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Sample records for alan heeger introduced

  1. In memoriam Alan Moorwood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Zeeuw, T.; Leibundgut, B.; Fosbury, R.; D'Odorico, S.

    2011-09-01

    Alan Moorwood died on 18 June 2011 at the age of 66 after a short illness. He had recently retired from ESO as Director of Programmes, having played a leading role in instrumentation for many years. There follows an obituary by Tim de Zeeuw and a joint tribute by three of his long-time ESO colleagues, Bruno Leibundgut, Bob Fosbury and Sandro D'Odorico.

  2. Adapted Su-Schrieffer-Heeger Hamiltonian for PPV, PPP, and polyacenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Yongwoo; Lin, Xi

    2011-03-01

    This work presents a unified model Hamiltonian for poly- p -phenylenevinylene (PPV), poly- p -phenylene (PPP), and polyacenes based on the classical Su- Schrieffer-Heeger Hamiltonian for polyacetylene, with one single extra electron- phonon coupling parameter. Predicted band gaps of all these polymers and their oligomers of all lengths closely match to the available experimental results, with an accuracy exceeding the time-dependent density functional theory. Self-localized polaron states and their mobility are computed without any constraints.

  3. Obituary: Alan D. Fiala (1942-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, George

    2011-12-01

    Dr. Alan Dale Fiala, astronomer and expert on solar eclipses, died on May 26, 2010 in Arlington, Virginia, of respiratory failure after a brief illness. He was 67. Fiala had been a staff astronomer at the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington, D.C., for his entire professional career, where he rose from a position as a summer intern to become the Chief of the Nautical Almanac Office, responsible for annual publications for astronomy and navigation that are used the world over. He retired from the observatory in 2000. Although a childhood case of polio affected his mobility for the rest of his life, he seldom let his physical constraints limit his activities, which were many and varied. Alan Fiala was born in Beatrice, Nebraska on November 9, 1942, the middle son of Emil A. ("John") and Lora Marie Fiala. Fiala's father was a postal clerk and Civil Service examiner. Fiala expressed interest in astronomy at a very young age. He contracted polio when he was 9. He graduated from Beatrice High School in 1960 with a straight-A average and went on to study at Carleton College. He received his B.A. summa cum laude after three years, in 1963, with a major in astronomy and minors in physics and mathematics. He was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi, and Pi Mu Epsilon (mathematics). In 1962, Alan Fiala obtained a job as a summer intern at the Naval Observatory in Washington, working in the Nautical Almanac Office (NAO). He entered the graduate program at Yale University and continued to work summers at the observatory. He received his Ph.D. in 1968, under Gerald Clemence. His dissertation was titled "Determination of the Mass of Jupiter from a Study of the Motion of 57 Mnemosyne." After receiving his doctorate, Fiala became a permanent member of the Naval Observatory staff. Computers were just being introduced there and he participated in the automation of many procedures used to prepare the annual publications of the Nautical Almanac Office. One of his first assignments was

  4. Excitation spectra and correlation functions of quantum Su-Schrieffer-Heeger models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Manuel; Assaad, Fakher F.; Hohenadler, Martin

    2015-06-01

    We study one-dimensional Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) models with quantum phonons using a continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo method. Within statistical errors, we obtain identical results for the SSH model with acoustic phonons, and a related model with a coupling to an optical bond phonon mode. Based on this agreement, we first study the Peierls metal-insulator transition of the spinless SSH model, and relate it to the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition of a spinless Luttinger liquid. In the Peierls phase, the spectral functions reveal the single-particle and charge gap, and a central peak related to long-range order. For the spinful SSH model, which has a dimerized ground state for any nonzero coupling, we reveal a symmetry-related degeneracy of spin and charge excitations, and the expected spin and charge gaps as well as a central peak. Finally, we study the SSH-U V model with electron-phonon and electron-electron interaction. We observe a Mott phase with critical spin and bond correlations at weak electron-phonon coupling, and a Peierls phase with gapped spin excitations at strong coupling. We relate our findings to the extended Hubbard model, and discuss the physical origin of the agreement between optical and acoustic phonons.

  5. Obituary: Alan D. Fiala (1942-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, George

    2011-12-01

    Dr. Alan Dale Fiala, astronomer and expert on solar eclipses, died on May 26, 2010 in Arlington, Virginia, of respiratory failure after a brief illness. He was 67. Fiala had been a staff astronomer at the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington, D.C., for his entire professional career, where he rose from a position as a summer intern to become the Chief of the Nautical Almanac Office, responsible for annual publications for astronomy and navigation that are used the world over. He retired from the observatory in 2000. Although a childhood case of polio affected his mobility for the rest of his life, he seldom let his physical constraints limit his activities, which were many and varied. Alan Fiala was born in Beatrice, Nebraska on November 9, 1942, the middle son of Emil A. ("John") and Lora Marie Fiala. Fiala's father was a postal clerk and Civil Service examiner. Fiala expressed interest in astronomy at a very young age. He contracted polio when he was 9. He graduated from Beatrice High School in 1960 with a straight-A average and went on to study at Carleton College. He received his B.A. summa cum laude after three years, in 1963, with a major in astronomy and minors in physics and mathematics. He was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi, and Pi Mu Epsilon (mathematics). In 1962, Alan Fiala obtained a job as a summer intern at the Naval Observatory in Washington, working in the Nautical Almanac Office (NAO). He entered the graduate program at Yale University and continued to work summers at the observatory. He received his Ph.D. in 1968, under Gerald Clemence. His dissertation was titled "Determination of the Mass of Jupiter from a Study of the Motion of 57 Mnemosyne." After receiving his doctorate, Fiala became a permanent member of the Naval Observatory staff. Computers were just being introduced there and he participated in the automation of many procedures used to prepare the annual publications of the Nautical Almanac Office. One of his first assignments was

  6. Roger Alan Myers (1930-2015).

    PubMed

    Phillips, Susan D; Ivey, Allen E

    2016-04-01

    Presents an obituary for Roger Alan Myers, who passed away September 13, 2015, in Stuart, Florida, at age 85. Meyers was a long-time national leader of counseling psychology. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27042889

  7. Portrait of Astronaut Alan L. Bean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Portrait of Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Prime Crew Lunar Module Pilot of the Apollo 12 Lunar Landing Mission, in his space suit minus the helmet. He is standing outside beside a mock-up of the Lunar Lander.

  8. Astronaut Alan Bean shaves while aboard Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, uses battery powered shaver while in the crew quarters of the Skylab space station's Orbital Workshop (OWS) crew quarters. This photograph was taken with a 35mm Nikon camera held by one of Bean's fellow crewmen during the 56.5 day second manned Skylab mission in Earth orbit.

  9. Alan Shepard in the Rendezvous Docking Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Astronaut Alan Shepard (right) was one of 14 astronauts, 8 NASA test pilots, and 2 McDonnell test pilots who took part in simulator studies. Shepard flew the simulator on November 14, 1963. A.W. Vogeley wrote: 'Many of the astronauts have flown this simulator in support of the Gemini studies and they, without exception, appreciated the realism of the visual scene. The simulator has also been used in the development of pilot techniques to handle certain jet malfunctions in order that aborts could be avoided. In these situations large attitude changes are sometimes necessary and the false motion cues that were generated due to earth gravity were somewhat objectionable; however, the pilots were readily able to overlook these false motion cues in favor of the visual realism.' Roy F. Brissenden noted that: 'The basic Gemini control studies developed the necessary techniques and demonstrated the ability of human pilots to perform final space docking with the specified Gemini-Agena systems using only visual references. ... Results... showed that trained astronauts can effect the docking with direct acceleration control and even with jet malfunctions as long as good visual conditions exist.... Probably more important than data results was the early confidence that the astronauts themselves gained in their ability to perform the maneuver in the ultimate flight mission.' Shepard commented: 'I had the feeling tonight - a couple of times - that I was actually doing the space mission instead of the simulation. As I said before, I think it is a very good simulation.' Shepard also commented on piloting techniques. Most astronauts arrived at this same preferred technique: Shepard: 'I believe I have developed the preferred technique for these conditions and the technique appeared to me to be best was to come in slightly above the target so that I was able to use the longitudinal marks on the body of the target as a reference, particularly for a lateral translation and, of course, I

  10. Mixed quantum-classical simulations of charge transport in organic materials: Numerical benchmark of the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Linjun; Beljonne, David; Chen Liping; Shi Qiang

    2011-06-28

    The electron-phonon coupling is critical in determining the intrinsic charge carrier and exciton transport properties in organic materials. In this study, we consider a Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) model for molecular crystals, and perform numerical benchmark studies for different strategies of simulating the mixed quantum-classical dynamics. These methods, which differ in the selection of initial conditions and the representation used to solve the time evolution of the quantum carriers, are shown to yield similar equilibrium diffusion properties. A hybrid approach combining molecular dynamics simulations of nuclear motion and quantum-chemical calculations of the electronic Hamiltonian at each geometric configuration appears as an attractive strategy to model charge dynamics in large size systems ''on the fly,'' yet it relies on the assumption that the quantum carriers do not impact the nuclear dynamics. We find that such an approximation systematically results in overestimated charge-carrier mobilities, with the associated error being negligible when the room-temperature mobility exceeds {approx}4.8 cm{sup 2}/Vs ({approx}0.14 cm{sup 2}/Vs) in one-dimensional (two-dimensional) crystals.

  11. Methods for synthesizing alane without the formation of adducts and free of halides

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Knight, Douglas A; Dinh, Long V

    2013-02-19

    A process is provided to synthesize an alane without the formation of alane adducts as a precursor. The resulting product is a crystallized .alpha.-alane and is a highly stable product and is free of halides.

  12. David Alan Walker (1928-2012).

    PubMed

    Edwards, Gerald E; Heber, Ulrich

    2012-06-01

    David Alan Walker, Emeritus Professor of Biology, University of Sheffield, UK and Fellow of the Royal Society, died on February 13, 2012. David had a marvelous 60 year career as a scientist, during which he was a researcher, mentor, valued colleague, and a prolific writer in the field of photosynthesis. His career was marked by creative breakthroughs in isolation and analysis of chloroplast metabolism in vitro and simple but valuable technical advances for measurement of photosynthesis in vivo that remain relevant on a global scale to production of crops and biofuels, as well as plant responses to climate change. We include here personal remembrances by the authors (GEE and UH), and by (in alphabetical order): Zoran Cerovic (France), Bob Furbank (Australia), Geoffrey Hind (USA), John Humby (UK), Agu Laisk (Estonia), Peter Lea (UK), Ross Lilley (Australia), Barry Osmond (Australia), Simon Robinson (Australia) and Charles Stirling (UK). PMID:22638915

  13. Remembering James Alan Bassham (1922-2012).

    PubMed

    Govindjee; Bassham, Helen; Bassham, Susan

    2016-04-01

    James Alan Bassham, known to many as Al, was born on November 26, 1922, in Sacramento, California (CA), USA. He died on November 19, 2012, in El Cerrito, CA. To celebrate his life at his 3rd death anniversary, we present here a brief biography, comments on his discoveries, but most importantly, remembrances from family and friends; we remember this wonderful and modest person who had played a major pivotal role in the discoveries that led to what he would like to call the P(hotosynthetic) C(arbon) R(eduction) cycle, known to many as the Calvin Cycle, the Calvin-Benson Cycle, or the Calvin-Benson-Bassham Cycle. Based on a personal request by Bassham himself to one of us (Govindjee), we refrain from including his name in the cycle-in recognition of his many students and associates he would have liked to honor. PMID:26582593

  14. Astronaut Alan Bean participates in lunar surface simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot of the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission, participates in lunar surface simulation training in bldg 29 at the Manned Spacecraft Center. Bean is strapped to a one-sixth gravity simulator.

  15. Astronaut Alan Bean works on Modular Equipment Stowage Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot for the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission, works at the Modular Equipment Stowage Assembly (MESA) on the Apollo 12 Lunar Module during the mission's first extravehicular activity, EVA-1, on November 19, 1969.

  16. Alan Shepard Hits A Golf Ball on the Moon

    NASA Video Gallery

    Apollo 14 Commander and original Mercury astronaut Alan Shepard, the first American to fly in space, tees off on the lunar surface during his 1971 mission, with crewmate Edgar Mitchell watching and...

  17. Introducing "Excel"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyrrell, Sidney

    2006-01-01

    In this brief article, the author instructs teachers on how to produce an interactive spreadsheet from scratch in about 20 minutes and en route equip themselves and their students, with handy "Excel" skills. The aim is to introduce the basics of "Excel," plus some fun bits, speedily and with a purpose; producing something that is useful in its own…

  18. Introducing Vectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, John

    1997-01-01

    Suggests an approach to teaching vectors that promotes active learning through challenging questions addressed to the class, as opposed to subtle explanations. Promotes introducing vector graphics with concrete examples, beginning with an explanation of the displacement vector. Also discusses artificial vectors, vector algebra, and unit vectors.…

  19. Critique as Homiletics: A Response to Alan Block

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayes, Clifford; Mayes, Pamela Blackwell; Williams, Ellen

    2004-01-01

    Alan Block's (2004) major criticism of the authors' study revolves around the notion that they have attempted to quantify their students' sense of calling in an existentially inauthentic, spiritually delimiting way. For, as he puts it, "identifications of presence are impossible." The authors cannot accept this pronouncement if only for the simple…

  20. Understanding the Scientific Enterprise: A Conversation with Alan Leshner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins-Gough, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the nature of science is even more important than mastering its details, says Alan Leshner, Chief Executive Officer of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, in an interview with Educational Leadership. In this article, Leshner discusses the controversy about teaching evolution, and he asserts that demands to…

  1. ESO Astronomers Emeriti -- Sandro D'Odorico and Alan Moorwood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primas, F.; Casali, M.; Walsh, J.

    2010-09-01

    In May and June 2010, Sandro D'Odorico and Alan Moorwood, both driving forces behind many ESO instruments and very active in research, retired after three decades at ESO. The ESO Director General, Tim de Zeeuw, elevated both to the newly inaugurated position of ESO Astronomer Emeritus. Celebrations on their transition to these esteemed positions were held and are briefly described.

  2. Astronaut Alan Bean holds Special Environmental Sample Container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot for the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission, holds a Special Environmental Sample Container filled with lunar soil collected during the extravehicular activity (EVA) in which Astronauts Charles Conrad Jr., commander, and Bean participated. Connrad, who took this picture, is reflected in the helmet visor of the lunar module pilot.

  3. Astronaut Alan Bean doing acrobatics in OWS dome area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, doing acrobatics in the dome area of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) on the space station cluster in Earth orbit. The dome area is about 22 feet in diameter and 19 feet from top to bottom.

  4. Astronaut Alan Bean deploys Lunar Surface Magnetometer on lunar surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot, deploys the Lunar Surface Magnetometer (LSM) during the first Apollo 12 extravehicular activity on the Moon. The LSM is a component of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP). The Lunar Module can be seen in the left background.

  5. Astronaut Alan Bean with subpackages of the ALSEP during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot, traverses with the two subpackages of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) during the first Apollo 12 extravehicular activity (EVA). Bean deployed the ALSEP components 300 feet from the Lunar Module (LM). The LM and deployed erectable S-band antenna can be seen in the background.

  6. Astronaut Owen Garriott trims hair of Astronaut Alan Bean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Scientist-Astronaut Owen K. Garriott, Skylab 3 science pilot, trims the hair of Astronaut Alan L. Bean, commander, in this on-board photograph from the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS). Bean holds a vacuum hose to gather in loose hair.

  7. Why Henry Made It: A Reply to S. Alan Cohen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleederman, Frances F.

    1977-01-01

    Responds to an article by S. Alan Cohen on oral language deficiency and its relation to reading failure, and concludes that reading achievement and reading failure are largely determined by cognitive and communicative strategies that may be socialized differently in diverse social and ethnic groups. (JM)

  8. 40 Years in Applied Linguistics: An Interview with Alan Davies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunnan, Antony John

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Professor Alan Davies who was born in Wales, studied at Oxford University and Birmingham University, and taught in Scotland at the University of Edinburgh, completing 40 years this year. Professor Davies has travelled widely to give invited talks and seminars, participate in applied linguistics conferences,…

  9. Astronaut Alan Shepard using MET during geological training in Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., commander of the Apollo 14 lunar landing mission, takes a piece of equipment from the Modular Equipment Transporter (MET) during geological and lunar surface simulation training training in the Pinacate volcanic area of northwestern Sonora, Mexico. The MET has been nicknamed 'Rickshaw' after its shape and method of propulsion.

  10. Editors' overview for the Alan Turner Memorial volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, Hannah J.; Elton, Sarah; Schreve, Danielle

    2014-07-01

    The papers presented here, in this special volume dedicated to the memory of Alan Turner (1947-2012), provide a glimpse of the multi-faceted ways in which the mammalian fossil record can be investigated. The authors of contributions in this Special Issue are by no means an exhaustive list of his international collaborators and colleagues, and indeed, many are not represented here, but the contents cover many of the topics and issues that were of central archaeological and wider Quaternary mammalian interest to Alan. Although the papers are not intended to provide a comprehensive overview of all techniques that can be applied, the set nevertheless reveals a snapshot of the state-of-the-art and of some of the methods that have the potential to bring much more of the past to life. Alan always sought to move beyond the 'stamp-collecting' approach of simply listing which taxa were present at a site, attempting to elucidate what the presence of those animals might mean in terms of palaeoecology. In particular, the span of Alan's career has seen major advances in our understanding of Quaternary mammalian biostratigraphy and palaeobiogeography, the widespread application of novel techniques such as ancient DNA, the development of high-precision geochronology and the discovery of new hominin species. The papers presented here reflect those developments and highlight interdisciplinary approaches, from examination of sediments to careful measurements of the fossils themselves, from modelling the presence of taxa at particular points in the Quaternary to examination of the similarities and differences in fauna within and between sites.

  11. Astronaut Alan Bean assisted with egressing command module after landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot, is assisted with egressing the Apollo 12 Command Module by a U.S. Navy underwater demolition team swimmer during recovery operations in the Pacific Ocean. Already in the life raft are Astronauts Charles Conrad Jr., commander; and Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot. The Apollo 12 splashdown occured at 2:58 p.m., November 24, 1969 near American Samoa.

  12. Astronaut Alan Bean flies the Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, flies the M509 Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment in the forward dome area of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) on the space station cluster in Earth orbit. Bean is strapped in to the back-mounted, hand-controlled Automatically Stabilized Maneuvering Unit (ASMU). This ASMU exerperiment is being done in shirt sleeves. The dome area where the experiment is conducted is about 22 feet in diameter and 19 feet from top to bottom.

  13. Astronaut Alan Bean flies the Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, flies the M509 Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment in the foreward dome area of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) on the space station cluster in Earth orbit. Bean is strapped in to the back-mounted, hand-controlled Automatically Stabilized Maneuvering Unit (ASMU). This ASMU exerperiment is being done in shirt sleeves. The dome area where the experiment is conducted is about 22 feet in diameter and 19 feet from top to bottom.

  14. Astronaut Alan Shepard walks toward MET during first EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., foreground, Apollo 14 commander, walks toward the Modularized Equipment Transporter (MET), out of view at right, during the first Apollo 14 extravehicular activity (EVA-1). An EVA checklist is attached to Shepard's left wrist. Astronaut Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot, is in the background working at a subpackage of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP). The cylindrical keg-like object directly under Mitchell's extended left hand is the Passive Seismic Experiment (PSE).

  15. Astronaut Alan Bean flies the Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, flies the M509 Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment in the foreward dome area of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) on the space station cluster in Earth orbit. Bean is strapped in to the back-mounted, hand-controlled Automatically Stabilized Maneuvering Unit (ASMU). He is wearing a pressure suit for this run of the M509 experiment, but other ASMU tests are done in shirt sleeves. The dome area where the experiment is conducted is about 22 feet in diameter and 19 feet from top to bottom.

  16. 77 FR 74518 - Alan T. Waterman Award Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Alan T. Waterman Award Committee; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92- 463, as amended), the National Science Foundation announces the following meeting: Name: Alan T. Waterman Award Committee,...

  17. Novel methods for synthesizing halide-free alane without the formation of adducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, Long V.; Knight, Douglas A.; Paskevicius, Mark; Buckley, Craig E.; Zidan, Ragaiy

    2012-04-01

    Many of the current synthesis methods for aluminum hydride (alane—AlH3) involve reacting AlCl3 and LiAlH4 in solvents. The reaction requires the formation of an alane adduct such as AlH3ṡ[(C2H5)2O] prior to obtaining crystallized stable α-AlH3. This process requires several hours of pumping in a vacuum system to remove the ether and convert the alane etherate into stable α-alane. This crystallization process is both costly and hazardous because a large amount of highly flammable material (e.g. ether) is removed by vacuum pumps over several hours. Conversely, the work presented herein describes novel methods to synthesize adduct-free alane. It is demonstrated here that AlH3 can form by mixing AlCl3 and LiAlH4 in the solid state and heating to 75∘C; only α-AlH3 was obtained. The α-AlH3 product can be washed with minimal solvents leading to zero formation of alane adducts. In addition, the unwanted LiCl by-product is also removed during the solvent wash, resulting in halide-free α-alane. Although simply mixing and heating the reactants led to a 40% yield of alane, having the reactants compacted and mechanically pressed while heating increases the yield to 60% crystalline α-AlH3.

  18. Light metal alanates and amides for reversible hydrogen storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jun

    Hydrogen is undoubtedly one of the key alternatives to replace petroleum products as a clean energy carrier for both transportation and stationary applications. Although there have been numerous material systems studied as potential candidates for hydrogen storage applications, none of the materials known to date has demonstrated sufficient hydrogen capacity or efficiency in the required operating temperature ranges. There are still considerable opportunities for the discovery of new materials that could lead to advances in science as well as commercial technologies in this area. In this study, two new hydrogen-storage systems, i.e. alanate/amide and LiMgN, are investigated. Firstly, we found that if LiAlH4 and LiNH2 are allowed to react in a proper molar ratio, the LiH that forms as an intermediate product of the dehydrogenation of LiAlH4 can subsequently react with LiNH2 to release H2 at temperatures below 300°C, much lower than that without LiNH2. However, this system is only partially reversible. The difficulty of reversing the reaction is attributed to the irreversibility of the dehydrogenation reaction of LiAlH4 to Li3AlH6. Further experimental results showed that the reversible storage capacity of the combined alanate/amide material system is increased to 7.0 wt% under 300°C, if LiNH2 were reacted with Li3AlH6, instead of LiAlH4, in a 3:1 molar ratio. We also found that the re-formation of Li3AlH 6 depends strongly on the heating rate during the hydrogenation process. To improve the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of the Li-Al-N-H systems, the reaction between Li3AlH6 and Mg(NH2) 2 was studied based on the understanding of the destabilizing effect of amide on alanates. The Li-Al-Mg-N-H system would have better kinetic properties than the Li-Al-N-H system due to the addition of Mg, based on the published research results on the comparison between the Li-Mg-N-H and Li-N-H systems. A reversible 6.2 wt% H2 storage capacity has been demonstrated under the

  19. Sir Alan Sterling Parkes: 10 September 1900 - 17 July 1990.

    PubMed

    Polge, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    Alan Parkes was one of the most influential figures in the field of reproductive biology in the twentieth century. He had a huge impact on its growth and development during that time, and the legacy of his work still remains.His research was highly innovative and original because of his imaginative and inquiring mind, which, coupled with an entrepreneurial bent, led him into several very different fields and into unchartered waters. He played a leading role in the spectacular rise of reproductive endocrinology in Britain in the 1920s and 1930s when the nature and activity of many of the reproductive processes in animals and humans and was an essential factor in the development of methods for their control. Even more pioneering was his research in low-temperature biology in the years after World War II. This was sparked off by the discovery that glycerol had a remarkable property of protecting spermatozoa against damage during freezing and storage at very low temperatures. Far-reaching applications arose from this discovery, especially in the preservation of bull semen, which led to a worldwide revolution in artificial insemination in cattle. Later, many other cells and tissues were also successfully frozen, including red blood cells, ovarian tissue and bone marrow, and a new branch of biological science, which became known as 'cryobiology', was born, Effects of deep hypothermia, including freezing, on whole animals were also investigated at that time. Having successfully launched a new area of science, it was characteristic of Alan Parkes to switch to new fields. First he became interested in the influence of pheromones on mammalian reproduction. Then, resuming a long-standing interest in comparative aspects of reproductive physiology in British wild mammals, he became involved in the work of the Nuffield Unit of Tropical Animal Ecology in Uganda, where similar studies were carried out on African animals. Even after retirement from the academic field, he was for

  20. The feasibility of using trimethylamine alane as an Al precursor for MOMBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abernathy, C. R.; Jordan, A. S.; Pearton, S. J.; Ren, F.; Baiocchi, F.; Bohling, D. A.; Muhr, G. T.

    1991-02-01

    The growth of III-V Al-containing epitaxial structures by MOMBE has proven difficult due to the excessive oxygen and carbon contamination introduced by the Al source. Triethylaluminum (TEAl), the most commonly used precursor, produces unacceptable levels of both impurities in AlGaAs grown by MOMBE. We have grown AlGaAs films with excellent structural and optical properties using a novel source, trimethylamine alane (TMAAl). Photoluminescence intensities from AlGaAs grown by MOMBE at 500δC with TMAAl are comparable to those from material grown by MOCVD at 675δC using trimethylaluminum. In addition, carbon and oxygen levels in AlGaAs, as detected by SIMS, are drastically reduced in comparison to similar films produced with TEAl. We shall also discuss the effects of growth temperature and Al content on carbon and oxygen incorporation as well as crystallinity and provide preliminary device results on GaAs/AlGaAs HBTs prepared by the MOMBE technique.

  1. Astronauts Alan Bean and Charles Conrad on Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The second manned lunar landing mission, Apollo 12 launched from launch pad 39-A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on November 14, 1969 via a Saturn Five launch vehicle. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard Apollo 12 was a crew of three astronauts: Alan L. Bean, pilot of the Lunar Module (LM), Intrepid; Richard Gordon, pilot of the Command Module (CM), Yankee Clipper; and Spacecraft Commander Charles Conrad. The LM, Intrepid, landed astronauts Conrad and Bean on the lunar surface in what's known as the Ocean of Storms while astronaut Richard Gordon piloted the CM, Yankee Clipper, in a parking orbit around the Moon. Their lunar soil activities included the deployment of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP), finding the unmanned Surveyor 3 that landed on the Moon on April 19, 1967, and collecting 75 pounds (34 kilograms) of rock samples. In this photograph, one of the astronauts on the Moon's surface is holding a container of lunar soil. The other astronaut is seen reflected in his helmet. Apollo 12 safely returned to Earth on November 24, 1969.

  2. How Alan Hirsig plans to play Arco chemical's strong hand

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, D.

    1993-02-17

    With 1992 net income up 4%, to $195 million. Arco Chemical (Newtown Square, PA) held its own in a year when many of its petrochemical industry peers were mauled again. Arco Chemical president and CEO Alan R. Hirsig talked recently with CW about his growth strategies for the company, and about progress with his Manufacturing Excellence initiative, lauched in the wake of the 1990 Channelview, TX tragedy. Riding on faster growth in the Asia region, Hirsig expects to see Arco's regional sales mix shift in the next three years and sales to grow from 1992's $3.1 billion to $4 billion/year. The foundation for that growth continues to be Arco's core proprietary technology competence for making propylene oxide (PO) with coproduction and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) - the key methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) feedstock, or styrene monomer. Arco claims a 28% share of world MTBE capacity, its 78,500-bbl/day capacity. He cites Jakarta, Bangkok, Mexico City, Milan, Turin, and Athens as examples of major cities where MTBE use in reformulated fuels is getting interest. Given what he views as Europe's traditional 10-year lag on the US in areas like catalytic mufflers and unleaded gasoline, he sees significant prospects in reformulated gasoline in that region in the coming years. Arco is also testing a proprietary TBA-based hydroperoxide in diesel fuels, which improves the cetane number and cleans up exhaust emissions, winning great interest in Tokyo. Also in the fuels area, Hirsig notes interest in ethyl tert-butyl ether production - which Arco launched in the US in December on a commercial scale - in France.

  3. Preparation of polyaniline/sodium alanate hybrid using a spray-drying process

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, B. R. E-mail: fabiopassador@gmail.com Passador, F. R. E-mail: fabiopassador@gmail.com Pessan, L. A. E-mail: fabiopassador@gmail.com

    2014-05-15

    Nowadays, hydrogen is highly interesting as an energy source, in particular in the automotive field. In fact, hydrogen is attractive as a fuel because it prevents air pollution and greenhouse emissions. One of the main problems with the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel is its on-board storage. The purpouse of this work was to develop a new hybrid material consisting of a polyaniline matrix with sodium alanate (NaAlH{sub 4}) using a spray-drying process. The polyaniline used for this experiment was synthesized by following a well-established method for the synthesis of the emeraldine base form of polyaniline using dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid as dopant. Micro particles of polyaniline/sodium alanate hybrids with 30 and 50 wt% of sodium alanate were prepared by using a spray-drying technique. Dilute solutions of polyaniline/sodium alanate were first prepared, 10g of the solid materials were mixed with 350 ml of toluene under stirring at room temperature for 24h and the solutions were dried using spray-dryer (Büchi, Switzerland) with 115°C of an inlet temperature. The hybrids were analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry, FT-IR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The addition of sodium alanate decreased the glass transition temperature of the hybrids when compared to neat polyaniline. FT-IR spectrum analysis was performed to identify the bonding environment of the synthesized material and was observed that simply physically mixture occurred between polyaniline and sodium alanate. The SEM images of the hybrids showed the formation of microspheres with sodium alanate dispersed in the polymer matrix.

  4. Preparation of polyaniline/sodium alanate hybrid using a spray-drying process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, B. R.; Passador, F. R.; Pessan, L. A.

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays, hydrogen is highly interesting as an energy source, in particular in the automotive field. In fact, hydrogen is attractive as a fuel because it prevents air pollution and greenhouse emissions. One of the main problems with the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel is its on-board storage. The purpouse of this work was to develop a new hybrid material consisting of a polyaniline matrix with sodium alanate (NaAlH4) using a spray-drying process. The polyaniline used for this experiment was synthesized by following a well-established method for the synthesis of the emeraldine base form of polyaniline using dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid as dopant. Micro particles of polyaniline/sodium alanate hybrids with 30 and 50 wt% of sodium alanate were prepared by using a spray-drying technique. Dilute solutions of polyaniline/sodium alanate were first prepared, 10g of the solid materials were mixed with 350 ml of toluene under stirring at room temperature for 24h and the solutions were dried using spray-dryer (Büchi, Switzerland) with 115°C of an inlet temperature. The hybrids were analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry, FT-IR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The addition of sodium alanate decreased the glass transition temperature of the hybrids when compared to neat polyaniline. FT-IR spectrum analysis was performed to identify the bonding environment of the synthesized material and was observed that simply physically mixture occurred between polyaniline and sodium alanate. The SEM images of the hybrids showed the formation of microspheres with sodium alanate dispersed in the polymer matrix.

  5. LEDs/ALAN-Working To Be Good Neighbors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Robert

    2015-08-01

    ALAN (Artificial Light At Night) and LEDs have recently become major discussion topics in the areas of astronomy, light pollution, endangered species and human health to mention but a few. In years past, MH, LPS and HPS dominated night lighting with LPS and its associated narrow spectrum as the preferred source around observatories and shorelines. LEDs offer the ability to modify the spectrum, realize substantial energy savings and other associated benefits while meeting the requirements of the astronomy community.The primary concern of the different groups relates to blue light content of the LED. For astronomers, the molecular (Raleigh) scattering related to the blue light interferes with certain portions of the spectrum used for deep space studies. The ecologists studying various endangered species find blue and green light can be related to declining leatherback turtle population in certain areas of the world. Other animals ranging from bats to moths and other insects are now being studied to determine the effect of the blue light spectrum on their behavior. The impact of blue light on the human circadian rhythm and vision, especially in the older population, is being extensively studied today.This presentation will discuss the spectral power distribution (SPD) of various light sources, the performance of new LED solutions and how the SPD of these new LED’s can be adapted to address some of the issues raised by various constituencies. A discussion describing why some of the metrics used to describe standard lighting are not adequate for specifying the new LED solutions with the modified spectra will be included.Today, lighting plans and implementation are all too often based on opinions and limited data. The ensuing problems and repercussions make it imperative to collect accurate and thorough information. Data collection is now ongoing using a variety of techniques analyzing the “before” and “after” lighting results from the C of HI LED streetlight

  6. Towards direct synthesis of alane: A predicted defect-mediated pathway confirmed experimentally

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Lin -Lin; Herwadkar, Aditi; Reich, Jason M.; Johnson, Duane D.; House, Stephen D.; Pena-Martin, Pamela; Rockett, Angus A.; Robertson, Ian M.; Gupta, Shalabh; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    2016-08-18

    Here, alane (AlH3) is a unique energetic material that has not found a broad practical use for over 70 years because it is difficult to synthesize directly from its elements. Using density functional theory, we examine the defect-mediated formation of alane monomers on Al(111) in a two-step process: (1) dissociative adsorption of H2 and (2) alane formation, which are both endothermic on a clean surface. Only with Ti dopant to facilitate H2 dissociation and vacancies to provide Al adatoms, both processes become exothermic. In agreement, in situ scanning tunneling microscopy showed that during H2 exposure, alane monomers and clusters formmore » primarily in the vicinity of Al vacancies and Ti atoms. Moreover, ball milling of the Al samples with Ti (providing necessary defects) showed a 10 % conversion of Al into AlH3 or closely related species at 344 bar H2, indicating that the predicted pathway may lead to the direct synthesis of alane from elements at pressures much lower than the 104 bar expected from bulk thermodynamics.« less

  7. Towards Direct Synthesis of Alane: A Predicted Defect-Mediated Pathway Confirmed Experimentally.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin-Lin; Herwadkar, Aditi; Reich, Jason M; Johnson, Duane D; House, Stephen D; Peña-Martin, Pamela; Rockett, Angus A; Robertson, Ian M; Gupta, Shalabh; Pecharsky, Vitalij K

    2016-09-01

    Alane (AlH3 ) is a unique energetic material that has not found a broad practical use for over 70 years because it is difficult to synthesize directly from its elements. Using density functional theory, we examine the defect-mediated formation of alane monomers on Al(111) in a two-step process: (1) dissociative adsorption of H2 and (2) alane formation, which are both endothermic on a clean surface. Only with Ti dopant to facilitate H2 dissociation and vacancies to provide Al adatoms, both processes become exothermic. In agreement, in situ scanning tunneling microscopy showed that during H2 exposure, alane monomers and clusters form primarily in the vicinity of Al vacancies and Ti atoms. Moreover, ball milling of the Al samples with Ti (providing necessary defects) showed a 10 % conversion of Al into AlH3 or closely related species at 344 bar H2 , indicating that the predicted pathway may lead to the direct synthesis of alane from elements at pressures much lower than the 10(4)  bar expected from bulk thermodynamics. PMID:27535100

  8. Thermochemistry of Alane Complexes for Hydrogen Storage: A Theoretical and Experimental Investigation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the relative stabilities of alane (AlH3) complexes with electron donors is essential for identifying hydrogen storage materials for vehicular applications that can be regenerated by off-board methods; however, almost no thermodynamic data are available to make this assessment. To fill this gap, we employed the G4(MP2) method to determine heats of formation, entropies, and Gibbs free energies of formation for 38 alane complexes with NH3−nRn (R = Me, Et; n = 0−3), pyridine, pyrazine, triethylenediamine (TEDA), quinuclidine, OH2−nRn (R = Me, Et; n = 0−2), dioxane, and tetrahydrofuran (THF). Monomer, bis, and selected dimer complex geometries were considered. Using these data, we computed the thermodynamics of the key formation and dehydrogenation reactions that would occur during hydrogen delivery and alane regeneration, from which trends in complex stability were identified. These predictions were tested by synthesizing six amine−alane complexes involving trimethylamine, triethylamine, dimethylethylamine, TEDA, quinuclidine, and hexamine and obtaining upper limits of ΔG° for their formation from metallic aluminum. Combining these computational and experimental results, we establish a criterion for complex stability relevant to hydrogen storage that can be used to assess potential ligands prior to attempting synthesis of the alane complex. On the basis of this, we conclude that only a subset of the tertiary amine complexes considered and none of the ether complexes can be successfully formed by direct reaction with aluminum and regenerated in an alane-based hydrogen storage system. PMID:22962624

  9. Thermochemistry of Alane Complexes for Hydrogen Storage: A Theoretical and Experimental Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, B.M.; Graetz, J.; Lacina, D.; Nielsen, I.M.B.; Allendorf, M.D.

    2011-03-30

    Knowledge of the relative stabilities of alane (AlH{sub 3}) complexes with electron donors is essential for identifying hydrogen storage materials for vehicular applications that can be regenerated by off-board methods; however, almost no thermodynamic data are available to make this assessment. To fill this gap, we employed the G4(MP2) method to determine heats of formation, entropies, and Gibbs free energies of formation for 38 alane complexes with NH{sub 3-n}R{sub n} (R = Me, Et; n = 0-3), pyridine, pyrazine, triethylenediamine (TEDA), quinuclidine, OH{sub 2-n}R{sub n} (R = Me, Et; n = 0-2), dioxane, and tetrahydrofuran (THF). Monomer, bis, and selected dimer complex geometries were considered. Using these data, we computed the thermodynamics of the key formation and dehydrogenation reactions that would occur during hydrogen delivery and alane regeneration, from which trends in complex stability were identified. These predictions were tested by synthesizing six amine-alane complexes involving trimethylamine, triethylamine, dimethylethylamine, TEDA, quinuclidine, and hexamine and obtaining upper limits of {Delta}G{sup o} for their formation from metallic aluminum. Combining these computational and experimental results, we establish a criterion for complex stability relevant to hydrogen storage that can be used to assess potential ligands prior to attempting synthesis of the alane complex. On the basis of this, we conclude that only a subset of the tertiary amine complexes considered and none of the ether complexes can be successfully formed by direct reaction with aluminum and regenerated in an alane-based hydrogen storage system.

  10. Presidents' Panel: A Conversation with I. King Jordan, Robert Davila, and T. Alan Hurwitz

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwald, Brian H.; Jordan, I. King; Davila, Robert; Hurwitz, T. Alan

    2014-01-01

    Former Gallaudet presidents: I. King Jordan and Robert Davila join current president T. Alan Hurwitz on a panel moderated by Brian H. Greenwald as they share their experience leading this institution of higher education and offer insight into the transformative changes brought about by the "Deaf President Now" movement.

  11. A Critical Stance in Language Education: A Reply to Alan Waters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, James

    2009-01-01

    In his recent Forum article on ideology in applied linguistics, Alan Waters (2009) takes up arms against what he perceives as a damaging critical tendency. Ideas about language teaching, he claims, are promoted (e.g. learner centredness) or proscribed (e.g. artificial texts) "on the basis of ideological belief rather than pedagogical value". By…

  12. MA-9 ASTRONAUT GORDON COOPER EXPLAINS CAMERA TO BACKUP PILOT ALAN SHEPARD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Astronaut L. Gordon Cooper explains the 16MM handheld spacecraft camera to his back-up pilot Astronaut Alan Shepard. The camera designed by J. R. Hereford, McDonnell Aircraft Corp., will be used by Cooper during the MA-9 mission.

  13. Astronaut Alan Bean deploys ALSEP during first Apollo 12 EVA on moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Apollo 12 lunar module pilot, deploys components of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) during the first Apollo 12 extravehicular activity (EVA) on the moon. The photo was made by Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., Apollo 12 commander, using a 70mm handheld Haselblad camera modified for lunar surface usage.

  14. Astronaut Alan Bean steps from ladder of Lunar Module for EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot for the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission, steps from the ladder of the Lunar Module to join Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander, in extravehicular activity on November 19, 1969. Astronaut Ricard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot, remained with the Command/Service Modules in lunar orbit.

  15. Astronaut Alan Bean looks over data acquisition camera on Skylab trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, commander for Skylab 3, the second manned Skylab mission, looks over the data acquisition camera mounted on the water tank in the upper level of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) one-G trainer at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC).

  16. Challenging the Status Quo: Alan Pifer and Higher Education Reform in Colonial Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anyanwu, Ogechi E.

    2013-01-01

    The historiography of higher education in Nigeria has not fully accounted for Alan Pifer's crucial contributions in reforming the elitist British higher education tradition in colonial Nigeria. Through qualitative analysis of mostly primary sources acquired from the Rare Book and Manuscript Library in Columbia University, this article argues that…

  17. Introducing Electromagnetic Field Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang

    2012-01-01

    I describe an elementary way of introducing electromagnetic field momentum. By considering a system of a long solenoid and line charge, the dependence of the field momentum on the electric and magnetic fields can be deduced. I obtain the electromagnetic angular momentum for a point charge and magnetic monopole pair partially through dimensional…

  18. INTRODUCED TERRESTRIAL SPECIES RICHNESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    These data represent predicted current distributions of all introduced mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and butterflies in the Middle-Atlantic region. These data are available for both 8-digit HUCs and EMAP hexagons. The data are species counts for each spatial unit.

  19. Introducing the Blues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Bryan

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the history of the blues and presents a list of resources that are designed to introduce the blues, both as a feeling and as an influential part of American music and culture. Includes picture books and nonfiction for young readers, nonfiction for older readers, Web sites, and compact disks. (LRW)

  20. Astronaut Alan Bean reads data from book while holding teleprinter tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, reads data from book in his right hand while holding teleprinter tape in his left hand, in the ward room of the Skylab space station's Orbital Workshop (OWS) crew quarters. This photograph was taken with a 35mm Nikon camera held by one of Bean's fellow crewmen during the 56.5 day second manned Skylab mission in Earth orbit.

  1. Hydrogen release properties of lithium alanate for application to fuel cell propulsion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbo, P.; Migliardini, F.; Veneri, O.

    In this paper the results of an experimental study on LiAlH 4 (lithium alanate) as hydrogen source for fuel cell propulsion systems are reported. The compound examined in this work was selected as reference material for light metal hydrides, because of its high hydrogen content (10.5 wt.%) and interesting desorption kinetic properties at moderate temperatures. Thermal dynamic and kinetic of hydrogen release from this hydride were investigated using a fixed bed reactor to evaluate the effect of heating procedure, carrier gas flow rate and sample form. The aim of this study was to characterize the lithium alanate decomposition through the reaction steps leading to the formation of Li 3AlH 6 and LiH. A hydrogen tank was designed and realized to contain pellets of lithium alanate as feeding for a fuel cell propulsion system based on a 2-kW Polymeric Electrolyte Fuel Cell (PEFC) stack. The fuel cell system was integrated into the power train comprising DC-DC converter, energy storage systems and electric drive for moped applications (3 kW). The experiments on the power train were conducted on a test bench able to simulate the vehicle behaviour and road characteristics on specific driving cycles. In particular the efficiencies of individual components and overall power train were analyzed evidencing the energy requirements of the hydrogen storage material.

  2. Genome Sequences of Mycobacteriophages AlanGrant, Baee, Corofin, OrangeOswald, and Vincenzo, New Members of Cluster B

    PubMed Central

    Carbonara, Maria E.; Cioffi, Hanna M.; Cruz, Tyler; Dang, Brian Q.; Doyle, Alexander N.; Fan, Olivia H.; Gallagher, Molly; Gentile, Gabrielle M.; German, Brian A.; Farrell, Margaret E.; Gerwig, Madeline; Hunter, Kelsey L.; Lefever, Virginia E.; Marfisi, Nicole A.; McDonnell, Jill E.; Monga, Jappmann K.; Quiroz, Kevin G.; Pong, Alexandra C.; Rimple, Patrick A.; Situ, Michelle; Sohnen, Peri C.; Stockinger, Annmarie N.; Thompson, Paige K.; Torchio, Nicole M.; Toner, Chelsea L.; Ulbrich, Megan C.; Vohra, Neelam I.; Zakir, Aala; Adkins, Nancy L.; Brown, Bryony R.; Churilla, Bryce M.; Kramer, Zachary J.; Lapin, Jonathan S.; Montgomery, Matthew T.; Prout, Ashley K.; Grubb, Sarah R.; Warner, Marcie H.; Bowman, Charles A.; Russell, Daniel A.; Hatfull, Graham F.

    2015-01-01

    AlanGrant, Baee, Corofin, OrangeOswald, and Vincenzo are newly isolated phages of Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155 discovered in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. All five phages share nucleotide similarity with cluster B mycobacteriophages but span considerable diversity with Corofin and OrangeOswald in subcluster B3, AlanGrant and Vincenzo in subcluster B4, and Baee in subcluster B5. PMID:26089409

  3. Genome Sequences of Mycobacteriophages AlanGrant, Baee, Corofin, OrangeOswald, and Vincenzo, New Members of Cluster B.

