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Sample records for alane alh3 nanoparticles

  1. Formation of Al2H7- anions--indirect evidence of volatile AlH3 on sodium alanate using solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Felderhoff, Michael; Zibrowius, Bodo

    2011-10-14

    After more than a decade of intense research on NaAlH(4) doped with transition metals as hydrogen storage material, the actual mechanism of the decomposition and rehydrogenation reaction is still unclear. Early on, monomeric AlH(3) was named as a possible transport shuttle for aluminium, but never observed experimentally. Here we report for the first time the trapping of volatile AlH(3) produced during the decomposition of undoped NaAlH(4) by an adduct of sodium alanate and crown ether. The resulting Al(2)H(7)(-) anion was identified by solid-state (27)Al NMR spectroscopy. Based on this indirect evidence of volatile alane, we present a simple description of the processes occurring during the reversible dehydrogenation of NaAlH(4). PMID:21879065

  2. Point-defect-mediated dehydrogenation of AlH3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismer, Lars; Janotti, Anderson; Van de Walle, Chris G.

    2010-11-01

    Based on hybrid density functional calculations, we propose a microscopic mechanism for the dehydrogenation of AlH3. Our results indicate that mass transport mediated by positively charged hydrogen vacancies (VH+) is likely the rate-limiting mechanism. The calculated activation energy of 1.72 eV is in good agreement with experimental values. The high formation energy and hence low concentration of VH+ explains why AlH3 does not decompose at room temperature, although it is thermodynamically unstable. Issues of maintaining charge neutrality are addressed.

  3. Towards Direct Synthesis of Alane: A Predicted Defect-Mediated Pathway Confirmed Experimentally.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin-Lin; Herwadkar, Aditi; Reich, Jason M; Johnson, Duane D; House, Stephen D; Peña-Martin, Pamela; Rockett, Angus A; Robertson, Ian M; Gupta, Shalabh; Pecharsky, Vitalij K

    2016-09-01

    Alane (AlH3 ) is a unique energetic material that has not found a broad practical use for over 70 years because it is difficult to synthesize directly from its elements. Using density functional theory, we examine the defect-mediated formation of alane monomers on Al(111) in a two-step process: (1) dissociative adsorption of H2 and (2) alane formation, which are both endothermic on a clean surface. Only with Ti dopant to facilitate H2 dissociation and vacancies to provide Al adatoms, both processes become exothermic. In agreement, in situ scanning tunneling microscopy showed that during H2 exposure, alane monomers and clusters form primarily in the vicinity of Al vacancies and Ti atoms. Moreover, ball milling of the Al samples with Ti (providing necessary defects) showed a 10 % conversion of Al into AlH3 or closely related species at 344 bar H2 , indicating that the predicted pathway may lead to the direct synthesis of alane from elements at pressures much lower than the 10(4)  bar expected from bulk thermodynamics.

  4. Towards Direct Synthesis of Alane: A Predicted Defect-Mediated Pathway Confirmed Experimentally.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin-Lin; Herwadkar, Aditi; Reich, Jason M; Johnson, Duane D; House, Stephen D; Peña-Martin, Pamela; Rockett, Angus A; Robertson, Ian M; Gupta, Shalabh; Pecharsky, Vitalij K

    2016-09-01

    Alane (AlH3 ) is a unique energetic material that has not found a broad practical use for over 70 years because it is difficult to synthesize directly from its elements. Using density functional theory, we examine the defect-mediated formation of alane monomers on Al(111) in a two-step process: (1) dissociative adsorption of H2 and (2) alane formation, which are both endothermic on a clean surface. Only with Ti dopant to facilitate H2 dissociation and vacancies to provide Al adatoms, both processes become exothermic. In agreement, in situ scanning tunneling microscopy showed that during H2 exposure, alane monomers and clusters form primarily in the vicinity of Al vacancies and Ti atoms. Moreover, ball milling of the Al samples with Ti (providing necessary defects) showed a 10 % conversion of Al into AlH3 or closely related species at 344 bar H2 , indicating that the predicted pathway may lead to the direct synthesis of alane from elements at pressures much lower than the 10(4)  bar expected from bulk thermodynamics. PMID:27535100

  5. Towards direct synthesis of alane: A predicted defect-mediated pathway confirmed experimentally

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Lin -Lin; Herwadkar, Aditi; Reich, Jason M.; Johnson, Duane D.; House, Stephen D.; Pena-Martin, Pamela; Rockett, Angus A.; Robertson, Ian M.; Gupta, Shalabh; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    2016-08-18

    Here, alane (AlH3) is a unique energetic material that has not found a broad practical use for over 70 years because it is difficult to synthesize directly from its elements. Using density functional theory, we examine the defect-mediated formation of alane monomers on Al(111) in a two-step process: (1) dissociative adsorption of H2 and (2) alane formation, which are both endothermic on a clean surface. Only with Ti dopant to facilitate H2 dissociation and vacancies to provide Al adatoms, both processes become exothermic. In agreement, in situ scanning tunneling microscopy showed that during H2 exposure, alane monomers and clusters formmore » primarily in the vicinity of Al vacancies and Ti atoms. Moreover, ball milling of the Al samples with Ti (providing necessary defects) showed a 10 % conversion of Al into AlH3 or closely related species at 344 bar H2, indicating that the predicted pathway may lead to the direct synthesis of alane from elements at pressures much lower than the 104 bar expected from bulk thermodynamics.« less

  6. Elastic, superconducting, and thermodynamic properties of the cubic metallic phase of AlH3 via first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yong-Kai; Ge, Ni-Na; Ji, Guang-Fu; Chen, Xiang-Rong; Cai, Ling-Cang; Zhou, Su-Qin; Wei, Dong-Qing

    2013-09-01

    The lattice dynamic, elastic, superconducting, and thermodynamic properties of the high-pressure cubic metallic phase AlH3 are studied within density function theory. The calculated elastic modulus and phonon dispersion curves at various pressures indicate that the cubic phase is both mechanically and dynamically stable above 73 GPa. The superconducting transition temperature was calculated using Allen-Dynes modification of the McMillan formula based on the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory. It is found that Tc approaches a linear decrease in the low pressure range at the rate dTC/dP ≈-0.22 K/GPa but gradually decreases exponentially at higher pressure, and then it becomes 0 K upon further compression. The calculations indicate that Tc is about 2.042 K at 110 GPa, in agreement with experimental results. The soft phonon modes, especially the lowest acoustic mode, contribute almost 79% to the total electron-phonon coupling parameter sλ for cubic AlH3 at 73 GPa. However, they disappear gradually with increasing pressure, showing a responsibility for the variation of Tc. The thermodynamic properties of cubic AlH3, such as the dependence of thermal expansion coefficient αV on pressure and temperature, the specific heat capacity CP, as well as the electronic specific heat coefficient Cel, were also investigated by the quasi-harmonic approximation theory.

  7. Initial gas phase reactions between Al(CH3)3/AlH3 and ammonia: theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Lisovenko, Anna S; Morokuma, Keiji; Timoshkin, Alexey Y

    2015-01-29

    Mechanisms of initial stages of gas phase reactions between trimethylaluminum and ammonia have been explored by DFT studies. Subsequent substitution of CH3 groups in AlMe3 by amido groups and substitution of hydrogen atoms in ammonia by AlMe2 groups have been considered. Structures of Al(CH3)x(NH2)3-x, NHx(Al(CH3)2)3-x (x = 0-3) and related donor-acceptor complexes, dimerization products, and reaction pathways for the methane elimination have been obtained. The transition state for the first methane elimination from Al(CH3)3NH3 adduct is the highest point on the reaction pathway; subsequent processes are exothermic and do not require additional activation energy. In excess ammonia, subsequent methane elimination reactions may lead to formation of [Al(NH2)3]2, while in excess trimethylaluminum, formation of N(AlMe2)3 is feasible. Formation of [AlMe2NH2]2 dimer is very favorable thermodynamically. Studies on model reactions between AlH3 and NH3 indicate that reaction barriers obtained for hydrogen-substituted species may serve as an upper estimate in studying the reactivity of methyl-substituted analogues in more complex systems. PMID:25536172

  8. Reaction kinetics for the solid state synthesis of the AlH3/MgCl2 nano-composite by mechanical milling.

    PubMed

    Duan, C W; Hu, L X; Sun, Y; Zhou, H P; Yu, H

    2015-09-14

    The process of mechanical milling has been proved to be a cost-effective way to synthesize the AlH3/MgCl2 nano-composite by using MgH2 and AlCl3 as reagents. However, so far there is no comprehensive knowledge of the kinetics of this process. In an effort to predict the reaction progress and optimize the milling parameters, the kinetics of the synthesis of the AlH3/MgCl2 nano-composite by mechanical milling of MgH2 and AlCl3 is experimentally investigated in the present work. The reaction progress or the transformation fraction upon milling for different times is evaluated using the isothermal hydrogen desorption test of the as-milled samples at 220 °C, which is much lower than the threshold temperature for the de-hydriding of the reagent MgH2 but enough for the de-hydriding of the as-synthesized nano-sized AlH3. The effects of milling parameters on the reaction kinetics as well as the underlying mechanism are discussed by referring to the mechanical energy input intensity, the vial temperature and the Gibbs free energy change for the reaction. Furthermore, it is found that the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) model can well describe the kinetics theoretically. By fitting the experimental data with the JMA expression, the theoretical kinetics expressions, the equation parameters, and the activation energy are obtained.

  9. Once a physicist: Alan Pierson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-08-01

    Alan Pierson is artistic director and conductor of the New York-based contemporary-music ensemble Alarm Will Sound, and a professor of conducting at Northwestern University's Bienen School of Music in Illinois

  10. Ab initio studies on phase transition, thermoelastic, superconducting and thermodynamic properties of the compressed cubic phase of AlH3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yong-Kai; Ge, Ni-Na; Chen, Xiang-Rong; Ji, Guang-Fu; Cai, Ling-Cang; Gu, Zhuo-Wei

    2014-03-01

    The phase transition, thermoelastic, lattice dynamic, and thermodynamic properties of the cubic metallic phase AlH3 were obtained within the density-function perturbation theory. The calculated elastic modulus and phonon dispersion curves under various pressures at 0 K indicate the cubic phase is both mechanically and dynamically stable above 73 GPa. The superconducting transition temperature Tc was calculated using the Allen-Dynes modification of the McMillan formula based on BCS theory. The calculations show that Tc for the cubic phase AlH3 is 8.5 K (μ*=0.1) at the onset of this phase (73 GPa), while decreases to 5.7 K at 80 GPa and almost disappears at 110 GPa, consisting with experimental phenomenon that there was no superconducting transition observed down to 4 K over a wide pressure range 110-164 GPa. It is found that the soft phonon mode for branch 1, namely, the lowest acoustic mode, plays a crucial role in elevating the total EPC parameter λ of cubic AlH3. And the evolution of Tc with pressure follows the corresponding change of this soft mode, i.e. this mode is responsible for the disappearance of Tc in experiments. Meanwhile, the softening of this lowest acoustic mode originates from the electronic momentum transfer from M to R point. This phenomenon provides an important insight into why drastic changes in the diffraction pattern were observed in the pressure range of 63-73 GPa in Goncharenko's experiments. Specifically, once finite electronic temperature effects are included, we find that dynamical instabilities can be removed in the phonon dispersion for P ≥63 GPa, rendering the metastability of this phase in the range of 63-73 GPa, and Tc (15.4 K) becomes remarkably high under the lowest possible pressure (63 GPa) compared with that of under 73 GPa (8.5 K). Our calculations open the possibility that finite temperature may allow cubic AlH3 to be dynamically stabilized even for pressures below 73 GPa. It is reasonable to deduced that if special techniques, such as rapid decompression, quenching, and annealing, are implemented in experiments, higher Tc can be observed in hydrides or hydrogen-rich compounds under much lower pressure than ever before.

  11. Portrait of Astronaut Alan L. Bean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Portrait of Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Prime Crew Lunar Module Pilot of the Apollo 12 Lunar Landing Mission, in his space suit minus the helmet. He is standing outside beside a mock-up of the Lunar Lander.

  12. Astronaut Alan Bean shaves while aboard Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, uses battery powered shaver while in the crew quarters of the Skylab space station's Orbital Workshop (OWS) crew quarters. This photograph was taken with a 35mm Nikon camera held by one of Bean's fellow crewmen during the 56.5 day second manned Skylab mission in Earth orbit.

  13. A therapist's response to Alan Waterman.

    PubMed

    Serlin, Ilene A

    2014-01-01

    Comments on the article "The humanistic psychology-positive psychology divide: Contrasts in philosophical foundations" by Waterman (see record 2013-12501-001). Alan Waterman's article brought a useful discerning eye to the differences between humanistic and positive psychology and their different theoretical and methodological assumptions. It is important that these differences not be glossed over too quickly by those who seek complementarity or integration of the two. However, Waterman also polarized them unnecessarily, which is unfortunate.

  14. Alan Shepard At Lunar Landing Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Alan Shepard was one of 20-some astronauts who used the Lunar Landing Research Facility and its associated Lunar Excursion Module Simulator, pictured here, to practice piloting problems they would encounter in the last 150 feet of descent to the surface of the moon. Shepard was the only one of the seven original Mercury astronauts to train with the simulator and make a lunar landing. He was also the fifth man on the moon and the nations first man in space. The facility was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1985 after the National Historic Preservation Act was expanded to include aerospace sites.

  15. Obituary: Alan D. Fiala (1942-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, George

    2011-12-01

    Dr. Alan Dale Fiala, astronomer and expert on solar eclipses, died on May 26, 2010 in Arlington, Virginia, of respiratory failure after a brief illness. He was 67. Fiala had been a staff astronomer at the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington, D.C., for his entire professional career, where he rose from a position as a summer intern to become the Chief of the Nautical Almanac Office, responsible for annual publications for astronomy and navigation that are used the world over. He retired from the observatory in 2000. Although a childhood case of polio affected his mobility for the rest of his life, he seldom let his physical constraints limit his activities, which were many and varied. Alan Fiala was born in Beatrice, Nebraska on November 9, 1942, the middle son of Emil A. ("John") and Lora Marie Fiala. Fiala's father was a postal clerk and Civil Service examiner. Fiala expressed interest in astronomy at a very young age. He contracted polio when he was 9. He graduated from Beatrice High School in 1960 with a straight-A average and went on to study at Carleton College. He received his B.A. summa cum laude after three years, in 1963, with a major in astronomy and minors in physics and mathematics. He was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi, and Pi Mu Epsilon (mathematics). In 1962, Alan Fiala obtained a job as a summer intern at the Naval Observatory in Washington, working in the Nautical Almanac Office (NAO). He entered the graduate program at Yale University and continued to work summers at the observatory. He received his Ph.D. in 1968, under Gerald Clemence. His dissertation was titled "Determination of the Mass of Jupiter from a Study of the Motion of 57 Mnemosyne." After receiving his doctorate, Fiala became a permanent member of the Naval Observatory staff. Computers were just being introduced there and he participated in the automation of many procedures used to prepare the annual publications of the Nautical Almanac Office. One of his first assignments was

  16. Obituary: Alan D. Fiala (1942-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, George

    2011-12-01

    Dr. Alan Dale Fiala, astronomer and expert on solar eclipses, died on May 26, 2010 in Arlington, Virginia, of respiratory failure after a brief illness. He was 67. Fiala had been a staff astronomer at the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington, D.C., for his entire professional career, where he rose from a position as a summer intern to become the Chief of the Nautical Almanac Office, responsible for annual publications for astronomy and navigation that are used the world over. He retired from the observatory in 2000. Although a childhood case of polio affected his mobility for the rest of his life, he seldom let his physical constraints limit his activities, which were many and varied. Alan Fiala was born in Beatrice, Nebraska on November 9, 1942, the middle son of Emil A. ("John") and Lora Marie Fiala. Fiala's father was a postal clerk and Civil Service examiner. Fiala expressed interest in astronomy at a very young age. He contracted polio when he was 9. He graduated from Beatrice High School in 1960 with a straight-A average and went on to study at Carleton College. He received his B.A. summa cum laude after three years, in 1963, with a major in astronomy and minors in physics and mathematics. He was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi, and Pi Mu Epsilon (mathematics). In 1962, Alan Fiala obtained a job as a summer intern at the Naval Observatory in Washington, working in the Nautical Almanac Office (NAO). He entered the graduate program at Yale University and continued to work summers at the observatory. He received his Ph.D. in 1968, under Gerald Clemence. His dissertation was titled "Determination of the Mass of Jupiter from a Study of the Motion of 57 Mnemosyne." After receiving his doctorate, Fiala became a permanent member of the Naval Observatory staff. Computers were just being introduced there and he participated in the automation of many procedures used to prepare the annual publications of the Nautical Almanac Office. One of his first assignments was

  17. A phenomenologist's response to Alan Waterman.

    PubMed

    Morley, James

    2014-01-01

    Comments on the article "The humanistic psychology-positive psychology divide: Contrasts in philosophical foundations" by Waterman (see record 2013-12501-001). Distancing positive psychology from humanistic psychology, Alan Waterman wishes to close the conversation between the two cognate psychological paradigms. It's true that strong fences can make good neighbors, and a desire for amicable separation on the basis of irreconcilable differences is understandable. The current author believes that Waterman's gracious style is an exemplary model for respectful disagreement. However, in distancing positive psychology from humanistic psychology generally, Waterman represented phenomenology as the philosophical foundation to humanistic psychology in a way that is seriously mistaken at worst and problematic at best. Putting aside the issue of the relationship between phenomenology and humanistic psychology (as well as positive psychology), this brief commentary will limit itself to those points where Waterman invoked the term phenomenological with broad strokes that invite friendly clarification.

  18. David Alan Walker (1928-2012).

    PubMed

    Edwards, Gerald E; Heber, Ulrich

    2012-06-01

    David Alan Walker, Emeritus Professor of Biology, University of Sheffield, UK and Fellow of the Royal Society, died on February 13, 2012. David had a marvelous 60 year career as a scientist, during which he was a researcher, mentor, valued colleague, and a prolific writer in the field of photosynthesis. His career was marked by creative breakthroughs in isolation and analysis of chloroplast metabolism in vitro and simple but valuable technical advances for measurement of photosynthesis in vivo that remain relevant on a global scale to production of crops and biofuels, as well as plant responses to climate change. We include here personal remembrances by the authors (GEE and UH), and by (in alphabetical order): Zoran Cerovic (France), Bob Furbank (Australia), Geoffrey Hind (USA), John Humby (UK), Agu Laisk (Estonia), Peter Lea (UK), Ross Lilley (Australia), Barry Osmond (Australia), Simon Robinson (Australia) and Charles Stirling (UK). PMID:22638915

  19. Methods for synthesizing alane without the formation of adducts and free of halides

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Knight, Douglas A; Dinh, Long V

    2013-02-19

    A process is provided to synthesize an alane without the formation of alane adducts as a precursor. The resulting product is a crystallized .alpha.-alane and is a highly stable product and is free of halides.

  20. A parallel vectorized implementation of triple excitations in CCSD(T) - Application to the binding energies of the AlH3, AlH2F, AlHF2 and AlF3 dimers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rendell, Alistair P.; Lee, Timothy J.; Komornicki, Andrew

    1991-01-01

    An efficient method for various noniterative estimates of connected triple excitations in coupled-cluster theory is outlined and related to a similar expression occurring in Moller-Plesset perturbation theory. The method is highly vectorized and capable of utilizing multiple processors on a shared-memory machine, leading to computational rates in excess of one billion floating-point operations per second on four processors of a CRAY Y-MP. Using the new procedure, the binding energies of the D(2h) diborane-type dimers of AlH3, AlH2F, AlHF2, and AlF3 have been determined to be 32, 40, 20, and 47 kcal/mol, respectively. For Al2F6, the correlation procedure includes 232 molecular orbitals and over 1.5 x 10 to the 6th single and double coupled-cluster amplitudes, effectively accounting for over 2 x 10 to the 9th connected triple excitations.

  1. Astronaut Alan Bean works on Modular Equipment Stowage Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot for the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission, works at the Modular Equipment Stowage Assembly (MESA) on the Apollo 12 Lunar Module during the mission's first extravehicular activity, EVA-1, on November 19, 1969.

  2. Astronaut Alan Bean participates in lunar surface simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot of the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission, participates in lunar surface simulation training in bldg 29 at the Manned Spacecraft Center. Bean is strapped to a one-sixth gravity simulator.

  3. Alan Shepard Hits A Golf Ball on the Moon

    NASA Video Gallery

    Apollo 14 Commander and original Mercury astronaut Alan Shepard, the first American to fly in space, tees off on the lunar surface during his 1971 mission, with crewmate Edgar Mitchell watching and...

  4. Understanding the Scientific Enterprise: A Conversation with Alan Leshner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins-Gough, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the nature of science is even more important than mastering its details, says Alan Leshner, Chief Executive Officer of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, in an interview with Educational Leadership. In this article, Leshner discusses the controversy about teaching evolution, and he asserts that demands to…

  5. Astronaut Owen Garriott trims hair of Astronaut Alan Bean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Scientist-Astronaut Owen K. Garriott, Skylab 3 science pilot, trims the hair of Astronaut Alan L. Bean, commander, in this on-board photograph from the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS). Bean holds a vacuum hose to gather in loose hair.

  6. Astronaut Alan Bean holds Special Environmental Sample Container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot for the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission, holds a Special Environmental Sample Container filled with lunar soil collected during the extravehicular activity (EVA) in which Astronauts Charles Conrad Jr., commander, and Bean participated. Connrad, who took this picture, is reflected in the helmet visor of the lunar module pilot.

  7. Astronaut Alan Bean with subpackages of the ALSEP during EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot, traverses with the two subpackages of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) during the first Apollo 12 extravehicular activity (EVA). Bean deployed the ALSEP components 300 feet from the Lunar Module (LM). The LM and deployed erectable S-band antenna can be seen in the background.

  8. Astronaut Alan Bean deploys Lunar Surface Magnetometer on lunar surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot, deploys the Lunar Surface Magnetometer (LSM) during the first Apollo 12 extravehicular activity on the Moon. The LSM is a component of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP). The Lunar Module can be seen in the left background.

  9. Astronaut Alan Bean doing acrobatics in OWS dome area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, doing acrobatics in the dome area of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) on the space station cluster in Earth orbit. The dome area is about 22 feet in diameter and 19 feet from top to bottom.

  10. 40 Years in Applied Linguistics: An Interview with Alan Davies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunnan, Antony John

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Professor Alan Davies who was born in Wales, studied at Oxford University and Birmingham University, and taught in Scotland at the University of Edinburgh, completing 40 years this year. Professor Davies has travelled widely to give invited talks and seminars, participate in applied linguistics conferences,…

  11. Catalog of the George Alan Connor Esperanto Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Karin, Comp.; Haake, Susan, Comp.

    This catalog inventories the collection of books, monographs, serials and periodicals, dictionaries, pamphlets, ephemera, and correspondence concerning Esperanto in the collection of George Alan Connor housed at the University of Oregon Library. Overall, the catalog contains approximately 475 serial entries and 3,000 author entries. Connor was a…

  12. 77 FR 74518 - Alan T. Waterman Award Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-14

    ... Alan T. Waterman Award Committee; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee...: Name: Alan T. Waterman Award Committee, 1172. Date and Time: January 11, 2013, 8:30a.m.-1:30 p.m. Place... Alan T. Waterman Award recipient. Agenda: To review and evaluate nominations as part of the...

  13. Editors' overview for the Alan Turner Memorial volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, Hannah J.; Elton, Sarah; Schreve, Danielle

    2014-07-01

    The papers presented here, in this special volume dedicated to the memory of Alan Turner (1947-2012), provide a glimpse of the multi-faceted ways in which the mammalian fossil record can be investigated. The authors of contributions in this Special Issue are by no means an exhaustive list of his international collaborators and colleagues, and indeed, many are not represented here, but the contents cover many of the topics and issues that were of central archaeological and wider Quaternary mammalian interest to Alan. Although the papers are not intended to provide a comprehensive overview of all techniques that can be applied, the set nevertheless reveals a snapshot of the state-of-the-art and of some of the methods that have the potential to bring much more of the past to life. Alan always sought to move beyond the 'stamp-collecting' approach of simply listing which taxa were present at a site, attempting to elucidate what the presence of those animals might mean in terms of palaeoecology. In particular, the span of Alan's career has seen major advances in our understanding of Quaternary mammalian biostratigraphy and palaeobiogeography, the widespread application of novel techniques such as ancient DNA, the development of high-precision geochronology and the discovery of new hominin species. The papers presented here reflect those developments and highlight interdisciplinary approaches, from examination of sediments to careful measurements of the fossils themselves, from modelling the presence of taxa at particular points in the Quaternary to examination of the similarities and differences in fauna within and between sites.

  14. Astronaut Alan Bean assisted with egressing command module after landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot, is assisted with egressing the Apollo 12 Command Module by a U.S. Navy underwater demolition team swimmer during recovery operations in the Pacific Ocean. Already in the life raft are Astronauts Charles Conrad Jr., commander; and Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot. The Apollo 12 splashdown occured at 2:58 p.m., November 24, 1969 near American Samoa.

  15. Astronaut Alan Bean flies the Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, flies the M509 Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment in the foreward dome area of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) on the space station cluster in Earth orbit. Bean is strapped in to the back-mounted, hand-controlled Automatically Stabilized Maneuvering Unit (ASMU). This ASMU exerperiment is being done in shirt sleeves. The dome area where the experiment is conducted is about 22 feet in diameter and 19 feet from top to bottom.

  16. Astronaut Alan Bean flies the Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, flies the M509 Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment in the forward dome area of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) on the space station cluster in Earth orbit. Bean is strapped in to the back-mounted, hand-controlled Automatically Stabilized Maneuvering Unit (ASMU). This ASMU exerperiment is being done in shirt sleeves. The dome area where the experiment is conducted is about 22 feet in diameter and 19 feet from top to bottom.

  17. Astronaut Alan Bean flies the Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, flies the M509 Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment in the foreward dome area of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) on the space station cluster in Earth orbit. Bean is strapped in to the back-mounted, hand-controlled Automatically Stabilized Maneuvering Unit (ASMU). He is wearing a pressure suit for this run of the M509 experiment, but other ASMU tests are done in shirt sleeves. The dome area where the experiment is conducted is about 22 feet in diameter and 19 feet from top to bottom.

  18. Alan Stone and the ethics of forensic psychiatry: an overview.

    PubMed

    Miller, Glenn H

    2008-01-01

    In 1982, Alan Stone presented a keynote speech at the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law (AAPL) on the ethics of forensic psychiatry. That speech was sharply critical of the prevailing ethics standards and led forensic psychiatrists to study his ideas carefully. A quarter-century later, he returned to the AAPL's Annual Meeting to present his current thinking. This overview outlines the development of Stone's thought over 25 years and the dialectic among Stone and three critics: Paul Appelbaum, Ezra Griffith, and Stephen Morse. Stone is now more optimistic about the possibility of developing an ethic for forensic psychiatry.

  19. Structures and thermodynamics of the mixed alkali alanates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graetz, J.; Lee, Y.; Reilly, J. J.; Park, S.; Vogt, T.

    2005-05-01

    The thermodynamics and structural properties of the hexahydride alanates (M2M'AlH6) with the elpasolite structure have been investigated. A series of mixed alkali alanates ( Na2LiAlH6, K2LiAlH6 , and K2NaAlH6 ) were synthesized and found to reversibly absorb and desorb hydrogen without the need for a catalyst. Pressure-composition isotherms were measured to investigate the thermodynamics of the absorption and desorption reactions with hydrogen. Isotherms for catalyzed (4 mol% TiCl3 ) and uncatalyzed Na2LiAlH6 exhibited an increase in kinetics, but no change in the bulk thermodynamics with the addition of a dopant. A structural analysis using synchrotron x-ray diffraction showed that these compounds favor the Fm3¯m space group with the smaller ion (M') occupying an octahedral site. These results demonstrate that appropriate cation substitutions can be used to stabilize or destabilize the material and may provide an avenue to improving the unfavorable thermodynamics of a number of materials with promising gravimetric hydrogen densities.

  20. 77 FR 37074 - License Amendment Request From the Alan J. Blotcky Reactor Facility

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-20

    ... accordance with the NRC E-Filing rule (72 FR 49139; August 28, 2007). The E-Filing process requires... COMMISSION License Amendment Request From the Alan J. Blotcky Reactor Facility AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... is referenced. The Alan J. Blotcky Reactor Facility Decommissioning Plan and License...

  1. Sir Alan Sterling Parkes: 10 September 1900 - 17 July 1990.

    PubMed

    Polge, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    Alan Parkes was one of the most influential figures in the field of reproductive biology in the twentieth century. He had a huge impact on its growth and development during that time, and the legacy of his work still remains.His research was highly innovative and original because of his imaginative and inquiring mind, which, coupled with an entrepreneurial bent, led him into several very different fields and into unchartered waters. He played a leading role in the spectacular rise of reproductive endocrinology in Britain in the 1920s and 1930s when the nature and activity of many of the reproductive processes in animals and humans and was an essential factor in the development of methods for their control. Even more pioneering was his research in low-temperature biology in the years after World War II. This was sparked off by the discovery that glycerol had a remarkable property of protecting spermatozoa against damage during freezing and storage at very low temperatures. Far-reaching applications arose from this discovery, especially in the preservation of bull semen, which led to a worldwide revolution in artificial insemination in cattle. Later, many other cells and tissues were also successfully frozen, including red blood cells, ovarian tissue and bone marrow, and a new branch of biological science, which became known as 'cryobiology', was born, Effects of deep hypothermia, including freezing, on whole animals were also investigated at that time. Having successfully launched a new area of science, it was characteristic of Alan Parkes to switch to new fields. First he became interested in the influence of pheromones on mammalian reproduction. Then, resuming a long-standing interest in comparative aspects of reproductive physiology in British wild mammals, he became involved in the work of the Nuffield Unit of Tropical Animal Ecology in Uganda, where similar studies were carried out on African animals. Even after retirement from the academic field, he was for

  2. Astronauts Alan Bean and Charles Conrad on Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The second manned lunar landing mission, Apollo 12 launched from launch pad 39-A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on November 14, 1969 via a Saturn Five launch vehicle. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard Apollo 12 was a crew of three astronauts: Alan L. Bean, pilot of the Lunar Module (LM), Intrepid; Richard Gordon, pilot of the Command Module (CM), Yankee Clipper; and Spacecraft Commander Charles Conrad. The LM, Intrepid, landed astronauts Conrad and Bean on the lunar surface in what's known as the Ocean of Storms while astronaut Richard Gordon piloted the CM, Yankee Clipper, in a parking orbit around the Moon. Their lunar soil activities included the deployment of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP), finding the unmanned Surveyor 3 that landed on the Moon on April 19, 1967, and collecting 75 pounds (34 kilograms) of rock samples. In this photograph, one of the astronauts on the Moon's surface is holding a container of lunar soil. The other astronaut is seen reflected in his helmet. Apollo 12 safely returned to Earth on November 24, 1969.

  3. How Alan Hirsig plans to play Arco chemical's strong hand

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, D.

    1993-02-17

    With 1992 net income up 4%, to $195 million. Arco Chemical (Newtown Square, PA) held its own in a year when many of its petrochemical industry peers were mauled again. Arco Chemical president and CEO Alan R. Hirsig talked recently with CW about his growth strategies for the company, and about progress with his Manufacturing Excellence initiative, lauched in the wake of the 1990 Channelview, TX tragedy. Riding on faster growth in the Asia region, Hirsig expects to see Arco's regional sales mix shift in the next three years and sales to grow from 1992's $3.1 billion to $4 billion/year. The foundation for that growth continues to be Arco's core proprietary technology competence for making propylene oxide (PO) with coproduction and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) - the key methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) feedstock, or styrene monomer. Arco claims a 28% share of world MTBE capacity, its 78,500-bbl/day capacity. He cites Jakarta, Bangkok, Mexico City, Milan, Turin, and Athens as examples of major cities where MTBE use in reformulated fuels is getting interest. Given what he views as Europe's traditional 10-year lag on the US in areas like catalytic mufflers and unleaded gasoline, he sees significant prospects in reformulated gasoline in that region in the coming years. Arco is also testing a proprietary TBA-based hydroperoxide in diesel fuels, which improves the cetane number and cleans up exhaust emissions, winning great interest in Tokyo. Also in the fuels area, Hirsig notes interest in ethyl tert-butyl ether production - which Arco launched in the US in December on a commercial scale - in France.

  4. nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreu-Cabedo, Patricia; Mondragon, Rosa; Hernandez, Leonor; Martinez-Cuenca, Raul; Cabedo, Luis; Julia, J. Enrique

    2014-10-01

    Thermal energy storage (TES) is extremely important in concentrated solar power (CSP) plants since it represents the main difference and advantage of CSP plants with respect to other renewable energy sources such as wind, photovoltaic, etc. CSP represents a low-carbon emission renewable source of energy, and TES allows CSP plants to have energy availability and dispatchability using available industrial technologies. Molten salts are used in CSP plants as a TES material because of their high operational temperature and stability of up to 500°C. Their main drawbacks are their relative poor thermal properties and energy storage density. A simple cost-effective way to improve thermal properties of fluids is to dope them with nanoparticles, thus obtaining the so-called salt-based nanofluids. In this work, solar salt used in CSP plants (60% NaNO3 + 40% KNO3) was doped with silica nanoparticles at different solid mass concentrations (from 0.5% to 2%). Specific heat was measured by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). A maximum increase of 25.03% was found at an optimal concentration of 1 wt.% of nanoparticles. The size distribution of nanoparticle clusters present in the salt at each concentration was evaluated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and image processing, as well as by means of dynamic light scattering (DLS). The cluster size and the specific surface available depended on the solid content, and a relationship between the specific heat increment and the available particle surface area was obtained. It was proved that the mechanism involved in the specific heat increment is based on a surface phenomenon. Stability of samples was tested for several thermal cycles and thermogravimetric analysis at high temperature was carried out, the samples being stable.

  5. LEDs/ALAN-Working To Be Good Neighbors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Robert

    2015-08-01

    ALAN (Artificial Light At Night) and LEDs have recently become major discussion topics in the areas of astronomy, light pollution, endangered species and human health to mention but a few. In years past, MH, LPS and HPS dominated night lighting with LPS and its associated narrow spectrum as the preferred source around observatories and shorelines. LEDs offer the ability to modify the spectrum, realize substantial energy savings and other associated benefits while meeting the requirements of the astronomy community.The primary concern of the different groups relates to blue light content of the LED. For astronomers, the molecular (Raleigh) scattering related to the blue light interferes with certain portions of the spectrum used for deep space studies. The ecologists studying various endangered species find blue and green light can be related to declining leatherback turtle population in certain areas of the world. Other animals ranging from bats to moths and other insects are now being studied to determine the effect of the blue light spectrum on their behavior. The impact of blue light on the human circadian rhythm and vision, especially in the older population, is being extensively studied today.This presentation will discuss the spectral power distribution (SPD) of various light sources, the performance of new LED solutions and how the SPD of these new LED’s can be adapted to address some of the issues raised by various constituencies. A discussion describing why some of the metrics used to describe standard lighting are not adequate for specifying the new LED solutions with the modified spectra will be included.Today, lighting plans and implementation are all too often based on opinions and limited data. The ensuing problems and repercussions make it imperative to collect accurate and thorough information. Data collection is now ongoing using a variety of techniques analyzing the “before” and “after” lighting results from the C of HI LED streetlight

  6. Preparation of polyaniline/sodium alanate hybrid using a spray-drying process

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, B. R. E-mail: fabiopassador@gmail.com Passador, F. R. E-mail: fabiopassador@gmail.com Pessan, L. A. E-mail: fabiopassador@gmail.com

    2014-05-15

    Nowadays, hydrogen is highly interesting as an energy source, in particular in the automotive field. In fact, hydrogen is attractive as a fuel because it prevents air pollution and greenhouse emissions. One of the main problems with the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel is its on-board storage. The purpouse of this work was to develop a new hybrid material consisting of a polyaniline matrix with sodium alanate (NaAlH{sub 4}) using a spray-drying process. The polyaniline used for this experiment was synthesized by following a well-established method for the synthesis of the emeraldine base form of polyaniline using dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid as dopant. Micro particles of polyaniline/sodium alanate hybrids with 30 and 50 wt% of sodium alanate were prepared by using a spray-drying technique. Dilute solutions of polyaniline/sodium alanate were first prepared, 10g of the solid materials were mixed with 350 ml of toluene under stirring at room temperature for 24h and the solutions were dried using spray-dryer (Büchi, Switzerland) with 115°C of an inlet temperature. The hybrids were analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry, FT-IR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The addition of sodium alanate decreased the glass transition temperature of the hybrids when compared to neat polyaniline. FT-IR spectrum analysis was performed to identify the bonding environment of the synthesized material and was observed that simply physically mixture occurred between polyaniline and sodium alanate. The SEM images of the hybrids showed the formation of microspheres with sodium alanate dispersed in the polymer matrix.

  7. Thermochemistry of Alane Complexes for Hydrogen Storage: A Theoretical and Experimental Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, B.M.; Graetz, J.; Lacina, D.; Nielsen, I.M.B.; Allendorf, M.D.

    2011-03-30

    Knowledge of the relative stabilities of alane (AlH{sub 3}) complexes with electron donors is essential for identifying hydrogen storage materials for vehicular applications that can be regenerated by off-board methods; however, almost no thermodynamic data are available to make this assessment. To fill this gap, we employed the G4(MP2) method to determine heats of formation, entropies, and Gibbs free energies of formation for 38 alane complexes with NH{sub 3-n}R{sub n} (R = Me, Et; n = 0-3), pyridine, pyrazine, triethylenediamine (TEDA), quinuclidine, OH{sub 2-n}R{sub n} (R = Me, Et; n = 0-2), dioxane, and tetrahydrofuran (THF). Monomer, bis, and selected dimer complex geometries were considered. Using these data, we computed the thermodynamics of the key formation and dehydrogenation reactions that would occur during hydrogen delivery and alane regeneration, from which trends in complex stability were identified. These predictions were tested by synthesizing six amine-alane complexes involving trimethylamine, triethylamine, dimethylethylamine, TEDA, quinuclidine, and hexamine and obtaining upper limits of {Delta}G{sup o} for their formation from metallic aluminum. Combining these computational and experimental results, we establish a criterion for complex stability relevant to hydrogen storage that can be used to assess potential ligands prior to attempting synthesis of the alane complex. On the basis of this, we conclude that only a subset of the tertiary amine complexes considered and none of the ether complexes can be successfully formed by direct reaction with aluminum and regenerated in an alane-based hydrogen storage system.

  8. Presidents' Panel: A Conversation with I. King Jordan, Robert Davila, and T. Alan Hurwitz

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwald, Brian H.; Jordan, I. King; Davila, Robert; Hurwitz, T. Alan

    2014-01-01

    Former Gallaudet presidents: I. King Jordan and Robert Davila join current president T. Alan Hurwitz on a panel moderated by Brian H. Greenwald as they share their experience leading this institution of higher education and offer insight into the transformative changes brought about by the "Deaf President Now" movement.

  9. Astronaut Alan Bean deploys ALSEP during first Apollo 12 EVA on moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Apollo 12 lunar module pilot, deploys components of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) during the first Apollo 12 extravehicular activity (EVA) on the moon. The photo was made by Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., Apollo 12 commander, using a 70mm handheld Haselblad camera modified for lunar surface usage.

  10. Astronaut Alan Bean steps from ladder of Lunar Module for EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot for the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission, steps from the ladder of the Lunar Module to join Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander, in extravehicular activity on November 19, 1969. Astronaut Ricard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot, remained with the Command/Service Modules in lunar orbit.

  11. Astronaut Alan Bean looks over data acquisition camera on Skylab trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, commander for Skylab 3, the second manned Skylab mission, looks over the data acquisition camera mounted on the water tank in the upper level of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) one-G trainer at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC).

  12. Challenging the Status Quo: Alan Pifer and Higher Education Reform in Colonial Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anyanwu, Ogechi E.

    2013-01-01

    The historiography of higher education in Nigeria has not fully accounted for Alan Pifer's crucial contributions in reforming the elitist British higher education tradition in colonial Nigeria. Through qualitative analysis of mostly primary sources acquired from the Rare Book and Manuscript Library in Columbia University, this article argues that…

  13. MA-9 ASTRONAUT GORDON COOPER EXPLAINS CAMERA TO BACKUP PILOT ALAN SHEPARD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Astronaut L. Gordon Cooper explains the 16MM handheld spacecraft camera to his back-up pilot Astronaut Alan Shepard. The camera designed by J. R. Hereford, McDonnell Aircraft Corp., will be used by Cooper during the MA-9 mission.

  14. Astronaut Alan Bean reads data from book while holding teleprinter tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, reads data from book in his right hand while holding teleprinter tape in his left hand, in the ward room of the Skylab space station's Orbital Workshop (OWS) crew quarters. This photograph was taken with a 35mm Nikon camera held by one of Bean's fellow crewmen during the 56.5 day second manned Skylab mission in Earth orbit.

  15. Genome Sequences of Mycobacteriophages AlanGrant, Baee, Corofin, OrangeOswald, and Vincenzo, New Members of Cluster B

    PubMed Central

    Carbonara, Maria E.; Cioffi, Hanna M.; Cruz, Tyler; Dang, Brian Q.; Doyle, Alexander N.; Fan, Olivia H.; Gallagher, Molly; Gentile, Gabrielle M.; German, Brian A.; Farrell, Margaret E.; Gerwig, Madeline; Hunter, Kelsey L.; Lefever, Virginia E.; Marfisi, Nicole A.; McDonnell, Jill E.; Monga, Jappmann K.; Quiroz, Kevin G.; Pong, Alexandra C.; Rimple, Patrick A.; Situ, Michelle; Sohnen, Peri C.; Stockinger, Annmarie N.; Thompson, Paige K.; Torchio, Nicole M.; Toner, Chelsea L.; Ulbrich, Megan C.; Vohra, Neelam I.; Zakir, Aala; Adkins, Nancy L.; Brown, Bryony R.; Churilla, Bryce M.; Kramer, Zachary J.; Lapin, Jonathan S.; Montgomery, Matthew T.; Prout, Ashley K.; Grubb, Sarah R.; Warner, Marcie H.; Bowman, Charles A.; Russell, Daniel A.; Hatfull, Graham F.

    2015-01-01

    AlanGrant, Baee, Corofin, OrangeOswald, and Vincenzo are newly isolated phages of Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155 discovered in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. All five phages share nucleotide similarity with cluster B mycobacteriophages but span considerable diversity with Corofin and OrangeOswald in subcluster B3, AlanGrant and Vincenzo in subcluster B4, and Baee in subcluster B5. PMID:26089409

  16. Astronaut Alan Bean flies the Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment in the OWS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, flies the M509 Astronaut Maneuvering Equipment, as seen in this photographic reproduction taken from a television transmission made by a color television camera in the Orbital Workshop (OWS) of the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. Bean is strapped into the back-mounted, hand-controlled Automatically stabilized Maneuvering Unit (ASMU). The M509 exercise was in the forward dome area of the OWS. THe dome area is about 22 feet in diameter and 19 feet form top to bottom.

  17. Professor Alan Turner (1947-2012). Specialist in Miocene-Pleistocene Carnivora, particularly Felidae and Hyaenidae and their palaeoecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, Hannah; Turner, Adam; Antón, Mauricio

    2014-07-01

    Alan first trained as a telecom engineer, working for the GPO (General Post Office) which later became British Telecom. He never forgot this early training and was fascinated by how things worked - always happy to take something apart and fix it (although his attempt to close a large plate glass window with a geological hammer was not one of his successes). Following a few years as an engineer, he went to Sheffield University to study archaeology as a mature student in 1973. At this time Sheffield was a hotbed of prehistory with Graeme Barker, Robin Dennell and many others contributing to a truly research-led degree (with tutorials in the pub (well, it was the 1970s)) (Fig. 1). Alan's interest in bones developed at this time, and having graduated in 1976 he went on to take a PhD, supervised by Robin Dennell, on "Aspects of the palaeoecology of large predators, including man, during the British Upper Pleistocene, with particular emphasis on predator-prey relationships" which resulted in a life-long interest in the Carnivora and particularly hyaenas. Following his PhD, Alan moved to the Environmental Archaeology Unit at York to undertake a Science Research Council project on the morphometrics of domestic cattle and pigs from Coppergate and other major urban excavations in the city. Faced with a lot of measurements and statistics, Alan retained his interest in the animals themselves. The project also confirmed to Alan that prehistory was his metier, rather than the historic periods. Former York colleagues still fondly recall Alan's dry wit, and the day that he successfully put the irritating lab telephone beyond use with no externally visible trace of damage.

  18. Hydrogen release from sodium alanate observed by time-resolved neutron backscattering.

    PubMed

    Léon, Aline; Wuttke, Joachim

    2011-06-29

    Innermolecular motion in Na(3)AlH(6) gives rise to a Lorentzian spectrum with a wavenumber-independent width of about 1  µeV at 180 °C, which is probably due to the rotation of AlH(6) tetrahedra. There is no such quasielastic line in NaAlH(4) or NaH. Based on this finding, time-resolved measurements on the neutron backscattering spectrometer SPHERES were used to monitor the decomposition kinetics of sodium alanate, [Formula: see text] NaH. Both reaction steps were found to be accelerated by autocatalysis, most likely at the surfaces of Na(3)AlH(6) and NaH crystallites.

  19. Moral absolutism and abortion: Alan Donagan on the hysterectomy and craniotomy cases.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Terrence

    1985-07-01

    Reynolds argues that the nonconsequentialist moral theory proposed by Alan Donagan in his book The Theory of Morality (University of Chicago Press; 1977) does not resolve the cases in which craniotomy or removal of a cancerous uterus appears necessary to save the life of a pregnant woman. Donagan's absolute prohibition against the murder of the innocent and his rejection of the principle of double effect have led him to view the fetus as a pursuer or assailant or to assert the theory of proleptic agreement--that in risk taking ventures the parties may agree that killing one person to save the lives of the others will be accepted. Reynolds holds these arguments to be inapplicable in therapeutic abortions involving craniotomy or hysterectomy and concludes that Donagan's absolutist theory must be reexamined.

  20. Moral absolutism and abortion: Alan Donagan on the hysterectomy and craniotomy cases.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Terrence

    1985-07-01

    Reynolds argues that the nonconsequentialist moral theory proposed by Alan Donagan in his book The Theory of Morality (University of Chicago Press; 1977) does not resolve the cases in which craniotomy or removal of a cancerous uterus appears necessary to save the life of a pregnant woman. Donagan's absolute prohibition against the murder of the innocent and his rejection of the principle of double effect have led him to view the fetus as a pursuer or assailant or to assert the theory of proleptic agreement--that in risk taking ventures the parties may agree that killing one person to save the lives of the others will be accepted. Reynolds holds these arguments to be inapplicable in therapeutic abortions involving craniotomy or hysterectomy and concludes that Donagan's absolutist theory must be reexamined. PMID:11658636

  1. Anisotropic storage medium development in a full-scale, sodium alanate-based, hydrogen storage system

    DOE PAGES

    Jorgensen, Scott W.; Johnson, Terry A.; Payzant, E. Andrew; Bilheux, Hassina Z.

    2016-06-11

    Deuterium desorption in an automotive-scale hydrogen storage tube was studied in-situ using neutron diffraction. Gradients in the concentration of the various alanate phases were observed along the length of the tube but no significant radial anisotropy was present. In addition, neutron radiography and computed tomography showed large scale cracks and density fluctuations, confirming the presence of these structures in an undisturbed storage system. These results demonstrate that large scale storage structures are not uniform even after many absorption/desorption cycles and that movement of gaseous hydrogen cannot be properly modeled by a simple porous bed model. In addition, the evidence indicatesmore » that there is slow transformation of species at one end of the tube indicating loss of catalyst functionality. These observations explain the unusually fast movement of hydrogen in a full scale system and shows that loss of capacity is not occurring uniformly in this type of hydrogen-storage system.« less

  2. An Interview with Alan J. Hovestadt: AAMFT Past President and Long-Time Marriage and Family Counselor Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juhnke, Gerald A.; Sunich, Michael F.; Coll, Kenneth M.; Lebron-Striker, Maritza

    2009-01-01

    Alan J. Hovestadt, EdD, is the immediate past president of the 24,000 member American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) and a long-time IAMFC member who served as an IAMFC founding board member when American Counseling Association (ACA) first granted International Association of Marriage and Family Counselors (IAMFC) divisional…

  3. The Society of Brains: How Alan Turing and Marvin Minsky Were Both Right

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struzik, Zbigniew R.

    2015-04-01

    In his well-known prediction, Alan Turing stated that computer intelligence would surpass human intelligence by the year 2000. Although the Turing Test, as it became known, was devised to be played by one human against one computer, this is not a fair setup. Every human is a part of a social network, and a fairer comparison would be a contest between one human at the console and a network of computers behind the console. Around the year 2000, the number of web pages on the WWW overtook the number of neurons in the human brain. But these websites would be of little use without the ability to search for knowledge. By the year 2000 Google Inc. had become the search engine of choice, and the WWW became an intelligent entity. This was not without good reason. The basis for the search engine was the analysis of the ’network of knowledge’. The PageRank algorithm, linking information on the web according to the hierarchy of ‘link popularity’, continues to provide the basis for all of Google's web search tools. While PageRank was developed by Larry Page and Sergey Brin in 1996 as part of a research project about a new kind of search engine, PageRank is in its essence the key to representing and using static knowledge in an emergent intelligent system. Here I argue that Alan Turing was right, as hybrid human-computer internet machines have already surpassed our individual intelligence - this was done around the year 2000 by the Internet - the socially-minded, human-computer hybrid Homo computabilis-socialis. Ironically, the Internet's intelligence also emerged to a large extent from ‘exploiting’ humans - the key to the emergence of machine intelligence has been discussed by Marvin Minsky in his work on the foundations of intelligence through interacting agents’ knowledge. As a consequence, a decade and a half decade into the 21st century, we appear to be much better equipped to tackle the problem of the social origins of humanity - in particular thanks to the

  4. Neuronal Remodeling During Metamorphosis Is Regulated by the alan shepard (shep) Gene in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dahong; Qu, Chunjing; Bjorum, Sonia M.; Beckingham, Kathleen M.; Hewes, Randall S.

    2014-01-01

    Peptidergic neurons are a group of neuronal cells that synthesize and secrete peptides to regulate a variety of biological processes. To identify genes controlling the development and function of peptidergic neurons, we conducted a screen of 545 splice-trap lines and identified 28 loci that drove expression in peptidergic neurons when crossed to a GFP reporter transgene. Among these lines, an insertion in the alan shepard (shep) gene drove expression specifically in most peptidergic neurons. shep transcripts and SHEP proteins were detected primarily and broadly in the central nervous system (CNS) in embryos, and this expression continued into the adult stage. Loss of shep resulted in late pupal lethality, reduced adult life span, wing expansion defects, uncoordinated adult locomotor activities, rejection of males by virgin females, and reduced neuropil area and reduced levels of multiple presynaptic markers throughout the adult CNS. Examination of the bursicon neurons in shep mutant pharate adults revealed smaller somata and fewer axonal branches and boutons, and all of these cellular phenotypes were fully rescued by expression of the most abundant wild-type shep isoform. In contrast to shep mutant animals at the pharate adult stage, shep mutant larvae displayed normal bursicon neuron morphologies. Similarly, shep mutant adults were uncoordinated and weak, while shep mutant larvae displayed largely, although not entirely, normal locomotor behavior. Thus, shep played an important role in the metamorphic development of many neurons. PMID:24931409

  5. Developmental and environmental influences on physiology and behavior--2014 Alan N. Epstein Research Award.

    PubMed

    Tamashiro, Kellie L K

    2015-12-01

    Environmental factors acting during development of an individual may influence future health and disease susceptibility. Stressors, including altered diet, psychosocial stress, and immune challenge, during gestation can have negative consequences on the intrauterine environment and increase disease susceptibility of the developing fetus. The long-term effects on offspring have been observed in humans and include greater susceptibility to psychiatric disease, such as depression and anxiety disorders, and adverse metabolic conditions including obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Studies in my laboratory use rodent models and incorporate a multilevel approach to determine the behavioral, physiological, and neurobiological correlates of disease development as a consequence of early life stressors. The road I took in developing this research program was a rather circuitous one and navigating that path would not have been possible without the many mentors, colleagues, fellows and students who provided critical support. Although my name appears on the plaque of the Alan N. Epstein Research Award, I share this with all those I had the privilege of working with along that road, as briefly summarized in this article.

  6. From Mercury to Apollo: astronaut Alan Shepard reflects on life support and other space issues [interview by Winston Huff].

    PubMed

    Shepard, A

    1995-01-01

    Alan Shepard was one of the original Mercury astronauts. He became the first American in space on May 5, 1961, in the Freedom 7 capsule, during a 15 minute suborbital trip reaching 115 miles altitude and 302 miles down the Atlantic tracking range. Grounded by an inner ear problem, he served as Chief of the Astronaut Office for several years. After an operation to correct the problem, he commanded the Apollo 14 moon mission in 1971. He retired as a Rear Admiral in 1974. Here, Alan Shepard offers his views on life support comedies and tragedies, going back to the moon, future drivers of the manned space flight program, the benefits of the space program, joint NASA and Russia missions, how his NASA experience affected his personal life, and the profitability of working with NASA. PMID:11538588

  7. From Mercury to Apollo: astronaut Alan Shepard reflects on life support and other space issues [interview by Winston Huff].

    PubMed

    Shepard, A

    1995-01-01

    Alan Shepard was one of the original Mercury astronauts. He became the first American in space on May 5, 1961, in the Freedom 7 capsule, during a 15 minute suborbital trip reaching 115 miles altitude and 302 miles down the Atlantic tracking range. Grounded by an inner ear problem, he served as Chief of the Astronaut Office for several years. After an operation to correct the problem, he commanded the Apollo 14 moon mission in 1971. He retired as a Rear Admiral in 1974. Here, Alan Shepard offers his views on life support comedies and tragedies, going back to the moon, future drivers of the manned space flight program, the benefits of the space program, joint NASA and Russia missions, how his NASA experience affected his personal life, and the profitability of working with NASA.

