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Sample records for alan gerard mathew

  1. Gerard Faeth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Gerard M. Faeth, University of Michigan, principal investigator in combustion science experiments, including Flow/Soot-Formation in Nonbuoyant Laminar Diffusion Flames, investigation of Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames in Microgravity: A Paradigm for Soot Processes in Turbulent Flames, and Soot Processes in Freely-Propagating Laminar Premixed Flames.

  2. Dr. Gerard Faeth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Professor Gerard M. Faeth, Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan, Arn Arbor, MI, is a principal investigator in NASA combustion science directed by Glenn Research Center. His projects include: Soot Processes in Freely-Propagating Laminar Premixed Flames; Investigation of Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames in Microgravity: A Paradigm for Soot Processes in Turbulent Flames (scheduled to fly on the STS-107 mission); and Flow/Soot- Formation in Nonbuoyant Laminar Diffusion Flames.

  3. Dr. Gerard Faeth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Professor Gerard M. Faeth, Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan, Arn Arbor, MI, is a principal investigator in NASA combustion science directed by Glenn Research Center. His projects include: Soot Processes in Freely-Propagating Laminar Premixed Flames; Investigation of Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames in Microgravity: A Paradigm for Soot Processes in Turbulent Flames (scheduled to fly on the STS-107 mission); and Flow/Soot- Formation in Nonbuoyant Laminar Diffusion Flames.

  4. SHEPARD, ALAN

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-01-01

    S61-03850 (1 Oct. 1961) --- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr. (right) receives a plaque and award from members of the British Rocket Society. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  5. Ground states of the massless Derezinski-Gerard model

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, Atsushi

    2009-11-15

    We consider the massless Derezinski-Gerard model introduced by Derezinski and Gerard in 1999. We give a sufficient condition for the existence of a ground state of the massless Derezinski-Gerard model without the assumption that the Hamiltonian of particles has compact resolvent.

  6. Tribes of Men: John Joseph Mathews and Indian Internationalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutenski, Emily

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses John Joseph Mathews and Indian internationalism. As an old man, Osage intellectual, writer, and historian, John Joseph Mathews recalled his expatriation from the United States during the 1920s. After growing up in Pawhuska, Oklahoma, seat of the Osage Nation, where he had been born in 1894 to a white mother…

  7. Tribes of Men: John Joseph Mathews and Indian Internationalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutenski, Emily

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses John Joseph Mathews and Indian internationalism. As an old man, Osage intellectual, writer, and historian, John Joseph Mathews recalled his expatriation from the United States during the 1920s. After growing up in Pawhuska, Oklahoma, seat of the Osage Nation, where he had been born in 1894 to a white mother…

  8. Alan Bean Art Exhibit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    NASA Apollo 12 Astronaut and Artist Alan Bean gives remarks at the opening of the exhibit "Alan Bean: Painting Apollo, First Artist on Another World" at the National Air and Space Museum, Monday, July 20, 2009 in Washington. The show opening coincided with the 40th anniversary celebration of Apollo. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. Alan Bean Art Exhibit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Guest view works of art by NASA Apollo 12 Astronaut and Artist Alan Bean during the opening of the show "Alan Bean: Painting Apollo, First Artist on Another World" at the National Air and Space Museum, Monday, July 20, 2009 in Washington. The show opening coincided with the 40th anniversary celebration of Apollo. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Tribute to the contribution of Gerard Lallenment to structural dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2001-01-01

    The Society for Experimental Mechanics and the International Modal Analysis Conference recognize the remarkable contribution to experimental mechanics, mechanical engineering and structural dynamics of Professor Gerard Lallement, from the University of Franche-Comte, France. A special session is organized during the IMAC-XX to outline the many achievements of Gerard Lallement in the fields of modal analysis, structural system identification, the theory and practice of structural modification, component mode synthesis and finite element model updating. The purpose of this publication is not to provide an exhaustive account of Gerard Lallement's contribution to structural dynamics. Numerous references are provided that should help the interested reader learn more about the many aspects of his work. Instead, the significance of this work is illustrated by discussing the role of structural dynamics in industrial applications and its future challenges. The technical aspects of Gerard Lallement's work are illustrated with a discussion of structural modification, modeling error localization and model updating.

  11. Teaching the A Level Text: Gerard Manley Hopkins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hills, Susan

    1987-01-01

    Describes a teacher's experience of learning about the poetry of Gerard Manley Hopkins along with her students. Asserts that through understanding his use of imagery and internal half-rhyme, students gained an appreciation of his poetry. (SRT)

  12. Gerard Kuiper and the Infrared Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, Derek

    2013-10-01

    The life and contributions of Gerard Kuiper have been documented by Dale Cruikshank in his National Academy of Sciences biography. I will argue that particularly important in this eventful life was Kuiper's war time experiences. Kuiper's wartime role evolved as the war unfolded, but towards the end he was charged by the US military with reporting German progress with war-related technologies and the activities of scientists under Nazi control. He interviewed a great many scientists, including his own PhD mentor (Ejnar Hertzsprung), and when Kuiper was the only person available, he interviewed concentration-camp victims. He carried briefing sheets that identified the technologies being sought by the allies and the major fraction of these involved infrared equipment. He sent back to the USA boxes of documents, and large amounts of equipment, and he stressed to the military his interest in these for his own research. It seems very likely that in this way an effective PbS infrared detector, so critical to Kuiper's career and the future of planetary science, came to the USA and to Robert Cashman's laboratory at Northwestern University. As the war was winding down, Cashman and Kuiper worked together to develop a practical infrared spectrometer for astronomical use. Within months, Kuiper discovered the C02 atmospheres on Mars and Venus.

  13. The madness of Gerard de Nerval.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, Allan

    2014-06-01

    This paper examines the madness of Gerard de Nerval, the nineteenth-century French writer. It looks at his account of mental disturbance, how he responded to the psychiatric profession and how he reacted to being diagnosed as insane. It considers his autobiographical novella of madness, Aurelia, which he began at the suggestion of his alienist, Dr Emile Blanche, and while he was still an asylum inmate. Nerval's story raises important questions about the nature of madness. Is it, as he contended, a mystical experience revealing truths about spiritual worlds inaccessible to the 'sane'? Does psychiatry fail to understand it and inappropriately reduce it to the categories of scientific reason? Or are such notions of the spiritual value of madness guilty of the charge that they romanticise insanity? Do they make extravagant claims for an experience that is often disturbing and debilitating? What is the relationship between madness and recovery? Should an individual try to forget their experience of mental disturbance once they recover, or should they examine what the event reveals about themselves? Can the language of madness be decoded to unveil profound truths as Carl Jung and R.D. Laing have suggested, or is it, as the psychiatrist German Berrios maintains, merely a series of 'empty speech acts', signifying nothing? And finally, how does one avoid writing about madness, and instead write madness?

  14. ASTRONAUT SHEPARD, ALAN - TX

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1963-03-07

    Astronaut Alan Shepard with Gilruth, and Astronauts Slayton, Cooper, Carpenter, Schirra, Grissom around the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) sign at the Farnsworth-Chambers Bldg. FARNSWORTH-CHAMBERS BLDG., HOUSTON, TX B&W

  15. Alan Bean Art Exhibit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    NASA Apollo 7 Astronaut Walt Cunningham, left, and NASA STS-125 Mission Specialist Michael Massimino talk with another guest during the opening of "Alan Bean: Painting Apollo, First Artist on Another World" by NASA Apollo 12 Astronaut and Artist Alan Bean at the National Air and Space Museum, Monday, July 20, 2009 in Washington. The show opening coincided with the 40th anniversary celebration of Apollo. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Alan Bean Art Exhibit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Former NASA Astronaut and U.S. Senator John Glenn is seen at the opening of the exhibit "Alan Bean: Painting Apollo, First Artist on Another World" at the National Air and Space Museum, Monday, July 20, 2009 in Washington. The show opening coincided with the 40th anniversary celebration of Apollo. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  17. Official portrait Payload specialists Robert Cenker and Gerard Magilton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Official portrait Robert J. Cenker (right) and Gerard Magilton, RCA Payload Specialists for STS 61-C. They are wearing the blue shuttle flight suit. They are sitting in front of a table with their helmets and an American flag behind them.

  18. ASTRONAUT SHEPARD, ALAN - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-05-05

    S61-01927 (5 May 1961) --- Mercury-Redstone 3 (MR-3), the United States' first manned spaceflight, is launched from Cape Canaveral on a suborbital mission. Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr. was the pilot of the Mercury spacecraft, designated "Freedom 7". The spacecraft attained a maximum speed of 5,180 miles per hour (mph), reached an altitude of 116 1/2 statute miles, and landed 302 statute miles downrange from Cape Canaveral, Florida. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  19. An updated summary of MATHEW/ADPIC model evaluation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, K.T.; Dickerson, M.H.

    1990-05-01

    This paper summarizes the major model evaluation studies conducted for the MATHEW/ADPIC atmospheric transport and diffusion models used by the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability. These studies have taken place over the last 15 years and involve field tracer releases influenced by a variety of meteorological and topographical conditions. Neutrally buoyant tracers released both as surface and elevated point sources, as well as material dispersed by explosive, thermally bouyant release mechanisms have been studied. Results from these studies show that the MATHEW/ADPIC models estimate the tracer air concentrations to within a factor of two of the measured values 20% to 50% of the time, and within a factor of five of the measurements 35% to 85% of the time depending on the complexity of the meteorology and terrain, and the release height of the tracer. Comparisons of model estimates to peak downwind deposition and air concentration measurements from explosive releases are shown to be generally within a factor of two to three. 24 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Summary of MATHEW/ADPIC model evaluation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, M.H.

    1985-10-01

    This report summarizes model evaluation studies conducted for the MATHEW/ADPIC transport and diffusion models during the past ten years. These models support the US Department of Energy Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability, an emergency response service for atmospheric releases of nuclear material. Field campaigns involving tracer releases used in these studies cover a broad range of meteorology, terrain and tracer release heights, the three most important aspects of estimating air concentration values resulting from airborne releases of toxic material. Results of these studies show that these models can estimate air concentration values within a factor of 2, 20% to 50% of the time and a factor of 5, 40% to 80% of the time. As the meteorology and terrain become more complex and the release height of the tracer is increased the accuracy of the model calculations degrades. This band of uncertainty appears to correctly represent the capability of these models at this time. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  1. An astrolabe attributed to Gerard Mercator, c. 1570

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Gerard L'E.; Dekker, Elly

    The Istituto e Museo di Storia della Scienza, Florence, Italy, possesses an astrolabe with five latitude plates that is now attributed to the Duisburg workshop of Gerard Mercator. Although it is known that Mercator made instruments, this is the first surviving example to be identified. Another latitude plate is shown to come from the workshop of the Florentine, Giovan Battista Giusti. A seventh plate, possibly engraved by Rumold Mercator, provides the only known Mercatorian polar stereographic projection. The role of Egnazio Danti, cosmographer to the Grand Duke of Tuscany, in the acquisition of the astrolabe in about 1570 is considered.

  2. The 1954 Social Science Statement and School Desegregation: A Reply to Gerard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Stuart W.

    1984-01-01

    H.B. Gerard (1983) has misrepresented the content of the 1954 Social Science Statement. His appraisal of school desegregation is misleading in terms of both its current status and future potential; further, the actual and potential role of social science in public policy is more extensive than Gerard has claimed. (CMG)

  3. Once a physicist: Alan Pierson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-08-01

    Alan Pierson is artistic director and conductor of the New York-based contemporary-music ensemble Alarm Will Sound, and a professor of conducting at Northwestern University's Bienen School of Music in Illinois

  4. Sediment as a Regional Resource in the Low-Commercial-Use Navigation Program, Mathews County, VA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Engineer District, Norfolk ( NAO ). INTRODUCTION. Mathews County (Figure 1) is located on the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay approximately 65 miles...addressing water resource issues was no longer feasible, and that a regional approach would be necessary. The Mathews County RSM effort allowed NAO ...USACE and stakeholders, and to examine the sediment distribution and movement across the County as a system. SYSTEM BOUNDARY AND COMPONENTS. NAO

  5. On Gerard P. Smith's scientific character and thought.

    PubMed

    Geary, Nori

    2004-08-01

    A fundamental tenet of the intellectual history of science is that the examination of the intellectual qualities of individual eminent scientists is a fruitful exercise for scholars who come after. I therefore review some salient aspects of the scientific character and thought of Gerard P. Smith (GPS), as they have been expressed in his writings. The first section considers some biographical details in respect to the sort of qualities that may prepare a mind for scientific achievement. The second section considers some logical and rhetorical qualities evident in the scientific writing of GPS, especially in the period of his career before the crucial tests of the CCK satiation hypothesis. The third section then considers the character of his thought as revealed in the formal statement, the operationalization, and the critical testing of the CCK satiation hypothesis. The qualities of mind discussed certainly contributed decisively to the scientific achievements of GPS, and their emulation may well contribute to the success of others.

  6. SHEPARD, ALAN - ASTRONAUT - SUIT - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-01-01

    S61-03651 (5 May 1961) --- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., in his pressure suit and helmet, is being inserted into the Freedom 7 capsule in preparation for the Mercury-Redstone 3 (MR-3) mission. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  7. Air quality modeling for emergency response applications. [MATHEW; ADPIC; FEM3

    SciTech Connect

    Gudiksen, P.H.; Chan, S.T.; Knox, J.B.; Dickerson, M.H.; Lange, R.

    1985-12-01

    The three-dimensional diagnostic wind field model (MATHEW) and the particle-in-cell transport and diffusion model (ADPIC) are used by the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) for real-time assessments of the consequences from accidental releases of radioactivity into the atmosphere. For the dispersion of hazardous heavier-than-air gases, a time-dependent, three-dimensional finite element model (FEM3) is used. These models have been evaluated extensively against a wide spectrum of field experiments involving the release of chemically inert tracers or heavier-than-air gases. The results reveal that the MATHEW/ADPIC models are capable of simulating the spatial and temporal distributions of tracer concentration to within a factor of 2 for 50% of the measured tracer concentrations for near surface releases in relatively flat terrain and within a factor of 2 for 20% of the comparisons for elevated releases in complex terrain. The FEM3 model produces quite satisfactory simulations of the spatial and temporal distributions of heavier-than-air gases, typically within a kilometer of the release point. The ARAC consists of a centralized computerized emergency response system that is capable of supporting up to 100 sites and providing real-time predictions of the consequence of transportation accidents that may occur anywhere. It utilizes pertinent accident information, local and regional meteorology, and terrain as input to the MATHEW/ADPIC models for the consequence analysis. It has responded to over 150 incidents and exercises over the past decade.

  8. Portrait of Astronaut Alan L. Bean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Portrait of Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Prime Crew Lunar Module Pilot of the Apollo 12 Lunar Landing Mission, in his space suit minus the helmet. He is standing outside beside a mock-up of the Lunar Lander.

  9. Portrait of Astronaut Alan L. Bean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Portrait of Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Prime Crew Lunar Module Pilot of the Apollo 12 Lunar Landing Mission, in his space suit minus the helmet. He is standing outside beside a mock-up of the Lunar Lander.

  10. ASTRONAUT ALAN SHEPARD - FREEDOM "7" - LIFTOFF - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-05-05

    S61-02409 (5 May 1961) --- Launching of the Mercury-Redstone 3 (MR-3) rocket from Cape Canaveral on astronaut Alan B. Shepard?s suborbital mission. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  11. ASTRONAUT ALAN SHEPARD - PREFLIGHT ACTIVITIES - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-01-01

    S61-02767 (5 May 1961) --- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr. in flight couch for final check before insertion into capsule for his Mercury-Redstone 3 (MR-3) flight. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  12. SHEPARD, ALAN B., ASTRONAUT - MISC. - PA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1960-01-01

    G60-02402 (1960) --- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr. prepares for testing in a capsule of the U.S. Navy's centrifuge at Johnsville, Pennsylvania. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  13. Alanes formation on the Al(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangan, Sylvie; Veyan, Jean-Francois; Chabal, Yves J.; Chaudhuri, Santanu; Muckerman, James T.

    2008-03-01

    Alane clusters (AlxHy) are believed to be the ubiquitous intermediates in hydrogen storage reactions for a wide variety of alanates (LiAlH4, NaAlH4) currently considered for hydrogen storage. The formation and behavior of alanes at surfaces appear to control and limit the efficiency of hydrogen storage. In particular, hydrogen adsorption on the Al(111) surface leads to the coexistence of several adsorbed species, the concentration of which is affected by the step density, the surface coverage and the temperature. We combine density functional theory (DFT) and surface infra-red (IR) absorption spectroscopy to uncover the mechanisms for alane formation on Al(111) surfaces. At low coverage, DFT predicts a two-fold bridge site adsorption for atomic hydrogen, consistent with previous Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy measurements. At higher coverage, the formation of small chemisorbed AlH3 occurs at the step edges. With increasing coverage AlH3 is extracted from the step edge and becomes highly mobile on the terraces in a weakly bound state. This mobility is the key factor leading to the growth of larger alanes through AlH3 oligomerization. For these large alanes, previous Thermal Programmed Desorption studies are discussed and compared to the thermal stability observed in IR.

  14. The 2015 Gerard W. Ostheimer Lecture: What's New in Labor Analgesia and Cesarean Delivery.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Katherine W

    2016-05-01

    Every year the Board of Directors of the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology selects an individual to review the literature pertinent to obstetric anesthesiology published the previous calendar year. This individual selects the most notable contributions, creates a syllabus of the articles, and then presents his/her overview in an annual lecture named in honor of the late Gerard W. Ostheimer, a pioneering obstetric anesthesiologist from the Brigham and Women's Hospital. This article reviews the literature published in 2014 focusing on the themes of labor analgesia and cesarean delivery. Its contents were presented as the Gerard W. Ostheimer Lecture at the 47th Annual Meeting of the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology, May 16, 2015, in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The syllabus is available as Supplemental Digital Content (http://links.lww.com/AA/B397).

  15. Meeting Mathew

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roud, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Students with hidden disabilities can be a handful. Fellow students dislike them. Teachers are wary. But these students need not be lost in the shuffle or ostracized. Educators, parents and the students themselves can--working together--change the attitudes and behaviors causing so much trouble. This article describes how the author conducted a…

  16. Two-parameter double-oscillator model of Mathews-Lakshmanan type: Series solutions and supersymmetric partners

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze-Halberg, Axel E-mail: xbataxel@gmail.com; Wang, Jie

    2015-07-15

    We obtain series solutions, the discrete spectrum, and supersymmetric partners for a quantum double-oscillator system. Its potential features a superposition of the one-parameter Mathews-Lakshmanan interaction and a one-parameter harmonic or inverse harmonic oscillator contribution. Furthermore, our results are transferred to a generalized Pöschl-Teller model that is isospectral to the double-oscillator system.

  17. 78 FR 76103 - Donald V. Bernardo, a/k/a Don Bernarndo, 701 Fredericksburg Road, Mathews, NC 28105; Order...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Donald V. Bernardo, a/k/a Don Bernarndo, 701 Fredericksburg Road, Mathews... District of Florida, Donald V. Bernardo, a/k/a Don Bernardo (``Bernardo''), was convicted of Section 38 of..., Donald V. Bernardo, a/k/a Don Bernardo, with a last known address at: 701 Fredericksburg Road,...

  18. [The influence of madness in the literary production of Gerard de Nerval].

    PubMed

    Miranda C, Marcelo; Bustamante C, M Leonor

    2010-01-01

    Gerard de Nerval was a French writer, poet and essayist, precursor of surrealism that used for the first time this word in literature and influenced many modern writers. Since the age of 32, Nerval had recurrent psychotic episodes mixed with a severe depression, leading to many hospitalizations, and finally to his death. This mental disease clearly influenced his works and provided originality to his prose and poetry. However no clear explanation has ever been given to his mental disorder. We analyzed the clinical data available from his own works and the opinion of his close friends and postulate the hypothesis that Nerval had a mood disorder.

  19. What's new in obstetric anesthesia? The 2011 Gerard W. Ostheimer Lecture.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Paloma

    2011-12-01

    The "What's New in Obstetric Anesthesia" lecture was established by the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology in 1975 to update members on the preceding year's medical literature. In 1995, the lecture was renamed in honor of Gerard W. Ostheimer, an obstetric anesthesiologist from Brigham and Women's Hospital who contributed significantly to the knowledge and practice of obstetric anesthesia. The Ostheimer lecturer reviews the obstetric anesthesia, obstetric, perinatology, and health services literature to identify articles that are relevant to the practice of obstetric anesthesiology. This review summarizes the most relevant publications from the 2010 literature.

  20. Astronaut Alan Bean shaves while aboard Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, uses battery powered shaver while in the crew quarters of the Skylab space station's Orbital Workshop (OWS) crew quarters. This photograph was taken with a 35mm Nikon camera held by one of Bean's fellow crewmen during the 56.5 day second manned Skylab mission in Earth orbit.

  1. Alan Bullock: Historian, Social Democrat and Chairman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caston, Geoffrey

    2006-01-01

    This study considers the influence on British education (particularly schools) of Alan Bullock, Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University from 1969 to 1973 and distinguished contemporary historian. It quotes extensively from Bullock's own writings, including his developing personal views on education, and reflections on his own experiences. Following a…

  2. SHEPARD, ALAN B., JR. ASTRONAUT - WASHINGTON, DC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1963-05-06

    S63-06268 (8 May 1963) --- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard, Jr., receives his NASA's Distinguished Service Medal from President John F. Kennedy, after his Mercury-Redstone 3 (MR-3) flight, in a Rose Garden ceremony on May 8, 1961 at the White House.

  3. Automotive storage of hydrogen in alane.

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Hua, T. Q.; Peng, J.-K.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-09-01

    Although alane (AlH{sub 3}) has many interesting properties as a hydrogen storage material, it cannot be regenerated on-board a vehicle. One way of overcoming this limitation is to formulate an alane slurry that can be easily loaded into a fuel tank and removed for off-board regeneration. In this paper, we analyze the performance of an on-board hydrogen storage system that uses alane slurry as the hydrogen carrier. A model for the on-board storage system was developed to analyze the AlH{sub 3} decomposition kinetics, heat transfer requirements, stability, startup energy and time, H{sub 2} buffer requirements, storage efficiency, and hydrogen storage capacities. The results from the model indicate that reactor temperatures higher than 200 C are needed to decompose alane at reasonable liquid hourly space velocities, i.e., > 60 h{sup -1}. At the system level, a gravimetric capacity of 4.2 wt% usable hydrogen and a volumetric capacity of 50 g H{sub 2}/L may be achievable with a 70% solids slurry. Under optimum conditions, {approx}80% of the H{sub 2} stored in the slurry may be available for the fuel cell engine. The model indicates that H{sub 2} loss is limited by the decomposition kinetics rather than by the rate of heat transfer from the ambient to the slurry tank.

  4. Rear View - Astronaut Alan Shepard - Pressure Suit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-01-01

    S61-02796 (5 May 1961) --- Rear view of astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., in his pressure suit and helmet, as he approaches the Freedom 7 capsule in preparation for ingress before the Mercury-Redstone 3 mission. All that can be seen of the astronaut is his legs. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  5. Low-Energy Polymeric Phases of Alanates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, Tran Doan; Amsler, Maximilian; Marques, Miguel A. L.; Botti, Silvana; Willand, Alexander; Goedecker, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    Low-energy structures of alanates are currently known to be described by patterns of isolated, nearly ideal tetrahedral [AlH4] anions and metal cations. We discover that the novel polymeric motif recently proposed for LiAlH4 plays a dominant role in a series of alanates, including LiAlH4, NaAlH4, KAlH4, Mg(AlH4)2, Ca(AlH4)2, and Sr(AlH4)2. In particular, most of the low-energy structures discovered for the whole series are characterized by networks of corner-sharing [AlH6] octahedra, forming wires and/or planes throughout the materials. Finally, for Mg(AlH4)2 and Sr(AlH4)2, we identify two polymeric phases to be lowest in energy at low temperatures.

  6. The 2013 Gerard W. Ostheimer Lecture: What's New in Obstetric Anesthesia?

    PubMed

    Palanisamy, A

    2014-02-01

    The "What's New in Obstetric Anesthesia?" lecture is delivered annually in honor of the eminent obstetric anesthesiologist Gerard. W. Ostheimer. This lecture summarizes topics of importance and clinical relevance published in the fields of obstetric anesthesia, obstetrics, and perinatology in the preceding year. The review is a redacted version of the lecture delivered at the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology's Annual Meeting in April 2013. Special emphasis is placed on non-invasive technologies and biomarkers that have the potential to improve clinical care of the pregnant woman. Furthermore, sufficient attention is focused on medical diseases that have their onset or are worsened during pregnancy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A therapist's response to Alan Waterman.

    PubMed

    Serlin, Ilene A

    2014-01-01

    Comments on the article "The humanistic psychology-positive psychology divide: Contrasts in philosophical foundations" by Waterman (see record 2013-12501-001). Alan Waterman's article brought a useful discerning eye to the differences between humanistic and positive psychology and their different theoretical and methodological assumptions. It is important that these differences not be glossed over too quickly by those who seek complementarity or integration of the two. However, Waterman also polarized them unnecessarily, which is unfortunate. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. Astronaut Alan L. Bean - Family - Houston, TX

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-07-05

    S73-31104 (17 July 1973) --- The wife and children of astronaut Alan L. Bean are photographed at their home near the Johnson Space Center (JSC), where their husband and father is preparing for NASA?s second manned Skylab mission. Bean is commander of the Skylab 3 Earth-orbital mission and will be joined by scientist-astronaut Owen K. Garriott, science pilot, and astronaut Jack R. Lousma, pilot for the schedule two-month mission. With Mrs. Sue Bean are the couple?s children Clay, 17, and Amy Sue, 10; and the family?s pet dog. Photo credit: NASA

  9. Obituary: Alan D. Fiala (1942-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, George

    2011-12-01

    Dr. Alan Dale Fiala, astronomer and expert on solar eclipses, died on May 26, 2010 in Arlington, Virginia, of respiratory failure after a brief illness. He was 67. Fiala had been a staff astronomer at the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington, D.C., for his entire professional career, where he rose from a position as a summer intern to become the Chief of the Nautical Almanac Office, responsible for annual publications for astronomy and navigation that are used the world over. He retired from the observatory in 2000. Although a childhood case of polio affected his mobility for the rest of his life, he seldom let his physical constraints limit his activities, which were many and varied. Alan Fiala was born in Beatrice, Nebraska on November 9, 1942, the middle son of Emil A. ("John") and Lora Marie Fiala. Fiala's father was a postal clerk and Civil Service examiner. Fiala expressed interest in astronomy at a very young age. He contracted polio when he was 9. He graduated from Beatrice High School in 1960 with a straight-A average and went on to study at Carleton College. He received his B.A. summa cum laude after three years, in 1963, with a major in astronomy and minors in physics and mathematics. He was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi, and Pi Mu Epsilon (mathematics). In 1962, Alan Fiala obtained a job as a summer intern at the Naval Observatory in Washington, working in the Nautical Almanac Office (NAO). He entered the graduate program at Yale University and continued to work summers at the observatory. He received his Ph.D. in 1968, under Gerald Clemence. His dissertation was titled "Determination of the Mass of Jupiter from a Study of the Motion of 57 Mnemosyne." After receiving his doctorate, Fiala became a permanent member of the Naval Observatory staff. Computers were just being introduced there and he participated in the automation of many procedures used to prepare the annual publications of the Nautical Almanac Office. One of his first assignments was

  10. Low-Energy Polymeric Phases of Alanates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Huan; Amsler, Maximilian; Marques, Miguel; Botti, Silvana; Willand, Alexander; Goedecker, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    Low-energy structures of alanates are currently known to be described by patterns of isolated, nearly ideal tetrahedral [AlH4] anions and metal cations. We discover that the novel polymeric motif recently proposed for LiAlH4 plays a dominant role in a series of alanates, including LiAlH4, NaAlH4, KAlH4, Mg(AlH4)2, Ca(AlH4)2 and Sr(AlH4)2. In particular, most of the low-energy structures discovered for the whole series are characterized by networks of corner-sharing [AlH6] octahedra, forming wires and/or planes throughout the materials. Finally, for Mg(AlH4)2 and Sr(AlH4)2, we identify two polymeric phases to be lowest in energy at low temperatures. Work supported by Swiss NSF. Computational resources were provided by the Swiss National Supercomputing Center (CSCS) in Lugano.

  11. A phenomenologist's response to Alan Waterman.

    PubMed

    Morley, James

    2014-01-01

    Comments on the article "The humanistic psychology-positive psychology divide: Contrasts in philosophical foundations" by Waterman (see record 2013-12501-001). Distancing positive psychology from humanistic psychology, Alan Waterman wishes to close the conversation between the two cognate psychological paradigms. It's true that strong fences can make good neighbors, and a desire for amicable separation on the basis of irreconcilable differences is understandable. The current author believes that Waterman's gracious style is an exemplary model for respectful disagreement. However, in distancing positive psychology from humanistic psychology generally, Waterman represented phenomenology as the philosophical foundation to humanistic psychology in a way that is seriously mistaken at worst and problematic at best. Putting aside the issue of the relationship between phenomenology and humanistic psychology (as well as positive psychology), this brief commentary will limit itself to those points where Waterman invoked the term phenomenological with broad strokes that invite friendly clarification. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. Remembering James Alan Bassham (1922-2012).

    PubMed

    Govindjee; Bassham, Helen; Bassham, Susan

    2016-04-01

    James Alan Bassham, known to many as Al, was born on November 26, 1922, in Sacramento, California (CA), USA. He died on November 19, 2012, in El Cerrito, CA. To celebrate his life at his 3rd death anniversary, we present here a brief biography, comments on his discoveries, but most importantly, remembrances from family and friends; we remember this wonderful and modest person who had played a major pivotal role in the discoveries that led to what he would like to call the P(hotosynthetic) C(arbon) R(eduction) cycle, known to many as the Calvin Cycle, the Calvin-Benson Cycle, or the Calvin-Benson-Bassham Cycle. Based on a personal request by Bassham himself to one of us (Govindjee), we refrain from including his name in the cycle-in recognition of his many students and associates he would have liked to honor.

  13. Astronaut Alan Shepard receives MASA Distinguished Service award

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Astronaut Alan B. Shepard recieves the NASA Distinguished Service Award from President John F. Kennedy in May 1961, days after his history making MR-3 flight (31387); Alan Shepard and his wife wave to the crowd after Shepard received the NASA Distinguished Service Award from President John F. Kennedy (31388).

  14. Methods for synthesizing alane without the formation of adducts and free of halides

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Knight, Douglas A; Dinh, Long V

    2013-02-19

    A process is provided to synthesize an alane without the formation of alane adducts as a precursor. The resulting product is a crystallized .alpha.-alane and is a highly stable product and is free of halides.

  15. Vacancy-mediated dehydrogenation of sodium alanate

    PubMed Central

    Gunaydin, Hakan; Houk, Kendall N.; Ozoliņš, Vidvuds

    2008-01-01

    Clarification of the mechanisms of hydrogen release and uptake in transition-metal-doped sodium alanate, NaAlH4, a prototypical high-density complex hydride, has fundamental importance for the development of improved hydrogen-storage materials. In this and most other modern hydrogen-storage materials, H2 release and uptake are accompanied by long-range diffusion of metal species. Using first-principles density-functional theory calculations, we have determined that the activation energy for Al mass transport via AlH3 vacancies is Q = 85 kJ/mol·H2, which is in excellent agreement with experimentally measured activation energies in Ti-catalyzed NaAlH4. The activation energy for an alternate decomposition mechanism via NaH vacancies is found to be significantly higher: Q = 112 kJ/mol·H2. Our results suggest that bulk diffusion of Al species is the rate-limiting step in the dehydrogenation of Ti-doped samples of NaAlH4 and that the much higher activation energies measured for uncatalyzed samples are controlled by other processes, such as breaking up of AlH4− complexes, formation/dissociation of H2 molecules, and/or nucleation of the product phases. PMID:18299582

  16. Astronaut Alan Bean works on Modular Equipment Stowage Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot for the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission, works at the Modular Equipment Stowage Assembly (MESA) on the Apollo 12 Lunar Module during the mission's first extravehicular activity, EVA-1, on November 19, 1969.

  17. Astronaut Alan Bean participates in lunar surface simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot of the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission, participates in lunar surface simulation training in bldg 29 at the Manned Spacecraft Center. Bean is strapped to a one-sixth gravity simulator.

  18. The making of an advocate. Interview with Alan Fernandez.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Alan

    2012-11-01

    We spoke with Alan, Associate Director at the Genetics Policy Institute (GPI), the organizer of the annual World Stem Cell Summit, to find out what led him to devote his career to stem cell advocacy. Alan has focused his career on advancing stem cell sciences and the field of regenerative medicine since 2006. While working with Burrill & Company, he began working with the Genetics Policy Institute (GPI) on the 2007 Stem Cell Summit with the Harvard Stem Cell Institute. He then joined the GPI full-time in 2008. Alan's skills in business development and marketing were cultivated at companies like Dow Jones, Ziff Davis and Burrill & Company. Earlier in his career, Alan worked in technology and grassroots business communications, working for start-ups and mid-sized companies.

  19. Astronaut Alan Bean participates in lunar surface simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot of the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission, participates in lunar surface simulation training in bldg 29 at the Manned Spacecraft Center. Bean is strapped to a one-sixth gravity simulator.

  20. Alan Shepard Hits A Golf Ball on the Moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Apollo 14 Commander and original Mercury astronaut Alan Shepard, the first American to fly in space, tees off on the lunar surface during his 1971 mission, with crewmate Edgar Mitchell watching and...

  1. Point-defect-mediated dehydrogenation of alane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismer, Lars

    2011-03-01

    For the engineering of better hydrogen storage materials a systematic understanding of their hydrogen sorption kinetics is crucial. Theoretical studies on metal hydrides have indicated that in many cases point defects control mass transport and hence hydrogen uptake and release. Manipulating point-defect concentrations thus allows control over hydrogen sorption kinetics, opening up new engineering strategies. However, in some cases the relevance of kinetic limitations due to point defects is still under debate; kinetic inhibition of hydrogen sorption has also been attributed to surface effects, e.g. oxide layers or low recombination rates. We present a systematic analysis of the dehydrogenation kinetics of alane (AlH3), one of the prime candidate materials for hydrogen storage. Using hybrid-density functional calculations we determine the concentrations and mobilities of point defects and their complexes. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations are used to describe the full dehydrogenation reaction. We show that under dehydrogenation conditions charged hydrogen vacancy defects form in the crystal, which have a strong tendency towards clustering. The vacancy clusters denote local nuclei of Al phase, and the growth of these nuclei eventually drives the AlH3/Al transformation. However, the low concentration of vacancy defects limits the transport of hydrogen across the bulk, and hence acts as the rate-limiting part of the process. The dehydrogenation is therefore essentially inactive at room temperature, explaining why AlH3 is metastable for years, even though it is thermodynamically unstable. Our derived activation energy and dehydrogenation curves are in excellent agreement with the experimental data, providing evidence for the relevance of bulk point-defect kinetics. Work performed in collaboration with A. Janotti and C. G. Van de Walle, and supported by DOE.

  2. Alan Shepard in the Rendezvous Docking Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Astronaut Alan Shepard (right) was one of 14 astronauts, 8 NASA test pilots, and 2 McDonnell test pilots who took part in simulator studies. Shepard flew the simulator on November 14, 1963. A.W. Vogeley wrote: 'Many of the astronauts have flown this simulator in support of the Gemini studies and they, without exception, appreciated the realism of the visual scene. The simulator has also been used in the development of pilot techniques to handle certain jet malfunctions in order that aborts could be avoided. In these situations large attitude changes are sometimes necessary and the false motion cues that were generated due to earth gravity were somewhat objectionable; however, the pilots were readily able to overlook these false motion cues in favor of the visual realism.' Roy F. Brissenden noted that: 'The basic Gemini control studies developed the necessary techniques and demonstrated the ability of human pilots to perform final space docking with the specified Gemini-Agena systems using only visual references. ... Results... showed that trained astronauts can effect the docking with direct acceleration control and even with jet malfunctions as long as good visual conditions exist.... Probably more important than data results was the early confidence that the astronauts themselves gained in their ability to perform the maneuver in the ultimate flight mission.' Shepard commented: 'I had the feeling tonight - a couple of times - that I was actually doing the space mission instead of the simulation. As I said before, I think it is a very good simulation.' Shepard also commented on piloting techniques. Most astronauts arrived at this same preferred technique: Shepard: 'I believe I have developed the preferred technique for these conditions and the technique appeared to me to be best was to come in slightly above the target so that I was able to use the longitudinal marks on the body of the target as a reference, particularly for a lateral translation and, of course, I

  3. σ-Alane complexes of chromium, tungsten, and manganese.

    PubMed

    Riddlestone, Ian M; Edmonds, Siân; Kaufman, Paul A; Urbano, Juan; Bates, Joshua I; Kelly, Michael J; Thompson, Amber L; Taylor, Russell; Aldridge, Simon

    2012-02-08

    Photolytic ligand displacement and salt metathesis routes have been exploited to give access to κ(1) σ-alane complexes featuring Al-H bonds bound to [W(CO)(5)] and [Cp'Mn(CO)(2)] fragments, together with a related κ(2) complex of [Cr(CO)(4)]. Spectroscopic, crystallographic, and quantum chemical studies are consistent with the alane ligands acting predominantly as σ-donors, with the resulting binding energies calculated to be marginally greater than those found for related dihydrogen complexes.

  4. Computing In College and University: 1978 and Beyond. Proceedings of the Gerard P. Weeg Memorial Conference, May 1-2, 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Computer Center.

    In most instances, the papers in this collection present information reflecting the current status of computer usage in education and offer substantive forecasts for academic computing. Two speeches from the special ceremony for the renaming of the computing center in honor of Gerard P. Weeg, which was held as part of the two-day national computer…

  5. NASA researchers in gold control room during an F-15 HiDEC flight, John Orme and Gerard Schkolnik

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    NASA researchers Gerard Schkolnik (left) and John Orme monitor equipment in the control room at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, during a flight of an F-15 Highly Integrated Digital Electronic Control (HIDEC) research aircraft. The system was developed on the F-15 to investigate and demonstrate methods of obtaining optimum aircraft performance. The major elements of HIDEC were a Digital Electronic Flight Control System (DEFCS), a Digital Electronic Engine Control (DEEC), an on-board general purpose computer, and an integrated architecture to allow all components to 'talk to each other.' Unlike standard F-15s, which have a mechanical and analog electronic flight control system, the HIDEC F-15 also had a dual-channel, fail-safe digital flight control system programmed in Pascal. It was linked to the Military Standard 1553B and a H009 data bus which tied all the other electronic systems together.

  6. NASA researchers in gold control room during an F-15 HiDEC flight, John Orme and Gerard Schkolnik

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    NASA researchers Gerard Schkolnik (left) and John Orme monitor equipment in the control room at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, during a flight of an F-15 Highly Integrated Digital Electronic Control (HIDEC) research aircraft. The system was developed on the F-15 to investigate and demonstrate methods of obtaining optimum aircraft performance. The major elements of HIDEC were a Digital Electronic Flight Control System (DEFCS), a Digital Electronic Engine Control (DEEC), an on-board general purpose computer, and an integrated architecture to allow all components to 'talk to each other.' Unlike standard F-15s, which have a mechanical and analog electronic flight control system, the HIDEC F-15 also had a dual-channel, fail-safe digital flight control system programmed in Pascal. It was linked to the Military Standard 1553B and a H009 data bus which tied all the other electronic systems together.

  7. 40 Years in Applied Linguistics: An Interview with Alan Davies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunnan, Antony John

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Professor Alan Davies who was born in Wales, studied at Oxford University and Birmingham University, and taught in Scotland at the University of Edinburgh, completing 40 years this year. Professor Davies has travelled widely to give invited talks and seminars, participate in applied linguistics conferences,…

  8. Astronaut Alan Bean with subpackages of the ALSEP during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot, traverses with the two subpackages of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) during the first Apollo 12 extravehicular activity (EVA). Bean deployed the ALSEP components 300 feet from the Lunar Module (LM). The LM and deployed erectable S-band antenna can be seen in the background.

  9. Astronaut Alan Bean doing acrobatics in OWS dome area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, doing acrobatics in the dome area of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) on the space station cluster in Earth orbit. The dome area is about 22 feet in diameter and 19 feet from top to bottom.

  10. Astronaut Alan Bean holds Special Environmental Sample Container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot for the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission, holds a Special Environmental Sample Container filled with lunar soil collected during the extravehicular activity (EVA) in which Astronauts Charles Conrad Jr., commander, and Bean participated. Connrad, who took this picture, is reflected in the helmet visor of the lunar module pilot.

  11. Astronaut Alan Bean deploys Lunar Surface Magnetometer on lunar surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot, deploys the Lunar Surface Magnetometer (LSM) during the first Apollo 12 extravehicular activity on the Moon. The LSM is a component of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP). The Lunar Module can be seen in the left background.

  12. Astronaut Owen Garriott trims hair of Astronaut Alan Bean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Scientist-Astronaut Owen K. Garriott, Skylab 3 science pilot, trims the hair of Astronaut Alan L. Bean, commander, in this on-board photograph from the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS). Bean holds a vacuum hose to gather in loose hair.