    PubMed

    Pope, Welkin H; Carbonara, Maria E; Cioffi, Hanna M; Cruz, Tyler; Dang, Brian Q; Doyle, Alexander N; Fan, Olivia H; Gallagher, Molly; Gentile, Gabrielle M; German, Brian A; Farrell, Margaret E; Gerwig, Madeline; Hunter, Kelsey L; Lefever, Virginia E; Marfisi, Nicole A; McDonnell, Jill E; Monga, Jappmann K; Quiroz, Kevin G; Pong, Alexandra C; Rimple, Patrick A; Situ, Michelle; Sohnen, Peri C; Stockinger, Annmarie N; Thompson, Paige K; Torchio, Nicole M; Toner, Chelsea L; Ulbrich, Megan C; Vohra, Neelam I; Zakir, Aala; Adkins, Nancy L; Brown, Bryony R; Churilla, Bryce M; Kramer, Zachary J; Lapin, Jonathan S; Montgomery, Matthew T; Prout, Ashley K; Grubb, Sarah R; Warner, Marcie H; Bowman, Charles A; Russell, Daniel A; Hatfull, Graham F

    2015-01-01

    AlanGrant, Baee, Corofin, OrangeOswald, and Vincenzo are newly isolated phages of Mycobacterium smegmatis mc(2)155 discovered in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. All five phages share nucleotide similarity with cluster B mycobacteriophages but span considerable diversity with Corofin and OrangeOswald in subcluster B3, AlanGrant and Vincenzo in subcluster B4, and Baee in subcluster B5. PMID:26089409

  4. Introducing CAML II

    SciTech Connect

    Pelaia II, Tom; Boyes, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Channel Access Markup Language (CAML) is a XML based markup language and implementation for displaying EPICS channel access controls within a web browser. The CAML II project expanded upon the work of CAML I adding more features and greater integration with other web technologies. The most dramatic new feature introduced in CAML II is the introduction of a namespace so CAML controls can be embedded within XHTML documents. A repetition template with macro substitution allows for rapid coding of arbitrary XHTML repetitions. Enhancements have been made to several controls including more powerful plotting options. Advanced formatting options were introduced for text controls. Virtual process variables allow for custom calculations. An EDL to CAML translator eases the transition from EDM screens to CAML pages.

  5. Introducing electromagnetic field momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu-Kuang Hu, Ben

    2012-07-01

    I describe an elementary way of introducing electromagnetic field momentum. By considering a system of a long solenoid and line charge, the dependence of the field momentum on the electric and magnetic fields can be deduced. I obtain the electromagnetic angular momentum for a point charge and magnetic monopole pair partially through dimensional analysis and without using vector calculus identities or the need to evaluate integrals. I use this result to show that linear and angular momenta are conserved for a charge in the presence of a magnetic dipole when the dipole strength is changed.

  6. Introducing the CTA concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, B. S.; Actis, M.; Aghajani, T.; Agnetta, G.; Aguilar, J.; Aharonian, F.; Ajello, M.; Akhperjanian, A.; Alcubierre, M.; Aleksić, J.; Alfaro, R.; Aliu, E.; Allafort, A. J.; Allan, D.; Allekotte, I.; Amato, E.; Anderson, J.; Angüner, E. O.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Aravantinos, A.; Arlen, T.; Armstrong, T.; Arnaldi, H.; Arrabito, L.; Asano, K.; Ashton, T.; Asorey, H. G.; Awane, Y.; Baba, H.; Babic, A.; Baby, N.; Bähr, J.; Bais, A.; Baixeras, C.; Bajtlik, S.; Balbo, M.; Balis, D.; Balkowski, C.; Bamba, A.; Bandiera, R.; Barber, A.; Barbier, C.; Barceló, M.; Barnacka, A.; Barnstedt, J.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Basili, A.; Basso, S.; Bastieri, D.; Bauer, C.; Baushev, A.; Becerra, J.; Becherini, Y.; Bechtol, K. C.; Becker Tjus, J.; Beckmann, V.; Bednarek, W.; Behera, B.; Belluso, M.; Benbow, W.; Berdugo, J.; Berger, K.; Bernard, F.; Bernardino, T.; Bernlöhr, K.; Bhat, N.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Biland, A.; Billotta, S.; Bird, T.; Birsin, E.; Bissaldi, E.; Biteau, J.; Bitossi, M.; Blake, S.; Blanch Bigas, O.; Blasi, P.; Bobkov, A.; Boccone, V.; Boettcher, M.; Bogacz, L.; Bogart, J.; Bogdan, M.; Boisson, C.; Boix Gargallo, J.; Bolmont, J.; Bonanno, G.; Bonardi, A.; Bonev, T.; Bonifacio, P.; Bonnoli, G.; Bordas, P.; Borgland, A.; Borkowski, J.; Bose, R.; Botner, O.; Bottani, A.; Bouchet, L.; Bourgeat, M.; Boutonnet, C.; Bouvier, A.; Brau-Nogué, S.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Briggs, M.; Bringmann, T.; Brook, P.; Brun, P.; Brunetti, L.; Buanes, T.; Buckley, J.; Buehler, R.; Bugaev, V.; Bulgarelli, A.; Bulik, T.; Busetto, G.; Buson, S.; Byrum, K.; Cailles, M.; Cameron, R.; Camprecios, J.; Canestrari, R.; Cantu, S.; Capalbi, M.; Caraveo, P.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Carr, J.; Carton, P.-H.; Casanova, S.; Casiraghi, M.; Catalano, O.; Cavazzani, S.; Cazaux, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chabanne, E.; Chadwick, P.; Champion, C.; Chen, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiappetti, L.; Chikawa, M.; Chitnis, V. R.; Chollet, F.; Chudoba, J.; Cieślar, M.; Cillis, A.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colin, P.; Colome, J.; Colonges, S.; Compin, M.; Conconi, P.; Conforti, V.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Contreras, J. L.; Coppi, P.; Corona, P.; Corti, D.; Cortina, J.; Cossio, L.; Costantini, H.; Cotter, G.; Courty, B.; Couturier, S.; Covino, S.; Crimi, G.; Criswell, S. J.; Croston, J.; Cusumano, G.; Dafonseca, M.; Dale, O.; Daniel, M.; Darling, J.; Davids, I.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Caprio, V.; De Frondat, F.; de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; de la Calle, I.; De La Vega, G. A.; de los Reyes Lopez, R.; De Lotto, B.; De Luca, A.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Naurois, M.; de Oliveira, Y.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; de Souza, V.; Decerprit, G.; Decock, G.; Deil, C.; Delagnes, E.; Deleglise, G.; Delgado, C.; Della Volpe, D.; Demange, P.; Depaola, G.; Dettlaff, A.; Di Paola, A.; Di Pierro, F.; Díaz, C.; Dick, J.; Dickherber, R.; Dickinson, H.; Diez-Blanco, V.; Digel, S.; Dimitrov, D.; Disset, G.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Doert, M.; Dohmke, M.; Domainko, W.; Dominis Prester, D.; Donat, A.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Dournaux, J.-L.; Drake, G.; Dravins, D.; Drury, L.; Dubois, F.; Dubois, R.; Dubus, G.; Dufour, C.; Dumas, D.; Dumm, J.; Durand, D.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Ebr, J.; Edy, E.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Einecke, S.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Elles, S.; Emmanoulopoulos, D.; Engelhaupt, D.; Enomoto, R.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Errando, M.; Etchegoyen, A.; Evans, P.; Falcone, A.; Fantinel, D.; Farakos, K.; Farnier, C.; Fasola, G.; Favill, B.; Fede, E.; Federici, S.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Ferenc, D.; Ferrando, P.; Fesquet, M.; Fiasson, A.; Fillin-Martino, E.; Fink, D.; Finley, C.; Finley, J. P.; Fiorini, M.; Firpo Curcoll, R.; Flores, H.; Florin, D.; Focke, W.; Föhr, C.; Fokitis, E.; Font, L.; Fontaine, G.; Fornasa, M.; Förster, A.; Fortson, L.; Fouque, N.; Franckowiak, A.; Fransson, C.; Fraser, G.; Frei, R.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Fresnillo, L.; Fruck, C.; Fujita, Y.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fukui, Y.; Funk, S.; Gäbele, W.; Gabici, S.; Gabriele, R.; Gadola, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Gallant, Y.; Gámez-García, J.; García, B.; Garcia López, R.; Gardiol, D.; Garrido, D.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaug, M.; Gaweda, J.; Gebremedhin, L.; Geffroy, N.; Gerard, L.; Ghedina, A.; Ghigo, M.; Giannakaki, E.; Gianotti, F.; Giarrusso, S.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Gika, V.; Giommi, P.; Girard, N.; Giro, E.; Giuliani, A.; Glanzman, T.; Glicenstein, J.-F.; Godinovic, N.; Golev, V.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Gómez-Ortega, J.; Gonzalez, M. M.; González, A.; González, F.; González Muñoz, A.; Gothe, K. S.; Gougerot, M.; Graciani, R.; Grandi, P.; Grañena, F.; Granot, J.; Grasseau, G.; Gredig, R.; Green, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grégoire, T.; Grimm, O.; Grube, J.; Grudzinska, M.; Gruev, V.; Grünewald, S.; Grygorczuk, J.; Guarino, V.; Gunji, S.; Gyuk, G.; Hadasch, D.; Hagiwara, R.; Hahn, J.; Hakansson, N.; Hallgren, A.; Hamer Heras, N.; Hara, S.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Harris, J.; Hassan, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Haubold, T.; Haupt, A.; Hayakawa, T.; Hayashida, M.; Heller, R.; Henault, F.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hermel, R.; Herrero, A.; Hidaka, N.; Hinton, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holder, J.; Horns, D.; Horville, D.; Houles, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hrupec, D.; Huan, H.; Huber, B.; Huet, J.-M.; Hughes, G.; Humensky, T. B.; Huovelin, J.; Ibarra, A.; Illa, J. M.; Impiombato, D.; Incorvaia, S.; Inoue, S.; Inoue, Y.; Ioka, K.; Ismailova, E.; Jablonski, C.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jean, P.; Jeanney, C.; Jimenez, J. J.; Jogler, T.; Johnson, T.; Journet, L.; Juffroy, C.; Jung, I.; Kaaret, P.; Kabuki, S.; Kagaya, M.; Kakuwa, J.; Kalkuhl, C.; Kankanyan, R.; Karastergiou, A.; Kärcher, K.; Karczewski, M.; Karkar, S.; Kasperek, J.; Kastana, D.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kawanaka, N.; Kellner-Leidel, B.; Kelly, H.; Kendziorra, E.; Khélifi, B.; Kieda, D. B.; Kifune, T.; Kihm, T.; Kishimoto, T.; Kitamoto, K.; Kluźniak, W.; Knapic, C.; Knapp, J.; Knödlseder, J.; Köck, F.; Kocot, J.; Kodani, K.; Köhne, J.-H.; Kohri, K.; Kokkotas, K.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, N.; Kominis, I.; Konno, Y.; Köppel, H.; Korohoda, P.; Kosack, K.; Koss, G.; Kossakowski, R.; Kostka, P.; Koul, R.; Kowal, G.; Koyama, S.; Kozioł, J.; Krähenbühl, T.; Krause, J.; Krawzcynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Krepps, A.; Kretzschmann, A.; Krobot, R.; Krueger, P.; Kubo, H.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Kushida, J.; Kuznetsov, A.; La Barbera, A.; La Palombara, N.; La Parola, V.; La Rosa, G.; Lacombe, K.; Lamanna, G.; Lande, J.; Languignon, D.; Lapington, J.; Laporte, P.; Lavalley, C.; Le Flour, T.; Le Padellec, A.; Lee, S.-H.; Lee, W. H.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lelas, D.; Lenain, J.-P.; Leopold, D. J.; Lerch, T.; Lessio, L.; Lieunard, B.; Lindfors, E.; Liolios, A.; Lipniacka, A.; Lockart, H.; Lohse, T.; Lombardi, S.; Lopatin, A.; Lopez, M.; López-Coto, R.; López-Oramas, A.; Lorca, A.; Lorenz, E.; Lubinski, P.; Lucarelli, F.; Lüdecke, H.; Ludwin, J.; Luque-Escamilla, P. L.; Lustermann, W.; Luz, O.; Lyard, E.; Maccarone, M. C.; Maccarone, T. J.; Madejski, G. M.; Madhavan, A.; Mahabir, M.; Maier, G.; Majumdar, P.; Malaguti, G.; Maltezos, S.; Manalaysay, A.; Mancilla, A.; Mandat, D.; Maneva, G.; Mangano, A.; Manigot, P.; Mannheim, K.; Manthos, I.; Maragos, N.; Marcowith, A.; Mariotti, M.; Marisaldi, M.; Markoff, S.; Marszałek, A.; Martens, C.; Martí, J.; Martin, J.-M.; Martin, P.; Martínez, G.; Martínez, F.; Martínez, M.; Masserot, A.; Mastichiadis, A.; Mathieu, A.; Matsumoto, H.; Mattana, F.; Mattiazzo, S.; Maurin, G.; Maxfield, S.; Maya, J.; Mazin, D.; Mc Comb, L.; McCubbin, N.; McHardy, I.; McKay, R.; Medina, C.; Melioli, C.; Melkumyan, D.; Mereghetti, S.; Mertsch, P.; Meucci, M.; Michałowski, J.; Micolon, P.; Mihailidis, A.; Mineo, T.; Minuti, M.; Mirabal, N.; Mirabel, F.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Mizuno, T.; Moal, B.; Moderski, R.; Mognet, I.; Molinari, E.; Molinaro, M.; Montaruli, T.; Monteiro, I.; Moore, P.; Moralejo Olaizola, A.; Mordalska, M.; Morello, C.; Mori, K.; Mottez, F.; Moudden, Y.; Moulin, E.; Mrusek, I.; Mukherjee, R.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Muraishi, H.; Murase, K.; Murphy, A.; Nagataki, S.; Naito, T.; Nakajima, D.; Nakamori, T.; Nakayama, K.; Naumann, C.; Naumann, D.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Nayman, P.; Nedbal, D.; Neise, D.; Nellen, L.; Neustroev, V.; Neyroud, N.; Nicastro, L.; Nicolau-Kukliński, J.; Niedźwiecki, A.; Niemiec, J.; Nieto, D.; Nikolaidis, A.; Nishijima, K.; Nolan, S.; Northrop, R.; Nosek, D.; Nowak, N.; Nozato, A.; O'Brien, P.; Ohira, Y.; Ohishi, M.; Ohm, S.; Ohoka, H.; Okuda, T.; Okumura, A.; Olive, J.-F.; Ong, R. A.; Orito, R.; Orr, M.; Osborne, J.; Ostrowski, M.; Otero, L. A.; Otte, N.; Ovcharov, E.; Oya, I.; Ozieblo, A.; Padilla, L.; Paiano, S.; Paillot, D.; Paizis, A.; Palanque, S.; Palatka, M.; Pallota, J.; Panagiotidis, K.; Panazol, J.-L.; Paneque, D.; Panter, M.; Paoletti, R.; Papayannis, A.; Papyan, G.; Paredes, J. M.; Pareschi, G.; Parks, G.; Parraud, J.-M.; Parsons, D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pech, M.; Pedaletti, G.; Pelassa, V.; Pelat, D.; Perez, M. d. C.; Persic, M.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pichel, A.; Pita, S.; Pizzolato, F.; Platos, Ł.; Platzer, R.; Pogosyan, L.; Pohl, M.; Pojmanski, G.; Ponz, J. D.; Potter, W.; Poutanen, J.; Prandini, E.; Prast, J.; Preece, R.; Profeti, F.; Prokoph, H.; Prouza, M.; Proyetti, M.; Puerto-Gimenez, I.; Pühlhofer, G.; Puljak, I.; Punch, M.; Pyzioł, R.; Quel, E. J.; Quinn, J.; Quirrenbach, A.; Racero, E.; Rajda, P. J.; Ramon, P.; Rando, R.; Rannot, R. C.; Rataj, M.; Raue, M.; Reardon, P.; Reimann, O.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reitberger, K.; Renaud, M.; Renner, S.; Reville, B.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Ribordy, M.; Richer, M. G.; Rico, J.; Ridky, J.; Rieger, F.; Ringegni, P.; Ripken, J.; Ristori, P. R.; Riviére, A.; Rivoire, S.; Rob, L.; Roeser, U.; Rohlfs, R.; Rojas, G.; Romano, P.; Romaszkan, W.; Romero, G. E.; Rosen, S.; Rosier Lees, S.; Ross, D.; Rouaix, G.; Rousselle, J.; Rousselle, S.; Rovero, A. C.; Roy, F.; Royer, S.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C.; Rupiński, M.; Russo, F.; Ryde, F.; Sacco, B.; Saemann, E. O.; Saggion, A.; Sahakian, V.; Saito, K.; Saito, T.; Saito, Y.; Sakaki, N.; Sakonaka, R.; Salini, A.; Sanchez, F.; Sanchez-Conde, M.; Sandoval, A.; Sandaker, H.; Sant'Ambrogio, E.; Santangelo, A.; Santos, E. M.; Sanuy, A.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartore, N.; Sasaki, H.; Satalecka, K.; Sawada, M.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Scarcioffolo, M.; Schafer, J.; Schanz, T.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schmidt, T.; Schmoll, J.; Schovanek, P.; Schroedter, M.; Schultz, C.; Schultze, J.; Schulz, A.; Schure, K.; Schwab, T.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarz, J.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schweizer, T.; Schwemmer, S.; Segreto, A.; Seiradakis, J.-H.; Sembroski, G. H.; Seweryn, K.; Sharma, M.; Shayduk, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Shi, J.; Shibata, T.; Shibuya, A.; Shum, E.; Sidoli, L.; Sidz, M.; Sieiro, J.; Sikora, M.; Silk, J.; Sillanpää, A.; Singh, B. B.; Sitarek, J.; Skole, C.; Smareglia, R.; Smith, A.; Smith, D.; Smith, J.; Smith, N.; Sobczyńska, D.; Sol, H.; Sottile, G.; Sowiński, M.; Spanier, F.; Spiga, D.; Spyrou, S.; Stamatescu, V.; Stamerra, A.; Starling, R.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Steiner, S.; Stergioulas, N.; Sternberger, R.; Sterzel, M.; Stinzing, F.; Stodulski, M.; Straumann, U.; Strazzeri, E.; Stringhetti, L.; Suarez, A.; Suchenek, M.; Sugawara, R.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Sun, S.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Suric, T.; Sutcliffe, P.; Sykes, J.; Szanecki, M.; Szepieniec, T.; Szostek, A.; Tagliaferri, G.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, K.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Talbot, G.; Tammi, J.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, S.; Tasan, J.; Tavani, M.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tejedor, L. A.; Telezhinsky, I.; Temnikov, P.; Tenzer, C.; Terada, Y.; Terrier, R.; Teshima, M.; Testa, V.; Tezier, D.; Thuermann, D.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tiengo, A.; Tluczykont, M.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tokanai, F.; Tokarz, M.; Toma, K.; Torii, K.; Tornikoski, M.; Torres, D. F.; Torres, M.; Tosti, G.; Totani, T.; Toussenel, F.; Tovmassian, G.; Travnicek, P.; Trifoglio, M.; Troyano, I.; Tsinganos, K.; Ueno, H.; Umehara, K.; Upadhya, S. S.; Usher, T.; Uslenghi, M.; Valdes-Galicia, J. F.; Vallania, P.; Vallejo, G.; van Driel, W.; van Eldik, C.; Vandenbrouke, J.; Vanderwalt, J.; Vankov, H.; Vasileiadis, G.; Vassiliev, V.; Veberic, D.; Vegas, I.; Vercellone, S.; Vergani, S.; Veyssiére, C.; Vialle, J. P.; Viana, A.; Videla, M.; Vincent, P.; Vincent, S.; Vink, J.; Vlahakis, N.; Vlahos, L.; Vogler, P.; Vollhardt, A.; von Gunten, H.-P.; Vorobiov, S.; Vuerli, C.; Waegebaert, V.; Wagner, R.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Walter, R.; Walther, T.; Warda, K.; Warwick, R.; Wawer, P.; Wawrzaszek, R.; Webb, N.; Wegner, P.; Weinstein, A.; Weitzel, Q.; Welsing, R.; Werner, M.; Wetteskind, H.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Wiesand, S.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, D. A.; Willingale, R.; Winiarski, K.; Wischnewski, R.; Wiśniewski, Ł.; Wood, M.; Wörnlein, A.; Xiong, Q.; Yadav, K. K.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Yamazaki, R.; Yanagita, S.; Yebras, J. M.; Yelos, D.; Yoshida, A.; Yoshida, T.; Yoshikoshi, T.; Zabalza, V.; Zacharias, M.; Zajczyk, A.; Zanin, R.; Zdziarski, A.; Zech, A.; Zhao, A.; Zhou, X.; Ziętara, K.; Ziolkowski, J.; Ziółkowski, P.; Zitelli, V.; Zurbach, C.; Żychowski, P.; CTA Consortium

    2013-03-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a new observatory for very high-energy (VHE) gamma rays. CTA has ambitions science goals, for which it is necessary to achieve full-sky coverage, to improve the sensitivity by about an order of magnitude, to span about four decades of energy, from a few tens of GeV to above 100 TeV with enhanced angular and energy resolutions over existing VHE gamma-ray observatories. An international collaboration has formed with more than 1000 members from 27 countries in Europe, Asia, Africa and North and South America. In 2010 the CTA Consortium completed a Design Study and started a three-year Preparatory Phase which leads to production readiness of CTA in 2014. In this paper we introduce the science goals and the concept of CTA, and provide an overview of the project.

  7. Computational study of pristine and titanium-doped sodium alanates for hydrogen storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dathar, Gopi Krishna Phani

    The emphasis of this research is to study and elucidate the underlying mechanisms of reversible hydrogen storage in pristine and Ti-doped sodium aluminum hydrides using molecular modeling techniques. An early breakthrough in using complex metal hydrides as hydrogen storage materials is from the research on sodium alanates by Bogdanovic et al., in 1997 reporting reversible hydrogen storage is possible at moderate temperatures and pressures in transition metal doped sodium alanates. Anton reported titanium salts as the best catalysts compared to all other transition metal salts from his further research on transition metal doped sodium alanates. However, a few questions remained unanswered regarding the role of Ti in reversible hydrogen storage of sodium alanates with improved thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrogen desorption. The first question is about the position of transition metal dopants in the sodium aluminum hydride lattice. The position is investigated by identifying the possible sites for titanium dopants in NaAlH4 lattice and studying the structure and dynamics of possible compounds resulting from titanium doping in sodium alanates. The second question is the role of titanium dopants in improved thermodynamics of hydrogen desorption in Ti-doped NaAlH4. Though it is accepted in the literature that formation of TiAl alloys (Ti-Al and TiAl3) is favorable, reaction pathways are not clearly established. Furthermore, the source of aluminum for Ti-Al alloy formation is not clearly understood. The third question in this area is the role of titanium dopants in improved kinetics of hydrogen absorption and desorption in Ti-doped sodium alanates. This study is directed towards addressing the three longstanding questions in this area. Thermodynamic and kinetic pathways for hydrogen desorption in pristine NaAlH4 and formation of Ti-Al alloys in Ti-doped NaAlH 4, are elucidated to understand the underlying mechanisms of hydrogen desorption. Density functional theory

  8. Astronaut Alan Bean flies the Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment in the OWS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, flies the M509 Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment, as seen in this photographic reproduction taken from a television transmission made by a color television camera in the Orbital Workshop (OWS) of the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. Bean is strapped into the back-mounted, hand-controlled Automatically stabilized Maneuvering Unit (ASMU). The M509 exercise was in the forward dome area of the OWS. THe dome area is about 22 feet in diameter and 19 feet form top to bottom.

  9. Introducing ADS Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomazzi, Alberto; Henneken, E.; Grant, C. S.; Kurtz, M. J.; Di Milia, G.; Luker, J.; Thompson, D. M.; Bohlen, E.; Murray, S. S.

    2011-05-01

    ADS Labs is a platform that ADS is introducing in order to test and receive feedback from the community on new technologies and prototype services. Currently, ADS Labs features a new interface for abstract searches, faceted filtering of results, visualization of co-authorship networks, article-level recommendations, and a full-text search service. The streamlined abstract search interface provides a simple, one-box search with options for ranking results based on a paper relevancy, freshness, number of citations, and downloads. In addition, it provides advanced rankings based on collaborative filtering techniques. The faceted filtering interface allows users to narrow search results based on a particular property or set of properties ("facets"), allowing users to manage large lists and explore the relationship between them. For any set or sub-set of records, the co-authorship network can be visualized in an interactive way, offering a view of the distribution of contributors and their inter-relationships. This provides an immediate way to detect groups and collaborations involved in a particular research field. For a majority of papers in Astronomy, our new interface will provide a list of related articles of potential interest. The recommendations are based on a number of factors, including text similarity, citations, and co-readership information. The new full-text search interface allows users to find all instances of particular words or phrases in the body of the articles in our full-text archive. This includes all of the scanned literature in ADS as well as a select portion of the current astronomical literature, including ApJ, ApJS, AJ, MNRAS, PASP, A&A, and soon additional content from Springer journals. Fulltext search results include a list of the matching papers as well as a list of "snippets" of text highlighting the context in which the search terms were found. ADS Labs is available at http://adslabs.org

  10. Professor Alan Turner (1947-2012). Specialist in Miocene-Pleistocene Carnivora, particularly Felidae and Hyaenidae and their palaeoecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, Hannah; Turner, Adam; Antón, Mauricio

    2014-07-01

    Alan first trained as a telecom engineer, working for the GPO (General Post Office) which later became British Telecom. He never forgot this early training and was fascinated by how things worked - always happy to take something apart and fix it (although his attempt to close a large plate glass window with a geological hammer was not one of his successes). Following a few years as an engineer, he went to Sheffield University to study archaeology as a mature student in 1973. At this time Sheffield was a hotbed of prehistory with Graeme Barker, Robin Dennell and many others contributing to a truly research-led degree (with tutorials in the pub (well, it was the 1970s)) (Fig. 1). Alan's interest in bones developed at this time, and having graduated in 1976 he went on to take a PhD, supervised by Robin Dennell, on "Aspects of the palaeoecology of large predators, including man, during the British Upper Pleistocene, with particular emphasis on predator-prey relationships" which resulted in a life-long interest in the Carnivora and particularly hyaenas. Following his PhD, Alan moved to the Environmental Archaeology Unit at York to undertake a Science Research Council project on the morphometrics of domestic cattle and pigs from Coppergate and other major urban excavations in the city. Faced with a lot of measurements and statistics, Alan retained his interest in the animals themselves. The project also confirmed to Alan that prehistory was his metier, rather than the historic periods. Former York colleagues still fondly recall Alan's dry wit, and the day that he successfully put the irritating lab telephone beyond use with no externally visible trace of damage.

  11. Anisotropic storage medium development in a full-scale, sodium alanate-based, hydrogen storage system

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jorgensen, Scott W.; Johnson, Terry A.; Payzant, E. Andrew; Bilheux, Hassina Z.

    2016-06-11

    Deuterium desorption in an automotive-scale hydrogen storage tube was studied in-situ using neutron diffraction. Gradients in the concentration of the various alanate phases were observed along the length of the tube but no significant radial anisotropy was present. In addition, neutron radiography and computed tomography showed large scale cracks and density fluctuations, confirming the presence of these structures in an undisturbed storage system. These results demonstrate that large scale storage structures are not uniform even after many absorption/desorption cycles and that movement of gaseous hydrogen cannot be properly modeled by a simple porous bed model. In addition, the evidence indicatesmore » that there is slow transformation of species at one end of the tube indicating loss of catalyst functionality. These observations explain the unusually fast movement of hydrogen in a full scale system and shows that loss of capacity is not occurring uniformly in this type of hydrogen-storage system.« less

  12. Reducing the Harms of College Student Drinking: How Alan Marlatt Changed Approaches, Outcomes, and the Field

    PubMed Central

    Kilmer, Jason R.; Palmer, Rebekka S.; Cronce, Jessica M.; Logan, Diane E.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we discuss Alan Marlatt’s contributions to the prevention and reduction of alcohol-related harms among college students. We consider Alan’s early research that later led to the development and evaluation of college student drinking programs, and examine Alan’s impact, both directly and indirectly through those he mentored and trained, as a scientist-practitioner. We review the recognition of the efficacy of Alan’s programs, including the Alcohol Skills Training Program (ASTP) and Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students (BASICS), in addition to extensions of these interventions in more recent studies. Finally, we discuss how Alan’s work influences interventions with college student drinkers today, and how future directions will continue to be informed by his vision and values. PMID:25774117

  13. Growth of high quality AlGaAs by metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy using trimethylamine alane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abernathy, C. R.; Jordan, A. S.; Pearton, S. J.; Hobson, W. S.; Bohling, D. A.; Muhr, G. T.

    1990-06-01

    AlGaAs grown by metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy (MOMBE) has been problematic due to oxygen and carbon contamination, particularly when triethylaluminum (TEAl) has been used as the aluminum source. Consequently, we have investigated trimethylamine alane (TMAAl) as a potential replacement for the conventional metalorganic Al sources. AlGaAs films with excellent structural and optical properties have been grown with this source. Photoluminescence intensities from AlGaAs grown by MOMBE at 500 °C using TMAAl are comparable to those from material grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition at 675 °C using triethylaluminum (TMAl). Carbon and oxygen levels in MOMBE-grown AlGaAs are drastically reduced in comparison to similar films grown with TEAl.

  14. Anisotropic Storage Medium Development in a Full-Scale, Sodium Alanate-Based, Hydrogen Storage System

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, Scott W; Johnson, Terry A; Payzant, E Andrew; Bilheux, Hassina Z

    2016-01-01

    Deuterium desorption in an automotive-scale hydrogen storage tube was studied in-situ using neutron diffraction. Gradients in the concentration of the various alanate phases were observed along the length of the tube but no significant radial anisotropy was present. In addition, neutron radiography and computed tomography showed large scale cracks and density fluctuations, confirming the presence of these structures in an undisturbed storage system. These results demonstrate that large scale storage structures are not uniform even after many absorption/desorption cycles and that movement of gaseous hydrogen cannot be properly modeled by a simple porous bed model. Furthermore, the evidence indicates that there is slow transformation of species at one end of the tube indicating loss of catalyst functionality. These observations explain the unusually fast movement of hydrogen in a full scale system and shows that loss of capacity is not occurring uniformly in this type of hydrogen-storage system.

  15. Alan Thomas and the Canadian Association for Adult Education, 1961-1970. Occasional Papers in Continuing Education, Number 24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selman, Gordon R.

    Alan Thomas' vision of a learning society and its implications for public policy and adult education in Canada were the driving forces in the Canadian Association for Adult Education (CAAE) for the nine years of his directorship. The most distinctive and important idea that he contributed to the field in the 1960s was that the basic concept must…

  16. 77 FR 62238 - Alan B. Miller and Universal Health Services; Analysis of Agreement Containing Consent Orders To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ... Alan B. Miller and Universal Health Services; Analysis of Agreement Containing Consent Orders To Aid... practices or unfair methods of competition. The attached Analysis to Aid Public Comment describes both the... following Analysis to Aid Public Comment describes the terms of the consent agreement, and the...

  17. Discovering the Optimal Route for Alane Synthesis on Ti doped Al Surfaces Using Density Functional Theory Based Kinetic Monte Carlo Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Altaf; Muckerman, James T.

    2010-03-01

    Issues such as catalytic dissociation of hydrogen and the mobility of alane species on Ti-doped Al surfaces are major challenges in the synthesis of aluminum hydride. Our recently developed modeling framework (DFT-based KMC simulation) enabled us to study the steady-state conditions of dissociative adsorption of hydrogen, its diffusion, and its reaction with Al adatoms leading to the formation of alane species on Ti-doped Al surfaces. Our studies show that the doping of Ti atoms in the top layer of Al surfaces significantly reduces the mobility of alane species. On the other hand, the doping of Ti atoms beneath the top layer of Al surfaces enhances the mobility of alane species. The arrangement of dopant Ti atoms in different layers not only affects the diffusion barriers of alane species but it also affects hydrogen dissociation barriers when Ti-Ti pairs are arranged in different ways in the top layer. Using our theoretical methods, we identified a few configurations of dopant Ti atoms having lower barriers for alane diffusion and hydrogen dissociation. Further, we discovered the optimal values of Ti concentration, temperature, and pressure under which the rate of alane formation is maximized.

  18. The Society of Brains: How Alan Turing and Marvin Minsky Were Both Right

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struzik, Zbigniew R.

    2015-04-01

    In his well-known prediction, Alan Turing stated that computer intelligence would surpass human intelligence by the year 2000. Although the Turing Test, as it became known, was devised to be played by one human against one computer, this is not a fair setup. Every human is a part of a social network, and a fairer comparison would be a contest between one human at the console and a network of computers behind the console. Around the year 2000, the number of web pages on the WWW overtook the number of neurons in the human brain. But these websites would be of little use without the ability to search for knowledge. By the year 2000 Google Inc. had become the search engine of choice, and the WWW became an intelligent entity. This was not without good reason. The basis for the search engine was the analysis of the ’network of knowledge’. The PageRank algorithm, linking information on the web according to the hierarchy of ‘link popularity’, continues to provide the basis for all of Google's web search tools. While PageRank was developed by Larry Page and Sergey Brin in 1996 as part of a research project about a new kind of search engine, PageRank is in its essence the key to representing and using static knowledge in an emergent intelligent system. Here I argue that Alan Turing was right, as hybrid human-computer internet machines have already surpassed our individual intelligence - this was done around the year 2000 by the Internet - the socially-minded, human-computer hybrid Homo computabilis-socialis. Ironically, the Internet's intelligence also emerged to a large extent from ‘exploiting’ humans - the key to the emergence of machine intelligence has been discussed by Marvin Minsky in his work on the foundations of intelligence through interacting agents’ knowledge. As a consequence, a decade and a half decade into the 21st century, we appear to be much better equipped to tackle the problem of the social origins of humanity - in particular thanks to the

  19. Challenges When Introducing Electronic Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuikka, Matti; Kitola, Markus; Laakso, Mikko-Jussi

    2014-01-01

    Time pressures often necessitate the use of more efficient exam tools, such as electronic exams (e-exams), instead of traditional paper exams. However, teachers may face challenges when introducing e-exams in a higher education context. This paper describes what kinds of challenges teachers may face when introducing e-exams, based on experiences…

  20. Ab initio study on the electronic structure and vibration modes of alkali and alkaline-earth amides and alanates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumuraya, Takao; Shishidou, Tatsuya; Oguchi, Tamio

    2009-05-01

    We study the electronic structure and vibrational modes of several amides M(NH2)n and alanates M(AlH4)n (M = K, Na, Li, Ca and Mg), focusing on the role of cation states. Calculated breathing stretching vibration modes for these compounds are compared with measured infrared and Raman spectra. In the amides, we find a significant tendency such that the breathing mode frequencies and the structural parameters of NH2 vary in accordance with the ionization energy of cation. The tendency may be explained by the strength in hybridization between cation orbitals and molecular orbitals of (NH2)-. The microscopic mechanism of correlations between the vibration frequencies and structural parameters is elucidated in relation to the electronic structure. A possible similar tendency in the alanates is also discussed.

  1. From Mercury to Apollo: astronaut Alan Shepard reflects on life support and other space issues [interview by Winston Huff].

    PubMed

    Shepard, A

    1995-01-01

    Alan Shepard was one of the original Mercury astronauts. He became the first American in space on May 5, 1961, in the Freedom 7 capsule, during a 15 minute suborbital trip reaching 115 miles altitude and 302 miles down the Atlantic tracking range. Grounded by an inner ear problem, he served as Chief of the Astronaut Office for several years. After an operation to correct the problem, he commanded the Apollo 14 moon mission in 1971. He retired as a Rear Admiral in 1974. Here, Alan Shepard offers his views on life support comedies and tragedies, going back to the moon, future drivers of the manned space flight program, the benefits of the space program, joint NASA and Russia missions, how his NASA experience affected his personal life, and the profitability of working with NASA. PMID:11538588

  2. Neuronal Remodeling During Metamorphosis Is Regulated by the alan shepard (shep) Gene in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dahong; Qu, Chunjing; Bjorum, Sonia M.; Beckingham, Kathleen M.; Hewes, Randall S.

    2014-01-01

    Peptidergic neurons are a group of neuronal cells that synthesize and secrete peptides to regulate a variety of biological processes. To identify genes controlling the development and function of peptidergic neurons, we conducted a screen of 545 splice-trap lines and identified 28 loci that drove expression in peptidergic neurons when crossed to a GFP reporter transgene. Among these lines, an insertion in the alan shepard (shep) gene drove expression specifically in most peptidergic neurons. shep transcripts and SHEP proteins were detected primarily and broadly in the central nervous system (CNS) in embryos, and this expression continued into the adult stage. Loss of shep resulted in late pupal lethality, reduced adult life span, wing expansion defects, uncoordinated adult locomotor activities, rejection of males by virgin females, and reduced neuropil area and reduced levels of multiple presynaptic markers throughout the adult CNS. Examination of the bursicon neurons in shep mutant pharate adults revealed smaller somata and fewer axonal branches and boutons, and all of these cellular phenotypes were fully rescued by expression of the most abundant wild-type shep isoform. In contrast to shep mutant animals at the pharate adult stage, shep mutant larvae displayed normal bursicon neuron morphologies. Similarly, shep mutant adults were uncoordinated and weak, while shep mutant larvae displayed largely, although not entirely, normal locomotor behavior. Thus, shep played an important role in the metamorphic development of many neurons. PMID:24931409

  3. Reactions of organyl and silyl alanes with 1,3,4,5,6-pentamethyl-2-aminoborazine.

    PubMed

    Fan, Maomin; Duesler, Eileen N; Nöth, Heinrich; Paine, Robert T

    2010-03-15

    The reactions of (Me(3)Si)(3)Al, Me(3)Al, Et(3)Al, and i-Bu(3)Al with 1,3,4,5,6-pentamethyl-2-aminoborazine have been examined. An amine alane adduct (Me(3)Si)(3)Al.NH(2)B(3)(Me)(2)N(3)Me(3) (1) and several elimination products [(Me(3)Si)(2)AlN(H)B(3)(Me)(2)N(3)Me(3)](2) (2), [(Me(3)SiAl)(4)(Me(3)SiN)(3)NH] (3), [Me(2)AlN(H) B(3)(Me)(2)N(3)Me(3)](2) (4), [Et(2)AlN(H) B(3)(Me)(2)N(3)Me(3)](2) (5), and [i-Bu(2)AlN(H) B(3)(Me)(2)N(3)Me(3)](2) (6) have been isolated. Compounds 1, 2, 4-6 have been spectroscopically characterized, and single crystal X-ray diffraction structure determinations have been completed for 1-4 and 6. The molecular chemistry provides insight into the reaction of Me(3)Al and 1,3,5-N-trimethyl-2,4,6-B-triaminoborazine that, upon pyrolysis, produces AlN/BN composite ceramic materials. PMID:20158196

  4. Functional anion concept: effect of fluorine anion on hydrogen storage of sodium alanate.

    PubMed

    Yin, Li-Chang; Wang, Ping; Kang, Xiang-Dong; Sun, Cheng-Hua; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2007-03-28

    Doping NaAlH(4) with Ti-catalyst has produced a promising hydrogen storage system that can be reversibly operated at moderate temperature conditions. Of the various dopant precursors, TiCl(3) was well recognized due to its pronounced catalytic effect on the reversible dehydrogenation processes of sodium aluminium hydrides. Quite recently we experimentally found that TiF(3) was even better than TiCl(3) in terms of the critical hydrogen storage properties of the doped hydrides, in particular the dehydriding performance at Na(3)AlH(6)/NaH + Al step at moderate temperature. We present here the DFT calculation results of the TiF(3) or TiCl(3) doped Na(3)AlH(6). Our computational studies have demonstrated that F(-) and Cl(-) anions differ substantially from each other with regard to the state and function in the doped sodium aluminium hydride. In great contrast to the case of chloride doping where Cl(-) anion constitutes the "dead weight" NaCl, the fluoride doping results in a substitution of H(-) by F(-) anion in the hydride lattice and accordingly, a favorable thermodynamics adjustment. These results well explain the observed dehydriding performance associated with TiF(3)/TiCl(3)-doping. More significantly, the coupled computational and experimental efforts allow us to put forward a "functional anion" concept. This renews the current mechanism understanding in the catalytically enhanced sodium alanate. PMID:17356758

  5. Developmental and environmental influences on physiology and behavior--2014 Alan N. Epstein Research Award.

    PubMed

    Tamashiro, Kellie L K

    2015-12-01

    Environmental factors acting during development of an individual may influence future health and disease susceptibility. Stressors, including altered diet, psychosocial stress, and immune challenge, during gestation can have negative consequences on the intrauterine environment and increase disease susceptibility of the developing fetus. The long-term effects on offspring have been observed in humans and include greater susceptibility to psychiatric disease, such as depression and anxiety disorders, and adverse metabolic conditions including obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Studies in my laboratory use rodent models and incorporate a multilevel approach to determine the behavioral, physiological, and neurobiological correlates of disease development as a consequence of early life stressors. The road I took in developing this research program was a rather circuitous one and navigating that path would not have been possible without the many mentors, colleagues, fellows and students who provided critical support. Although my name appears on the plaque of the Alan N. Epstein Research Award, I share this with all those I had the privilege of working with along that road, as briefly summarized in this article. PMID:26291266

  6. Introducing Chemical Formulae and Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Chris; Rowell, Jack

    1979-01-01

    Discusses when the writing of chemical formula and equations can be introduced in the school science curriculum. Also presents ways in which formulae and equations learning can be aided and some examples for balancing and interpreting equations. (HM)

  7. First-principles Study on the Vibration Modes and Electronic Structure of Alkali and Alkaline-earth Amides and Alanates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumuraya, Takao; Shishidou, Tatsuya; Oguchi, Tamio

    2009-03-01

    Light alkaline and alkaline-earth metal hydrides such as amides M(NH2)n and alanates M(AlH4)n (M=K, Na, Li, Ca, and Mg) have attracted a growing interest as reversible hydrogen storage materials recently because of their innately high hydrogen contents. [1, 2] We study the electronic structure of the amides and alanates with different cations, focusing on the role of cation states from first-principles calculations based on the all-electron FLAPW method. Calculated breathing stretch vibration modes for these compounds are compared with measured infrared and Raman spectra. In the amides, we find a significant tendency such that the breathing stretch vibration frequencies and the structural parameters of NH2 vary in accordance with the ionization energy of cation, which may be explained by the strength in hybridization between cation orbitals and molecular orbitals of (NH2)^-. We elucidate the microscopic mechanism of correlations between the breathing stretch vibration frequencies of N-H and structural parameters by analyzing the calculated electronic structure from a view point of the molecular-orbitals. A similar tendency in the alanates is also discussed. [1] P. Chen, Z. Xiong, J. Luo, J. Lin and K.L. Tan, Nature 420, 302 (2002). [2] B. Bogdanovi and M. Schwickardi, J. Alloys Compd. 253-254, 1 (1997).

  8. Introduce XBRL to Business Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corkern, Sheree M.; Morgan, Mark I.

    2012-01-01

    This paper informs business instructors and educators about XBRL (Extensible Business Reporting Language) so that they can introduce it to their students and expand their students' understanding of how it relates to the accounting profession. Even though the financial community has entered a new age with this standardized reporting language, many…

  9. Prompting Strategies for Introducing Opera.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Charles R.

    2002-01-01

    Describes how to introduce opera to students through the use of prompting strategies. Explains that these strategies encourage active participation by students and help to improve listening skills. Focuses on prompting strategies, such as matching characters to songs, identifying, and sequencing songs. (CMK)

  10. An Exercise to Introduce Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seier, Edith; Liu, Yali

    2013-01-01

    In introductory statistics courses, the concept of power is usually presented in the context of testing hypotheses about the population mean. We instead propose an exercise that uses a binomial probability table to introduce the idea of power in the context of testing a population proportion. (Contains 2 tables, and 2 figures.)

  11. Introducing Synchrotrons Into the Classroom

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-07-22

    Brookhaven's Introducing Synchrotrons Into the Classroom (InSynC) program gives teachers and their students access to the National Synchrotron Light Source through a competitive proposal process. The first batch of InSynC participants included a group of students from Islip Middle School, who used the massive machine to study the effectiveness of different what filters.

  12. Introducing Literature of the Minorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeks, Elizabeth

    This paper discusses a thematic approach to introduce high school or college students to fiction that deals with minority groups. The author discusses how this thematic arrangement of novels may be a useful method for organizing a study of minority groups as represented in major works of American fiction. She discusses the initiation motif as a…

  13. Introducing Group Theory through Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Craig M.

    2009-01-01

    The central ideas of postcalculus mathematics courses offered in college are difficult to introduce in middle and secondary schools, especially through the engineering and sciences examples traditionally used in algebra, geometry, and trigonometry textbooks. However, certain concepts in music theory can be used to expose students to interesting…

  14. Introducing Synchrotrons Into the Classroom

    SciTech Connect

    2011-05-20

    Brookhaven's Introducing Synchrotrons Into the Classroom (InSynC) program gives teachers and their students access to the National Synchrotron Light Source through a competitive proposal process. The first batch of InSynC participants included a group of students from Islip Middle School, who used the massive machine to study the effectiveness of different what filters.