  8. Elusive silane-alane complex [Si-H⋅⋅⋅Al]: isolation, characterization, and multifaceted frustrated Lewis pair type catalysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiawei; Chen, Eugene Y-X

    2015-06-01

    The super acidity of the unsolvated Al(C6F5)3 enabled isolation of the elusive silane-alane complex [Si-H⋅⋅⋅Al], which was structurally characterized by spectroscopic and X-ray diffraction methods. The Janus-like nature of this adduct, coupled with strong silane activation, effects multifaceted frustrated-Lewis-pair-type catalysis. When compared with the silane-borane system, the silane-alane system offers unique features or clear advantages in the four types of catalytic transformations examined in this study, including: ligand redistribution of tertiary silanes into secondary and quaternary silanes, polymerization of conjugated polar alkenes, hydrosilylation of unactivated alkenes, and hydrodefluorination of fluoroalkanes.

  9. Jesús Alanís and the first recording of the his bundle: the scientist and the man.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Manlio F; Moukabary, Talal; Gonzalez, Mario D

    2014-12-01

    The anatomy and physiology of the specialized conduction system has intrigued investigators since the 19th century and is still not fully understood. Dr. Wilhelm His Jr. is well known because he discovered the A-V bundle, and Dr. Sunao Tawara is rightly credited with the discovery of the atrioventricular (AV) node, but who was the first to record the electrical activity of the His bundle? This paper reviews the historical background and scientific contributions made by Dr. Jesús Alanís in the middle of the 20th century working at the National Institute of Cardiology in Mexico City. Collaborating with outstanding investigators such as Arturo Rosenblueth, Dr. Alanís recorded for the first time the electrical activity of the His bundle in the isolate canine heart. That the recorded electrogram was indeed the His bundle and not the AV node was confirmed by detailed studies that set the basis for modern clinical electrophysiology. The life and research contributions of this extraordinary man are reviewed in the context of a unique group of investigators who made significant advances in cardiac electrophysiology. PMID:25175406

  10. Jesús Alanís and the first recording of the his bundle: the scientist and the man.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Manlio F; Moukabary, Talal; Gonzalez, Mario D

    2014-12-01

    The anatomy and physiology of the specialized conduction system has intrigued investigators since the 19th century and is still not fully understood. Dr. Wilhelm His Jr. is well known because he discovered the A-V bundle, and Dr. Sunao Tawara is rightly credited with the discovery of the atrioventricular (AV) node, but who was the first to record the electrical activity of the His bundle? This paper reviews the historical background and scientific contributions made by Dr. Jesús Alanís in the middle of the 20th century working at the National Institute of Cardiology in Mexico City. Collaborating with outstanding investigators such as Arturo Rosenblueth, Dr. Alanís recorded for the first time the electrical activity of the His bundle in the isolate canine heart. That the recorded electrogram was indeed the His bundle and not the AV node was confirmed by detailed studies that set the basis for modern clinical electrophysiology. The life and research contributions of this extraordinary man are reviewed in the context of a unique group of investigators who made significant advances in cardiac electrophysiology.

  11. Materials Data on AlH3 (SG:58) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on AlH3 (SG:167) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. The reactivity of sodium alanates with O[2], H[2]O, and CO[2] : an investigation of complex metal hydride contamination in the context of automotive systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Dedrick, Daniel E.; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.

    2007-08-01

    Safe and efficient hydrogen storage is a significant challenge inhibiting the use of hydrogen as a primary energy carrier. Although energy storage performance properties are critical to the success of solid-state hydrogen storage systems, operator and user safety is of highest importance when designing and implementing consumer products. As researchers are now integrating high energy density solid materials into hydrogen storage systems, quantification of the hazards associated with the operation and handling of these materials becomes imperative. The experimental effort presented in this paper focuses on identifying the hazards associated with producing, storing, and handling sodium alanates, and thus allowing for the development and implementation of hazard mitigation procedures. The chemical changes of sodium alanates associated with exposure to oxygen and water vapor have been characterized by thermal decomposition analysis using simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry (STMBMS) and X-ray diffraction methods. Partial oxidation of sodium alanates, an alkali metal complex hydride, results in destabilization of the remaining hydrogen-containing material. At temperatures below 70 C, reaction of sodium alanate with water generates potentially combustible mixtures of H{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. In addition to identifying the reaction hazards associated with the oxidation of alkali-metal containing complex hydrides, potential treatment methods are identified that chemically stabilize the oxidized material and reduce the hazard associated with handling the contaminated metal hydrides.

  14. Laboratories, museums, and the comparative perspective: Alan A. Boyden's quest for objectivity in serological taxonomy, 1924-1962.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Bruno J

    2010-01-01

    The rise of experimentation and the decline of natural history constitute the historiographic backbone to most narratives about the history of the life sciences in the twentieth century. As I argue here, however, natural history practices, such as the collection adn comparison of data from numerous species, adn experimental practices have actually converged throughout the century, giving rise to a new hybrid research culture which is essential to the contemporary life sciences. Looking at some examples of researchers who studied experimentally the relationships between organisms offers a unique window into how the norms, values, and practices of natural history entered the laboratory and, conversely, how the norms, values, and practices of experimentation transformed natural history. this paper concentrates on a largely overlooked episode in the history of the life sciences: the development of Alan A. Boyden's serological taxonomy. In the United States, from the late 1920s to the early 1960s, he was the most prominent advocate of this experimental approach in natural history. His quest for an objective method to understand the relationships among species, his creation of a serological museum where he could apply his comparative perspective, and his continued negotiations between natural historical and experimental traditions, illustrate the rise of a new hybrid research culture in the twentieth century. It also helps us solve a historiographic puzzle, namely how biological diversity become so central in the experimental life sciences, i.e., in a tradition which we generally understand as having focused on a few model organisms, and which relegated the study of biodiversity to naturalists and their museums.

  15. Historical streamflows of Double Mountain Fork of Brazos River and water-surface elevations of Lake Alan Henry, Garza County, Texas, water years 1962-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, William H.; Vrabel, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the City of Lubbock, Texas, operates two surface-water stations in Garza County, Tex.: USGS streamflow-gaging station 08079600 Double Mountain Fork Brazos River at Justiceburg, Tex., and 08079700 Lake Alan Henry Reservoir, a water-supply reservoir about 60 miles southeast of Lubbock, Tex., and about 10 miles east of Justiceburg, Tex. The streamflow and water-surface elevation data from the two stations are useful to water-resource managers and planners in support of forecasting and water-resource infrastructure operations and are used in regional hydrologic studies.

  16. Finite size effect on hydrogen bond cooperativity in (Ala)n polypeptides: A DFT study using numeric atom-centered orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Volker; Ireta, Joel; Scheffler, Matthias

    2007-03-01

    An accurate representation of the energetic contribution Ehb of hydrogen bonds to structure formation is paramount to understand the secondary structure stability of proteins, both qualitatively and quantitatively. However, Ehb depends strongly on its environment, and even on the surrounding peptide conformation itself. For instance, a short α-helical polypeptide (Ala)4 can not be stabilized by its single hydrogen bond, whereas an infinite α-helical chain (Ala)∞ is clearly energetically stable over a fully extended conformation. We here use all-electron density functional calculations in the PBE generalized gradient approximation by a recently developed, computationally efficient numeric atom-centered orbital based code^1 to investigate this H-bond cooperativity that is intrinsic to Alanine-based polypeptides (Ala)n (n=1-20,∞). We compare finite and infinite prototypical helical conformations (α, π, 310) on equal footing, with both neutral and ionic termination for finite (Ala)n peptides. Moderately sized NAO basis sets allow to capture Ehb with meV accuracy, revealing a clear jump in Ehb (cooperativity) when two H-bonds first appear in line, followed by slower and more continuous increase of Ehb towards n->∞. ^1 V. Blum, R. Gehrke, P. Havu, V. Havu, M. Scheffler, The FHI Ab Initio Molecular Simulations (aims) Project, Fritz-Haber-Institut, Berlin (2006).

  17. Intermetallic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Dileep; Yusufoglu, Yusuf; Timofeeva, Elena; Routbort, Jules

    2015-07-14

    A process for preparing intermetallic nanoparticles of two or more metals is provided. In particular, the process includes the steps: a) dispersing nanoparticles of a first metal in a solvent to prepare a first metal solution, b) forming a reaction mixture with the first metal solution and a reducing agent, c) heating the reaction mixture to a reaction temperature; and d) adding a second metal solution containing a salt of a second metal to the reaction mixture. During this process, intermetallic nanoparticles, which contain a compound with the first and second metals are formed. The intermetallic nanoparticles with uniform size and a narrow size distribution is also provided. An electrochemical device such as a battery with the intermetallic nanoparticles is also provided.

  18. Intermetallic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Dileep; Yusufoglu, Yusuf; Timofeeva, Elena; Routbort, Jules L.

    2015-11-20

    A process for preparing intermetallic nanoparticles of two or more metals is provided. In particular, the process includes the steps: a) dispersing nanoparticles of a first metal in a solvent to prepare a first metal solution, b) forming a reaction mixture with the first metal solution and a reducing agent, c) heating the reaction mixture to a reaction temperature; and d) adding a second metal solution containing a salt of a second metal to the reaction mixture. During this process, intermetallic nanoparticles, which contain a compound with the first and second metals are formed. The intermetallic nanoparticles with uniform size and a narrow size distribution is also provided. An electrochemical device such as a battery with the intermetallic nanoparticles is also provided.

  19. Precision Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    John Hemminger

    2009-07-21

    A revolutionary technology that efficiently produces nanoparticles in uniform and prescribed sizes (1-100 nanometers) using supercritical fluids. INL researcher Robert Fox was joined by Idaho State University researchers Rene Rodriquez and Joshua Pak in d

  20. Precision Nanoparticles

    ScienceCinema

    John Hemminger

    2016-07-12

    A revolutionary technology that efficiently produces nanoparticles in uniform and prescribed sizes (1-100 nanometers) using supercritical fluids. INL researcher Robert Fox was joined by Idaho State University researchers Rene Rodriquez and Joshua Pak in d

  1. Synthesis of semiconductor nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xianfeng; Dobson, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    Here, we describe typical methods and provide detailed experimental protocols for synthesizing and processing various semiconductor nanoparticles which have potential application in biology and medicine. These include synthesis of binary semiconductor nanoparticles; core@shell nanoparticles and alloyed nanoparticles; size-selective precipitation to obtain monodisperse nanoparticles; and strategies for phase transfer of nanoparticles from organic solution to aqueous media. PMID:22791427

  2. Nanoparticle vaccines.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Seth, Arjun; Wibowo, Nani; Zhao, Chun-Xia; Mitter, Neena; Yu, Chengzhong; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology increasingly plays a significant role in vaccine development. As vaccine development orientates toward less immunogenic "minimalist" compositions, formulations that boost antigen effectiveness are increasingly needed. The use of nanoparticles in vaccine formulations allows not only improved antigen stability and immunogenicity, but also targeted delivery and slow release. A number of nanoparticle vaccines varying in composition, size, shape, and surface properties have been approved for human use and the number of candidates is increasing. However, challenges remain due to a lack of fundamental understanding regarding the in vivo behavior of nanoparticles, which can operate as either a delivery system to enhance antigen processing and/or as an immunostimulant adjuvant to activate or enhance immunity. This review provides a broad overview of recent advances in prophylactic nanovaccinology. Types of nanoparticles used are outlined and their interaction with immune cells and the biosystem are discussed. Increased knowledge and fundamental understanding of nanoparticle mechanism of action in both immunostimulatory and delivery modes, and better understanding of in vivo biodistribution and fate, are urgently required, and will accelerate the rational design of nanoparticle-containing vaccines. PMID:24295808

  3. Chemical vapor deposition of palladium thin films from Lewis base adducts of Pd(hfac)(2) and of aluminum thin films from diethylamido alanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Alec

    1999-11-01

    (N-Me-morpholine) (6) in an AACVD reactor. Deposition was found to be feed-rate limited for (3), ( 4), and (6). (5) Diethylamidoalane (8), bis(diethylamido)alane (9) and diisopropylamidoalane ( 10) were synthesized, characterized and investigated as CVD precursors for the deposition of aluminum thin films. All three alanes were characterized by 1H, 13C{1H} 14N, and 27Al NMR spectroscopy and structurally characterized in the solid-state by single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods. Chemical vapor deposition of aluminum thin films was performed with diethylamidoalane and bis(diethylamido)alane on silicon(111) substrates in a HVCVD reactor.

  4. Studies of gas phase reactions, nucleation and growth mechanisms of plasma promoted chemical vapor deposition of aluminum using dimethylethylamine alane as source percursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorr, Andreas H.

    The work presented herein focuses on the use of plasma promoted chemical vapor deposition (PPCVD) of aluminum (Al) using dimethylethylamine alane (DMEAA) as source precursor to provide an integrated, low temperature alternative to currently employed Al deposition methods in ultra large sale integration ULSI multilevel metal wiring schemes. In this respect, key findings are reported and discussed from critical scientific and technical aspects of an research and development effort, which was successfully executed to identify a viable Al CVD deposition process. In this respect, advanced atomic scale analytical techniques were successfully employed to characterize the PPCVD deposition process at the molecular level, and document the dependence of film's structural and compositional properties on key process parameters. This led to the development and optimization of a PPCVD Al process for ULSI applications. In addition, gas phase quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) was employed to study the gas phase evolution during TCVD and PPCVD in order to gain a thorough understanding of the potential chemical and physical reactions that could occur in the gas phase and derive corresponding optimized reaction pathways for both CVD processes. Key reaction mechanisms involved in thermal and plasma promoted CVD as a function of processing parameters were investigated, including the role of hydrogen plasma in providing an efficient pathway to aluminum nucleation and growth. The resulting reaction mechanisms were then employed to identify the most likely precursor decomposition pathways and explore relevant implications for thermal and plasma promoted CVD Al. Furthermore, the nucleation and growth of Al in both TCVD and PPCVD were thoroughly characterized. Time evolution studies were carried out employing a variety of relevant liners and seed layers under selected surface chemical states. The surface morphology of the resulting films were analyzed by means of scanning probe microscopy

  5. The ALAN Review. Fall 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Arthea, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Intended for junior high and high school English teachers, the articles and features in this journal focus on adolescent literature and the young adult audience. Articles in the journal discuss (1) politics as an emerging topic in young adult novels, (2) teacher attitudes and practices relevant to the use of the young adult novel in secondary…

  6. De-alloyed platinum nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Strasser, Peter; Koh, Shirlaine; Mani, Prasanna; Ratndeep, Srivastava

    2011-08-09

    A method of producing de-alloyed nanoparticles. In an embodiment, the method comprises admixing metal precursors, freeze-drying, annealing, and de-alloying the nanoparticles in situ. Further, in an embodiment de-alloyed nanoparticle formed by the method, wherein the nanoparticle further comprises a core-shell arrangement. The nanoparticle is suitable for electrocatalytic processes and devices.

  7. Nanoparticles for Biomedical Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Nune, Satish K.; Gunda, Padmaja; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Lin, Ying-Ying; Forrest, Laird M.; Berkland, Cory J.

    2009-11-01

    Background: Synthetic nanoparticles are emerging as versatile tools in biomedical applications, particularly in the area of biomedical imaging. Nanoparticles 1 to 100 nm in diameter possess dimensions comparable to biological functional units. Diverse surface chemistries, unique magnetic properties, tunable absorption and emission properties, and recent advances in the synthesis and engineering of various nanoparticles suggest their potential as probes for early detection of diseases such as cancer. Surface functionalization has further expanded the potential of nanoparticles as probes for molecular imaging. Objective: To summarize emerging research of nanoparticles for biomedical imaging with increased selectivity and reduced non-specific uptake with increased spatial resolution containing stabilizers conjugated with targeting ligands. Methods: This review summarizes recent technological advances in the synthesis of various nanoparticle probes, and surveys methods to improve the targeting of nanoparticles for their applications in biomedical imaging. Conclusion: Structural design of nanomaterials for biomedical imaging continues to expand and diversify. Synthetic methods have aimed to control the size and surface characteristics of nanoparticles to control distribution, half-life and elimination. Although molecular imaging applications using nanoparticles are advancing into clinical applications, challenges such as storage stability and long-term toxicology should continue to be addressed. Keywords: nanoparticle synthesis, surface modification, targeting, molecular imaging, and biomedical imaging.

  8. A nanoparticle in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Martynenko, Yu. V.; Nagel', M. Yu.; Orlov, M. A.

    2009-06-15

    Charge and energy fluxes onto a nanoparticle under conditions typical of laboratory plasmas are investigated theoretically. Here, by a nanoparticle is meant a grain the size of which is much smaller than both the electron Larmor radius and Debye length and the thermionic emission from which is not limited by the space charge. Under conditions at which thermionic emission plays an important role, the electric potential and temperature T{sub p} of a nanoparticle are determined by solving a self-consistent set of equations describing the balance of energy and charge fluxes onto the nanoparticle. It is shown that, when the degree of plasma ionization exceeds a critical level, the potential of the nanoparticle and the energy flux onto it increase with increasing nanoparticle temperature, so that, starting from a certain temperature, the nanoparticle potential becomes positive. The critical degree of ionization starting from which the potential of a nanoparticle is always positive is determined as a function of the plasma density and electron temperature. The nanoparticle temperature T{sub p} corresponding to the equilibrium state of a positively charged nanoparticle is found as a function of the electron density for different electron temperatures.

  9. Nanoparticle agglomerates in magnetoliposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cintra, E. R.; Ferreira, F. S.; Santos Junior, J. L.; Campello, J. C.; Socolovsky, L. M.; Lima, E. M.; Bakuzis, A. F.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetoliposomes consist of vesicles composed of a phospholipid membrane encapsulating magnetic nanoparticles. These systems have several important applications, such as in MRI contrast agents, drug and gene carriers, and cancer treatment devices. For all of these applications, controlling the number of encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles is a key issue. In this work, we used a magneto-optical technique to obtain information about the efficiency of encapsulation, the number of nanoparticles encapsulated per liposome and also about the formation of the nanoparticle structures. The parameters studied included the effect of the duration of sonication, the presence of cholesterol in the liposome membrane, as well as time-related stability. For the liposomal vesicles prepared in this work, we found between 35 and 300 nanoparticles encapsulated per liposome, depending on the experimental conditions, consisting of small linear chains of nanoparticles, basically trimers and tetramers. The methodology developed might be useful for the investigation and improvement of the properties of several magnetic nanocarrier systems.

  10. Stimulus responsive nanoparticles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Darren Robert (Inventor); Huebsch, Wade W. (Inventor); Sierros, Konstantinos A. (Inventor); Shafran, Matthew S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Disclosed are various embodiments of methods and systems related to stimulus responsive nanoparticles. In one embodiment includes a stimulus responsive nanoparticle system, the system includes a first electrode, a second electrode, and a plurality of elongated electro-responsive nanoparticles dispersed between the first and second electrodes, the plurality of electro-responsive nanorods configured to respond to an electric field established between the first and second electrodes.

  11. Stimulus Responsive Nanoparticles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Darran Robert (Inventor); Huebsch, Wade W. (Inventor); Sierros, Konstantinos A. (Inventor); Shafran, Matthew S. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Disclosed are various embodiments of methods and systems related to stimulus responsive nanoparticles. In one embodiment includes a stimulus responsive nanoparticle system, the system includes a first electrode, a second electrode, and a plurality of elongated electro-responsive nanoparticles dispersed between the first and second electrodes, the plurality of electro-responsive nanorods configured to respond to an electric field established between the first and second electrodes.

  12. Nanoparticle mediated micromotor motion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mei; Liu, Limei; Gao, Wenlong; Su, Miaoda; Ge, Ya; Shi, Lili; Zhang, Hui; Dong, Bin; Li, Christopher Y

    2015-03-21

    In this paper, we report the utilization of nanoparticles to mediate the motion of a polymer single crystal catalytic micromotor. Micromotors have been fabricated by directly self-assembling functional nanoparticles (platinum and iron oxide nanoparticles) onto one or both sides of two-dimensional polymer single crystals. We show that the moving velocity of these micromotors in fluids can be readily tuned by controlling the nanoparticles' surface wettability and catalytic activity. A 3 times velocity increase has been achieved for a hydrophobic micromotor as opposed to the hydrophilic ones. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the catalytic activity of platinum nanoparticles inside the micromotor can be enhanced by their synergetic interactions with iron oxide nanoparticles and an electric field. Both strategies lead to dramatically increased moving velocities, with the highest value reaching ∼200 μm s(-1). By decreasing the nanoparticles' surface wettability and increasing their catalytic activity, a maximum of a ∼10-fold increase in the moving speed of the nanoparticle based micromotor can be achieved. Our results demonstrate the advantages of using nanoparticles in micromotor systems.

  13. Metallic magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hernando, A; Crespo, P; García, M A

    2005-12-22

    In this paper, we reviewed some relevant aspects of the magnetic properties of metallic nanoparticles with small size (below 4 nm), covering the size effects in nanoparticles of magnetic materials, as well as the appearance of magnetism at the nanoscale in materials that are nonferromagnetic in bulk. These results are distributed along the text that has been organized around three important items: fundamental magnetic properties, different fabrication procedures, and characterization techniques. A general introduction and some experimental results recently obtained in Pd and Au nanoparticles have also been included. Finally, the more promising applications of magnetic nanoparticles in biomedicine are indicated. Special care was taken to complete the literature available on the subject.

  14. Nanoparticles for biomedical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nune, Satish K; Gunda, Padmaja; Thallapally, Praveen K; Lin, Ying-Ying; Forrest, M Laird; Berkland, Cory J

    2011-01-01

    Background Synthetic nanoparticles are emerging as versatile tools in biomedical applications, particularly in the area of biomedical imaging. Nanoparticles 1 – 100 nm in diameter have dimensions comparable to biological functional units. Diverse surface chemistries, unique magnetic properties, tunable absorption and emission properties, and recent advances in the synthesis and engineering of various nanoparticles suggest their potential as probes for early detection of diseases such as cancer. Surface functionalization has expanded further the potential of nanoparticles as probes for molecular imaging. Objective To summarize emerging research of nanoparticles for biomedical imaging with increased selectivity and reduced nonspecific uptake with increased spatial resolution containing stabilizers conjugated with targeting ligands. Methods This review summarizes recent technological advances in the synthesis of various nanoparticle probes, and surveys methods to improve the targeting of nanoparticles for their application in biomedical imaging. Conclusion Structural design of nanomaterials for biomedical imaging continues to expand and diversify. Synthetic methods have aimed to control the size and surface characteristics of nanoparticles to control distribution, half-life and elimination. Although molecular imaging applications using nanoparticles are advancing into clinical applications, challenges such as storage stability and long-term toxicology should continue to be addressed. PMID:19743894

  15. A new type of genetic regulation of allogeneic response. A novel locus on mouse chromosome 4, Alan2 controls MLC reactivity to three different alloantigens: C57BL/10, BALB/c and CBA.

    PubMed

    Havelková, H; Badalová, J; Demant, P; Lipoldová, M

    2000-12-01

    The intensity of the mixed lymphocyte response (MLR) depends on the genetic disparity between the donors of responding and stimulating cells. Differences in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and Mls1 antigens induce the strongest responses. However, even with comparable incompatibilities in MHC and Mls antigens, some strains of genetically defined mice respond remarkably better than other strains. Apparently other, so far undefined, genetic factors contribute to the magnitude of the MLR. The strain OcB-9 (H2pz) has 87.5% genes from the strain O20/A (O20) and 12.5% genes from strain B10.O20 (both H2pz). In spite of the overal similarity of their genomes, OcB-9 mice differed from O20 mice in response to three different alloantigens C57BL/10 (H2b), BALB/c (H2d) and CBA (H2k). As both O20 and OcB-9 strains carry identical haplotype H2pz, their differences in alloantigen response depend only on non-MHC genes. We analyzed the genetic basis of these strain differences using (OcB-9 x O20)F2 hybrids, and we mapped a novel locus Alan2 (Alloantigen response 2) on chromosome 4 near D4Mit72 that influences the response to all alloantigens tested. This linkage was significant for C57BL/10 and for BALB/c alloantigens (corrected P values 0.0475 and 0.0158, respectively) and highly suggestive for CBA (corrected P = 0.0661). The response to DBA/1 (H2q) alloantigens exhibited a similar pattern but the linkage was not significant. As MLR reflects the recognition phase of transplantation reaction, identification of human counterparts of the Alan genes and a better understanding of the regulation of alloresponsiveness might lead to a better prediction of patients' reactions to allografts and to a more individualized measures to prevent rejection.

  16. Nanoparticle Oscillations and Fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Lagzi, Istvan; Kowalczyk, Bartlomiej; Wang, Dawei; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    2010-09-30

    Chemical oscillations can be coupled to the dynamic self-assembly of nanoparticles. Periodic pH changes translate into protonation and deprotonation of the ligands that stabilize the nanoparticles, thus altering repulsive and attractive interparticle forces. In a continuous stirred-tank reactor, rhythmic aggregation and dispersion is observed; in spatially distributed media, propagation of particle aggregation fronts is seen.

  17. Biocompatible nanoparticles and biopolyelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zribi, Olena

    The research presented in this manuscript encompasses a merger of two research directions: a study of aqueous nanoparticle colloids and a study of biological polyelectrolytes. The majority of biomedical applications of nanoparticles require stable aqueous colloids of nanoparticles as a starting point. A new one-step method of preparation of aqueous solutions of ultra-fine ferroelectric barium titanate nanoparticles was developed and generalized to the preparation of stable aqueous colloids of semiconductor nanoparticles. This high-energy ball milling technique is low cost, environmentally friendly, and allows for control of nanoparticle size by changing milling time. Aqueous colloids of BaTiO3 nanoparticles are stable over time, maintain ferroelectricity and can be used as second harmonic generating nanoprobes for biomedical imaging. Biopolyelectrolytes exhibit a variety of novel liquid-crystalline phases in aqueous solutions where their electrolytic nature is a driving force behind phase formation. We study medically relevant mixtures of F-actin, DNA and oppositely charged ions (such as multivalent salts and antibiotic drugs) and map out phase diagrams and laws that govern phase transitions. We combine these research directions in studies of the condensation behavior in aqueous solutions of biocompatible nanoparticles and biopolyelectrolytes.

  18. Industrial applications of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Stark, W J; Stoessel, P R; Wohlleben, W; Hafner, A

    2015-08-21

    Research efforts in the past two decades have resulted in thousands of potential application areas for nanoparticles - which materials have become industrially relevant? Where are sustainable applications of nanoparticles replacing traditional processing and materials? This tutorial review starts with a brief analysis on what makes nanoparticles attractive to chemical product design. The article highlights established industrial applications of nanoparticles and then moves to rapidly emerging applications in the chemical industry and discusses future research directions. Contributions from large companies, academia and high-tech start-ups are used to elucidate where academic nanoparticle research has revolutionized industry practice. A nanomaterial-focused analysis discusses new trends, such as particles with an identity, and the influence of modern instrument advances in the development of novel industrial products.

  19. Single Nanoparticle Plasmonic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Manish; Zong, Kelly; Vivekchand, S. R. C.; Gooding, J. Justin

    2015-01-01

    The adoption of plasmonic nanomaterials in optical sensors, coupled with the advances in detection techniques, has opened the way for biosensing with single plasmonic particles. Single nanoparticle sensors offer the potential to analyse biochemical interactions at a single-molecule level, thereby allowing us to capture even more information than ensemble measurements. We introduce the concepts behind single nanoparticle sensing and how the localised surface plasmon resonances of these nanoparticles are dependent upon their materials, shape and size. Then we outline the different synthetic approaches, like citrate reduction, seed-mediated and seedless growth, that enable the synthesis of gold and silver nanospheres, nanorods, nanostars, nanoprisms and other nanostructures with tunable sizes. Further, we go into the aspects related to purification and functionalisation of nanoparticles, prior to the fabrication of sensing surfaces. Finally, the recent developments in single nanoparticle detection, spectroscopy and sensing applications are discussed. PMID:26473866

  20. Single nanoparticle plasmonic sensors.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Manish; Zong, Kelly; Vivekchand, S R C; Gooding, J Justin

    2015-01-01

    The adoption of plasmonic nanomaterials in optical sensors, coupled with the advances in detection techniques, has opened the way for biosensing with single plasmonic particles. Single nanoparticle sensors offer the potential to analyse biochemical interactions at a single-molecule level, thereby allowing us to capture even more information than ensemble measurements. We introduce the concepts behind single nanoparticle sensing and how the localised surface plasmon resonances of these nanoparticles are dependent upon their materials, shape and size. Then we outline the different synthetic approaches, like citrate reduction, seed-mediated and seedless growth, that enable the synthesis of gold and silver nanospheres, nanorods, nanostars, nanoprisms and other nanostructures with tunable sizes. Further, we go into the aspects related to purification and functionalisation of nanoparticles, prior to the fabrication of sensing surfaces. Finally, the recent developments in single nanoparticle detection, spectroscopy and sensing applications are discussed. PMID:26473866

  1. Nanoparticle approaches against bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Gao, Weiwei; Thamphiwatana, Soracha; Angsantikul, Pavimol; Zhang, Liangfang

    2014-01-01

    Despite the wide success of antibiotics, the treatment of bacterial infections still faces significant challenges, particularly the emergence of antibiotic resistance. As a result, nanoparticle drug delivery platforms including liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, dendrimers, and various inorganic nanoparticles have been increasingly exploited to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of existing antibiotics. This review focuses on areas where nanoparticle approaches hold significant potential to advance the treatment of bacterial infections. These areas include targeted antibiotic delivery, environmentally responsive antibiotic delivery, combinatorial antibiotic delivery, nanoparticle-enabled antibacterial vaccination, and nanoparticle-based bacterial detection. In each area we highlight the innovative antimicrobial nanoparticle platforms and review their progress made against bacterial infections.

  2. Nanoparticle Approaches against Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Weiwei; Thamphiwatana, Soracha; Angsantikul, Pavimol; Zhang, Liangfang

    2014-01-01

    Despite the wide success of antibiotics, the treatment of bacterial infection still faces significant challenges, particularly the emergence of antibiotic resistance. As a result, nanoparticle drug delivery platforms including liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, dendrimers, and various inorganic nanoparticles have been increasingly exploited to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of existing antibiotics. This review focuses on areas where nanoparticle approaches hold significant potential to advance the treatment of bacterial infection. These areas include targeted antibiotic delivery, environmentally responsive antibiotic delivery, combinatorial antibiotic delivery, nanoparticle-enabled antibacterial vaccination, and nanoparticle-based bacterial detection. In each area we highlight the innovative antimicrobial nanoparticle platforms and review their progress made against bacterial infections. PMID:25044325

  3. Shear thinning of nanoparticle suspensions.

    SciTech Connect

    Grest, Gary Stephen; Petersen, Matthew K.; in't Veld, Pieter J.

    2008-08-01

    Results of large scale non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations are presented for nanoparticles in an explicit solvent. The nanoparticles are modeled as a uniform distribution of Lennard-Jones particles, while the solvent is represented by standard Lennard-Jones particles. Here we present results for the shear rheology of spherical nanoparticles of size 5 to 20 times that of the solvent for a range of nanoparticle volume fractions and interactions. Results from NEMD simulations suggest that for strongly interacting nanoparticle that form a colloidal gel, the shear rheology of the suspension depends only weakly on the size of the nanoparticle, even for nanoparticles as small as 5 times that of the solvent. However for hard sphere-like colloids the size of the nanoparticles strongly affects the shear rheology. The shear rheology for dumbbell nanoparticles made of two fused spheres is also compared to spherical nanoparticles and found to be similar except at very high volume fractions.

  4. Electronically cloaked nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Wenqing

    The concept of electronic cloaking is to design objects invisible to conduction electrons. The approach of electronic cloaking has been recently suggested to design invisible nanoparticle dopants with electronic scattering cross section smaller than 1% of the physical cross section (pi a2), and therefore to enhance the carrier mobility of bulk materials. The proposed nanoparticles have core-shell structures. The dopants are incorporated inside the core, while the shell layer serves both as a spacer to separate the charge carriers from their parent atoms and as a cloaking shell to minimize the scattering cross section of the electrons from the ionized nanoparticles. Thermoelectric materials are usually highly doped to have enough carrier density. Using invisible dopants could achieve larger thermoelectric power factors by enhancing the electronic mobility. Core-shell nanoparticles show an advantage over one-layer nanoparticles, which are proposed in three-dimensional modulation doping. However designing such nanoparticles is not easy as there are too many parameters to be considered. This thesis first shows an approach to design hollow nanoparticles by applying constrains on variables. In the second part, a simple mapping approach is introduced where one can identify possible core-shell particles by comparing the dimensionless parameters of chosen materials with provided maps. In both parts of this work, several designs with realistic materials were made and proven to achieve electronic cloaking. Improvement in the thermoelectric power factor compared to the traditional impurity doping method was demonstrated in several cases.

  5. Gas Phase Nanoparticle Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granqvist, Claes; Kish, Laszlo; Marlow, William

    This book deals with gas-phase nanoparticle synthesis and is intended for researchers and research students in nanomaterials science and engineering, condensed matter physics and chemistry, and aerosol science. Gas-phase nanoparticle synthesis is instrumental to nanotechnology - a field in current focus that raises hopes for environmentally benign, resource-lean manufacturing. Nanoparticles can be produced by many physical, chemical, and even biological routes. Gas-phase synthesis is particularly interesting since one can achieve accurate manufacturing control and hence industrial viability.

  6. Magnetic nanoparticle temperature estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, John B.; Rauwerdink, Adam M.; Hansen, Eric W.

    2009-05-15

    The authors present a method of measuring the temperature of magnetic nanoparticles that can be adapted to provide in vivo temperature maps. Many of the minimally invasive therapies that promise to reduce health care costs and improve patient outcomes heat tissue to very specific temperatures to be effective. Measurements are required because physiological cooling, primarily blood flow, makes the temperature difficult to predict a priori. The ratio of the fifth and third harmonics of the magnetization generated by magnetic nanoparticles in a sinusoidal field is used to generate a calibration curve and to subsequently estimate the temperature. The calibration curve is obtained by varying the amplitude of the sinusoidal field. The temperature can then be estimated from any subsequent measurement of the ratio. The accuracy was 0.3 deg. K between 20 and 50 deg. C using the current apparatus and half-second measurements. The method is independent of nanoparticle concentration and nanoparticle size distribution.

  7. Toxicity of therapeutic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Maurer-Jones, Melissa A; Bantz, Kyle C; Love, Sara A; Marquis, Bryce J; Haynes, Christy L

    2009-02-01

    A total of six nanotherapeutic formulations are already approved for medical use and more are in the approval pipeline currently. Despite the massive research effort in nanotherapeutic materials, there is relatively little information about the toxicity of these materials or the tools needed to assess this toxicity. Recently, the scientific community has begun to respond to the paucity of information by investing in the field of nanoparticle toxicology. This review is intended to provide an overview of the techniques needed to assess toxicity of these therapeutic nanoparticles and to summarize the current state of the field. We begin with background on the toxicological assessment techniques used currently as well as considerations in nanoparticle dosing. The toxicological research overview is divided into the most common applications of therapeutic nanoparticles: drug delivery, photodynamic therapy and bioimaging. We end with a perspective section discussing the current technological gaps and promising research aimed at addressing those gaps.

  8. Aquatic environmental nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wigginton, Nicholas S; Haus, Kelly L; Hochella, Michael F

    2007-12-01

    Researchers are now discovering that naturally occurring environmental nanoparticles can play a key role in important chemical characteristics and the overall quality of natural and engineered waters. The detection of nanoparticles in virtually all water domains, including the oceans, surface waters, groundwater, atmospheric water, and even treated drinking water, demonstrates a distribution near ubiquity. Moreover, aquatic nanoparticles have the ability to influence environmental and engineered water chemistry and processes in a much different way than similar materials of larger sizes. This review covers recent advances made in identifying nanoparticles within water from a variety of sources, and advances in understanding their very interesting properties and reactivity that affect the chemical characteristics and behaviour of water. In the future, this science will be important in our vital, continuing efforts in water safety, treatment, and remediation.

  9. Theoretical Approaches to Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempa, Krzysztof

    Nanoparticles can be viewed as wave resonators. Involved waves are, for example, carrier waves, plasmon waves, polariton waves, etc. A few examples of successful theoretical treatments that follow this approach are given. In one, an effective medium theory of a nanoparticle composite is presented. In another, plasmon polaritonic solutions allow to extend concepts of radio technology, such as an antenna and a coaxial transmission line, to the visible frequency range.

  10. Introduction to metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mody, Vicky V; Siwale, Rodney; Singh, Ajay; Mody, Hardik R

    2010-10-01

    Metallic nanoparticles have fascinated scientist for over a century and are now heavily utilized in biomedical sciences and engineering. They are a focus of interest because of their huge potential in nanotechnology. Today these materials can be synthesized and modified with various chemical functional groups which allow them to be conjugated with antibodies, ligands, and drugs of interest and thus opening a wide range of potential applications in biotechnology, magnetic separation, and preconcentration of target analytes, targeted drug delivery, and vehicles for gene and drug delivery and more importantly diagnostic imaging. Moreover, various imaging modalities have been developed over the period of time such as MRI, CT, PET, ultrasound, SERS, and optical imaging as an aid to image various disease states. These imaging modalities differ in both techniques and instrumentation and more importantly require a contrast agent with unique physiochemical properties. This led to the invention of various nanoparticulated contrast agent such as magnetic nanoparticles (Fe(3)O(4)), gold, and silver nanoparticles for their application in these imaging modalities. In addition, to use various imaging techniques in tandem newer multifunctional nanoshells and nanocages have been developed. Thus in this review article, we aim to provide an introduction to magnetic nanoparticles (Fe(3)O(4)), gold nanoparticles, nanoshells and nanocages, and silver nanoparticles followed by their synthesis, physiochemical properties, and citing some recent applications in the diagnostic imaging and therapy of cancer. PMID:21180459

  11. Introduction to metallic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Mody, Vicky V.; Siwale, Rodney; Singh, Ajay; Mody, Hardik R.

    2010-01-01

    Metallic nanoparticles have fascinated scientist for over a century and are now heavily utilized in biomedical sciences and engineering. They are a focus of interest because of their huge potential in nanotechnology. Today these materials can be synthesized and modified with various chemical functional groups which allow them to be conjugated with antibodies, ligands, and drugs of interest and thus opening a wide range of potential applications in biotechnology, magnetic separation, and preconcentration of target analytes, targeted drug delivery, and vehicles for gene and drug delivery and more importantly diagnostic imaging. Moreover, various imaging modalities have been developed over the period of time such as MRI, CT, PET, ultrasound, SERS, and optical imaging as an aid to image various disease states. These imaging modalities differ in both techniques and instrumentation and more importantly require a contrast agent with unique physiochemical properties. This led to the invention of various nanoparticulated contrast agent such as magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4), gold, and silver nanoparticles for their application in these imaging modalities. In addition, to use various imaging techniques in tandem newer multifunctional nanoshells and nanocages have been developed. Thus in this review article, we aim to provide an introduction to magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4), gold nanoparticles, nanoshells and nanocages, and silver nanoparticles followed by their synthesis, physiochemical properties, and citing some recent applications in the diagnostic imaging and therapy of cancer. PMID:21180459

  12. Externally modulated theranostic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Cordula; Urban, Alexander S.; Charron, Heather; Joshi, Amit

    2013-01-01

    Externally modulated nanoparticles comprise a rapidly advancing class of cancer nanotherapeutics, which combine the favorable tumor accumulation of nanoparticles, with external spatio-temporal control on therapy delivery via optical, magnetic, or ultrasound modalities. The local control on therapy enables higher tumor treatment efficacy, while simultaneously reducing off-target effects. The nanoparticle interactions with external fields have an additional advantage of frequently generating an imaging signal, and thus such agents provide theranostic (both diagnostic and therapeutic) capabilities. In this review, we classify the emerging externally modulated theranostic nanoparticles according to the mode of external control and describe the physiochemical mechanisms underlying the external control of therapy, and illustrate the major embodiments of nanoparticles in each class with proven biological efficacy: (I) electromagnetic radiation in visible and near-infrared range is being exploited for gold based and carbon nanostructures with tunable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for imaging and photothermal therapy (PTT) of cancer, photochemistry based manipulations are employed for light sensitive liposomes and porphyrin based nanoparticles; (II) Magnetic field based manipulations are being developed for iron-oxide based nanostructures for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetothermal therapy; (III) ultrasound based methods are primarily being employed to increase delivery of conventional drugs and nanotherapeutics to tumor sites. PMID:24834381

  13. Imaging through plasmonic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tanzid, Mehbuba; Sobhani, Ali; DeSantis, Christopher J; Cui, Yao; Hogan, Nathaniel J; Samaniego, Adam; Veeraraghavan, Ashok; Halas, Naomi J

    2016-05-17

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles with plasmon resonances have been studied extensively, typically by measuring the transmission of light, as a function of wavelength, through a nanoparticle suspension. One question that has not yet been addressed, however, is how an image is transmitted through such a suspension of absorber-scatterers, in other words, how the various spatial frequencies are attenuated as they pass through the nanoparticle host medium. Here, we examine how the optical properties of a suspension of plasmonic nanoparticles affect the transmitted image. We use two distinct ways to assess transmitted image quality: the structural similarity index (SSIM), a perceptual distortion metric based on the human visual system, and the modulation transfer function (MTF), which assesses the resolvable spatial frequencies. We show that perceived image quality, as well as spatial resolution, are both dependent on the scattering and absorption cross-sections of the constituent nanoparticles. Surprisingly, we observe a nonlinear dependence of image quality on optical density by varying optical path length and nanoparticle concentration. This work is a first step toward understanding the requirements for visualizing and resolving objects through media consisting of subwavelength absorber-scatterer structures, an approach that should also prove useful in the assessment of metamaterial or metasurface-based optical imaging systems. PMID:27140618

  14. Imaging through plasmonic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanzid, Mehbuba; Sobhani, Ali; DeSantis, Christopher J.; Cui, Yao; Hogan, Nathaniel J.; Samaniego, Adam; Veeraraghavan, Ashok; Halas, Naomi J.

    2016-05-01

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles with plasmon resonances have been studied extensively, typically by measuring the transmission of light, as a function of wavelength, through a nanoparticle suspension. One question that has not yet been addressed, however, is how an image is transmitted through such a suspension of absorber-scatterers, in other words, how the various spatial frequencies are attenuated as they pass through the nanoparticle host medium. Here, we examine how the optical properties of a suspension of plasmonic nanoparticles affect the transmitted image. We use two distinct ways to assess transmitted image quality: the structural similarity index (SSIM), a perceptual distortion metric based on the human visual system, and the modulation transfer function (MTF), which assesses the resolvable spatial frequencies. We show that perceived image quality, as well as spatial resolution, are both dependent on the scattering and absorption cross-sections of the constituent nanoparticles. Surprisingly, we observe a nonlinear dependence of image quality on optical density by varying optical path length and nanoparticle concentration. This work is a first step toward understanding the requirements for visualizing and resolving objects through media consisting of subwavelength absorber-scatterer structures, an approach that should also prove useful in the assessment of metamaterial or metasurface-based optical imaging systems.

  15. Imaging through plasmonic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Tanzid, Mehbuba; Sobhani, Ali; DeSantis, Christopher J.; Cui, Yao; Hogan, Nathaniel J.; Samaniego, Adam; Veeraraghavan, Ashok; Halas, Naomi J.

    2016-01-01

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles with plasmon resonances have been studied extensively, typically by measuring the transmission of light, as a function of wavelength, through a nanoparticle suspension. One question that has not yet been addressed, however, is how an image is transmitted through such a suspension of absorber-scatterers, in other words, how the various spatial frequencies are attenuated as they pass through the nanoparticle host medium. Here, we examine how the optical properties of a suspension of plasmonic nanoparticles affect the transmitted image. We use two distinct ways to assess transmitted image quality: the structural similarity index (SSIM), a perceptual distortion metric based on the human visual system, and the modulation transfer function (MTF), which assesses the resolvable spatial frequencies. We show that perceived image quality, as well as spatial resolution, are both dependent on the scattering and absorption cross-sections of the constituent nanoparticles. Surprisingly, we observe a nonlinear dependence of image quality on optical density by varying optical path length and nanoparticle concentration. This work is a first step toward understanding the requirements for visualizing and resolving objects through media consisting of subwavelength absorber-scatterer structures, an approach that should also prove useful in the assessment of metamaterial or metasurface-based optical imaging systems. PMID:27140618

  16. Antifungal nanoparticles and surfaces.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Cristiana S O; Vidal, Maria; Ferreira, Lino S

    2010-10-11

    Nosocomial fungal infections, an increasing healthcare concern worldwide, are often associated with medical devices. We have developed antifungal nanoparticle conjugates that can act in suspension or attach to a surface, efficiently killing fungi. For that purpose, we immobilized covalently amphotericin B (AmB), a potent antifungal agent approved by the FDA, widely used in clinical practice and effective against a large spectrum of fungi, into silica nanoparticles. These antifungal nanoparticle conjugates are fungicidal against several strains of Candida sp., mainly by contact. In addition, they can be reused up to 5 cycles without losing their activity. Our results show that the antifungal nanoparticle conjugates are more fungistatic and fungicidal than 10 nm colloidal silver. The antifungal activity of the antifungal nanoparticle conjugates is maintained when they are immobilized on a surface using a chemical adhesive formed by polydopamine. The antifungal nanocoatings have no hemolytic or cytotoxic effect against red blood cells and blood mononuclear cells, respectively. Surfaces coated with these antifungal nanoparticle conjugates can be very useful to render medical devices with antifungal properties. PMID:20845938

  17. Externally modulated theranostic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Urban, Cordula; Urban, Alexander S; Charron, Heather; Joshi, Amit

    2013-08-01

    Externally modulated nanoparticles comprise a rapidly advancing class of cancer nanotherapeutics, which combine the favorable tumor accumulation of nanoparticles, with external spatio-temporal control on therapy delivery via optical, magnetic, or ultrasound modalities. The local control on therapy enables higher tumor treatment efficacy, while simultaneously reducing off-target effects. The nanoparticle interactions with external fields have an additional advantage of frequently generating an imaging signal, and thus such agents provide theranostic (both diagnostic and therapeutic) capabilities. In this review, we classify the emerging externally modulated theranostic nanoparticles according to the mode of external control and describe the physiochemical mechanisms underlying the external control of therapy, and illustrate the major embodiments of nanoparticles in each class with proven biological efficacy: (I) electromagnetic radiation in visible and near-infrared range is being exploited for gold based and carbon nanostructures with tunable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for imaging and photothermal therapy (PTT) of cancer, photochemistry based manipulations are employed for light sensitive liposomes and porphyrin based nanoparticles; (II) Magnetic field based manipulations are being developed for iron-oxide based nanostructures for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetothermal therapy; (III) ultrasound based methods are primarily being employed to increase delivery of conventional drugs and nanotherapeutics to tumor sites.

  18. Heteroaggregation of cerium oxide nanoparticles and nanoparticles of pyrolyzed biomass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heteroaggregation with indigenous particles is an important process controlling the mobility of engineered nanomaterials in the environment. We studied heteroaggregation of cerium oxide nanoparticles (n-CeO2), which are widely used commercially, with nanoparticles of pyrogenic carbonaceous material ...

  19. Book Review: The future of spacetime. Stephen William Hawking (ed.); Kip S. Thorne, Igor Novikov, Timothy Ferris, Alan Lightman, and Richard Price, W.W. Norton & Company, 2002, 224 pp., US 25.95, ISBN 0393020223

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeenk, Chris

    The study of Einstein's theory of general relativity experienced a renaissance beginning in the early 1960s. Prior to this resurgence of interest, general relativity was isolated from mainstream physics-admired for its elegance, perhaps, but only from a distance. The generation of students who risked their careers by entering this neglected field has now reached the age of festschrifts. In June of 2000, Caltech hosted "Kipfest," a conference in honor of Kip Thorne's 60th birthday. Thorne started graduate school at Princeton in 1962 and began research in general relativity under John Wheeler's guidance in the heady early days of the renaissance. Since then, he has played a prominent role in general relativity: as co-author of the influential textbook Gravitation, as a leader in research regarding astrophysical applications of Einstein's theory, and as a co-founder and chief advocate for the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), to mention a few aspects of his far-reaching work. "Kipfest" included 14 speakers discussing fields to which Thorne has contributed. But the conference also reflected Thorne's long-standing commitment to communicating science to a general audience: Igor Novikov, Stephen Hawking, Timothy Ferris, and Alan Lightman gave popular talks at "Kipfest," with Thorne himself tricked into delivering a fifth. The Future of Spacetime gathers adaptations of these five lectures, along with a lengthy introductory essay by Richard Price.

  20. MEASUREMENT OF NANOPARTICLES IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measuring nanoparticles in water differs from traditional dissolved solute measurement in several ways. The most salient difference is that nanoparticles are colloids rather than solutes and therefore are subject to the interparticle interactions (mainly electrostatic and Van de...

  1. Direct hierarchical assembly of nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Ting; Zhao, Yue; Thorkelsson, Kari

    2014-07-22

    The present invention provides hierarchical assemblies of a block copolymer, a bifunctional linking compound and a nanoparticle. The block copolymers form one micro-domain and the nanoparticles another micro-domain.

  2. Chemistry for oncotheranostic gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Trouiller, Anne Juliette; Hebié, Seydou; El Bahhaj, Fatima; Napporn, Teko W; Bertrand, Philippe

    2015-06-24

    This review presents in a comprehensive ways the chemical methods used to functionalize gold nanoparticles with focus on anti-cancer applications. The review covers the parameters required for the synthesis gold nanoparticles with defined shapes and sizes, method for targeted delivery in tumours, and selected examples of anti-cancers compounds delivered with gold nanoparticles. A short survey of bioassays for oncology based on gold nanoparticles is also presented.

  3. Evaluation of nanoparticle-ligand distributions to determine nanoparticle concentration.

    PubMed

    Uddayasankar, Uvaraj; Shergill, Ravi T; Krull, Ulrich J

    2015-01-20

    The concentration of nanoparticles in solution is an important, yet challenging, parameter to quantify. In this work, a facile strategy for the determination of nanoparticle concentration is presented. The method relies on the quantitative analysis of the inherent distribution of nanoparticle-ligand conjugates that are generated when nanoparticles are functionalized with ligands. Validation of the method was accomplished by applying it to gold nanoparticles and semiconductor nanoparticles (CdSe/ZnS; core/shell). Poly(ethylene glycol) based ligands, with functional groups that quantitatively react with the nanoparticles, were incubated with the nanoparticles at varying equivalences. Agarose gel electrophoresis was subsequently used to separate and quantify the nanoparticle-ligand conjugates of varying valences. The distribution in the nanoparticle-ligand conjugates agreed well with that predicted by the Poisson model. A protocol was then developed, where a series of only eight different ligand amounts could provide an estimate of the nanoparticle concentration that spans 3 orders of magnitude (1 μM to 1 mM). For the gold nanoparticles and semiconductor nanoparticles, the measured concentrations were found to deviate by only 7% and 2%, respectively, from those determined by UV-vis spectroscopy. The precision of the assay was evaluated, resulting in a coefficient of variation of 5-7%. Finally, the protocol was used to determine the extinction coefficient of alloyed semiconductor nanoparticles (CdSxSe1-x/ZnS), for which a reliable estimate is currently unavailable, of three different emission wavelengths (525, 575, and 630 nm). The extinction coefficient of the nanoparticles of all emission wavelengths was similar and was found to be 2.1 × 10(5) M(-1)cm(-1).

  4. Gold Nanoparticles Cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironava, Tatsiana

    Over the last two decades gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been used for many scientific applications and have attracted attention due to the specific chemical, electronic and optical size dependent properties that make them very promising agents in many fields such as medicine, imagine techniques and electronics. More specifically, biocompatible gold nanoparticles have a huge potential for use as the contrast augmentation agent in X-ray Computed Tomography and Photo Acoustic Tomography for early tumor diagnostic as well these nanoparticles are extensively researched for enhancing the targeted cancer treatment effectiveness such as photo-thermal and radiotherapy. In most biomedical applications biocompatible gold nanoparticles are labeled with specific tumor or other pathology targeting antibodies and used for site specific drug delivery. However, even though gold nanoparticles poses very high level of anti cancer properties, the question of their cytotoxicity ones they are released in normal tissue has to be researched. Moreover, the huge amount of industrially produced gold nanoparticles raises the question of these particles being a health hazard, since the penetration is fairly easy for the "nano" size substances. This study focuses on the effect of AuNPs on a human skin tissue, since it is fall in both categories -- the side effects for biomedical applications and industrial workers and users' exposure during production and handling. Therefore, in the present project, gold nanoparticles stabilized with the biocompatible agent citric acid were generated and characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The cytotoxic effect of AuNPs release to healthy skin tissue was modeled on 3 different cell types: human keratinocytes, human dermal fibroblasts, and human adipose derived stromal (ADS) cells. The AuNPs localization inside the cell was found to be cell type dependent. Overall cytotoxicity was found to be dependent

  5. Lactobacillusassisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    An eco-friendlylactobacillussp. (microbe) assisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles is reported. The synthesis is performed at room temperature. X-ray and transmission electron microscopy analyses are performed to ascertain the formation of Ti nanoparticles. Individual nanoparticles as well as a number of aggregates almost spherical in shape having a size of 40–60 nm are found.

  6. Virus templated metallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljabali, Alaa A. A.; Barclay, J. Elaine; Lomonossoff, George P.; Evans, David J.

    2010-12-01

    Plant viruses are considered as nanobuilding blocks that can be used as synthons or templates for novel materials. Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) particles have been shown to template the fabrication of metallic nanoparticles by an electroless deposition metallization process. Palladium ions were electrostatically bound to the virus capsid and, when reduced, acted as nucleation sites for the subsequent metal deposition from solution. The method, although simple, produced highly monodisperse metallic nanoparticles with a diameter of ca. <=35 nm. CPMV-templated particles were prepared with cobalt, nickel, iron, platinum, cobalt-platinum and nickel-iron.Plant viruses are considered as nanobuilding blocks that can be used as synthons or templates for novel materials. Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) particles have been shown to template the fabrication of metallic nanoparticles by an electroless deposition metallization process. Palladium ions were electrostatically bound to the virus capsid and, when reduced, acted as nucleation sites for the subsequent metal deposition from solution. The method, although simple, produced highly monodisperse metallic nanoparticles with a diameter of ca. <=35 nm. CPMV-templated particles were prepared with cobalt, nickel, iron, platinum, cobalt-platinum and nickel-iron. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional experimental detail, agarose gel electrophoresis results, energy dispersive X-ray spectra, ζ-potential measurements, dynamic light scattering data, nanoparticle tracking analysis and an atomic force microscopy image of Ni-CPMV. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00525h

  7. Nanoparticles as synthetic vaccines.

    PubMed

    Smith, Josiah D; Morton, Logan D; Ulery, Bret D

    2015-08-01

    As vaccines have transitioned from the use of whole pathogens to only the required antigenic epitopes, unwanted side effects have been decreased, but corresponding immune responses have been greatly diminished. To enhance immunogenicity, a variety of controlled release vehicles have been proposed as synthetic vaccines, but nanoparticles have emerged as particularly impressive systems due to many exciting publications. In specific, nanoparticles have been shown capable of not only desirable vaccine release, but can also be targeted to immune cells of interest, loaded with immunostimulatory substances termed adjuvants, or even induce desirable immune activating effects on their own. In the present review, recent advances in the utilization of inorganic, polymeric, and biomolecular nanoparticles as synthetic vaccines are discussed.

