysis is used for proper data interpretation.

  11. Prototype demonstration of radiation therapy planning code system

    SciTech Connect

    Little, R.C.; Adams, K.J.; Estes, G.P.; Hughes, L.S. III; Waters, L.S.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Radiation therapy planning is the process by which a radiation oncologist plans a treatment protocol for a patient preparing to undergo radiation therapy. The objective is to develop a protocol that delivers sufficient radiation dose to the entire tumor volume, while minimizing dose to healthy tissue. Radiation therapy planning, as currently practiced in the field, suffers from inaccuracies made in modeling patient anatomy and radiation transport. This project investigated the ability to automatically model patient-specific, three-dimensional (3-D) geometries in advanced Los Alamos radiation transport codes (such as MCNP), and to efficiently generate accurate radiation dose profiles in these geometries via sophisticated physics modeling. Modem scientific visualization techniques were utilized. The long-term goal is that such a system could be used by a non-expert in a distributed computing environment to help plan the treatment protocol for any candidate radiation source. The improved accuracy offered by such a system promises increased efficacy and reduced costs for this important aspect of health care.

  12. NASA astronaut dosimetry: Implementation of scalable human phantoms and benchmark comparisons of deterministic versus Monte Carlo radiation transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadori, Amir Alexander

    Astronauts are exposed to a unique radiation environment in space. United States terrestrial radiation worker limits, derived from guidelines produced by scientific panels, do not apply to astronauts. Limits for astronauts have changed throughout the Space Age, eventually reaching the current National Aeronautics and Space Administration limit of 3% risk of exposure induced death, with an administrative stipulation that the risk be assured to the upper 95% confidence limit. Much effort has been spent on reducing the uncertainty associated with evaluating astronaut risk for radiogenic cancer mortality, while tools that affect the accuracy of the calculations have largely remained unchanged. In the present study, the impacts of using more realistic computational phantoms with size variability to represent astronauts with simplified deterministic radiation transport were evaluated. Next, the impacts of microgravity-induced body changes on space radiation dosimetry using the same transport method were investigated. Finally, dosimetry and risk calculations resulting from Monte Carlo radiation transport were compared with results obtained using simplified deterministic radiation transport. The results of the present study indicated that the use of phantoms that more accurately represent human anatomy can substantially improve space radiation dose estimates, most notably for exposures from solar particle events under light shielding conditions. Microgravity-induced changes were less important, but results showed that flexible phantoms could assist in optimizing astronaut body position for reducing exposures during solar particle events. Finally, little overall differences in risk calculations using simplified deterministic radiation transport and 3D Monte Carlo radiation transport were found; however, for the galactic cosmic ray ion spectra, compensating errors were observed for the constituent ions, thus exhibiting the need to perform evaluations on a particle

  13. Terahertz radiation induced chaotic electron transport in semiconductor superlattices with a tilted magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C. Wang, F.; Cao, J. C.

    2014-09-01

    Chaotic electron transport in semiconductor superlattice induced by terahertz electric field that is superimposed on a dc electric field along the superlattice axis are studied using the semiclassical motion equations including the effect of dissipation. A magnetic field that is tilted relative to the superlattice axis is also applied to the system. Numerical simulation shows that electrons in superlattice miniband exhibit complicate nonlinear oscillating modes with the influence of terahertz radiation. Transitions between frequency-locking and chaos via pattern forming bifurcations are observed with the varying of terahertz amplitude. It is found that the chaotic regions gradually contract as the dissipation increases. We attribute the appearance of complicate nonlinear oscillation in superlattice to the interaction between terahertz radiation and internal cooperative oscillating mode relative to Bloch oscillation and cyclotron oscillation.

  14. A hybrid transport-diffusion Monte Carlo method for frequency-dependent radiative-transfer simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffery D.; Thompson, Kelly G.; Urbatsch, Todd J.

    2012-08-15

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations in optically thick media. In DDMC, particles take discrete steps between spatial cells according to a discretized diffusion equation. Each discrete step replaces many smaller Monte Carlo steps, thus improving the efficiency of the simulation. In this paper, we present an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency-integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold, as optical thickness is typically a decreasing function of frequency. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo, which results in a hybrid transport-diffusion scheme. With a set of frequency-dependent test problems, we confirm the accuracy and increased efficiency of our new DDMC method.

  15. Terahertz radiation induced chaotic electron transport in semiconductor superlattices with a tilted magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Wang, F; Cao, J C

    2014-09-01

    Chaotic electron transport in semiconductor superlattice induced by terahertz electric field that is superimposed on a dc electric field along the superlattice axis are studied using the semiclassical motion equations including the effect of dissipation. A magnetic field that is tilted relative to the superlattice axis is also applied to the system. Numerical simulation shows that electrons in superlattice miniband exhibit complicate nonlinear oscillating modes with the influence of terahertz radiation. Transitions between frequency-locking and chaos via pattern forming bifurcations are observed with the varying of terahertz amplitude. It is found that the chaotic regions gradually contract as the dissipation increases. We attribute the appearance of complicate nonlinear oscillation in superlattice to the interaction between terahertz radiation and internal cooperative oscillating mode relative to Bloch oscillation and cyclotron oscillation. PMID:25273189

  16. An improved separability approximation for line radiative transport in nonhomogeneous media.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boughner, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    A simple modification to the constant half-width approximation of Wilson and Greif, which is an extension of the well-known Curtis-Godson method to the treatment of temperature variations along the integration path, is introduced which permits a more accurate evaluation of line radiative transport in nonhomogeneous gases. To demonstrate the method's accuracy, comparisons are made with Wilson and Greif and numerical frequency integrated results for the line equivalent width and radiative flux in a planar slab with prescribed Planck function and line half-width spatial variations. These variations are chosen to represent typical shock layer conditions. It is found that the modified procedure reduces the inaccuracies inherent in Wilson and Greif's approximation by factors ranging from 5 to 10, while retaining the latter method's ease of application.

  17. Radial Transport, Local Acceleration, and Loss in the Radiation Belts: Integration of Theories and Observations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, A. A.; Elkington, S. R.; Albert, J.; Zheng, L.

    2013-12-01

    Although much is known about the dynamics of the radiation belts there are still many unanswered questions on the basic physical processes responsible for the storm-time variations of relativistic electrons. Two physical processes that are thought to be especially important are (i) drift-resonant wave-particle interactions with ULF perturbations, which may lead to radial diffusion, and (ii) cyclotron-resonant wave-particle interactions with VLF/ELF waves, which may lead to local energy and pitch-angle diffusion. While there is theoretical and observational support that both of these processes play important roles in radiation belt dynamics, their relative contributions are still not well understood quantitatively. Also, recent work suggests that magnetopause shadowing may play a larger role than previously expected, and the physical connections between changes in the radiation belts and different solar interplanetary drivers are not well understood. In this presentation I will briefly review published work on radial transport, local acceleration, and loss, and I will also present recent results (particularly for high-speed-stream storms) that emphasize the value of integrating theories and observations of the radiation belts, including comments on theories and observations of related electromagnetic fields and plasma populations in the Earth's inner magnetosphere.

  18. Direct-current proton-beam measurements at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Joseph; Stevens, Ralph R.; Schneider, J. David; Zaugg, Thomas

    1995-09-15

    Recently, a CW proton accelerator complex was moved from Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) to Los Alamos National Laboratory. This includes a 50-keV dc proton injector with a single-solenoid low-energy beam transport system (LEBT) and a CW 1.25-MeV, 267-MHz radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ). The move was completed after CRL had achieved 55-mA CW operation at 1.25 MeV using 250-kW klystrode tubes to power the RFQ. These accelerator components are prototypes for the front end of a CW linac required for an accelerator-driven transmutation linac, and they provide early confirmation of some CW accelerator components. The injector (ion source and LEBT) and emittance measuring unit are installed and operational at Los Alamos. The dc microwave ion source has been operated routinely at 50-keV, 75-mA hydrogen-ion current. This ion source has demonstrated very good discharge and H2 gas efficiencies, and sufficient reliability to complete CW RFQ measurements at CRL. Proton fraction of 75% has been measured with 550-W discharge power. This high proton fraction removes the need for an analyzing magnet. Proton LEBT emittance measurements completed at Los Alamos suggest that improved transmission through the RFQ may be achieved by increasing the solenoid focusing current. Status of the final CW RFQ operation at CRL and the installation of the RFQ at Los Alamos will be given.

  19. Direct-current proton-beam measurements at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, J.; Stevens, R.R.; Schneider, J.D.; Zaugg, T.

    1994-08-01

    Recently, a CW proton accelerator complex was moved from Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) to Los Alamos National Laboratory. This includes a 50-keV dc proton injector with a single-solenoid low-energy beam transport system (LEBT) and a CW 1.25-MeV, 267-MHz radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ). The move was completed after CRL had achieved 55-mA CW operation at 1.25 MeV using 250-kW klystrode tubes to power the RFQ. These accelerator components are prototypes for the front end of a CW linac required for an accelerator-driven transmutation linac, and they provide early confirmation of some CW accelerator components. The injector (ion source and LEBT) and emittance measuring unit are installed and operational at Los Alamos. The dc microwave ion source has been operated routinely at 50-keV, 75-mA hydrogen-ion current. This ion source has demonstrated very good discharge and H{sub 2} gas efficiencies, and sufficient reliability to complete CW RFQ measurements at CRL. Proton fraction of 75% has been measured with 550-W discharge power. This high proton fraction removes the need for an analyzing magnet. Proton LEBT emittance measurements completed at Los Alamos suggest that improved transmission through the RFQ may be achieved by increasing the solenoid focusing current. Status of the final CW RFQ operation at CRL and the installation of the RFQ at Los Alamos is given.

  20. Minimizing the cost of splitting in Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Juzaitis, R.J.

    1980-10-01

    A deterministic analysis of the computational cost associated with geometric splitting/Russian roulette in Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations is presented. Appropriate integro-differential equations are developed for the first and second moments of the Monte Carlo tally as well as time per particle history, given that splitting with Russian roulette takes place at one (or several) internal surfaces of the geometry. The equations are solved using a standard S/sub n/ (discrete ordinates) solution technique, allowing for the prediction of computer cost (formulated as the product of sample variance and time per particle history, sigma/sup 2//sub s/tau p) associated with a given set of splitting parameters. Optimum splitting surface locations and splitting ratios are determined. Benefits of such an analysis are particularly noteworthy for transport problems in which splitting is apt to be extensively employed (e.g., deep penetration calculations).

  1. Modelling the transport of ionizing radiation using the finite element method.

    PubMed

    Boman, E; Tervo, J; Vauhkonen, M

    2005-01-21

    Radiation therapy treatment planning is based on the calculation of the absorbed dose in the patient domain. For exact dose calculations, the solution of three coupled Boltzmann transport equations (BTEs) is needed to cover the transport of photons, electrons and positrons. In many situations, however, two coupled systems for photons and electrons are enough. The use of numerical methods in finding the exact solution of the unknown particle fluxes is necessary. In the stationary case, the BTE has six variables, three spatial, two directional and one energy variable. In this paper, we describe an approach in which the finite element method (FEM) is used to solve the six-dimensional problem. For the coupled photon-electron system, the variational formulation and the existence and uniqueness of the solution are derived. We simulate the solution of two coupled BTEs describing the travelling of photons and electrons in two spatial dimensions. The results are compared to Monte Carlo calculations with good agreement. PMID:15742943

  2. Parametric study of radiation dose rates from rail and truck spent fuel transport casks

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C.V.; Hermann, O.W.; Knight, J.R.

    1985-08-01

    Neutron and gamma dose rates from typical rail and truck spent fuel transport casks are reported for a variety of spent PWR fuel sources and cask conditions. The IF 300 rail cask and NLI 1/2 truck cask were selected for use as appropriate cask models. All calculations (cross section preparation, generation of spent fuel source terms, radiation transport calculations, and dose evaluation) were performed using various modules of the SCALE computational system. Conditions or parameters for which there were variations between cases include: detector distance from cask, spent fuel cooling time, the setting of fuel or neutron shielding cavities to either wet or dry, the cobalt content of assembly materials, normal fuel assemblies and consolidated cannisters, the geometry mesh interval size, and the order of the angular quadrature set. 13 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs.

  3. Thermal radiative near field transport between vanadium dioxide and silicon oxide across the metal insulator transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menges, F.; Dittberner, M.; Novotny, L.; Passarello, D.; Parkin, S. S. P.; Spieser, M.; Riel, H.; Gotsmann, B.

    2016-04-01

    The thermal radiative near field transport between vanadium dioxide and silicon oxide at submicron distances is expected to exhibit a strong dependence on the state of vanadium dioxide which undergoes a metal-insulator transition near room temperature. We report the measurement of near field thermal transport between a heated silicon oxide micro-sphere and a vanadium dioxide thin film on a titanium oxide (rutile) substrate. The temperatures of the 15 nm vanadium dioxide thin film varied to be below and above the metal-insulator-transition, and the sphere temperatures were varied in a range between 100 and 200 °C. The measurements were performed using a vacuum-based scanning thermal microscope with a cantilevered resistive thermal sensor. We observe a thermal conductivity per unit area between the sphere and the film with a distance dependence following a power law trend and a conductance contrast larger than 2 for the two different phase states of the film.

  4. Effect of radiation and thermal treatment on structural and transport parameters for cellulose regenerated membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Váquez, M. I.; Galán, P.; Casado, J.; Ariza, M. J.; Benavente, J.

    2004-11-01

    Modifications caused by different types of ionizing radiation and thermal treatment on transport, chemical and structural parameters of polymeric (regenerated cellulose) membranes have been studied. Particularly, the effect of different types of radiation (ultraviolet light (UV) and ionising radiation (Ir) with different doses) and heating at 60 °C on transport and electrical parameters for a cellophane membrane has been considered by determining salt permeability and electrical resistance for the different samples. These parameters were obtained from salt diffusion and impedance spectroscopy (IS) measurements with the membranes in contact with NaCl solutions at different concentrations. Chemical surface and structural modifications of the polymer matrix due to the treatments have also been determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared spectroscopy (ATR mode). Results obtained from infrared spectroscopy seem to indicate that ionising radiation modifies the proportion of OH links, which is related to the dose of irradiation. XPS analysis only shows small differences in the atomic concentration and shape of the C 1s spectra. On the other hand, an increase of salt permeability for heated and UV-treated membranes was obtained, while this parameter decreases in the case of irradiated membranes. This result could be related to a change in the packing of the polymer chains, which results in an increase of the fractional void volume in the case of heat- and UV-treated membranes and the opposite effect for the irradiated ones; for these latter, a correlation between the irradiation dose and the decrease in permeability values was also obtained. IS results show a decrease in the electrical resistance of all treated samples. This fact can be due to the most open structure of heated and UV-treated samples, previously indicated; however, due to the closer structure assumed for the irradiated sample, this point might be related to the presence of free

  5. Modeling Interactions Among Turbulence, Gas-Phase Chemistry, Soot and Radiation Using Transported PDF Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haworth, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    The importance of explicitly accounting for the effects of unresolved turbulent fluctuations in Reynolds-averaged and large-eddy simulations of chemically reacting turbulent flows is increasingly recognized. Transported probability density function (PDF) methods have emerged as one of the most promising modeling approaches for this purpose. In particular, PDF methods provide an elegant and effective resolution to the closure problems that arise from averaging or filtering terms that correspond to nonlinear point processes, including chemical reaction source terms and radiative emission. PDF methods traditionally have been associated with studies of turbulence-chemistry interactions in laboratory-scale, atmospheric-pressure, nonluminous, statistically stationary nonpremixed turbulent flames; and Lagrangian particle-based Monte Carlo numerical algorithms have been the predominant method for solving modeled PDF transport equations. Recent advances and trends in PDF methods are reviewed and discussed. These include advances in particle-based algorithms, alternatives to particle-based algorithms (e.g., Eulerian field methods), treatment of combustion regimes beyond low-to-moderate-Damköhler-number nonpremixed systems (e.g., premixed flamelets), extensions to include radiation heat transfer and multiphase systems (e.g., soot and fuel sprays), and the use of PDF methods as the basis for subfilter-scale modeling in large-eddy simulation. Examples are provided that illustrate the utility and effectiveness of PDF methods for physics discovery and for applications to practical combustion systems. These include comparisons of results obtained using the PDF method with those from models that neglect unresolved turbulent fluctuations in composition and temperature in the averaged or filtered chemical source terms and/or the radiation heat transfer source terms. In this way, the effects of turbulence-chemistry-radiation interactions can be isolated and quantified.

  6. RFQ development at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, D.D.; Cornelius, W.D.; Purser, F.O.; Jameson, R.A.; Wangler, T.P.

    1984-01-01

    We report recent progress on the two radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) structures being developed at Los Alamos. First, we report on the second 425-MHz RFQ for H/sup -/ acceleration, which is being built in a research effort to understand and further develop the RFQ. Second, we discuss progress on the 80-MHz cw RFQ for deuterons, which is being built for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility.

  7. Studies of Radiation-Driven and Buoyancy-Driven Fluid Flows and Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronney, Paul D.; Fortmeyer, Justin M.

    1996-01-01

    It is well known that radiative heat transport influences many types of buoyant flows due to its effect on the temperature and thus density field in the fluid medium. It is of interest to study gaseous flows driven solely by radiation in the absence of buoyancy, particularly because of its application to astrophysical flows that are well known from astronomical observations and numerical simulation. However, no laboratory-scale experiments of this phenomenon have ever been conducted. To study the possibility of obtaining such flows in the laboratory, an apparatus was built to produce large temperature differences (Delta (T)) up to 300 K in a gas confined between flat parallel plates. SF6 was used as the radiatively-active gas because its Planck absorption length is much shorter than that of any other common non-reactive gas. The NASA-Lewis 2.2 second drop tower was used to obtain reduced gravity in order to suppress buoyancy effects. To image the resulting flows, a laser shearing interferometer was employed. Initial results indicate the presence of flow that does not appear to be attributable to the residual flow resulting from buoyancy influences before the drop. For Delta(T) greater than 70 K, slight deformations in the interferometer fringes seen at lower Delta(T) became large unsteady swirls. Such behavior did not occur for radiatively-inactive gases, suggesting that a flow driven solely by radiation was obtained in SF6 and to a lesser extent in CO2. This was more pronounced at higher pressures and plate spacings, consistent with our scaling predictions.

  8. Studies of Radiation-Driven and Buoyancy-Driven Fluid Flows and Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronney, Paul D.; Fortmeyer, Justin M.

    1994-01-01

    It is well known that radiative heat transport influences many types of buoyant flows due to its effect on the temperature and thus density field in the fluid medium. It is of interest to study gaseous flows driven solely by radiation in the absence of buoyancy, particularly because of its application to astrophysical flows that are well known from astronomical observations and numerical simulation. However, no laboratory-scale experiments of this phenomenon have ever been conducted. To study the possibility of obtaining such flows in the laboratory, an apparatus was built to produce large temperature differences (Delta T) up to 300 K in a gas confined between flat parallel plates. SF6 was used as the radiatively-active gas because its Planck absorption length is much shorter than that of any other common non-reactive gas. The NASA-Lewis 2.2 second drop tower was used to obtain reduced gravity in order to suppress buoyancy effects. To image the resulting flows, a laser shearing interferometer was employed. Initial results indicate the presence of flow that does not appear to be attributable to the residual flow resulting from buoyancy influences before the drop. For Delta T greater than 70 K, slight deformations in the interferometer fringes seen at lower Delta T became large unsteady swirls. Such behavior did not occur for radiatively-inactive gases, suggesting that a flow driven solely by radiation was obtained in SF6 and to a lesser extent in CO2 This was more pronounced at higher pressures and plate spacings, consistent with our scaling predictions.

  9. Transport of and radiation production by transrelativistic and nonrelativistic particles moving through sub-Larmor-scale electromagnetic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Brett D; Ford, Alexander L; Medvedev, Mikhail V

    2015-09-01

    Plasmas with electromagnetic fields turbulent at sub-Larmor scales are a feature of a wide variety of high-energy-density environments and are essential to the description of many astrophysical and laboratory plasma phenomena. Radiation from particles, whether they are relativistic or nonrelativistic, moving through small-scale magnetic turbulence has spectral characteristics distinct from both synchrotron and cyclotron radiation. The radiation, carrying information on the statistical properties of the magnetic turbulence, is also intimately related to the particle diffusive transport. We have investigated, both theoretically and numerically, the transport of nonrelativistic and trans-relativistic particles in plasmas with high-amplitude isotropic sub-Larmor-scale magnetic turbulence, and its relation to the spectra of radiation simultaneously produced by these particles. Consequently, the diffusive and radiative properties of plasmas turbulent on sub-Larmor scales may serve as a powerful tool to diagnosis laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. PMID:26465572

  10. Line-by-line transport calculations for Jupiter entry probes. [of radiative transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. O.; Cooper, D. M.; Park, C.; Prakash, S. G.

    1979-01-01

    Line-by-line calculations of the radiative transport for a condition near peak heating for entry of the Galileo probe into the Jovian atmosphere are described. The discussion includes a thorough specification of the atomic and molecular input data used in the calculations that could be useful to others working in the field. The results show that the use of spectrally averaged cross sections for diatomic absorbers such as CO and C2 in the boundary layer can lead to an underestimation (by as much as 29%) of the spectral flux at the stagnation point. On the other hand, for the turbulent region near the cone frustum on the probe, the flow tends to be optically thin, and the spectrally averaged results commonly used in coupled radiative transport-flow field calculations are in good agreement with the present line-by-line results. It is recommended that these results be taken into account in sizing the final thickness of the Galileo's heat shield.

  11. Portable MRI developed at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle

    2015-04-22

    Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory are developing an ultra-low-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system that could be low-power and lightweight enough for forward deployment on the battlefield and to field hospitals in the World's poorest regions. "MRI technology is a powerful medical diagnostic tool," said Michelle Espy, the Battlefield MRI (bMRI) project leader, "ideally suited for imaging soft-tissue injury, particularly to the brain." But hospital-based MRI devices are big and expensive, and require considerable infrastructure, such as large quantities of cryogens like liquid nitrogen and helium, and they typically use a large amount of energy. "Standard MRI machines just can't go everywhere," said Espy. "Soldiers wounded in battle usually have to be flown to a large hospital and people in emerging nations just don't have access to MRI at all. We've been in contact with doctors who routinely work in the Third World and report that MRI would be extremely valuable in treating pediatric encephalopathy, and other serious diseases in children." So the Los Alamos team started thinking about a way to make an MRI device that could be relatively easy to transport, set up, and use in an unconventional setting. Conventional MRI machines use very large magnetic fields that align the protons in water molecules to then create magnetic resonance signals, which are detected by the machine and turned into images. The large magnetic fields create exceptionally detailed images, but they are difficult and expensive to make. Espy and her team wanted to see if images of sufficient quality could be made with ultra-low-magnetic fields, similar in strength to the Earth's magnetic field. To achieve images at such low fields they use exquisitely sensitive detectors called Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices, or SQUIDs. SQUIDs are among the most sensitive magnetic field detectors available, so interference with the signal is the primary stumbling block. "SQUIDs are

  12. Transport and radiative impacts of atmospheric pollen using online, observation-based emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wozniak, M. C.; Steiner, A. L.; Solmon, F.; Li, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric pollen emitted from trees and grasses exhibits both a high temporal variability and a highly localized spatial distribution that has been difficult to quantify in the atmosphere. Pollen's radiative impact is also not quantified because it is neglected in climate modeling studies. Here we couple an online, meteorological active pollen emissions model guided by observations of airborne pollen to understand the role of pollen in the atmosphere. We use existing pollen counts from 2003-2008 across the continental U.S. in conjunction with a tree database and historical meteorological data to create an observation-based phenological model that produces accurately scaled and timed emissions. These emissions are emitted and transported within the regional climate model (RegCM4) and the direct radiative effect is calculated. Additionally, we simulate the rupture of coarse pollen grains into finer particles by adding a second size mode for pollen emissions, which contributes to the shortwave radiative forcing and also has an indirect effect on climate.

  13. Comparison of Radiation Transport Codes, HZETRN, HETC and FLUKA, Using the 1956 Webber SPE Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, John H.; Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Handler, Thomas; Gabriel, Tony A.; Pinsky, Lawrence S.; Reddell, Brandon; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Singleterry, Robert C.; Norbury, John W.; Badavi, Francis F.; Aghara, Sukesh K.

    2009-01-01

    Protection of astronauts and instrumentation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) in the harsh environment of space is of prime importance in the design of personal shielding, spacec raft, and mission planning. Early entry of radiation constraints into the design process enables optimal shielding strategies, but demands efficient and accurate tools that can be used by design engineers in every phase of an evolving space project. The radiation transport code , HZETRN, is an efficient tool for analyzing the shielding effectiveness of materials exposed to space radiation. In this paper, HZETRN is compared to the Monte Carlo codes HETC-HEDS and FLUKA, for a shield/target configuration comprised of a 20 g/sq cm Aluminum slab in front of a 30 g/cm^2 slab of water exposed to the February 1956 SPE, as mode led by the Webber spectrum. Neutron and proton fluence spectra, as well as dose and dose equivalent values, are compared at various depths in the water target. This study shows that there are many regions where HZETRN agrees with both HETC-HEDS and FLUKA for this shield/target configuration and the SPE environment. However, there are also regions where there are appreciable differences between the three computer c odes.

  14. CONVERGENCE STUDIES OF MASS TRANSPORT IN DISKS WITH GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITIES. II. THE RADIATIVE COOLING CASE

    SciTech Connect

    Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.; Durisen, Richard H.; Michael, Scott; McConnell, Caitlin R.; Boley, Aaron C. E-mail: durisen@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: carmccon@indiana.edu

    2013-05-10

    We conduct a convergence study of a protoplanetary disk subject to gravitational instabilities (GIs) at a time of approximate balance between heating produced by the GIs and radiative cooling governed by realistic dust opacities. We examine cooling times, characterize GI-driven spiral waves and their resultant gravitational torques, and evaluate how accurately mass transport can be represented by an {alpha}-disk formulation. Four simulations, identical except for azimuthal resolution, are conducted with a grid-based three-dimensional hydrodynamics code. There are two regions in which behaviors differ as resolution increases. The inner region, which contains 75% of the disk mass and is optically thick, has long cooling times and is well converged in terms of various measures of structure and mass transport for the three highest resolutions. The longest cooling times coincide with radii where the Toomre Q has its minimum value. Torques are dominated in this region by two- and three-armed spirals. The effective {alpha} arising from gravitational stresses is typically a few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} and is only roughly consistent with local balance of heating and cooling when time-averaged over many dynamic times and a wide range of radii. On the other hand, the outer disk region, which is mostly optically thin, has relatively short cooling times and does not show convergence as resolution increases. Treatment of unstable disks with optical depths near unity with realistic radiative transport is a difficult numerical problem requiring further study. We discuss possible implications of our results for numerical convergence of fragmentation criteria in disk simulations.

  15. Variable order spherical harmonic expansion scheme for the radiative transport equation using finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Surya Mohan, P.; Tarvainen, Tanja; Schweiger, Martin; Pulkkinen, Aki; Arridge, Simon R.

    2011-08-10

    Highlights: {yields} We developed a variable order global basis scheme to solve light transport in 3D. {yields} Based on finite elements, the method can be applied to a wide class of geometries. {yields} It is computationally cheap when compared to the fixed order scheme. {yields} Comparisons with local basis method and other models demonstrate its accuracy. {yields} Addresses problems encountered n modeling of light transport in human brain. - Abstract: We propose the P{sub N} approximation based on a finite element framework for solving the radiative transport equation with optical tomography as the primary application area. The key idea is to employ a variable order spherical harmonic expansion for angular discretization based on the proximity to the source and the local scattering coefficient. The proposed scheme is shown to be computationally efficient compared to employing homogeneously high orders of expansion everywhere in the domain. In addition the numerical method is shown to accurately describe the void regions encountered in the forward modeling of real-life specimens such as infant brains. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated over three model problems where the P{sub N} approximation is compared against Monte Carlo simulations and other state-of-the-art methods.

  16. GRAVE: An Interactive Geometry Construction and Visualization Software System for the TORT Nuclear Radiation Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Blakeman, E.D.

    2000-05-07

    A software system, GRAVE (Geometry Rendering and Visual Editor), has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to perform interactive visualization and development of models used as input to the TORT three-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport code. Three-dimensional and two-dimensional visualization displays are included. Display capabilities include image rotation, zoom, translation, wire-frame and translucent display, geometry cuts and slices, and display of individual component bodies and material zones. The geometry can be interactively edited and saved in TORT input file format. This system is an advancement over the current, non-interactive, two-dimensional display software. GRAVE is programmed in the Java programming language and can be implemented on a variety of computer platforms. Three- dimensional visualization is enabled through the Visualization Toolkit (VTK), a free-ware C++ software library developed for geometric and data visual display. Future plans include an extension of the system to read inputs using binary zone maps and combinatorial geometry models containing curved surfaces, such as those used for Monte Carlo code inputs. Also GRAVE will be extended to geometry visualization/editing for the DORT two-dimensional transport code and will be integrated into a single GUI-based system for all of the ORNL discrete ordinates transport codes.