  15. Qualitative research. Introducing focus groups.

    PubMed Central

    Kitzinger, J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper introduces focus group methodology, gives advice on group composition, running the groups, and analysing the results. Focus groups have advantages for researchers in the field of health and medicine: they do not discriminate against people who cannot read or write and they can encourage participation from people reluctant to be interviewed on their own or who feel they have nothing to say. Images p301-a PMID:7633241

  16. Understanding the Role of Ti in Reversible Hydrogen Storage as Sodium Alanate: A Combined Experimental and Density Functional Theoretical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri,S.; Graetz, J.; Ignatov, A.; Reilly, J.; Muckerman, J.

    2006-01-01

    We report the results of an experimental and theoretical study of hydrogen storage in sodium alanate (NaAlH{sub 4}). Reversible hydrogen storage in this material is dependent on the presence of 2-4% Ti dopant. Our combined study shows that the role of Ti may be linked entirely to Ti-containing active catalytic sites in the metallic Al phase present in the dehydrogenated NaAlH{sub 4}. The EXAFS data presented here show that dehydrogenated samples contain a highly disordered distribution of Ti-Al distances with no long-range order beyond the second coordination sphere. We have used density functional theory techniques to calculate the chemical potential of possible Ti arrangements on an Al(001) surface for Ti coverages ranging from 0.125 to 0.5 monolayer (ML) and have identified those that can chemisorb molecular hydrogen via spontaneous or only moderately activated pathways. The chemisorption process exhibits a characteristic nodal symmetry property for the low-barrier sites: the incipient doped surface-H2 adduct's highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) incorporates the {sigma}* antibonding molecular orbital of hydrogen, allowing the transfer of charge density from the surface to dissociate the molecular hydrogen. This work also proposes a plausible mechanism for the transport of an aluminum hydride species back into the NaH lattice that is supported by Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations of the stability and mobility of aluminum clusters (alanes) on Al(001). As an experimental validation of the proposed role of titanium and the subsequent diffusion of alanes, we demonstrate experimentally that AlH{sub 3} reacts with NaH to form NaAlH{sub 4} without any requirement of a catalyst or hydrogen overpressure.

  17. Understanding the role of Ti in reversible hydrogen storage as sodium alanate: a combined experimental and density functional theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Santanu; Graetz, Jason; Ignatov, Alex; Reilly, James J; Muckerman, James T

    2006-09-01

    We report the results of an experimental and theoretical study of hydrogen storage in sodium alanate (NaAlH(4)). Reversible hydrogen storage in this material is dependent on the presence of 2-4% Ti dopant. Our combined study shows that the role of Ti may be linked entirely to Ti-containing active catalytic sites in the metallic Al phase present in the dehydrogenated NaAlH(4). The EXAFS data presented here show that dehydrogenated samples contain a highly disordered distribution of Ti-Al distances with no long-range order beyond the second coordination sphere. We have used density functional theory techniques to calculate the chemical potential of possible Ti arrangements on an Al(001) surface for Ti coverages ranging from 0.125 to 0.5 monolayer (ML) and have identified those that can chemisorb molecular hydrogen via spontaneous or only moderately activated pathways. The chemisorption process exhibits a characteristic nodal symmetry property for the low-barrier sites: the incipient doped surface-H(2) adduct's highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) incorporates the sigma antibonding molecular orbital of hydrogen, allowing the transfer of charge density from the surface to dissociate the molecular hydrogen. This work also proposes a plausible mechanism for the transport of an aluminum hydride species back into the NaH lattice that is supported by Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations of the stability and mobility of aluminum clusters (alanes) on Al(001). As an experimental validation of the proposed role of titanium and the subsequent diffusion of alanes, we demonstrate experimentally that AlH(3) reacts with NaH to form NaAlH(4) without any requirement of a catalyst or hydrogen overpressure. PMID:16939263

  18. Introduced species as evolutionary traps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schlaepfer, Martin A.; Sherman, P.W.; Blossey, B.; Runge, M.C.

    2005-01-01

    Invasive species can alter environments in such a way that normal behavioural decision-making rules of native species are no longer adaptive. The evolutionary trap concept provides a useful framework for predicting and managing the impact of harmful invasive species. We discuss how native species can respond to changes in their selective regime via evolution or learning. We also propose novel management strategies to promote the long-term co-existence of native and introduced species in cases where the eradication of the latter is either economically or biologically unrealistic.

  19. Introducing heifers to freestall housing.

    PubMed

    von Keyserlingk, M A G; Cunha, G E; Fregonesi, J A; Weary, D M

    2011-04-01

    Little work to date has assessed how dairy cattle respond when first introduced to freestall housing. In this study we carried out 2 experiments. The aim of experiment 1 was to assess the behavioral responses of naïve heifers to pens fitted with freestalls. Holstein heifers (n=7 groups, each containing 3 heifers, 3 mo of age), with no previous experience with freestalls, were initially housed on a sawdust bedded pack and fed through a fixed feed barrier for at least 6 wk and then moved to a freestall pen fitted with a head-locking feed barrier. When kept on the bedded pack, the heifers' lying time averaged 14.2 h/d. On the day heifers were moved to the freestall pen, lying times declined by 2.9 h, but recovered on the following days. The time spent lying down on the barn floor (i.e., outside the lying area) increased by 2.5 h on the day heifers were introduced to freestalls and remained higher during subsequent days. Heifers spent 46 min/d less time feeding on the day they were switched to the head-locking barrier, but recovered on the following days. In experiment 2 we assessed the behavioral responses of naïve heifers introduced to pens fitted with freestalls with or without a neck rail. Holstein heifers (n=12 groups, each containing 2 heifers, 3 mo of age), with no previous experience with freestalls, were initially housed on a sawdust bedded pack and then moved to a freestall pen with or without neck rails. Heifers spent 4.2 h/d less time lying down in the 24 h following introduction into the freestall pen; the neck rail treatment had no effect on lying time but heifers spent more time standing with just their front 2 hooves in the stall when a neck rail was in the stall. In summary, lying and feeding behavior of naïve heifers is altered following introduction to new housing. PMID:21426979

  20. Introducing the Moon's Orbital Eccentricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2014-11-01

    I present a novel way to introduce the lunar orbital eccentricity in introductory astronomy courses. The Moon is perhaps the clearest illustration of the general orbital elements such as inclination, ascending node, eccentricity, perigee, and so on. Furthermore, I like the students to discover astronomical phenomena for themselves, by means of a guided exercise, rather than just telling them the facts.1 The inclination and nodes may be found by direct observation, monitoring carefully the position of the Moon among the stars. Even the regression of the nodes may be discovered in this way2 To find the eccentricity from students' observations is also possible,3 but that requires considerable time and effort. if a whole class should discover it in a short time, here is a method more suitable for a one-day class or home assignment. The level I aim at is, more or less, advanced high school or first-year college students. I assume them to be acquainted with celestial coordinates and the lunar phases, and to be able to use algebra and trigonometry.

  1. Minerals Bill introduced in House

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    A bill that aims to strengthen a national minerals policy and to establish a three-member White-House-level council to coordinate the development of this policy was introduced in the House of Representatives on April 30 by James D. Santini (D-Nev.). Entitled the National Minerals Security Act (NMSA), the legislation, if passed, also would amend tax laws to assist the mining industry to make capital investments to locate and produce strategic minerals; it would provide the means for the Secretary of the Interior to make withdrawn public lands available for mineral development; and it would create a revolving fund for the sale and purchase of strategic minerals.Santini estimates that 4 billion tons of minerals are needed annually to sustain the nation's economy. Much of the minerals are supplied by other nations, however; Santini wants to see an end to the United States' dependence on foreign countries, especially those that seem relatively unstable politically. ‘The U.S. has placed its national security in the hands of a few foreign nations,’ Santini said in a recent press conference. ‘We are heavily dependent on the region of southern Africa for 76% of our cobalt, 93% of our platinum, 48% of our chromium, and a host of other strategic and critical minerals. Without these minerals, we cannot build jet aircraft, weapons, or other military hardware vitally important to our national security.’

  2. A resolution commending Alan S. Frumin on his service to the United States Senate.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Reid, Harry [D-NV

    2012-01-31

    01/31/2012 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S200-201; text as passed Senate: CR S200-201; text of measure as introduced: CR S213) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. Radiolarians, foraminifers, and biostratigraphy of the Coniacian-Campanian deposits of the Alan-Kyr Section, Crimean Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragina, L. G.; Beniamovsky, V. N.; Kopaevich, L. F.

    2016-01-01

    Data on the distribution of radiolarians and planktonic and benthic foraminifers are obtained for the first time from the Alan-Kyr Section (Coniacian-Campanian), in the central regions of the Crimean Mountains. Radiolarian biostrata, previously established from Ak-Kaya Mountain (central regions of the Crimean Mountains) were traced: Alievium praegallowayi-Crucella plana (upper Coniacian-lower Santonian), Alievium gallowayi-Crucella espartoensis (upper Santonian without the topmost part), and Dictyocephalus (Dictyocryphalus) (?) legumen-Spongosaturninus parvulus (upper part of the upper Santonian). Radiolarians from the Santonian-Campanian boundary beds of the Crimean Mountains are studied for the first time, and Prunobrachium sp. ex gr. crassum-Diacanthocapsa acanthica Beds (uppermost Santonian-lower Campanian) are recognized. Bolivinoides strigillatus Beds (upper Santonian) and Stensioeina pommerana-Anomalinoides (?) insignis Beds (upper part of the upper Santonian-lower part of the lower Campanian) are recognized. Eouvigerina aspera denticulocarinata Beds (middle and upper parts of the lower Campanian) and Angulogavelinella gracilis Beds (upper part of the upper Campanian are recognized on the basis of benthic foraminifers. These beds correspond to the synchronous biostrata of the East European Platform and Mangyshlak. Marginotruncana coronata- Concavatotruncana concavata Beds (Coniacian-upper Santonian), Globotruncanita elevata Beds (terminal Santonian), and Globotruncana arca Beds (lower Campanian) are recognized on the basis of planktonic foraminifers. Radiolarian and planktonic and benthic foraminiferal data agree with one another. The position of the Santonian-Campanian boundary in the Alan-Kyr Section, which is located stratigraphically above the levels of the latest occurrence of Concavatotruncana concavata and representatives of the genus Marginotruncana, is refined, i.e., at the level of the first appearance of Globotruncana arca. A gap in the Middle

  4. Introducing the Atmospheric Visualization Collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaus, C. M.; Andrew, K.; Mace, G. G.; McCollum, T.; Gobble, T.

    2002-12-01

    The Atmospheric Visualization Collection is a digital library collection, a section in the NSF's National Science Digital Library. The collection has two essential components. The first is an archive of images based on data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. The second is a collection of educational material based on atmospheric science concepts that use these data images. The data image archive focuses on the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, which has the largest collection of ground-based remote-sensing atmospheric instruments. Our visualization tools are automated to create the data images for both archival and real-time uses. ARM instrument mentors and ARM scientist as well as other scientists involved in campaigns at the ARM SGP site review our visualization work for scientific quality. While the archive of weather images was initially created for scientists, collaboration with teachers has identified many of the barriers to educational use. This revealed the need for more educationally friendly interfaces into our weather images and the need for greater documentation. One of the results is our geophysical focus area interface, allowing teachers and students to access these data images. The visualization tools used to produce these data images are available through an open source repository. Testing with undergraduate students has demonstrated the usability of these tools with data from the ARM Archive for class projects. While the task of reviewing and improving user interfaces continues, we have reached a stage where educators and students can easily access our atmospheric data images. An initial set of peer reviewed lesson plans based on these data images has been the basis for workshops to introduce teachers to the AVC. To further involve these teachers a Lesson Plan Sandbox. The Lesson Plan Sandbox allows teachers to submit their lesson plans to share with others, to review lesson plans submitted by other teachers, and to add

  5. The reactivity of sodium alanates with O[2], H[2]O, and CO[2] : an investigation of complex metal hydride contamination in the context of automotive systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Dedrick, Daniel E.; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.

    2007-08-01

    Safe and efficient hydrogen storage is a significant challenge inhibiting the use of hydrogen as a primary energy carrier. Although energy storage performance properties are critical to the success of solid-state hydrogen storage systems, operator and user safety is of highest importance when designing and implementing consumer products. As researchers are now integrating high energy density solid materials into hydrogen storage systems, quantification of the hazards associated with the operation and handling of these materials becomes imperative. The experimental effort presented in this paper focuses on identifying the hazards associated with producing, storing, and handling sodium alanates, and thus allowing for the development and implementation of hazard mitigation procedures. The chemical changes of sodium alanates associated with exposure to oxygen and water vapor have been characterized by thermal decomposition analysis using simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry (STMBMS) and X-ray diffraction methods. Partial oxidation of sodium alanates, an alkali metal complex hydride, results in destabilization of the remaining hydrogen-containing material. At temperatures below 70 C, reaction of sodium alanate with water generates potentially combustible mixtures of H{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. In addition to identifying the reaction hazards associated with the oxidation of alkali-metal containing complex hydrides, potential treatment methods are identified that chemically stabilize the oxidized material and reduce the hazard associated with handling the contaminated metal hydrides.

  6. "Innovate-Ideagora": Introducing a New Feature in "Innovate"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCord, Alan; Easton, Denise; Shimabukuro, James N.

    2008-01-01

    Alan McCord, Denise Easton, and James Shimabukuro discuss "Innovate-Ideagora", a new social and professional networking site designed to enhance professional communication in the "Innovate" community. The site will both increase and elevate discussion among "Innovate" readers, providing a forum in which collaboration and complex problem solving…

  7. Formation of Al2H7- anions--indirect evidence of volatile AlH3 on sodium alanate using solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Felderhoff, Michael; Zibrowius, Bodo

    2011-10-14

    After more than a decade of intense research on NaAlH(4) doped with transition metals as hydrogen storage material, the actual mechanism of the decomposition and rehydrogenation reaction is still unclear. Early on, monomeric AlH(3) was named as a possible transport shuttle for aluminium, but never observed experimentally. Here we report for the first time the trapping of volatile AlH(3) produced during the decomposition of undoped NaAlH(4) by an adduct of sodium alanate and crown ether. The resulting Al(2)H(7)(-) anion was identified by solid-state (27)Al NMR spectroscopy. Based on this indirect evidence of volatile alane, we present a simple description of the processes occurring during the reversible dehydrogenation of NaAlH(4). PMID:21879065

  8. Towards understanding a mechanism for reversible hydrogen storage: theoretical study of transition metal catalysed dehydrogenation of sodium alanate.

    PubMed

    Ljubić, Ivan; Clary, David C

    2010-04-28

    On the basis of density functional theory and coupled-cluster CCSD(T) calculations we propose a mechanism of the dehydrogenation of transition metal doped sodium alanate. Insertion of two early 3d-transition metals, scandium and titanium, both of which are promising catalysts for reversible hydrogen storage in light metal hydrides, is compared. The mechanism is deduced from studies on the decomposition of a model system consisting of one transition metal atom and two NaAlH(4) units. Subsequently, the significance of such minimal cluster model systems to the real materials is tested by embedding the systems into the surface of the NaAlH(4) crystal. It is found that the dehydrogenation proceeds via breaking of the bridge H-Al bond and consequent formation of intermediate coordination compounds in which the H(2) molecule is side-on (eta(2)-) bonded to the transition metal centre. The total barrier to the H(2) release is thus dependent upon both the strength of the Al-H bond to be broken and the depth of the coordinative potential. The analogous mechanism applies for the recognized three successive dehydrogenation steps. The gas-phase model structures embedded into the surface of the NaAlH(4) crystal exhibit an unambiguous kinetic stability and their general geometric features remain largely unchanged. PMID:20379493

  9. Gas Source Melecular Beam Epitaxy Growth of High Quality AlGaAs Using Trimethylamine Alane as the Aluminum Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Naoya; Ando, Hideyasu; Sandhu, Adarsh; Fujii, Toshio

    1991-12-01

    We investigated the dependence of the background impurity incorporation on growth conditions and optical properties of undoped AlGaAs grown by gas source molecular beam epitaxy using trimethylamine alane (TMAAl), triethylgallium, and arsine. The use of TMAAl enabled us to reduce the carbon concentration (7× 1016 cm-3) to over one order of magnitude less than that using triethylaluminum (TEAl). The 77 K photoluminescence spectrum of undoped AlGaAs grown using TMAAl was dominated by excitonic band-edge emission not observable in AlGaAs grown using TEAl. Furthermore, we report for the first time the doping characteristics of n-type AlGaAs grown using disilane (Si2H6) as an n-type gaseous dopant source together with TMAAl. The carrier concentration (5× 1017--3× 1018 cm-3) in n-AlxGa1-xAs (x{=}0.09--0.27) was reliably controlled and showed the same Si2H6 flow rate dependence as that of GaAs. The activation efficiency of silicon was more than 60%. We demonstrated the excellent n-type doping characteristics by uisng TMAAl.

  10. Decomposition Process of Alane and Gallane Compounds in Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition Studied by Surface Photo-Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Yoshiharu; Kobayashi, Naoki

    1992-09-01

    We used surface photo-absorption (SPA) to study trimethylamine alane (TMAA) and dimethylamine gallane (DMAG) decomposition processes on a substrate surface in metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The decomposition onset temperatures of these group III hydride sources correspond to the substrate temperature at which the SPA reflectivity starts to increase during the supply of the group III source onto a group V stabilized surface. It was found that TMAA and DMAG start to decompose at about 150°C on an As-stabilized surface, which is much lower than the decomposition onsets of trialkyl Al and Ga compounds. Low temperature photoluminescence spectra exhibit dominant excitionic emissions for GaAs layers grown by DMAG at substrate temperatures above 400°C, indicating that carbon incorporation and the crystal quality deterioration due to incomplete decomposition on surface is much suppressed by using DMAG. A comparison of AlGaAs photoluminescence between layers by TMAA/triethylgallium and triethylaluminum/triethylgallium shows that the band-to-carbon acceptor transition is greatly reduced by using TMAA. TMAA and DMAG were verified to be promising group III sources for low-temperature and high-purity growth with low-carbon incorporation.

  11. English Clubs: Introducing English to Young Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afia, Jawida Ben

    2006-01-01

    This article introduces an approach taken in Tunisia to introduce English as a foreign language to children in primary school classrooms. The author states that in Tunisia, children in primary schools are first taught Arabic and then French. The government does not want to overburden the students with English learning. Then, the author describes…

  12. Introducing Optical Concepts in Electrical Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daneshvar, K.; Coleman, R.

    The expansion in the fields of optical engineering and optoelectronics has made it essential to introduce optical engineering concepts into undergraduate courses and curricula. Because of limits on the number of course requirements for the BS degree, it is not clear how these topics should be introduced without replacing some of the traditional…

  13. Introducing Virological Concepts Using an Insect Virus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Roger F.

    1980-01-01

    A technique is presented which utilizes wax moth larvae in a laboratory investigation of an insect virus. Describes how an insect virus can be used to introduce undergraduate biology students to laboratory work on viruses and several virological concepts. (SA)

  14. Introducing Relativity: Less May Be More

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogborn, Jon

    2005-01-01

    This article shows how relativity can be introduced in four stages, each building on those before it, but the teacher can choose to stop after whichever stage he/she believes the pupils are capable of tackling.

  15. Introducing High School Students To Neurophysiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Bonnie; Stavraky, Tom

    1997-01-01

    Describes a project launched by graduate student volunteers of Let's Talk Science at the University of Western Ontario that introduces senior high school students to research presentations given by undergraduate physiology students. (Author/AIM)

  16. Introducing Solar Observation to Elementary Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyck, G. P.

    2013-06-01

    (Abstract only) I will demonstrate the presentation I have developed for introducing solar observation to elementary students in Dartmouth, Massachusetts, and surrounding public schools. Copies of my program will be available for AAVSO members who would like to use it.

  17. Introducing Abstraction to Junior High Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costanzo, Nancy

    1981-01-01

    Suggests a way to introduce abstract art to junior high school students who, more than students of any other age, emphasize realism both in their artwork and in their appreciation of works of art. (Author/SJL)

  18. Alan F. Guttmacher Lecture.

    PubMed

    Morgentaler, H

    1989-01-01

    In this lecture, Dr. Henry Morgentaler describes how he led the fight to make abortion sage and legal in Canada. In 1967, the Canadian government began exploring possible changes in the abortion law, which at that made abortion a major crime. As president of the Humanist Fellowship of Montreal, Morgentaler presented a brief to House of Commons calling for abortion on request. His appeal attracted great media attention, and soon women started coming to Morgentaler's office seeking abortions. Risking prosecution, Morgentaler agreed to perform the operations (in the process becoming the first doctor in North America to use the vacuum suction technique). His abortion practice grew rapidly. In 1969, the Canadian government made abortion legal if approved by a committee of 3 doctors and if performed in a hospital. Though an improvement over the previous law, the new abortion law still had many deficiencies, most notably: it discriminated against women in rural areas (where the only available hospitals were Catholic), and it made getting an abortion a lengthy process, making the procedure more dangerous. Still campaigning vigorously performing abortions in his Montreal clinic, Morgentaler on charges of illegal abortion by the Quebec government. For the next 6 years, Morgentaler rode a legal roller coaster -- 3 jury acquittals were overturned or disregarded -- serving 10 months in prison throughout the ordeal (the legal battle produced the so-called Morgentaler Amendment, which stipulates that court cannot substitute its own verdict for a jury verdict of not guilty). In 1976, Quebec ended its battle with Morgentaler, who in turn launched his campaign to the rest of Canada. And in 1988, the Canadian Supreme Court rescinded the abortion low, thus affirming the dignity and equality of women. PMID:12284999

  19. Historical streamflows of Double Mountain Fork of Brazos River and water-surface elevations of Lake Alan Henry, Garza County, Texas, water years 1962-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, William H.; Vrabel, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the City of Lubbock, Texas, operates two surface-water stations in Garza County, Tex.: USGS streamflow-gaging station 08079600 Double Mountain Fork Brazos River at Justiceburg, Tex., and 08079700 Lake Alan Henry Reservoir, a water-supply reservoir about 60 miles southeast of Lubbock, Tex., and about 10 miles east of Justiceburg, Tex. The streamflow and water-surface elevation data from the two stations are useful to water-resource managers and planners in support of forecasting and water-resource infrastructure operations and are used in regional hydrologic studies.

  20. Preparing to introduce personal health budgets.

    PubMed

    Porter, Zoe; Simpson, Bernadette

    2013-10-01

    A large-scale study ( Forder et al 2012 ) piloting personal health budgets for people with long-term conditions found that they improved patients' quality of life and psychological wellbeing. They were cost-effective and reduced the use of other healthcare services. From April next year, people receiving NHS continuing healthcare funding will have the right to ask for personal health budgets. Some clinical commissioning groups are also introducing them for mental health service users and patients with other long-term conditions. This article outlines the benefits and challenges of introducing personal health budgets, and suggests how nursing managers can begin to consider their role in implementing them. PMID:24063340

  1. A "Handy" Way to Introduce Research Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, David E.

    1996-01-01

    Provides an exercise for introducing research methods to undergraduates. The students view a graph revealing that left-handed people are underrepresented in older age groups. Small group discussions attempt to explain this phenomenon. A follow-up class discussion focuses on the different approaches and methods available for interpreting the data.…

  2. Introducing Giovanni Gentile, the "Philosopher of Fascism"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    This essay aims to introduce Giovanni Gentile to scholars of Gramsci studies broadly and Gramsci-education studies more specifically. The largest part of the essay explores Gentile's academic life, his philosophical agenda, and his political career. Having established a basis for understanding the educational reform Gentile enacted as Mussolini's…

  3. Introducing Simulation via the Theory of Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Arvid C.

    2011-01-01

    While spreadsheet simulation can be a useful method by which to help students to understand some of the more advanced concepts in an introductory statistics course, introducing the simulation methodology at the same time as these concepts can result in student cognitive overload. This article describes a spreadsheet model that has been…

  4. Introducing Michaelis-Menten Kinetics through Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halkides, Christopher J.; Herman, Russell

    2007-01-01

    We describe a computer tutorial that introduces the concept of the steady state in enzyme kinetics. The tutorial allows students to produce graphs of the concentrations of free enzyme, enzyme-substrate complex, and product versus time in order to learn about the approach to steady state. By using a range of substrate concentrations and rate…

  5. How to Introduce the Magnetic Dipole Moment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bezerra, M.; Kort-Kamp, W. J. M.; Cougo-Pinto, M. V.; Farina, C.

    2012-01-01

    We show how the concept of the magnetic dipole moment can be introduced in the same way as the concept of the electric dipole moment in introductory courses on electromagnetism. Considering a localized steady current distribution, we make a Taylor expansion directly in the Biot-Savart law to obtain, explicitly, the dominant contribution of the…

  6. Introducing Literary Arabic, Volume II: Grammatical Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanna, Sami A.; Greis, Naguib

    This volume, designed as a companion to "Introducing Literary Arabic" provides basic grammatical explanations essential in first-year courses. Each of the 15 units, with the exception of the first, contains related grammatical notes, paradigms, and illustrations. The grammatical rules are intended to make explicit general underlying structures.…

  7. 21 CFR 870.1340 - Catheter introducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Catheter introducer. 870.1340 Section 870.1340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... the skin into a vein or artery. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  8. Using Simulation to Introduce Engineering Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stier, Kenneth; Laingen, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Today's engineers and technologists are more frequently thrust into the role of problem solver. Some would argue that, if this is the case, then using simulation is a more acceptable way to educate students for the work environment they will enter. The authors wanted to introduce entry-level university students to advanced engineering concepts…

  9. Introducing Economics: A Critical Guide for Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Mark H.; Nelson, Julie A.

    2007-01-01

    Make economics resonate to high school students. This practical handbook will help economics and social studies teachers foster critical thinking by introducing students to the real-life dimensions of the major controversies in contemporary economics. Filled with useful teaching tips and user-friendly information on finding engaging materials and…

  10. Introducing the Classics to Reluctant Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Lissa J.

    Using the pocket classics can be a painless way to introduce the classics to eighth-grade students. Condensed versions of the classics can take the sting out of the reading, stimulate students' interest, and help prepare them for high school. To offer students in one eighth-grade class some control over their own learning, a contract system was…

  11. Introducing Educational Technologies to Teachers: Experience Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thota, Neena; Negreiros, Joao G. M.

    2015-01-01

    The dramatic rise in use of digital media has changed the way learning is taking place and has led to new ways to teach with digital technologies. In this article, we describe the experiences of teaching a course that introduces educational technologies to teachers in Macau. The course design is based on connectivism, a learning theory for the…

  12. Introducing Abelian Groups Using Bullseyes and Jenga

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to share a new approach for introducing students to the definition and standard examples of Abelian groups. The definition of an Abelian group is revised to include six axioms. A bullseye provides a way to visualize elementary examples and non-examples of Abelian groups. An activity based on the game of Jenga is used…

  13. Introducing a High Bounce Ball Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernardo, Pat

    2004-01-01

    Those growing up in the 1950s, 60s or 70s are familiar with how physically active children were before computers and video games were introduced. Each neighborhood had its own version of the various games that were played. Many of these games involved a pink rubber ball called a Spaldeen. They were everywhere and almost everyone had one. These…

  14. Tissue Barriers: Introducing an exciting new journal

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Andrei I

    2014-01-01

    This Editorial is written to introduce Tissue Barriers, a new Taylor & Francis journal, to the readers of Temperature. It describes the role of temperature in the regulation of different tissue barriers under normal and disease conditions. It also highlights the most interesting articles published in the first volume of Tissue Barriers.

  15. Introducing Exclusion Logic as a Deontic Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Richard

    This paper introduces Exclusion Logic - a simple modal logic without negation or disjunction. We show that this logic has an efficient decision procedure. We describe how Exclusion Logic can be used as a deontic logic. We compare this deontic logic with Standard Deontic Logic and with more syntactically restricted logics.

  16. Introducing Technology Education at the Elementary Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKnight, Sean

    2012-01-01

    Many school districts are seeing a need to introduce technology education to students at the elementary level. Pennsylvania's Penn Manor School District is one of them. Pennsylvania has updated science and technology standards for grades 3-8, and after several conversations the author had with elementary principals and the assistant superintendent…

  17. Rice blast evaluation of newly introduced germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic resistance to the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae (anamorph Pyricularia grisea oryzae) was identified in newly introduced rice germplasm through quarantine when tested in artificially inoculated greenhouse and field nursery tests during the 2007 growing season. Of 229 accessions, 31 we...

  18. Classroom Activities for Introducing Equivalence Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Equivalence relations and partitions are two interconnected ideas that play important roles in advanced mathematics. While students encounter the informal notion of equivalence in many courses, the formal definition of an equivalence relation is typically introduced in a junior level transition-to-proof course. This paper reports the results of a…

  19. Introducing the Emerging Discipline of Statistics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Zvi, Dani; Garfield, Joan

    2008-01-01

    Increasing attention has been given over the last decade by the statistics, mathematics and science education communities to the development of statistical literacy and numeracy skills of all citizens and the enhancement of statistics education at all levels. This paper introduces the emerging discipline of statistics education and considers its…

  20. Method for introducing unidirectional nested deletions

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, John J.; Quesada, Mark A.; Randesi, Matthew

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for the introduction of unidirectional deletions in a cloned DNA segment in the context of a cloning vector which contains an f1 endonuclease recognition sequence adjacent to the insertion site of the DNA segment. Also disclosed is a method for producing single-stranded DNA probes utilizing the same cloning vector. An optimal vector, PZIP is described. Methods for introducing unidirectional deletions into a terminal location of a cloned DNA sequence which is inserted into the vector of the present invention are also disclosed. These methods are useful for introducing deletions into either or both ends of a cloned DNA insert, for high throughput sequencing of any DNA of interest.

  1. Introducing thermodynamics through energy and entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Abreu, Rodrigo; Guerra, Vasco

    2012-07-01

    We suggest a simple approach to introducing thermodynamics, beginning with the concept of internal energy of deformable bodies. From a series of thought experiments involving ideal gases, we show that the internal energy depends on the volume and on a second parameter, leading to the development of the concept of entropy. By introducing entropy before the notions of temperature and heat, the proposed approach avoids some of the major conceptual difficulties with the traditional presentation. The relationship between mechanics and thermodynamics naturally emerges, mechanics corresponding to isentropic thermodynamics. The questions of evolution to equilibrium and irreversibility are studied under the light of the action of the "dynamic force" and its dissipative character, evincing the benefits of keeping in mind the microscopic picture.

  2. Introducing HEP to schools through educational scenaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourkoumelis, C.; Vourakis, S.

    2015-05-01

    Recent activities, towards the goal of introducing High Energy Physics in the school class, are reviewed. The most efficient method is a half or a full day workshop where the students are introduced to one of the large LHC experiments, follow a "virtual visit" to the experiment's Control Room and perform an interactive analysis of real data. Science cafes and visits to the CERN expositions are also very helpful, provided that the tours/discussions are led by an active scientist and/or a trained teacher. Several EU outreach projects provide databases rich with education scenaria and data analysis tools ready to be used by the teachers in order to bridge the gap between modern research and technology and school education.

  3. [Effects of introducing Eucalyptus on indigenous biodiversity].

    PubMed

    Ping, Liang; Xie, Zong-Qiang

    2009-07-01

    Eucalyptus is well-known as an effective reforestation tree species, due to its fast growth and high adaptability to various environments. However, the introduction of Eucalyptus could have negative effects on the local environment, e. g., inducing soil degradation, decline of groundwater level, and decrease of biodiversity, and especially, there still have controversies on the effects of introduced Eucalyptus on the understory biodiversity of indigenous plant communities and related mechanisms. Based on a detailed analysis of the literatures at home and abroad, it was considered that the indigenous plant species in the majority of introduced Eucalyptus plantations were lesser than those in natural forests and indigenous species plantations but more than those in other exotic species plantations, mainly due to the unique eco-physiological characteristics of Eucalyptus and the irrational plantation design and harvesting techniques, among which, anthropogenic factors played leading roles. Be that as it may, the negative effects of introducing Eucalyptus on local plant biodiversity could be minimized via more rigorous scientific plantation design and management based on local plant community characteristics. To mitigate the negative effects of Eucalyptus introduction, the native trees and understory vegetation in plantations should be kept intact during reforestation with Eucalyptus to favor the normal development of plant community and regeneration. At the same time, human disturbance should be minimized to facilitate the natural regeneration of native species. PMID:19899483

  4. Introducing Stereochemistry to Non-science Majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luján-Upton, Hannia

    2001-04-01

    Stereochemistry is often a difficult topic for both science and non-science majors to learn. The topics covered in most undergraduate textbooks, although fundamental, seem very abstract to most students. This manuscript describes two simple exercises that can be used to introduce concepts associated with stereochemistry such as "sameness", superimposability, chirality, enantiomers, optical activity, polarimetry, and racemic mixtures. One exercise compares chirality in hands with the achiral nature of two textbooks. The other exercise involves a murder mystery, the solution of which hinges upon understanding the concept of optical activity, specifically in natural products such as toxins from poisonous mushrooms.

  5. Kinesiophobia – Introducing a New Diagnostic Tool

    PubMed Central

    Knapik, Andrzej; Saulicz, Edward; Gnat, Rafał

    2011-01-01

    Technical development of human civilisation brings about a decrease of adaptation potential of an individual, which is directly linked to deficient motor activity. Only precise identification of factors leading to hypokinesia would make prophylactic and therapeutic actions possible. In this article, authors would like to introduce a new, original tool aiming at diagnosing limitations of motor activity in adults. They propose a synthetic diagnosis of hypokinesia in two domains: biological and psycho-social, which is based on the contemporary model of health. PMID:23487514

  6. Kinesiophobia - introducing a new diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Knapik, Andrzej; Saulicz, Edward; Gnat, Rafał

    2011-06-01

    Technical development of human civilisation brings about a decrease of adaptation potential of an individual, which is directly linked to deficient motor activity. Only precise identification of factors leading to hypokinesia would make prophylactic and therapeutic actions possible. In this article, authors would like to introduce a new, original tool aiming at diagnosing limitations of motor activity in adults. They propose a synthetic diagnosis of hypokinesia in two domains: biological and psycho-social, which is based on the contemporary model of health. PMID:23487514

  7. [Financial impact of introducing filmless CRT diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Kusakabe, Yukihiro

    2002-09-01

    There has been a great deal of discussion as to the cost and benefit of introducing filmless CRT diagnosis for radiological exams. Although the various advantages of the filmless system tend to be highlighted, very few studies have attempted to provide a quantitative estimate of the degree of impact. We analyzed the potential financial impact on the cost of film management (film development, maintenance, and transportation) if CRT diagnosis were to be introduced in Seirei Hamamatsu Hospital. In conducting this analysis, we assumed that CRT diagnosis initially would be limited to CT and MR. The analysis demonstrated that the actual yearly cost of managing films amounts to about 240 million yen. As individual items, the cost of film materials, labor, and depreciation of assets were the three largest cost sectors, with the cost of film accounting for more than 30% of the total. The expense attributable to CT and MR exams was roughly half of the total cost. Against this level of expense, the expected savings in the first year after shifting to the filmless system would be 100 million yen, or a 36% reduction in current expenses. This savings reflects various effects of system change, including lack of need for related materials, reduction in staff workload, elimination of unnecessary equipment, etc. Under the simulation we conducted, 70% of savings occurred in the area of variable costs and 30% in the area of fixed costs. PMID:12520224

  8. Introducing Dialogic Teaching to Science Student Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehesvuori, Sami; Viiri, Jouni; Rasku-Puttonen, Helena

    2011-12-01

    It is commonly believed that science teachers rely on language that allows only minor flexibility when it comes to taking into account contrasting views and pupil thoughts. Too frequently science teachers either pose questions that target predefined answers or simply lecture through lessons, a major concern from a sociocultural perspective. This study reports the experiences of science student teachers when introduced to the Communicative Approach to science education drawing on dialogic teacher-talk in addition to authoritative teacher-talk. This approach was introduced to the students in an interventional teaching program running parallel to the student teachers' field practice. The practical implications of this approach during initial teacher education are the central focus of this study. The data consisting of videos of lessons and interviews indicate that the student teacher awareness of teacher-talk and alternative communicative options did increase. Student teachers reported greater awareness of the different functions of teacher-talk as well as the challenges when trying to implement dialogic teaching.

  9. An Introduced Insect Biological Control Agent Preys on an Introduced Weed Biological Control Agent.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biotic interference, especially by generalist predators, has been implicated in preventing establishment or limiting the impact of introduced weed biological control agents. Boreioglycaspis melaleucae Moore (Homoptera: Psyllidae) was released into Florida in 2002 as part of a classical biological c...

  10. Introducing fear of crime to risk research.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jonathan

    2006-02-01

    This article introduces the fear of crime to risk research, noting a number of areas for future interdisciplinary study. First, the article analyzes both the career of the concept of fear of crime and the politics of fear. Second, it considers research and theory on the psychology of risk, particularly the interplay between emotion and cognition, and what might be called the risk as image perspective. Third, the article speculates how people learn about risk and suggests how to customize a social amplification of risk framework to fear of crime. Finally, the article advances the argument that fear of crime may be an individual response to community social order and a generalized attitude toward the moral trajectory of society. Each of these areas of discussion has implications for future theoretical developments within risk research; each highlights how risk research can contribute to the social scientific understanding of an important issue of the day. PMID:16492196

  11. Introducing Astronomy Through Solar and Lunar Calendar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raharto, Moedji

    Lack of competence teachers to educate basic science astronomy and space science in Indonesia implies that knowledge of astronomy and space science will be transmitted to the young generation improperly. Priority in curriculum of basic science include only small amount of general astronomy and public perception that astronomy is less importance than basic science both are disadvantage for developing astronomical community in Indonesia a country with more than 230 million people. Muslim community in Indonesia has a tradition to use a lunar calendar and a tradition to determine the first day the important month Ramadhan Syawal and Dzulhijjah. Recent disputeof determining the first day of the three important month partly due to the lack of knowledge the first visibility of lunar crescent. The challenge of introducing astronomy on wider community with less background on astronomical education will be discussed in this paper

  12. Introducing Ergonomics in Two US Elementary Schools

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C L; Tien, D

    2003-06-25

    The increasing presence of computers and other forms of information and communications technology (ICT) in schools has raised concerns in the United States (US) and elsewhere. Children are using computers more than any other age group in the US. It is not known whether early intensive use of ICT predisposes children to future injury. Ergonomics is not included in state curriculum standards or requirements but can be supported by some of the existing standards. Some who believe that children are better off being educated early about ergonomics are taking action to bring ergonomics into elementary and secondary schools. This paper describes the process used to introduce ergonomics into two elementary schools in two different states by initiators with two different roles.

  13. How to introduce yourself to patients.

    PubMed

    Guest, Mags

    2016-06-01

    Rationale and key points This article explores the process of introducing yourself to patients. This is an essential interaction because it forms the basis of the therapeutic nurse-patient relationship. ▶ Effective communication skills are essential to foster therapeutic nurse-patient relationships based on mutual trust and respect. ▶ It is important to consider both verbal and non-verbal communication in patient interactions. Reflective activity Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How this article will change your practice when meeting patients for the first time. 2. How you could use this article to educate your colleagues. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio . PMID:27286624

  14. Towards Introducing Space Science in Uganda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anguma, S.; Ayikoru, J.

    This paper discusses the strategies and importance of introducing space science in Uganda. It proposes that Mbarara University, as a new university focusing on science and technology, would be ideally situated to spearhead the introduction of space science in Uganda. It is our expectation that this will have a spin-off effect to other higher institutions of learning and that consequently space science will become fully incorporated into the national teaching curriculum for all schools in Uganda. Based on the fact that the Government has a deliberate policy of popularizing science and technology to accelerate national economic development, the introduction of space science in the school system is to be enhanced by these efforts. We have charted the way forward for space science in Uganda and outlined the conceptual framework illustrating the spin-off effect into the education system.

  15. Introducing the Ginga FITS Viewer and Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeschke, E.; Inagaki, T.; Kackley, R.

    2013-10-01

    We introduce Ginga, a new open-source FITS viewer and toolkit based on Python astronomical packages such as pyfits, numpy, scipy, matplotlib, and pywcs. For developers, we present a set of Python classes for viewing FITS files under the modern Gtk and Qt widget sets and a more full-featured viewer that has a plugin architecture. We further describe how plugins can be written to extend the viewer with many different capabilities. The software may be of interest to software developers who are looking for a solution for integrating FITS visualization into their Python programs and end users interested in a new and different FITS viewer that is not based on Tcl/Tk widget technology. The software has been released under a BSD license.

  16. Radiofrequency Cauterization with Biopsy Introducer Needle

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, William F.; Wray-Cahen, Diane; Karanian, John W.; Hilbert, Stephen; Wood, Bradford J.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The principal risks of needle biopsy are hemorrhage and implantation of tumor cells in the needle tract. This study compared hemorrhage after liver and kidney biopsy with and without radiofrequency (RF) ablation of the needle tract. MATERIALS AND METHODS Biopsies of liver and kidney were performed in swine through introducer needles modified to allow RF ablation with the distal 2 cm of the needle. After each biopsy, randomization determined whether the site was to undergo RF ablation during withdrawal of the introducer needle. Temperature was measured with a thermistor stylet near the needle tip, with a target temperature of 70°C–100°C with RF ablation. Blood loss was measured as grams of blood absorbed in gauze at the puncture site for 2 minutes after needle withdrawal. Selected specimens were cut for gross examination. RESULTS RF ablation reduced bleeding compared with absence of RF ablation in liver and kidney (P < .01), with mean blood loss reduced 63% and 97%, respectively. Mean amounts of blood loss (±SD) in the liver in the RF and no-RF groups were 2.03 g ± 4.03 (CI, 0.53–3.54 g) and 5.50 g ± 5.58 (CI, 3.33–7.66 g), respectively. Mean amounts of blood loss in the kidney in the RF and no-RF groups were 0.26 g ± 0.32 (CI, −0.01 to 0.53 g) and 8.79 g ± 7.72 (CI, 2.34–15.24 g), respectively. With RF ablation, thermal coagulation of the tissue surrounding the needle tract was observed. CONCLUSION RF ablation of needle biopsy tracts reduced hemorrhage after biopsy in the liver and kidney and may reduce complications of hemorrhage as well as implantation of tumor cells in the tract. PMID:14963187

  17. Introducing Python tools for magnetotellurics: MTpy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieger, L.; Peacock, J.; Inverarity, K.; Thiel, S.; Robertson, K.

    2013-12-01

    Within the framework of geophysical exploration techniques, the magnetotelluric method (MT) is relatively immature: It is still not as widely spread as other geophysical methods like seismology, and its processing schemes and data formats are not thoroughly standardized. As a result, the file handling and processing software within the academic community is mainly based on a loose collection of codes, which are sometimes highly adapted to the respective local specifications. Although tools for the estimation of the frequency dependent MT transfer function, as well as inversion and modelling codes, are available, the standards and software for handling MT data are generally not unified throughout the community. To overcome problems that arise from missing standards, and to simplify the general handling of MT data, we have developed the software package "MTpy", which allows the handling, processing, and imaging of magnetotelluric data sets. It is written in Python and the code is open-source. The setup of this package follows the modular approach of successful software packages like GMT or Obspy. It contains sub-packages and modules for various tasks within the standard MT data processing and handling scheme. Besides pure Python classes and functions, MTpy provides wrappers and convenience scripts to call external software, e.g. modelling and inversion codes. Even though still under development, MTpy already contains ca. 250 functions that work on raw and preprocessed data. However, as our aim is not to produce a static collection of software, we rather introduce MTpy as a flexible framework, which will be dynamically extended in the future. It then has the potential to help standardise processing procedures and at same time be a versatile supplement for existing algorithms. We introduce the concept and structure of MTpy, and we illustrate the workflow of MT data processing utilising MTpy on an example data set collected over a geothermal exploration site in South

  18. Introducing systems biology for nursing science.

    PubMed

    Founds, Sandra A

    2009-07-01

    Systems biology expands on general systems theory as the "omics'' era rapidly progresses. Although systems biology has been institutionalized as an interdisciplinary framework in the biosciences, it is not yet apparent in nursing. This article introduces systems biology for nursing science by presenting an overview of the theory. This framework for the study of organisms from molecular to environmental levels includes iterations of computational modeling, experimentation, and theory building. Synthesis of complex biological processes as whole systems rather than isolated parts is emphasized. Pros and cons of systems biology are discussed, and relevance of systems biology to nursing is described. Nursing research involving molecular, physiological, or biobehavioral questions may be guided by and contribute to the developing science of systems biology. Nurse scientists can proactively incorporate systems biology into their investigations as a framework for advancing the interdisciplinary science of human health care. Systems biology has the potential to advance the research and practice goals of the National Institute for Nursing Research in the National Institutes of Health Roadmap initiative. PMID:19221104

  19. Introducing tropical lianas in a vegetation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeeck, Hans; De Deurwaerder, Hannes; Brugnera, Manfredo di Procia e.; Krshna Moorthy Paravathi, Sruthi; Pausenberger, Nancy; Roels, Jana; kearsley, elizabeth

    2016-04-01

    Tropical forests are essential components of the earth system and play a critical role for land surface feedbacks to climate change. These forests are currently experiencing large-scale structural changes, including the increase of liana abundance and biomass. This liana proliferation might have large impacts on the carbon cycle of tropical forests. However no single global vegetation model currently accounts for lianas. The TREECLIMBERS project (ERC starting grant) aims to introduce for the first time lianas into a vegetation model. The project attempts to reach this challenging goal by performing a global meta-analysis on liana data and by collecting new data in South American forests. Those new and existing datasets form the basis of a new liana plant functional type (PFT) that will be included in the Ecosystem Demography model (ED2). This presentation will show an overview of the current progress of the TREECLIMBERS project. Liana inventory data collected in French Guiana along a forest disturbance gradient show the relation between liana abundance and disturbance. Xylem water isotope analysis indicates that trees and lianas can rely on different soil water resources. New modelling concepts for liana PFTs will be presented and in-situ leaf gas exchange and sap flow data are used to parameterize water and carbon fluxes for this new PFT. Finally ongoing terrestrial LiDAR observations of liana infested forest will be highlighted.