  8. Superbackscattering nanoparticle dimers.

    PubMed

    Liberal, Iñigo; Ederra, Iñigo; Gonzalo, Ramón; Ziolkowski, Richard W

    2015-07-10

    The theory and design of superbackscattering nanoparticle dimers are presented. We analytically derive the optimal configurations and the upper bound of their backscattering cross-sections. In particular, it is demonstrated that electrically small nanoparticle dimers can enhance the backscattering by a factor of 6.25 with respect to single dipolar particles. We demonstrate that optimal designs approaching this theoretical limit can be found by using a simple circuit model. The study of practical implementations based on plasmonic and high-permittivity particles has been also addressed. Moreover, the numerical examples reveal that the dimers can attain close to a fourfold enhancement of the single nanoparticle response even in the presence of high losses.

  9. Superbackscattering nanoparticle dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberal, Iñigo; Ederra, Iñigo; Gonzalo, Ramón; Ziolkowski, Richard W.

    2015-07-01

    The theory and design of superbackscattering nanoparticle dimers are presented. We analytically derive the optimal configurations and the upper bound of their backscattering cross-sections. In particular, it is demonstrated that electrically small nanoparticle dimers can enhance the backscattering by a factor of 6.25 with respect to single dipolar particles. We demonstrate that optimal designs approaching this theoretical limit can be found by using a simple circuit model. The study of practical implementations based on plasmonic and high-permittivity particles has been also addressed. Moreover, the numerical examples reveal that the dimers can attain close to a fourfold enhancement of the single nanoparticle response even in the presence of high losses.

  10. Nanoparticles from renewable polymers

    PubMed Central

    Wurm, Frederik R.; Weiss, Clemens K.

    2014-01-01

    The use of polymers from natural resources can bring many benefits for novel polymeric nanoparticle systems. Such polymers have a variety of beneficial properties such as biodegradability and biocompatibility, they are readily available on large scale and at low cost. As the amount of fossil fuels decrease, their application becomes more interesting even if characterization is in many cases more challenging due to structural complexity, either by broad distribution of their molecular weights (polysaccharides, polyesters, lignin) or by complex structure (proteins, lignin). This review summarizes different sources and methods for the preparation of biopolymer-based nanoparticle systems for various applications. PMID:25101259

  11. PEGylated Inorganic Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Karakoti, Ajay S.; Das, Soumya; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Seal, Sudipta

    2011-02-25

    Application of inorganic nanoparticles in diagnosis and therapy has become a critical component in targeted treatment of diseases. The surface modification of inorganic oxides is important for providing diversity in size, shape, solubility, long term stability and attachment of selective functional groups. PEGylation of surfaces is a key strategic approach for providing stealth characteristics to nanomaterials otherwise identified as foreign materials by human body. The current review describes the role of surface modification of oxides by polyethylene glycol (PEG) in providing versatile characteristics to inorganic oxide nanoparticles with a focus on their biomedical applications. The role of PEG as structure directing agent in synthesis of oxides is also captured in this short review.

  12. TOPICAL REVIEW: Biopolymeric nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundar, Sushmitha; Kundu, Joydip; Kundu, Subhas C.

    2010-02-01

    This review on nanoparticles highlights the various biopolymers (proteins and polysaccharides) which have recently revolutionized the world of biocompatible and degradable natural biological materials. The methods of their fabrication, including emulsification, desolvation, coacervation and electrospray drying are described. The characterization of different parameters for a given nanoparticle, such as particle size, surface charge, morphology, stability, structure, cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, drug loading and drug release, is outlined together with the relevant measurement techniques. Applications in the fields of medicine and biotechnology are discussed along with a promising future scope.

  13. Nanoparticles from Renewable Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurm, Frederik; Weiss, Clemens

    2014-07-01

    The use of polymers from natural resources can bring many benefits for novel polymeric nanoparticle systems. Such polymers have a variety of beneficial properties such as biodegradability and biocompatibility, they are readily available on large scale and at low cost. As the amount of fossil fuels decrease, their application becomes more interesting even if characterization is in many cases more challenging due to structural complexity, either by broad distribution of their molecular weights polysaccharides, polyesters, lignin) or by complex structure (proteins, lignin). This review summarizes different sources and methods for the preparation of biopolymer-based nanoparticle systems for various applications.

  14. Biocatalytic Single Enzyme Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; Kim, Jungbae

    2004-03-31

    As an innovative way of enzyme stabilization, we recently developed a new enzyme composite of nano-meter scale that we call "single-enzyme nanoparticles (SENs)" (9). Each enzyme molecule is surrounded with a porous composite organic/inorganic network of less than a few nanometers think. This approach represents a new type of enzyme-containing nanostructure. In experiments with perotease (chymotrypsin, CT), the activity of single enzyme nanoparticle form of the enzyme was greatly stabilized compared to the free form, without imposing a serious mass transfer limitation of substrates. In this chapter we will describe the synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of the new SENs.

  15. Nanoparticles from renewable polymers.

    PubMed

    Wurm, Frederik R; Weiss, Clemens K

    2014-01-01

    The use of polymers from natural resources can bring many benefits for novel polymeric nanoparticle systems. Such polymers have a variety of beneficial properties such as biodegradability and biocompatibility, they are readily available on large scale and at low cost. As the amount of fossil fuels decrease, their application becomes more interesting even if characterization is in many cases more challenging due to structural complexity, either by broad distribution of their molecular weights (polysaccharides, polyesters, lignin) or by complex structure (proteins, lignin). This review summarizes different sources and methods for the preparation of biopolymer-based nanoparticle systems for various applications. PMID:25101259

  16. Nanoparticles from renewable polymers.

    PubMed

    Wurm, Frederik R; Weiss, Clemens K

    2014-01-01

    The use of polymers from natural resources can bring many benefits for novel polymeric nanoparticle systems. Such polymers have a variety of beneficial properties such as biodegradability and biocompatibility, they are readily available on large scale and at low cost. As the amount of fossil fuels decrease, their application becomes more interesting even if characterization is in many cases more challenging due to structural complexity, either by broad distribution of their molecular weights (polysaccharides, polyesters, lignin) or by complex structure (proteins, lignin). This review summarizes different sources and methods for the preparation of biopolymer-based nanoparticle systems for various applications.

  17. Nanoparticle shuttle memory

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alex Karlwalter

    2012-03-06

    A device for storing data using nanoparticle shuttle memory having a nanotube. The nanotube has a first end and a second end. A first electrode is electrically connected to the first end of the nanotube. A second electrode is electrically connected to the second end of the nanotube. The nanotube has an enclosed nanoparticle shuttle. A switched voltage source is electrically connected to the first electrode and the second electrode, whereby a voltage may be controllably applied across the nanotube. A resistance meter is also connected to the first electrode and the second electrode, whereby the electrical resistance across the nanotube can be determined.

  18. Thermally stable nanoparticles on supports

    DOEpatents

    Roldan Cuenya, Beatriz; Naitabdi, Ahmed R.; Behafarid, Farzad

    2012-11-13

    An inverse micelle-based method for forming nanoparticles on supports includes dissolving a polymeric material in a solvent to provide a micelle solution. A nanoparticle source is dissolved in the micelle solution. A plurality of micelles having a nanoparticle in their core and an outer polymeric coating layer are formed in the micelle solution. The micelles are applied to a support. The polymeric coating layer is then removed from the micelles to expose the nanoparticles. A supported catalyst includes a nanocrystalline powder, thin film, or single crystal support. Metal nanoparticles having a median size from 0.5 nm to 25 nm, a size distribution having a standard deviation .ltoreq.0.1 of their median size are on or embedded in the support. The plurality of metal nanoparticles are dispersed and in a periodic arrangement. The metal nanoparticles maintain their periodic arrangement and size distribution following heat treatments of at least 1,000.degree. C.

  19. Wrapping of nanoparticles by membranes.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Amir H; Raatz, Michael; Agudo-Canalejo, Jaime; Michel, Raphael; Curtis, Emily M; Hall, Carol K; Gradzielski, Michael; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Weikl, Thomas R

    2014-06-01

    How nanoparticles interact with biomembranes is central for understanding their bioactivity. Biomembranes wrap around nanoparticles if the adhesive interaction between the nanoparticles and membranes is sufficiently strong to compensate for the cost of membrane bending. In this article, we review recent results from theory and simulations that provide new insights on the interplay of bending and adhesion energies during the wrapping of nanoparticles by membranes. These results indicate that the interplay of bending and adhesion during wrapping is strongly affected by the interaction range of the particle-membrane adhesion potential, by the shape of the nanoparticles, and by shape changes of membrane vesicles during wrapping. The interaction range of the particle-membrane adhesion potential is crucial both for the wrapping process of single nanoparticles and the cooperative wrapping of nanoparticles by membrane tubules.

  20. Biotemplated magnetic nanoparticle arrays.

    PubMed

    Galloway, Johanna M; Bramble, Jonathan P; Rawlings, Andrea E; Burnell, Gavin; Evans, Stephen D; Staniland, Sarah S

    2012-01-23

    Immobilized biomineralizing protein Mms6 templates the formation of uniform magnetite nanoparticles in situ when selectively patterned onto a surface. Magnetic force microscopy shows that the stable magnetite particles maintain their magnetic orientation at room temperature, and may be exchange coupled. This precision-mixed biomimetic/soft-lithography methodology offers great potential for the future of nanodevice fabrication.

  1. Starch nanoparticles: a review.

    PubMed

    Le Corre, Déborah; Bras, Julien; Dufresne, Alain

    2010-05-10

    Starch is a natural, renewable, and biodegradable polymer produced by many plants as a source of stored energy. It is the second most abundant biomass material in nature. The starch structure has been under research for years, and because of its complexity, an universally accepted model is still lacking (Buleon, A.; et al. Int. J. Biol. Macromol. 1998, 23, 85-112). However, the predominant model for starch is a concentric semicrystalline multiscale structure that allows the production of new nanoelements: (i) starch nanocrystals resulting from the disruption of amorphous domains from semicrystalline granules by acid hydrolysis and (ii) starch nanoparticles produced from gelatinized starch. This paper intends to give a clear overview of starch nanoparticle preparation, characterization, properties, and applications. Recent studies have shown that they could be used as fillers to improve mechanical and barrier properties of biocomposites. Their use for industrial packaging, continuously looking for innovative solutions for efficient and sustainable systems, is being investigated. Therefore, recently, starch nanoparticles have been the focus of an exponentially increasing number of works devoted to develop biocomposites by blending starch nanoparticles with different biopolymeric matrices. To our knowledge, this topic has never been reviewed, despite several published strategies and conclusions. PMID:20405913

  2. Biotemplated magnetic nanoparticle arrays.

    PubMed

    Galloway, Johanna M; Bramble, Jonathan P; Rawlings, Andrea E; Burnell, Gavin; Evans, Stephen D; Staniland, Sarah S

    2012-01-23

    Immobilized biomineralizing protein Mms6 templates the formation of uniform magnetite nanoparticles in situ when selectively patterned onto a surface. Magnetic force microscopy shows that the stable magnetite particles maintain their magnetic orientation at room temperature, and may be exchange coupled. This precision-mixed biomimetic/soft-lithography methodology offers great potential for the future of nanodevice fabrication. PMID:22052737

  3. Nanoparticles as biochemical sensors

    PubMed Central

    El-Ansary, Afaf; Faddah, Layla M

    2010-01-01

    There is little doubt that nanoparticles offer real and new opportunities in many fields, such as biomedicine and materials science. Such particles are small enough to enter almost all areas of the body, including cells and organelles, potentially leading to new approaches in nanomedicine. Sensors for small molecules of biochemical interest are of critical importance. This review is an attempt to trace the use of nanomaterials in biochemical sensor design. The possibility of using nanoparticles functionalized with antibodies as markers for proteins will be elucidated. Moreover, capabilities and applications for nanoparticles based on gold, silver, magnetic, and semiconductor materials (quantum dots), used in optical (absorbance, luminescence, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, surface plasmon resonance), electrochemical, and mass-sensitive sensors will be highlighted. The unique ability of nanosensors to improve the analysis of biochemical fluids is discussed either through considering the use of nanoparticles for in vitro molecular diagnosis, or in the biological/biochemical analysis for in vivo interaction with the human body. PMID:24198472

  4. Nanoparticles for celllabeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhirde, Ashwinkumar; Xie, Jin; Swierczewska, Maggie; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2011-01-01

    Cell based therapeutics are emerging as powerful regimens. To better understand the migration and proliferation mechanisms of implanted cells, a means to track cells in living subjects is essential, and to achieve that, a number of celllabeling techniques have been developed. Nanoparticles, with their superior physical properties, have become the materials of choice in many investigations along this line. Owing to inherent magnetic, optical or acoustic attributes, these nanoparticles can be detected by corresponding imaging modalities in living subjects at a high spatial and temporal resolution. These features allow implanted cells to be separated from host cells; and have advantages over traditional histological methods, as they permit non-invasive, real-time tracking in vivo. This review attempts to give a summary of progress in using nanotechnology to monitor cell trafficking. We will focus on direct celllabeling techniques, in which cells ingest nanoparticles that bear traceable signals, such as iron oxide or quantum dots. Ferritin and MagA reporter genes that can package endogenous iron or iron supplement into iron oxide nanoparticles will also be discussed.

  5. Asymmetric Hybrid Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Chumanov, George

    2015-11-05

    Hybrid Nanoparticles (AHNs) are rationally-designed multifunctional nanostructures and novel building blocks for the next generation of advanced materials and devices. Nanoscale materials attract considerable interest because of their unusual properties and potential for practical applications. Most of the activity in this field is focused on the synthesis of homogeneous nanoparticles from metals, metal oxides, semiconductors, and polymers. It is well recognized that properties of nanoparticles can be further enhanced if they are made as hybrid structures. This program is concerned with the synthesis, characterization, and application of such hybrid structures termed AHNs. AHNs are composed of a homogeneous core and several caps of different materials deposited on its surface (Fig. 1). Combined properties of the core and the caps as well as new properties that arise from core-cap and cap-cap interactions render AHNs multifunctional. In addition, specific chemical reactivity of the caps enables directional self-assembly of AHNs into complex architectures that are not possible with only spherical nanoparticles.

  6. Nanoparticles in forensic science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantu, Antonio A.

    2008-10-01

    Nanoparticles appear in several areas of forensic science including security documents, paints, inks, and reagents that develop latent prints. One reagent (known as the silver physical developer) that visualizes the water insoluble components of latent print residue is based on the formation of highly charged silver nanoparticles. These attach to and grow on the residue and generate a silver image. Another such reagent involves highly charged gold nanoparticles. These attach to the residue forming a weak gold image which can be amplified with a silver physical developer. Nanoparaticles are also used in items such as paints, printing inks, and writing inks. Paints and most printing inks consist of nano-sized pigments in a vehicle. However, certain modern ink jet printing inks now contain nano-sized pigments to improve their light fastness and most gel inks are also based on nano scale pigments. These nanoparticlecontaining materials often appear as evidence and are thus subject to forensic characterization. Both luminescent (quantum dots), up-converting nano scale phosphors, and non luminescent nanoparticles are used as security tags to label product, add security to documents, and as anti counterfeiting measures. These assist in determining if an item is fraudulently made.

  7. Toxicity of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zoroddu, Maria Antonietta; Medici, Serenella; Ledda, Alessia; Nurchi, Valeria Marina; Lachowicz, Joanna I; Peana, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays more than thousands of different nanoparticles are known, though no well-defined guidelines to evaluate their potential toxicity and to control their exposure are fully provided. The way of entry of nanoparticles together with their specificities such as chemistry, chemical composition, size, shape or morphology, surface charge and area can influence their biological activities and effects. A specific property may give rise to either a safe particle or to a dangerous one. The small size allows nanoparticles to enter the body by crossing several barriers, to pass into the blood stream and lymphatic system from where they can reach organs and tissues and strictly interact with biological structures, thus damaging their normal functions in different ways. This review provides a summary of what is known on the toxicology related to the specificity of nanoparticles, both as technological tools or ambient pollutants. The aim is to highlight their potential hazard and to provide a balanced update on all the important questions and directions that should be focused in the near future.

  8. DNA templated magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsella, Joseph M.

    Recent discoveries in nanoscience are predicted to potentially revolutionize future technologies in an extensive number of fields. These developments are contingent upon discovering new and often unconventional methods to synthesize and control nanoscale components. Nature provides several examples of working nanotechnology such as the use of programmed self assembly to build and deconstruct complex molecular systems. We have adopted a method to control the one dimensional assembly of magnetic nanoparticles using DNA as a scaffold molecule. With this method we have demonstrated the ability to organize 5 nm particles into chains that stretch up to ˜20 mum in length. One advantage of using DNA compared is the ability of the molecule to interact with other biomolecules. After assembling particles onto DNA we have been able to cleave the molecule into smaller fragments using restriction enzymes. Using ligase enzymes we have re-connected these fragments, coated with either gold or iron oxide, to form long one-dimensional arrangements of the two different types of nanoparticles on a single molecular guide. We have also created a sensitive magnetic field sensor by incorporating magnetic nanoparticle coated DNA strands with microfabricated electrodes. The IV characteristics of the aligned nanoparticles are dependant on the magnitude of an externally applied magnetic field. This transport phenomenon known as tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) shows room temperature resistance of our devices over 80% for cobalt ferrite coated DNA when a field of 20 kOe is applied. In comparison, studies using two dimensional nanoparticle films of irox oxides xii only exhibit a 35% MR effect. Confinement into one dimension using the DNA guide produces a TMR mechanism which produces significant increases in magnetoresistance. This property can be utilized for applications in magnetic field sensing, data storage, and logic elements.

  9. Magnetoacoustic Sensing of Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kellnberger, Stephan; Rosenthal, Amir; Myklatun, Ahne; Westmeyer, Gil G; Sergiadis, George; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-03-11

    The interaction of magnetic nanoparticles and electromagnetic fields can be determined through electrical signal induction in coils due to magnetization. However, the direct measurement of instant electromagnetic energy absorption by magnetic nanoparticles, as it relates to particle characterization or magnetic hyperthermia studies, has not been possible so far. We introduce the theory of magnetoacoustics, predicting the existence of second harmonic pressure waves from magnetic nanoparticles due to energy absorption from continuously modulated alternating magnetic fields. We then describe the first magnetoacoustic system reported, based on a fiber-interferometer pressure detector, necessary for avoiding electric interference. The magnetoacoustic system confirmed the existence of previously unobserved second harmonic magnetoacoustic responses from solids, magnetic nanoparticles, and nanoparticle-loaded cells, exposed to continuous wave magnetic fields at different frequencies. We discuss how magnetoacoustic signals can be employed as a nanoparticle or magnetic field sensor for biomedical and environmental applications.

  10. Progress toward clonable inorganic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Thomas W.; Staicu, Lucian C.; Nemeth, Richard S.; Schwartz, Cindi L.; Crawford, David; Seligman, Jeffrey D.; Hunter, William J.; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A. H.; Ackerson, Christopher J.

    2015-10-01

    Pseudomonas moraviensis stanleyae was recently isolated from the roots of the selenium (Se) hyperaccumulator plant Stanleya pinnata. This bacterium tolerates normally lethal concentrations of SeO32- in liquid culture, where it also produces Se nanoparticles. Structure and cellular ultrastructure of the Se nanoparticles as determined by cellular electron tomography shows the nanoparticles as intracellular, of narrow dispersity, symmetrically irregular and without any observable membrane or structured protein shell. Protein mass spectrometry of a fractionated soluble cytosolic material with selenite reducing capability identified nitrite reductase and glutathione reductase homologues as NADPH dependent candidate enzymes for the reduction of selenite to zerovalent Se nanoparticles. In vitro experiments with commercially sourced glutathione reductase revealed that the enzyme can reduce SeO32- (selenite) to Se nanoparticles in an NADPH-dependent process. The disappearance of the enzyme as determined by protein assay during nanoparticle formation suggests that glutathione reductase is associated with or possibly entombed in the nanoparticles whose formation it catalyzes. Chemically dissolving the nanoparticles releases the enzyme. The size of the nanoparticles varies with SeO32- concentration, varying in size form 5 nm diameter when formed at 1.0 μM [SeO32-] to 50 nm maximum diameter when formed at 100 μM [SeO32-]. In aggregate, we suggest that glutathione reductase possesses the key attributes of a clonable nanoparticle system: ion reduction, nanoparticle retention and size control of the nanoparticle at the enzyme site.Pseudomonas moraviensis stanleyae was recently isolated from the roots of the selenium (Se) hyperaccumulator plant Stanleya pinnata. This bacterium tolerates normally lethal concentrations of SeO32- in liquid culture, where it also produces Se nanoparticles. Structure and cellular ultrastructure of the Se nanoparticles as determined by cellular

  11. Magnetoacoustic Sensing of Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kellnberger, Stephan; Rosenthal, Amir; Myklatun, Ahne; Westmeyer, Gil G; Sergiadis, George; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-03-11

    The interaction of magnetic nanoparticles and electromagnetic fields can be determined through electrical signal induction in coils due to magnetization. However, the direct measurement of instant electromagnetic energy absorption by magnetic nanoparticles, as it relates to particle characterization or magnetic hyperthermia studies, has not been possible so far. We introduce the theory of magnetoacoustics, predicting the existence of second harmonic pressure waves from magnetic nanoparticles due to energy absorption from continuously modulated alternating magnetic fields. We then describe the first magnetoacoustic system reported, based on a fiber-interferometer pressure detector, necessary for avoiding electric interference. The magnetoacoustic system confirmed the existence of previously unobserved second harmonic magnetoacoustic responses from solids, magnetic nanoparticles, and nanoparticle-loaded cells, exposed to continuous wave magnetic fields at different frequencies. We discuss how magnetoacoustic signals can be employed as a nanoparticle or magnetic field sensor for biomedical and environmental applications. PMID:27015511

  12. Harnessing nanoparticles for immune modulation

    PubMed Central

    Getts, Daniel R.; Shea, Lonnie D; Miller, Stephen D.; King, Nicholas J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Recent approaches using nanoparticles engineered for immune regulation have yielded promising results in preclinical models of disease. The number of nanoparticle therapies is growing, fueled by innovations in nanotechnology and advances in understanding of the underlying pathogenesis of immune-mediated diseases. In particular, recent mechanistic insight into the ways in which nanoparticles interact with the mononuclear phagocyte system and impact its function during homeostasis and inflammation have highlighted the potential of nanoparticle-based therapies for controlling severe inflammation while concurrently restoring peripheral immune tolerance in autoimmune disease. Here we review recent advances in nanoparticle-based approaches aimed at immune-modulation, and discuss these in the context of concepts in polymeric nanoparticle development, including particle modification, delivery and the factors associated with successful clinical deployment. PMID:26088391

  13. The ALAN Review. Volume 8, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, W. Geiger, Ed.; Ward, Dan, Ed.

    1980-01-01

    The articles in this journal issue focus on adolescent literature. Topics covered in the articles include: (1) teaching adolescent literature about minorities to majority group students, (2) death in adolescent literature, (3) trends in German youth literature, and (4) female identity in the young adult novel. In addition, the journal issue…

  14. The ALAN Review. Volume 9, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, W. Geiger, Ed.; Ward, Dan, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    The articles in this journal issue focus on adolescent literature. In the first article, author Sue Ellen Bridgers explains how she writes books, while the second article offers an analysis of the recent works of Paul Zindel. The third article presents a discussion of the treatment of outsiders, such as the mentally ill, in four Roy Brown…

  15. Nanoparticles for Detection and Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Agasti, Sarit S.; Rana, Subinoy; Park, Myoung-Hwan; Kim, Chae Kyu; You, Chang-Cheng; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2009-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based platforms for identification of chemical and biological agents offer substantial benefits to biomedical and environmental science. These platforms benefit from the availability of a wide variety of core materials as well as the unique physical and chemical properties of these nanoscale materials. This review surveys some of the emerging approaches in the field of nanoparticle based detection systems, highlighting the nanoparticle based screening methods for metal ions, proteins, nucleic acids, and biologically relevant small molecules. PMID:19913581

  16. Progress toward clonable inorganic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ni, Thomas W; Staicu, Lucian C; Nemeth, Richard S; Schwartz, Cindi L; Crawford, David; Seligman, Jeffrey D; Hunter, William J; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H; Ackerson, Christopher J

    2015-11-01

    Pseudomonas moraviensis stanleyae was recently isolated from the roots of the selenium (Se) hyperaccumulator plant Stanleya pinnata. This bacterium tolerates normally lethal concentrations of SeO3(2-) in liquid culture, where it also produces Se nanoparticles. Structure and cellular ultrastructure of the Se nanoparticles as determined by cellular electron tomography shows the nanoparticles as intracellular, of narrow dispersity, symmetrically irregular and without any observable membrane or structured protein shell. Protein mass spectrometry of a fractionated soluble cytosolic material with selenite reducing capability identified nitrite reductase and glutathione reductase homologues as NADPH dependent candidate enzymes for the reduction of selenite to zerovalent Se nanoparticles. In vitro experiments with commercially sourced glutathione reductase revealed that the enzyme can reduce SeO3(2-) (selenite) to Se nanoparticles in an NADPH-dependent process. The disappearance of the enzyme as determined by protein assay during nanoparticle formation suggests that glutathione reductase is associated with or possibly entombed in the nanoparticles whose formation it catalyzes. Chemically dissolving the nanoparticles releases the enzyme. The size of the nanoparticles varies with SeO3(2-) concentration, varying in size form 5 nm diameter when formed at 1.0 μM [SeO3(2-)] to 50 nm maximum diameter when formed at 100 μM [SeO3(2-)]. In aggregate, we suggest that glutathione reductase possesses the key attributes of a clonable nanoparticle system: ion reduction, nanoparticle retention and size control of the nanoparticle at the enzyme site.

  17. Study of iron nanoparticle melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, A. V.; Shulgin, A. V.; Lavruk, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    In paper melting process of iron nanoparticles was investigated with molecular dynamics method. Melting temperatures was found for particles with radius from 1.5 to 4 nm. Results match with data of other authors. Heat capacity was calculated based on investigation of caloric curves. Dependence between heat capacity and temperature for different size of nanoparticles was approximated. Heat conductivity of iron nanoparticles was calculated.

  18. Nanoparticles: scaffolds and building blocks.

    PubMed

    Shenhar, Roy; Rotello, Vincent M

    2003-07-01

    Nanoparticles provide key tools for bridging the gap between "bottom-up" synthetic methods and "top-down" fabrication. In this Account we describe some of the unique structural aspects of nanoparticles and the use of these attributes to the creation of devices with tunable specificity and environmental response. We also explore the use of nanoparticles as "building blocks" for the creation of nanocomposite materials that feature structural control from the molecular to the micron scale.

  19. Lung toxicity of biodegradable nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fattal, Elias; Grabowski, Nadége; Mura, Simona; Vergnaud, Juliette; Tsapis, Nicolas; Hillaireau, Hervé

    2014-10-01

    Biodegradable nanoparticles exhibit high potentialities for local or systemic drug delivery through lung administration making them attractive as nanomedicine carriers. However, since particulate matter or some inorganic manufactured nanoparticles exposed to lung cells have provoked cytotoxic effects, inflammatory and oxidative stress responses, it becomes important to investigate nanomedicine toxicity towards the lungs. This is the reason why, in the present review, the behavior of biodegradable nanoparticles towards the different parts of the respiratory tract as well as the toxicological consequences, measured on several models in vitro, ex vivo or in vivo, are described. Taken all together, the different studies carried out so far conclude on no or slight toxicity of biodegradable nanoparticles.

  20. Silver Nanoparticles in Dental Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Juliana Mattos; Mori, Matsuyoshi; Sanches, Heloísa Lajas; da Cruz, Adriana Dibo; Poiate, Isis Andréa Venturini Pola

    2015-01-01

    Silver has been used in medicine for centuries because of its antimicrobial properties. More recently, silver nanoparticles have been synthesized and incorporated into several biomaterials, since their small size provides great antimicrobial effect, at low filler level. Hence, these nanoparticles have been applied in dentistry, in order to prevent or reduce biofilm formation over dental materials surfaces. This review aims to discuss the current progress in this field, highlighting aspects regarding silver nanoparticles incorporation, such as antimicrobial potential, mechanical properties, cytotoxicity, and long-term effectiveness. We also emphasize the need for more studies to determine the optimal concentration of silver nanoparticle and its release over time. PMID:25667594

  1. Magnetic Nanoparticle Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Isaac; Josephson, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Many types of biosensors employ magnetic nanoparticles (diameter = 5–300 nm) or magnetic particles (diameter = 300–5,000 nm) which have been surface functionalized to recognize specific molecular targets. Here we cover three types of biosensors that employ different biosensing principles, magnetic materials, and instrumentation. The first type consists of magnetic relaxation switch assay-sensors, which are based on the effects magnetic particles exert on water proton relaxation rates. The second type consists of magnetic particle relaxation sensors, which determine the relaxation of the magnetic moment within the magnetic particle. The third type is magnetoresistive sensors, which detect the presence of magnetic particles on the surface of electronic devices that are sensitive to changes in magnetic fields on their surface. Recent improvements in the design of magnetic nanoparticles (and magnetic particles), together with improvements in instrumentation, suggest that magnetic material-based biosensors may become widely used in the future. PMID:22408498

  2. Nanoparticles for neuroimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Re, F.; Moresco, R.; Masserini, M.

    2012-02-01

    The advent of nanotechnology has introduced a variety of novel exciting possibilities into the medical and clinical field. Nanoparticles, ultra-small object sized between 100 and 1 nm, are promising diagnostic tools for various diseases among other devices, thanks to the possibility of their functionalization allowing the selective targeting of organs, tissues and cells and to facilitate their transport to primary target organs. However, brain targeting represents a still unresolved challenge due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier, a tightly packed layer of endothelial cells that prevents unwanted substances entering the central nervous system. We review a range of nanoparticles suitable for in vivo diagnostic imaging of neurodegenerative diseases and brain disorders, highlighting the possibility to potentially increase their efficiency and kinetics of brain-targeting. We also review a range of imaging techniques with an emphasis on most recently introduced molecular imaging modalities, their current status and future potential.

  3. Nanoparticle Reactions on Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, J. M.; Kirner, Th.; Wagner, J.; Csáki, A.; Möller, R.; Fritzsche, W.

    The handling of heterogenous systems in micro reactors is difficult due to their adhesion and transport behaviour. Therefore, the formation of precipitates and gas bubbles has to be avoided in micro reaction technology, in most cases. But, micro channels and other micro reactors offer interesting possibilities for the control of reaction conditions and transport by diffusion and convection due to the laminar flow caused by small Reynolds numbers. This can be used for the preparation and modification of objects, which are much smaller than the cross section of microchannels. The formation of colloidal solutions and the change of surface states of nano particles are two important tasks for the application of chip reactors in nanoparticle technology. Some concepts for the preparation and reaction of nanoparticles in modular chip reactor arrangements will be discussed.

  4. Hydrogel nanoparticle based immunoassay

    DOEpatents

    Liotta, Lance A; Luchini, Alessandra; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Espina, Virginia

    2015-04-21

    An immunoassay device incorporating porous polymeric capture nanoparticles within either the sample collection vessel or pre-impregnated into a porous substratum within fluid flow path of the analytical device is presented. This incorporation of capture particles within the immunoassay device improves sensitivity while removing the requirement for pre-processing of samples prior to loading the immunoassay device. A preferred embodiment is coreshell bait containing capture nanoparticles which perform three functions in one step, in solution: a) molecular size sieving, b) target analyte sequestration and concentration, and c) protection from degradation. The polymeric matrix of the capture particles may be made of co-polymeric materials having a structural monomer and an affinity monomer, the affinity monomer having properties that attract the analyte to the capture particle. This device is useful for point of care diagnostic assays for biomedical applications and as field deployable assays for environmental, pathogen and chemical or biological threat identification.

  5. Conjugated polymer nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuncel, Dönüs; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2010-04-01

    Conjugated polymer nanoparticles are highly versatile nano-structured materials that can potentially find applications in various areas such as optoelectronics, photonics, bio-imaging, bio-sensing and nanomedicine. Their straightforward synthesis in desired sizes and properties, biocompatibility and non-toxicity make these materials highly attractive for the aforementioned applications. This feature article reviews the recent developments in the synthesis, characterization, properties and application of these exciting nanostructured materials.

  6. Evaluation of nanoparticle immunotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovolskaia, Marina A.; Germolec, Dori R.; Weaver, James L.

    2009-07-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is developing increasing numbers of drugs and diagnostics based on nanoparticles, and evaluating the immune response to these diverse formulations has become a challenge for scientists and regulatory agencies alike. An international panel of scientists and representatives from various agencies and companies reviewed the imitations of current tests at a workshop held at the National Cancer Institute in Frederick, Maryland. This article outlines practical strategies for identifying and controlling interferences in common evaluation methods and the implications for regulation.

  7. Characterization of starch nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymońska, J.; Targosz-Korecka, M.; Krok, F.

    2009-01-01

    Nanomaterials already attract great interest because of their potential applications in technology, food science and medicine. Biomaterials are biodegradable and quite abundant in nature, so they are favoured over synthetic polymer based materials. Starch as a nontoxic, cheap and renewable raw material is particularly suitable for preparation of nanoparticles. In the paper, the structure and some physicochemical properties of potato and cassava starch particles of the size between 50 to 100 nm, obtained by mechanical treatment of native starch, were presented. We demonstrated, with the aim of the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and the non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy (nc-AFM), that the shape and dimensions of the obtained nanoparticles both potato and cassava starch fit the blocklets - previously proposed as basic structural features of native starch granules. This observation was supported by aqueous solubility and swelling power of the particles as well as their iodine binding capacity similar to those for amylopectin-type short branched polysaccharide species. Obtained results indicated that glycosidic bonds of the branch linkage points in the granule amorphous lamellae might be broken during the applied mechanical treatment. Thus the released amylopectin clusters could escape out of the granules. The starch nanoparticles, for their properties qualitatively different from those of native starch granules, could be utilized in new applications.

  8. Thermal treatment of magnetite nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wykowska, Urszula; Satula, Dariusz; Nordblad, Per

    2015-01-01

    Summary This paper presents the results of a thermal treatment process for magnetite nanoparticles in the temperature range of 50–500 °C. The tested magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized using three different methods that resulted in nanoparticles with different surface characteristics and crystallinity, which in turn, was reflected in their thermal durability. The particles were obtained by coprecipitation from Fe chlorides and decomposition of an Fe(acac)3 complex with and without a core–shell structure. Three types of ferrite nanoparticles were produced and their thermal stability properties were compared. In this study, two sets of unmodified magnetite nanoparticles were used where crystallinity was as determinant of the series. For the third type of particles, a Ag shell was added. By comparing the coated and uncoated particles, the influence of the metallic layer on the thermal stability of the nanoparticles was tested. Before and after heat treatment, the nanoparticles were examined using transmission electron microscopy, IR spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Based on the obtained results, it was observed that the fabrication methods determine, to some extent, the sensitivity of the nanoparticles to external factors. PMID:26199842

  9. Gluing Soft Interfaces by Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhen; Dobrynin, Andrey

    Using a combination of the molecular dynamics simulations and scaling analysis we studied reinforcement of interface between two soft gel-like materials by spherical nanoparticles. Analysis of the simulations shows that the depth of penetration of a nanoparticle into a gel is determined by a balance of the elastic energy of the gel and nanoparticle deformations and the surface energy of nanoparticle/gel interface. In order to evaluate work of adhesion of the reinforced interface, the potential of mean force for separation of two gels was calculated. These simulations showed that the gel separation proceeds through formation of necks connecting nanoparticle with two gels. The shapes of the necks are controlled by a fine interplay between nanoparticle/gel surface energies and elastic energy of the neck deformation. Our simulations showed that by introducing nanoparticles at soft interfaces, the work required for separation of two gels could be 10-100 times larger than the work of adhesion between two gels without nanoparticle reinforcement. These results provide insight in understanding the mechanism of gluing soft gels and biological tissues by nano- and micro-sized particles. NSF DMR-1409710.

  10. Responsive foams for nanoparticle delivery.

    PubMed

    Tang, Christina; Xiao, Edward; Sinko, Patrick J; Szekely, Zoltan; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2015-09-01

    We have developed responsive foam systems for nanoparticle delivery. The foams are easy to make, stable at room temperature, and can be engineered to break in response to temperature or moisture. Temperature-responsive foams are based on the phase transition of long chain alcohols and could be produced using medical grade nitrous oxide as a propellant. These temperature-sensitive foams could be used for polyacrylic acid (PAA)-based nanoparticle delivery. We also discuss moisture-responsive foams made with soap pump dispensers. Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based nanoparticles or PMMA latex nanoparticles were loaded into Tween 20 foams and the particle size was not affected by the foam formulation or foam break. Using biocompatible detergents, we anticipate this will be a versatile and simple approach to producing foams for nanoparticle delivery with many potential pharmaceutical and personal care applications. PMID:26091943

  11. Composite Nanoparticles for Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhua; Huang, Leaf

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle-mediated gene and siRNA delivery has been an appealing area to gene therapists when they attempt to treat the diseases by manipulating the genetic information in the target cells. However, the advances in materials science could not keep up with the demand for multifunctional nanomaterials to achieve desired delivery efficiency. Researchers have thus taken an alternative approach to incorporate various materials into single composite nanoparticle using different fabrication methods. This approach allows nanoparticles to possess defined nanostructures as well as multiple functionalities to overcome the critical extracellular and intracellular barriers to successful gene delivery. This chapter will highlight the advances of fabrication methods that have the most potential to translate nanoparticles from bench to bedside. Furthermore, a major class of composite nanoparticle–lipid-based composite nanoparticles will be classified based on the components and reviewed in details. PMID:25409605

  12. Host thin films incorporating nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, Uzma

    The focus of this research project was the investigation of the functional properties of thin films that incorporate a secondary nanoparticulate phase. In particular to assess if the secondary nanoparticulate material enhanced a functional property of the coating on glass. In order to achieve this, new thin film deposition methods were developed, namely use of nanopowder precursors, an aerosol assisted transport technique and an aerosol into atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition system. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) was used to deposit 8 series of thin films on glass. Five different nanoparticles silver, gold, ceria, tungsten oxide and zinc oxide were tested and shown to successfully deposit thin films incorporating nanoparticles within a host matrix. Silver nanoparticles were synthesised and doped within a titania film by AACVD. This improved solar control properties. A unique aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) into atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition (APCVD) system was used to deposit films of Au nanoparticles and thin films of gold nanoparticles incorporated within a host titania matrix. Incorporation of high refractive index contrast metal oxide particles within a host film altered the film colour. The key goal was to test the potential of nanopowder forms and transfer the suspended nanopowder via an aerosol to a substrate in order to deposit a thin film. Discrete tungsten oxide nanoparticles or ceria nanoparticles within a titanium dioxide thin film enhanced the self-cleaning and photo-induced super-hydrophilicity. The nanopowder precursor study was extended by deposition of zinc oxide thin films incorporating Au nanoparticles and also ZnO films deposited from a ZnO nanopowder precursor. Incorporation of Au nanoparticles within a VO: host matrix improved the thermochromic response, optical and colour properties. Composite VC/TiC and Au nanoparticle/V02/Ti02 thin films displayed three useful

  13. Nanocalorimetry of bismuth nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Eric Ashley

    The properties of nanosized bismuth particles are investigated using a nanocalorimetric technique. A brief description of the experimental method and data analysis procedures is reported. Bismuth nanoparticles are found to melt at a temperature below that of bulk material, but higher than expected using the standard model. Also included is the results of a finite element analysis and simulated melting of bismuth films on various kinds of sensors. Temperature distributions are found to be nonuniform for calorimetric sensors with Al metallizations, but much more uniform for Pt metallized sensors. The consequences of this nonuniformity on caloric data are discussed.

  14. Nanoparticle enhanced ionic liquid heat transfer fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Elise B.; Visser, Ann E.; Bridges, Nicholas J.; Gray, Joshua R.; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.

    2014-08-12

    A heat transfer fluid created from nanoparticles that are dispersed into an ionic liquid is provided. Small volumes of nanoparticles are created from e.g., metals or metal oxides and/or alloys of such materials are dispersed into ionic liquids to create a heat transfer fluid. The nanoparticles can be dispersed directly into the ionic liquid during nanoparticle formation or the nanoparticles can be formed and then, in a subsequent step, dispersed into the ionic liquid using e.g., agitation.

  15. Nanoparticles in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Papakostas, Dimitrios; Rancan, Fiorenza; Sterry, Wolfram; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Vogt, Annika

    2011-10-01

    Recent advances in the field of nanotechnology have allowed the manufacturing of elaborated nanometer-sized particles for various biomedical applications. A broad spectrum of particles, extending from various lipid nanostructures such as liposomes and solid lipid nanoparticles, to metal, nanocrystalline and polymer particles have already been tested as drug delivery systems in different animal models with remarkable results, promising an extensive commercialization in the coming years. Controlled drug release to skin and skin appendages, targeting of hair follicle-specific cell populations, transcutaneous vaccination and transdermal gene therapy are only a few of these new applications. Carrier systems of the new generation take advantage of improved skin penetration properties, depot effect with sustained drug release and of surface functionalization (e.g., the binding to specific ligands) allowing specific cellular and subcellular targeting. Drug delivery to skin by means of microparticles and nanocarriers could revolutionize the treatment of several skin disorders. However, the toxicological and environmental safety of micro- and nanoparticles has to be evaluated using specific toxicological studies prior to a wider implementation of the new technology. This review aims to give an overview of the most investigated applications of transcutaneously applied particle-based formulations in the fields of cosmetics and dermatology. PMID:21837474

  16. Nanopore and nanoparticle catalysts.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J M; Raja, R

    2001-01-01

    The design, atomic characterization, performance, and relevance to clean technology of two distinct categories of new nanocatalysts are described and interpreted. Exceptional molecular selectivity and high activity are exhibited by these catalysts. The first category consists of extended, crystallographically ordered inorganic solids possessing nanopores (apertures, cages, and channels), the diameters of which fall in the range of about 0.4 to about 1.5 nm, and the second of discrete bimetallic nanoparticles of diameter 1 to 2 nm, distributed more or less uniformly along the inner walls of mesoporous (ca. 3 to 10 nm diameter) silica supports. Using the principles and practices of solid-state and organometallic chemistry and advanced physico-chemical techniques for in situ and ex situ characterization, a variety of powerful new catalysts has been evolved. Apart from those that, inter alia, simulate the behavior of enzymes in their specificity, shape selectivity, regio-selectivity, and ability to function under ambient conditions, many of these new nanocatalysts are also viable as agents for effecting commercially significant processes in a clean, benign, solvent-free, single-step fashion. In particular, a bifunctional, molecular sieve nanopore catalyst is described that converts cyclohexanone in air and ammonia to its oxime and caprolactam, and a bimetallic nanoparticle catalyst that selectively converts cyclic polyenes into desirable intermediates. Nanocatalysts in the first category are especially effective in facilitating highly selective oxidations in air, and those in the second are well suited to effecting rapid and selective hydrogenations of a range of organic compounds.

  17. Nanoparticle optical notch filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasinadhuni, Pradeep Kumar

    Developing novel light blocking products involves the design of a nanoparticle optical notch filter, working on the principle of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). These light blocking products can be used in many applications. One such application is to naturally reduce migraine headaches and light sensitivity. Melanopsin ganglion cells present in the retina of the human eye, connect to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN-the body's clock) in the brain, where they participate in the entrainment of the circadian rhythms. As the Melanopsin ganglion cells are involved in triggering the migraine headaches in photophobic patients, it is necessary to block the part of visible spectrum that activates these cells. It is observed from the action potential spectrum of the ganglion cells that they absorb light ranging from 450-500nm (blue-green part) of the visible spectrum with a λmax (peak sensitivity) of around 480nm (blue line). Currently prescribed for migraine patients is the FL-41 coating, which blocks a broad range of wavelengths, including wavelengths associated with melanopsin absorption. The nanoparticle optical notch filter is designed to block light only at 480nm, hence offering an effective prescription for the treatment of migraine headaches.

  18. Magnetic nanoparticles for theragnostics

    PubMed Central

    Shubayev, Veronica I.; Pisanic, Thomas R.; Jin, Sungho

    2009-01-01

    Engineered magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) represent a cutting-edge tool in medicine because they can be simultaneously functionalized and guided by a magnetic field. Use of MNPs has advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), guided drug and gene delivery, magnetic hyperthermia cancer therapy, tissue engineering, cell tracking and bioseparation. Integrative therapeutic and diagnostic (i.e., theragnostic) applications have emerged with MNP use, such as MRI-guided cell replacement therapy or MRI-based imaging of cancer-specific gene delivery. However, mounting evidence suggests that certain properties of nanoparticles (e.g., enhanced reactive area, ability to cross cell and tissue barriers, resistance to biodegradation) amplify their cytotoxic potential relative to molecular or bulk counterparts. Oxidative stress, a 3-tier paradigm of nanotoxicity, manifests in activation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) (tier I), followed by a pro-inflammatory response (tier II) and DNA damage leading to cellular apoptosis and mutagenesis (tier III). In vivo administered MNPs are quickly challenged by macrophages of the reticuloendothelial system (RES), resulting in not only neutralization of potential MNP toxicity but also reduced circulation time necessary for MNP efficacy. We discuss the role of MNP size, composition and surface chemistry in their intracellular uptake, biodistribution, macrophage recognition and cytotoxicity, and review current studies on MNP toxicity, caveats of nanotoxicity assessments and engineering strategies to optimize MNPs for biomedical use. PMID:19389434

  19. Inorganic Nanoparticles in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sanjib; Kudgus, Rachel A.; Bhattacharya, Resham; Mukherjee, Priyabrata

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is an evolving field with enormous potential for biomedical applications. The growing interest to use inorganic nanoparticles in medicine is due to the unique size and shape-dependent optoelectronic properties. Herein, we will focus on gold, silver and platinum nanoparticles, discussing recent developments for therapeutic applications with regard to cancer in terms of nanoparticles being used as a delivery vehicle as well as therapeutic agents. We will also discuss some of the key challenges to be addressed in future studies. PMID:21104301

  20. Method of synthesizing tungsten nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Thoma, Steven G; Anderson, Travis M

    2013-02-12

    A method to synthesize tungsten nanoparticles has been developed that enables synthesis of nanometer-scale, monodisperse particles that can be stabilized only by tetrahydrofuran. The method can be used at room temperature, is scalable, and the product concentrated by standard means. Since no additives or stabilizing surfactants are required, this method is particularly well suited for producing tungsten nanoparticles for dispersion in polymers. If complete dispersion is achieved due to the size of the nanoparticles, then the optical properties of the polymer can be largely maintained.

  1. Electrochemiluminescent metallopolymer-nanoparticle composites: nanoparticle size effects.

    PubMed

    Devadoss, Anitha; Dickinson, Calum; Keyes, Tia E; Forster, Robert J

    2011-03-15

    Metallopolymer-gold nanocomposites have been synthesized in which the metal complex-Au nanoparticle (NP) mole ratio is systematically varied by mixing solutions of 4-(dimethylamino) pyridine protected gold nanoparticles and a [Ru(bpy)(2)PVP(10)](2+) metallopolymer; bpy is 2,2'-bipyridyl and PVP is poly-(4-vinylpyridine). The impact of changing the gold nanoparticle diameter ranging from 4.0 ± 0.5 to 12.5 ± 1 nm has been investigated. The photo induced emission of the metallopolymer undergoes static quenching by the metal nanoparticles irrespective of their size. When the volume ratio of Au NP-Ru is 1, the quenching efficiency increases from 38% to 93% on going from 4.0 ± 0.5 to 12.5 ± 1 nm diameter nanoparticles while the radius of the quenching sphere remains unaffected at 75 ± 5 Å. The conductivity of thin films is initially unaffected by nanoparticle incorporation until a percolation threshold is reached at a mole ratio of 4.95 × 10(-2) after which the conductivity increases before reaching a maximum. For thin films of the nanocomposites on electrodes, the electrochemiluminescence intensity of the nanocomposite initially increases as nanoparticles are added before decreasing for the highest loadings. The electrochemiluminescence intensity increases with increasing nanoparticle diameter. The electrochemiluminescence (ECL) emission intensity of the nanocomposite formed using 12.5 nm particles at mole ratios between 5 × 10(-3) and 10 × 10(-3) is approximately 7-fold higher than that found for the parent metallopolymer. The application of these materials for low cost ECL-based point of care devices is discussed.

  2. Dynamics of nanoparticle combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, David James

    A heterogeneous shock tube was used to ignite and measure the combustion behavior of the nano-aluminum suspension behind reflected shock waves. The burning time and particle temperatures were measured using optical diagnostics. In order to use pyrometry measurements for nano-aluminum particles, the emissivity of nano-alumina particles was also measured using the shock tube to heat the particles to known temperatures. The burning time and peak particle temperature results suggested that heat transfer models currently used for burning nanoparticles may significantly overestimate heat losses during combustion. By applying conventional non-continuum heat transfer correlations to burning nano-aluminum particles, the observed peak temperatures, which greatly exceed the ambient temperature, should only be observable if the burning time were very short, of the order of 1 mus, whereas the observed burning time is two orders of magnitude larger. These observations can be reconciled if the energy accommodation coefficient for these conditions is of the order of 0.005, which is the value suggested by Altman, instead of approximately unity, which is the common assumption. A simple model was developed for nano-aluminum particle combustion focusing on a surface controlled reaction as evidenced by experimental data and heat transfer to the surroundings. The simple model supports a low energy accommodation coefficient as suggested by Altman. This result has significant implications on the heat transfer and performance of the nanoparticles in combustion environments. Direct measurement is needed in order to decouple the accommodation coefficient from the assumed combustion mechanism in the simple model. Time-resolved laser induced incandescence measurements were performed to measure the accommodation coefficient of nano-alumina particles in various gaseous environments. The accommodation coefficient was found to be 0.03, 0.07, and 0.15 in helium, nitrogen, and argon respectively at

  3. Cellular Binding of Anionic Nanoparticles is Inhibited by Serum Proteins Independent of Nanoparticle Composition.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Candace C; Kumar, Umesh; Payne, Christine K

    2013-09-01

    Nanoparticles used in biological applications encounter a complex mixture of extracellular proteins. Adsorption of these proteins on the nanoparticle surface results in the formation of a "protein corona," which can dominate the interaction of the nanoparticle with the cellular environment. The goal of this research was to determine how nanoparticle composition and surface modification affect the cellular binding of protein-nanoparticle complexes. We examined the cellular binding of a collection of commonly used anionic nanoparticles: quantum dots, colloidal gold nanoparticles, and low-density lipoprotein particles, in the presence and absence of extracellular proteins. These experiments have the advantage of comparing different nanoparticles under identical conditions. Using a combination of fluorescence and dark field microscopy, flow cytometry, and spectroscopy, we find that cellular binding of these anionic nanoparticles is inhibited by serum proteins independent of nanoparticle composition or surface modification. We expect these results will aid in the design of nanoparticles for in vivo applications.

  4. Flexible chains of ferromagnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Townsend, James; Burtovyy, Ruslan; Galabura, Yuriy; Luzinov, Igor

    2014-07-22

    We report the fabrication of flexible chains of ferromagnetic Ni nanoparticles that possess the ability to adapt other than the typically observed rigid (nearly) straight configurations in the absence of an external magnetic field. The dynamic mobility of the ferromagnetic chains originates from a layer of densely grafted polyethylene glycol macromolecules enveloping each nanoparticle in the chain. While ferromagnetic chains of unmodified Ni nanoparticles behave as stiff nickel nanorods, the chains made of the grafted nanoparticles demonstrate extreme flexibility. Upon changing the direction of the field, and inevitably going through a zero-field point, the shorter chains undergo chain-globule-chain transformation. The longer chains can bend to a high degree, attaining "snake-like" configurations.

  5. Nanoparticle aggregation: principles and modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    The high surface area to volume ratio of nanoparticles usually results in highly reactive and colloidal instability compared to their bulk counterparts. Aggregation as well as many other transformations (e.g., dissolution) in the environment may alter the physiochemical properties, reactivity, fate, transport, and biological interactions (e.g., bioavailability and uptake) of nanoparticles. The unique properties pertinent to nanoparticles, such as shape, size, surface characteristics, composition, and electronic structures, greatly challenge the ability of colloid science to understand nanoparticle aggregation and its environmental impacts. This review briefly introduces fundamentals about aggregation, fractal dimensions, classic and extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeak (DLVO) theories, aggregation kinetic modeling, experimental measurements, followed by detailed discussions on the major factors on aggregation and subsequent effects on nanomaterial transport and reactivity.