  17. Soot formation, transport, and radiation in unsteady diffusion flames : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Suo-Anttila, Jill Marie; Williams, Timothy C.; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Jensen, Kirk A.; Blevins, Linda Gail; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Schefer, Robert W.

    2004-10-01

    Fires pose the dominant risk to the safety and security of nuclear weapons, nuclear transport containers, and DOE and DoD facilities. The thermal hazard from these fires primarily results from radiant emission from high-temperature flame soot. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the local transport and chemical phenomena that determine the distributions of soot concentration, optical properties, and temperature in order to develop and validate constitutive models for large-scale, high-fidelity fire simulations. This report summarizes the findings of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project devoted to obtaining the critical experimental information needed to develop such constitutive models. A combination of laser diagnostics and extractive measurement techniques have been employed in both steady and pulsed laminar diffusion flames of methane, ethylene, and JP-8 surrogate burning in air. For methane and ethylene, both slot and coannular flame geometries were investigated, as well as normal and inverse diffusion flame geometries. For the JP-8 surrogate, coannular normal diffusion flames were investigated. Soot concentrations, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) signals, hydroxyl radical (OH) LIF, acetylene and water vapor concentrations, soot zone temperatures, and the velocity field were all successfully measured in both steady and unsteady versions of these various flames. In addition, measurements were made of the soot microstructure, soot dimensionless extinction coefficient (&), and the local radiant heat flux. Taken together, these measurements comprise a unique, extensive database for future development and validation of models of soot formation, transport, and radiation.

  18. Direct Radiative Effects of Particulate Aerosols Emitted by the Space Transport Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, M.; Zittel, P.; Toohey, D. W.; Mills, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    Rockets are the sole source of human produced nonvolatile particulate directly injected into the atmosphere above 20 km altitude. The main components of rocket particulate are submicron black carbon soot (BC) from hydrocarbon (HC) fueled engines and Al2O3 (alumina) from solid rocket motors. Since the emission index and atmospheric lifetime of BC emitted by rockets are each several orders of magnitude greater than those of aircraft, the direct shortwave (SW) radiative forcing (RF) of rocket BC could be comparable to aircraft, even though the amount of HC fuel burned in the stratosphere by rockets is small compared to aircraft. The net RF of alumina particulate, on the other hand, is more uncertain. Alumina possesses large SW scattering and large longwave (LW) absorption so that the net RF for alumina is a strong function of particle size. For submicron alumina particles that constitute the steady state stratospheric population from solid rockets, the SW scattering and LW absorption efficiencies are comparable and the net RF depends on the assumed properties of the steady state population. We present calculations of the SW and LW optical properties of BC and alumina emitted by rocket engines and estimates of the global direct RF under various assumptions of engine type combinations and growth in the space transport sector. We compare these results to the RF associated with other transport sectors and the direct RF from the CO2 emissions from the space transport sector.

  19. A comparison study of discrete-ordinates and flux-limited diffusion methods for modeling radiation transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myra, Eric S.; Hawkins, Wm. Daryl

    2013-03-01

    The Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) is investigating methods of improving the predictive capability of numerical simulations for radiative shock waves that are produced in Omega laser experiments. The laser is used to shock, ionize, and accelerate a beryllium foil into a xenon-filled shock tube. These shock waves, when driven above a threshold velocity of about 60 km/s, become strongly radiative and convert much of the incident energy flux into radiation. Radiative shocks have properties that are significantly different from purely hydrodynamic shocks and, in modeling this phenomenon numerically, it is important to compute radiative effects accurately. In this article, we examine approaches to modeling radiation transport by comparing two methods: (i) a computationally efficient, multigroup, flux-limited-diffusion approximation, currently in use in the CRASH radiation-hydrodynamics code, with (ii) a more accurate discrete-ordinates treatment that is offered by the radiation-transport code PDT. We present a selection of results from a growing suite of code-to-code comparison tests, showing both results for idealized problems and for those that are representative of conditions found in the CRASH experiment.

  20. A hybrid transport-diffusion method for Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffery D. . E-mail: jdd@lanl.gov; Urbatsch, Todd J. . E-mail: tmonster@lanl.gov; Evans, Thomas M. . E-mail: tme@lanl.gov; Buksas, Michael W. . E-mail: mwbuksas@lanl.gov

    2007-03-20

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Monte Carlo particle-transport simulations in diffusive media. If standard Monte Carlo is used in such media, particle histories will consist of many small steps, resulting in a computationally expensive calculation. In DDMC, particles take discrete steps between spatial cells according to a discretized diffusion equation. Each discrete step replaces many small Monte Carlo steps, thus increasing the efficiency of the simulation. In addition, given that DDMC is based on a diffusion equation, it should produce accurate solutions if used judiciously. In practice, DDMC is combined with standard Monte Carlo to form a hybrid transport-diffusion method that can accurately simulate problems with both diffusive and non-diffusive regions. In this paper, we extend previously developed DDMC techniques in several ways that improve the accuracy and utility of DDMC for nonlinear, time-dependent, radiative-transfer calculations. The use of DDMC in these types of problems is advantageous since, due to the underlying linearizations, optically thick regions appear to be diffusive. First, we employ a diffusion equation that is discretized in space but is continuous in time. Not only is this methodology theoretically more accurate than temporally discretized DDMC techniques, but it also has the benefit that a particle's time is always known. Thus, there is no ambiguity regarding what time to assign a particle that leaves an optically thick region (where DDMC is used) and begins transporting by standard Monte Carlo in an optically thin region. Also, we treat the interface between optically thick and optically thin regions with an improved method, based on the asymptotic diffusion-limit boundary condition, that can produce accurate results regardless of the angular distribution of the incident Monte Carlo particles. Finally, we develop a technique for estimating radiation momentum deposition during the

  1. Los Alamos Science: Number 16

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, N.G.

    1988-01-01

    It was an unusually stimulating day and a half at Los Alamos when two Nobel Laureates in physiology, a leading paleontologist, and a leading bio-astrophysicist came together to discuss ''Unsolved Problems in the Science of Life,'' the topic of the second in a series of special meetings sponsored by the Fellows of the Laboratory. Just like the first one on ''Creativity in Science,'' this colloquium took us into a broader arena of ideas and viewpoints than is our usual daily fare. To contemplate the evolution and mysteries of intelligent life from the speakers' diverse points of view at one time, in one place was indeed a rare experience.

  2. Solving Inverse Radiation Transport Problems with Multi-Sensor Data in the Presence of Correlated Measurement and Modeling Errors

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Edward V.; Stork, Christopher L.; Mattingly, John K.

    2015-07-01

    Inverse radiation transport focuses on identifying the configuration of an unknown radiation source given its observed radiation signatures. The inverse problem is traditionally solved by finding the set of transport model parameter values that minimizes a weighted sum of the squared differences by channel between the observed signature and the signature pre dicted by the hypothesized model parameters. The weights are inversely proportional to the sum of the variances of the measurement and model errors at a given channel. The traditional implicit (often inaccurate) assumption is that the errors (differences between the modeled and observed radiation signatures) are independent across channels. Here, an alternative method that accounts for correlated errors between channels is described and illustrated using an inverse problem based on the combination of gam ma and neutron multiplicity counting measurements.

  3. The Method of Manufactured Solutions for RattleSnake A SN Radiation Transport Solver Inside the MOOSE Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Yaqi Wang

    2012-06-01

    The Method of Manufactured Solutions (MMS) is an accepted technique to verify that a numerical discretization for the radiation transport equation has been implemented correctly. This technique offers a few advantages over other methods such as benchmark problems or analytical solutions. The solution can be manufactured such that properties for the angular flux are either stressed or preserved. For radiation transport, these properties can include desired smoothness, positiveness and arbitrary order of anisotropy in angle. Another advantage is that the angular flux solution can be manufactured for multidimensional problems where analytical solutions are difficult to obtain in general.

  4. Transport, vertical structure and radiative properties of dust events in southeast China determined from ground and space sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jianjun; Zheng, Y.; Li, Zhanqing; Flynn, Connor J.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Cribb, Maureen

    2011-11-01

    Two dust events were detected over the Yangtze Delta region of China during March 14-17 and April 25-26 in 2009 where such dust events are uncommon. The transport behavior, spatio-temporal evolution, vertical structure, direct radiative effects, as well as induced heating rates, are investigated using a combination of ground-based and satellite-based measurements, a back-trajectory analysis, an aerosol model and a radiative transfer model.

  5. Transport of charge carriers through the thin base of a heterobipolar transistor under the impact of radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Puzanov, A. S. Obolenskii, S. V. Kozlov, V. A.

    2015-01-15

    The transport of electrons in heterobipolar transistors with radiation defects is studied under conditions where the characteristic sizes of defect clusters and the distances between them can be comparable or can even exceed the sizes of the device base. It is shown that, under some levels of irradiation, neutron radiation can bring about a decrease in the time of flight of hot electrons through the base, which retards the degradation of the transistor parameters.

  6. Radiation transport calculations on unstructured grids using a spatially decomposed and threaded algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Nemanic, M K; Nowak, P

    1999-04-12

    We consider the solution of time-dependent, energy-dependent, discrete ordinates, and nonlinear radiative transfer problems on three-dimensional unstructured spatial grids. We discuss the solution of this class of transport problems, using the code TETON, on large distributed-memory multinode computers having multiple processors per ''node'' (e.g. the IBM-SP). We discuss the use of both spatial decomposition using message passing between ''nodes'' and a threading algorithm in angle on each ''node''. We present timing studies to show how this algorithm scales to hundreds and thousands of processors. We also present an energy group ''batching'' algorithm that greatly enhances cache performance. Our conclusion, after considering cache performance, storage limitations and dependencies inherent in the physics, is that a model that uses a combination of message-passing and threading is superior to one that uses message-passing alone. We present numerical evidence to support our conclusion.

  7. Radiation transport calculations for the ANS (Advanced Neutron Source) beam tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, W.W., Jr.; Lillie, R.A.; Slater, C.O.

    1988-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source facility (ANS) will incorporate a large number of both radial and no-line-of-sight (NLS) beam tubes to provide very large thermal neutron fluxes to experimental facilities. The purpose of this work was to obtain comparisons for the ANS single- and split-core designs of the thermal and damage neutron and gamma-ray scalar fluxes in these beams tubes. For experimental locations far from the reactor cores, angular flux data are required; however, for close-in experimental locations, the scalar fluxes within each beam tube provide a credible estimate of the various signal to noise ratios. In this paper, the coupled two- and three-dimensional radiation transport calculations employed to estimate the scalar neutron and gamma-ray fluxes will be described and the results from these calculations will be discussed. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Modeling Heat Conduction and Radiation Transport with the Diffusion Equation in NIF ALE-AMR

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A C; Bailey, D S; Kaiser, T B; Gunney, B N; Masters, N D; Koniges, A E; Eder, D C; Anderson, R W

    2009-10-06

    The ALE-AMR code developed for NIF is a multi-material hydro-code that models target assembly fragmentation in the aftermath of a shot. The combination of ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian) hydro with AMR (Adaptive Mesh Refinement) allows the code to model a wide range of physical conditions and spatial scales. The large range of temperatures encountered in the NIF target chamber can lead to significant fluxes of energy due to thermal conduction and radiative transport. These physical effects can be modeled approximately with the aid of the diffusion equation. We present a novel method for the solution of the diffusion equation on a composite mesh in order to capture these physical effects.

  9. Viscous dissipation and radiative transport in magnetic reconnection of collisionless magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Gunsu; Ji, Jeong-Young; Thatipamula, Shekar; Kstar Team

    2015-11-01

    Viscous dissipation rate of magnetic field energy due to wave-like fluctuations in collisionless magnetized plasma is obtained analytically using the exact integral closure for electron fluid viscosity [Ji, Phys. Plasmas 21 (2014)]. For typical high-temperature tokamak plasma, the viscous resistivity is several orders larger than the Spitzer (collisional) resistivity. For magnetic reconnection, it is also found that the radiative transport (i.e. Poynting flux) of the field energy of Alfven waves [Bellan, Phys. Plasmas 5, 3081 (1998)] is comparable to the viscous dissipation. The viscous dissipation is more effective for shorter wavelength fluctuation. The importance of viscous dissipation is supported by broadband emission and chirping-down phenomena observed in the ion cyclotron harmonic frequency range at the crash onset of edge-localized mode on the KSTAR tokamak. Work supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea and the Asia-Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics.

  10. Development and validation of a GEANT4 radiation transport code for CT dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Carver, DE; Kost, SD; Fernald, MJ; Lewis, KG; Fraser, ND; Pickens, DR; Price, RR; Stabin, MG

    2014-01-01

    We have created a radiation transport code using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo toolkit to simulate pediatric patients undergoing CT examinations. The focus of this paper is to validate our simulation with real-world physical dosimetry measurements using two independent techniques. Exposure measurements were made with a standard 100-mm CT pencil ionization chamber, and absorbed doses were also measured using optically stimulated luminescent (OSL) dosimeters. Measurements were made in air, a standard 16-cm acrylic head phantom, and a standard 32-cm acrylic body phantom. Physical dose measurements determined from the ionization chamber in air for 100 and 120 kVp beam energies were used to derive photon-fluence calibration factors. Both ion chamber and OSL measurement results provide useful comparisons in the validation of our Monte Carlo simulations. We found that simulated and measured CTDI values were within an overall average of 6% of each other. PMID:25706135

  11. X-ray transport and radiation response assessment (XTRRA) experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fournier, K. B.; Brown, Jr., C. G.; Yeoman, M. F.; Fisher, J. H.; Seiler, S. W.; Hinshelwood, D.; Compton, S.; Holdener, F. R.; Kemp, G. E.; Newlander, C. D.; et al

    2016-08-10

    Our team has developed an experimental platform to evaluate the x-ray-generated stress and impulse in materials. Experimental activities include x-ray source development, design of the sample mounting hardware and sensors interfaced to the NIF’s diagnostics insertion system, and system integration into the facility. This paper focuses on the X-ray Transport and Radiation Response Assessment (XTRRA) test cassettes built for these experiments. The test cassette is designed to position six samples at three predetermined distances from the source, each known to within ±1% accuracy. Built in calorimeters give in situ measurements of the x-ray environment along the sample lines of sight.more » We discuss the measured accuracy of sample responses, as well as planned modifications to the XTRRA cassette.« less

  12. Non-randomized mtDNA damage after ionizing radiation via charge transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xin; Liu, Xinguo; Zhang, Xin; Zhou, Rong; He, Yang; Li, Qiang; Wang, Zhenhua; Zhang, Hong

    2012-10-01

    Although it is well known that there are mutation hot spots in mtDNA, whether there are damage hot spots remain elusive. In this study, the regional DNA damage of mitochondrial genome after ionizing radiation was determined by real-time quantitative PCR. The mtDNA damage level was found to be dose-dependent and regional unequal. The control region was the most susceptible region to oxidative damage. GGG, as an typical hole trap during charge transport, was found to be disproportionally enriched in the control region. A total of 107 vertebrate mitochondrial genomes were then analyzed to testify whether the GGG enrichment in control region was evolutionary conserved. Surprisingly, the triple G enrichment can be observed in most of the homeothermal animals, while the majority of heterothermic animals showed no triple G enrichment. These results indicated that the triple G enrichment in control region was related to the mitochondrial metabolism during evolution.

  13. Implementation, capabilities, and benchmarking of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Tara M.; Johnson, Seth R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Davidson, Gregory G.; Hamilton, Steven P.; Godfrey, Andrew T.

    2016-03-01

    This work discusses the implementation, capabilities, and validation of Shift, a massively parallel Monte Carlo radiation transport package authored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Shift has been developed to scale well from laptops to small computing clusters to advanced supercomputers and includes features such as support for multiple geometry and physics engines, hybrid capabilities for variance reduction methods such as the Consistent Adjoint-Driven Importance Sampling methodology, advanced parallel decompositions, and tally methods optimized for scalability on supercomputing architectures. The scaling studies presented in this paper demonstrate good weak and strong scaling behavior for the implemented algorithms. Shift has also been validated and verified against various reactor physics benchmarks, including the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors' Virtual Environment for Reactor Analysis criticality test suite and several Westinghouse AP1000® problems presented in this paper. These benchmark results compare well to those from other contemporary Monte Carlo codes such as MCNP5 and KENO.

  14. A coupling model of the radiative transport equation for calculating photon migration in biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Hiroyuki; Okawa, Shinpei; Yamada, Yukio; Hoshi, Yoko; Watanabe, Masao

    2015-12-01

    Development of a physically accurate and computationally efficient photon migration model for turbid media is crucial for optical computed tomography such as diffuse optical tomography. For the development, this paper constructs a space-time coupling model of the radiative transport equation with the photon diffusion equation. In the coupling model, a space-time regime of the photon migration is divided into the ballistic and diffusive regimes with the interaction between the both regimes to improve the accuracy of the results and the efficiency of computation. The coupling model provides an accurate description of the photon migration in various turbid media in a wide range of the optical properties, and reduces computational loads when compared with those of full calculation of the RTE.

  15. An object-oriented implementation of a parallel Monte Carlo code for radiation transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Pedro Duarte; Lani, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes the main features of a state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solver for radiation transport which has been implemented within COOLFluiD, a world-class open source object-oriented platform for scientific simulations. The Monte Carlo code makes use of efficient ray tracing algorithms (for 2D, axisymmetric and 3D arbitrary unstructured meshes) which are described in detail. The solver accuracy is first verified in testcases for which analytical solutions are available, then validated for a space re-entry flight experiment (i.e. FIRE II) for which comparisons against both experiments and reference numerical solutions are provided. Through the flexible design of the physical models, ray tracing and parallelization strategy (fully reusing the mesh decomposition inherited by the fluid simulator), the implementation was made efficient and reusable.

  16. Accelerating execution of the integrated TIGER series Monte Carlo radiation transport codes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.M.; Hochstedler, R.D.

    1997-02-01

    Execution of the integrated TIGER series (ITS) of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo radiation transport codes has been accelerated by modifying the FORTRAN source code for more efficient computation. Each member code of ITS was benchmarked and profiled with a specific test case that directed the acceleration effort toward the most computationally intensive subroutines. Techniques for accelerating these subroutines included replacing linear search algorithms with binary versions, replacing the pseudo-random number generator, reducing program memory allocation, and proofing the input files for geometrical redundancies. All techniques produced identical or statistically similar results to the original code. Final benchmark timing of the accelerated code resulted in speed-up factors of 2.00 for TIGER (the one-dimensional slab geometry code), 1.74 for CYLTRAN (the two-dimensional cylindrical geometry code), and 1.90 for ACCEPT (the arbitrary three-dimensional geometry code).

  17. Development and validation of a GEANT4 radiation transport code for CT dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Carver, D E; Kost, S D; Fernald, M J; Lewis, K G; Fraser, N D; Pickens, D R; Price, R R; Stabin, M G

    2015-04-01

    The authors have created a radiation transport code using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo toolkit to simulate pediatric patients undergoing CT examinations. The focus of this paper is to validate their simulation with real-world physical dosimetry measurements using two independent techniques. Exposure measurements were made with a standard 100-mm CT pencil ionization chamber, and absorbed doses were also measured using optically stimulated luminescent (OSL) dosimeters. Measurements were made in air with a standard 16-cm acrylic head phantom and with a standard 32-cm acrylic body phantom. Physical dose measurements determined from the ionization chamber in air for 100 and 120 kVp beam energies were used to derive photon-fluence calibration factors. Both ion chamber and OSL measurement results provide useful comparisons in the validation of the Monte Carlo simulations. It was found that simulated and measured CTDI values were within an overall average of 6% of each other. PMID:25706135

  18. Finite element approximation of the radiative transport equation in a medium with piece-wise constant refractive index

    SciTech Connect

    Lehtikangas, O.; Tarvainen, T.; Kim, A.D.; Arridge, S.R.

    2015-02-01

    The radiative transport equation can be used as a light transport model in a medium with scattering particles, such as biological tissues. In the radiative transport equation, the refractive index is assumed to be constant within the medium. However, in biomedical media, changes in the refractive index can occur between different tissue types. In this work, light propagation in a medium with piece-wise constant refractive index is considered. Light propagation in each sub-domain with a constant refractive index is modeled using the radiative transport equation and the equations are coupled using boundary conditions describing Fresnel reflection and refraction phenomena on the interfaces between the sub-domains. The resulting coupled system of radiative transport equations is numerically solved using a finite element method. The approach is tested with simulations. The results show that this coupled system describes light propagation accurately through comparison with the Monte Carlo method. It is also shown that neglecting the internal changes of the refractive index can lead to erroneous boundary measurements of scattered light.

  19. Modeling the Impenetrable Barrier to Inward Transport of Ultra-relativistic Radiation Belt Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, W.; Cunningham, G.; Chen, Y.; Baker, D. N.; Henderson, M. G.; Reeves, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    It has long been considered that the inner edge of the Earth's outer radiation belt is closely correlated with the minimum plasmapause location. However, recent discoveries by Baker et al. [1] show that it is not the case for ultra-relativistic electrons (2-10 MeV) in the radiation belt. Based on almost two years of Van Allen Probes/REPT data, they find that the inner edge of highly relativistic electrons is rarely collocated with the plasmapause; and more interestingly, there is a clear, persistent, and nearly impenetrable barrier to inward transport of high energy electrons, observed to locate at L~2.8. The presence of such an impenetrable barrier at this very specific location poses a significant puzzle. Using our DREAM3D diffusion model, which includes radial, pitch angle, and momentum diffusion, we are able to simulate the observed impenetrable barrier of ultra-relativistic electrons. The simulation demonstrates that during strong geomagnetic storms the plasmapause can be compressed to very low L region (sometimes as low as L~3), then strong chorus waves just outside the plasmapause can locally accelerate electrons up to multiple-MeV; when storm recovers, plasmapause moves back to large L, while the highly-relativistic electrons generated at low L continue to diffuse inward and slow decay by pitch angle diffusion from plasmaspheric hiss. The delicate balance between slow inward radial diffusion and weak pitch angle scattering creates a fixed inner boundary or barrier for ultra-relativistic electrons. The barrier is found to locate at a fixed L location, independent of the initial penetration depth of electrons that is correlated with the plasmapause location. Our simulation results quantitatively reproduce the evolution of the flux versus L profile, the L location of the barrier, and the decay rate of highly energetic electrons right outside the barrier. 1Baker, D. N., et al. (2014), Nearly Impenetrable Barrier to Inward Ultra-relativistic Magnetospheric

  20. Radiative Effect of Clouds on Tropospheric Chemistry in a Global Three-Dimensional Chemical Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hongyu; Crawford, James H.; Pierce, Robert B.; Norris, Peter; Platnick, Steven E.; Chen, Gao; Logan, Jennifer A.; Yantosca, Robert M.; Evans, Mat J.; Kittaka, Chieko; Feng, Yan; Tie, Xuexi

    2006-01-01

    Clouds exert an important influence on tropospheric photochemistry through modification of solar radiation that determines photolysis frequencies (J-values). We assess the radiative effect of clouds on photolysis frequencies and key oxidants in the troposphere with a global three-dimensional (3-D) chemical transport model (GEOS-CHEM) driven by assimilated meteorological observations from the Goddard Earth Observing System data assimilation system (GEOS DAS) at the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO). We focus on the year of 2001 with the GEOS-3 meteorological observations. Photolysis frequencies are calculated using the Fast-J radiative transfer algorithm. The GEOS-3 global cloud optical depth and cloud fraction are evaluated and generally consistent with the satellite retrieval products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). Results using the linear assumption, which assumes linear scaling of cloud optical depth with cloud fraction in a grid box, show global mean OH concentrations generally increase by less than 6% because of the radiative effect of clouds. The OH distribution shows much larger changes (with maximum decrease of approx.20% near the surface), reflecting the opposite effects of enhanced (weakened) photochemistry above (below) clouds. The global mean photolysis frequencies for J[O1D] and J[NO2] in the troposphere change by less than 5% because of clouds; global mean O3 concentrations in the troposphere increase by less than 5%. This study shows tropical upper tropospheric O3 to be less sensitive to the radiative effect of clouds than previously reported (approx.5% versus approx.20-30%). These results emphasize that the dominant effect of clouds is to influence the vertical redistribution of the intensity of photochemical activity while global average effects remain modest, again contrasting with previous studies. Differing vertical distributions

  1. Alterations in dose and lineal energy spectra under different shieldings in the Los Alamos high-energy neutron field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Huff, H.; Wilkins, R.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear interactions of space radiation with shielding materials result in alterations in dose and lineal energy spectra that depend on the specific elemental composition, density and thickness of the material. The shielding characteristics of materials have been studied using charged-particle beams and radiation transport models by examining the risk reduction using the conventional dose-equivalent approach. Secondary neutrons contribute a significant fraction of the total radiation exposure in space. An experiment to study the changes in dose and lineal energy spectra by shielding materials was carried out at the Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center neutron facility. In the energy range of about 2 to 200 MeV, this neutron spectrum is similar in shape within a factor of about 2 to the spectrum expected in the International Space Station habitable modules. It is shown that with a shielding thickness of about 5 g cm(-2), the conventional radiation risk increases, in some cases by as much as a factor of 2, but decreases with thicknesses of about of 20 g cm(-2). This suggests that care must be taken in evaluating the shielding effectiveness of a given material by including both the charged-particle and neutron components of space radiation.

  2. Trend of surface solar radiation over Asia simulated by aerosol transport-climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, T.; Ohmura, A.

    2009-12-01

    Long-term records of surface radiation measurements indicate a decrease in the solar radiation between the 1950s and 1980s (“global dimming”), then its recovery afterward (“global brightening”) at many locations all over the globe [Wild, 2009]. On the other hand, the global brightening is delayed over the Asian region [Ohmura, 2009]. It is suggested that these trends of the global dimming and brightening are strongly related with a change in aerosol loading in the atmosphere which affect the climate change through the direct, semi-direct, and indirect effects. In this study, causes of the trend of the surface solar radiation over Asia during last several decades are analyzed with an aerosol transport-climate model, SPRINTARS. SPRINTARS is coupled with MIROC which is a general circulation model (GCM) developed by Center for Climate System Research (CCSR)/University of Tokyo, National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), and Frontier Research Center for Global Change (FRCGC) [Takemura et al., 2000, 2002, 2005, 2009]. The horizontal and vertical resolutions are T106 (approximately 1.1° by 1.1°) and 56 layers, respectively. SPRINTARS includes the transport, radiation, cloud, and precipitation processes of all main tropospheric aerosols (black and organic carbons, sulfate, soil dust, and sea salt). The model treats not only the aerosol mass mixing ratios but also the cloud droplet and ice crystal number concentrations as prognostic variables, and the nucleation processes of cloud droplets and ice crystals depend on the number concentrations of each aerosol species. Changes in the cloud droplet and ice crystal number concentrations affect the cloud radiation and precipitation processes in the model. Historical emissions, that is consumption of fossil fuel and biofuel, biomass burning, aircraft emissions, and volcanic eruptions are prescribed from database provided by the Aerosol Model Intercomparison Project (AeroCom) and the latest IPCC inventories

  3. Impurity transport and radiated power loss estimates in NSTX using 2-d USXR arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutman, Dan; Finkenthal, Michael; Vero, Robert; Roquemore, Lane; Johnson, David; Kaita, Robert

    2000-10-01

    Large area, low capacitance, absolute photodiodes have been installed in the three ultrasoft X-ray (USXR) arrays operational on NSTX, for the beginning of the high power operation phase. In addition to bandpass filtered measurements in the USXR range, the absolute diodes enable total radiated power measurements and improve the accuracy of the absolute emissivity estimates. The position of the viewing chords with respect to the NSTX vacuum vessel has been measured using a laser pointing technique and the vignetting of the top array by in-vessel structures calibrated using an in-vessel extended light source. The Granetz-Cormack algorithm with Bessel radial functions is used to derive emissivity maps from the measured brightness profiles. The plasma emission in the spectral ranges defined by the bandpass filters on each array (0.3 μm Ti, 10 μm, 100 μm and 500 μm Be) is modeled using impurity line emission data computed with the HULLAC atomic physics package coupled to a 1-d impurity transport code. The evolution of the USXR emissivity, radiated power, and estimated impurity and plasma profiles during MHD phenomena like the Internal Reconnection Event and sawteeth, as well as emission data for ohmic, auxiliary heated and coaxial helicity injection discharges are presented.

  4. Evaluation of a radiation transport modeling method for radioactive bone cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, T. S.; Sehgal, V.; Skinner, H. B.; Al-Ghazi, M. S. A. L.; Ramisinghani, N. S.; Keyak, J. H.