  13. Understanding the Scientific Enterprise: A Conversation with Alan Leshner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins-Gough, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the nature of science is even more important than mastering its details, says Alan Leshner, Chief Executive Officer of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, in an interview with Educational Leadership. In this article, Leshner discusses the controversy about teaching evolution, and he asserts that demands to…

  14. Astronaut Alan Bean doing acrobatics in OWS dome area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, doing acrobatics in the dome area of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) on the space station cluster in Earth orbit. The dome area is about 22 feet in diameter and 19 feet from top to bottom.

  15. Astronaut Alan Bean holds Special Environmental Sample Container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot for the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission, holds a Special Environmental Sample Container filled with lunar soil collected during the extravehicular activity (EVA) in which Astronauts Charles Conrad Jr., commander, and Bean participated. Connrad, who took this picture, is reflected in the helmet visor of the lunar module pilot.

  16. Astronaut Owen Garriott trims hair of Astronaut Alan Bean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Scientist-Astronaut Owen K. Garriott, Skylab 3 science pilot, trims the hair of Astronaut Alan L. Bean, commander, in this on-board photograph from the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS). Bean holds a vacuum hose to gather in loose hair.

  17. Critique as Homiletics: A Response to Alan Block

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayes, Clifford; Mayes, Pamela Blackwell; Williams, Ellen

    2004-01-01

    Alan Block's (2004) major criticism of the authors' study revolves around the notion that they have attempted to quantify their students' sense of calling in an existentially inauthentic, spiritually delimiting way. For, as he puts it, "identifications of presence are impossible." The authors cannot accept this pronouncement if only for the simple…

  18. Understanding the Scientific Enterprise: A Conversation with Alan Leshner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins-Gough, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the nature of science is even more important than mastering its details, says Alan Leshner, Chief Executive Officer of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, in an interview with Educational Leadership. In this article, Leshner discusses the controversy about teaching evolution, and he asserts that demands to…

  19. Astronaut Alan Bean with subpackages of the ALSEP during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-19

    AS12-46-6807 (19 Nov. 1969) --- Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot, traverses with the two sub packages of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) during the first Apollo 12 extravehicular activity (EVA). Bean deployed the ALSEP components 300 feet from the Lunar Module (LM). The LM and deployed erectable S-band antenna can be seen in the background.

  20. Astronaut Alan Shepard recieves NASA Distinguished Service Award

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-05-07

    S67-19572 (8 May 1961) --- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr. receives the NASA Distinguished Service Award from United States President John F. Kennedy May 8, 1961, days after his history making MR-3 flight. Shepard's wife and mother on left and the other six Mercury astronauts are in background. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  1. Astronaut Alan Bean deploys Lunar Surface Magnetometer on lunar surface

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-19

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot, deploys the Lunar Surface Magnetometer (LSM) during the first Apollo 12 extravehicular activity on the Moon. The LSM is a component of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP). The Lunar Module can be seen in the left background.

  2. Astronaut Alan Bean participates in lunar surface simulation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-10-29

    S69-56059 (24 Oct. 1969) --- Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot of the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission, participates in lunar surface simulation training in Building 29 at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC). Bean is strapped to a one-sixth gravity simulator.

  3. Astronaut Alan Shepard in pressure suit with Freedom 7 capsule

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-01-01

    S61-02547 (5 May 1961) --- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., in his pressure suit and helmet, looks into the Freedom 7 capsule in preparation for ingress before the Mercury-Redstone 3 (MR-3) mission. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  4. CLOSEUP - ASTRONAUT SHEPARD, ALAN - PRESSURE SUIT - FREEDOM 7 CAPSULE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-07-01

    S61-03645 (5 May 1961) --- Close-up of astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., in his pressure suit and helmet, ingressing into the Freedom 7 capsule in preparation for the Mercury-Redstone 3 (MR-3) mission. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  5. 40 Years in Applied Linguistics: An Interview with Alan Davies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunnan, Antony John

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Professor Alan Davies who was born in Wales, studied at Oxford University and Birmingham University, and taught in Scotland at the University of Edinburgh, completing 40 years this year. Professor Davies has travelled widely to give invited talks and seminars, participate in applied linguistics conferences,…

  6. Elucidation of hydrogen-release mechanism from methylamine in the presence of borane, alane, diborane, dialane, and borane-alane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Ting; He, Hongqing; Zhang, Jinglai

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of hydrogen release from methylamine with or without borane, alane, diborane, dialane, and borane-alane are theoretically explored. Geometries of stationary points are optimised at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level and energy profiles are refined at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ level based on the second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) optimised geometries. H2 elimination is impossible from the unimolecular CH3NH2 because of a high energy barrier. The results show that all catalysts can facilitate H2 loss from CH3NH2. However, borane or alane has no real catalytic effect because the H2 release is not preferred as compared with the B-N or Al-N bond cleavage once a corresponding adduct is formed. The diborane, dialane, and borane-alane will lead to a substantial reduction of energy barrier as a bifunctional catalyst. The similar and distinct points among various catalysts are compared. Hydrogen bond and six-membered ring formation are two crucial factors to decrease the energy barriers.

  7. 77 FR 74518 - Alan T. Waterman Award Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-14

    ... Alan T. Waterman Award Committee; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee...: Name: Alan T. Waterman Award Committee, 1172. Date and Time: January 11, 2013, 8:30a.m.-1:30 p.m. Place... Alan T. Waterman Award recipient. Agenda: To review and evaluate nominations as part of the...

  8. Alan E. Kazdin: Award for Distinguished Scientific Applications of Psychology.

    PubMed

    2011-11-01

    Presents Alan E. Kazdin, the 2011 winner of the American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Scientific Applications of Psychology. "For outstanding and pathbreaking contributions to the understanding of the development, assessment, and treatment of psychopathology. Alan E. Kazdin's theoretically innovative, methodologically rigorous, and scientifically informed research has significantly advanced knowledge of child and adolescent psychopathologies such as depression and conduct problems. His writings on research strategies and methods have set a high standard for rigor in the field. His work and his ideas have had an enormous impact on the science, practice, and teaching of psychology, and his research has strengthened assessment and treatment of children and adolescents in scientific and clinical settings. His passion, energy, wisdom, and wit have inspired countless colleagues and students over the years, and his work will no doubt continue to do so for many generations to come." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Astronaut Alan Bean flies the Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, flies the M509 Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment in the foreward dome area of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) on the space station cluster in Earth orbit. Bean is strapped in to the back-mounted, hand-controlled Automatically Stabilized Maneuvering Unit (ASMU). This ASMU exerperiment is being done in shirt sleeves. The dome area where the experiment is conducted is about 22 feet in diameter and 19 feet from top to bottom.

  10. Astronaut Alan Bean flies the Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, flies the M509 Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment in the forward dome area of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) on the space station cluster in Earth orbit. Bean is strapped in to the back-mounted, hand-controlled Automatically Stabilized Maneuvering Unit (ASMU). This ASMU exerperiment is being done in shirt sleeves. The dome area where the experiment is conducted is about 22 feet in diameter and 19 feet from top to bottom.

  11. Astronaut Alan Bean assisted with egressing command module after landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot, is assisted with egressing the Apollo 12 Command Module by a U.S. Navy underwater demolition team swimmer during recovery operations in the Pacific Ocean. Already in the life raft are Astronauts Charles Conrad Jr., commander; and Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot. The Apollo 12 splashdown occured at 2:58 p.m., November 24, 1969 near American Samoa.

  12. Editors' overview for the Alan Turner Memorial volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, Hannah J.; Elton, Sarah; Schreve, Danielle

    2014-07-01

    The papers presented here, in this special volume dedicated to the memory of Alan Turner (1947-2012), provide a glimpse of the multi-faceted ways in which the mammalian fossil record can be investigated. The authors of contributions in this Special Issue are by no means an exhaustive list of his international collaborators and colleagues, and indeed, many are not represented here, but the contents cover many of the topics and issues that were of central archaeological and wider Quaternary mammalian interest to Alan. Although the papers are not intended to provide a comprehensive overview of all techniques that can be applied, the set nevertheless reveals a snapshot of the state-of-the-art and of some of the methods that have the potential to bring much more of the past to life. Alan always sought to move beyond the 'stamp-collecting' approach of simply listing which taxa were present at a site, attempting to elucidate what the presence of those animals might mean in terms of palaeoecology. In particular, the span of Alan's career has seen major advances in our understanding of Quaternary mammalian biostratigraphy and palaeobiogeography, the widespread application of novel techniques such as ancient DNA, the development of high-precision geochronology and the discovery of new hominin species. The papers presented here reflect those developments and highlight interdisciplinary approaches, from examination of sediments to careful measurements of the fossils themselves, from modelling the presence of taxa at particular points in the Quaternary to examination of the similarities and differences in fauna within and between sites.

  13. Astronaut Alan Shepard receives MASA Distinguished Service award

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-05-07

    S88-31387 (8 May 1961) --- President John F. Kennedy (left) congratulates NASA's Distinguished Service Medal Award recipient astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr. in a Rose Garden ceremony on May 8, 1961, at the White House. Vice-President Lyndon B. Johnson, NASA Administrator James E. Webb and several NASA astronauts are in the background. Three days earlier, Shepard made history with a 15-minute suborbital space mission in the Freedom 7, Mercury-Redstone 3 spacecraft. Photo credit: NASA

  14. Astronaut Alan Shepard undergoes suiting up operations during Apollo 14

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-01-31

    S71-16638 (31 Jan. 1971) --- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., commander, undergoes suiting up operations at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) during the Apollo 14 prelaunch countdown. Apollo 14, with astronauts Shepard; Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot; and Stuart A. Roosa, command module pilot; aboard was launched from Pad A, Launch Complex 39 at 4:03:02 p.m. (EST), Jan. 31, 1971.

  15. Astronaut Alan Shepard receives MASA Distinguished Service award

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-05-07

    S88-31388 (8 May 1961) --- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr. (center), along with wife Louise, waves to a crowd outside the U.S. Capitol building. Shepard, Mercury-Redstone 3 astronaut, had earlier briefed Congress on the first U.S. manned spaceflight -- a 15-minute suborbital mission on May 5, 1961, aboard the Freedom 7 capsule. (NASA Hq. Photo No., MR3-49) Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  16. ASTRONAUT ALAN B. SHEPARD, JR. - PERSONAL (GT-11) - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-09-12

    S66-50713 (12 Sept. 1966) --- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., Chief, MSC Astronaut Office, shields his eyes from the sun as he follows the Gemini-11 liftoff. Onboard were astronauts Charles Conrad Jr., command pilot, and Richard F. Gordon Jr., pilot, scheduled for a three-day mission in space. Liftoff was at 9:42 a.m. (EST), Sept. 12, 1966. Photo credit: NASA

  17. Astronaut Alan Shepard onboard helicopter after recovery of Mercury capsule

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-05-05

    S88-31383 (5 May 1961) --- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., Mercury-Redstone 3 (MR-3) pilot, jokes with doctors while in-flight between the U.S. Navy Carrier Champlain and the Grand Bahama Islands. Shepard is the first American in space with the successful completion of the 15-minute suborbital mission. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  18. Crew Members - USS Champlain - Arrival - Astronaut Alan Shepard

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-01-01

    S61-02711 (5 May 1961) --- Crew members of the U.S. Navy Carrier Champlain cheer and take pictures of the arrival of the first Project Mercury pilot to fly a suborbital flight, astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr. Two helicopters are approaching the ship, one carrying the astronaut and the other the Mercury-Redstone 3 (MR-3) capsule. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  19. Gerard E. Hogarty (1935–2006): Combining Science and Humanism to Improve the Care of Persons With Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Eack, Shaun M.; Schooler, Nina R.; Ganguli, Rohan

    2007-01-01

    Gerard E. Hogarty was a scholar and clinician whose career was dedicated to improving the lives of persons with schizophrenia through the rigorous development and testing of novel psychosocial treatment approaches. During the course of his career, he is credited with the development of many of the psychosocial treatments that have become the pillars of evidence-based practices for schizophrenia today. This review outlines the evolution of Hogarty's contributions to the development of psychosocial approaches for schizophrenia by presenting a chronological history of the 4 distinct treatments he developed during the course of his career. These include major role therapy, an early precursor to clinical case management; family psychoeducation, an approach to ally with and educate family members to reduce intrafamilial distress; personal therapy, a flexible, individual psychotherapy, aimed at teaching patients stress management and affective regulation techniques; and finally, cognitive enhancement therapy, a comprehensive, developmental approach to the remediation of social- and nonsocial-cognitive deficits. Each of these treatments built upon the findings of the previous one, and as a consequence, each significantly improved the lives of persons with schizophrenia and expanded the treatment possibilities available to such individuals. These efforts represent a lifelong dedication to advancing the treatment of schizophrenia through rigorous scientific inquiry and exemplify a unique combination of science and humanism that has left a lasting impact on the field and the lives of many individuals suffering from this disease. PMID:17617662

  20. Gerard E. Hogarty (1935--2006): combining science and humanism to improve the care of persons with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Eack, Shaun M; Schooler, Nina R; Ganguli, Rohan

    2007-09-01

    Gerard E. Hogarty was a scholar and clinician whose career was dedicated to improving the lives of persons with schizophrenia through the rigorous development and testing of novel psychosocial treatment approaches. During the course of his career, he is credited with the development of many of the psychosocial treatments that have become the pillars of evidence-based practices for schizophrenia today. This review outlines the evolution of Hogarty's contributions to the development of psychosocial approaches for schizophrenia by presenting a chronological history of the 4 distinct treatments he developed during the course of his career. These include major role therapy, an early precursor to clinical case management; family psychoeducation, an approach to ally with and educate family members to reduce intrafamilial distress; personal therapy, a flexible, individual psychotherapy, aimed at teaching patients stress management and affective regulation techniques; and finally, cognitive enhancement therapy, a comprehensive, developmental approach to the remediation of social- and nonsocial-cognitive deficits. Each of these treatments built upon the findings of the previous one, and as a consequence, each significantly improved the lives of persons with schizophrenia and expanded the treatment possibilities available to such individuals. These efforts represent a lifelong dedication to advancing the treatment of schizophrenia through rigorous scientific inquiry and exemplify a unique combination of science and humanism that has left a lasting impact on the field and the lives of many individuals suffering from this disease.

  1. Astronaut Alan Bean flies the Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, flies the M509 Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment in the foreward dome area of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) on the space station cluster in Earth orbit. Bean is strapped in to the back-mounted, hand-controlled Automatically Stabilized Maneuvering Unit (ASMU). He is wearing a pressure suit for this run of the M509 experiment, but other ASMU tests are done in shirt sleeves. The dome area where the experiment is conducted is about 22 feet in diameter and 19 feet from top to bottom.

  2. Astronaut Owen Garriott trims hair of Astronaut Alan Bean

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-08-19

    SL3-108-1292 (19 Aug. 1973) --- Scientist-astronaut Owen K. Garriott, Skylab 3 science pilot, trims the hair of astronaut Alan L. Bean, commander, in this onboard photograph from the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS) in Earth orbit. Astronaut Jack R. Lousma, pilot, took this picture with a 35mm Nikon camera. Bean holds a vacuum hose to gather in loose hair. The crew of the second manned Skylab flight went on to successfully complete 59 days aboard the Skylab space station cluster in Earth orbit. Photo credit: NASA

  3. Astronaut Alan Shepard with Modular Equipment Transporter aboard KC-135

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-11-04

    S70-53479 (4 Nov. 1970) -- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., Apollo 14 commander, pulls the modular equipment transporter (MET) under weightless conditions aboard an Air Force KC-135 out of Patrick Air Force Base. Astronaut Edgar D. Mitchell, Apollo 14 lunar module pilot, is behind the MET. The KC-135 aircraft, flying a parabolic curve, creates a weightless environment providing a training exercise in preparation for the astronauts' extravehicular activities (EVA) on the lunar surface. This training simulates the 1/6 gravity the astronauts will encounter on the moon.

  4. Astronaut Alan Bean holds Special Environmental Sample Container

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-20

    AS12-49-7278 (19-20 Nov. 1969) --- Astronaut Alan L. Bean holds a Special Environmental Sample Container filled with lunar soil collected during the extravehicular activity (EVA) in which astronauts Charles Conrad Jr., commander, and Bean, lunar module pilot, participated. Conrad, who took this picture, is reflected in Bean's helmet visor. Conrad and Bean descended in the Apollo 12 Lunar Module (LM) to explore the lunar surface while astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit. Photo credit: NASA

  5. Lightweight sodium alanate thin films grown by reactive sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Filippi, M.; Rector, J. H.; Gremaud, R.; Setten, M. J. van; Dam, B.

    2009-09-21

    We report the preparation of sodium alanate, a promising hydrogen storage material, in a thin film form using cosputtering in a reactive atmosphere of atomic hydrogen. We study the phase formation and distribution, and the hydrogen desorption, with a combination of optical and infrared transmission spectroscopy. We show that the hydrogen desorption, the phase segregation, and the role of the dopants in these complex metal hydrides can be monitored with optical measurements. This result shows that a thin film approach can be used for a model study of technologically relevant lightweight metal hydrides.

  6. Astronaut Alan Bean works on Modular Equipment Stowage Assembly

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-19

    AS12-46-6749 (19 Nov. 1969) --- Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot for the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission, works at the Modular Equipment Stowage Assembly (MESA) on the Apollo 12 Lunar Module (LM) during the mission's first extravehicular activity, (EVA) on Nov. 19, 1969. Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander, and Bean descended in the Apollo 12 LM to explore the moon while astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit.

  7. Astronaut Alan Bean flies the Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-08-27

    SL3-107-1215 (27 Aug. 1973) --- Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, flies the M509 Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment in the forward dome area of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) on the space station cluster in Earth orbit. One of his fellow crewmen took this photograph with a 35mm Nikon camera. Bean is strapped into the back mounted, hand-controlled Automatically Stabilized Maneuvering Unit (ASMU). The dome area is about 22 feet in diameter and 19 feet from top to bottom. Photo credit: NASA

  8. View of Astronaut Alan Shepard inside the Freedom 7 capsule

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-05-05

    S88-31374 (29 April 1961) --- A close-up of astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr. in his space suit with his helmet on inside the Mercury capsule. He is undergoing a flight simulation test with the capsule mated to the Redstone booster. This will be the first attempt to put a man into space by the U.S. aboard a Mercury spacecraft, launched atop a Redstone rocket. The suborbital trajectory will be down the Atlantic Missile Range. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  9. Astronaut Alan Bean flies the Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-08-18

    SL3-108-1304 (July-September 1973) --- Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, flies the M509 Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment in the forward dome area of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) on the space station cluster in Earth orbit. Bean is strapped in to the back-mounted, hand-controlled Automatically Stabilized Maneuvering Unit (ASMU). This ASMU experiment is being done in shirt sleeves. The dome area where the experiment is conducted is about 22 feet in diameter and 19 feet from top to bottom. Photo credit: NASA

  10. Astronaut Alan B. Shepard in lunar surface simulation training

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-07-21

    S70-46191 (July 1970) --- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., commander of the Apollo 14 lunar landing mission, participates in lunar surface training at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Shepard is adjusting a camera mounted to the modular equipment transporter (MET). The MET, nicknamed the "Rickshaw", will serve as a portable work bench with a place for the Apollo lunar hand tools and their carrier, three cameras, two sample container bags, a special environment sample container, spare magazines, and a lunar surface Penetrometer. Shepard is wearing an Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU).

  11. Astronaut Alan B. Shepard in lunar surface simulation training

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-07-21

    S70-46157 (July 1970) --- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., commander of the Apollo 14 lunar landing mission, participates in lunar surface simulation training at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The modular equipment transporter (MET) is in the left background, in the center foreground is a gnomon. The MET, nicknamed the "Rickshaw", will serve as a portable work bench with a place for the Apollo lunar hand tools and their carrier, three cameras, two sample container bags, a special environment sample container, spare magazines, and a lunar surface Penetrometer. Shepard is wearing an Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU).

  12. Effect of Titanium Doping of Al(111) Surfaces on Alane Formation Mobility, and Desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra I. S.; Graetz J.; Chaudhuri, S.; Veyan, J.-F.; Chabal, Y. J.

    2011-07-05

    Alanes are critical intermediates in hydrogen storage reactions for mass transport during the formation of complex metal hydrides. Titanium has been shown to promote hydrogen desorption and hydrogenation, but its role as a catalyst is not clear. Combining surface infrared (IR) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT), the role of Ti is explored during the interaction of atomic hydrogen with Ti-doped Al(111) surfaces. Titanium is found to reduce the formation of large alanes, due to a decrease of hydrogen mobility and to trapping of small alanes on Ti sites, thus hindering oligomerization. For high doping levels ({approx}0.27 ML Ti) on Al(111), only chemisorbed AlH{sub 3} is observed on Ti sites, with no evidence for large alanes. Titanium also dramatically lowers the desorption temperature of large alanes from 290 to 190 K, due to a more restricted translational motion of these alanes.

  13. Norman Dott, Gerard Guiot, and Jules Hardy: key players in the resurrection and preservation of transsphenoidal surgery.

    PubMed

    Patel, Smruti K; Husain, Qasim; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Couldwell, William T; Liu, James K

    2012-08-01

    Developed over a century ago, the transsphenoidal approach to access lesions of the pituitary gland and sella turcica has transformed the field of neurosurgery, largely due to the work of Oskar Hirsch and Harvey Cushing. Furthermore, its use and modification in the early 1900s was perhaps one of Cushing's greatest legacies to skull base surgery. However, Cushing, who had worked relentlessly to improve the transsphenoidal route to the pituitary region, abandoned the approach by 1929 in his pursuit to master transcranial approaches to the suprasellar region. Hirsch and a few other surgeons continued to perform transsphenoidal operations, but they were unable to maintain the popularity of the approach among their peers. During a time when transsphenoidal surgery was on the brink of extinction, a critical lineage of 3 key surgeons--Norman Dott, Gerard Guiot, and Jules Hardy--would resurrect the art, each working to further improve the procedure. Dott, Cushing's apprentice from 1923 to 1924, brought his experiences with transsphenoidal surgery to Edinburgh, Scotland, and along the way, developed the lighted nasal speculum to provide better illumination in the narrow working area. Guiot, inspired by Dott, adopted his technique and used intraoperative radiofluoroscopic technique for image guidance. Hardy, a fellow of Guiot, from Montreal, Canada, revolutionized transsphenoidal microsurgery with the introduction of the binocular microscope and selective adenomectomy. The teachings of these pioneers have endured over time and are now widely used by neurosurgeons worldwide. In this paper, we review the lineage and contributions of Dott, Guiot, and Hardy who served as crucial players in the preservation of transsphenoidal surgery.

  14. Alan Frederick Williams 25 May 1945 - 9 April 1992.

    PubMed

    Crumpton, Michael J

    2004-01-01

    Alan WIlliams is noted for his seminal contributions to the field of leucocyte membrane glycoproteins (that is, differentiation antigens). He played a leading role in the development of approaches to the purification and structural analysis of cell surface antigens. His comprehensive characterization of the structure of the rat Thy-1 antigen, as well as the application of monoclonal antibodies to the designation and subsequent isolation of multiple new leucocyte antigens, were exemplary. His discovery that Thy-1 is structurally related to immunoglobulin led directly to the concept of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily, which embraced a spectrum of cell surface molecules involved in a variety of cell recognition systems. He was a very strong advocate in support of the rat as a model animal in the study of immunological phenomena. He was energetic and courageous, as well as radiating enthusiasm for immunological research, inspiring others, critically analysing accepted dogmas and setting high standards. In short, he was a brilliant research scientist.

  15. Astronaut Alan Shepard during Apollo 14 EVA on the moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-02-05

    AS14-66-9232 (5 Feb. 1971) --- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., commander of the Apollo 14 lunar landing mission, stands by the deployed United States flag on the lunar surface during the early moments of the first extravehicular activity (EVA) of the mission. Shadows of the Lunar Module (LM), astronaut Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot, and the erectable S-Band Antenna surround the scene of the third flag implanting to be performed on the lunar surface. While astronauts Shepard and Mitchell descended in the LM ?Antares? to explore the Fra Mauro region of the moon, astronaut Stuart A. Roosa, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) ?Kitty Hawk? in lunar orbit.

  16. Borane and alane mediated hydrogen release from silane and methylsilane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Huyen Thi; Majumdar, D.; Leszczynski, Jerzy; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2015-01-01

    The dehydrogenations of silanes SiH4 and CH3SiH3 in the presence of borane and alane were investigated using density functional (B3LYP) and coupled-cluster (CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVnZ) theories. The calculated results showed that the hydrogen release reactions are more favorable in presence of BH3. Our theoretical analyses have further revealed that the addition of an extra BH3 can lead to several low energy barrier pathways. This observation is important to understand the catalytic role of BH3 in such reactions (depending on its release mechanism). Overall, silane and its alkyl derivatives can be used as effective starting materials for H2 production.

  17. Foreword: R. Alan Plumb—A brief biographical sketch and personal tribute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobel, Adam H.

    Raymond Alan Plumb was born on 30 March 1948 in Ripon, Yorkshire, United Kingdom. He is not known for talking about his childhood, but we do know that he liked to sing and was part of a group called the Avocets. Alan did his undergraduate degree in Manchester, obtaining his BS Physics with I Honors in 1969. He was offered a fellowship to do his PhD at Cambridge, but he had a negative reaction to a visit there and decided to stay at Manchester, where he pursued his studies in Astronomy, completing his PhD in 1972. With a highly disengaged thesis advisor, Alan was largely self-taught as a graduate student. He studied planetary atmospheres. Toward the end of his studies, Alan participated in a summer school organized by Steve Thorpe in Bangor,Wales, where he came into contact with the broader international community in geophysical fluid dynamics. Raymond Hide became particularly influential and became Alan's mentor at the UK Meteorological Office (UKMO), where Alan worked for 4 years after receiving his PhD. Another key early influence whom Alan met then was Michael McIntyre. McIntyre's interest and encouragement were very important to Alan at that early time and would continue to be so in later years, including after his move to Australia.

  18. H adsorption and the formation of alane oligomers on Al(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Go, Eden P.; Thuermer, Konrad; Reutt-Robey, Janice E.

    1999-09-01

    Complementary scanning tunneling microscopy and surface infrared measurements show that H reacts strongly with Al(111), producing a variety of new alane (aluminum hydride) surface species. Alane oligomers, ranging in size from the monomer to 30-mers, form through a sequence of surface etching and condensation reactions. Atomic hydrogen initiates production by extracting aluminum atoms from the surface lattice to create mobile monohydride monomers (ad-AlH), which predominate in the low-coverage regime. At higher hydrogen coverages, multihydride oligomers form in coexistence with the ad-AlH. These alane oligomers are more thermally stable, remaining on the surface at room temperature, where they are directly imaged. The mass transfer of aluminum to surface alanes is discussed in relationship to alane stoichiometry.

  19. Sir Alan Sterling Parkes: 10 September 1900 - 17 July 1990.

    PubMed

    Polge, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    Alan Parkes was one of the most influential figures in the field of reproductive biology in the twentieth century. He had a huge impact on its growth and development during that time, and the legacy of his work still remains.His research was highly innovative and original because of his imaginative and inquiring mind, which, coupled with an entrepreneurial bent, led him into several very different fields and into unchartered waters. He played a leading role in the spectacular rise of reproductive endocrinology in Britain in the 1920s and 1930s when the nature and activity of many of the reproductive processes in animals and humans and was an essential factor in the development of methods for their control. Even more pioneering was his research in low-temperature biology in the years after World War II. This was sparked off by the discovery that glycerol had a remarkable property of protecting spermatozoa against damage during freezing and storage at very low temperatures. Far-reaching applications arose from this discovery, especially in the preservation of bull semen, which led to a worldwide revolution in artificial insemination in cattle. Later, many other cells and tissues were also successfully frozen, including red blood cells, ovarian tissue and bone marrow, and a new branch of biological science, which became known as 'cryobiology', was born, Effects of deep hypothermia, including freezing, on whole animals were also investigated at that time. Having successfully launched a new area of science, it was characteristic of Alan Parkes to switch to new fields. First he became interested in the influence of pheromones on mammalian reproduction. Then, resuming a long-standing interest in comparative aspects of reproductive physiology in British wild mammals, he became involved in the work of the Nuffield Unit of Tropical Animal Ecology in Uganda, where similar studies were carried out on African animals. Even after retirement from the academic field, he was for

  20. Novel methods for synthesizing halide-free alane without the formation of adducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, Long V.; Knight, Douglas A.; Paskevicius, Mark; Buckley, Craig E.; Zidan, Ragaiy

    2012-04-01

    Many of the current synthesis methods for aluminum hydride (alane—AlH3) involve reacting AlCl3 and LiAlH4 in solvents. The reaction requires the formation of an alane adduct such as AlH3ṡ[(C2H5)2O] prior to obtaining crystallized stable α-AlH3. This process requires several hours of pumping in a vacuum system to remove the ether and convert the alane etherate into stable α-alane. This crystallization process is both costly and hazardous because a large amount of highly flammable material (e.g. ether) is removed by vacuum pumps over several hours. Conversely, the work presented herein describes novel methods to synthesize adduct-free alane. It is demonstrated here that AlH3 can form by mixing AlCl3 and LiAlH4 in the solid state and heating to 75∘C; only α-AlH3 was obtained. The α-AlH3 product can be washed with minimal solvents leading to zero formation of alane adducts. In addition, the unwanted LiCl by-product is also removed during the solvent wash, resulting in halide-free α-alane. Although simply mixing and heating the reactants led to a 40% yield of alane, having the reactants compacted and mechanically pressed while heating increases the yield to 60% crystalline α-AlH3.

  1. Astronauts Alan Bean and Charles Conrad on Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The second manned lunar landing mission, Apollo 12 launched from launch pad 39-A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on November 14, 1969 via a Saturn Five launch vehicle. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard Apollo 12 was a crew of three astronauts: Alan L. Bean, pilot of the Lunar Module (LM), Intrepid; Richard Gordon, pilot of the Command Module (CM), Yankee Clipper; and Spacecraft Commander Charles Conrad. The LM, Intrepid, landed astronauts Conrad and Bean on the lunar surface in what's known as the Ocean of Storms while astronaut Richard Gordon piloted the CM, Yankee Clipper, in a parking orbit around the Moon. Their lunar soil activities included the deployment of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP), finding the unmanned Surveyor 3 that landed on the Moon on April 19, 1967, and collecting 75 pounds (34 kilograms) of rock samples. In this photograph, one of the astronauts on the Moon's surface is holding a container of lunar soil. The other astronaut is seen reflected in his helmet. Apollo 12 safely returned to Earth on November 24, 1969.

  2. Astronauts Alan Bean and Charles Conrad on Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The second manned lunar landing mission, Apollo 12 launched from launch pad 39-A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on November 14, 1969 via a Saturn Five launch vehicle. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard Apollo 12 was a crew of three astronauts: Alan L. Bean, pilot of the Lunar Module (LM), Intrepid; Richard Gordon, pilot of the Command Module (CM), Yankee Clipper; and Spacecraft Commander Charles Conrad. The LM, Intrepid, landed astronauts Conrad and Bean on the lunar surface in what's known as the Ocean of Storms while astronaut Richard Gordon piloted the CM, Yankee Clipper, in a parking orbit around the Moon. Their lunar soil activities included the deployment of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP), finding the unmanned Surveyor 3 that landed on the Moon on April 19, 1967, and collecting 75 pounds (34 kilograms) of rock samples. In this photograph, one of the astronauts on the Moon's surface is holding a container of lunar soil. The other astronaut is seen reflected in his helmet. Apollo 12 safely returned to Earth on November 24, 1969.

  3. The catalyzed hydrogen sorption mechanism in alkali alanates.

    PubMed

    Kocabas Atakli, Züleyha Özlem; Callini, Elsa; Kato, Shunsuke; Mauron, Philippe; Orimo, Shin-Ichi; Züttel, Andreas

    2015-08-28

    The hydrogen sorption pathways of alkali alanates were analyzed and a mechanism for the catalytic hydrogen sorption was developed. Gibbs free energy values of selected intermediate steps were calculated based on experimentally determined thermodynamic data (enthalpies and entropies) of individual hydrides: MAlH4, M3AlH6, and MH. The values of the activation energies, based on the intermediates M(+), H(-), MH, and AlH3, were obtained. The mechanism of the catalytic activity of Ti is finally clarified: we present an atomistic model, where MAlH4 desorbs hydrogen through the intermediates M(+), H(-), MH, and AlH3 to the hexahydride M3AlH6 and finally the elemental hydride MH. The catalyst acts as a bridge to transfer M(+) and H(-) from MAlH4(-) to the neighboring AlH4(-), forming AlH6(3-) and finally isolated MH, leaving AlH3 behind, which spontaneously desorbs hydrogen to give Al and 1.5H2. The proposed mechanism is symmetric in the direction of hydrogen desorption as well as readsorption processes.

  4. Astronaut Alan B. Shepard has his blood pressure and temperature checked

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Astronaut Alan B. Shepard has his blood pressure and temperate checked prior to his Mercury-Redstone 3 (MR-3) mission, the first American manned space flight. The attending physician is Dr. William K. Douglas.

  5. Astronaut Alan B. Shepard has his blood pressure and temperature checked

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Astronaut Alan B. Shepard has his blood pressure and temperate checked prior to his Mercury-Redstone 3 (MR-3) mission, the first American manned space flight. The attending physician is Dr. William K. Douglas.

  6. MERCURY-ATLAS (MA)-9 - SHEPARD, ALAN B., JR. ASTRONAUT - MERCURY CONTROL CENTER (MCC) - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1963-05-16

    S63-07857 (15-16 May 1963) --- Astronaut Alan Shepard (left) and Walter C. Williams monitor progress of the Mercury Atlas 9 (MA-9) mission from Mercury Control Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida. Photo credit: NASA

  7. Astronaut Alan Shepard removing space suit on U.S. Champlain after recovery

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-05-05

    S88-31382 (5 May 1961) --- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard receives assistance in removing his spacesuit while on the U.S. Champlain after the recovery of his Mercury capsule. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  8. Watching the dehydrogenation of alane (AlH3) in a TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beattie, Shane; Humphries, Terry; Weaver, Louise; McGrady, Sean

    2008-03-01

    Alane (AlH3) is a promising candidate for on-board hydrogen storage applications. Its theoretical gravimetric capacity is 10.1 percent and decomposition is achieved with modest heating (60-200 deg C). We studied the dehydrogenation of alane, insitu, in a TEM. Alane powder was loaded into the TEM and heated at 80 deg C. We were able to `watch' the dehydrogenation of the alane to aluminum. Electron diffraction and dark fiend images are used to show how and where the aluminum crystallites grow. Although crystalline aluminum phases were successfully identified, some of the sample remained amorphous. We will discuss the nature of the amorphous material and present images clearly identifying the nature of the aluminum crystallites.

  9. LEDs/ALAN-Working To Be Good Neighbors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Robert

    2015-08-01

    ALAN (Artificial Light At Night) and LEDs have recently become major discussion topics in the areas of astronomy, light pollution, endangered species and human health to mention but a few. In years past, MH, LPS and HPS dominated night lighting with LPS and its associated narrow spectrum as the preferred source around observatories and shorelines. LEDs offer the ability to modify the spectrum, realize substantial energy savings and other associated benefits while meeting the requirements of the astronomy community.The primary concern of the different groups relates to blue light content of the LED. For astronomers, the molecular (Raleigh) scattering related to the blue light interferes with certain portions of the spectrum used for deep space studies. The ecologists studying various endangered species find blue and green light can be related to declining leatherback turtle population in certain areas of the world. Other animals ranging from bats to moths and other insects are now being studied to determine the effect of the blue light spectrum on their behavior. The impact of blue light on the human circadian rhythm and vision, especially in the older population, is being extensively studied today.This presentation will discuss the spectral power distribution (SPD) of various light sources, the performance of new LED solutions and how the SPD of these new LED’s can be adapted to address some of the issues raised by various constituencies. A discussion describing why some of the metrics used to describe standard lighting are not adequate for specifying the new LED solutions with the modified spectra will be included.Today, lighting plans and implementation are all too often based on opinions and limited data. The ensuing problems and repercussions make it imperative to collect accurate and thorough information. Data collection is now ongoing using a variety of techniques analyzing the “before” and “after” lighting results from the C of HI LED streetlight

  10. Preparation of polyaniline/sodium alanate hybrid using a spray-drying process

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, B. R. E-mail: fabiopassador@gmail.com Passador, F. R. E-mail: fabiopassador@gmail.com Pessan, L. A. E-mail: fabiopassador@gmail.com

    2014-05-15

    Nowadays, hydrogen is highly interesting as an energy source, in particular in the automotive field. In fact, hydrogen is attractive as a fuel because it prevents air pollution and greenhouse emissions. One of the main problems with the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel is its on-board storage. The purpouse of this work was to develop a new hybrid material consisting of a polyaniline matrix with sodium alanate (NaAlH{sub 4}) using a spray-drying process. The polyaniline used for this experiment was synthesized by following a well-established method for the synthesis of the emeraldine base form of polyaniline using dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid as dopant. Micro particles of polyaniline/sodium alanate hybrids with 30 and 50 wt% of sodium alanate were prepared by using a spray-drying technique. Dilute solutions of polyaniline/sodium alanate were first prepared, 10g of the solid materials were mixed with 350 ml of toluene under stirring at room temperature for 24h and the solutions were dried using spray-dryer (Büchi, Switzerland) with 115°C of an inlet temperature. The hybrids were analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry, FT-IR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The addition of sodium alanate decreased the glass transition temperature of the hybrids when compared to neat polyaniline. FT-IR spectrum analysis was performed to identify the bonding environment of the synthesized material and was observed that simply physically mixture occurred between polyaniline and sodium alanate. The SEM images of the hybrids showed the formation of microspheres with sodium alanate dispersed in the polymer matrix.

  11. Preparation of polyaniline/sodium alanate hybrid using a spray-drying process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, B. R.; Passador, F. R.; Pessan, L. A.

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays, hydrogen is highly interesting as an energy source, in particular in the automotive field. In fact, hydrogen is attractive as a fuel because it prevents air pollution and greenhouse emissions. One of the main problems with the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel is its on-board storage. The purpouse of this work was to develop a new hybrid material consisting of a polyaniline matrix with sodium alanate (NaAlH4) using a spray-drying process. The polyaniline used for this experiment was synthesized by following a well-established method for the synthesis of the emeraldine base form of polyaniline using dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid as dopant. Micro particles of polyaniline/sodium alanate hybrids with 30 and 50 wt% of sodium alanate were prepared by using a spray-drying technique. Dilute solutions of polyaniline/sodium alanate were first prepared, 10g of the solid materials were mixed with 350 ml of toluene under stirring at room temperature for 24h and the solutions were dried using spray-dryer (Büchi, Switzerland) with 115°C of an inlet temperature. The hybrids were analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry, FT-IR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The addition of sodium alanate decreased the glass transition temperature of the hybrids when compared to neat polyaniline. FT-IR spectrum analysis was performed to identify the bonding environment of the synthesized material and was observed that simply physically mixture occurred between polyaniline and sodium alanate. The SEM images of the hybrids showed the formation of microspheres with sodium alanate dispersed in the polymer matrix.

  12. Towards direct synthesis of alane: A predicted defect-mediated pathway confirmed experimentally

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin -Lin; Herwadkar, Aditi; Reich, Jason M.; Johnson, Duane D.; House, Stephen D.; Pena-Martin, Pamela; Rockett, Angus A.; Robertson, Ian M.; Gupta, Shalabh; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    2016-08-18

    Here, alane (AlH3) is a unique energetic material that has not found a broad practical use for over 70 years because it is difficult to synthesize directly from its elements. Using density functional theory, we examine the defect-mediated formation of alane monomers on Al(111) in a two-step process: (1) dissociative adsorption of H2 and (2) alane formation, which are both endothermic on a clean surface. Only with Ti dopant to facilitate H2 dissociation and vacancies to provide Al adatoms, both processes become exothermic. In agreement, in situ scanning tunneling microscopy showed that during H2 exposure, alane monomers and clusters form primarily in the vicinity of Al vacancies and Ti atoms. Moreover, ball milling of the Al samples with Ti (providing necessary defects) showed a 10 % conversion of Al into AlH3 or closely related species at 344 bar H2, indicating that the predicted pathway may lead to the direct synthesis of alane from elements at pressures much lower than the 104 bar expected from bulk thermodynamics.

  13. Towards direct synthesis of alane: A predicted defect-mediated pathway confirmed experimentally

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Lin -Lin; Herwadkar, Aditi; Reich, Jason M.; ...