  20. Introducing The Newtonian Gravity Concept Inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Kathryn; Willoughby, S.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple-choice Concept Inventories (CIs) have become important tools in the Astronomy Education Research community for assessing student learning and the effects of instructional interventions. We introduce for the first time the Newtonian Gravity Concept Inventory (NGCI), a 26-item research validated instrument to quickly and effectively assess introductory college astronomy students’ understanding of gravity. The conceptual focus of the NGCI covers four conceptual domains: (1) Independence of gravity from other factors (such as air pressure, magnetism, and rotation), (2) Application of the force law (including mass and distance proportionality relationships), (3) Behavior at certain thresholds (such as low mass and high distance limits, as well as atmospheric boundaries), and (4) Directionality (for objects on Earth or orbiting, and including superposition. After three iterations of testing and refining, the NGCI has proven to be both a reliable and valid instrument. As evidence, we present a full statistical analysis of overall instrument reliability, item difficulty and item discriminatory power, supplemented with qualitative information from think-aloud student interviews and expert review

  1. Introducing the Virtual Astronomy Multimedia Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, Ryan; Christensen, L. L.; Gauthier, A.; Hurt, R.

    2008-05-01

    The goal of the Virtual Astronomy Multimedia Project (VAMP) is to promote and vastly multiply the use of astronomy multimedia resources—from images and illustrations to animations, movies, and podcasts—and enable innovative future exploitation of a wide variety of outreach media by systematically linking resource archives worldwide. High-quality astronomical images, accompanied by rich caption and background information, abound on the web and yet prove notoriously difficult to locate efficiently using existing search tools. The Virtual Astronomy Multimedia Project offers a solution via the Astronomy Visualization Metadata (AVM) standard. Due to roll out in time for IYA2009, VAMP manages the design, implementation, and dissemination of the AVM standard for the education and public outreach astronomical imagery that observatories publish. VAMP will support implementations in World Wide Telescope, Google Sky, Portal to the Universe, and 365 Days of Astronomy, as well as Uniview and DigitalSky software designed specifically for planetariums. The VAMP workshop will introduce the AVM standard and describe its features, highlighting sample image tagging processes using diverse tools—the critical first step in getting media into VAMP. Participants with laptops will have an opportunity to experiment first hand, and workshop organizers will update a web page with system requirements and software options in advance of the conference (see http://virtualastronomy.org/ASP2008/ for links to resources). The workshop will also engage participants in a discussion and review of the innovative AVM image hierarchy taxonomy, which will soon be extended to other types of media.

  2. Introducing Knowledge into Differential Expression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Biecek, Przemysław; Tiuryn, Jerzy; Vingron, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Gene expression measurements allow determining sets of up- or down-regulated, or unchanged genes in a particular experimental condition. Additional biological knowledge can suggest examples of genes from one of these sets. For instance, known target genes of a transcriptional activator are expected, but are not certain to go down after this activator is knocked out. Available differential expression analysis tools do not take such imprecise examples into account. Here we put forward a novel partially supervised mixture modeling methodology for differential expression analysis. Our approach, guided by imprecise examples, clusters expression data into differentially expressed and unchanged genes. The partially supervised methodology is implemented by two methods: a newly introduced belief-based mixture modeling, and soft-label mixture modeling, a method proved efficient in other applications. We investigate on synthetic data the input example settings favorable for each method. In our tests, both belief-based and soft-label methods prove their advantage over semi-supervised mixture modeling in correcting for erroneous examples. We also compare them to alternative differential expression analysis approaches, showing that incorporation of knowledge yields better performance. We present a broad range of knowledge sources and data to which our partially supervised methodology can be applied. First, we determine targets of Ste12 based on yeast knockout data, guided by a Ste12 DNA-binding experiment. Second, we distinguish miR-1 from miR-124 targets in human by clustering expression data under transfection experiments of both microRNAs, using their computationally predicted targets as examples. Finally, we utilize literature knowledge to improve clustering of time-course expression profiles. PMID:20726790

  3. Successful Innovative Methods in Introducing Astronomy Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattejee, T. K. C.

    2006-08-01

    Innovating new informative methods to induce interest in students has permitted us to introduce astronomy in several universities and institutes in Mexico. As a prelude, we gave a popular course in the history of astronomy. This was very easy as astronomy seems to be the most ancient of sciences and relating the achievements of the ancient philosophers/scientists was very enlightening. Then we put up an amateur show of the sky every week (subject to climatic conditions for observability). We showed how to take photographs and make telescopic observations. We enlightened the students of the special missions of NASA and took them to museums for space exploration. We gave a popular seminar on "Astrodynamics," highlighting its importance. We gave a series of introductory talks in radio and T.V. Finally we exposed them to electronic circulars, like "Universe Today" and "World Science." The last mentioned strategy had the most electrifying effect. We may not have been successful without it, as the students began to take the matter seriously only after reading numerous electronic circulars. In this respect, these circulars are not only informative about the latest news in astronomy, but highlight the role of astronomy in the modern world. Without it, students seem to relate astronomy to astrology; it is due to this misconception that they are not attracted to astronomy. Students were hardly convinced of the need for an astronomy course, as they did not know about the scope and development of the subject. This awakened the interests of students and they themselves proposed the initiation of an elementary course in astronomy to have a feel of the subject. Later on they proposed a course on "Rocket Dynamics." We will discuss our methods and their impact in detail.

  4. The Molecular Modeling Workbook for Organic Chemistry (by Warren J. Hehre, Alan J. Shusterman, and Janet E. Nelson)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouch, R. David

    1999-09-01

    Wavefunction, Inc.: Irvine, CA, 1998. 307 pp. ISBN 1-890661-06-6. 30.00. This workbook is the latest in a series of "lab manuals" designed to increase the presence of molecular modeling and computational chemistry in undergraduate courses. The authors have designed the workbook to differ from its predecessors in two ways: the target audience is introductory organic chemistry students, and a CD-ROM containing files of molecules and data replaces the need for expensive molecular modeling software. It also differs from its predecessors in that the exercises in it are not really molecular modeling experiments. Instead, students are introduced to the field by viewing the results of computational work stored on the CD-ROM. The workbook is divided into 21 chapters, each of which covers a topic encountered in introductory-level organic chemistry. The sequence of chapters follows the sequence of topics that instructors of introductory organic courses might employ, allowing the workbook to be used with most modern organic chemistry texts. The heart of the workbook, though, is the CD-ROM included with the book. It contains files of molecules and their accompanying computational results as well as Spartan View, a software package that allows these models to be visualized. Although it does not allow actual calculations to be performed, Spartan View permits the user to rotate molecules, intermediates, and transition states and retrieve "precalculated" values of bond and dihedral angles, bond lengths, energies, dipole moments, charge, and frequency of vibration. Spartan View also allows the user to search molecules and intermediates for electron-rich or electron-poor regions by showing electrostatic potential as well as HOMOs and LUMOs. Some files allow for animation of reactions or conformational changes. Note, however, that since the data are just stored on the CD-ROM, not all the data are available for all files. Although performing calculations is not an option, Spartan View

  5. MAINTENANCE AND STABILITY OF INTRODUCED GENOTYPES IN GROUNDWATER AQUIFER MATERIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three indigenous groundwater bacterial strains and Pseudomonas putida harboring plasmids TOL (pWWO) and RK2 were introduced into experimentally contaminated groundwater aquifer microcosms. Maintenance of the introduced genotypes was measured over time by colony hybridization with...

  6. Spread of an introduced parasite across the Hawaiian archipelago independent of its introduced host

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gagne, Roderick B.; Hogan, J. Derek; McIntyre, Peter B.; Hain, Ernie F.; Gilliam, James F.; Pracheil, Brenda M.; Blum, Michael J.

    2014-11-11

    1. Co-introductions of non-native parasites with non-native hosts can be a major driver of disease emergence in native species, but the conditions that promote the establishment and spread of nonnative parasites remain poorly understood. Here, we characterise the infection of a native host species by a non-native parasite relative to the distribution and density of the original non-native host species and a suite of organismal and environmental factors that have been associated with parasitism, but not commonly considered within a single system. 2. We examined the native Hawaiian goby Awaous stamineus across 23 catchments on five islands for infection bymore » the non-native nematode parasite Camallanus cotti. We used model selection to test whether parasite infection was associated with the genetic diversity, size and population density of native hosts, the distribution and density of non-native hosts, land use and water quality. 3. We found that the distribution of non-native C. cotti parasites has become decoupled from the non-native hosts that were primary vectors of introduction to the Hawaiian Islands. Although no single intrinsic or extrinsic factor was identified that best explains parasitism of A. stamineus by C. cotti, native host size, population density and water quality were consistently identified as influencing parasite intensity and prevalence. 4. The introduction of non-native species can indirectly influence native species through infection of co-introduced parasites. Here, we show that the effects of enemy addition can extend beyond the range of non-native hosts through the independent spread of non-native parasites. This suggests that control of non-native hosts is not sufficient to halt the spread of introduced parasites. Furthermore, designing importation regulations to prevent host parasite co-introductions can promote native species conservation, even in remote areas that may not seem susceptible to human influence.« less

  7. 17 CFR 155.4 - Trading standards for introducing brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Trading standards for introducing brokers. 155.4 Section 155.4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION TRADING STANDARDS § 155.4 Trading standards for introducing brokers. (a) Each introducing...

  8. Can an introduced specialist parasitic castrator eliminate its host?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Griffen's isopod, Orthione griffenis was probably introduced to North America with ballast water from Asia in the 1980’s and is the first introduced bopyrid to be recognized anywhere in the world. Orthione griffenis is also one of the first obligate marine species introduced to ...

  9. Spread of an introduced parasite across the Hawaiian archipelago independent of its introduced host

    SciTech Connect

    Gagne, Roderick B.; Hogan, J. Derek; McIntyre, Peter B.; Hain, Ernie F.; Gilliam, James F.; Pracheil, Brenda M.; Blum, Michael J.

    2014-11-11

    1. Co-introductions of non-native parasites with non-native hosts can be a major driver of disease emergence in native species, but the conditions that promote the establishment and spread of nonnative parasites remain poorly understood. Here, we characterise the infection of a native host species by a non-native parasite relative to the distribution and density of the original non-native host species and a suite of organismal and environmental factors that have been associated with parasitism, but not commonly considered within a single system. 2. We examined the native Hawaiian goby Awaous stamineus across 23 catchments on five islands for infection by the non-native nematode parasite Camallanus cotti. We used model selection to test whether parasite infection was associated with the genetic diversity, size and population density of native hosts, the distribution and density of non-native hosts, land use and water quality. 3. We found that the distribution of non-native C. cotti parasites has become decoupled from the non-native hosts that were primary vectors of introduction to the Hawaiian Islands. Although no single intrinsic or extrinsic factor was identified that best explains parasitism of A. stamineus by C. cotti, native host size, population density and water quality were consistently identified as influencing parasite intensity and prevalence. 4. The introduction of non-native species can indirectly influence native species through infection of co-introduced parasites. Here, we show that the effects of enemy addition can extend beyond the range of non-native hosts through the independent spread of non-native parasites. This suggests that control of non-native hosts is not sufficient to halt the spread of introduced parasites. Furthermore, designing importation regulations to prevent host parasite co-introductions can promote native species conservation, even in remote areas that may not seem susceptible to human

  10. Studies of gas phase reactions, nucleation and growth mechanisms of plasma promoted chemical vapor deposition of aluminum using dimethylethylamine alane as source percursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorr, Andreas H.

    The work presented herein focuses on the use of plasma promoted chemical vapor deposition (PPCVD) of aluminum (Al) using dimethylethylamine alane (DMEAA) as source precursor to provide an integrated, low temperature alternative to currently employed Al deposition methods in ultra large sale integration ULSI multilevel metal wiring schemes. In this respect, key findings are reported and discussed from critical scientific and technical aspects of an research and development effort, which was successfully executed to identify a viable Al CVD deposition process. In this respect, advanced atomic scale analytical techniques were successfully employed to characterize the PPCVD deposition process at the molecular level, and document the dependence of film's structural and compositional properties on key process parameters. This led to the development and optimization of a PPCVD Al process for ULSI applications. In addition, gas phase quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) was employed to study the gas phase evolution during TCVD and PPCVD in order to gain a thorough understanding of the potential chemical and physical reactions that could occur in the gas phase and derive corresponding optimized reaction pathways for both CVD processes. Key reaction mechanisms involved in thermal and plasma promoted CVD as a function of processing parameters were investigated, including the role of hydrogen plasma in providing an efficient pathway to aluminum nucleation and growth. The resulting reaction mechanisms were then employed to identify the most likely precursor decomposition pathways and explore relevant implications for thermal and plasma promoted CVD Al. Furthermore, the nucleation and growth of Al in both TCVD and PPCVD were thoroughly characterized. Time evolution studies were carried out employing a variety of relevant liners and seed layers under selected surface chemical states. The surface morphology of the resulting films were analyzed by means of scanning probe microscopy

  11. Sample introducing apparatus and sample modules for mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Cyril V.; Wise, Marcus B.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for introducing gaseous samples from a wide range of environmental matrices into a mass spectrometer for analysis of the samples is described. Several sample preparing modules including a real-time air monitoring module, a soil/liquid purge module, and a thermal desorption module are individually and rapidly attachable to the sample introducing apparatus for supplying gaseous samples to the mass spectrometer. The sample-introducing apparatus uses a capillary column for conveying the gaseous samples into the mass spectrometer and is provided with an open/split interface in communication with the capillary and a sample archiving port through which at least about 90 percent of the gaseous sample in a mixture with an inert gas that was introduced into the sample introducing apparatus is separated from a minor portion of the mixture entering the capillary discharged from the sample introducing apparatus.

  12. Sample introducing apparatus and sample modules for mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, C.V.; Wise, M.B.

    1993-12-21

    An apparatus for introducing gaseous samples from a wide range of environmental matrices into a mass spectrometer for analysis of the samples is described. Several sample preparing modules including a real-time air monitoring module, a soil/liquid purge module, and a thermal desorption module are individually and rapidly attachable to the sample introducing apparatus for supplying gaseous samples to the mass spectrometer. The sample-introducing apparatus uses a capillary column for conveying the gaseous samples into the mass spectrometer and is provided with an open/split interface in communication with the capillary and a sample archiving port through which at least about 90 percent of the gaseous sample in a mixture with an inert gas that was introduced into the sample introducing apparatus is separated from a minor portion of the mixture entering the capillary discharged from the sample introducing apparatus. 5 figures.

  13. The Alan Gregg Memorial Lecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewster, Kingman, Jr.

    1970-01-01

    All university professionals must make greater effort to mobilize local, state and national public opinion to support the creation and funding of non-academic public service institutions to meet social needs of the community. Delivered at the 80th Annual Meeting of AAMC, Nov. 1, 1969. (IR)

  14. The ALAN Review. Fall 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Arthea, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Intended for junior high and high school English teachers, the articles and features in this journal focus on adolescent literature and the young adult audience. Articles in the journal discuss (1) politics as an emerging topic in young adult novels, (2) teacher attitudes and practices relevant to the use of the young adult novel in secondary…

  15. The ALAN Review. Winter 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Arthea, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Intended for junior or senior high school English teachers, articles and features in this journal issue focus on young adult literature and the adolescent audience. The first article, Kevin Major's "The Truth about My Fictitious Friends," describes the genesis of the author's fiction writing for the Newfoundland audience, and is followed by a…

  16. The ALAN Review. Winter, 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, W. Geiger, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Intended for the junior high school or secondary school English teacher, the articles and features in this journal focus on young adult literatue and the adolescent audience. The first article, Zibby Oneal's "Writing for Adolescents: Pleasures and Problems," describes the responsibilities of authors of adolescent fiction, while the second article,…

  17. Introducing Dynamic Analysis Using Malthus's Principle of Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pingle, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Declares the use of dynamic models is increasing in macroeconomics. Explains how to introduce dynamic models to students whose technical skills are modest or varied. Chooses Malthus's Principle of Population as a natural context for introducing dynamic analysis because it provides a method for reviewing the mathematical tools and theoretical…

  18. Math Standards in Action. Primary: Introducing Division. Intermediate: Elementary Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Marilyn; Winson, Beth

    1993-01-01

    Presents activities that introduce mathematics to primary and intermediate level elementary students. At the primary level, students read a story about fresh cookies that must be divided and shared. At the intermediate level, instructions are provided for a game that introduces elementary algebra. (SM)

  19. Special Relativity in Week One: 3) Introducing the Lorentz Contraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha

    2011-01-01

    This is the third of four articles on teaching special relativity in the first week of an introductory physics course. With Einstein's second postulate that the speed of light is the same to all observers, we could use the light pulse clock to introduce time dilation. But we had difficulty introducing the Lorentz contraction until we saw the movie…

  20. Introducing Engineering Design through an Intelligent Rube Goldberg Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acharya, Sushil; Sirinterlikci, Arif

    2010-01-01

    Engineering students need a head start on designing a component, a process, or a system early in their educational endeavors, and engineering design topics need to be introduced appropriately without negatively affecting students' motivation for engineering. In ENGR1010 at Robert Morris University, freshmen engineering students are introduced to…

  1. A Computer-Based Tool for Introducing Turfgrass Species.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fermanian, T. W.; Wehner, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a self-contained computer application constructed using the SuperCard development tool which introduces the characteristics of turfgrass species and their optimum environments. Evaluates students' gain in understanding turf species characteristics through this approach. (LZ)

  2. Hold My Calls: An Activity for Introducing the Statistical Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abel, Todd; Poling, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Working with practicing teachers, this article demonstrates, through the facilitation of a statistical activity, how to introduce and investigate the unique qualities of the statistical process including: formulate a question, collect data, analyze data, and interpret data.

  3. Another Way to Introduce Natural Logarithms and e.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christian, Robert R.

    1983-01-01

    A simple way to introduce natural logarithms and e is presented. The standard approach is outlined, followed by the approach via differentiating the exponential functions that the student knows about. (MNS)

  4. Javametrics 101: Introducing Nonscience Majors to the Chemistry Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Maureen Kendrick

    2000-01-01

    Introduces the course Javametrics 101: Mastering the Art and Science of Good Coffee which is designed for nonmajor science students. Emphasizes the scientific method in an integrated curriculum. (Contains 15 references.) (YDS)

  5. Video 4 of 8: Strategies for Introducing the Lesson

    NASA Video Gallery

    Solar Cell Availability from Around the Country is the lesson’s topic. You may use different approaches to introduce it to your students. Two approaches use science concepts related to radiation an...

  6. Introduced species and management of a Nothofagus/Austrocedrus forest.

    PubMed

    Simberloff, Daniel; Relva, Maria Andrea; Nunez, Martin

    2003-02-01

    Isla Victoria (Nahuel Huapi National Park, Argentina), a large island dominated by native Nothofagus and Austrocedrus forest, has old plantations of many introduced tree species, some of which are famed invaders of native ecosystems elsewhere. There are also large populations of introduced deer and shrubs that may interact in a complex way with the introduced trees, as well as a recently arrived population of wild boar. Long-standing concern that the introduced trees will invade and transform native forest may be unwarranted, as there is little evidence of progressive invasion, even close to the plantations, despite over 50 years of opportunity. Introduced and native shrubs allow scattered introduced trees to achieve substantial size in abandoned pastures, but in almost all areas neither the trees nor the shrubs appear to be spreading beyond these sites. These shrub communities may be stable rather than successional, but the technology for restoring them to native forest is uncertain and probably currently impractical. Any attempt to remove the exotic tree seedlings and saplings from native forest would probably create the very conditions that would favor colonization by exotic plants rather than native trees, while simply clear-cutting the plantations would be unlikely to lead to regeneration of Nothofagus or Austrocedrus. The key to maintaining native forest is preventing catastrophic fire, as several introduced trees and shrubs would be favored over native dominant trees in recolonization. Deer undoubtedly interact with both native and introduced trees and shrubs, but their net effect on native forest is not yet clear, and specific management of deer beyond the current hunting by staff is unwarranted, at least if preventing tree invasion is the goal. The steep terrain and shallow soil make the recently arrived boar a grave threat to the native forest. Eradication is probably feasible and should be attempted quickly. PMID:12520381

  7. Introduced birds incompletely replace seed dispersal by a native frugivore.

    PubMed

    Pejchar, Liba

    2015-01-01

    The widespread loss of native species and the introduction of non-native species has important consequences for island ecosystems. Non-native species may or may not functionally replace the role of native species in ecological processes such as seed dispersal. Although the majority of Hawaii's native plants require bird-mediated seed dispersal, only one native frugivore, Omao (Myadestes obscurus), persists in sufficient numbers to fill this functional role. Omao are restricted to less than half their original range, but two introduced frugivores are abundant throughout Hawaii. Given large-scale extinctions on islands, it is important to understand whether introduced birds serve as functional replacements or whether the absence of native frugivores alters plant communities. To assess seed dispersal by native and introduced birds, seed rain, vegetation characteristics, bird diet, density and habitat use were measured at three sites with Omao and three sites without Omao on Hawaii Island. The diet of native and introduced birds overlapped substantially, but Omao dispersed a variety of native species (n = 6) relatively evenly. In contrast, introduced birds dispersed an invasive species and fewer native species (n = 4), and >90 % of seeds dispersed by introduced birds were from two ubiquitous small-seeded species. Seed rain was significantly greater and more species rich at sites with Omao. These findings suggest that patterns of seed dispersal are altered following the local extinction of a native island frugivore. To more directly evaluate the relative roles of native and introduced frugivores in ecological processes, future studies could include reintroducing Omao to a suitable habitat within its historic range, or novel introductions to nearby islands where closely related species are now extinct. In an era of widespread extinction and invasion of island ecosystems, understanding the consequences of novel animal assemblages for processes like seed dispersal will be

  8. Introduced birds incompletely replace seed dispersal by a native frugivore

    PubMed Central

    Pejchar, Liba

    2015-01-01

    The widespread loss of native species and the introduction of non-native species has important consequences for island ecosystems. Non-native species may or may not functionally replace the role of native species in ecological processes such as seed dispersal. Although the majority of Hawaii's native plants require bird-mediated seed dispersal, only one native frugivore, Omao (Myadestes obscurus), persists in sufficient numbers to fill this functional role. Omao are restricted to less than half their original range, but two introduced frugivores are abundant throughout Hawaii. Given large-scale extinctions on islands, it is important to understand whether introduced birds serve as functional replacements or whether the absence of native frugivores alters plant communities. To assess seed dispersal by native and introduced birds, seed rain, vegetation characteristics, bird diet, density and habitat use were measured at three sites with Omao and three sites without Omao on Hawaii Island. The diet of native and introduced birds overlapped substantially, but Omao dispersed a variety of native species (n = 6) relatively evenly. In contrast, introduced birds dispersed an invasive species and fewer native species (n = 4), and >90 % of seeds dispersed by introduced birds were from two ubiquitous small-seeded species. Seed rain was significantly greater and more species rich at sites with Omao. These findings suggest that patterns of seed dispersal are altered following the local extinction of a native island frugivore. To more directly evaluate the relative roles of native and introduced frugivores in ecological processes, future studies could include reintroducing Omao to a suitable habitat within its historic range, or novel introductions to nearby islands where closely related species are now extinct. In an era of widespread extinction and invasion of island ecosystems, understanding the consequences of novel animal assemblages for processes like seed dispersal will be

  9. Investigation of bipolaron formation in the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) model and various extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sous, John; Berciu, Mona; Krems, Roman

    We develop a variational scheme for studying the stability of bipolarons in one-dimensional systems. In particular, we consider the SSH, Holstein, and, Breathing-Mode models along with combinations of these couplings and with other extended variations. We derive equations of motions under the variational approximation and solve numerically for the two-particle Green's function. We study the stability of bipolarons under different conditions and for fermonic and bosonic particles.

  10. Introduced northern pike consumption of salmonids in Southcentral Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sepulveda, Adam J.; Rutz, David S.; Dupuis, Aaron W; Shields, Patrick A; Dunker, Kristine J.

    2015-01-01

    The impacts of introduced northern pike (Esox lucius) on salmonid populations have attracted much attention because salmonids are popular subsistence, sport and commercial fish. Concern over the predatory effects of introduced pike on salmonids is especially high in Southcentral Alaska, where pike were illegally introduced to the Susitna River basin in the 1950s. We used pike abundance, growth, and diet estimates and bioenergetics models to characterise the realised and potential consumptive impacts that introduced pike (age 2 and older) have on salmonids in Alexander Creek, a tributary to the Susitna River. We found that juvenile salmonids were the dominant prey item in pike diets and that pike could consume up to 1.10 metric tons (realised consumption) and 1.66 metric tons (potential consumption) of juvenile salmonids in a summer. Age 3–4 pike had the highest per capita consumption of juvenile salmonids, and age 2 and age 3–4 pike had the highest overall consumption of juvenile salmonid biomass. Using historical data on Chinook salmon and pike potential consumption of juvenile salmonids, we found that pike consumption of juvenile salmonids may lead to collapsed salmon stocks in Alexander Creek. Taken together, our results indicate that pike consume a substantial biomass of juvenile salmonids in Alexander Creek and that coexistence of pike and salmon is unlikely without management actions to reduce or eliminate introduced pike.

  11. Invasive and introduced reptiles and amphibians: Chapter 28

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, Robert N.; Krysko, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    Why is there a section on introduced amphibians and reptiles in this volume, and why should veterinarians care about this issue? Globally, invasive species are a major threat to the stability of native ecosystems,1,2 and amphibians and reptiles are attracting increased attention as potential invaders. Some introduced amphibians and reptiles have had a major impact (e.g., Brown Tree Snakes [Boiga irregularis] wiping out the native birds of Guam3 or Cane Toads [Rhinella marina] poisoning native Australian predators).4 For the vast majority of species, however, the ecological, economic, and sociopolitical effects of introduced amphibians and reptiles are generally poorly quantified, largely because of a lack of focused research effort rather than because such effects are nonexistent. This trend is alarming given that rates of introduction have increased exponentially in recent decades.

  12. Introducing information technology into the home: conducting a home assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Zayas-Cabán, Teresa

    2002-01-01

    Abstract As the home becomes an increasingly important site for health care, an increasing number of technology applications or devices are being introduced to support health at home. However, introducing new technology into a household raises a number of issues that must be considered prior to, during, and after the technology is implemented. This paper reviews the experiences of the UW-Madison Advanced Technologies for Health@Home Project, summarizing our assessment of household requirements that should be analyzed prior to introducing new technology. The overall goal of the Health@Home project is to improve the functionality and content of information technology innovations for the home. Using Venkatesh and Mazumdar's framework this article will summarize the relevant social, behavioral, technological, and physical dimensions of households that must be carefully assessed and understood to help ensure that the technology fits the needs of home residents. PMID:12463960

  13. Atwood's machine as a tool to introduce variable mass systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sousa, Célia A.

    2012-03-01

    This article discusses an instructional strategy which explores eventual similarities and/or analogies between familiar problems and more sophisticated systems. In this context, the Atwood's machine problem is used to introduce students to more complex problems involving ropes and chains. The methodology proposed helps students to develop the ability needed to apply relevant concepts in situations not previously encountered. The pedagogical advantages are relevant for both secondary and high school students, showing that, through adequate examples, the question of the validity of Newton's second law may even be introduced to introductory level students.

  14. Introducing Locality-Aware Computation into OpenMP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Lei; Jin, Haoqiang; Chapman, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents our idea to introduce data locality feature into OpenMP. Given the facts that the memory systems are hierarchical while OpenMP is at, we believe that it is important to introduce new features to OpenMF to provide Open MP programmer capability to manage the data layout and align tasks and data as close as possible in modern architectures. We present the syntax and examples of the proposed features in this paper, and hope to enable further discussion of useful language features to keep OpenMP scalable in emerging architectures.

  15. S.Res.359 — 112th Congress (2011-2012) A resolution commending Alan S. Frumin on his service to the United States Senate.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Reid, Harry [D-NV

    2012-01-31

    01/31/2012 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S200-201; text as passed Senate: CR S200-201; text of measure as introduced: CR S213) (All Actions)

  16. Alaska Native Stories: Using Narrative to Introduce Expository Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Marilyn

    The reading program described in this lesson plan uses traditional stories of the Native peoples (narrative text) to introduce students to the study of animals in Alaska (expository text). During three 45-minute lessons, students will: complete a KWLQ (Know; Want to Know; Learn; Question) chart; listen and respond to a story (narrative text) by…

  17. Using "Monopoly" to Introduce Concepts of Race and Ethnic Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waren, Warren

    2011-01-01

    In this paper I suggest a technique which uses the familiar Parker Brother's game "Monopoly" to introduce core concepts of race and ethnic relations. I offer anecdotes from my classes where an abbreviated version of the game is used as an analog to highlight the sociological concepts of direct institutional discrimination, the legacy of…

  18. Introducing the Contextual Orientation to Bible: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levisohn, Jon A.

    2008-01-01

    Barry Holtz' (2003) presentation of a map of orientations for the teaching of Bible provides a certain kind of focus for research, enabling us to ask deeper and richer question about those orientations. This article investigates the teaching of one teacher, in two different settings--more specifically, how that teacher introduces Bible in those…

  19. Starting with Shakespeare: Successfully Introducing Shakespeare to Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Pauline; Daubert, Todd

    By immersing young learners in the life and times of Shakespeare and his characters, this book motivates students and helps them learn. It contains everything teachers need to introduce elementary students to four plays: "A Midsummer Night's Dream,""Macbeth,""Hamlet," and "Romeo and Juliet." For each play, there is a complete historical…

  20. Introducing the CEFR in BC: Questions and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wernicke, Meike; Bournot-Trites, Monique

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, the British Columbia Ministry of Education introduced an updated version of its international languages curricula titled Additional Languages (AL) draft curriculum which set out a clear articulation of the province's language education as conceived and developed over the past 15 years. The strength of the draft curriculum lies in its…

  1. Introducing Children to Economic Reasoning: Some Beginning Lessons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schug, Mark C.

    1996-01-01

    Provides an overview, guidelines, and specific suggestions for introducing economic thinking to elementary school children. Utilizes examples from US history (buffalo hunting, cattle farming) to illustrate economic concepts. Includes an appendix that frames economic concepts as mysteries with clues (and answers) provided. (MJP)

  2. Library Outreach: Introducing Campus Childcare Providers to the Academic Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Melissa Maxwell; Thornton, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    This case study describes a library outreach effort to university staff members employed by the campus child care center. Authors planned an instructional session to introduce child care staff members to library resources, focusing on the curriculum collection as a source of supplemental materials for classrooms. Surveys were administered before…

  3. Introducing Aliphatic Substitution with a Discovery Experiment Using Competing Electrophiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Timothy P.; Mostovoy, Amelia J.; Curran, Margaret E.; Berger, Clara

    2016-01-01

    A facile, discovery-based experiment is described that introduces aliphatic substitution in an introductory undergraduate organic chemistry curriculum. Unlike other discovery-based experiments that examine substitution using two competing nucleophiles with a single electrophile, this experiment compares two isomeric, competing electrophiles…

  4. Introducing MASC: A Movie for the Assessment of Social Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dziobek, Isabel; Fleck, Stefan; Kalbe, Elke; Rogers, Kimberley; Hassenstab, Jason; Brand, Matthias; Kessler, Josef; Woike, Jan K.; Wolf, Oliver T.; Convit, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    In the present study we introduce a sensitive video-based test for the evaluation of subtle mindreading difficulties: the Movie for the Assessment of Social Cognition (MASC). This new mindreading tool involves watching a short film and answering questions referring to the actors' mental states. A group of adults with Asperger syndrome (n = 19) and…

  5. Marbles: A Means of Introducing Students to Scattering Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, K. M.; Westphal, P. S.; Ramsier, R. D.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this activity is to introduce students to concepts of short-range and long-range scattering, and engage them in using indirect measurements and probabilistic models. The activity uses simple and readily available apparatus, and can be adapted for use with secondary level students as well as those in general physics courses or…

  6. Introducing Sustainability into Business Education Contexts Using Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacVaugh, Jason; Norton, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore how active learning may help address the legitimacy and practicability issues inherent in introducing education for sustainability into business-related degree programs. Design/methodology/approach: The focus of this study is the experience of the authors in the development and implementation of…

  7. Embedded C Programming: A Practical Course Introducing Programmable Microprocessors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laverty, David M.; Milliken, Jonny; Milford, Matthew; Cregan, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a new laboratory-based module for embedded systems teaching, which addresses the current lack of consideration for the link between hardware development, software implementation, course content and student evaluation in a laboratory environment. The course introduces second year undergraduate students to the interface between…

  8. Introducing DAE Systems in Undergraduate and Graduate Chemical Engineering Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandela, Ravi Kumar; Sridhar, L. N.; Rengaswamy, Raghunathan

    2010-01-01

    Models play an important role in understanding chemical engineering systems. While differential equation models are taught in standard modeling and control courses, Differential Algebraic Equation (DAE) system models are not usually introduced. These models appear naturally in several chemical engineering problems. In this paper, the introduction…

  9. DNA cleavage by oxymyoglobin and cysteine-introduced metmyoglobin.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Megha Subhash; Junedi, Sendy; Prakash, Halan; Nagao, Satoshi; Yamanaka, Masaru; Hirota, Shun

    2014-12-11

    Double stranded DNA was cleaved oxidatively by incubation with oxygenated myoglobin, and Lys96Cys sperm whale myoglobin in its stable ferric form functioned as an artificial nuclease under air by formation of an oxygenated species, owing to electron transfer from the SH group of the introduced cysteine to the heme. PMID:25327831

  10. Introducing the History of Science at the French Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fauque, Danielle M. E.

    2009-01-01

    In scientific teaching, especially in physics and chemistry, some historical aspects have been introduced at the secondary level in France, since 1993. Particularly, in 2007, the syllabuses of 11'-15' years old level ("college") propose precise activities in history of science and technology. Detailed guidance has been distributed in official…

  11. Introducing Artificial Neural Networks through a Spreadsheet Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rienzo, Thomas F.; Athappilly, Kuriakose K.

    2012-01-01

    Business students taking data mining classes are often introduced to artificial neural networks (ANN) through point and click navigation exercises in application software. Even if correct outcomes are obtained, students frequently do not obtain a thorough understanding of ANN processes. This spreadsheet model was created to illuminate the roles of…

  12. Introducing the Measurement of Shape in Freshman Human Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, M. Leonard

    The concept of shape often enters introductory cultural geography textbooks through the subject of political geography. This paper focuses on a quantitative way to introduce the concept of shape to students of cultural geography. The measure used in this approach was to compare the perimeter of the sovereign state with the perimeter of a circle…

  13. Introducing Computer Algebra to School Teachers of Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Man, Yiu-Kwong

    2007-01-01

    Since the last decade, the use of computer algebra systems at the Hong Kong school level is still very limited. Among various reasons behind, the lack of exposure of this kind of software to local school teachers should be taken into account. In this article, we describe how to introduce MAPLE in a BEd module of a local teacher-training programme.…

  14. An introduced Asian parasite threatens northeastern Pacific estuarine ecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We test a prevalent assumption in marine ecology that species are native to where they are found until contrary evidence appears. The native assumption significantly biases interpretations of marine community and ecosystem dynamics if it results in oversight of critically important introduced specie...

  15. Professional Development of PMRI Teachers for Introducing Social Norms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putri, Ratu Ilma Indra; Dolk, Maarten; Zulkardi

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports implementation results of designing a workshop for mathematics teachers in introducing classroom social norms. The participants are eight mathematics teachers in primary and junior secondary level. Teachers learned and did some activities about social norms during the workshop. First, they watched an example of learning videos…

  16. Introducing Students to Structural Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthoine, Armelle; Marazzi, Francesco; Tirelli, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The European Laboratory for Structural Assessment (ELSA) is one of the world's main laboratories for seismic studies. Besides its research activities, it also aims to bring applied science closer to the public. This article describes teaching activities based on a demonstration shaking table which is used to introduce the structural dynamics of…

  17. Introducing Development Education in Technical Universities: Successful Experiences in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boni, A.; Perez-Foguet, A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents and analyses the main characteristics of successful experiences of Development Education (DE) introduced in two major Spanish Technical Universities (Technical University of Catalonia, TUC, and Technical University of Valencia, TUV) during the nineties and the beginning of the twenty-first century. In this paper, after a brief…

  18. Introducing Students to Darwin via the Voyage of HMS "Beagle"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swab, Janice C.

    2010-01-01

    I use the diary that Darwin wrote during the voyage of HMS Beagle and recent images of a few of the places he visited to illustrate some comparisons between Darwin's world and ours. For today's students, increasingly committed to environmental issues, this may be an especially promising way to introduce Darwin.

  19. Atwood's Machine as a Tool to Introduce Variable Mass Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Sousa, Celia A.

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses an instructional strategy which explores eventual similarities and/or analogies between familiar problems and more sophisticated systems. In this context, the Atwood's machine problem is used to introduce students to more complex problems involving ropes and chains. The methodology proposed helps students to develop the…

  20. 21 CFR 880.6920 - Syringe needle introducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Syringe needle introducer. 880.6920 Section 880.6920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... that uses a spring-loaded mechanism to drive a hypodermic needle into a patient to a...

  1. 21 CFR 880.6920 - Syringe needle introducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Syringe needle introducer. 880.6920 Section 880.6920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... that uses a spring-loaded mechanism to drive a hypodermic needle into a patient to a...

  2. 21 CFR 880.6920 - Syringe needle introducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Syringe needle introducer. 880.6920 Section 880.6920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... that uses a spring-loaded mechanism to drive a hypodermic needle into a patient to a...

  3. 21 CFR 880.6920 - Syringe needle introducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Syringe needle introducer. 880.6920 Section 880.6920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... that uses a spring-loaded mechanism to drive a hypodermic needle into a patient to a...

  4. 21 CFR 880.6920 - Syringe needle introducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Syringe needle introducer. 880.6920 Section 880.6920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... that uses a spring-loaded mechanism to drive a hypodermic needle into a patient to a...

  5. A Model for Introducing Student Teachers to Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamens, Michele Wilson

    1997-01-01

    Investigated the advantages and disadvantages of placing student teachers in a collaborative situation at one elementary school. Data from student teacher journals and surveys, cooperating teacher interviews, and supervisor field notes indicated that, despite a few disadvantages, there were many benefits to introducing collaboration during the…

  6. Using a Case-Study Article to Effectively Introduce Mitosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hoewyk, Doug

    2007-01-01

    Community college students in a nonmajors biology class are introduced to mitosis by reading a case-study article that allows them to gauge how many times various parts of their bodies have been regenerated. The case-study article allows students to develop a conceptual framework of the cell cycle prior to a lecture on mitosis. (Contains 1 figure.)

  7. An Excel Solver Exercise to Introduce Nonlinear Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinder, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    Business students taking business analytics courses that have significant predictive modeling components, such as marketing research, data mining, forecasting, and advanced financial modeling, are introduced to nonlinear regression using application software that is a "black box" to the students. Thus, although correct models are…

  8. Two-Dimensional Crystallography Introduced by the Sprinkler Watering Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Toro, Jose A.; Calvo, Gabriel F.; Muniz, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    The problem of optimizing the number of circular sprinklers watering large fields is used to introduce, from a purely elementary geometrical perspective, some basic concepts in crystallography and comment on a few size effects in condensed matter physics. We examine square and hexagonal lattices to build a function describing the, so-called, dry…

  9. Introducing Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry: Probing the Substrate Selectivity of Acetylcholinesterase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angelin, Marcus; Larsson, Rikard; Vongvilai, Pornrapee; Ramstrom, Olof

    2010-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, college students are introduced to dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) and apply it to determine the substrate selectivity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Initially, the students construct a chemical library of dynamically interchanging thioesters and thiols. Then, AChE is added and allowed to select and hydrolyze…

  10. Maximizing Academic Success: Introducing the Concept of Optimized Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phan, Huy P.

    2015-01-01

    This research article reports on two correlational studies that examined the notion of "optimized functioning." Optimized functioning, introduced in a recent published study, offers an alternative approach into the understanding of optimization. Optimized functioning is proposed to consist of four distinctive components: personal…

  11. Hammer and Compass: Introducing East Germany. An Anthology with Interpretations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Elizabeth M.

    This anthology introduces students of German to the life of the people of East Germany. The three-part text describes interrelated cultural and political activities which are characteristic of the republic. Part One explores basic communistic philosophy, "a new myth", particularly through commentary on Walter Ulbricht's "Universe, Earth, and Man."…

  12. Differential escape from parasites by two competing introduced crabs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakeslee, April M.; Keogh, Carolyn L.; Byers, James E.; Kuris, Armand M.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Torchin, Mark E.

    2009-01-01

    Although introduced species often interact with one another in their novel communities, the role of parasites in these interactions remains less clear. We examined parasite richness and prevalence in 2 shorecrab species with different invasion histories and residency times in an introduced region where their distributions overlap broadly. On the northeastern coast of the USA, the Asian shorecrab Hemigrapsus sanguineus was discovered 20 yr ago, while the European green crab Carcinus maenas has been established for over 200 yr. We used literature and field surveys to evaluate parasitism in both crabs in their native and introduced ranges. We found only 1 parasite species infecting H. sanguineus on the US East Coast compared to 6 species in its native range, while C. maenas was host to 3 parasite species on the East Coast compared to 10 in its native range. The prevalence of parasite infection was also lower for both crabs in the introduced range compared to their native ranges; however, the difference was almost twice as much for H. sanguineus as for C. maenas. There are several explanations that could contribute to C. maenas' greater parasite diversity than that of H. sanguineus on the US East Coast, including differences in susceptibility, time since introduction, manner of introduction (vector), distance from native range, taxonomic isolation, and the potential for parasite identification bias. Our study underscores not just that non-native species lose parasites upon introduction, but that they may do so differentially, with ramifications for their direct interactions and with potential community-level influences.

  13. Introducing ICT into Schools in Rwanda: Educational Challenges and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubagiza, Jolly; Were, Edmond; Sutherland, Rosamund

    2011-01-01

    The Rwandan government views Information and Communication Technology (ICT) as a key tool for transforming the economy, with the education sector playing an important role in developing the necessary human resources. Since 2000 there has been a big push to introduce computers into schools and integrate ICT into the education curriculum through a…

  14. Use of Alumenontos to Introduce General Paleontologic and Biostratigraphic Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hageman, Steven James

    1989-01-01

    Describes exercises in which tabs from aluminum beverage cans are used to introduce principles of classification, biostratigraphy, and evolution. Provides diagrams which represent dorsal and ventral views of species and a table which graphs units of time in relation to species duration. (RT)

  15. The Mixer: Introducing the Concept of Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segrist, Dan J.; Pawlow, Laura A.

    2007-01-01

    This study entailed the development and implementation of a classroom activity designed to introduce students to the concept of factor analysis. We implemented the activity in both a personality theories course and a tests and measurements course. Data suggest that students learned about factor analysis from this activity, while enjoying it.…

  16. Light response of native and introduced Miscanthus sinensis seedlings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Miscanthus sinensis is an Asian grass introduced to the U.S. for ornamental purposes, which has formed naturalized populations across the Eastern and Midwest regions. In both its native and exotic ranges M. sinensis is found in open habitats with high light levels. Within its exotic range M. sinen...

  17. A Fictional Dialogue on Infinitude of Primes: Introducing Virtual Duoethnography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zazkis, Rina; Koichu, Boris

    2015-01-01

    We introduce "virtual duoethnography" as a novel research approach in mathematics education, in which researchers produce a text of a dialogic format in the voices of fictional characters, who present and contrast different perspectives on the nature of a particular mathematical phenomenon. We use fiction as a form of research linked to…

  18. Introducing the Moon's Orbital Eccentricity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    I present a novel way to introduce the lunar orbital eccentricity in introductory astronomy courses. The Moon is perhaps the clearest illustration of the general orbital elements such as inclination, ascending node, eccentricity, perigee, and so on. Furthermore, I like the students to discover astronomical phenomena for themselves, by means of a…

  19. Introducing Undergraduate Students to Real-Time PCR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Dale; Funnell, Alister; Jack, Briony; Johnston, Jill

    2010-01-01

    An experiment is conducted, which in four 3 h laboratory sessions, introduces third year undergraduate Biochemistry students to the technique of real-time PCR in a biological context. The model used is a murine erythroleukemia cell line (MEL cells). These continuously cycling, immature red blood cells, arrested at an early stage in erythropoiesis,…

  20. Introducing Online Bibliographic Service to its Users: The Online Presentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crane, Nancy B.; Pilachowski, David M.