    2010-05-01

    Spinal metastases are a common and serious manifestation of cancer, and are often treated with vertebroplasty/kyphoplasty followed by external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). As an alternative, we have introduced radioactive bone cement, i.e. bone cement incorporated with a radionuclide. In this study, we present a Monte Carlo radiation transport modeling method to calculate dose distributions within vertebrae containing radioactive cement. Model accuracy was evaluated by comparing model-predicted depth-dose curves to those measured experimentally in eight cadaveric vertebrae using radiochromic film. The high-gradient regions of the depth-dose curves differed by radial distances of 0.3-0.9 mm, an improvement over EBRT dosimetry accuracy. The low-gradient regions differed by 0.033-0.055 Gy/h/mCi, which may be important in situations involving prior spinal cord irradiation. Using a more rigorous evaluation of model accuracy, four models predicted the measured dose distribution within the experimental uncertainty, as represented by the 95% confidence interval of the measured log-linear depth-dose curve. The remaining four models required modification to account for marrow lost from the vertebrae during specimen preparation. However, the accuracy of the modified model results indicated that, when this source of uncertainty is accounted for, this modeling method can be used to predict dose distributions in vertebrae containing radioactive cement.

  5. A Deterministic Electron, Photon, Proton and Heavy Ion Radiation Transport Suite for the Study of the Jovian System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Badavi, Francis F.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Atwell, William

    2011-01-01

    A deterministic suite of radiation transport codes, developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), which describe the transport of electrons, photons, protons, and heavy ions in condensed media is used to simulate exposures from spectral distributions typical of electrons, protons and carbon-oxygen-sulfur (C-O-S) trapped heavy ions in the Jovian radiation environment. The particle transport suite consists of a coupled electron and photon deterministic transport algorithm (CEPTRN) and a coupled light particle and heavy ion deterministic transport algorithm (HZETRN). The primary purpose for the development of the transport suite is to provide a means for the spacecraft design community to rapidly perform numerous repetitive calculations essential for electron, proton and heavy ion radiation exposure assessments in complex space structures. In this paper, the radiation environment of the Galilean satellite Europa is used as a representative boundary condition to show the capabilities of the transport suite. While the transport suite can directly access the output electron spectra of the Jovian environment as generated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Galileo Interim Radiation Electron (GIRE) model of 2003; for the sake of relevance to the upcoming Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM), the 105 days at Europa mission fluence energy spectra provided by JPL is used to produce the corresponding dose-depth curve in silicon behind an aluminum shield of 100 mils ( 0.7 g/sq cm). The transport suite can also accept ray-traced thickness files from a computer-aided design (CAD) package and calculate the total ionizing dose (TID) at a specific target point. In that regard, using a low-fidelity CAD model of the Galileo probe, the transport suite was verified by comparing with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for orbits JOI--J35 of the Galileo extended mission (1996-2001). For the upcoming EJSM mission with a potential launch date of 2020, the transport suite is used to compute

  6. Transport and Mixing Patterns over Central California during the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES)

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, William I.; Berg, Larry K.; Shaw, William J.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Barnard, James C.; Ferrare, R.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hair, John; Erickson, Matthew H.; Jobson, Tom; Flowers, Bradley; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Springston, Stephen R.; Pirce, Bradley R.; Dolislager, Leon; Pederson, J. R.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2012-02-17

    We describe the synoptic and regional-scale meteorological conditions that affected the transport and mixing of trace gases and aerosols in the vicinity of Sacramento, California during June 2010 when the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) was conducted. The meteorological measurements collected by various instruments deployed during the campaign and the performance of the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF-Chem) are both discussed. WRF-Chem was run daily during the campaign to forecast the spatial and temporal variation of carbon monoxide emitted from 20 anthropogenic source regions in California to guide aircraft sampling. The model is shown to reproduce the overall circulations and boundary-layer characteristics in the region, although errors in the upslope wind speed and boundary-layer depth contribute to differences in the observed and simulated carbon monoxide. Thermally-driven upslope flows that transported pollutants from Sacramento over the foothills of the Sierra Nevada occurred every afternoon, except during three periods when the passage of mid-tropospheric troughs disrupted the regional-scales flow patterns. The meteorological conditions after the passage of the third trough were the most favorable for photochemistry and likely formation of secondary organic aerosols. Meteorological measurements and model forecasts indicate that the Sacramento pollutant plume was likely transported over a downwind site that collected trace gas and aerosol measurements during 23 periods; however, direct transport occurred during only eight of these periods. The model also showed that emissions from the San Francisco Bay area transported by intrusions of marine air contributed a large fraction of the carbon monoxide in the vicinity of Sacramento, suggesting that this source likely affects local chemistry. Contributions from other sources of pollutants, such as those in the Sacramento Valley and San Joaquin Valley

  7. Transport and mixing patterns over Central California during the carbonaceous aerosol and radiative effects study (CARES)

    SciTech Connect

    Fast J. D.; Springston S.; Gustafson Jr., W. I.; Berg, L. K.; Shaw, W. J.; Pekour, M.; Shrivastava, M.; Barnard, J. C.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. A.; Erickson, M.; Jobson, B. T.; Flowers, B.; Dubey, M. K.; Pierce, R. B.; Dolislager, L.; Pederson, J.; Zaveri, R. A.

    2012-02-17

    We describe the synoptic and regional-scale meteorological conditions that affected the transport and mixing of trace gases and aerosols in the vicinity of Sacramento, California during June 2010 when the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) was conducted. The meteorological measurements collected by various instruments deployed during the campaign and the performance of the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF-Chem) are both discussed. WRF-Chem was run daily during the campaign to forecast the spatial and temporal variation of carbon monoxide emitted from 20 anthropogenic source regions in California to guide aircraft sampling. The model is shown to reproduce the overall circulations and boundary-layer characteristics in the region, although errors in the upslope wind speed and boundary-layer depth contribute to differences in the observed and simulated carbon monoxide. Thermally-driven upslope flows that transported pollutants from Sacramento over the foothills of the Sierra Nevada occurred every afternoon, except during three periods when the passage of mid-tropospheric troughs disrupted the regional-scale flow patterns. The meteorological conditions after the passage of the third trough were the most favorable for photochemistry and likely formation of secondary organic aerosols. Meteorological measurements and model forecasts indicate that the Sacramento pollutant plume was likely transported over a downwind site that collected trace gas and aerosol measurements during 23 time periods; however, direct transport occurred during only eight of these periods. The model also showed that emissions from the San Francisco Bay area transported by intrusions of marine air contributed a large fraction of the carbon monoxide in the vicinity of Sacramento, suggesting that this source likely affects local chemistry. Contributions from other sources of pollutants, such as those in the Sacramento Valley and San Joaquin

  8. Benchmarks and models for 1-D radiation transport in stochastic participating media

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D S

    2000-08-21

    Benchmark calculations for radiation transport coupled to a material temperature equation in a 1-D slab and 1-D spherical geometry binary random media are presented. The mixing statistics are taken to be homogeneous Markov statistics in the 1-D slab but only approximately Markov statistics in the 1-D sphere. The material chunk sizes are described by Poisson distribution functions. The material opacities are first taken to be constant and then allowed to vary as a strong function of material temperature. Benchmark values and variances for time evolution of the ensemble average of material temperature energy density and radiation transmission are computed via a Monte Carlo type method. These benchmarks are used as a basis for comparison with three other approximate methods of solution. One of these approximate methods is simple atomic mix. The second approximate model is an adaptation of what is commonly called the Levermore-Pomraning model and which is referred to here as the standard model. It is shown that recasting the temperature coupling as a type of effective scattering can be useful in formulating the third approximate model, an adaptation of a model due to Su and Pomraning which attempts to account for the effects of scattering in a stochastic context. This last adaptation shows consistent improvement over both the atomic mix and standard models when used in the 1-D slab geometry but shows limited improvement in the 1-D spherical geometry. Benchmark values are also computed for radiation transmission from the 1-D sphere without material heating present. This is to evaluate the performance of the standard model on this geometry--something which has never been done before. All of the various tests demonstrate the importance of stochastic structure on the solution. Also demonstrated are the range of usefulness and limitations of a simple atomic mix formulation.

  9. Transport, radiative, and dynamical effects of the antarctic ozone hole: A GFDL SKYHI' model experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mahlman, J.D; Umscheid, L.J. ); Pinto, J.P. )

    1994-02-15

    The GFDL SKYHI' general circulation model has been used to simulate the effect of the Antarctic ozone hole' phenomenon on the radiative and dynamical environment of the lower stratosphere. Both the polar ozone destruction and photochemical restoration chemistries are calculated by parameterized simplifications of the still somewhat uncertain chemical processes. The modeled total column ozone depletions are near 25% in spring over Antarctica, with 1% depletion reaching equatorial latitudes by the end of the 4 1/2-year model experiment. In the lower stratosphere, ozone reductions of 5% reach to the equator. Large coolings of about 8 K are simulated in the lower stratospheric over Antarctica in late spring, while a general cooling of about 1-1.5 K is present throughout the Southern Hemisphere lower stratosphere. The model atmosphere experiences a long-term positive temperature-chemical feedback because significant ozone reductions carry over into the next winter. The overall temperature response to the reduced ozone is essentially radiative in character. However, substantial dynamical changes are induced by the ozone hole effect. The Antarctic middle stratosphere in late spring warms by about 6 K over Antarctica and the lower midlatitude stratosphere warms by approximately 1 K. These warming spots are produced mainly by an increased residual circulation intensity. Also, the Antarctic vortex becomes tighter and more confined as a result of the reduced ozone. These two dynamical effects combine to steepen the meridional slope of quasi-conservative trace constituent isolines. Thus, the entire transport, radiative, and dynamical climatology of the springtime stratosphere is affected to an important degree by the ozone hole phenomenon. Over the entire year, however, these dynamical effects are considerably smaller. 27 refs., 13 figs.

  10. C5 Benchmark Problem with Discrete Ordinate Radiation Transport Code DENOVO

    SciTech Connect

    Yesilyurt, Gokhan; Clarno, Kevin T; Evans, Thomas M; Davidson, Gregory G; Fox, Patricia B

    2011-01-01

    The C5 benchmark problem proposed by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency was modeled to examine the capabilities of Denovo, a three-dimensional (3-D) parallel discrete ordinates (S{sub N}) radiation transport code, for problems with no spatial homogenization. Denovo uses state-of-the-art numerical methods to obtain accurate solutions to the Boltzmann transport equation. Problems were run in parallel on Jaguar, a high-performance supercomputer located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Both the two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D configurations were analyzed, and the results were compared with the reference MCNP Monte Carlo calculations. For an additional comparison, SCALE/KENO-V.a Monte Carlo solutions were also included. In addition, a sensitivity analysis was performed for the optimal angular quadrature and mesh resolution for both the 2-D and 3-D infinite lattices of UO{sub 2} fuel pin cells. Denovo was verified with the C5 problem. The effective multiplication factors, pin powers, and assembly powers were found to be in good agreement with the reference MCNP and SCALE/KENO-V.a Monte Carlo calculations.

  11. Improved non-local electron thermal transport model for two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Duc; Moses, Gregory; Delettrez, Jacques

    2015-08-15

    An implicit, non-local thermal conduction algorithm based on the algorithm developed by Schurtz, Nicolai, and Busquet (SNB) [Schurtz et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 4238 (2000)] for non-local electron transport is presented and has been implemented in the radiation-hydrodynamics code DRACO. To study the model's effect on DRACO's predictive capability, simulations of shot 60 303 from OMEGA are completed using the iSNB model, and the computed shock speed vs. time is compared to experiment. Temperature outputs from the iSNB model are compared with the non-local transport model of Goncharov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)]. Effects on adiabat are also examined in a polar drive surrogate simulation. Results show that the iSNB model is not only capable of flux-limitation but also preheat prediction while remaining numerically robust and sacrificing little computational speed. Additionally, the results provide strong incentive to further modify key parameters within the SNB theory, namely, the newly introduced non-local mean free path. This research was supported by the Laboratory for Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester.

  12. Improved non-local electron thermal transport model for two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Duc; Moses, Gregory; Delettrez, Jacques

    2015-08-01

    An implicit, non-local thermal conduction algorithm based on the algorithm developed by Schurtz, Nicolai, and Busquet (SNB) [Schurtz et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 4238 (2000)] for non-local electron transport is presented and has been implemented in the radiation-hydrodynamics code DRACO. To study the model's effect on DRACO's predictive capability, simulations of shot 60 303 from OMEGA are completed using the iSNB model, and the computed shock speed vs. time is compared to experiment. Temperature outputs from the iSNB model are compared with the non-local transport model of Goncharov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)]. Effects on adiabat are also examined in a polar drive surrogate simulation. Results show that the iSNB model is not only capable of flux-limitation but also preheat prediction while remaining numerically robust and sacrificing little computational speed. Additionally, the results provide strong incentive to further modify key parameters within the SNB theory, namely, the newly introduced non-local mean free path. This research was supported by the Laboratory for Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester.

  13. CSDUST3 - A radiation transport code for a dusty medium with 1-D planar, spherical or cylindrical geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, Michael P.; Leung, Chun Ming; Spagna, George F., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The program solves the radiation transport problem in a dusty medium with one-dimensional planar, spherical or cylindrical geometry. It determines self-consistently the effects of multiple scattering, absorption, and re-emission of photons on the temperature of dust grains and the characteristics of the internal radiation field. The program can treat radiation field anisotropy, linear anisotropic scattering, and multi-grain components. The program output consists of the dust-temperature distribution, flux spectrum, surface brightness at each frequency and the observed intensities (involving a convolution with a telescope beam pattern).

  14. Natural Attenuation of Anthropogenic Chromium in Selected Puye Formation in Regional Aquifer System of LOS Alamos, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. B.; Ding, M.; WoldeGabriel, G. W.; Cheshire, M.; Rearick, M.; Conradson, S.; Kluk, E.; Katzman, D.

    2014-12-01

    Routine groundwater monitoring conducted in 2005 revealed significant chromium (Cr) contamination in regional groundwater in Los Alamos, New Mexico. Previous use of potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7) in cooling towers at Los Alamos National Laboratory's main power plant is believed to be the source of the elevated chromium levels. From 1956 to 1972 between 31,000 and 72,000 Kg of toxic Cr(IV) was released into Sandia Canyon. Initial investigations of the vadose zone using chromium isotopes indicated that reduction of anthropogenic Cr(IV) had occurred. However, to justify the use of Monitoring Natural Attenuation (MNA) as a valid remediation strategy, the Cr attenuation mechanism and the reduction capacity of the regional aquifer needs to be determined. Conventional batch sorption and synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies were performed. Two samples were selected from the Puye formation, a silicoclastic sedimentary rock sequence located within the contaminated aquifer. Additionally, two Los Alamos Puye outcrop samples with no chromium exposure were selected for comparison. Each sample was subsequently sorted based on grain size, magnetic, and clay fractions. Groundwater with a known concentration of Cr(IV) was used in the batch experiments. Spectroscopy measurements of Puye samples before and after exposure to the same contaminated groundwater were conducted at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL). Batch sorption results indicated little to no attenuation, as indicated by the small measured sorption coefficient (Kd < 5 Kg/L). Spectroscopic measurements suggest that attenuation of hexavalent chromium in groundwater is due to reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in the Puye and may be attributed almost exclusively to the clay fraction. These results indicate that the tested Puye sediments occurring in the regional aquifer have minor ability to naturally attenuate anthropogenic Cr(IV), with the clay fraction dominating the reduction process

  15. Los Alamos, Toshiba probing Fukushima with cosmic rays

    ScienceCinema

    Morris, Christopher

    2014-06-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has announced an impending partnership with Toshiba Corporation to use a Los Alamos technique called muon tomography to safely peer inside the cores of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors and create high-resolution images of the damaged nuclear material inside without ever breaching the cores themselves. The initiative could reduce the time required to clean up the disabled complex by at least a decade and greatly reduce radiation exposure to personnel working at the plant. Muon radiography (also called cosmic-ray radiography) uses secondary particles generated when cosmic rays collide with upper regions of Earth's atmosphere to create images of the objects that the particles, called muons, penetrate. The process is analogous to an X-ray image, except muons are produced naturally and do not damage the materials they contact. Muon radiography has been used before in imaginative applications such as mapping the interior of the Great Pyramid at Giza, but Los Alamos's muon tomography technique represents a vast improvement over earlier technology.

  16. Los Alamos, Toshiba probing Fukushima with cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Christopher

    2014-06-16

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has announced an impending partnership with Toshiba Corporation to use a Los Alamos technique called muon tomography to safely peer inside the cores of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors and create high-resolution images of the damaged nuclear material inside without ever breaching the cores themselves. The initiative could reduce the time required to clean up the disabled complex by at least a decade and greatly reduce radiation exposure to personnel working at the plant. Muon radiography (also called cosmic-ray radiography) uses secondary particles generated when cosmic rays collide with upper regions of Earth's atmosphere to create images of the objects that the particles, called muons, penetrate. The process is analogous to an X-ray image, except muons are produced naturally and do not damage the materials they contact. Muon radiography has been used before in imaginative applications such as mapping the interior of the Great Pyramid at Giza, but Los Alamos's muon tomography technique represents a vast improvement over earlier technology.

  17. NEQAIRv14.0 Release Notes: Nonequilibrium and Equilibrium Radiative Transport Spectra Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandis, Aaron Michael; Cruden, Brett A.

    2014-01-01

    NEQAIR v14.0 is the first parallelized version of NEQAIR. Starting from the last version of the code that went through the internal software release process at NASA Ames (NEQAIR 2008), there have been significant updates to the physics in the code and the computational efficiency. NEQAIR v14.0 supersedes NEQAIR v13.2, v13.1 and the suite of NEQAIR2009 versions. These updates have predominantly been performed by Brett Cruden and Aaron Brandis from ERC Inc at NASA Ames Research Center in 2013 and 2014. A new naming convention is being adopted with this current release. The current and future versions of the code will be named NEQAIR vY.X. The Y will refer to a major release increment. Minor revisions and update releases will involve incrementing X. This is to keep NEQAIR more in line with common software release practices. NEQAIR v14.0 is a standalone software tool for line-by-line spectral computation of radiative intensities and/or radiative heat flux, with one-dimensional transport of radiation. In order to accomplish this, NEQAIR v14.0, as in previous versions, requires the specification of distances (in cm), temperatures (in K) and number densities (in parts/cc) of constituent species along lines of sight. Therefore, it is assumed that flow quantities have been extracted from flow fields computed using other tools, such as CFD codes like DPLR or LAURA, and that lines of sight have been constructed and written out in the format required by NEQAIR v14.0. There are two principal modes for running NEQAIR v14.0. In the first mode NEQAIR v14.0 is used as a tool for creating synthetic spectra of any desired resolution (including convolution with a specified instrument/slit function). The first mode is typically exercised in simulating/interpreting spectroscopic measurements of different sources (e.g. shock tube data, plasma torches, etc.). In the second mode, NEQAIR v14.0 is used as a radiative heat flux prediction tool for flight projects. Correspondingly, NEQAIR has

  18. Radiation transport codes for potential applications related to radiobiology and radiotherapy using protons, neutrons, and negatively charged pions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.

    1972-01-01

    Several Monte Carlo radiation transport computer codes are used to predict quantities of interest in the fields of radiotherapy and radiobiology. The calculational methods are described and comparisions of calculated and experimental results are presented for dose distributions produced by protons, neutrons, and negatively charged pions. Comparisons of calculated and experimental cell survival probabilities are also presented.

  19. System and method for radiation dose calculation within sub-volumes of a monte carlo based particle transport grid

    DOEpatents

    Bergstrom, Paul M.; Daly, Thomas P.; Moses, Edward I.; Patterson, Jr., Ralph W.; Schach von Wittenau, Alexis E.; Garrett, Dewey N.; House, Ronald K.; Hartmann-Siantar, Christine L.; Cox, Lawrence J.; Fujino, Donald H.

    2000-01-01

    A system and method is disclosed for radiation dose calculation within sub-volumes of a particle transport grid. In a first step of the method voxel volumes enclosing a first portion of the target mass are received. A second step in the method defines dosel volumes which enclose a second portion of the target mass and overlap the first portion. A third step in the method calculates common volumes between the dosel volumes and the voxel volumes. A fourth step in the method identifies locations in the target mass of energy deposits. And, a fifth step in the method calculates radiation doses received by the target mass within the dosel volumes. A common volume calculation module inputs voxel volumes enclosing a first portion of the target mass, inputs voxel mass densities corresponding to a density of the target mass within each of the voxel volumes, defines dosel volumes which enclose a second portion of the target mass and overlap the first portion, and calculates common volumes between the dosel volumes and the voxel volumes. A dosel mass module, multiplies the common volumes by corresponding voxel mass densities to obtain incremental dosel masses, and adds the incremental dosel masses corresponding to the dosel volumes to obtain dosel masses. A radiation transport module identifies locations in the target mass of energy deposits. And, a dose calculation module, coupled to the common volume calculation module and the radiation transport module, for calculating radiation doses received by the target mass within the dosel volumes.

  20. Los Alamos PC estimating system

    SciTech Connect

    Stutz, R.A.; Lemon, G.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Los Alamos Cost Estimating System (QUEST) is being converted to run on IBM personal computers. This very extensive estimating system is capable of supporting cost estimators from many different and varied fields. QUEST does not dictate any fixed method for estimating. QUEST supports many styles and levels of detail estimating. QUEST can be used with or without data bases. This system allows the estimator to provide reports based on levels of detail defined by combining work breakdown structures. QUEST provides a set of tools for doing any type of estimate without forcing the estimator to use any given method. The level of detail in the estimate can be mixed based on the amount of information known about different parts of the project. The system can support many different data bases simultaneously. Estimators can modify any cost in any data base.

  1. Expanded recycling at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Betschart, J.F.; Malinauskas, L.; Burns, M.

    1996-07-01

    The Pollution Prevention Program Office has increased recycling activities, reuse, and options to reduce the solid waste streams through streamlining efforts that applied best management practices. The program has prioritized efforts based on volume and economic considerations and has greatly increased Los Alamos National Laboratory`s (LANL`s) recycle volumes. The Pollution Prevention Program established and chairs a Solid Waste Management Solutions Group to specifically address and solve problems in nonradioactive, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), state-regulated, and sanitary and industrial waste streams (henceforth referred to as sanitary waste in this paper). By identifying materials with recycling potential, identifying best management practices and pathways to return materials for reuse, and introducing the concept and practice of {open_quotes}asset management,{open_quotes} the Group will divert much of the current waste stream from disposal. This Group is developing procedures, agreements, and contracts to stage, collect, sort, segregate, transport and process materials, and is also garnering support for the program through the involvement of upper management, facility managers, and generators.

  2. Accurate dose assessment system for an exposed person utilising radiation transport calculation codes in emergency response to a radiological accident.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, F; Shigemori, Y; Seki, A

    2009-01-01

    A system has been developed to assess radiation dose distribution inside the body of exposed persons in a radiological accident by utilising radiation transport calculation codes-MCNP and MCNPX. The system consists mainly of two parts, pre-processor and post-processor of the radiation transport calculation. Programs for the pre-processor are used to set up a 'problem-dependent' input file, which defines the accident condition and dosimetric quantities to be estimated. The program developed for the post-processor part can effectively indicate dose information based upon the output file of the code. All of the programs in the dosimetry system can be executed with a generally used personal computer and accurately give the dose profile to an exposed person in a radiological accident without complicated procedures. An experiment using a physical phantom was carried out to verify the availability of the dosimetry system with the developed programs in a gamma ray irradiation field. PMID:19181661

  3. Laser protective eyewear program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Winburn, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    The proliferation of lasers at Los Alamos focused considerable attention on providing adequate eye protection for experimenters involved in the use of a wide variety of nonionizing radiation. Experiments with fast-pulsed lasers (Nd:YAG, HF, and CO/sub 2/) were performed to gain biological threshold data on ocular damage. In parallel, eye protection devices were evaluated, which resulted in the development of lightweight, comfortable spectacles of colored glass filters that can be ground to prescription specifications. Goggle styles are employed in specific applications.

  4. Stormtime ring current and radiation belt ion transport: Simulations and interpretations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Larry R.; Gorney, David J.; Chen, Margaret W.; Schulz, Michael

    1995-01-01

    We use a dynamical guiding-center model to investigate the stormtime transport of ring current and radiation-belt ions. We trace the motion of representative ions' guiding centers in response to model substorm-associated impulses in the convection electric field for a range of ion energies. Our simple magnetospheric model allows us to compare our numerical results quantitatively with analytical descriptions of particle transport, (e.g., with the quasilinear theory of radial diffusion). We find that 10-145-keV ions gain access to L approximately 3, where they can form the stormtime ring current, mainly from outside the (trapping) region in which particles execute closed drift paths. Conversely, the transport of higher-energy ions (approximately greater than 145 keV at L approximately 3) turns out to resemble radial diffusion. The quasilinear diffusion coefficient calculated for our model storm does not vary smoothly with particle energy, since our impulses occur at specific (although randomly determined) times. Despite the spectral irregularity, quasilinear theory provides a surprisingly accurate description of the transport process for approximately greater than 145-keV ions, even for the case of an individual storm. For 4 different realizations of our model storm, the geometric mean discrepancies between diffusion coefficients D(sup sim, sub LL) obtained from the simulations and the quasilinear diffusion coefficient D(sup ql, sub LL) amount to factors of 2.3, 2.3, 1.5, and 3.0, respectively. We have found that these discrepancies between D(sup sim, sub LL) and D(sup ql, sub LL) can be reduced slightly by invoking drift-resonance broadening to smooth out the sharp minima and maxima in D(sup ql, sub LL). The mean of the remaining discrepancies between D(sup sim, sub LL) and D(sup ql, sub LL) for the 4 different storms then amount to factors of 1.9, 2.1, 1.5, and 2.7, respectively. We find even better agreement when we reduce the impulse amplitudes systematically in

  5. Evidence for dust-driven, radial plasma transport in Saturn's inner radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Kollmann, P.; Paranicas, C.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Andriopoulou, M.

    2016-08-01

    A survey of Cassini MIMI/LEMMS data acquired between 2004 and 2015 has led to the identification of 13 energetic electron microsignatures that can be attributed to particle losses on one of the several faint rings of the planet. Most of the signatures were detected near L-shells that map between the orbits of Mimas and Enceladus or near the G-ring. Our analysis indicates that it is very unlikely for these signatures to have originated from absorption on Mimas, Enceladus or unidentified Moons and rings, even though most were not found exactly at the L-shells of the known rings of the saturnian system (G-ring, Methone, Anthe, Pallene). The lack of additional absorbers is apparent in the L-shell distribution of MeV ions which are very sensitive for tracing the location of weakly absorbing material permanently present in Saturn's radiation belts. This sensitivity is demonstrated by the identification, for the first time, of the proton absorption signatures from the asteroid-sized Moons Pallene, Anthe and/or their rings. For this reason, we investigate the possibility that the 13 energetic electron events formed at known saturnian rings and the resulting depletions were later displaced radially by one or more magnetospheric processes. Our calculations indicate that the displacement magnitude for several of those signatures is much larger than the one that can be attributed to radial flows imposed by the recently discovered noon-to-midnight electric field in Saturn's inner magnetosphere. This observation is consistent with a mechanism where radial plasma velocities are enhanced near dusty obstacles. Several possibilities are discussed that may explain this observation, including a dust-driven magnetospheric interchange instability, mass loading by the pick-up of nanometer charged dust grains and global magnetospheric electric fields induced by perturbed orbits of charged dust due to the act of solar radiation pressure. Indirect evidence for a global scale interaction

  6. Radiation Transport Analysis in Chalcogenide-Based Devices and a Neutron Howitzer Using MCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Herbert

    As photons, electrons, and neutrons traverse a medium, they impart their energy in ways that are analytically difficult to describe. Monte Carlo methods provide valuable insight into understanding this behavior, especially when the radiation source or environment is too complex to simplify. This research investigates simulating various radiation sources using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code, characterizing their impact on various materials, and comparing the simulation results to general theory and measurements. A total of five sources were of interest: two photon sources of different incident particle energies (3.83 eV and 1.25 MeV), two electron sources also of different energies (30 keV and 100 keV), and a californium-252 (Cf-252) spontaneous fission neutron source. Lateral and vertical programmable metallization cells (PMCs) were developed by other researchers for exposure to these photon and electron sources, so simplified PMC models were implemented in MCNP to estimate the doses and fluences. Dose rates measured around the neutron source and the predicted maximum activity of activation foils exposed to the neutrons were determined using MCNP and compared to experimental results obtained from gamma-ray spectroscopy. The analytical fluence calculations for the photon and electron cases agreed with MCNP results, and differences are due to MCNP considering particle movements that hand calculations do not. Doses for the photon cases agreed between the analytical and simulated results, while the electron cases differed by a factor of up to 4.8. Physical dose rate measurements taken from the neutron source agreed with MCNP within the 10% tolerance of the measurement device. The activity results had a percent error of up to 50%, which suggests a need to further evaluate the spectroscopy setup.