    2016-08-18

    Here, alane (AlH3) is a unique energetic material that has not found a broad practical use for over 70 years because it is difficult to synthesize directly from its elements. Using density functional theory, we examine the defect-mediated formation of alane monomers on Al(111) in a two-step process: (1) dissociative adsorption of H2 and (2) alane formation, which are both endothermic on a clean surface. Only with Ti dopant to facilitate H2 dissociation and vacancies to provide Al adatoms, both processes become exothermic. In agreement, in situ scanning tunneling microscopy showed that during H2 exposure, alane monomers and clusters formmore » primarily in the vicinity of Al vacancies and Ti atoms. Moreover, ball milling of the Al samples with Ti (providing necessary defects) showed a 10 % conversion of Al into AlH3 or closely related species at 344 bar H2, indicating that the predicted pathway may lead to the direct synthesis of alane from elements at pressures much lower than the 104 bar expected from bulk thermodynamics.« less

  14. Towards Direct Synthesis of Alane: A Predicted Defect-Mediated Pathway Confirmed Experimentally.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin-Lin; Herwadkar, Aditi; Reich, Jason M; Johnson, Duane D; House, Stephen D; Peña-Martin, Pamela; Rockett, Angus A; Robertson, Ian M; Gupta, Shalabh; Pecharsky, Vitalij K

    2016-09-08

    Alane (AlH3 ) is a unique energetic material that has not found a broad practical use for over 70 years because it is difficult to synthesize directly from its elements. Using density functional theory, we examine the defect-mediated formation of alane monomers on Al(111) in a two-step process: (1) dissociative adsorption of H2 and (2) alane formation, which are both endothermic on a clean surface. Only with Ti dopant to facilitate H2 dissociation and vacancies to provide Al adatoms, both processes become exothermic. In agreement, in situ scanning tunneling microscopy showed that during H2 exposure, alane monomers and clusters form primarily in the vicinity of Al vacancies and Ti atoms. Moreover, ball milling of the Al samples with Ti (providing necessary defects) showed a 10 % conversion of Al into AlH3 or closely related species at 344 bar H2 , indicating that the predicted pathway may lead to the direct synthesis of alane from elements at pressures much lower than the 10(4)  bar expected from bulk thermodynamics. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Towards direct synthesis of alane: A predicted defect-mediated pathway confirmed experimentally

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin -Lin; Herwadkar, Aditi; Reich, Jason M.; Johnson, Duane D.; House, Stephen D.; Pena-Martin, Pamela; Rockett, Angus A.; Robertson, Ian M.; Gupta, Shalabh; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    2016-08-18

    Here, alane (AlH3) is a unique energetic material that has not found a broad practical use for over 70 years because it is difficult to synthesize directly from its elements. Using density functional theory, we examine the defect-mediated formation of alane monomers on Al(111) in a two-step process: (1) dissociative adsorption of H2 and (2) alane formation, which are both endothermic on a clean surface. Only with Ti dopant to facilitate H2 dissociation and vacancies to provide Al adatoms, both processes become exothermic. In agreement, in situ scanning tunneling microscopy showed that during H2 exposure, alane monomers and clusters form primarily in the vicinity of Al vacancies and Ti atoms. Moreover, ball milling of the Al samples with Ti (providing necessary defects) showed a 10 % conversion of Al into AlH3 or closely related species at 344 bar H2, indicating that the predicted pathway may lead to the direct synthesis of alane from elements at pressures much lower than the 104 bar expected from bulk thermodynamics.

  16. Defect-mediated Alane formation on Ti-doped Al(111) surfaces: a DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herwadkar, Aditi; Wang, Lin-Lin; Johnson, Duane D.

    2011-03-01

    Understanding of Alane (AlH3) formation on Al surface remains elusive, including interpreting STM results under various conditions. Using density functional theory calculations, we study Alane formation on close-packed (111) and stepped surfaces with {111} and {100} microfacets of Al, with and without Ti as a catalyst. We find that Ti dopants act as catalyst in the formation of Alane on Al(111) via a vacancy-mediated mechanism. Additionally, we find the Alane formation energy at steps is 40 % less than that from the flat surface. We assess the energetics of various surface-defect configurations to understand the concerted roles that Ti dopants, surface vacancies, and step defects play in Alane formation. Work was supported in part by Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Science under contract DEFC36-05GO15064 (Sandia Metal-Hydride Center of Excellence), DE-FG02-03ER15476, DE-FG02-03ER46026, and DE-AC02-07CH11358 at the Ames Laboratory operated by Iowa State University.

  17. Isotopic effect on the non-isothermal dehydrogenation kinetics of lithium alanates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Tiwari, Gyanendra Prasad; Krishnamurthy, Nagaiyar; Kojima, Yoshitsugu

    2017-08-01

    The isotopic effect on the dehydrogenation kinetics of lithium alanate has been studied. The desorption of hydrogen/deuterium of LiAlH4/LiAlD4 occurs in two steps below 300 °C. The deuterium desorption temperature of LiAlD4 was found to be marginally higher for both the steps as compared to hydrogen desorption of LiAlH4. The apparent activation energy of hydrogen/deuterium desorption was evaluated and found to be in the order of EaLiAlH4 >EaLiAlD4 . The higher desorption temperature of LiAlD4 has been explained on the basis the zero point energy per unit H/D atom of the alanates. The results indicate the normal isotopic effect of lithium alanate, which could be extended for the tritium.

  18. A density functional theory study of the one-dimensional alane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yan-Hong; Wang, Jian-Guo; Xu, W.

    2010-01-01

    The AlH1-6, Al2H1-7, Al3H1-9, AlmH3m (m = 4-10), and the periodic helical structure of the one-dimensional (1D) alane are studied by means of density functional theory calculations. The helical isolated structure is more stable than those in the corresponding cyclic and other geometries. A new periodic 1D helical alane structure is predicted for the first time. The stability of this periodic 1D helical alane structure has been confirmed by its large average binding energy based on AlH3, large energy gap of highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, and the typically double helical π-orbital which parallels its bone structure.

  19. A density functional theory study of the one-dimensional alane.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yan-Hong; Wang, Jian-Guo; Xu, W

    2010-01-15

    The AlH(1-6), Al(2)H(1-7), Al(3)H(1-9), Al(m)H(3m) (m = 4-10), and the periodic helical structure of the one-dimensional (1D) alane are studied by means of density functional theory calculations. The helical isolated structure is more stable than those in the corresponding cyclic and other geometries. A new periodic 1D helical alane structure is predicted for the first time. The stability of this periodic 1D helical alane structure has been confirmed by its large average binding energy based on AlH(3), large energy gap of highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, and the typically double helical pi-orbital which parallels its bone structure.

  20. Thermochemistry of Alane Complexes for Hydrogen Storage: A Theoretical and Experimental Investigation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the relative stabilities of alane (AlH3) complexes with electron donors is essential for identifying hydrogen storage materials for vehicular applications that can be regenerated by off-board methods; however, almost no thermodynamic data are available to make this assessment. To fill this gap, we employed the G4(MP2) method to determine heats of formation, entropies, and Gibbs free energies of formation for 38 alane complexes with NH3−nRn (R = Me, Et; n = 0−3), pyridine, pyrazine, triethylenediamine (TEDA), quinuclidine, OH2−nRn (R = Me, Et; n = 0−2), dioxane, and tetrahydrofuran (THF). Monomer, bis, and selected dimer complex geometries were considered. Using these data, we computed the thermodynamics of the key formation and dehydrogenation reactions that would occur during hydrogen delivery and alane regeneration, from which trends in complex stability were identified. These predictions were tested by synthesizing six amine−alane complexes involving trimethylamine, triethylamine, dimethylethylamine, TEDA, quinuclidine, and hexamine and obtaining upper limits of ΔG° for their formation from metallic aluminum. Combining these computational and experimental results, we establish a criterion for complex stability relevant to hydrogen storage that can be used to assess potential ligands prior to attempting synthesis of the alane complex. On the basis of this, we conclude that only a subset of the tertiary amine complexes considered and none of the ether complexes can be successfully formed by direct reaction with aluminum and regenerated in an alane-based hydrogen storage system. PMID:22962624

  1. Thermochemistry of Alane Complexes for Hydrogen Storage: A Theoretical and Experimental Investigation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Bryan M; Lacina, David; Nielsen, Ida M B; Graetz, Jason; Allendorf, Mark D

    2011-04-21

    Knowledge of the relative stabilities of alane (AlH(3)) complexes with electron donors is essential for identifying hydrogen storage materials for vehicular applications that can be regenerated by off-board methods; however, almost no thermodynamic data are available to make this assessment. To fill this gap, we employed the G4(MP2) method to determine heats of formation, entropies, and Gibbs free energies of formation for 38 alane complexes with NH(3-n)R(n) (R = Me, Et; n = 0-3), pyridine, pyrazine, triethylenediamine (TEDA), quinuclidine, OH(2-n)R(n) (R = Me, Et; n = 0-2), dioxane, and tetrahydrofuran (THF). Monomer, bis, and selected dimer complex geometries were considered. Using these data, we computed the thermodynamics of the key formation and dehydrogenation reactions that would occur during hydrogen delivery and alane regeneration, from which trends in complex stability were identified. These predictions were tested by synthesizing six amine-alane complexes involving trimethylamine, triethylamine, dimethylethylamine, TEDA, quinuclidine, and hexamine and obtaining upper limits of ΔG° for their formation from metallic aluminum. Combining these computational and experimental results, we establish a criterion for complex stability relevant to hydrogen storage that can be used to assess potential ligands prior to attempting synthesis of the alane complex. On the basis of this, we conclude that only a subset of the tertiary amine complexes considered and none of the ether complexes can be successfully formed by direct reaction with aluminum and regenerated in an alane-based hydrogen storage system.

  2. Thermochemistry of Alane Complexes for Hydrogen Storage: A Theoretical and Experimental Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, B.M.; Graetz, J.; Lacina, D.; Nielsen, I.M.B.; Allendorf, M.D.

    2011-03-30

    Knowledge of the relative stabilities of alane (AlH{sub 3}) complexes with electron donors is essential for identifying hydrogen storage materials for vehicular applications that can be regenerated by off-board methods; however, almost no thermodynamic data are available to make this assessment. To fill this gap, we employed the G4(MP2) method to determine heats of formation, entropies, and Gibbs free energies of formation for 38 alane complexes with NH{sub 3-n}R{sub n} (R = Me, Et; n = 0-3), pyridine, pyrazine, triethylenediamine (TEDA), quinuclidine, OH{sub 2-n}R{sub n} (R = Me, Et; n = 0-2), dioxane, and tetrahydrofuran (THF). Monomer, bis, and selected dimer complex geometries were considered. Using these data, we computed the thermodynamics of the key formation and dehydrogenation reactions that would occur during hydrogen delivery and alane regeneration, from which trends in complex stability were identified. These predictions were tested by synthesizing six amine-alane complexes involving trimethylamine, triethylamine, dimethylethylamine, TEDA, quinuclidine, and hexamine and obtaining upper limits of {Delta}G{sup o} for their formation from metallic aluminum. Combining these computational and experimental results, we establish a criterion for complex stability relevant to hydrogen storage that can be used to assess potential ligands prior to attempting synthesis of the alane complex. On the basis of this, we conclude that only a subset of the tertiary amine complexes considered and none of the ether complexes can be successfully formed by direct reaction with aluminum and regenerated in an alane-based hydrogen storage system.

  3. Combustion of Alane and Aluminum with Water for Hydrogen and Thermal Energy Generation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    17–24]. Alane is a covalently bonded hydride which often appears in a polymeric form ( AlH3 )n and has at least seven known non- solvated forms. The...most stable polymorph is a- AlH3 [19,25,26]. Alane decomposition or dehy- drogenation (an endothermic process) has been found to be dependent on particle...Steady-state and one-dimensional approxi- mations are invoked. The entire region of interest is divided into six zones: (1) Al/ AlH3 -ice preheat zone

  4. Multiscale modeling of interaction of alane clusters on Al(111) surfaces: A reactive force field and infrared absorption spectroscopy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojwang, J. G. O.; Chaudhuri, Santanu; van Duin, Adri C. T.; Chabal, Yves J.; Veyan, Jean-Francois; van Santen, Rutger; Kramer, Gert Jan; Goddard, William A.

    2010-02-01

    We have used reactive force field (ReaxFF) to investigate the mechanism of interaction of alanes on Al(111) surface. Our simulations show that, on the Al(111) surface, alanes oligomerize into larger alanes. In addition, from our simulations, adsorption of atomic hydrogen on Al(111) surface leads to the formation of alanes via H-induced etching of aluminum atoms from the surface. The alanes then agglomerate at the step edges forming stringlike conformations. The identification of these stringlike intermediates as a precursor to the bulk hydride phase allows us to explain the loss of resolution in surface IR experiments with increasing hydrogen coverage on single crystal Al(111) surface. This is in excellent agreement with the experimental works of Go et al. [E. Go, K. Thuermer, and J. E. Reutt-Robey, Surf. Sci. 437, 377 (1999)]. The mobility of alanes molecules has been studied using molecular dynamics and it is found that the migration energy barrier of Al2H6 is 2.99 kcal/mol while the prefactor is D0=2.82×10-3 cm2/s. We further investigated the interaction between an alane and an aluminum vacancy using classical molecular dynamics simulations. We found that a vacancy acts as a trap for alane, and eventually fractionates/annihilates it. These results show that ReaxFF can be used, in conjunction with ab initio methods, to study complex reactions on surfaces at both ambient and elevated temperature conditions.

  5. Multiscale modeling of interaction of alane clusters on Al(111) surfaces: a reactive force field and infrared absorption spectroscopy approach.

    PubMed

    Ojwang, J G O; Chaudhuri, Santanu; van Duin, Adri C T; Chabal, Yves J; Veyan, Jean-Francois; van Santen, Rutger; Kramer, Gert Jan; Goddard, William A

    2010-02-28

    We have used reactive force field (ReaxFF) to investigate the mechanism of interaction of alanes on Al(111) surface. Our simulations show that, on the Al(111) surface, alanes oligomerize into larger alanes. In addition, from our simulations, adsorption of atomic hydrogen on Al(111) surface leads to the formation of alanes via H-induced etching of aluminum atoms from the surface. The alanes then agglomerate at the step edges forming stringlike conformations. The identification of these stringlike intermediates as a precursor to the bulk hydride phase allows us to explain the loss of resolution in surface IR experiments with increasing hydrogen coverage on single crystal Al(111) surface. This is in excellent agreement with the experimental works of Go et al. [E. Go, K. Thuermer, and J. E. Reutt-Robey, Surf. Sci. 437, 377 (1999)]. The mobility of alanes molecules has been studied using molecular dynamics and it is found that the migration energy barrier of Al(2)H(6) is 2.99 kcal/mol while the prefactor is D(0)=2.82 x 10(-3) cm(2)/s. We further investigated the interaction between an alane and an aluminum vacancy using classical molecular dynamics simulations. We found that a vacancy acts as a trap for alane, and eventually fractionates/annihilates it. These results show that ReaxFF can be used, in conjunction with ab initio methods, to study complex reactions on surfaces at both ambient and elevated temperature conditions.

  6. MA-9 ASTRONAUT GORDON COOPER EXPLAINS CAMERA TO BACKUP PILOT ALAN SHEPARD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Astronaut L. Gordon Cooper explains the 16MM handheld spacecraft camera to his back-up pilot Astronaut Alan Shepard. The camera designed by J. R. Hereford, McDonnell Aircraft Corp., will be used by Cooper during the MA-9 mission.

  7. Challenging the Status Quo: Alan Pifer and Higher Education Reform in Colonial Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anyanwu, Ogechi E.

    2013-01-01

    The historiography of higher education in Nigeria has not fully accounted for Alan Pifer's crucial contributions in reforming the elitist British higher education tradition in colonial Nigeria. Through qualitative analysis of mostly primary sources acquired from the Rare Book and Manuscript Library in Columbia University, this article argues that…

  8. 77 FR 37074 - License Amendment Request From the Alan J. Blotcky Reactor Facility

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-20

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2012-15009] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 50-131; NRC-2012-0141] License Amendment Request From the Alan J. Blotcky Reactor Facility AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION... Branch (RADB), Office of Administration, Mail Stop: TWB-05-B01M, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory...

  9. Astronaut Alan Bean looks over data acquisition camera on Skylab trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, commander for Skylab 3, the second manned Skylab mission, looks over the data acquisition camera mounted on the water tank in the upper level of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) one-G trainer at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC).

  10. Astronaut Alan Bean steps from ladder of Lunar Module for EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot for the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission, steps from the ladder of the Lunar Module to join Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander, in extravehicular activity on November 19, 1969. Astronaut Ricard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot, remained with the Command/Service Modules in lunar orbit.

  11. Astronaut Alan Bean deploys ALSEP during first Apollo 12 EVA on moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Apollo 12 lunar module pilot, deploys components of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) during the first Apollo 12 extravehicular activity (EVA) on the moon. The photo was made by Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., Apollo 12 commander, using a 70mm handheld Haselblad camera modified for lunar surface usage.

  12. The Great Tunes of the Hough: Music and Song in Alan Garner's "The Stone Book Quartet "

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godek, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    Although song and music are often elements in children's books, little critical attention has gone into examining their literary uses. Alan Garner's "The Stone Book Quartet" is an example of four texts for children in which music plays a vital role. The several snatches of traditional songs found throughout the quartet bring to life the culture of…

  13. Presidents' Panel: A Conversation with I. King Jordan, Robert Davila, and T. Alan Hurwitz

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwald, Brian H.; Jordan, I. King; Davila, Robert; Hurwitz, T. Alan

    2014-01-01

    Former Gallaudet presidents: I. King Jordan and Robert Davila join current president T. Alan Hurwitz on a panel moderated by Brian H. Greenwald as they share their experience leading this institution of higher education and offer insight into the transformative changes brought about by the "Deaf President Now" movement.

  14. Astronaut Alan B. Shepard has his blood pressure and temperature checked

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Astronaut Alan B. Shepard has a thermometer in his mouth to check his temperature checked prior to his Mercury-Redstone 3 (MR-3) mission, the first American manned suborbital space flight (02739); Shepard has his heart rate checked. The attending physician is Dr. William K. Douglas (02740).

  15. 2016 Summer Series - Alan Stern - The Exploration of Pluto by New Horizons

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-11

    Interplanetary exploration is essential for the long-term survival of our species. Robotic space exploration allows us to advance our knowledge of our solar system and beyond. Dr. Alan Stern will talk about the New Horizons mission to Pluto and the scientific knowledge gained through the exploration of the icy worlds at the edge of our solar system.

  16. Astronaut Alan B. Shepard has his blood pressure and temperature checked

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-01-01

    S61-02740 (5 May 1961) --- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr. has his heart rate checked prior to his Mercury-Redstone 3 (MR-3) mission, the first American manned suborbital spaceflight. The attending physician is Dr. William K. Douglas. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  17. Astronaut Alan B. Shepard has his blood pressure and temperature checked

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-01-01

    S61-02749 (5 May 1961) --- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr. has his blood pressure and temperature checked prior to his Mercury-Redstone 3 (MR-3) mission, the first American manned spaceflight. The attending physician is Dr. William K. Douglas. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  18. Challenging the Status Quo: Alan Pifer and Higher Education Reform in Colonial Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anyanwu, Ogechi E.

    2013-01-01

    The historiography of higher education in Nigeria has not fully accounted for Alan Pifer's crucial contributions in reforming the elitist British higher education tradition in colonial Nigeria. Through qualitative analysis of mostly primary sources acquired from the Rare Book and Manuscript Library in Columbia University, this article argues that…

  19. Astronaut Alan B. Shepard has his blood pressure and temperature checked

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Astronaut Alan B. Shepard has a thermometer in his mouth to check his temperature checked prior to his Mercury-Redstone 3 (MR-3) mission, the first American manned suborbital space flight (02739); Shepard has his heart rate checked. The attending physician is Dr. William K. Douglas (02740).

  20. Presidents' Panel: A Conversation with I. King Jordan, Robert Davila, and T. Alan Hurwitz

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwald, Brian H.; Jordan, I. King; Davila, Robert; Hurwitz, T. Alan

    2014-01-01

    Former Gallaudet presidents: I. King Jordan and Robert Davila join current president T. Alan Hurwitz on a panel moderated by Brian H. Greenwald as they share their experience leading this institution of higher education and offer insight into the transformative changes brought about by the "Deaf President Now" movement.

  1. OFFICIAL PORTRAIT - MERCURY-REDSTONE (MR)-3 PILOT - ASTRONAUT SHEPARD, ALAN B., JR.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1963-03-25

    S63-02082 (5 May 1961) --- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., attired in his Mercury pressure suit, poses for a photo prior to his launch in a Mercury-Redstone 3 (MR-3) spacecraft from Cape Canaveral on a suborbital mission ? the first U.S. manned spaceflight. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  2. Astronaut Alan Bean during news conference prior to Skylab 3 mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-06-29

    S73-30113 (30 June 1973) --- Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, ponders a question from a newsman during the premission press conference on June 30, 1973, in the Building 1 large auditorium at Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA

  3. Transmetallation between metal-only Lewis pairs: a new rhodium alane complex.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Jürgen; Braunschweig, Holger; Radacki, Krzysztof

    2012-10-28

    In this communication, synthesis of a rhodium alane Lewis adduct, [Cp(Me(3)P)(2)Rh→AlCl(3)], is reported. Given that direct synthesis using aluminium trichloride failed, a convenient transmetallation reaction was applied. The new MOLP was analysed by single crystal X-ray diffraction, multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations.

  4. Astronaut Alan Shepard - Pressure Suit - Mercury-Redstone (MR)-3 Flight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-01-01

    S61-02766 (5 May 1961) --- Side view of astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr. in his pressure suit, with helmet closed, for the Mercury-Redstone 3 (MR-3) flight, the first American manned spaceflight. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  5. ASTRONAUT SHEPARD, ALAN - ARRIVAL - ASTRONAUT GRISSOM, VIRGIL I. (GUS) - GREETING - GRAND BAHAMA ISLAND (GBI)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-05-05

    S61-02731 (5 May 1961) --- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr. arrives at Grand Bahamas Island and is greeted by astronaut Virgil I. (Gus) Grissom after the first American suborbital flight. He will participate in a press conference with Grissom and Donald Slayton. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  6. Astronaut Alan Shepard - Pressure Suit - Mercury-Redstone (MR)-3 flight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-01-01

    S61-02755 (5 May 1961) --- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr. is being helped into the lower half of his pressure suit for the Mercury-Redstone 3 (MR-3) flight, the first American manned spaceflight. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  7. Astronaut Alan Bean looks over data acquisition camera on Skylab trainer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-09-01

    S72-39256 (1972) --- Astronaut Alan L. Bean, commander for Skylab 3, the second manned Skylab mission, looks over the data acquisition camera mounted on the water tank in the upper level of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) one-G trainer at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC). Photo credit: NASA

  8. Closeup View - Astronaut Alan Shepard - Pressure Suit - Mercury-Redstone ( MR)-3 Flight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-04-20

    S61-00220 (20 April 1961) --- Close-up view of astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr. in his pressure suit, with helmet opened, for the Mercury-Redstone 3 (MR-3) flight, the first American manned spaceflight. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  9. CLOSEUP VIEW - ASTRONAUT SHEPARD, ALAN - PRESSURE SUIT - MERCURY-REDSTONE (MR)-3 - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-01-01

    S61-02775 (5 May 1961) --- Close-up view of astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr. in his pressure suit, with helmet opened, for the Mercury-Redstone 3 (MR-3) flight, the first American manned spaceflight. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  10. Astronaut Alan Shepard - Pressure Suit - Mercury-Redstone (MR)-3 Flight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-04-01

    S61-02757 (5 May 1961) --- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr. is being helped into his pressure suit for the Mercury-Redstone 3 (MR-3) flight, the first American manned spaceflight. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  11. Astronaut Alan Bean steps from ladder of Lunar Module for EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-19

    AS12-46-6729 (19 Nov. 1969) --- Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot for the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission, steps from the ladder of the Lunar Module to join astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander, in extravehicular activity on Nov. 19, 1969. Astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules in lunar orbit.

  12. Astronaut Alan Bean deploys ALSEP during first Apollo 12 EVA on moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-19

    AS12-47-6919 (19 Nov. 1969) --- Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot, deploys components of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) during the first Apollo 12 extravehicular activity (EVA) on the moon. The photo was made by astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander, using a 70mm handheld Hasselblad camera modified for lunar surface usage.

  13. Dry mechanochemical synthesis of alane from LiH and AlCl3.

    PubMed

    Hlova, Ihor Z; Gupta, Shalabh; Goldston, Jennifer F; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek; Pecharsky, Vitalij K

    2014-01-01

    A mechanochemical process for the synthesis of alane (AlH3) starting from lithium hydride (LiH) and aluminium chloride (AlCl3) at room temperature and the underlying reaction pathway have been studied. In contrast to a conventional process using the same two reactants dissolved in diethyl ether, our approach enables a solvent-free synthesis, thereby directly leading to adduct-free alane. The method described here is quick and efficient, resulting in the quantitative conversion of all aluminium in the starting mixture to alane. Both the intermediate compounds formed during the reaction and the final products have been characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, solid-state (27)Al NMR spectroscopy, and temperature programmed desorption analysis of the as-milled mixtures. We show that excess LiH in the starting mixture (with an optimal ratio of 9LiH : 1AlCl3) is essential for the formation and stability of Al-H bonds, initially in the form of alanates and, eventually, as alane. Further processing of this mixture, gradually adding AlCl3 to reach the ideal 3LiH : 1AlCl3 stoichiometry, appears to restrict the local accumulation of AlCl3 during the ball-milling process, thereby preventing the formation of unstable intermediates that decompose to metallic Al and molecular hydrogen. We also demonstrate that under the milling conditions used, a moderate hydrogen pressure of ca. 300 bar is required to suppress competing reactions that lead to the formation of metallic Al at room temperature. The identification of the reaction intermediates at each stage of the synthesis provides significant insight into the mechanism of this solid-state reaction, which may potentially afford a more rational approach toward the production of AlH3 in a simple solvent-free process.

  14. Alane adsorption and dissociation on the Si(0 0 1) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. L.; Bowler, D. R.

    2017-10-01

    We used DFT to study the energetics of the decomposition of alane, AlH3, on the Si(0 0 1) surface, as the acceptor complement to PH3. Alane forms a dative bond with the raised atoms of silicon surface dimers, via the Si atom lone pair. We calculated the energies of various structures along the pathway of successive dehydrogenation events following adsorption: AlH2, AlH and Al, finding a gradual, significant decrease in energy. For each stage, we analyse the structure and bonding, and present simulated STM images of the lowest energy structures. Finally, we find that the energy of Al atoms incorporated into the surface, ejecting a Si atom, is comparable to Al adatoms. These findings show that Al incorporation is likely to be as precisely controlled as P incorporation, if slightly less easy to achieve.

  15. Statistical Thermodynamics of Phase Transformations in Lithium Alanates with Release of Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaginaichenko, S. Yu.; Matysina, Z. A.; Shchur, D. V.; Pomytkin, A. P.; Gabdullin, M. T.; Zaritskii, D. A.

    2017-02-01

    Based on the molecular and kinetic concepts, the paper presents the theory of phase transformations in lithium alanates with the release of hydrogen. The calculations are given for free energies of phases and their dependences on pressure, temperature, hydrogen concentration, and energy parameters are determined. The equations are derived for the thermodynamically-equilibrium states which determine the Pressure-Temperature-Concentration diagram and estimate the energy parameters with the use of experimental results taken from the literature. The investigation of the detected temperature/concentration dependence in crystals shows the impossibility of a complete hydrogen release from alanates. The paper contains isotherm and isopleth plots. A possibility is established for the hysteresis effect. A comparison is given to the theoretical and experimental results.

  16. Hydrogen release from systems containing phosphine, borane, alane and galane: A mechanistic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Vinh Son; Majumdar, D.; Leszczynski, Jerzy; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2013-10-01

    The H2 release mechanism from phosphine borane and phosphine alane was investigated using quantum chemical methods (MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ geometry optimization and coupled-cluster energies were obtained through complete basis set extrapolation, CCSD(T)/CBS). The effect of catalysts borane, alane and galane on the processes was also explored. As the energy barriers for the release of H2 from BH3PH3 and AlH3PH3 are much higher than the B-P and Al-P bond energies, the presence of inherent catalysts can reduce substantially such energy barriers (using BH3 for BH3PH3, while AlH3 and GaH3 for AlH3PH3), and these systems could be useful as probable hydrogen source.

  17. Alane adsorption and dissociation on the Si(0 0 1) surface.

    PubMed

    Smith, R L; Bowler, D R

    2017-10-04

    We used DFT to study the energetics of the decomposition of alane, AlH3, on the Si(0 0 1) surface, as the acceptor complement to PH3. Alane forms a dative bond with the raised atoms of silicon surface dimers, via the Si atom lone pair. We calculated the energies of various structures along the pathway of successive dehydrogenation events following adsorption: AlH2, AlH and Al, finding a gradual, significant decrease in energy. For each stage, we analyse the structure and bonding, and present simulated STM images of the lowest energy structures. Finally, we find that the energy of Al atoms incorporated into the surface, ejecting a Si atom, is comparable to Al adatoms. These findings show that Al incorporation is likely to be as precisely controlled as P incorporation, if slightly less easy to achieve.

  18. Calculations suggest facile hydrogen release from water using boranes and alanes as catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinnen, Saartje; Nguyen, Vinh Son; Sakai, Shogo; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2009-04-01

    Producing H 2 from water is a very challenging task. Using quantum chemical calculations with the MP2 and CCSD(T) methods and the aug-cc-pVnZ basis sets (extrapolated to CBS), we investigated the possibilities of B 2H 6, AlH 3, Al 2H 6 and AlH 3BH 3 to act as catalysts in the reactions that split water. Hydrogen production from H 2O is greatly accelerated in the presence of alane, dialane or borane-alane in such a way that reaction H 2O + Al 2H 6 is a nearly spontaneous process. The main catalytic effect of AlH 3 arises from the occurrence of a strong dihydrogen bond of the type Al-H δ-- δ+H-O within a cyclic transition structure.

  19. Astronaut Alan Bean reads data from book while holding teleprinter tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, reads data from book in his right hand while holding teleprinter tape in his left hand, in the ward room of the Skylab space station's Orbital Workshop (OWS) crew quarters. This photograph was taken with a 35mm Nikon camera held by one of Bean's fellow crewmen during the 56.5 day second manned Skylab mission in Earth orbit.

  20. ASTRONAUT BEAN, ALAN L - SIMULATION - BLDG. 35 - COMMAND MODULE TRAINER - JSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1975-02-20

    S75-21720 (14 Feb. 1975) --- Astronaut Alan L. Bean (foreground) and cosmonaut Aleksey A. Leonov participate in Apollo-Soyuz Test Project joint crew training in Building 35 at NASA's Johnson Space Center. They are in the Apollo Command Module trainer. The training session simulated activities on the first day in Earth orbit. Bean is the commander of the American ASTP backup crew. Leonov is the commander of the Soviet ASTP first (prime) crew.

  1. Astronaut Alan Shepard stands beside large boulder found by Apollo 14 crew

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-02-06

    AS14-68-9414 (6 Feb. 1971) --- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., Apollo 14 commander, stands beside a large boulder on the lunar surface during the mission's second extravehicular activity (EVA), on Feb. 6, 1971. Note the lunar dust clinging to Shepard's space suit. Astronauts Shepard and Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot, explored the lunar surface while astronaut Stuart A. Roosa, command module pilot, orbited the moon in the Command and Service Modules (CSM).

  2. Astronaut Alan Shepard on U.S. Champlain after recovery of Mercury capsule

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-05-05

    S88-31380 (5 May 1961) --- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., strides across the deck of the U.S. Navy Carrier Champlain following an inspection of his Freedom 7 capsule. Shepard had just completed the first manned U.S. space mission, a 15-minute suborbital flight. (NASA Hq. Photo No., MR3-40) Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  3. Astronaut Alan Bean reads data from book while holding teleprinter tape

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-08-08

    SL3-111-1514 (July-September 1973) --- Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, reads data from book in his right hand while holding teleprinter tape in his left hand, in the ward room of the Skylab space station's Orbital Workshop (OWS) crew quarters. This photograph was taken with a 35mm Nikon camera held by one of Bean's fellow crewmen during the 56.5 day second manned Skylab mission in Earth orbit. Photo credit: NASA

  4. Hydrogen release properties of lithium alanate for application to fuel cell propulsion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbo, P.; Migliardini, F.; Veneri, O.

    In this paper the results of an experimental study on LiAlH 4 (lithium alanate) as hydrogen source for fuel cell propulsion systems are reported. The compound examined in this work was selected as reference material for light metal hydrides, because of its high hydrogen content (10.5 wt.%) and interesting desorption kinetic properties at moderate temperatures. Thermal dynamic and kinetic of hydrogen release from this hydride were investigated using a fixed bed reactor to evaluate the effect of heating procedure, carrier gas flow rate and sample form. The aim of this study was to characterize the lithium alanate decomposition through the reaction steps leading to the formation of Li 3AlH 6 and LiH. A hydrogen tank was designed and realized to contain pellets of lithium alanate as feeding for a fuel cell propulsion system based on a 2-kW Polymeric Electrolyte Fuel Cell (PEFC) stack. The fuel cell system was integrated into the power train comprising DC-DC converter, energy storage systems and electric drive for moped applications (3 kW). The experiments on the power train were conducted on a test bench able to simulate the vehicle behaviour and road characteristics on specific driving cycles. In particular the efficiencies of individual components and overall power train were analyzed evidencing the energy requirements of the hydrogen storage material.

  5. Genome Sequences of Mycobacteriophages AlanGrant, Baee, Corofin, OrangeOswald, and Vincenzo, New Members of Cluster B.

    PubMed

    Pope, Welkin H; Carbonara, Maria E; Cioffi, Hanna M; Cruz, Tyler; Dang, Brian Q; Doyle, Alexander N; Fan, Olivia H; Gallagher, Molly; Gentile, Gabrielle M; German, Brian A; Farrell, Margaret E; Gerwig, Madeline; Hunter, Kelsey L; Lefever, Virginia E; Marfisi, Nicole A; McDonnell, Jill E; Monga, Jappmann K; Quiroz, Kevin G; Pong, Alexandra C; Rimple, Patrick A; Situ, Michelle; Sohnen, Peri C; Stockinger, Annmarie N; Thompson, Paige K; Torchio, Nicole M; Toner, Chelsea L; Ulbrich, Megan C; Vohra, Neelam I; Zakir, Aala; Adkins, Nancy L; Brown, Bryony R; Churilla, Bryce M; Kramer, Zachary J; Lapin, Jonathan S; Montgomery, Matthew T; Prout, Ashley K; Grubb, Sarah R; Warner, Marcie H; Bowman, Charles A; Russell, Daniel A; Hatfull, Graham F

    2015-06-18

    AlanGrant, Baee, Corofin, OrangeOswald, and Vincenzo are newly isolated phages of Mycobacterium smegmatis mc(2)155 discovered in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. All five phages share nucleotide similarity with cluster B mycobacteriophages but span considerable diversity with Corofin and OrangeOswald in subcluster B3, AlanGrant and Vincenzo in subcluster B4, and Baee in subcluster B5. Copyright © 2015 Pope et al.

  6. Interview with Forrest J. Gerard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Journal, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Focusing on the current policy, organization and direction of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, this edited interview addressed such issues as BIA reorganization, delivery systems, PL 93-638, Indian Water Rights, Senate Select Committee on Indian Affairs, PL 95-561 and Indian Education. (RTS)

  7. Multiscale modelling of Interaction of Alane Clusters on Al(111) surface: A Reactive Force Field and Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojwang, Julius; van Duin, Adri; Goddard, William, III; van Santen, Rutger

    2010-10-01

    Alanes are believed to be the ubiquitous facilitators of mass transport of aluminum atoms during the thermal decomposition of NaAlH4. Alanes also take part on decomposition of AlH3, another important material for hydrogen storage. We have used interplay of theoretical simulations (reactive force field and density functional theory) and experiments (IR reflection absorption spectroscopy) to address the issue of the role of alanes as facilitators of mass transport of aluminum atoms. We have obtained valuable details on the mechanism of formation and agglomeration of alanes on Al(111) surface. Our simulations show that, on the Al(111) surface, alanes oligomerize into larger alanes. The identification of these string like intermediates as a precursor to the bulk hydride phase allows us to explain the loss of resolution in surface IR experiments with increasing hydrogen coverage on single crystal Al(111) surface. This is in excellent agreement with the experimental works of Go et al. (E. Go, K. Thuermer, J.E. Reutt-Robey, Surf. Sci.,437:377(1999)).

  8. Astronaut Alan Bean flies the Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment in the OWS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, flies the M509 Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment, as seen in this photographic reproduction taken from a television transmission made by a color television camera in the Orbital Workshop (OWS) of the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. Bean is strapped into the back-mounted, hand-controlled Automatically stabilized Maneuvering Unit (ASMU). The M509 exercise was in the forward dome area of the OWS. THe dome area is about 22 feet in diameter and 19 feet form top to bottom.

  9. Astronaut Alan Shepard near Lunar Landing Training Vehicle prior to test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-12-14

    S70-56287 (14 Dec. 1970) --- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., commander of the Apollo 14 lunar landing mission, stands near a Lunar Landing Training Vehicle (LLTV) prior to a test flight at Ellington Air Force Base, Houston, on Dec. 14, 1970. Shepard will be at the controls of the Apollo 14 Lunar Module (LM) when it lands on the moon in the highlands near Fra Mauro. Astronaut Stuart A. Roosa, command module pilot, will remain with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit while astronauts Shepard and Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot, descend in the LM to explore the moon.

  10. Astronaut Alan Bean flies the Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment in the OWS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-08-28

    S73-34207 (28 Aug. 1973) --- Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, flies the M509 astronaut Maneuvering Equipment, as seen in this photographic reproduction taken from a television transmission made by a color television camera in the Orbital Workshop (OWS) of the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. Bean is strapped into the back-mounted, hand-controlled Automatically Stabilized Maneuvering Unit (ASMU). The M509 exercise was in the forward dome area of the OWS. The dome area is about 22 feet in diameter and 19 feet from top to bottom. Photo credit: NASA

  11. Astronaut Alan Bean flies the Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment in the OWS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, flies the M509 Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment, as seen in this photographic reproduction taken from a television transmission made by a color television camera in the Orbital Workshop (OWS) of the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. Bean is strapped into the back-mounted, hand-controlled Automatically stabilized Maneuvering Unit (ASMU). The M509 exercise was in the forward dome area of the OWS. THe dome area is about 22 feet in diameter and 19 feet form top to bottom.

  12. Astronaut Alan Shepard inspects his capsule on U.S. Champlain after recovery

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-05-05

    S88-31384 (5 May 1961) --- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., Mercury-Redstone 3 (MR-3) pilot, is pictured near his Freedom 7 capsule during a postflight inspection aboard the U.S. Navy Carrier Champlain after the recovery of his Mercury vehicle. Earlier Shepard had completed the historical 15-minute suborbital Mercury-Redstone 3 mission, marking the U.S. inaugural manned space mission. (NASA Hq. No. 61-MR3-107 or MR3-44) Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  13. Growth of aluminum on Si using dimethyl-ethyl amine alane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neo, Yoichiro; Niwano, Michio; Mimura, Hidenori; Yokoo, Kuniyoshi

    1999-04-01

    The paper describes growth of aluminum on a hydrogen terminated Si (100) surface using dimethyl-ethyl amine alane. The growth rate depends on the substrate temperature with an activation energy of 0.56 eV at the temperature ranging from 150 to 250°C. Selective growth of Al into 1.5-μm diameter via-holes is successfully demonstrated at the substrate temperature of 150°C. In situ FTIR measurements suggest that growth of Al occurs by the chemical reaction between AlH 3 and a hydrogen terminated Si surface.

  14. Metal-alane adducts with zero-valent nickel, cobalt, and iron.

    PubMed

    Rudd, P Alex; Liu, Shengsi; Gagliardi, Laura; Young, Victor G; Lu, Connie C

    2011-12-28

    Coordination complexes that pair a zero-valent transition metal (Ni, Co, Fe) and an aluminum(III) center have been prepared. They add to the few examples of structurally characterized metal alanes and are the first reported metallalumatranes. To understand the M-Al interaction and gauge the effect of varying the late metal, the complexes were characterized by X-ray crystallography, electrochemistry, UV-Vis-NIR and NMR spectroscopies, and theoretical calculations. The M-Al bond strength decreases with varying M in the order Ni > Co > Fe. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  15. Computational study of pristine and titanium-doped sodium alanates for hydrogen storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dathar, Gopi Krishna Phani

    The emphasis of this research is to study and elucidate the underlying mechanisms of reversible hydrogen storage in pristine and Ti-doped sodium aluminum hydrides using molecular modeling techniques. An early breakthrough in using complex metal hydrides as hydrogen storage materials is from the research on sodium alanates by Bogdanovic et al., in 1997 reporting reversible hydrogen storage is possible at moderate temperatures and pressures in transition metal doped sodium alanates. Anton reported titanium salts as the best catalysts compared to all other transition metal salts from his further research on transition metal doped sodium alanates. However, a few questions remained unanswered regarding the role of Ti in reversible hydrogen storage of sodium alanates with improved thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrogen desorption. The first question is about the position of transition metal dopants in the sodium aluminum hydride lattice. The position is investigated by identifying the possible sites for titanium dopants in NaAlH4 lattice and studying the structure and dynamics of possible compounds resulting from titanium doping in sodium alanates. The second question is the role of titanium dopants in improved thermodynamics of hydrogen desorption in Ti-doped NaAlH4. Though it is accepted in the literature that formation of TiAl alloys (Ti-Al and TiAl3) is favorable, reaction pathways are not clearly established. Furthermore, the source of aluminum for Ti-Al alloy formation is not clearly understood. The third question in this area is the role of titanium dopants in improved kinetics of hydrogen absorption and desorption in Ti-doped sodium alanates. This study is directed towards addressing the three longstanding questions in this area. Thermodynamic and kinetic pathways for hydrogen desorption in pristine NaAlH4 and formation of Ti-Al alloys in Ti-doped NaAlH 4, are elucidated to understand the underlying mechanisms of hydrogen desorption. Density functional theory

  16. Formation and bonding of alane clusters on Al(111) surfaces studied by infrared absorption spectroscopy and theoretical modeling.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Santanu; Rangan, Sylvie; Veyan, Jean-Francois; Muckerman, James T; Chabal, Yves J

    2008-08-13

    Alanes are believed to be the mass transport intermediate in many hydrogen storage reactions and thus important for understanding rehydrogenation kinetics for alanates and AlH3. Combining density functional theory (DFT) and surface infrared (IR) spectroscopy, we provide atomistic details about the formation of alanes on the Al(111) surface, a model environment for the rehydrogenation reactions. At low coverage, DFT predicts a 2-fold bridge site adsorption for atomic hydrogen at 1150 cm(-1), which is too weak to be detected by IR but was previously observed in electron energy loss spectroscopy. At higher coverage, steps are the most favorable adsorption sites for atomic H adsorption, and it is likely that the AlH3 molecules form (initially strongly bound to steps) at saturation. With increasing exposures AlH3 is extracted from the step edge and becomes highly mobile on the terraces in a weakly bound state, accounting for step etching observed in previous STM studies. The mobility of these weakly bound AlH3 molecules is the key factor leading to the growth of larger alanes through AlH3 oligomerization. The subsequent decomposition and desorption of alanes is also investigated and compared to previous temperature programmed desorption studies.