  6. Targeted nanoparticles for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Cisterna, Bruno A; Kamaly, Nazila; Choi, Won Il; Tavakkoli, Ali; Farokhzad, Omid C; Vilos, Cristian

    2016-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is highly prevalent worldwide, and despite notable progress in treatment still leads to significant morbidity and mortality. The use of nanoparticles as a drug delivery system has become one of the most promising strategies for cancer therapy. Targeted nanoparticles could take advantage of differentially expressed molecules on the surface of tumor cells, providing effective release of cytotoxic drugs. Several efforts have recently reported the use of diverse molecules as ligands on the surface of nanoparticles to interact with the tumor cells, enabling the effective delivery of antitumor agents. Here, we present recent advances in targeted nanoparticles against CRC and discuss the promising use of ligands and cellular targets in potential strategies for the treatment of CRCs. PMID:27529192

  7. Lipid nanoparticle interactions and assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preiss, Matthew Ryan

    Novel liposome-nanoparticle assemblies (LNAs) provide a biologically inspired route for designing multifunctional bionanotheranostics. LNAs combine the benefits of lipids and liposomes to encapsulate, transport, and protect hydrophilic and hydrophobic therapeutics with functional nanoparticles. Functional nanoparticles endow LNAs with additional capabilities, including the ability to target diseases, triggered drug release, controlled therapeutic output, and diagnostic capabilities to produce a drug delivery system that can effectively and efficiently deliver therapeutics while reducing side effects. Not only could LNAs make existing drugs better, they could also provide an avenue to allow once promising non-approved drugs (rejected due to harmful side effects, inadequate pharmacokinetics, and poor efficacy) to be safely used through targeted and controlled delivery directly to the diseased site. LNAs have the potential to be stimuli responsive, delivering drugs on command by external (ultrasound, RF heating, etc.) or internal (pH, blood sugar, heart rate, etc.) stimuli. Individually, lipids and nanoparticles have been clinically approved for therapy, such as Doxil (a liposomal doxorubicin for cancer treatment), and diagnosis, such as Feridex (an iron oxide nanoparticle an MRI contrast enhancement agent for liver tumors). In order to engineer these multifunctional LNAs for theranostic applications, the interactions between nanoparticles and lipids must be better understood. This research sought to explore the formation, design, structures, characteristics, and functions of LNAs. To achieve this goal, different types of LNAs were formed, specifically magnetoliposomes, bilayer decorated LNAs (DLNAs), and lipid-coated magnetic nanoparticles (LMNPs). A fluorescent probe was embedded in the lipid bilayer of magnetoliposomes allowing the local temperature and membrane fluidity to be observed. When subjected to an electromagnetic field that heated the encapsulated iron

  8. Multiscaffold DNA Origami Nanoparticle Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    DNA origami templated self-assembly has shown its potential in creating rationally designed nanophotonic devices in a parallel and repeatable manner. In this investigation, we employ a multiscaffold DNA origami approach to fabricate linear waveguides of 10 nm diameter gold nanoparticles. This approach provides independent control over nanoparticle separation and spatial arrangement. The waveguides were characterized using atomic force microscopy and far-field polarization spectroscopy. This work provides a path toward large-scale plasmonic circuitry. PMID:23841957

  9. Organophosphorous functionalization of magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kalska-Szostko, B; Rogowska, M; Satuła, D

    2013-11-01

    In this work magnetite nanoparticles covered by gold and silver shell were obtained. Analyzed particles were modified by two kinds of organophosphorous compounds: 3-phosphonopropionic acid and 16-phosphonohexadecanoic acid. Enzyme immobilization on particles modified in such a way was tested. The crystal structure of obtained nanoparticles was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Possible changes on the surfaces were analyzed by the use of infrared spectroscopy. Magnetic properties were studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy.

  10. Functionalized magnetic nanoparticle analyte sensor

    DOEpatents

    Yantasee, Wassana; Warner, Maryin G; Warner, Cynthia L; Addleman, Raymond S; Fryxell, Glen E; Timchalk, Charles; Toloczko, Mychailo B

    2014-03-25

    A method and system for simply and efficiently determining quantities of a preselected material in a particular solution by the placement of at least one superparamagnetic nanoparticle having a specified functionalized organic material connected thereto into a particular sample solution, wherein preselected analytes attach to the functionalized organic groups, these superparamagnetic nanoparticles are then collected at a collection site and analyzed for the presence of a particular analyte.

  11. Diamond Synthesis Employing Nanoparticle Seeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uppireddi, Kishore (Inventor); Morell, Gerardo (Inventor); Weiner, Brad R. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Iron nanoparticles were employed to induce the synthesis of diamond on molybdenum, silicon, and quartz substrates. Diamond films were grown using conventional conditions for diamond synthesis by hot filament chemical vapor deposition, except that dispersed iron oxide nanoparticles replaced the seeding. This approach to diamond induction can be combined with dip pen nanolithography for the selective deposition of diamond and diamond patterning while avoiding surface damage associated to diamond-seeding methods.

  12. Method for producing metallic nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Jonathan; Perry, William L.; Kroenke, William J.

    2004-02-10

    Method for producing metallic nanoparticles. The method includes generating an aerosol of solid metallic microparticles, generating non-oxidizing plasma with a plasma hot zone at a temperature sufficiently high to vaporize the microparticles into metal vapor, and directing the aerosol into the hot zone of the plasma. The microparticles vaporize in the hot zone to metal vapor. The metal vapor is directed away from the hot zone and to the plasma afterglow where it cools and condenses to form solid metallic nanoparticles.

  13. Polyelemental nanoparticle libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng-Cheng; Liu, Xiaolong; Hedrick, James L.; Xie, Zhuang; Wang, Shunzhi; Lin, Qing-Yuan; Hersam, Mark C.; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2016-06-01

    Multimetallic nanoparticles are useful in many fields, yet there are no effective strategies for synthesizing libraries of such structures, in which architectures can be explored in a systematic and site-specific manner. The absence of these capabilities precludes the possibility of comprehensively exploring such systems. We present systematic studies of individual polyelemental particle systems, in which composition and size can be independently controlled and structure formation (alloy versus phase-separated state) can be understood. We made libraries consisting of every combination of five metallic elements (Au, Ag, Co, Cu, and Ni) through polymer nanoreactor–mediated synthesis. Important insight into the factors that lead to alloy formation and phase segregation at the nanoscale were obtained, and routes to libraries of nanostructures that cannot be made by conventional methods were developed.

  14. Nanoparticles and Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Win-Shwe, Tin-Tin; Fujimaki, Hidekazu

    2011-01-01

    Humans are exposed to nanoparticles (NPs; diameter < 100 nm) from ambient air and certain workplaces. There are two main types of NPs; combustion-derived NPs (e.g., particulate matters, diesel exhaust particles, welding fumes) and manufactured or engineered NPs (e.g., titanium dioxide, carbon black, carbon nanotubes, silver, zinc oxide, copper oxide). Recently, there have been increasing reports indicating that inhaled NPs can reach the brain and may be associated with neurodegeneration. It is necessary to evaluate the potential toxic effects of NPs on brain because most of the neurobehavioral disorders may be of environmental origin. This review highlights studies on both combustion-derived NP- and manufactured or engineered NP-induced neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and gene expression, as well as the possible mechanism of these effects in animal models and in humans. PMID:22016657

  15. Nanoparticles Containing Insoluble Drug for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shutao; Huang, Leaf

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticle drug formulations have been extensively researched and developed in the field of drug delivery as a means to efficiently deliver insoluble drugs to tumor cells. By mechanisms of the enhanced permeability and retention effect, nanoparticle drug formulations are capable of greatly enhancing the safety, pharmacokinetic profiles and bioavailability of the administered treatment. Here, the progress of various nanoparticle formulations in both research and clinical applications is detailed with a focus on the development of drug/gene delivery systems. Specifically, the unique advantages and disadvanges of polymeric nanoparticles, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanocrystals and lipid-coated nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery will be investigated in detail. PMID:24113214

  16. Interdigitated nanoelectrodes for nanoparticle detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaquin, L.; Vieu, C.; Martinez, C.; Steck, B.; Carcenac, F.

    2005-05-01

    Experimental results on the electrical detection of metal nanoparticles adsorbed on interdigitated nanoelectrode based devices are presented. By adjusting the gap between these electrodes to the diameter of the nanoparticles, we demonstrate that efficient bridging of the electrodes can take place. This phenomenon leads to a strong modification of the conductance of the device. The capability of the nanoelectrodes to detect single adsorption events electrically is demonstrated and reveals that the sensitivity reaches the individual nanoparticle level. This result is proven by current-voltage measurements at room temperature performed in solution during the adsorption of the nanoparticles and after the deposition process and surface drying. The capability of the devices to perform quantitative measurements is also addressed. Even if individual adsorption events could be detected one by one in solution, current-voltage measurements performed after the deposition and drying show that a correlation between the number of particles immobilized on the sensing area of the devices and the electrical characteristic remains difficult. The current flow is dominated by tunnel transport through the junctions formed between the nanoparticles and the nanoelectrodes and the dispersion of the electrical characteristics of the junctions is a limitation for quantifying the number of nanoparticles involved in the electrical response.

  17. Interaction of nanoparticles with cells.

    PubMed

    Mailänder, Volker; Landfester, Katharina

    2009-09-14

    Nanoparticles and their interaction with human cells have been a focus of many groups during the past decade. We discuss and review here the progress in the field of understanding and harnessing the interactions of polymeric nanoparticles synthesized by the miniemulsion process with different cell types. Nanotechnology and the hereby produced nanomaterials have promised to make use of specific properties of supramolecular assemblies and nanomaterials so that hitherto inaccessible effects can be exploited for new applications. Examples are superparamagnetism or the high surface area helpful for catalysis and adsorption. In biology and medicine, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have been used for cell selection and as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents. Furthermore, uptake of nanoparticles into a wide variety of cells is an effect that seems to be specific for materials in the range of 50-200 nm. Surface modifications (positively or negatively charged side groups of the polymers, amino acids, or peptides/proteins) enhance this uptake. Knowledge about factors influencing cellular uptake, like size, surface properties, cell type, and endocytotic pathways, enables optimization of labeling and selection of cells and nanoparticles for applications in vitro and in vivo. For in vivo applications, we will focus on how nanoparticles can cross the blood-brain barrier. PMID:19637907

  18. [Nanoparticles: properties and application prospects].

    PubMed

    Chekman, I S

    2009-01-01

    A new trend of scientific-technical and medical researches has been formed which unites nanoscience, nanotechnology, nanomedicine, nanopharmacology. Nanoparticles are the main product of nanotechnologies. Nanoparticles are organic and inorganic structures, their size being less than one hundred nanometers (nano from Greece nanos--a dwarf; particle is a separate unit which is separated from the whole). Prefix nano means 10(-9) m. Nanosizes are values from 1 to 100 nanometers, micro-sizes--from 100 to 1000 nanometers, and above 1000 nanometers--are macrosizes. By the data of Internet for 1.08.20.2008 there are 18512 papers in the world scientific literature (8663 of them were published during the last 2.5 years), where properties of nanoparticles which are obtained by different nanotechnological methods are described. Actually, quantity of works concerning nanoparticles is much more because not all publications are cited in Internet. The first publication concerning a characteristic of nanoparticles was published in 1978. The survey generalized the data of scientific literature and author's investigations which concern sizes of nanoparticles of biologic molecules and their properties. PMID:19877425

  19. Celecoxib Nanoparticles for Therapeutic Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Margulis, Katherine; Neofytou, Evgenios A; Beygui, Ramin E; Zare, Richard N

    2015-09-22

    Controllable induction of blood vessel formation (angiogenesis) presents an important therapeutic goal in ischemic diseases and is also beneficial in various normal physiological processes. In this study, we have shown that nanoparticles of celecoxib, a lipophilic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, effectively evoke therapeutic angiogenesis in animal models, in both normal and ischemic organs. Celecoxib is widely considered to inhibit angiogenesis, although a recent study suggests that it can instead promote blood vessel growth in cancer cell lines. The hydrophobic nature of this drug necessitates its administration in nanoparticulate form in order to elicit a perceivable pharmacological response. We developed a facile method for nanoparticle formation by solvent extraction from microemulsions in supercritical carbon dioxide. This method exploits a spontaneous formation of nanometric domains within the microemulsion system and their rapid conversion to nanoparticles by supercritical fluid. The resultant nanoparticles were administered subcutaneously to mice in a biocompatible hydrogel, and caused a 4-fold increase in blood vessel count in normally perfused skin compared with drug-free particles. They were at least as effective in inducing angiogenesis as nanoparticles of deferoxamine, a well-established neovascularization promoter. Next, we evaluated their effect on ischemic tissues in murine model of myocardial infarction. We found that celecoxib nanoparticles were able to induce a significant vascularization of ischemic myocardium and hamper the progression of heart failure, which points toward a new approach for treating ischemia.

  20. Exposure to Nanoparticles and Hormesis

    PubMed Central

    Iavicoli, Ivo; Calabrese, Edward J.; Nascarella, Marc A.

    2010-01-01

    Nanoparticles are particles with lengths that range from 1 to 100 nm. They are increasingly being manufactured and used for commercial purpose because of their novel and unique physicochemical properties. Although nanotechnology-based products are generally thought to be at a pre-competitive stage, an increasing number of products and materials are becoming commercially available. Human exposure to nanoparticles is therefore inevitable as they become more widely used and, as a result, nanotoxicology research is now gaining attention. However, there are many uncertainties as to whether the unique properties of nanoparticles also pose occupational health risks. These uncertainties arise because of gaps in knowledge about the factors that are essential for predicting health risks such as routes of exposure, distribution, accumulation, excretion and dose-response relationship of the nanoparticles. In particular, uncertainty remains with regard to the nature of the dose-response curve at low level exposures below the toxic threshold. In fact, in the literature, some studies that investigated the biological effects of nanoparticles, observed a hormetic dose-response. However, currently available data regarding this topic are extremely limited and fragmentary. It therefore seems clear that future studies need to focus on this issue by studying the potential adverse health effects caused by low-level exposures to nanoparticles. PMID:21191487

  1. Magnetic Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ying

    Nanotechnology is revolutionizing human's life. Synthesis and application of magnetic nanoparticles is a fast burgeoning field which has potential to bring significant advance in many fields, for example diagnosis and treatment in biomedical area. Novel nanoparticles to function efficiently and intelligently are in desire to improve the current technology. We used a magnetron-sputtering-based nanocluster deposition technique to synthesize magnetic nanoparticles in gas phase, and specifically engineered nanoparticles for different applications. Alternating magnetic field heating is emerging as a technique to assist cancer treatment or drug delivery. We proposed high-magnetic-moment Fe3Si particles with relatively large magnetic anisotropy energy should in principle provide superior performance. Such nanoparticles were experimentally synthesized and characterized. Their promising magnetic properties can contribute to heating performance under suitable alternating magnetic field conditions. When thermal energy is used for medical treatment, it is ideal to work in a designed temperature range. Biocompatible and "smart" magnetic nanoparticles with temperature self-regulation were designed from both materials science and biomedicine aspects. We chose Fe-Si material system to demonstrate the concept. Temperature dependent physical property was adjusted by tuning of exchange coupling between Fe atoms through incorporation of various amount of Si. The magnetic moment can still be kept in a promising range. The two elements are both biocompatible, which is favored by in-vivo medical applications. A combination of "smart" magnetic particles and thermo-sensitive polymer were demonstrated to potentially function as a platform for drug delivery. Highly sensitive diagnosis for point-of-care is in desire nowadays. We developed composition- and phase-controlled Fe-Co nanoparticles for bio-molecule detection. It has been demonstrated that Fe70Co30 nanoparticles and giant

  2. Development of polymeric–cationic peptide composite nanoparticles, a nanoparticle-in-nanoparticle system for controlled gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Arvind K; Massey, Ashley; Yusuf, Helmy; McDonald, Denise M; McCarthy, Helen O; Kett, Vicky L

    2015-01-01

    We report the formulation of novel composite nanoparticles that combine the high transfection efficiency of cationic peptide-DNA nanoparticles with the biocompatibility and prolonged delivery of polylactic acid–polyethylene glycol (PLA-PEG). The cationic cell-penetrating peptide RALA was used to condense DNA into nanoparticles that were encapsulated within a range of PLA-PEG copolymers. The composite nanoparticles produced exhibited excellent physicochemical properties including size <200 nm and encapsulation efficiency >80%. Images of the composite nanoparticles obtained with a new transmission electron microscopy staining method revealed the peptide-DNA nanoparticles within the PLA-PEG matrix. Varying the copolymers modulated the DNA release rate >6 weeks in vitro. The best formulation was selected and was able to transfect cells while maintaining viability. The effect of transferrin-appended composite nanoparticles was also studied. Thus, we have demonstrated the manufacture of composite nanoparticles for the controlled delivery of DNA. PMID:26648722

  3. Development of polymeric-cationic peptide composite nanoparticles, a nanoparticle-in-nanoparticle system for controlled gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Jain, Arvind K; Massey, Ashley; Yusuf, Helmy; McDonald, Denise M; McCarthy, Helen O; Kett, Vicky L

    2015-01-01

    We report the formulation of novel composite nanoparticles that combine the high transfection efficiency of cationic peptide-DNA nanoparticles with the biocompatibility and prolonged delivery of polylactic acid-polyethylene glycol (PLA-PEG). The cationic cell-penetrating peptide RALA was used to condense DNA into nanoparticles that were encapsulated within a range of PLA-PEG copolymers. The composite nanoparticles produced exhibited excellent physicochemical properties including size <200 nm and encapsulation efficiency >80%. Images of the composite nanoparticles obtained with a new transmission electron microscopy staining method revealed the peptide-DNA nanoparticles within the PLA-PEG matrix. Varying the copolymers modulated the DNA release rate >6 weeks in vitro. The best formulation was selected and was able to transfect cells while maintaining viability. The effect of transferrin-appended composite nanoparticles was also studied. Thus, we have demonstrated the manufacture of composite nanoparticles for the controlled delivery of DNA.

  4. Molecular Imaging with Theranostic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Jokerst, Jesse V.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2011-01-01

    Conspectus Nanoparticles offer diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities impossible with small molecules or micro-scale tools. As molecular biology merges with medical imaging to form the field of molecular imaging, nanoparticle imaging is increasingly common with both therapeutic and diagnostic applications. The term theranostic indicates technology with concurrent and complementary diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities. When performed with sub-micron materials, the field may be termed theranostic nanomedicine. Although nanoparticles have been FDA-approved for clinical use as transport vehicles for nearly 15 years, full translation of their theranostic potential is incomplete. Still, remarkable successes with nanoparticles have been realized in the areas of drug delivery and magnetic resonance imaging. Emerging applications include image-guided resection, optical/photoacoustic imaging in vivo, contrast-enhanced ultrasound, and thermoablative therapy. Diagnosis with nanoparticles in molecular imaging involves correlating signal to a phenotype. The disease’s size, stage, and biochemical signature can be gleaned from the location and intensity of nanoparticle signal emanating from a living subject. Therapy with NP uses the image for resection or delivery of small molecule or RNA thererapeutic. Ablation of the affected area is also possible via heat or radioactivity. The ideal theranostic NP: (1) selectively and rapidly accumulates in diseased tissue, (2) reports biochemical and morphological characteristics of the area, (3) delivers a non-invasive therapeutic, and (4) is safe and biodegrades with non-toxic byproducts. Above is a schematic of such a system which contains a central imaging core (yellow) surrounded by small molecule therapeutics (red). The system targets via ligands such as IgG (pink) and is protected from immune scavengers by a cloak of protective polymer (green). While no nanoparticle has achieved all of the above features, many NPs do fulfill one

  5. Ultrasound mediated nanoparticle drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, Lee B.

    Ultrasound is not only a powerful diagnostic tool, but also a promising therapeutic technology that can be used to improve localized drug delivery. Microbubble contrast agents are micron sized encapsulated gas filled bubbles that are administered intravenously. Originally developed to enhance ultrasound images, microbubbles are highly echogenic due to the gas core that provides a detectable impedance difference from the surrounding medium. The core also allows for controlled response of the microbubbles to ultrasound pulses. Microbubbles can be pushed using acoustic radiation force and ruptured using high pressures. Destruction of microbubbles can increase permeability at the cellular and vascular level, which can be advantageous for drug delivery. Advances in drug delivery methods have been seen with the introduction of nanoparticles, nanometer sized objects often carrying a drug payload. In chemotherapy, nanoparticles can deliver drugs to tumors while limiting systemic exposure due to abnormalities in tumor vasculature such large gaps between endothelial cells that allow nanoparticles to enter into the interstitial space; this is referred to as the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. However, this effect may be overestimated in many tumors. Additionally, only a small percentage of the injected dose accumulates in the tumor, which most the nanoparticles accumulating in the liver and spleen. It is hypothesized that combining the acoustic activity of an ultrasound contrast agent with the high payload and extravasation ability of a nanoparticle, localized delivery to the tumor with reduced systemic toxicity can be achieved. This method can be accomplished by either loading nanoparticles onto the shell of the microbubble or through a coadministration method of both nanoparticles and microbubbles. The work presented in this dissertation utilizes novel and commercial nanoparticle formulations, combined with microbubbles and a variety of ultrasound systems

  6. Interaction of nanoparticles with proteins: relation to bio-reactivity of the nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Saptarshi, Shruti R; Duschl, Albert; Lopata, Andreas L

    2013-07-19

    Interaction of nanoparticles with proteins is the basis of nanoparticle bio-reactivity. This interaction gives rise to the formation of a dynamic nanoparticle-protein corona. The protein corona may influence cellular uptake, inflammation, accumulation, degradation and clearance of the nanoparticles. Furthermore, the nanoparticle surface can induce conformational changes in adsorbed protein molecules which may affect the overall bio-reactivity of the nanoparticle. In depth understanding of such interactions can be directed towards generating bio-compatible nanomaterials with controlled surface characteristics in a biological environment. The main aim of this review is to summarise current knowledge on factors that influence nanoparticle-protein interactions and their implications on cellular uptake.

  7. Mycosynthesis of silver nanoparticles bearing antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Azmath, Pasha; Baker, Syed; Rakshith, Devaraju; Satish, Sreedharamurthy

    2016-03-01

    Mycosynthesis of silver nanoparticles was achieved by endophytic Colletotrichum sp. ALF2-6 inhabiting Andrographis paniculata. Well dispersed nanoparticles were characterized using UV-Visible spectrometry with maximum absorption conferring at 420 nm. FTIR analysis revealed possible biomolecules reducing the metal salt and stabilization of nanoparticles. XRD analysis depicted the diffraction intensities exhibiting between 20 and 80 °C at 2theta angle thus conferring the crystalline nature of nanoparticles. Morphological characteristic using TEM revealed the polydispersity of nanoparticles with size ranging from 20 to 50 nm. Synthesized nanoparticles exhibited bactericidal activity against selected human pathogens. Nanoparticles mode of action was carried out to reveal DNA damage activity. Thus the present investigation reports facile fabrication of silver nanoparticles from endophytic fungi. PMID:27013906

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Environmentally Benign Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been a growing interest in replacing current non-biodegradable and toxic nanosystems with environmentally benign biopolymer based ones to minimize post-utilization hazards due to uncontrolled accumulation of nanoparticles in the environment. Lignin based nanoparticles (...

  9. Pearling of lipid vesicles induced by nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yan; Granick, Steve

    2009-10-14

    We show that cationic nanoparticles encapsulated within vesicles of phosphocholine lipid can induce pearling. The dynamic process occurs as two stages: formation of tubular protrusions followed by pearling instability. The breakup into individual vesicles can be controlled by nanoparticle concentration.

  10. Physical Principles of Nanoparticle Cellular Endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sulin; Gao, Huajian; Bao, Gang

    2015-09-22

    This review article focuses on the physiochemical mechanisms underlying nanoparticle uptake into cells. When nanoparticles are in close vicinity to a cell, the interactions between the nanoparticles and the cell membrane generate forces from different origins. This leads to the membrane wrapping of the nanoparticles followed by cellular uptake. This article discusses how the kinetics, energetics, and forces are related to these interactions and dependent on the size, shape, and stiffness of nanoparticles, the biomechanical properties of the cell membrane, as well as the local environment of the cells. The discussed fundamental principles of the physiochemical causes for nanoparticle-cell interaction may guide new studies of nanoparticle endocytosis and lead to better strategies to design nanoparticle-based approaches for biomedical applications.

  11. Nanoparticles Ease Aching Joints in Mice

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161188.html Nanoparticles Ease Aching Joints in Mice Treatment might one ... News) -- New research in mice suggests that tiny nanoparticles might one day be a better way to ...

  12. Endotoxin hitchhiking on polymer nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnell, Mason L.; Lyon, Andrew J.; Mormile, Melanie R.; Barua, Sutapa

    2016-07-01

    The control of microbial infections is critical for the preparation of biological media including water to prevent lethal septic shock. Sepsis is one of the leading causes of death in the United States. More than half a million patients suffer from sepsis every year. Both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria are responsible for septic infection by the most common organisms i.e., Escherichia coli and Pseuodomonas aeruginosa. The bacterial cell membrane releases negatively charged endotoxins upon death and enzymatic destruction, which stimulate antigenic response in humans to gram-negative infections. Several methods including distillation, ethylene oxide treatment, filtration and irradiation have been employed to remove endotoxins from contaminated samples, however, the reduction efficiency remains low, and presents a challenge. Polymer nanoparticles can be used to overcome the current inability to effectively sequester endotoxins from water. This process is termed endotoxin hitchhiking. The binding of endotoxin on polymer nanoparticles via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions offers efficient removal from water. However, the effect of polymer nanoparticles and its surface areas has not been investigated for removal of endotoxins. Poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) polymer was tested for its ability to effectively bind and remove endotoxins from water. By employing a simple one-step phase separation technique, we were able to synthesize PCL nanoparticles of 398.3 ± 95.13 nm size and a polydispersity index of 0.2. PCL nanoparticles showed ∼78.8% endotoxin removal efficiency, the equivalent of 3.9 × 105 endotoxin units (EU) per ml. This is 8.34-fold more effective than that reported for commercially available membranes. Transmission electron microscopic images confirmed binding of multiple endotoxins to the nanoparticle surface. The concept of using nanoparticles may be applicable not only to eliminate gram-negative bacteria, but also for any gram

  13. Endotoxin hitchhiking on polymer nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Donnell, Mason L; Lyon, Andrew J; Mormile, Melanie R; Barua, Sutapa

    2016-07-15

    The control of microbial infections is critical for the preparation of biological media including water to prevent lethal septic shock. Sepsis is one of the leading causes of death in the United States. More than half a million patients suffer from sepsis every year. Both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria are responsible for septic infection by the most common organisms i.e., Escherichia coli and Pseuodomonas aeruginosa. The bacterial cell membrane releases negatively charged endotoxins upon death and enzymatic destruction, which stimulate antigenic response in humans to gram-negative infections. Several methods including distillation, ethylene oxide treatment, filtration and irradiation have been employed to remove endotoxins from contaminated samples, however, the reduction efficiency remains low, and presents a challenge. Polymer nanoparticles can be used to overcome the current inability to effectively sequester endotoxins from water. This process is termed endotoxin hitchhiking. The binding of endotoxin on polymer nanoparticles via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions offers efficient removal from water. However, the effect of polymer nanoparticles and its surface areas has not been investigated for removal of endotoxins. Poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) polymer was tested for its ability to effectively bind and remove endotoxins from water. By employing a simple one-step phase separation technique, we were able to synthesize PCL nanoparticles of 398.3 ± 95.13 nm size and a polydispersity index of 0.2. PCL nanoparticles showed ∼78.8% endotoxin removal efficiency, the equivalent of 3.9 × 10(5) endotoxin units (EU) per ml. This is 8.34-fold more effective than that reported for commercially available membranes. Transmission electron microscopic images confirmed binding of multiple endotoxins to the nanoparticle surface. The concept of using nanoparticles may be applicable not only to eliminate gram-negative bacteria, but also for any gram

  14. Endotoxin hitchhiking on polymer nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Donnell, Mason L; Lyon, Andrew J; Mormile, Melanie R; Barua, Sutapa

    2016-07-15

    The control of microbial infections is critical for the preparation of biological media including water to prevent lethal septic shock. Sepsis is one of the leading causes of death in the United States. More than half a million patients suffer from sepsis every year. Both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria are responsible for septic infection by the most common organisms i.e., Escherichia coli and Pseuodomonas aeruginosa. The bacterial cell membrane releases negatively charged endotoxins upon death and enzymatic destruction, which stimulate antigenic response in humans to gram-negative infections. Several methods including distillation, ethylene oxide treatment, filtration and irradiation have been employed to remove endotoxins from contaminated samples, however, the reduction efficiency remains low, and presents a challenge. Polymer nanoparticles can be used to overcome the current inability to effectively sequester endotoxins from water. This process is termed endotoxin hitchhiking. The binding of endotoxin on polymer nanoparticles via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions offers efficient removal from water. However, the effect of polymer nanoparticles and its surface areas has not been investigated for removal of endotoxins. Poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) polymer was tested for its ability to effectively bind and remove endotoxins from water. By employing a simple one-step phase separation technique, we were able to synthesize PCL nanoparticles of 398.3 ± 95.13 nm size and a polydispersity index of 0.2. PCL nanoparticles showed ∼78.8% endotoxin removal efficiency, the equivalent of 3.9 × 10(5) endotoxin units (EU) per ml. This is 8.34-fold more effective than that reported for commercially available membranes. Transmission electron microscopic images confirmed binding of multiple endotoxins to the nanoparticle surface. The concept of using nanoparticles may be applicable not only to eliminate gram-negative bacteria, but also for any gram

  15. Dynamic Nanoparticles Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    WANG, LIBING; XU, LIGUANG; KUANG, HUA; XU, CHUANLAI; KOTOV, NICHOLAS A.

    2012-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Importance Although nanoparticle (NP) assemblies are at the beginning of their development, their unique geometrical shapes and media-responsive optical, electronic and magnetic properties have attracted significant interest. Nanoscale assembly bridges multiple sizes of materials: individual nanoparticles, discrete molecule-like or virus-like nanoscale agglomerates, microscale devices, and macroscale materials. The capacity to self-assemble can greatly facilitate the integration of nanotechnology with other technologies and, in particular, with microscale fabrication. In this Account, we describe developments in the emerging field of dynamic NP assemblies, which are spontaneously formed superstructures containing more than two inorganic nanoscale particles that display ability to change their geometrical, physical, chemical, and other attributes. In many ways, dynamic assemblies can represent a bottleneck in the ‘bottom-up’ fabrication of NP-based devices because they can produce a much greater variety of assemblies, but they also provide a convenient tool for variation of geometries and dimensions of nanoparticle assemblies. Classification Superstructures of NPs (and those held together by similar intrinsic forces) are classified into two groups: Class 1 where media and external fields can alter shape, conformation, and order of stable superstructures with a nearly constant number same. The future development of successful dynamic assemblies requires understanding the equilibrium in dynamic NP systems. The dynamic nature of Class 1 assemblies is associated with the equilibrium between different conformations of a superstructure and is comparable to the isomerization in classical chemistry. Class 2 assemblies involve the formation and/or breakage of linkages between the NPs, which is analogous to the classical chemical equilibrium for the formation of a molecule from atoms. Finer classification of NP assemblies in accord with established conventions

  16. Optical Trapping of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Jarrah; Zehtabi-Oskuie, Ana; Ghaffari, Saeedeh; Pang, Yuanjie; Gordon, Reuven

    2013-01-01

    Optical trapping is a technique for immobilizing and manipulating small objects in a gentle way using light, and it has been widely applied in trapping and manipulating small biological particles. Ashkin and co-workers first demonstrated optical tweezers using a single focused beam1. The single beam trap can be described accurately using the perturbative gradient force formulation in the case of small Rayleigh regime particles1. In the perturbative regime, the optical power required for trapping a particle scales as the inverse fourth power of the particle size. High optical powers can damage dielectric particles and cause heating. For instance, trapped latex spheres of 109 nm in diameter were destroyed by a 15 mW beam in 25 sec1, which has serious implications for biological matter2,3. A self-induced back-action (SIBA) optical trapping was proposed to trap 50 nm polystyrene spheres in the non-perturbative regime4. In a non-perturbative regime, even a small particle with little permittivity contrast to the background can influence significantly the ambient electromagnetic field and induce a large optical force. As a particle enters an illuminated aperture, light transmission increases dramatically because of dielectric loading. If the particle attempts to leave the aperture, decreased transmission causes a change in momentum outwards from the hole and, by Newton's Third Law, results in a force on the particle inwards into the hole, trapping the particle. The light transmission can be monitored; hence, the trap can become a sensor. The SIBA trapping technique can be further improved by using a double-nanohole structure. The double-nanohole structure has been shown to give a strong local field enhancement5,6. Between the two sharp tips of the double-nanohole, a small particle can cause a large change in optical transmission, thereby inducing a large optical force. As a result, smaller nanoparticles can be trapped, such as 12 nm silicate spheres7 and 3.4 nm

  17. Alloy nanoparticle synthesis using ionizing radiation

    DOEpatents

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Powers, Dana A.; Zhang, Zhenyuan

    2011-08-16

    A method of forming stable nanoparticles comprising substantially uniform alloys of metals. A high dose of ionizing radiation is used to generate high concentrations of solvated electrons and optionally radical reducing species that rapidly reduce a mixture of metal ion source species to form alloy nanoparticles. The method can make uniform alloy nanoparticles from normally immiscible metals by overcoming the thermodynamic limitations that would preferentially produce core-shell nanoparticles.

  18. Ferrocene-functionalized carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yang; Kang, Xiongwu; Zuckerman, Nathaniel B.; Phebus, Bruce; Konopelski, Joseph P.; Chen, Shaowei

    2011-05-01

    Carbon nanoparticles were synthesized from natural gas soot and functionalized with ferrocenyl moieties by using 4-ferrocenylphenyldiazonium as the reactive precursor. The incorporation of the ferrocenyl units onto the carbon nanoparticle surface was confirmed by varied spectroscopic measurements. For instance, in FTIR measurements the characteristic vibrational bands of the ferrocenyl and phenyl moieties could be clearly identified. XPS measurements showed that there were approximately 31.9 ferrocenyl units per nanoparticle. UV-vis spectroscopic measurements displayed an absorption band at ca. 465 nm which was consistent with the optical characteristics of ferrocenyl derivatives. Furthermore, with surface functionalization by the ferrocenyl moieties, the photoluminescence of the carbon nanoparticles was found to diminish in intensity and red-shift in energy with the addition of NOBF4. This was accounted for by the formation of varied electron-accepting moieties on the particle surface, such as positively charged ferrocenium, quinone-like derivatives, and nitrosation of the aromatic rings of the graphitic cores. Interestingly, in electrochemical studies the nanoparticle-bound ferrocenyl moieties were found to exhibit two pairs of voltammetric waves with a difference of their formal potentials at about 78 mV, suggesting nanoparticle-mediated intraparticle charge delocalization at mixed valence as a result of the strong core-ligand covalent bonds and the conductive sp2 carbon matrix of the graphitic cores. Consistent behaviors were observed in near-infrared measurements, indicating that the particles behaved analogously to a Class I/II mixed-valence compound.Carbon nanoparticles were synthesized from natural gas soot and functionalized with ferrocenyl moieties by using 4-ferrocenylphenyldiazonium as the reactive precursor. The incorporation of the ferrocenyl units onto the carbon nanoparticle surface was confirmed by varied spectroscopic measurements. For instance

  19. Nanoparticle Superlattice Engineering with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macfarlane, Robert John

    In this thesis, we describe a set of design rules for using programmable oligonucleotide interactions, elements of both thermodynamic and kinetic control, and an understanding of the dominant forces that are responsible for particle assembly to design and deliberately make a wide variety of nanoparticle-based superlattices. Like the rules for ionic solids developed by Linus Pauling, these rules are guidelines for determining relative nanoparticle superlattice stability, rather than rigorous mathematical descriptions. However, unlike Pauling's rules, the set of rules developed herein allow one to not just predict crystal stability, but also to deliberately and independently control the nanoparticle sizes, interparticle spacings, and crystallographic symmetries of a superlattice. In the first chapter of this thesis, a general background is given for using DNA as a tool in programmable materials synthesis. Chapter 2 demonstrates how altering oligonucleotide length and nanoparticle size can be used to control nanoparticle superlattice lattice parameters with nanometer-scale precision. In the third chapter, the kinetics of crystallization are examined, and a method to selectively stabilize kinetic products is presented. The data in chapter 4 prove that it is the overall hydrodynamic radius of a DNA-functionalized particle, rather than the sizes of the inorganic nanoparticles being assembled, that dictates particle packing behavior. Chapter 5 demonstrates how particles that exhibit non-equivalent packing behavior can be used to control superlattice symmetry, and chapter 6 utilizes these data to develop a phase diagram that predicts lattice stability a priori to synthesis. In chapter 7, the ability to functionalize a particle with multiple types of oligonucleotides is used to synthesize complex lattices, including ternary superlattices that are capable of dynamic symmetry conversion between a binary and a ternary state. The final chapter provides an outlook on other

  20. Tannin biosynthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera-Becerra, R.; Rius, J. L.; Zorrilla, C.

    2010-08-01

    In this work, iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized with gallic acid and tannic acid are characterized using High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). Its size, form, and structure are compared with nanoparticles obtained previously using alfalfa biomass in order to find a simpler, consistent, and environmentally friendly method in the production of iron oxide nanoparticles.

  1. Nanoparticles for Imaging: Top or Flop?

    PubMed Central

    Mertens, Marianne E.; Grimm, Jan; Lammers, Twan

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles are frequently suggested as diagnostic agents. However, except for iron oxide nanoparticles, diagnostic nanoparticles have been barely incorporated into clinical use so far. This is predominantly due to difficulties in achieving acceptable pharmacokinetic properties and reproducible particle uniformity as well as to concerns about toxicity, biodegradation, and elimination. Reasonable indications for the clinical utilization of nanoparticles should consider their biologic behavior. For example, many nanoparticles are taken up by macrophages and accumulate in macrophage-rich tissues. Thus, they can be used to provide contrast in liver, spleen, lymph nodes, and inflammatory lesions (eg, atherosclerotic plaques). Furthermore, cells can be efficiently labeled with nanoparticles, enabling the localization of implanted (stem) cells and tissue-engineered grafts as well as in vivo migration studies of cells. The potential of using nanoparticles for molecular imaging is compromised because their pharmacokinetic properties are difficult to control. Ideal targets for nanoparticles are localized on the endothelial luminal surface, whereas targeted nanoparticle delivery to extravascular structures is often limited and difficult to separate from an underlying enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. The majority of clinically used nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems are based on the EPR effect, and, for their more personalized use, imaging markers can be incorporated to monitor biodistribution, target site accumulation, drug release, and treatment efficacy. In conclusion, although nanoparticles are not always the right choice for molecular imaging (because smaller or larger molecules might provide more specific information), there are other diagnostic and theranostic applications for which nanoparticles hold substantial clinical potential. PMID:25247562

  2. [Magnetic nanoparticles and intracellular delivery of biopolymers].

    PubMed

    Kornev, A A; Dubina, M V

    2014-03-01

    The basic methods of intracellular delivery of biopolymers are present in this review. The structure and synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles, their stabilizing surfactants are described. The examples of the interaction of nanoparticles with biopolymers such as nucleic acids and proteins are considered. The final part of the review is devoted to problems physiology and biocompatibility of magnetic nanoparticles.

  3. Lactobacillus assisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, K.; Jha, Anal K.; Kulkarni, A. R.

    2007-05-01

    An eco-friendly lactobacillus sp. (microbe) assisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles is reported. The synthesis is performed at room temperature. X-ray and transmission electron microscopy analyses are performed to ascertain the formation of Ti nanoparticles. Individual nanoparticles as well as a number of aggregates almost spherical in shape having a size of 40 60 nm are found.

  4. Magnetic nanoparticles for "smart liposomes".

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yoshitaka; Mustapić, Mislav; Ebrahimian, Haleh; Wagner, Pawel; Kim, Jung Ho; Hossain, Md Shahriar Al; Horvat, Joseph; Martinac, Boris

    2015-12-01

    Liposomal drug delivery systems (LDDSs) are promising tools used for the treatment of diseases where highly toxic pharmacological agents are administered. Currently, destabilising LDDSs by a specific stimulus at a target site remains a major challenge. The bacterial mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) presents an excellent candidate biomolecule that could be employed as a remotely controlled pore-forming nanovalve for triggered drug release from LDDSs. In this study, we developed superparamagnetic nanoparticles for activation of the MscL nanovalves by magnetic field. Synthesised CoFe2O4 nanoparticles with the radius less than 10 nm were labelled by SH groups for attachment to MscL. Activation of MscL by magnetic field with the nanoparticles attached was examined by the patch clamp technique showing that the number of activated channels under ramp pressure increased upon application of the magnetic field. In addition, we have not observed any cytotoxicity of the nanoparticles in human cultured cells. Our study suggests the possibility of using magnetic nanoparticles as a specific trigger for activation of MscL nanovalves for drug release in LDDSs. PMID:26184724

  5. Hyperbolic polaritons in nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhiyuan; Rubio, Angel; Guinea, Francisco; Basov, Dimitri; Fogler, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Hyperbolic optical materials (HM) are characterized by permittivity tensor that has both positive and negative principal values. Collective electromagnetic modes (polaritons) of HM have novel properties promising for various applications including subdiffractional imaging and on-chip optical communication. Hyperbolic response is actively investigated in the context of metamaterials, anisotropic polar insulators, and layered superconductors. We study polaritons in spheroidal HM nanoparticles using Hamiltonian optics. The field equations are mapped to classical dynamics of fictitious particles (wave packets) of an indefinite Hamiltonian. This dynamics is quantized using the Einstein-Brillouin-Keller quantization rule. The eigenmodes are classified as either bulk or surface according to whether their transverse momenta are real or imaginary. To model how such hyperbolic polaritons can be probed by near-field experiments, we compute the field distribution induced inside and outside the spheroid by an external point dipole. At certain magic frequencies the field shows striking geometric patterns whose origin is traced to the classical periodic orbits. The theory is applied to natural hyperbolic materials hexagonal boron nitride and superconducting LaSrCuO.

  6. Nanoparticles for transcutaneous vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Steffi; Lehr, Claus‐Michael

    2012-01-01

    Summary The living epidermis and dermis are rich in antigen presenting cells (APCs). Their activation can elicit a strong humoral and cellular immune response as well as mucosal immunity. Therefore, the skin is a very attractive site for vaccination, and an intradermal application of antigen may be much more effective than a subcutaneous or intramuscular injection. However, the stratum corneum (SC) is a most effective barrier against the invasion of topically applied vaccines. Products which have reached the stage of clinical testing, avoid this problem by injecting the nano‐vaccine intradermally or by employing a barrier disrupting method and applying the vaccine to a relatively large skin area. Needle‐free vaccination is desirable from a number of aspects: ease of application, improved patient acceptance and less risk of infection among them. Nanocarriers can be designed in a way that they can overcome the SC. Also incorporation into nanocarriers protects instable antigen from degradation, improves uptake and processing by APCs, and facilitates endosomal escape and nuclear delivery of DNA vaccines. In addition, sustained release systems may build a depot in the tissue gradually releasing antigen which may avoid booster doses. Therefore, nanoformulations of vaccines for transcutaneous immunization are currently a very dynamic field of research. Among the huge variety of nanocarrier systems that are investigated hopes lie on ultra‐flexible liposomes, superfine rigid nanoparticles and nanocarriers, which are taken up by hair follicles. The potential and pitfalls associated with these three classes of carriers will be discussed. PMID:21854553

  7. Vaccine delivery using nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Anthony E.; Titball, Richard; Williamson, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination has had a major impact on the control of infectious diseases. However, there are still many infectious diseases for which the development of an effective vaccine has been elusive. In many cases the failure to devise vaccines is a consequence of the inability of vaccine candidates to evoke appropriate immune responses. This is especially true where cellular immunity is required for protective immunity and this problem is compounded by the move toward devising sub-unit vaccines. Over the past decade nanoscale size (<1000 nm) materials such as virus-like particles, liposomes, ISCOMs, polymeric, and non-degradable nanospheres have received attention as potential delivery vehicles for vaccine antigens which can both stabilize vaccine antigens and act as adjuvants. Importantly, some of these nanoparticles (NPs) are able to enter antigen-presenting cells by different pathways, thereby modulating the immune response to the antigen. This may be critical for the induction of protective Th1-type immune responses to intracellular pathogens. Their properties also make them suitable for the delivery of antigens at mucosal surfaces and for intradermal administration. In this review we compare the utilities of different NP systems for the delivery of sub-unit vaccines and evaluate the potential of these delivery systems for the development of new vaccines against a range of pathogens. PMID:23532930

  8. Ecotoxicity of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Sachindri; Kalaichelvan, P. T.

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a science of producing and utilizing nanosized particles that are measured in nanometers. The unique size-dependent properties make the nanoparticles superior and indispensable as they show unusual physical, chemical, and properties such as conductivity, heat transfer, melting temperature, optical properties, and magnetization. Taking the advantages of these singular properties in order to develop new products is the main purpose of nanotechnology, and that is why it is regarded as “the next industrial revolution.” Although nanotechnology is quite a recent discipline, there have already high number of publications which discuss this topic. However, the safety of nanomaterials is of high priority. Whereas toxicity focuses on human beings and aims at protecting individuals, ecotoxicity looks at various trophic organism levels and intend to protect populations and ecosystems. Ecotoxicity includes natural uptake mechanisms and the influence of environmental factors on bioavailability (and thereby on toxicity). The present paper focuses on the ecotoxic effects and mechanisms of nanomaterials on microorganisms, plants, and other organisms including humans. PMID:23724300

  9. Metal Nanoparticle Aerogel Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Sibille, Laurent; Ignont, Erica; Snow, Lanee; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have fabricated sol-gels containing gold and silver nanoparticles. Formation of an aerogel produces a blue shift in the surface plasmon resonance as a result of the decrease in the dielectric constant of the matrix upon supercritical extraction of the solvent. However, as a result of chemical interface damping this blue shift does not obey effective medium theories. Annealing the samples in a reducing atmosphere at 400 C eliminates this discrepancy and results in narrowing and further blue shifting of the plasmon resonance. Metal particle aggregation also results in a deviation from the predictions of effective medium theories, but can be controlled through careful handling and by avoiding the use of alcohol. By applying effective medium theories to the heterogeneous interlayer surrounding each metal particle, we extend the technique of immersion spectroscopy to inhomogeneous materials characterized by spatially dependent dielectric constants, such as aerogels. We demonstrate that the shift in the surface plasmon wavelength provides the average fractional composition of each component (air and silica) in this inhomogeneous layer, i.e. the porosity of the aerogel or equivalently, for these materials, the catalytic dispersion. Additionally, the kinetics suggest that collective particle interactions in coagulated metal clusters are perturbed during silica gelation resulting in a change in the aggregate geometry.

  10. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles and silver nanoparticles via green technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Zulfiqaar; Balu, S. S.

    2012-11-01

    The proposed work describes the comparison of various methods of green synthesis for preparation of Gold and Silver nanoparticles. Pure extracts of Lemon (Citrus limon) and Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) were mixed with aqueous solution of auric tetrachloride and silver nitrate. The resultant solutions were treated with four common techniques to assist in the reduction namely photo catalytic, thermal, microwave assisted reduction and solvo - thermal reduction. UV - Visible Spectroscopy results and STM images of the final solutions confirmed the formation of stable metallic nanoparticles. A preliminary account of the green synthesis work is presented here.

  11. Green chemistry for nanoparticle synthesis.

    PubMed

    Duan, Haohong; Wang, Dingsheng; Li, Yadong

    2015-08-21

    The application of the twelve principles of green chemistry in nanoparticle synthesis is a relatively new emerging issue concerning the sustainability. This field has received great attention in recent years due to its capability to design alternative, safer, energy efficient, and less toxic routes towards synthesis. These routes have been associated with the rational utilization of various substances in the nanoparticle preparations and synthetic methods, which have been broadly discussed in this tutorial review. This article is not meant to provide an exhaustive overview of green synthesis of nanoparticles, but to present several pivotal aspects of synthesis with environmental concerns, involving the selection and evaluation of nontoxic capping and reducing agents, the choice of innocuous solvents and the development of energy-efficient synthetic methods. PMID:25615873

  12. Nanoparticle composites for printed electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Männl, U.; van den Berg, C.; Magunje, B.; Härting, M.; Britton, D. T.; Jones, S.; van Staden, M. J.; Scriba, M. R.

    2014-03-01

    Printed Electronics is a rapidly developing sector in the electronics industry, in which nanostructured materials are playing an increasingly important role. In particular, inks containing dispersions of semiconducting nanoparticles, can form nanocomposite materials with unique electronic properties when cured. In this study we have extended on our previous studies of functional nanoparticle electronic inks, with the development of a solvent-based silicon ink for printed electronics which is compatible with existing silver inks, and with the investigation of other metal nanoparticle based inks. It is shown that both solvent-based and water-based inks can be used for both silver conductors and semiconducting silicon, and that qualitatively there is no difference in the electronic properties of the materials printed with a soluble polymer binder to when an acrylic binder is used.

  13. The adjuvanticity of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykman, Lev A.; Bogatyrev, Vladimir A.; Staroverov, Sergey A.; Pristensky, Dmitry V.; Shchyogolev, Sergey Yu.; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G.

    2006-06-01

    A new variant of a technique for in vivo production of antibodies to various antigens with colloidal-gold nanoparticles as carrier is discussed. With this technique we obtained highly specific and relatively high-titre antibodies to different antigens. The antibodies were tested by an immunodot assay with gold nanoparticle markers. Our results provide the first demonstration that immunization of animals with colloidal gold complexed with either haptens or complete antigens gives rise to highly specific antibodies even without the use of complete Freund's adjuvant. These findings may attest to the adjuvanticity of gold nanoparticles itself. We provide also experimental results and discussion aimed at elucidation of possible mechanisms of the discovered colloidal-gold-adjuvanticity effect.

  14. Fabrication of Metallic Hollow Nanoparticles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Choi, Sr., Sang H. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Chu, Sang-Hyon (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Metal and semiconductor nanoshells, particularly transition metal nanoshells, are fabricated using dendrimer molecules. Metallic colloids, metallic ions or semiconductors are attached to amine groups on the dendrimer surface in stabilized solution for the surface seeding method and the surface seedless method, respectively. Subsequently, the process is repeated with additional metallic ions or semiconductor, a stabilizer, and NaBH.sub.4 to increase the wall thickness of the metallic or semiconductor lining on the dendrimer surface. Metallic or semiconductor ions are automatically reduced on the metallic or semiconductor nanoparticles causing the formation of hollow metallic or semiconductor nanoparticles. The void size of the formed hollow nanoparticles depends on the dendrimer generation. The thickness of the metallic or semiconductor thin film around the dendrimer depends on the repetition times and the size of initial metallic or semiconductor seeds.

  15. Green chemistry for nanoparticle synthesis.

    PubMed

    Duan, Haohong; Wang, Dingsheng; Li, Yadong

    2015-08-21

    The application of the twelve principles of green chemistry in nanoparticle synthesis is a relatively new emerging issue concerning the sustainability. This field has received great attention in recent years due to its capability to design alternative, safer, energy efficient, and less toxic routes towards synthesis. These routes have been associated with the rational utilization of various substances in the nanoparticle preparations and synthetic methods, which have been broadly discussed in this tutorial review. This article is not meant to provide an exhaustive overview of green synthesis of nanoparticles, but to present several pivotal aspects of synthesis with environmental concerns, involving the selection and evaluation of nontoxic capping and reducing agents, the choice of innocuous solvents and the development of energy-efficient synthetic methods.

  16. Nanoparticles heat through light localization.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Nathaniel J; Urban, Alexander S; Ayala-Orozco, Ciceron; Pimpinelli, Alberto; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2014-08-13

    Aqueous solutions containing light-absorbing nanoparticles have recently been shown to produce steam at high efficiencies upon solar illumination, even when the temperature of the bulk fluid volume remains far below its boiling point. Here we show that this phenomenon is due to a collective effect mediated by multiple light scattering from the dispersed nanoparticles. Randomly positioned nanoparticles that both scatter and absorb light are able to concentrate light energy into mesoscale volumes near the illuminated surface of the liquid. The resulting light absorption creates intense localized heating and efficient vaporization of the surrounding liquid. Light trapping-induced localized heating provides the mechanism for low-temperature light-induced steam generation and is consistent with classical heat transfer.

  17. Nanoparticle-Mediated Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Sha; Leach, John C.; Ye, Kaiming

    Nonviral gene delivery has been gaining considerable attention recently. Although the efficacy of DNA transfection, which is a major concern, is low in nonviral vector-mediated gene transfer compared with viral ones, nonviral vectors are relatively easy to prepare, less immunogenic and oncogenic, and have no potential of virus recombination and no limitation on the size of a transferred gene. The ability to incorporate genetic materials such as plasmid DNA, RNA, and siRNA into functionalized nanoparticles with little toxicity demonstrates a new era in pharmacotherapy for delivering genes selectively to tissues and cells. In this chapter, we highlight the basic concepts and applications of nonviral gene delivery using super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and functionalized silica nanoparticles. The experimental protocols related to these topics are described in the chapter.

  18. Nanoparticles: heating tumors to death?

    PubMed

    Vauthier, Christine; Tsapis, Nicolas; Couvreur, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Thermotherapy consisting of heating tumors to death appears to be a suitable method to achieve tumor ablation in a noninvasive manner with minimal side effects but developments were hampered because of the lack of specificity of the heating method. New interests have emerged by introducing nanoparticles as energy absorbent agents in tumor tissue to locally enhance the action of irradiation, hence increasing the specificity of the method. Mechanisms of tumor death depend on the nature of the nanoparticles and irradiation modalities. They can be induced either by heat-dependent or by heat-independent phenomena. As discussed in this article, it can reasonably be expected that the recent methods of thermotherapy developed with nanoparticles have a tremendous potential for cancer treatments. However, overcoming challenging milestones is now required before the method will be ready for the treatment of a wide range of cancers.

  19. Polycatechol Nanoparticle MRI Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiwen; Huang, Yuran; Wang, Zhao; Carniato, Fabio; Xie, Yijun; Patterson, Joseph P; Thompson, Matthew P; Andolina, Christopher M; Ditri, Treffly B; Millstone, Jill E; Figueroa, Joshua S; Rinehart, Jeffrey D; Scadeng, Miriam; Botta, Mauro; Gianneschi, Nathan C

    2016-02-01

    Amphiphilic triblock copolymers containing Fe(III) -catecholate complexes formulated as spherical- or cylindrical-shaped micellar nanoparticles (SMN and CMN, respectively) are described as new T1-weighted agents with high relaxivity, low cytotoxicity, and long-term stability in biological fluids. Relaxivities of both SMN and CMN exceed those of established gadolinium chelates across a wide range of magnetic field strengths. Interestingly, shape-dependent behavior is observed in terms of the particles' interactions with HeLa cells, with CMN exhibiting enhanced uptake and contrast via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared with SMN. These results suggest that control over soft nanoparticle shape will provide an avenue for optimization of particle-based contrast agents as biodiagnostics. The polycatechol nanoparticles are proposed as suitable for preclinical investigations into their viability as gadolinium-free, safe, and effective imaging agents for MRI contrast enhancement. PMID:26681255

  20. [Respiratory effects of manufactured nanoparticles].