  7. Radiative forcing due to changes in ozone and methane caused by the transport sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myhre, G.; Shine, K. P.; Rädel, G.; Gauss, M.; Isaksen, I. S. A.; Tang, Q.; Prather, M. J.; Williams, J. E.; van Velthoven, P.; Dessens, O.; Koffi, B.; Szopa, S.; Hoor, P.; Grewe, V.; Borken-Kleefeld, J.; Berntsen, T. K.; Fuglestvedt, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    The year 2000 radiative forcing (RF) due to changes in O 3 and CH 4 (and the CH 4-induced stratospheric water vapour) as a result of emissions of short-lived gases (oxides of nitrogen (NO x), carbon monoxide and non-methane hydrocarbons) from three transport sectors (ROAD, maritime SHIPping and AIRcraft) are calculated using results from five global atmospheric chemistry models. Using results from these models plus other published data, we quantify the uncertainties. The RF due to short-term O 3 changes (i.e. as an immediate response to the emissions without allowing for the long-term CH 4 changes) is positive and highest for ROAD transport (31 mW m -2) compared to SHIP (24 mW m -2) and AIR (17 mW m -2) sectors in four of the models. All five models calculate negative RF from the CH 4 perturbations, with a larger impact from the SHIP sector than for ROAD and AIR. The net RF of O 3 and CH 4 combined (i.e. including the impact of CH 4 on ozone and stratospheric water vapour) is positive for ROAD (+16(±13) (one standard deviation) mW m -2) and AIR (+6(±5) mW m -2) traffic sectors and is negative for SHIP (-18(±10) mW m -2) sector in all five models. Global Warming Potentials (GWP) and Global Temperature change Potentials (GTP) are presented for AIR NO x emissions; there is a wide spread in the results from the 5 chemistry models, and it is shown that differences in the methane response relative to the O 3 response drive much of the spread.

  8. Radiation-transport method to simulate noncontinuum gas flows for MEMS devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Torczynski, John Robert

    2004-01-01

    A Micro Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) typically consists of micron-scale parts that move through a gas at atmospheric or reduced pressure. In this situation, the gas-molecule mean free path is comparable to the geometric features of the microsystem, so the gas flow is noncontinuum. When mean-free-path effects cannot be neglected, the Boltzmann equation must be used to describe the gas flow. Solution of the Boltzmann equation is difficult even for the simplest case because of its sevenfold dimensionality (one temporal dimension, three spatial dimensions, and three velocity dimensions) and because of the integral nature of the collision term. The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is the method of choice to simulate high-speed noncontinuum flows. However, since DSMC uses computational molecules to represent the gas, the inherent statistical noise must be minimized by sampling large numbers of molecules. Since typical microsystem velocities are low (< 1 m/s) compared to molecular velocities ({approx}400 m/s), the number of molecular samples required to achieve 1% precision can exceed 1010 per cell. The Discrete Velocity Gas (DVG) method, an approach motivated by radiation transport, provides another way to simulate noncontinuum gas flows. Unlike DSMC, the DVG method restricts molecular velocities to have only certain discrete values. The transport of the number density of a velocity state is governed by a discrete Boltzmann equation that has one temporal dimension and three spatial dimensions and a polynomial collision term. Specification and implementation of DVG models are discussed, and DVG models are applied to Couette flow and to Fourier flow. While the DVG results for these benchmark problems are qualitatively correct, the errors in the shear stress and the heat flux can be order-unity even for DVG models with 88 velocity states. It is concluded that the DVG method, as described herein, is not sufficiently accurate to simulate the low-speed gas flows

  9. Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The purpose of the safety and health assessment was to determine the effectiveness of representative safety and health programs at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Within the safety and health programs at LANL, performance was assessed in the following technical areas: Organization and Administration, Quality Verification, Operations, Maintenance, Training and Certification, Auxiliary Systems, Emergency Preparedness, Technical Support, Packaging and Transportation, Nuclear Criticality Safety, Security/Safety Interface, Experimental Activities, Site/Facility Safety Review, Radiological Protection, Personnel Protection, Worker Safety and Health (OSHA) Compliance, Fire Protection, Aviation Safety, Explosives Safety, Natural Phenomena, and Medical Services.

  10. Studies of Particle Acceleration, Transport and Radiation in Impulsive Phase of Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, Vahe

    2005-01-01

    the reconnection region above a flare loop. This turbulence accelerates particles stochastically which radiate some of their energy in this region but carry most of their energy to the footpoints of the loop, where they lose all their energy and radiate bulk of the observed radiation as in the traditional thick target model. In the past we have worked on various aspects of this model. We have evaluated the interaction rates of the plasma waves with electrons and ions, developed theoretical frameworks for the acceleration, transport and radiative processes, and produced numerical codes for the investigation of these processes. The goal of this grant has been further development and testing of this new paradigm, with emphases on the relative acceleration of electrons and ions and on a comprehensive investigation of the turbulence generation, cascade, and damping processes. We review several pieces of important evidence that we have uncovered indicating the crucial roles of turbulence, in and we describe accomplishments during the past two years of this grant.

  11. Radiative transport in plant canopies: Forward and inverse problem for UAV applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furfaro, Roberto

    This dissertation deals with modeling the radiative regime in vegetation canopies and the possible remote sensing applications derived by solving the forward and inverse canopy transport equation. The aim of the research is to develop a methodology (called "end-to-end problem solution") that, starting from first principles describing the interaction between light and vegetation, constructs, as the final product, a tool that analyzes remote sensing data for precision agriculture (ripeness prediction). The procedure begins by defining the equations that describe the transport of photons inside the leaf and within the canopy. The resulting integro-differential equations are numerically integrated by adapting the conventional discrete-ordinate methods to compute the reflectance at the top of the canopy. The canopy transport equation is also analyzed to explore its spectral properties. The goal here is to apply Case's method to determine eigenvalues and eigenfunctions and to prove completeness. A model inversion is attempted by using neural network algorithms. Using input-outputs generated by running the forward model, a neural network is trained to learn the inverse map. The model-based neural network represents the end product of the overall procedure. During Oct 2002, an Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) equipped with a camera system, flew over Kauai to take images of coffee field plantations. Our goal is to predict the amount of ripe coffee cherries for optimal harvesting. The Leaf-Canopy model was modified to include cherries as absorbing and scattering elements and two classes of neural networks were trained on the model to learn the relationship between reflectance and percentage of ripe, over-ripe and under-ripe cherries. The neural networks are interfaced with images coming from Kauai to predict ripeness percentage. Both ground and airborne images are considered. The latter were taken from the on-board Helios UAV camera system flying over the Kauai coffee field

  12. Produce and fish sampling program of Los Alamos National Laboratory's Environmental Surveillance Group

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, J.G.

    1984-09-01

    This report describes produce and fish sampling procedures of the Environmental Surveillance Group at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The program monitors foodstuffs and fish for possible radioactive contamination from Laboratory operations. Data gathered in this program on radionuclide concentrations help to estimate radiation doses to Laboratory personnel and the public. 3 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

  13. Comparison of Integrated Radiation Transport Models with TEPC Measurements for the Average Quality Factors in Spaceflights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Nikjoo, Hooshang; Dicello, John F.; Pisacane, Vincent; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    radiation type (Z = 1 to 28). Because the anomalous response has been observed at large event sizes in the experiment due to the escape of energy out of sensitive volume by delta-rays and the entry of delta-rays from the high-density wall into the low-density gas-volume cavity, Monte Carlo simulation was also made for the response of a walled-TEPC with wall thickness 2 mm and density 1 g/cm(exp 3). The radius of cavity was set to 6.35 mm and a gas density 7.874 x 10(exp -5) g/cm(exp 3). The response of the walled- and the wall-less counters were compared. The average quality factor Q(sub ave)(y) for trapped protons on STS-89 demonstrated the good agreement between the model calculations and flight TEPC data as shown. Using an integrated space radiation model (this includes the transport codes HZETRN and BRYNTRN, the quantum nuclear interaction model QMSFRG) and the resultant response distribution functions of walled-TEPC from Monte-Carlo track simulations, we compared model calculations with walled-TEPC measurements from NASA missions in LEO and made predictions for the lunar and the Mars missions. The Q(sub ave)(y) values for the trapped or the solar protons ranged from 1.9-2.5. This over-estimates the Qave(LET) values which ranged from 1.4-1.6. Both quantities increase with shield thickness due to nuclear fragmentation. The Q(sub ave)(LET) for the complete GCR spectra was found to be 3.5-4.5, while flight TEPCs measured 2.9-3.4 for Q(sub ave)(y). The GCR values are decreasing with the shield thickness. Our analysis for a proper interpretation of data supports the use of TEPCs for monitoring space radiation environment.

  14. An Improved Elastic and Nonelastic Neutron Transport Algorithm for Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clowdsley, Martha S.; Wilson, John W.; Heinbockel, John H.; Tripathi, R. K.; Singleterry, Robert C., Jr.; Shinn, Judy L.

    2000-01-01

    A neutron transport algorithm including both elastic and nonelastic particle interaction processes for use in space radiation protection for arbitrary shield material is developed. The algorithm is based upon a multiple energy grouping and analysis of the straight-ahead Boltzmann equation by using a mean value theorem for integrals. The algorithm is then coupled to the Langley HZETRN code through a bidirectional neutron evaporation source term. Evaluation of the neutron fluence generated by the solar particle event of February 23, 1956, for an aluminum water shield-target configuration is then compared with MCNPX and LAHET Monte Carlo calculations for the same shield-target configuration. With the Monte Carlo calculation as a benchmark, the algorithm developed in this paper showed a great improvement in results over the unmodified HZETRN solution. In addition, a high-energy bidirectional neutron source based on a formula by Ranft showed even further improvement of the fluence results over previous results near the front of the water target where diffusion out the front surface is important. Effects of improved interaction cross sections are modest compared with the addition of the high-energy bidirectional source terms.

  15. Exponential characteristic nonlinear radiation transport method for unstructured grids of triangular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, K.A.; Brennan, C.R.

    1997-07-01

    The exponential characteristic (EC) method is one of a family of nonlinear spatial quadratures for discrete ordinates radiation transport that are positive and at least second-order accurate and provide accurate results for deep-penetration problems using coarse meshes. The authors use a split-cell methodology to adapt the method to unstructured grids of arbitrarily shaped and oriented triangular cells that provide efficient representation of curved surfaces. Exponential representations of the flux entering through a cell edge and of the scattering source within a cell are constructed to match average values and first moments passed from the adjacent cell (or from the boundary conditions) or obtained from the angular quadrature of the directional flux spatial moments in the previous iteration (or from an initial guess). The resulting one- and two-dimensional nonlinear rootsolving problems are efficiently solved using Newton`s method with an accurate starting approximation. Improved algorithms, presented here, have increased the efficiency of the method by a factor of 10 as compared to an initial report. The EC method now costs only twice as much per cell as does the linear characteristic method but can be accurate with many fewer cells. Numerical testing shows the EC method to be robust and effective.

  16. Radiation transport algorithms on trans-petaflops supercomputers of different architectures.

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher, Thomas Woods

    2003-08-01

    We seek to understand which supercomputer architecture will be best for supercomputers at the Petaflops scale and beyond. The process we use is to predict the cost and performance of several leading architectures at various years in the future. The basis for predicting the future is an expanded version of Moore's Law called the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS). We abstract leading supercomputer architectures into chips connected by wires, where the chips and wires have electrical parameters predicted by the ITRS. We then compute the cost of a supercomputer system and the run time on a key problem of interest to the DOE (radiation transport). These calculations are parameterized by the time into the future and the technology expected to be available at that point. We find the new advanced architectures have substantial performance advantages but conventional designs are likely to be less expensive (due to economies of scale). We do not find a universal ''winner'', but instead the right architectural choice is likely to involve non-technical factors such as the availability of capital and how long people are willing to wait for results.

  17. Radiative transport produced by oblique illumination of turbid media with collimated beams

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Adam R.; Kim, Arnold D.; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2014-01-01

    We examine the general problem of light transport initiated by oblique illumination of a turbid medium with a collimated beam. This situation has direct relevance to the analysis of cloudy atmospheres, terrestrial surfaces, soft condensed matter, and biological tissues. We introduce a novel solution approach to the equation of radiative transfer that governs this problem, and develop a comprehensive spherical harmonics expansion method utilizing Fourier decomposition (SHEFN). The SHEFN approach enables the solution of problems lacking azimuthal symmetry and provides both the spatial and directional dependence of the radiance. We also introduce the method of sequential-order smoothing (SOS) that enables the calculation of accurate solutions from the results of two sequential low-order approximations. We apply the SHEFN approach to determine the spatial and angular dependence of both internal and boundary radiances from strongly- and weakly-scattering turbid media. These solutions are validated using more costly Monte Carlo simulations and reveal important insights regarding the evolution of the radiant field generated by oblique collimated beams spanning ballistic and diffusely-scattering regimes. PMID:23848807

  18. Radiative transport produced by oblique illumination of turbid media with collimated beams.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Adam R; Kim, Arnold D; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2013-06-01

    We examine the general problem of light transport initiated by oblique illumination of a turbid medium with a collimated beam. This situation has direct relevance to the analysis of cloudy atmospheres, terrestrial surfaces, soft condensed matter, and biological tissues. We introduce a solution approach to the equation of radiative transfer that governs this problem, and develop a comprehensive spherical harmonics expansion method utilizing Fourier decomposition (SHEF(N)). The SHEF(N) approach enables the solution of problems lacking azimuthal symmetry and provides both the spatial and directional dependence of the radiance. We also introduce the method of sequential-order smoothing that enables the calculation of accurate solutions from the results of two sequential low-order approximations. We apply the SHEF(N) approach to determine the spatial and angular dependence of both internal and boundary radiances from strongly and weakly scattering turbid media. These solutions are validated using more costly Monte Carlo simulations and reveal important insights regarding the evolution of the radiant field generated by oblique collimated beams spanning ballistic and diffusely scattering regimes. PMID:23848807

  19. NEQAIR96,Nonequilibrium and Equilibrium Radiative Transport and Spectra Program: User's Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiting, Ellis E.; Park, Chul; Liu, Yen; Arnold, James O.; Paterson, John A.

    1996-01-01

    This document is the User's Manual for a new version of the NEQAIR computer program, NEQAIR96. The program is a line-by-line and a line-of-sight code. It calculates the emission and absorption spectra for atomic and diatomic molecules and the transport of radiation through a nonuniform gas mixture to a surface. The program has been rewritten to make it easy to use, run faster, and include many run-time options that tailor a calculation to the user's requirements. The accuracy and capability have also been improved by including the rotational Hamiltonian matrix formalism for calculating rotational energy levels and Hoenl-London factors for dipole and spin-allowed singlet, doublet, triplet, and quartet transitions. Three sample cases are also included to help the user become familiar with the steps taken to produce a spectrum. A new user interface is included that uses check location, to select run-time options and to enter selected run data, making NEQAIR96 easier to use than the older versions of the code. The ease of its use and the speed of its algorithms make NEQAIR96 a valuable educational code as well as a practical spectroscopic prediction and diagnostic code.

  20. Radiative transport produced by oblique illumination of turbid media with collimated beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Adam R.; Kim, Arnold D.; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2013-06-01

    We examine the general problem of light transport initiated by oblique illumination of a turbid medium with a collimated beam. This situation has direct relevance to the analysis of cloudy atmospheres, terrestrial surfaces, soft condensed matter, and biological tissues. We introduce a solution approach to the equation of radiative transfer that governs this problem, and develop a comprehensive spherical harmonics expansion method utilizing Fourier decomposition (SHEFN). The SHEFN approach enables the solution of problems lacking azimuthal symmetry and provides both the spatial and directional dependence of the radiance. We also introduce the method of sequential-order smoothing that enables the calculation of accurate solutions from the results of two sequential low-order approximations. We apply the SHEFN approach to determine the spatial and angular dependence of both internal and boundary radiances from strongly and weakly scattering turbid media. These solutions are validated using more costly Monte Carlo simulations and reveal important insights regarding the evolution of the radiant field generated by oblique collimated beams spanning ballistic and diffusely scattering regimes.

  1. A space-angle DGFEM approach for the Boltzmann radiation transport equation with local angular refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kópházi, József; Lathouwers, Danny

    2015-09-01

    In this paper a new method for the discretization of the radiation transport equation is presented, based on a discontinuous Galerkin method in space and angle that allows for local refinement in angle where any spatial element can support its own angular discretization. To cope with the discontinuous spatial nature of the solution, a generalized Riemann procedure is required to distinguish between incoming and outgoing contributions of the numerical fluxes. A new consistent framework is introduced that is based on the solution of a generalized eigenvalue problem. The resulting numerical fluxes for the various possible cases where neighboring elements have an equal, higher or lower level of refinement in angle are derived based on tensor algebra and the resulting expressions have a very clear physical interpretation. The choice of discontinuous trial functions not only has the advantage of easing local refinement, it also facilitates the use of efficient sweep-based solvers due to decoupling of unknowns on a large scale thereby approaching the efficiency of discrete ordinates methods with local angular resolution. The approach is illustrated by a series of numerical experiments. Results show high orders of convergence for the scalar flux on angular refinement. The generalized Riemann upwinding procedure leads to stable and consistent solutions. Further the sweep-based solver performs well when used as a preconditioner for a Krylov method.

  2. Integrated Radiation Transport and Thermo-Mechanics Simulation of a PWR Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Clarno, Kevin T; Hamilton, Steven P; Philip, Bobby; Sampath, Rahul S; Allu, Srikanth; Berrill, Mark A; Barai, Pallab; Banfield, James E

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Multi-Physics (AMP) Nuclear Fuel Performance code (AMPFuel) is focused on predicting the temperature and strain within a nuclear fuel assembly to evaluate the performance and safety of existing and advanced nuclear fuel bundles within existing and advanced nuclear reactors. AMPFuel was extended to include an integrated nuclear fuel assembly capability for (one-way) coupled radiation transport and nuclear fuel assembly thermo-mechanics. This capability is the initial step towards incorporating an improved predictive nuclear fuel assembly modeling capability to accurately account for source terms, such as the neutron flux distribution, coolant conditions, and assembly mechanical stresses, of traditional (single-pin) nuclear fuel performance simulation. AMPFuel was used to model an entire 17 x 17 Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel assembly with many of the features resolved in three dimensions (for thermo-mechanics and/or neutronics), including the fuel, gap, and cladding of each of the 264 fuel pins, the 25 guide tubes, top and bottom structural regions, and the upper and lower (neutron) reflector regions. The final full-assembly calculation was executed on Jaguar (Cray XT5) at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility using 40,000 cores in under 10 hours to model over 162 billion degrees of freedom for 10 loading steps.

  3. Particle Transport across Bi-Fluid Interface Using Acoustic Radiation Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Lim, Kian-Meng

    A bi-fluid micro-flow system is proposed for separating particles from its original solvent and re-diluting them into another solvent simultaneously. In this micro-flow system, two different miscible solvents flow parallel to each other through a 2-inlet-2-outlet micro-channel, where an acoustic standing wave is set up. Due to the differences in acoustic properties of these solvents, the pressure node of the acoustic wave is shifted from the middle line of the channel. Under the action of the acoustic radiation force, particles with positive ϕ-factors are extracted from their original solvent and re-suspended into the other solvent, wherein the pressure node resides. Particles suspended in the new solvent are collected at one of the two outlets downstream. Experiments were conducted on a prototype using two aqueous solutions: deionized water and 40% glycerin aqueous solution with polystyrene micro-particles. The results show that under the action of the acoustic standing wave, most of the particles were successfully transported from its original solvent to the other solvent and collected at the outlet.

  4. A space–angle DGFEM approach for the Boltzmann radiation transport equation with local angular refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Kópházi, József Lathouwers, Danny

    2015-09-15

    In this paper a new method for the discretization of the radiation transport equation is presented, based on a discontinuous Galerkin method in space and angle that allows for local refinement in angle where any spatial element can support its own angular discretization. To cope with the discontinuous spatial nature of the solution, a generalized Riemann procedure is required to distinguish between incoming and outgoing contributions of the numerical fluxes. A new consistent framework is introduced that is based on the solution of a generalized eigenvalue problem. The resulting numerical fluxes for the various possible cases where neighboring elements have an equal, higher or lower level of refinement in angle are derived based on tensor algebra and the resulting expressions have a very clear physical interpretation. The choice of discontinuous trial functions not only has the advantage of easing local refinement, it also facilitates the use of efficient sweep-based solvers due to decoupling of unknowns on a large scale thereby approaching the efficiency of discrete ordinates methods with local angular resolution. The approach is illustrated by a series of numerical experiments. Results show high orders of convergence for the scalar flux on angular refinement. The generalized Riemann upwinding procedure leads to stable and consistent solutions. Further the sweep-based solver performs well when used as a preconditioner for a Krylov method.

  5. Sunset at the ALaMO

    NASA Video Gallery

    A new color all-sky camera has opened its eyes at the ALaMO, or Automated Lunar and Meteor Observatory, at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Watch its inaugural video below, s...

  6. New Rad Lab for Los Alamos

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2010-01-08

    The topping out ceremony for a key construction stage in the Los Alamos National Laboratory's newest facility, the Radiological Laboratory Utility & Office Building. This is part of the National Nu...  

  7. Publications of Los Alamos research 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Varjabedian, K.; Dussart, S.A.; McClary, W.J.; Rich, J.A.

    1989-12-01

    This bibliography lists unclassified publications of work done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for 1988. The entries, which are subdivided by broad subject categories, are cross-referenced with an author index and a numeric index.

  8. New Rad Lab for Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    2008-08-06

    The topping out ceremony for a key construction stage in the Los Alamos National Laboratory's newest facility, the Radiological Laboratory Utility & Office Building. This is part of the National Nu...  

  9. Edward Teller Returns to LOS Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker, Siegfried S.

    2010-01-01

    I was asked to share some reflections of Edward Teller's return to Los Alamos during my directorship. I met Teller late in his life. My comments focus on that time and they will be mostly in the form of stories of my interactions and those of my colleagues with Teller. Although the focus of this symposium is on Teller's contributions to science, at Los Alamos it was never possible to separate Teller's science from policy and controversy ...

  10. Internship at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, Ryan Q.

    2012-07-11

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is located in Los Alamos, New Mexico. It provides support for our country's nuclear weapon stockpile as well as many other scientific research projects. I am an Undergraduate Student Intern in the Systems Design and Analysis group within the Nuclear Nonproliferation division of the Global Security directorate at LANL. I have been tasked with data analysis and modeling of particles in a fluidized bed system for the capture of carbon dioxide from power plant flue gas.

  11. Comparison of measured and calculated air-transported radiation from a fast unshielded nuclear reactor. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Robitaille, H.A.; Hoffarth, B.E.

    1980-12-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray spectra have been measured at various distances up to 1100 metres from the fast-neutron reactor of the U.S. Army Pulse Radiation Division (Materiel Testing Directorate, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.) The spectra were obtained at a height of two metres above the air-ground interface and are compared to previous measurements performed by two other research laboratories, and also to the results of theoretical predictions based on two-dimensional discrete-ordinates transport theory. Integral quantities such as partial and total radiation kermas are generally in good agreement, however the theoretical calculations tend to predict somewhat softer neutron spectra than are observed experimentally.

  12. STATUS OF THE MCNPX TRANSPORT CODE

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, H.G.; Chadwick, M.B.

    2000-10-01

    The Monte Carlo particle transport code MCNPX and its associated data have been the focus of a major development effort at Los Alamos for several years. The system has reached a mature state, and has become a significant tool for many intermediate and high-energy particle transport applications. A recent version has been released to the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC). A recent report provides an overview of the code and an extensive set of references for the component physics modules used in the code. In this paper we review the status of the developmental version of MCNPX, and describe some important new enhancements, including the use of evaluated nuclear data files for proton transport; the use of photonuclear reaction data; improved elastic and inelastic react ion cross sections for nucleons, antinucleons, pions, and kaons; and two new modes of operation of the code. We also illustrate the use of the new proton and photonuclear data in two representative applications.

  13. Los Alamos Laser Eye Investigation.

    SciTech Connect

    Odom, C. R.

    2005-01-01

    A student working in a laser laboratory at Los Alamos National Laboratory sustained a serious retinal injury to her left eye when she attempted to view suspended particles in a partially evacuated target chamber. The principle investigator was using the white light from the flash lamp of a Class 4 Nd:YAG laser to illuminate the particles. Since the Q-switch was thought to be disabled at the time of the accident, the principal investigator assumed it would be safe to view the particles without wearing laser eye protection. The Laboratory Director appointed a team to investigate the accident and to report back to him the events and conditions leading up to the accident, equipment malfunctions, safety management causal factors, supervisory and management action/inaction, adequacy of institutional processes and procedures, emergency and notification response, effectiveness of corrective actions and lessons learned from previous similar events, and recommendations for human and institutional safety improvements. The team interviewed personnel, reviewed documents, and characterized systems and conditions in the laser laboratory during an intense six week investigation. The team determined that the direct and primary failures leading to this accident were, respectively, the principle investigator's unsafe work practices and the institution's inadequate monitoring of worker performance. This paper describes the details of the investigation, the human and institutional failures, and the recommendations for improving the laser safety program.

  14. Transport, charge exchange and loss of energetic heavy ions in the earth's radiation belts - Applicability and limitations of theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.

    1981-11-01

    Computer simulations of processes which control the relative abundances of ions in the trapping regions of geospace are compared with observations from discriminating ion detectors. Energy losses due to Coulomb collisions between ions and exospheric neutrals are considered, along with charge exchange losses and internal charge exchanges. The time evolution of energetic ion fluxes of equatorially mirroring ions under radial diffusion is modelled to include geomagnetic and geoelectric fluctutations. Limits to the validity of diffusion transport theory are discussed, and the simulation is noted to contain provisions for six ionic charge states and the source effect on the radiation belt oxygen ion distributions. Comparisons are made with ion flux data gathered on Explorer 45 and ISEE-1 spacecraft and results indicate that internal charge exchanges cause the radiation belt ion charge state to be independent of source charge rate characteristics, and relative charge state distribution is independent of the radially diffusive transport rate below the charge state redistribution zone.

  15. Infrared thermography system for transport infrastructures survey with inline local atmospheric parameter measurements and offline model for radiation attenuation evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumoulin, Jean; Boucher, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    An infrared system has been developed to monitor transport infrastructures in a standalone configuration. It is based on low cost infrared thermal cameras linked with a calculation unit in order to produce a corrected thermal map of the surveyed structure at a selected time step. With the inline version, the data collected feed simplified radiative models running a GPU. With the offline version, the thermal map can be corrected when data are collected under different atmospheric conditions up to foggy night conditions. A model for radiative transmission prediction is proposed and limitations are addressed. Furthermore, the results obtained by image and signal processing methods with data acquired on the transport infrastructure opened to traffic are presented. Finally, conclusions and perspectives for new implementation and new functionalities are presented and discussed.

  16. Comparative analysis of discrete and continuous absorption weighting estimators used in Monte Carlo simulations of radiative transport in turbid media.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Carole K; Spanier, Jerome; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2014-02-01

    We examine the relative error of Monte Carlo simulations of radiative transport that employ two commonly used estimators that account for absorption differently, either discretely, at interaction points, or continuously, between interaction points. We provide a rigorous derivation of these discrete and continuous absorption weighting estimators within a stochastic model that we show to be equivalent to an analytic model, based on the radiative transport equation (RTE). We establish that both absorption weighting estimators are unbiased and, therefore, converge to the solution of the RTE. An analysis of spatially resolved reflectance predictions provided by these two estimators reveals no advantage to either in cases of highly scattering and highly anisotropic media. However, for moderate to highly absorbing media or isotropically scattering media, the discrete estimator provides smaller errors at proximal source locations while the continuous estimator provides smaller errors at distal locations. The origin of these differing variance characteristics can be understood through examination of the distribution of exiting photon weights. PMID:24562029

  17. Comparative analysis of discrete and continuous absorption weighting estimators used in Monte Carlo simulations of radiative transport in turbid media

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Carole K.; Spanier, Jerome; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2014-01-01

    We examine the relative error of Monte Carlo simulations of radiative transport that employ two commonly used estimators that account for absorption differently, either discretely, at interaction points, or continuously, between interaction points. We provide a rigorous derivation of these discrete and continuous absorption weighting estimators within a stochastic model that we show to be equivalent to an analytic model, based on the radiative transport equation (RTE). We establish that both absorption weighting estimators are unbiased and, therefore, converge to the solution of the RTE. An analysis of spatially resolved reflectance predictions provided by these two estimators reveals no advantage to either in cases of highly scattering and highly anisotropic media. However, for moderate to highly absorbing media or isotropically scattering media, the discrete estimator provides smaller errors at proximal source locations while the continuous estimator provides smaller errors at distal locations. The origin of these differing variance characteristics can be understood through examination of the distribution of exiting photon weights. PMID:24562029

  18. MCNP-to-TORT radiation transport calculations in support of mixed oxide fuels testing for the Fissile Materials Disposition Program

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, J.V. III

    1998-04-01

    The US (US) Department of Energy Fissile Materials Disposition Program has begun studies for disposal of surplus weapons-grade plutonium (WG-Pu) as mixed uranium plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel for commercial light water reactors (LWRs). Currently MOX fuel is used commercially in a number of foreign countries, but is not in the US. Most of the experience is with reactor grade plutonium (RG-Pu) in MOX fuel. Therefore, to use WG-Pu in MOX fuel, one must demonstrate that the experience with RG-Pu is relevant. As a first step in this program, the utilization of WG-Pu in a LWR environment must be demonstrated. To accomplish this, a test is to be conducted to investigate some of the unresolved issues. The initial tests will be made in an I-hole of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Initial radiation transport calculations of the test specimens were made at INEEL using the MCNP Monte Carlo radiation transport code. These calculations were made to determine the linear heating rates in the fuel specimens. Unfortunately, the results of the calculations could not show the detailed high and low power density spots in the specimens. However, a discrete ordinates radiation transport code could pinpoint these spatial details. Therefore, INEEL was tasked with producing a MCNP source at the boundary of a rectangular parallelepiped enclosing the ATR I-hole, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory was tasked with transforming this boundary source into a discrete ordinates boundary source for the Three-dimensional Oak Ridge radiation Transport (TORT) code. Thus, the TORT results not only complemented, but also were in agreement with the MCNP results.