  17. pardInvestigation of the Direct Hydrogenation of Aluminum to Alane in Supercritical Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Craig; McGrady, Sean; Ayabe, Reyna; Reddy, Ben

    2007-03-01

    Alane, AlH3 has many of the properties that are requisite for materials to be considered viable for onboard hydrogen storage applications. Most notibly, it contains 10.1 wt% hydrogen and undergoes dehydrogenation at appreciable rates at temperatures below 100^oC. However, the very low, >= 6 kJ/mol, enthalpy of dehydrogenation of AlH3 prohibits subsequent re-hydrogenation through standard gas-solid techniques except at very high pressures or very low temperatures. The extremely low solubility of gaseous H2 in conventional organic solvents also vitiates a solution-based approach. Re-hydrogenation of Al using a supercritical fluid potentially offers a workable approach since the fluid can act as a solvent, at the same time remaining completely miscible with permanent gases like hydrogen. Recently, it has been found that mixtures of NaH and Al can be hydrogenated to sodium alanate, NaAlH4 under modest pressures and temperatures in supercritical fluids. We have now extended these studies to the hydrogenation of Al to AlH3. The results of these studies and experimental details will be reported.

  18. Robots testing robots: ALAN-Arm, a humanoid arm for the testing of robotic rehabilitation systems.

    PubMed

    Brookes, Jack; Kuznecovs, Maksims; Kanakis, Menelaos; Grigals, Arturs; Narvidas, Mazvydas; Gallagher, Justin; Levesley, Martin

    2017-07-01

    Robotics is increasing in popularity as a method of providing rich, personalized and cost-effective physiotherapy to individuals with some degree of upper limb paralysis, such as those who have suffered a stroke. These robotic rehabilitation systems are often high powered, and exoskeletal systems can attach to the person in a restrictive manner. Therefore, ensuring the mechanical safety of these devices before they come in contact with individuals is a priority. Additionally, rehabilitation systems may use novel sensor systems to measure current arm position. Used to capture and assess patient movements, these first need to be verified for accuracy by an external system. We present the ALAN-Arm, a humanoid robotic arm designed to be used for both accuracy benchmarking and safety testing of robotic rehabilitation systems. The system can be attached to a rehabilitation device and then replay generated or human movement trajectories, as well as autonomously play rehabilitation games or activities. Tests of the ALAN-Arm indicated it could recreate the path of a generated slow movement path with a maximum error of 14.2mm (mean = 5.8mm) and perform cyclic movements up to 0.6Hz with low gain (<1.5dB). Replaying human data trajectories showed the ability to largely preserve human movement characteristics with slightly higher path length and lower normalised jerk.

  19. Professor Alan Turner (1947-2012). Specialist in Miocene-Pleistocene Carnivora, particularly Felidae and Hyaenidae and their palaeoecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, Hannah; Turner, Adam; Antón, Mauricio

    2014-07-01

    Alan first trained as a telecom engineer, working for the GPO (General Post Office) which later became British Telecom. He never forgot this early training and was fascinated by how things worked - always happy to take something apart and fix it (although his attempt to close a large plate glass window with a geological hammer was not one of his successes). Following a few years as an engineer, he went to Sheffield University to study archaeology as a mature student in 1973. At this time Sheffield was a hotbed of prehistory with Graeme Barker, Robin Dennell and many others contributing to a truly research-led degree (with tutorials in the pub (well, it was the 1970s)) (Fig. 1). Alan's interest in bones developed at this time, and having graduated in 1976 he went on to take a PhD, supervised by Robin Dennell, on "Aspects of the palaeoecology of large predators, including man, during the British Upper Pleistocene, with particular emphasis on predator-prey relationships" which resulted in a life-long interest in the Carnivora and particularly hyaenas. Following his PhD, Alan moved to the Environmental Archaeology Unit at York to undertake a Science Research Council project on the morphometrics of domestic cattle and pigs from Coppergate and other major urban excavations in the city. Faced with a lot of measurements and statistics, Alan retained his interest in the animals themselves. The project also confirmed to Alan that prehistory was his metier, rather than the historic periods. Former York colleagues still fondly recall Alan's dry wit, and the day that he successfully put the irritating lab telephone beyond use with no externally visible trace of damage.

  20. Apollo 12 Mission image - Alan Bean unloads ALSEP RTG fuel element

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-19

    AS12-46-6790 (19 Nov. 1969) --- Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot, is photographed at quadrant II of the Lunar Module (LM) during the first Apollo 12 extravehicular activity (EVA) on the moon. This picture was taken by astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander. Here, Bean is using a fuel transfer tool to remove the fuel element from the fuel cask mounted on the LM's descent stage. The fuel element was then placed in the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG), the power source for the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) which was deployed on the moon by the two astronauts. The RTG is next to Bean's right leg. While astronauts Conrad and Bean descended in the LM "Intrepid" to explore the Ocean of Storms region of the moon, astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Yankee Clipper" in lunar orbit.

  1. Anisotropic storage medium development in a full-scale, sodium alanate-based, hydrogen storage system

    DOE PAGES

    Jorgensen, Scott W.; Johnson, Terry A.; Payzant, E. Andrew; ...

    2016-06-11

    Deuterium desorption in an automotive-scale hydrogen storage tube was studied in-situ using neutron diffraction. Gradients in the concentration of the various alanate phases were observed along the length of the tube but no significant radial anisotropy was present. In addition, neutron radiography and computed tomography showed large scale cracks and density fluctuations, confirming the presence of these structures in an undisturbed storage system. These results demonstrate that large scale storage structures are not uniform even after many absorption/desorption cycles and that movement of gaseous hydrogen cannot be properly modeled by a simple porous bed model. In addition, the evidence indicatesmore » that there is slow transformation of species at one end of the tube indicating loss of catalyst functionality. These observations explain the unusually fast movement of hydrogen in a full scale system and shows that loss of capacity is not occurring uniformly in this type of hydrogen-storage system.« less

  2. Anisotropic storage medium development in a full-scale, sodium alanate-based, hydrogen storage system

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, Scott W.; Johnson, Terry A.; Payzant, E. Andrew; Bilheux, Hassina Z.

    2016-06-11

    Deuterium desorption in an automotive-scale hydrogen storage tube was studied in-situ using neutron diffraction. Gradients in the concentration of the various alanate phases were observed along the length of the tube but no significant radial anisotropy was present. In addition, neutron radiography and computed tomography showed large scale cracks and density fluctuations, confirming the presence of these structures in an undisturbed storage system. These results demonstrate that large scale storage structures are not uniform even after many absorption/desorption cycles and that movement of gaseous hydrogen cannot be properly modeled by a simple porous bed model. In addition, the evidence indicates that there is slow transformation of species at one end of the tube indicating loss of catalyst functionality. These observations explain the unusually fast movement of hydrogen in a full scale system and shows that loss of capacity is not occurring uniformly in this type of hydrogen-storage system.

  3. Reducing the Harms of College Student Drinking: How Alan Marlatt Changed Approaches, Outcomes, and the Field

    PubMed Central

    Kilmer, Jason R.; Palmer, Rebekka S.; Cronce, Jessica M.; Logan, Diane E.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we discuss Alan Marlatt’s contributions to the prevention and reduction of alcohol-related harms among college students. We consider Alan’s early research that later led to the development and evaluation of college student drinking programs, and examine Alan’s impact, both directly and indirectly through those he mentored and trained, as a scientist-practitioner. We review the recognition of the efficacy of Alan’s programs, including the Alcohol Skills Training Program (ASTP) and Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students (BASICS), in addition to extensions of these interventions in more recent studies. Finally, we discuss how Alan’s work influences interventions with college student drinkers today, and how future directions will continue to be informed by his vision and values. PMID:25774117

  4. Anisotropic storage medium development in a full-scale, sodium alanate-based, hydrogen storage system

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, Scott W.; Johnson, Terry A.; Payzant, E. Andrew; Bilheux, Hassina Z.

    2016-06-11

    Deuterium desorption in an automotive-scale hydrogen storage tube was studied in-situ using neutron diffraction. Gradients in the concentration of the various alanate phases were observed along the length of the tube but no significant radial anisotropy was present. In addition, neutron radiography and computed tomography showed large scale cracks and density fluctuations, confirming the presence of these structures in an undisturbed storage system. These results demonstrate that large scale storage structures are not uniform even after many absorption/desorption cycles and that movement of gaseous hydrogen cannot be properly modeled by a simple porous bed model. In addition, the evidence indicates that there is slow transformation of species at one end of the tube indicating loss of catalyst functionality. These observations explain the unusually fast movement of hydrogen in a full scale system and shows that loss of capacity is not occurring uniformly in this type of hydrogen-storage system.

  5. Moral absolutism and abortion: Alan Donagan on the hysterectomy and craniotomy cases.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Terrence

    1985-07-01

    Reynolds argues that the nonconsequentialist moral theory proposed by Alan Donagan in his book The Theory of Morality (University of Chicago Press; 1977) does not resolve the cases in which craniotomy or removal of a cancerous uterus appears necessary to save the life of a pregnant woman. Donagan's absolute prohibition against the murder of the innocent and his rejection of the principle of double effect have led him to view the fetus as a pursuer or assailant or to assert the theory of proleptic agreement--that in risk taking ventures the parties may agree that killing one person to save the lives of the others will be accepted. Reynolds holds these arguments to be inapplicable in therapeutic abortions involving craniotomy or hysterectomy and concludes that Donagan's absolutist theory must be reexamined.

  6. First-principles study of hydrogen vacancies in sodium alanate with Ti substitution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Tezuka, Akinori; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Ikeshoji, Tamio

    2010-05-26

    In order to clarify the effect of hydrogen vacancies on the stability and structure of sodium alanate, NaAlH(4), with and without Ti substitution for Al, first-principles electronic structure calculations were carried out. The relative thermodynamic stability of the Ti dopant and the H vacancy in a supercell was obtained. For the Ti-doped Na(16)Al(16)H(64) supercell calculations, it was preferable to perform the initial substitution with a cluster of TiAlH(n). We showed that substitution of a Ti atom for an Al atom in Na(16)Al(15)TiH(63) with H vacancies increases the stability of the structure. A density of states analysis revealed weakening of the bond strength corresponding to increase in the bond length.

  7. Growth Mechanisms of Aluminum Dots Deposited by Laser-induced Decomposition of Trimethylamine Alane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonneau, Didier; Thuron, Frédéric; Correia, Antonio; Bouree, Jean; Pauleau, Yves

    1998-09-01

    Aluminum dots have been deposited by thermal decomposition of trimethylamine alane (TMAA) on silicon substrates irradiated with a tightly focused argon ion laser beam (λ=514 nm). Carbon free Al deposits containing less than 5 at.% of impurities (mainly oxygen) detected by Auger Electron Spectroscopy were grown. The growth kinetics of Al dots was investigated as a function of TMAA pressure and laser-induced temperature. The deposition of dots occurred at a laser-induced temperature as low as 210°C. The TMAA decomposition was thermally activated (activation energy of 18 kcal/mole) and the deposition rate at 300°C was equal to 2 µm/s. The effects of H2 or He (used as buffer gases) in the gas phase on the growth kinetics of dots was also studied. The growth mechanisms of dots are discussed and proposed on the basis of the results of this kinetic study.

  8. Astronaut Alan Shepard is rescued by helicopter at end of MR-3 flight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-05-05

    S88-31376 (5 May 1961) --- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., pilot of the Mercury-Redstone 3 (MR-3) suborbital spaceflight, is retrieved by a helicopter from the USS Lake Champlain during recovery operations in the western Atlantic Ocean. Shepard and the Mercury spacecraft designated the ?Freedom 7? (floating in water below) were flown to the deck of the recovery ship within 11 minutes of splashdown. MR-3 was the United States? first manned space mission. The spacecraft attained a maximum speed of 5,180 miles per hour, reached an altitude of 116 1/2 statute miles, and landed 302 statute miles downrange from Cape Canaveral, Florida. The suborbital mission lasted 15 minutes and 22 seconds. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  9. Astronaut Alan Shepard - U.S.S. Champlain - Post-Recovery Mercury Capsule

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-05-05

    S61-02727 (5 May 1961) --- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard is seen on the deck of the USS Lake Champlain after the recovery of his Mercury capsule in the western Atlantic Ocean. Shepard and the Mercury spacecraft designated the ?Freedom 7? were flown to the deck of the recovery ship within 11 minutes of splashdown. MR-3 was the United States? first manned space mission. The spacecraft attained a maximum speed of 5,180 miles per hour, reached an altitude of 116 1/2 statute miles, and landed 302 statute miles downrange from Cape Canaveral, Florida. The suborbital mission lasted 15 minutes and 22 seconds. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  10. An Interview with Alan J. Hovestadt: AAMFT Past President and Long-Time Marriage and Family Counselor Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juhnke, Gerald A.; Sunich, Michael F.; Coll, Kenneth M.; Lebron-Striker, Maritza

    2009-01-01

    Alan J. Hovestadt, EdD, is the immediate past president of the 24,000 member American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) and a long-time IAMFC member who served as an IAMFC founding board member when American Counseling Association (ACA) first granted International Association of Marriage and Family Counselors (IAMFC) divisional…

  11. An Interview with Alan J. Hovestadt: AAMFT Past President and Long-Time Marriage and Family Counselor Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juhnke, Gerald A.; Sunich, Michael F.; Coll, Kenneth M.; Lebron-Striker, Maritza

    2009-01-01

    Alan J. Hovestadt, EdD, is the immediate past president of the 24,000 member American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) and a long-time IAMFC member who served as an IAMFC founding board member when American Counseling Association (ACA) first granted International Association of Marriage and Family Counselors (IAMFC) divisional…

  12. Black and Conservative: Finding a Place. A Symposium on Alan L. Keyes'"Masters of the Dream".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ervin, Clark Kent; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents commentaries from Clark Kent Ervin, A. J. Williams-Meyers, and Paul T. Murray on Alan L. Keyes'"Masters of the Dream: The Strength and Betrayal of Black America" (1995). They respond to Keyes' controversial assertions, among which is that the Great Society movement and liberalism have undermined black progress that today's…

  13. Black and Conservative: Finding a Place. A Symposium on Alan L. Keyes'"Masters of the Dream".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ervin, Clark Kent; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents commentaries from Clark Kent Ervin, A. J. Williams-Meyers, and Paul T. Murray on Alan L. Keyes'"Masters of the Dream: The Strength and Betrayal of Black America" (1995). They respond to Keyes' controversial assertions, among which is that the Great Society movement and liberalism have undermined black progress that today's…

  14. Discovering the Optimal Route for Alane Synthesis on Ti doped Al Surfaces Using Density Functional Theory Based Kinetic Monte Carlo Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Altaf; Muckerman, James T.

    2010-03-01

    Issues such as catalytic dissociation of hydrogen and the mobility of alane species on Ti-doped Al surfaces are major challenges in the synthesis of aluminum hydride. Our recently developed modeling framework (DFT-based KMC simulation) enabled us to study the steady-state conditions of dissociative adsorption of hydrogen, its diffusion, and its reaction with Al adatoms leading to the formation of alane species on Ti-doped Al surfaces. Our studies show that the doping of Ti atoms in the top layer of Al surfaces significantly reduces the mobility of alane species. On the other hand, the doping of Ti atoms beneath the top layer of Al surfaces enhances the mobility of alane species. The arrangement of dopant Ti atoms in different layers not only affects the diffusion barriers of alane species but it also affects hydrogen dissociation barriers when Ti-Ti pairs are arranged in different ways in the top layer. Using our theoretical methods, we identified a few configurations of dopant Ti atoms having lower barriers for alane diffusion and hydrogen dissociation. Further, we discovered the optimal values of Ti concentration, temperature, and pressure under which the rate of alane formation is maximized.

  15. The Society of Brains: How Alan Turing and Marvin Minsky Were Both Right

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struzik, Zbigniew R.

    2015-04-01

    In his well-known prediction, Alan Turing stated that computer intelligence would surpass human intelligence by the year 2000. Although the Turing Test, as it became known, was devised to be played by one human against one computer, this is not a fair setup. Every human is a part of a social network, and a fairer comparison would be a contest between one human at the console and a network of computers behind the console. Around the year 2000, the number of web pages on the WWW overtook the number of neurons in the human brain. But these websites would be of little use without the ability to search for knowledge. By the year 2000 Google Inc. had become the search engine of choice, and the WWW became an intelligent entity. This was not without good reason. The basis for the search engine was the analysis of the ’network of knowledge’. The PageRank algorithm, linking information on the web according to the hierarchy of ‘link popularity’, continues to provide the basis for all of Google's web search tools. While PageRank was developed by Larry Page and Sergey Brin in 1996 as part of a research project about a new kind of search engine, PageRank is in its essence the key to representing and using static knowledge in an emergent intelligent system. Here I argue that Alan Turing was right, as hybrid human-computer internet machines have already surpassed our individual intelligence - this was done around the year 2000 by the Internet - the socially-minded, human-computer hybrid Homo computabilis-socialis. Ironically, the Internet's intelligence also emerged to a large extent from ‘exploiting’ humans - the key to the emergence of machine intelligence has been discussed by Marvin Minsky in his work on the foundations of intelligence through interacting agents’ knowledge. As a consequence, a decade and a half decade into the 21st century, we appear to be much better equipped to tackle the problem of the social origins of humanity - in particular thanks to the

  16. Functional anion concept: effect of fluorine anion on hydrogen storage of sodium alanate.

    PubMed

    Yin, Li-Chang; Wang, Ping; Kang, Xiang-Dong; Sun, Cheng-Hua; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2007-03-28

    Doping NaAlH(4) with Ti-catalyst has produced a promising hydrogen storage system that can be reversibly operated at moderate temperature conditions. Of the various dopant precursors, TiCl(3) was well recognized due to its pronounced catalytic effect on the reversible dehydrogenation processes of sodium aluminium hydrides. Quite recently we experimentally found that TiF(3) was even better than TiCl(3) in terms of the critical hydrogen storage properties of the doped hydrides, in particular the dehydriding performance at Na(3)AlH(6)/NaH + Al step at moderate temperature. We present here the DFT calculation results of the TiF(3) or TiCl(3) doped Na(3)AlH(6). Our computational studies have demonstrated that F(-) and Cl(-) anions differ substantially from each other with regard to the state and function in the doped sodium aluminium hydride. In great contrast to the case of chloride doping where Cl(-) anion constitutes the "dead weight" NaCl, the fluoride doping results in a substitution of H(-) by F(-) anion in the hydride lattice and accordingly, a favorable thermodynamics adjustment. These results well explain the observed dehydriding performance associated with TiF(3)/TiCl(3)-doping. More significantly, the coupled computational and experimental efforts allow us to put forward a "functional anion" concept. This renews the current mechanism understanding in the catalytically enhanced sodium alanate.

  17. Developmental and environmental influences on physiology and behavior--2014 Alan N. Epstein Research Award.

    PubMed

    Tamashiro, Kellie L K

    2015-12-01

    Environmental factors acting during development of an individual may influence future health and disease susceptibility. Stressors, including altered diet, psychosocial stress, and immune challenge, during gestation can have negative consequences on the intrauterine environment and increase disease susceptibility of the developing fetus. The long-term effects on offspring have been observed in humans and include greater susceptibility to psychiatric disease, such as depression and anxiety disorders, and adverse metabolic conditions including obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Studies in my laboratory use rodent models and incorporate a multilevel approach to determine the behavioral, physiological, and neurobiological correlates of disease development as a consequence of early life stressors. The road I took in developing this research program was a rather circuitous one and navigating that path would not have been possible without the many mentors, colleagues, fellows and students who provided critical support. Although my name appears on the plaque of the Alan N. Epstein Research Award, I share this with all those I had the privilege of working with along that road, as briefly summarized in this article. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Developmental and Environmental Influences on Physiology and Behavior – 2014 Alan N. Epstein Research Award

    PubMed Central

    Tamashiro, Kellie L. K.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental factors acting during development of an individual may influence future health and disease susceptibility. Stressors, including altered diet, psychosocial stress, immune challenge, during gestation can have negative consequences on the intrauterine environment and increase disease susceptibility of the developing fetus. The long-term effects on offspring have been observed in humans and include greater susceptibility to psychiatric disease, such as depression and anxiety disorders, and adverse metabolic conditions including obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Studies in my laboratory use rodent models and incorporate a multilevel approach to determine the behavioral, physiological, and neurobiological correlates of disease development as a consequence of early life stressors. The road I took in developing this research program was a rather circuitous one and navigating that path would not have been possible without the many mentors, colleagues, fellows and students who provided critical support. Although my name appears on the plaque of the Alan N. Epstein Research Award, I share this with all those I had the privilege of working with along that road, as briefly summarized in this article. PMID:26291266

  19. Determining the structure of Ac-AlanLysH^+ in vacuo: computational spectroscopy using DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Mariana; Blum, Volker; Kupser, Peter; von Helden, Gert; Bierau, Frauke; Meijer, Gerard; Scheffler, Matthias

    2010-03-01

    Well defined secondary structure motifs (e.g., helices) in polypeptides can be systematically studied in vacuo, offering a unique ``clean room" condition to quantify the stabilizing intramolecular interactions. Here we address theoretically the structure of alanine polypeptides Ac-Alan-LysH^+ (n=5,10,15), for which gas-phase helical structure was indicated in experiment [1]. Using van der Waals (vdW) corrected [2] Density Functional Theory (DFT), we present vibrational spectra and compare to room temperature multiple photon IR spectroscopy data obtained at the FELIX free electron laser. For the longer molecules (n=10,15) α-helical models provide good qualitative agreement (theory vs. experiment) already in the harmonic approximation. For Ac-Ala5LysH^+, the predicted lowest energy conformer (``g-1'') in vdW corrected DFT (PBE, B3LYP, revPBE) is not a simple helix. However, the harmonic free energy suggests that g-1 and the lowest-energy α-helical conformers are energetically close at 300 K, and thus might all coexist in experiment. Consistently, their calculated vibrational spectra agree with experiment, but only if anharmonic effects are included by explicit molecular dynamics simulations. [1] R. Hudgins et al., JACS 120, 12974 (1998) [2] A. Tkatchenko, M. Scheffler, PRL 102, 073005 (2009)

  20. Pi bonding and negative hyperconjugation in mono-, di-, and triaminoborane, -alane, -gallane, and -indane.

    PubMed

    Kormos, Bethany L; Cramer, Christopher J

    2003-10-20

    A systematic quantum chemical investigation of mono-, di-, and triaminoborane, -alane, -gallane, and -indane is carried out to determine quantitatively the effects of pi bonding and negative hyperconjugation on structures, energetics, and rotational barriers in these systems. Pi bonding plays a significant role in the aminoborane compounds, but becomes rapidly less significant in the aminoalanes, -gallanes, and -indanes. For each main-group metal X investigated, X-N rotational barriers are found to be essentially equal depending only on the number of remaining in-plane amino groups. The contribution of negative hyperconjugation to reducing rotational barriers, as assessed from natural bond orbital (NBO) delocalization energies, is independent of the pyramidalization of the out-of-plane amino group, and is also dependent only on the number of rotated groups. Optimized tris[bis(trimethylsilyl)amino]-substituted structures of boron, aluminum, gallium, and indium are found to compare quite well with available experimental structural data, and exhibit X-N torsion angles that are independent of the central metal atom.

  1. Reactions of organyl and silyl alanes with 1,3,4,5,6-pentamethyl-2-aminoborazine.

    PubMed

    Fan, Maomin; Duesler, Eileen N; Nöth, Heinrich; Paine, Robert T

    2010-03-15

    The reactions of (Me(3)Si)(3)Al, Me(3)Al, Et(3)Al, and i-Bu(3)Al with 1,3,4,5,6-pentamethyl-2-aminoborazine have been examined. An amine alane adduct (Me(3)Si)(3)Al.NH(2)B(3)(Me)(2)N(3)Me(3) (1) and several elimination products [(Me(3)Si)(2)AlN(H)B(3)(Me)(2)N(3)Me(3)](2) (2), [(Me(3)SiAl)(4)(Me(3)SiN)(3)NH] (3), [Me(2)AlN(H) B(3)(Me)(2)N(3)Me(3)](2) (4), [Et(2)AlN(H) B(3)(Me)(2)N(3)Me(3)](2) (5), and [i-Bu(2)AlN(H) B(3)(Me)(2)N(3)Me(3)](2) (6) have been isolated. Compounds 1, 2, 4-6 have been spectroscopically characterized, and single crystal X-ray diffraction structure determinations have been completed for 1-4 and 6. The molecular chemistry provides insight into the reaction of Me(3)Al and 1,3,5-N-trimethyl-2,4,6-B-triaminoborazine that, upon pyrolysis, produces AlN/BN composite ceramic materials.

  2. Elusive silane-alane complex [Si-H⋅⋅⋅Al]: isolation, characterization, and multifaceted frustrated Lewis pair type catalysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiawei; Chen, Eugene Y-X

    2015-06-01

    The super acidity of the unsolvated Al(C6F5)3 enabled isolation of the elusive silane-alane complex [Si-H⋅⋅⋅Al], which was structurally characterized by spectroscopic and X-ray diffraction methods. The Janus-like nature of this adduct, coupled with strong silane activation, effects multifaceted frustrated-Lewis-pair-type catalysis. When compared with the silane-borane system, the silane-alane system offers unique features or clear advantages in the four types of catalytic transformations examined in this study, including: ligand redistribution of tertiary silanes into secondary and quaternary silanes, polymerization of conjugated polar alkenes, hydrosilylation of unactivated alkenes, and hydrodefluorination of fluoroalkanes. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. From Mercury to Apollo: astronaut Alan Shepard reflects on life support and other space issues [interview by Winston Huff].

    PubMed

    Shepard, A

    1995-01-01

    Alan Shepard was one of the original Mercury astronauts. He became the first American in space on May 5, 1961, in the Freedom 7 capsule, during a 15 minute suborbital trip reaching 115 miles altitude and 302 miles down the Atlantic tracking range. Grounded by an inner ear problem, he served as Chief of the Astronaut Office for several years. After an operation to correct the problem, he commanded the Apollo 14 moon mission in 1971. He retired as a Rear Admiral in 1974. Here, Alan Shepard offers his views on life support comedies and tragedies, going back to the moon, future drivers of the manned space flight program, the benefits of the space program, joint NASA and Russia missions, how his NASA experience affected his personal life, and the profitability of working with NASA.

  4. Apollo 12 Mission image - Dark view of Astronaut Alan L. Bean climbing down the ladder of the Lunar Module (LM)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-19

    AS12-46-6728 (19 Nov. 1969) --- Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot for the Apollo 12 mission, is about to step off the ladder of the Lunar Module to join astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., mission commander, in extravehicular activity (EVA). Conrad and Bean descended in the Apollo 12 LM to explore the moon while astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules in lunar orbit.

  5. Apollo 12 Mission image - Dark view of Astronaut Alan L. Bean climbing down the ladder of the Lunar Module (LM)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-19

    AS12-46-6726 (19 Nov. 1969) --- Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot for the Apollo 12 mission, starts down the ladder of the Lunar Module (LM) to join astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., mission commander, in extravehicular activity (EVA). While astronauts Conrad and Bean descended in the LM "Intrepid" to explore the Ocean of Storms region of the moon, astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Yankee Clipper" in lunar orbit.

  6. A benign synthesis of alane by the composition-controlled mechanochemical reaction of sodium hydride and aluminum chloride

    DOE PAGES

    Hlova, Ihor; Goldston, Jennifer F.; Gupta, Shalabh; ...

    2017-05-30

    Solid-state mechanochemical synthesis of alane (AlH3) starting from sodium hydride (NaH) and aluminum chloride (AlCl3) has been achieved at room temperature. The transformation pathway of this solid-state reaction was controlled by a stepwise addition of AlCl3 to the initial reaction mixture that contained sodium hydride in excess of stoichiometric amount. As in the case of previously investigated LiH–AlCl3 system, complete selectivity was achieved whereby formation of unwanted elemental aluminum was fully suppressed, and AlH3 was obtained in quantitative yield. Reaction progress during each step was investigated by means of solid-state NMR and powder X-ray diffraction, which revealed that the overallmore » reaction proceeds through a series of intermediate alanates that may be partially chlorinated. The NaH–AlCl3 system presents some subtle differences compared to LiH–AlCl3 system particularly with respect to optimal concentrations needed during one of the reaction stages. Based on the results, we postulate that high local concentrations of NaH may stabilize chlorine-containing derivatives and prevent decomposition into elemental aluminum with hydrogen evolution. As a result, complete conversion with quantitative yield of alane was confirmed by both SSNMR and hydrogen desorption analysis.« less

  7. The effect of the NH2 substituent on NH3: hydrazine as an alternative for ammonia in hydrogen release in the presence of boranes and alanes.

    PubMed

    Vinh-Son, Nguyen; Swinnen, Saartje; Matus, Myrna H; Nguyen, Minh Tho; Dixon, David A

    2009-08-14

    Potential energy surfaces for H(2) release from hydrazine interacting with borane, alane, diborane, dialane and borane-alane were constructed from MP2/aVTZ geometries and zero point energies with single point energies at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ level. With one borane or alane molecule, the energy barrier for H(2)-loss of approximately 38 or 30 kcal mol(-1) does not compete with the B-N or Al-N bond cleavage ( approximately 30 or approximately 28 kcal mol(-1)). The second borane or alane molecule can play the role of a bifunctional catalyst. The barrier energy for H(2)-elimination is reduced from 38 to 23 kcal mol(-1), or 30 to 20 kcal mol(-1) in the presence of diborane or dialane, respectively. The mixed borane-alane dimer reduces the barrier energy for H(2) release from hydrazine to approximately 17 kcal mol(-1). A systematic comparison with the reaction pathways from ammonia borane shows that hydrazine could be an alternative for ammonia in producing borane amine derivatives. The results show a significant effect of the NH(2) substituent on the relevant thermodynamics. The B-N dative bond energy of 31 kcal mol(-1) in NH(2)NH(2)BH(3) is approximately 5 kcal mol(-1) larger than that of the parent BH(3)NH(3). The higher thermodynamic stability could allow hydrazine-borane to be used as a material for certain energetic H(2) storage applications.

  8. Hydrogen storage in calcium alanate: First-principles thermodynamics and crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolverton, Christopher; Ozoliņš, Vidvuds

    2007-02-01

    Using first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we study the thermodynamics and crystal structure of calcium alanate, Ca(AlH4)2 , and its decomposition products CaAlH5 , CaH2 , and CaAl2 . Using a large database of AB2C8 and ABC5 structure types, we perform nearly 200 DFT calculations in an effort to predict the crystal structures of the Ca(AlH4)2 and CaAlH5 phases. For the low-energy T=0K phases, we perform DFT frozen-phonon calculations to ascertain the zero-point and vibrational entropy contributions to the thermodynamics of decomposition. We find the following: (i) For Ca(AlH4)2 , we confirm the previously predicted CaB2F8 -type structure as the stable phase. In addition, we uncover several phases (e.g., β-ThMo2O8 -type, AgAu2F8 -type, and PbRe2O8 -type) very competitive in energy with the ground state structure. (ii) For CaAlH5 , we find the stable structure type to be the recently observed α'-SrAlF5 -type, with UTlF5 -type, SrFeF5 -type and BaGaF5 -type structures being close in energy to the ground state. (iii) In agreement with recent experiments, our calculations show that the decomposition of Ca(AlH4)2 is divided into a weakly exothermic step [Ca(AlH4)2→CaAlH5+Al+3/2H2] , a weakly endothermic step [CaAlH5→CaH2+Al+3/2H2] , and a strong endothermic step [CaH2+2Al→CaAl2+H2] . (iv) Including static T=0K energies, zero-point energies, and the dynamic contributions of H2 gas, the DFT-calculated ΔH values for the first two decomposition steps ( -9 and +26kJ/mol H2 at the observed decomposition temperatures Ttilde 127 and 250°C , respectively) agree well with the experimental values recently reported ( -7 and +32kJ/mol H2 ). Only the second step [CaAlH5/CaH2] has thermodynamics near the targeted range that might make a suitable on-board hydrogen storage reaction for hydrogen-fueled vehicles. (v) Comparing the enthalpies for final stage of decomposition [ CaH2+2Al→CaAl2+H2 , ΔH=72kJ/mol H2 ] with the pure decomposition of CaH2

  9. Effect of Ti Dopant on Surface Diffusion of Isolated Alane Species: A Comparison between Al (111) and Al (100) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Altaf; Muckerman, James

    2009-03-01

    Our density functional theory-based kinetic Monte Carlo simulations show that an embedded Ti atom creates a well in the potential energy surfaces of Al(111) and Al(100) as probed by hydrogen and other isolated alane species. Hydrogen adatoms become trapped around Ti atoms on an Al(111) surface, whereas Al adatoms do not exhibit any significant effect of the potential energy well created by the Ti atoms. In contrast to the case of Al(111), Al adatoms on an Al(100) surface also become trapped around the Ti atoms for a longer period of time compared to the hydrogen adatoms on this surface. Therefore, Ti sites on Al(100) become poisoned by the presence of Al adatoms around them for long periods of time, thereby blocking further dissociative adsorption of hydrogen. The overall diffusion of Al adatoms on an Al(100) surface is significantly lower compared to the Al(111) surface. This fact suggests that the Ti-doped Al(111) surface is perhaps more conducive to the production of alane species than the Ti-doped Al(100) surface despite its higher activation barrier for the dissociation of molecular hydrogen.

  10. Action Man: An Interview with Gerard Egan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugarman, Leonie

    1995-01-01

    Presents an interview which explores the ideas and strategies of the counseling model contained in the interviewee's text, "The Skilled Helper". Discusses the cross-cultural applicability of the model and how conceptions of the prototype have changed or stayed the same across numerous editions of the text. (RJM)

  11. Gerard of Cremona (c. 1114-87)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Italian scholar, born in Cremona, Italy, flourished in Toledo, a centre of Islamic culture, learned Arabic to be able to translate lost classical works. He translated 92 works in all, including the Almagest, Elements, AL-KHWARIZMI's works, the Hippocratic writers, and the physical works of ARISTOTLE. Unfortunately, no mathematician, he could not understand the Almagest after translating it....

  12. Population Growth in Planaria Dugesia tigrina (Gerard)

    PubMed Central

    Davison, John

    1973-01-01

    Planaria reproduce by transverse fission. Isolated worms increase in number exponentially, while social animals at the same density are inhibited in terms of numerical increase, but over a 25 day period undergo a larger increase in mass. Isolated posterior fission products reproduce faster than isolated anterior fission products. Regulation of population growth is independent of density over a 16-fold range and regulatory factors cannot be demonstrated in the medium. Regulation of population growth depends on direct contact between animals. Fission period varies from individual to individual and from period to period for a given individual. Doubling time is related to the absolute number of individuals comprising the population as follows: PN = (PM · N)/(K + N), where PN is the doubling period of a population of N individuals, PM is the doubling time of an infinitely large population, N is the number of individuals in the population, and K is the number of individuals in a population the period of which is one-half PM. At 22°–24°C PM is estimated to be 43.3 days and K is 1.87 individuals. A model system assumes that inhibitor flows through the population from animal to animal from the slowest to the fastest animal in the population thus acting to synchronize population increase as well as to determine the rate of population growth. A possible source of the inhibitor is discussed. PMID:4708406

  13. Apollo 12 Mission image - Astronaut Alan L. Bean,lunar module pilot,and two U.S. spacecraft

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-20

    AS12-48-7134 (20 Nov. 1969) --- This unusual photograph, taken during the second Apollo 12 extravehicular activity (EVA), shows two U.S. spacecraft on the surface of the moon. The Apollo 12 Lunar Module (LM) is in the background. The unmanned Surveyor 3 spacecraft is in the foreground. The Apollo 12 LM, with astronauts Charles Conrad Jr. and Alan L. Bean aboard, landed about 600 feet from Surveyor 3 in the Ocean of Storms. The television camera and several other pieces were taken from Surveyor 3 and brought back to Earth for scientific examination. Here, Conrad examines the Surveyor's TV camera prior to detaching it. Astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr. remained with the Apollo 12 Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit while Conrad and Bean descended in the LM to explore the moon. Surveyor 3 soft-landed on the moon on April 19, 1967.

  14. A requiem for whole brain death: a response to D. Alan Shewmon's 'the brain and somatic integration'.

    PubMed

    Potts, M

    2001-10-01

    Alan Shewmon's article, 'The brain and somatic integration: Insights into the standard biological rationale for equating "brain death" with death' (2001), strikes at the heart of the standard justification for whole brain death criteria. The standard justification, which I call the 'standard paradigm', holds that the permanent loss of the functions of the entire brain marks the end of the integrative unity of the body. In my response to Shewmon's article, I first offer a brief summary of the standard paradigm and cite recent work by advocates of whole brain criteria who tenaciously cling to the standard paradigm despite increasing evidence showing that it has significant weaknesses. Second, I address Shewmon's case against the standard paradigm, arguing that he is successful in showing that whole brain dead patients have integrated organic unity. Finally, I discuss some minor problems with Shewmon's article, along with suggestions for further elaboration.

  15. On the fate of laser-produced NH 2 in a constrained pulsed expansion of trimethylamine alane and NH 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demchuk, Alexander; Cahill, John J.; Simpson, Steven; Koplitz, Brent

    2001-11-01

    The effects of both 193 nm radiation and NH 3 on an expansion of trimethylamine alane (TMAA) have been studied. In neat TMAA, 193 nm radiation induces small but significant clustering. When NH 3 is introduced in the absence of 193 nm photons, no visible reaction occurs. However, when NH 3 is introduced along with 193 nm photons, the H 3Al:N(CH 3) 3 parent molecule is completely replaced by H 3AlNH 2. Moreover, the clustering channels observed with neat TMAA disappear. The apparent stability or inertness of the R 3MNH 2 (R=H, CH 3 or C 2H 5; M=Ga or Al) species in a variety of metal nitride reactive environments is discussed.

  16. Epitaxial Growth of Aluminum on Silicon Substrates by Metalorganic Molecular Beam Epitaxy using Dimethyl-Ethylamine Alane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neo, Yoichiro; Otoda, Toshihiro; Sagae, Katumi; Mimura, Hidenori; Yokoo, Kuniyoshi

    1998-05-01

    In this paper, the growth process of aluminum on a silicon substrate by metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy using dimethyl-ethylamine alane has been described. The crystallographic orientation of the aluminum grains strongly depends on the substrate temperature. The epitaxial single crystalline (111) Al grains grow on a (111) Si substrate at a substrate temperature between 450 and 500°C. The bi-crystalline (110) Al grains grow on a (100) Si substrate at the substrate temperature between 350 and 450°C. For a (100) Si substrate, the orientation of Al is related to the reconstruction of the Si substrate. Furthermore, the selective growth of Al into 1.5-µm-diameter via-holes is shown to be possible.

  17. A Comparison between AlN Films Grown by MOCVD Using Dimethylethylamine Alane and Trimethylaluminium as the Aluminium Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wei-Guo; Liu, Xiang-Lin; Zhang, Pan-Feng; Zhao, Feng-Ai; Jiao, Chun-Mei; Wei, Hong-Yuan; Zhang, Ri-Qing; Wu, Jie-Jun; Cong, Guang-Wei; Pan, Yi

    2007-02-01

    Aluminium nitride (AlN) films grown with dimethylethylamine alane (DMEAA) are compared with the ones grown with trimethylaluminium (TMA). In the high-resolution x-ray diffraction Ω scans, the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of (0002) AlN films grown with DMEAA is about 0.70 deg, while the FWHM of (0002) AlN films grown with TMA is only 0.11 deg. The surface morphologies of the films are different, and the rms roughnesses of the surface are approximately identical. The rms roughness of AlN films grown with DMEAA is 47.4 nm, and grown with TMA is 69.4 nm. Although using DMEAA as the aluminium precursor cannot improve the AlN crystal quality, AlN growth can be reached at low temperature of 673 K. Thus, DMEAA is an alternative aluminium precursor to deposit AlN film at low growth temperatures.

  18. D. Alan Shewmon and the PCBE's White Paper on Brain Death: are brain-dead patients dead?

    PubMed

    Brugger, E Christian

    2013-04-01

    The December 2008 White Paper (WP) on "Brain Death" published by the President's Council on Bioethics (PCBE) reaffirmed its support for the traditional neurological criteria for human death. It spends considerable time explaining and critiquing what it takes to be the most challenging recent argument opposing the neurological criteria formulated by D. Alan Shewmon, a leading critic of the "whole brain death" standard. The purpose of this essay is to evaluate and critique the PCBE's argument. The essay begins with a brief background on the history of the neurological criteria in the United States and on the preparation of the 2008 WP. After introducing the WP's contents, the essay sets forth Shewmon's challenge to the traditional neurological criteria and the PCBE's reply to Shewmon. The essay concludes by critiquing the WP's novel justification for reaffirming the traditional conclusion, a justification the essay finds wanting.