    PubMed

    Andujar, P; Lanone, S; Brochard, P; Boczkowski, J

    2009-06-01

    Nanotechnology, defined as techniques aimed to design, characterize and produce materials on a nanometer scale, is a fast-growing field today. Nanomaterials are made of nanoobjects (nanoparticles, nanofibers, nanotubes...). The nanoscale confers on these materials their novel, hitherto unknown, chemical and physical properties by the laws of quantum physics which are essentially expressed on this scale. Nanotechnology applications are numerous (e.g., cosmetics, industry and medicine) and they keep growing. We can safely predict that the production and utilization of nanomaterials will increase greatly in the years to come. Nonetheless, the same properties that make these nanomaterials very attractive are a source of concern: there are questions about their potential toxicity, their long-term side effects, and their biodegradability. These questions are based on knowledge of the toxic effects of micrometric particles in air pollution and the fear that these effects will be amplified because of the nanometric size of the new materials. We present in this article a global but not exhaustive summary of current knowledge. We begin by defining lung penetration, deposition, translocation and elimination of nanoparticles. Finally, we consider the respiratory effects of metallic nanoparticles, titanium dioxide nanoparticles in particular, and carbon nanotubes. In vivo and in vitro experimental studies currently available highlight the existence of biological effects of nanoparticles on the respiratory system with generation of oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory and pro-thrombotic effects and the possible development of fibrosis and pulmonary emphysema or DNA damage. A better understanding of the potential biological effects of nanoparticles is required to implement appropriate preventive measures in the workplace and/or in the general population, if this should be necessary.

  1. Lipid nanoparticles for parenteral delivery of actives.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Medha D; Müller, Rainer H

    2009-02-01

    The present review compiles the applications of lipid nanoparticles mainly solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) and lipid drug conjugates (LDC) in parenteral delivery of pharmaceutical actives. The attempts to incorporate anticancer agents, imaging agents, antiparasitics, antiarthritics, genes for transfection, agents for liver, cardiovascular and central nervous system targeting have been summarized. The utility of lipid nanoparticles as adjuvant has been discussed separately. A special focus of this review is on toxicity caused by these kinds of lipid nanoparticles with a glance on the fate of lipid nanoparticles after their parenteral delivery in vivo viz the protein adsorption patterns. PMID:18824097

  2. Few-layer black phosphorus nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sofer, Zdenek; Bouša, Daniel; Luxa, Jan; Mazanek, Vlastimil; Pumera, Martin

    2016-01-28

    Herein, black phosphorus quantum dots and nanoparticles of a few layer thickness were prepared and characterized using STEM, AFM, dynamic light scattering, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence. Impact electrochemistry of the induvidual black phosphorus nanoparticles allows their size determination. The centrifugation of colloidal black phosphorus nanoparticles allowed separation of quantum dots with sizes up to 15 nm. These black phosphorus nanoparticles exhibit a large band gap and are expected to find a wide range of applications from semiconductors to biomolecule tags. The use of black phosphorus nanoparticles for vapour sensing was successfully demonstrated.

  3. Fabrication of transparent ceramics using nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Cherepy, Nerine J; Tillotson, Thomas M; Kuntz, Joshua D; Payne, Stephen A

    2012-09-18

    A method of fabrication of a transparent ceramic using nanoparticles synthesized via organic acid complexation-combustion includes providing metal salts, dissolving said metal salts to produce an aqueous salt solution, adding an organic chelating agent to produce a complexed-metal sol, heating said complexed-metal sol to produce a gel, drying said gel to produce a powder, combusting said powder to produce nano-particles, calcining said nano-particles to produce oxide nano-particles, forming said oxide nano-particles into a green body, and sintering said green body to produce the transparent ceramic.

  4. From silicon to organic nanoparticle memory devices.

    PubMed

    Tsoukalas, D

    2009-10-28

    After introducing the operational principle of nanoparticle memory devices, their current status in silicon technology is briefly presented in this work. The discussion then focuses on hybrid technologies, where silicon and organic materials have been combined together in a nanoparticle memory device, and finally concludes with the recent development of organic nanoparticle memories. The review is focused on the nanoparticle memory concept as an extension of the current flash memory device. Organic nanoparticle memories are at a very early stage of research and have not yet found applications. When this happens, it is expected that they will not directly compete with mature silicon technology but will find their own areas of application.

  5. DNA-guided nanoparticle assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Gang, Oleg; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Maye, Mathew; van der Lelie, Daniel

    2013-07-16

    In some embodiments, DNA-capped nanoparticles are used to define a degree of crystalline order in assemblies thereof. In some embodiments, thermodynamically reversible and stable body-centered cubic (bcc) structures, with particles occupying <.about.10% of the unit cell, are formed. Designs and pathways amenable to the crystallization of particle assemblies are identified. In some embodiments, a plasmonic crystal is provided. In some aspects, a method for controlling the properties of particle assemblages is provided. In some embodiments a catalyst is formed from nanoparticles linked by nucleic acid sequences and forming an open crystal structure with catalytically active agents attached to the crystal on its surface or in interstices.

  6. Multiscale study of metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byeongchan

    Extremely small structures with reduced dimensionality have emerged as a scientific motif for their interesting properties. In particular, metal nanoparticles have been identified as a fundamental material in many catalytic activities; as a consequence, a better understanding of structure-function relationship of nanoparticles has become crucial. The functional analysis of nanoparticles, reactivity for example, requires an accurate method at the electronic structure level, whereas the structural analysis to find energetically stable local minima is beyond the scope of quantum mechanical methods as the computational cost becomes prohibitingly high. The challenge is that the inherent length scale and accuracy associated with any single method hardly covers the broad scale range spanned by both structural and functional analyses. In order to address this, and effectively explore the energetics and reactivity of metal nanoparticles, a hierarchical multiscale modeling is developed, where methodologies of different length scales, i.e. first principles density functional theory, atomistic calculations, and continuum modeling, are utilized in a sequential fashion. This work has focused on identifying the essential information that bridges two different methods so that a successive use of different methods is seamless. The bond characteristics of low coordination systems have been obtained with first principles calculations, and incorporated into the atomistic simulation. This also rectifies the deficiency of conventional interatomic potentials fitted to bulk properties, and improves the accuracy of atomistic calculations for nanoparticles. For the systematic shape selection of nanoparticles, we have improved the Wulff-type construction using a semi-continuum approach, in which atomistic surface energetics and crystallinity of materials are added on to the continuum framework. The developed multiscale modeling scheme is applied to the rational design of platinum

  7. Optical Properties of Metallic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallée, F.

    The bright and changing colours obtained by dispersing metallic compounds in a glass matrix have been known empirically for centuries. Indeed, glasses have been coloured in the bulk by inclusion of metallic powders since ancient times to make jewellery and ornaments (see Chap. 25). Then in the Middle Ages, they were used for stained glass windows and later on for coloured glass artefacts, e.g., ruby red glass objects. However, the role played by nanoparticles in this colouring effect, i.e., the effects of nanoparticles on optical properties, were only first studied scientifically in the nineteenth century, by Michael Faraday [1].

  8. Heat transfer fluids containing nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Dileep; Routbort, Jules; Routbort, A.J.; Yu, Wenhua; Timofeeva, Elena; Smith, David S.; France, David M.

    2016-05-17

    A nanofluid of a base heat transfer fluid and a plurality of ceramic nanoparticles suspended throughout the base heat transfer fluid applicable to commercial and industrial heat transfer applications. The nanofluid is stable, non-reactive and exhibits enhanced heat transfer properties relative to the base heat transfer fluid, with only minimal increases in pumping power required relative to the base heat transfer fluid. In a particular embodiment, the plurality of ceramic nanoparticles comprise silicon carbide and the base heat transfer fluid comprises water and water and ethylene glycol mixtures.

  9. Probing nanoparticles and nanoparticle-conjugated biomolecules using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Pil; Shon, Hyun Kyong; Shin, Seung Koo; Lee, Tae Geol

    2015-01-01

    Bio-conjugated nanoparticles have emerged as novel molecular probes in nano-biotechnology and nanomedicine and chemical analyses of their surfaces have become challenges. The time-of-flight (TOF) secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has been one of the most powerful surface characterization techniques for both nanoparticles and biomolecules. When combined with various nanoparticle-based signal enhancing strategies, TOF-SIMS can probe the functionalization of nanoparticles as well as their locations and interactions in biological systems. Especially, nanoparticle-based SIMS is an attractive approach for label-free drug screening because signal-enhancing nanoparticles can be designed to directly measure the enzyme activity. The chemical-specific imaging analysis using SIMS is also well suited to screen nanoparticles and nanoparticle-biomolecule conjugates in complex environments. This review presents some recent applications of nanoparticle-based TOF-SIMS to the chemical analysis of complex biological systems.

  10. Synthesis metal nanoparticle

    DOEpatents

    Bunge, Scott D.; Boyle, Timothy J.

    2005-08-16

    A method for providing an anhydrous route for the synthesis of amine capped coinage-metal (copper, silver, and gold) nanoparticles (NPs) using the coinage-metal mesityl (mesityl=C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3 -2,4,6) derivatives. In this method, a solution of (Cu(C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.5, (Ag(C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.4, or (Au(C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.5 is dissolved in a coordinating solvent, such as a primary, secondary, or tertiary amine; primary, secondary, or tertiary phosphine, or alkyl thiol, to produce a mesityl precursor solution. This solution is subsequently injected into an organic solvent that is heated to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. After washing with an organic solvent, such as an alcohol (including methanol, ethanol, propanol, and higher molecular-weight alcohols), oxide free coinage NP are prepared that could be extracted with a solvent, such as an aromatic solvent (including, for example, toluene, benzene, and pyridine) or an alkane (including, for example, pentane, hexane, and heptane). Characterization by UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy showed that the NPs were approximately 9.2.+-.2.3 nm in size for Cu.degree., (no surface oxide present), approximately 8.5.+-.1.1 nm Ag.degree. spheres, and approximately 8-80 nm for Au.degree..

  11. Nanotoxicology and nanoparticle safety in biomedical designs

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Jafar; Biazar, Esmaeil; Jafarpour, Mostafa; Montazeri, Mohamad; Majdi, Ali; Aminifard, Saba; Zafari, Mandana; Akbari, Hanie R; Rad, Hadi Gh

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology has wide applications in many fields, especially in the biological sciences and medicine. Nanomaterials are applied as coating materials or in treatment and diagnosis. Nanoparticles such as titania, zirconia, silver, diamonds, iron oxides, carbon nanotubes, and biodegradable polymers have been studied in diagnosis and treatment. Many of these nanoparticles may have toxic effects on cells. Many factors such as size, inherent properties, and surface chemistry may cause nanoparticle toxicity. There are methods for improving the performance and reducing toxicity of nanoparticles in medical design, such as biocompatible coating materials or biodegradable/biocompatible nanoparticles. Most metal oxide nanoparticles show toxic effects, but no toxic effects have been observed with biocompatible coatings. Biodegradable nanoparticles are also used in the efficient design of medical materials, which will be reviewed in this article. PMID:21698080

  12. Nanoparticles for drug delivery to the lungs.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jean C; Pulliam, Brian L; Edwards, David A

    2007-12-01

    The lungs are an attractive route for non-invasive drug delivery with advantages for both systemic and local applications. Incorporating therapeutics with polymeric nanoparticles offers additional degrees of manipulation for delivery systems, providing sustained release and the ability to target specific cells and organs. However, nanoparticle delivery to the lungs has many challenges including formulation instability due to particle-particle interactions and poor delivery efficiency due to exhalation of low-inertia nanoparticles. Thus, novel methods formulating nanoparticles into the form of micron-scale dry powders have been developed. These carrier particles exhibit improved handling and delivery, while releasing nanoparticles upon deposition in the lungs. This review covers the development of nanoparticle formulations for pulmonary delivery as both individual nanoparticles and encapsulated within carrier particles.

  13. Gold nanoparticle capture within protein crystal scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Ann E; Huber, Thaddaus R; Ni, Thomas W; Hartje, Luke F; Appel, Karina L; Yost, Jarad W; Ackerson, Christopher J; Snow, Christopher D

    2016-07-01

    DNA assemblies have been used to organize inorganic nanoparticles into 3D arrays, with emergent properties arising as a result of nanoparticle spacing and geometry. We report here the use of engineered protein crystals as an alternative approach to biologically mediated assembly of inorganic nanoparticles. The protein crystal's 13 nm diameter pores result in an 80% solvent content and display hexahistidine sequences on their interior. The hexahistidine sequence captures Au25(glutathione)∼17 (nitrilotriacetic acid)∼1 nanoclusters throughout a chemically crosslinked crystal via the coordination of Ni(ii) to both the cluster and the protein. Nanoparticle loading was validated by confocal microscopy and elemental analysis. The nanoparticles may be released from the crystal by exposure to EDTA, which chelates the Ni(ii) and breaks the specific protein/nanoparticle interaction. The integrity of the protein crystals after crosslinking and nanoparticle capture was confirmed by single crystal X-ray crystallography. PMID:27264210

  14. Plasmonic twinned silver nanoparticles with molecular precision

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huayan; Wang, Yu; Chen, Xi; Zhao, Xiaojing; Gu, Lin; Huang, Huaqi; Yan, Juanzhu; Xu, Chaofa; Li, Gang; Wu, Junchao; Edwards, Alison J.; Dittrich, Birger; Tang, Zichao; Wang, Dongdong; Lehtovaara, Lauri; Häkkinen, Hannu; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2016-01-01

    Determining the structures of nanoparticles at atomic resolution is vital to understand their structure–property correlations. Large metal nanoparticles with core diameter beyond 2 nm have, to date, eluded characterization by single-crystal X-ray analysis. Here we report the chemical syntheses and structures of two giant thiolated Ag nanoparticles containing 136 and 374 Ag atoms (that is, up to 3 nm core diameter). As the largest thiolated metal nanoparticles crystallographically determined so far, these Ag nanoparticles enter the truly metallic regime with the emergence of surface plasmon resonance. As miniatures of fivefold twinned nanostructures, these structures demonstrate a subtle distortion within fivefold twinned nanostructures of face-centred cubic metals. The Ag nanoparticles reported in this work serve as excellent models to understand the detailed structure distortion within twinned metal nanostructures and also how silver nanoparticles can span from the molecular to the metallic regime. PMID:27611564

  15. Plasmonic twinned silver nanoparticles with molecular precision.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huayan; Wang, Yu; Chen, Xi; Zhao, Xiaojing; Gu, Lin; Huang, Huaqi; Yan, Juanzhu; Xu, Chaofa; Li, Gang; Wu, Junchao; Edwards, Alison J; Dittrich, Birger; Tang, Zichao; Wang, Dongdong; Lehtovaara, Lauri; Häkkinen, Hannu; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2016-01-01

    Determining the structures of nanoparticles at atomic resolution is vital to understand their structure-property correlations. Large metal nanoparticles with core diameter beyond 2 nm have, to date, eluded characterization by single-crystal X-ray analysis. Here we report the chemical syntheses and structures of two giant thiolated Ag nanoparticles containing 136 and 374 Ag atoms (that is, up to 3 nm core diameter). As the largest thiolated metal nanoparticles crystallographically determined so far, these Ag nanoparticles enter the truly metallic regime with the emergence of surface plasmon resonance. As miniatures of fivefold twinned nanostructures, these structures demonstrate a subtle distortion within fivefold twinned nanostructures of face-centred cubic metals. The Ag nanoparticles reported in this work serve as excellent models to understand the detailed structure distortion within twinned metal nanostructures and also how silver nanoparticles can span from the molecular to the metallic regime. PMID:27611564

  16. Plasmonic twinned silver nanoparticles with molecular precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huayan; Wang, Yu; Chen, Xi; Zhao, Xiaojing; Gu, Lin; Huang, Huaqi; Yan, Juanzhu; Xu, Chaofa; Li, Gang; Wu, Junchao; Edwards, Alison J.; Dittrich, Birger; Tang, Zichao; Wang, Dongdong; Lehtovaara, Lauri; Häkkinen, Hannu; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2016-09-01

    Determining the structures of nanoparticles at atomic resolution is vital to understand their structure-property correlations. Large metal nanoparticles with core diameter beyond 2 nm have, to date, eluded characterization by single-crystal X-ray analysis. Here we report the chemical syntheses and structures of two giant thiolated Ag nanoparticles containing 136 and 374 Ag atoms (that is, up to 3 nm core diameter). As the largest thiolated metal nanoparticles crystallographically determined so far, these Ag nanoparticles enter the truly metallic regime with the emergence of surface plasmon resonance. As miniatures of fivefold twinned nanostructures, these structures demonstrate a subtle distortion within fivefold twinned nanostructures of face-centred cubic metals. The Ag nanoparticles reported in this work serve as excellent models to understand the detailed structure distortion within twinned metal nanostructures and also how silver nanoparticles can span from the molecular to the metallic regime.

  17. Optical Characterization of Single Plasmonic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Jana; Dominguez-Medina, Sergio; Hoggard, Anneli; Wang, Lin-Yung; Chang, Wei-Shun; Link, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    This tutorial review surveys the optical properties of plasmonic nanoparticles studied by various single particle spectroscopy techniques. The surface plasmon resonance of metallic nanoparticles depends sensitively on the nanoparticle geometry and its environment, with even relatively minor deviations causing significant changes in the optical spectrum. Because for chemically prepared nanoparticles a distribution of their size and shape is inherent, ensemble spectra of such samples are inhomogeneously broadened, hiding the properties of the individual nanoparticles. The ability to measure one nanoparticle at a time using single particle spectroscopy can overcome this limitation. This review provides an overview of different steady-state single particle spectroscopy techniques that provide detailed insight into the spectral characteristics of plasmonic nanoparticles. PMID:24979351

  18. Structural characterization of multimetallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukundan, Vineetha

    Bimetallic and trimetallic alloy nanoparticles have enhanced catalytic activities due to their unique structural properties. Using in situ time-resolved synchrotron based x-ray diffraction, we investigated the structural properties of nanoscale catalysts undergoing various heat treatments. Thermal treatment brings about changes in particle size, morphology, dispersion of metals on support, alloying, surface electronic properties, etc. First, the mechanisms of coalescence and grain growth in PtNiCo nanoparticles supported on planar silica on silicon were examined in detail in the temperature range 400-900°C. The sintering process in PtNiCo nanoparticles was found to be accompanied by lattice contraction and L10 chemical ordering. The mass transport involved in sintering is attributed to grain boundary diffusion and its corresponding activation energy is estimated from the data analysis. Nanoscale alloying and phase transformations in physical mixtures of Pd and Cu ultrafine nanoparticles were also investigated in real time with in situ synchrotron based x-ray diffraction complemented by ex situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. PdCu nanoparticles are interesting because they are found to be more efficient as catalysts in ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) than monometallic Pd catalysts. The combination of metal support interaction and reactive/non-reactive environment was found to determine the thermal evolution and ultimate structure of this binary system. The composition of the as prepared Pd:Cu mixture in this study was 34% Pd and 66% Cu. At 300°C, the nanoparticles supported on silica and carbon black intermix to form a chemically ordered CsCl-type (B2) alloy phase. The B2 phase transforms into a disordered fcc alloy at higher temperature (>450°C). The alloy nanoparticles supported on silica and carbon black are homogeneous in volume, but evidence was found of Pd surface enrichment. In sharp contrast, when supported on alumina, the two metals

  19. Environmental Transformations of Engineered Nanoparticles: Implications for Nanoparticle Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, G. V.; Levard, C.; Reinsch, B.; Ma, R.; Kirschling, T.; Brown, G. E.; Tilton, R.

    2011-12-01

    Geochemical transformations that engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) may undergo in different environments very poorly characterized. Sulfidation of metallic nanoparticles (NPs), particularly class B soft metals such as Ag NPs, is expected in the environment. Transformation will alter the surface properties and fate of Ag NPs. ENMs are often coated with a polymeric coating to prevent aggregation or to provide specific functionality. These coatings dramatically impact their transport properties. The potential for biological processes to remove covalently bound polymeric coatings from nanoparticles, and the effect of coating loss on the particle's transport properties is not known. The objectives of this work were to 1) better understand the environmental conditions that would promote sufidation of class B soft metal nanoparticles (Ag NPs and ZnO NPs), and to determine the effect that this has on their surface properties and aggregation potential, and 2) to determine if microbes can access covalently bound polymeric coatings from an engineered NP, and the effect on their surface properties and aggregation potential. Ag and ZnO NPs were synthesized and characterized for size, shape, coating mass, charge, crystal structure, and chemical composition using a range of analytical methods (TEM, DLS, TGA, EPM, XAS). These particles were sulfidized in the laboratory, biosolids, and wetland soils and the transformed materials were characterized. Sulfidation was rapid in all cases and resulted in a mixed crystalline/amorphous Ag2S/Ag2O particle depending on the ratio of Ag to HS- in the system. Sulfidation decreased surface charge and displayed significant aggregation compared to the unsulfidized materials. Sulfidation also occurred in biosolids and in wetland soils. Polymer coatings covalently bound to ENMs are bioavailable. Model poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) brush-coated nanoparticles (30 nm hydrodynamic radius) were synthesized to obtain a nanomaterial in which biodegradation was

  20. Gold nanoparticle capture within protein crystal scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Ann E.; Huber, Thaddaus R.; Ni, Thomas W.; Hartje, Luke F.; Appel, Karina L.; Yost, Jarad W.; Ackerson, Christopher J.; Snow, Christopher D.

    2016-06-01

    DNA assemblies have been used to organize inorganic nanoparticles into 3D arrays, with emergent properties arising as a result of nanoparticle spacing and geometry. We report here the use of engineered protein crystals as an alternative approach to biologically mediated assembly of inorganic nanoparticles. The protein crystal's 13 nm diameter pores result in an 80% solvent content and display hexahistidine sequences on their interior. The hexahistidine sequence captures Au25(glutathione)~17 (nitrilotriacetic acid)~1 nanoclusters throughout a chemically crosslinked crystal via the coordination of Ni(ii) to both the cluster and the protein. Nanoparticle loading was validated by confocal microscopy and elemental analysis. The nanoparticles may be released from the crystal by exposure to EDTA, which chelates the Ni(ii) and breaks the specific protein/nanoparticle interaction. The integrity of the protein crystals after crosslinking and nanoparticle capture was confirmed by single crystal X-ray crystallography.DNA assemblies have been used to organize inorganic nanoparticles into 3D arrays, with emergent properties arising as a result of nanoparticle spacing and geometry. We report here the use of engineered protein crystals as an alternative approach to biologically mediated assembly of inorganic nanoparticles. The protein crystal's 13 nm diameter pores result in an 80% solvent content and display hexahistidine sequences on their interior. The hexahistidine sequence captures Au25(glutathione)~17 (nitrilotriacetic acid)~1 nanoclusters throughout a chemically crosslinked crystal via the coordination of Ni(ii) to both the cluster and the protein. Nanoparticle loading was validated by confocal microscopy and elemental analysis. The nanoparticles may be released from the crystal by exposure to EDTA, which chelates the Ni(ii) and breaks the specific protein/nanoparticle interaction. The integrity of the protein crystals after crosslinking and nanoparticle capture was

  1. In vitro cytotoxicity of surface modified bismuth nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yang; Wang, Chaoming; Qiao, Yong; Hossain, Mainul; Ma, Liyuan; Su, Ming

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes in vitro cytotoxicity of bismuth nanoparticles revealed by three complementary assays (MTT, G6PD, and calcein AM/EthD-1). The results show that bismuth nanoparticles are more toxic than most previously reported bismuth compounds. Concentration dependent cytotoxicities have been observed for bismuth nanoparticles and surface modified bismuth nanoparticles. The bismuth nanoparticles are non-toxic at concentration of 0.5 nM. Nanoparticles at high concentration (50 nM) kill 45, 52, 41, 34 % HeLa cells for bare nanoparticles, amine terminated bismuth nanoparticles, silica coated bismuth nanoparticles, and polyethylene glycol (PEG) modified bismuth nanoparticles, respectively; which indicates cytotoxicity in terms of cell viability is in the descending order of amine terminated bismuth nanoparticles, bare bismuth nanoparticles, silica coated bismuth nanoparticles, and PEG modified bismuth nanoparticles. HeLa cells are more susceptible to toxicity from bismuth nanoparticles than MG-63 cells. The simultaneous use of three toxicity assays provides information on how nanoparticles interact with cells. Silica coated bismuth nanoparticles can damage cellular membrane yet keep mitochondria less influenced; while amine terminated bismuth nanoparticles can affect the metabolic functions of cells. The findings have important implications for caution of nanoparticle exposure and evaluating toxicity of bismuth nanoparticles.

  2. Single nanoparticle tracking reveals influence of chemical functionality of nanoparticles on local ordering of liquid crystals and nanoparticle diffusion coefficients.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Gary M; Ong, Rizal; Cortes, Angel D; Moreno-Razo, J Antonio; de Pablo, Juan J; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2009-07-01

    This letter reports that darkfield microscopy can be used to track the trajectories of chemically functionalized gold nanoparticles in nematic liquid crystals (LCs), thus leading to measurements of the diffusion coefficients of the nanoparticles in the LCs. These measurements reveal that the diffusion coefficients of the nanoparticles dispersed in the LC are strongly dependent on the surface chemistry of the nanoparticles. Because the changes in surface chemistry are measured to have negligible influence on the diffusion coefficients of the same nanoparticles dispersed in isotropic solvents, we conclude that surface chemistry-induced changes in the local order of LCs underlie the behavior of the diffusion coefficients of the nanoparticles in the LC. Surface chemistry-dependent ordering of the LCs near the surfaces of the nanoparticles was also found to influence diffusion coefficients measured when the LC was heated above the bulk nematic-to-isotropic transition temperature. These experimental measurements are placed into the context of past theoretical predictions regarding the impact of local ordering of LCs on diffusion coefficients. The results that emerge from this study provide important insights into the mobility of nanoparticles in LCs and suggest new approaches based on measurements of nanoparticle dynamics that can yield information on the ordering of LCs near nanoparticles.

  3. Gluing gels: A nanoparticle solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, Eric A.; Scherman, Oren A.

    2014-03-01

    Synthetic polymer gels with certain surface chemistries can be glued together by a simple and inexpensive method that uses commercially available silica nanoparticles. Biological tissues can also be joined by this nanotechnological route, eliminating the need for sutures, additional adhesives or chemical reactions.

  4. Volume plasmon of bismuth nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan; Su, Dong; Spence, John C. H.; Zhou, Shifeng; Qiu, Jianrong

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the measurements of the bulk plasmon of Bi nanoparticles supported by a SiO 2 matrix using electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The blue shifts of plasmon peak in small particles were observed. However, the degree of shift was much smaller than the previous study in the literature and cannot be interpreted by the quantum confinement.

  5. Thermodynamics of catalytic nanoparticle morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwolak, Michael; Sharma, Renu; Lin, Pin Ann

    Metallic nanoparticles are an important class of industrial catalysts. The variability of their properties and the environment in which they act, from their chemical nature & surface modification to their dispersion and support, allows their performance to be optimized for many chemical processes useful in, e.g., energy applications and other areas. Their large surface area to volume ratio, as well as varying sizes and faceting, in particular, makes them an efficient source for catalytically active sites. These characteristics of nanoparticles - i.e., their morphology - can often display intriguing behavior as a catalytic process progresses. We develop a thermodynamic model of nanoparticle morphology, one that captures the competition of surface energy with other interactions, to predict structural changes during catalytic processes. Comparing the model to environmental transmission electron microscope images of nickel nanoparticles during carbon nanotube (and other product) growth demonstrates that nickel deformation in response to the nanotube growth is due to a favorable interaction with carbon. Moreover, this deformation is halted due to insufficient volume of the particles. We will discuss the factors that influence morphology and also how the model can be used to extract interaction strengths from experimental observations.

  6. Biocompatibility of crystalline opal nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Silica nanoparticles are being developed as a host of biomedical and biotechnological applications. For this reason, there are more studies about biocompatibility of silica with amorphous and crystalline structure. Except hydrated silica (opal), despite is presents directly and indirectly in humans. Two sizes of crystalline opal nanoparticles were investigated in this work under criteria of toxicology. Methods In particular, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects caused by opal nanoparticles (80 and 120 nm) were evaluated in cultured mouse cells via a set of bioassays, methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium-bromide (MTT) and 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU). Results 3T3-NIH cells were incubated for 24 and 72 h in contact with nanocrystalline opal particles, not presented significant statistically difference in the results of cytotoxicity. Genotoxicity tests of crystalline opal nanoparticles were performed by the BrdU assay on the same cultured cells for 24 h incubation. The reduction of BrdU-incorporated cells indicates that nanocrystalline opal exposure did not caused unrepairable damage DNA. Conclusions There is no relationship between that particles size and MTT reduction, as well as BrdU incorporation, such that the opal particles did not induce cytotoxic effect and genotoxicity in cultured mouse cells. PMID:23088559

  7. Green Nanoparticles for Mosquito Control

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Namita; Prakash, Soam

    2014-01-01

    Here, we have used the green method for synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles. In the present study the silver (Ag) and gold (Au) nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by using the aqueous bark extract of Indian spice dalchini (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) (C. zyelanicum or C. verum J. Presl). Additionally, we have used these synthesized nanoparticles for mosquito control. The larvicidal activity has been tested against the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi and filariasis vector Culex quinquefasciatus. The results were obtained using UV-visible spectrophotometer and the images were recorded with a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The efficacy tests were then performed at different concentrations and varying numbers of hours by probit analysis. The synthesized AgNPs were in spherical shape and average sizes (11.77 nm AgNPs and 46.48 nm AuNPs). The larvae of An. stephensi were found highly susceptible to the synthesized AgNPs and AuNPs than the Cx. quinquefasciatus. These results suggest that the C. zeylanicum synthesized silver and gold nanoparticles have the potential to be used as an ideal ecofriendly approach for the control of mosquito. PMID:25243210

  8. Carbonaceous Matter in Growing Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, M. V.; Stangl, C. M.; Horan, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric nanoparticles constitute the greatest portion of ambient aerosol loading by number. A major source of atmospheric nanoparticles is new particle formation (NPF), a gas to particle conversion process whereby clusters nucleate from gas phase precursors to form clusters on the order of one or a few nanometers and then grow rapidly to climatically relevant sizes. A substantial fraction of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are thought to arise from NPF. In order to better predict the frequency, growth rates, and climatic impacts of NPF, knowledge of the chemical mechanisms by which nucleated nanoparticles grow is needed. The two main contributors to particle growth are (neutralized) sulfate and carbonaceous matter. Particle growth by sulfuric acid condensation is generally well understood, though uncertainty remains about the extent of base neutralization and the relative roles of ammonia and amines. Much less is known about carbonaceous matter, and field measurements suggest that nitrogen-containing species are important. In this presentation, recent work by our group will be described that uses a combination of ambient measurements, laboratory experiments and computational work to study carbonaceous matter in growing nanoparticles. These studies span a range of particle sizes from the initial adsorption of molecules onto a nanometer-size ammonium bisulfate seed cluster to reactions in particles that are large enough to support condensed-phase chemistry.

  9. Enzymatic Synthesis of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kolhatkar, Arati G.; Dannongoda, Chamath; Kourentzi, Katerina; Jamison, Andrew C.; Nekrashevich, Ivan; Kar, Archana; Cacao, Eliedonna; Strych, Ulrich; Rusakova, Irene; Martirosyan, Karen S.; Litvinov, Dmitri; Lee, T. Randall; Willson, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first in vitro enzymatic synthesis of paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic nanoparticles toward magnetic ELISA reporting. With our procedure, alkaline phosphatase catalyzes the dephosphorylation of l-ascorbic-2-phosphate, which then serves as a reducing agent for salts of iron, gadolinium, and holmium, forming magnetic precipitates of Fe45±14Gd5±2O50±15 and Fe42±4Ho6±4O52±5. The nanoparticles were found to be paramagnetic at 300 K and antiferromagnetic under 25 K. Although weakly magnetic at 300 K, the room-temperature magnetization of the nanoparticles found here is considerably greater than that of analogous chemically-synthesized LnxFeyOz (Ln = Gd, Ho) samples reported previously. At 5 K, the nanoparticles showed a significantly higher saturation magnetization of 45 and 30 emu/g for Fe45±14Gd5±2O50±15 and Fe42±4Ho6±4O52±5, respectively. Our approach of enzymatically synthesizing magnetic labels reduces the cost and avoids diffusional mass-transfer limitations associated with pre-synthesized magnetic reporter particles, while retaining the advantages of magnetic sensing. PMID:25854425

  10. Nanoparticles: Neither solid nor liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguado, Andrés

    2016-09-01

    Nanoparticles of gallium deposited on a sapphire substrate, which are now shown to remain stable in a state of solid/liquid coexistence across a temperature window wider than 600 K, may prove useful for studying the properties of solid/liquid interfaces and in plasmonic or catalytic applications.

  11. Nanoparticles: Is Toxicity a Concern?

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Pragna

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology involving manipulation of atoms and molecules at the nanoscale is one of the frontier areas of research in modern science. During the last few years, nanotechnology has witnessed breakthroughs in the fields of medicine, environment, therapeutics, drug development and biotechnology. This is due to the unique properties of nanomaterials (e.g. chemical, mechanical, optical, magnetic, and biological) which make them desirable for commercial and medical applications. Considering the theory and practice of using nanoparticles, nanotechnology has a great potential in improving treatment of various disorders and in vitro diagnostics. However, there is not much information available on the toxicity of nanoparticles in relation to human health. Toxic effect of nanomaterials on humans is the primary concern of the health industry. Nanomaterials are able to cross biological membranes and access cells, tissues and organs that larger-sized particles normally cannot. Nanomaterials can gain access to the blood stream via inhalation or ingestion. This may lead to both genotoxicity and biochemical toxicity. In this review we try to show which types, sizes and concentrations of nanoparticles are safe for human use and this will help in developing diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic models using nanoparticles.

  12. Interaction of Nanoparticles with Biofilms

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this work we have studied the interaction and adsorption of engineered nanoparticles such as TiO2, ZnO, CeO2 , and carbon nanotubes with biofilms. Biofilm is an extracellular polymeric substance coating comprised of living material and it is an aggregation of bacteria, algae, ...

  13. Nanoparticle-based theranostic agents

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jin; Lee, Seulki; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2010-01-01

    Theranostic nanomedicine is emerging as a promising therapeutic paradigm. It takes advantage of the high capacity of nanoplatforms to ferry cargo and loads onto them both imaging and therapeutic functions. The resulting nanosystems, capable of diagnosis, drug delivery and monitoring of therapeutic response, are expected to play a significant role in the dawning era of personalized medicine, and much research effort has been devoted toward that goal. A convenience in constructing such function-integrated agents is that many nanoplatforms are already, themselves, imaging agents. Their well developed surface chemistry makes it easy to load them with pharmaceutics and promote them to be theranostic nanosystems. Iron oxide nanoparticles, quantum dots, carbon nanotubes, gold nanoparticles and silica nanoparticles, have been previously well investigated in the imaging setting and are candidate nanoplatforms for building up nanoparticle-based theranostics. In the current article, we will outline the progress along this line, organized by the category of the core materials. We will focus on construction strategies and will discuss the challenges and opportunities associated with this emerging technology. PMID:20691229

  14. Targeted Nanoparticles in Mitochondrial Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Rakesh K.; Kolishetti, Nagesh; Dhar, Shanta

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria, the so-called “energy factory of cells” not only produce energy but also contribute immensely in cellular mortality management. Mitochondrial dysfunctions result in various diseases including but not limited to cancer, atherosclerosis, and neurodegenerative diseases. In the recent years, targeting mitochondria emerged as an attractive strategy to control mitochondrial dysfunction related diseases. Despite the desire to direct therapeutics to the mitochondria, the actual task is more difficult due to the highly complex nature of the mitochondria. The potential benefits of integrating nanomaterials with properties such as biodegradability, magnetization, fluorescence, and near-infrared absorption into a single object of nanoscale dimensions can lead to the development of hybrid nano-medical platforms for targeting therapeutics to the mitochondria. Only a handful of nanoparticles based on metal oxides, gold nanoparticles, dendrons, carbon nanotubes, and liposomes were recently engineered to target mitochondria. Most of these materials face tremendous challenges when administered in vivo due to their limited biocompatibility. Biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles emerged as eminent candidates for effective drug delivery. In this review we highlight the current advancements in the development of biodegradable nanoparticle platforms as effective targeting tools for mitochondrial medicine. PMID:25348382

  15. Enzymatic synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kolhatkar, Arati G; Dannongoda, Chamath; Kourentzi, Katerina; Jamison, Andrew C; Nekrashevich, Ivan; Kar, Archana; Cacao, Eliedonna; Strych, Ulrich; Rusakova, Irene; Martirosyan, Karen S; Litvinov, Dmitri; Lee, T Randall; Willson, Richard C

    2015-01-01

    We report the first in vitro enzymatic synthesis of paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic nanoparticles toward magnetic ELISA reporting. With our procedure, alkaline phosphatase catalyzes the dephosphorylation of l-ascorbic-2-phosphate, which then serves as a reducing agent for salts of iron, gadolinium, and holmium, forming magnetic precipitates of Fe45±14Gd5±2O50±15 and Fe42±4Ho6±4O52±5. The nanoparticles were found to be paramagnetic at 300 K and antiferromagnetic under 25 K. Although weakly magnetic at 300 K, the room-temperature magnetization of the nanoparticles found here is considerably greater than that of analogous chemically-synthesized LnxFeyOz (Ln = Gd, Ho) samples reported previously. At 5 K, the nanoparticles showed a significantly higher saturation magnetization of 45 and 30 emu/g for Fe45±14Gd5±2O50±15 and Fe42±4Ho6±4O52±5, respectively. Our approach of enzymatically synthesizing magnetic labels reduces the cost and avoids diffusional mass-transfer limitations associated with pre-synthesized magnetic reporter particles, while retaining the advantages of magnetic sensing. PMID:25854425

  16. Electron dynamics in metallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigot, J.-Y.; Halté, V.; Merle, J.-C.; Daunois, A.

    2000-01-01

    We studied the dynamics of electrons in copper and silver nanoparticles embedded in a transparent matrix, using the technique of pump-probe femtosecond spectroscopy. Comparative measurements are made in thin films of the same metals. In the case of the nanoparticles, the electron dynamics is strongly influenced by the surface at the boundary of the metal and the surrounding dielectric matrix. A detailed study of the pump-probe signals near the plasmon resonance of the nanoparticles reveals the importance of electron-electron scattering during several hundreds of femtoseconds. The influence of these scattering processes on the real and imaginary parts of the metal dielectric function is compared in the nanoparticles and thin films. In addition, the non-thermal component of the electrons and the heat transfer to the surrounding dielectric are measured. The results are analyzed with a model of effective medium, where the metal dielectric function is described in the random phase approximation, including the surface effects in a phenomenological way.

  17. Enzymatic synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kolhatkar, Arati G; Dannongoda, Chamath; Kourentzi, Katerina; Jamison, Andrew C; Nekrashevich, Ivan; Kar, Archana; Cacao, Eliedonna; Strych, Ulrich; Rusakova, Irene; Martirosyan, Karen S; Litvinov, Dmitri; Lee, T Randall; Willson, Richard C

    2015-01-01

    We report the first in vitro enzymatic synthesis of paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic nanoparticles toward magnetic ELISA reporting. With our procedure, alkaline phosphatase catalyzes the dephosphorylation of l-ascorbic-2-phosphate, which then serves as a reducing agent for salts of iron, gadolinium, and holmium, forming magnetic precipitates of Fe45±14Gd5±2O50±15 and Fe42±4Ho6±4O52±5. The nanoparticles were found to be paramagnetic at 300 K and antiferromagnetic under 25 K. Although weakly magnetic at 300 K, the room-temperature magnetization of the nanoparticles found here is considerably greater than that of analogous chemically-synthesized LnxFeyOz (Ln = Gd, Ho) samples reported previously. At 5 K, the nanoparticles showed a significantly higher saturation magnetization of 45 and 30 emu/g for Fe45±14Gd5±2O50±15 and Fe42±4Ho6±4O52±5, respectively. Our approach of enzymatically synthesizing magnetic labels reduces the cost and avoids diffusional mass-transfer limitations associated with pre-synthesized magnetic reporter particles, while retaining the advantages of magnetic sensing.

  18. Breakthrough: Fighting Cancer with Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhkova, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Argonne nanoscientist Elena Rozhkova is studying ways to enlist nanoparticles to treat brain cancer. This nano-bio technology may eventually provide an alternative form of therapy that targets only cancer cells and does not affect normal living tissue. Read more at http://1.usa.gov/JAXh7Q.

  19. Breakthrough: Fighting Cancer with Nanoparticles

    ScienceCinema

    Rozhkova, Elena

    2016-07-12

    Argonne nanoscientist Elena Rozhkova is studying ways to enlist nanoparticles to treat brain cancer. This nano-bio technology may eventually provide an alternative form of therapy that targets only cancer cells and does not affect normal living tissue. Read more at http://1.usa.gov/JAXh7Q.

  20. Nanoparticle toxicity and cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevenslik, T.

    2011-07-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have provided significant advancements in cancer treatment. But as in any technology, there is a darkside. Experiments have shown NPs in body fluids pose a health risk by causing DNA damage that in of itself may lead to cancer. To avoid the dilemma that NPs are toxic to both cancer cells and DNA alike, the mechanism of NP toxicity must be understood so that the safe use of NPs may go forward. Reactive oxidative species (ROS) of peroxide and hydroxyl radicals damage the DNA by chemical reaction, but require NPs provide energies of about 5 eV not possible by surface effects. Only electromagnetic (EM) radiations beyond ultraviolet (UV) levels may explain the toxicity of NPs. Indeed, experiments show DNA damage from <100 nm NPs mimic the same reaction pathways of conventional sources of ionizing radiation, Hence, it is reasonable to hypothesize that NPs produce their own source of UV radiation, albeit at low intensity. Ionizing radiation from NPs at UV levels is consistent with the theory of QED induced EM radiation. QED stands for quantum electrodynamics. By this theory, fine < 100 nm NPs absorb low frequency thermal energy in the far infrared (FIR) from collisions with the water molecules in body fluids. Since quantum mechanics (QM) precludes NPs from having specific heat, absorbed EM collision energy cannot be conserved by an increase in temperature. But total internal reflection (TIR) momentarily confines the absorbed EM energy within the NP. Conservation proceeds by the creation of QED photons by frequency up-conversion of the absorbed EM energy to the TIR confinement frequency, typically beyond the UV. Subsequently, the QED photons upon scattering from atoms within the NP avoid TIR confinement and leak UV to the surroundings, thereby explaining the remarkable toxicity of NPs. But QED radiation need not be limited to natural or man-made NPs. Extensions suggest UV radiation is produced from biological NPs within the body, e.g., enzyme induced

  1. Nanoparticle ζ -potentials.

    PubMed

    Doane, Tennyson L; Chuang, Chi-Hung; Hill, Reghan J; Burda, Clemens

    2012-03-20

    For over half a century, alternating electric fields have been used to induce particle transport, furnishing the ζ-potential of analytes with sizes ranging from a few nanometers to several micrometers. Concurrent advances in nanotechnology have provided new materials for catalysis, self-assembly, and biomedical applications, all of which benefit from a thorough understanding of particle surface charge. Therefore, the measurement of the ζ-potential via electrophoretic light scattering (ELS) has become essential for nanoparticle (NP) research. However, the interpretation of NP electrophoretic mobility, especially that of ligand-coated NPs, can be a complex undertaking. Despite the inherent intricacy of these data, key concepts from colloidal science can help to distill valuable information from ELS. In this Account, we adopt PEGylated Au NPs as an illustrative example to explore extensions of the classical theories of Smoluchowski, Hückel, and Henry to more contemporary theories for ligand-coated NP systems such as those from Ohshima, and Hill, Saville, and Russel. First, we review the basic experimental considerations necessary to understand NP electrophoretic mobility, identifying when O'Brien and White's numerical solution of the standard electrokinetic model should be adopted over Henry's closed-form analytical approximation. Next, we explore recent developments in the theory of ligand-coated particle electrophoresis, and how one can furnish accurate and meaningful relationships between measured NP mobility, ζ-potential, and surface charge. By identifying key ligand-coated NP parameters (e.g., coating thickness, permeability, molecular mass, and hydrodynamic segment size), we present a systematic method for quantitatively interpreting NP electrophoretic mobility. In addition to reviewing theoretical foundations, we describe our recent results that examine how the unique surface curvature of NPs alters and controls their properties. These data provide

  2. Engineering biofunctional magnetic nanoparticles for biotechnological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moros, Maria; Pelaz, Beatriz; López-Larrubia, Pilar; García-Martin, Maria L.; Grazú, Valeria; de La Fuente, Jesus M.

    2010-09-01

    Synthesis and characterization of magnetic nanoparticles with excellent size control are showed here. Their functionalization using an amphiphilic polymer is also described. This strategy allows the stabilization of magnetic nanoparticles in aqueous solvents and in addition, the polymer shell serves as a platform to incorporate relevant biomolecules, such as poly(ethylene glycol) and a number of carbohydrates. Nanoparticles functionalized with carbohydrates show the ability to avoid unspecific interactions between proteins present in the working medium and the nanoparticles, so can be used as an alternative to poly(ethylene glycol) molecules. Results confirm these nanoparticles as excellent contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Changes in the spin-spin transversal relaxation times of the surrounding water protons due to nanoparticle aggregation demonstrates the bioactivity of these nanoparticles functionalized with carbohydrates. To finish with, nanoparticle toxicity is evaluated by means of MTT assay. The obtained results clearly indicate that these nanoparticles are excellent candidates for their further application in nanomedicine or nanobiotechnology.Synthesis and characterization of magnetic nanoparticles with excellent size control are showed here. Their functionalization using an amphiphilic polymer is also described. This strategy allows the stabilization of magnetic nanoparticles in aqueous solvents and in addition, the polymer shell serves as a platform to incorporate relevant biomolecules, such as poly(ethylene glycol) and a number of carbohydrates. Nanoparticles functionalized with carbohydrates show the ability to avoid unspecific interactions between proteins present in the working medium and the nanoparticles, so can be used as an alternative to poly(ethylene glycol) molecules. Results confirm these nanoparticles as excellent contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Changes in the spin-spin transversal relaxation times of the

  3. Nanoparticle shape, thermodynamics and kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, L. D.; Peng, L.

    2016-02-01

    Nanoparticles can be beautiful, as in stained glass windows, or they can be ugly as in wear and corrosion debris from implants. We estimate that there will be about 70 000 papers in 2015 with nanoparticles as a keyword, but only one in thirteen uses the nanoparticle shape as an additional keyword and research focus, and only one in two hundred has thermodynamics. Methods for synthesizing nanoparticles have exploded over the last decade, but our understanding of how and why they take their forms has not progressed as fast. This topical review attempts to take a critical snapshot of the current understanding, focusing more on methods to predict than a purely synthetic or descriptive approach. We look at models and themes which are largely independent of the exact synthetic method whether it is deposition, gas-phase condensation, solution based or hydrothermal synthesis. Elements are old dating back to the beginning of the 20th century—some of the pioneering models developed then are still relevant today. Others are newer, a merging of older concepts such as kinetic-Wulff constructions with methods to understand minimum energy shapes for particles with twins. Overall we find that while there are still many unknowns, the broad framework of understanding and predicting the structure of nanoparticles via diverse Wulff constructions, either thermodynamic, local minima or kinetic has been exceedingly successful. However, the field is still developing and there remain many unknowns and new avenues for research, a few of these being suggested towards the end of the review.

  4. Silicalite nanoparticles that promote transgene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Megan E.; Mai, Hoang Q.; Lee, Namhoon; Larsen, Sarah C.; Salem, Aliasger K.

    2008-04-01

    Here, we report on a new zeolite-based silicalite nanoparticle that can enhance the transfection efficiencies generated by poly ethylene imine-plasmid DNA (PEI-pDNA) complexes via a sedimentation mechanism and can enhance the transfection efficiencies of pDNA alone when surface functionalized with amine groups. The silicalite nanoparticles have a mean size of 55 nm. Functionalizing the silicalite nanoparticles with amine groups results in a clear transition in zeta potential from -25.9 ± 2.3 mV (pH 7.4) for unfunctionalized silicalite nanoparticles to 4.9 ± 0.7 mV (pH 7.4) for amine functionalized silicalite nanoparticles. We identify that silicalite nanoparticles used to promote non-viral vector acceleration to the cell surface are found in acidic vesicles or the cytoplasm but not the nucleus. An MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay showed that the silicalite nanoparticles were non-toxic at the concentrations tested for transfection. We show that surface functionalization of silicalite nanoparticles with amine groups results in a significant (230%) increase in transfection efficiency of pDNA when compared to unfunctionalized silicalite nanoparticles. Silicalite nanoparticles enhanced pDNA-PEI induced transfection of human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cells by over 150%.

  5. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles cause genotoxicity in human lung epithelial cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of engineered nanoparticles in consumer products is steadily increasing. However, the health effects of exposure to these nanoparticles are not thoroughly understood. This study investigated the genotoxicity of six titanium dioxide and two cerium oxide nanoparticles of va...

  6. Methods for producing nanoparticles using palladium salt and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Chan, Siu-Wai; Liang, Hongying

    2015-12-01

    The disclosed subject matter is directed to a method for producing nanoparticles, as well as the nanoparticles produced by this method. In one embodiment, the nanoparticles produced by the disclosed method have a high defect density.

  7. Interfacial functionalization and engineering of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yang

    The intense research interest in nanoscience and nanotechnology is largely fueled by the unique properties of nanoscale materials. In this dissertation, the research efforts are focused on surface functionalization and interfacial engineering of functional nanoparticles in the preparation of patchy nanoparticles (e.g., Janus nanoparticles and Neapolitan nanoparticles) such that the nanoparticle structures and properties may be manipulated to an unprecedented level of sophistication. Experimentally, Janus nanoparticles were prepared by an interfacial engineering method where one hemisphere of the originally hydrophobic nanoparticles was replaced with hydrophilic ligands at the air|liquid or solid|liquid interface. The amphiphilic surface characters of the Janus nanoparticles were verified by contact angle measurements, as compared to those of the bulk-exchange counterparts where the two types of ligands were distributed rather homogeneously on the nanoparticle surface. In a further study, a mercapto derivative of diacetylene was used as the hydrophilic ligands to prepare Janus nanoparticles by using hydrophobic hexanethiolate-protected gold nanoparticles as the starting materials. Exposure to UV irradiation led to effective covalent cross-linking between the diacetylene moieties of neighboring ligands and hence marked enhancement of the structural integrity of the Janus nanoparticles, which was attributable to the impeded surface diffusion of the thiol ligands on the nanoparticle surface, as manifested in fluorescence measurements of aged nanoparticles. More complicated bimetallic AgAu Janus nanoparticles were prepared by interfacial galvanic exchange reactions of a Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer of 1-hexanethiolate-passivated silver nanoparticles on a glass slide with gold(I)-mercaptopropanediol complex in a water/ethanol solution. The resulting nanoparticles exhibited an asymmetrical distribution not only of the organic capping ligands on the nanoparticle surface but

  8. Protein--nanoparticle interaction: identification of the ubiquitin--gold nanoparticle interaction site.

    PubMed

    Calzolai, Luigi; Franchini, Fabio; Gilliland, Douglas; Rossi, François

    2010-08-11

    We demonstrate that it is possible to identify the protein--nanoparticle interaction site at amino acid scale in solution. Using NMR, chemical shift perturbation analysis, and dynamic light scattering we have identified a specific domain of human ubiquitin that interacts with gold nanoparticles. This method allows a detailed structural analysis of proteins absorbed onto surfaces of nanoparticles in physiological conditions and it will provide much needed experimental data for better modeling and prediction of protein--nanoparticle interactions. PMID:20698623

  9. Rare earth oxide fluoride nanoparticles and hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Fulton, John L [Richland, WA; Hoffmann, Markus M [Richland, WA

    2001-11-13

    A hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles of a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine has been discovered. Nanoparticles comprising a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine are also described. These nanoparticles can exhibit excellent refractory properties as well as remarkable stability in hydrothermal conditions. The nanoparticles can exhibit excellent properties for numerous applications including fiber reinforcement of ceramic composites, catalyst supports, and corrosion resistant coatings for high-temperature aqueous solutions.

  10. Rare Earth Oxide Fluoride Nanoparticles And Hydrothermal Method For Forming Nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Fulton, John L.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2003-12-23

    A hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles of a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine has been discovered. Nanoparticles comprising a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine are also described. These nanoparticles can exhibit excellent refractory properties as well as remarkable stability in hydrothermal conditions. The nanoparticles can exhibit excellent properties for numerous applications including fiber reinforcement of ceramic composites, catalyst supports, and corrosion resistant coatings for high-temperature aqueous solutions.