  19. Application of the new MultiTrans SP3 radiation transport code in BNCT dose planning.

    PubMed

    Kotiluoto, P; Hiisamäki, P; Savolainen, S

    2001-09-01

    Dose planning in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a complex problem and requires sophisticated numerical methods. In the framework of the Finnish BNCT project, new deterministic three-dimensional radiation transport code MultiTrans SP3 has been developed at VTT Chemical Technology, based on a novel application of the tree multigrid technique. To test the applicability of this new code in a realistic BNCT dose planning problem, cylindrical PMMA (polymethyl-methacrylate) phantom was chosen as a benchmark case. It is a convenient benchmark, as it has been modeled by several different codes, including well-known DORT and MCNP. Extensive measured data also exist. In this paper, a comparison of the new MultiTrans SP3 code with other methods is presented for the PMMA phantom case. Results show that the total neutron dose rate to ICRU adult brain calculated by the MultiTrans SP3 code differs less than 4% in 2 cm depth in phantom (in thermal maximum) from the DORT calculation. Results also show that the calculated 197Au(n,gamma) and 55Mn(n,gamma) reaction rates in 2 cm depth in phantom differ less than 4% and 1% from the measured values, respectively. However, the photon dose calculated by the MultiTrans SP3 code seems to be incorrect in this PMMA phantom case, which requires further studying. As expected, the deterministic MultiTrans SP3 code is over an order of magnitude faster than stochastic Monte Carlo codes (with similar resolution), thus providing a very efficient tool for BNCT dose planning. PMID:11585221

  20. Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with transportation and energy use. Its objective is for the student to be able to discuss the implication of energy usage as it applies to the area of transportation. Some topics covered are efficiencies of various transportation…

  1. Radiation processed polychloroprene-co-ethylene-propene diene terpolymer blends: Effect of radiation vulcanization on solvent transport kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, K. A.; Bhardwaj, Y. K.; Chaudhari, C. V.; Kumar, Virendra; Goel, N. K.; Sabharwal, S.

    2009-03-01

    Blends of polychloroprene rubber (PCR) and ethylene propylene diene terpolymer rubber (EPDM) of different compositions were made and exposed to different gamma radiation doses. The radiation sensitivity and radiation vulcanization efficiency of blends was estimated by gel-content analysis, Charlesby-Pinner parameter determination and crosslinking density measurements. Gamma radiation induced crosslinking was most efficient for EPDM ( p0/ q0 ˜ 0.08), whereas it was the lowest for blends containing 40% PCR ( p0/ q0 ˜ 0.34). The vulcanized blends were characterized for solvent diffusion characteristics by following the swelling dynamics. Blends with higher PCR content showed anomalous swelling. The sorption and permeability of the solvent were not strictly in accordance with each other and the extent of variation in two parameters was found to be a function of blend composition. The Δ G values for solvent diffusion were in the range -2.97 to -9.58 kJ/mol and indicated thermodynamically favorable sorption for all blends. These results were corroborated by dynamic swelling, experimental as well as simulated profiles and have been explained on the basis of correlation between crosslinking density, diffusion kinetics, thermodynamic parameters and polymer-polymer interaction parameter.

  2. Effect of Cyclic Precipitation and Radiation on the Fate and Transport of TNT and DNT Near Soil-Atmospheric Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anaya, A.; Padilla, I. Y.; Hwang, S.

    2007-12-01

    Many explosive-related compounds (ERCs) are found near the soil-atmospheric surface in sites containing buried explosive devices, such as landmines and unexploded ordnance, detonation-residual solid explosives, and munitions residues from explosive manufacturing facilities. Accurate assessment of the fate and transport processes is essential for predicting their movement to the surface, groundwater, or any other important environmental compartment. The dynamics of ERCs movement is complex, involving multiple, interrelated processes. The transport processes controlling the direction and magnitude of the movement, and chemical, physical, and biological processes controlling the fate of the chemicals vary with environmental conditions. This research addresses the effect of variable rainfall, evaporation, temperature, and solar radiation on fate and transport of 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-Dinitrotoluene (DNT), and other related chemicals in partially saturated soil. Fate and transport experiments were conducted in a laboratory-scale geo-environmental system containing a 3D SoilBed packed with a sandy soil, and equipped with rainfall and solar radiation simulators, and temperature control settings. Experiments were conducted by burying a TNT/DNT source under the soil surface and applying cyclic rainfall and radiation over the surface of the soil. Aqueous and gaseous concentrations of tracers, TNT, DNT and other related ERCs were monitored through time at several distances from the source. Measured hydraulic conditions and tracer concentrations during the experiments indicate the existence of preferential flow paths during infiltration events and solute accumulation during evaporation periods. TNT, DNT and an undetermined chemical believed to be a degradation by-product of TNT were detected non-continuously in space and time. Concentrations of TNT and DNT were much lower than their solubility limits, indicating rate- limited mass-transfer, dissolution limitations

  3. Resonant electronic transport through a triple quantum-dot with Λ-type level structure under dual radiation fields

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Chun; Xing, Yunhui; Zhang, Chao; Ma, Zhongshui

    2014-08-14

    Due to quantum interference, light can transmit through dense atomic media, a phenomenon known as electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). We propose that EIT is not limited to light transmission and there is an electronic analog where resonant transparency in charge transport in an opaque structure can be induced by electromagnetic radiation. A triple-quantum-dots system with Λ-type level structure is generally opaque due to the level in the center dot being significantly higher and therefore hopping from the left dot to the center dot is almost forbidden. We demonstrate that an electromagnetically induced electron transparency (EIET) in charge of transport can indeed occur in the Λ-type system. The direct evidence of EIET is that an electron can travel from the left dot to the right dot, while the center dot apparently becomes invisible. We analyze EIET and the related shot noise in both the zero and strong Coulomb blockade regimes. It is found that the EIET (position, height, and symmetry) can be tuned by several controllable parameters of the radiation fields, such as the Rabi frequencies and detuning frequencies. The result offers a transparency/opaque tuning technique in charge transport using interfering radiation fields.

  4. MCNP-to-TORT Radiation Transport Calculations in Support of Mixed Oxide Fuels Testing for the Fissile Materials Disposition Program

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, J.V.

    1999-11-01

    The United States (US) Department of Energy Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) began studies for disposal of surplus weapons-grade plutonium (WG-Pu) as mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (@40X) fuel for commercial light-water reactors(LWRS). As a first step in this program, a test of the utilization of WG-Pu in a LWR environment is being conducted in an I-hole of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Initial radiation transport calculations of the test specimens were made at INEEL using the MCNP Monte Carlo radiation transport code to determine the linear heating rates in the fuel specimens. Unfortunately, the results of the calculations could not show the detailed high and low power-density spots in the specimens. Therefore, INEEL produced an MCNP source at the boundary of a rectangular parallelepiped enclosing the ATR I-hole, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) transformed this boundary source into a discrete -ordinates boundary source for the Three-dimensional Oak Ridge radiation Transport (TORT) code to pinpoint spatial detail. Agreement with average MCNP results were within 5%.

  5. Development of Parallel Computing Framework to Enhance Radiation Transport Code Capabilities for Rare Isotope Beam Facility Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kostin, Mikhail; Mokhov, Nikolai; Niita, Koji

    2013-09-25

    A parallel computing framework has been developed to use with general-purpose radiation transport codes. The framework was implemented as a C++ module that uses MPI for message passing. It is intended to be used with older radiation transport codes implemented in Fortran77, Fortran 90 or C. The module is significantly independent of radiation transport codes it can be used with, and is connected to the codes by means of a number of interface functions. The framework was developed and tested in conjunction with the MARS15 code. It is possible to use it with other codes such as PHITS, FLUKA and MCNP after certain adjustments. Besides the parallel computing functionality, the framework offers a checkpoint facility that allows restarting calculations with a saved checkpoint file. The checkpoint facility can be used in single process calculations as well as in the parallel regime. The framework corrects some of the known problems with the scheduling and load balancing found in the original implementations of the parallel computing functionality in MARS15 and PHITS. The framework can be used efficiently on homogeneous systems and networks of workstations, where the interference from the other users is possible.

  6. Resonant electronic transport through a triple quantum-dot with Λ-type level structure under dual radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Chun; Xing, Yunhui; Zhang, Chao; Ma, Zhongshui

    2014-08-01

    Due to quantum interference, light can transmit through dense atomic media, a phenomenon known as electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). We propose that EIT is not limited to light transmission and there is an electronic analog where resonant transparency in charge transport in an opaque structure can be induced by electromagnetic radiation. A triple-quantum-dots system with Λ-type level structure is generally opaque due to the level in the center dot being significantly higher and therefore hopping from the left dot to the center dot is almost forbidden. We demonstrate that an electromagnetically induced electron transparency (EIET) in charge of transport can indeed occur in the Λ-type system. The direct evidence of EIET is that an electron can travel from the left dot to the right dot, while the center dot apparently becomes invisible. We analyze EIET and the related shot noise in both the zero and strong Coulomb blockade regimes. It is found that the EIET (position, height, and symmetry) can be tuned by several controllable parameters of the radiation fields, such as the Rabi frequencies and detuning frequencies. The result offers a transparency/opaque tuning technique in charge transport using interfering radiation fields.

  7. Environmental surveillance and compliance at Los Alamos during 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report presents environmental data that characterize environmental performance and addresses compliance with environmental standards and requirements at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) during 1996. The Laboratory routinely monitors for radiation and for radioactive nonradioactive materials at Laboratory sites as well as in the surrounding region. LANL uses the monitoring results to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to identify potentially undesirable trends. Data were collected in 1996 to assess external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions; and concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface waters and groundwaters, the municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs. Using comparisons with standards and regulations, this report concludes that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a demonstrable threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment. Laboratory operations were in compliance with all major environmental regulations.

  8. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1991. Environmental protection group

    SciTech Connect

    Dewart, J.; Kohen, K.L.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1991. Routine monitoring for radiation and for radioactive and chemical materials is conducted on the Laboratory site as well as in the surrounding region. Monitoring results are used to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to permit early identification of potentially undesirable trends. Results and interpretation of data for 1991 cover external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface waters and groundwaters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Comparisons with appropriate standards, regulations, and background levels provide the basis for concluding that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment.

  9. Radiation Effects in Zeolites and Clays for the Sorption and Release of Radionuclides During Transport Through the Geosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lumin; Ewing, Rod C.; Hayes, Kim F.

    2003-09-11

    Site restoration activities at DOE facilities and the permanent disposal of nuclear waste generated at DOE facilities involve working with and within various types and levels of radiation fields. The radiation exposure due to the release and sorption of long-lived actinides (e.g., 237Np) and fission products (e.g., 137Cs and 90Sr) may cause changes in important properties of geological materials along transport pathways of radionuclides through the geosphere. Through a comprehensive study of the microstructure and ion exchange capacity under varying types of irradiation (electrons, ions and neutrons), dose rate, temperature and ion exchange conditions, we have developed a basic understanding of radiation effects on the ion exchange and retention capacity of clays and zeolites for Cs and Sr. The results provide an essential database for the long term effectiveness of clays and zeolite in radionuclide retention, as well as the mobility of the radionuclides in contaminated sites.

  10. Characterization and immobilization of cesium-137 in soil at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ningping; Mason, C.F.V.; Turney, W.R.J.R.

    1996-06-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory, cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) is a major contaminant in soils of Technical Area 21 (TA-21) and is mainly associated with soil particles {<=}2.00 mm. Cesium-137 was not leached by synthetic groundwater or acid rainwater. Soil erosion is a primary mechanism of {sup 137}Cs transport in TA-21. The methodology that controls soil particle runoff can prevent the transport of {sup 137}Cs.

  11. Los Alamos contribution to target diagnostics on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, J.M.; Baker, D.A.; Caldwell, S.E.

    1994-07-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will have a large suite of sophisticated target diagnostics. This will allow thoroughly diagnosed experiments to be performed both at the ignition and pre-ignition levels. As part of the national effort Los Alamos National Laboratory will design, construct and implement a number of diagnostics for the NIF. This paper describes Los Alamos contributions to the ``phase I diagnostics.`` Phase I represents the most fundamental and basic measurement systems that will form the core for most work on the NIF. The Los Alamos effort falls into four categories: moderate to hard X-ray (time resolved imaging neutron spectroscopy- primarily with neutron time of flight devices; burn diagnostics utilizing gamma ray measurements; testing measurement concepts on the TRIDENT laser system at Los Alamos. Because of the high blast, debris and radiation environment, the design of high resolution X-ray imaging systems present significant challenges. Systems with close target proximity require special protection and methods for such protection is described. The system design specifications based on expected target performance parameters is also described. Diagnosis of nuclear yield and burn will be crucial to the NIF operation. Nuclear reaction diagnosis utilizing both neutron and gamma ray detection is discussed. The Los Alamos TRIDENT laser system will be used extensively for the development of new measurement concepts and diagnostic instrumentation. Some its potential roles in the development of diagnostics for NIF are given.

  12. RCRA facility investigation for the townsite of Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Dorries, A.M.; Conrad, R.C.; Nonno, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    During World War II, Los Alamos, New Mexico was established as an ideal location for the secrecy and safety needed for the research and development required to design a nuclear fission bomb. Experiments carried out in the 1940s generated both radioactive and hazardous waste constituents on what is presently part of the Los Alamos townsite. Under the RCRA permit issued to Los alamos national Laboratory in 1990, the Laboratory is scheduled for investigation of its solid waste management units (SWMUs). The existing information on levels of radioactivity on the townsite is principally data from soil samples taken during the last site decontamination in 1976, little information on the presence of hazardous constituents exists today. This paper addresses pathway analysis and a preliminary risk assessment for current residents of the Los Alamos townsite. The estimated dose levels, in mrem per year, show that the previously decontaminated SWMU areas on the Los Alamos townsite will not contribute a radiation dose of any concern to the current residents.

  13. RCRA facility investigation for the townsite of Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Dorries, A.M.; Conrad, R.C.; Nonno, L.M.

    1992-02-01

    During World War II, Los Alamos, New Mexico was established as an ideal location for the secrecy and safety needed for the research and development required to design a nuclear fission bomb. Experiments carried out in the 1940s generated both radioactive and hazardous waste constituents on what is presently part of the Los Alamos townsite. Under the RCRA permit issued to Los alamos national Laboratory in 1990, the Laboratory is scheduled for investigation of its solid waste management units (SWMUs). The existing information on levels of radioactivity on the townsite is principally data from soil samples taken during the last site decontamination in 1976, little information on the presence of hazardous constituents exists today. This paper addresses pathway analysis and a preliminary risk assessment for current residents of the Los Alamos townsite. The estimated dose levels, in mrem per year, show that the previously decontaminated SWMU areas on the Los Alamos townsite will not contribute a radiation dose of any concern to the current residents.

  14. A generalized framework for in-line energy deposition during steady-state Monte Carlo radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Griesheimer, D. P.; Stedry, M. H.

    2013-07-01

    A rigorous treatment of energy deposition in a Monte Carlo transport calculation, including coupled transport of all secondary and tertiary radiations, increases the computational cost of a simulation dramatically, making fully-coupled heating impractical for many large calculations, such as 3-D analysis of nuclear reactor cores. However, in some cases, the added benefit from a full-fidelity energy-deposition treatment is negligible, especially considering the increased simulation run time. In this paper we present a generalized framework for the in-line calculation of energy deposition during steady-state Monte Carlo transport simulations. This framework gives users the ability to select among several energy-deposition approximations with varying levels of fidelity. The paper describes the computational framework, along with derivations of four energy-deposition treatments. Each treatment uses a unique set of self-consistent approximations, which ensure that energy balance is preserved over the entire problem. By providing several energy-deposition treatments, each with different approximations for neglecting the energy transport of certain secondary radiations, the proposed framework provides users the flexibility to choose between accuracy and computational efficiency. Numerical results are presented, comparing heating results among the four energy-deposition treatments for a simple reactor/compound shielding problem. The results illustrate the limitations and computational expense of each of the four energy-deposition treatments. (authors)

  15. Investigation of Charge Transport Properties of CdZnTe Detectors with Synchrotron X-ray Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang,G.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; James, R.B.

    2008-10-19

    Various internal defects, such as Te inclusions, twin boundaries, dislocation, etc., are prevalent in as-grown CdZnTe (CZT) crystals, which affect the charge transport properties of CZT crystals and, therefore, worsen the performance of CZT detectors. In order to develop high quality CZT detectors, it is imperative to clarify the effects of internal defects on the charge transport properties of CZT. Simple flood illumination with nuclear radiation source cannot reveal the nature of highly localized defects in CZT. Therefore, at Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), we have developed a unique testing system for micro-scale defect investigation of CZT, which employs an X-ray beam collimated with the spatial resolution as small as 3 x 3 {micro}m{sup 2}, a microscopic size comparable to the scale of common defects in CZT. This powerful tool enables us to investigate the effect of internal defects on charge transport properties of CZT in detail.

  16. Second order time evolution of the multigroup diffusion and P{sub 1} equations for radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Gordon L.

    2011-08-20

    Highlights: {yields} An existing multigroup transport algorithm is extended to be second-order in time. {yields} A new algorithm is presented that does not require a grey acceleration solution. {yields} The two algorithms are tested with 2D, multi-material problems. {yields} The two algorithms have comparable computational requirements. - Abstract: An existing solution method for solving the multigroup radiation equations, linear multifrequency-grey acceleration, is here extended to be second order in time. This method works for simple diffusion and for flux-limited diffusion, with or without material conduction. A new method is developed that does not require the solution of an averaged grey transport equation. It is effective solving both the diffusion and P{sub 1} forms of the transport equation. Two dimensional, multi-material test problems are used to compare the solution methods.

  17. Nuclear Physics Issues in Space Radiation Risk Assessment-The FLUKA Monte Carlo Transport Code Used for Space Radiation Measurement and Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K. T.

    2007-02-12

    The long term human exploration goals that NASA has embraced, requires the need to understand the primary radiation and secondary particle production under a variety of environmental conditions. In order to perform accurate transport simulations for the incident particles found in the space environment, accurate nucleus-nucleus inelastic event generators are needed, and NASA is funding their development. For the first time, NASA is including the radiation problem into the . design of the next manned exploration vehicle. The NASA-funded FLUER-S (FLUKA Executing Under ROOT-Space) project has several goals beyond the improvement of the internal nuclear physics simulations. These include making FLUKA more user-friendly. Several tools have been developed to simplify the use of FLUKA without compromising its accuracy or versatility. Among these tools are a general source input, ability of distributive computing, simplification of geometry input, geometry and event visualization, and standard FLUKA scoring output analysis using a ROOT GUI. In addition to describing these tools we will show how they have been used for space radiation environment data analysis in MARIE, IVCPDS, and EVCPDS. Similar analyses can be performed for future radiation measurement detectors before they are deployed in order to optimize their design. These tools can also be used in the design of nuclear-based power systems on manned exploration vehicles and planetary surfaces. In addition to these space applications, the simulations are being used to support accelerator based experiments like the cross-section measurements being performed at HIMAC and NSRL at BNL.

  18. Low-frequency internal waves in magnetized rotating stellar radiation zones. II. Angular momentum transport with a toroidal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathis, S.; de Brye, N.

    2012-04-01

    Context. With the progress of observational constraints on dynamical processes in stars, it becomes necessary to understand the angular momentum and the rotation profile history. In this context, internal waves constitute an efficient transport mechanism over long distances in stellar radiation zones. Indeed, they could be one of the mechanisms responsible for the quasi-flat rotation profile of the solar radiative region up to 0.2 R⊙. Aims: Angular momentum transport induced by internal waves depends on the properties of their excitation regions and of their dissipation during propagation. Then, the bottom of convective envelopes (the top of convective cores, respectively) are differentially rotating magnetic layers while radiation zones may host fossil magnetic fields. It is therefore necessary to understand the modification of internal wave mechanisms by both rotation and magnetic fields. Methods: We continue our previous work by proceeding step by step. We analytically built a complete formalism that treats the angular momentum transport by internal waves while taking into account both the Coriolis acceleration and the Lorentz force in a non-perturbative way for an axisymmetric toroidal field. We assumed a uniform Alfvén frequency and a weak differential rotation to isolate the transport properties as a function of the Rossby and Elsasser numbers. Results: We examined the different possible approximations to describe low-frequency internal waves modified by the Coriolis acceleration and the Lorentz force in a deep spherical shell. The complete structure of these waves, which become magneto-gravito-inertial waves, is given assuming the quasi-linear approximation first in the adiabatic case and then in the dissipative one. Vertical and equatorial trapping phenomena appear that favor retrograde waves. The efficiency of the induced transport as a function of the Rossby and Elsasser numbers is then obtained. Conclusions: A complete study of the transport of

  19. Radiation Effects on the Sorption and Mobilization of Radionuclide during Transport through the Geosphere

    SciTech Connect

    L.M. Wang; R.C. Eqing; K.F. Hayes

    2004-03-14

    Site restoration activities at DOE facilities and the permanent disposal of nuclear waste inevitably involve understanding the behavior of materials in a radiation field. Radionuclide decay and the associated radiation fields lead to physical and chemical changes that can degrade or enhance important material properties. Alpha-decay of the actinide elements and beta-decay of the fission products lead to atomic-scale changes in materials (radiation damage and transmutation).

  20. Radiation Effects on the Sorption and Mobilization of Radionuclides during Transport through the Geosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Lumin Wang; R.C. Ewing; K.F. Hayes

    2004-03-14

    Site restoration activities at DOE facilities and the permanent disposal of nuclear waste inevitably involve understanding the behavior of materials in a radiation field. Radionuclide decay and the associated radiation fields lead to physical and chemical changes that can degrade or enhance important material properties. Alpha-decay of the actinide elements and beta-decay of the fission products lead to atomic-scale changes in materials (radiation damage and transmutation).

  1. Radiated Sound of a High-Speed Water-Jet-Propelled Transportation Vessel.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Alexis B; Richlen, Michael F; Stimpert, Alison K; Au, Whitlow W L

    2016-01-01

    The radiated noise from a high-speed water-jet-propelled catamaran was measured for catamaran speeds of 12, 24, and 37 kn. The radiated noise increased with catamaran speed, although the shape of the noise spectrum was similar for all speeds and measuring hydrophone depth. The spectra peaked at ~200 Hz and dropped off continuously at higher frequencies. The radiated noise was 10-20 dB lower than noise from propeller-driven ships at comparable speeds. The combination of low radiated noise and high speed could be a factor in the detection and avoidance of water-jet-propelled ships by baleen whales. PMID:26611054

  2. Dust Long-Range Transport and the Dust-Radiation Effects on the Modification of the SAL Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Wang, S.; Waylonis, M.; Sc

    2010-12-01

    A tracer model based on the Weather Research and Forecast model was developed to simulate dust long-range transport for a dust outbreak event that occurred during July 18-20, 2005. Two numerical experiments were conducted with (ON) and without (OFF) the dust-radiation effects. Simulations were compared with the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) and results were very reasonable. The influence of dust-radiation effects on the modification of Saharan Air Layer (SAL), which can have a substantial influence on Tropical Cyclone (TC) activities over the eastern Atlantic Ocean, was also investigated. Suspended dust was able to reduce the net downward shortwave radiation by more than 300 W m-2 on the surface. The modification of temperature profiles due to dust-radiation effects resulted in the adjustment of the vertical shear. The dust-radiation effects also modified the dust distribution, which can have a feedback to the heating profile and the vertical shear.

  3. Dosimetric impact of Acuros XB deterministic radiation transport algorithm for heterogeneous dose calculation in lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Han Tao; Followill, David; Repchak, Roman; Molineu, Andrea; Howell, Rebecca; Salehpour, Mohammad; Mikell, Justin; Mourtada, Firas

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: The novel deterministic radiation transport algorithm, Acuros XB (AXB), has shown great potential for accurate heterogeneous dose calculation. However, the clinical impact between AXB and other currently used algorithms still needs to be elucidated for translation between these algorithms. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of AXB for heterogeneous dose calculation in lung cancer for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: The thorax phantom from the Radiological Physics Center (RPC) was used for this study. IMRT and VMAT plans were created for the phantom in the Eclipse 11.0 treatment planning system. Each plan was delivered to the phantom three times using a Varian Clinac iX linear accelerator to ensure reproducibility. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and Gafchromic EBT2 film were placed inside the phantom to measure delivered doses. The measurements were compared with dose calculations from AXB 11.0.21 and the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) 11.0.21. Two dose reporting modes of AXB, dose-to-medium in medium (D{sub m,m}) and dose-to-water in medium (D{sub w,m}), were studied. Point doses, dose profiles, and gamma analysis were used to quantify the agreement between measurements and calculations from both AXB and AAA. The computation times for AAA and AXB were also evaluated. Results: For the RPC lung phantom, AAA and AXB dose predictions were found in good agreement to TLD and film measurements for both IMRT and VMAT plans. TLD dose predictions were within 0.4%-4.4% to AXB doses (both D{sub m,m} and D{sub w,m}); and within 2.5%-6.4% to AAA doses, respectively. For the film comparisons, the gamma indexes ({+-}3%/3 mm criteria) were 94%, 97%, and 98% for AAA, AXB{sub Dm,m}, and AXB{sub Dw,m}, respectively. The differences between AXB and AAA in dose-volume histogram mean doses were within 2% in the planning target volume, lung, heart, and within 5% in the spinal cord

  4. New Generation of Los Alamos Opacity Tables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgan, James; Kilcrease, D. P.; Magee, N. H.; Sherrill, M. E.; Abdallah, J.; Hakel, P.; Fontes, C. J.; Guzik, J. A.; Mussack, K. A.

    2016-05-01

    We present a new generation of Los Alamos OPLIB opacity tables that have been computed using the ATOMIC code. Our tables have been calculated for all 30 elements from hydrogen through zinc and are publicly available through our website. In this poster we discuss the details of the calculations that underpin the new opacity tables. We also show several recent applications of the use of our opacity tables to solar modeling and other astrophysical applications. In particular, we demonstrate that use of the new opacities improves the agreement between solar models and helioseismology, but does not fully resolve the long-standing `solar abundance' problem. The Los Alamos National Laboratory is operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC5206NA25396.

  5. Publications of Los Alamos Research, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, C.J.; McClary, W.J.; Rich, J.A.; Rodriguez, L.L.

    1984-10-01

    This bibliography is a compilation of unclassified publications of work done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for 1983. Papers published in 1982 are included regardless of when they were actually written. Publications received too late for inclusion in earlier compilations have also been listed. Declassification of previously classified reports is considered to constitute publication. All classified issuances are omitted - even those papers, themselves unclassified, which were published only as part of a classified document. If a paper was published more than once, all places of publication are included. The bibliography includes Los Alamos National Laboratory reports, papers released as non-Laboratory reports, journal articles, books, chapters of books, conference papers either published separately or as part of conference proceedings issued as books or reports, papers publishd in congressional hearings, theses, and US patents. Publications by Los Alamos authors that are not records of Laboratory-sponsored work are included when the Library becomes aware of them.

  6. Publications of Los Alamos research 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, C.A.; Willis, J.K.

    1981-09-01

    This bibliography is a compilation of unclassified publications of work done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for 1980. Papers published in 1980 are included regardless of when they were actually written. Publications received too late for inclusion in earlier compilations have also been listed. Declassification of previously classified reports is considered to constitute publication. All classified issuances are omitted-even those papers, themselves unclassified, which were published only as part of a classified document. If a paper was pubished more than once, all places of publication are included. The bibliography includes Los Alamos National Laboratory reports, papers released as non-laboratory reports, journal articles, books, chapters of books, conference papers published either separately or as part of conference proceedings issued as books or reports, papers published in congressional hearings, theses, and US patents. Publications by Los Alamos authors that are not records of Laboratory-sponsored work are included when the Library becomes aware of them.