  19. Revisiting the ALA/N (alpha-lipoic acid/low-dose naltrexone) protocol for people with metastatic and nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer: a report of 3 new cases.

    PubMed

    Berkson, Burton M; Rubin, Daniel M; Berkson, Arthur J

    2009-12-01

    The authors, in a previous article, described the long-term survival of a man with pancreatic cancer and metastases to the liver, treated with intravenous alpha-lipoic acid and oral low-dose naltrexone (ALA/N) without any adverse effects. He is alive and well 78 months after initial presentation. Three additional pancreatic cancer case studies are presented in this article. At the time of this writing, the first patient, GB, is alive and well 39 months after presenting with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas with metastases to the liver. The second patient, JK, who presented to the clinic with the same diagnosis was treated with the ALA/N protocol and after 5 months of therapy, PET scan demonstrated no evidence of disease. The third patient, RC, in addition to his pancreatic cancer with liver and retroperitoneal metastases, has a history of B-cell lymphoma and prostate adenocarcinoma. After 4 months of the ALA/N protocol his PET scan demonstrated no signs of cancer. In this article, the authors discuss the poly activity of ALA: as an agent that reduces oxidative stress, its ability to stabilize NF(k)B, its ability to stimulate pro-oxidant apoptosic activity, and its discriminative ability to discourage the proliferation of malignant cells. In addition, the ability of lowdose naltrexone to modulate an endogenous immune response is discussed. This is the second article published on the ALA/N protocol and the authors believe the protocol warrants clinical trial.

  20. The reactivity of sodium alanates with O[2], H[2]O, and CO[2] : an investigation of complex metal hydride contamination in the context of automotive systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Dedrick, Daniel E.; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.

    2007-08-01

    Safe and efficient hydrogen storage is a significant challenge inhibiting the use of hydrogen as a primary energy carrier. Although energy storage performance properties are critical to the success of solid-state hydrogen storage systems, operator and user safety is of highest importance when designing and implementing consumer products. As researchers are now integrating high energy density solid materials into hydrogen storage systems, quantification of the hazards associated with the operation and handling of these materials becomes imperative. The experimental effort presented in this paper focuses on identifying the hazards associated with producing, storing, and handling sodium alanates, and thus allowing for the development and implementation of hazard mitigation procedures. The chemical changes of sodium alanates associated with exposure to oxygen and water vapor have been characterized by thermal decomposition analysis using simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry (STMBMS) and X-ray diffraction methods. Partial oxidation of sodium alanates, an alkali metal complex hydride, results in destabilization of the remaining hydrogen-containing material. At temperatures below 70 C, reaction of sodium alanate with water generates potentially combustible mixtures of H{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. In addition to identifying the reaction hazards associated with the oxidation of alkali-metal containing complex hydrides, potential treatment methods are identified that chemically stabilize the oxidized material and reduce the hazard associated with handling the contaminated metal hydrides.

  1. Apollo 12 Mission image - Astronaut Alan L. Bean,lunar module pilot,and two U.S. spacecraft

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-20

    AS12-48-7136 (20 Nov. 1969) --- Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander, examines the unmanned Surveyor 3 spacecraft during the second Apollo 12 extravehicular activity (EVA). In the background is the lunar module, parked where the crew had landed it in the Ocean of Storms only 600 feet from Surveyor 3. This series of pictures documents the only occasion wherein Apollo astronauts landed near or had hands-on contact with another spacecraft which had arrived on the moon's surface well ahead of them. This picture was taken by astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot. The television camera and several other pieces were taken from Surveyor 3 and brought back to Earth for scientific examination. Surveyor 3 soft-landed on the moon on April 19, 1967. Astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit while astronauts Conrad and Bean descended in the LM to explore the moon. Photo credit: NASA

  2. Towards understanding a mechanism for reversible hydrogen storage: theoretical study of transition metal catalysed dehydrogenation of sodium alanate.

    PubMed

    Ljubić, Ivan; Clary, David C

    2010-04-28

    On the basis of density functional theory and coupled-cluster CCSD(T) calculations we propose a mechanism of the dehydrogenation of transition metal doped sodium alanate. Insertion of two early 3d-transition metals, scandium and titanium, both of which are promising catalysts for reversible hydrogen storage in light metal hydrides, is compared. The mechanism is deduced from studies on the decomposition of a model system consisting of one transition metal atom and two NaAlH(4) units. Subsequently, the significance of such minimal cluster model systems to the real materials is tested by embedding the systems into the surface of the NaAlH(4) crystal. It is found that the dehydrogenation proceeds via breaking of the bridge H-Al bond and consequent formation of intermediate coordination compounds in which the H(2) molecule is side-on (eta(2)-) bonded to the transition metal centre. The total barrier to the H(2) release is thus dependent upon both the strength of the Al-H bond to be broken and the depth of the coordinative potential. The analogous mechanism applies for the recognized three successive dehydrogenation steps. The gas-phase model structures embedded into the surface of the NaAlH(4) crystal exhibit an unambiguous kinetic stability and their general geometric features remain largely unchanged.

  3. Trimethylamine alane for low-pressure MOVPE growth of AlGaAs-based materials and device structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, R.P.; Bryan, R.P.; Jones, E.D.; Biefield, R.M.; Olbright, G.R.

    1991-12-31

    The use of trimethylamine alane (TMAA1) as an alternative to trimethylaluminum (TMA1) for low-pressure metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE) of AlGaAs thin films as well as complex optoelectronic device structures has been studied in detail. AlGaAs layers were grown in a horizontal reaction chamber at 20--110 mbar with growth temperatures in the range 650{degrees}C {le} T{sub G} {le} 750{degrees}C. Wafer thickness uniformity is strongly dependent on growth pressure, and is acceptable only for the highest linear flow velocities. The 12K photoluminescence (PL) spectra of AlGaAs layers grown using TMAA1 and TEGa exhibit uniformly intense and narrow bound-exciton emission throughout the growth temperature range investigated. To assess the viability of this new source for the low-pressure OMVPE growth of advanced optoelectronic devices, several optically-pumped vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) structures were grown using TMAA1 extensively. Room temperature lasing at 850 nm was reproducibly obtained from the VCSEL structures, with a threshold pumping power comparable to similar structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy in our laboratories.

  4. Synthesis and platinum complexes of an alane-appended 1,1'-bis(phosphino)ferrocene ligand.

    PubMed

    Cowie, Bradley E; Tsao, Fu An; Emslie, David J H

    2015-02-09

    An aryldimethylalane-appended analogue of 1,1'-bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene, FcPPAl, was prepared, and reaction with [Pt(nb)3 ] (nb=norbornene) afforded [Pt(η(2) -nb)(FcPPAl)] (1). Heating a solution of 1 to 80 °C resulted in crystallization of [{Pt(FcPPAl)}2 ] (2), whereas treatment of 1 with C2 H4 , C2 Ph2 , H2 , or CO provided [PtL(FcPPAl)] [L=C2 H4 (3), C2 Ph2 (4)], [PtH2 (FcPPAl)] (5), and [Pt(CO)(FcPPAl)] (6). In all complexes, the FcPPAl ligand is coordinated through both phosphines and the alane. Whereas 2 adopts a T-shaped geometry at platinum, 3-5 are square-pyramidal, and 6 is distorted square-planar. The hydride and carbonyl complexes feature unusual multicenter bonding involving platinum, aluminum, and a hydride or carbonyl ligand. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition growth of high-quality AlGaAs using dimethylethylamine alane and triethylgallium dimethylethylamine adduct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, M.; Kizuki, H.; Tsugami, M.; Fujii, N.; Mihashi, Y.; Takamiya, S.

    1998-08-01

    High-purity Al 0.25Ga 0.75As layer has been successfully obtained by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) using new precursors of dimethylethylamine alane (DMEAA) and triethylgallium-dimethylethylamine adduct (TEG-DMEA). It is shown that the concentrations of residual carbon and oxygen in the AlGaAs layer grown at a relatively low V/III ratio were under detection limits of secondary-ion mass spectrometry (3.0×10 15 and 5.0×10 15 cm -3, respectively). In the photoluminescence spectra at 4.2 K, the peak intensity of carbon-related emission was much weaker than that of bound-exciton (BE) emission. The full-width at half-maximum for the BE peak was as narrow as 5.6 meV. Any predeposition between these precursors due to a gas-phase prereaction was not observed. These results indicate that the combination of DMEAA and TEG-DMEA are promising precursors for MOCVD growth of AlGaAs with low residual impurity concentration.

  6. Trimethylamine alane for low-pressure MOVPE growth of AlGaAs-based materials and device structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, R.P.; Bryan, R.P.; Jones, E.D.; Biefield, R.M. ); Olbright, G.R. )

    1991-01-01

    The use of trimethylamine alane (TMAA1) as an alternative to trimethylaluminum (TMA1) for low-pressure metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE) of AlGaAs thin films as well as complex optoelectronic device structures has been studied in detail. AlGaAs layers were grown in a horizontal reaction chamber at 20--110 mbar with growth temperatures in the range 650{degrees}C {le} T{sub G} {le} 750{degrees}C. Wafer thickness uniformity is strongly dependent on growth pressure, and is acceptable only for the highest linear flow velocities. The 12K photoluminescence (PL) spectra of AlGaAs layers grown using TMAA1 and TEGa exhibit uniformly intense and narrow bound-exciton emission throughout the growth temperature range investigated. To assess the viability of this new source for the low-pressure OMVPE growth of advanced optoelectronic devices, several optically-pumped vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) structures were grown using TMAA1 extensively. Room temperature lasing at 850 nm was reproducibly obtained from the VCSEL structures, with a threshold pumping power comparable to similar structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy in our laboratories.

  7. Formation of Al2H7- anions--indirect evidence of volatile AlH3 on sodium alanate using solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Felderhoff, Michael; Zibrowius, Bodo

    2011-10-14

    After more than a decade of intense research on NaAlH(4) doped with transition metals as hydrogen storage material, the actual mechanism of the decomposition and rehydrogenation reaction is still unclear. Early on, monomeric AlH(3) was named as a possible transport shuttle for aluminium, but never observed experimentally. Here we report for the first time the trapping of volatile AlH(3) produced during the decomposition of undoped NaAlH(4) by an adduct of sodium alanate and crown ether. The resulting Al(2)H(7)(-) anion was identified by solid-state (27)Al NMR spectroscopy. Based on this indirect evidence of volatile alane, we present a simple description of the processes occurring during the reversible dehydrogenation of NaAlH(4).

  8. Strong dissimilarities between the gas-phase acidities of saturated and alpha,beta-unsaturated boranes and the corresponding alanes and gallanes.

    PubMed

    Gámez, José A; Guillemin, Jean-Claude; Mó, Otilia; Yáñez, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    The effect that unsaturation has on the intrinsic acidity of boranes, alanes, and gallanes, was analyzed by B3 LYP and CCSD(T)/6-311+G(3df,2p) calculations on methyl-, ethyl-, vinyl-, and ethynylboranes, -alanes and -gallanes, and on the corresponding hydrides XH3. Quite unexpectedly, methylborane, which behaves as a carbon acid, is predicted to have an intrinsic acidity almost 200 kJ mol(-1) stronger than BH3, reflecting the large reinforcement of the C--B bond, which upon deprotonation becomes a double bond through the donation of the lone pair created on the carbon atom into the empty p orbital of the boron. Also unexpectedly, and for the same reason, the saturated and alpha,beta-unsaturated boranes are much stronger acids than the corresponding hydrocarbons, in spite of being carbon acids as well. The Al derivatives also behave as carbon acids, but in this case the most favorable deprotonation process occurs at C beta, leading to the formation of rather stable three-membered rings, again through the donation of the C beta lone pair into the empty p orbital of Al. For Ga-containing compounds the deprotonation of the GaH2 group is the most favorable process. Therefore only Ga derivatives behave similarly to the analogues of Groups 14, 15, and 16 of the periodic table, and the saturated derivatives exhibit a weaker acidity than the unsaturated ones. Within Group 13, boranes are stronger acids than alanes and gallanes. For ethyl and vinyl derivatives, alanes are stronger acids than gallanes. We have shown, for the first time, that acidity enhancement for primary heterocompounds is not only dictated by the position of the heteroatom in the periodic table and the nature of the substituent, but also by the bonding rearrangements triggered by the deprotonation of the neutral acid.

  9. Density Functional Theory Based Kinetic Monte Carlo Approach for Understanding Atomistic Mechanisms for Reversible Hydrogen Storage in Metal Hydrides: Application to Alane Formation on Ti Doped Al Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, A.; Muckerman, J.; Sutter, P.; Muller, E.

    2008-03-01

    We describe a density functional kinetic Monte Carlo approach enabling us to study and simulate the steady-state situation of dissociative adsorption of hydrogen along with diffusion and reaction of Al and H atoms leading towards the formation of alane species on Ti-doped Al surfaces. In the first step, density functional theory is used in conjunction with the nudged elastic band/drag method to obtain the energetics of the relevant atomistic processes of Al and H diffusion and their reactions on Al surfaces with different concentration of dopant Ti atoms. Subsequently, the kinetic Monte Carlo method is employed, which accounts for the spatial distribution, fluctuations, and evolution of chemical species at Ti-doped Al surfaces under steady-state conditions. This DFT-based KMC approach provides an insight into the kinetics of alanes at technologically relevant pressure and temperature conditions. Our computed production rates of AlH3 on Al surfaces are in agreement with experimental data. We also obtained temperature programmed desorption spectra of different alane species, which is agreeing well with experiments.

  10. Surface investigations of the atomic layer growth mechanism in aluminum nitride thin film deposition using dimethylethylamine alane and ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Jason Se-Yung

    Aluminum Nitride (AlN), a wide-bandgap semiconductor, has been shown to be an extremely versatile material in semiconductor applications. Our previous efforts in formulating a Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) processing strategy to deposit AN using Dimethylethylamine Alane (DMEAA; AlH3:N(CH3)2CH2CH3) and ammonia resulted in high quality film growth at low temperatures (˜600 K). Understanding the surface reactions involved is a key step in successfully optimizing a MOCVD process. In this research, we investigated the surface interactions between DMEAA and ammonia leading to the Atomic Layer Growth (ALG) mode on a Si(100) surface using a combination of surface analysis techniques, including Secondary-Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), Temperature-Programmed SIMS (TPSIMS), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), and Temperature-Programmed Desorption (TPD). The exposure of Si(100) to DMEAA at 310 K resulted in self-limiting adsorption of molecular DMEAA and Dimethylethylamine (DMEA). Based on the stoichiometric information from XPS, the molecularly adsorbed DMEA most likely originated from the exposure of a mixed DMEAA-DMEA gas phase rather than a dissociative adsorption process. The DMEAA molecule is susceptible to thermal decomposition, as the aminealane adduct configuration was no longer observed above 490 K. This can impose an upper temperature limit in developing a processing strategy. The chemical interaction between ammonia and DMEAA resulted in a displacement of DMEA by ammonia. A new surface intermediate (AlHND2) was detected with both SIMS and XPS. This displacement mechanism was rationalized using Hard-Soft-Acid-Base (HSAB) theory. We were able to observe, in a step-by-step fashion, the atomic layer growth process by monitoring the C:N ratios using XPS. The resulting AlN film contained substantial hydrogen but the hydrogen content may be removed thermally. Atomic layer growth mechanism provides an effective means to grow high quality thin films by

  11. Historical streamflows of Double Mountain Fork of Brazos River and water-surface elevations of Lake Alan Henry, Garza County, Texas, water years 1962-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, William H.; Vrabel, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the City of Lubbock, Texas, operates two surface-water stations in Garza County, Tex.: USGS streamflow-gaging station 08079600 Double Mountain Fork Brazos River at Justiceburg, Tex., and 08079700 Lake Alan Henry Reservoir, a water-supply reservoir about 60 miles southeast of Lubbock, Tex., and about 10 miles east of Justiceburg, Tex. The streamflow and water-surface elevation data from the two stations are useful to water-resource managers and planners in support of forecasting and water-resource infrastructure operations and are used in regional hydrologic studies.

  12. Optimisation des transferts de chaleur dans un systeme de stockage d'hydrogene a base d'alanate de sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhouri, Maha

    Le déploiement des applications de transport basées sur l'hydrogène comme source d'énergie est assujetti à l'identification d'une méthode efficace pour son stockage. En ce qui concerne la voie de stockage solide, les principaux inconvénients sont les faibles propriétés thermiques de l'hydrure, le long temps de chargement du réservoir et sa faible capacité gravimétrique. Dans ce cadre, l'alanate de sodium est choisi comme matériau de référence pour optimiser le fonctionnement d'un système de stockage d'un kilogramme d'hydrogène, en termes d'efficacité thermique et de capacités gravimétrique et volumétrique. Trois configurations ont été considérées en variant la disposition du lit d'hydrure et du fluide de refroidissement ainsi que le choix des échangeurs de chaleur et des structures permettant l'amélioration des propriétés thermiques de ce lit. Le modèle mathématique décrivant les transferts de chaleur et de masse au sein du lit d'hydrure a été résolu avec le logiciel commercial COMSOL Multiphysics® 3.5a. Les résultats numériques nous ont permis de déterminer l'interaction entre les propriétés géométriques des éléments d'échange de chaleur et le taux de stockage d'hydrogène ainsi que sa dépendance des conditions opérationnelles. L'efficacité thermique du système de stockage est déterminée en comparant le taux de stockage d'hydrogène calculé à celui issu du modèle de cinétique et validé avec les données expérimentales. Une fois que la quantité d'hydrogène stocké est optimisée, la contribution des éléments d'échange de chaleur au poids et au volume du réservoir et les capacités gravimétrique et volumétrique des configurations correspondantes sont déterminées et discutées en fonction des critères de sélection fixées par le DOE.

  13. Finite size effect on hydrogen bond cooperativity in (Ala)n polypeptides: A DFT study using numeric atom-centered orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Volker; Ireta, Joel; Scheffler, Matthias

    2007-03-01

    An accurate representation of the energetic contribution Ehb of hydrogen bonds to structure formation is paramount to understand the secondary structure stability of proteins, both qualitatively and quantitatively. However, Ehb depends strongly on its environment, and even on the surrounding peptide conformation itself. For instance, a short α-helical polypeptide (Ala)4 can not be stabilized by its single hydrogen bond, whereas an infinite α-helical chain (Ala)∞ is clearly energetically stable over a fully extended conformation. We here use all-electron density functional calculations in the PBE generalized gradient approximation by a recently developed, computationally efficient numeric atom-centered orbital based code^1 to investigate this H-bond cooperativity that is intrinsic to Alanine-based polypeptides (Ala)n (n=1-20,∞). We compare finite and infinite prototypical helical conformations (α, π, 310) on equal footing, with both neutral and ionic termination for finite (Ala)n peptides. Moderately sized NAO basis sets allow to capture Ehb with meV accuracy, revealing a clear jump in Ehb (cooperativity) when two H-bonds first appear in line, followed by slower and more continuous increase of Ehb towards n->∞. ^1 V. Blum, R. Gehrke, P. Havu, V. Havu, M. Scheffler, The FHI Ab Initio Molecular Simulations (aims) Project, Fritz-Haber-Institut, Berlin (2006).

  14. Intra- and intermolecular N-H...F-C hydrogen-bonding interactions in amine adducts of tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane and -alane.

    PubMed

    Mountford, Andrew J; Lancaster, Simon J; Coles, Simon J; Horton, Peter N; Hughes, David L; Hursthouse, Michael B; Light, Mark E

    2005-08-08

    The reaction between B(C(6)F(5))(3) and NH(3)(g) in light petroleum yielded the solvated adduct H(3)N.B(C(6)F(5))(3).NH(3). Treatment with a second equivalent of B(C(6)F(5))(3) afforded H(3)N.B(C(6)F(5))(3). Attempts to prepare the analogous alane adduct were unsuccessful and resulted in protolysis. Related compounds of the form R'R' 'N(H).M(C(6)F(5))(3) were synthesized from M(C(6)F(5))(3) and the corresponding primary and secondary amines (M = B, Al; R' = H, Me, CH(2)Ph; R' ' = Me, CH(2)Ph, CH(Me)(Ph); R'R' ' = cyclo-C(5)H(10)). The solid-state structures of 13 new compounds have been elucidated by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and are discussed. Each of the borane adducts has a significant bifurcated intramolecular hydrogen bond between an amino hydrogen and two o-fluorines, while N-H...F-C interactions in the alane adducts are weaker and more variable. (19)F NMR studies demonstrate that the borane adducts retain the bifurcated C-F...H...F-C hydrogen bond in solution. Compounds of the type R'R' 'N(H).M(C(6)F(5))(3) conform to Etter's rules for the prediction of hydrogen-bonding interactions.

  15. Al2O3 thin films by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition using trimethyl-amine alane (TMAA) as the Al precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chryssou, C. E.; Pitt, C. W.

    We report the low temperature (200-300 °C) deposition of uniform, amorphous Al2O3 thin films by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) using trimethyl-amine alane (TMAA) as the Al precursor. The thin films were deposited on both Si and quartz silica (SiO2) substrates. Deposition rates were typically 60 Åmin-1 keeping the TMAA temperature constant at 45 °C. The deposited Al2O3 thin films were stoichiometric alumina with low carbon contamination (0.7-1.3 At%). The refractive index ranged from 1.54 to 1.62 depending on the deposition conditions. The deposition rate was studied as a function of both the RF power and the substrate temperature. The structure and the surface of the deposited Al2O3 thin films were studied using X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  16. Reaction of Dimethylethylamine Alane and Ammonia on Si(100) during the Atomic Layer Growth of AIN: Static SIMS, TPSIMS, and TPD

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, JW Bill W. )

    2000-01-01

    Dimethylethylamine alane (DMEAA; AIH3: N(CH3)2(CH2CH3)) has been used as an Al source in the chemical vapor deposition of AIN. In the Atomic Layer Growth (ALG) mode, ammonia and DMEAA interact selectively by nucleophilic displacement. In the first part of this study, the surface adsorption and reaction processes are characterized with static secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and temperature-programmed secondary-ion mass spectrometry (TPSIMS). The secondary ion emission from DMEAA-covered Si surface shares similar general characteristics with the gas phase cracking pattern. The secondary ion emission spectrum is interpreted according to a unimolecular ion decomposition mechanism and is used as the fingerprint for the presence of molecular DMEAA. During the surface reaction between DMEAA and ammonia, the intensity of the fingerprint peaks diminishes, representing the departure of the amine ligand. The thermal stability of DMEAA and its decomposition behavior on Si are also examined.

  17. Reaction of dimethylethylamine alane and ammonia on Si(100) during the atomic layer growth of AlN: static SIMS, TPSIMS, and TPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, J. S.; Rogers, J. W.

    2000-05-01

    Dimethylethylamine alane [DMEAA; AlH 3:N(CH 3) 2(CH 2CH 3)] has been used as an Al source in the chemical vapor deposition of AlN. In the atomic layer growth mode, ammonia and DMEAA interact selectively by nucleophilic displacement. In the first part of this study, the surface adsorption and reaction processes are characterized with static secondary-ion mass spectrometry and temperature-programmed secondary-ion mass spectrometry. The secondary ion emission from DMEAA-covered Si surface shares similar general characteristics with the gas phase cracking pattern. The secondary ion emission spectrum is interpreted according to a unimolecular ion decomposition mechanism and is used as the fingerprint for the presence of molecular DMEAA. During the surface reaction between DMEAA and ammonia, the intensity of the fingerprint peaks diminish, representing the departure of the amine ligand. The thermal stability of DMEAA and its decomposition behavior on Si are also examined.

  18. Atomic layer epitaxy of AlP and (AlP) n(GaP) n superlattice using ethyldimethylamine alane as a new aluminum source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Shingo; Yamaura, Masaaki; Munekata, Hiro

    1999-08-01

    Atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) of AlP was realized using ethyldimethylamine alane (EDMAAl) as a new Al source. Self-limiting growth of AlP took place at one and two monolayers per ALE cycle. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy revealed that the amounts of incorporated impurities (carbon, hydrogen and oxygen) in ALE-grown AlP layers was greatly suppressed by using the new Al source, to nearly the same levels as in high-quality MOVPE-grown layers. We also achieved the successful ALE growth of (AlP) n(GaP) n short-period superlattices (SLs), taking advantage of the overlapping temperature windows of ALE-GaP and ALE-AlP. X-ray diffraction measurements showed reasonably good interface abruptness of SLs as low as 3. The PL emission peak from SLs involving Al-containing layers was observed in ALE growth for the first time.

  19. Chemical vapor deposition of palladium thin films from Lewis base adducts of Pd(hfac)(2) and of aluminum thin films from diethylamido alanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Alec

    1999-11-01

    (N-Me-morpholine) (6) in an AACVD reactor. Deposition was found to be feed-rate limited for (3), ( 4), and (6). (5) Diethylamidoalane (8), bis(diethylamido)alane (9) and diisopropylamidoalane ( 10) were synthesized, characterized and investigated as CVD precursors for the deposition of aluminum thin films. All three alanes were characterized by 1H, 13C{1H} 14N, and 27Al NMR spectroscopy and structurally characterized in the solid-state by single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods. Chemical vapor deposition of aluminum thin films was performed with diethylamidoalane and bis(diethylamido)alane on silicon(111) substrates in a HVCVD reactor.

  20. Helical secondary structure of polyalanine peptides in vacuo: Ac-Alan-LysH^+ (n=5,10,15), experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Mariana; Blum, Volker; Kupser, Peter; von Helden, Gert; Bierau, Frauke; Meijer, Gerard; Scheffler, Matthias

    2009-03-01

    The presence of a solvent is often viewed as indispensable to explain the structure of peptides and proteins. However, well defined secondary structure motifs (helices, sheets, ...) also exist in vacuo, offering a unique ``clean room'' condition to quantify the stabilizing interactions. We here unravel the structure of LysineH^+ capped polyalanine peptides Ac-Alan-LysH^+ (n-5,10,15), by combining experimental multi-photon IR spectra obtained using the FELIX free-electron laser at room-temperature with van der Waals-corrected all-electron density-functional theory (DFT) in the generalized gradient approximation in the FHI-aims code [1]. Earlier ion mobility studies of these molecules indicate helical structure [2], which we here demonstrate quantitatively. For n=5, we find a close energetic competition of different helix motifs (α, 310), with similar and good agreement between measured and calculated vibrational spectra. We show how the LysH^+ termination acts to induce helices also for longer peptides, and how vibrational modes develop with helix length (n=10,15), yielding, e.g., a softening of collective modes towards the infinite helix limit. [1] V. Blum et al, Comp. Phys. Comm. (2008), accepted. [2] M. Kohtani et al., JACS 120, 12975 (1998).

  1. Microstructure and properties of aluminum contacts formed on GaAs(100) by low pressure chemical vapor deposition with dimethylethylamine alane source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashkin, V.; Rushworth, S.; Danil'Tsev, V.; Murel, A.; Drozdov, Yu.; Gusev, S.; Khrykin, O.; Vostokov, N.

    2001-08-01

    We report on a low pressure chemical vapor deposition of metallic thin aluminum films on GaAs (001) with a dimethylethylamine alane (DMEAA) source and H2 as a carrier gas. The deposition temperatures varied in the range 130-360°C. Integrated volumes for Al (111), (100), (110)R, and (110) grains were estimated by the x-ray diffraction technique and the growth temperature values preferred for every type of grains were observed. The experimentally observed dominance of Al(110)R over Al(110), irrespective of the substrate miscut direction, supports the GaAs(100) inner anisotropy effect on the Al grain orientation. Electrical resistivity was 5 ·cm for the best Al films. The Schottky barrier heights were near a 0.7 eV level and the ideality factor n=1.1. Nonalloyed ohmic contacts were fabricated on an n-type GaAs epitaxial layer with an additional set of Si-layers near the Al/GaAs interface. Specific contact resistance, c=7 cm2, was measured. Best contacts were obtained at a deposition temperature lower than 250°C.

  2. Chemical Vapor Deposition of TiAlN film by Using Titanium Tetrachloride, Dimethylethylamine Alane and Ammonia Gas for ULSI Cu Diffusion Barrier Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Young-Hoon; Shimogaki, Yukihiro

    2004-12-01

    We report on the deposition of Ti1-xAlxN films by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. Titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4), dimethylethylamine alane (DMEAA) and ammonia gas were used as sources. Chemical composition, microstructure and electrical resistivity were investigated at various deposition conditions by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and 4 point probe. Al content, x, in Ti1-xAlxN film was varied from 0.04 to 0.79 in our experimental conditions. As deposition temperature increased in the temperature range from 220°C to 410°C, Al content decreased. Also, Al content in Ti1-xAlxN films shows a linear relationship with the partial pressure of DMEAA. Up to x=0.15, glancing angle XRD peaks showed only B1 (NaCl) cubic structures but further increasing of Al content leads to amorphous structure. For Ti0.76Al0.24N film, Cu(50 nm)/Ti0.76Al0.24N(20 nm)/Si substrate stack was prepared to examine the barrier property against Cu diffusion. Cu diffused into Si substrate through the Ti0.76Al0.24N(20 nm) film from 700°C, 30 min vacuum annealing. This result is higher than that of CVD-TiN(50 nm) barrier which failed at 400°C.

  3. Feasibility study of the direct mechano-chemical synthesis of nanostructured magnesium tetrahydroaluminate (alanate) [Mg(AlH(4))(2)] complex hydride.

    PubMed

    Varin, R A; Chiu, Ch; Czujko, T; Wronski, Z

    2005-10-01

    The present work reports a feasibility study of the direct mechano-chemical synthesis by controlled reactive mechanical alloying (CRMA) in a magneto-ball mill of the nanostructured magnesium tetrahydroaluminate (magnesium alanate) Mg(AlH(4))(2) complex hydride. Three stoichiometric Mg-2Al mixtures, (a) elemental Mg and Al powders, (b) elemental Al powder and commercial AZ91 alloy (Mg-Al-Zn alloy) and (c) powder of as-cast Mg-2Al alloy, have been used. No successful synthesis of Mg(AlH(4))(2) has been achieved. The only nanocrystalline hydride formed up to 270 h of CRMA is beta-MgH(2), and it does not react with Al and H(2) to form Mg(AlH(4))(2). It has been found that there is strong competition between formation of Al(Mg) solid solution and the beta-MgH(2) hydride occurring to a various extent up to approximately 10 h of CRMA in all three Mg-2Al mixtures. It is hypothesized that the presence of Al(Mg) solid solution inhibits the reaction of beta-MgH(2), Al and H(2) to form Mg(AlH(4))(2). Furthermore, despite the fact that after prolonged milling the Al(Mg) solution eventually decomposes into secondary Al(s) (derived from solid solution), the latter retains its physico-chemical characteristics of the former solid solution which still inhibits the reaction to form Mg(AlH(4))(2). Experimental evidence from DSC measurements shows increasing ranges of the melting enthalpy with increasing amounts of Al(Mg) solid solution and consequently the secondary Al(s) for all the three Mg-2Al mixtures. This strongly supports the hypothesis about the different nature of Al(Mg) and the secondary Al(s) as compared to the primary elemental Al powder.

  4. Studies of gas phase reactions, nucleation and growth mechanisms of plasma promoted chemical vapor deposition of aluminum using dimethylethylamine alane as source percursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorr, Andreas H.

    The work presented herein focuses on the use of plasma promoted chemical vapor deposition (PPCVD) of aluminum (Al) using dimethylethylamine alane (DMEAA) as source precursor to provide an integrated, low temperature alternative to currently employed Al deposition methods in ultra large sale integration ULSI multilevel metal wiring schemes. In this respect, key findings are reported and discussed from critical scientific and technical aspects of an research and development effort, which was successfully executed to identify a viable Al CVD deposition process. In this respect, advanced atomic scale analytical techniques were successfully employed to characterize the PPCVD deposition process at the molecular level, and document the dependence of film's structural and compositional properties on key process parameters. This led to the development and optimization of a PPCVD Al process for ULSI applications. In addition, gas phase quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) was employed to study the gas phase evolution during TCVD and PPCVD in order to gain a thorough understanding of the potential chemical and physical reactions that could occur in the gas phase and derive corresponding optimized reaction pathways for both CVD processes. Key reaction mechanisms involved in thermal and plasma promoted CVD as a function of processing parameters were investigated, including the role of hydrogen plasma in providing an efficient pathway to aluminum nucleation and growth. The resulting reaction mechanisms were then employed to identify the most likely precursor decomposition pathways and explore relevant implications for thermal and plasma promoted CVD Al. Furthermore, the nucleation and growth of Al in both TCVD and PPCVD were thoroughly characterized. Time evolution studies were carried out employing a variety of relevant liners and seed layers under selected surface chemical states. The surface morphology of the resulting films were analyzed by means of scanning probe microscopy

  5. The ALAN Review. Winter, 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, W. Geiger, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Intended for the junior high school or secondary school English teacher, the articles and features in this journal focus on young adult literatue and the adolescent audience. The first article, Zibby Oneal's "Writing for Adolescents: Pleasures and Problems," describes the responsibilities of authors of adolescent fiction, while the second article,…

  6. The ALAN Review. Winter 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Arthea, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Intended for junior or senior high school English teachers, articles and features in this journal issue focus on young adult literature and the adolescent audience. The first article, Kevin Major's "The Truth about My Fictitious Friends," describes the genesis of the author's fiction writing for the Newfoundland audience, and is followed…

  7. The ALAN Review. Winter, 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, W. Geiger, Ed.; Ward, Dan, Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Articles in this issue focus on adolescent literature. The first article is a reflection by author Katie Letcher Lyle on her personal experiences since the publication of her last novel. The second article examines the dramatic power of the novels of Alice Childress. The third article reports the results of a questionnaire on the reading…

  8. The ALAN Review. Winter, 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, W. Geiger, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Intended for the junior high school or secondary school English teacher, the articles and features in this journal focus on young adult literatue and the adolescent audience. The first article, Zibby Oneal's "Writing for Adolescents: Pleasures and Problems," describes the responsibilities of authors of adolescent fiction, while the second article,…

  9. Reactivity of NHC Alane Adducts towards N-Heterocyclic Carbenes and Cyclic (Alkyl)(amino)carbenes: Ring Expansion, Ring Opening, and Al-H Bond Activation.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Heidi; Hock, Andreas; Bertermann, Rüdiger; Radius, Udo

    2017-09-07

    The synthesis of mono-NHC alane adducts of the type (NHC)⋅AlH3 (NHC=Me2 Im (1), Me2 Im(Me) (2), iPr2 Im (3 and [D3 ]-3), iPr2 Im(Me) (4), Dipp2 Im (10); Im=imidazolin-2-ylidene, Dipp=2,6-diisopropylphenyl) and (NHC)⋅AliBu2 H (NHC=iPr2 Im (11), Dipp2 Im (12)) as well as their reactivity towards different types of carbenes is presented. Although the mono-NHC adducts remained stable at elevated temperatures, ring expansion occurred when (iPr2 Im)⋅AlH3 (3) was treated with a second equivalent of the carbene iPr2 Im to give (iPr2 Im)⋅AlH(RER-iPr2 ImH2 ) (6). In 6, {(iPr2 Im}AlH} is inserted into the NHC ring. In contrast, ring opening was observed with the sterically more demanding Dipp2 Im with the formation of (iPr2 Im)⋅AlH2 (ROR-Dipp2 ImH2 )H2 Al⋅(iPr2 Im) (9). In 9, two {(iPr2 Im)⋅AlH2 } moieties stabilize the ring-opened Dipp2 Im. If two hydridic sites are blocked, the adducts are stable with respect to further ring expansion or ring opening, as exemplified by the adducts (iPr2 Im)⋅AliBu2 H (11) and (Dipp2 Im)⋅AliBu2 H (12). The adducts (NHC)⋅AlH3 and (iPr2 Im)⋅AliBu2 H reacted with cAAC(Me) by insertion of the carbene carbon atom into the Al-H bond to give (NHC)⋅AlH2 /iBu2 (cAAC(Me) H) (13-18) instead of ligand substitution, ring-expansion, or ring-opened products. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Reaction of the Primary Alane (2,4,6-t-Bu(3)H(2)C(6)AlH(2))(2) with Nitriles, Isonitriles, and Primary Amines.

    PubMed

    Wehmschulte, Rudolf J.; Power, Philip P.

    1998-12-28

    The reactions of the sterically encumbered primary alane (MesAlH(2))(2) (Mes = C(6)H(2)-2,4,6-t-Bu(3)) with the nitriles t-BuCN, MesCN (Mes = C(6)H(2)-2,4,6-Me(3)) or MeCN lead eventually to dimeric amido alane products in which one of the ortho t-Bu groups of the Mes ligand is metalated and the nitrile is reduced to the amide ligand N(H)CH(2)R (R = t-Bu, Mes, or Me). The compounds (R = t-Bu, 2 (cis), 3 (trans); Mes, 4 (cis), 5 (trans); Me, 6 (cis)) have been isolated and characterized spectroscopically and also by X-ray crystallography in the cases of 4 and 5. The intermediate, dimeric iminato complex [MesAl(H){&mgr;(2)-NC(H)t-Bu}](2) (1), can also be isolated under carefully controlled, mild conditions. Reaction of (MesAlH(2))(2) with the isonitrile t-BuNC affords the cyclic species {MesAlN(t-Bu)CH(2)}(2) (7) featuring a six-membered (AlNC)(2) ring which, when heated, affords the cyclometalated species (8). Recognition that the products 2-6 and 8 were derivatives of primary amides led to an investigation of synthetic approaches to these product types via the direct reaction of (MesAlH(2))(2) with some primary amines. Treatment of (MesAlH(2))(2) with H(2)NCH(2)Mes affords the dimeric amido alane [Mes(H)Al{&mgr;(2)-N(H)CH(2)Mes}](2) as a mixture of trans (9) and cis (10) isomers. Further heating of 9 and 10 affords the ortho-metalated compounds 4 and 5. The reaction of (MesAlH(2))(2) with H(2)NSiPh(3) furnishes the bis amido aluminum compound MesAl{N(H)SiPh(3)}(2) (11) and [Mes(H)Al{N(H)SiPh(3)}](2). The latter yields the dimeric imide {MesAlNSiPh(3)}(2) (12) at elevated temperature.

  11. Book Review: The future of spacetime. Stephen William Hawking (ed.); Kip S. Thorne, Igor Novikov, Timothy Ferris, Alan Lightman, and Richard Price, W.W. Norton & Company, 2002, 224 pp., US 25.95, ISBN 0393020223

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeenk, Chris

    2003-12-01

    The study of Einstein's theory of general relativity experienced a renaissance beginning in the early 1960s. Prior to this resurgence of interest, general relativity was isolated from mainstream physics-admired for its elegance, perhaps, but only from a distance. The generation of students who risked their careers by entering this neglected field has now reached the age of festschrifts. In June of 2000, Caltech hosted ;Kipfest,; a conference in honor of Kip Thorne's 60th birthday. Thorne started graduate school at Princeton in 1962 and began research in general relativity under John Wheeler's guidance in the heady early days of the renaissance. Since then, he has played a prominent role in general relativity: as co-author of the influential textbook Gravitation, as a leader in research regarding astrophysical applications of Einstein's theory, and as a co-founder and chief advocate for the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), to mention a few aspects of his far-reaching work. ;Kipfest; included 14 speakers discussing fields to which Thorne has contributed. But the conference also reflected Thorne's long-standing commitment to communicating science to a general audience: Igor Novikov, Stephen Hawking, Timothy Ferris, and Alan Lightman gave popular talks at ;Kipfest,; with Thorne himself tricked into delivering a fifth. The Future of Spacetime gathers adaptations of these five lectures, along with a lengthy introductory essay by Richard Price.

  12. 75 FR 66138 - George Mathew, M.D.; Denial of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-27

    ... business properties listed Abel Rodriguez as the registered agent for La Familia Pharmacy III, Inc. Id. at... Rodriguez's pharmacy, La Familia Pharmacy, to fill some of its prescriptions, and that that was how...-stamping' Dr. Mora's name to prescriptions filled by the La Familia group, even though he was not actually...

  13. Geologic map of the Lake Mathews 7.5' quadrangle, Riverside County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Douglas M.; Weber, F. Harold

    2001-01-01

    a. This Readme; includes in Appendix I, data contained in lkm_met.txt b. The same graphic as plotted in 2 above. Test plots have not produced 1:24,000-scale map sheets. Adobe Acrobat page size setting influences map scale. The Correlation of Map Units and Description of Map Units is in the editorial format of USGS Miscellaneous Investigations Series (I-series) maps but has not been edited to comply with I-map standards. Within the geologic map data package, map units are identified by standard geologic map criteria such as formation-name, age, and lithology. Where known, grain size is indicated on the map by a subscripted letter or letters following the unit symbols as follows: lg, large boulders; b, boulder; g, gravel; a, arenaceous; s, silt; c, clay; e.g. Qyfa is a predominantly young alluvial fan deposit that is arenaceous.Multiple letters are used for more specific identification or for mixed units, e.g., Qfysa is a silty sand.In some cases, mixed units are indicated by a compound symbol; e.g., Qyf2sc. Marine deposits are in part overlain by local, mostly alluvial fan, deposits and are labeled Qomf. Grain size follows f. Even though this is an Open-File report and includes the standard USGS Open-File disclaimer, the report closely adheres to the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U.S. Geological Survey. Descriptions of units can be obtained by viewing or plotting the .pdf file (3b above) or plotting the postscript file (2 above).