    1978-01-01

    A description of techniques for introducing online services to new user groups includes discussion of terms and their definitions, evolution of online searching, advantages and disadvantages of online searching, production of the data bases, search strategies, Boolean logic, costs and charges, "do's and don'ts," and a user search questionnaire. (J…

  1. Native species replace introduced grass cultivars seeded following wildfire

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seeding of non-native species following wildfires to stabilize soils and prevent erosion has become a controversial practice because it risks inhibiting tree regeneration, introducing noxious weeds, and permanently replacing native species. This paper reports the fate of non-native seeded species du...

  2. A Laboratory Exercise to Introduce Inorganic Biomimetic Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Donald M.

    1985-01-01

    Biomimetic chemistry is concerned with the synthesis of small, molecular weight molecules which mimic the properties of metal-containing sites within certain biologically significant species. A series of experiments for an advanced undergraduate laboratory is described as a way to introduce this area into the chemistry curriculum. (JN)

  3. Introducing the Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy 2012 Scholar Lecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flintoff, Anne; Fitzgerald, Hayley

    2014-01-01

    This commentary introduces David Kirk's paper entitled "Making a career in Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy in the corporatized university: Reflections on hegemony, resistance, collegiality and scholarship", which was presented in the 2012 Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy (PESP) "scholar lecture" at the British…

  4. Introducing ISTE Learning: What Do You Want to Learn Today?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayman, April

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces ISTE Learning, a new online professional development (PD) program designed specifically to make PD both fun and more easily accessible for busy educators. One thing that makes ISTE Learning different from everything else out there is that the NETS for students, teachers, and administrators are the cornerstone of everything…

  5. Introducing the Newest APPA Fellows: Maggie Kinnaman and Mo Qayoumi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thaler-Carter, Ruth E.

    2010-01-01

    Few APPA members have contributed as much in as many areas over as many years as the 2010 recipients of APPA's highest individual honor, the APPA Fellow. This article introduces two recipients of the 2010 APPA Fellows, Margaret "Maggie" Kinnaman, who retired as director for business administration for the facilities division at the University of…

  6. GlideScope and Frova Introducer for Difficult Airway Management

    PubMed Central

    Ciccozzi, Alessandra; Guetti, Cristiana; Papola, Roberta; Paladini, Antonella; Varrassi, Giustino; Marinangeli, Franco

    2013-01-01

    The introduction into clinical practice of new tools for intubation as videolaringoscopia has dramatically improved the success rate of intubation and the work of anesthesiologists in what is considered the most delicate maneuver. Nevertheless intubation difficulties may also be encountered with good anatomical visualization of glottic structures in videolaringoscopia. To overcome the obstacles that may occur both in a difficult provided intubation such as those unexpected, associated endotracheal introducer able to facilitate the passage of the endotracheal tube through the vocal cords into the trachea may be useful. We report 4 cases of difficult intubation planned and unplanned and completed successfully using the GlideScope videolaryngoscope associated with endotracheal Frova introducer. PMID:23991339

  7. [Flat Panel Detector Philips introduced and its system direction].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shinichi

    2002-01-01

    We introduced digital X-ray diagnostic systems with Flat panel detector both in general X-ray systems and in Angiography systems. Our introduced Flat Panel Detector has the latest technology and has Cesium Iodide (CsI) that absorbs X-ray energy and generates visible light. Detected light signals make digital X-ray images. CsI is the most important material because its absorption rate of X-ray influences the strength of output digital signal. The purpose in this paper is checking that is latest Flat Panel Detector pulls out enough capability CsI has. Especially the thickness of CsI relates to X-ray absorption. X-ray absorption rate depended on the thickness of CsI was calculated by using simulated X-ray model and the future direction of Flat Panel Detector system was discussed. PMID:12766268

  8. Introducing shape constraints into object-based traveltime tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaullier, G.; Charbonnier, P.; Heitz, F.; Côte, P.

    2016-09-01

    Traveltime tomography is a difficult, ill-posed reconstruction problem due to the nonlinearity of the forward model and the limited number of measurements usually available. In such an adverse situation, pixel-based regularization methods are generally unable to provide satisfactory reconstructions. In this paper we propose a novel object-based reconstruction method that introduces prior information about the shape of the structures to be reconstructed, which yields high quality geoacoustic inversion. The proposed method approaches the forward model by a series of linear problems, leading to a sequence of minimizations during which the shape prior is introduced. The method is demonstrated on synthetic and real data, collected on a specific bench dedicated to non-destructive testing of civil engineering structures.

  9. Introduced marine species of the North Sea coasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reise, K.; Gollasch, S.; Wolff, W. J.

    1998-09-01

    About 80 non-indigenous species are assumed to have been introduced into the North Sea by transoceanic shipping and aquaculture. The number is certainly underestimated as most small organisms received insufficient attention at the species level. Also, the seafaring tradition of the North Sea countries is much longer than our biological surveys are. Most exotic invertebrates originate from the western Atlantic and were introduced by shipping, while most algae stem from the Pacific and came with the introduced oysters. A peak of newcomers was observed in the 1970s. Most of the arrivals became established in brackish environments, at harbor sites and in the vicinity of oyster farms, fouling on hard substrates or living as epibionts. A few live in sediments, are holoplanktonic or are parasites. At the open coast, approximately 6% of the macrobenthic species are exotics, while in estuaries their share is up to 20%. Most exotics have been encountered in the southern North Sea first, and many did not spread further north. About 25% of the established non-natives are widespread and attain locally high abundances. As a consequence, some inshore habitats are entirely dominated by exotics. The overall effect on the ecosystem seems to be more additive than one of displacement. This suggests that the coastal biota of the North Sea are quite capable of accommodating newcomers. However, this is no guarantee that the next introduced species may not cause severe ecological change or economic harm. There is a need to minimize the risk of unintentional introductions by ballast water treatment and by adhering to quarantine procedures in aquaculture. Current research on exotics in the North Sea is regarded as inadequate for proper evaluation and management requirements.

  10. Drift wave transport scalings introduced by varying correlation length

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, J.; Holod, I.

    2005-01-01

    Scalings of the correlation length of drift wave turbulence with magnetic current q, shear, elongation, and temperature ratio have been introduced into a drift wave transport model. The correlation length is calculated from linear scaling of the fastest growing mode. Such a procedure is supported by previous turbulence simulations with absorbing boundaries for short and long wavelengths. The resulting q and s scalings are now in better agreement with experimental scalings. In particular, the simulation results for transport barrier shots improve.

  11. Introducing polarization and magnetization into Maxwell's equations: A modified approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakoby, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of electric polarization and magnetization—the density of electric and magnetic dipole moments respectively—into Maxwell's equations requires establishing their respective relation to polarization charges and magnetization currents. Using a method introduced by Feynman in his famous lectures on physics and considering statistically distributed dipoles on the microscopic scale, the desired relations can be established in a manner that may be more intuitive to undergraduate students.

  12. Toxoplasmosis in three species of native and introduced Hawaiian birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, T.M.; Massey, J.G.; Lindsay, D.S.; Dubey, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii was found in endemic Hawaiian birds, including 2 nene geese (Nesochen sandvicensis), 1 red-footed booby (Sula sula), and an introduced bird, the Erckels francolin (Francolinus erckelii). All 4 birds died of disseminated toxoplasmosis; the parasite was found in sections of many organs, and the diagnosis was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining with antia??T. gondiia??specific polyclonal antibodies. This is the first report of toxoplasmosis in these species of birds.

  13. Toxoplasmosis in three species of native and introduced Hawaiian birds.

    PubMed

    Work, Thierry M; Massey, J Gregory; Lindsay, David; Dubey, J P

    2002-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii was found in endemic Hawaiian birds, including 2 nene geese (Nesochen sandvicensis), 1 red-footed booby (Sula sula), and an introduced bird, the Erckels francolin (Francolinus erckelii). All 4 birds died of disseminated toxoplasmosis; the parasite was found in sections of many organs, and the diagnosis was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining with anti-T. gondii-specific polyclonal antibodies. This is the first report of toxoplasmosis in these species of birds. PMID:12435157

  14. Fate and activity of microorganisms introduced into soil.

    PubMed Central

    van Veen, J A; van Overbeek, L S; van Elsas, J D

    1997-01-01

    Introduced microorganisms are potentially powerful agents for manipulation of processes and/or components in soil. Fields of application include enhancement of crop growth, protection of crops against plant-pathogenic organisms, stimulation of biodegradation of xenobiotic compounds (bioaugmentation), and improvement of soil structure. Inoculation of soils has already been applied for decades, but it has often yielded inconsistent or disappointing results. This is caused mainly by a commonly observed rapid decline in inoculant population activity following introduction into soil, i.e., a decline of the numbers of inoculant cells and/or a decline of the (average) activity per cell. In this review, we discuss the available information on the effects of key factors that determine the fate and activity of microorganisms introduced into soil, with emphasis on bacteria. The factors addressed include the physiological status of the inoculant cells, the biotic and abiotic interactions in soil, soil properties, and substrate availability. Finally, we address the possibilities available to effectively manipulate the fate and activity of introduced microorganisms in relation to the main areas of their application. PMID:9184007

  15. Toxicological evaluation of proteins introduced into food crops

    PubMed Central

    Kough, John; Herouet-Guicheney, Corinne; Jez, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    This manuscript focuses on the toxicological evaluation of proteins introduced into GM crops to impart desired traits. In many cases, introduced proteins can be shown to have a history of safe use. Where modifications have been made to proteins, experience has shown that it is highly unlikely that modification of amino acid sequences can make a non-toxic protein toxic. Moreover, if the modified protein still retains its biological function, and this function is found in related proteins that have a history of safe use (HOSU) in food, and the exposure level is similar to functionally related proteins, then the modified protein could also be considered to be “as-safe-as” those that have a HOSU. Within nature, there can be considerable evolutionary changes in the amino acid sequence of proteins within the same family, yet these proteins share the same biological function. In general, food crops such as maize, soy, rice, canola etc. are subjected to a variety of processing conditions to generate different food products. Processing conditions such as cooking, modification of pH conditions, and mechanical shearing can often denature proteins in these crops resulting in a loss of functional activity. These same processing conditions can also markedly lower human dietary exposure to (functionally active) proteins. Safety testing of an introduced protein could be indicated if its biological function was not adequately characterized and/or it was shown to be structurally/functionally related to proteins that are known to be toxic to mammals. PMID:24164515

  16. [Feasibility to introduce rare tree species Pinus sibirica into China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Guifeng; Yang, Chuanping; Zhao, Guangyi

    2002-11-01

    Pinus sibirica growing mainly in Siberia of Russia is distributed over the Euro-Asia Taiga forest belt. There are many high-quality populations due to a great deal of variations. This kind of tree has an advantage of standing up to frigid environment, and can spread out in such places that have cold weather and high altitude. In China, boreal forest is a wide-spreaded type of forest that has the largest area and high volume. For this reason, it is feasible to introduce Pinus sibirica into the region that the condition is suitable. Introducing this kind of tree is a strategic project that can improve the structure and quality of our boreal forest. Introducing it can not only meet the demands of improved variety in short time, but also do the experiment of producing edible seeds and build up the developing center of nut, which can be a way of getting rid of poverty of forest region in heavy frigid area where is regarded as infertile area for farming formerly. PMID:12625013

  17. Why should biochemistry students be introduced to molecular dynamics simulations--and how can we introduce them?

    PubMed

    Elmore, Donald E

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations play an increasingly important role in many aspects of biochemical research but are often not part of the biochemistry curricula at the undergraduate level. This article discusses the pedagogical value of exposing students to MD simulations and provides information to help instructors consider what software and hardware resources are necessary to successfully introduce these simulations into their courses. In addition, a brief review of the MD-based activities in this issue and other sources are provided. PMID:27001155

  18. Introduced brown trout alter native acanthocephalan infections in native fish.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Rachel A; Townsend, Colin R; Poulin, Robert; Tompkins, Daniel M

    2011-09-01

    1. Native parasite acquisition provides introduced species with the potential to modify native host-parasite dynamics by acting as parasite reservoirs (with the 'spillback' of infection increasing the parasite burdens of native hosts) or sinks (with the 'dilution' of infection decreasing the parasite burdens of native hosts) of infection. 2. In New Zealand, negative correlations between the presence of introduced brown trout (Salmo trutta) and native parasite burdens of the native roundhead galaxias (Galaxias anomalus) have been observed, suggesting that parasite dilution is occurring. 3. We used a multiple-scale approach combining field observations, experimental infections and dynamic population modelling to investigate whether native Acanthocephalus galaxii acquisition by brown trout alters host-parasite dynamics in native roundhead galaxias. 4. Field observations demonstrated higher infection intensity in introduced trout than in native galaxias, but only small, immature A. galaxii were present in trout. Experimental infections also demonstrated that A. galaxii does not mature in trout, although parasite establishment and initial growth were similar in the two hosts. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that trout may serve as an infection sink for the native parasite. 5. However, dynamic population modelling predicts that A. galaxii infections in native galaxias should at most only be slightly reduced by dilution in the presence of trout. Rather, model exploration indicates parasite densities in galaxias are highly sensitive to galaxias predation on infected amphipods, and to relative abundances of galaxias and trout. Hence, trout presence may instead reduce parasite burdens in galaxias by either reducing galaxias density or by altering galaxias foraging behaviour. PMID:21426342

  19. Drug treatments for skin disease introduced in 2007.

    PubMed

    2008-03-01

    A comprehensive list of drug treatments for skin disease including: Adapalene Gel 0.3% (Differin(R)), Drospirenone/ Ethinyl Estradiol (Yaz(R)), Tretinoin 0.05% Gel (Anthralin(R)), Daptomycin for Injection (CUBICIN(R)), Retapamulin Ointment 1% (Altabax(R)), Tinidazole Tablets (Tindamax(R)), Ciclopirox Topical Solution 8%, Ketoconazole 2% Foam (Extina(R)), Terbinafine Hydrochloride (Lamisil(R)), Desloratadine (Aerius(R)/ Azomyr(R)/ Neoclarityn(R)), Levocetirizine Dihydrochloride (Xyzal(R)), Loratadine Dry Syrup 1% (Claritin(R)) and many other treatments introduced in 2007. PMID:18373042

  20. Fabrication of mesoscopic floating Si wires by introducing dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motohashi, Mitsuya; Shimizu, Kazuya; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Niwa, Masaaki

    2014-12-01

    We fabricated a mesoscopic Si wire by introducing dislocations in a silicon wafer before HF anodization. The dislocations formed along the (111) crystal plane. The outline of the dislocation line was an inverted triangle. The resulting wire floated on a bridge girder and had a hybrid structure consisting of a porous layer and crystalline Si. The cross section of the wire had an inverted triangle shape. The wire formation mechanism is discussed in terms of carrier transport, crystal structure, and dislocation formation during anodization.

  1. Introducing AC inductive reactance with a power tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Wesley; Baker, Blane

    2016-09-01

    The concept of reactance in AC electrical circuits is often non-intuitive and difficult for students to grasp. In order to address this lack of conceptual understanding, classroom exercises compare the predicted resistance of a power tool, based on electrical specifications, to measured resistance. Once students discover that measured resistance is smaller than expected, they are asked to explain these observations using previously studied principles of magnetic induction. Exercises also introduce the notion of inductive reactance and impedance in AC circuits and, ultimately, determine self-inductance of the motor windings within the power tool.

  2. Using basic electromagnetism to introduce LINAC4 (CERN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cid-Vidal, Xabier; Cid, Ramon; Vretenar, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    The LHC is the last element of CERN’s accelerator complex, which is a succession of machines with increasingly higher energies. Everything starts in the 50 MeV linear accelerator (LINAC2), but a new linear accelerator, the 160 MeV LINAC4, will replace LINAC2 in 2018, upgrading LHC injectors to higher intensity and eventually increasing the luminosity of LHC. The aim of this article is briefly introducing this new accelerator, and presenting a simple application of some fundamental laws of magnetism to be taken to the secondary school classrooms.

  3. Introducing meta-services for biomedical information extraction

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Florian; Krallinger, Martin; Rodriguez-Penagos, Carlos; Hakenberg, Jörg; Plake, Conrad; Kuo, Cheng-Ju; Hsu, Chun-Nan; Tsai, Richard Tzong-Han; Hung, Hsi-Chuan; Lau, William W; Johnson, Calvin A; Sætre, Rune; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Chen, Yan Hua; Kim, Sun; Shin, Soo-Yong; Zhang, Byoung-Tak; Baumgartner, William A; Hunter, Lawrence; Haddow, Barry; Matthews, Michael; Wang, Xinglong; Ruch, Patrick; Ehrler, Frédéric; Özgür, Arzucan; Erkan, Güneş; Radev, Dragomir R; Krauthammer, Michael; Luong, ThaiBinh; Hoffmann, Robert; Sander, Chris; Valencia, Alfonso

    2008-01-01

    We introduce the first meta-service for information extraction in molecular biology, the BioCreative MetaServer (BCMS; ). This prototype platform is a joint effort of 13 research groups and provides automatically generated annotations for PubMed/Medline abstracts. Annotation types cover gene names, gene IDs, species, and protein-protein interactions. The annotations are distributed by the meta-server in both human and machine readable formats (HTML/XML). This service is intended to be used by biomedical researchers and database annotators, and in biomedical language processing. The platform allows direct comparison, unified access, and result aggregation of the annotations. PMID:18834497

  4. Variability in GRB light curves: Introducing Orthogonal Matching Pursuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dereli, Husne; Bégué, Damien; Ryde, Felix

    2016-07-01

    Constraining the variability of GRBs is important as it is one of the few keys to estimate many unknown parameters, such as the emission radius, the Lorentz factor, the size of the progenitor. In this work, we introduced the Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (OMP) method to study GRB light curves and to compute the minimum time variability of GRBs. Commonly used in medical sciences, this method reconstructs a signal by choosing among predefined functional shapes. We will discuss the implementation of the code, and compare its performances with those of other dedicated methods (Haar wavelet analysis, peak finding algorithm and step wise filter correlation).

  5. Placement of large suprapubic tube using peel-away introducer.

    PubMed

    Chiou, R K; Morton, J J; Engelsgjerd, J S; Mays, S

    1995-04-01

    We describe a new method for placing a large suprapubic tube and report our experience with 56 patients. This method uses a specially designed fascial dilator and peel-away introducer to place an 18F Foley catheter suprapubically. In our experience the method is simple and effective for the exchange of a small suprapubic tube to an 18F Foley catheter, and for primary placement of a large suprapubic tube. It is easily performed at the bedside or during a minor procedure with the patient under local anesthesia. PMID:7869492

  6. Cryptocoryne beckettii complex (Araceae) introduced at a Florida spring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacono, C.C.

    2002-01-01

    A vegetative population of Cryptocoryne (Araceae), introduced at a Florida spring, appeared to represent three closely related species in the C. beckettii complex: C. beckettii Thw. ex Trimen, C. wendtii de Wit and C. undulata Wendt. Individuals of C. undulata were true to type and could be delineated at the site. Intergradation of diagnostic features was common in others, upon transplanting and flowering. While some transplants produced spathes characteristic of either C. wendtii or C. beckettii, intermediates between the two species were common. Neither C. beckettii nor C. wendtii could be delineated at the site. The seclusion of the stream and the integrity of native plant communities have likely prevented dispersal downstream.

  7. Larviphagy in native bivalves and an introduced oyster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troost, Karin; Kamermans, Pauline; Wolff, Wim J.

    2008-10-01

    Introduced Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas have expanded rapidly in the Dutch Oosterschelde estuary, while stocks of native bivalves declined slightly. As a consequence, total filtration pressure increased significantly, which may affect the mortality of bivalve larvae. Better escape abilities in Pacific oyster larvae might be a contributing factor to their rapid geographic expansion. To study whether C. gigas larvae are filtered less than larvae of native bivalves, we investigated filtration and ingestion of the larvae of the native Mytilus edulis and introduced C. gigas by the adults of C. gigas and M. edulis as well as the native Cerastoderma edule. We measured filtration rates of C. gigas and M. edulis larvae by the adult bivalves ( C. gigas, M. edulis and C. edule), and compared these to filtration rates of algae. Additionally, we studied the fate of filtered larvae. All three adult species filtered both C. gigas and M. edulis larvae. M. edulis larvae were filtered by all three bivalve species with the same filtration rates as algae, whereas filtration rates of C. gigas larvae were roughly 50% lower than filtration rates of algae. This suggests that C. gigas larvae can somehow reduce their filtration risk, whereas larvae of M. edulis cannot. The majority of filtered C. gigas and M. edulis larvae were ingested.

  8. Detecting infiltration and impacts of introduced water using strontium isotopes.

    PubMed

    Brinck, Elizabeth L; Frost, Carol D

    2007-01-01

    Water introduced to surface drainages, such as agricultural and roadway runoff, mine drainage, or coalbed natural gas (CBNG)-produced water, potentially can be of environmental concern. In order to mitigate potential environmental effects, it may be important to be able to trace water discharged to the surface as it infiltrates and interacts with near-surface aquifers. We have chosen to study water withdrawn during CBNG production for isotope tracing in the hyporheic zone because it poses a variety of economic, environmental, and policy issues in the Rocky Mountain states. Ground water quality must be protected as CBNG water is added to semiarid ecosystems. Strontium (Sr) isotopes are effective fingerprints of the aquifer from which water originates. In this study, CBNG water was found to have a higher (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratio than the local alluvial aquifer water. This measurable difference allows the strontium isotope ratio and concentration to be used as tracers of CBNG water following its discharge to the surface. The dissolution and mobilization of salts from soil are an important contributor to ground water quality degradation. In the Powder River basin of Wyoming, the soils are calcium carbonate-buffered systems. The chemical similarity of strontium to calcium allows it to substitute into calcium minerals and enabled us to use strontium isotopes to identify calcium salts mobilized from the soil. Strontium isotopes are an effective monitor of the source of ions and the volume and direction of introduced water flow in the hyporheic zone. PMID:17760582

  9. Bedtime procrastination: introducing a new area of procrastination

    PubMed Central

    Kroese, Floor M.; De Ridder, Denise T. D.; Evers, Catharine; Adriaanse, Marieke A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Procrastination is a prevalent and problematic phenomenon that has mostly been studied in the domain of academic behavior. The current study shows that procrastination may also lead to harmful outcomes in the area of health behavior, introducing bedtime procrastination as an important factor related to getting insufficient sleep and consequently affecting individual well-being. Bedtime procrastination is defined as failing to go to bed at the intended time, while no external circumstances prevent a person from doing so. Methods: To empirically support the conceptual introduction of bedtime procrastination, an online survey study was conducted among a community sample (N = 177). The relationship between bedtime procrastination and individual difference variables related to self-regulation and general procrastination was assessed. Moreover, it was investigated whether bedtime procrastination was a predictor of self-reported sleep outcomes (experienced insufficient sleep, hours of sleep, fatigue during the day). Results: Bedtime procrastination was negatively associated with self-regulation: people who scored lower on self-regulation variables reported more bedtime procrastination. Moreover, self-reported bedtime procrastination was related to general reports of insufficient sleep above and beyond demographics and self-regulation. Conclusions: Introducing a novel domain in which procrastinators experience problems, bedtime procrastination appears to be a prevalent and relevant issue that is associated with getting insufficient sleep. PMID:24994989

  10. Hybridization between introduced spotted bass and smallmouth bass in reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierce, P.C.; Van Den Avyle, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Introductions of black basses Micropterus spp. beyond their native ranges have led to hybridization within the genus. In the southeastern USA, the potential for hybridization appears high because species introductions have been common in reservoirs. We determined the extent of hybridization between smallmouth bass M. dolomieu and spotted bass M. punctulatus in reservoirs in which introductions of either species into the native range of the other species had occurred. Three allozyme loci were used to distinguish the two species and their hybrids. Significant hybridization occurred in two of three reservoirs where introductions had been reported. In Lake Chatuge, Georgia-North Carolina, where the Alabama subspecies of spotted bass M.p. henshalli was introduced, 77 of 276 fish had hybrid genotypes, and only 2 fish had genotypes of the native smallmouth bass. In Thurlow Reservoir, Alabama, where smallmouth bass were introduced and Alabama spotted bass were native, 3 of 17 fish had hybrid genotypes. Only I fish with a possible hybrid genotype was identified in two reservoirs containing native smallmouth bass and northern spotted bass M.p. punctulatus.

  11. Trichomonad infection in endemic and introduced columbids in the Seychelles.

    PubMed

    Bunbury, N

    2011-07-01

    Island endemic avifaunas face many threats, including the now well-documented impacts of pathogens. The impacts of pathogens on the endemic Seychelles avifauna, however, have been little studied. The protozoan parasite Trichomonas gallinae has been shown to reduce survival and reproductive success of the endemic Pink Pigeon Columba mayeri on the nearby island of Mauritius. I investigated trichomonad infection prevalence and pathogenicity in endemic Seychelles Blue Pigeons, Alectroenas pulcherrima, and two introduced species of columbid, the Madagascar Turtle-dove, Streptopelia picturata, and the Barred Ground Dove, Geopelia striata, on the Seychelles island of Mahé during September-October 2007. I asked whether: 1) trichomonad infections occur in these species; 2) prevalence varies among species; and 3) birds show any signs of pathogenicity consistent with tricho-monosis. I use the results to assess the potential threat of this pathogen to A. pulcherrima. All three species were infected with trichomonads, and the overall prevalence was 27.5%. Alectroenas pulcherrima had higher prevalence (47.1%) than the two introduced species combined (24.3%). No infected individuals showed any signs of disease. These findings suggest that trichomonad parasites should be considered as a potential disease threat to the A. pulcherrima population. PMID:21719842

  12. Phase-averaged measurements of perturbations introduced into boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H.

    1991-01-01

    Large-scale structures in turbulent and transitional wall-bounded flows make a significant contribution to the Reynolds stress and turbulent energy. The behavior of these structures is examined. Small perturbations are introduced into a laminar and a turbulent boundary layer to trigger the formation of large-scale features. Both flows use the same inlet unit Reynolds number, and they experience the same pressure gradient history, i.e. a favorable pressure gradient (FPG) followed by an adverse pressure gradient (APG). The perturbation consists of a small short duration flow repetitively introduced through a hole in the wall located at the C(sub p) minimum. Hot-wire data are averaged on the basis of the phase of the disturbance, and automation of the experiment was used to obtain measurements on large spatially dense grids. In the turbulent boundary, the perturbation evolves into a vortex loop which retains its identity for a considerable streamwise distance. In the laminar layer, the perturbation decays to a very small magnitude before growing rapidly and triggering the transition process in the APG. The 'time-like' animations of the phase-averaged data are used to gain insight into the naturally occurring physical mechanisms in each flow.

  13. Production of UT Reference Blocks Containing Artificially Introduced Defects

    SciTech Connect

    Kaya, A. A.; Ucuncuoglu, S.; Kurkcu, N.; Kandemir, A.; Arslan, H.

    2007-03-21

    Metallic blocks of Inconel 718 and Ti-6A1-4V alloys that contain artificially introduced defects of known type, size, shape and location were prepared to serve as calibration standards in ultrasonic inspection. The synthetic defects employed to serve as reflectors were all pertinent to the specific alloy systems used, i.e. compositional defects termed as 'dirty white' 'white spot' and 'freckle' for Inconel 718; 'hard-alpha' for titanium alloy. Furthermore, as a defect type common to all three materials, spherical voids of various sizes were also incorporated into these calibration blocks. The aim of this study is to introduce defects of known type and size into metallic blocks made of superalloy Inconel 718 and titanium Ti-6A1-4V alloy. The scope of the study entailed determination of the correct parameters for manufacturing processes involved. Based on the results of the preceding phases of this study, it was decided that the method of Vacuum Hot Pressing (VHP) was to be used in this project to manufacture the metallic block containing artificial defects.

  14. Introducing paediatric grommet "rapid turnover" lists. A Quality Improvement Project.

    PubMed

    Easto, Rachel; Shukla, Rishi; Rowland, Charlie; Williams, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric grommet insertions are a common ENT procedure which is typically carried out as a daycase procedure. National guidelines exist (NICE CG60) outlining the criteria for grommet insertions. At our institution it was noted that children were experiencing long waits for their grommet surgery with 78% breaching the national 18 week RTT target by time of surgery in the preceding 6 months. 38% of children were attending for surgery with out of date audiograms and as a consequence, due to children no longer meeting the NICE criteria for grommet insertions, 8% of children were being cancelled on the day of surgery. To improve our waiting times and reduce on the day cancellations we introduced a pilot scheme of "rapid turnover" paediatric day case theatre lists. These lists were accompanied by a pre-operative consent clinic, enabling children not requiring surgery to be cancelled. The theatre lists were run by a senior ENT registrar and had two anaesthetic "pods" i.e. two anaesthetists and two ODPs. This enabled faster turnover of patients and consequently more patients could be operated on per theatre list. Following our pilot there are no longer any children on the grommet waiting list in breach of the 18 week RTT time. Furthermore, there were no on the day cancellations due to surgery not being indicated. All staff and patients involved were satisfied with the "rapid turnover" lists and subsequently the idea is to be introduced on a regular, 2 monthly basis, to keep waiting times down. PMID:27158497

  15. Detecting infiltration and impacts of introduced water using strontium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Brinck, E.L.; Frost, C.D.

    2007-09-15

    Water introduced to surface drainages, such as agricultural and roadway runoff, mine drainage, or coalbed natural gas (CBNG)-produced water, potentially can be of environmental concern. In order to mitigate potential environmental effects, it may be important to be able to trace water discharged to the surface as it infiltrates and interacts with near-surface aquifers. We have chosen to study water withdrawn during CBNG production for isotope tracing in the hyporheic zone because it poses a variety of economic, environmental, and policy issues in the Rocky Mountain states. Ground water quality must be protected as CBNG water is added to semiarid ecosystems. Strontium (Sr) isotopes are effective fingerprints of the aquifer from which water originates. In this study, CBNG water was found to have a higher Sr-87/Sr-86 ratio than the local alluvial aquifer water. This measurable difference allows the strontium isotope ratio and concentration to be used as tracers of CBNG water following its discharge to the surface. The dissolution and mobilization of salts from soil are an important contributor to ground water quality degradation. In the Powder River basin of Wyoming, the soils are calcium carbonate-buffered systems. The chemical similarity of strontium to calcium allows it to substitute into calcium minerals and enabled us to use strontium isotopes to identify calcium salts mobilized from the soil. Strontium isotopes are an effective monitor of the source of ions and the volume and direction of introduced water flow in the hyporheic zone.

  16. Effects of Introduced Materials in the Drift Scale Test

    SciTech Connect

    DeLoach, L; Jones, RL

    2002-01-11

    Water samples previously acquired from superheated (>140 C) zones within hydrological test boreholes of the Drift Scale Test (DST) show relatively high fluoride concentrations (5-66 ppm) and low pH (3.1-3.5) values. In these high temperature regions of the rock, water is present superheated vapor only--liquid water for sampling purposes is obtained during the sampling process by cooling. Based on data collected to date, it is evident that the source of the fluoride and low pH is from introduced man-made materials (Teflon{trademark} and/or Viton{trademark} fluoroelastomer) used in the test. The test materials may contribute fluoride either by degassing hydrogen fluoride (HF) directly to produce trace concentrations of HF gas ({approx}0.1 ppm) in the high temperature steam, or by leaching fluoride in the sampling tubes after condensation of the superheated steam. HF gas is known to be released from Viton{trademark} at high temperatures (Dupont Dow Elastomers L.L.C., Elkton, MD, personal communication) and the sample water compositions indicate near stoichiometric balance of hydrogen ion and fluoride ion, indicating dissolution of HF gas into the aqueous phase. These conclusions are based on a series of water samples collected to determine if the source of the fluoride is from the degradation of materials originally installed to facilitate measurements. Analyses of these water samples show that the source of the fluoride is the introduced materials, that is the Viton{trademark} packers used to isolate test zones and/or Teflon{trademark} tubing used to draw water and steam from the test zones. In particular, water samples collected from borehole (BH) 72 high temperatures ({approx} 170 C) prior to introduction of any Viton{trademark} or Teflon{trademark} show pH Values (4.8 to 5.5) and fluoride concentrations well below 1 ppm over a period of six months. These characteristics are typical of condensing DST steam that contains only some dissolved carbon dioxide generated

  17. Introducing MASC: a movie for the assessment of social cognition.

    PubMed

    Dziobek, Isabel; Fleck, Stefan; Kalbe, Elke; Rogers, Kimberley; Hassenstab, Jason; Brand, Matthias; Kessler, Josef; Woike, Jan K; Wolf, Oliver T; Convit, Antonio

    2006-07-01

    In the present study we introduce a sensitive video-based test for the evaluation of subtle mindreading difficulties: the Movie for the Assessment of Social Cognition (MASC). This new mindreading tool involves watching a short film and answering questions referring to the actors' mental states. A group of adults with Asperger syndrome (n = 19) and well-matched control subjects (n = 20) were administered the MASC and three other mindreading tools as part of a broader neuropsychological testing session. Compared to control subjects, Asperger individuals exhibited marked and selective difficulties in social cognition. A Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis for the mindreading tests identified the MASC as discriminating the diagnostic groups most accurately. Issues pertaining to the multidimensionality of the social cognition construct are discussed. PMID:16755332

  18. Introducing Defects in Photonic Band-Gap (PBG) Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Elliott C.; /North Dakota State U. /SLAC

    2007-11-07

    Photonic Band-Gap (PBG) fibers are a periodic array of optical materials arranged in a lattice called a photonic crystal. The use of PBG fibers for particle acceleration is being studied by the Advanced Accelerator Research Department (AARD) at SLAC. By introducing defects in such fibers, e.g. removing one or more capillaries from a hexagonal lattice, spatially confined modes suitable for particle acceleration may be created. The AARD has acquired several test samples of PBG fiber arrays with varying refractive index, capillary size, and length from an external vendor for testing. The PBGs were inspected with a microscope and characteristics of the capillaries including radii, spacing, and errors in construction were determined. Transmission tests were performed on these samples using a broad-range spectrophotometer. In addition, detailed E-field simulations of different PBG configurations were done using the CUDOS and RSOFT codes. Several accelerating modes for different configurations were found and studied in detail.

  19. Introducing djatoka: a reuse friendly, open source JPEG image server

    SciTech Connect

    Chute, Ryan M; Van De Sompel, Herbert

    2008-01-01

    The ISO-standardized JPEG 2000 image format has started to attract significant attention. Support for the format is emerging in major consumer applications, and the cultural heritage community seriously considers it a viable format for digital preservation. So far, only commercial image servers with JPEG 2000 support have been available. They come with significant license fees and typically provide the customers with limited extensibility capabilities. Here, we introduce djatoka, an open source JPEG 2000 image server with an attractive basic feature set, and extensibility under control of the community of implementers. We describe djatoka, and point at demonstrations that feature digitized images of marvelous historical manuscripts from the collections of the British Library and the University of Ghent. We also caIl upon the community to engage in further development of djatoka.

  20. Treating ballast water with hydroxyl radical on introduced organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhitao; Bai, Mindi; Xiao, Yu; Bai, Mindong; Yang, Bo; Bai, Xiyao

    2006-06-01

    With physical method of micro-gap gas discharge, a large amount of hydroxyl radical can be produced in 20t/h pilot-scale system using the ionization of O2 and H2O. In this paper, the effect of biochemistry of hydroxyl radicals on introduced organisms in ballast water was experimentally investigated. The results indicate that the contents of chlorophyl- a, chlorophyl- b, chlorophyl- c and carotenoid are decreased by 35% 64% within 8.0s and further to the lowest limit of test 5 minutes. In addition, the main reasons of cell death are the lipid peroxidation, the strong destruction to the monose, amylose, protein, DNA and RNA of cell, and damage in CAT, POD and SOD of antioxidant enzyme system.

  1. Introducing a feedback training system for guided home rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    As the number of people requiring orthopaedic intervention is growing, individualized physiotherapeutic rehabilitation and adequate postoperative care becomes increasingly relevant. The chances of improvement in the patients condition is directly related to the performance and consistency of the physiotherapeutic exercises. In this paper a smart, cost-effective and easy to use Feedback Training System for home rehabilitation based on standard resistive elements is introduced. This ensures high accuracy of the exercises performed and offers guidance and control to the patient by offering direct feedback about the performance of the movements. 46 patients were recruited and performed standard physiotherapeutic training to evaluate the system. The results show a significant increase in the patient's ability to reproduce even simple physiotherapeutic exercises when being supported by the Feedback Training System. Thus physiotherapeutic training can be extended into the home environment whilst ensuring a high quality of training. PMID:20078852

  2. Reconsidering reflexivity: introducing the case for intellectual entrepreneurship.

    PubMed

    Cutcliffe, John R

    2003-01-01

    In this article, the author reconsiders reflexivity and attempts to examine some unresolved issues by drawing particular attention to the relationship between reflexivity and certain related phenomena/processes: the researcher's a priori knowledge, values, beliefs; empathy within qualitative research; the presence and influence of the researcher's tacit knowledge, and May's "magic" in method. Given the limitations of some reflexive activity identified in this article, the author introduces the case for greater intellectual entrepreneurship within the context of qualitative research. He suggests that excessive emphasis on reflexive activity might inhibit intellectual entrepreneurship. Wherein intellectual entrepreneurship implies a conscious and deliberate attempt on the part of academics to explore the world of ideas boldly; to take more risks in theory development and to move away from being timid researchers. PMID:12564268

  3. Introducing a Precursor Model of Inheritance to Young Children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergazaki, Marida; Valanidou, Eftychia; Kasimati, Maria-Christina; Kalantzi, Mara

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports on a mixed-model case study of designing and implementing a constructivist teaching intervention about reproduction and physical family resemblance for young children. The objective of the study was to explore whether the ways that preschoolers reason about the resemblance between offspring and parents can be improved with a teaching intervention that introduces a rudimentary idea of genes through reproduction. The participants were 60 preschoolers (age 5-5.5 years) from public kindergartens of Patras. The qualitative analysis of their pre- and post semi-structured interviews showed a remarkable improvement in their reasoning, which was found to be statistically significant as well. After the three-part teaching intervention, children appeared to recognize the biological contribution of both parents to a child's creation. Moreover, most of them appeared able to attribute a child's species and body traits to the parental genes passed to the child through reproduction and not to the parents' or child's intention.

  4. The costs of introducing new technologies into space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodson, E. N.; Partma, H.; Ruhland, W.

    1992-01-01

    A review is conducted of cost-research studies intended to provide guidelines for cost estimates of integrating new technologies into existing satellite systems. Quantitative methods are described for determining the technological state-of-the-art so that proposed programs can be evaluated accurately in terms of their contribution to technological development. The R&D costs associated with the proposed programs are then assessed with attention given to the technological advances. Also incorporated quantifiably are any reductions in the costs of production, operations, and support afforded by the advanced technologies. The proposed model is employed in relation to a satellite sizing and cost study in which a tradeoff between increased R&D costs and reduced production costs is examined. The technology/cost model provides a consistent yardstick for assessing the true relative economic impact of introducing novel techniques and technologies.

  5. Effects of introducing foxes and raccoons on herring gull colonies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kadlec, J.A.

    1971-01-01

    Red foxes (Vulpes fulva) and raccoons (Procyon lotor) released at colonies of herring gulls (Larus argentatus) on islands off the Massachusetts coast effectively eliminated the production of young gulls. Annual predator introductions for 2-4 years caused major reductions in colony size and occasionally total abandonment of the island as a colony site. Observations of the experimental islands for 2 years after cessation of predator introductions showed slow repopulation of the islands and lower breeding success than on control islands. The size of the regional population was reduced largely because of the movements of gulls off the experimental islands. The introduced predators are, in most cases, difficult to maintain on the islands; this restricts their utility in population management.

  6. Introducing Astronomy Related Research into Non-Astronomy Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Douglas

    The concern over the insufficient number of students choosing to enter the science and engineering fields has been discussed and documented for years. While historically addressed at the national level, many states are now recognizing that the lack of a highly-skilled technical workforce within their states' borders has a significant effect on their economic health. Astronomy, as a science field, is no exception. Articles appear periodically in the most popular astronomy magazines asking the question, "Where are the young astronomers?" Astronomy courses at the community college level are normally restricted to introductory astronomy I and II level classes that introduce the student to the basics of the night sky and astronomy. The vast majority of these courses is geared toward the non-science major and is considered by many students to be easy and watered down courses in comparison to typical physics and related science courses. A majority of students who enroll in these classes are not considering majors in science or astronomy since they believe that science is "boring and won't produce any type of career for them." Is there any way to attract students? This paper discusses an approach being undertaken at the Estrella Mountain Community College to introduce students in selected mathematics courses to aspects of astronomy related research to demonstrate that science is anything but boring. Basic statistical techniques and understanding of geometry are applied to a large virgin data set containing the magnitudes and phase characteristics of sets of variable stars. The students' work consisted of developing and presenting a project that explored analyzing selected aspects of the variable star data set. The description of the data set, the approach the students took for research projects, and results from a survey conducted at semester's end to determine if student's interest and appreciation of astronomy was affected are presented. Using the data set provided, the

  7. Virtual states introduced for overcoming entropic barriers in conformational space

    PubMed Central

    Higo, Junichi; Nakamura, Haruki

    2012-01-01

    Free-energy landscape is an important quantity to study large-scale motions of a biomolecular system because it maps possible pathways for the motions. When the landscape consists of thermodynamically stable states (low-energy basins), which are connected by narrow conformational pathways (i.e., bottlenecks), the narrowness slows the inter-basin round trips in conformational sampling. This results in inaccuracy of free energies for the basins. This difficulty is not cleared out even when an enhanced conformational sampling is fairly performed along a reaction coordinate. In this study, to enhance the inter-basin round trips we introduced a virtual state that covers the narrow pathways. The probability distribution function for the virtual state was controlled based on detailed balance condition for the inter-state transitions (transitions between the real-state basins and the virtual state). To mimic the free-energy landscape of a real biological system, we introduced a simple model where a wall separates two basins and a narrow hole is pierced in the wall to connect the basins. The sampling was done based on Monte Carlo (MC). We examined several hole-sizes and inter-state transition probabilities. For a small hole-size, a small inter-state transition probability produced a sampling efficiency 100 times higher than a conventional MC does. This result goes against ones intuition, because one considers generally that the sampling efficiency increases with increasing the transition probability. The present method is readily applicable to enhanced conformational sampling such as multi-canonical or adaptive umbrella sampling, and extendable to molecular dynamics.

  8. Introducing artificial length scales to tailor magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassbender, J.; Strache, T.; Liedke, M. O.; Markó, D.; Wintz, S.; Lenz, K.; Keller, A.; Facsko, S.; Mönch, I.; McCord, J.

    2009-12-01

    Magnetism is a collective phenomenon. Hence, a local variation on the nanoscale of material properties, which act on the magnetic properties, affects the overall magnetism in an intriguing way. Of particular importance are the length scales on which a material property changes. These might be related to the exchange length, the domain wall width, a typical roughness correlation length, or a length scale introduced by patterning of the material. Here we report on the influence of two artificially created length scales: (i) ion erosion templates that serve as a source of a predefined surface morphology (ripple structure) and hence allow for the investigation of roughness phenomena. It is demonstrated that the ripple wave length can be easily tuned over a wide range (25-175 nm) by varying the primary ion erosion energy. The effect of this ripple morphology on the induced uniaxial magnetic anisotropy in soft magnetic Permalloy films is studied. Only below a ripple wavelength threshold (≈60 nm) is a significant induced magnetic anisotropy found. Above this threshold the corrugated Permalloy film acts as a flat film. This cross-over is discussed in the frame of dipolar interactions giving rise to the induced anisotropies. (ii) Ion implantation through a lithographically defined mask, which is used for a magnetic property patterning on various length scales. The resulting magnetic properties are neither present in non-implanted nor in homogeneously implanted films. Here new insight is gained by the comparison of different stripe patterning widths ranging from 1 to 10 μm. In addition, the appearance of more complicated magnetic domain structures, i.e. spin-flop domain configurations and head-on domain walls, during hard axis magnetization reversal is demonstrated. In both cases the magnetic properties, the magnetization reversal process as well as the magnetic domain configurations depend sensitively on the artificially introduced length scale.