  7. Radiation environment at the Moon: Comparisons of transport code modeling and measurements from the CRaTER instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Jamie A.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Spence, Harlan; Golightly, Michael; Schwadron, Nathan; Kasper, Justin; Case, Anthony W.; Blake, John B.; Zeitlin, Cary

    2014-06-01

    The Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER), an instrument carried on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft, directly measures the energy depositions by solar and galactic cosmic radiations in its silicon wafer detectors. These energy depositions are converted to linear energy transfer (LET) spectra. High LET particles, which are mainly high-energy heavy ions found in the incident cosmic ray spectrum, or target fragments and recoils produced by protons and heavier ions, are of particular importance because of their potential to cause significant damage to human tissue and electronic components. Aside from providing LET data useful for space radiation risk analyses for lunar missions, the observed LET spectra can also be used to help validate space radiation transport codes, used for shielding design and risk assessment applications, which is a major thrust of this work. In this work the Monte Carlo transport code HETC-HEDS (High-Energy Transport Code-Human Exploration and Development in Space) is used to estimate LET contributions from the incident primary ions and their charged secondaries produced by nuclear collisions as they pass through the three pairs of silicon detectors. Also in this work, the contributions to the LET of the primary ions and their charged secondaries are analyzed and compared with estimates obtained using the deterministic space radiation code HZETRN 2010, developed at NASA Langley Research Center. LET estimates obtained from the two transport codes are compared with measurements of LET from the CRaTER instrument during the mission. Overall, a comparison of the LET predictions of the HETC-HEDS code to the predictions of the HZETRN code displays good agreement. The code predictions are also in good agreement with the CRaTER LET measurements above 15 keV/µm but differ from the measurements for smaller values of LET. A possible reason for this disagreement between measured and calculated spectra below 15 keV/µm is an

  8. SEDs at Los Alamos: A Personal Memoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bederson, Benjamin

    2001-03-01

    I have written this personal memoir approximately 55 years after the events I describe. It is based almost exclusively on memory, since apart from the diary I kept while on Tinian, I have few documents concerning it. It covers my service in the U.S. Army's Special Engineering Detachment (SED) in Oak Ridge and Los Alamos in 1944-45, on Tinian island, the launching pad for the bombing raids on Japan, in the summer and fall of 1945, and my return to Los Alamos until my discharge in January 1946.

  9. Upper Los Alamos canyon fact sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Jeffrey H

    2007-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is planning to make environmental assessments in portions of Upper Los Alamos Canyon. Upper Los Alamos Canyon is one of the areas included in the 2005 Consent Order agreed to by Los Alamos National Laboratory, the National Nuclear Security Administration, and the New Mexico Environment Department. As such, it must be evaluated for potential contamination. The area is located within and south of the Los Alamos townsite in Technical Areas 00, 01, 03, 32, 41, 43, and 61 of Los Alamos National Laboratory and includes a total of 115 solid waste management units and areas of concern. This area was home to some of the earliest operations at Los Alamos, dating from the 1940s. Of the 115 solid-waste management units and areas of concern, 54 have been addressed previously. The remaining 61 are the focus of this project. These include septic tanks and outfalls, sanitary and industrial waste lines, storm drains, soil contamination areas, landfill and surface disposal areas, transformer sites, and incinerators. The Consent Order requires the Laboratory to evaluate historical work sites for the potential presence of residual contamination. It also requires the Laboratory to identify and implement corrective actions should contamination be found. The Laboratory began performing these types of activities in the 1990s. The Upper Los Alamos Canyon project entails: (1) collecting soil and rock samples using the most efficient and least-invasive methods practicable; (2) defining the nature and extent of any residual contamination associated with each solid waste management unit or area of concern; and (3) gathering additional data if needed to evaluate potential remedial alternatives. A variety of methods, including studies of engineering drawings, nonintrusive geophysical surveys, and trenching, may be used to identify the final sampling locations. The field team then determines which collection method to use at each location, based on such site

  10. Plutonium 238 facilities at Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinehart, Gary H.

    1991-01-01

    Plutonium 238 operations at Los Alamos are performed at the Plutonium Facility (TA-55), the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Building, and the Radioisotope Fuels Impact Test Facility. The plutonium 238 facilities at Los Alamos support a wide variety of heat source activities including development of new fuel forms and containment materials, research on the high temperature properties of containment materials, investigation of the high temperature compatibility of fuels with potential container materials, processing plutonium 238 fuel forms, manufacture of heat sources under quality assurance surveillance, and performing safety testing on heat sources and radioisotope thermoelectric generators.

  11. Plutonium-238 facilities at Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinehart, Gary H.

    Plutonium-238 operations at Los Alamos are performed at the Plutonium Facility (TA-55), the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Building, and the Radioisotope Fuels Impact Test Facility. The plutonium-238 facilities at Los Alamos support a wide variety of heat source activities including development of new fuel forms and containment materials, research on the high temperature properties of containment materials, investigation of the high temperature compatibility of fuels with potential container materials, processing plutonium-238 fuel forms, manufacture of heat sources under quality assurance surveillance, and performing safety testing on heat sources and radioisotope thermoelectric generators.

  12. Reactor Dosimetry Applications Using RAPTOR-M3G:. a New Parallel 3-D Radiation Transport Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longoni, Gianluca; Anderson, Stanwood L.

    2009-08-01

    The numerical solution of the Linearized Boltzmann Equation (LBE) via the Discrete Ordinates method (SN) requires extensive computational resources for large 3-D neutron and gamma transport applications due to the concurrent discretization of the angular, spatial, and energy domains. This paper will discuss the development RAPTOR-M3G (RApid Parallel Transport Of Radiation - Multiple 3D Geometries), a new 3-D parallel radiation transport code, and its application to the calculation of ex-vessel neutron dosimetry responses in the cavity of a commercial 2-loop Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). RAPTOR-M3G is based domain decomposition algorithms, where the spatial and angular domains are allocated and processed on multi-processor computer architectures. As compared to traditional single-processor applications, this approach reduces the computational load as well as the memory requirement per processor, yielding an efficient solution methodology for large 3-D problems. Measured neutron dosimetry responses in the reactor cavity air gap will be compared to the RAPTOR-M3G predictions. This paper is organized as follows: Section 1 discusses the RAPTOR-M3G methodology; Section 2 describes the 2-loop PWR model and the numerical results obtained. Section 3 addresses the parallel performance of the code, and Section 4 concludes this paper with final remarks and future work.

  13. Physics-based, reduced-order gas cloud with radiative transport model for rapid simulation of hyperspectral infrared sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kottke, Peter A.; Fedorov, Andrei G.

    2012-05-01

    We have developed a reduced-order, physics-based model of gas cloud transport and combined it with an approximate formulation of the equation of radiative transport to enable efficient prediction of spectral irradiation for simulation of hyperspectral infrared sensors. The resulting combined model is easily implemented, providing a rapid and flexible in silico experimentation capability. The gas cloud model is based on the entrainment hypothesis and predicts cloud trajectories in three-dimensions, with elevation changes occurring primarily due to buoyancy effects and with spreading and accompanying dilution and cooling occurring due to a turbulence dominated growth mechanism. The radiation transport model is simplified through an approximate treatment of scattering that transforms the governing equation from an integro-differential equation to an ordinary differential equation. The conjugate model has been combined with a simple sensor model and has been validated through comparison to results from large-scale field tests. The utility of the simulations has also been demonstrated through inclusion in a larger algorithm development and analysis program, the chem/bio algorithm development kit.

  14. The Los Alamos suite of relativistic atomic physics codes

    SciTech Connect

    Fontes, C. J.; Zhang, H. L.; Jr, J. Abdallah; Clark, R. E. H.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Colgan, J.; Cunningham, R. T.; Hakel, P.; Magee, N. H.; Sherrill, M. E.

    2015-05-28

    The Los Alamos SuitE of Relativistic (LASER) atomic physics codes is a robust, mature platform that has been used to model highly charged ions in a variety of ways. The suite includes capabilities for calculating data related to fundamental atomic structure, as well as the processes of photoexcitation, electron-impact excitation and ionization, photoionization and autoionization within a consistent framework. These data can be of a basic nature, such as cross sections and collision strengths, which are useful in making predictions that can be compared with experiments to test fundamental theories of highly charged ions, such as quantum electrodynamics. The suite can also be used to generate detailed models of energy levels and rate coefficients, and to apply them in the collisional-radiative modeling of plasmas over a wide range of conditions. Such modeling is useful, for example, in the interpretation of spectra generated by a variety of plasmas. In this work, we provide a brief overview of the capabilities within the Los Alamos relativistic suite along with some examples of its application to the modeling of highly charged ions.

  15. The Los Alamos suite of relativistic atomic physics codes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fontes, C. J.; Zhang, H. L.; Jr, J. Abdallah; Clark, R. E. H.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Colgan, J.; Cunningham, R. T.; Hakel, P.; Magee, N. H.; Sherrill, M. E.

    2015-05-28

    The Los Alamos SuitE of Relativistic (LASER) atomic physics codes is a robust, mature platform that has been used to model highly charged ions in a variety of ways. The suite includes capabilities for calculating data related to fundamental atomic structure, as well as the processes of photoexcitation, electron-impact excitation and ionization, photoionization and autoionization within a consistent framework. These data can be of a basic nature, such as cross sections and collision strengths, which are useful in making predictions that can be compared with experiments to test fundamental theories of highly charged ions, such as quantum electrodynamics. The suitemore » can also be used to generate detailed models of energy levels and rate coefficients, and to apply them in the collisional-radiative modeling of plasmas over a wide range of conditions. Such modeling is useful, for example, in the interpretation of spectra generated by a variety of plasmas. In this work, we provide a brief overview of the capabilities within the Los Alamos relativistic suite along with some examples of its application to the modeling of highly charged ions.« less

  16. Sandia Computational Engine for Particle Transport for Radiation Effects v 1.4

    2014-01-24

    The SCEPTRE code solves the linear Boltzmann transport equation for general two- and three-dimensional geometries. SCEPTRE is capable of handling any particle type for which multigroup-Legendre cross sections are available. However, the code is designed primarily to model the transport of photons, electrons, and positrons through matter.

  17. 3D computational and experimental radiation transport assessments of Pu-Be sources and graded moderators for parcel screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghita, Gabriel; Sjoden, Glenn; Baciak, James; Huang, Nancy

    2006-05-01

    The Florida Institute for Nuclear Detection and Security (FINDS) is currently working on the design and evaluation of a prototype neutron detector array that may be used for parcel screening systems and homeland security applications. In order to maximize neutron detector response over a wide spectrum of energies, moderator materials of different compositions and amounts are required, and can be optimized through 3-D discrete ordinates and Monte Carlo model simulations verified through measurement. Pu-Be sources can be used as didactic source materials to augment the design, optimization, and construction of detector arrays with proper characterization via transport analysis. To perform the assessments of the Pu-Be Source Capsule, 3-D radiation transport computations are used, including Monte Carlo (MCNP5) and deterministic (PENTRAN) methodologies. In establishing source geometry, we based our model on available source schematic data. Because both the MCNP5 and PENTRAN codes begin with source neutrons, exothermic (α,n) reactions are modeled using the SCALE5 code from ORNL to define the energy spectrum and the decay of the source. We combined our computational results with experimental data to fully validate our computational schemes, tools and models. Results from our computational models will then be used with experiment to generate a mosaic of the radiation spectrum. Finally, we discuss follow-up studies that highlight response optimization efforts in designing, building, and testing an array of detectors with varying moderators/thicknesses tagged to specific responses predicted using 3-D radiation transport models to augment special nuclear materials detection.

  18. Measurements of the linear energy transfer spectra on the Mir orbital station and comparison with radiation transport models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Konradi, A.; Atwell, W.; Golightly, M. J.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Petrov, V. M.; Tchernykh, I. V.; Shurshakov, V. A.; Lobakov, A. P.

    1996-01-01

    A tissue equivalent proportional counter designed to measure the linear energy transfer spectra (LET) in the range 0.2-1250 keV/micrometer was flown in the Kvant module on the Mir orbital station during September 1994. The spacecraft was in a 51.65 degrees inclination, elliptical (390 x 402 km) orbit. This is nearly the lower limit of its flight altitude. The total absorbed dose rate measured was 411.3 +/- 4.41 microGy/day with an average quality factor of 2.44. The galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) dose rate was 133.6 microGy/day with a quality factor of 3.35. The trapped radiation belt dose rate was 277.7 microGy/day with an average quality factor of 1.94. The peak rate through the South Atlantic Anomaly was approximately 12 microGy/min and nearly constant from one pass to another. A detailed comparison of the measured LET spectra has been made with radiation transport models. The GCR results are in good agreement with model calculations; however, this is not the case for radiation belt particles and again points to the need for improving the AP8 omni-directional trapped proton models.

  19. TRANSPORT, RADIATIVE, AND DYNAMICAL EFFECTS OF THE ANTARCTIC OZONE HOLE: A GFDL "SKYHI" MODEL EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The GFDL 'SKYHI' general circulation model has been used to simulate the effect of the Antarctic "ozone hole" phenomenon on the radiative and dynamical environment of the lower stratosphere. oth the polar ozone destruction and photochemical restoration chemistries are calculated ...

  20. Experiences in the Performance Analysis and Optimization of a Deterministic Radiation Transport Code on the Cray SV1

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Cebull

    2004-05-01

    The Attila radiation transport code, which solves the Boltzmann neutron transport equation on three-dimensional unstructured tetrahedral meshes, was ported to a Cray SV1. Cray's performance analysis tools pointed to two subroutines that together accounted for 80%-90% of the total CPU time. Source code modifications were performed to enable vectorization of the most significant loops, to correct unfavorable strides through memory, and to replace a conjugate gradient solver subroutine with a call to the Cray Scientific Library. These optimizations resulted in a speedup of 7.79 for the INEEL's largest ATR model. Parallel scalability of the OpenMP version of the code is also discussed, and timing results are given for other non-vector platforms.

  1. Numerical modeling of photon migration in the cerebral cortex of the living rat using the radiative transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Hiroyuki; Okawa, Shinpei; Nadamoto, Ken; Okada, Eiji; Yamada, Yukio; Hoshi, Yoko; Watanabe, Masao

    2015-03-01

    Accurate modeling and efficient calculation of photon migration in biological tissues is requested for determination of the optical properties of living tissues by in vivo experiments. This study develops a calculation scheme of photon migration for determination of the optical properties of the rat cerebral cortex (ca 0.2 cm thick) based on the three-dimensional time-dependent radiative transport equation assuming a homogeneous object. It is shown that the time-resolved profiles calculated by the developed scheme agree with the profiles measured by in vivo experiments using near infrared light. Also, an efficient calculation method is tested using the delta-Eddington approximation of the scattering phase function.

  2. Proceedings of the Los Alamos neutrino workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, F.; Stephenson, G.J. Jr.

    1982-08-01

    A workshop on neutrino physics was held at Los Alamos from June 8 to 12, 1981. The material presented has been provided in part by the organizers, in part by the chairmen of the working sessions. Closing date for contributions was October 1981.

  3. Induction inserts at the Los Alamos PSR

    SciTech Connect

    King-Yuen Ng

    2002-09-30

    Ferrite-loaded induction tuners installed in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring have been successful in compensating space-charge effects. However, the resistive part of the ferrite introduces unacceptable microwave instability and severe bunch lengthening. An effective cure was found by heating the ferrite cores up to {approx} 130 C. An understanding of the instability and cure is presented.

  4. Los Alamos waste drum shufflers users manual

    SciTech Connect

    Rinard, P.M.; Adams, E.L.; Painter, J.

    1993-08-24

    This user manual describes the Los Alamos waste drum shufflers. The primary purpose of the instruments is to assay the mass of {sup 235}U (or other fissile materials) in drums of assorted waste. It can perform passive assays for isotopes that spontaneously emit neutrons or active assays using the shuffler technique as described on this manual.

  5. Radiation calculations using LAHET/MCNP/CINDER90

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, L.

    1994-10-01

    The LAHET monte carlo code system has recently been expanded to include high energy hadronic interactions via the FLUKA code, while retaining the original Los Alamos versions of HETC and ISABEL at lower energies. Electrons and photons are transported with EGS4 or ITS, while the MCNP coupled neutron/photon monte carlo code provides analysis of neutrons with kinetic energies less than 20 MeV. An interface with the CINDER activation code is now in common use. Various other changes have been made to facilitate analysis of high energy accelerator radiation environments and experimental physics apparatus, such as those found at SSC and RHIC. Current code developments and applications are reviewed.

  6. Radiation calculations using LAHET/MCNP/CINDER90

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, L.S.

    1993-08-01

    The LAHET Monte Carlo code system has recently been expanded to include high energy hadronic interactions via the FLUKA code, while retaining the original Los Alamos versions of HETC and ISABEL at lower energies. Electrons and photons are transported with EGS4 or ITS, while the MCNP coupled neutron/photon Monte Carlo code provides analysis of neutrons with kinetic energies less than 20 MeV. An interface with the CINDER activation code is now in common use. Various other changes have been made to facilitate analysis of high energy accelerator radiation environments and experimental physics apparatus, such as those found at SSC and RHIC. Current code developments and applications are reviewed.

  7. Studies of HZE particle interactions and transport for space radiation protection purposes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.; Schimmerling, Walter; Wong, Mervyn

    1987-01-01

    The main emphasis is on developing general methods for accurately predicting high-energy heavy ion (HZE) particle interactions and transport for use by researchers in mission planning studies, in evaluating astronaut self-shielding factors, and in spacecraft shield design and optimization studies. The two research tasks are: (1) to develop computationally fast and accurate solutions to the Boltzmann (transport) equation; and (2) to develop accurate HZE interaction models, from fundamental physical considerations, for use as inputs into these transport codes. Accurate solutions to the HZE transport problem have been formulated through a combination of analytical and numerical techniques. In addition, theoretical models for the input interaction parameters are under development: stopping powers, nuclear absorption cross sections, and fragmentation parameters.

  8. Los Alamos Fires From Landsat 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On May 9, 2000, the Landsat 7 satellite acquired an image of the area around Los Alamos, New Mexico. The Landsat 7 satellite acquired this image from 427 miles in space through its sensor called the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+). Evident within the imagery is a view of the ongoing Cerro Grande fire near the town of Los Alamos and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Combining the high-resolution (30 meters per pixel in this scene) imaging capacity of ETM+ with its multi-spectral capabilities allows scientists to penetrate the smoke plume and see the structure of the fire on the surface. Notice the high-level of detail in the infrared image (bottom), in which burn scars are clearly distinguished from the hotter smoldering and flaming parts of the fire. Within this image pair several features are clearly visible, including the Cerro Grande fire and smoke plume, the town of Los Alamos, the Los Alamos National Laboratory and associated property, and Cerro Grande peak. Combining ETM+ channels 7, 4, and 2 (one visible and two infrared channels) results in a false color image where vegetation appears as bright to dark green (bottom image). Forested areas are generally dark green while herbaceous vegetation is light green. Rangeland or more open areas appear pink to light purple. Areas with extensive pavement or urban development appear light blue or white to purple. Less densely-developed residential areas appear light green and golf courses are very bright green. The areas recently burned appear black. Dark red to bright red patches, or linear features within the burned area, are the hottest and possibly actively burning areas of the fire. The fire is spreading downslope and the front of the fire is readily detectable about 2 kilometers to the west and south of Los Alamos. Combining ETM+ channels 3, 2, and 1 provides a true-color image of the greater Los Alamos region (top image). Vegetation is generally dark to medium green. Forested areas are very dark green

  9. Needs analysis and project schedule for the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Health Physics Analysis Laboratory (HPAL) upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Rhea, T.A.; Rucker, T.L.; Stafford, M.W.

    1990-09-28

    This report is a needs assessment and project schedule for the Health Physics Analysis Laboratory (HPAL) upgrade project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). After reviewing current and projected HPAL operations, two custom-developed laboratory information management systems (LIMS) for similar facilities were reviewed; four commercially available LIMS products were also evaluated. This project is motivated by new regulations for radiation protection and training and by increased emphasis on quality assurance (QA). HPAL data are used to: protect the health of radiation workers; document contamination levels for transportation of radioactive materials and for release of materials to the public for uncontrolled use; and verify compliance with environmental emission regulations. Phase 1 of the HPAL upgrade project concentrates on four types of counting instruments which support in excess of 90% of the sample workload at the existing central laboratories. Phase 2 is a refinement phase and also integrates summary-level databases on the central Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) VAX. Phase 3 incorporates additional instrument types and integrates satellite laboratories into the HPAL LIMS. Phase 1 will be a multi-year, multimillion dollar project. The temptation to approach the upgrade of the HPAL program in a piece meal fashion should be avoided. This is a major project, with clearly-defined goals and priorities, and should be approached as such. Major programmatic and operational impacts will be felt throughout HSE as a result of this upgrade, so effective coordination with key customer contacts will be critical.

  10. Ballistic phonon and thermal radiation transport across a minute vacuum gap in between aluminum and silicon thin films: Effect of laser repetitive pulses on transport characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Ali, H.

    2016-08-01

    Short-pulse laser heating of aluminum and silicon thin films pair with presence of a minute vacuum gap in between them is considered and energy transfer across the thin films pair is predicted. The frequency dependent Boltzmann equation is used to predict the phonon intensity distribution along the films pair for three cycles of the repetitive short-pulse laser irradiation on the aluminum film surface. Since the gap size considered is within the Casimir limit, thermal radiation and ballistic phonon contributions to energy transfer across the vacuum gap is incorporated. The laser irradiated field is formulated in line with the Lambert's Beer law and it is considered as the volumetric source in the governing equations of energy transport. In order to assess the phonon intensity distribution in the films pair, equivalent equilibrium temperature is introduced. It is demonstrated that thermal separation of electron and lattice sub-systems in the aluminum film, due to the short-pulse laser irradiation, takes place and electron temperature remains high in the aluminum film while equivalent equilibrium temperature for phonons decays sharply in the close region of the aluminum film interface. This behavior is attributed to the phonon boundary scattering at the interface and the ballistic phonon transfer to the silicon film across the vacuum gap. Energy transfer due to the ballistic phonon contribution is significantly higher than that of the thermal radiation across the vacuum gap.

  11. Nuclear-accident dosimetry: measurements at the Los Alamos SHEBA critical assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilik, D.G.; Martin, R.W.; Fuller, D.

    1981-07-01

    Criticality dosimeters were exposed to different degraded neutron and gamma-ray energy spectra from the Los Alamos Solution High Energy Burst Assembly (SHEBA). The liquid critical test assembly was operated in the continuous mode to provide a mixed source of neutron and gamma-ray radiation for the evaluation of Los Alamos criticality detector systems. Different neutron and gamma-ray spectra were generated by operating the reactor (a) shielded by 12 cm of Lucite, (b) unshielded, (c) shielded by 20 cm of concrete, and (d) shielded by 15 cm of steel. This report summarizes the dosimetry measurements conducted for these different configurations. In-air measurements were conducted with shielded and unshielded area and personnel dosimeters. Phantom measurements were made using personnel dosimeters. Combined blood-sodium and hair sulfur activation measurements of absorbed dose were also made. In addition, indium foils placed on phantoms were evaluated for the purpose of screening personnel for radiation exposure.

  12. Optical absorption and radiative heat transport in olivine at high temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankland, T. J.; Nitsan, U.; Duba, A. G.

    1979-01-01

    Results are presented of measurements of the optical absorption spectra (300-8000 nm) of olivine as a function of temperature (300-1700 K) under conditions of controlled and known oxygen fugacity within the stability field of the samples. The absorption spectra are used to calculate the temperature-dependent radiative transfer coefficient of olivine and to numerically study the accuracy of the method. The present absorption measurements in olivine under oxidizing conditions known to be within the olivine stability field indicate that the effective radiative conductivity K(R) is lower than that obtained in previous studies under different experimental conditions. The lower value of K(R) makes it more likely that some of the earth's internal heat is removed by convection and less likely that thermal models involving conduction and radiation alone will satisfactorily explain thermal conditions in the earth's mantle.

  13. A Radiative Transport Model for Heating Paints using High Density Plasma Arc Lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Duty, Chad E; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Nichols, Mark; Blue, Craig A; Ott, Ronald D

    2009-01-01

    The energy distribution and ensuing temperature evolution within paint-like systems under the influence of infrared radiation was studied. Thermal radiation effects as well as those due to heat conduction were considered. A complete set of material properties was derived and discussed. Infrared measurements were conducted to obtain experimental data for the temperature in the paint film. The heat flux of the incident radiation from the plasma arc lamp was measured using a heat flux sensor with a very short response time. The comparison between the computed and experimental results for temperature show that the models that are based on spectral four-flux RTE and accurate optical properties yield accurate results for the black paint systems.

  14. Experimental Study on Fast Electrons Transport in Ultra-intense Laser Irradiated Solid Targets by Transition Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhijian, Zheng; Guangcan, Wang; Yuqiu, Gu

    2008-11-01

    The experiment was performed with SILEX laser facility(Ti-saphhire) at LFRC in China. The SILEX parameter: wavelength 0.8μm, duration 35fs, output power 280TW, contrast 5*105, The focal spot φ10μm(F/1.7), intensity on target surface 1*10^19W/cm^2(F/3). The main diagnostic equipments are the electron spectrometer, OMA spectrometer, optical streak camera. Some experimental results are given: The spectrum of optical emission from rear surface is rather narrow around some particular frequencies(1φ, 2φ, 3φ), We ascribe and confirm that the spike-like spectral line that is coherent transition radiation; The coherent light is also seen on time-integrated image with ring-patter due to Weibel instability of the fast electron transport; Obtained experimental cure of target thickness vs OTR image intensity is relative to mean free path of fast electron; The measuring optical transition radiation(OTR) duration of 171ps much longer than 1ps duration of fast electron transport target, the possible explanation is that the OTR duration to be determined magnetic diffusion time.

  15. Combining node-centered parallel radiation transport and higher-order multi-material cell-centered hydrodynamics methods in three-temperature radiation hydrodynamics code TRHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sijoy, C. D.; Chaturvedi, S.

    2016-06-01

    Higher-order cell-centered multi-material hydrodynamics (HD) and parallel node-centered radiation transport (RT) schemes are combined self-consistently in three-temperature (3T) radiation hydrodynamics (RHD) code TRHD (Sijoy and Chaturvedi, 2015) developed for the simulation of intense thermal radiation or high-power laser driven RHD. For RT, a node-centered gray model implemented in a popular RHD code MULTI2D (Ramis et al., 2009) is used. This scheme, in principle, can handle RT in both optically thick and thin materials. The RT module has been parallelized using message passing interface (MPI) for parallel computation. Presently, for multi-material HD, we have used a simple and robust closure model in which common strain rates to all materials in a mixed cell is assumed. The closure model has been further generalized to allow different temperatures for the electrons and ions. In addition to this, electron and radiation temperatures are assumed to be in non-equilibrium. Therefore, the thermal relaxation between the electrons and ions and the coupling between the radiation and matter energies are required to be computed self-consistently. This has been achieved by using a node-centered symmetric-semi-implicit (SSI) integration scheme. The electron thermal conduction is calculated using a cell-centered, monotonic, non-linear finite volume scheme (NLFV) suitable for unstructured meshes. In this paper, we have described the details of the 2D, 3T, non-equilibrium, multi-material RHD code developed with a special attention to the coupling of various cell-centered and node-centered formulations along with a suite of validation test problems to demonstrate the accuracy and performance of the algorithms. We also report the parallel performance of RT module. Finally, in order to demonstrate the full capability of the code implementation, we have presented the simulation of laser driven shock propagation in a layered thin foil. The simulation results are found to be in good

  16. Combining node-centered parallel radiation transport and higher-order multi-material cell-centered hydrodynamics methods in three-temperature radiation hydrodynamics code TRHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sijoy, C. D.; Chaturvedi, S.

    2016-06-01

    Higher-order cell-centered multi-material hydrodynamics (HD) and parallel node-centered radiation transport (RT) schemes are combined self-consistently in three-temperature (3T) radiation hydrodynamics (RHD) code TRHD (Sijoy and Chaturvedi, 2015) developed for the simulation of intense thermal radiation or high-power laser driven RHD. For RT, a node-centered gray model implemented in a popular RHD code MULTI2D (Ramis et al., 2009) is used. This scheme, in principle, can handle RT in both optically thick and thin materials. The RT module has been parallelized using message passing interface (MPI) for parallel computation. Presently, for multi-material HD, we have used a simple and robust closure model in which common strain rates to all materials in a mixed cell is assumed. The closure model has been further generalized to allow different temperatures for the electrons and ions. In addition to this, electron and radiation temperatures are assumed to be in non-equilibrium. Therefore, the thermal relaxation between the electrons and ions and the coupling between the radiation and matter energies are required to be computed self-consistently. This has been achieved by using a node-centered symmetric-semi-implicit (SSI) integration scheme. The electron thermal conduction is calculated using a cell-centered, monotonic, non-linear finite volume scheme (NLFV) suitable for unstructured meshes. In this paper, we have described the details of the 2D, 3T, non-equilibrium, multi-material RHD code developed with a special attention to the coupling of various cell-centered and node-centered formulations along with a suite of validation test problems to demonstrate the accuracy and performance of the algorithms. We also report the parallel performance of RT module. Finally, in order to demonstrate the full capability of the code implementation, we have presented the simulation of laser driven shock propagation in a layered thin foil. The simulation results are found to be in good

  17. Use of single scatter electron monte carlo transport for medical radiation sciences

    DOEpatents

    Svatos, Michelle M.