  14. The ALAN Review. Volume 9, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, W. Geiger, Ed.; Ward, Dan, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    The articles in this journal issue focus on adolescent literature. In the first article, author Sue Ellen Bridgers explains how she writes books, while the second article offers an analysis of the recent works of Paul Zindel. The third article presents a discussion of the treatment of outsiders, such as the mentally ill, in four Roy Brown…

  15. The ALAN Review. Volume 9, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, W. Geiger, Ed.; Ward, Dan, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    The articles in this journal issue focus on adolescent literature. In the first article, author Sue Ellen Bridgers explains how she writes books, while the second article offers an analysis of the recent works of Paul Zindel. The third article presents a discussion of the treatment of outsiders, such as the mentally ill, in four Roy Brown…

  16. The ALAN Review. Volume 8, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, W. Geiger, Ed.; Ward, Dan, Ed.

    1980-01-01

    The articles in this journal issue focus on adolescent literature. Topics covered in the articles include: (1) teaching adolescent literature about minorities to majority group students, (2) death in adolescent literature, (3) trends in German youth literature, and (4) female identity in the young adult novel. In addition, the journal issue…

  17. The ALAN Review. Volume 8, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, W. Geiger, Ed.; Ward, Dan, Ed.

    1980-01-01

    The articles in this journal issue focus on adolescent literature. Topics covered in the articles include: (1) teaching adolescent literature about minorities to majority group students, (2) death in adolescent literature, (3) trends in German youth literature, and (4) female identity in the young adult novel. In addition, the journal issue…

  18. Theoretical study of icosahedral closo-borane, -alane, and -gallane dianions (A(12)H(12)(2-); A = B, Al, Ga) with endohedral noble gas atoms (Ng = He, Ne, Ar, and Kr) and their lithium salts (Li[Ng@A(12)H(12)](-) and Li(2)[Ng@A(12)H(12)]).

    PubMed

    Charkin, O P; Klimenko, N M; Moran, D; Mebel, A M; Charkin, D O; Schleyer, P R

    2001-12-31

    Geometries, energies, vibrational frequencies, and magnetic properties have been computed at the B3LYP level with the 6-31G and 6-311+G basis sets for a family of endohedral closo-boranes, -alanes, and -gallanes Ng@A(12)H(12)(2-) with noble gas atoms (Ng) located in the centers of icosahedral [B(12)], [Al(12)], and [Ga(12)] clusters. The endohedral structures of most of the systems are minima lying above separated Ng + A(12)H(12)(2-) by 166 (He@B(12)H(12)(2-)) and 403 (Ne@B(12)H(12)(2-)) kcal/mol for boranes; 29 (He@Al(12)H(12)(2-)), 63 (Ne@Al(12)H(12)(2-)), 154 (Ar@Al(12)H(12)(2-)), and 189 (Kr@Al(12)H(12)(2-)) kcal/mol for alanes; and 39 (He@Ga(12)H(12)(2-)), 71 (Ne@Ga(12)H(12)(2-)), and 213 (Ar@Ga(12)H(12)(2-)) kcal/mol for gallanes. Three types of transition states are found for the exit of Ng from a cage: via an edge (TS-1), through a face (TS-2), and via a more extensive deformation through a pentagonal cage "neck" (TS-3). The most favorable exit path depends on the rigidity of the cage, the exothermicity of the dissociation, and the relationship between the size of the internal cavity of the cage and the Ng atomic radius. Ng exit via TS-3 is preferred for He@Al(12)H(12)(2-), Ne@Al(12)H(12)(2-), He@Ga(12)H(12)(2-), Ne@Ga(12)H(12)(2-), Ar@Al(12)H(12)(2), and Kr@Al(12)H(12)(2-). Helium exits via a cage edge (TS-1) for He@B(12)H(12)(2-), while for Ne@B(12)H(12)(2-) the neon exits via a triangular face (TS-2). Exit barriers (H(exit)(double dagger)) are high enough (30-60 kcal/mol) for all helium clusters and for Ne@Al(12)H(12)(2-) and Ne@Ga(12)H(12)(2-) to ensure the kinetic stability of these systems. The barriers for Ar@Al(12)H(12)(2-) and Kr@Al(12)H(12)(2-) decrease to 10-15 kcal/mol, while Ne@B(12)H(12)(2-) has a very low exit barrier and is not expected to be stable kinetically. There is a linear dependence of Ng@A(12)H(12)(2-) cage size on the Ng atomic radii; that is, the heavier Ng atoms "bulge" the cages. Nucleus independent chemical shifts (NICS

  19. The Civil War as Photographed by Mathew Brady. The Constitution Community: Civil War and Reconstruction (1850-1870).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Douglas

    Many historians call the Civil War the central event in U.S. history. The formation of the U.S. Constitution corrected the autonomy of individual states that the Articles of Confederation did not harness. The young country struggled for 75 years to find a graceful balance between the power of the federal government and that of the states. The…

  20. A resolution relative to the death of Harlan Mathews, former United States Senator for the State of Tennessee.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Alexander, Lamar [R-TN

    2014-05-13

    05/13/2014 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  1. A resolution relative to the death of Harlan Mathews, former United States Senator for the State of Tennessee.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Alexander, Lamar [R-TN

    2014-05-13

    05/13/2014 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S2980; text as passed Senate: CR S2958) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  2. Description and Evaluation of the Cultural Resources within Mathews Canyon and Pine Canyon, Lincoln County, Nevada. Cultural Resources Report. Appendix,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-09-30

    8217 ’ . . ., -. . . . . . . . . .. ~ ~ *~~. ~ - - -.. -;%. University of California ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITE SURVEY RECORD 1. Site.-...N-1652 2. Map IMSS Fife Mtn 7 1/2’ - 3. County[Ancoln- HT 4. Twp. 5S Range 69E

  3. A resolution relative to the death of Harlan Mathews, former United States Senator for the State of Tennessee.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Alexander, Lamar [R-TN

    2014-05-13

    Senate - 05/13/2014 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  4. Monomeric Alanes: Synthesis, Structure, and Thermolysis of MesAl(H)N(SiMe(3))(2) and a One-Pot Synthetic Route to Mes(2)AlH (Mes = -C(6)H(2)-2,4,6-t-Bu(3)).

    PubMed

    Wehmschulte, Rudolf J.; Power, Philip P.

    1998-05-04

    The reaction of (MesAlH(2))(2) (Mes = -C(6)H(2)-2,4,6-t-Bu(3)) with HN(SiMe(3))(2) affords the monomeric amidoarylalane MesAl(H)N(SiMe(3))(2), 1. This product can also be synthesized by the reaction of [MesAlH(2)](2) with LiN(SiMe(3))(2), which, in addition, yields the byproducts LiAlH(2){N(SiMe(3))(2)}(2), 3, and MesH. Thermolysis of 1 at 175-180 degrees C affords three different the related and the imide [MesAlN(SiMe(3))](n)(), 5. In addition, the previously reported monomeric alane Mes(2)AlH was synthesized in ca. 70% yield by a one-pot reaction between LiMes (generated in situ) and AlH(3).NMe(3). All products were spectroscopically characterized, and the structure of 1 was determined by X-ray crystallography. The Al-N distance (1.819(2) Å) in 1 is relatively long. However, it has a substantial, 18.5 kcal mol(-)(1), Al-N rotation barrier which is attributed to steric congestion rather than Al-N pi bonding.

  5. Effect of an acute and chronic toxicity of four commercial detergents on the freshwater fish Gambusia affinis Baird & Gerard.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Pratibha; Sharma, Subhasini; Sharma, Shweta; Suryavathi, V; Grover, Ruby; Soni, Pratima; Kumar, Suresh; Sharma, K P

    2005-04-01

    The toxic effects of four commercial detergents (two washing powders and two cakes) are reported in this paper on behavior, mortality and RBC counts of a freshwater fish Gambusia affinis. During acute toxicity studies (96h), surface movements of fish increased markedly for 24h, only at higher concentrations (>10 ppm) of all the four detergents. Thereafter, they were lethargic and bottom dwellers similar to those exposed for a period of 30 days in the longterm ecotoxicological studies made on detergent powders at a sublethal concentration (10 ppm). The detergents exposed to fish were found slippery due to mucous secretion. Hemorrhage regions were also found on their gills. The dissolved oxygen content also decreased (10-18%) in the detergent treatments of higher concentration (> 10 ppm). During acute toxicity studies, cakes (LC50 = 6.69 - 19.98ppm) were found more toxic than powders (LC50 = 18.34-20.72ppm). In comparison to the control fish, RBC counts decreased (12-64%) in the detergent exposed fish, being more pronounced among those exposed to cakes. The chronic exposure (30 days) of the fish also resulted in reduction in the RBC counts (41-58%). It is thus evident that all the four detergents are toxic to the fish Gambusia affinis.

  6. GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-9 TEST - ASTRONAUT BEAN, ALAN - KSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-08-14

    S73-31973 (August 1973) --- Scientist-astronaut Owen K. Garriott, Skylab 3 science pilot, looks at a map of Earth at the food table in the ward room of the Orbital Workshop (OWS). In this photographic reproduction taken from a television transmission made by a color TV camera aboard the Skylab space station cluster in Earth orbit. Photo credit: NASA

  7. Alan N. Epstein award: Intracellular signaling and ingestive behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Derek

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the role of intracellular signaling pathways in ingestive behavior is a challenging problem in behavioral neuroscience. This review summarizes work conducted on two systems with the aim of identifying intracellular events that relate to food and fluid intake. The first set of experiments focused on melanocortin receptors and their ability to signal through members of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase family. The second set of experiments focused on the role of intracellular signaling pathways in water and saline intakes that are stimulated by angiotensin II (AngII). The initial findings in each line of research have been extended by subsequent research that is discussed in turn. PMID:20346964

  8. Communication and Computability: The Case of Alan Mathison Turing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesebro, James W.

    1993-01-01

    Provides a preliminary examination of the relationships which exist between the disciplines of communication and computer science. Isolates the original principles which determined the development of computer science. Suggests how these early formation principles had and continue to have on the study of communication. Focuses on the seminal role…

  9. Inorganic Chemistry (Catherine E. Housecroft and Alan G. Sharpe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Craig E.

    2003-07-01

    There is certainly more material in this text than can be covered in the traditional one-semester course in the junior or senior year, so instructors will have to pick and choose among the topics and depth of coverage offered. Short answers to most of the problems at the end of each chapter are provided after the appendices. A solutions manual, written by Housecroft, is available separate from the text and is not included in this review.

  10. Sodium alanate nanoparticles--linking size to hydrogen storage properties.

    PubMed

    Baldé, Cornelis P; Hereijgers, Bart P C; Bitter, Johannes H; de Jong, Krijn P

    2008-05-28

    Important limitations in the application of light metal hydrides for hydrogen storage are slow kinetics and poor reversibility. To alleviate these problems doping and ball-milling are commonly applied, for NaAlH 4 leading to particle sizes down to 150 nm. By wet-chemical synthesis we have prepared carbon nanofiber-supported NaAlH 4 with discrete particle size ranges of 1-10 microm, 19-30 nm, and 2-10 nm. The hydrogen desorption temperatures and activation energies decreased from 186 degrees C and 116 kJ.mol (-1) for the largest particles to 70 degrees C and 58 kJ.mol (-1) for the smallest particles. In addition, decreasing particle sizes lowered the pressures needed for reloading. This reported size-performance correlation for NaAlH 4 may guide hydrogen storage research for a wide range of nanostructured light (metal) hydrides.

  11. HIGH TEMPERATURE PRESSURE PROCESSING OF MIXED ALANATE COMPOUNDS

    SciTech Connect

    Berseth, P; Ragaiy Zidan, R; Donald Anton, D; Kirk Shanahan, K; Ashley Stowe, A

    2007-06-07

    Mixtures of light-weight elements and hydrides were investigated to increase the understanding of the chemical reactions that take place between various materials. This report details investigations we have made into mixtures that include NaAlH{sub 4}, LiAlH{sub 4}, MgH{sub 2}, Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 4}, alkali(ne) hydrides, and early third row transition metals (V, Cr, Mn). Experimental parameters such as stoichiometry, heat from ball milling versus hand milling, and varying the temperature of high pressure molten state processing were studied to examine the effects of these parameters on the reactions of the complex metal hydrides.

  12. Communication and Computability: The Case of Alan Mathison Turing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesebro, James W.

    1993-01-01

    Provides a preliminary examination of the relationships which exist between the disciplines of communication and computer science. Isolates the original principles which determined the development of computer science. Suggests how these early formation principles had and continue to have on the study of communication. Focuses on the seminal role…

  13. Synthesis and properties of calcium alanate and two solvent adducts.

    PubMed

    Fichtner, Maximilian; Frommen, Christoph; Fuhr, Olaf

    2005-05-16

    Several ways to synthesize solvated and desolvated calcium tetrahydroaluminate by wet-chemical and mechanochemical methods are presented. The products were characterized by elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The crystal structure of Ca(AlH(4))(2).4THF was determined. After desolvation, an ultrafine powder was obtained. IR data and the mass balance suggest a compound with the composition Ca(AlH(4))(2), containing tetrahedral [AlH(4)] groups.

  14. Atomic Simulations of Alane Phase Transformations and Dehydrogenation Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opalka, Susanne; Saxe, Paul; Lovvik, Ole Martin

    2007-03-01

    Density functional theory atomic ground state, molecular dynamics, and direct method lattice dynamic simulations were used to mechanistically probe phase transformations between the various crystallographically refined α, α', β, and γ AlH3 phases. Lattice dynamic predictions of the AlH3 structures provided an ideal test case for systematically accessing the accuracy of the vibrational thermodynamic property contributions with the harmonic approximation. The predicted transformation pathways involved coordinated tilting and rotation mechanisms, similar to that observed in perovskite structures. Further simulations were conducted to elucidate the mechanism for α AlH3 phase decomposition to the Al and H2 products and to identify probable barriers to reversible rehydrogenation.

  15. Title VI and Title IX Compliance by the Office for Civil Rights in State-Operated Special Purpose and Vocational Schools Pursuant to Adams v. Mathews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClure, Phyllis

    This paper examines the compliance activities of the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) undertaken to eliminate racial and sex discrimination in special purpose schools administered by State departments of education. After reviewing background to non-enforcement of Title VI, and briefly explaining Title IX, the activities of OCR with regard to special…

  16. Title VI and Title IX Compliance by the Office for Civil Rights in State-Operated Special Purpose and Vocational Schools Pursuant to Adams v. Mathews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClure, Phyllis

    This paper examines the compliance activities of the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) undertaken to eliminate racial and sex discrimination in special purpose schools administered by State departments of education. After reviewing background to non-enforcement of Title VI, and briefly explaining Title IX, the activities of OCR with regard to special…

  17. The Development of Mauna Kea as an Astronomical Site Panelists: John Jefferies, Ann Boesgaard, Alan Stockton, Eric Becklin, and Alan Tokunaga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmony, Teasel Muir; Devorkin, David

    2016-10-01

    On August 11 we held a panel discussion at the 2015 IAU General Assembly, within the three-day Focus Meeting FM2, ``Astronomical Heritage: Progressing the UNESCO-IAU Initiative''. Our purpose was to both honor and explore the contributions of John Jefferies to the creation and development of Mauna Kea as an astronomical site.

  18. Formation and properties of composites comprised of calcium-deficient hydroxyapatites and ethyl alanate polyphosphazenes.

    PubMed

    Greish, Y E; Sturgeon, J L; Singh, A; Krogman, N R; Touny, A H; Sethuraman, S; Nair, L S; Laurencin, C T; Allcock, H R; Brown, P W

    2008-09-01

    Composites comprised of calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (HAp) and biodegradable polyphosphazenes were formed via cement-type reactions at physiologic temperature. The composite precursors were produced by blending particulate hydroxyapatite precursors with 10 wt% polymer using a solvent/non-solvent technique. HAp precursors having calcium-to-phosphate ratios of 1.5 (CDH) and 1.6 (CDS) were used. The polymeric constituents were poly[bis(ethyl alanato)phosphazene] (PNEA) and poly[(ethyl alanato)(1) (p-phenylphenoxy)(1) phosphazene] (PNEA(50)PhPh(50)). The effect of incorporating the phenyl phenoxy group was evaluated as a means of increasing the mechanical properties of the composites without retarding the rates of HAp formation. Reaction kinetics and mechanistic paths were characterized by pH determination, X-ray diffraction analyses, scanning electron microscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. The mechanical properties were analyzed by compression testing. These analyses indicated that the presence of the polymers slightly reduced the rate HAp formation. However, surface hydrolysis of polymer ester groups permitted the formation of calcium salt bridges that provide a mechanism for bonding with the HAp. The compressive strengths of the composites containing PNEA(50)PhPh(50) were superior to those containing PNEA, and were comparable to those of HAp produced in the absence of polymer. The current composites more closely match the structure of bone, and are thus strongly recommended to be used as bone cements where high loads are not expected.

  19. A First Principles Study of Mass Transport in the Dehydrogenation of Lithium Amides and Lithium Alanates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolih, Biljana

    The pursuit of competitive alternatives to energy derived from the combustion of fossil fuels, has led to a great variety of new technologies. Exceptional develop- ments in electrochemical storage and production promise to lead to clean burning passenger vehicles. The high chemical density of a hydrogen fuel cell enables it to meet current standards for driving range and weight required of vehicles, making it an excellent candidate for universal application in the automotive industry. One of the biggest obstacles the fuel cell industry has yet to overcome is the means of practical hydrogen storage. Solid state metal hydrides are a class of materials that show potential for both economic and practical hydrogen storage. The search for the ideal metal hydride is defined by thermodynamic and kinetic constraints, since the requirements for a viable system are a rapid release of hydrogen in the temperature range of -40°C, to 80°C. First-principles density functional theory is an excellent method for gaining insight into the kinetics and thermodynamics of metal hydride solid state reactions. In the work presented here, density functional theory is used to explore formation energies, concentrations and migration barriers of metal hydrides. In particular, the following systems were analyzed: • Li - N - H It is well known that the reactive hydride composite LiNH 2 + LiH reversibly releases a large amount of hydrogen gas, with more favorable thermodynamics than LiNH2 alone. Kinetics of mass transport during the dehydrogenation of LiNH2 + LiH are investigated. A model is developed for determining activation energies of native defects in bulk crystals. In order to establish whether mass transport is the rate-limiting step in the dehydrogenation reaction, results are compared to experimental values. • Li - Al - H Kinetics of mass transport during the dehydrogenation of the metal hydride LiAlH2 are investigated. It is known that LiAlH4 endothermically decomposes via a two step reaction. The kinetics of both steps in the reactions are studied. Results are compared to experiments in order to determine whether mass transport is the rate-limiting process in the reactions.

  20. Remaking Adult Learning: Essays on Adult Education in Honour of Alan Tuckett

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derrick, Jay, Ed.; Howard, Ursula, Ed.; Field, John, Ed.; Lavender, Peter, Ed.; Meyer, Sue, Ed.; von Rein, Ekkehard Nuissl, Ed.; Schuller, Tom, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Remaking Adult Learning provides an exciting and innovative addition to the literature on adult learning. Charting challenges and successes in the sector, it illustrates how taking part in well-thought-out programmes can have a positive and sometimes life-saving impact on people's lives. While grounded in adult learning practice, the book draws…

  1. Next steps for Tennessee: a conversation with Gov. Phil Bredesen. Interview by Alan Weil.

    PubMed

    Bredsen, Phil

    2007-01-01

    In this conversation, conducted during the February 2007 meeting of the National Governors Association, Gov. Phil Bredesen of Tennessee discusses his views on health care, health information technology, and the challenges of changing a massive system with many moving parts. He talks about his involvement in the State Alliance for E-Health, which is working on privacy, licensure, and data communications across state lines. He discusses the state's TennCare program; his views on effective managed care; and his Cover Tennessee program, which seeks to provide low-income workers with an innovative low-cost insurance product focused on preventive care.

  2. 76 FR 20025 - Alan H. Olefsky, M.D.; Denial of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-11

    ..., Respondent entered a treatment program for impaired professionals run by Resurrection Behavioral Health. GX 1.... Daniel H. Angres, Director, Resurrection Behavioral Health Addiction Services Division, Rush University...-certified in Psychiatry Neurology and Addiction Medicine, served as Medical Director, Resurrection...

  3. "Not in the Middle Ages"?: Alan Garner's "The Owl Service" and the Literature of Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardwick, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Discusses connecting with the Middle Ages in adolescent fiction. Discusses how, in "The Owl Service," Garner addresses a relationship between adolescence in the late twentieth century and an aspect of the past--specifically the Middle Ages. Considers how "The Owl Service" is a story energized by myth, concerning the…

  4. Gertrude Stein and Alan Robbe-Grillet: Toward a New Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wank, Martin

    1978-01-01

    In figures like Gertrude Stein and Alain Robbe-Grillet, we see the continuation of that long tradition, given to us by the Greeks, of the writer as prophet, touched by the gods. Examines the development of literature through the work of these two writers and the criticisms that accompanied their efforts. (Author/RK)

  5. A resolution commending Alan S. Frumin on his service to the United States Senate.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Reid, Harry [D-NV

    2012-01-31

    Senate - 01/31/2012 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. Synthesis of Nanoflower-Shaped MXene Derivative with Unexpected Catalytic Activity for Dehydrogenation of Sodium Alanates.

    PubMed

    Zou, Guodong; Liu, Baozhong; Guo, Jianxin; Zhang, Qingrui; Fernandez, Carlos; Peng, Qiuming

    2017-03-01

    Surface group modification and functionalization of two-dimensional materials in many cases are deemed as effective approaches to achieve some distinctive properties. Herein, we present a new nanoflower-shaped TiO2/C composite which was synthesized by in situ alcoholysis of two-dimensional layered MXene (Ti3C2(OHxF1-x)2) in a dilute HF solution (0.5 wt %) for the first time. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that it bestows a strong catalytic activity for the dehydrogenation of NaAlH4. The results show that the NaAlH4 containing 10 wt % A0.9R0.1-TiO2/C (containing 90% anatase TiO2 and 10% rutile TiO2) composite merely took ∼85 min to reach a stable and maximum dehydrogenation capacity of ∼3.08 wt % at 100 °C, and it maintains stable after ten cycles, which is the best Ti-based catalyst for the dehydrogenation of NaAlH4 reported so far. Theoretical calculation confirms that this C-doping TiO2 crystals remarkably decreases desorption energy barrier of Al-H bonding in NaAlH4, accelerating the breakdown of Al-H bonding. This finding raises the potential for development and application of new fuel cells.

  7. A resolution commending Alan S. Frumin on his service to the United States Senate.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Reid, Harry [D-NV

    2012-01-31

    01/31/2012 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. A resolution commending Alan S. Frumin on his service to the United States Senate.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Reid, Harry [D-NV

    2012-01-31

    01/31/2012 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S200-201; text as passed Senate: CR S200-201; text of measure as introduced: CR S213) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. Remaking Adult Learning: Essays on Adult Education in Honour of Alan Tuckett

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derrick, Jay, Ed.; Howard, Ursula, Ed.; Field, John, Ed.; Lavender, Peter, Ed.; Meyer, Sue, Ed.; von Rein, Ekkehard Nuissl, Ed.; Schuller, Tom, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Remaking Adult Learning provides an exciting and innovative addition to the literature on adult learning. Charting challenges and successes in the sector, it illustrates how taking part in well-thought-out programmes can have a positive and sometimes life-saving impact on people's lives. While grounded in adult learning practice, the book draws…

  10. "Not in the Middle Ages"?: Alan Garner's "The Owl Service" and the Literature of Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardwick, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Discusses connecting with the Middle Ages in adolescent fiction. Discusses how, in "The Owl Service," Garner addresses a relationship between adolescence in the late twentieth century and an aspect of the past--specifically the Middle Ages. Considers how "The Owl Service" is a story energized by myth, concerning the…

  11. Reductive openings of benzylidene acetals. Kinetic studies of borane and alane activation by Lewis acids.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, Richard; Cukalevski, Risto; Dragén, Fanny; Ivanisevic, Damir; Johansson, Ida; Petersson, Linn; Wettergren, Erika Elgstrand; Yam, Ka Bo; Yang, Beatrice; Ellervik, Ulf

    2008-11-24

    The reaction kinetics for a number of reductive openings of methyl 2,3-di-O-benzyl-4,6-O-benzylidene-alpha-D-glucopyranoside have been investigated. Openings to give free HO-6 (using BH(3) x THF-AlCl(3)-THF or LiAlH(4)-AlCl(3)-Et(2)O) follow first order kinetics, while reactions yielding free HO-4 (using BH(3) x NMe(3)-AlCl(3)-THF or BH(3) x NMe(3)-BF(3) x OEt(2)-THF) follow higher order kinetics. The addition of water to the BH(3) x NMe(3)-AlCl(3)-THF results in faster reactions. The BH(3) x SMe(2)-AlCl(3)-THF system constitutes a borderline case, yielding both free HO-6 (by a first order reaction) and free HO-4 (by a higher order reaction). These results correlate well with the concept of regioselectivity by activation of borane complexes.

  12. Cationic aluminum hydride complexes: reactions of carbene-alane adducts with trityl-borate.

    PubMed

    Cao, Levy L; Daley, Erika; Johnstone, Timothy C; Stephan, Douglas W

    2016-04-18

    Reaction of (Idipp)AlH3 with [Ph3C][B(C6F5)4] in toluene affords the dimeric aluminum dication [((Idipp)AlH(μ-H))2][B(C6F5)4]22. In contrast, the reaction of (IBn)AlH3 with [Ph3C][B(C6F5)4] in bromobenzene gives a redistribution product, the salt of a monomeric dication [(IBn)2AlH][B(C6F5)4]24.

  13. Gertrude Stein and Alan Robbe-Grillet: Toward a New Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wank, Martin

    1978-01-01

    In figures like Gertrude Stein and Alain Robbe-Grillet, we see the continuation of that long tradition, given to us by the Greeks, of the writer as prophet, touched by the gods. Examines the development of literature through the work of these two writers and the criticisms that accompanied their efforts. (Author/RK)

  14. Proposals to aa Gerard, FL gallo-Prov. 1761, Kramer, Elench. Veg. 156, and Miller, Gard. Dict. Abr. ed. 4 1754 to the list of suppressed works in Appendix VI.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants in its current edition, the 2012 Melbourne Code, includes in Art. 34 provisions for the suppression of names in specified publications that are listed in its Appendix VI. Any publication can be proposed for suppression, and if such a...

  15. 9. INTAKE STREAM ON GROUND LOOKING WEST AS IT FLOWS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. INTAKE STREAM ON GROUND LOOKING WEST AS IT FLOWS DOWNSTREAM TO LAKE MATHEWS, ALL WATER COMING FROM PUMPS. - Colorado River Aqueduct, From Colorado River to Lake Mathews, Parker Dam, San Bernardino County, CA

  16. 78 FR 62364 - Sunshine Act; Notice of Agency Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-21

    ... Act. Closed pursuant to exemption (6). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Gerard Poliquin, Secretary of the Board, Telephone: 703-518-6304. Gerard Poliquin, Secretary of the Board. BILLING CODE 7535-01-P...

  17. 78 FR 73889 - Notice of Sunshine Act Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    .... Personnel. Closed pursuant to Exemption (2). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Gerard Poliquin, Secretary of the Board, Telephone: 703-518-6304. Gerard Poliquin, Secretary of the Board. BILLING CODE 7535-01-P...

  18. 77 FR 62238 - Alan B. Miller and Universal Health Services; Analysis of Agreement Containing Consent Orders To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ... Home Page (for October 5, 2012), on the World Wide Web, at http://www.ftc.gov/os/actions.shtm . A paper... discretion, the Commission tries to remove individuals' home contact information from comments before placing....10(a)(2). In particular, do not include competitively sensitive information such as costs, sales...

  19. 2013 Alan Blizzard Award Feature Article--Enriching Educational Experiences through UBC's First Year Seminar in Science (SCIE113)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Joanne; Birol, Gülnur; Han, Andrea; Cassidy, Alice; Nakonechny, Joanne; Berger, Jim; Peacock, Simon; Samuels, Lacey

    2014-01-01

    The First Year Seminar in Science (SCIE113) was developed during 2009/2010 academic year through an exemplary collaboration between faculty, administrators and educational support staff in the Faculty of Science at the University of British Columbia (UBC). SCIE113 reflects the vision and values of the Faculty of Science and UBC by offering an…

  20. The Molecular Modeling Workbook for Organic Chemistry (by Warren J. Hehre, Alan J. Shusterman, and Janet E. Nelson)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouch, R. David

    1999-09-01

    Wavefunction, Inc.: Irvine, CA, 1998. 307 pp. ISBN 1-890661-06-6. 30.00. This workbook is the latest in a series of "lab manuals" designed to increase the presence of molecular modeling and computational chemistry in undergraduate courses. The authors have designed the workbook to differ from its predecessors in two ways: the target audience is introductory organic chemistry students, and a CD-ROM containing files of molecules and data replaces the need for expensive molecular modeling software. It also differs from its predecessors in that the exercises in it are not really molecular modeling experiments. Instead, students are introduced to the field by viewing the results of computational work stored on the CD-ROM. The workbook is divided into 21 chapters, each of which covers a topic encountered in introductory-level organic chemistry. The sequence of chapters follows the sequence of topics that instructors of introductory organic courses might employ, allowing the workbook to be used with most modern organic chemistry texts. The heart of the workbook, though, is the CD-ROM included with the book. It contains files of molecules and their accompanying computational results as well as Spartan View, a software package that allows these models to be visualized. Although it does not allow actual calculations to be performed, Spartan View permits the user to rotate molecules, intermediates, and transition states and retrieve "precalculated" values of bond and dihedral angles, bond lengths, energies, dipole moments, charge, and frequency of vibration. Spartan View also allows the user to search molecules and intermediates for electron-rich or electron-poor regions by showing electrostatic potential as well as HOMOs and LUMOs. Some files allow for animation of reactions or conformational changes. Note, however, that since the data are just stored on the CD-ROM, not all the data are available for all files. Although performing calculations is not an option, Spartan View can be used to display models and data obtained using Spartan or MacSpartan and stored on a disk. In this way, student exercises can be customized by the instructor or the instructor can prepare customized examples for use in lecture. Each chapter in the workbook contains a series of 3 to 17 exercises that use models and associated data contained on the accompanying CD-ROM. The exercises are not simply cookbook procedures in which the student is directed how to solve a problem. Instead, the authors provide background in a two-part tutorial and several essays that describe the information that can be obtained through molecular modeling, and then introduce a problem in organic chemistry that can be addressed using molecular modeling. The student is left to determine how best to obtain the requested data. For example, an exercise in the chapter Acids & Bases directs the student to determine the atomic charges and view the electrostatic potential map of the conjugate bases of three organic acids. The student is not, however, told which menu to pull or button to push. At the end of the exercise, the student is directed to compare the reactivity of the acids with the data collected from Spartan View. The exercises are relatively easy to complete after spending a few minutes with the tutorials, and many require students to compare the results of calculations with the reactivity of the molecules as discussed in the traditional lecture portion of the course. In this sense, the workbook provides a meaningful link between molecular modeling exercises outside of class and activities in the classroom. While some exercises involve comparing the energies of intermediates or transition states, others are more like videos of processes. Instructors will find many of these to be useful as visual aids in lecture. Mechanisms of Ring Inversion, for example, allows the instructor to show the stepwise ring flip of cyclohexane. Although some of the animations are very similar to those contained on CD-ROMs that sometimes accompany textbooks, the exercises in this workbook allow for the retrieval of data such as the energies of the various conformations cyclohexane. Not only can the student see the stepwise conversion of one chair conformation into another, but the changes in energy as the ring flip occurs are available. Also, unlike many of the visualizations on the CD-ROMs packaged with textbooks, these give the student control over the orientation of the structures on the screen, allowing views from numerous angles. The possibility of the instructor's customizing the exercises adds to the appeal of this workbook. In reviewing this book, I noted a couple of problems. The energy of molecules is presented in hartrees or atomic units (au). Although a factor is given for converting these values into the more familiar kcal/mol or kJ/mol, wouldn't it be easier to use these results if they were given in the units that are more typically used in introductory organic chemistry texts? Similarly, a number of exercises ask the student to plot data that they have calculated in the exercise. However, no routine for plotting the data is included with Spartan View and students must go through the cumbersome process of copying the values and preparing the plots using another program or by hand. And, finally, in Tutorial B, animations are introduced by showing "the SN2 displacement of chloride in tert-butyl chloride by bromide." Although the animation shows an SN1 mechanism with the C-Cl bond breaking before approach of the incoming bromide ion, students who are new to organic mechanisms will be misled by the erroneous description in the workbook. Although instructors may want to carefully consider whether to add an additional 30 to the already high cost of required texts, this workbook provides a unique and potentially valuable addition to the introductory organic chemistry course. With many exercises involving the visualization of electrostatic potentials and HOMOs and LUMOs, it adds an increased presence of physical organic chemistry in the introductory course. And, although the exercises are not really molecular modeling, this workbook also provides a low-cost introduction to the field without the considerable cost of modeling software. If Spartan or MacSpartan is already available in the department, the possible tie-in with the workbook and the capability to project the results should make this an attractive addition to any instructor's repertoire of visualization tools for lecture. The Molecular Modeling Workbook for Organic Chemistry is definitely worthy of consideration by anyone interested in adding molecular modeling to the organic course.

  1. Two step novel hydrogen system using additives to enhance hydrogen release from the hydrolysis of alane and activated aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Teprovich, Joseph A.; Motyka, Theodore

    2015-12-01

    A system for the generation of hydrogen for use in portable power systems is set forth utilizing a two-step process that involves the thermal decomposition of AlH.sub.3 (10 wt % H.sub.2) followed by the hydrolysis of the activated aluminum (Al*) byproduct to release additional H.sub.2. Additionally, a process in which water is added directly without prior history to the AlH.sub.3:PA composite is also disclosed.

  2. [Book review] Aquatic Ecology: Scale, Pattern and Process, edited by Paul S. Giller, Alan G. Hildrew, and David G. Raffaelli

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, M.C.

    1995-01-01

    Review of: Aquatic ecology : scale, pattern, and process. Paul S Giller; A G Hildrew; D G Raffaelli; British Ecological Society. Symposium; American Society of Limnology and Oceanography. Oxford ; Boston : Blackwell Scientific Publications, 1994. xiii, 649 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.

  3. A first principles study of structural stability, electronic structure and mechanical properties of beryllium alanate BeAlH5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhosh, M.; Rajeswarapalanichamy, R.; Priyanga, G. Sudha; Kanagaprabha, S.; Cinthia, A. Jemmy; Iyakutti, K.

    2015-06-01

    Ab initio calculations are performed to investigate the structural stability, electronic structure and mechanical properties of BeAlH5 for monoclinic crystal structures with two different types of space group namely P21 and C2/c. Among the considered structures monoclinic (P21) phase is found to be the most stable at ambient condition. The structural phase transition from monoclinic (P21) to monoclinic (C2/c) phase is observed in BeAlH5. The electronic structure reveals that this compound is insulator. The calculated elastic constants indicate that this material is mechanically stable at ambient condition.

  4. The U.S. Navy in Operation Overlord Under the Command of Rear Admiral Alan G. Kirk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-19

    doubled soon after the arrival of Eisenhower and Montgomery, Bradely assigned two veteran infantry divisions to lead the assault. Bradley planned to send a...213; and Keegan, Second World War, pp. 375-77. 179 14. Ellis, Victory in the-West, p. 17; 15. Alfred Chandler, ed., The Papers of Dwight David ...Kirk Mss, NHC. 3. David Brown, "Operation Neptune, The Normandy Invasion: 6 dune to 3 July 1944," July 1993, Naval Historical Branch, Ministry of

  5. Do rapid 'superbug' tests pay off? Balance the costs and benefits of leading-edge technology. Interview by Alan Joch.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Margie Ann

    2009-02-01

    As hospitals become increasingly sensitive to the health and financial consequences of health care-associated infections (HAIs), a new generation of molecular-based testing technologies promises to significantly shorten the time required to identify "superbugs" and other bacterial infections. The leading-edge techniques promise to reduce costs by helping hospitals quickly determine which patients to isolate because they carry active methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections, for example, or which ones to release from prophylactic isolation because they ultimately tested negative for a dangerous infection. But diagnostic speed comes at a price--the costs to perform molecular tests are significantly higher than conventional methods. This challenges hospitals to balance health care expenses with medical efficacy, says molecular testing veteran Margie Morgan, Ph.D., scientific director at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles. "The rapid methods can be extreme time savers and possibly help a great deal with the isolation of patients. But some of the tests may cost five times what manual methods might be, so there is a price for seeing so much of a reduction in time," she says.

  6. Atomic and Molecular Hydrogen Interaction with Ti-Doped Al (100): Hydrogen Dissociation and Surface Alane Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Erik; Sutter, Peter; Zahl, Percy; Chaudhuri, Santanu; Muckerman, James

    2006-03-01

    A comprehensive research effort on the atomistic mechanisms underlying hydrogen storage in Ti-doped NaAlH4 is aimed at deriving a knowledge base for the rational optimization of this and other related complex hydride materials. Our investigation focuses on the role of the Ti dopants in promoting reversible hydrogenation, a key requirement for any practical hydrogen storage material. The re-hydrogenation reaction proceeds from the crucial initial step of dissociative adsorption of molecular hydrogen on Al or NaH. A specific Al:Ti complex was recently predicted as an active site for H2 dissociation on extended Al(100) surfaces [1]. Combining high-resolution surface imaging experiments (scanning tunneling microscopy, low-energy electron microscopy) with density functional theory, we are investigating the dissociative adsorption of H2 on Ti-doped Al(100) prepared in ultrahigh vacuum. We will discuss our progress toward identifying catalytically active sites for H2 dissociation on this surface, as well as pathways toward the formation of mobile Al-species. [1] S. Chaudhuri and J.T. Muckerman, J. Phys. Chem. B 109, 6952 (2005).

  7. Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability Pilot Project at Two Nuclear Power Plants and Associated State Offices of Emergency Preparedness.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    CPS andiPs..................4 MATHEW. .. ....... .......... 5 ADPIC . ... ........ ......... 5 PATRIC .. .. ........ ......... 5 III. Utilization of...due to a unit release rate. All contours are calculated by employing the MATHEW/ ADPIC codes ..... .. ...................... ... 15 8. Representative...ARAC model calculations employing MATHEW/ ADPIC codes during the January 19, 1982, test at Rancho Seco. (a) Deposition of 1-131 for a unit source rate

  8. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, emcees a ceremony in the Space Station Processing Facility to highlight the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope) arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Speakers at the ceremony included KSC Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA's Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, emcees a ceremony in the Space Station Processing Facility to highlight the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope) arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Speakers at the ceremony included KSC Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA's Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  9. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency, speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility at a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency, speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility at a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  10. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station, Node 2 and the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), ownership of Node 2 was officially transferred between the European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA. Shaking hands after the signing are Alan Thirkettle (center), International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; and NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik (right), deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs. At left, also part of the signing, is Andrea Lorenzoni (left), International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency. NASA's Node 2, built by ESA in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station, Node 2 and the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), ownership of Node 2 was officially transferred between the European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA. Shaking hands after the signing are Alan Thirkettle (center), International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; and NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik (right), deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs. At left, also part of the signing, is Andrea Lorenzoni (left), International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency. NASA's Node 2, built by ESA in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  11. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, European Space Agency (ESA); and NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, sign documents officially transferring ownership of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA. The signing was part of a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module (above right) of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. Emceed by Lisa Malone (far left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, European Space Agency (ESA); and NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, sign documents officially transferring ownership of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA. The signing was part of a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module (above right) of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. Emceed by Lisa Malone (far left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  12. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. speaks to the media and guests gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility for a ceremony to highlight the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope) arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone (far left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: NASA's Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. speaks to the media and guests gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility for a ceremony to highlight the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope) arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone (far left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: NASA's Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  13. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. speaks to the media and guests gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility for a ceremony to highlight the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope) arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone (left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: NASA's Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. speaks to the media and guests gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility for a ceremony to highlight the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope) arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone (left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: NASA's Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  14. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA's Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility for a ceremony to highlight the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope) arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone (far left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. (second from left); William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA's Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility for a ceremony to highlight the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope) arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone (far left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. (second from left); William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  15. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan, speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility at a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager ; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; and Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan, speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility at a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager ; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; and Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency.

  16. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan, speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility at a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone (far left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. (second from left); NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; and Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan, speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility at a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone (far left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. (second from left); NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; and Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency.

  17. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station, William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager, points to one of the components as he speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station, William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager, points to one of the components as he speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  18. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan, speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility at a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module (above right) of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone (far left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. (second from left); NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager ; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; and Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan, speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility at a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module (above right) of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone (far left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. (second from left); NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager ; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; and Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency.