  11. Sulfidation of silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levard, C.; Michel, F. M.; Brown, G. E.

    2010-12-01

    Rapid development of nanotechnologies that exploit the properties of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) raises questions concerning the impact of Ag on the environment. Ag-NPs are currently among the most widely used in the nanotechnology industry and the amount released into the environment is expected to increase along with production (1). When present in geochemical systems, Ag-NPs may undergo a variety of changes due to varying redox, pH, and chemical conditions. Expected changes range from surface modification (e.g., oxidation, sulfidation, chloridation etc.) to complete dissolution and re-precipitation. In this context, the focus of our work is on understanding the behavior of synthetic Ag-NPs with different particle sizes under varying conditions relevant to the environment. Sulfidation of Ag-NPs is of particular interest since it among the processes most likely to occur in aqueous systems, in particular under reducing conditions. Three sizes of Ag-NPs coated with polyvinyl pyrrolidone were produced using the polyol process (2) (7 ±1; 20 ±4, and 40 ±9 nm). Batch solutions containing the different Ag-NPs were subsequently reacted with Na2S solutions of different concentrations. The sulfidation process was followed step-wise for 24 hours and the corrosion products formed were characterized by electron microscopy (TEM/SEM), diffraction (XRD), and photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS). Surface charge (pHPZC) of the products formed during this process was also measured, as were changes in solubility and reactivity. Based on experimental observations we infer that the sulfidation process is the result of dissolution-precipitation and find that: (i) acanthite (Ag2S) is formed as a corrosion product; (ii) Ag-NPs aggregation increased with sulfidation rate; (iii) pHPZC increases with the rate of sulfidation; and (iv) the solubility of the corrosion products formed from sulfidation appears lower than that of non-sulfidated Ag-NPs. We observe size-dependent differences in

  12. Targeted polymeric nanoparticles for cancer gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jayoung; Wilson, David R.; Zamboni, Camila G.; Green, Jordan J.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, advances in designing polymeric nanoparticles for targeted cancer gene therapy are reviewed. Characterization and evaluation of biomaterials, targeting ligands, and transcriptional elements are each discussed. Advances in biomaterials have driven improvements to nanoparticle stability and tissue targeting, conjugation of ligands to the surface of polymeric nanoparticles enable binding to specific cancer cells, and the design of transcriptional elements has enabled selective DNA expression specific to the cancer cells. Together, these features have improved the performance of polymeric nanoparticles as targeted non-viral gene delivery vectors to treat cancer. As polymeric nanoparticles can be designed to be biodegradable, non-toxic, and to have reduced immunogenicity and tumorigenicity compared to viral platforms, they have significant potential for clinical use. Results of polymeric gene therapy in clinical trials and future directions for the engineering of nanoparticle systems for targeted cancer gene therapy are also presented. PMID:26061296

  13. Emerging nanomedicine opportunities with perfluorocarbon nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Winter, Patrick M; Cai, Kejia; Caruthers, Shelton D; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2007-03-01

    Perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoparticles can serve as a platform technology for molecular imaging and targeted drug-delivery applications. These nanoparticles are approximately 250 nm in diameter and are encapsulated in a phospholipid shell, which provides an ideal surface for the incorporation of targeting ligands, imaging agents and drugs. For molecular imaging, PFC nanoparticles can carry very large payloads of gadolinium to detect pathological biomarkers with magnetic resonance imaging. A variety of different epitopes, including alpha(v)beta(3)-integrin, tissue factor and fibrin, have been imaged using nanoparticles formulated with appropriate antibodies or peptidomimentics as targeting ligands. Lipophilic drugs can also be incorporated into the outer lipid shell of nanoparticles for targeted delivery. Upon binding to the target cell, the drug is exchanged from the particle surfactant monolayer to the cell membrane through a novel process called 'contact facilitated drug delivery'. By combining targeted molecular imaging and localized drug delivery, PFC nanoparticles provide diagnosis and therapy with a single agent.

  14. Nanosecond laser ablation of silver nanoparticle film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jaewon; Han, Sewoon; Lee, Daeho; Ahn, Sanghoon; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Moon, Jooho; Ko, Seung H.

    2013-02-01

    Nanosecond laser ablation of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) protected silver nanoparticle (20 nm diameter) film is studied using a frequency doubled Nd:YAG nanosecond laser (532 nm wavelength, 6 ns full width half maximum pulse width). In the sintered silver nanoparticle film, absorbed light energy conducts well through the sintered porous structure, resulting in ablation craters of a porous dome shape or crown shape depending on the irradiation fluence due to the sudden vaporization of the PVP. In the unsintered silver nanoparticle film, the ablation crater with a clean edge profile is formed and many coalesced nanoparticles of 50 to 100 nm in size are observed inside the ablation crater. These results and an order of magnitude analysis indicate that the absorbed thermal energy is confined within the nanoparticles, causing melting of nanoparticles and their coalescence to larger agglomerates, which are removed following melting and subsequent partial vaporization.

  15. Photoswitchable nanoparticles for in vivo cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tong, Rong; Chiang, Homer H; Kohane, Daniel S

    2013-11-19

    There are many obstacles to effective cancer chemotherapy, including drug penetration and accumulation in tumors and drug systemic toxicity. The penetration of therapies into tumors is limited by the dense tumor matrix and by compression of the tumor vasculature. We have developed spiropyran-based nanoparticles that shrink from 103 to 49 nm upon irradiation at 365 nm. That shrinkage enhanced tissue penetration and drug release. Irradiation of s.c. HT-1080 tumors in nude mice administered i.v. docetaxel-containing nanoparticles was more effective treatment than free docetaxel or encapsulated docetaxel without irradiation. Irradiation at the tumor site also resulted in less systemic toxicity than if the nanoparticles were irradiated before injection, presumably because of less systemically distributed free drug. The enhanced efficacy of nanoparticles in irradiated tumors may have been related to the observed enhanced tumor penetration by nanoparticles and decompression of tumor blood vessels, which may also increase nanoparticle delivery into tumors.

  16. Calix-Based Nanoparticles: A Review.

    PubMed

    Kongor, Anita R; Mehta, Viren A; Modi, Krunal M; Panchal, Manthan K; Dey, Shuvankar A; Panchal, Urvi S; Jain, Vinod K

    2016-06-01

    Calixarenes are considered as third generation supramolecules with hollow cavity-like architecture whereas nanoparticles are small entities with dimensions in the nanoscale. Many exciting achievements are seen when the calix system merges with nanoparticles which produces many fascinating facets in all fields of contemporary chemistry. The properties of nanoparticles which are tuned by calixarenes find applications in sensing, catalysis, molecular recognition, etc. Here, we have reviewed the chemistry of calix-based nanoparticles, and emphasis is laid on the modified, reducing, templated and stabilizing roles of calixarenes. This review covers the research being carried out in the domain of calix protected metal nanoparticles during last 18 years under the canopy of important 109 references. This article contains 58 figures which include 81 easy to understand structures. Calix-protected nanoparticles have enthralled researchers in the field of nanoscience with a tremendous growth in its applications, which heralds much promise to become in future a separate area of research. PMID:27573268

  17. [Interaction of fibrinogen with magnetite nanoparticles].

    PubMed

    Bychkova, A V; Sorokina, O N; Kovarskiĭ, A L; Shapiro, A B; Leonova, V B; Rozenfel'd, M A

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between fibrinogen and magnetite nanoparticles in solution has been studied by the methods of spin labeling, ferromagnetic resonance, dynamic and Rayleigh light scattering. It was shown that protein molecules adsorb on the surface of nanoparticles to form multilayer protein covers. The number of molecules adsorbed on one nanoparticle amounts to approximately 65 and the thickness of the adsorption layer amounts to approximately 27 nm. Separate nanoparticles with fibrinogen covers (clusters) form aggregates due to interactions of the end D-domains of fibrinogen. Under the influence of direct magnetic field, nanoparticles with adsorbed proteins form linear aggregates parallel to force lines. It was shown that the rate of protein coagulation during the formation of fibrin gel under the action of thrombin on fibrinogen decreases approximately 2 times in the presence of magnetite nanoparticles, and the magnitude of the average fiber mass-length ratio grows.

  18. Targeted polymeric nanoparticles for cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jayoung; Wilson, David R; Zamboni, Camila G; Green, Jordan J

    2015-01-01

    In this article, advances in designing polymeric nanoparticles for targeted cancer gene therapy are reviewed. Characterization and evaluation of biomaterials, targeting ligands, and transcriptional elements are each discussed. Advances in biomaterials have driven improvements to nanoparticle stability and tissue targeting, conjugation of ligands to the surface of polymeric nanoparticles enable binding to specific cancer cells, and the design of transcriptional elements has enabled selective DNA expression specific to the cancer cells. Together, these features have improved the performance of polymeric nanoparticles as targeted non-viral gene delivery vectors to treat cancer. As polymeric nanoparticles can be designed to be biodegradable, non-toxic, and to have reduced immunogenicity and tumorigenicity compared to viral platforms, they have significant potential for clinical use. Results of polymeric gene therapy in clinical trials and future directions for the engineering of nanoparticle systems for targeted cancer gene therapy are also presented.

  19. Tough germanium nanoparticles under electrochemical cycling.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wentao; Yang, Hui; Fan, Feifei; Liu, Yang; Liu, Xiao Hua; Huang, Jian Yu; Zhu, Ting; Zhang, Sulin

    2013-04-23

    Mechanical degradation of the electrode materials during electrochemical cycling remains a serious issue that critically limits the capacity retention and cyclability of rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. Here we report the highly reversible expansion and contraction of germanium nanoparticles under lithiation-delithiation cycling with in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). During multiple cycles to the full capacity, the germanium nanoparticles remained robust without any visible cracking despite ∼260% volume changes, in contrast to the size-dependent fracture of silicon nanoparticles upon the first lithiation. The comparative in situ TEM study of fragile silicon nanoparticles suggests that the tough behavior of germanium nanoparticles can be attributed to the weak anisotropy of the lithiation strain at the reaction front. The tough germanium nanoparticles offer substantial potential for the development of durable, high-capacity, and high-rate anodes for advanced lithium-ion batteries.

  20. Nanoparticles and cars - analysis of potential sources

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Urban health is potentially affected by particle emissions. The potential toxicity of nanoparticles is heavily debated and there is an enormous global increase in research activity in this field. In this respect, it is commonly accepted that nanoparticles may also be generated in processes occurring while driving vehicles. So far, a variety of studies addressed traffic-related particulate matter emissions, but only few studies focused on potential nanoparticles. Therefore, the present study analyzed the literature with regard to nanoparticles and cars. It can be stated that, to date, only a limited amount of research has been conducted in this area and more studies are needed to 1) address kind and sources of nanoparticles within automobiles and to 2) analyse whether there are health effects caused by these nanoparticles. PMID:22726351

  1. Application of Magnetic Nanoparticles to Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kami, Daisuke; Takeda, Shogo; Itakura, Yoko; Gojo, Satoshi; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Toyoda, Masashi

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticle technology is being incorporated into many areas of molecular science and biomedicine. Because nanoparticles are small enough to enter almost all areas of the body, including the circulatory system and cells, they have been and continue to be exploited for basic biomedical research as well as clinical diagnostic and therapeutic applications. For example, nanoparticles hold great promise for enabling gene therapy to reach its full potential by facilitating targeted delivery of DNA into tissues and cells. Substantial progress has been made in binding DNA to nanoparticles and controlling the behavior of these complexes. In this article, we review research on binding DNAs to nanoparticles as well as our latest study on non-viral gene delivery using polyethylenimine-coated magnetic nanoparticles. PMID:21747701

  2. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using tannins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Pandian Bothi; Rahim, Afidah Abdul; Qureshi, Ahmad Kaleem; Awang, Khalijah

    2014-09-01

    Colloidal silver nanoparticles were prepared by rapid green synthesis using different tannin sources as reducing agent viz. chestnut (CN), mangrove (MG) and quebracho (QB). The aqueous silver ions when exposed to CN, MG and QB tannins were reduced which resulted in formation of silver nanoparticles. The resultant silver nanoparticles were characterized using UV-Visible, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDX), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. Furthermore, the possible mechanism of nanoparticles synthesis was also derived using FT-IR analysis. Spectroscopy analysis revealed that the synthesized nanoparticles were within 30 to 75 nm in size, while XRD results showed that nanoparticles formed were crystalline with face centered cubic geometry.

  3. Liquid-liquid interfacial nanoparticle assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Emrick, Todd S.; Russell, Thomas P.; Dinsmore, Anthony; Skaff, Habib; Lin, Yao

    2008-12-30

    Self-assembly of nanoparticles at the interface between two fluids, and methods to control such self-assembly process, e.g., the surface density of particles assembling at the interface; to utilize the assembled nanoparticles and their ligands in fabrication of capsules, where the elastic properties of the capsules can be varied from soft to tough; to develop capsules with well-defined porosities for ultimate use as delivery systems; and to develop chemistries whereby multiple ligands or ligands with multiple functionalities can be attached to the nanoparticles to promote the interfacial segregation and assembly of the nanoparticles. Certain embodiments use cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles, since the photoluminescence of the particles provides a convenient means by which the spatial location and organization of the particles can be probed. However, the systems and methodologies presented here are general and can, with suitable modification of the chemistries, be adapted to any type of nanoparticle.

  4. Fabricating solar cells with silicon nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Loscutoff, Paul; Molesa, Steve; Kim, Taeseok

    2014-09-02

    A laser contact process is employed to form contact holes to emitters of a solar cell. Doped silicon nanoparticles are formed over a substrate of the solar cell. The surface of individual or clusters of silicon nanoparticles is coated with a nanoparticle passivation film. Contact holes to emitters of the solar cell are formed by impinging a laser beam on the passivated silicon nanoparticles. For example, the laser contact process may be a laser ablation process. In that case, the emitters may be formed by diffusing dopants from the silicon nanoparticles prior to forming the contact holes to the emitters. As another example, the laser contact process may be a laser melting process whereby portions of the silicon nanoparticles are melted to form the emitters and contact holes to the emitters.

  5. Effect of nanoparticles on transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Cappel, M J; Kreuter, J

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess by in vitro means the effect of poly (methylmethacrylate) nanoparticles and poly (butylcyanoacrylate) nanoparticles on transdermal drug delivery. Methanol and octanol were chosen as test permeants. In order to distinguish between thermodynamic effect and those due to biological consequences, two different membranes were employed, i.e., full thickness hairless mouse skin and silicone elastomer sheeting (175 microns). It is evident that poly (methylmethacrylate) nanoparticles and poly (butylcyanoacrylate) nanoparticles increase the permeability of methanol through hairless mouse skin by a factor of 1.2-2. The permeability of lipophilic octanol is either unaffected by nanoparticles or decreases as a function of nanoparticle concentration depending on the lipophilicity of the polymer material.

  6. Studies on the biodistribution of dextrin nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, C.; Ferreira, M. F. M.; Santos, A. C.; Prata, M. I. M.; Geraldes, C. F. G. C.; Martins, J. A.; Gama, F. M.

    2010-07-01

    The characterization of biodistribution is a central requirement in the development of biomedical applications based on the use of nanoparticles, in particular for controlled drug delivery. The blood circulation time, organ biodistribution and rate of excretion must be well characterized in the process of product development. In this work, the biodistribution of recently developed self-assembled dextrin nanoparticles is addressed. Functionalization of the dextrin nanoparticles with a DOTA-monoamide-type metal chelator, via click chemistry, is described. The metal chelator functionalized nanoparticles were labelled with a γ-emitting 153Sm3 + radioisotope and the blood clearance rate and organ biodistribution of the nanoparticles were obtained. The effect of PEG surface coating on the blood clearance rate and organ biodistribution of the nanoparticles was also studied.

  7. Gold nanoparticles for tumour detection and treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartsuiker, L.; Petersen, W.; Jose, J.; van Es, P.; Lenferink, A.; Poot, A. A.; Terstappen, L. W. M. M.; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Manohar, S.; Otto, C.

    2011-07-01

    The use of nanoparticles in biomedical applications is emerging rapidly. Recent developments have led to numerous studies of noble metal nanoparticles, down to the level of single molecule detection in living cells. The application of noble metal nanoparticles in diagnostics and treatment of early stage carcinomas is the subject of many present studies. Gold nanoparticles are particularly interesting for optical biomedical applications due to their biocompatibility and moreover, their enhanced absorption cross-sections. The latter is a result of surface plasmon resonance, which can be tuned by altering the shape of the nanoparticles enabling usage of the near infrared tissue transparent optical window. This paper presents a brief overview of the variety of shapes, size and surface chemistries of the gold nanoparticles used for cancer detection and treatment, as well as their effects in different tumour models that have recently been investigated, both in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Nanoparticle impacts show high-ionic-strength citrate avoids aggregation of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lees, Jessica C; Ellison, Joanna; Batchelor-McAuley, Christopher; Tschulik, Kristina; Damm, Christine; Omanović, Dario; Compton, Richard G

    2013-12-01

    Quantitative analytical detection and sizing of silver nanoparticles is achieved by applying the new electrochemical method nanoparticle coulometry. For the first time, tri-sodium citrate is used as both an electrolyte and a nanoparticle stabilizing agent, allowing the individual particles to be addressed.

  9. Synthesis and structural characterization of CZTS nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Lydia, R.; Reddy, P. Sreedhara

    2013-06-03

    The CZTS nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by Chemical co-precipitation method with different pH values in the range of 6 to 8. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. XRD studies revealed that the CZTS nanoparticles exhibited Kesterite Structure with preferential orientation along the (112) direction. Sample at pH value of 7 reached the nearly stoichiometric ratio.

  10. Magnetic nanoparticles for gene and drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    McBain, Stuart C; Yiu, Humphrey HP; Dobson, Jon

    2008-01-01

    Investigations of magnetic micro- and nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery began over 30 years ago. Since that time, major progress has been made in particle design and synthesis techniques, however, very few clinical trials have taken place. Here we review advances in magnetic nanoparticle design, in vitro and animal experiments with magnetic nanoparticle-based drug and gene delivery, and clinical trials of drug targeting. PMID:18686777

  11. Imaging carbon nanoparticles and related cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C.; Porter, A. E.; Muller, K.; Koziol, K.; Skepper, J. N.; Midgley, P.; Welland, M.

    2009-02-01

    Carbon-based nanoparticles have attracted significant attention due to their unique physical, chemical, and electrical properties. Numerous studies have been published on carbon nanoparticle toxicity; however, the results remain contradictory. An ideal approach is to combine a cell viability assay with nanometer scale imaging to elucidate the detailed physiological and structural effects of cellular exposure to nanoparticles. We have developed and applied a combination of advanced microscopy techniques to image carbon nanoparticles within cells. Specifically, we have used EFTEM, HAADF-STEM, and tomography and confocal microscopy to generate 3-D images enabling determination of nanoparticle spatial distribution in a cell. With these techniques, we can differentiate between the carbon nanoparticles and the cell in both stained and unstained sections. We found carbon nanoparticles (C60, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT)) within the cytoplasm, lysosomes, and nucleus of human monocyte-derived macrophage cells (HMM). C60 aggregated along the plasma and nuclear membrane while MWNTs and SWNTs were seen penetrating the plasma and nuclear membranes. Both the Neutral Red (NR) assay and ultra-stuctural analysis showed an increase in cell death after exposure to MWNTs and SWNTs. SWNTs were more toxic than MWNTs. For both MWNTs and SWNTs, we correlated uptake of the nanoparticles with a significant increase in necrosis. In conclusion, high resolution imaging studies provide us with significant insight into the localised interactions between carbon nanoparticles and cells. Viability assays alone only provide a broad toxicological picture of nanoparticle effects on cells whereas the high resolution images associate the spatial distributions of the nanoparticles within the cell with increased incidence of necrosis. This combined approach will enable us to probe the mechanisms of particle uptake and subsequent chemical changes within the

  12. Aerosol fabrication methods for monodisperse nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Jiang, Xingmao; Brinker, C Jeffrey

    2014-10-21

    Exemplary embodiments provide materials and methods for forming monodisperse particles. In one embodiment, the monodisperse particles can be formed by first spraying a nanoparticle-containing dispersion into aerosol droplets and then heating the aerosol droplets in the presence of a shell precursor to form core-shell particles. By removing either the shell layer or the nanoparticle core of the core-shell particles, monodisperse nanoparticles can be formed.

  13. Monovalent plasmonic nanoparticles for biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Daeha; Lee, Hyunjung; Lee, Jung-uk; Haas, Thomas J.; Jun, Young-wook

    2016-03-01

    The multivalent nature of commercial nanoparticle imaging agents and the difficulties associated with producing monovalent nanoparticles challenge their use in biology, where clustering of target biomolecules can perturb dynamics of biomolecular targets. Here, we report production and purification of monovalent gold and silver nanoparticles for their single molecule imaging application. We first synthesized DNA-conjugated 20 nm and 40 nm gold and silver nanoparticles via conventional metal-thiol chemistry, yielding nanoparticles with mixed valency. By employing an anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography (AE-HPLC) method, we purified monovalent nanoparticles from the mixtures. To allow efficient peak-separation resolution while keeping the excellent colloidal stability of nanoparticles against harsh purification condition (e.g. high NaCl), we optimized surface properties of nanoparticles by modulating surface functional groups. We characterized the monovalent character of the purified nanoparticles by hybridizing two complementary conjugates, forming dimers. Finally, we demonstrate the use of the monovalent plasmonic nanoprobes as single molecule imaging probes by tracking single TrkA receptors diffusing on the cell membrane and compare to monovalent quantum dot probes.

  14. Colloidally deposited nanoparticle wires for biophysical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Sophie C.; Liu, Wen-Tao; Diao, Jia-Jie

    2015-12-01

    Among the techniques developed to prepare nanoparticle wires for multiple applications, the colloidal deposition method at interface has been regarded as cost-efficient and eco-friendly, and hence has attracted an increasing amount of research attention. In this report, the recent developments in preparing nanoparticle wires and integrated nanoparticle wire arrays using this technique have been reviewed. Furthermore, we have also discussed the application of these nanoparticle structures in detecting chemical and biological molecules. Project supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities through Xi’an Jiaotong University and the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB856304).

  15. Biogenic synthesized nanoparticles and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Abhijeet; Sharma, Madan Mohan

    2016-05-01

    In the present scenario, there are growing concerns over the potential impacts of bioengineered nanoparticles in the health sector. However, our understanding of how bioengineered nanoparticles may affect organisms within natural ecosystems, lags far behind our rapidly increasing ability to engineer novel nanoparticles. To date, research on the biological impacts of bioengineered nanoparticles has primarily consisted of controlled lab studies of model organisms with single species in culture media. Here, we described a cost effective and environment friendly technique for green synthesis of silver nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles were successfully synthesized from 1 mM AgNO3 via a green synthesis process using leaf extract as reducing as well as capping agent. Nanoparticles were characterized with the help of UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and TEM analysis which revealed the size of nanoparticles of 30-40 nm size. Further the nanoparticles synthesized by green route are found highly toxic against pathogenic bacteria and plant pathogenic fungi viz. Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas syringae and Sclerotiniasclerotiorum. The most important outcome of this work will be the development of value-added products and protection of human health from pathogens viz., bacteria, virus, fungi etc.

  16. Cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, I-Ju

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation mainly focuses on the investigation of the cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. We are interested in the study of endocytosis and exocytosis behaviors of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with desired surface functionality. The relationship between mesoporous silica nanoparticles and membrane trafficking of cells, either cancerous cells or normal cells was examined. Since mesoporous silica nanoparticles were applied in many drug delivery cases, the endocytotic efficiency of mesoporous silica nanoparticles needs to be investigated in more details in order to design the cellular drug delivery system in the controlled way. It is well known that cells can engulf some molecules outside of the cells through a receptor-ligand associated endocytosis. We are interested to determine if those biomolecules binding to cell surface receptors can be utilized on mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to improve the uptake efficiency or govern the mechanism of endocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) is a small peptide recognized by cell integrin receptors and it was reported that avidin internalization was highly promoted by tumor lectin. Both RGD and avidin were linked to the surface of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to investigate the effect of receptor-associated biomolecule on cellular endocytosis efficiency. The effect of ligand types, ligand conformation and ligand density were discussed in Chapter 2 and 3. Furthermore, the exocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles is very attractive for biological applications. The cellular protein sequestration study of mesoporous silica nanoparticles was examined for further information of the intracellular pathway of endocytosed mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials. The surface functionality of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials demonstrated selectivity among the materials and cancer and normal cell lines. We aimed to determine

  17. Targeted PRINTRTM nanoparticles for effective cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, Kelly Marie

    Conventional therapeutics for the treatment of cancer are often faced with challenges such as systemic biodistribution within the body, drug degradation in vivo, low bioavailability at the site of disease, and off-target toxicity. As such, particulate drug delivery systems have been developed with the aim of minimizing these limitations of current therapies. Through the PRINTRTM (Particle Replication in Non-wetting Templates) technology, hydrogel nanoparticles, prepared from biocompatible poly(ethylene glycol) and acid-sensitive silyl ether crosslinkers, were functionalized and conjugated with targeting ligands for the folate receptor (FR), HER2 receptor, and transferrin receptor (TfR). By conjugating specific ligands to nanoparticles to impart specificity, highly selective targeting and internalization (>80%) of nanoparticles were demonstrated in various cancer cell lines. The extent of cellular uptake of targeted nanoparticles was dependent on the surface characteristics of the nanoparticles, particle concentration, and kinetics. Because a negative surface charge reduces nonspecific cellular uptake, attaching monoclonal antibodies to the surface of negatively charged PRINT nanoparticles facilitated specific binding of the antibodies to cellular surface receptors that subsequently triggered receptor-mediated endocytosis. Additionally, the multivalent nature of nanoparticles influenced cellular uptake. Specifically, nanoparticles with a higher valence internalized more rapidly and efficiently than those with a lower valence. Nanoparticles that selectively target and accumulate within diseased cells have the potential of minimizing drug degradation under physiological conditions, enhancing bioavailability at the tumor, improving the efficacy of the drug, and reducing toxicity from systemic biodistribution. Drug delivery through targeted nanoparticles was achieved by loading nanoparticles with silyl ether-modified gemcitabine prodrugs. Covalently reacting the prodrug

  18. Self-assembling nanoparticles into holographic nanopatterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Heon; Diana, Frédéric S.; Badolato, Antonio; Petroff, Pierre M.; Kramer, Edward J.

    2004-05-01

    We demonstrate a method to self-assemble metal nanoparticles into two-dimensional lattices. Monodisperse cobalt nanoparticles were synthesized within inverse micelles of polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinylpyridine) copolymer in toluene. A periodic hole pattern of photoresist (PR) was fabricated on a GaAs substrate by holographic lithography. The nanoparticles as prepared above were self-assembled onto the PR nanopatterns by dip or spin casting. They were selectively positioned in the holes due to the capillary forces related to the pattern geometry. Our study reveals that self-assembled nanoparticles in two-dimensional lattices can be obtained with a controllable number of particles per lattice point.

  19. Nanoparticles applied to plant science: a review.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Sandra Cristina Capaldi; Silva, Alisson Luiz Diniz; Galazzi, Rodrigo Moretto; Azevedo, Ricardo Antunes; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi

    2015-01-01

    The present review addresses certain important aspects regarding nanoparticles and the environment, with an emphasis on plant science. The production and characterization of nanoparticles is the focus of this review, providing an idea of the range and the consolidation of these aspects in the literature, with modifications on the routes of synthesis and the application of the analytical techniques for characterization of the nanoparticles (NPs). Additionally, aspects related to the interaction between the NPs and plants, their toxicities, and the phytoremediation process, among others, are also discussed. Future trends are also presented, supplying evidence for certain possibilities regarding new research involving nanoparticles and plants.

  20. Solid lipid nanoparticles for parenteral drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wissing, S A; Kayser, O; Müller, R H

    2004-05-01

    This review describes the use of nanoparticles based on solid lipids for the parenteral application of drugs. Firstly, different types of nanoparticles based on solid lipids such as "solid lipid nanoparticles" (SLN), "nanostructured lipid carriers" (NLC) and "lipid drug conjugate" (LDC) nanoparticles are introduced and structural differences are pointed out. Different production methods including the suitability for large scale production are described. Stability issues and drug incorporation mechanisms into the particles are discussed. In the second part, the biological activity of parenterally applied SLN and biopharmaceutical aspects such as pharmacokinetic profiles as well as toxicity aspects are reviewed. PMID:15109768

  1. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Sophie; Bridot, Jean-Luc; Elst, Luce Vander; Muller, Robert N

    2010-03-01

    Due to their high magnetization, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles induce an important decrease in the transverse relaxation of water protons and are, therefore, very efficient negative MRI contrast agents. The knowledge and control of the chemical and physical characteristics of nanoparticles are of great importance. The choice of the synthesis method (microemulsions, sol-gel synthesis, laser pyrolysis, sonochemical synthesis or coprecipitation) determines the magnetic nanoparticle's size and shape, as well as its size distribution and surface chemistry. Nanoparticles can be used for numerous in vivo applications, such as MRI contrast enhancement and hyperthermia drug delivery. New developments focus on targeting through molecular imaging and cell tracking. PMID:21426176

  2. NAOMI: nanoparticle-assisted optical molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Dirk J.; de Bruin, Martijn; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; Verbraak, Frank D.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2007-02-01

    We present our first steps towards nanoparticle assisted, optical molecular imaging (NAOMI) using biodegradable nanoparticles. Our focus is on using optical coherence tomography(OCT) as the imaging modality. We propose to use nanoparticles based on biodegradable polymers, loaded with carefully selected dyes as contrast agent, and outline a method for establishing their desired optical properties prior to synthesis. Moreover, we perform a qualitative pilot study using these biodegradable nanoparticles, measuring their optical properties which are found to be in line with theoretical predictions.

  3. DNA-templated gold nanoparticles formation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lanlan; Song, Yonghai; Wang, Li; Sun, Yujing; Guo, Cunlan; Liu, Zhelin; Li, Zhuang

    2008-09-01

    The interaction between HAuCl4 and DNA has enabled creation of DNA-templated gold nanoparticles without formation of large nanoparticles. It was found that spheral DNA-HAuCl4 hybrid of 8.7 nm in diameter, flower-like DNA-HAuCl4 hybrid, nanoparticles chains and nanoparticles network of DNA-HAuCl4 hybrid could be obtained by varying the reaction conditions, including DNA concentration and reaction temperature. The intermediate product was investigated by shortening the reaction time of DNA and HAuCl4, and the obtained nanoparticles preserved a small DNA segment, which indicated that the reaction between DNA and HAuCl4 had a process. The addition of reduction reagent resulted in DNA-templated gold nanoparticles and nanoflowers, respectively. UV-vis absorption spectra were used to characterize the DNA-HAuCl4 hybrid and the gold nanostructures templated on DNA, and XPS spectra were used to compare the composition of DNA-Au(III) complex and gold nanoparticles. AFM and TEM results revealed that the spheral gold nanoparticles of about 11 nm in size and flower-like gold nanoparticles were formed after the addition of NaBH4.

  4. Toxicity of Engineered Nanoparticles in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Maurer-Jones, Melissa A.; Gunsolus, Ian L.; Murphy, Catherine J.; Haynes, Christy L.

    2014-01-01

    While nanoparticles occur naturally in the environment and have been intentionally used for centuries, the production and use of engineered nanoparticles has seen a recent spike, which makes environmental release almost certain. Therefore, recent efforts to characterize the toxicity of engineered nanoparticles have focused on the environmental implications, including exploration of toxicity to organisms from wide-ranging parts of the ecosystem food webs. Herein, we summarize the current understanding of toxicity of engineered nanoparticles to representatives of various trophic levels, including bacteria, plants, and multicellular aquatic/terrestrial organisms, to highlight important challenges within the field of econanotoxicity, challenges that analytical chemists are expertly poised to address. PMID:23427995

  5. Formation of Nanoparticles in binary polymer mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Tong; Lu, Xihua; Hu, Zhibin

    2000-10-01

    Formation of Nanoparticles in binary polymer mixtures Tong CAI, Xihua LU, and Zhibin HU Department of Physics, Denton, TX76203 The nanoparticles of hydrorypropyl cellulose (HPC)-polyacrylic acid (PAA) complex have been studied using light scattering method. The formation of the nanoparticles results from the hydrogen-bonding interaction between HPC and PAA. The particle size and size distribution, characterized by dynamic light scattering, depend on the HPC concentration, PAA concentration and reactive temperature. Because HPC and PAA have been approved for use inside human body by FDA, the nanoparticle obtained in this study could be used as drug carriers for controlled release.

  6. Fighting cancer with magnetic nanoparticles and immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, L.; Mejías, R.; Barber, D. F.; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, S.; Serna, C. J.; Lázaro, F. J.; Morales, M. P.

    2012-03-01

    IFN-γ-adsorbed DMSA-coated magnetite nanoparticles can be used as an efficient in vivo drug delivery system for tumor immunotherapy. Magnetic nanoparticles, with adsorbed interferon-γ, were targeted to the tumor site by application of an external magnetic field. A relevant therapeutic dosage of interferon in the tumor was detected and led to a notable reduction in tumor size. In general, only 10% of the total injected nanoparticles after multiple exposures were found in tissues by AC susceptibility measurements of the corresponding resected tissues. Magnetic nanoparticle biodistribution is affected by the application of an external magnetic field.

  7. Structure, chemistry, and properties of mineral nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Waychunas, G.A.; Zhang, H.; Gilbert, B.

    2008-12-02

    Nanoparticle properties can depart markedly from their bulk analog materials, including large differences in chemical reactivity, molecular and electronic structure, and mechanical behavior. The greatest changes are expected at the smallest sizes, e.g. 10 nm and below, where surface effects are expected to dominate bonding, shape and energy considerations. The precise chemistry at nanoparticle interfaces can have a profound effect on structure, phase transformations, strain, and reactivity. Certain phases may exist only as nanoparticles, requiring transformations in chemistry, stoichiometry and structure with evolution to larger sizes. In general, mineralogical nanoparticles have been little studied.

  8. Thermal stability of PLD grown silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokeen, Poonam; Jain, Amit; Kapoor, Avinashi

    2016-05-01

    Present work discusses the stability of silver nanoparticles at different annealing temperatures. Air muffle furnace annealing is performed to study the thermal stability of pulsed laser deposited silver nanoparticles. Silver reacts with atmospheric oxygen to form silver oxide at annealing temperatures below 473K and thermal decomposition of silver oxide takes place at temperatures above 473K. Oxide formation results in core shrinkage of silver, which in turn affects the surface plasmon resonance of silver nanoparticles. With increase in annealing temperature, the surface plasmon effect of nanoparticles starts to fade. SEM, XRD and UV-vis spectroscopy have been performed to analysis various structural and optical properties.

  9. Counting electrons on supported nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lykhach, Yaroslava; Kozlov, Sergey M; Skála, Tomáš; Tovt, Andrii; Stetsovych, Vitalii; Tsud, Nataliya; Dvořák, Filip; Johánek, Viktor; Neitzel, Armin; Mysliveček, Josef; Fabris, Stefano; Matolín, Vladimír; Neyman, Konstantin M; Libuda, Jörg

    2016-03-01

    Electronic interactions between metal nanoparticles and oxide supports control the functionality of nanomaterials, for example, the stability, the activity and the selectivity of catalysts. Such interactions involve electron transfer across the metal/support interface. In this work we quantify this charge transfer on a well-defined platinum/ceria catalyst at particle sizes relevant for heterogeneous catalysis. Combining synchrotron-radiation photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning tunnelling microscopy and density functional calculations we show that the charge transfer per Pt atom is largest for Pt particles of around 50 atoms. Here, approximately one electron is transferred per ten Pt atoms from the nanoparticle to the support. For larger particles, the charge transfer reaches its intrinsic limit set by the support. For smaller particles, charge transfer is partially suppressed by nucleation at defects. These mechanistic and quantitative insights into charge transfer will help to make better use of particle size effects and electronic metal-support interactions in metal/oxide nanomaterials.

  10. Nanoparticle superlattice engineering with DNA.

    SciTech Connect

    MacFarlane, R. J.; Lee, B.; Jones, M. R.; Harris, N.; Shatz, G. C.; Mirkin, C. A.

    2011-10-14

    A current limitation in nanoparticle superlattice engineering is that the identities of the particles being assembled often determine the structures that can be synthesized. Therefore, specific crystallographic symmetries or lattice parameters can only be achieved using specific nanoparticles as building blocks (and vice versa). We present six design rules that can be used to deliberately prepare nine distinct colloidal crystal structures, with control over lattice parameters on the 25- to 150-nanometer length scale. These design rules outline a strategy to independently adjust each of the relevant crystallographic parameters, including particle size (5 to 60 nanometers), periodicity, and interparticle distance. As such, this work represents an advance in synthesizing tailorable macroscale architectures comprising nanoscale materials in a predictable fashion.

  11. Intravenous magnetic nanoparticle cancer hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hui S; Hainfeld, James F

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles heated by an alternating magnetic field could be used to treat cancers, either alone or in combination with radiotherapy or chemotherapy. However, direct intratumoral injections suffer from tumor incongruence and invasiveness, typically leaving undertreated regions, which lead to cancer regrowth. Intravenous injection more faithfully loads tumors, but, so far, it has been difficult achieving the necessary concentration in tumors before systemic toxicity occurs. Here, we describe use of a magnetic nanoparticle that, with a well-tolerated intravenous dose, achieved a tumor concentration of 1.9 mg Fe/g tumor in a subcutaneous squamous cell carcinoma mouse model, with a tumor to non-tumor ratio > 16. With an applied field of 38 kA/m at 980 kHz, tumors could be heated to 60°C in 2 minutes, durably ablating them with millimeter (mm) precision, leaving surrounding tissue intact. PMID:23901270

  12. Gold nanoparticles for photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wanwan; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a biomedical imaging modality that provides functional information regarding the cellular and molecular signatures of tissue by using endogenous and exogenous contrast agents. There has been tremendous effort devoted to the development of PA imaging agents, and gold nanoparticles as exogenous contrast agents have great potential for PA imaging due to their inherent and geometrically induced optical properties. The gold-based nanoparticles that are most commonly employed for PA imaging include spheres, rods, shells, prisms, cages, stars and vesicles. This article provides an overview of the current state of research in utilizing these gold nanomaterials for PA imaging of cancer, atherosclerotic plaques, brain function and image-guided therapy. PMID:25600972

  13. Effects of hydriding and ageing of Pd nanoparticles to contact between nanoparticles and quartz and contacts among nanoparticles investigated by the pump-probe technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Guanghua; Jiao, Weiyan; Yang, Linpo; Wu, Xingzhi; Chen, Minrui; Gao, Renxi; Li, Yan; Xie, Bo; Liu, Jiaqi; Han, Min; Song, Yinglin; Qu, Shiliang

    2016-09-01

    Closely contacted Pd nanoparticles with average size of 8 nm are uniformly deposited on quartz. The ageing, hydriding, hydriding and then ageing of the nanoparticles are characterized by the transmission electron microscopy, optical extinction spectrum, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which show little chemical and crystallographic change. The contact between the nanoparticles and quartz and contacts among the nanoparticles are investigated by the pump-probe technique. The contact between nanoparticles and quartz looses with the ageing, hydriding, hydriding and then ageing of the nanoparticles, and the contacts among nanoparticles loose with the ageing whereas compresses with the hydriding.

  14. Photoresponsive nanoparticles for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Rwei, Alina Y.; Wang, Weiping; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Externally triggerable drug delivery systems provide a strategy for the delivery of therapeutic agents preferentially to a target site, presenting the ability to enhance therapeutic efficacy while reducing side effects. Light is a versatile and easily tuned external stimulus that can provide spatiotemporal control. Here we will review the use of nanoparticles in which light triggers drug release or induces particle binding to tissues (phototargeting). PMID:26644797

  15. Carbon Nanoparticles and Carbonaceous Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duley, W. W.

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports on the preparation of hydrogenated amorphous carbon nano-particles whose spectral characteristics include an absorption band at 217.5 nm with the profile and characteristics of the interstellar 217.5 nm feature. Vibrational spectra of these particles also contain the features commonly observed in IR absorption and emission from dust in the diffuse interstellar medium. These materials are produced under ``slow`` deposition conditions by minimizing the flux of incident carbon atoms and by reducing surface mobility.

  16. Single nanoparticle tracking spectroscopic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Haw; Cang, Hu; Xu, Cangshan; Wong, Chung M.

    2011-07-19

    A system that can maintain and track the position of a single nanoparticle in three dimensions for a prolonged period has been disclosed. The system allows for continuously imaging the particle to observe any interactions it may have. The system also enables the acquisition of real-time sequential spectroscopic information from the particle. The apparatus holds great promise in performing single molecule spectroscopy and imaging on a non-stationary target.

  17. Detection of combustion formed nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sgro, L A; Basile, G; Barone, A C; D'Anna, A; Minutolo, P; Borghese, A; D'Alessio, A

    2003-06-01

    UV-visible extinction and scattering and two extra situ sampling techniques: atomic force microscopy (AFM) and differential mobility analysis (DMA) are used to follow the evolution of the particles formed in flames. These particle sizing techniques were chosen because of their sensitivity to detect inception particles, which have diameters, d<5 nm, too small to be observed with typical particle measurement instrumentation. The size of the particles determined by AFM and DMA compares well with the size determined by in situ optical measurements, indicating that the interpretation of the UV-visible optical signal is quite good, and strongly showing the presence of d=2-4 nm particles. UV-visible extinction measurements are also used to determine the concentration of d=2-4 nm particles at the exhausts of practical combustion systems. A numerical model, able to reproduce the experimentally observed low coagulation rate of nanoparticles with respect to soot particles, is used to investigate the operating conditions in the combustion chamber and exhaust system for which 2-4 nm particles survive the exhaust or grow to larger sizes. Combustion generated nanoparticles are suspected to affect human and environmental health because of their affinity for water, small size, low rate of coagulation, and large surface area/weight ratio. The ability to isolate nanoparticles from soot particles in hydrosols collected from combustion may be useful for future analysis by a variety of techniques and toxicological assays.

  18. Antimicrobial Polymers with Metal Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Palza, Humberto

    2015-01-01

    Metals, such as copper and silver, can be extremely toxic to bacteria at exceptionally low concentrations. Because of this biocidal activity, metals have been widely used as antimicrobial agents in a multitude of applications related with agriculture, healthcare, and the industry in general. Unlike other antimicrobial agents, metals are stable under conditions currently found in the industry allowing their use as additives. Today these metal based additives are found as: particles, ions absorbed/exchanged in different carriers, salts, hybrid structures, etc. One recent route to further extend the antimicrobial applications of these metals is by their incorporation as nanoparticles into polymer matrices. These polymer/metal nanocomposites can be prepared by several routes such as in situ synthesis of the nanoparticle within a hydrogel or direct addition of the metal nanofiller into a thermoplastic matrix. The objective of the present review is to show examples of polymer/metal composites designed to have antimicrobial activities, with a special focus on copper and silver metal nanoparticles and their mechanisms. PMID:25607734

  19. Nanoparticle release from dental composites.

    PubMed

    Van Landuyt, K L; Hellack, B; Van Meerbeek, B; Peumans, M; Hoet, P; Wiemann, M; Kuhlbusch, T A J; Asbach, C

    2014-01-01

    Dental composites typically contain high amounts (up to 60 vol.%) of nanosized filler particles. There is a current concern that dental personnel (and patients) may inhale nanosized dust particles (<100 nm) during abrasive procedures to shape, finish or remove restorations but, so far, whether airborne nanoparticles are released has never been investigated. In this study, composite dust was analyzed in real work conditions. Exposure measurements of dust in a dental clinic revealed high peak concentrations of nanoparticles in the breathing zone of both dentist and patient, especially during aesthetic treatments or treatments of worn teeth with composite build-ups. Further laboratory assessment confirmed that all tested composites released very high concentrations of airborne particles in the nanorange (>10(6)cm(-3)). The median diameter of airborne composite dust varied between 38 and 70 nm. Electron microscopic and energy dispersive X-ray analysis confirmed that the airborne particles originated from the composite, and revealed that the dust particles consisted of filler particles or resin or both. Though composite dust exhibited no significant oxidative reactivity, more toxicological research is needed. To conclude, on manipulation with the bur, dental composites release high concentrations of nanoparticles that may enter deeply into the lungs.

  20. Nanoparticles, nanotechnology and pulmonary nanotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A J; Cemlyn-Jones, J; Robalo Cordeiro, C

    2013-01-01

    The recently emergent field of Nanotechnology involves the production and use of structures at the nanoscale. Research at atomic, molecular or macromolecular levels, has led to new materials, systems and structures on a scale consisting of particles less than 100 nm and showing unique and unusual physical, chemical and biological properties, which has enabled new applications in diverse fields, creating a multimillion-dollar high-tech industry. Nanotechnologies have a wide variety of uses from nanomedicine, consumer goods, electronics, communications and computing to environmental applications, efficient energy sources, agriculture, water purification, textiles, and aerospace industry, among many others. The different characteristics of nanoparticles such as size, shape, surface charge, chemical properties, solubility and degree of agglomeration will determine their effects on biological systems and human health, and the likelihood of respiratory hazards. There are a number of new studies about the potential occupational and environmental effects of nanoparticles and general precautionary measures are now fully justified. Adverse respiratory effects include multifocal granulomas, peribronchial inflammation, progressive interstitial fibrosis, chronic inflammatory responses, collagen deposition and oxidative stress. The authors present an overview of the most important studies about respiratory nanotoxicology and the effects of nanoparticles and engineered nanomaterials on the respiratory system.

  1. Plasmon hybridization in nanoparticle dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordlander, Peter; Prodan, Emil; Oubre, Chris

    2004-03-01

    We apply the recently developed plasmon hybridization method (Science 302(2003)419-422) to solid sphere and nanoshell dimers. The results provide a simple and intuitive description of how the energy and excitation cross sections of the dimer plasmons depend on nanoparticle separation, D. We show that the dimer plasmons can be viewed as bonding and antibonding combinations, i.e. hybridization of the individual nanoparticle plasmons. For large D, the shifts of the dipolar dimer plasmons essentially follow the interaction energy between two classical dipoles (1/D^3). As D becomes smaller, the shifts of the dipolar dimer plasmons becomes much stronger and varies much faster with D due to the interaction of the dipolar plasmon of an individual particle with higher energy multipolar plasmons of the other particle. For the heterodimer, the hybridization between the individual nanoparticle plasmons on the different particles result in dimer plasmons whose energies as a function of D exhibit avoided crossings and other interesting effects. The results are compared with FDTD calculations. Work supported by ARO, TATP and the Robert A. Welch Foundation

  2. Nanoparticles for Brain Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Masserini, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    The central nervous system, one of the most delicate microenvironments of the body, is protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) regulating its homeostasis. BBB is a highly complex structure that tightly regulates the movement of ions of a limited number of small molecules and of an even more restricted number of macromolecules from the blood to the brain, protecting it from injuries and diseases. However, the BBB also significantly precludes the delivery of drugs to the brain, thus, preventing the therapy of a number of neurological disorders. As a consequence, several strategies are currently being sought after to enhance the delivery of drugs across the BBB. Within this review, the recently born strategy of brain drug delivery based on the use of nanoparticles, multifunctional drug delivery systems with size in the order of one-billionth of meters, is described. The review also includes a brief description of the structural and physiological features of the barrier and of the most utilized nanoparticles for medical use. Finally, the potential neurotoxicity of nanoparticles is discussed, and future technological approaches are described. The strong efforts to allow the translation from preclinical to concrete clinical applications are worth the economic investments. PMID:25937958

  3. Assembly of metals and nanoparticles into novel nanocomposite superstructures

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiaquan; Chen, Lianyi; Choi, Hongseok; Konish, Hiromi; Li, Xiaochun

    2013-01-01

    Controlled assembly of nanoscale objects into superstructures is of tremendous interests. Many approaches have been developed to fabricate organic-nanoparticle superstructures. However, effective fabrication of inorganic-nanoparticle superstructures (such as nanoparticles linked by metals) remains a difficult challenge. Here we show a novel, general method to assemble metals and nanoparticles rationally into nanocomposite superstructures. Novel metal-nanoparticle superstructures are achieved by self-assembly of liquid metals and nanoparticles in immiscible liquids driven by reduction of free energy. Superstructures with various architectures, such as metal-core/nanoparticle-shell, nanocomposite-core/nanoparticle-shell, network of metal-linked core/shell nanostructures, and network of metal-linked nanoparticles, were successfully fabricated by simply tuning the volume ratio between nanoparticles and liquid metals. Our approach provides a simple, general way for fabrication of numerous metal-nanoparticle superstructures and enables a rational design of these novel superstructures with desired architectures for exciting applications.

  4. Chemoelectronic circuits based on metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yong; Warren, Scott C; Fuller, Patrick; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2016-07-01

    To develop electronic devices with novel functionalities and applications, various non-silicon-based materials are currently being explored. Nanoparticles have unique characteristics due to their small size, which can impart functions that are distinct from those of their bulk counterparts. The use of semiconductor nanoparticles has already led to improvements in the efficiency of solar cells, the processability of transistors and the sensitivity of photodetectors, and the optical and catalytic properties of metal nanoparticles have led to similar advances in plasmonics and energy conversion. However, metals screen electric fields and this has, so far, prevented their use in the design of all-metal nanoparticle circuitry. Here, we show that simple electronic circuits can be made exclusively from metal nanoparticles functionalized with charged organic ligands. In these materials, electronic currents are controlled by the ionic gradients of mobile counterions surrounding the 'jammed' nanoparticles. The nanoparticle-based electronic elements of the circuitry can be interfaced with metal nanoparticles capable of sensing various environmental changes (humidity, gas, the presence of various cations), creating electronic devices in which metal nanoparticles sense, process and ultimately report chemical signals. Because the constituent nanoparticles combine electronic and chemical sensing functions, we term these systems 'chemoelectronic'. The circuits have switching times comparable to those of polymer electronics, selectively transduce parts-per-trillion chemical changes into electrical signals, perform logic operations, consume little power (on the scale of microwatts), and are mechanically flexible. They are also 'green', in the sense that they comprise non-toxic nanoparticles cast at room temperature from alcohol solutions. PMID:26974958

  5. Chemoelectronic circuits based on metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yong; Warren, Scott C.; Fuller, Patrick; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    2016-07-01

    To develop electronic devices with novel functionalities and applications, various non-silicon-based materials are currently being explored. Nanoparticles have unique characteristics due to their small size, which can impart functions that are distinct from those of their bulk counterparts. The use of semiconductor nanoparticles has already led to improvements in the efficiency of solar cells, the processability of transistors and the sensitivity of photodetectors, and the optical and catalytic properties of metal nanoparticles have led to similar advances in plasmonics and energy conversion. However, metals screen electric fields and this has, so far, prevented their use in the design of all-metal nanoparticle circuitry. Here, we show that simple electronic circuits can be made exclusively from metal nanoparticles functionalized with charged organic ligands. In these materials, electronic currents are controlled by the ionic gradients of mobile counterions surrounding the ‘jammed’ nanoparticles. The nanoparticle-based electronic elements of the circuitry can be interfaced with metal nanoparticles capable of sensing various environmental changes (humidity, gas, the presence of various cations), creating electronic devices in which metal nanoparticles sense, process and ultimately report chemical signals. Because the constituent nanoparticles combine electronic and chemical sensing functions, we term these systems ‘chemoelectronic’. The circuits have switching times comparable to those of polymer electronics, selectively transduce parts-per-trillion chemical changes into electrical signals, perform logic operations, consume little power (on the scale of microwatts), and are mechanically flexible. They are also ‘green’, in the sense that they comprise non-toxic nanoparticles cast at room temperature from alcohol solutions.

  6. Heteroaggregation of nanoparticles with biocolloids and geocolloids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongtao; Adeleye, Adeyemi S; Huang, Yuxiong; Li, Fengting; Keller, Arturo A

    2015-12-01

    The application of nanoparticles has raised concern over the safety of these materials to human health and the ecosystem. After release into an aquatic environment, nanoparticles are likely to experience heteroaggregation with biocolloids, geocolloids, natural organic matter (NOM) and other types of nanoparticles. Heteroaggregation is of vital importance for determining the fate and transport of nanoparticles in aqueous phase and sediments. In this article, we review the typical cases of heteroaggregation between nanoparticles and biocolloids and/or geocolloids, mechanisms, modeling, and important indicators used to determine heteroaggregation in aqueous phase. The major mechanisms of heteroaggregation include electric force, bridging, hydrogen bonding, and chemical bonding. The modeling of heteroaggregation typically considers DLVO, X-DLVO, and fractal dimension. The major indicators for studying heteroaggregation of nanoparticles include surface charge measurements, size measurements, observation of morphology of particles and aggregates, and heteroaggregation rate determination. In the end, we summarize the research challenges and perspective for the heteroaggregation of nanoparticles, such as the determination of αhetero values and heteroaggregation rates; more accurate analytical methods instead of DLS for heteroaggregation measurements; sensitive analytical techniques to measure low concentrations of nanoparticles in heteroaggregation systems; appropriate characterization of NOM at the molecular level to understand the structures and fractionation of NOM; effects of different types, concentrations, and fractions of NOM on the heteroaggregation of nanoparticles; the quantitative adsorption and desorption of NOM onto the surface of nanoparticles and heteroaggregates; and a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms and modeling of heteroaggregation in natural water which is a complex system containing NOM, nanoparticles, biocolloids and geocolloids.

  7. Spectral Induced Polarization of Goethite Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, J. A.; Moradi, S.; Zimmermann, E.; Bosch, J.; Vereecken, H.

    2014-12-01

    Goethite nanoparticles are being considered as a tool to enhance in situ remediation of aquifers contaminated with aromatic hydrocarbons. Injection of goethite nanoparticles into the plume is expected to enhance microbial iron reduction and associated beneficial oxidation of hydrocarbons in a cost-effective manner. Amongst others, current challenges associated with this novel approach are the monitoring of nanoparticle delivery and the nanoparticle and contaminant concentration dynamics over time. Obviously, non-invasive monitoring of these properties would be highly useful. In this study, we aim to evaluate whether spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements of the complex electrical conductivity are suitable for such non-invasive characterization. In principle, this is not unreasonable because the electrical double layers of the goethite nanoparticles are expected to affect electrical polarization and thus the imaginary part of the complex electrical conductivity. In a first set of measurements, we determined the complex electrical conductivity of goethite nanoparticle suspensions with different nanoparticle concentrations, pH, and ionic strength in the mHz to kHz frequency range. In a second set of measurements, mixtures of sand and different concentrations of goethite nanoparticles and variable pH and ionic strengths were analyzed. Finally, flow experiments were monitored with SIP in a 1-m long laboratory column to investigate dynamic effects associated with goethite nanoparticle injection and delivery. The results showed that the imaginary part of the electrical conductivity was only affected in the high frequency range (Hz - kHz), which is expected from the small size of the goethite nanoparticles. Overall, we found that the goethite nanoparticles are associated with a small increase in the imaginary electrical conductivity at 1 kHz that can be measured in situ using recently improved borehole electrical impedance tomography measurement equipment that

  8. Toxicity assessment of silica nanoparticles, functionalised silica nanoparticles, and HASE-grafted silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Clément, Laura; Zenerino, Arnaud; Hurel, Charlotte; Amigoni, Sonia; Taffin de Givenchy, Elisabeth; Guittard, Frédéric; Marmier, Nicolas

    2013-04-15

    Numerous nanomaterials have recently been developed, and numerous practical applications have been found in water treatment, medicine, cosmetics, and engineering. Associative polymers, such as hydrophobically modified alkali-soluble emulsion (HASE) systems are involved in several applications and have been extensively studied due to their ability to form three-dimensional networked gels. However, the data on the potential environmental effects of this polymers are scarce. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of functionalisation of silica nanoparticles, and coupling of functionalised silica nanoparticles to the associative polymer HASE on their toxicity. Thus, acute and chronic toxicity tests included a modified acute test (72 h) using daphnies, algae, and plants as model organisms. Gradient of toxicity varied with the tested organisms. Our results revealed that the functionalised nanoparticules and NP grafted polymer cause a global decrease in toxicity compared to commercial nanoparticule and HASE polymer. PMID:23474257

  9. Co-precipitation of oppositely charged nanoparticles: the case of mixed ligand nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moglianetti, Mauro; Ponomarev, Evgeniy; Szybowski, Maxime; Stellacci, Francesco; Reguera, Javier

    2015-11-01

    Colloid stability is of high importance in a multitude of fields ranging from food science to biotechnology. There is strong interest in studying the stability of small particles (of a size of a few nanometres) with complex surface structures, that make them resemble the complexity of proteins and other natural biomolecules, in the presence of oppositely charged nanoparticles. While for nanoparticles with homogeneously charged surfaces an abrupt precipitation has been observed at the neutrality of charges, data are missing about the stability of nanoparticles when they have more complex surface structures, like the presence of hydrophobic patches. To study the role of these hydrophobic patches in the stability of nanoparticles a series of negatively charged nanoparticles has been synthesized with different ratios of hydrophobic content and with control on the structural distribution of the hydrophobic moiety, and then titrated with positively charged nanoparticles. For nanoparticles with patchy nanodomains, the influence of hydrophobic content was observed together with the influence of the size of the nanoparticles. By contrast, for nanoparticles with a uniform distribution of hydrophobic ligands, size changes and hydrophobic content did not play any role in co-precipitation behaviour. A comparison of these two sets of nanoparticles suggests that nanodomains present at the surfaces of nanoparticles are playing an important role in stability against co-precipitation.