    2001-01-01

    The single scatter Monte Carlo code CREEP models precise microscopic interactions of electrons with matter to enhance physical understanding of radiation sciences. It is designed to simulate electrons in any medium, including materials important for biological studies. It simulates each interaction individually by sampling from a library which contains accurate information over a broad range of energies.

  18. FINAL REPORT. RADIATION EFFECTS ON TRANSPORT AND BUBBLE FORMATION IN SILICATE GLASSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this research is to develop fundamental knowledge of radiation-matter interaction at the atomic level and provide mechanistic insight required for prognostication of the Tera-rad damage in HLW glasses through: a) understanding of the mechanism for radiolytic damage...

  19. Low-cost cadmium zinc telluride radiation detectors based on electron-transport-only designs

    SciTech Connect

    B. A. Brunett; J. C. Lund; J. M. Van Scyoc; N. R. Hilton; E. Y. Lee; R. B. James

    1999-01-01

    The goal of this project was to utilize a novel device design to build a compact, high resolution, room temperature operated semiconductor gamma ray sensor. This sensor was constructed from a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) crystal. It was able to both detect total radiation intensity and perform spectroscopy on the detected radiation. CZT detectors produced today have excellent electron charge carrier collection, but suffer from poor hole collection. For conventional gamma-ray spectrometers, both the electrons and holes must be collected with high efficiency to preserve energy resolution. The requirement to collect the hole carriers, which have relatively low lifetimes, limits the efficiency and performance of existing experimental devices. By implementing novel device designs such that the devices rely only on the electron signal for energy information, the sensitivity of the sensors for detecting radiation can be increased substantially. In this report the authors describe a project to develop a new type of electron-only CZT detector. They report on their successful efforts to design, implement and test these new radiation detectors. In addition to the design and construction of the sensors the authors also report, in considerable detail, on the electrical characteristics of the CZT crystals used to make their detectors.

  20. ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT. RADIATION EFFECTS ON SORPTION AND MOBILIZATION OF RADIONUCLIDES DURING TRANSPORT THROUGH THE GEOSPHERE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research program has been aimed at the understanding of radiation effects on the sorption/desorption and ion exchange capacity of radionuclides in two major groups of geologic materials, clays and zeolites. The experiments are designed for investigating the effects of ionizi...

  1. Highly relativistic radiation belt electron acceleration, transport, and loss: Large solar storm events of March and June 2015

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Baker, Daniel N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Foster, J. C.; Erickson, P. J.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Zhao, H.; Li, X.; Elkington, S. R.; et al

    2016-07-26

    Two of the largest geomagnetic storms of the last decade were witnessed in 2015. On 17 March 2015, a coronal mass ejection-driven event occurred with a Dst (storm time ring current index) value reaching –223 nT. On 22 June 2015 another strong storm (Dst reaching –204 nT) was recorded. These two storms each produced almost total loss of radiation belt high-energy (E ≳ 1 MeV) electron fluxes. Following the dropouts of radiation belt fluxes there were complex and rather remarkable recoveries of the electrons extending up to nearly 10 MeV in kinetic energy. The energized outer zone electrons showed amore » rich variety of pitch angle features including strong “butterfly” distributions with deep minima in flux at α = 90°. However, despite strong driving of outer zone earthward radial diffusion in these storms, the previously reported “impenetrable barrier” at L ≈ 2.8 was pushed inward, but not significantly breached, and no E ≳ 2.0 MeV electrons were seen to pass through the radiation belt slot region to reach the inner Van Allen zone. Altogether, these intense storms show a wealth of novel features of acceleration, transport, and loss that are demonstrated in the present detailed analysis.« less

  2. Real-time airborne gamma-ray background estimation using NASVD with MLE and radiation transport for calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulisek, J. A.; Schweppe, J. E.; Stave, S. C.; Bernacki, B. E.; Jordan, D. V.; Stewart, T. N.; Seifert, C. E.; Kernan, W. J.

    2015-06-01

    Helicopter-mounted gamma-ray detectors can provide law enforcement officials the means to quickly and accurately detect, identify, and locate radiological threats over a wide geographical area. The ability to accurately distinguish radiological threat-generated gamma-ray signatures from background gamma radiation in real time is essential in order to realize this potential. This problem is non-trivial, especially in urban environments for which the background may change very rapidly during flight. This exacerbates the challenge of estimating background due to the poor counting statistics inherent in real-time airborne gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements. To address this challenge, we have developed a new technique for real-time estimation of background gamma radiation from aerial measurements without the need for human analyst intervention. The method can be calibrated using radiation transport simulations along with data from previous flights over areas for which the isotopic composition need not be known. Over the examined measured and simulated data sets, the method generated accurate background estimates even in the presence of a strong, 60Co source. The potential to track large and abrupt changes in background spectral shape and magnitude was demonstrated. The method can be implemented fairly easily in most modern computing languages and environments.

  3. NA22 Model Cities Project - LL244T An Intelligent Transportation System-Based Radiation Alert and Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Peglow, S

    2004-02-24

    The purpose of this project was twofold: first, provide an understanding of the technical foundation and planning required for deployment of Intelligent Transportation System (ITS)-based system architectures for the protection of New York City from a terrorist attack using a vehicle-deployed nuclear device; second, work with stakeholders to develop mutual understanding of the technologies and tactics required for threat detection/identification and establish guidelines for designing operational systems and procedures. During the course of this project we interviewed and coordinated analysis with people from the New Jersey State Attorney General's office, the New Jersey State Police, the Port Authority of New York/New Jersey, the Counterterrorism Division of the New York City Police Department, the New Jersey Transit Authority, the State of New Jersey Department of Transportation, TRANSCOM and a number of contractors involved with state and federal intelligent transportation development and implementation. The basic system architecture is shown in the figure below. In an actual system deployment, radiation sensors would be co-located with existing ITS elements and the data will be sent to the Traffic Operations Center. A key element of successful system operation is the integration of vehicle data, such as license plate, EZ pass ID, vehicle type/color and radiation signature. A threat data base can also be implemented and utilized in cases where there is a suspect vehicle identified from other intelligence sources or a mobile detector system. Another key aspect of an operational architecture is the procedures used to verify the threat and plan interdiction. This was a major focus of our work and discussed later in detail. In support of the operational analysis, we developed a detailed traffic simulation model that is described extensively in the body of the report.

  4. High Altitude Radiations Relevant to the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Goldhagan, P.; Maiden, D. L.; Tai, H.

    2004-01-01

    The Langley Research Center (LaRC) performed atmospheric radiation studies under the SST development program in which important ionizing radiation components were measured and extended by calculations to develop the existing atmospheric ionizing radiation (AIR) model. In that program the measured neutron spectrum was limited to less than 10 MeV by the available 1960-1970 instrumentation. Extension of the neutron spectrum to high energies was made using the LaRC PROPER-3C monte carlo code. It was found that the atmospheric neutrons contributed about half of the dose equivalent and approximately half of the neutron contribution was from high energy neutrons above 10 MeV. Furthermore, monte carlo calculations of solar particle events showed that potential exposures as large as 10-100 mSv/hr may occur on important high latitude routes but acceptable levels of exposure could be obtained if timely descent to subsonic altitudes could be made. The principal concern was for pregnant occupants onboard the aircraft. As a result of these studies the FAA Advisory Committee on the Radiobiological Aspects of the SST recommended: 1. Crew members will have to be informed of their exposure levels 2. Maximum exposures on any flight to be limited to 5 mSv 3. Airborne radiation detection devices for total exposure and exposure rates 4. Satellite monitoring system to provide SST aircraft real-time information on atmospheric radiation levels for exposure mitigation 5. A solar forecasting system to warn flight operations of an impending solar event for flight scheduling and alert status. These recommendations are a reasonable starting point to requirements for the HSCT with some modification reflecting new standards of protection as a result of changing risk coefficients.

  5. Transport calculations of radiation exposure to vessel support structures in the Trojan Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Asgari, M.; Williams, M.L.; Kam, F.B.K.; McGarry, E.D.

    1994-07-01

    Comparison of transport calculations of the dosimeter activities with the experimental measurements shows that the values obtained with ENDF/B-VI cross-section data overestimate the measured results for high-energy-threshold reactions in the cavity by up to 41%, and thermal reactions by up to a factor of 3.0. The transport calculations performed with the original SAILOR cross-section library (based on ENDF/B-VI data) overestimate measured threshold reactions by only 15% and the thermal reactions by about a factor of 2.50. These results are inconsistent with those obtained in earlier studies that compared transport calculations done with SAILOR vs ENDF/B-VI, which indicate that SAILOR tends to underestimate cavity dosimeter activities for threshold reactions, while the ENDF/B-VI values usually agree better with experimental results. One factor that probably contributes to the rather large discrepancy between the computed and measured activities is the core power distribution used in the transport calculations. Because of unavailability of plant-specific data, a generic power distribution provided by Westinghouse was used. Since the calculated cavity flux levels appear to be over-estimated, the results estimated for the exposure to the support structure should be conservative.

  6. HELIOSEISMIC TESTS OF THE NEW LOS ALAMOS OPACITIES

    SciTech Connect

    J. GUZIK; ET AL

    2001-01-01

    We compare the helioseismic properties of two solar models, one calibrated with the OPAL opacities and the other with the recent Los Alamos LEDCOP opacities. We show that, in the radiative interior of the Sun, the small differences between the two sets of opacities (up to 6% near the base of the convection zone) lead to noticeable differences in the solar structure (up to 0.4% in sound speed), with the OPAL model being the closest to the helioseismic data. More than half of the difference between the two opacity sets results from the interpolation scheme and from the relatively widely spaced temperature grids used in the tables. The remaining 3% intrinsic difference between the OPAL and the LEDCOP opacities in the radiative interior of the Sun is well within the error bars on the opacity calculations resulting from the uncertainties on the physics. We conclude that the OPAL and LEDCOP opacity sets do about as well in the radiative interior of the Sun.

  7. Radiation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Outside the protective cocoon of Earth's atmosphere, the universe is full of harmful radiation. Astronauts who live and work in space are exposed not only to ultraviolet rays but also to space radi...

  8. Observing gas and dust in simulations of star formation with Monte Carlo radiation transport on Voronoi meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubber, D. A.; Ercolano, B.; Dale, J.

    2016-02-01

    Ionizing feedback from massive stars dramatically affects the interstellar medium local to star-forming regions. Numerical simulations are now starting to include enough complexity to produce morphologies and gas properties that are not too dissimilar from observations. The comparison between the density fields produced by hydrodynamical simulations and observations at given wavelengths relies however on photoionization/chemistry and radiative transfer calculations. We present here an implementation of Monte Carlo radiation transport through a Voronoi tessellation in the photoionization and dust radiative transfer code MOCASSIN. We show for the first time a synthetic spectrum and synthetic emission line maps of a hydrodynamical simulation of a molecular cloud affected by massive stellar feedback. We show that the approach on which previous work is based, which remapped hydrodynamical density fields on to Cartesian grids before performing radiative transfer/photoionization calculations, results in significant errors in the temperature and ionization structure of the region. Furthermore, we describe the mathematical process of tracing photon energy packets through a Voronoi tessellation, including optimizations, treating problematic cases and boundary conditions. We perform various benchmarks using both the original version of MOCASSIN and the modified version using the Voronoi tessellation. We show that for uniform grids, or equivalently a cubic lattice of cell generating points, the new Voronoi version gives the same results as the original Cartesian grid version of MOCASSIN for all benchmarks. For non-uniform initial conditions, such as using snapshots from smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations, we show that the Voronoi version performs better than the Cartesian grid version, resulting in much better resolution in dense regions.

  9. Nuclear Forensics at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Podlesak, David W; Steiner, Robert E.; Burns, Carol J.; LaMont, Stephen P.; Tandon, Lav

    2012-08-09

    The overview of this presentation is: (1) Introduction to nonproliferation efforts; (2) Scope of activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (3) Facilities for radioanalytical work at LANL; (4) Radiochemical characterization capabilities; and (5) Bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities. Some conclusions are: (1) Analytical chemistry measurements on plutonium and uranium matrices are critical to numerous defense and non-defense programs including safeguards accountancy verification measurements; (2) Los Alamos National Laboratory operates capable actinide analytical chemistry and material science laboratories suitable for nuclear material forensic characterization; (3) Actinide analytical chemistry uses numerous means to validate and independently verify that measurement data quality objectives are met; and (4) Numerous LANL nuclear facilities support the nuclear material handling, preparation, and analysis capabilities necessary to evaluate samples containing nearly any mass of an actinide (attogram to kilogram levels).

  10. Radiation Transport with non-isotropic Scattering by Acclerated Lambda Iteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentz, E. J.; Mezzacappa, A.

    2005-12-01

    In standard stellar atmospheres problems the scattering of photons is taken to be isotropic. For some radiative processes, scattering is highly directional, and when these processes dominate, this must be taken into account. This is the case in neutrino radiation hydrodynamics in core collapse supernovae. We show how to adapt the ALI method for use with non-isotropic scattering and present several examples related to the core collapse supernova problem. This work was performed under the auspices of the TeraScale Supernova Initiative, funded by SciDAC grants from the DOE Office of Science High-Energy, Nuclear, and Advanced Scientific Computing Research Programs. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  11. Radiation and gas conduction heat transport across a helium dewer multilayer insulation system

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.

    1995-02-01

    This report describes a method for calculating mixed heat transfer through the multilayer insulation used to insulated a 4K liquid helium cryostat. The method described permits one to estimate the insulation potential for a multilayer insulation system from first principles. The heat transfer regimes included are: radiation, conduction by free molecule gas conduction, and conduction through continuum gas conduction. Heat transfer in the transition region between the two gas conduction regimes is also included.

  12. Voxel2MCNP: software for handling voxel models for Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations.

    PubMed

    Hegenbart, Lars; Pölz, Stefan; Benzler, Andreas; Urban, Manfred

    2012-02-01

    Voxel2MCNP is a program that sets up radiation protection scenarios with voxel models and generates corresponding input files for the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. Its technology is based on object-oriented programming, and the development is platform-independent. It has a user-friendly graphical interface including a two- and three-dimensional viewer. A row of equipment models is implemented in the program. Various voxel model file formats are supported. Applications include calculation of counting efficiency of in vivo measurement scenarios and calculation of dose coefficients for internal and external radiation scenarios. Moreover, anthropometric parameters of voxel models, for instance chest wall thickness, can be determined. Voxel2MCNP offers several methods for voxel model manipulations including image registration techniques. The authors demonstrate the validity of the program results and provide references for previous successful implementations. The authors illustrate the reliability of calculated dose conversion factors and specific absorbed fractions. Voxel2MCNP is used on a regular basis to generate virtual radiation protection scenarios at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology while further improvements and developments are ongoing. PMID:22217596

  13. Amphibians and Reptiles of Los Alamos County

    SciTech Connect

    Teralene S. Foxx; Timothy K. Haarmann; David C. Keller

    1999-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that amphibians and reptiles are good indicators of environmental health. They live in terrestrial and aquatic environments and are often the first animals to be affected by environmental change. This publication provides baseline information about amphibians and reptiles that are present on the Pajarito Plateau. Ten years of data collection and observations by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the University of New Mexico, the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish, and hobbyists are represented.

  14. Los Alamos Novel Rocket Design Flight Tested

    ScienceCinema

    Tappan, Bryce

    2015-01-05

    Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists recently flight tested a new rocket design that includes a high-energy fuel and a motor design that also delivers a high degree of safety. Researchers will now work to scale-up the design, as well as explore miniaturization of the system, in order to exploit all potential applications that would require high-energy, high-velocity, and correspondingly high safety margins.

  15. Los Alamos Novel Rocket Design Flight Tested

    SciTech Connect

    Tappan, Bryce

    2014-10-23

    Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists recently flight tested a new rocket design that includes a high-energy fuel and a motor design that also delivers a high degree of safety. Researchers will now work to scale-up the design, as well as explore miniaturization of the system, in order to exploit all potential applications that would require high-energy, high-velocity, and correspondingly high safety margins.

  16. Los Alamos Team Demonstrates Bottle Scanner Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle; Schultz, Larry

    2014-05-06

    Los Alamos scientists are demonstrating a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMR) technology that may provide a breakthrough for screening liquids at airport security. By adding low-power X-ray data to the NMR mix, scientists believe they have unlocked a new detection technology. Funded in part by the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate, the new technology is called MagRay.

  17. Los Alamos Team Demonstrates Bottle Scanner Technology

    ScienceCinema

    Espy, Michelle; Schultz, Larry

    2014-06-02

    Los Alamos scientists are demonstrating a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMR) technology that may provide a breakthrough for screening liquids at airport security. By adding low-power X-ray data to the NMR mix, scientists believe they have unlocked a new detection technology. Funded in part by the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate, the new technology is called MagRay.

  18. Los Alamos National Laboratory Facility Review

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ronald Owen

    2015-06-05

    This series of slides depicts the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The Center's 800-MeV linac produces H+ and H- beams as well as beams of moderated (cold to 1 MeV) and unmoderated (0.1 to 600 MeV) neutrons. Experimental facilities and their capabilities and characteristics are outlined. Among these are LENZ, SPIDER, and DANCE.

  19. Los Alamos synchronous orbit data set

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.N.; Higbie, P.R.; Belian, R.D.; Hones, E.W.; Klebesadel, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    Energetic electron (30-15000 keV) and proton 145 keV to 150 MeV) measurements made by Los Alamos National Laboratory sensors at geostationary orbit (6.6 R/sub E/) are summarized. The instrumentation employed and the satellite positions are described. The spacecraft have been variously located, but in their present configuration the Los Alamos satellites designated 1976-059, 1977-007, and 1979-053 are located, respectively, at approx. 70/sup 0/W, approx. 70/sup 0/E, and approx. 135/sup 0/W longitude. Several examples of the high temporal and full three-dimensional spatial measurement capabilities of these instruments are illustrated by examples from the published literature. Discussion is also given for the Los Alamos Synoptic Data Set (SDS) which gives a broad overview of the Los Alamos geostationary orbit measurements. The SDS data are plotted in terms of daily average spectra, 3-hour local time averages, and in a variety of statistical formats. The data summarize conditions from mid-1976 through 1978 (S/C 1976-059) and from early 1977 through 1978 (S/C 1977-007). The SDS compilations presented correspond to measurements at 35/sup 0/W, 70/sup 0/W, and 135/sup 0/W geographic longitude and thus are indicative of conditions at 9/sup 0/, 11/sup 0/, and 4.8/sup 0/ geomagnetic latitude, respectively. The bulk of the SDS report presents data plots which are organized according to Carrington solar rotations and, as such, the data are readily comparable to solar rotation-dependent interplanetary conditions. Potential applications of the Synoptic Data Set (available to all interested users in June 1981) are discussed.

  20. Status of the Los Alamos Anger camera

    SciTech Connect

    Seeger, P.A.; Nutter, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    Results of preliminary tests of the neutron Anger camera being developed at Los Alamos are presented. This detector uses a unique encoding scheme involving parellel processing of multiple receptive fields. Design goals have not yet been met, but the results are very encouraging and improvements in the test procedures are expected to show that the detector will be ready for use on a small-angle scattering instrument next year. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  1. HZETRN: A heavy ion/nucleon transport code for space radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John W.; Chun, Sang Y.; Badavi, Forooz F.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Lamkin, Stanley L.

    1991-12-01

    The galactic heavy ion transport code (GCRTRN) and the nucleon transport code (BRYNTRN) are integrated into a code package (HZETRN). The code package is computer efficient and capable of operating in an engineering design environment for manned deep space mission studies. The nuclear data set used by the code is discussed including current limitations. Although the heavy ion nuclear cross sections are assumed constant, the nucleon-nuclear cross sections of BRYNTRN with full energy dependence are used. The relation of the final code to the Boltzmann equation is discussed in the context of simplifying assumptions. Error generation and propagation is discussed, and comparison is made with simplified analytic solutions to test numerical accuracy of the final results. A brief discussion of biological issues and their impact on fundamental developments in shielding technology is given.

  2. HZETRN: A heavy ion/nucleon transport code for space radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Chun, Sang Y.; Badavi, Forooz F.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Lamkin, Stanley L.

    1991-01-01

    The galactic heavy ion transport code (GCRTRN) and the nucleon transport code (BRYNTRN) are integrated into a code package (HZETRN). The code package is computer efficient and capable of operating in an engineering design environment for manned deep space mission studies. The nuclear data set used by the code is discussed including current limitations. Although the heavy ion nuclear cross sections are assumed constant, the nucleon-nuclear cross sections of BRYNTRN with full energy dependence are used. The relation of the final code to the Boltzmann equation is discussed in the context of simplifying assumptions. Error generation and propagation is discussed, and comparison is made with simplified analytic solutions to test numerical accuracy of the final results. A brief discussion of biological issues and their impact on fundamental developments in shielding technology is given.

  3. Solutions and reductions for radiative energy transport in laser-heated plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Broadbridge, P.; Ivanova, N. M.

    2015-01-15

    A full symmetry classification is given for models of energy transport in radiant plasma when the mass density is spatially variable and the diffusivity is nonlinear. A systematic search for conservation laws also leads to some potential symmetries and to an integrable nonlinear model. Classical point symmetries, potential symmetries, and nonclassical symmetries are used to effect variable reductions and exact solutions. The simplest time-dependent solution is shown to be stable and relevant to a closed system.

  4. Critical partnerships: Los Alamos, universities, and industry

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.L.

    1997-04-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, situated 35 miles northwest of Santa Fe, NM, is one of the Department of Energy`s three Defense Programs laboratories. It encompasses 43 square miles, employees approximately 10,000 people, and has a budget of approximately $1.1B in FY97. Los Alamos has a strong post-cold war mission, that of reducing the nuclear danger. But even with that key role in maintaining the nation`s security, Los Alamos views partnerships with universities and industry as critical to its future well being. Why is that? As the federal budget for R&D comes under continued scrutiny and certain reduction, we believe that the triad of science and technology contributors to the national system of R&D must rely on and leverage each others capabilities. For us this means that we will rely on these partners to help us in 5 key ways: We expect that partnerships will help us maintain and enhance our core competencies. In doing so, we will be able to attract the best scientists and engineers. To keep on the cutting edge of research and development, we have found that partnerships maintain the excellence of staff through new and exciting challenges. Additionally, we find that from our university and corporate partners we often learn and incorporate {open_quotes}best practices{close_quotes} in organizational management and operations. Finally, we believe that a strong national system of R&D will ensure and enhance our ability to generate revenues.

  5. Los Alamos National Laboratory Building Cost Index

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, H.D.; Lemon, G.D.

    1983-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Building Cost Index indicates that actual escalation since 1970 is near 10% per year. Therefore, the Laboratory will continue using a 10% per year escalation rate for construction estimates through 1985 and a slightly lower rate of 8% per year from 1986 through 1990. The computerized program compares the different elements involved in the cost of a typical construction project, which for our purposes, is a complex of office buildings and experimental laboratores. The input data used in the program consist primarily of labor costs and material and equipment costs. The labor costs are the contractural rates of the crafts workers in the Los Alamos area. For the analysis, 12 field-labor draft categories are used; each is weighted corresponding to the labor craft distribution associated with the typical construction project. The materials costs are current Los Alamos prices. Additional information sources include material and equipment quotes obtained through conversations with vendors and from trade publications. The material and equipment items separate into 17 categories for the analysis and are weighted corresponding to the material and equipment distribution associated with the typical construction project. The building cost index is compared to other national building cost indexes.

  6. Los Alamos National Laboratory building cost index

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, H.D.; Lemon, G.D.

    1982-10-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Building Cost Index indicates that actual escalation since 1970 is near 10% per year. Therefore, the Laboratory will continue using a 10% per year escalation rate for construction estimates through 1985 and a slightly lower rate of 8% per year from 1986 through 1990. The computerized program compares the different elements involved in the cost of a typical construction project, which for our purposes, is a complex of office buildings and experimental laboratories. The input data used in the program consist primarily of labor costs and material and equipment costs. The labor costs are the contractual rates of the crafts workers in the Los Alamos area. For the analysis, 12 field-labor craft categories are used; each is weighted corresponding to the labor craft distribution associated with the typical construction project. The materials costs are current Los Alamos prices. Additional information sources include material and equipment quotes obtained through conversations with vendors and from trade publications. The material and equipment items separate into 17 categories for the analysis and are weighted corresponding to the material and equipment distribution associated with the typical construction project. The building cost index is compared to other national building cost indexes.

  7. Exploration geochemistry: The Los Alamos experience

    SciTech Connect

    Maassen, L.W.; Bolivar, S.L.

    1989-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory became actively involved in geochemical exploration in 1975 by conducting a reconnaissance-scale exploration program for uranium as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Initially, only uranium and thorium were analyzed. By 1979 Los Alamos was analyzing a multielement suite. The data were presented in histograms and as black and white concentration plots for uranium and thorium only. Data for the remaining elements were presented as hard copy data listings in an appendix to the report. In 1983 Los Alamos began using exploration geochemistry for the purpose of finding economic mineral deposits to help stimulate the economies of underdeveloped countries. Stream-sediment samples were collected on the Caribbean island of St. Lucia and a geochemical atlas of that island was produced. The data were statistically smoothed and presented as computer-generated color plots of each element of the multielement suite. Studies for the US Bureau of Land Management in 1984 consisted of development of techniques for the integration of several large data sets, which could then be used for computer-assisted mineral resource assessments. A supervised classification technique was developed which compares the attributes of grid cells containing mines or mineral occurrences with attributes of unclassified cells not known to contain mines or occurrences. Color maps indicate how closely unclassified cells match in attributes the cells with mines or occurrences. 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. A fast Monte Carlo code for proton transport in radiation therapy based on MCNPX

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Keyvan; Seuntjens, Jan

    2014-01-01

    An important requirement for proton therapy is a software for dose calculation. Monte Carlo is the most accurate method for dose calculation, but it is very slow. In this work, a method is developed to improve the speed of dose calculation. The method is based on pre-generated tracks for particle transport. The MCNPX code has been used for generation of tracks. A set of data including the track of the particle was produced in each particular material (water, air, lung tissue, bone, and soft tissue). This code can transport protons in wide range of energies (up to 200 MeV for proton). The validity of the fast Monte Carlo (MC) code is evaluated with data MCNPX as a reference code. While analytical pencil beam algorithm transport shows great errors (up to 10%) near small high density heterogeneities, there was less than 2% deviation of MCNPX results in our dose calculation and isodose distribution. In terms of speed, the code runs 200 times faster than MCNPX. In the Fast MC code which is developed in this work, it takes the system less than 2 minutes to calculate dose for 106 particles in an Intel Core 2 Duo 2.66 GHZ desktop computer. PMID:25190994

  9. Moment closures based on minimizing the residual of the PN angular expansion in radiation transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Weixiong; McClarren, Ryan G.

    2016-06-01

    In this work we present two new closures for the spherical harmonics (PN) method in slab geometry transport problems. Our approach begins with an analysis of the squared-residual of the transport equation where we show that the standard truncation and diffusive closures do not minimize the residual of the PN expansion. Based on this analysis we derive two models, a moment-limited diffusive (ML DN) closure and a transient PN (TPN) closure that attempt to address shortcomings of common closures. The form of these closures is similar to flux-limiters for diffusion with the addition of a time-derivative in the definition of the closure. Numerical results on a pulsed plane source problem, the Gordian knot of slab-geometry transport problems, indicate that our new closure outperforms existing linear closures. Additionally, on a deep penetration problem we demonstrate that the TPN closure does not suffer from the artificial shocks that can arise in the MN entropy-based closure. Finally, results for Reed's problem demonstrate that the TPN solution is as accurate as the PN+3 solution. We further extend the TPN closure to 2D Cartesian geometry. The line source test problem demonstrates the model effectively damps oscillations and negative densities.

  10. Atmospheric transport in complex terrain at Los Alamos, Area G

    SciTech Connect

    Vold, E.L.

    1997-03-01

    This report documents the atmospheric dispersion used in the Area G Performance Assessment for off-site airborne dose calculations. Potential airborne contaminants from the mesa top disposal facility disperse in the complex terrain dominated by narrow mesas in parallel to narrow canyons. The dispersion is characterized by site-specific values of X/Q [(Ci/m{sup 3})/(Ci/s)] at each of two designated receptor locations, a {open_quote}maximum off-site dose{close_quote} location and a nearby population center (White Rock, NM). The values of X/Q in each of the sixteen wind sectors are first estimated with the CAP-88 computer code using 1992 annual meteorologic data from Area G and assuming an area source for release. This data captures the dominant wind direction on the mesa tops from the SSW. These dispersion parameters are assumed to apply to open, flat terrain and must be corrected for the complex mesa and canyon terrain terrain surrounding the Area G site. Additional meteorologic data has been collected over two years from six remote temporary meteorological stations operated on the mesas and in the canyons immediately around Area G. These data indicate that the wind flow in the canyons is exclusively bimodel, flowing up canyon during the day and down canyon at night. It is conservatively assumed that all ground level releases from Area G which blow out across an adjacent canyon become entrained in the canyon flow. This effectively combines the contaminant release for several sectors into a single canyon flow which is upstream during the day or downstream at night. This canyon channeling mechanism is implemented in the model by summing the wind sector dispersion factors over those sectors appropriate to the geometry for a release from Area G toward either adjacent canyon.