  9. Introducing seismic metamaterials and their potential geophysical applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombi, Andrea; Roux, Philippe; Craster, Richard; Guenneau, Sebastien

    2016-04-01

    What if in the future the propagation of seismic surface waves in urban environments could be shaped at will? Until a few years ago, this question would have sounded rather provocative to the seismological community: Today, thanks to seismic metamaterials, this is no longer the case. This talk reviews the recent developments that have brought metamaterials, introduced in the 90's to mould the flow of electromagnetic waves at micro- or nano-scales, to be promising in the control the propagation of seismic waves in the ground. The idea behind a seismic metamaterial is tomodify the local properties of the ground through the insertion of inclusions of a different material at a sub-wavelength scale. The different types of inclusions, resonant or non-resonant, determine the property and the performance of the metamaterial. After a brief overview on some seminal acoustic experiments, we introduce three types of seismic metamaterials: The first is based on a cluster of closely spaced sub-wavelength resonators attached to the ground realising a metasurface that can stop the propagation of Rayleigh waves. A geophysical experiment has demonstrated that forest trees can act like this metamaterial for frequencyies between 30 and 100 Hz. The second type is derived from the previous, but now the subwavelength resonators realising the cluster are graded (i.e. of decreasing height) such that they allow Rayleigh waves to be converted into shear waves. Finally, in the last example, we present a metamaterial that uses soft soil inclusions in the ground to create a lens for rerouting seismic surface waves around an obstacle. Since most of the results shown here come from numerical simulations, this talk will be of interest also for numerical modelers concerned with scattering from deeply subwavelength (resonant) inclusions.

  10. Introduced and invasive cactus species: a global review.

    PubMed

    Novoa, Ana; Le Roux, Johannes J; Robertson, Mark P; Wilson, John R U; Richardson, David M

    2014-01-01

    Understanding which species are introduced and become invasive, and why, are central questions in invasion science. Comparative studies on model taxa have provided important insights, but much more needs to be done to unravel the context dependencies of these findings. The cactus family (Cactaceae), one of the most popular horticultural plant groups, is an interesting case study. Hundreds of cactus species have been introduced outside their native ranges; a few of them are among the most damaging invasive plant species in the world. We reviewed the drivers of introductions and invasions in the family and seek insights that can be used to minimize future risks. We compiled a list of species in the family and determined which have been recorded as invasive. We also mapped current global distributions and modelled the potential global distributions based on distribution data of known invasive taxa. Finally, we identified whether invasiveness is phylogenetically clustered for cacti and whether particular traits are correlated with invasiveness. Only 57 of the 1922 cactus species recognized in this treatment have been recorded as invasive. There are three invasion hotspots: South Africa (35 invasive species recorded), Australia (26 species) and Spain (24 species). However, there are large areas of the world with climates suitable for cacti that are at risk of future invasion-in particular, parts of China, eastern Asia and central Africa. The invasive taxa represent an interesting subset of the total species pool. There is a significant phylogenetic signal: invasive species occur in 2 of the 3 major phylogenetic clades and in 13 of the 130 genera. This phylogenetic signal is not driven by human preference, i.e. horticultural trade, but all invasive species are from 5 of the 12 cactus growth forms. Finally, invasive species tend to have significantly larger native ranges than non-invasive species, and none of the invasive species are of conservation concern in their

  11. Dissecting the Machinery That Introduces Disulfide Bonds in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Arts, Isabelle S.; Ball, Geneviève; Leverrier, Pauline; Garvis, Steven; Nicolaes, Valérie; Vertommen, Didier; Ize, Bérengère; Tamu Dufe, Veronica; Messens, Joris; Voulhoux, Romé; Collet, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Disulfide bond formation is required for the folding of many bacterial virulence factors. However, whereas the Escherichia coli disulfide bond-forming system is well characterized, not much is known on the pathways that oxidatively fold proteins in pathogenic bacteria. Here, we report the detailed unraveling of the pathway that introduces disulfide bonds in the periplasm of the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The genome of P. aeruginosa uniquely encodes two DsbA proteins (P. aeruginosa DsbA1 [PaDsbA1] and PaDsbA2) and two DsbB proteins (PaDsbB1 and PaDsbB2). We found that PaDsbA1, the primary donor of disulfide bonds to secreted proteins, is maintained oxidized in vivo by both PaDsbB1 and PaDsbB2. In vitro reconstitution of the pathway confirms that both PaDsbB1 and PaDsbB2 shuttle electrons from PaDsbA1 to membrane-bound quinones. Accordingly, deletion of both P. aeruginosa dsbB1 (PadsbB1) and PadsbB2 is required to prevent the folding of several P. aeruginosa virulence factors and to lead to a significant decrease in pathogenicity. Using a high-throughput proteomic approach, we also analyzed the impact of PadsbA1 deletion on the global periplasmic proteome of P. aeruginosa, which allowed us to identify more than 20 new potential substrates of this major oxidoreductase. Finally, we report the biochemical and structural characterization of PaDsbA2, a highly oxidizing oxidoreductase, which seems to be expressed under specific conditions. By fully dissecting the machinery that introduces disulfide bonds in P. aeruginosa, our work opens the way to the design of novel antibacterial molecules able to disarm this pathogen by preventing the proper assembly of its arsenal of virulence factors. PMID:24327342

  12. Introduced and invasive cactus species: a global review

    PubMed Central

    Novoa, Ana; Le Roux, Johannes J.; Robertson, Mark P.; Wilson, John R.U.; Richardson, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding which species are introduced and become invasive, and why, are central questions in invasion science. Comparative studies on model taxa have provided important insights, but much more needs to be done to unravel the context dependencies of these findings. The cactus family (Cactaceae), one of the most popular horticultural plant groups, is an interesting case study. Hundreds of cactus species have been introduced outside their native ranges; a few of them are among the most damaging invasive plant species in the world. We reviewed the drivers of introductions and invasions in the family and seek insights that can be used to minimize future risks. We compiled a list of species in the family and determined which have been recorded as invasive. We also mapped current global distributions and modelled the potential global distributions based on distribution data of known invasive taxa. Finally, we identified whether invasiveness is phylogenetically clustered for cacti and whether particular traits are correlated with invasiveness. Only 57 of the 1922 cactus species recognized in this treatment have been recorded as invasive. There are three invasion hotspots: South Africa (35 invasive species recorded), Australia (26 species) and Spain (24 species). However, there are large areas of the world with climates suitable for cacti that are at risk of future invasion—in particular, parts of China, eastern Asia and central Africa. The invasive taxa represent an interesting subset of the total species pool. There is a significant phylogenetic signal: invasive species occur in 2 of the 3 major phylogenetic clades and in 13 of the 130 genera. This phylogenetic signal is not driven by human preference, i.e. horticultural trade, but all invasive species are from 5 of the 12 cactus growth forms. Finally, invasive species tend to have significantly larger native ranges than non-invasive species, and none of the invasive species are of conservation concern in their

  13. Introducing A Global Dataset Of Open Permanent Water Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, Maurizio; Lamarche, Celine; Bontemps, Sophie; Wegmuller, Urs; Kalogirou, Vasileios; Arino, Oliver; Defourny, Pierre

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces a 300-m global map of open permanent water bodies derived from multi-temporal synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data. The SAR dataset consisted of images of the radar backscatter acquired by Envisat Advanced SAR(ASAR) in Wide Swath Mode (WSM, 150 m spatial resolution) between 2005 and 2010. Extended time series of WSM to 2012, Image Mode Medium resolution (IMM) and Global Monitoring Mode (GMM) data have been used to fill gaps. Using as input the temporal variability (TV) of the backscatter and the minimum backscatter (MB), a SAR- based indicator of water bodies (SAR-WBI) has been generated for all continents with a previously validated thresholding algorithm and local refinements. The accuracy of the SAR-WBI is 80%; a threshold of 50% has been used for the land/water fraction in the case of mixed pixels. Correction of inconsistencies with respect to auxiliary datasets, completion of gaps and aggregation to 300 m were applied to obtain the final global water body map referred to as Climate Change Initiative Land Cover Water Body (CCI-LC WB) Product.

  14. Introducing student inquiry in large introductory genetics classes.

    PubMed Central

    Pukkila, Patricia J

    2004-01-01

    An appreciation of genetic principles depends upon understanding the individual curiosity that sparked particular investigations, the creativity involved in imagining alternative outcomes and designing experiments to eliminate these outcomes, and the clarity of thought necessary to convince one's scientific peers of the validity of the conclusions. At large research universities, students usually begin their study of genetics in large lecture classes. It is widely assumed that the lecture format, coupled with the pressures to be certain that students become familiar with the principal conclusions of genetics investigations, constrains most if not all departures from the formats textbooks used to explain these conclusions. Here I present several examples of mechanisms to introduce meaningful student inquiry in an introductory genetics course and to evaluate student creative effort. Most of the examples involve altered student preparation prior to class and additional in-class activities, while a few depend upon a smaller recitation section, which accompanies the course from which the examples have been drawn. I conclude that large introductory classes are suitable venues to teach students how to identify scientific claims, determine the evidence that is essential to eliminate alternative conclusions, and convince their peers of the validity of their arguments. PMID:15020401

  15. Rapid Range Shift in an Introduced Tropical Marine Invertebrate

    PubMed Central

    Crickenberger, Sam; Moran, Amy

    2013-01-01

    The barnacle Megabalanus coccopoma is native to shorelines from Baja California to Peru and has been introduced to a number of other locations including the Atlantic US SE coast, where it was first recorded in 2006. In 2009, the range of M. coccopoma in the SE US extended from Ft. Pierce, FL north to Cape Hatteras, NC with seasonal populations found as far north as Kitty Hawk, NC. During the exceptionally cold winter of 2009/2010, the range of M. coccopoma shifted dramatically due to the dieback of all monitored populations north of Florida. We examined body size, distribution, and density of M. coccopoma during the summers of 2010, 2011, and 2012 to describe the extent of the range retraction and the rate of range re-expansion. In 2010, recruits were found as far north as Tybee Island, Ga, but no established populations were found north of Florida. In 2011 recruits were found at Rodanthe, NC but established populations were still limited to Florida. By 2012 populations were established in Rodanthe, NC, slightly north of its previously known range limit. Estimated rates of range re-expansion were 255.8 km/yr in 2010 and 794.1 km/yr in 2011. Rates of re-expansion to the north in 2010 and 2011 were faster than have previously been reported for any marine species, and are one of the few rates published for any tropical marine invertebrate. PMID:24098598

  16. Introducing GRACE Follow-On mock data challenge project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbeheshti, Neda; Naeimi, Majid; Hewitson, Martin; Heinzel, Gerhard; Flury, Jakob

    2016-04-01

    GRACE Follow-On satellites will be launched in 2017. Equipped with the additional Laser Ranging Instrument (LRI) sensor, GRACE Follow-On is expected to reach even better spatial and temporal resolution for the Earth's gravity field. GRACE Follow-On mock data challenge project is part of the geo-Q project at Leibniz Universität Hannover and plans several runs of data challenges for GRACE Follow-On. The challenges are coordinated from simple gravity field recovery in 2015 to more advanced forms when LRI noise model will be added in 2016 challenge. The aim of these challenges is to engage different research centers around the world to test their methods for gravity field recovery from simulated data which will lead to develop data analysis tools and capabilities for GRACE follow-On data. In this contribution we introduce the mock data challenge project for GRACE and GRACE Follow-On. The highlights and objectives of the challenges will be given, with the details about the webpage and data exchange for the participants.

  17. [Alkaloids of Vinca rosea L. introduced to Western Georgia].

    PubMed

    Vachnadze, N S; Kintsurashvili, L G; Suladze, T Sh; Bakuridze, A D; Vachnadze, V Iu

    2013-11-01

    Vinca roseae L. (Саtharanthus rosea (L.) G. Don) was introduced at Kobuleti experimental station of medical plants. The object of investigation was the plant material of Vinca roseae L. collected in May, 2005., September, 2006 and October, 2009. Total alkaloids were obtained in accordance with Atta- ur-Rachman method. The variability of the quantitative and qualitative composition of total alkaloids and vincaleikoblastin (VLB) fraction during vegetation was studied. It was established that the maximal content of total alkaloids and VLB fraction of Vinca roseae L. is accumulated in the phase of secondary flowering, hence the collecting of a plant material is recommended to be made during the aforesaid vegetation phase as for this period it is a rather high output of a raw material, alkaloid complex and VLB faction. Alkaloids vinkaleikoblastin, ajmalicine and new epimer tetrahydroalstonine with С3Н-α- orientation were yielded, separated and identified using modern physical-chemical and spectral methods (13С NMR). PMID:24323972

  18. Introducing concurrency in the Gaudi data processing framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemencic, Marco; Hegner, Benedikt; Mato, Pere; Piparo, Danilo

    2014-06-01

    In the past, the increasing demands for HEP processing resources could be fulfilled by the ever increasing clock-frequencies and by distributing the work to more and more physical machines. Limitations in power consumption of both CPUs and entire data centres are bringing an end to this era of easy scalability. To get the most CPU performance per watt, future hardware will be characterised by less and less memory per processor, as well as thinner, more specialized and more numerous cores per die, and rather heterogeneous resources. To fully exploit the potential of the many cores, HEP data processing frameworks need to allow for parallel execution of reconstruction or simulation algorithms on several events simultaneously. We describe our experience in introducing concurrency related capabilities into Gaudi, a generic data processing software framework, which is currently being used by several HEP experiments, including the ATLAS and LHCb experiments at the LHC. After a description of the concurrent framework and the most relevant design choices driving its development, we describe the behaviour of the framework in a more realistic environment, using a subset of the real LHCb reconstruction workflow, and present our strategy and the used tools to validate the physics outcome of the parallel framework against the results of the present, purely sequential LHCb software. We then summarize the measurement of the code performance of the multithreaded application in terms of memory and CPU usage.

  19. Introducing a New 3D Dynamical Model for Barred Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Christof; Zotos, Euaggelos E.

    2015-11-01

    The regular or chaotic dynamics of an analytical realistic three dimensional model composed of a spherically symmetric central nucleus, a bar and a flat disk is investigated. For describing the properties of the bar, we introduce a new simple dynamical model and we explore the influence on the character of orbits of all the involved parameters of it, such as the mass and the scale length of the bar, the major semi-axis and the angular velocity of the bar, as well as the energy. Regions of phase space with ordered and chaotic motion are identified in dependence on these parameters and for breaking the rotational symmetry. First, we study in detail the dynamics in the invariant plane z = pz = 0 using the Poincaré map as a basic tool and then study the full three-dimensional case using the Smaller Alignment index method as principal tool for distinguishing between order and chaos. We also present strong evidence obtained through the numerical simulations that our new bar model can realistically describe the formation and the evolution of the observed twin spiral structure in barred galaxies.

  20. Competition between introduced and native spiders (Araneae: Linyphiidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houser, J.D.; Ginsberg, Howard S.; Jakob, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    The European sheet-web spider Linyphia triangularis (Araneae: Linyphiidae) has become established in Maine, where it often reaches very high densities. Two lines of evidence from previous work suggest that L. triangularis affects populations of the native linyphiid spider Frontinella communis. First, F. communis individuals are relatively scarce in both forest and coastal habitat where L. triangularis is common, but more common where L. triangularis is at low density. Second, in field experiments, F. communis species are less likely to settle in experimental plots when L. triangularis is present, and F. communis disappears from study plots when L. triangularis is introduced. Here we test two mechanisms that may underlie these patterns. First, we tested whether L. triangularis invades and usurps the webs of F. communis. When spiders were released onto webs of heterospecifics, L. triangularis was more likely to take over or share webs of F. communis than the reverse. We also observed natural takeovers of F. communis webs. Second, we explored the hypothesis that L. triangularis reduces prey availability for native species. We sampled flying prey in areas with L. triangularis and those where it had been removed, and found no effect of spider presence on measured prey density. We also found no effect of prey supplementation on web tenacity in F. communis, suggesting that F. communis movements are not highly dependent on prey availability. We conclude that web takeover is likely more important than prey reduction in driving negative effects of L. triangularis on F. communis.

  1. The island syndrome and population dynamics of introduced rats.

    PubMed

    Russell, James C; Ringler, David; Trombini, Aurélien; Le Corre, Matthieu

    2011-11-01

    The island syndrome predicts directional changes in the morphology and demography of insular vertebrates, due to changes in trophic complexity and migration rates caused by island size and isolation. However, the high rate of human-mediated species introductions to some islands also increases trophic complexity, and this will reduce the perceived insularity on any such island. We test four hypotheses on the role of increased trophic complexity on the island syndrome, using introduced black rats (Rattus rattus) on two isolated coral atolls in the Mozambique Channel. Europa Island has remained relatively pristine and insular, with few species introductions, whereas Juan de Nova Island has had many species introductions, including predators and competitors of rats, anthropogenically increasing its trophic complexity. In the most insular environments, the island syndrome is expected to generate increases in body size and densities of rodents but decreases in the rates of reproduction and population cycling. Morphology and reproduction were compared using linear regression and canonical discriminant analysis, while density and population cycling were compared using spatially explicit capture-recapture analysis. Results were compared to other insular black rat populations in the Mozambique Channel and were consistent with predictions from the island syndrome. The manifestation of an island syndrome in rodents depends upon the trophic composition of a community, and may not relate to island size alone when many species additions, such as invasions, have occurred. The differing patterns of rodent population dynamics on each island provide information for future rodent eradication operations. PMID:21643994

  2. Introducing a large dataset of Persian license plate characters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghahnavieh, Amir Ebrahimi; Enayati, Mahmoud; Raie, Abolghasem A.

    2014-03-01

    A large dataset of Persian license plate characters is introduced. These extracted characters are provided by Bani Nick Pardazesh Company, which is a pioneer in the intelligent transportation systems field, and its license plate recognition system has been used for many applications in Iran. Natural scene vehicle images delivered from this company were in various conditions. Most of them were taken with visible light during day and a few of them by infrared light with 850 nm wavelength during night. The vehicle images were achieved by color, black and white, or infrared cameras from front view and back view of automobiles in ˜20 different indoor and outdoor locations, such as streets, roads, and parking lots, for different purposes, such as traffic control, issuing fines, etc. The images are different in size and angle and were taken in light and dark backgrounds, where the direction and intensity of the light varied. Also, some of the license plates were muddy and had parts that were shadowed. Out of all the available images, ˜20,145 Persian characters were extracted by an intelligent system and verified by human observers. The extracted images are different in size, and some of them suffer from elimination, distortion, rotation, and noise.

  3. Introducing hydrological information in rainfall intensity-duration thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, Roberto; Bogaard, Thom

    2016-04-01

    Regional landslide hazard assessment is mainly based on empirically derived precipitation-intensity-duration (PID) thresholds. Generally, two features of rainfall events are plotted to discriminate between observed occurrence and absence of occurrence of mass movements. Hereafter, a separation line is drawn in logarithmic space. Although successfully applied in many case studies, such PID thresholds suffer from many false positives as well as limited physical process insight. One of the main limitations is indeed that they do not include any information about the hydrological processes occurring along the slopes, so that the triggering is only related to rainfall characteristics. In order to introduce such an hydrological information in the definition of rainfall thresholds for shallow landslide triggering assessment, in this study the introduction of non-dimensional rainfall characteristics is proposed. In particular, rain storm depth, intensity and duration are divided by a characteristic infiltration depth, a characteristic infiltration rate and a characteristic duration, respectively. These latter variables depend on the hydraulic properties and on the moisture state of the soil cover at the beginning of the precipitation. The proposed variables are applied to the case of a slope covered with shallow pyroclastic deposits in Cervinara (southern Italy), for which experimental data of hourly rainfall and soil suction were available. Rainfall thresholds defined with the proposed non-dimensional variables perform significantly better than those defined with dimensional variables, either in the intensity-duration plane or in the depth-duration plane.

  4. (Re)Introducing Communication Competence to the Health Professions

    PubMed Central

    Spitzberg, Brian H.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the central role that communication skills play in contemporary accounts of effective health care delivery in general, and the communication of medical error specifically, there is no common or consensual core in the health professions regarding the nature of such skills. This lack of consensus reflects, in part, the tendency for disciplines to reinvent concepts and measures without first situating such development in disciplines with more cognate specialization in such concepts. In this essay, an integrative model of communication competence is introduced, along with its theoretical background and rationale. Communication competence is defined as an impression of appropriateness and effectiveness, which is functionally related to individual motivation, knowledge, skills, and contextual facilitators and constraints. Within this conceptualization, error disclosure contexts are utilized to illustrate the heuristic value of the theory, and implications for assessment are suggested. Significance for public health Models matter, as do the presuppositions that underlie their architecture. Research indicates that judgments of competence moderate outcomes such as satisfaction, trust, understanding, and power-sharing in relationships and in individual encounters. If the outcomes of health care encounters depend on the impression of competence that patients or their family members have of health care professionals, then knowing which specific communicative behaviors contribute to such impressions is not merely important – it is essential. To pursue such a research agenda requires that competence assessment and operationalization becomes better aligned with conceptual assumptions that separate behavioral performance from the judgments of the competence of that performance. PMID:25170494

  5. Introducing large color displays in the Gripen fighter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundgren, Mats; Brandtberg, Hans

    1998-09-01

    Cockpit design is about communication between the aircraft system and the pilot. The information available on-board is very large and increases with on-going development of the systems. New functions for integration and fusion will, together with decision support and automation, set requirements on the displays to transfer information to the pilot. Information overload, mental workload and flight safety are always important areas to put efforts in. The present version of the Swedish JAS 39 Gripen aircraft has three monochrome multi-function displays. The displays are fairly large for a small aircraft, 5' X 6', giving a good situation awareness for the pilot. A new version of the Gripen cockpit featuring large color displays is now under development and will be introduced to the Swedish air force and ready for export market in the end of 2001. Display size, resolution, graphics capability and color have great impact on the pilots ability to acquire and understand the presented information. These factors are very important when designing an improved cockpit. By utilizing the most modern flat panel AMLCD techniques we have succeeded in integrating three 6.2' X 8.3' full-color multi-function displays in the Gripen aircraft.

  6. Book Review: The future of spacetime. Stephen William Hawking (ed.); Kip S. Thorne, Igor Novikov, Timothy Ferris, Alan Lightman, and Richard Price, W.W. Norton & Company, 2002, 224 pp., US 25.95, ISBN 0393020223

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeenk, Chris

    The study of Einstein's theory of general relativity experienced a renaissance beginning in the early 1960s. Prior to this resurgence of interest, general relativity was isolated from mainstream physics-admired for its elegance, perhaps, but only from a distance. The generation of students who risked their careers by entering this neglected field has now reached the age of festschrifts. In June of 2000, Caltech hosted "Kipfest," a conference in honor of Kip Thorne's 60th birthday. Thorne started graduate school at Princeton in 1962 and began research in general relativity under John Wheeler's guidance in the heady early days of the renaissance. Since then, he has played a prominent role in general relativity: as co-author of the influential textbook Gravitation, as a leader in research regarding astrophysical applications of Einstein's theory, and as a co-founder and chief advocate for the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), to mention a few aspects of his far-reaching work. "Kipfest" included 14 speakers discussing fields to which Thorne has contributed. But the conference also reflected Thorne's long-standing commitment to communicating science to a general audience: Igor Novikov, Stephen Hawking, Timothy Ferris, and Alan Lightman gave popular talks at "Kipfest," with Thorne himself tricked into delivering a fifth. The Future of Spacetime gathers adaptations of these five lectures, along with a lengthy introductory essay by Richard Price.

  7. Introducing Charge Hydration Asymmetry into the Generalized Born Model.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Abhishek; Aguilar, Boris H; Tolokh, Igor S; Onufriev, Alexey V

    2014-04-01

    The effect of charge hydration asymmetry (CHA)-non-invariance of solvation free energy upon solute charge inversion-is missing from the standard linear response continuum electrostatics. The proposed charge hydration asymmetric-generalized Born (CHA-GB) approximation introduces this effect into the popular generalized Born (GB) model. The CHA is added to the GB equation via an analytical correction that quantifies the specific propensity of CHA of a given water model; the latter is determined by the charge distribution within the water model. Significant variations in CHA seen in explicit water (TIP3P, TIP4P-Ew, and TIP5P-E) free energy calculations on charge-inverted "molecular bracelets" are closely reproduced by CHA-GB, with the accuracy similar to models such as SEA and 3D-RISM that go beyond the linear response. Compared against reference explicit (TIP3P) electrostatic solvation free energies, CHA-GB shows about a 40% improvement in accuracy over the canonical GB, tested on a diverse set of 248 rigid small neutral molecules (root mean square error, rmse = 0.88 kcal/mol for CHA-GB vs 1.24 kcal/mol for GB) and 48 conformations of amino acid analogs (rmse = 0.81 kcal/mol vs 1.26 kcal/mol). CHA-GB employs a novel definition of the dielectric boundary that does not subsume the CHA effects into the intrinsic atomic radii. The strategy leads to finding a new set of intrinsic atomic radii optimized for CHA-GB; these radii show physically meaningful variation with the atom type, in contrast to the radii set optimized for GB. Compared to several popular radii sets used with the original GB model, the new radii set shows better transferability between different classes of molecules. PMID:24803871

  8. Introducing future engineers to sustainable ecology problems: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipkowski, A.

    2011-12-01

    The problem of Earth environmental destruction by human activities is becoming dangerous. Engineers responsible for the production of any goods should be well aware of the negative influence of their activities on the state of the planet. This is why the understanding of ecological problems is essential for people responsible for production and industrial design. The energy, which they consume, is increasing the greenhouse effect and the waste poisons the environment. So far, most courses on ecology are offered to specialists in environmental engineering. These courses are filled with many details. The Warsaw Academy of Computer Science, Management and Administration teaches students in the direction of management and production engineering. Upon completion, the students receive the degree of 'engineer'. Their future work will mainly concern management of different types of industrial enterprises and they will be responsible for organising it in such a way as to avoid a dangerous contribution to environmental pollution and climate change. This is why it was decided to introduce a new course entitled 'Principles of Ecology and Environmental Management'. This course is quite broad, concerning almost all technical, law and organisational aspects of the problem. The presentation is made in a spectacular way, aiming to convince students that their future activity must be environmentally friendly. It contains information about international activities in ecology, legal aspects concerning pollution, technical and information methods of monitoring and, finally, the description of 'green' solutions. Altogether, 27 hours of lectures and 15 hours of discussions and students' presentations complete the course. Details of this course are described in this paper.

  9. Storyboards and Science: Introducing the Planetary Data Storyboard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, T. A.; Del Villar, A.; Alkhawaja, A.; Grayzeck, E. J.; Galica, C.; Odess, J.; Erickson, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    Every discovery has a story and storytelling is an ancient form of education. The stories of scientific discovery are often very formal and technical and not always very accessible. As in the past, today most scientific storytelling is done as in-person presentations in the form of slide shows or movies that unfold according to the design of its author. Things have changed. Using today's technologies telling stories can be a rich multi-media experience with a blending of text, animations, movies and infographics. Also, with presentations on the web the presentation can provide links to more details and the audience (reader) can jump to the linked information. Even so, the most common form of today's storytelling is as a narrative that starts with a page, a link to a single movie or a slide-show. We introduce a new promising form of scientific storytelling, the storyboard. With a storyboard a story is presented as a set of panels that contain representative images of an event and may have associated notes or instructions. The panels are arranged in a timeline that allow the audience to experience the discovery in the same way it occurred. A panel can also link to a more detailed source such as a publication, the data that was collected or items derived from the research (like movies or animations). Scientific storyboards can make science discovery more accessible to people by presenting events in an easy to follow layout. Scientific storyboards can also help to teach the scientific method, by following the experiences of a researcher as they investigate a phenomenon or try to understand a new set of observations. We illustrate the unique features of scientific storyboards with the Planetary Data Storyboard using data archived by the Planetary Data System.

  10. Pitfalls to avoid when introducing a cultural competency training initiative.

    PubMed

    Chun, Maria B J

    2010-06-01

    OBJECTIVES In an effort to provide preventive advice, this paper aims to acknowledge what has not worked with regard to cultural competency initiatives. A successful cultural competency training initiative should have lasting impact on its participants in terms of long-term, ideally permanent changes to attitudes, knowledge and skills resulting in the provision of optimum care, regardless of a patient's cultural background. Legal mandates mean there is an assumed need for cultural competency curricula and training programmes for medical students and postgraduate medical trainees. However, policy and practice have bypassed 'proof' that such programmes are effective and result in better patient care. Often only positive results are reported, which may minimise the difficulties involved in programme implementation. METHODS Utilising the example of a cultural competency initiative introduced into a postgraduate general surgery training programme, this paper discusses mistakes that were made during the implementation phase, particularly with regard to underestimating potential resistance by the trainees. Also presented are the lessons learned and efforts that were made to mitigate the problems that arose. None of what is discussed in this paper is new. However, the literature often does not discuss in detail the difficulties that can be or have been faced and how these obstacles can be adequately mitigated. CONCLUSIONS The glow of cultural competency training initiatives is fading in the light of higher expectations for an evidence base prior to acknowledgement that their introduction has had a positive impact. For these initiatives to advance, there needs to be a clear understanding of terms utilised, buy-in and a long-term commitment at both individual and organisational levels, and use of standardised and validated tools to measure outcomes. An understanding of potential pitfalls can help to advance cultural competency training to the next level, namely, a solid

  11. Moon 101: Introducing Students to Lunar Science and Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaner, A. J.; Shipp, S. S.; Allen, J. S.; Kring, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    , students are asked a series of questions which help reinforce the lunar science concepts they should take away from the readings. Students then use their new knowledge of the Moon in the final section of Moon 101 where they are asked to characterize the geology of the region surrounding the Apollo 11 landing site. To do this, they conduct a survey of available lunar data, examining imagery from lunar missions as recent as the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter and as old as the Ranger missions of the 1960s. This allows students to explore the available datasets and identify the advantages and disadvantages of each. Pre/post test questions have also been developed to assess changes in student understanding of the formation and evolution of the Moon, and lunar exploration. Moon 101 is a framework for introducing students to lunar science, and can be followed up with student-driven research. Moon 101 can be easily modified to suit the needs of the students and the instructor. Because lunar science is an evolving field of study, the use of resources such as the PSRD allows Moon 101 to be flexible and to change as the lunar community re-discovers our celestial neighbor.

  12. Evolution of fast-growing and more resistant phenotypes in introduced common mullein (Verbascum thapsus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Species introduced into areas outside of their native range have to adapt to new biotic and abiotic conditions to be able to establish. Some of these introduced species are also more successful in their introduced than their native range, with increased growth and fecundity. We used a common garden ...

  13. 17 CFR 201.235 - Introducing prior sworn statements of witnesses into the record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Introducing prior sworn... Prehearing Rules § 201.235 Introducing prior sworn statements of witnesses into the record. (a) At a hearing, any person wishing to introduce a prior, sworn statement of a witness, not a party,...

  14. 17 CFR 201.235 - Introducing prior sworn statements of witnesses into the record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Introducing prior sworn... Prehearing Rules § 201.235 Introducing prior sworn statements of witnesses into the record. (a) At a hearing, any person wishing to introduce a prior, sworn statement of a witness, not a party,...

  15. 17 CFR 201.235 - Introducing prior sworn statements of witnesses into the record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Introducing prior sworn... Prehearing Rules § 201.235 Introducing prior sworn statements of witnesses into the record. (a) At a hearing, any person wishing to introduce a prior, sworn statement of a witness, not a party,...

  16. 17 CFR 201.235 - Introducing prior sworn statements of witnesses into the record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Introducing prior sworn... Prehearing Rules § 201.235 Introducing prior sworn statements of witnesses into the record. (a) At a hearing, any person wishing to introduce a prior, sworn statement of a witness, not a party,...

  17. 17 CFR 201.235 - Introducing prior sworn statements of witnesses into the record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Introducing prior sworn... Prehearing Rules § 201.235 Introducing prior sworn statements of witnesses into the record. (a) At a hearing, any person wishing to introduce a prior, sworn statement of a witness, not a party,...

  18. No difference in the competitive ability of introduced and native Trifolium provenances when grown with soil biota from their introduced and native ranges

    PubMed Central

    Shelby, Natasha; Hulme, Philip E.; van der Putten, Wim H.; McGinn, Kevin J.; Weser, Carolin; Duncan, Richard P.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of increased competitive ability (EICA) hypothesis could explain why some introduced plant species perform better outside their native ranges. The EICA hypothesis proposes that introduced plants escape specialist pathogens or herbivores leading to selection for resources to be reallocated away from defence and towards greater competitive ability. We tested the hypothesis that escape from soil-borne enemies has led to increased competitive ability in three non-agricultural Trifolium (Fabaceae) species native to Europe that were introduced to New Zealand in the 19th century. Trifolium performance is intimately tied to rhizosphere biota. Thus, we grew plants from one introduced (New Zealand) and two native (Spain and the UK) provenances for each of three species in pots inoculated with soil microbiota collected from the rhizosphere beneath conspecifics in the introduced and native ranges. Plants were grown singly and in competition with conspecifics from a different provenance in order to compare competitive ability in the presence of different microbial communities. In contrast to the predictions of the EICA hypothesis, we found no difference in the competitive ability of introduced and native provenances when grown with soil microbiota from either the native or introduced range. Although plants from introduced provenances of two species grew more slowly than native provenances in native-range soils, as predicted by the EICA hypothesis, plants from the introduced provenance were no less competitive than native conspecifics. Overall, the growth rate of plants grown singly was a poor predictor of their competitive ability, highlighting the importance of directly quantifying plant performance in competitive scenarios, rather than relying on surrogate measures such as growth rate. PMID:26969431

  19. No difference in the competitive ability of introduced and native Trifolium provenances when grown with soil biota from their introduced and native ranges.

    PubMed

    Shelby, Natasha; Hulme, Philip E; van der Putten, Wim H; McGinn, Kevin J; Weser, Carolin; Duncan, Richard P

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of increased competitive ability (EICA) hypothesis could explain why some introduced plant species perform better outside their native ranges. The EICA hypothesis proposes that introduced plants escape specialist pathogens or herbivores leading to selection for resources to be reallocated away from defence and towards greater competitive ability. We tested the hypothesis that escape from soil-borne enemies has led to increased competitive ability in three non-agriculturalTrifolium(Fabaceae) species native to Europe that were introduced to New Zealand in the 19th century.Trifoliumperformance is intimately tied to rhizosphere biota. Thus, we grew plants from one introduced (New Zealand) and two native (Spain and the UK) provenances for each of three species in pots inoculated with soil microbiota collected from the rhizosphere beneath conspecifics in the introduced and native ranges. Plants were grown singly and in competition with conspecifics from a different provenance in order to compare competitive ability in the presence of different microbial communities. In contrast to the predictions of the EICA hypothesis, we found no difference in the competitive ability of introduced and native provenances when grown with soil microbiota from either the native or introduced range. Although plants from introduced provenances of two species grew more slowly than native provenances in native-range soils, as predicted by the EICA hypothesis, plants from the introduced provenance were no less competitive than native conspecifics. Overall, the growth rate of plants grown singly was a poor predictor of their competitive ability, highlighting the importance of directly quantifying plant performance in competitive scenarios, rather than relying on surrogate measures such as growth rate. PMID:26969431

  20. The ALAN Review. Volume 9, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, W. Geiger, Ed.; Ward, Dan, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    The articles in this journal issue focus on adolescent literature. In the first article, author Sue Ellen Bridgers explains how she writes books, while the second article offers an analysis of the recent works of Paul Zindel. The third article presents a discussion of the treatment of outsiders, such as the mentally ill, in four Roy Brown…

  1. The ALAN Review. Volume 8, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, W. Geiger, Ed.; Ward, Dan, Ed.

    1980-01-01

    The articles in this journal issue focus on adolescent literature. Topics covered in the articles include: (1) teaching adolescent literature about minorities to majority group students, (2) death in adolescent literature, (3) trends in German youth literature, and (4) female identity in the young adult novel. In addition, the journal issue…

  2. Introducing cyber.

    PubMed

    Hult, Fredrik; Sivanesan, Giri

    In January 2012, the World Economic Forum made cyber attacks its fourth top global risk. In the 2013 risk report, cyber attacks were noted to be an even higher risk in absolute terms. The reliance of critical infrastructure on cyber working has never been higher; the frequency, intensity, impact and sophistication of attacks is growing. This trend looks likely to continue. It can be argued that it is no longer a question whether an organisation will be successfully hacked, but how long it will take to detect. In the ever-changing cyber environment, traditional protection techniques and reliance on preventive controls are not enough. A more agile approach is required to give assurance of a sufficiently secure digital society. Are we faced with a paradigm shift or a storm in a digital teacup? This paper offers an introduction to why cyber is important, a wider taxonomy on the topic and some historical context on how the discipline of cyber security has evolved, and an interpretation on what this means in the new normal of today. PMID:24457321

  3. Introducing CETA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Gerry

    1978-01-01

    Describes the three major types of training programs funded under CETA (Comprehensive Employment and Training Act) in Wisconsin and discusses recent trends in CETA program funding and administration, focusing on functions of the Prime Sponsors, particularly as they operate in Wisconsin. (BM)

  4. Introducing Isolines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akridge, Michelle; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes an activity which provides students with a concrete example of how isolines translate into daily weather maps. Outlines materials, procedures, and information needed for teaching the lesson. Includes an example of a map showing isotherms across the United States. (RT)

  5. 10 CFR 110.123 - Notice of intent to introduce classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Notice of intent to introduce classified information. 110... EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL Special Procedures for Classified Information in Hearings § 110.123 Notice of intent to introduce classified information. (a) A participant shall seek the required security...

  6. 10 CFR 110.123 - Notice of intent to introduce classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Notice of intent to introduce classified information. 110... EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL Special Procedures for Classified Information in Hearings § 110.123 Notice of intent to introduce classified information. (a) A participant shall seek the required security...

  7. 10 CFR 110.123 - Notice of intent to introduce classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Notice of intent to introduce classified information. 110... EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL Special Procedures for Classified Information in Hearings § 110.123 Notice of intent to introduce classified information. (a) A participant shall seek the required security...

  8. 10 CFR 110.123 - Notice of intent to introduce classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Notice of intent to introduce classified information. 110... EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL Special Procedures for Classified Information in Hearings § 110.123 Notice of intent to introduce classified information. (a) A participant shall seek the required security...

  9. 10 CFR 110.123 - Notice of intent to introduce classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Notice of intent to introduce classified information. 110... EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL Special Procedures for Classified Information in Hearings § 110.123 Notice of intent to introduce classified information. (a) A participant shall seek the required security...

  10. 49 CFR 232.503 - Process to introduce new brake system technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Process to introduce new brake system technology... Technology § 232.503 Process to introduce new brake system technology. (a) Pursuant to the procedures... brake system technology, prior to implementing the plan. (b) Each railroad shall complete a...

  11. 31 CFR 1026.220 - Customer identification programs for futures commission merchants and introducing brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... made. In all other respects, the records must be maintained pursuant to the provisions of 17 CFR 1.31... futures commission merchants and introducing brokers. 1026.220 Section 1026.220 Money and Finance..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY RULES FOR FUTURES COMMISSION MERCHANTS AND INTRODUCING BROKERS IN...

  12. Risky Choices: The Dilemmas of Introducing Contemporary Art Practices into Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary art is a popular feature of the cultural landscape in the United Kingdom, and recent research has recommended introducing its practices into state education. Yet these practices are still rare in schools, and this paper argues that the many difficulties that arise from attempts to introduce them are indicative of their socially…

  13. The genetic consequences of a demographic bottleneck in an introduced biological control insect

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined phylogeography and population genetics of the melaleuca psyllid Boreioglycaspis melaleucae, which was introduced from Australia to Florida as a biological control agent of the invasive plant Melaleuca quinquenervia. We sampled psyllids in the native and introduced ranges as well as indi...

  14. Introduced Species: Can We Balance Human Systems with Natural Processes? Global Environmental Change Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Teachers Association, Arlington, VA.

    The seven activities contained in this book are designed to equip students (grades 9-12) with scientific tools and skills for understanding what introduced species are, how they impact natural processes and human systems, and what may be done about them. The activities are designed to link the biology and ecology of introduced species with…

  15. A SOE-PCR method of introducing multiple mutations into Mycoplasma gallisepticum neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lei; Chen, Hongjun; Yu, Shengqing; Qiu, Xusheng; Song, Cuiping; Chen, Danqing; Zhang, Shilei; Zhang, Fanqing; He, Suibin; Shen, Xinyue; Hu, Meirong; Ding, Chan

    2013-08-01

    A modified splicing with overlap extension PCR (SOE-PCR) was generated to introduce 21 TGA to TGG at Mycoplasma gallisepticum MGA_0329 gene. The recombinant protein was successfully expressed and retained neuraminidase activities, indicating that SOE-PCR is a rapid and highly efficient method of introducing multiple mutations into large M. gallisepticum genes. PMID:23707236

  16. 31 CFR 1026.220 - Customer identification programs for futures commission merchants and introducing brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... futures commission merchants and introducing brokers. 1026.220 Section 1026.220 Money and Finance..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY RULES FOR FUTURES COMMISSION MERCHANTS AND INTRODUCING BROKERS IN COMMODITIES Programs § 1026.220 Customer identification programs for futures commission merchants and...

  17. 31 CFR 1026.220 - Customer identification programs for futures commission merchants and introducing brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... futures commission merchants and introducing brokers. 1026.220 Section 1026.220 Money and Finance..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY RULES FOR FUTURES COMMISSION MERCHANTS AND INTRODUCING BROKERS IN COMMODITIES Programs § 1026.220 Customer identification programs for futures commission merchants and...

  18. 31 CFR 1026.220 - Customer identification programs for futures commission merchants and introducing brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... futures commission merchants and introducing brokers. 1026.220 Section 1026.220 Money and Finance..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY RULES FOR FUTURES COMMISSION MERCHANTS AND INTRODUCING BROKERS IN COMMODITIES Programs § 1026.220 Customer identification programs for futures commission merchants and...

  19. 49 CFR 232.503 - Process to introduce new brake system technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Process to introduce new brake system technology... Technology § 232.503 Process to introduce new brake system technology. (a) Pursuant to the procedures... brake system technology, prior to implementing the plan. (b) Each railroad shall complete a...

  20. 49 CFR 232.503 - Process to introduce new brake system technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Process to introduce new brake system technology... Technology § 232.503 Process to introduce new brake system technology. (a) Pursuant to the procedures... brake system technology, prior to implementing the plan. (b) Each railroad shall complete a...

  1. 49 CFR 232.503 - Process to introduce new brake system technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Process to introduce new brake system technology... Technology § 232.503 Process to introduce new brake system technology. (a) Pursuant to the procedures... brake system technology, prior to implementing the plan. (b) Each railroad shall complete a...

  2. Abundance of introduced species at home predicts abundance away in herbaceous grasslands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many ecosystems worldwide are dominated by introduced plant species, leading to loss of biodiversity and ecosystem function. A common but rarely tested assumption is that these plants are more abundant in introduced versus native communities, because ecological or evolutionary based shifts in popula...

  3. 49 CFR 232.503 - Process to introduce new brake system technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Process to introduce new brake system technology... Technology § 232.503 Process to introduce new brake system technology. (a) Pursuant to the procedures... brake system technology, prior to implementing the plan. (b) Each railroad shall complete a...

  4. Global Creativity: Introduce a Creative Element to Your Teaching through Global Collaborations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) has made no secret of its desire for teachers to introduce more creativity into UK classrooms. Imaginatively minded teachers have found a number of ways to introduce creativity into the classroom. Dance, music, problem solving and role-play exercises are all well trodden routes, but it was the…

  5. FIRE REHABIlIATION USING NATIVE AND INTRODUCED SPECIES: A LANDSCAPE TRIAL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Following the 1999 Railroad Fire in Tintic Valley, Utah, we initiated a large-scale fire rehabilitation study comparing a predominately introduced species seed mix used by the US Department of Interior-Bureau of Land Management (BLM), a mix of native and introduced species provided by the US Departm...

  6. Rapid plant evolution in the presence of an introduced species alters community composition.

    PubMed

    Smith, David Solance; Lau, Matthew K; Jacobs, Ryan; Monroy, Jenna A; Shuster, Stephen M; Whitham, Thomas G

    2015-10-01

    Because introduced species may strongly interact with native species and thus affect their fitness, it is important to examine how these interactions can cascade to have ecological and evolutionary consequences for whole communities. Here, we examine the interactions among introduced Rocky Mountain elk, Cervus canadensis nelsoni, a common native plant, Solidago velutina, and the diverse plant-associated community of arthropods. While introduced species are recognized as one of the biggest threats to native ecosystems, relatively few studies have investigated an evolutionary mechanism by which introduced species alter native communities. Here, we use a common garden design that addresses and supports two hypotheses. First, native S. velutina has rapidly evolved in the presence of introduced elk. We found that plants originating from sites with introduced elk flowered nearly 3 weeks before plants originating from sites without elk. Second, evolution of S. velutina results in a change to the plant-associated arthropod community. We found that plants originating from sites with introduced elk supported an arthropod community that had ~35 % fewer total individuals and a different species composition. Our results show that the impacts of introduced species can have both ecological and evolutionary consequences for strongly interacting species that subsequently cascade to affect a much larger community. Such evolutionary consequences are likely to be long-term and difficult to remediate. PMID:26062439

  7. Genetic differentiation in life-history traits of introduced and native common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) populations.