  19. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility for a ceremony to highlight the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope) arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility for a ceremony to highlight the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope) arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  20. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, European Space Agency (ESA), speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility at a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by ESA in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, European Space Agency (ESA), speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility at a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by ESA in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  1. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station, Node 2 and the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), ownership of Node 2 was officially transferred between the European Space Agency and NASA. Shaking hands after the signing are Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; and Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, European Space Agency (ESA). At right is NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs. NASA's Node 2, built by ESA in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station, Node 2 and the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), ownership of Node 2 was officially transferred between the European Space Agency and NASA. Shaking hands after the signing are Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; and Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, European Space Agency (ESA). At right is NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs. NASA's Node 2, built by ESA in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  2. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station, Node 2 and the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), ownership of Node 2 was officially transferred between the European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA. Shaking hands after the signing are (left) Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency, and (right) NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik (right), deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs. Also part of the signing is (center) Alan Thirkettle (center), International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, European Space Agency. NASA's Node 2, built by ESA in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. Emceed by Lisa Malone (background, left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station, Node 2 and the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), ownership of Node 2 was officially transferred between the European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA. Shaking hands after the signing are (left) Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency, and (right) NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik (right), deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs. Also part of the signing is (center) Alan Thirkettle (center), International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, European Space Agency. NASA's Node 2, built by ESA in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. Emceed by Lisa Malone (background, left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  3. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Alan Thirkettle (center), International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, European Space Agency (ESA); and NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik (right), deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, sign documents officially transferring ownership of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA. At left, also part of the signing, is Andrea Lorenzoni (left), International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency. NASA's Node 2, built by ESA in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Alan Thirkettle (center), International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, European Space Agency (ESA); and NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik (right), deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, sign documents officially transferring ownership of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA. At left, also part of the signing, is Andrea Lorenzoni (left), International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency. NASA's Node 2, built by ESA in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  4. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, media and guests listen intently to remarks during a ceremony to highlight the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope) arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony included these speakers: KSC Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA's Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, media and guests listen intently to remarks during a ceremony to highlight the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope) arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony included these speakers: KSC Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA's Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  5. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency, speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility at a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone (far left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager ; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency, speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility at a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone (far left), deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager ; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  6. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, European Space Agency (ESA), speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility at a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, European Space Agency (ESA), speaks to guests and the media gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility at a ceremony highlighting the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy, arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope), arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone, deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: Center Director Roy Bridges Jr.; NASA’s Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; and Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  7. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. speaks to the media and guests gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility for a ceremony to highlight the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope) arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone (left) , deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: NASA's Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Center Director Roy Bridges Jr. speaks to the media and guests gathered in the Space Station Processing Facility for a ceremony to highlight the arrival of two major components of the International Space Station. NASA's Node 2, built by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Italy arrived at KSC on June 1. It will be the next pressurized module installed on the Station. The pressurized module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), named "Kibo" (Hope) arrived at KSC on June 4. It is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. The ceremony held today included the official transfer of ownership signing of Node 2 between the ESA and NASA.. Emceed by Lisa Malone (left) , deputy director of External Relations and Business Development at KSC, the ceremony also included these speakers: NASA's Michael C. Kostelnik, deputy associate administrator for International Space Station and Shuttle Programs, and William Gerstenmaier, International Space Station Program manager; Alan Thirkettle, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, ESA; Andrea Lorenzoni, International Space Station Program manager for Node 2, Italian Space Agency; Kuniaki Shiraki, JEM Project manager, National Aerospace and Development Agency of Japan.

  8. Summary report of working group I CO{sub 2} capture, fixation/utilization, and disposal

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    The topics of our working group were divided into four key areas: CO{sub 2} Capture, Utilization/Fixation, Ocean Disposal, and Land Disposal. Fourteen presentations were made as follows: CO{sub 2} Capture: Toshikatsu Hakuta (Japan) and Rod Judkins, Bruce St. John, and Alan Wolsky (US). Utilization/Fixation: Hironori Arakawa, Yasuo Asada, and Takashi lbusuki (Japan) and Ed Lipinsky (US). Ocean Disposal: Yuji Shindo (Japan) and Eric Adams, Gerard Nihous, and Wheeler North (US). Land Disposal: Shoichi Tanaka (Japan) and Roger Bailey (US/Canada). Co-chairs for this working group were Toshikatsu Hakuta (Japan) and Howard Herzog (US). This document contains only a summary outline of research needs in the area of CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration. It should be used in conjunction with other assessments made in this area. For the U.S., a DOE report entitled A Research Needs Assessment for the Capture, Utilization and Disposal of Carbon Dioxide from Fossil Fuel-Fired Power Plants will be forthcoming in 1993.

  9. Evaluation of Carbon Nanotube Thin Films for Optically Transparent Microwave Applications Using On-Wafer Probing of Corbino Disc Test Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Structures by Ryan C. Toonen, Julia B. Doggett, S. Gary Hirsch, Mathew P . Ivill, Eric H. Ngo, Clifford W. Hubbard, Henning Richter, and Ramesh Sivarajan...Corbino Disc Test Structures Ryan C. Toonen, S. Gary Hirsch, Mathew P . Ivill, Eric H. Ngo, and Clifford W. Hubbard Weapons and Materials Research...5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Ryan C. Toonen, Julia B. Doggett,* S. Gary Hirsch, Mathew P . Ivill, Eric H. Ngo, Clifford

  10. Hyperviscosity - newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seizures Strokes Alternative Names Neonatal polycythemia; Hyperviscosity - newborn Images Blood cells References Mathews DC, Glader B. Erythrocyte disorders of infancy. In: Gleason CA, Devaskar SU, ...

  11. 76 FR 58557 - Virginia Disaster Number VA-00038

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ..., Charles City, Chesterfield, Dinwiddie, Henrico, King George, King and Queen, King William, Mathews... Numbers 59002 and 59008) James E. Rivera, Associate Administrator for Disaster Assistance. BILLING CODE...

  12. M&S Support to Assessment of Extended Air Defence C2 Interoperability (Soutien M&S de l’evaluation de l’interoperabilite entre le C2 et la defense aerienne elargie)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-01

    ANBACIS D-1 D.2 HAPPIE/RIOT D-1 D.3 MATHEW/ ADPIC D-1 D.4 NUSSE D-2 D.5 PEGEM D-2 D.6 VLSTRACK D-2 Appendix E – Exercises E-1 E.1 Cannon Cloud...http://www.pml.tno.nl/en/ts/hazard_area_prediction.html D.3 MATHEW/ ADPIC MATHEW/ ADPIC The Mass Consistent Wind Field (MATHEW) is a mass-consistent...wind field model that provides three-dimensional winds to the Atmospheric Diffusion Particle in Cell ( ADPIC ) model. ADPIC provides graphical plots of

  13. Sea Level Rise, Rainfall and Coastal Flooding in Northeastern U.S. Cities Vivien Gornitz, Radley Horton, Philip Orton, Nickitas Georgas, Alan Blumberg, and Cynthia Rosenzweig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gornitz, V.; Horton, R. M.; Orton, P. M.; Georgas, N.; Blumberg, A. F.; Rosenzweig, C.

    2012-12-01

    Populations and infrastructure along much of the northeastern coast of the United States will become increasingly vulnerable to the impacts of rising sea level and storm surges over the coming century. This vulnerability is amplified by regional land subsidence and likely also by shifts in ocean circulation. Building upon recent studies for the New York City Panel on Climate Change (NPCC), New York State ClimAid assessment, and the latest U.S. National Climate Assessment, we report new regional sea level rise projections based on the latest CMIP-5 global climate models (GCMs) and RCP emission scenarios, adjusted for revised glacial ice melt contributions, and other factors such as gravitational effects, land water storage, and changes in the Atlantic Meriodional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). Over the coming two years, GCM-derived sea level outputs for future decades will be utilized in risk assessments for coastal flooding in New York City, Boston, and Philadelphia, as part of the Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast-RISA project. The Stevens Institute Estuarine and Coastal Ocean Model (sECOM) will be used to produce best estimates (including uncertainty ranges) of sea level rise impacts for a wide range of tropical and extra-tropical cyclones for the 2010s, 2050s, and 2080s. Major improvements over prior studies include (a) the use of a detailed, extensively validated ocean model, and (b) inclusion of rainfall and river flow influences on coastal flooding, which affect flood levels in enclosed tidal waterways (e.g., the Hudson and Delaware Rivers), and which are also likely important in coastal confluence zones of impermeable urbanized watersheds. In addition to the sea level rise results, we present initial model validation results for historical storms.

  14. "I Told You I Was Ill" (Spike's Preferred Epitaph): In Honour and in Memory of (Terence Alan) Spike Milligan, 1918-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Rijke, Victoria

    2002-01-01

    Presents a personal tribute in memory of the work of eccentric writer and performer Spike Milligan. Celebrates and examines Spike's absurdist poetry and sketches for children in the context of both British nonsense traditions and the poetry of American writer Ogden Nash and Dr. Seuss. (SG)

  15. A first principles study of structural stability, electronic structure and mechanical properties of beryllium alanate BeAlH{sub 5}

    SciTech Connect

    Santhosh, M.; Rajeswarapalanichamy, R. Priyanga, G. Sudha; Cinthia, A. Jemmy; Kanagaprabha, S.; Iyakutti, K.

    2015-06-24

    Ab initio calculations are performed to investigate the structural stability, electronic structure and mechanical properties of BeAlH{sub 5} for monoclinic crystal structures with two different types of space group namely P2{sub 1} and C{sub 2}/c. Among the considered structures monoclinic (P2{sub 1}) phase is found to be the most stable at ambient condition. The structural phase transition from monoclinic (P2{sub 1}) to monoclinic (C{sub 2}/c) phase is observed in BeAlH{sub 5}. The electronic structure reveals that this compound is insulator. The calculated elastic constants indicate that this material is mechanically stable at ambient condition.

  16. Eric Apel and Alan Hills of the National Center for Atmospheric Research install the Trace Organic Gas Analyzer's sensor probe on the exterior of NASA's DC-8

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-03-07

    Climate researchers from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and several universities install and perform functional checkouts of a variety of sensitive atmospheric instruments on NASA's DC-8 airborne laboratory prior to beginning the ARCTAS mission.

  17. Understanding Film as Process of Change: A Metalanguage for the Study of Film Developed and Applied to Ingmar Bergman's "Persona" and Alan J. Pakula's "The Sterile Cuckoo."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Christian Herbert

    This study develops and applies a way of talking about that transformation or change occurring in the mind of a film viewer as he views a film. This articulation is expressed in a metalanguage constructed along parameters of a game situation. The terminology employed in the articulation is derived from contemporary French structuralism and…

  18. A resolution relative to the death of the Honorable Alan John Dixon, former United States Senator for the State of Illinois.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Durbin, Richard J. [D-IL

    2014-07-07

    Senate - 07/07/2014 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. A resolution relative to the death of the Honorable Alan John Dixon, former United States Senator for the State of Illinois.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Durbin, Richard [D-IL

    2014-07-07

    07/07/2014 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  20. Statement Testimony of Mr. Alan Shaffer, Principal Deputy, Defense Research and Engineering, Before the Subcommittee on Readiness of the House Armed Services Committee

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-03

    paradigm shift from stove -piped power generation to integrated power management. The architecture could provide a modular power grid and intelligent...May to Aug 2008, using a dual bio- reactor and gasifier . These prototype systems validated the concept, but there are a number of challenges for

  1. Synthesis, structure, and stability of adducts between phosphide and amide anions and the Lewis acids borane, tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane, and tris(pentafluorophenyl)alane.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Anna-Marie; Mountford, Andrew J; Scott, Matthew L; Coles, Simon J; Horton, Peter N; Hughes, David L; Hursthouse, Michael B; Lancaster, Simon J

    2009-12-07

    The phosphinoborane adduct H(3)P x B(C(6)F(5))(3) can be deprotonated using LiN(SiMe(3))(2) to give the phosphidoborate salt Li[H(2)PB(C(6)F(5))(3)], which was converted to the phosphidodiborates Li[H(2)P{B(C(6)F(5))(3)}(2)] and Li[H(2)P{B(C(6)F(5))(3)}{BH(3)}] by treatment with an equivalent of B(C(6)F(5))(3) or Me(2)S.BH(3), respectively. A series of anions of the form [RR'P{M(C(6)F(5))(3)}{BH(3)}](-), where R = R' = Ph or R= (t)Bu, R' = H, and M = B or Al, were prepared (through treatment of salts Li[RR'P(BH(3))] with the corresponding Lewis acid) and characterized using multinuclear NMR, elemental analysis and X-ray crystallography. The solid state structures of [Li(Et(2)O)(x)][Ph(2)P{M(C(6)F(5))(3)}{BH(3)}] exhibit eta(2)-bonding of the BH(3) group to the cationic lithium center. The attempted preparation of an analogous series with amide cores of the form [R(2)N{B(C(6)F(5))(3)}{BH(3)}](-) proved unsuccessful; among the competing reaction pathways hydride abstraction occurred preferentially to yield Li[HB(C(6)F(5))(3)] and dimers or higher oligomers with the composition (R(2)NBH(2))(n).

  2. Proton-transfer and H2-elimination reactions of trimethylamine alane: role of dihydrogen bonding and Lewis acid-base interactions.

    PubMed

    Filippov, Oleg A; Tsupreva, Victoria N; Golubinskaya, Lyudmila M; Krylova, Antonina I; Bregadze, Vladimir I; Lledos, Agusti; Epstein, Lina M; Shubina, Elena S

    2009-04-20

    Proton-transfer and H(2)-elimination reactions of aluminum hydride AlH(3)(NMe(3)) (TMAA) with XH acids were studied by means of IR and NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations. The dihydrogen-bonded (DHB) intermediates in the interaction of the TMAA with XH acids (CH(3)OH, (i)PrOH, CF(3)CH(2)OH, adamantyl acetylene, indole, 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluoroaniline, and 2,3,5,6-tetrachloroaniline) were examined experimentally at low temperatures, and the spectroscopic characteristics, dihydrogen bond strength and structures, and the electronic and energetic characteristics of these complexes were determined by combining experimental and theoretical approaches. The possibility of two different types of DHB complexes with polydentate proton donors (typical monodentate and bidentate coordination with the formation of a symmetrical chelate structure) was shown by DFT calculations and was experimentally proven in solution. The DHB complexes are intermediates of proton-transfer and H(2)-elimination reactions. The extent of this reaction is very dependent on the acid strength and temperature. With temperature increases the elimination of H(2) was observed for OH and NH acids, yielding the reaction products with Al-O and Al-N bonds. The reaction mechanism was computationally studied. Besides the DHB pathway for proton transfer, another pathway starting from a Lewis complex was discovered. Preference for one of the pathways is related to the acid strength and the nucleophilicity of the proton donor. As a consequence of the dual Lewis acid-base nature of neutral aluminum hydride, participation of a second ROH molecule acting as a bifunctional catalyst forming a six-member cycle connecting aluminum and hydride sites notably reduces the reaction barrier. This mechanism could operate for proton transfer from weak OH acids to TMAA in the presence of an excess of proton donor.

  3. A structural study of bis-(trimethylamine)alane, AlH 3·2NMe 3, by variable temperature X-ray crystallography and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, Terry D.; Sirsch, Peter; Decken, Andreas; Sean McGrady, G.

    2009-04-01

    The structure of AlH 3·2NMe 3 has been investigated by single-crystal X-ray diffraction over the range of 296-173 K. Over this temperature range a phase change is observed from Cmca to Pbcm where the methyl groups convert from a statistically disordered conformation to adopt a mutually eclipsed conformation at lower temperatures. Measurement of the unit cell dimensions shows a decrease in the lengths of the a and b axes, and an increase in that of the c axis as the temperature is lowered, with inflections apparent between 223 and 233 K in the region of the phase change. Low-temperature DSC measurements reveal the change from Pbcm to Cmca to occur at 218.3 K, with an enthalpy of 107.7 J mol -1. The molecular structure of AlH 3·2NMe 3 is compared with those of related amine adducts of Group 13 hydrides, either measured experimentally or calculated using DFT methods. 1H, 13C and 27Al NMR spectroscopy has also been utilized to characterize AlH 3·2NMe 3 and its 1:1 counterpart AlH 3·NMe 3.

  4. 75 FR 18413 - 2009-2010 Refuge-Specific Hunting and Sport Fishing Regulations-Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    ...(s); Properly manage the fish and wildlife resource(s); Protect other refuge values; Ensure refuge... provide enhanced weekend hunting opportunities. Response 4: Mathews Brake has long had the reputation of... system, and helps limit disturbance to the wildlife resource values of Mathews Brake. We do allow up...

  5. High Resolution Transferred Substrate HBT Microwave/RF ADCs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-21

    obtained. Staff supported S. Jaganathan (Ph.D. 2000) Sundararajan Krishnan (Ph.D. 2002) Thomas Mathew (Ph.D. 2001) C. Serhan (M.S. 2000) 17...Conference on Indium Paper Smith, S. Jaganathan, T. Mathew, P. Phosphide and Related (Invited) Krishnan, C. Serhan , and S. Long, Materials, Davos

  6. Prognostic Modeling of Valve Degradation within Power Stations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-02

    run to failure (Heng, Tan, Mathew, Montgomery, Banjevic, & Jardine , 2009). Within power generation, implementation of prognostic methods would...Tan, A. C. C., Mathew, J., Montgomery, N, Banjevic, D. & Jardine , A. K. S., (2009), Intelligent Condition-Based Prediction of Machinery

  7. An Evacuation Emergency Response Model Coupling Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability Output.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-10

    concentration contours coupled with the SMI evacuation model were calculated by using the MATHEW and ADPIC codes. The evacuation emergency response...2 M ATH EW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 2 ADPIC ...CDC 7600 computer within a matter of minutes MATHEW and ADPIC codes. These two models after the computer center is notified, are described briefly

  8. Touch-Based Interaction Approach for Network Science Research and Visualization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory (ARL) Visualization Framework presents a language -agnostic, platform-independent approach to connecting data published by probes to... Visualization by John P Hancock, Mathew Aguirre, and Andrew Toth Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited...Laboratory Touch-Based Interaction Approach for Network Science Research and Visualization by John P Hancock and Mathew Aguirre ArtisTech, Inc

  9. Thermodynamic properties of molecular borane phosphines, alane amines, and phosphine alanes and the [BH(4)(-)][PH(4)(+)], [AlH(4)(-)][NH(4)(+)], and [AlH(4)(-)][PH(4)(+)] salts for chemical hydrogen storage systems from ab initio electronic structure theory.

    PubMed

    Grant, Daniel J; Dixon, David A

    2005-11-10

    The heats of formation for the molecules BH(3)PH(3), BH(2)PH(2), HBPH, AlH(3)NH(3), AlH(2)NH(2), HAlNH, AlH(3)PH(3), AlH(2)PH(2), HAlPH, AlH(4)(-), PH(3), PH(4), and PH(4)(+), as well as the diatomics BP, AlN, and AlP, have been calculated by using ab initio molecular orbital theory. The coupled cluster with single and double excitations and perturbative triples method (CCSD(T)) was employed for the total valence electronic energies. Correlation consistent basis sets were used, up through the augmented quadruple-zeta, to extrapolate to the complete basis set limit. Additional d core functions were used for Al and P. Core/valence, scalar relativistic, and spin-orbit corrections were included in an additive fashion to predict the atomization energies. Geometries were calculated at the CCSD(T) level up through at least aug-cc-pVTZ and frequencies were calculated at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ level. The heats of formation of the salts [BH(4)(-)][PH(4)(+)](s), [AlH(4)(-)][NH(4)(+)](s), and [AlH(4)(-)][PH(4)(+)](s) have been estimated by using an empirical expression for the lattice energy and the calculated heats of formation of the two component ions. The calculations show that both AlH(3)NH(3)(g) and [AlH(4)(-)][NH(4)(+)](s) can serve as good hydrogen storage systems that release H(2) in a slightly exothermic process. In addition, AlH(3)PH(3) and the salts [AlH(4)(-)][PH(4)(+)] and [BH(4)(-)][PH(4)(+)] have the potential to serve as H(2) storage systems. The hydride affinity of AlH(3) is calculated to be -70.4 kcal/mol at 298 K. The proton affinity of PH(3) is calculated to be 187.8 kcal/mol at 298 K in excellent agreement with the experimental value of 188 kcal/mol. PH(4) is calculated to be barely stable with respect to loss of a hydrogen to form PH(3).

  10. Development of the TFX F-111 in the Department of Defense’s Search for Multi-Mission, Joint-Service Aerial Platforms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-10

    University of Illinois Press, 1997), 34. 5Gerard J. DeGroot , The Bomb: A Life (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2005), 254. 6Robert J...Acquisition Reform. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1977. DeGroot , Gerard J. The Bomb: A Life. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2005

  11. Fecal Transplant Shows Early Promise Against Autism

    MedlinePlus

    ... biomics at Arizona State's Swette Center for Environmental Biotechnology. These include vitamins like folic acid and biotin, ... and applied bionics, ASU's Swette Center for Environmental Biotechnology; Mathew Pletcher, Ph.D., vice president and head, ...

  12. 77 FR 73510 - Virginia Disaster #VA-00052

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... State of Virginia (FEMA- 4092-DR), dated 11/26/2012. Incident: Hurricane Sandy Incident Period: 10/26...; Highland; King And Queen; Lancaster; Loudoun; Madison; Manassas City; Mathews; Middlesex;...

  13. 76 FR 58290 - Virginia; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ... notice of a major disaster declaration for the Commonwealth of Virginia (FEMA-4024-DR), dated September 3..., Chesterfield, Dinwiddie, Henrico, King George, King and Queen, King William, Mathews, Northumberland,...

  14. A resolution calling for the immediate and unconditional release of United States citizen Alan Phillip Gross from detention in Cuba and urging the Government of Cuba to address his medical issues.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Moran, Jerry [R-KS

    2012-12-05

    12/05/2012 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Voice Vote. (consideration: CR S7637-7638; text as passed Senate: CR S7637-7638; text of measure as introduced: CR S7459) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  15. Statement Testimony of Mr. Alan R. Shaffer, Principal Deputy, Defense Research and Engineering Before the United States House of Representatives Committee on Armed Services, Subcommittee on Terrorism, Unconventional Threats and Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-20

    position, navigational timing data. The High Integrity GPS ( iGPS ) program is developing and demonstrating technologies that enable orders of magnitude...have successfully demonstrated a two orders of magnitude increase in GPS AJ with decimeter position precision. Oversight of the iGPS program is led

  16. A resolution calling for the immediate and unconditional release of United States citizen Alan Phillip Gross from detention in Cuba and urging the Government of Cuba to address his medical issues.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Moran, Jerry [R-KS

    2012-12-05

    12/05/2012 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Voice Vote. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  17. COMMENTS CONTRIBUTED BY ALAN HUBER TO AWMA AB-3 COMMITTEE FOR POSSIBLE INCLUSION IN THE COMMITTEE'S PRESENTATION AT EPA'S 8TH CONFERENCE ON AIR QUALITY MODELING - A&WMA AB-3 COMMENTS ON NONSTANDARD MODELING APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Technical comments are provided to the Air and waste Management Associations AB-3 committee for potential inclusion into the committee's comments to be made at EPA's 8th Conference on Air Quality Modeling. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations can model specific cases wh...

  18. COMMENTS CONTRIBUTED BY ALAN HUBER TO AWMA AB-3 COMMITTEE FOR POSSIBLE INCLUSION IN THE COMMITTEE'S PRESENTATION AT EPA'S 8TH CONFERENCE ON AIR QUALITY MODELING - A&WMA AB-3 COMMENTS ON NONSTANDARD MODELING APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Technical comments are provided to the Air and waste Management Associations AB-3 committee for potential inclusion into the committee's comments to be made at EPA's 8th Conference on Air Quality Modeling. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations can model specific cases wh...

  19. Emergencies in children's and young people's nursing Emergencies in children's and young people's nursing Edward Alan Glasper , Gillian McEwing and Jim Richardson (Eds) Oxford University Press £21.95 456pp 9780199547197 019954719X [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2011-09-01

    THIS IS an excellent book for anyone dealing with children and young adults in an emergency care environment. its subjects range from the principles of care and the management of critical events, to more common injuries and illnesses.

  20. Statement Testimony of Mr. Alan Shaffer, Principal Deputy, Defense Research and Engineering, Before the United States House of Representatives Committee on Armed Services, Subcommittee on Terrorism, Unconventional Threats and Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-13

    neuroscience , biotechnology, immersive technology, quantum information science, nanotechnology, and autonomous systems. The Army has also increased...already occurred within the intelligence community. These include (but were not limited to) a 10 Gigabit/second encryption to NSA , delivering a

  1. A resolution calling for the immediate and unconditional release of United States citizen Alan Phillip Gross from detention in Cuba and urging the Government of Cuba to address his medical issues.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Moran, Jerry [R-KS

    2012-12-05

    Senate - 12/05/2012 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Voice Vote. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  2. Foundation Studies for Nursing: Using enquiry based learning Sue Grandis Foundation studies for nursing: Using enquiry based learning , Garth Long , Palgrave Alan Glasper and Pam Jackson 482 £19.99 0333777387 0333777387 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2003-10-01

    Although problem-based learning (PBL) or enquiry-based learning (EBL) has been used in medical education in the UK, its use as a teaching approach in nurse education is embryonic. Few nursing curricula employ a purely EBL/PBL approach - although many courses are beginning to include it as a teaching method.

  3. Insertion of benzonitrile into Al-N and ga-N bonds: formation of fused carbatriaza-gallanes/alanes and their subsequent synthesis from amidines and trimethyl-gallium/aluminum.

    PubMed

    Maheswari, K; Rao, A Ramakrishna; Reddy, N Dastagiri

    2015-02-16

    Insertion of aromatic nitriles into Al-N and Ga-N bonds are reported. Sterically less hindered aluminum amide [PhNHAlMe2]2 (1) undergoes C≡N insertion with benzonitrile to give an isomeric mixture of tetracyclic triazaalanes {[PhNC(Ph)N]3[PhNC(Ph)NH]Al[AlMe][AlMe2]2} (2 and 3). A similar reaction with analogous gallium amide affords a tetracyclic triazagallane {[PhNC(Ph)N]3[PhNC(Ph)NH]Ga[GaMe][GaMe2]2} (6) along with a novel bowl shaped carbon containing Ga-N cluster {[PhNC(Ph)N][PhN][GaMe]2}3 (5). On the other hand, when sterically bulky gallium amide (Dipp on N, Dipp = 2,6-diisopropylphenyl) is employed, a tetrameric gallium amidinate {[(Dipp)NC(Ph)N]GaMe}4 (8) is obtained. Tetracyclic triazagallazane 6 is also synthesized from the condensation reaction of N-phenylbenzamidine with GaMe3·OEt2. Unlike AlMe3, this reaction produces only one isomer. In case of amidines with bulkier substituents on N such as Dipp, formation of a bicyclic triazagallane {[(Dipp)NC(Ph)NH]2[(Dipp)NC(Ph)N][GaMe]2} (14) is also observed along with tetrameric gallium amidinate 8, whereas N-tert-butylbenzamidine affords exclusively a tetrameric gallium amidinate {[(tert-Bu)NC(Ph)N]GaMe}4 (15) similar to its Al analogue. However, treating N-(Dipp)acetamidine with GaMe3·OEt2 gives only a bicyclic triazagallane {[(Dipp)NC(Me)NH]2[(Dipp)NC(Me)N][GaMe]2} (16). An intermediate [(tert-Bu)N(H) C(Ph)NGaMe2]2 (17), which is involved in the formation of tetrameric gallium amidinate 15, is also characterized. A comparison of the structural parameters of Ga-N-C and Al-N-C frameworks synthesized in this study is reported.

  4. A Fully Integrated Materials Framework for Enabling the Wireless Detection of Micro-defects in Aging and Battle-worn Structures (Year 1)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    by Ryan C. Toonen , Richard X. Fu, Mathew P. Ivill, S. Gary Hirsch, Melanie W. Cole, and Tsvetanka S. Zheleva ARL-MR-0775 April 2011...Materials Framework for Enabling the Wireless Detection of Micro-defects in Aging and Battle-worn Structures (Year 1) Ryan C. Toonen , Richard...NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Ryan C. Toonen , Richard X. Fu, Mathew P. Ivill, S. Gary Hirsch, Melanie W. Cole

  5. An Evaluation of Diagnostic Atmospheric Dispersion Models for ’Cold Spill’ Applications at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-30

    tandem with ADPIC , RIMPUFF, or CALPUIF diffusion may provide the most robust diagnostic modeling suite. A cost/benefit analysis of computer hardware and...LINCOM/RIMPUFF 43 H. GENERAL DENSE GAS DISCUSSION 51 I. HEAVYPUFF 52 J. MATHEW/ ADPIC TICQUALYf 54 V. SUMMARY COMMENTS Accesion For 65 VI. REFERENCES...serious contenders: NUATMOS/CITPUFF, CALMET/CALPUFF, PGEMS, WOCSS/MACHWIND/Adaptive plume, LINCOM/ RIMPUFF/HEAVYPUFF, MATHEW/ ADPIC . The following

  6. Against the Odds in Composition and Rhetoric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Wendy

    2001-01-01

    Draws on the poetry of Gerard Manley Hopkins to explore and celebrate a life in composition. Outlines possibilities for individual renewal, particularly through the process of mentoring new members. (SG)

  7. Montreal: A Breeding Ground for Cynical Heroes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karch, Mariel O'Neil; Karch, Pierre

    1977-01-01

    Cynicism stemming from the unequal social and economic positions of the French and English inhabitants of Montreal is expressed strongly in the literature of Gabrielle Roy, Gerard Bessette, Paul Chamberland, and others. (CHK)

  8. USSR Report, USA: Economics, Politics, Ideology, No. 11, November 1983

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-31

    through international cooperation. For the past 30 years the publisher of SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN has been Gerard Piel , a talented popularizer of...science, under whose guidance the journal acquired its present appearance and won widespread international acclaim. Gerard Piel is a member of the...Living Organisms," No 3, pp 50-58); the study of oncogenes—genes causing cancer , which were first found in viruses but which apparently exist in normal

  9. Metamaterial and Metastructural Architectures for Novel C4ISR Devices and Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    OEIC for chip-scale integrated photonics, RF-photonics, and systems for communication, radar, computation and sensor applications . 19 2.8...and Sensors by Weimin Zhou, Gerard Dang, Monica Taysing-Lara, Daniel Shreiber, Melanie Cole, Eric Ngo, Matt Ivill, Grace Metcalfe, Nathaniel...Architectures for Novel C4ISR Devices and Sensors by Weimin Zhou, Gerard Dang, Monica Taysing-Lara, Grace Metcalfe, Nathaniel Woodward, and Amir

  10. Boards Versus Bureaucracies: Field Grade Officer Education in the United States Army, 1946-1985

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-24

    Department Memorandum for the Commandant, Command and General Staff College 27 May 1945. 21Henry Gerard Phillips, The Making of a Professional: Manton S ...Professional: Manton S . Eddy, USA (Westport, Conn.: Praeger, 2000), 197. 24Henry Gerard Phillips, The Making of a Professional: Manton S . Eddy, USA...eight months to conduct a review and this time should not start until the members of the board are identified and assembled. 130Harrison board, M -1

  11. Haiti: Developments and U.S. Policy Since 1991 and Current Congressional Concerns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    Bertrand Aristide first assumed office in February 1991, following elections that were widely heralded as the first free and fair elections in Haiti’s...has been established with Gerard LaTortue as Prime Minister. Some Members have called for investigations into Aristide’s claim that he is still the...and U.S. Policy Since 19911 Most Recent Developments As security and stability continue to elude Haiti, Prime Minister Gerard Latortue asked

  12. Haiti: Developments and U.S. Policy Since 1991 and Current Congressional Concerns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-19

    Bertrand Aristide first assumed office in February 1991, following elections that were widely heralded as the first free and fair elections in Haiti’s...was established with Gerard LaTortue as Prime Minister. Some Members have called for investigations into Aristide’s claim that he is still the...Minister Gerard Latortue asked Washington to send U.S. troops back to Haiti, saying U.N. peacekeepers are failing to establish security. The Defense

  13. Elongation of the Core in an Assignment Game

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    Routing Problem," Theory of Graphs, P. Rosenstiehl Editor, New York, Dunod, Paris, Gordon, and Breach, pp. 77-84. Debreu , Gerard [1983], Mathematical...Economics: Twenty Papers of Gerard Debreu , New York: Cambridge University Press. Demange, Gabrielle and David Gale [1985], "The Strategy Structure of...a.ta;.*. ~ -53- FOOTNOTES / See for instance, Debreu , Chapters 11 and 14. 2/ Operations researchers will recognize the core as the set of dual

  14. Medical Robotic and Telesurgical Simulation and Education Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Deutsch • Gerard Doherty • Brian Dunkin • Susan Dunlow • Gary Dunnington • Ricardo Estape • Peter Fabri • Vicenzo Ficarra • Marvin Fried • Gerald...Prokar Dasgupta • Ellen Deutsch • Gerard Doherty • Brian Dunkin • Susan Dunlow • Gary Dunnington • Ricardo Estape • Peter Fabri • Vicenzo Ficarra...further frontiers for more effective management or even a potential cure for several diseases . However, with the exponential growth of technology in

  15. Military Deception

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-13

    something else . . .” The Emperor Maurice The Strategikon, c. 600 AD a. Focus. MILDEC must target the adversary decision maker capable of taking the...make good use of the opportunities he finds, and in this way he will overpower the enemy.” The Emperor Maurice The Strategikon, c. 600 AD 1. Roles and...Soldiers by Phillip Gerard (Dutton/Plume, 2002). y. Secret Soldiers: The Story of World War II’s Heroic Army of Deception by Philip Gerard ( Penguin

  16. Psychological Dimensions of Cross-Cultural Differences

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2013-0214 Psychological Dimensions of Cross- Cultural Differences Saucier, Gerard University of Oregon May...Psychological Dimensions of Cross- Cultural Differences Grant Research Final Performance Report – February 2013 prepared by Gerard Saucier, Principal...Psychological Dimensions of Cross- Cultural Differences Contract/Grant Number: FA9550-09-1-0398 Reporting period: June 1, 2009 to November 30, 2012

  17. 16th International Command and Control Research Technology Symposium (ICCRTS) June 2011 Overseas Visit Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    support OASD (NII)-DoD CIO & Mr Garard Christman Program Manager and Senior Systems Engineer Femme Comp Inc (FCI) .... 3 4. TOPICS OF THE PARALLEL...Program Manager and Senior Systems Engineer Femme Comp Inc (FCI) This presentation focused on situational awareness for decision support...Electronics mervyncheah@stee.stengg.com 36 Christman Gerard Femme Comp gerard.christman.ctr@osd.mil 38 Clemente Mark Boeing mark.n.clemente

  18. Highlights of Astronomy, Vol. 15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, Ian

    2010-11-01

    Preface; Part I. Gruber Cosmology Prize Lecture; Part II. Invited Discourses; Part III. Joint Discussions: 1. Dark matter in early-type galaxies Léon V. E. Koopmans and Tommaso Treu; 2. Diffuse light in galaxy clusters Magda Arnaboldi and Ortwin Gerhard; 3. Neutron stars - timing in extreme environments Tomaso Belloni, Mariano Méndez and Chengmin Zhang; 4. Progress in understanding the physics of Ap and related stars Margarida Cunha; 5. Modelling the Milky Way in the age of Gaia Annie C. Robin; 6. Time and astronomy Pascale Defraigne; 7. Astrophysical outflows and associated accretion phenomena Elisabete M. de Gouveia Dal Pino and Alex C. Raga; 8. Hot interstellar matter in elliptical galaxies Dong-Woo Kim and Silvia Pellegrini; 9. Are the fundamental constants varying with time? Paolo Molaro and Elisabeth Vangioni; 10. 3D views on cool stellar atmospheres - theory meets observation K. N. Nagendra, P. Bonifacio and H. G. Ludwig; 11. New advances in helio- and astero-seismology; 12. The first galaxies - theoretical predictions and observational clues; 13. Eta Carinae in the context of the most massive stars Theodore R. Gull and Augusto Damineli; 14. The ISM of galaxies in the far-infrared and sub-millimetre; 15. Magnetic fields in diffuse media Elisabete M. de Gouveia Dal Pino and Alex Lazarian; 16. IHY global campaign - whole heliosphere interval; Part IV. Special Sessions: SpS 1. IR and sub-mm spectroscopy - a new tool for studying stellar evolution Glenn Wahlgren, Hans Käufl and Florian Kerber; SpS 2. The international year of astronomy Pedro Russo, Catherine Cesarsky and Lars Lindberg Christensen; SpS 3. Astronomy in Antarctica in 2009 Michael G. Burton; SpS 4. Astronomy education between past and future J. P. De Greve; SpS 5. Accelerating the rate of astronomical discovery Ray P. Norris; SpS 6. Planetary systems as potential sites for life Régis Courtin, Alan Boss and Michel Mayor; SpS 7. Young stars, brown dwarfs, and protoplanetary disks Jane Gregorio

  19. 75 FR 54114 - Procurement List Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ... perform the Janitorial and Grounds Service at the Alan Bible Federal Building and Lloyd George U.S... Service, Alan Bible Federal Building, 600 Las Vegas Blvd South, Las Vegas, NV. Lloyd George...

  20. 78 FR 31627 - Thirteenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 222, Inmarsat AMS(R)S.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... Conference. Participants who will be traveling to the meeting should contact Alan Schuster-Bruce, alan... open to the interested public but limited to space availability. With the approval of the...

  1. Investigating the Department of Defense’s Implementation of Passive Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    75 D. BOTTOM LINE.............................................................................................76 APPENDIX A: MR. ALAN ...would like to thank all of our subject-matter experts/interviewees ( Alan Estevez, Kathleen Smith, Lieutenant Colonel Monte Murphy, Robert Pickett...Mr. Alan Estevez’s calendar. Emeterio V. Hernandez and Christopher A. Thomas A very special thanks goes to my partner in this research

  2. Inside Outdoor Education: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffan, James

    This case study examines the teaching practices of Alan Woods, (pseudonym) who teaches elementary students in an outdoor education program. It describes a typical teaching day, including Alan's comments about his work and important aspects of being an outdoor educator. Alan stated that he used recitation questioning (asking students to recite…

  3. Discrete Elements Method of Neutral Particle Transport

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    0 ,,S" . K A t - "’.* DISCRETE ELEMENTS METHOD NEUTRAL PARTICLE TRANSPORT ..- DISSERTATION AF. IT/DS/PH/83-5 Kirk A. Mathews LCDR USN D~ Approved for...DISCRETE ELEMENTS METHOD OF NEUTRAL PARTICLE TRANSPORT DISSERTATION Presented to the Faculty of the School of Engineering of the Air Force Institute...o .°. .• . r •.- - DS/PH/83-5 DISCRETE ELEMENTS METHOD OF NEUTRAL PARTICLE TRANSPORT 4 "by Kirk A. Mathews LCDR USN Approved: , Charles J

  4. Implementation of a siting methodology for utility size WECS in western Massachusetts and northwestern Connecticut

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchhoff, R.H.; Kaminsky, F.C.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes a long term research project by Northeast Utilities and the University of Massachusetts to identify candidate sites for utility size wind energy systems in Western Massachusetts and Northwestern Connecticut. A generalized methodology is described for identifying the candidate sites. This methodology includes the use of biological wind prospecting, data collection with TALA kites, computerized wind mapping with MATHEW, and the installation of long run data collection stations. This paper also describes the use of a mass consistent flow model known as MATHEW in developing computerized wind maps for selected regions of the area under study.

  5. West German Rearmament: From Enemy to Ally in Ten Short Years

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    18Naef, Poliics pp. 13 - 14. 19Elizabeth Noelle and Erich Peter Neumann . eds., The Germans: Public Opinion Polls 1947 - 1%6. trans. Gerard Finan...Arbor. MI: University Microfilms International, 1979), p. 91. 17Merritt, HICOG S p. 20. 74 18Ibid. 19Elizabeth Noelle and Erich Peter Neumann , eds., The... Noelle and Erich Peter Neumann , eds., The Germans: Public Ooinion PolLs 1947 - 1I6 trans. Gerard Finan (Allenbach: Ver1agfuirIemostopie. 1%7), p. 443

  6. Human Pregnancy-Specific Glycoproteins Function as Immunomodulators In Vitro by Inducing Secretion of IL-10 and IL-6 in Human Monocytes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-02-29

    ofIL-la1p. Due to the inhibition ofTNF-a synthesis, IL-IO reduces endotoxin- mediated lethality in mice ( Gerard et. aL, 1993). In addition IL-IO...128. Eskdale J, Gallagher G, Verweij CL, Keijsers V, Westendorp RGJ and TW Huizinga . 1998. InterIeukin 10 secretion is relation to human IL-IO locus...biosynthesis through the raslraf-l /meklmapk pathway. Mol Med I: 93-103. Gerard C, Bruyns C, Marchant A, Abramowicz 0, Vandenabeele P, Delvaux A, Fiers

  7. ALUMINUM HYDRIDE: A REVERSIBLE STORAGE MATERIAL FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Zidan, R; Christopher Fewox, C; Brenda Garcia-Diaz, B; Joshua Gray, J

    2009-01-09

    One of the challenges of implementing the hydrogen economy is finding a suitable solid H{sub 2} storage material. Aluminium (alane, AlH{sub 3}) hydride has been examined as a potential hydrogen storage material because of its high weight capacity, low discharge temperature, and volumetric density. Recycling the dehydride material has however precluded AlH{sub 3} from being implemented due to the large pressures required (>10{sup 5} bar H{sub 2} at 25 C) and the thermodynamic expense of chemical synthesis. A reversible cycle to form alane electrochemically using NaAlH{sub 4} in THF been successfully demonstrated. Alane is isolated as the triethylamine (TEA) adduct and converted to unsolvated alane by heating under vacuum. To complete the cycle, the starting alanate can be regenerated by direct hydrogenation of the dehydrided alane and the alkali hydride (NaH) This novel reversible cycle opens the door for alane to fuel the hydrogen economy.