  11. Angular Momentum Transport in Magnetized Stellar Radiative Zones. II. The Solar Spin-down

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, P.; MacGregor, K. B.

    1993-11-01

    We present a large set of numerical calculations describing the rotational evolution of a solar-type star, in response to the torque exerted on it by a magnetically coupled wind emanating from its surface. We consider a situation where the internal redistribution of angular momentum in the radiative part of the envelope is dominated by magnetic stresses arising from the shearing of a preexisting, large-scale, poloidal magnetic field. By assuming a time-independent poloidal magnetic field, neglecting fluid motions in meridional planes, and restricting our attention to axisymmetric systems, we reduce the spin-down problem to solving the (coupled) ψ-components of the momentum and induction equations. Nevertheless, our computations remain dynamical, in that they take into account both the generation of a toroidal magnetic field by shearing of the preexisting poloidal field, and the back-reaction of the resulting Lorentz force on the differential rotation. It becomes possible to draw, for the first time, a reasonably realistic and quantitative picture of the effects of large-scale internal magnetic fields on the main-sequence rotational evolution of solar-type stars. We perform spin-down calculations for a standard solar model, starting from the ZAMS and extending all the way to the solar age. The wind-induced surface torque is computed using the axisymmetric formulation of Weber & Davis (1967). We consider a number of poloidal magnetic field configurations which differ both in the degree of magnetic coupling between the convective envelope and radiative core and in average strength. The rotational evolution can be divided into three more or less distinct phases: an initial phase of toroidal field buildup in the radiative zone, lasting from a few times 104 to a few times 106 yr; a second period in which oscillations set up in the radiative zone during the first phase are damped; and a third period, lasting from an age of about 107 yr onward, characterized by a state of

  12. Neutron, Proton, and Photonuclear Cross Sections for Radiation Therapy and Radiation Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, M.B.

    1998-09-10

    The authors review recent work at Los Alamos to evaluate neutron, proton, and photonuclear cross section up to 150 MeV (to 250 MeV for protons), based on experimental data and nuclear model calculations. These data are represented in the ENDF format and can be used in computer codes to simulate radiation transport. They permit calculations of absorbed dose in the body from therapy beams, and through use of kerma coefficients allow absorbed dose to be estimated for a given neutron energy distribution. For radiation protection, these data can be used to determine shielding requirements in accelerator environments, and to calculate neutron, proton, gamma-ray, and radionuclide production. Illustrative comparisons of the evaluated cross section and kerma coefficient data with measurements are given.

  13. Influence of Natural Convection and Thermal Radiation Multi-Component Transport in MOCVD Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, S.; Krishnan, A.; Clark, I.

    1999-01-01

    The influence of Grashof and Reynolds number in Metal Organic Chemical Vapor (MOCVD) reactors is being investigated under a combined empirical/numerical study. As part of that research, the deposition of Indium Phosphide in an MOCVD reactor is modeled using the computational code CFD-ACE. The model includes the effects of convection, conduction, and radiation as well as multi-component diffusion and multi-step surface/gas phase chemistry. The results of the prediction are compared with experimental data for a commercial reactor and analyzed with respect to the model accuracy.

  14. Radiation Doses to the Public From the Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Best, R. E.; Maheras, S. J.; Ross, S. S.; Weiner, R.

    2003-02-25

    This paper reviews issues that have been raised concerning radiological risks and safety of the public exposed to shipments of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste to a Yucca Mountain repository. It presents and analyzes the contrasting viewpoints of opponents and proponents, presents facts about radiological exposures and risks, and provides perspective from which to observe the degree of risk that would devolve from the shipments. The paper concludes that the risks to the public's health and safety from being exposed to radiation from the shipments will not be discernable.

  15. Implicit filtered PN for high-energy density thermal radiation transport using discontinuous Galerkin finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laboure, Vincent M.; McClarren, Ryan G.; Hauck, Cory D.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we provide a fully-implicit implementation of the time-dependent, filtered spherical harmonics (FPN) equations for non-linear, thermal radiative transfer. We investigate local filtering strategies and analyze the effect of the filter on the conditioning of the system, showing in particular that the filter improves the convergence properties of the iterative solver. We also investigate numerically the rigorous error estimates derived in the linear setting, to determine whether they hold also for the non-linear case. Finally, we simulate a standard test problem on an unstructured mesh and make comparisons with implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) calculations.

  16. Alternate closures for radiation transport using Legendre polynomials in 1D and spherical harmonics in 2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Gordon L.

    2012-04-01

    When using polynomial expansions for the angular variables in the radiation transport equation, the usual procedure is to truncate the series by setting all higher order terms to zero. At low order, such simple closures may not give the optimum solution. This work tests alternate closures that scale either the time- or spatial-derivatives in the highest order equation. These scale factors can be chosen such that waves propagate at exactly the speed of light in optically thin media. Alternatively, they may be chosen to significantly improve the accuracy of low-order solutions with no additional computational cost. The same scaling procedure and scale factors work in one- and multi-dimensions. In multidimensions, reducing the order of a solution can save significant amounts of computer time.

  17. Study of the response of a lithium yttrium borate scintillator based neutron rem counter by Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunil, C.; Tyagi, Mohit; Biju, K.; Shanbhag, A. A.; Bandyopadhyay, T.

    2015-12-01

    The scarcity and the high cost of 3He has spurred the use of various detectors for neutron monitoring. A new lithium yttrium borate scintillator developed in BARC has been studied for its use in a neutron rem counter. The scintillator is made of natural lithium and boron, and the yield of reaction products that will generate a signal in a real time detector has been studied by FLUKA Monte Carlo radiation transport code. A 2 cm lead introduced to enhance the gamma rejection shows no appreciable change in the shape of the fluence response or in the yield of reaction products. The fluence response when normalized at the average energy of an Am-Be neutron source shows promise of being used as rem counter.

  18. Dose reconstruction for weapons experiments involving 140La at Los Alamos National Laboratory, 1944-1962.

    PubMed

    Kraig, D H

    1997-10-01

    A series of 254 weapons design experiments was conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory from 1944 through 1962 and resulted in the dispersal of approximately 11 PBq (300 kCi) of radioactive 140La. All shots occurred at Point Able in Bayo Canyon, east of the Los Alamos townsite. Public interest and the Government Accounting Office probe precipitated a dose reconstruction to assess potential exposures to members of the public. The information available for each shot included explosive charge size, date and time of explosion, and shot activity. Detailed meteorological data were not available for the majority of the shots, requiring the development of statistically representative meteorological data. A wind rose was developed specific to the afternoon-evening time of the shots, and the wind frequency in each sector was used to determine the fraction of activity dispersed towards each hypothetical receptor. HOTSPOT 7, a Gaussian plume-based dispersion model, was used to determine the average dose per sector per unit of shot activity. The dose from penetrating radiation from ground-deposited 140La was greater by several orders of magnitude than the dose from inhalation and immersion. The highest doses to a permanent resident probably occurred in the easternmost part of the Los Alamos townsite. The highest annual dose occurred in 1955 and was approximately 0.23 mSv. Assuming an individual had been at the location of maximum potential exposure in the Los Alamos townsite continuously throughout the experiments, the total dose from the 18-y series would have been approximately 1.4 mSv with an average dose of approximately 0.09 mSv y(-1). Doses at nearby Totavi trailer park, San Ildefonso Pueblo, and Santa Clara Pueblo were approximately 75%, 40%, and 15%, respectively, of those at Los Alamos. Visitors to nearby public areas received negligible doses. PMID:9314221

  19. On solar radiation-driven surface transport of sodium atoms at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, W.-H.

    1990-06-01

    The ballistic motion of the exospheric sodium atoms on the surface Mercury is modeled, taking into account the solar radiation pressure acceleration and partial surface thermal accommodation. The Monte Carlo simulations show that there should be a significant degree of limb brightening as well as brightness enhancement over the poles. To maintain the observed sodium optical emission, a surface production rate on the order of 5-9 x 10 to the 24th atoms/s is needed. It is also found that, under the present set of assumptions, a reasonable agreement can be reached between theoretical results and ground-based measurements for the dependence of the disk-averaged abundance of the sodium atoms on the solar radiation pressure acceleration. If the low-altitude portion of the planetary surface is shielded from the magnetospheric convective electric field, the effective loss rate of the sodium atoms via photoionization and magnetospheric pickup may be reduced to about 2 x 10 to the 24th atoms/s, with the polar regions acting as the main area of ion outflows.

  20. Application of Filtered Spherical Harmonics Radiation Transport to High-Speed Reactive Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houim, Ryan; Oran, Elaine

    2015-11-01

    Radiative heat transfer is an important, but often neglected, process in high-speed reacting and multiphase flow applications. Some scenarios, such as dust explosions in coal mines, can have regions that are nearly transparent and other regions with high dust concentration that are optically thick. Most approximations to the radiative transfer equation (RTE) are not valid in both limits simultaneously. Issues also arise when solving approximations to the RTE that can often require the solution of elliptic equations. Many compressible hydrodynamic codes use explicit time-marching and block-structured adaptive-mesh-refinement algorithms. Adapting these codes to solve elliptic equations is not always straightforward. Recently, filtered spherical harmonics (FPN) approximations to the RTE have been developed. The FPN equations are hyperbolic and, as a result, can be solved using algorithms that are similar Godunov's method for compressible fluid flow. The FPN model is also valid in optically thick and thin situations provided that the order, N, is high enough. We show that the FPN equations are a promising alternative to traditional RTE approximations. Challenging test cases that involve both free-streaming and optically thick regions will be presented.

  1. A high-resolution coherent transition radiation diagnostic for laser-produced electron transport studies (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Storm, M.; Begishev, I. A.; Brown, R. J.; Mileham, C.; Myatt, J. F.; Nilson, P. M.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Zuegel, J. D.; Guo, C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2008-10-15

    High-resolution images of the rear-surface optical emission from high-intensity (I{approx}10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) laser illuminated metal foils have been recorded using coherent transition radiation (CTR). CTR is generated as relativistic electrons, generated in high-intensity laser-plasma interactions, exit the target's rear surface and move into vacuum. A transition radiation diagnostic (TRD) records time-integrated images in a 24 nm bandwidth window around {lambda}=529 nm. The optical transmission at {lambda}=1053 nm, the laser wavelength, is 15 orders of magnitude lower than the transmission at the wavelength of interest, {lambda}=527 nm. The detector is a scientific grade charge-coupled device (CCD) camera that operates with a signal-to-noise ratio of 10{sup 3} and has a dynamic range of 10{sup 4}. The TRD has demonstrated a spatial resolution of 1.4 {mu}m over a 1 mm field of view, limited only by the CCD pixel size.

  2. Transport, radiative, and dynamical effects of the antarctic ozone hole: A GFDL 'SKYHI' model experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mahlman, J.D.; Pinto, J.P.; Umscheid, L.J.

    1994-02-15

    The Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory 'SKYHI' general circulation model has been used to simulate the effect of the Antarctic 'ozone hole' phenomenon on the radiative and dynamical environment of the lower stratosphere. Both the polar ozone destruction and photochemical restoration chemistries are calculated by parameterized simplifications of the still uncertain, more complete chemical processes. The modeled total column ozone depletions are near 25% in spring over Antarctica, with 1% depletion reaching equatorial latitudes by the end of the 4 1/2 year model experiment. In the lower stratosphere, ozone reductions of 5% reach to the equator. Large coolings of about 8 C are simulated in the lower stratosphere over Antarctica in late spring, while a general cooling of about 1-1.5 C is present throughout the Southern Hemisphere lower stratosphere. The model atmosphere experiences a long-term positive temperature-chemical feedback because significant ozone reductions carry over into the next winter. The overall temperature response to the reduced ozone is essentially radiative in character. However, substantial dynamical changes are induced by the ozone hole effect. The Antarctic middle stratosphere in late spring warms by about 6 C over Antarctica and the lower mid-latitude stratosphere warms by approximately one degree. These warming spots are produced mainly by an increased residual circulation intensity.

  3. Fire emission heights in the climate system - Part 2: Impact on transport, black carbon concentrations and radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veira, A.; Kloster, S.; Schutgens, N. A. J.; Kaiser, J. W.

    2015-07-01

    Wildfires represent a major source for aerosols impacting atmospheric radiation, atmospheric chemistry and cloud micro-physical properties. Previous case studies indicated that the height of the aerosol-radiation interaction may crucially affect atmospheric radiation, but the sensitivity to emission heights has been examined with only a few models and is still uncertain. In this study we use the general circulation model ECHAM6 extended by the aerosol module HAM2 to investigate the impact of wildfire emission heights on atmospheric long-range transport, black carbon (BC) concentrations and atmospheric radiation. We simulate the wildfire aerosol release using either various versions of a semi-empirical plume height parametrization or prescribed standard emission heights in ECHAM6-HAM2. Extreme scenarios of near-surface or free-tropospheric-only injections provide lower and upper constraints on the emission height climate impact. We find relative changes in mean global atmospheric BC burden of up to 7.9±4.4 % caused by average changes in emission heights of 1.5-3.5 km. Regionally, changes in BC burden exceed 30-40 % in the major biomass burning regions. The model evaluation of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) against Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) observations indicates that the implementation of a plume height parametrization slightly reduces the ECHAM6-HAM2 biases regionally, but on the global scale these improvements in model performance are small. For prescribed emission release at the surface, wildfire emissions entail a total sky top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcing (RF) of -0.16±0.06 W m-2. The application of a plume height parametrization which agrees reasonably well with observations introduces a slightly stronger negative TOA RF of -0.20±0.07 W m-2. The standard ECHAM6-HAM2 model in which 25 % of the wildfire emissions are injected

  4. Real-Time Airborne Gamma-Ray Background Estimation Using NASVD with MLE and Radiation Transport for Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Schweppe, John E.; Stave, Sean C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Jordan, David V.; Stewart, Trevor N.; Seifert, Carolyn E.; Kernan, Warnick J.

    2015-06-01

    Helicopter-mounted gamma-ray detectors can provide law enforcement officials the means to quickly and accurately detect, identify, and locate radiological threats over a wide geographical area. The ability to accurately distinguish radiological threat-generated gamma-ray signatures from background gamma radiation in real time is essential in order to realize this potential. This problem is non-trivial, especially in urban environments for which the background may change very rapidly during flight. This exacerbates the challenge of estimating background due to the poor counting statistics inherent in real-time airborne gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements. To address this, we have developed a new technique for real-time estimation of background gamma radiation from aerial measurements. This method is built upon on the noise-adjusted singular value decomposition (NASVD) technique that was previously developed for estimating the potassium (K), uranium (U), and thorium (T) concentrations in soil post-flight. The method can be calibrated using K, U, and T spectra determined from radiation transport simulations along with basis functions, which may be determined empirically by applying maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) to previously measured airborne gamma-ray spectra. The method was applied to both measured and simulated airborne gamma-ray spectra, with and without man-made radiological source injections. Compared to schemes based on simple averaging, this technique was less sensitive to background contamination from the injected man-made sources and may be particularly useful when the gamma-ray background frequently changes during the course of the flight.

  5. Massively parallel simulation with DOE's ASCI supercomputers : an overview of the Los Alamos Crestone project

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, R. P.; Gittings, M. L.

    2004-01-01

    The Los Alamos Crestone Project is part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative, or ASCI Program. The main goal of this software development project is to investigate the use of continuous adaptive mesh refinement (CAMR) techniques for application to problems of interest to the Laboratory. There are many code development efforts in the Crestone Project, both unclassified and classified codes. In this overview I will discuss the unclassified SAGE and the RAGE codes. The SAGE (SAIC adaptive grid Eulerian) code is a one-, two-, and three-dimensional multimaterial Eulerian massively parallel hydrodynamics code for use in solving a variety of high-deformation flow problems. The RAGE CAMR code is built from the SAGE code by adding various radiation packages, improved setup utilities and graphics packages and is used for problems in which radiation transport of energy is important. The goal of these massively-parallel versions of the codes is to run extremely large problems in a reasonable amount of calendar time. Our target is scalable performance to {approx}10,000 processors on a 1 billion CAMR computational cell problem that requires hundreds of variables per cell, multiple physics packages (e.g. radiation and hydrodynamics), and implicit matrix solves for each cycle. A general description of the RAGE code has been published in [l],[ 2], [3] and [4]. Currently, the largest simulations we do are three-dimensional, using around 500 million computation cells and running for literally months of calendar time using {approx}2000 processors. Current ASCI platforms range from several 3-teraOPS supercomputers to one 12-teraOPS machine at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the White machine, and one 20-teraOPS machine installed at Los Alamos, the Q machine. Each machine is a system comprised of many component parts that must perform in unity for the successful run of these simulations. Key features of any massively parallel system

  6. Anatomical database generation for radiation transport modeling from computed tomography (CT) scan data

    SciTech Connect

    Margle, S.M.; Tinnel, E.P.; Till, L.E.; Eckerman, K.F.; Durfee, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Geometric models of the anatomy are used routinely in calculations of the radiation dose in organs and tissues of the body. Development of such models has been hampered by lack of detailed anatomical information on children, and models themselves have been limited to quadratic conic sections. This summary reviews the development of an image processing workstation used to extract anatomical information from routine diagnostic CT procedure. A standard IBM PC/AT microcomputer has been augmented with an automatically loading 9-track magnetic tape drive, an 8-bit 1024 {times} 1024 pixel graphics adapter/monitor/film recording package, a mouse/trackball assembly, dual 20 MB removable cartridge media, a 72 MB disk drive, and a printer. Software utilized by the workstation includes a Geographic Information System (modified for manipulation of CT images), CAD software, imaging software, and various modules to ease data transfer among the software packages. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Monte Carlo Code System for High-Energy Radiation Transport Calculations.

    2000-02-16

    Version 00 HERMES-KFA consists of a set of Monte Carlo Codes used to simulate particle radiation and interaction with matter. The main codes are HETC, MORSE, and EGS. They are supported by a common geometry package, common random routines, a command interpreter, and auxiliary codes like NDEM that is used to generate a gamma-ray source from nuclear de-excitation after spallation processes. The codes have been modified so that any particle history falling outside the domainmore » of the physical theory of one program can be submitted to another program in the suite to complete the work. Also response data can be submitted by each program, to be collected and combined by a statistic package included within the command interpreter.« less

  8. Application of GEANT4 radiation transport toolkit to dose calculations in anthropomorphic phantoms.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, P; Trindade, A; Peralta, L; Alves, C; Chaves, A; Lopes, M C

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, we present a novel implementation of a dose calculation application, based on the GEANT4 Monte Carlo toolkit. Validation studies were performed with an homogeneous water phantom and an Alderson-Rando anthropomorphic phantom both irradiated with high-energy photon beams produced by a clinical linear accelerator. As input, this tool requires computer tomography images for automatic codification of voxel-based geometries and phase-space distributions to characterize the incident radiation field. Simulation results were compared with ionization chamber, thermoluminescent dosimetry data and commercial treatment planning system calculations. In homogeneous water phantom, overall agreement with measurements were within 1-2%. For anthropomorphic simulated setups (thorax and head irradiation) mean differences between GEANT4 and TLD measurements were less than 2%. Significant differences between GEANT4 and a semi-analytical algorithm implemented in the treatment planning system, were found in low-density regions, such as air cavities with strong electronic disequilibrium. PMID:15388147

  9. Parallel multigrid solver of radiative transfer equation for photon transport via graphics processing unit.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hao; Phan, Lan; Lin, Yuting

    2012-09-01

    A graphics processing unit-based parallel multigrid solver for a radiative transfer equation with vacuum boundary condition or reflection boundary condition is presented for heterogeneous media with complex geometry based on two-dimensional triangular meshes or three-dimensional tetrahedral meshes. The computational complexity of this parallel solver is linearly proportional to the degrees of freedom in both angular and spatial variables, while the full multigrid method is utilized to minimize the number of iterations. The overall gain of speed is roughly 30 to 300 fold with respect to our prior multigrid solver, which depends on the underlying regime and the parallelization. The numerical validations are presented with the MATLAB codes at https://sites.google.com/site/rtefastsolver/. PMID:23085905

  10. A robotic system to conduct radiation and contamination surveys on nuclear waste transport casks

    SciTech Connect

    Harrigan, R.W.; Sanders, T.L.

    1990-06-01

    The feasibility of performing, numerous spent fuel cask operations using fully integrated robotic systems is under evaluation. Using existing technology, operational and descriptive software and hardware in the form of robotic end effectors are being designed in conjunction with interfacing cask components. A robotic radiation and contamination survey system has been developed and used on mock-up cask hardware to evaluate the impact of such fully automated operations on cask design features and productivity. Based on experience gained from the survey system, numerous health physics operations can be reliably performed with little human intervention using a fully automated system. Such operations can also significantly reduce time requirements for cask-receiving operations. 7 refs., 51 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Angular Distribution of Particles Emerging from a Diffusive Region and its Implications for the Fleck-Canfield Random Walk Algorithm for Implicit Monte Carlo Radiation Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, M.A.

    2000-07-03

    We present various approximations for the angular distribution of particles emerging from an optically thick, purely isotropically scattering region into a vacuum. Our motivation is to use such a distribution for the Fleck-Canfield random walk method [1] for implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) [2] radiation transport problems. We demonstrate that the cosine distribution recommended in the original random walk paper [1] is a poor approximation to the angular distribution predicted by transport theory. Then we examine other approximations that more closely match the transport angular distribution.

  12. Observational evidence of competing source, loss, and transport processes for relativistic electrons in Earth's outer radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Drew; Mann, Ian; Usanova, Maria; Rodriguez, Juan; Henderson, Mike; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Morley, Steven; Claudepierre, Seth; Li, Wen; Kellerman, Adam; Boyd, Alexander; Kim, Kyung-Chan

    Earth’s outer electron radiation belt is a region of extreme variability, with relativistic electron intensities changing by orders of magnitude over time scales ranging from minutes to years. Extreme variations of outer belt electrons ultimately result from the relative impacts of various competing source (and acceleration), loss, and transport processes. Most of these processes involve wave-particle interactions between outer belt electrons and different types of plasma waves in the inner magnetosphere, and in turn, the activity of these waves depends on different solar wind and magnetospheric driving conditions and thus can vary drastically from event to event. Using multipoint analysis with data from NASA’s Van Allen Probes, THEMIS, and SAMPEX missions, NOAA’s GOES and POES constellations, and ground-based observatories, we present results from case studies revealing how different source/acceleration and loss mechanisms compete during active periods to result in drastically different distributions of outer belt electrons. By using a combination of low-Earth orbiting and high-altitude-equatorial orbiting satellites, we briefly review how it is possible to get a much more complete picture of certain wave activity and electron losses over the full range of MLTs and L-shells throughout the radiation belt. We then show example cases highlighting the importance of particular mechanisms, including: substorm injections and whistler-mode chorus waves for the source and acceleration of relativistic electrons; magnetopause shadowing and wave-particle interactions with EMIC waves for sudden losses; and ULF wave activity for driving radial transport, a process which is important for redistributing relativistic electrons, contributing both to acceleration and loss processes. We show how relativistic electron enhancement events involve local acceleration that is consistent with wave-particle interactions between a seed population of 10s to 100s of keV electrons, with a

  13. O{sub 3} and stratospheric H{sub 2}O radiative forcing resulting from a supersonic jet transport emission scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, A.S.; Kinnison, D.E.; Penner, J.E.; Grant, K.E.; Tamaresis, J.; Connell, P.S.

    1996-01-01

    The tropospheric radiative forcing has been calculated for ozone and water vapor perturbations caused by a realistic High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft emission scenario. Atmospheric profiles of water vapor and ozone were obtained using the LLNL 2-D chemical-radiative-transport model (CRT) of the global troposphere and stratosphere. IR radiative forcing calculations were made with the LLNL correlated k-distribution radiative transfer model. UV-Visible-Near IR radiative forcing calculations were made with the LLNL two stream solar radiation model. For the case of water vapor the IR and Near IR radiative forcing was determined at five different latitudes and then averaged using an appropriate latitudinal average to obtain the global average value. Global average values of radiative forcing were approximately 1.2--2.6 10{sup {minus}3} W/m{sup 2}, depending on the background atmospheric water vapor profile. This result is consistent with prior published values for a similar aircraft scenario and supports the conclusion that the water vapor climate forcing effect is very small. The radiative forcing in the IR and UV-Visible spectral ranges, due to the ozone perturbation, was calculated for the globally averaged atmosphere. Global average values of the radiative forcing were 0.034 W/m{sup 2} for the UV-Visible spectral range and 0.006 W/m{sup 2} for the IR spectral range (0.04 W/m{sup 2} total). This result is also consistent with the range of published values obtained for a similar HSCT scenario. As was the case for water vapor, the ozone forcing is too small to be of major consequence.

  14. Provisional standards of radiation safety of flight personnel and passengers in air transport of the civil aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Provisional standards for radiation affecting passenger aircraft are considered. Agencies responsible for seeing that the regulations are enforced are designated while radiation sources and types of radiation are defined. Standard levels of permissible radiation are given and conditions for radiation safety are discussed. Dosimetric equipment on board aircraft is delineated and regulation effective dates are given.

  15. Los Alamos Before and After the Fire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On May 4, 2000, a prescribed fire was set at Bandelier National Monument, New Mexico, to clear brush and dead and dying undergrowth to prevent a larger, subsequent wildfire. Unfortunately, due to high winds and extremely dry conditions in the surrounding area, the prescribed fire quickly raged out of control and, by May 10, the blaze had spread into the nearby town of Los Alamos. In all, more than 20,000 people were evacuated from their homes and more than 200 houses were destroyed as the flames consumed about 48,000 acres in and around the Los Alamos area. The pair of images above were acquired by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) sensor, flying aboard NASA's Landsat 7 satellite, shortly before the Los Alamos fire (top image, acquired April 14) and shortly after the fire was extinguished (lower image, June 17). The images reveal the extent of the damage caused by the fire. Combining ETM+ channels 7, 4, and 2 (one visible and two infrared channels) results in a false-color image where vegetation appears as bright to dark green. Forested areas are generally dark green while herbaceous vegetation is light green. Rangeland or more open areas appear pink to light purple. Areas with extensive pavement or urban development appear light blue or white to purple. Less densely-developed residential areas appear light green and golf courses are very bright green. In the lower image, the areas recently burned appear bright red. Landsat 7 data courtesy United States Geological Survey EROS DataCenter. Images by Robert Simmon, NASA GSFC.

  16. LAMPF II workshop, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, February 1-4, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Thiessen, H.A.

    1982-01-01

    This report contains the proceedings of the first LAMPF II Workshop held at Los Alamos February 1 to 4, 1982. Included are the talks that were available in written form. The conclusion of the participants was that there are many exciting areas of physics that will be addressed by such a machine.

  17. Biological assessment for the effluent reduction program, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, S.P.

    1996-08-01

    This report describes the biological assessment for the effluent recution program proposed to occur within the boundaries of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Potential effects on wetland plants and on threatened and endangered species are discussed, along with a detailed description of the individual outfalls resulting from the effluent reduction program.

  18. Los Alamos National Laboratory computer benchmarking 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.L.

    1983-06-01

    Evaluating the performance of computing machinery is a continual effort of the Computer Research and Applications Group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This report summarizes the results of the group's benchmarking activities performed between October 1981 and September 1982, presenting compilation and execution times as well as megaflop rates for a set of benchmark codes. Tests were performed on the following computers: Cray Research, Inc. (CRI) Cray-1S; Control Data Corporation (CDC) 7600, 6600, Cyber 73, Cyber 825, Cyber 835, Cyber 855, and Cyber 205; Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) VAX 11/780 and VAX 11/782; and Apollo Computer, Inc., Apollo.

  19. Ultraprecision machining of optics at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Rhorer, R.L.; Gauler, A.L.; Colston, E.W.; Ruhe, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    Ultraprecision machine tools are used at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for single-point diamond turning of optics and other precision parts. Measurements of a 50-mm-diam copper flat illustrate the quality of a part that can be machined on the Moore No. 3 lathe. Measurements of a 0.4-m-diam aluminum mirror with a 20-m radius of curvature are presented as an example of a part machined on the Moore No. 5 lathe. A varying frequency sine wave grating shows a type of special optical grating that can be produced using the Pneumo lathe.

  20. Ultraprecision machining of optics at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Rhorer, R.L.; Gauler, A.L.; Colston, E.W.; Ruhe, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    Ultraprecision machine tools are used at Los Alamos for single point diamond turning of optics and other precision parts. Measurements of a 50-mm-dia copper flat are used to illustrate the quality of a part which can be machined on the Moore No. 3 lathe. Measurements of a 0.4-m-dia aluminum mirror with a 20-m radius-of-curvature are presented as an example of a part machined on the Moore No. 5 lathe. A varying frequency sine wave grating is used to show a type of special optical grating which can be produced using the Pneumo lathe.