    PubMed

    Hodgins, K A; Rieseberg, L

    2011-12-01

    Introduced species represent opportunities to observe evolution over contemporary time scales, and as exotics encounter new environments, adaptive responses can occur, potentially contributing to invasion. Here, we compare 22 native North American populations and 12 introduced European populations of common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) in five common gardens (control, herbivory, light stress, nutrient stress and drought). We found evidence for improved growth and reproduction of the introduced populations in most environments, particularly in the light stress. However, under drought conditions, the introduced plants experienced more rapid wilting and mortality than their native counterparts, evidence consistent with a life-history trade-off between rapid growth and drought tolerance. Moreover, we found parallel latitudinal clines in flowering time and correlations between fitness components and the local climate of the source populations in both ranges. Together these data provide evidence for adaptation to local environmental conditions in the native and introduced range of common ragweed. PMID:22023052

  8. Phylogenetic relatedness and leaf functional traits, not introduced status, influence community assembly.

    PubMed

    Lemoine, Nathan P; Shue, Jessica; Verrico, Brittany; Erickson, David; Kress, W John; Parker, John D

    2015-10-01

    Considerable debate focuses on whether invasive species establish and become abundant by being functionally and phylogenetically distinct from native species, leading to a host of invasion-specific hypotheses of community assembly. Few studies, however, have quantitatively assessed whether similar patterns of phylogenetic and functional similarity explain local abundance of both native and introduced species, which would suggest similar assembly mechanisms regardless of origin. Using a chronosequence of invaded temperate forest stands, we tested whether the occurrence and abundance of both introduced and native species were predicted by phylogenetic relatedness, functional overlap, and key environmental characteristics including forest age. Environmental filtering against functionally and phylogenetically distinct species strongly dictated the occurrence and abundance of both introduced and native species, with slight modifications of these patterns according to forest age. Thus, once functional and evolutionary novelty were quantified, introduced status provided little information about species' presence or abundance, indicating largely similar sorting mechanisms for both native and introduced species. PMID:26649382

  9. Relations between introduced fish and environmental conditions at large geographic scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meador, M.R.; Brown, L.R.; Short, T.

    2003-01-01

    Data collected from 20 major river basins between 1993 and 1995 as part of the US Geological Survey's (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program were analyzed to assess patterns in introduced and native fish species richness and abundance relative to watershed characteristics and stream physicochemistry. Sites (N = 157) were divided into three regions-northeast, southeast, and west- to account for major longitudinal differences in precipitation/runoff and latitudinal limits of glaciation that affect zoogeographic patterns in fish communities. Common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) were the most frequently collected introduced fish species across all river basins combined. Based on the percentage of introduced fish species, the fish communities most altered by the presence of introduced fish occurred in the western and northeastern parts of the US. Native fish species richness was not an indicator of introduced fish species richness for any of the three regions. However, in the west, introduced fish species richness was an indicator of total fish species richness and the abundance of introduced fish was negatively related to native fish species richness. Some relations between introduced fish species and environmental conditions were common between regions. Increased introduced fish species richness was related to increased population density in the northeast and southeast; increased total nitrogen in the northeast and west; and increased total phosphorous and water temperature in the southeast and west. These results suggest that introduced fish species tend to be associated with disturbance at large geographic scales, though specific relations may vary regionally. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Contemporary evolution of host plant range expansion in an introduced herbivorous beetle Ophraella communa.

    PubMed

    Fukano, Y; Doi, H; Thomas, C E; Takata, M; Koyama, S; Satoh, T

    2016-04-01

    Host range expansion of herbivorous insects is a key event in ecological speciation and insect pest management. However, the mechanistic processes are relatively unknown because it is difficult to observe the ongoing host range expansion in natural population. In this study, we focused on the ongoing host range expansion in introduced populations of the ragweed leaf beetle, Ophraella communa, to estimate the evolutionary process of host plant range expansion of a herbivorous insect. In the native range of North America, O. communa does not utilize Ambrosia trifida, as a host plant, but this plant is extensively utilized in the beetle's introduced range. Larval performance and adult preference experiments demonstrated that native O. communa beetles show better survival on host plant individuals from introduced plant populations than those from native plant populations and they also oviposit on the introduced plant, but not on the native plant. Introduced O. communa beetles showed significantly higher performance on and preference for both introduced and native A. trifida plants, when compared with native O. communa. These results indicate the contemporary evolution of host plant range expansion of introduced O. communa and suggest that the evolutionary change of both the host plant and the herbivorous insect involved in the host range expansion. PMID:26728888

  11. Are Introduced Species Better Dispersers Than Native Species? A Global Comparative Study of Seed Dispersal Distance

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Moreno, Habacuc; Thomson, Fiona J.; Warton, David I.; Moles, Angela T.

    2013-01-01

    We provide the first global test of the idea that introduced species have greater seed dispersal distances than do native species, using data for 51 introduced and 360 native species from the global literature. Counter to our expectations, there was no significant difference in mean or maximum dispersal distance between introduced and native species. Next, we asked whether differences in dispersal distance might have been obscured by differences in seed mass, plant height and dispersal syndrome, all traits that affect dispersal distance and which can differ between native and introduced species. When we included all three variables in the model, there was no clear difference in dispersal distance between introduced and native species. These results remained consistent when we performed analyses including a random effect for site. Analyses also showed that the lack of a significant difference in dispersal distance was not due to differences in biome, taxonomic composition, growth form, nitrogen fixation, our inclusion of non-invasive introduced species, or our exclusion of species with human-assisted dispersal. Thus, if introduced species do have higher spread rates, it seems likely that these are driven by differences in post-dispersal processes such as germination, seedling survival, and survival to reproduction. PMID:23818991

  12. Acquired and introduced macroparasites of the invasive Cuban treefrog, Osteopilus septentrionalis

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Nicole; Price, Wayne; Campbell, Todd; Rohr, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Because shifts in host–parasite relationships can alter host populations, attention should be given to the parasites that introduced species take with them or acquire in their introduced range. The Cuban treefrog, Osteopilus septentrionalis, is a successful invasive species in Florida with its parasites in the native range being well-documented, but there is a void in the literature regarding what parasites were lost or introduced in its expansion. We necropsied 330 O. septentrionalis from Tampa, FL and compared their macroparasites to those of O. septentrionalis in their native range and to the parasites of anurans native to the Tampa, FL area to determine the species O. septentrionalis likely introduced or acquired in Florida. At least nine parasite species (Aplectana sp., Oswaldocruzia lenteixeirai, Cylindrotaenia americana, Physaloptera sp., Rhabdias sp., Centrorhynchus sp., unidentified trematode metacercariae, unidentified larval acuariids, and unidentified pentastomids) were isolated. We found no differences in parasite communities of adult male and female frogs, which averaged 19.36 parasite individuals and 1.39 parasite species per adult frog, and had an overall prevalence of 77.52%. Acuariid larvae were likely acquired by O. septentrionalis in FL because they are not found in their native range. O. lenteixeirai was likely introduced because it is commonly reported in O. septentrionalis' native range but has never been reported in FL-native anurans. Aplectana sp. is also likely introduced because it has been reported in several anurans in Cuba but only reported once in Florida. O. septentrionalis tended to harbor fewer of its native parasites in the introduced range, which is consistent with the enemy release hypothesis and potentially creates an immunological advantage for this invasive host. Because native populations can be threatened by introduced parasites, there is a need to further explore the frequency and rate at which non-native hosts

  13. A resolution calling for the immediate and unconditional release of United States citizen Alan Phillip Gross from detention in Cuba and urging the Government of Cuba to address his medical issues.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Moran, Jerry [R-KS

    2012-12-05

    12/05/2012 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Voice Vote. (consideration: CR S7637-7638; text as passed Senate: CR S7637-7638; text of measure as introduced: CR S7459) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  14. Introducing CASE Methodology at Key Stage 4: An Example of Bridging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Jacky; Vaughan, Susan

    2000-01-01

    Describes materials developed for key stage 4 for the improvement of student thinking skills that are used to explain atomic structure and bonding. Tests student understanding by introducing seemingly plausible, yet possibly incorrect, explanations of situations. (Author/YDS)

  15. Introducing Students to Computer Programming on a UNIX Time-Sharing System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Allen R.

    1983-01-01

    Reviews experiences in teaching computer programing to engineering freshmen at the University of Oklahoma. Focuses on the stimulating interactive environment that is possible when using the UNIX operating system to introduce students to programing. (JN)

  16. Introducing Students to the Role of Folk and Popular Health Belief-Systems in Patient Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubenstein, Harriet L.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The Medical College of Pennsylvania has introduced a four-hour interdisciplinary class for sophomore students in the role of folk and popular healing systems in patient care. Student and faculty responded enthusiastically, and the program will be expanded. (MSE)

  17. PREVALENCE OF ANTIBODIES TO SELECTED VIRUSES AND PARASITES IN INTRODUCED AND ENDEMIC CARNIVORES IN WESTERN MADAGASCAR.

    PubMed

    Pomerantz, Julie; Rasambainarivo, Fidisoa T; Dollar, Luke; Rahajanirina, Leon Pierrot; Andrianaivoarivelo, Radosoa; Parker, Patricia; Dubovi, Edward

    2016-07-01

    Introduced animals impact endemic populations through predation, competition, and disease transmission. Populations of endemic carnivores in Madagascar are declining, and pathogens transmitted from introduced species may further endanger these unique species. We assessed the exposure of introduced and endemic carnivores to common viral and parasitic pathogens in two national parks of Madagascar (Kirindy Mitea National Park and Ankarafantsika National Park) and their neighboring villages. We also identified variables associated with the presence of antibodies to these pathogens in fosa ( Cryptoprocta ferox ). Introduced and endemic species were exposed to canine parvovirus, canine herpesvirus, feline calicivirus, and Toxoplasma gondii . Domestic dogs ( Canis familiaris ) and cats ( Felis catus ) may be sources of infection for these pathogens. Prevalence of antibodies to Toxoplasma in captured fosa was >93%, and adults were more likely to be exposed than immature individuals. Our data provide a basis upon which to evaluate and manage risks of pathogen transmission between species. PMID:27195685

  18. An introduced pentastomid parasite (Raillietiella frenata) infects native cane toads (Rhinella marina) in Panama.

    PubMed

    Kelehear, Crystal; Saltonstall, Kristin; Torchin, Mark E

    2015-04-01

    The pentastomid parasite, Raillietiella frenata, is native to Asia where it infects the Asian House gecko, Hemidactylus frenatus. This gecko has been widely introduced and recently R. frenata was found in introduced populations of cane toads (Rhinella marina) in Australia, indicating a host-switch from introduced geckos to toads. Here we report non-native adult R. frenata infecting the lungs of native cane toads in Panama. Eight of 64 toads were infected (median = 2.5, range = 1-80 pentastomids/toad) and pentastomid prevalence was positively associated with the number of buildings at a site, though further sampling is needed to confirm this pattern. We postulate that this pattern is likely due to a host shift of this parasite from an urban-associated introduced gecko. This is the first record of this parasite infecting cane toads in their native range, and the first instance of this parasite occurring in Central America. PMID:25394910

  19. Introducing the Practical Aspects of Computational Chemistry to Undergraduate Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Jason K.

    2007-01-01

    Various efforts are being made to introduce the different physical aspects and uses of computational chemistry to the undergraduate chemistry students. A new laboratory approach that demonstrates all such aspects via experiments has been devised for the purpose.

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF MICROSATELLITE LOCI IN THE WIDELY INTRODUCED ESTUARINE ANEMONE NEMATOSTELLA VECTENSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We characterized ten polymorphic microsatellite loci from Nematostella vectensis, a burrowing anemone recently introduced to estuaries along the Pacific coast of North America and the southeast coast of England. Preliminary results indicate high variability and significant depar...

  1. Abundance of introduced species at home predicts abundance away in herbaceous communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Firn, Jennifer; Moore, Joslin L.; MacDougall, Andrew S.; Borer, Elizabeth T.; Seabloom, Eric W.; HilleRisLambers, Janneke; Harpole, W. Stanley; Cleland, Elsa E.; Brown, Cynthia S.; Knops, Johannes M.H.; Prober, Suzanne M.; Pyke, David A.; Farrell, Kelly A.; Bakker, John D.; O'Halloran, Lydia R.; Adler, Peter B.; Collins, Scott L.; D'Antonio, Carla M.; Crawley, Michael J.; Wolkovich, Elizabeth M.; La Pierre, Kimberly J.; Melbourne, Brett A.; Hautier, Yann; Morgan, John W.; Leakey, Andrew D.B.; Kay, Adam; McCulley, Rebecca; Davies, Kendi F.; Stevens, Carly J.; Chu, Cheng-Jin; Holl, Karen D.; Klein, Julia A.; Fay, Phillip A.; Hagenah, Nicole; Kirkman, Kevin P.; Buckley, Yvonne M.

    2011-01-01

    Many ecosystems worldwide are dominated by introduced plant species, leading to loss of biodiversity and ecosystem function. A common but rarely tested assumption is that these plants are more abundant in introduced vs. native communities, because ecological or evolutionary-based shifts in populations underlie invasion success. Here, data for 26 herbaceous species at 39 sites, within eight countries, revealed that species abundances were similar at native (home) and introduced (away) sites - grass species were generally abundant home and away, while forbs were low in abundance, but more abundant at home. Sites with six or more of these species had similar community abundance hierarchies, suggesting that suites of introduced species are assembling similarly on different continents. Overall, we found that substantial changes to populations are not necessarily a pre-condition for invasion success and that increases in species abundance are unusual. Instead, abundance at home predicts abundance away, a potentially useful additional criterion for biosecurity programmes.

  2. Introducing Molecular Biology to Environmental Engineers through Development of a New Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oerther, Daniel B.

    2002-01-01

    Introduces a molecular biology course designed for environmental engineering majors using 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid-targeted technology that allows students to identify and study microorganisms in bioreactor environments. (Contains 17 references.) (YDS)

  3. Using GoNoodle to Introduce Health Concepts in the K-5 Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    This article introduces readers to the GoNoodle platform for incorporating physical activity throughout the school day, and describes how one of the features, Ultimate Champ Training, can be used to teach health concepts in the elementary school classroom.

  4. A Comparison of the Recruitment Success of Introduced and Native Species Under Natural Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Moreno, Habacuc; Moles, Angela T.

    2013-01-01

    It is commonly accepted that introduced species have recruitment advantages over native species. However, this idea has not been widely tested, and those studies that have compared survival of introduced and native species have produced mixed results. We compiled data from the literature on survival through germination (seed to seedling survival), early seedling survival (survival through one week from seedling emergence) and survival to adulthood (survival from germination to first reproduction) under natural conditions for 285 native and 63 introduced species. Contrary to expectations, we found that introduced and native species do not significantly differ in survival through germination, early seedling survival, or survival from germination to first reproduction. These comparisons remained non-significant after accounting for seed mass, longevity and when including a random effect for site. Results remained consistent after excluding naturalized species from the introduced species data set, after performing phylogenetic independent contrasts, and after accounting for the effect of life form (woody/non-woody). Although introduced species sometimes do have advantages over native species (for example, through enemy release, or greater phenotypic plasticity), our findings suggest that the overall advantage conferred by these factors is either counterbalanced by advantages of native species (such as superior adaptation to local conditions) or is simply too small to be detected at a broad scale. PMID:23951326

  5. Comparison of native and introduced flathead catfish populations in Alabama and Georgia: Growth, mortality, and management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sakaris, P.C.; Irwin, E.R.; Jolley, J.C.; Harrison, D.

    2006-01-01

    We compared growth of flathead catfish Pylodictis olivaris from two native populations in Alabama (Coosa and Tallapoosa rivers) and two introduced populations in Georgia (Ocmulgee and Satilla rivers). We also compared mortality rates and potential outcomes of various management regimes (minimum length limits [MLLs]) among the populations. Total length-log10(age) regression slopes for introduced fish were higher than those for native fish, and von Bertalanffy growth coefficients (K) were greater for introduced fish (Ocmulgee: 0.195; Satilla: 0.201) than for native individuals (Coosa: 0.057; Tallapoosa: 0.059). Therefore, introduced flathead catfish grew more rapidly than those in their native range. Mortality (instantaneous mortality rate, Z) was higher in the Satilla River population (Z = -0.602) than in the Ocmulgee River (Z = -0.227) and Coosa River (Z = -0.156) populations. However, fish in the Satilla River population had been introduced for only 10 years and presumably did not reach their theoretical maximum age, potentially biasing the mortality estimate for that population. Simulation of management regimes in Fishery Analyses and Simulation Tools software predicted that maximum biomass of flathead catfish in the Ocmulgee (1,668 kg) and Satilla (1,137 kg) rivers was substantially larger than that in the Coosa (873 kg) and Tallapoosa (768 kg) populations. However, increased exploitation rates in the Ocmulgee and Satilla River populations resulted in dramatic declines in overall biomass, especially at lower MLLs (254 and 356 mm, respectively). Therefore, in systems where introduced flathead catfish represent an important recreational fishery but have dramatically reduced the abundance of native fishes through predation, minimal protection is recommended. We contend that rapid growth of introduced flathead catfish has major implications for their management and the conservation of native fishes. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2006.

  6. Microsatellite genetic diversity and differentiation of native and introduced grass carp populations in three continents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapman, Duane C.; Chen, Qin; Wang, Chenghui; Zhao, Jinlian; Lu, Guoqing; Zsigmond, Jeney; Li, Sifa

    2012-01-01

    Grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella), a freshwater species native to China, has been introduced to about 100 countries/regions and poses both biological and environmental challenges to the receiving ecosystems. In this study, we analyzed genetic variation in grass carp from three introduced river systems (Mississippi River Basin in US, Danube River in Hungary, and Tone River in Japan) as well as its native ranges (Yangtze, Pearl, and Amur Rivers) in China using 21 novel microsatellite loci. The allelic richness, observed heterozygosity, and within-population gene diversity were found to be lower in the introduced populations than in the native populations, presumably due to the small founder population size of the former. Significant genetic differentiation was found between all pairwise populations from different rivers. Both principal component analysis and Bayesian clustering analysis revealed obvious genetic distinction between the native and introduced populations. Interestingly, genetic bottlenecks were detected in the Hungarian and Japanese grass carp populations, but not in the North American population, suggesting that the Mississippi River Basin grass carp has experienced rapid population expansion with potential genetic diversification during the half-century since its introduction. Consequently, the combined forces of the founder effect, introduction history, and rapid population expansion help explaining the observed patterns of genetic diversity within and among both native and introduced populations of the grass carp.

  7. Maternal influence on the acceptance of virgin queens introduced into Africanized honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies.

    PubMed

    Moretto, G; Guerra, J C V; Kalvelage, H; Espindola, E

    2004-01-01

    The oviposition potential of honey bee queens decreases with age, therefore it is important to replace old queens with younger ones on a periodic basis. However, queen replacement is problematic, especially in Africanized honey bee colonies, since many introduced queens are not accepted, and virgin queens are less easily accepted than are mated queens. We assessed the influence of genetic origin (queen mother) on the acceptance of queens, when they were introduced as virgins into Africanized honey bee colonies. For this purpose, 12 daughter queens from each of 11 mother queens with no degree of kinship among themselves were introduced. Introductions were made monthly, for 12 months, though the winter months of June and July were not included, as there is little brood and drones are rare in winter. There was some seasonal variation in the acceptance rates; generally there was greater acceptance in months with good honey flows. However, the acceptance of introduced queens was influenced by their origin. The rate of acceptance of daughter queens from the 11 different mother queens varied significantly, ranging from 33 to 75%. There appears to be a genetic influence of the mother queen on the introduced queen acceptance rate. PMID:15614734

  8. Learning to Stand: The Acceptability and Feasibility of Introducing Standing Desks into College Classrooms

    PubMed Central

    Benzo, Roberto M.; Gremaud, Allene L.; Jerome, Matthew; Carr, Lucas J.

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged sedentary behavior is an independent risk factor for multiple negative health outcomes. Evidence supports introducing standing desks into K-12 classrooms and work settings to reduce sitting time, but no studies have been conducted in the college classroom environment. The present study explored the acceptability and feasibility of introducing standing desks in college classrooms. A total of 993 students and 149 instructors completed a single online needs assessment survey. This cross-sectional study was conducted during the fall semester of 2015 at a large Midwestern University. The large majority of students (95%) reported they would prefer the option to stand in class. Most students (82.7%) reported they currently sit during their entire class time. Most students (76.6%) and instructors (86.6%) reported being in favor of introducing standing desks into college classrooms. More than half of students and instructors predicted having access to standing desks in class would improve student’s “physical health”, “attention”, and “restlessness”. Collectively, these findings support the acceptability of introducing standing desks in college classrooms. Future research is needed to test the feasibility, cost-effectiveness and efficacy of introducing standing desks in college classrooms. Such studies would be useful for informing institutional policies regarding classroom designs. PMID:27537901

  9. Learning to Stand: The Acceptability and Feasibility of Introducing Standing Desks into College Classrooms.

    PubMed

    Benzo, Roberto M; Gremaud, Allene L; Jerome, Matthew; Carr, Lucas J

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged sedentary behavior is an independent risk factor for multiple negative health outcomes. Evidence supports introducing standing desks into K-12 classrooms and work settings to reduce sitting time, but no studies have been conducted in the college classroom environment. The present study explored the acceptability and feasibility of introducing standing desks in college classrooms. A total of 993 students and 149 instructors completed a single online needs assessment survey. This cross-sectional study was conducted during the fall semester of 2015 at a large Midwestern University. The large majority of students (95%) reported they would prefer the option to stand in class. Most students (82.7%) reported they currently sit during their entire class time. Most students (76.6%) and instructors (86.6%) reported being in favor of introducing standing desks into college classrooms. More than half of students and instructors predicted having access to standing desks in class would improve student's "physical health", "attention", and "restlessness". Collectively, these findings support the acceptability of introducing standing desks in college classrooms. Future research is needed to test the feasibility, cost-effectiveness and efficacy of introducing standing desks in college classrooms. Such studies would be useful for informing institutional policies regarding classroom designs. PMID:27537901

  10. Tuberous legumes: preliminary evaluation of tropical Australian and introduced species as fuel crops

    SciTech Connect

    Saxon, E.C.

    1981-04-01

    The evaluation of native and introduced legumes with starch-storing roots or tubers was undertaken to test whether plants traditionally collected as food by Australian aborigines might have a role in the development of crops for liquid fuel production (by fermentation of carbohydrates to ethanol). Tuberous-rooted legumes from overseas were planted at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, division of Tropical Crops and Pastures, Kimberley Research Station, Western Australia (15/sup 0/39'S, 128/sup 0/42'E) in December 1974, March 1978 and February 1979. Roots from the latter plantings were harvested in June 1979. Native plant material was collected during visits to aboriginal communities in the Kimberleys between April and June 1979. The native and introduced specimens were analyzed for fermentable carbohydrate and protein content. Several native plants appear more promising than introduced species as liquid fuel crops.

  11. Native Salamanders and Introduced Fish: Changing the Nature of Mountain Lakes and Ponds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, Gary L.; Hoffman, Robert L.

    2003-01-01

    During the last century, many fishless mountain lakes and ponds in the Pacific Northwest were stocked with non-native fish, such as brook trout, for recreational purposes. These introduced fish replaced long-toed and northwestern salamander larvae as the top aquatic vertebrate predator by preying on salamander larvae. This predatory interaction has been shown to reduce the abundances of larval salamander populations. We conducted studies in two national parks to assess the abundances of salamander larvae in lakes with and without introduced fish. These studies suggest that the two salamander species were affected quite differently by the presence of introduced fish because of different life-history traits and different distributions of salamanders and fish within each park.

  12. Reduced helminth parasitism in the introduced bank vole (Myodes glareolus): More parasites lost than gained.

    PubMed

    Loxton, Karen C; Lawton, Colin; Stafford, Peter; Holland, Celia V

    2016-08-01

    Introduced species are often less parasitised compared to their native counterparts and to ecologically similar hosts in the new environment. Reduced parasitism may come about due to both the loss of original parasites and low acquisition of novel parasites. In this study we investigated the intestinal helminth parasites of the introduced bank vole (Myodes glareolus) in Ireland. Results were compared to data from other European studies and to the intestinal helminth fauna of an ecologically similar native rodent in Ireland, the wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus). The helminth fauna of introduced bank voles exhibited low diversity with only 3 species recovered: Aspiculuris tianjinensis; Aonchotheca murissylvatici and Taenia martis larvae. In particular, no adult parasites with indirect life-cycles were found in bank voles suggesting that indirectly transmitted parasites are less likely to establish in invasive hosts. Also, the results of this study add support to the enemy release hypothesis. PMID:27408800

  13. Infants Prefer Tunes Previously Introduced by Speakers of Their Native Language.

    PubMed

    Soley, Gaye; Sebastián-Gallés, Núria

    2015-01-01

    Infants show attentional biases for certain individuals over others based on various cues. However, the role of these biases in shaping infants' preferences and learning is not clear. This study asked whether infants' preference for native speakers (Kinzler, Dupoux, & Spelke, 2007) would modulate their preferences for tunes. After getting equal exposure to two different tunes introduced by two speakers, 7-month-olds (N = 32) listened longer to the tune that was introduced by a native speaker compared to the tune that was introduced by a foreign speaker. This suggests that the social-emotional context in which exposure to stimuli occurs influences auditory preferences, and that the early emerging attentional biases might have important ramifications regarding social learning in early infancy. PMID:26300428

  14. The role of introduced species in the degradation of island ecosystems: A case history of Guam

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fritts, T.H.; Rodda, G.H.

    1998-01-01

    The accidental introduction of the brown treesnake (Boiga irregularis) on Guam around 1950 induced a cascade of extirpations that may be unprecedented among historical extinction events in taxonomic scope and severity. Birds, bats, and reptiles were affected, and by 1990 most forested areas on Guam retained only three native vertebrates, all of which were small lizards. Of the hypotheses to account for the severity of this extinction event, we find some support for the importance of lack of coevolution between introduced predator and prey, availability of alternate prey, extraordinary predatory capabilities of the snake, and vulnerabilities of the Guam ecosystem. In addition, there were important interactions among these factors, especially the presence of introduced prey (possessing coevolutionary experience) that were thus able to maintain their populations and provide alternate prey to the introduced predator while it was driving the native prey species to extinction. This complex of vulnerabilities is common on oceanic islands.

  15. The role of introduced species in the degradation of island ecosystems: A case history of guam

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fritts, T.H.; Rodda, G.H.

    1998-01-01

    The accidental introduction of the brown treesnake (Boiga irregularis) on Guam around 1950 induced a cascade of extirpations that may be unprecedented among historical extinction events in taxonomic scope and severity. Birds, bats, and reptiles were affected, and by 1990 most forested areas on Guam retained only three native vertebrates, all of which were small lizards. Of the hypotheses to account for the severity of this extinction event, we find some support for the importance of lack of coevolution between introduced predator and prey, availability of alternate prey, extraordinary predatory capabilities of the snake, and vulnerabilities of the Guam ecosystem. In addition, there were important interactions among these factors, especially the presence of introduced prey (possessing coevolutionary experience) that were thus able to maintain their populations and provide alternate prey to the introduced predator while it was driving the native prey species to extinction. This complex of vulnerabilities is common on oceanic islands.

  16. Grassland fires may favor native over introduced plants by reducing pathogen loads.

    PubMed

    Roy, Bitty A; Hudson, Kenneth; Visser, Matt; Johnson, Bart R

    2014-07-01

    Grasslands have been lost and degraded in the United States since Euro-American settlement due to agriculture, development, introduced invasive species, and changes in fire regimes. Fire is frequently used in prairie restoration to control invasion by trees and shrubs, but may have additional consequences. For example, fire might reduce damage by herbivore and pathogen enemies by eliminating litter, which harbors eggs and spores. Less obviously, fire might influence enemy loads differently for native and introduced plant hosts. We used a controlled burn in a Willamette Valley (Oregon) prairie to examine these questions. We expected that, without fire, introduced host plants should have less damage than native host plants because the introduced species are likely to have left many of their enemies behind when they were transported to their new range (the enemy release hypothesis, or ERH). If the ERH holds, then fire, which should temporarily reduce enemies on all species, should give an advantage to the natives because they should see greater total reduction in damage by enemies. Prior to the burn, we censused herbivore and pathogen attack on eight plant species (five of nonnative origin: Bromus hordaceous, Cynosuros echinatus, Galium divaricatum, Schedonorus arundinaceus (= Festuca arundinacea), and Sherardia arvensis; and three natives: Danthonia californica, Epilobium minutum, and Lomatium nudicale). The same plots were monitored for two years post-fire. Prior to the burn, native plants had more kinds of damage and more pathogen damage than introduced plants, consistent with the ERH. Fire reduced pathogen damage relative to the controls more for the native than the introduced species, but the effects on herbivory were negligible. Pathogen attack was correlated with plant reproductive fitness, whereas herbivory was not. These results suggest that fire may be useful for promoting some native plants in prairies due to its negative effects on their pathogens. PMID

  17. The effect of native and introduced biofuel crops on the composition of soil biota communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heděnec, Petr; Ustak, Sergej; Novotný, David; Frouz, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Biofuel crops are an accepted alternative to fossil fuels, but little is known about the ecological impact of their production. The aim of this contribution is to study the effect of native (Salix viminalis and Phalaris arundinacea) and introduced (Helianthus tuberosus, Reynoutria sachalinensis and Silphium perfoliatum) biofuel crop plantations on the soil biota in comparison with cultural meadow vegetation used as control. The study was performed as part of a split plot field experiment of the Crop Research Institute in the city of Chomutov (Czech Republic). The composition of the soil meso- and macrofauna community, composition of the cultivable fraction of the soil fungal community, cellulose decomposition (using litter bags), microbial biomass, basal soil respiration and PLFA composition (incl. F/B ratio) were studied in each site. The C:N ratio and content of polyphenols differed among plant species, but these results could not be considered significant between introduced and native plant species. Abundance of the soil meso- and macrofauna was higher in field sites planted with S. viminalis and P. arundinacea than those planted with S. perfoliatum, H. tuberosus and R. sachalinensis. RDA and Monte Carlo Permutation Test showed that the composition of the faunal community differed significantly between various native and introduced plants. Significantly different basal soil respiration was found in sites planted with various energy crops; however, this difference was not significant between native and introduced species. Microbial biomass carbon and cellulose decomposition did not exhibit any statistical differences among the biofuel crops. The largest statistically significant difference we found was in the content of actinobacterial and bacterial (bacteria, G+ bacteria and G- bacteria) PLFA in sites overgrown by P. arundinacea compared to introduced as well as native biofuel crops. In conclusion, certain parameters significantly differ between various native

  18. Genetic Diversity in Introduced Golden Mussel Populations Corresponds to Vector Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ghabooli, Sara; Zhan, Aibin; Sardiña, Paula; Paolucci, Esteban; Sylvester, Francisco; Perepelizin, Pablo V.; Briski, Elizabeta; Cristescu, Melania E.; MacIsaac, Hugh J.

    2013-01-01

    We explored possible links between vector activity and genetic diversity in introduced populations of Limnoperna fortunei by characterizing the genetic structure in native and introduced ranges in Asia and South America. We surveyed 24 populations: ten in Asia and 14 in South America using the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene, as well as eight polymorphic microsatellite markers. We performed population genetics and phylogenetic analyses to investigate population genetic structure across native and introduced regions. Introduced populations in Asia exhibit higher genetic diversity (HE = 0.667–0.746) than those in South America (HE = 0.519–0.575), suggesting higher introduction effort for the former populations. We observed pronounced geographical structuring in introduced regions, as indicated by both mitochondrial and nuclear markers based on multiple genetic analyses including pairwise ФST, FST, Bayesian clustering method, and three-dimensional factorial correspondence analyses. Pairwise FST values within both Asia (FST = 0.017–0.126, P = 0.000–0.009) and South America (FST = 0.004–0.107, P = 0.000–0.721) were lower than those between continents (FST = 0.180–0.319, P = 0.000). Fine-scale genetic structuring was also apparent among introduced populations in both Asia and South America, suggesting either multiple introductions of distinct propagules or strong post-introduction selection and demographic stochasticity. Higher genetic diversity in Asia as compared to South America is likely due to more frequent propagule transfers associated with higher shipping activities between source and donor regions within Asia. This study suggests that the intensity of human-mediated introduction vectors influences patterns of genetic diversity in non-indigenous species. PMID:23533614

  19. Low Predictability of Colour Polymorphism in Introduced Guppy (Poecilia reticulata) Populations in Panama.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Celestino; Chavarría, Carmen; Sharpe, Diana M T; De León, Luis Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Colour polymorphism is a recurrent feature of natural populations, and its maintenance has been studied in a range of taxa in their native ranges. However, less is known about whether (and how) colour polymorphism is maintained when populations are removed from their native environments, as in the case of introduced species. We here address this issue by analyzing variation in colour patterns in recently-discovered introduced populations of the guppy (Poecilia reticulata) in Panama. Specifically, we use classic colour analysis to estimate variation in the number and the relative area of different colour spots across low predation sites in the introduced Panamanian range of the species. We then compare this variation to that found in the native range of the species under low- and high predation regimes. We found aspects of the colour pattern that were both consistent and inconsistent with the classical paradigm of colour evolution in guppies. On one hand, the same colours that dominated in native populations (orange, iridescent and black) were also the most dominant in the introduced populations in Panama. On the other, there were no clear differences between either introduced-low and native low- and high predation populations. Our results are therefore only partially consistent with the traditional role of female preference in the absence of predators, and suggest that additional factors could influence colour patterns when populations are removed from their native environments. Future research on the interaction between female preference and environmental variability (e.g. multifarious selection), could help understand adaptive variation in this widely-introduced species, and the contexts under which variation in adaptive traits parallels (or not) variation in the native range. PMID:26863538

  20. Low Predictability of Colour Polymorphism in Introduced Guppy (Poecilia reticulata) Populations in Panama

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Celestino; Chavarría, Carmen; Sharpe, Diana M. T.; De León, Luis Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Colour polymorphism is a recurrent feature of natural populations, and its maintenance has been studied in a range of taxa in their native ranges. However, less is known about whether (and how) colour polymorphism is maintained when populations are removed from their native environments, as in the case of introduced species. We here address this issue by analyzing variation in colour patterns in recently-discovered introduced populations of the guppy (Poecilia reticulata) in Panama. Specifically, we use classic colour analysis to estimate variation in the number and the relative area of different colour spots across low predation sites in the introduced Panamanian range of the species. We then compare this variation to that found in the native range of the species under low- and high predation regimes. We found aspects of the colour pattern that were both consistent and inconsistent with the classical paradigm of colour evolution in guppies. On one hand, the same colours that dominated in native populations (orange, iridescent and black) were also the most dominant in the introduced populations in Panama. On the other, there were no clear differences between either introduced-low and native low- and high predation populations. Our results are therefore only partially consistent with the traditional role of female preference in the absence of predators, and suggest that additional factors could influence colour patterns when populations are removed from their native environments. Future research on the interaction between female preference and environmental variability (e.g. multifarious selection), could help understand adaptive variation in this widely-introduced species, and the contexts under which variation in adaptive traits parallels (or not) variation in the native range. PMID:26863538

  1. The effect of native and introduced biofuel crops on the composition of soil biota communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frouz, Jan; Hedenec, Petr

    2016-04-01

    Biofuel crops are an accepted alternative to fossil fuels, but little is known about the ecological impact of their production. The aim of this contribution is to study the effect of native (Salix viminalis and Phalaris arundinacea) and introduced (Helianthus tuberosus, Reynoutria sachalinensis and Silphium perfoliatum) biofuel crop plantations on the soil biota in comparison with cultural meadow vegetation used as control. The study was performed as part of a split plot field experiment of the Crop Research Institute in the city of Chomutov (Czech Republic). The composition of the soil meso- and macrofauna community, composition of the cultivable fraction of the soil fungal community, cellulose decomposition (using litter bags), microbial biomass, basal soil respiration and PLFA composition (incl. F/B ratio) were studied in each site. The C:N ratio and content of polyphenols differed among plant species, but these results could not be considered significant between introduced and native plant species. Abundance of the soil meso- and macrofauna was higher in field sites planted with S. viminalis and P. arundinacea than those planted with S. perfoliatum, H. tuberosus and R. sachalinensis. RDA and Monte Carlo Permutation Test showed that the composition of the faunal community differed significantly between various native and introduced plants. Significantly different basal soil respiration was found in sites planted with various energy crops; however, this difference was not significant between native and introduced species. Microbial biomass carbon and cellulose decomposition did not exhibit any statistical differences among the biofuel crops. The largest statistically significant difference we found was in the content of actinobacterial and bacterial (bacteria, G+ bacteria and G- bacteria) PLFA in sites overgrown by P. arundinacea compared to introduced as well as native biofuel crops. In conclusion, certain parameters significantly differ between various native

  2. Introducing Change (Science into the Operating Room): Quality Improvement versus Experimentation

    PubMed Central

    Poullis, Mike

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: Introducing change is sometimes vital on an individual, departmental, and institutional level to improve the quality of care of patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass. This review discussed the following areas: cost of poor quality, variation, knowledge, Deming’s red bead experiments and his conclusions, how do you try to improve, measurement, statistics, and quality improvement verses research. Successes and failures with regard to the introduction of change, and strategies to introduce change without creating conflict are discussed with reference to the hospital in which the author works. PMID:20092081

  3. Filtrates & Residues. A Laboratory Exercise Introducing Students to the Pourbaix Diagram for Cobalt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Dick; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise designed to introduce students to the Pourbaix diagram for cobalt. Discusses the use of a Pourbaix diagram as a potential-pH plot which displays some of the most thermodynamically stable species for a given element. Outlines a laboratory demonstration and a student investigation. (TW)

  4. Argumentation-Teaching as a Method to Introduce Indigenous Knowledge into Science Classrooms: Opportunities and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewson, Mariana G.; Ogunniyi, Meshach B.

    2011-01-01

    An innovative school science curriculum in South Africa requires the inclusion of African societal/cultural knowledge, such as indigenous knowledge (IK). The main project involves introducing argumentation to accomplish this requirement. We used a focus group plus critical incident technique to ascertain nine teachers' understandings of…

  5. Introducing Objective Tests and OMR-Based Student Assessment: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Ruth; Chalkley, Brian

    1997-01-01

    Describes the process by which objective tests utilizing an optical mark reader (OMR) were introduced into a number of first-year geography courses at the University of Plymouth (England). Presents the results of various statistical tests including a comparison of student performance in the objective and the traditional essay examinations. (MJP)

  6. A Qualitative Case Study of Prospective Chemistry Teachers' Knowledge about Instructional Strategies: Introducing Particulate Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boz, Nihat; Boz, Yezdan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate prospective chemistry teachers' knowledge about instructional strategies, one component of pedagogical content knowledge about introducing particulate theory, as well as sources of this knowledge. Twenty-two prospective chemistry teachers participated in the study. Data were collected by the means of a…

  7. Effects of vegetative propagule pressure on the establishment of an introduced clonal plant, Hydrocotyle vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruihua; Chen, Qiuwen; Dong, Bicheng; Yu, Feihai

    2014-01-01

    Some introduced clonal plants spread mainly by vegetative (clonal) propagules due to the absence of sexual reproduction in the introduced range. Propagule pressure (i.e. total number of propagules) may affect the establishment and thus invasion success of introduced clonal plants, and such effects may also depend on habitat conditions. A greenhouse experiment with an introduced plant, Hydrocotyle vulgaris was conducted to investigate the role of propagule pressure on its invasion process. High (five ramets) or low (one ramet) propagule pressure was established either in bare soil or in an experimental plant community consisting of four grassland species. H. vulgaris produced more total biomass under high than under low propagule pressure in both habitat conditions. Interestingly, the size of the H. vulgaris individuals was smaller under high than under low propagule pressure in bare soil, whereas it did not differ between the two propagule pressure treatments in the grassland community. The results indicated that high propagule pressure can ensure the successful invasion in either the grass community or bare soil, and the shift in the intraspecific interaction of H. vulgaris from competition in the bare soil to facilitation in the grassland community may be a potential mechanism. PMID:24981102

  8. Introducing Consultancy Supervision in a Primary School for Children with Social, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Della

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a pilot study where consultancy supervision was introduced into a primary school for pupils with SEBD in England. School staff engaged with supervision and evaluated their experience through a quantitative and qualitative methodology. The paper explores the nature of supervision, the qualities of the supervisory relationship…

  9. 78 FR 65955 - Migratory Bird Permits; Control Order for Introduced Migratory Bird Species in Hawaii

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... eradication and control. These include staff of the Kauai Invasive Species Committee, the Oahu Invasive... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 21 RIN 1018-AZ69 Migratory Bird Permits; Control Order for Introduced Migratory Bird Species in Hawaii AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION:...

  10. In Search of a Better Bean: A Simple Activity to Introduce Plant Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaccarotella, Kim; James, Roxie

    2014-01-01

    Measuring plant stem growth over time is a simple activity commonly used to introduce concepts in growth and development in plant biology (Reid & Pu, 2007). This Quick Fix updates the activity and incorporates a real-world application: students consider possible effects of soil substrate and sunlight conditions on plant growth without needing…

  11. Introducing Evidence-Based Principles to Guide Collaborative Approaches to Evaluation: Results of an Empirical Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulha, Lyn M.; Whitmore, Elizabeth; Cousins, J. Bradley; Gilbert, Nathalie; al Hudib, Hind

    2016-01-01

    This article introduces a set of evidence-based principles to guide evaluation practice in contexts where evaluation knowledge is collaboratively produced by evaluators and stakeholders. The data from this study evolved in four phases: two pilot phases exploring the desirability of developing a set of principles; an online questionnaire survey…

  12. Failed fibreoptic intubation: 70° rigid nasendoscope and Frova introducer to the rescue

    PubMed Central

    Vinayagam, Stalin; Prakash, MVS Satya; Kundra, Pankaj; Gopalakrishnan, Surianarayana

    2016-01-01

    Endotracheal intubation was successfully accomplished with 70° rigid nasendoscope under video guidance in two patients in whom repeated attempts to secure airway with flexible fibreoptic bronchoscope were unsuccessful. Both patients had compromised airway (laryngeal papillomatosis and a huge thyroid swelling) and were uncooperative. Frova intubating introducer was used along with 70° rigid nasendoscope to accomplish tracheal intubation under video guidance. PMID:27512168

  13. Field assessment of three introduced parasitoids of Paracoccus marginatus (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract: Field assessment of the ability of three introduced parasitoids (Acerophagus papayae Noyes and Schauff, Anagyrus loecki Noyes, and Pseudleptomastix mexicana Noyes and Schauff) to control Paracoccus marginatus Williams and Granara de Willink was investigated in 2005 and 2006 in three locat...

  14. Efficiency and establishment of three introduced parasitoids of the mealybug Paracoccus marginatus (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study on the efficiency and establishment of three previously introduced parasitoids (Acerophagus papayae, Anagyrus loecki, and Pseudleptomastix mexicana) to control the mealybug Paracoccus marginatus was made in 2005 and 2006, at three locations in Homestead (Miami-Dade County), Florida. In each ...

  15. Introducing Algebraic Structures through Solving Equations: Vertical Content Knowledge for K-12 Mathematics Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Nicholas H.

    2014-01-01

    Algebraic structures are a necessary aspect of algebraic thinking for K-12 students and teachers. An approach for introducing the algebraic structure of groups and fields through the arithmetic properties required for solving simple equations is summarized; the collective (not individual) importance of these axioms as a foundation for algebraic…

  16. Dilemmas in Introducing Applied Technology: The Plough and the Cattlelords in Timor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Mary

    1990-01-01

    An effort to introduce the plow to Timor farmers faced following barriers: nature of the land and climate, strongly demarcated traditional system, tensions among ethnic groups, cattlelords system, necessary time to place/retain trainers in villages. Positive factors were concrete results, use of small groups and native trainers, age of adopters,…

  17. Pedagogical Innovation and Music Education in Spain: Introducing the Dalcroze Method in Catalonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comas Rubí, Francesca; Motilla-Salas, Xavier; Sureda-Garcia, Bernat

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse how the Dalcroze method was introduced to Spain and became known there, more specifically in the Catalonia of the "Noucentisme" movement, and why it made the greatest impact and was more widely disseminated in this particular region of Spain. Following a summary of Dalcroze's contributions to…

  18. Using Pooled Data and Data Visualization to Introduce Statistical Concepts in the General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    I describe how data pooling and data visualization can be employed in the first-semester general chemistry laboratory to introduce core statistical concepts such as central tendency and dispersion of a data set. The pooled data are plotted as a 1-D scatterplot, a purpose-designed number line through which statistical features of the data are…

  19. Introducing Heuristics of Cultural Dimensions into the Service-Level Technical Communication Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafer, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A significant problem for practitioners of technical communication is to gain the skills to compete in a global, multicultural work environment. Instructors of technical communication can provide future practitioners with the tools to compete and excel in this global environment by introducing heuristics of cultural dimensions into the…

  20. The Ordering Challenge: An Online Game to Introduce Independent Demand Inventory Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Brad C.; Bishop, Debra S.