  10. The ecotoxicology and chemistry of manufactured nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Handy, Richard D; von der Kammer, Frank; Lead, Jamie R; Hassellöv, Martin; Owen, Richard; Crane, Mark

    2008-05-01

    The emerging literature on the ecotoxicity of nanoparticles and nanomaterials is summarised, then the fundamental physico-chemistry that governs particle behaviour is explained in an ecotoxicological context. Techniques for measuring nanoparticles in various biological and chemical matrices are also outlined. The emerging ecotoxicological literature shows toxic effects on fish and invertebrates, often at low mg l(-1) concentrations of nanoparticles. However, data on bacteria, plants, and terrestrial species are particularly lacking at present. Initial data suggest that at least some manufactured nanoparticles may interact with other contaminants, influencing their ecotoxicity. Particle behaviour is influenced by particle size, shape, surface charge, and the presence of other materials in the environment. Nanoparticles tend to aggregate in hard water and seawater, and are greatly influenced by the specific type of organic matter or other natural particles (colloids) present in freshwater. The state of dispersion will alter ecotoxicity, but many abiotic factors that influence this, such as pH, salinity, and the presence of organic matter remain to be systematically investigated as part of ecotoxicological studies. Concentrations of manufactured nanoparticles have rarely been measured in the environment to date. Various techniques are available to characterise nanoparticles for exposure and dosimetry, although each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages for the ecotoxicologist. We conclude with a consideration of implications for environmental risk assessment of manufactured nanoparticles.

  11. Behavior of engineered nanoparticles in landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Bolyard, Stephanie C; Reinhart, Debra R; Santra, Swadeshmukul

    2013-08-01

    This research sought to understand the behavior of engineered nanoparticles in landfill leachate by examining the interactions between nanoparticles and leachate components. The primary foci of this paper are the effects of ZnO, TiO2, and Ag nanoparticles on biological landfill processes and the form of Zn, Ti, and Ag in leachate following the addition of nanoparticles. Insight into the behavior of nanoparticles in landfill leachate was gained from the observed increase in the aqueous concentrations over background for Zn, Ti, and Ag in some tested leachates attributed to leachate components interacting with the nanoparticle coatings resulting in dispersion, dissolution/dissociation, and/or agglomeration. Coated nanoparticles did not affect biological processes when added to leachate; five-day biochemical oxygen demand and biochemical methane potential results were not statistically different when exposed to nanoparticles, presumably due to the low concentration of dissolved free ionic forms of the associated metals resulting from the interaction with leachate components. Chemical speciation modeling predicted that dissolved Zn in leachate was primarily associated with dissolved organic matter, Ti with hydroxide, and Ag with hydrogen sulfide and ammonia; less than 1% of dissolved Zn and Ag was in the free ionic form, and free ionic Ti and Ag concentrations were negligible.

  12. Nonclassical nucleation and growth of inorganic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jisoo; Yang, Jiwoong; Kwon, Soon Gu; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2016-08-01

    The synthesis of nanoparticles with particular compositions and structures can lead to nanoparticles with notable physicochemical properties, thus promoting their use in various applications. In this area of nanoscience, the focus is shifting from size- and shape-uniform single-component nanoparticles to multicomponent nanoparticles with enhanced performance and/or multifunctionality. With the increasing complexity of synthetic reactions, an understanding of the formation mechanisms of the nanoparticles is needed to enable a systematic synthetic approach. This Review highlights mechanistic studies underlying the synthesis of nanoparticles, with an emphasis on nucleation and growth behaviours that are not expected from classical theories. We discuss the structural properties of nanoclusters that are of a size that bridges molecules and solids. We then describe the role of nanoclusters in the prenucleation process as well as in nonclassical nucleation models. The growth of nanoparticles via the assembly and merging of primary particles is also overviewed. Finally, we present the heterogeneous nucleation mechanisms behind the synthesis of multicomponent nanoparticles.

  13. PEGylated Silk Nanoparticles for Anticancer Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Wongpinyochit, Thidarat; Uhlmann, Petra; Urquhart, Andrew J; Seib, F Philipp

    2015-11-01

    Silk has a robust clinical track record and is emerging as a promising biopolymer for drug delivery, including its use as nanomedicine. However, silk-based nanomedicines still require further refinements for full exploitation of their potential; the application of "stealth" design principals is especially necessary to support their evolution. The aim of this study was to develop and examine the potential of PEGylated silk nanoparticles as an anticancer drug delivery system. We first generated B. mori derived silk nanoparticles by driving β-sheet assembly (size 104 ± 1.7 nm, zeta potential -56 ± 5.6 mV) using nanoprecipitation. We then surface grafted polyethylene glycol (PEG) to the fabricated silk nanoparticles and verified the aqueous stability and morphology of the resulting PEGylated silk nanoparticles. We assessed the drug loading and release behavior of these nanoparticles using clinically established and emerging anticancer drugs. Overall, PEGylated silk nanoparticles showed high encapsulation efficiency (>93%) and a pH-dependent release over 14 days. Finally, we demonstrated significant cytotoxicity of drug loaded silk nanoparticles applied as single and combination nanomedicines to human breast cancer cells. In conclusion, these results, taken together with prior silk nanoparticle data, support a viable future for silk-based nanomedicines. PMID:26418537

  14. Surface patterning of nanoparticles with polymer patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choueiri, Rachelle M.; Galati, Elizabeth; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; Klinkova, Anna; Larin, Egor M.; Querejeta-Fernández, Ana; Han, Lili; Xin, Huolin L.; Gang, Oleg; Zhulina, Ekaterina B.; Rubinstein, Michael; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2016-10-01

    Patterning of colloidal particles with chemically or topographically distinct surface domains (patches) has attracted intense research interest. Surface-patterned particles act as colloidal analogues of atoms and molecules, serve as model systems in studies of phase transitions in liquid systems, behave as ‘colloidal surfactants’ and function as templates for the synthesis of hybrid particles. The generation of micrometre- and submicrometre-sized patchy colloids is now efficient, but surface patterning of inorganic colloidal nanoparticles with dimensions of the order of tens of nanometres is uncommon. Such nanoparticles exhibit size- and shape-dependent optical, electronic and magnetic properties, and their assemblies show new collective properties. At present, nanoparticle patterning is limited to the generation of two-patch nanoparticles, and nanoparticles with surface ripples or a ‘raspberry’ surface morphology. Here we demonstrate nanoparticle surface patterning, which utilizes thermodynamically driven segregation of polymer ligands from a uniform polymer brush into surface-pinned micelles following a change in solvent quality. Patch formation is reversible but can be permanently preserved using a photocrosslinking step. The methodology offers the ability to control the dimensions of patches, their spatial distribution and the number of patches per nanoparticle, in agreement with a theoretical model. The versatility of the strategy is demonstrated by patterning nanoparticles with different dimensions, shapes and compositions, tethered with various types of polymers and subjected to different external stimuli. These patchy nanocolloids have potential applications in fundamental research, the self-assembly of nanomaterials, diagnostics, sensing and colloidal stabilization.

  15. Phytofabrication of nanoparticles through plant as nanofactories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Jitendra; Batra, Amla; Singh, Abhijeet; Mohan Sharma, Madan

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, nanoscience and nanotechnology have emerged as a new area of fundamental science and are receiving global attention due to their extensive applications. Conventionally nanoparticles were manufactured by physical and chemical techniques. The recent development and implementation of new technologies have led to a new trend, the nano-revolution unfolding the role of plants in bio- and green synthesis of nanoparticles which seems to have drawn a quite unequivocal attention to the synthesis of stable nanoparticles. Although nanoparticles can be synthesized through many conventional methods, biological route of the synthesis is more competent than the physical and chemical techniques. Biologically synthesized nanoparticles have enjoyed an upsurge of applications in various sectors. Hence, the present study envisions biosynthesis of nanoparticles from plants which are emerging as nanofactories. Hence, the present review summarizes the literature reported thus far and envisions plants as emerging sources of nanofactories along with applications, the mechanism behind phytosynthesis of nanoparticles and the mechanism of antibacterial action of nanoparticles.

  16. Nanoparticles for the Treatment of Wounds.

    PubMed

    Oyarzun-Ampuero, Felipe; Vidal, Alejandra; Concha, Miguel; Morales, Javier; Orellana, Sandra; Moreno-Villoslada, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of skin wounds represents an important research area due to the important physiological and aesthetic role of this tissue. During the last years, nanoparticles have emerged as important platforms to treat skin wounds. Silver, gold, and copper nanoparticles, as well as titanium and zinc oxide nanoparticles, have shown potential therapeutic effects on wound healing. Due to their specific characteristics, nanoparticles such as nanocapsules, polymersomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, and polymeric nanocomplexes are ideal vehicles to improve the effect of drugs (antibiotics, growth factors, etc.) aimed at wound healing. On the other hand, if active excipients are added during the formulation, such as hyaluronate or chitosan, the nanomedicine could significantly improve its potential. In addition, the inclusion of nanoparticles in different pharmaceutical materials may enhance the beneficial effects of the formulations, and allow achieving a better dose control. This paper aims at reviewing significant findings in the area of nanoparticles and wound treatment. Among the reviewed topics, we underline formulations comprising inorganic, polymeric, surfactant self-assembled, and lipid nanosystems. Among the drugs included in the nanoformulations, the paper refers to antibiotics, natural extracts, proteins, and growth factors, among others. Finally, the paper also addresses nanoparticles embedded in secondary vehicles (fibers, dressings, hydrogels, etc.) that could improve their application and/or upgrade the release profile of the active. PMID:26323420

  17. Lanthanum fluoride nanoparticles for radiosensitization of tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudinov, Konstantin; Bekah, Devesh; Cooper, Daniel; Shastry, Sathvik; Hill, Colin; Bradforth, Stephen; Nadeau, Jay

    2016-03-01

    Dense inorganic nanoparticles have recently been identified as promising radiosensitizers. In addition to dose enhancement through increased attenuation of ionizing radiation relative to biological tissue, scintillating nanoparticles can transfer energy to coupled photosensitizers to amplify production of reactive oxygen species, as well as provide UVvisible emission for optical imaging. Lanthanum fluoride is a transparent material that is easily prepared as nanocrystals, and which can provide radioluminescence at a number of wavelengths through simple substitution of lanthanum ions with other luminescent lanthanides. We have prepared lanthanum fluoride nanoparticles doped with cerium, terbium, or both, that have good spectral overlap with chlorine6 or Rose Bengal photosensitizer molecules. We have also developed a strategy for stable conjugation of the photosensitizers to the nanoparticle surface, allowing for high energy transfer efficiencies on a per molecule basis. Additionally, we have succeeded in making our conjugates colloidally stable under physiological conditions. Here we present our latest results, using nanoparticles and nanoparticle-photosensitizer conjugates to demonstrate radiation dose enhancement in B16 melanoma cells. The effects of nanoparticle treatment prior to 250 kVp x-ray irradiation were investigated through clonogenic survival assays and cell cycle analysis. Using a custom apparatus, we have also observed scintillation of the nanoparticles and conjugates under the same conditions that the cell samples are irradiated.

  18. Therapeutic gold, silver, and platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Miko; Foote, Matthew; Prow, Tarl W

    2015-01-01

    There are an abundance of nanoparticle technologies being developed for use as part of therapeutic strategies. This review focuses on a narrow class of metal nanoparticles that have therapeutic potential that is a consequence of elemental composition and size. The most widely known of these are gold nanoshells that have been developed over the last two decades for photothermal ablation in superficial cancers. The therapeutic effect is the outcome of the thickness and diameter of the gold shell that enables fine tuning of the plasmon resonance. When these metal nanoparticles are exposed to the relevant wavelength of light, their temperature rapidly increases. This in turn induces a localized photothermal ablation that kills the surrounding tumor tissue. Similarly, gold nanoparticles have been developed to enhance radiotherapy. The high-Z nature of gold dramatically increases the photoelectric cross-section. Thus, the photoelectric effects are significantly increased. The outcome of these interactions is enhanced tumor killing with lower doses of radiation, all while sparing tissue without gold nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles have been used for their wound healing properties in addition to enhancing the tumor-killing effects of anticancer drugs. Finally, platinum nanoparticles are thought to serve as a reservoir for platinum ions that can induce DNA damage in cancer cells. The future is bright with the path to clinical trials is largely cleared for some of the less complex therapeutic metal nanoparticle systems.

  19. Magnetite Nanoparticles Prepared By Spark Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiorov, M.; Blums, E.; Kronkalns, G.; Krumina, A.; Lubane, M.

    2016-08-01

    In the present research, we study a possibility of using the electric spark erosion method as an alternative to the method of chemical co-precipitation for preparation of magnetic nanoparticles. Initiation of high frequency electric discharge between coarse iron particles under a layer of distilled water allows obtaining pure magnetite nanoparticles.

  20. PEGylated Silk Nanoparticles for Anticancer Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Wongpinyochit, Thidarat; Uhlmann, Petra; Urquhart, Andrew J; Seib, F Philipp

    2015-11-01

    Silk has a robust clinical track record and is emerging as a promising biopolymer for drug delivery, including its use as nanomedicine. However, silk-based nanomedicines still require further refinements for full exploitation of their potential; the application of "stealth" design principals is especially necessary to support their evolution. The aim of this study was to develop and examine the potential of PEGylated silk nanoparticles as an anticancer drug delivery system. We first generated B. mori derived silk nanoparticles by driving β-sheet assembly (size 104 ± 1.7 nm, zeta potential -56 ± 5.6 mV) using nanoprecipitation. We then surface grafted polyethylene glycol (PEG) to the fabricated silk nanoparticles and verified the aqueous stability and morphology of the resulting PEGylated silk nanoparticles. We assessed the drug loading and release behavior of these nanoparticles using clinically established and emerging anticancer drugs. Overall, PEGylated silk nanoparticles showed high encapsulation efficiency (>93%) and a pH-dependent release over 14 days. Finally, we demonstrated significant cytotoxicity of drug loaded silk nanoparticles applied as single and combination nanomedicines to human breast cancer cells. In conclusion, these results, taken together with prior silk nanoparticle data, support a viable future for silk-based nanomedicines.

  1. Nanoparticles in ionic liquids: interactions and organization.

    PubMed

    He, Zhiqi; Alexandridis, Paschalis

    2015-07-28

    Ionic liquids (ILs), defined as low-melting organic salts, are a novel class of compounds with unique properties and a combinatorially great chemical diversity. Ionic liquids are utilized as synthesis and dispersion media for nanoparticles as well as for surface functionalization. Ionic liquid and nanoparticle hybrid systems are governed by a combined effect of several intermolecular interactions between their constituents. For each interaction, including van der Waals, electrostatic, structural, solvophobic, steric, and hydrogen bonding, the characterization and quantitative calculation methods together with factors affecting these interactions are reviewed here. Various self-organized structures based on nanoparticles in ionic liquids are generated as a result of a balance of these intermolecular interactions. These structures, including colloidal glasses and gels, lyotropic liquid crystals, nanoparticle-stabilized ionic liquid-containing emulsions, ionic liquid surface-functionalized nanoparticles, and nanoscale ionic materials, possess properties of both ionic liquids and nanoparticles, which render them useful as novel materials especially in electrochemical and catalysis applications. This review of the interactions within nanoparticle dispersions in ionic liquids and of the structure of nanoparticle and ionic liquid hybrids provides guidance on the rational design of novel ionic liquid-based materials, enabling applications in broad areas.

  2. TOXICITY OF SILVER NANOPARTICLES TO DAPHNIA MAGNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Relatively little is known regarding toxicity of nanoparticles in the environment. It is widely assumed that the toxicity of nanoparticles will be less than that of their metallic ions. Also the effect of organics on metal toxicity is well established. Presented here are the resu...

  3. Preparation of nanoparticles in reverse microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovstun, Sergey A.; Razumov, Vladimir F.

    2011-10-01

    Experimental data and results of theoretical studies dealing with the synthesis of nanoparticles by the condensation of products of chemical reactions in reverse microemulsions are generalized. Attention is focused on the analysis of mechanisms of nanoparticle nucleation and growth. The bibliography includes 252 references.

  4. Gold Nanoparticle Labels Amplify Ellipsometric Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatasubbarao, Srivatsa

    2008-01-01

    The ellipsometric method reported in the immediately preceding article was developed in conjunction with a method of using gold nanoparticles as labels on biomolecules that one seeks to detect. The purpose of the labeling is to exploit the optical properties of the gold nanoparticles in order to amplify the measurable ellipsometric effects and thereby to enable ultrasensitive detection of the labeled biomolecules without need to develop more-complex ellipsometric instrumentation. The colorimetric, polarization, light-scattering, and other optical properties of nanoparticles depend on their sizes and shapes. In the present method, these size-and-shape-dependent properties are used to magnify the polarization of scattered light and the diattenuation and retardance of signals derived from ellipsometry. The size-and-shape-dependent optical properties of the nanoparticles make it possible to interrogate the nanoparticles by use of light of various wavelengths, as appropriate, to optimally detect particles of a specific type at high sensitivity. Hence, by incorporating gold nanoparticles bound to biomolecules as primary or secondary labels, the performance of ellipsometry as a means of detecting the biomolecules can be improved. The use of gold nanoparticles as labels in ellipsometry has been found to afford sensitivity that equals or exceeds the sensitivity achieved by use of fluorescence-based methods. Potential applications for ellipsometric detection of gold nanoparticle-labeled biomolecules include monitoring molecules of interest in biological samples, in-vitro diagnostics, process monitoring, general environmental monitoring, and detection of biohazards.

  5. Therapeutic gold, silver, and platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Miko; Foote, Matthew; Prow, Tarl W

    2015-01-01

    There are an abundance of nanoparticle technologies being developed for use as part of therapeutic strategies. This review focuses on a narrow class of metal nanoparticles that have therapeutic potential that is a consequence of elemental composition and size. The most widely known of these are gold nanoshells that have been developed over the last two decades for photothermal ablation in superficial cancers. The therapeutic effect is the outcome of the thickness and diameter of the gold shell that enables fine tuning of the plasmon resonance. When these metal nanoparticles are exposed to the relevant wavelength of light, their temperature rapidly increases. This in turn induces a localized photothermal ablation that kills the surrounding tumor tissue. Similarly, gold nanoparticles have been developed to enhance radiotherapy. The high-Z nature of gold dramatically increases the photoelectric cross-section. Thus, the photoelectric effects are significantly increased. The outcome of these interactions is enhanced tumor killing with lower doses of radiation, all while sparing tissue without gold nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles have been used for their wound healing properties in addition to enhancing the tumor-killing effects of anticancer drugs. Finally, platinum nanoparticles are thought to serve as a reservoir for platinum ions that can induce DNA damage in cancer cells. The future is bright with the path to clinical trials is largely cleared for some of the less complex therapeutic metal nanoparticle systems. PMID:25521618

  6. Zero-valent iron nanoparticles preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Oropeza, S.; Corea, M.; Gómez-Yáñez, C.; Cruz-Rivera, J.J.; Navarro-Clemente, M.E.

    2012-06-15

    Graphical abstract: Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}] at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. The synthesized nanoparticles were spherical and had diameters less than 5 nm. Highlights: ► Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}]. ► The conditions of reaction were at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. ► The synthesized nanoparticles were spherical and had diameters less than 5 nm. -- Abstract: Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}] at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. To monitor the reaction, a stainless steel pressure reactor lined with PTFE and mechanically stirred was designed. This design allowed the extraction of samples at different times, minimizing the perturbation in the system. In this way, the shape and the diameter of the nanoparticles produced during the reaction were also monitored. The results showed the production of zero-valent iron nanoparticles that were approximately 5 nm in diameter arranged in agglomerates. The agglomerates grew to 900 nm when the reaction time increased up to 12 h; however, the diameter of the individual nanoparticles remained almost the same. During the reaction, some byproducts constituted by amino species acted as surfactants; therefore, no other surfactants were necessary.

  7. Synthesis and Transformation of Carbonaceous Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennella, Vito

    2015-03-01

    The physical properties of carbonaceous nanoparticles depend on the production conditions. In addition, these properties are modified by heat, UV and ion irradiation and gas interaction. We will discuss the synthesis and transformation of carbon nanoparticles that have been proposed as carriers of aromatic and aliphatic spectroscopic features observed in the interstellar medium.

  8. Preparation of DPPE-Stabilized Gold Nanoparticles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dungey, Keenan E.; Muller, David P.; Gunter, Tammy

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is presented that introduces students to nanotechnology through the preparation of nanoparticles and their visualization using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The experiment familiarizes the students with nonaqueous solvents, biphasic reactions, phase-transfer agents, ligands to stabilize growing nanoparticles, and bidentate…

  9. Nanoparticle biointerfacing by platelet membrane cloaking.

    PubMed

    Hu, Che-Ming J; Fang, Ronnie H; Wang, Kuei-Chun; Luk, Brian T; Thamphiwatana, Soracha; Dehaini, Diana; Nguyen, Phu; Angsantikul, Pavimol; Wen, Cindy H; Kroll, Ashley V; Carpenter, Cody; Ramesh, Manikantan; Qu, Vivian; Patel, Sherrina H; Zhu, Jie; Shi, William; Hofman, Florence M; Chen, Thomas C; Gao, Weiwei; Zhang, Kang; Chien, Shu; Zhang, Liangfang

    2015-10-01

    Development of functional nanoparticles can be encumbered by unanticipated material properties and biological events, which can affect nanoparticle effectiveness in complex, physiologically relevant systems. Despite the advances in bottom-up nanoengineering and surface chemistry, reductionist functionalization approaches remain inadequate in replicating the complex interfaces present in nature and cannot avoid exposure of foreign materials. Here we report on the preparation of polymeric nanoparticles enclosed in the plasma membrane of human platelets, which are a unique population of cellular fragments that adhere to a variety of disease-relevant substrates. The resulting nanoparticles possess a right-side-out unilamellar membrane coating functionalized with immunomodulatory and adhesion antigens associated with platelets. Compared to uncoated particles, the platelet membrane-cloaked nanoparticles have reduced cellular uptake by macrophage-like cells and lack particle-induced complement activation in autologous human plasma. The cloaked nanoparticles also display platelet-mimicking properties such as selective adhesion to damaged human and rodent vasculatures as well as enhanced binding to platelet-adhering pathogens. In an experimental rat model of coronary restenosis and a mouse model of systemic bacterial infection, docetaxel and vancomycin, respectively, show enhanced therapeutic efficacy when delivered by the platelet-mimetic nanoparticles. The multifaceted biointerfacing enabled by the platelet membrane cloaking method provides a new approach in developing functional nanoparticles for disease-targeted delivery.

  10. Gold nanoparticles for nucleic acid delivery.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ya; Jiang, Ziwen; Saha, Krishnendu; Kim, Chang Soo; Kim, Sung Tae; Landis, Ryan F; Rotello, Vincent M

    2014-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles provide an attractive and applicable scaffold for delivery of nucleic acids. In this review, we focus on the use of covalent and noncovalent gold nanoparticle conjugates for applications in gene delivery and RNA-interference technologies. We also discuss challenges in nucleic acid delivery, including endosomal entrapment/escape and active delivery/presentation of nucleic acids in the cell. PMID:24599278

  11. Nanoparticles in liquid crystals, and liquid crystals in nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pablo, Juan

    2015-03-01

    Liquid crystals are remarkably sensitive to interfacial interactions. Small perturbations at a liquid crystal interface, for example, can be propagated over relatively long length scales, thereby providing the basis for a wide range of applications that rely on amplification of molecular events into macroscopic observables. Our recent research efforts have focused on the reverse phenomenon; that is, we have sought to manipulate the interfacial assembly of nanoparticles or the organization of surface active molecules by controlling the structure of a liquid crystal. This presentation will consist of a review of the basic principles that are responsible for liquid crystal-mediated interactions, followed by demonstrations of those principles in the context of two types of systems. In the first, a liquid crystal is used to direct the assembly of nanoparticles; through a combination of molecular and continuum models, it is found that minute changes in interfacial energy and particle size lead to liquid-crystal induced attractions that can span multiple orders of magnitude. Theoretical predictions are confirmed by experimental observations, which also suggest that LC-mediated assembly provides an effective means for fabrication of plasmonic devices. In the second type of system, the structure of a liquid crystal is controlled by confinement in submicron droplets. The morphology of the liquid crystal in a drop depends on a delicate balance between bulk and interfacial contributions to the free energy; that balance can be easily perturbed by adsorption of analytes or nanoparticles at the interface, thereby providing the basis for development of hierarchical assembly of responsive, anisotropic materials. Theoretical predictions also indicate that the three-dimensional order of a liquid crystal can be projected onto a two-dimensional interface, and give rise to novel nanostructures that are not found in simple isotropic fluids.

  12. Heteroaggregation of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles and Nanoparticles of Pyrolyzed Biomass.

    PubMed

    Yi, Peng; Pignatello, Joseph J; Uchimiya, Minori; White, Jason C

    2015-11-17

    Heteroaggregation with indigenous particles is critical to the environmental mobility of engineered nanomaterials (ENM). We studied heteroaggregation of ceria nanoparticles (n-CeO2), as a model for metal oxide ENM, with nanoparticles of pyrogenic carbonaceous material (n-PCM) derived from pecan shell biochar, a model for natural chars and human-made chars used in soil remediation and agriculture. The TEM and STEM images of n-PCM identify both hard and soft particles, both C-rich and C,O,Ca-containing particles (with CaCO3 crystals), both amorphous and "onion-skin" C-rich particles, and traces of nanotubes. Heteroaggregation was evaluated at constant n-CeO2, variable n-PCM concentration by monitoring hydrodynamic diameter by dynamic light scattering and ζ-potential under conditions where n-PCM is "invisible". At pH 5.3, where n-CeO2 and n-PCM are positively and negatively charged, respectively, and each stable to homoaggregation, heteroaggregation is favorable and occurs by a charge neutralization-charge reversal mechanism (CNCR): in this mechanism, primary heteroaggregates that form in the initial stage are stable at low or high n-PCM concentration due to electrostatic repulsion, but unstable at intermediate n-PCM concentration, leading to secondary heteroaggregation. The greatest instability coincides with full charge neutralization. At pH 7.1, where n-CeO2 is neutral and unstable alone, and n-PCM is negative and stable alone, heteroaggregation occurs by a charge-accumulation, core-shell stabilization (CACS) mechanism: n-PCM binds to and forms a negatively charged shell on the neutral surface of the nascent n-CeO2 core, stabilizing the core-shell heteraggregate at a size that decreases with n-PCM concentration. The CNCR and CACS mechanisms give fundamental insight into heteroaggregation between oppositely charged, and between neutral and charged nanoparticles. PMID:26461459

  13. Collision-spike sputtering of Au nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2015-08-06

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For this specific case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31% of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remainder is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80% of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.

  14. Collision-spike sputtering of Au nanoparticles

    DOE PAGES

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2015-08-06

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For this specific case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31% of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remaindermore » is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80% of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.« less

  15. Thermal conductivity of nanoparticle-fluid mixture.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Xu, X.; Choi, S. U.-S.; Energy Technology; Purdue Univ.

    1999-10-01

    Effective thermal conductivity of mixtures of fluids and nanometer-size particles is measured by a steady-state parallel-plate method. The tested fluids contain two types of nanoparticles, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CuO, dispersed in water, vacuum pump fluid, engine oil, and ethylene glycol. Experimental results show that the thermal conductivities of nanoparticle-fluid mixtures are higher than those of the base fluids. Using theoretical models of effective thermal conductivity of a mixture, we have demonstrated that the predicted thermal conductivities of nanoparticle-fluid mixtures are much lower than our measured data, indicating the deficiency in the existing models when used for nanoparticle-fluid mixtures. Possible mechanisms contributing to enhancement of the thermal conductivity of the mixtures are discussed. A more comprehensive theory is needed to fully explain the behavior of nanoparticle-fluid mixtures.

  16. Visualization of the coalescence of bismuth nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Niu, Kai-Yang; Liao, Hong-Gang; Zheng, Haimei

    2014-04-01

    Coalescence is a significant pathway for the growth of nanostructures. Here we studied the coalescence of Bi nanoparticles in situ by liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The growth of Bi nanoparticles was initiated from a bismuth neodecanoate precursor solution by electron beam irradiation inside a liquid cell under the TEM. A significant number of coalescence events occurred from the as-grown Bi nanodots. Both symmetric coalescence of two equal-sized nanoparticles and asymmetric coalescence of two or more unequal-sized nanoparticles were analyzed along their growth trajectories. Our observation suggests that two mass transport mechanisms, i.e., surface diffusion and grain boundary diffusion, are responsible for the shape evolution of nanoparticles after a coalescence event.

  17. Collision-spike Sputtering of Au Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M

    2015-12-01

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For the particular case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31 % of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remainder is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80 % of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.

  18. Dynamic hook-and-eye nanoparticle sponges

    SciTech Connect

    Klajn, Rafal; Olson, Mark A.; Wesson, Paul J.; Fang, Lei; Ali, Coskun; Trabolsi, Ali; Soh, Siowling; Stoddart, J. Fraser; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    2009-11-15

    Systems in which nanoscale components of different types can be captured and/or released from organic scaffolds provide a fertile basis for the construction of dynamic, exchangeable functional materials. In such heterogeneous systems, the components interact with one another by means of programmable, noncovalent bonding interactions. Herein, we describe polymers that capture and release functionalized nanoparticles selectively during redox-controlled aggregation and disaggregation, respectively. The interactions between the polymer and the NPs are mediated by the reversible formation of polypseudorotaxanes, and give rise to architectures ranging from short chains composed of few nanoparticles to extended networks of nanoparticles crosslinked by the polymer. In the latter case, the polymer/nanoparticle aggregates precipitate from solution such that the polymer acts as a selective ‘sponge’ for the capture/release of the nanoparticles of different types.

  19. Single nanoparticle detectors for biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurt, Abdulkadir; Daaboul, George G.; Connor, John H.; Goldberg, Bennett B.; Selim Ünlü, M.

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticle research has become increasingly important in the context of bioscience and biotechnology. Practical use of nanoparticles in biology has significantly advanced our understanding about biological processes in the nanoscale as well as led to many novel diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Besides, synthetic and natural nanoparticles are of concern for their potential adverse effect on human health. Development of novel detection and characterization tools for nanoparticles will impact a broad range of disciplines in biological research from nanomedicine to nanotoxicology. In this article, we discuss the recent progress and future directions in the area of single nanoparticle detectors with an emphasis on their biological applications. A brief critical overview of electrical and mechanical detection techniques is given and a more in-depth discussion of label-free optical detection techniques is presented.

  20. Selenium nanoparticles inhibit Staphylococcus aureus growth.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phong A; Webster, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a key bacterium commonly found in numerous infections. S. aureus infections are difficult to treat due to their biofilm formation and documented antibiotic resistance. While selenium has been used for a wide range of applications including anticancer applications, the effects of selenium nanoparticles on microorganisms remain largely unknown to date. The objective of this in vitro study was thus to examine the growth of S. aureus in the presence of selenium nanoparticles. Results of this study provided the first evidence of strongly inhibited growth of S. aureus in the presence of selenium nanoparticles after 3, 4, and 5 hours at 7.8, 15.5, and 31 μg/mL. The percentage of live bacteria also decreased in the presence of selenium nanoparticles. Therefore, this study suggests that selenium nanoparticles may be used to effectively prevent and treat S. aureus infections and thus should be further studied for such applications.

  1. The bactericidal effect of silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruben Morones, Jose; Elechiguerra, Jose Luis; Camacho, Alejandra; Holt, Katherine; Kouri, Juan B.; Tapia Ramírez, Jose; Yacaman, Miguel Jose

    2005-10-01

    Nanotechnology is expected to open new avenues to fight and prevent disease using atomic scale tailoring of materials. Among the most promising nanomaterials with antibacterial properties are metallic nanoparticles, which exhibit increased chemical activity due to their large surface to volume ratios and crystallographic surface structure. The study of bactericidal nanomaterials is particularly timely considering the recent increase of new resistant strains of bacteria to the most potent antibiotics. This has promoted research in the well known activity of silver ions and silver-based compounds, including silver nanoparticles. The present work studies the effect of silver nanoparticles in the range of 1 100 nm on Gram-negative bacteria using high angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Our results indicate that the bactericidal properties of the nanoparticles are size dependent, since the only nanoparticles that present a direct interaction with the bacteria preferentially have a diameter of ~1 10 nm.

  2. Nanoparticles displacement analysis using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    StrÄ kowski, Marcin R.; Kraszewski, Maciej; StrÄ kowska, Paulina

    2016-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a versatile optical method for cross-sectional and 3D imaging of biological and non-biological objects. Here we are going to present the application of polarization sensitive spectroscopic OCT system (PS-SOCT) for quantitative measurements of materials containing nanoparticles. The PS-SOCT combines the polarization sensitive analysis with time-frequency analysis. In this contribution the benefits of using the combination of timefrequency and polarization sensitive analysis are being expressed. The usefulness of PS-SOCT for nanoparticles evaluation is going to be tested on nanocomposite materials with TiO2 nanoparticles. The OCT measurements results have been compared with SEM examination of the PMMA matrix with nanoparticles. The experiment has proven that by the use of polarization sensitive and spectroscopic OCT the nanoparticles dispersion and size can be evaluated.

  3. Enzyme Nanoparticles-Based Electronic Biosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe; Ostatna, V.; Wang, Joseph

    2005-06-28

    A novel method for fabricating electronic biosensors based on coupling enzyme nanoparticles and self assembly technology is illustrated. Redox horseradish peroxidase nanoparticles were prepared by desolvation with ethanol and subsequent crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. The cross-linked enzyme nanoparticles were functionalized by cysteine to introduce thiol groups on the nanoparticle surface. Immobilized enzyme nanoparticle on the gold electrode by self-assembly kept redox and electrocatalytic activities, and was used to develop reagentless biosensors for H2O2 detection without promoters and mediators. The new approach is simple, low cost and circumvents complications associated with solution systems. It is a universal immobilization method for biosensor, biomedical devices, biofuel cells and enzymatic bioreactors fabrication and expected to open new opportunities for biosensor, clinical diagnostics, and for bioanalysis, in general.

  4. Plasmonic nanoparticle scattering for color holograms

    PubMed Central

    Montelongo, Yunuen; Tenorio-Pearl, Jaime Oscar; Williams, Calum; Zhang, Shuang; Milne, William Ireland; Wilkinson, Timothy David

    2014-01-01

    This work presents an original approach to create holograms based on the optical scattering of plasmonic nanoparticles. By analogy to the diffraction produced by the scattering of atoms in X-ray crystallography, we show that plasmonic nanoparticles can produce a wave-front reconstruction when they are sampled on a diffractive plane. By applying this method, all of the scattering characteristics of the nanoparticles are transferred to the reconstructed field. Hence, we demonstrate that a narrow-band reconstruction can be achieved for direct white light illumination on an array of plasmonic nanoparticles. Furthermore, multicolor capabilities are shown with minimal cross-talk by multiplexing different plasmonic nanoparticles at subwavelength distances. The holograms were fabricated from a single subwavelength thin film of silver and demonstrate that the total amount of binary information stored in the plane can exceed the limits of diffraction and that this wavelength modulation can be detected optically in the far field. PMID:25122675

  5. Inoculation of silicon nanoparticles with silver atoms

    PubMed Central

    Cassidy, Cathal; Singh, Vidyadhar; Grammatikopoulos, Panagiotis; Djurabekova, Flyura; Nordlund, Kai; Sowwan, Mukhles

    2013-01-01

    Silicon (Si) nanoparticles were coated inflight with silver (Ag) atoms using a novel method to prepare multicomponent heterostructured metal-semiconductor nanoparticles. Molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations were employed, supported by high-resolution bright field (BF) transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with a resolution ≤0.1 nm in high angle annular dark field (HAADF) mode. These studies revealed that the alloying behavior and phase dynamics during the coating process are more complex than when attaching hetero-atoms to preformed nanoparticles. According to the MD simulations, Ag atoms condense, nucleate and diffuse into the liquid Si nanoparticles in a process that we term “inoculation”, and a phase transition begins. Subsequent solidification involves an intermediate alloying stage that enabled us to control the microstructure and crystallinity of the solidified hybrid heterostructured nanoparticles. PMID:24170178

  6. In situ nanoparticle sizing with zeptomole sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Batchelor-McAuley, Christopher; Ellison, Joanna; Tschulik, Kristina; Hurst, Philip L; Boldt, Regine; Compton, Richard G

    2015-08-01

    We present the basis for an entirely new approach to in situ nanoparticle sizing. Nanoparticles containing just 12 zeptomoles (1 zeptomole = 10(-21) moles) of silver, are detected via in situ particle coulometry. These stochastic charge measurements correspond to the transfer of only 7000-8000 electrons, yielding direct information relating to the individual nanoparticle volumes. The resulting particle size distribution (average equivalent radius 5 nm) obtained via nanoparticle coulometry is in excellent correspondence with that attained from TEM analysis. Moreover, the measurable particle size limit by this electrochemical method is shown to be significantly below that of more common optical nanoparticle tracking techniques, and as such can be viewed as a potential disruptive nano-technology.

  7. New methods for lipid nanoparticles preparation.

    PubMed

    Corrias, Francesco; Lai, Francesco

    2011-09-01

    Lipid nanoparticles have attracted many researchers during recent years due to the excellent tolerability and advantages compared to liposomes and polymeric nanoparticles. High pressure homogenization is the main technique used to prepare solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) encapsulating different type of drugs, however this method involves some critical process parameters. For this reason and in order to overcome patented methods, different production techniques for lipid nanoparticles have been widely investigated in recent years (last decade). The paper reviews new methods for lipid nanoparticles preparation, and their recent applications in pharmaceutical field, especially focusing on coacervation, microemulsions templates, supercritical fluid technology, phase-inversion temperature (PIT) techniques. References of the most relevant literature and patents published by various research groups on these fields are provided. PMID:21834772

  8. Structural characterization of copolymer embedded magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedelcu, G. G.; Nastro, A.; Filippelli, L.; Cazacu, M.; Iacob, M.; Rossi, C. Oliviero; Popa, A.; Toloman, D.; Dobromir, M.; Iacomi, F.

    2015-10-01

    Small magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4) were synthesized by co-precipitation and coated by emulsion polymerization with poly(methyl methacrylate-co-acrylic acid) (PMMA-co-AAc) to create surface functional groups that can attach drug molecules and other biomolecules. The coated and uncoated magnetite nanoparticles were stored for two years in normal closed ships and than characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The solid phase transformation of magnetite to maghemite, as well as an increase in particle size were evidenced for the uncoated nanoparticles. The coated nanoparticles preserved their magnetite structure and magnetic properties. The influences of monomers and surfactant layers on interactions between the magnetic nanoparticles evidenced that the thickness of the polymer has a significant effect on magnetic properties.

  9. Immunostimulatory Lipid Nanoparticles from Herbal Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Hasson, Tal H.; Takaoka, Anna; de la Rica, Roberto; Matsui, Hiroshi; Smeureanu, Gabriela; Drain, Charles M.; Kawamura, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Reproducibility is an important issue in biological characterization of drug candidates and natural products. It is not uncommon to encounter cases in which supposedly the same sample exhibits very different biological activities. During our characterization of macrophage-stimulatory lipids from herbal medicine, it was found that the potency of these lipids could vary substantially from experiment to experiment. Further analysis of this reproducibility issue led to the discovery of solvent-dependent nanoparticle formation by these lipids. While larger nanoparticles (approximately 100 nm) of these lipids showed modest macrophage-stimulatory activity, smaller nanoparticles (<10 nm) of the same lipids exhibited substantially higher potency. Thus, the study revealed an unexpected link between nanoparticle formation and macrophage-stimulatory activity of plant lipids. Although nanoparticles have been extensively studied in the context of vehicles for drug delivery, our finding indicates that drugs themselves can form nanoassemblies, and their biological properties may be altered by the way they assemble. PMID:24495243

  10. Diatomite silica nanoparticles for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Immacolata; Terracciano, Monica; Martucci, Nicola M.; De Stefano, Luca; Migliaccio, Nunzia; Tatè, Rosarita; Rendina, Ivo; Arcari, Paolo; Lamberti, Annalisa; Rea, Ilaria

    2014-07-01

    Diatomite is a natural fossil material of sedimentary origin, constituted by fragments of diatom siliceous skeletons. In this preliminary work, the properties of diatomite nanoparticles as potential system for the delivery of drugs in cancer cells were exploited. A purification procedure, based on thermal treatments in strong acid solutions, was used to remove inorganic and organic impurities from diatomite and to make them a safe material for medical applications. The micrometric diatomite powder was reduced in nanoparticles by mechanical crushing, sonication, and filtering. Morphological analysis performed by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy reveals a particles size included between 100 and 300 nm. Diatomite nanoparticles were functionalized by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and labeled by tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate. Different concentrations of chemically modified nanoparticles were incubated with cancer cells and confocal microscopy was performed. Imaging analysis showed an efficient cellular uptake and homogeneous distribution of nanoparticles in cytoplasm and nucleus, thus suggesting their potentiality as nanocarriers for drug delivery.

  11. Interactions of Model Cell Membranes with Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, S. M.; Camesano, T. A.; Nagarajan, R.

    2011-12-01

    The same properties that give nanoparticles their enhanced function, such as high surface area, small size, and better conductivity, can also alter the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials. Ultimately, many of these nanomaterials will be released into the environment, and can cause cytotoxic effects to environmental bacteria, aquatic organisms, and humans. Previous results from our laboratory suggest that nanoparticles can have a detrimental effect on cells, depending on nanoparticle size. It is our goal to characterize the properties of nanomaterials that can result in membrane destabilization. We tested the effects of nanoparticle size and chemical functionalization on nanoparticle-membrane interactions. Gold nanoparticles at 2, 5,10, and 80 nm were investigated, with a concentration of 1.1x1010 particles/mL. Model cell membranes were constructed of of L-α-phosphatidylcholine (egg PC), which has negatively charged lipid headgroups. A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was used to measure frequency changes at different overtones, which were related to mass changes corresponding to nanoparticle interaction with the model membrane. In QCM-D, a lipid bilayer is constructed on a silicon dioxide crystal. The crystals, oscillate at different harmonic frequencies depending upon changes in mass or energy dissipation. When mass is added to the crystal surface, such as through addition of a lipid vesicle solution, the frequency change decreases. By monitoring the frequency and dissipation, we could verify that a supported lipid bilayer (SLB) formed on the silica surface. After formation of the SLB, the nanoparticles can be added to the system, and the changes in frequency and dissipation are monitored in order to build a mechanistic understanding of nanoparticle-cell membrane interactions. For all of the smaller nanoparticles (2, 5, and 10 nm), nanoparticle addition caused a loss of mass from the lipid bilayer, which appears to be due to the formation of holes

  12. Decontaminating soil organic pollutants with manufactured nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Chen, Xijuan; Zhuang, Jie; Chen, Xin

    2016-06-01

    Organic pollutants in soils might threaten the environmental and human health. Manufactured nanoparticles are capable to reduce this risk efficiently due to their relatively large capacity of sorption and degradation of organic pollutants. Stability, mobility, and reactivity of nanoparticles are prerequisites for their efficacy in soil remediation. On the basis of a brief introduction of these issues, this review provides a comprehensive summary of the application and effectiveness of various types of manufactured nanoparticles for removing organic pollutants from soil. The main categories of nanoparticles include iron (oxides), titanium dioxide, carbonaceous, palladium, and amphiphilic polymeric nanoparticles. Their advantages (e.g., unique properties and high sorption capacity) and disadvantages (e.g., high cost and low recovery) for soil remediation are discussed with respect to the characteristics of organic pollutants. The factors that influence the decontamination effects, such as properties, surfactants, solution chemistry, and soil organic matter, are addressed.

  13. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry of Chiral Polymeric Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Werber, Liora; Preiss, Laura C; Landfester, Katharina; Muñoz-Espí, Rafael; Mastai, Yitzhak

    2015-09-01

    Chiral polymeric nanoparticles are of prime importance, mainly due to their enantioselective potential, for many applications such as catalysis and chiral separation in chromatography. In this article we report on the preparation of chiral polymeric nanoparticles by miniemulsion polymerization. In addition, we describe the use of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to measure the chiral interactions and the energetics of the adsorption of enantiomers from aqueous solutions onto chiral polymeric nanoparticles. The characterization of chirality in nano-systems is a very challenging task; here, we demonstrate that ITC can be used to accurately determine the thermodynamic parameters associated with the chiral interactions of nanoparticles. The use of ITC to measure the energetics of chiral interactions and recognition at the surfaces of chiral nanoparticles can be applied to other nanoscale chiral systems and can provide further insight into the chiral discrimination processes of nanomaterials.

  14. Rapid control of phase growth by nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lian-Yi; Xu, Jia-Quan; Choi, Hongseok; Konishi, Hiromi; Jin, Song; Li, Xiao-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Effective control of phase growth under harsh conditions (such as high temperature, highly conductive liquids or high growth rate), where surfactants are unstable or ineffective, is still a long-standing challenge. Here we show a general approach for rapid control of diffusional growth through nanoparticle self-assembly on the fast-growing phase during cooling. After phase nucleation, the nanoparticles spontaneously assemble, within a few milliseconds, as a thin coating on the growing phase to block/limit diffusion, resulting in a uniformly dispersed phase orders of magnitude smaller than samples without nanoparticles. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated in both inorganic (immiscible alloy and eutectic alloy) and organic materials. Our approach overcomes the microstructure refinement limit set by the fast phase growth during cooling and breaks the inherent limitations of surfactants for growth control. Considering the growing availability of numerous types and sizes of nanoparticles, the nanoparticle-enabled growth control will find broad applications. PMID:24809454

  15. Synthesis of silver nanoparticle and its application.

    PubMed

    Pandian, A Muthu Kumara; Karthikeyan, C; Rajasimman, M; Dinesh, M G

    2015-11-01

    In this work, silver nanoparticles have been synthesized by wet chemical technique, green synthesis and microbial methods. Silver nitrate (10(-3)M) was used with aqueous extract to produce silver nanoparticles. From the results it was observed that the yield of nanoparticles was high in green synthesis. The size of the silver nanoparticles was determined from Scanning Electron Microscope analysis (SEM). Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was carried out to determine the presence of biomolecules in them. Its cytotoxic effect was studied in cancerous cell line and normal cell line. MTT assay was done to test its optimal concentration and efficacy which gives valuable information for the use of silver nanoparticles for future cancer therapy. PMID:25866204

  16. Decontaminating soil organic pollutants with manufactured nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Chen, Xijuan; Zhuang, Jie; Chen, Xin

    2016-06-01

    Organic pollutants in soils might threaten the environmental and human health. Manufactured nanoparticles are capable to reduce this risk efficiently due to their relatively large capacity of sorption and degradation of organic pollutants. Stability, mobility, and reactivity of nanoparticles are prerequisites for their efficacy in soil remediation. On the basis of a brief introduction of these issues, this review provides a comprehensive summary of the application and effectiveness of various types of manufactured nanoparticles for removing organic pollutants from soil. The main categories of nanoparticles include iron (oxides), titanium dioxide, carbonaceous, palladium, and amphiphilic polymeric nanoparticles. Their advantages (e.g., unique properties and high sorption capacity) and disadvantages (e.g., high cost and low recovery) for soil remediation are discussed with respect to the characteristics of organic pollutants. The factors that influence the decontamination effects, such as properties, surfactants, solution chemistry, and soil organic matter, are addressed. PMID:26906002

  17. Single-Component Upconverting Polymeric Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Thévenaz, David C; Lee, Soo Hyon; Guignard, Florian; Balog, Sandor; Lattuada, Marco; Weder, Christoph; Simon, Yoan C

    2016-05-01

    Low-power light upconversion is a highly desirable feature for a broad range of applications and new materials enabling this process are sought in both bulk and particulate form. Here, the preparation of upconverting nanoparticles is reported from a methacrylic terpolymer bearing diphenylanthracene and meso-phenoxytris(heptyl)porphyrin pendant groups by a microemulsion technique. The use of a terpolymer in which the upconvering dye molecules are covalently attached mitigates some of the drawbacks of triplet-triplet annihilation upconverting nanoparticles made by other techniques, in particular dye leakage from the nanoparticles, and limited control of the sensitizer and emitter concentration within each nanoparticle. Size and morphology of the new upconverting nanoparticles are investigated by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy and elucidated their upconverting properties by luminescence spectroscopy. PMID:27071664

  18. Synthesis of silver nanoparticle and its application.

    PubMed

    Pandian, A Muthu Kumara; Karthikeyan, C; Rajasimman, M; Dinesh, M G

    2015-11-01

    In this work, silver nanoparticles have been synthesized by wet chemical technique, green synthesis and microbial methods. Silver nitrate (10(-3)M) was used with aqueous extract to produce silver nanoparticles. From the results it was observed that the yield of nanoparticles was high in green synthesis. The size of the silver nanoparticles was determined from Scanning Electron Microscope analysis (SEM). Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was carried out to determine the presence of biomolecules in them. Its cytotoxic effect was studied in cancerous cell line and normal cell line. MTT assay was done to test its optimal concentration and efficacy which gives valuable information for the use of silver nanoparticles for future cancer therapy.

  19. Modeling Pulsed Laser Melting of Embedded Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Carolyn Anne

    A model of pulsed laser melting of embedded nanoparticles is introduced. Pulsed laser melting (PLM) is commonly used to achieve a fast quench rate in nanoparticles; this model enables a better understanding of the influence of PLM on the size distribution of nanoparticles, which is crucial for studying or using their size-dependent properties. The model includes laser absorption according to the Mie theory, a full heat transport model, and rate equations for nucleation, growth, coarsening, and melting and freezing of nanoparticles embedded in a transparent matrix. The effects of varying the laser parameters and sample properties are studied, as well as combining PLM and rapid thermal annealing (RTA) processing steps on the same sample. A general theory for achieving narrow size distributions of nanoparticles is presented, and widths as narrow as 12% are achieved using PLM and RTA.

  20. Pulmonary applications and toxicity of engineered nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Card, Jeffrey W.; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Bonner, James C.; Nestmann, Earle R.

    2008-01-01

    Because of their unique physicochemical properties, engineered nanoparticles have the potential to significantly impact respiratory research and medicine by means of improving imaging capability and drug delivery, among other applications. These same properties, however, present potential safety concerns, and there is accumulating evidence to suggest that nanoparticles may exert adverse effects on pulmonary structure and function. The respiratory system is susceptible to injury resulting from inhalation of gases, aerosols, and particles, and also from systemic delivery of drugs, chemicals, and other compounds to the lungs via direct cardiac output to the pulmonary arteries. As such, it is a prime target for the possible toxic effects of engineered nanoparticles. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the potential usefulness of nanoparticles and nanotechnology in respiratory research and medicine and to highlight important issues and recent data pertaining to nanoparticle-related pulmonary toxicity. PMID:18641236

  1. QCM-D study of nanoparticle interactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Xu, Shengming; Liu, Qingxia; Masliyah, Jacob; Xu, Zhenghe

    2016-07-01

    Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) has been proven to be a powerful research tool to investigate in situ interactions between nanoparticles and different functionalized surfaces in liquids. QCM-D can also be used to quantitatively determine adsorption kinetics of polymers, DNA and proteins from solutions on various substrate surfaces while providing insights into conformations of adsorbed molecules. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview on various important applications of QCM-D, focusing on deposition of nanoparticles and attachment-detachment of nanoparticles on model membranes in complex fluid systems. We will first describe the working principle of QCM-D and DLVO theory pertinent to understanding nanoparticle deposition phenomena. The interactions between different nanoparticles and functionalized surfaces for different application areas are then critically reviewed. Finally, the potential applications of QCM-D in other important fields are proposed and knowledge gaps are identified. PMID:26546115

  2. Laser ablation synthesis and spectral characterization of ruby nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, M. S.; Bardina, A. A.; Savelyev, A. G.; Khramov, V. N.; Khaydukov, E. V.

    2016-04-01

    The laser ablation method was implemented for synthesis of ruby nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were obtained by nanosecond ablation of bulk ruby crystal in 10% ethanol water solution. The nanoparticles enable water colloid stability and exhibit narrow photoluminescent line at 694 nm when pumped at blue-green spectral range. The ruby nanoparticles were characterized by SEM and Z-sizer.

  3. The synthesis and characterization of iron nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Tyler

    Nanoparticle synthesis has garnered attention for technological applications for catalysts, industrial processing, and medical applications. The size ranges for these is in the particles nanostructural domain. Pure iron nanoparticles have been of particular interest for their reactivity and relative biological inertness. Applications include cancer treatment and carrying medicine to a relevant site. Unfortunately, because of their reactivity, pure iron nanoparticles have been difficult to study. This is because of their accelerated tendency to form oxides in air, due to the increased surface area to volume ratio. Using synthesis processes with polyphenols or long chain amines, air stable iron nanoparticles have been produced with a diameter size range of ~ 2 to about ~10 nm, but apparently have transformed due to internal pressure and crystallographic defects to the FCC phase. The FCC crystals have been seen to form icosahedral and decahedral shapes. This size is within the range for use as a catalyst for the growth of both carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes as well for biomedical applications. The advantages of these kinds of catalysts are that nanotube growth can be for the first time separated from the catalyst formation. Additionally, the catalyst size can be preselected for a certain size nanotube to grow. In summary: (1) we found the size distributions of nanoparticles for various synthesis processes, (2) we discovered the right size range for growth of nanotubes from the iron nanoparticles, (3) the nanoparticles are under a very high internal pressure, (4) the nanoparticles are in the FCC phase, (5) they appear to be in icosahedral and decahedral structures, (6) they undergo room temperature twinning, (7) the FCC crystals are distorted due to carbon in octahedral sites, (8) the iron nanoparticles are stable in air, (9) adding small amounts of copper make the iron nanoparticles smaller.