  8. Electrical conductivity of aluminum hydride AlH3 at high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakhray, Denis; Molodets, Alexander; Fortov, Vladimir; Khrapak, Aleksei

    2009-06-01

    A study of electrophysical and thermodynamic properties of alane AlH3 under multi shock compression has been carried out. The increase in specific electroconductivity of alane at shock compression up to pressure 100 GPa have been measured. High pressures and temperatures were obtained with explosive device, which accelerates the stainless impactor up to 3 km/sec. The impact shock is split into a shock wave reverberating in alane between two stiff metal anvils. The conductivity of shocked alane increases in the range up to 60-75 GPa and is about 30 1/Ohm*cm. In this region the semiconductor regime is true for shocked alane. The conductivity of alane achieves approximately 500 1/Ohm*cm at 80-90 GPa. In this region conductivity is interpreted in frames of the conception of the ``dielectric catastrophe'', taking into consideration significant difference between electronic states of isolated AlH3 molecule and condensed alane.

  9. EDITORIAL: Materially speaking!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornwall, Malcolm G.

    1997-05-01

    areas of physics-based science and technology. Can materials science be made intellectually more exciting and mind-stretching for our students? In this special issue we present several articles by researchers in less-than-familiar but important areas of materials science and technology. Following a review by Mathew Philip of some of the basic atomic theory which underlies materials science, Jose Silva looks at how artificial diamonds can be made and at how we can apply this exotic material (other than on fingers and around necks). Alan Piercy reviews the field of giant magnetostrictive materials, which, when magnetized, change dimensions hundreds or even thousands of times more than traditional ferromagnetics. David Pettifor provides a nicely interdisciplinary overview of how computer simulations, from the subatomic to the macroscopic level, can be used to help in the design of new materials for such things as turbine blades. Adrian Rennie offers a much-requested written version of the entertaining 1995/6 IOP Schools Lecture on the physics of polymers. (We had hoped to include an article by Professor Colin Gough of Birmingham University on High Temperatue Superconductors, but for technical reasons this has had to be postponed until a future issue.) Finally, there are two articles describing an initiative which will have a direct practical impact on the teaching and learning of `Materials' in the UK. Karen Davies describes the exciting new Materials Gallery due to be opened at the Science Museum as this issue goes to press in May 1997 (no coincidence!), and David Sang provides details of how the new gallery has been linked directly with the GNVQ curriculum, and can certainly be exploited more widely in our physics and technology teaching. Perhaps this can help provide the missing 'zing' that materials science at present seems to lack.

  10. Higher Education Exchange, 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This volume begins with an essay by Noelle McAfee, a contributor who is familiar to readers of Higher Education Exchange (HEX). She reiterates Kettering's president David Mathews' argument regarding the disconnect between higher education's sense of engagement and the public's sense of engagement, and suggests a way around the epistemological…

  11. Higher Education Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This volume begins with an essay by Noelle McAfee, a contributor who is familiar to readers of Higher Education Exchange (HEX). She reiterates Mathews' argument regarding the disconnect between higher education's sense of engagement and the public's sense of engagement, and suggests a way around the epistemological conundrum of "knowledge…

  12. Long-Term Changes in Beach Fauna at Duck, North Carolina.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    changes in the wave climate. On the sound beach, salinity is the main factor controlling the % biological community and, in order to understand the...P.O. Box 624 G31S31 Mathews, VA 23109 II. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE Department of the Army November 1982 Coastal Engineering...12 S. Sampling Device ...... ... ........................ ... 12 6. Biological Sample Processing and Analysis

  13. 10. INTERIOR OF OUTLET TOWER LOOKING DOWN TO TIER #1 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. INTERIOR OF OUTLET TOWER LOOKING DOWN TO TIER #1 OF SLIDE GATES. STRUCTURE HAS LEVELS ENABLING OPERATORS TO CHOOSE LEVEL WITH BEST QUALITY WATER. OVERHANGING DEVICE THAT LOOKS LIKE A LIGHT STANDARD IS ACTUALLY A METER FOR MEASURING WATER LEVELS. - Lake Mathews, East of Route 15, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  14. Orientation of International Medical Graduates to Canadian Medical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenerson, Heather J.; Davis, Penny M.; Labash, Andrea M.; Procyshyn, Mavis M.

    2009-01-01

    The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Saskatchewan tracked a cohort of 39 international medical graduates (IMGs) in rural Saskatchewan and discovered that 51% left the province within five years (personal communication). A study by Basky, Mathew, Edwards, and Rourke (2007) found that half a cohort of IMGs in rural Newfoundland and Labrador…

  15. Departments of Labor and Health, Education, and Welfare Appropriations for 1977. Hearings Before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations. House of Representatives, Ninety-Fourth Congress, Second Session. Part 2: Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Testimony of the Secretary, Special Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Appropriations.

    This publication is a comprehensive record of testimony and exhibits presented by representatives of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (DHEW) to a subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations of the U.S. House of Representatives during hearings on 1977 DHEW budget requests. Testifying for DHEW were F. David Mathews, Secretary of…

  16. Thinking and Meddling with Boundaries: Critical Reflections on Matthew Weinstein's Narrative of Street Medics, Red-Zones and Glop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsop, Steve

    2015-01-01

    In pursuit of more mindful notions of hybridity, this review essay provides a series of reflections on Mathew Weinstein's representations of Street Medics and "sciences for the red zones of neoliberalism". My analysis draws on three popular ways of thinking with boundaries to offer a critical reading of the boundary-work that the…

  17. Kinetic Analysis of Amylase Using Quantitative Benedict's and Iodine Starch Reagents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Beverly; Lunday, Deborah; Miskevich, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of carbohydrates is a fundamental analytical tool used in many aspects of biology and chemistry. We have adapted a technique developed by Mathews et al. using an inexpensive scanner and open-source image analysis software to quantify amylase activity using both the breakdown of starch and the appearance of glucose. Breakdown…

  18. Failure to Launch: Confronting the Male College Student Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Lane A.; Van Wert, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    A few years ago, Mathew McConaughey and Sarah Jessica Parker generated big laughs and big box office sales in "Failure to Launch," an absurd comedy about a 26-year old man still living in his parents' basement, spending his days watching television and playing video games while the world passed him by. The film was closer to the truth…

  19. Attrition in Respiratory Care: Stress versus Intrinsic/Extrinsic Rewards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawlins, Timothy D.

    A recent study (Mathews, Lira, and Neis, 1984) indicated that the reason that respiratory therapists leave or intend to leave their profession is the desire for jobs which offer more job satisfaction, better salary, opportunity for advancement, more status or recognition, better work schedules, and better benefits. Although the lack of these…

  20. Comparison between tracer measurements and model calculations for nighttime drainage flows in complex terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, K.T.; Dickerson, M.H.

    1984-06-01

    Results from a series of field experiments in the Geysers area of northern California, in which nonreactive tracers were released from different locations within or near nighttime drainage flows, were used to evaluate a three-dimensional mars-consistent diagnostic wind field model (MATHEW) and a particle-in-cell transport and diffusion model (APDIC). 9 references, 4 figures, 2 tables. (ACR)

  1. Sociopathic Knowledge Bases: Correct Knowledge Can Be Harmful Even Given Unlimited Computation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    SYMBOL 7a. NAME OF MONITORING ORGANIZATION *University of Illinois f (If applicable) Artificial Intelligence (Code 1133) ______________________ 1...Mathews Ave Dist Urbana, IL 61801 A August 1989 Submitted for Publication: Artificial Intelligence Journal Sociopathic Knowledge Bases: Correct...Introduction Reasoning under uncertainty has been widely investigated in artificial intelligence . Prob- abilistic approaches are of particular relevance

  2. From Matron to Maven: A New Role and New Professional Identity for Deans of Women, 1892 to 1918.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nidiffer, Jana

    This paper examines the role of "deans of women" at coeducational universities in the United States at the turn of the century, focusing on the careers of Marion Talbot (University of Chicago, 1892-1925), Mary Bidwell Breed (Indiana University, 1901-1906), Ada Comstock (University of Minnesota, 1906-1912), and Lois Kimball Mathews (University of…

  3. Departments of Labor and Health, Education, and Welfare Appropriations for 1977. Hearings Before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations. House of Representatives, Ninety-Fourth Congress, Second Session. Part 2: Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Testimony of the Secretary, Special Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Appropriations.

    This publication is a comprehensive record of testimony and exhibits presented by representatives of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (DHEW) to a subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations of the U.S. House of Representatives during hearings on 1977 DHEW budget requests. Testifying for DHEW were F. David Mathews, Secretary of…

  4. 76 FR 10072 - Proposed Generic Communications; Draft NRC Regulatory Issue Summary 2011-XX, Adequacy of Station...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ... Electric Distribution System Voltages; Reopening of Public Comment Period AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory..., Adequacy of Station Electric Distribution System Voltages, closes on February 17, 2011. The purpose of this... February, 2011. For the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Roy Mathew, Acting Branch Chief, Electrical...

  5. Sweetening Statistical Lemons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perreault, George

    2000-01-01

    Criticizes Jay Mathews'"Newsweek" article ranking the 100 "best" American high schools by a Challenge Index dividing the number of advanced placement/international baccalaureate tests taken by the number of graduating seniors. Clifford Adelman's research on good academic content and good teachers provides more useful criteria.…

  6. 40 CFR 81.347 - Virginia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... County X King William County X Lancaster County X Louisa County X Madison County X Mathews County X... Intrastate AQCR: Isle of Wight County X James City County X Southampton County X York County X City of... Interstate AQCR (Virginia Portion): Arlington County X Fairfax County X Loudoun County X Prince William...

  7. 40 CFR 81.347 - Virginia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... County X King William County X Lancaster County X Louisa County X Madison County X Mathews County X... Intrastate AQCR: Isle of Wight County X James City County X Southampton County X York County X City of... Interstate AQCR (Virginia Portion): Arlington County X Fairfax County X Loudoun County X Prince William...

  8. 40 CFR 81.347 - Virginia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... County X King William County X Lancaster County X Louisa County X Madison County X Mathews County X... Intrastate AQCR: Isle of Wight County X James City County X Southampton County X York County X City of... Interstate AQCR (Virginia Portion): Arlington County X Fairfax County X Loudoun County X Prince William...

  9. 40 CFR 81.347 - Virginia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... County X King William County X Lancaster County X Louisa County X Madison County X Mathews County X... Intrastate AQCR: Isle of Wight County X James City County X Southampton County X York County X City of... Interstate AQCR (Virginia Portion): Arlington County X Fairfax County X Loudoun County X Prince William...

  10. Personnel discussing Gemini 11 space flight in Mission Control

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-09-12

    S66-52157 (12 Sept. 1966) --- Discussing the Gemini-11 spaceflight in the Mission Control Center are: (left to right) Christopher C. Kraft Jr., (wearing glasses), Director of Flight Operations; Charles W. Mathews (holding phone), Manager, Gemini Program Office; Dr. Donald K. Slayton (center, checked coat), Director of Flight Crew Operations; astronaut William A. Anders, and astronaut John W. Young. Photo credit: NASA

  11. Research in Correctional Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehabilitation Services Administration (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Forty-three leaders in corrections and rehabilitation participated in the seminar planned to provide an indication of the status of research in correctional rehabilitation. Papers include: (1) "Program Trends in Correctional Rehabilitation" by John P. Conrad, (2) "Federal Offenders Rahabilitation Program" by Percy B. Bell and Merlyn Mathews, (3)…

  12. Orientation of International Medical Graduates to Canadian Medical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenerson, Heather J.; Davis, Penny M.; Labash, Andrea M.; Procyshyn, Mavis M.

    2009-01-01

    The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Saskatchewan tracked a cohort of 39 international medical graduates (IMGs) in rural Saskatchewan and discovered that 51% left the province within five years (personal communication). A study by Basky, Mathew, Edwards, and Rourke (2007) found that half a cohort of IMGs in rural Newfoundland and Labrador…

  13. Proceedings from the ETS and ARI Emotional Intelligence Workshop held in Princeton, New Jersey on November 13-15, 2003. Volume 1. Sessions 1 and 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-11-01

    Chair) Paul A. Gade, ARI Patrick C. Kyllonen, ETS Moshe Zeidner, University of Haifa, Israel Gerald Mathews, University of Cincinnati William ...Venus Mifsud, William Monaghan, William Petzinger, Vicky Pszonka, Matthew Roberts, Ralf Schulze, and Manuel Voelkle. Each of you, in your own way...Copyright © 2004 Educational Testing Service Listening. Learning. Leading. EMOTIONS: PSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES William Strickland (HumRRO) OPENING

  14. The Department of Defense Requisition Priority System Impact on Theater Airlift Support

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-01

    Undated, p 59. 6 Mathews, James K, and Holt, Cora J. So Many, So Much, So Far, So Fast. p 59. 7 Menorchik, Douglas. Powerlift -Getting to Desert Storm...Staff and Research Center United States Transportation Command. Menarchik, Douglas. Powerlift - Getting to Desert Storm, Praeger Publishers, West Port

  15. Economic Approaches to Overhead Costs an Application of Multiproduct Cost Theory,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-20

    on the areas of transpor- tation ( Spady and Friedlander, 1976) securities (Mathews, 1981), airlines (Caves, Christianson and Tretheway, 1984) and...been developed to circumvent this problem, with some success. Spady and Friedlander (1976) use homothe- tic aggregation and index number techniques...post. Spady and Friedlander (1978) and Goetz (1984) use hedonic functions to differentiate variations of physical output based on attributes or

  16. Kinetic Analysis of Amylase Using Quantitative Benedict's and Iodine Starch Reagents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Beverly; Lunday, Deborah; Miskevich, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of carbohydrates is a fundamental analytical tool used in many aspects of biology and chemistry. We have adapted a technique developed by Mathews et al. using an inexpensive scanner and open-source image analysis software to quantify amylase activity using both the breakdown of starch and the appearance of glucose. Breakdown…

  17. Pioneering Deans of Women: More Than Wise and Pious Matrons. Athene Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nidiffer, Jana

    This book examines the careers and contributions of four pioneering deans of women and the innovations they created as they worked to enhance opportunities and community for women. The women are Marion Talbot, Mary Bidwell Breed, Ada Louise Comstock, and Lois Kimball Mathews. The book analyzes how they developed a profession out of their…

  18. Cultural Effects on the Expression of Some Fears by Chinese and British Female Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Louise T.

    2004-01-01

    To compare the culturally acquired aspects of fears in two different cultures, the author gave an augmented version of the I. M. Marks and A. M. Mathews Fear Scale (1979) to 50 female students in China and 49 female students in England. When the rank ordering of the fears measured in both groups was compared, the author found a high positive…

  19. Lidar Measurement of Optical Turbulence: Theory of the Crossed Path Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-08

    17Mathewn, J. and Walker. R.L. (1970) Methods of Mathematical Physics , 2"d edn., WA. Benjamin, Reading, MA. ’Bracewell, R.N. (1978) The Fourier...Propagation in a Turbulent Medium, McGraw-Hill, New York. 7Mathews, J., and Walker, R.L. (1970) Methods of Mathematical Physics , 2’ edn., W.A. Ben- jamin

  20. Differentiating Youth Who Sexually Abuse: Applying a Multidimensional Framework when Assessing and Treating Subtypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Lucinda A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent empirical research has shown that children with sexual behavior problems and adolescents who offend sexually are diverse populations consisting of several subtypes (Hall, Mathews, & Pearce, 2002; Pithers, Gray, Busconi, & Houchens, 1998; Worling, 2001). This article reviews the descriptive and empirical research related to identifying…

  1. Thinking and Meddling with Boundaries: Critical Reflections on Matthew Weinstein's Narrative of Street Medics, Red-Zones and Glop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsop, Steve

    2015-01-01

    In pursuit of more mindful notions of hybridity, this review essay provides a series of reflections on Mathew Weinstein's representations of Street Medics and "sciences for the red zones of neoliberalism". My analysis draws on three popular ways of thinking with boundaries to offer a critical reading of the boundary-work that the…

  2. MCC During GT-11

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-09-15

    S66-52762 (15 Sept. 1966) --- Dr. Robert R. Gilruth (left) smokes a cigar in Houston's Mission Control Center to celebrate the successful splashdown of Gemini-11. Looking on are James C. Elms (center), MSC deputy director, and Charles W. Mathews, Gemini program manager. Photo credit: NASA

  3. Exorcising HEW

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, William

    1975-01-01

    The appointment of David Mathews, a 39-year-old Southerner and respected educator, as Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare is reviewed with reference to his position on various issues and substantial hope and confidence among educational leaders that he will "deliver education from the bureaucratic doldrums." (JT)

  4. Sweetening Statistical Lemons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perreault, George

    2000-01-01

    Criticizes Jay Mathews'"Newsweek" article ranking the 100 "best" American high schools by a Challenge Index dividing the number of advanced placement/international baccalaureate tests taken by the number of graduating seniors. Clifford Adelman's research on good academic content and good teachers provides more useful criteria.…

  5. Failure to Launch: Confronting the Male College Student Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Lane A.; Van Wert, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    A few years ago, Mathew McConaughey and Sarah Jessica Parker generated big laughs and big box office sales in "Failure to Launch," an absurd comedy about a 26-year old man still living in his parents' basement, spending his days watching television and playing video games while the world passed him by. The film was closer to the truth…

  6. Differentiating Youth Who Sexually Abuse: Applying a Multidimensional Framework when Assessing and Treating Subtypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Lucinda A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent empirical research has shown that children with sexual behavior problems and adolescents who offend sexually are diverse populations consisting of several subtypes (Hall, Mathews, & Pearce, 2002; Pithers, Gray, Busconi, & Houchens, 1998; Worling, 2001). This article reviews the descriptive and empirical research related to identifying…

  7. Mineral Expert Discusses Global Scramble for Natural Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-11-01

    With the global population boom and more people growing into affluence, there is increasing demand, desire, and competition for minerals, said Vince Mathews during a talk about the global scramble for natural resources on 30 October at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America in Denver, Colo.

  8. Student Personnel Pioneers: Those Who Developed Our Profession.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fley, Jo Ann

    1979-01-01

    This is a series of short biographical essays on LeBaron Russell Briggs (Harvard), Marion Talbot (University of Chicago), Thomas Arkle Clark (University of Illinois), and Lois Kimball Mathews Rosenberry. These were pioneers in student personnel work at the turn of the century. (BEF)

  9. Tribal Secrets: Recovering American Indian Intellectual Traditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warrior, Robert Allen

    This book is a comparative interpretation of the works of Vine Deloria, Jr., (Standing Rock Sioux) and John Joseph Mathews (Osage), two American Indian intellectuals of this century. In bringing these two thinkers together, the book lays the groundwork for a discussion of several crucial issues in contemporary American Indian critical studies: (1)…

  10. RAND Arroyo Center Annual Report 2009

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    The doctoral program is available through the Pardee RAND Graduate School, a separate unit of the RAND Corporation; Army officers enrolled as...Major Mathew Guerrie (standing) and Matt Lewis and Aimee Bower (seated). 2 6 r e s e A r c h A g e n D A To accomplish its mission, the program

  11. Joint Operation Planning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-26

    feasibility — only then does he issue an order.” General Mathew B. Ridgway The Korean War, 1967 SECTION A. JOINT STRATEGIC PLANNING — TYPES AND SCOPE 1...necessary. Meanwhile from the west would come the U.S. (sic) Army’s power punch. Looking at [Commander, XVIII Airborne Corps, Lieutenant General] Gary

  12. The Identification of Splice Variants as Molecular Markers in Parkinson’s Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    diagnosed PD patients, who are not yet on dopamine therapy . The overall goal is to use splice variants as biomarkers to identify individuals at risk for PD...FosB-like proteins by electroconvulsive seizure and cocaine treatments. Mol Pharmacol. 48, 880-9. Chen, L., Cagniard, B., Mathews, T., Jones, S., Koh

  13. The Public and Public Education: A Cousins Research Group Report on Public Education in Democracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, David

    2016-01-01

    This Cousins Research Group report includes two articles by Kettering Foundation president David Mathews that were published previously. "The Public for Public Schools Is Slipping" was first published in "Education Week" in 1995. The second piece, "Putting the Public Back into Public Education: An Old-Fashioned Remedy for…

  14. Stakeholder Input and Test Design: A Case Study on Changing the Interlocutor Familiarity Facet of the Group Oral Discussion Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ockey, Gary J.; Koyama, Dennis; Setoguchi, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Test takers should have a voice in testing practices (Mathew, 2004). However, when incorporating their input, systematic processes to ensure the validity of testing practices must be followed. Such processes allow for test development to be a more democratic process (Shohamy, 2001), without sacrificing the value of the resulting inferences made…

  15. Cautious Peace: Strategy and Circumstance in Asia-Pacific Security.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-07-01

    Away Asia’s Security Bedrock," Asian Wall Street Journal, July 27, 1993 Simon Dalby , "A Climate of Conflict? Environment and Security in the...34 International Security, 8(1), 1983; Jessica Tuchman Mathews, "Redefining Security," Foreign Affairs, Spring 1989; and Simon Dalby , "A Climate of Conflict

  16. 76 FR 37062 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... (guest speaker: Paul Lloyd, Department of Agriculture, TARGET Center). 10:45-Noon--Ad Hoc Committee Meetings (Closed to Public). 1:30-2:45 p.m.--Presentation on Research Collaboration (guest speakers: Sue...). 10:45-Noon--Presentation on Accessible Taxis (guest speakers: Mathew McCollough; Kelly...

  17. An induction pack for care home staff (transitions): for front-line staff of care homes An induction pack for care home staff (transitions): for front-line staff of care homes Alan Chapman Jim Kilgour , and Margaret Williamson Dementia Services Development Trust and University of Stirling 145 pp £35 1 85769 178 4 1857691784 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2005-06-01

    This pack has been compiled by three members of the Dementia Service Development Centre based at Stirling University. It was tested by a local care home in Lanarkshire and is divided by colour-coding into four parts - a good descriptive introduction, the main part, which is the individual study, the answers to the exercise questions, and a resource booklet. The pack is easy to read and understand, and the exercises are, for the most part, common sense. Some prospective students may, however, feel slightly patronised by this particular form of study.

  18. Response to the Colloquium "The Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development's International Early Learning Study: Opening for Debate and Contestation", by Peter Moss, Gunilla Dahlberg, Susan Grieshaber, Susanna Mantovani, Helen May, Alan Pence, Sylvie Rayna, Beth Blue Swadener and Michel Vandenbroeck, "Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood" 17(3)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackey, Glynne; Hill, Diti; De Vocht, Lia

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the authors opine that the introduction of an international assessment of children's early learning, such as proposed by the OECD with its planned International Early Learning Study, will shift the emphasis away from pedagogies which focus on that which is meaningful and relevant in children's lives and their learning, to an…

  19. Response to the Colloquium "The Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development's International Early Learning Study: Opening for Debate and Contestation", by Peter Moss, Gunilla Dahlberg, Susan Grieshaber, Susanna Mantovani, Helen May, Alan Pence, Sylvie Rayna, Beth Blue Swadener and Michel Vandenbroeck, "Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood" 17(3)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackey, Glynne; Hill, Diti; De Vocht, Lia

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the authors opine that the introduction of an international assessment of children's early learning, such as proposed by the OECD with its planned International Early Learning Study, will shift the emphasis away from pedagogies which focus on that which is meaningful and relevant in children's lives and their learning, to an…

  20. Comment on “The role of interbasin groundwater transfers in geologically complex terranes, demonstrated by the Great Basin in the western United States”: report published in Hydrogeology Journal (2014) 22:807–828, by Stephen T. Nelson and Alan L. Mayo

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masbruch, Melissa D.; Brooks, Lynette E.; Heilweil, Victor M.; Sweetkind, Donald S.

    2015-01-01

    The subject article (Nelson and Mayo 2014) presents an overview of previous reports of interbasin flow in the Great Basin of the western United States. This Comment is presented by authors of a cited study (comprising chapters in one large report) on the Great Basin carbonate and alluvial aquifer system (GBCAAS; Heilweil and Brooks 2011; Masbruch et al. 2011; Sweetkind et al. 2011a, b), who agree that water budget imbalances alone are not enough to accurately quantify interbasin flow; however, it is proposed that statements made in the subject article about the GBCAAS report are inaccurate. The Comment authors appreciate the opportunity to clarify some statements made about the work.

  1. Metallization of aluminum hydride AlH3 at high multiple-shock pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molodets, A. M.; Shakhray, D. V.; Khrapak, A. G.; Fortov, V. E.

    2009-05-01

    A study of electrophysical and thermodynamic properties of alane AlH3 under multishock compression has been carried out. The increase in specific electroconductivity of alane at shock compression up to pressure 100 GPa has been measured. High pressures and temperatures were obtained with an explosive device, which accelerates the stainless impactor up to 3 km/s. A strong shock wave is generated on impact with a holder containing alane. The impact shock is split into a shock wave reverberating in alane between two stiff metal anvils. This compression loads the alane sample by a multishock manner up to pressure 80-90 GPa, heats alane to the temperature of about 1500-2000 K, and lasts 1μs . The conductivity of shocked alane increases in the range up to 60-75 GPa and is about 30(Ωcm)-1 . In this region the semiconductor regime is true for shocked alane. The conductivity of alane achieves approximately 500(Ωcm)-1 at 80-90 GPa. In this region, conductivity is interpreted in frames of the conception of the “dielectric catastrophe,” taking into consideration significant differences between the electronic states of isolated molecule AlH3 and condensed alane.

  2. TODAY: EPA Administrator to Attend Wall Street Journals ECO:nomics Conference

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - Today, EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy will join the Wall Street Journal's ECO:nomics conference for an interview with Editor in Chief Gerard Baker on the economic need for acting on climate change. Administrator McCarthy will speak abo

  3. TOMORROW: EPA Administrator to Attend Wall Street Journals ECO:nomics Conference

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - Tomorrow, EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy will join the Wall Street Journal's ECO:nomics conference for an interview with Editor in Chief Gerard Baker on the economic need for acting on climate change. Administrator McCarthy will speak

  4. 77 FR 66861 - Louisiana; Amendment No. 15 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... Order 12148, as amended, Gerard M. Stolar, of FEMA is appointed to act as the Federal Coordinating... to be used for reporting and drawing funds: 97.030, Community Disaster Loans; 97.031, Cora Brown Fund... (Presidentially Declared Disasters); 97.039, Hazard Mitigation Grant. W. Craig Fugate, Administrator, Federal...

  5. Nucleosome Core Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Nucleosome Core Particle grown on STS-81. The fundamental structural unit of chromatin and is the basis for organization within the genome by compaction of DNA within the nucleus of the cell and by making selected regions of chromosomes available for transcription and replication. Principal Investigator's are Dr. Dan Carter and Dr. Gerard Bunick of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  6. The Chara Array Angular Diameter of HR 8799 Favors Planetary Masses for Its Imaged Companions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-10

    Department of Physics & Astronomy, Macquarie University, New South Wales, NSW 2109, Australia 5 NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of...would be on the exoplanet /brown dwarf cusp. We thank Gerard van Belle for his insight on the nature of HR 8799’s pirouette through space. The CHARA Array

  7. Corporeal and Sonic Diagrams for Cinematic Ethics in Rolf De Heer's "Dance Me to My Song"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickey-Moody, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Rolf De Heer's 1997 Australian feature film "Dance Me to My Song" was devised with the late Heather Rose, a person with Cerebral Palsy. The film also features a central performance by Heather (as the character of Julia) and is clearly about "her world". The ethic of engagement exemplified by this film resonates with what Gerard Goggin has termed…

  8. Experiences in Nature: Resolute Second-Plane Directions toward Erdkinder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Gerard; Allen, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Gerard Leonard and Kathleen Allen describe a variety of nature experiences as a part of the Montessori elementary tradition, beginning with a warning about the way contemporary life constrains children's experience of nature. Through a lyrical rendering of the nature-based expressions of children, Leonard and Allen look at a variety of approaches…

  9. Bigger Shield: Alliance, Politics, and Military Change in Japan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    Technology, 4. 20 See Edward L. Katzenbach Jr., The Horse Cavalry in the Twentieth Century as quoted in Farrell and Terriff, The Sources of Military Change...World Politics, edited by John Gerard Ruggie. New York: Columbia University Press, 1996. Katzenstein, Peter J., and Nobuo Okawara. Japan’s National

  10. Operational Employment of the Airborne Brigade Combat Team: The 503d Parachute Infantry Regiment as a Case Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-21

    American Airborne Forces, 37. 15 Edward M. Flanagan Jr. Corregidor- The Rock Force Assault, 1945. (Novato, CA: Presidio Press, 1988), 112; Gordon Rottman...17 Breuer, 484 18 Gerard M. Devlin, Back to Corregidor: America Retakes the Rock . (New York, NY: St...working with two Kurdish organizations and their militia groups. The Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP), located generally to the north along the border

  11. Bond Receives 2003 Maurice Ewing Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broecker, Wallace S.

    2004-02-01

    Gerard C. Bond was awarded the Ewing Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on 10 December 2003, in San Francisco, California. The medal honors ``significant original contributions to the scientific understanding of the processes in the ocean; for the advancement of oceanographic engineering, technology, and instrumentation; and for outstanding service to marine sciences.''

  12. Beyond Stalemate: Deterrence and Nonproliferation in the New World Order

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    French and British programs, see Bertrand Goldschmidt, Atomic Rivals, Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, 1990, and Ronald W. Clark, The Birth...effects of sanctions, and the legal basis see Kimberly Ann Elliott; Sanctions: A Look at the Record; and Drew Christianson and Gerard F. Powers

  13. Unconventional Warfare in the Contemporary Operational Environment: Transforming Special Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    entry operation to remove the ruling junta from power and return the democratically elected Jean- Bertrand Aristide to rule the country. The last-minute...Staff College, 1993. Tertychny, Gerard P. "Setting Europe Ablaze: The Origins of United States Army Special Forces." Master of Arts thesis

  14. Development of III-Nitride Based THz Inter-Subband Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-30

    132 (2002). 16 C. Adelmann, E. Sarigiannidou, D. Jalabert, Y. Hori, J. –L. Rouviere , B. Daudin, S. Fanget, C. Bru-Chevallier, T. Shibata, and M...Jalabert, E. Monroy, E. Sarigiannidou, J.L. Rouviere , T. Shibata, M. Tanaka, J.M. Gerard, and B. Daudin, J. Appl. Phys. 96, 1104 (2004). 19 S. Nicolay, E

  15. University of Hawaii Institute for Astronomy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    Joseph, Nick Kaiser, Lev Kofman, John Kormendy, Jeffrey R. Kuhn, Barry J. LaBonte, Gerard A. Luppino, Alexander N. McCly- mont, Robert A. McLaren...Tokunaga, John L. Tonry, R. Brent Tully, William D. Vacca, Richard J. Wain - scoat, and Gareth Wynn-Williams. Postdoctoral fellows included Amy Barger ~NICMOS

  16. Innovation in Geographical Education. Netherlands Geographic Studies 208. Proceedings of the International Geographic Congress (38th, The Hague, Netherlands, August 5-10, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schee, Joop van der, Ed.; Schoenmaker, Gerard, Ed.; Trimp, Henk, Ed.; Westrhenen, Hans van, Ed.

    This book examines trends in current educational literature and how they impact geography instruction. The volume contains 22 articles divided into 5 sections addressing geography innovation and educational research in geography. The introduction by Hans van Westrhenen and Gerard Schoenmaker delineates the foundation for the book and the theme…

  17. Proceedings of the Workshop on Gulf Stream Structure and Variability Held at Research Triangle Park, North Carolina on 1-2 April 1982.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    and William Gerard de Brahm. Irmago I4undi, 28(2), 105-120, 1976. Herrera y Tordesillas, Antonio de, Historia general de los hechos de los Castellanos...layer instrument on mooring B lost a fin at the start of the second deployment giving low speeds. Also temperature from the top meter on mooring B of

  18. Microgravity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-01-01

    Gerard M. Faeth, University of Michigan, principal investigator in combustion science experiments, including Flow/Soot-Formation in Nonbuoyant Laminar Diffusion Flames, investigation of Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames in Microgravity: A Paradigm for Soot Processes in Turbulent Flames, and Soot Processes in Freely-Propagating Laminar Premixed Flames.

  19. The Influence of Lexicographic Preference Ordering on Relative Demands Under Alternative Price Ratios--A Graphical Presentation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-08-01

    sufficient resources are available. If Gerard Debreu , Theory of ’.’.due, John Wiley and Sons, New York, 1959. WH^ vmtmimi^^^*’ ■ -2- lexicographlc...RATIOS—A GRAPHICAL PRESENTATION Kenneth F. Ryder, Jr. The Rand Corporation, Washington, D.C. In his Theory of Value, Debreu cites lexicographic

  20. Large Context Problems and Their Applications to Education: Some Contemporary Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winchester, Ian

    2006-01-01

    Some 35 years ago, Gerard K. O'Neill used the large context of space travel with his undergraduate physics students. A Canadian physics teacher, Art Stinner, independently arrived at a similar notion in a more limited but, therefore, more generally useful sense, which he referred to as the "large context problem" approach. At a slightly earlier…

  1. Advances in the Prevention of Low Birthweight. Proceedings from an International Symposium (Cape Cod, Massachusetts, May 8-11, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berendes, Heinz W., Ed.; And Others

    This proceedings document contains papers addressing trends, determinants, and interventions in preventing low birthweight. Papers have the following titles and authors: "Trends in Rates of Low Birthweight in the United States" (Mary McCormick); "Evolution of the Preterm Birth Rate in France" (Gerard Breart); "The Etiology and Prevention of Low…

  2. Family Literacy and Digital Literacies: A Redefined Approach to Examining Social Practices of an African-American Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Tisha Y.

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation examines the digital literacy practices of an urban African-American family. Using an ethnographic case study approach (Stake, 2000), this qualitative study explores the multiple ways a mother (Larnee) and son (Gerard) interacted with digital literacies in the home. Situated within the framework of sociocultural traditions from…

  3. Innovation in Geographical Education. Netherlands Geographic Studies 208. Proceedings of the International Geographic Congress (38th, The Hague, Netherlands, August 5-10, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schee, Joop van der, Ed.; Schoenmaker, Gerard, Ed.; Trimp, Henk, Ed.; Westrhenen, Hans van, Ed.

    This book examines trends in current educational literature and how they impact geography instruction. The volume contains 22 articles divided into 5 sections addressing geography innovation and educational research in geography. The introduction by Hans van Westrhenen and Gerard Schoenmaker delineates the foundation for the book and the theme…

  4. Impact on U.S. Scientific Research of Proposal to Withdraw from Unesco. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Natural Resources, Agriculture Research and Environment and the Subcommittee on Science, Research and Technology of the Committee on Science and Technology, U.S. House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session, (March 8,15, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Science and Technology.

    These hearings focused on the impact of the United States decision to leave the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). Included are prepared statements and/or testimony by: Congressman Jim Leach (Iowa); Jean Gerard (U.S. Ambassador to UNESCO); Paul Baker; William Nierenberg; Thomas Galvin; and A. K. Solomon.…

  5. SKOLE: The Journal of Alternative Education, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SKOLE: The Journal of Alternative Education, 1994

    1994-01-01

    The two issues of the journal SKOLE for 1994 contain original articles and reprints about small alternative schools, home schooling, the contradictions and deficiencies of public education, and educational innovations. Major articles include: (1) "Reunion" (about Rockland Project School, New York) (Alice Gerard); (2) "Children's Village: The…

  6. Large Context Problems and Their Applications to Education: Some Contemporary Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winchester, Ian

    2006-01-01

    Some 35 years ago, Gerard K. O'Neill used the large context of space travel with his undergraduate physics students. A Canadian physics teacher, Art Stinner, independently arrived at a similar notion in a more limited but, therefore, more generally useful sense, which he referred to as the "large context problem" approach. At a slightly earlier…

  7. Nucleosome Core Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Nucleosome Core Particle grown on STS-81. The fundamental structural unit of chromatin and is the basis for organization within the genome by compaction of DNA within the nucleus of the cell and by making selected regions of chromosomes available for transcription and replication. Principal Investigator's are Dr. Dan Carter and Dr. Gerard Bunick of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  8. Learning Action Research and Managing Educational Change-Improvement in Careers Education: A Case Study of Managerialism in Action?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Barry

    1998-01-01

    Asks why so few prospective teachers, on completing their studies (extolling action research), continue to use this approach in their subsequent practice. Drawing upon Esland's notion of "managerialism" and employing an indepth case study of Gerard, a recent graduate, concludes that marketing pressures have taken priority over core…

  9. Family Literacy and Digital Literacies: A Redefined Approach to Examining Social Practices of an African-American Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Tisha Y.

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation examines the digital literacy practices of an urban African-American family. Using an ethnographic case study approach (Stake, 2000), this qualitative study explores the multiple ways a mother (Larnee) and son (Gerard) interacted with digital literacies in the home. Situated within the framework of sociocultural traditions from…

  10. Students of Sinte Gleska University Reflect on What It Means to Be a Warrior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rykaczewski Carriere, Lauren Grace

    2011-01-01

    This study developed after hearing Gerard Baker, the first Native American to serve as a National Park Superintendent, state that he "was not a warrior" when he was unsuccessful in college the first time (G. Baker, International Partnership for Service-Learning and Leadership [IPSL] conference presentation, October 18, 2005). The purpose…

  11. Rebuild America clean and green.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Leo W

    2009-01-01

    The testimony of International President Leo Gerard of the United Steelworkers before a House subcommittee on trade in March addressed how to minimize "carbon leakage" between nations-when emissions reductions in one country lead to increased emissions in another that has strict climate change policies-in a manner that will sustain existing U.S. jobs and keep domestic industry competitive.

  12. Design Office within the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Kumari

    1980-01-01

    To help architectural students adapt to the realities of the work environment, Gerard Campbell of Holland College has set up his classroom as a design office. Working as a team, the students prepare a complete set of working drawings and construction documents, simulating an actual design process. (JOW)

  13. School and Family Collaboration: Parental Involvement and Student Success at a School in Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilmore, Elaine L.

    This paper describes how parents and the school can work together to improve educational outcomes. It describes collaborative community-involvement strategies used at Gerard Elementary School in Cleburne, Texas. The school offers a meet-the-teacher day at the beginning of the school year, a parent-orientation night, and parent-school conferences.…

  14. Innovative Teaching: Sharing Expertise through Videoconferencing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luck, Michael; Laurence, Gerard Michael

    2005-01-01

    Guest lectures are a valuable resource in higher education. However, shrinking budgets make it difficult to bring in experts from remote areas of the globe. Videoconferencing, Michael Luck and Gerard Laurence believe, may be a cost-effective way to bring experts to the classroom. Luck and Laurence describe their 2003 study that formally evaluated…

  15. The Transparent Village: Community Parenting in Trinidad and Tobago.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Ron

    1994-01-01

    Overviews the history of Service Volunteered for All (Servol), an organization founded in 1970 in Trinidad and Tobago by Gerard Pantin, a Catholic priest. The organization has evolved into 2 national networks of 150 preschools, 40 life centers for teenage boys and girls, training programs for preschool teachers, and community programs aimed at…

  16. Preparing for the Future of Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinnell, Charles

    1983-01-01

    The crucial decisions and attitude changes that educators and administrators must make if higher education is to survive into the 21st century are identified using the insights and ideas of Alvin Toffler, John Naisbitt, Gerard O'Neill, and other futures thinkers. (Author/RM)

  17. Children and Community: Progressing through Partnership. Summary Report and Conclusion. Proceedings of the International Seminar of the Bernard van Leer Foundation (10th, Kingston, Jamaica, November 14-24, 1988). With the Cooperation of the West Indies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard Van Leer Foundation, The Hague (Netherlands).

    This report focuses on children and the community. In the community. In the opening address, Dr. Willem H. Welling, Executive Director of the van Leer Foundation, describes the history of the foundation and the content of previous seminars. He concludes the address with a discussion of community empowerment. Father Gerard Pantin, the keynote…

  18. The Role of Texture in French Spectral Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besharse, Kari E.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the essential role of texture in French spectral music and its contribution to musical evolution and form in specific works by Gerard Grisey, Tristan Murail, Philippe Hurel, and Kaija Saariaho. The use of texture in French spectral music is placed in a historical context by exploring the new ways that texture is employed in…

  19. Book Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holeinger, Philip R.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Presents and review six books. Topics include earth science topics (Philip R. Holzinger, 1985), the wild horse controversy (Richard Symanski, 1985), historical Dutch geography (Audrey M. Lambert, 1985), urban geography (Susan L. Cutter, 1985), a geopolitical atlas (Gerard Chaliand and Jean-Pierre Rageau, 1985), and remote sensing (Robert K. Holz,…

  20. 78 FR 48773 - Quarterly Publication of Individuals, Who Have Chosen To Expatriate, as Required by Section 6039G

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... BALLENGER ANGEL LARRINAGA BALLMER CHRISTINA BALLMER MIRIJAM SABRINA BALLOU STEPHEN GERARD BANDY CHRISTIAN... DWAN KEVIN MICHAEL DY DANIEL SY ] EAKER WAYNE LYNE EDWARDS MARTHA JANE EDWARDS STEPHEN FRANCIS EGGER... STEPHEN WERNER FREIBURGHAUS THOMAS JORG FREIMAN HAROLD JOSEPH FREY SYLVIA ROSA FRICKER STEPHAN DANIEL...