    2011-01-01

    Students are put in the role of a manager who watches inventory levels decrease and must order at the right time and in the right quantity to minimize costs. This interactive game requires the students to race against time and has levels of increasing difficulty. It introduces the students to the concepts of holding cost, ordering cost, backlog…

  1. Combining ability of binary mixtures of introduced, cool- and warm-season grasses and legumes.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When two forage species are grown together they can be compatible, compete, or interact with each other. We estimated the combining ability effects for introduced, cool- and warm-season grasses and legumes grown in binary mixtures in NW Oklahoma. Six pure stands and 15 mixtures were transplanted int...

  2. Introducing National Tests in Swedish Primary Education: Implications for Test Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyroos, Mikaela; Wiklund-Hornqvist, Carola

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The Swedish government has decided to introduce national tests in primary education. Swedish pupils in general have few tests and a recognised possible adverse effect of testing is test anxiety among pupils, which may have a negative impact on examination performance. However, there has been little research on effects of testing on…

  3. The Markings of a New Pencil: Introducing Programming-as-Writing in the Middle School Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Quinn

    2012-01-01

    Using the setting of a writing-workshop to facilitate a deliberate process to learn computer programming, this exploratory study investigates (a) where there is a natural overlap between programming and writing through the storytelling motif, and (b) to what extent existing language arts coursework and pedagogy can be leveraged to introduce this…

  4. Opening Gates of Learning Environments through Technology: Introducing New Technologies to the Adult Learner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weitzenkamp, Deborah J.; Heckathorn, Barbara H.

    This study analyzed how faculty and graduate students interacted within a distance education environment when a new technology was introduced. Data from an education course offered via interactive audio/video and supported with Web-based materials and interaction opportunities were analyzed. Initially, the course was developed for delivery through…

  5. 17 CFR 1.12 - Maintenance of minimum financial requirements by futures commission merchants and introducing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Maintenance of minimum financial requirements by futures commission merchants and introducing brokers. 1.12 Section 1.12 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION GENERAL REGULATIONS UNDER THE COMMODITY EXCHANGE ACT Minimum Financial and...

  6. 17 CFR 3.10 - Registration of futures commission merchants, introducing brokers, commodity trading advisors...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Registration of futures commission merchants, introducing brokers, commodity trading advisors, commodity pool operators and leverage transaction merchants. 3.10 Section 3.10 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION REGISTRATION Registration §...

  7. 31 CFR 103.123 - Customer identification programs for futures commission merchants and introducing brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... must be maintained pursuant to the provisions of 17 CFR 1.31. (4) Comparison with government lists. The... futures commission merchant or introducing broker will rely on the performance by another financial..., but not limited to, those established to effect transactions in contracts of sale of a commodity...

  8. Measuring the Reader Self-Perceptions of Adolescents: Introducing the RSPS2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henk, William A.; Marinak, Barbara A.; Melnick, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a new affective instrument for assessing the reader self-perceptions of students in grades seven through ten. The Reader Self-Perception Scale 2 (RSPS2) builds upon its predecessor, the RSPS, a tool that measures the reading efficacy beliefs of children in grades four through six. New items were created for the RSPS2 to…

  9. A Community of Practice Model for Introducing Mobile Tablets to University Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drouin, Michelle; Vartanian, Lesa Rae; Birk, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    We examined the effectiveness of a community of practice (CoP) model for introducing tablets to 139 faculty members at a higher education institution. Using a CoP within a systems model, we used large- and small-group mentorship to foster collaboration among faculty members. Most faculty members agreed that the project was well organized and…

  10. Introducing Creativity in a Design Laboratory for a Freshman Level Electrical and Computer Engineering Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkett, Susan L.; Kotru, Sushma; Lusth, John C.; McCallum, Debra; Dunlap, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Dunlap, The University of Alabama, USA ABSTRACT In the electrical and computer engineering (ECE) curriculum at The University of Alabama, freshmen are introduced to fundamental electrical concepts and units, DC circuit analysis techniques, operational amplifiers, circuit simulation, design, and professional ethics. The two credit course has both…

  11. Introducing B2B Service Level Measures via a Poker-Card Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chun-Miin; Bailey, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    To determine the appropriate level of product availability, most operations management textbooks introduce and define service level measures in a Business-to-Customer context. In other words, a retailer that wants to measure product availability in their store calculates the fill rate (FR) or cycle service level over an infinite review horizon.…

  12. Introducing Preschool Children to Novel Fruits and Vegetables: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tande, D. L.; Niemeier, B. S.; Hwang, J. H.; Stastny, S.; Bezbaruah, N.; Hektner, J. M.; Habedank, D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this pilot study was to compare changes in preschool children's identification, preferences, and beliefs related to fruits and vegetables introduced to a child care center's menu before and after a nutrition education and food exposure intervention. The study also sought to determine how these changes…

  13. Problem Solving and Engineering Design, Introducing Bachelor Students to Engineering Practice at K. U. Leuven

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heylen, Christel; Smet, Marc; Buelens, Hermans; Sloten, Jos Vander

    2007-01-01

    A present-day engineer has a large scientific knowledge; he is a team-player, eloquent communicator and life-long learner. At the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, the course "Problem Solving and Engineering Design" introduces engineering students from the first semester onwards into real engineering practice and teamwork. Working in small groups,…

  14. Reinforcing Sampling Distributions through a Randomization-Based Activity for Introducing ANOVA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Laura; Doehler, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the use of a randomization-based activity to introduce the ANOVA F-test to students. The two main goals of this activity are to successfully teach students to comprehend ANOVA F-tests and to increase student comprehension of sampling distributions. Four sections of students in an advanced introductory statistics course…

  15. Modules for Introducing Organometallic Reactions: A Bridge between Organic and Inorganic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaller, Chris P.; Graham, Kate J.; Johnson, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal organometallic reactions have become increasingly important in the synthesis of organic molecules. A new approach has been developed to introduce organometallic chemistry, along with organic and inorganic chemistry, at the foundational level. This change highlights applications of organometallic chemistry that have dramatically…

  16. 21 CFR 884.5380 - Contraceptive tubal occlusion device (TOD) and introducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (premarket approval). (c) Date premarket approval application (PMA) or notice of completion of a product development protocol (PDP) is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with... May 28, 1976. Any other TOD and introducer shall have an approved PMA or a declared completed PDP...

  17. 21 CFR 884.5360 - Contraceptive intrauterine device (IUD) and introducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... approval application (PMA) or notice of completion of a product development protocol (PDP) is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the Food and Drug Administration... introducer shall have an approved PMA or a declared completed PDP in effect before being placed in...

  18. 21 CFR 884.5380 - Contraceptive tubal occlusion device (TOD) and introducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (premarket approval). (c) Date premarket approval application (PMA) or notice of completion of a product development protocol (PDP) is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with... May 28, 1976. Any other TOD and introducer shall have an approved PMA or a declared completed PDP...

  19. 21 CFR 884.5360 - Contraceptive intrauterine device (IUD) and introducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... approval application (PMA) or notice of completion of a product development protocol (PDP) is required. A PMA or a notice of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the Food and Drug Administration... introducer shall have an approved PMA or a declared completed PDP in effect before being placed in...

  20. Strategies for Successfully Introducing Women to Active Outdoor Pursuits of an Instrumental Nature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boukhedouma, Jamila

    1997-01-01

    Strategies for introducing females to competitive outdoor recreational activities include having all-female outings, designating women as instructors and coaches, and maintaining the level of fun within the activity. Barriers to active involvement of females in competitive activities include the presence of an evaluative audience, negative…

  1. THE HEALING HAND OF TIME: NATIVE SPECIES REPLACE INTRODUCED GRASS CULTIVARS SEEDED FOLLOWING WILDFIRE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seeding of non-native species following wildfires to prevent erosion has become a controversial practice for several reasons: it risks inhibiting tree regeneration, introducing noxious weeds, and permanently replacing native species. The paper reports the fate of non-native seeded grasses 31 years ...

  2. I like Cities; Do You like Letters? Introducing Urban Typography in Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huerta, Ricard

    2010-01-01

    This article proposes a study of the letters and graphics found in the city, while at the same time opening up unusual spaces linked to the cultural arena and visual geographies for the creation of learning spaces in art education, introducing urban typography for training teachers. The letters in urban spaces can help us reinterpret the…

  3. The biology of small, introduced populations, with special reference to biological control

    PubMed Central

    Fauvergue, Xavier; Vercken, Elodie; Malausa, Thibaut; Hufbauer, Ruth A

    2012-01-01

    Populations are introduced into novel environments in different contexts, one being the biological control of pests. Despite intense efforts, less than half introduced biological control agents establish. Among the possible approaches to improve biological control, one is to better understand the processes that underpin introductions and contribute to ecological and evolutionary success. In this perspective, we first review the demographic and genetic processes at play in small populations, be they stochastic or deterministic. We discuss the theoretical outcomes of these different processes with respect to individual fitness, population growth rate, and establishment probability. Predicted outcomes differ subtly in some cases, but enough so that the evaluating results of introductions have the potential to reveal which processes play important roles in introduced populations. Second, we attempt to link the theory we have discussed with empirical data from biological control introductions. A main result is that there are few available data, but we nonetheless report on an increasing number of well-designed, theory-driven, experimental approaches. Combining demography and genetics from both theoretical and empirical perspectives highlights novel and exciting avenues for research on the biology of small, introduced populations, and great potential for improving both our understanding and practice of biological control. PMID:22949919

  4. Natural enemies associated with the invasive weed, Lepidium latifolium L., in its introduced range

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perennial pepperweed, Lepidium latifolium L., is a perennial mustard (Brassicaceae) native to Eurasia. It was unintentionally introduced to North America in the early 1900s, and has since spread over millions of acres. This weed is an aggressive invader of wetlands, meadows, roadsides, and agricul...

  5. Introducing and Integrating Gifted Education into an Existing Independent School: An Analysis of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKibben, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    In this analysis of practice, I conduct a combination formative and summative program evaluation of an initiative introduced to serve gifted learners at The Ocean School (TOS), an independent, Pre-K-grade 8 day school located in a rural area of the West Coast. Using the best practices as articulated by the National Association of Gifted Children…

  6. Introduced Amino Terminal Epitopes Can Reduce Surface Expression of Neuronal Nicotinic Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bracamontes, John R.; Akk, Gustav; Steinbach, Joe Henry

    2016-01-01

    Epitopes accessible on the surface of intact cells are extremely valuable in studies of membrane proteins, allowing quantification and determination of the distribution of proteins as well as identification of cells expressing large numbers of proteins. However for many membrane proteins there are no suitable antibodies to native sequences, due to lack of availability, low affinity or lack of specificity. In these cases the use of an introduced epitope at specific sites in the protein of interest can often provide a suitable tool for studies. However, the introduction of the epitope sequence has the potential to affect protein expression, the assembly of multisubunit proteins or transport to the surface membrane. We find that surface expression of heteromeric neuronal nicotinic receptors containing the α4 and β4 subunits can be affected by introduced epitopes when inserted near the amino terminus of a subunit. The FLAG epitope greatly reduces surface expression when introduced into either α4 or β4 subunits, the V5 epitope has little effect when placed in either, while the Myc epitope reduces expression more when inserted into β4 than α4. These results indicate that the extreme amino terminal region is important for assembly of these receptors, and demonstrate that some widely used introduced epitopes may severely reduce surface expression. PMID:26963253

  7. Introducing National Curriculum Geography to Australia's Primary Schools: Lessons from England's Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catling, Simon

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an insight into the development of primary geography since the inception of the national curriculum in England in the late 1980s. It is hoped this is informative as the "Australian Curriculum: Geography Foundation to Year 12" is introduced to and implemented in primary schools. It draws out various matters which…

  8. Genetic variation in native and introduced populations of Taeniatherum caput-medusae (Poaceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic analysis of both native and introduced populations of invasive species can be used to examine population origins and spread. Accurate delineation of an invasive species’ source populations can contribute to the search for specific and effective biological control agents. Medusahead, Taenia...

  9. A Method of Developing and Introducing Case-Based Learning to a Preclinical Veterinary Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowther, Emma; Baillie, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Case-based learning (CBL) has been introduced as part of a major review of the veterinary curriculum at the University of Bristol. The initial aim was to improve integration between all first year subjects, i.e., basic science disciplines (anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry), animal management, and professional studies, while highlighting the…

  10. Introducing Science Experiments to Rote-Learning Classes in Pakistani Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pell, Anthony William; Iqbal, Hafiz Muhammad; Sohail, Shahida

    2010-01-01

    A mixed-methods sequential research design has been used to test the effect of introducing teacher science demonstrations to a traditional book-learning sample of 384 Grade 7 boys and girls from five schools in Lahore, Pakistan. In the quasi-experimental quantitative study, the eight classes of comparable ability were designated either…

  11. 31 CFR 501.734 - Introducing prior sworn statements of witnesses into the record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Introducing prior sworn statements of witnesses into the record. 501.734 Section 501.734 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY...

  12. 31 CFR 501.734 - Introducing prior sworn statements of witnesses into the record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Introducing prior sworn statements of witnesses into the record. 501.734 Section 501.734 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY...

  13. 31 CFR 501.734 - Introducing prior sworn statements of witnesses into the record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Introducing prior sworn statements of witnesses into the record. 501.734 Section 501.734 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY...

  14. 31 CFR 501.734 - Introducing prior sworn statements of witnesses into the record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Introducing prior sworn statements of witnesses into the record. 501.734 Section 501.734 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY...

  15. 31 CFR 501.734 - Introducing prior sworn statements of witnesses into the record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Introducing prior sworn statements of witnesses into the record. 501.734 Section 501.734 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY...

  16. Introducing Molecular Visualization to Primary Schools in California: The STArt! Teaching Science Through Art Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpine, Susana Maria

    2004-01-01

    The STArt! teaching Science Through Art program was developed to help both students and teachers address the new California Science Content standards. An initial presentation of program introduces molecular visualization using narrative discussions, handheld models, visualization software and art workshops and it also emphasize low-cost materials,…

  17. Introducing Students to Bio-Inspiration and Biomimetic Design: A Workshop Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santulli, Carlo; Langella, Carla

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, bio-inspired approach to design has gained considerable interest between designers, engineers and end-users. However, there are difficulties in introducing bio-inspiration concepts in the university curriculum in that they involve multi-disciplinary work, which can only possibly be successfully delivered by a team with integrated…

  18. Accelerating global innovation to address antibacterial resistance: introducing CARB-X.

    PubMed

    Outterson, Kevin; Rex, John H; Jinks, Tim; Jackson, Peter; Hallinan, John; Karp, Steve; Hung, Deborah T; Franceschi, Francois; Merkeley, Tyler; Houchens, Christopher; Dixon, Dennis M; Kurilla, Michael G; Aurigemma, Rosemarie; Larsen, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    A global response to the chronic shortfall in antibiotic innovation is urgently needed to combat antimicrobial resistance. Here, we introduce CARB-X, a new global public-private partnership that will invest more than US$350 million in the next 5 years to accelerate the progression of a diverse portfolio of innovative antibacterial products into clinical trials. PMID:27469032

  19. Introducing Public Libraries to The Big Read: Final Report on the Audio Guide Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloan, Kay; Randall, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    In July 2008, over 14,000 public libraries throughout the U.S. received, free of charge, a set of fourteen Audio Guides introducing them to The Big Read. Since 2007, when the National Endowment for the Arts and the Institute of Museum and Library Services, in partnership with Arts Midwest, debuted The Big Read, the program has awarded grants to…

  20. Categorization of Digital Games in English Language Learning Studies: Introducing the SSI Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundqvist, Pia

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of the present paper is to introduce a model for digital game categorization suitable for use in English language learning studies: the Scale of Social Interaction (SSI) Model (original idea published as Sundqvist, 2013). The SSI Model proposes a classification of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) digital games into three categories:…

  1. Introducing the Concept of Salutogenesis to School Leadership Research: Problematizing Empirical Methodologies and Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces and explores the concept of "salutogenesis" as a way of interpreting school leadership research and its findings in two significant areas: its effect on student outcomes and the motivation of incumbents. In its original setting, salutogenesis describes an approach that focuses on health, rather than on disease, but…

  2. Be a Bee and Other Approaches To Introducing Young Children to Entomology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danoff-Burg, James A.

    2002-01-01

    Early and ongoing exposure to entomology promotes interest in insects, minimizes fear of nature, and instills appreciation for biodiversity. Three effective ways to introduce young children to the study of insects are: live collections for observation and investigation, re-creation of insects through artistic constructions to learn structure and…

  3. Exploring Electrochromics: A Series of Eye-Catching Experiments to Introduce Students to Multidisciplinary Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, Leo J.; Wolf, Steven; Spoerke, Erik D.

    2014-01-01

    Introducing students to a multidisciplinary research laboratory presents challenges in terms of learning specific technical skills and concepts but also with respect to integrating different technical elements to form a coherent picture of the research. Here we present a multidisciplinary series of experiments we have developed in the Electronic,…

  4. The Junior Computer Dictionary. 101 Useful Words and Definitions to Introduce Students to Computer Terminology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willing, Kathlene R.; Girard, Suzanne

    Suitable for children from grades four to seven, this dictionary is designed to introduce children to computer terminology at a level that they will understand and find useful. It is also suitable as a home resource for parents, for library use, and as a handbook for teachers. For each word, the first sentence of the definition contains the kernel…

  5. Introducing Statistical Research to Undergraduate Mathematical Statistics Students Using the Guitar Hero Video Game Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramler, Ivan P.; Chapman, Jessica L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article we describe a semester-long project, based on the popular video game series Guitar Hero, designed to introduce upper-level undergraduate statistics students to statistical research. Some of the goals of this project are to help students develop statistical thinking that allows them to approach and answer open-ended research…

  6. Geographies of American Popular Music: Introducing Students to Basic Geographic Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClain, Stephen S.

    2010-01-01

    Popular music can be used to study many subjects and issues related to the social sciences. "Geographies of American Popular Music" was a workshop that not only examined the history and development of select genres of American music, it also introduced students to basic geographic concepts such as the culture hearth and spatial diffusion. Through…

  7. Assembly of a Vacuum Chamber: A Hands-On Approach to Introduce Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bussie`re, Guillaume; Stoodley, Robin; Yajima, Kano; Bagai, Abhimanyu; Popowich, Aleksandra K.; Matthews, Nicholas E.

    2014-01-01

    Although vacuum technology is essential to many aspects of modern physical and analytical chemistry, vacuum experiments are rarely the focus of undergraduate laboratories. We describe an experiment that introduces students to vacuum science and mass spectrometry. The students first assemble a vacuum system, including a mass spectrometer. While…

  8. Science and Management of the Introduced Seagrass Zostera japonica in North America

    EPA Science Inventory

    Healthy seagrass is considered a prime indicator of estuarine ecosystem function. On the Pacific coast of North America, at least two congeners of Zostera occur: native Zostera marina, and introduced, Z. japonica. Z. japonica is considered “invasive” and therefore, ecologically...

  9. Introducing Molecular Life Science Students to Model Building Using Computer Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aegerter-Wilmsen, Tinri; Kettenis, Dik; Sessink, Olivier; Hartog, Rob; Bisseling, Ton; Janssen, Fred

    2006-01-01

    Computer simulations can facilitate the building of models of natural phenomena in research, such as in the molecular life sciences. In order to introduce molecular life science students to the use of computer simulations for model building, a digital case was developed in which students build a model of a pattern formation process in…

  10. Identity and origins of introduced and native Azolla species in Florida.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Azolla pinnata, an introduced aquatic fern, is spreading rapidly causing concern that it may displace native Azolla. It is now present in the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, the northernmost portion of the Florida Everglades. Because A. pinnata subspecies are native to Afri...

  11. Introducing Programmable Logic to Undergraduate Engineering Students in a Digital Electronics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todorovich, E.; Marone, J. A.; Vazquez, M.

    2012-01-01

    Due to significant technological advances and industry requirements, many universities have introduced programmable logic and hardware description languages into undergraduate engineering curricula. This has led to a number of logistical and didactical challenges, in particular for computer science students. In this paper, the integration of some…

  12. Introducing the Notion of Bare and Effective Mass via Newton's Second Law of Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Marcus Benghi

    2007-01-01

    The concepts of bare and effective mass are widely used within modern physics. Their meaning is discussed in advanced undergraduate and graduate courses such as solid state physics, nuclear physics and quantum field theory. Here I discuss how these concepts may be introduced together with the discussion of Newton's second law of motion. The…

  13. Community Outreach Projects as a Sustainable Way of Introducing Information Technology in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zlotnikova, Irina; van der Weide, Theo

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes an approach to the sustainable introduction of IT in developing countries based on international collaboration between students taking the form of a knowledge bridge. The authors consider the challenges for introducing information technologies in developing countries; one of these is lack of reading materials ultimately leading…

  14. The Importance of Teaching Roles when Introducing Personal Digital Assistants in a Year 6 Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartnell-Young, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyses the experience of a teacher and her Year 6 class (10-11 year-olds) over a school year, while participating in a pilot project introducing Personal Digital Assistants as a learning tool. The intervention was initiated and supported by the local City Learning Centre, which was concerned with how best to use technologies for…

  15. Cannibalism as the main feeding behaviour of tucunares introduced in southeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Gomiero, L M; Braga, F M S

    2004-08-01

    Individuals of its own genus were the main food item of two species of tucunares (Cichla cf. ocellaris and Cichla monoculus) introduced into the Volta Grande Reservoir. The abundance of adult tucunares may cause intra-specific competition, possibly leading to the high cannibalism rates found. PMID:15620000

  16. The Impact on Student Achievement of When CAS Technology Is Introduced

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driver, David

    2012-01-01

    When a Computer Algebra System (CAS) is used as a pedagogical and functional tool in class and as a functional tool in exams, its effect on student achievement can be quite profound. The timing of when students are first introduced to a CAS has an impact on gains in student achievement. In this action research project, the CAS calculator was…

  17. Common garden comparisons of native and introduced plant populations: latitudinal clines can obscure evolutionary inferences

    PubMed Central

    Colautti, Robert I; Maron, John L; Barrett, Spencer C H

    2009-01-01

    Common garden studies are increasingly used to identify differences in phenotypic traits between native and introduced genotypes, often ignoring sources of among-population variation within each range. We re-analyzed data from 32 common garden studies of 28 plant species that tested for rapid evolution associated with biological invasion. Our goals were: (i) to identify patterns of phenotypic trait variation among populations within native and introduced ranges, and (ii) to explore the consequences of this variation for how differences between the ranges are interpreted. We combined life history and physiologic traits into a single principal component (PCALL) and also compared subsets of traits related to size, reproduction, and defense (PCSIZE, PCREP, and PCDEF, respectively). On average, introduced populations exhibited increased growth and reproduction compared to native conspecifics when latitude was not included in statistical models. However, significant correlations between PC-scores and latitude were detected in both the native and introduced ranges, indicating population differentiation along latitudinal gradients. When latitude was explicitly incorporated into statistical models as a covariate, it reduced the magnitude and reversed the direction of the effect for PCALL and PCSIZE. These results indicate that unrecognized geographic clines in phenotypic traits can confound inferences about the causes of evolutionary change in invasive plants. PMID:25567860

  18. Introducing Preservice Teachers to Issues Surrounding Evolution and Creationism via a Mock Trial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helgeson, Lars J.; Hoover, John; Sheehan, James

    2002-01-01

    Describes cooperation between social studies and science education professors to introduce preservice teachers to the evolution versus creationism debate via a mock trial. Uses a hypothetical situation in which a 6th grade teacher was fired for not balancing evolution and creationism in his teaching. Reports that the mock trial slightly increased…

  19. Analytical Essay Writing: A New Activity Introduced to a Traditional Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kommalage, Mahinda

    2012-01-01

    Medical students following a traditional curriculum get few opportunities to engage in activities such as a literature search, scientific writing, and active and collaborative learning. An analytical essay writing activity (AEWA) in physiology was introduced to first-year students. Each student prepared an essay incorporating new research findings…

  20. Turning Point for Korean Computer Educators: Introducing LogoWriter as a Thinking Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Mi Ok

    LogoWriter was introduced in this study as a tool to teach problem solving and thinking skills to students in Korean schools; teacher-mediated learning was also structured to help students monitor their thinking processes. In the teacher-mediated learning model, the following problem solving strategies were used: decomposing, planning, detecting…

  1. Barcoding Techniques Help Tracking the Evolutionary History of the Introduced Species Pennaria disticha (Hydrozoa, Cnidaria)

    PubMed Central

    Miglietta, Maria Pia; Odegard, Dean; Faure, Baptiste; Faucci, Anuschka

    2015-01-01

    The Christmas tree hydroid Pennaria disticha is listed as one of the most common introduced species in Hawaii. Firstly reported in Kaneohe Bay (Oahu) in 1928, it is now established throughout the entire archipelago, including the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, a U.S. National Monument and World Heritage site. The Hawaiian population of P. disticha has also been reported as being the source of further introductions to Palmyra Atoll in the U.S. Line Islands. Using a phylogenetic hypothesis based on a 611 base pair fragment of the mitochondrial 16S barcoding gene, we demonstrate that P. disticha is a complex of cryptic species, rather than one species with cosmopolitan distribution. We also show that in Hawaii there are three species of Pennaria, rather than one introduced species. Two of these species share haplotypes with specimens from distant locations such as Florida and Panama and may have been introduced, possibly from the Atlantic Ocean. A third species could either represent a lineage with nearly cosmopolitan distribution, or another introduced species. Our dataset refutes the widely accepted idea that only one lineage of P. disticha is present in Hawaii. On the contrary, P. disticha in Hawaii may be the outcome of multiple independent introductions of several morphologically undistinguishable cryptic lineages. Our results uncover an unsuspected complexity within the very common hydroid P. disticha, and highlight the need for routine use of molecular tools, such as DNA barcoding, to improve the identification and recognition of non-indigenous species. PMID:26657561

  2. Introducing an Intervention Model for Fostering Affective Involvement with Persons Who Are Congenitally Deafblind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martens, Marga A. W.; Janssen, Marleen J.; Ruijssenaars, Wied A. J. J. M.; Riksen-Walraven, J. Marianne

    2014-01-01

    The article presented here introduces the Intervention Model for Affective Involvement (IMAI), which was designed to train staff members (for example, teachers, caregivers, support workers) to foster affective involvement during interaction and communication with persons who have congenital deaf-blindness. The model is theoretically underpinned,…

  3. Introducing a Culture of Civility in First-Year College Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connelly, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Higher education, as well as the larger society appears to be experiencing a serious decline in civility. In this article the author presents the case for introducing civility education in first-year general education courses. After citing some of the research documenting both faculty and student perceptions of incivility in the university and…

  4. 17 CFR 1.10 - Financial reports of futures commission merchants and introducing brokers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Financial reports of futures commission merchants and introducing brokers. 1.10 Section 1.10 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION GENERAL REGULATIONS UNDER THE COMMODITY EXCHANGE ACT Minimum Financial and Related Reporting Requirements §...

  5. Natural enemies of perennial pepperweed, lepidium latifolium L., in its introduced range

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perennial pepperweed, Lepidium latifolium L., is a member of the Brassicaceae native to Eurasia. It was unintentionally introduced to North America in the early 1900s, where it has since spread over millions of acres. This weed is an aggressive invader of wetlands, meadows, roadsides, and agricult...

  6. Hybrid vigor between native and introduced salamanders raises new challenges for conservation

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Benjamin M.; Shaffer, H. Bradley

    2007-01-01

    Hybridization between differentiated lineages can have many different consequences depending on fitness variation among hybrid offspring. When introduced organisms hybridize with natives, the ensuing evolutionary dynamics may substantially complicate conservation decisions. Understanding the fitness consequences of hybridization is an important first step in predicting its evolutionary outcome and conservation impact. Here, we measured natural selection caused by differential viability of hybrid larvae in wild populations where native California Tiger Salamanders (Ambystoma californiense) and introduced Barred Tiger Salamanders (Ambystoma tigrinum mavortium) have been hybridizing for 50–60 years. We found strong evidence of hybrid vigor; mixed-ancestry genotypes had higher survival rates than genotypes containing mostly native or mostly introduced alleles. Hybrid vigor may be caused by heterozygote advantage (overdominance) or recombinant hybrid vigor (due to epistasis or complementation). These genetic mechanisms are not mutually exclusive, and we find statistical support for both overdominant and recombinant contributions to hybrid vigor in larval tiger salamanders. Because recombinant homozygous genotypes can breed true, a single highly fit genotype with a mosaic of native and introduced alleles may eventually replace the historically pure California Tiger Salamander (listed as Threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act). The management implications of this outcome are complex: Genetically pure populations may not persist into the future, but average fitness and population viability of admixed California Tiger Salamanders may be enhanced. The ecological consequences for other native species are unknown. PMID:17884982

  7. Pollination ecology of a plant in its native and introduced areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero-Castaño, Ana; Vilà, Montserrat; Ortiz-Sánchez, F. Javier

    2014-04-01

    Entomophilous and obligate out-crossing non-native plants need to become well integrated in the resident plant-pollinator network to set seeds and become established. However, it is largely unknown how pollination patterns differ between native ranges and those where plants have been introduced.

  8. INTRODUCING ENGLISH, AN ORAL PRE-READING PROGRAM FOR SPANISH-SPEAKING PRIMARY PUPILS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LANCASTER, LOUISE

    THIS 28-UNIT ORAL PROGRAM WAS PREPARED AS A GUIDE FOR TEACHERS OF SPANISH-SPEAKING FOUR-, FIVE- AND SIX-YEAR-OLD CHILDREN WHO ARE LEARNING ENGLISH FOR THE FIRST TIME. IT IS ORGANIZED TO GIVE THE CHILDREN SOME UNDERSTANDING AND COMMAND OF SPOKEN ENGLISH BEFORE BEING INTRODUCED TO READING IN ENGLISH. A BASIC SPEAKING VOCABULARY OF FIVE TO SIX…

  9. Introducing Project-Based Instruction in the Saudi ESP Classroom: A Study in Qassim University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsamani, Abdul-Aziz Saleh; Daif-Allah, Ayman Sabry

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the impact of introducing an integrative pedagogical approach in the ESP classes on developing the English language vocabulary of Computer Science and Information Technology students in the College of Science, Qassim University. The study suggests a framework for an ESP course-design employing students' project…

  10. An Innovative Context-Based Module to Introduce Students to the Optical Properties of Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Testa, I.; Lombardi, S.; Monroy, G.; Sassi, E.

    2011-01-01

    A context-based module to introduce secondary school students to the study of the optical properties of materials and geometric optics is presented. The module implements an innovative teaching approach in which the behaviour of the chosen application, in this article, the optical fibre, is iteratively explored and modelled by means of a…

  11. An Instructional Strategy to Introduce Pedagogical Content Knowledge Using Venn Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otto, Charlotte A.; Everett, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a three-circle Venn diagram as a vehicle for introducing pre-service elementary teachers to pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). Each circle of the diagram represents pedagogy, content and context individually. The overlap of any two circles represents the interaction between the circles. For example, the overlap of…

  12. PALATABILITY OF NORTHWESTERN AMPHIBIAN LARVAE TO NATIVE AND INTRODUCED FISHES: IMPLICATIONS FOR CONSERVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Non-native gamefish have been introduced throughout the Pacific Northwest, representing one of the most marked alterations of wetlands used by native amphibians. In laboratory tests, we examined susceptibility of larvae of 3 salamander and 3 frog species to selected species of na...

  13. "I'm Not a Feminist, But...": Introducing Feminism in Psychology of Women Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dottolo, Andrea L.

    2011-01-01

    This article will describe an exercise the author uses within the first week (usually the second day) of her Psychology of Women courses in order to (a) quickly introduce basic principles of feminism, (b) dispel some of the myths and stereotypes about feminists, and (c) address some students' fears and misconceptions about feminism and the course.…

  14. Exploring the Educational Benefits of Introducing Aspect-Oriented Programming Into a Programming Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boticki, I.; Katic, M.; Martin,S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the educational benefits of introducing the aspect-oriented programming paradigm into a programming course in a study on a sample of 75 undergraduate software engineering students. It discusses how using the aspect-oriented paradigm, in addition to the object-oriented programming paradigm, affects students' programs, their…

  15. Assessing impacts of introduced aquatic species: Grass carp in large systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, Mark B.

    1993-03-01

    Introduced species have created environmental benefits and unanticipated disasters so a priori assessments of species introductions are needed for environmental management. A checklist for assessing impacts of introduced species was developed from studies of introduced species and recommendations for planning introductions. Sterile, triploid grass carp ( Ctenopharyngodon idella) are just beginning to be used as a biocontrol agent for the management of aquatic vegetation in open waterways. Potential impacts of grass carp in open systems were identified by reviewing grass carp biology relative to the impact assessment checklist. The potential consequences of introduced grass carp were reviewed for one case study. The case study demonstrated that conclusions about potential impacts and monitoring needs can be made despite incomplete information and uncertainty. Indicators of environmental impact and vulnerability of host systems were grouped into six categories: population control, hybridization, diseases and parasites, habitat alterations, biological effects, and management issues. Triploid grass carp can significantly alter habitat and biological resources through the secondary effects of reductions in aquatic vegetation. Potential impacts and significant uncertainties involve fish dispersions from plant control areas, inability to control vegetation loss, loss of diverse plant communities and their dependent species, and conflicts with human use of the water resource. Adequate knowledge existed to assess most potential consequences of releasing large numbers of triploid grass carp in Guntersville Reservoir, Alabama. However, the assessment of potential impacts indicated that moderate, incremental stockings combined with monitoring of vegetation and biological resources are necessary to control the effects of grass carp and achieve desirable, intermediate plant densities.

  16. Introducing Life Events in Preschool Education: Future Educators' Attitudes and Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brouskeli, Vasiliki

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to clarify future preschool teachers' attitudes and perceptions about introducing life events, such as chronic illness, hospitalisation, divorce and death to their pupils. We used semi-structured interviews for two different groups who had and had not attended relative to life events courses. Results indicated that…

  17. How Are New Behavioral Forms and Functions Introduced during Ontogenesis? Commentary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolff, Peter H.

    1991-01-01

    Comments on Thelen and Ulrich's monograph in this issue. Examines theoretical and empirical sections and findings, concluding that the authors have taken a major step forward by introducing the dynamic systems perspective to the study of behavioral coordination in infants, thus opening the way for experimental investigation of phenomena that could…

  18. Introducing and Evaluating the Behavior of Non-Verbal Features in the Virtual Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dharmawansa, Asanka D.; Fukumura, Yoshimi; Marasinghe, Ashu; Madhuwanthi, R. A. M.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research is to introduce the behavior of non-verbal features of e-Learners in the virtual learning environment to establish a fair representation of the real user by an avatar who represents the e-Learner in the virtual environment and to distinguish the deportment of the non-verbal features during the virtual learning…

  19. Characteristics of Team-Based Organization Introduced to Academic Libraries in South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoon, Hye-Young

    2005-01-01

    This study was performed to analyze characteristics of a team-based organization introduced lately to many academic libraries in South Korea. The major areas of exploration included the introduction of the team approach, team empowerment, leadership of team leaders, open communication, and the director's commitment. The study used a survey design…

  20. Improvement of internal quality of continuously cast slabs by introducing consumable vibrating macrocoolers in a mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golenkov, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The methods of controlling metal solidification by introducing consumable internal macrocoolers in the form of strips, wires, and powders are considered. The effect of this technology on the structure of continuously cast slabs is described. The results of full-scale experiments on the introduction of a steel strip as a macrocooler into the molds of continuous casters of various types are presented.

  1. Tech Upward Bound: A Program to Introduce Students to the World of Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazarro, Dominick E.

    2004-01-01

    To compete globally in the 21st century, it is important to introduce more young people to industrial technology and improve technology-related education. All citizens must understand and know how to use technology (Burris, 1998). Knowledge, expertise, and economics will determine their future success in the world's markets. This article describes…

  2. The Interns Play: A Mimetic Approach to Introducing and Working with Countertransference in Professional Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiMino, John L.

    2009-01-01

    An approach is presented that introduces the concept of countertransference to predoctoral interns and externs in a unique way during their professional training. This approach goes beyond a didactic presentation of the concept and even beyond discussion of case material in supervision. Through an experiential role-play process called Mimesis,…

  3. Bustin' Bunnies: An Adaptable Inquiry-Based Approach Introducing Molecular Weight and Polymer Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mc Ilrath, Sean P.; Robertson, Nicholas J.; Kuchta, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Plastics are more prevalent in our society than ever before, yet the general public has a limited understanding of why plastics have properties that are vastly different from other common materials such as glass and ceramics. This lab is designed to introduce students to several introductory principles of polymer science and their relation to the…

  4. Look Around You. A Primary Student Activity Book Introducing Basic Environmental Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkey, Sharon

    This activity book, designed for student use, introduces environmental concepts to the primary student. The basic concept around which the guide is developed is the idea that the environment contains many interdependent things. Water, wind, clouds, non-living objects, plants, animals, and pollution are dealt with as part of the primary student's…

  5. Higher parasite richness, abundance and impact in native versus introduced cichlid fishes.

    PubMed

    Roche, Dominique G; Leung, Brian; Franco, Edgar F Mendoza; Torchin, Mark E

    2010-11-01

    Empirical studies suggest that most exotic species have fewer parasite species in their introduced range relative to their native range. However, it is less clear how, ecologically, the loss of parasite species translates into a measurable advantage for invaders relative to native species in the new community. We compared parasitism at three levels (species richness, abundance and impact) for a pair of native and introduced cichlid fishes which compete for resources in the Panama Canal watershed. The introduced Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, was infected by a single parasite species from its native range, but shared eight native parasite species with the native Vieja maculicauda. Despite acquiring new parasites in its introduced range, O. niloticus had both lower parasite species richness and lower parasite abundance compared with its native competitor. There was also a significant negative association between parasite load (abundance per individual fish) and host condition for the native fish, but no such association for the invader. The effects of parasites on the native fish varied across sites and types of parasites, suggesting that release from parasites may benefit the invader, but that the magnitude of release may depend upon interactions between the host, parasites and the environment. PMID:20600073

  6. Designing and Evaluating Research-Based Instructional Sequences for Introducing Magnetic Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guisasola, Jenaro; Almudi, Jose Manuel; Ceberio, Mikel; Zubimendi, Jose Luis

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the didactic suitability of introducing a teaching sequence when teaching the concept of magnetic fields within introductory physics courses at the university level. This instructional sequence was designed taking into account students' common conceptions, an analysis of the course content, and the history of the development of…

  7. New Uses for a Familiar Technology: Introducing Mobile Phone Polling in Large Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voelkel, Susanne; Bennett, Daimark

    2014-01-01

    We have introduced a real-time polling system to support student engagement and feedback in four large Level 1 and 2 modules in Biological Sciences. The audience response system makes use of a technology that is ubiquitous and familiar to the students. To participate, students send text messages using their mobile phones or send a message via…

  8. ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT OF THE ZEBRA MUSSEL AND OTHER INTRODUCED AQUATIC NUISANCE SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the content of presentations and discussions held over 2 1/2 days in a plenary session and in working groups at the Environmental Protection Agency's introduced Species Workshop held in Saginaw, Michigan on Sept 26-28, 1990. he purpose of the workshop was to ...

  9. Impact of Introducing the Pneumococcal and Rotavirus Vaccines Into the Routine Immunization Program in Niger

    PubMed Central

    Assi, Tina-Marie; Rajgopal, Jayant; Norman, Bryan A.; Chen, Sheng-I; Brown, Shawn T.; Slayton, Rachel B.; Kone, Souleymane; Kenea, Hailu; Welling, Joel S.; Connor, Diana L.; Wateska, Angela R.; Jana, Anirban; Wiringa, Ann E.; Van Panhuis, Willem G.; Burke, Donald S.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated whether introducing the rotavirus and pneumococcal vaccines, which are greatly needed in West Africa, would overwhelm existing supply chains (i.e., the series of steps required to get a vaccine from the manufacturers to the target population) in Niger. Methods. As part of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation–funded Vaccine Modeling Initiative, we developed a computational model to determine the impact of introducing these new vaccines to Niger's Expanded Program on Immunization vaccine supply chain. Results. Introducing either the rotavirus vaccine or the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine could overwhelm available storage and transport refrigerator space, creating bottlenecks that would prevent the flow of vaccines down to the clinics. As a result, the availability of all World Health Organization Expanded Program on Immunization vaccines to patients might decrease from an average of 69% to 28.2% (range = 10%–51%). Addition of refrigerator and transport capacity could alleviate this bottleneck. Conclusions. Our results suggest that the effects on the vaccine supply chain should be considered when introducing a new vaccine and that computational models can help assess evolving needs and prevent problems with vaccine delivery. PMID:21940923

  10. Introducing Technology Studies in Malawi's Model Primary Schools: Towards Building a Technologically Literate Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chikasanda, Vanwyk Khobidi; Mgawi, Rabson Killion; Mtemang'ombe, Doris; Alide, Yusuf

    2015-01-01

    While the goal of the vocationalisation of school curriculum has been viewed as fallacious and mythical, many countries have continued to introduce practical subjects in schools. This paper reports on the views of three teachers involved in the development of the technology studies curriculum. The curriculum developers' views were corroborated…

  11. THE FLUID POWER INSTITUTES TESTED PROCEDURES FOR INTRODUCING EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES, 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BAYSINGER, GERALD

    TO EXPLORE NEW WAYS OF INTRODUCING EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES INTO SCHOOLS, FLUID POWER INSTITUTES WERE HELD IN 1964 AND 1965, AND THE SUCCESSFUL PROCEDURES FROM THE TWO WERE THE BASIS FOR PLANNING THE 1966 INSTITUTES HELD IN FIVE INSTITUTIONS HAVING TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS. SEVENTY-FIVE HIGH SCHOOL OR COLLEGE LEVEL TEACHERS FROM 25 STATES…

  12. THE FLUID POWER INSTITUTES--A PILOT PROGRAM FOR INTRODUCING EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BAYSINGER, GERALD

    A PILOT PROGRAM CONDUCTED TO TRAIN TEACHERS OF VOCATIONAL, TECHNICAL, OR INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION IN FLUID POWER WAS DESIGNED TO EXPLORE AND TRY OUT THE TECHNIQUES OF INTRODUCING A NEW TECHNOLOGY INTO SCHOOLS. THE PROGRAM CONSISTED OF SEVEN SUMMER INSTITUTES OFFERED AT FIVE DIFFERENT INSTITUTIONS AND PROVIDING INITIAL PREPARATION FOR 168 INSERVICE…

  13. Introducing Ethics to Chemistry Students in a "Research Experiences for Undergraduates" (REU) Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    A three-day ethics seminar introduced ethics to undergraduate environmental chemistry students in the Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program. The seminar helped students become sensitive to and understand the ethical and values dimensions of their work as researchers. It utilized a variety of resources to supplement lectures and…

  14. Introducing Case Management to Students in a Virtual World: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Joanne; Adams, Ruifang Hope

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses a small, exploratory study introducing students to case management using role-plays conducted in a virtual world. Data from pre- and posttest questionnaires (to assess self-efficacy regarding a range of case management tasks) suggest students felt more confident in their abilities after virtual role-play participation. Also…

  15. Introducing Individualization with Computer-Managed Learning: An Example from Adult Basic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahy, Patrick J.

    This report presents findings from four pilot projects introducing computer-based individualization in adult basic education programming. The report includes a description of the andragogic and developmental studies underpinnings supporting the principal project goals of responsiveness in the learning environment and choices for students. Elements…

  16. TOFIR: A Tool of Facilitating Information Retrieval - Introduce a Visual Retrieval Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jin

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a new method for the visualization of information retrieval called TOFIR (Tool of Facilitating Information Retrieval). Discusses the use of angle attributes of a document to construct the angle-based visual space; two-dimensional and three-dimensional visual tools; ambiguity; and future research directions. (Author/LRW)

  17. Periphyton responses to nutrient and atrazine mixtures introduced through agricultural runoff

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural runoff often contains pollutants with potential antagonistic impacts on periphyton, such as nutrients and atrazine. The individual influence of these pollutants on periphyton has been extensively studied, but their impact when introduced in a more realistic scenario of multiple agricult...

  18. A Comparative Study of Sequence of Instruction When Introducing Golf Skills to Beginners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraft, Robert E.

    Three instructional methods of club sequence for introducing golf skills to beginning golfers were compared: (1) full swing; (2) putter and short approach; and (3) freedom of choice. Sixty-eight male and female college students participated in golf lessons twice weekly for 12 weeks, receiving small group and individual instruction. Two forms of…

  19. Herbivory by introduced insects reduces growth and survival of Melaleuca quinquenervia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Melaleuca quinquenervia (Cav.) Blake (Myrtaceae) (melaleuca) is a native to eastern Australia and has been introduced to various locations around the world. One hundred years after its introduction into Florida, melaleuca grows spontaneously and displaces native plants as well as animals in the wetl...

  20. Solar Spots - Activities to Introduce Solar Energy into the K-8 Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longe, Karen M.; McClelland, Michael J.

    Following an introduction to solar technology which reviews solar heating and cooling, passive solar systems (direct gain systems, thermal storage walls, sun spaces, roof ponds, and convection loops), active solar systems, solar electricity (photovoltaic and solar thermal conversion systems), wind energy, and biomass, activities to introduce solar…