  4. Controlled functionalization of nanoparticles & practical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashwan, Khaled

    With the increasing use of nanoparticles in both science and industry, their chemical modification became a significant part of nanotechnology. Unfortunately, most commonly used procedures provide just randomly functionalized materials. The long-term objective of our work is site- and stoichiometrically-controlled functionalization of nanoparticles with the utilization of solid supports and other nanostructures. On the examples of silica nanoparticles and titanium dioxide nanorods, we have obtained results on the solid-phase chemistry, method development, and modeling, which advanced us toward this goal. At the same time, we explored several applications of nanoparticles that will benefit from the controlled functionalization: imaging of titanium-dioxide-based photocatalysts, bioimaging by fluorescent nanoparticles, drug delivery, assembling of bone implants, and dental compositions. Titanium dioxide-based catalysts are known for their catalytic activity and their application in solar energy utilization such as photosplitting of water. Functionalization of titanium dioxide is essential for enhancing bone-titanium dioxide nanotube adhesion, and, therefore, for its application as an interface between titanium implants and bones. Controlled functionalization of nanoparticles should enhance sensitivity and selectivity of nanoassemblies for imaging and drug delivery applications. Along those lines, we studied the relationship between morphology and surface chemistry of nanoparticles, and their affinity to organic molecules (salicylic and caffeic acid) using Langmuir adsorption isotherms, and toward material surfaces using SEM- and TEM-imaging. We focused on commercial samples of titanium dioxide, titanium dioxide nanorods with and without oleic acid ligands, and differently functionalized silica nanoparticles. My work included synthesis, functionalization, and characterization of several types of nanoparticles, exploring their application in imaging, dentistry, and bone

  5. Quantifying the complex permittivity and permeability of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, B. M.; Gui, Y. S.; Worden, M.; Hegmann, T.; Xing, M.; Chen, X. S.; Lu, W.; Wroczynskyj, Y.; van Lierop, J.; Hu, C.-M.

    2015-04-01

    The complex permittivity and permeability of superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles has been quantified using a circular waveguide assembly with a static magnetic field to align the nanoparticle's magnetization. The high sensitivity of the measurement provides the precise resonant feature of nanoparticles. The complex permeability in the vicinity of ferromagnetic resonance is in agreement with the nanoparticle's measured magnetization via conventional magnetometry. A rigorous and self-consistent measure of complex permittivities and permeabilities of nanoparticles is crucial to ascertain accurately the dielectric behaviour as well as the frequency response of nanoparticle magnetization, necessary ingredients when designing and optimizing magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

  6. Magnetic nanoparticle sensing: decoupling the magnetization from the excitation field

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Daniel B.; Weaver, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Remote sensing of magnetic nanoparticles has exciting applications for magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia and molecular detection. We introduce, simulate, and experimentally demonstrate an innovation—a sensing coil that is geometrically decoupled from the excitation field—for magnetic nanoparticle spectroscopy that increases the flexibility and capabilities of remote detection. The decoupling enhances the sensitivity absolutely; to small amounts of nanoparticles, and relatively; to small changes in the nanoparticle dynamics. We adapt a previous spectroscopic method that measures the relaxation time of nanoparticles and demonstrate a new measurement of nanoparticle temperature that could potentially be used concurrently during hyperthermia. PMID:24610961

  7. Nanoparticle distribution and temperature elevations in prostatic tumours in mice during magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Attaluri, Anilchandra; Ma, Ronghui; Qiu, Yun; Li, Wei; Zhu, Liang

    2011-01-01

    Among a variety of hyperthermia methods, magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia is a highly promising approach for its confined heating within the tumour. In this study we perform in vivo animal experiments on implanted prostatic tumours in mice to measure temperature distribution in the tumour during magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia. Temperature elevations are induced by a commercially available ferrofluid injected via a single injection to the centre of the tumour, when the tumour is subject to an alternating magnetic field. Temperature mapping in the tumours during magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia has demonstrated the feasibility of elevating tumour temperatures higher than 50°C using only 0.1 cm(3) ferrofluid injected in the tumour under a relatively low magnetic field (3 kA/m). Detailed 3-D nanoparticle concentration distribution is quantified using a high-resolution microCT imaging system. The calculated nanoparticle distribution volume based on the microCT scans is useful to analyse nanoparticle deposition in the tumours. Slower ferrofluid infusion rates result in smaller nanoparticle distribution volumes in the tumours. Nanoparticles are more confined in the vicinity of the injection site with slower infusion rates, causing higher temperature elevations in the tumours. The increase in the nanoparticle distribution volume in the tumour group after the heating from that in the tumour group without heating suggests possible nanoparticle re-distribution in the tumours during the heating. PMID:21756046

  8. Engineering nanoparticle-protein associations for protein crystal nucleation and nanoparticle arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, Denise N.

    Engineering the nanoparticle - protein association offers a new way to form protein crystals as well as new approaches for arrangement of nanoparticles. Central to this control is the nanoparticle surface. By conjugating polymers on the surface with controlled molecular weights many properties of the nanoparticle can be changed including its size, stability in buffers and the association of proteins with its surface. Large molecular weight poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coatings allow for weak associations between proteins and nanoparticles. These interactions can lead to changes in how proteins crystallize. In particular, they decrease the time to nucleation and expand the range of conditions over which protein crystals form. Interestingly, when PEG chain lengths are too short then protein association is minimized and these effects are not observed. One important feature of protein crystals nucleated with nanoparticles is that the nanoparticles are incorporated into the crystals. What results are nanoparticles placed at well-defined distances in composite protein-nanoparticle crystals. Crystals on the size scale of 10 - 100 micrometers exhibit optical absorbance, fluorescence and super paramagnetic behavior derivative from the incorporated nanomaterials. The arrangement of nanoparticles into three dimensional arrays also gives rise to new and interesting physical and chemical properties, such as fluorescence enhancement and varied magnetic response. In addition, anisotropic nanomaterials aligned throughout the composite crystal have polarization dependent optical properties.

  9. Antimicrobial activity of biogenic silver nanoparticles, and silver chloride nanoparticles: an overview and comments.

    PubMed

    Durán, Nelson; Nakazato, Gerson; Seabra, Amedea B

    2016-08-01

    The antimicrobial impact of biogenic-synthesized silver-based nanoparticles has been the focus of increasing interest. As the antimicrobial activity of nanoparticles is highly dependent on their size and surface, the complete and adequate characterization of the nanoparticle is important. This review discusses the characterization and antimicrobial activity of biogenic synthesized silver nanoparticles and silver chloride nanoparticles. By revising the literature, there is confusion in the characterization of these two silver-based nanoparticles, which consequently affects the conclusion regarding to their antimicrobial activities. This review critically analyzes recent publications on the synthesis of biogenic silver nanoparticles and silver chloride nanoparticles by attempting to correlate the characterization of the nanoparticles with their antimicrobial activity. It was difficult to correlate the size of biogenic nanoparticles with their antimicrobial activity, since different techniques are employed for the characterization. Biogenic synthesized silver-based nanoparticles are not completely characterized, particularly the nature of capped proteins covering the nanomaterials. Moreover, the antimicrobial activity of theses nanoparticles is assayed by using different protocols and strains, which difficult the comparison among the published papers. It is important to select some bacteria as standards, by following international foundations (Pharmaceutical Microbiology Manual) and use the minimal inhibitory concentration by broth microdilution assays from Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, which is the most common assay used in antibiotic ones. Therefore, we conclude that to have relevant results on antimicrobial effects of biogenic silver-based nanoparticles, it is necessary to have a complete and adequate characterization of these nanostructures, followed by standard methodology in microbiology protocols. PMID:27289481

  10. Size-separation of silver nanoparticles using sucrose gradient centrifugation

    SciTech Connect

    Suresh, Anil K.; Pelletier, Dale A.; Moon, Ji Won; Phelps, Tommy; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2015-08-28

    Size and shape distributions of nanoparticles can drastically contribute to the overall properties of nanoparticles, thereby influencing their interaction with different chemotherapeutic molecules, biological organisms and or materials and cell types. Therefore, to exploit the proper use of nanoparticles for various biomedical and biosensor applications, it is important to obtain well-separated monodispersed nanoparticles. However, gaining precise control over the morphological characteristics of nanoparticles during their synthesis is often a challenging task. Consequently, post-synthesis separation of nanoparticles is necessary. In the present study, we demonstrate the successful one-pot post-synthesis separation of anisotropic silver nanoparticles to near modispersities using sucrose density gradient sedimentation. The separation of the nanoparticles was evidenced based on optical confirmation, and spectrophotometric and transmission electron microscopy measurements. Our results clearly demonstrate the facile separation of anisotropic silver nanoparticles using sucrose density gradient sedimentation and can enable the use of nanoparticles for various biomedical applications.

  11. Size-separation of silver nanoparticles using sucrose gradient centrifugation

    DOE PAGES

    Suresh, Anil K.; Pelletier, Dale A.; Moon, Ji Won; Phelps, Tommy; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2015-08-28

    Size and shape distributions of nanoparticles can drastically contribute to the overall properties of nanoparticles, thereby influencing their interaction with different chemotherapeutic molecules, biological organisms and or materials and cell types. Therefore, to exploit the proper use of nanoparticles for various biomedical and biosensor applications, it is important to obtain well-separated monodispersed nanoparticles. However, gaining precise control over the morphological characteristics of nanoparticles during their synthesis is often a challenging task. Consequently, post-synthesis separation of nanoparticles is necessary. In the present study, we demonstrate the successful one-pot post-synthesis separation of anisotropic silver nanoparticles to near modispersities using sucrose density gradientmore » sedimentation. The separation of the nanoparticles was evidenced based on optical confirmation, and spectrophotometric and transmission electron microscopy measurements. Our results clearly demonstrate the facile separation of anisotropic silver nanoparticles using sucrose density gradient sedimentation and can enable the use of nanoparticles for various biomedical applications.« less

  12. Polystyrene nanoparticles affecting blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Oslakovic, Cecilia; Cedervall, Tommy; Linse, Sara; Dahlbäck, Björn

    2012-08-01

    The association of nanoparticles (NPs) with blood coagulation proteins may influence the natural balance between pro- and anticoagulant pathways. We investigated whether polystyrene NPs, when added to human plasma, affected the generation of thrombin in plasma. Amine-modified NPs were found to decrease the thrombin formation due to binding of factors VII and IX to the NPs, which resulted in depletion of the respective protein in solution. In contrast, carboxyl-modified NPs were able to act as a surface for activation of the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation in plasma. These results highlight the influence of NPs on a biologically important pathway.

  13. Rhodium Nanoparticles for Ultraviolet Plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Anne M.; Zhang, Xiao; Alcaraz de la Osa, Rodrigo; Sanz, Juan Marcos; González, Francisco; Moreno, Fernando; Finkelstein, Gleb; Liu, Jie; Everitt, Henry O.

    2015-02-01

    The non-oxidizing catalytic noble metal rhodium is introduced for ultraviolet plasmonics. Planar tripods of 8 nm Rh nanoparticles, synthesized by a modified polyol reduction method, have a calculated local surface plasmon resonance near 330 nm. By attaching p-aminothiophenol, local field-enhanced Raman spectra and accelerated photo-damage were observed under near-resonant ultraviolet illumination, while charge transfer simultaneously increased fluorescence for up to 13 minutes. The combined local field enhancement and charge transfer demonstrate essential steps toward plasmonically-enhanced ultraviolet photocatalysis.

  14. Nanoparticle delivery for transdermal HRT.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Pilar; Simon, James A

    2012-09-01

    Nanomedicine is an emerging technology and the first nano-engineered medical products have come to light in the last decade. Transdermal drug delivery has significant advantages compared to other routes of drug administration. Nanoparticles unique physical and chemical properties enable transport of substances directly into the skin. The objective of this paper is to review different aspects of nanoparticle delivery, generally, and discuss its current use for transdermal hormone therapy. Transdermal estrogen therapy remains the most effective treatment for bothersome menopausal symptoms, particularly in those women for whom the potential adverse effects associated with "first pass" hepatic metabolism are to be avoided. Available alternatives for transdermal estrogen delivery include patches, gels, sprays and lotions. Other non-oral therapies which likewise avoid "first pass" hepatic metabolism include: subcutaneous implants and vaginal rings. Some of the transdermal products are associated with mild adverse skin effects such as redness and irritation, but more severe and bothersome consequences include blistering and tattooing. Even the mild adverse skin effects are frequently cited as reasons for discontinuation. Micellar nanoparticle estradiol emulsion (MNPEE) is a lotion-like therapy which constitutes an alternative transdermal delivery system not requiring the permeation enhancers or temporary skin digestion, both of which increase the possibility of irritation. MNPEE's advantages include low fluctuation of plasma estradiol concentrations, infrequent skin related adverse effects, and pleasant cosmetic-like moisturizing properties. The efficacy of MNPEE for management of menopausal vasomotor symptoms has been demonstrated in a randomized placebo controlled trial, and the product is FDA approved for management of moderate to severe vasomotor symptoms. None of the observed adverse effects in the MNPEE group were statistically different from the placebo group

  15. Nanoparticle delivery for transdermal HRT.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Pilar; Simon, James A

    2012-09-01

    Nanomedicine is an emerging technology and the first nano-engineered medical products have come to light in the last decade. Transdermal drug delivery has significant advantages compared to other routes of drug administration. Nanoparticles unique physical and chemical properties enable transport of substances directly into the skin. The objective of this paper is to review different aspects of nanoparticle delivery, generally, and discuss its current use for transdermal hormone therapy. Transdermal estrogen therapy remains the most effective treatment for bothersome menopausal symptoms, particularly in those women for whom the potential adverse effects associated with "first pass" hepatic metabolism are to be avoided. Available alternatives for transdermal estrogen delivery include patches, gels, sprays and lotions. Other non-oral therapies which likewise avoid "first pass" hepatic metabolism include: subcutaneous implants and vaginal rings. Some of the transdermal products are associated with mild adverse skin effects such as redness and irritation, but more severe and bothersome consequences include blistering and tattooing. Even the mild adverse skin effects are frequently cited as reasons for discontinuation. Micellar nanoparticle estradiol emulsion (MNPEE) is a lotion-like therapy which constitutes an alternative transdermal delivery system not requiring the permeation enhancers or temporary skin digestion, both of which increase the possibility of irritation. MNPEE's advantages include low fluctuation of plasma estradiol concentrations, infrequent skin related adverse effects, and pleasant cosmetic-like moisturizing properties. The efficacy of MNPEE for management of menopausal vasomotor symptoms has been demonstrated in a randomized placebo controlled trial,(1) and the product is FDA approved for management of moderate to severe vasomotor symptoms. None of the observed adverse effects in the MNPEE group were statistically different from the placebo group.(1

  16. Microspheres and nanoparticles from ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Won Hyuk

    Improved preparations of various examples of monodispersed, porous, hollow, and core-shell metal and semiconductor nanoparticles or nanowires have been developed. Now titania microspheres and nanoparticles and silica microspheres can be synthesized using an inexpensive high frequency (1.7 MHz) ultrasonic generator (household humidifier; ultrasonic spray pyrolysis; USP). Morphology and pore size of titania microspheres were controlled by the silica to Ti(IV) ratio and silica particle size. Fine tuning the precursor ratio affords sub-50 nm titania nanoparticles as well. In terms of silica microspheres, morphology was controlled by the silica to organic monomer ratio. In liquids irradiated with high intensity ultrasound (20 kHz; HIUS), acoustic cavitation produces high energy chemistry through intense local heating inside the gas phase of collapsing bubbles in the liquid. HIUS and USP confine the chemical reactions to isolated sub-micron reaction zones, but sonochemistry does so in a heated gas phase within a liquid, while USP uses a hot liquid droplet carried by a gas flow. Thus, USP can be viewed as a method of phase-separated synthesis using submicron-sized droplets as isolated chemical reactors for nanomaterial synthesis. While USP has been used to create both titania and silica spheres separately, there are no prior reports of titania-silica composites. Such nanocomposites of metal oxides have been produced, and by further manipulation, various porous structures with fascinating morphologies were generated. Briefly, a precursor solution was nebulized using a commercially available household ultrasonic humidifier (1.7 MHz ultrasound generator), and the resulting mist was carried in a gas stream of air through a quartz glass tube in a hot furnace. After exiting the hot zone, these microspheres are porous or hollow and in certain cases magnetically responsive. In the case of titania microspheres, they are rapidly taken up into the cytoplasm of mammalian cells and

  17. Gold nanoparticle photosensitized radical photopolymerization.

    PubMed

    Anyaogu, Kelechi C; Cai, Xichen; Neckers, Douglas C

    2008-12-01

    We report the photopolymerization of an acrylic monomer using thiol-stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and [4-[(octyloxy)phenyl] phenyl] iodonium hexafluoroantimonate (OPPI) as photoinitiator and coinitiator, respectively. Polymerization occurred only when the AuNPs, in the presence of the iodonium salt, were irradiated at the particle plasmonic absorption region (lambda>450 nm). The AuNPs activate the coinitiator by intermolecular electron transfer since OPPI has no absorption in the visible region. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to monitor polymerization. UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy measurements were used to characterize the NPs. PMID:19037499

  18. Rhodium nanoparticles for ultraviolet plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Watson, Anne M; Zhang, Xiao; Alcaraz de la Osa, Rodrigo; Marcos Sanz, Juan; González, Francisco; Moreno, Fernando; Finkelstein, Gleb; Liu, Jie; Everitt, Henry O

    2015-02-11

    The nonoxidizing catalytic noble metal rhodium is introduced for ultraviolet plasmonics. Planar tripods of 8 nm Rh nanoparticles, synthesized by a modified polyol reduction method, have a calculated local surface plasmon resonance near 330 nm. By attaching p-aminothiophenol, local field-enhanced Raman spectra and accelerated photodamage were observed under near-resonant ultraviolet illumination, while charge transfer simultaneously increased fluorescence for up to 13 min. The combined local field enhancement and charge transfer demonstrate essential steps toward plasmonically enhanced ultraviolet photocatalysis.

  19. Synthesis and Hydrogen Desorption Properties of Aluminum Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Wanseop; Lee, Sang-Hwa; Kim, Jaeyong

    2016-03-01

    Aluminum hydride (AlH3 or alane) is known to store maximum 10.1 wt.% of hydrogen at relatively low temperature (< 100 degrees C), which partially fulfills the U.S. department of energy requirements for gravimetric loading capacity. However, its detailed mechanisms of appearing of different phases, structural stability, and dynamics of hydrogen desorption are still not clear. To understand the desorption properties of hydrogen in alane, thermodynamically stable α-AlH3 was synthesized by employing an ethereal reaction method. The dependence of pathways on phase formation and the properties of hydrogen evolution were investigated, and the results were compared with the ones for γ-AlH3. It was found that γ-AlH3 requires 10 degrees C higher than that of γ-AlH3 to form, and its decomposition rate demonstrated enhanced endothermic stabilities. For desorption, all hydrogen atoms of alane evolved under an isothermal condition at 138 degrees C in less than 1 hour, and the sample completely transformed to pure aluminum. Our results show that the total amount of desorbed hydrogen from α-AlH3 exceeded 9.05 wt.%, with a possibility of further increase. Easy synthesis, thermal stability, and a large amount of hydrogen desorption of alane fulfill the requirements for light-weight hydrogen storage materials once the pathway of hydrogen cycling is provided. PMID:27455747

  20. Synthesis and Hydrogen Desorption Properties of Aluminum Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Wanseop; Lee, Sang-Hwa; Kim, Jaeyong

    2016-03-01

    Aluminum hydride (AlH3 or alane) is known to store maximum 10.1 wt.% of hydrogen at relatively low temperature (< 100 degrees C), which partially fulfills the U.S. department of energy requirements for gravimetric loading capacity. However, its detailed mechanisms of appearing of different phases, structural stability, and dynamics of hydrogen desorption are still not clear. To understand the desorption properties of hydrogen in alane, thermodynamically stable α-AlH3 was synthesized by employing an ethereal reaction method. The dependence of pathways on phase formation and the properties of hydrogen evolution were investigated, and the results were compared with the ones for γ-AlH3. It was found that γ-AlH3 requires 10 degrees C higher than that of γ-AlH3 to form, and its decomposition rate demonstrated enhanced endothermic stabilities. For desorption, all hydrogen atoms of alane evolved under an isothermal condition at 138 degrees C in less than 1 hour, and the sample completely transformed to pure aluminum. Our results show that the total amount of desorbed hydrogen from α-AlH3 exceeded 9.05 wt.%, with a possibility of further increase. Easy synthesis, thermal stability, and a large amount of hydrogen desorption of alane fulfill the requirements for light-weight hydrogen storage materials once the pathway of hydrogen cycling is provided.

  1. Determining Concentration of Nanoparticles from Ellipsometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatasubbarao, Srivatsa; Kempen, Lothar U.; Chipman, Russell

    2008-01-01

    A method of using ellipsometry or polarization analysis of light in total internal reflection of a surface to determine the number density of gold nanoparticles on a smooth substrate has been developed. The method can be modified to enable determination of densities of sparse distributions of nanoparticles in general, and is expected to be especially useful for measuring gold-nanoparticle-labeled biomolecules on microarrays. The method is based on theoretical calculations of the ellipsometric responses of gold nanoparticles. Elements of the calculations include the following: For simplicity, the gold nanoparticles are assumed to be spherical and to have the same radius. The distribution of gold nanoparticles is assumed to be a sub-monolayer (that is, sparser than a monolayer). The optical response of the sub-monolayer is modeled by use of a thin-island-film theory, according to which the polarizabilities parallel and perpendicular to the substrate are functions of the wavelength of light, the dielectric functions (permittivities expressed as complex functions of frequency or wavelength) of the gold and the suspending medium (in this case, the suspending medium is air), the fraction of the substrate area covered by the nanoparticles, and the radius of the nanoparticles. For the purpose of the thin-island-film theory, the dielectric function of the gold nanoparticles is modeled as the known dielectric function of bulk gold plus a correction term that is necessitated by the fact that the mean free path length for electrons in gold decreases with decreasing radius, in such a manner as to cause the imaginary part of the dielectric function to increase with decreasing radius (see figure). The correction term is a function of the nanoparticle radius, the wavelength of light, the mean free path and the Fermi speed of electrons in bulk gold, the plasma frequency of gold, and the speed of light in a vacuum. These models are used to calculate ellipsometric responses for

  2. Comparing highly ordered monolayers of nanoparticles fabricated using electrophoretic deposition: Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles versus iron oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, James H.; Krejci, Alex J.; Garcia, Adriana -Mendoza; Sun, Shouheng; Pham, Viet Hung

    2015-08-01

    Ordered assemblies of nanoparticles remain challenging to fabricate, yet could open the door to many potential applications of nanomaterials. Here, we demonstrate that locally ordered arrays of nanoparticles, using electrophoretic deposition, can be extended to produce long-range order among the constituents. Voronoi tessellations along with multiple statistical analyses show dramatic increases in order compared with previously reported assemblies formed through electric field-assisted assembly. As a result, based on subsequent physical measurements of the nanoparticles and the deposition system, the underlying mechanisms that generate increased order are inferred.

  3. Membrane-mediated aggregation of anisotropically curved nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Olinger, Alexander D; Spangler, Eric J; Kumar, P B Sunil; Laradji, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Using systematic numerical simulations, we study the self-assembly of elongated curved nanoparticles on lipid vesicles. Our simulations are based on molecular dynamics of a coarse-grained implicit-solvent model of self-assembled lipid membranes with a Langevin thermostat. Here we consider only the case wherein the nanoparticle-nanoparticle interaction is repulsive, only the concave surface of the nanoparticle interacts attractively with the lipid head groups and only the outer surface of the vesicle is exposed to the nanoparticles. Upon their adhesion on the vesicle, the curved nanoparticles generate local curvature on the membrane. The resulting nanoparticle-generated membrane curvature leads in turn to nanoparticle self-assembly into two main types of aggregates corresponding to chain aggregates at low adhesion strengths and aster aggregates at high adhesion strength. The chain-like aggregates are due to the fact that at low values of adhesion strength, the nanoparticles prefer to lie parallel to each other. As the adhesion strength is increased, a splay angle between the nanoparticles is induced with a magnitude that increases with increasing adhesion strength. The origin of the splay angles between the nanoparticles is shown to be saddle-like membrane deformations induced by a tilt of the lipids around the nanoparticles. This phenomenon of membrane mediated self-assembly of anisotropically curved nanoparticles is explored for systems with varying nanoparticle number densities, adhesion strength, and nanoparticle intrinsic curvature.

  4. DNA nanoparticles with core-shell morphology.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Preethi L; Dimitriadis, Emilios K; Lisziewicz, Julianna; Speransky, Vlad; Horkay, Ferenc

    2014-10-14

    Mannobiose-modified polyethylenimines (PEI) are used in gene therapy to generate nanoparticles of DNA that can be targeted to the antigen-presenting cells of the immune system. We report that the sugar modification alters the DNA organization within the nanoparticles from homogenous to shell-like packing. The depth-dependent packing of DNA within the nanoparticles was probed using AFM nano-indentation. Unmodified PEI-DNA nanoparticles display linear elastic properties and depth-independent mechanics, characteristic of homogenous materials. Mannobiose-modified nanoparticles, however, showed distinct force regimes that were dependent on indentation depth, with 'buckling'-like response that is reproducible and not due to particle failure. By comparison with theoretical studies of spherical shell mechanics, the structure of mannobiosylated particles was deduced to be a thin shell with wall thickness in the order of few nanometers, and a fluid-filled core. The shell-core structure is also consistent with observations of nanoparticle denting in altered solution conditions, with measurements of nanoparticle water content from AFM images, and with images of DNA distribution in Transmission Electron Microscopy.

  5. Bioenhanced oral curcumin nanoparticles: Role of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Anisha A; Devarajan, Padma V

    2016-01-20

    The paper discusses polysaccharide-adsorbed curcumin-Gantrez nanoparticles for bioenhancement of oral curcumin. Nanoparticles revealed no change in size over time in pH 1.2 and 7.4, and a rapid drug release in pH 1.2 and 7.4 medium containing surfactant. Without adsorbed polysaccharides, nanoparticles exhibited high Cmax (61.3 ± 22.3 ng/mL), sustained plasma concentration up to 24h and 117% absolute bioavailability, attributed to bioadhesion. In contrast galactose polysaccharides arabinogalactan and kappa-carrageenan adsorbed nanoparticles exhibited rapid absorption with higher Cmax of 109.5 ± 31.2 ng/mL and 92.3 ± 21.2 ng/mL, respectively, but faster elimination and absolute bioavailability of greater than 25%. The glucose polysaccharide pullulan adsorbed nanoparticles exhibited significantly lower Cmax (39.7 ± 20.6 ng/mL) and bioavailability (13%). Lower bioavailability of polysaccharide adsorbed nanoparticles was attributed to high metabolism of curcumin in the intestine as a result of faster gastric elimination and high intestinal localization. However polysaccharide-adsorbed nanoparticles could play an important role in bioenhancement of drugs specifically those exhibiting good stability across the gastrointestinal tract.

  6. Properties of polypropylene nanocomposites containing silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jang, Myung Wook; Kim, Ju-Young; Ihn, Kyo Jin

    2007-11-01

    Silver/polypropylene (PP) nanocomposites containing silver nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm were prepared using a new synthetic method. AgNO3 crystals were dissolved into hydrophilic domain of polyoxyethylene maleate-based surfactant (PEOM), which gives self-assembly nano-structures. The AgNO3 in the nano-domains of PEOM was reduced by NaBH4 to form nanoparticles. The colloidal solutions with silver nanoparticles were diluted with ethanol and were mixed with PP pellets. Silver nanocomposites were prepared by extrusion compounding process after drying the pellets. Contents of silver nanoparticles dispersed within PP resin were changed from 100 to 1000 ppm. Formation of silver nanoparticles within PP was confirmed by UV-Vis spectroscopy and TEM. Size and distribution of dispersed silver nanoparticles were also measured by TEM. Silver/PP nanocomposites films showed not only improved thermal stability but also increased mechanical properties compared to neat PP film. Tensile properties of PP nanocomposites were largely improved compared with neat PP resin, and elongation increased also by 175% for the nanocomposites containing 1000 ppm silver nanoparticles.

  7. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles: A green approach.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shakeel; Annu; Ikram, Saiqa; Yudha S, Salprima

    2016-08-01

    Nanotechnology is an immensely developing field due to its extensive range of applications in different areas of technology and science. Different types of methods are employed for synthesis of nanoparticles due to their wide applications. The conventional chemical methods have certain limitations with them either in the form of chemical contaminations during their syntheses procedures or in later applications and use of higher energy. During the last decade research have been focussed on developing simple, clean, non-toxic, cost effective and eco-friendly protocols for synthesis of nanoparticles. In order to get this objective, biosynthesis methods have been developed in order to fill this gap. The biosynthesis of nanoparticles is simple, single step, eco-friendly and a green approach. The biochemical processes in biological agents reduce the dissolved metal ions into nano metals. The various biological agents like plant tissues, fungi, bacteria, etc. are used for biosynthesis for metal nanoparticles. In this review article, we summarised recent literature on biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles which have revolutionised technique of synthesis for their applications in different fields. Due to biocompatibility of gold nanoparticles, it has find its applications in biomedical applications. The protocol and mechanism of biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles along with various applications have also been discussed. PMID:27236049

  8. Nanoparticle ligand presentation for targeting solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Duskey, Jason T; Rice, Kevin G

    2014-10-01

    Among the many scientific advances to come from the study of nanoscience, the development of ligand-targeted nanoparticles to eliminate solid tumors is predicted to have a major impact on human health. There are many reports describing novel designs and testing of targeted nanoparticles to treat cancer. While the principles of the technology are well demonstrated in controlled lab experiments, there are still many hurdles to overcome for the science to mature into truly efficacious targeted nanoparticles that join the arsenal of agents currently used to treat cancer in humans. One of these hurdles is overcoming unwanted biodistribution to the liver while maximizing delivery to the tumor. This almost certainly requires advances in both nanoparticle stealth technology and targeting. Currently, it continues to be a challenge to control the loading of ligands onto polyethylene glycol (PEG) to achieve maximal targeting. Nanoparticle cellular uptake and subcellular targeting of genes and siRNA also remain a challenge. This review examines the types of ligands that have been most often used to target nanoparticles to solid tumors. As the science matures over the coming decade, careful control over ligand presentation on nanoparticles of precise size, shape, and charge will likely play a major role in achieving success.

  9. Photochromic silver nanoparticles fabricated by sputter deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Okumu, J.; Dahmen, C.; Sprafke, A.N.; Luysberg, M.; Plessen, G. von; Wuttig, M.

    2005-05-01

    In this study a simple route to preparing photochromic silver nanoparticles in a TiO{sub 2} matrix is presented, which is based upon sputtering and subsequent annealing. The formation of silver nanoparticles with sizes of some tens of nanometers is confirmed by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The inhomogeneously broadened particle-plasmon resonance of the nanoparticle ensemble leads to a broad optical-absorption band, whose spectral profile can be tuned by varying the silver load and the annealing temperature. Multicolor photochromic behavior of this Ag-TiO{sub 2} system upon irradiation with laser light is demonstrated and discussed in terms of a particle-plasmon-assisted electron transfer from the silver nanoparticles to TiO{sub 2} and subsequent trapping by adsorbed molecular oxygen. The electron depletion in the nanoparticles reduces the light absorption at the wavelength of irradiation. A gradual recovery of the absorption band is observed after irradiation, which is explained with a slow thermal release of electrons from the oxygen trapping centers and subsequent capture into the nanoparticles. The recovery can be accelerated by ultraviolet irradiation; the explanation for this observation is that electrons photoexcited in the TiO{sub 2} are captured into the nanoparticles and restore the absorption band.

  10. Directed assembly of nanoparticles for hybrid photovoltaic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Vivian; Mastroianni, Alexander; Thokelsson, Kari; Ma, Wanli; Alivisatos, Paul; Xu, Ting

    2010-03-01

    Nanoparticles have unique optical and electronic properties. Be able to control the hierarchical assembly of nanoparticles in thin films may lead to devices for energy harvest and storage. Recently it was shown that nanoparticles can be assembled with high precision using block copolymer-based supramolecules.1 Here we present detailed studies on nanoparticle assembly in thin films. Effects of varies parameters including: small molecular loading, supramolecular morphology, film thickness, nanoparticle loading, interfacial interaction and solvent annealing condition on the macroscopic alignment of nanoparticle assembly as well as inter-particle ordering within the copolymer microdomain have been systematic investigated. We show that nanoparticle assembly can be readily aligned either parallel or perpendicular to the substrate. In addition, inter-particle distances can be tailored. A Schottky barrier type solar cell has been fabricated to correlate the structure and device performance and cell efficiency. 1. Zhao, Y.; Thorkelsson, K.; Mastroianni, A. J.; Schilling, T.; Luther, J. M.; Rancatore, B. J.; Matsunaga, K.; Jinnai, H.; Wu, Y.; Poulsen, D.; Frechet, J. M. J.; Paul Alivisatos, A.; Xu, T. Nat Mater 2009, advance online publication.

  11. Photon upconversion in core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xian; Peng, Denfeng; Ju, Qiang; Wang, Feng

    2015-03-21

    Photon upconversion generally results from a series of successive electronic transitions within complex energy levels of lanthanide ions that are embedded in the lattice of a crystalline solid. In conventional lanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles, the dopant ions homogeneously distributed in the host lattice are readily accessible to surface quenchers and lose their excitation energy, giving rise to weak and susceptible emissions. Therefore, present studies on upconversion are mainly focused on core-shell nanoparticles comprising spatially confined dopant ions. By doping upconverting lanthanide ions in the interior of a core-shell nanoparticle, the upconversion emission can be substantially enhanced, and the optical integrity of the nanoparticles can be largely preserved. Optically active shells are also frequently employed to impart multiple functionalities to upconversion nanoparticles. Intriguingly, the core-shell design introduces the possibility of constructing novel upconversion nanoparticles by exploiting the energy exchange interactions across the core-shell interface. In this tutorial review, we highlight recent advances in the development of upconversion core-shell nanoparticles, with particular emphasis on the emerging strategies for regulating the interplay of dopant interactions through core-shell nanostructural engineering that leads to unprecedented upconversion properties. The improved control over photon energy conversion will open up new opportunities for biological and energy applications. PMID:25058157

  12. Synthesis and characterization of functionalized magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Dipti; Peeples, Brianna N.; Spence, Destiny D.; Peeples, Caryn; Bell, Crystal N.; Pradhan, A. K.

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been used in a wide array of industrial and biomedical applications due to their unique properties at the nanoscale level. They are extensively used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic hyperthermia treatment, drug delivery, and in assays for biological separations. Furthermore, superparamagnetic nanoparticles are of large interest for in vivo applications. However, these unmodified nanoparticles aggregate and consequently lose their superparamagnetic behaviors, due to high surface to volume ratio and strong dipole to dipole interaction. For these reasons, surface coating is necessary for the enhancement and effectiveness of magnetic nanoparticles to be used in various applications. In addition to providing increased stability to the nanoparticles in different solvents or media, stabilizers such as surfactants, organic/inorganic molecules, polymer and co-polymers are employed as surface coatings, which yield magnetically responsive systems. In this work we present the synthesis and magnetic characterization of Fe3O4 nanoparticles coated with 3-aminopropyltriethoxy silane (APS) and citric acid. The particles magnetic hysteresis was measured by a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer with an in-plane magnetic field. The uncoated and coated magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by using fourier transform infrared (FTIR), UV-vis, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and thermo-gravimetric analysis.

  13. Modeling Electrospray Deposition of Nanoparticle Inks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ao; Fideles da Silva, Jefferson; Yong, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Electrospray of nanoparticle inks is of great importance to the manufacturing of functional materials. In this study, we develop a new three-dimensional multiphysics method to model the electrospray of colloidal suspension to a flat substrate. The Lagrangian Particle Tracking (LPT) transport equation is coupled to mass and heat transfer using convective droplet vaporization model, which allow us to track each particle-laden ink droplets and dry nanoparticles in the electrospray plume and probe the deposit structures. Herein, we consider dilute inks that are experimentally relevant, assuming monodisperse nanoparticles. We characterize the overall statistics of the plume and the dynamics of individual ink droplet or dry nanoparticle. It is shown that the segregation effect affects not only primary and satellite droplets but also dry nanoparticles. We observe nanoparticles deposit structure changing process, in particular time evolution of the density profile along radial direction. Our results show that the region of high nanoparticle density transitioning from only the edge to both the edge and center, which agrees with previous experimental studies.

  14. Nanoparticles--production and role in biotransformation.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, D P; Gassara, F; Brar, S K

    2011-02-01

    Renewed interest has arisen in the manufacture of nanoparticles due to their unusually enhanced physico-chemical properties and biological activities compared to the bulk parent materials. The industrial scale production and wide variety of application of nanoparticles has resulted in broad range applications in biotechnology, more recently in the increase in efficiency of biotransformation processes. Biotransformation processes utilized to form different bio-products and nanoparticles demonstrate various roles in the bio-products formation. In order to address the issue, it is necessary to understand the different methods available for synthesis of nanoparticles and their effects on biotransformation process, an efficient process for utilization of nanoparticles. In this review, an overview of physical, chemical and biological methods for synthesis of nanoparticles and their role in biotransformation process on formation of different bio-products, such as bioethanol, biohydrogen, biodiesel, enzymes and bioplastics is outlined. In fact, the nanoparticles are going to prove revolutionary in the field of biotransformation by improving the efficiency and yield and often widening the application range. PMID:21456120

  15. Titration of gold nanoparticles in phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Han-Wen; Schadt, Mark J; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2015-12-01

    In the organic-aqueous phase transfer process of gold nanoparticles, there are two types of distinctive interfaces involving hydrophilic and hydrophobic ligands, the understanding of which is important for the design of functional nanomaterials for analytical/bioanalytical applications and the control over the nanoparticles' nanoactivity and nanotoxicity in different phases. This report describes new findings of an investigation of the quantitative aspect of ligand ion pairing at the capping monolayer structure that drives the phase extraction of gold nanoparticles. Alkanethiolate-capped gold nanoparticles of 8 nm diameter with high size monodispersity (RSD ∼ 5%) were first derivatized by a ligand place exchange reaction with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid to form a mixed monolayer shell consisting of both hydrophobic (-CH3) and hydrophilic (-COOH) groups. It was followed by quantitative titration of the resulting nanoparticles with a cationic species (-NR4(+)) in a toluene phase, yielding ion pairing of -NR4(+) and -COO(-) on part of the capping monolayer. Analysis of the phase extraction allowed a quantitative determination of the percentage of ion pairing and structural changes in the capping monolayer on the nanoparticles. The results, along with morphological characterization, are discussed in terms of the interfacial structural changes and their implications on the rational design of surface-functionalized nanoparticles and fine tuning of the interfacial reactivity. PMID:26523548

  16. Radiofrequency Heating Pathways for Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Collins, C. B.; McCoy, R. S.; Ackerson, B. J.; Collins, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    This feature article reviews the thermal dissipation of nanoscopic gold under radiofrequency (RF) irradiation. It also presents previously unpublished data addressing obscure aspects of this phenomenon. While applications in biology motivated initial investigation of RF heating of gold nanoparticles, recent controversy concerning whether thermal effects can be attributed to nanoscopic gold highlight the need to understand the involved mechanism or mechanisms of heating. Both the nature of the particle and the nature of the RF field influence heating. Aspects of nanoparticle chemistry and physics, including the hydrodynamic diameter of the particle, the oxidation state and related magnetism of the core, and the chemical nature of the ligand shell may all strongly influence to what extent a nanoparticle heats in an RF field. Aspects of RF include: power, frequency and antenna designs that emphasize relative strength of magnetic or electric fields, and also influence the extent to which a gold nanoparticle heats in RF. These nanoparticle and RF properties are analysed in the context of three heating mechanisms proposed to explain gold nanoparticle heating in an RF field. This article also makes a critical analysis of the existing literature in the context of the nanoparticle preparations, RF structure, and suggested mechanisms in previously reported experiments. PMID:24962620

  17. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles: A green approach.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shakeel; Annu; Ikram, Saiqa; Yudha S, Salprima

    2016-08-01

    Nanotechnology is an immensely developing field due to its extensive range of applications in different areas of technology and science. Different types of methods are employed for synthesis of nanoparticles due to their wide applications. The conventional chemical methods have certain limitations with them either in the form of chemical contaminations during their syntheses procedures or in later applications and use of higher energy. During the last decade research have been focussed on developing simple, clean, non-toxic, cost effective and eco-friendly protocols for synthesis of nanoparticles. In order to get this objective, biosynthesis methods have been developed in order to fill this gap. The biosynthesis of nanoparticles is simple, single step, eco-friendly and a green approach. The biochemical processes in biological agents reduce the dissolved metal ions into nano metals. The various biological agents like plant tissues, fungi, bacteria, etc. are used for biosynthesis for metal nanoparticles. In this review article, we summarised recent literature on biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles which have revolutionised technique of synthesis for their applications in different fields. Due to biocompatibility of gold nanoparticles, it has find its applications in biomedical applications. The protocol and mechanism of biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles along with various applications have also been discussed.

  18. Gold Nanoparticle Quantitation by Whole Cell Tomography.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Aric W; Jeerage, Kavita M; Schwartz, Cindi L; Curtin, Alexandra E; Chiaramonti, Ann N

    2015-12-22

    Many proposed biomedical applications for engineered gold nanoparticles require their incorporation by mammalian cells in specific numbers and locations. Here, the number of gold nanoparticles inside of individual mammalian stem cells was characterized using fast focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy based tomography. Enhanced optical microscopy was used to provide a multiscale map of the in vitro sample, which allows cells of interest to be identified within their local environment. Cells were then serially sectioned using a gallium ion beam and imaged using a scanning electron beam. To confirm the accuracy of single cross sections, nanoparticles in similar cross sections were imaged using transmission electron microscopy and scanning helium ion microscopy. Complete tomographic series were then used to count the nanoparticles inside of each cell and measure their spatial distribution. We investigated the influence of slice thickness on counting single particles and clusters as well as nanoparticle packing within clusters. For 60 nm citrate stabilized particles, the nanoparticle cluster packing volume is 2.15 ± 0.20 times the volume of the bare gold nanoparticles.

  19. Functionalization of gold nanoparticles as antidiabetic nanomaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatachalam, M.; Govindaraju, K.; Mohamed Sadiq, A.; Tamilselvan, S.; Ganesh Kumar, V.; Singaravelu, G.

    2013-12-01

    In the present investigation, functionalization of gold nanoparticles synthesized using propanoic acid 2-(3-acetoxy-4,4,14-trimethylandrost-8-en-17-yl) (PAT) an active biocomponent isolated from Cassia auriculata is studied in detail. On reaction of PAT with aqueous HAuCl4, rapid formation of stable gold nanoparticles was achieved. Formation of gold nanoparticles was confirmed by UV-vis spectroscopy, XRD, GC-MS, FTIR, TEM and SEM with EDAX. Gold nanoparticles mostly were monodisperse, spherical in shape and ranged in size 12-41 nm. Gold nanoparticles synthesised using PAT was administered to alloxan (150 mg/kg body weight) induced diabetic male albino rats at different doses (0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 mg/kg body weight) for 28 days. Plasma glucose level, cholesterol and triglyceride were significantly (p < 0.001) reduced in experimental animals treated with gold nanoparticles at dosage of 0.5 mg/kg body weight and plasma insulin increased significantly. The newly genre green gold nanoparticles exhibit remarkable protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitory activity.

  20. Titration of gold nanoparticles in phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Han-Wen; Schadt, Mark J; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2015-12-01

    In the organic-aqueous phase transfer process of gold nanoparticles, there are two types of distinctive interfaces involving hydrophilic and hydrophobic ligands, the understanding of which is important for the design of functional nanomaterials for analytical/bioanalytical applications and the control over the nanoparticles' nanoactivity and nanotoxicity in different phases. This report describes new findings of an investigation of the quantitative aspect of ligand ion pairing at the capping monolayer structure that drives the phase extraction of gold nanoparticles. Alkanethiolate-capped gold nanoparticles of 8 nm diameter with high size monodispersity (RSD ∼ 5%) were first derivatized by a ligand place exchange reaction with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid to form a mixed monolayer shell consisting of both hydrophobic (-CH3) and hydrophilic (-COOH) groups. It was followed by quantitative titration of the resulting nanoparticles with a cationic species (-NR4(+)) in a toluene phase, yielding ion pairing of -NR4(+) and -COO(-) on part of the capping monolayer. Analysis of the phase extraction allowed a quantitative determination of the percentage of ion pairing and structural changes in the capping monolayer on the nanoparticles. The results, along with morphological characterization, are discussed in terms of the interfacial structural changes and their implications on the rational design of surface-functionalized nanoparticles and fine tuning of the interfacial reactivity.

  1. Nanoparticles modified with multiple organic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Ronald Lee (Inventor); Luebben, Silvia DeVito (Inventor); Myers, Andrew William (Inventor); Smith, Bryan Matthew (Inventor); Elliott, Brian John (Inventor); Kreutzer, Cory (Inventor); Wilson, Carolina (Inventor); Meiser, Manfred (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Surface-modified nanoparticles of boehmite, and methods for preparing the same. Aluminum oxyhydroxide nanoparticles are surface modified by reaction with selected amounts of organic acids. In particular, the nanoparticle surface is modified by reactions with two or more different carboxylic acids, at least one of which is an organic carboxylic acid. The product is a surface modified boehmite nanoparticle that has an inorganic aluminum oxyhydroxide core, or part aluminum oxyhydroxide core and a surface-bonded organic shell. Organic carboxylic acids of this invention contain at least one carboxylic acid group and one carbon-hydrogen bond. One embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that have been surface modified with two or more acids one of which additional carries at least one reactive functional group. Another embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that have been surface modified with multiple acids one of which has molecular weight or average molecular weight greater than or equal to 500 Daltons. Yet, another embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that are surface modified with two or more acids one of which is hydrophobic in nature and has solubility in water of less than 15 by weight. The products of the methods of this invention have specific useful properties when used in mixture with liquids, as filler in solids, or as stand-alone entities.

  2. Nanoparticles modified with multiple organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Cook, Ronald Lee; Luebben, Silvia DeVito; Myers, Andrew William; Smith, Bryan Matthew; Elliott, Brian John; Kreutzer, Cory; Wilson, Carolina; Meiser, Manfred

    2007-07-17

    Surface-modified nanoparticles of boehmite, and methods for preparing the same. Aluminum oxyhydroxide nanoparticles are surface modified by reaction with selected amounts of organic acids. In particular, the nanoparticle surface is modified by reactions with two or more different carboxylic acids, at least one of which is an organic carboxylic acid. The product is a surface modified boehmite nanoparticle that has an inorganic aluminum oxyhydroxide core, or part aluminum oxyhydroxide core and a surface-bonded organic shell. Organic carboxylic acids of this invention contain at least one carboxylic acid group and one carbon-hydrogen bond. One embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that have been surface modified with two or more acids one of which additional carries at least one reactive functional group. Another embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that have been surface modified with multiple acids one of which has molecular weight or average molecular weight greater than or equal to 500 Daltons. Yet, another embodiment of this invention provides boehmite nanoparticles that are surface modified with two or more acids one of which is hydrophobic in nature and has solubility in water of less than 15 by weight. The products of the methods of this invention have specific useful properties when used in mixture with liquids, as filler in solids, or as stand-alone entities.

  3. Nanoparticle ligand presentation for targeting solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Duskey, Jason T; Rice, Kevin G

    2014-10-01

    Among the many scientific advances to come from the study of nanoscience, the development of ligand-targeted nanoparticles to eliminate solid tumors is predicted to have a major impact on human health. There are many reports describing novel designs and testing of targeted nanoparticles to treat cancer. While the principles of the technology are well demonstrated in controlled lab experiments, there are still many hurdles to overcome for the science to mature into truly efficacious targeted nanoparticles that join the arsenal of agents currently used to treat cancer in humans. One of these hurdles is overcoming unwanted biodistribution to the liver while maximizing delivery to the tumor. This almost certainly requires advances in both nanoparticle stealth technology and targeting. Currently, it continues to be a challenge to control the loading of ligands onto polyethylene glycol (PEG) to achieve maximal targeting. Nanoparticle cellular uptake and subcellular targeting of genes and siRNA also remain a challenge. This review examines the types of ligands that have been most often used to target nanoparticles to solid tumors. As the science matures over the coming decade, careful control over ligand presentation on nanoparticles of precise size, shape, and charge will likely play a major role in achieving success. PMID:24927668

  4. Ion mediated targeting of cells with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheshwari, Vivek; Fu, Jinlong

    2010-03-01

    In eukaryotic cells, Ca^2+ ions are necessary for intracellular signaling, in activity of mitochondria and a variety of other cellular process that have been linked to cell apoptosis, proteins synthesis and cell-cycle regulation. Here we show that Ca^2+ ions, serving as the bio-compatible interface can be used to target Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SaC, baker's yeast), a model eukaryotic cell, with Au nanoparticles (10 nm). The Ca^2+ ions bind to the carboxylic acid groups in the citrate functionalized Au nanoparticles. This transforms the nanoparticles into micron long 1-D branched chain assemblies due to inter-particle dipole-dipole interaction and inter-particle bonding due to the divalent nature of the Ca^2+ ion. A similar transformation is observed with the use of divalent ions Mg^2+, Cd^2+ and Fe^2+. The 1-D assembly aids the interfacing of ion-nanoparticles on the cell by providing multiple contact points. Further monovalent ions such as Na^+ are also effective for the targeting of the cell with nanoparticles. However Na-Au nanoparticles are limited in their deposition as they exist in solution as single particles. The cells remain alive after the deposition process and their vitality is unaffected by the interfacing with ion-nanoparticles.

  5. Standardization of Nanoparticle Characterization: Methods for Testing Properties, Stability, and Functionality of Edible Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    McClements, Jake; McClements, David Julian

    2016-06-10

    There has been a rapid increase in the fabrication of various kinds of edible nanoparticles for oral delivery of bioactive agents, such as those constructed from proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and/or minerals. It is currently difficult to compare the relative advantages and disadvantages of different kinds of nanoparticle-based delivery systems because researchers use different analytical instruments and protocols to characterize them. In this paper, we briefly review the various analytical methods available for characterizing the properties of edible nanoparticles, such as composition, morphology, size, charge, physical state, and stability. This information is then used to propose a number of standardized protocols for characterizing nanoparticle properties, for evaluating their stability to environmental stresses, and for predicting their biological fate. Implementation of these protocols would facilitate comparison of the performance of nanoparticles under standardized conditions, which would facilitate the rational selection of nanoparticle-based delivery systems for different applications in the food, health care, and pharmaceutical industries.

  6. Carbohydrate Nanoparticles for Brain Delivery.

    PubMed

    Lalatsa, A; Barbu, E

    2016-01-01

    Many brain tumors and neurological diseases can greatly benefit from the use of emerging nanotechnologies based on targeted nanomedicines that are able to noninvasively transport highly potent and specific pharmaceuticals across the blood-brain barrier. Carbohydrates have received considerable interest as materials for drug carriers due to their natural origin and inherent biodegradability and biocompatibility, as well as due to their hydrophilic character and ease of chemical modification combined with low cost and the possibility for large-scale manufacturing. This chapter provides an overview of the latest research involving the use of carbohydrate-based nanoparticles for drug delivery to the central nervous system. After reviewing the challenges posed by delivering drugs into the brain, the current state-of-the-art approaches for delivery of actives across the blood-brain barrier, including invasive and noninvasive strategies, are presented. A particular focus has been placed on chitosan polymers as they are among the most promising carbohydrate nanocarriers for the preparation and testing of chitosan-based nanomedicines that led, in preclinical proof-of-concept studies, to enhanced brain drug levels and increased pharmacodynamics responses after intravenous, nasal, and oral administration. While chitosan nanoparticles are to date among the most studied and most promising carriers, approaches based on other polysaccharides such as dextran, pullulan, and cellulose warrant further research in the attempt to advance the existing technologies for overcoming the blood-brain barrier. PMID:27678176

  7. Single lamella nanoparticles of polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Weber, C H M; Chiche, A; Krausch, G; Rosenfeldt, S; Ballauff, M; Harnau, L; Göttker-Schnetmann, I; Tong, Q; Mecking, S

    2007-07-01

    We present a complete analysis of the structure of polyethylene (PE) nanoparticles synthesized and stabilized in water under very mild conditions (15 degrees C, 40 atm) by a nickel-catalyzed polymerization in aqueous solution. Combining cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) with X-ray scattering, we demonstrate that this new synthetic route leads to a stable dispersion of individual PE nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution. Most of the semicrystalline particles have a hexagonal shape (lateral size 25 nm, thickness 9 nm) and exhibit the habit of a truncated lozenge. The combination of cryo-TEM and small-angle X-ray scattering demonstrates that the particles consist of a single crystalline lamella sandwiched between two thin amorphous polymer layers ("nanohamburgers"). Hence, these nanocrystals that comprise only ca. 14 chains present the smallest single crystals of PE ever reported. The very small thickness of the crystalline lamella (6.3 nm) is related to the extreme undercooling (more than 100 degrees C) that is due to the low temperature at which the polymerization takes place. This strong undercooling cannot be achieved by any other method so far. Dispersions of polyethylene nanocrystals may have a high potential for a further understanding of polymer crystallization as well as for materials science as, e.g., for the fabrication of extremely thin crystalline layers.

  8. Enhanced potentiometry by metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Noyhouzer, T; Valdinger, I; Mandler, D

    2013-09-01

    Measuring the oxidation-reduction potential (Eh) requires an interface that is not selective toward specific species but exchanges electrons with all redox couples in the solution. Sluggish electron transfer (ET) kinetics with the species will not reflect the "true" Eh of the solution. Here, we present a novel approach by which adsorbed metal nanoparticles (NPs) are used for enhancing ET exchange rates between redox species and electrode surface and therefore affect significantly the measurement of the open circuit potential (OCP) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The OCP and CV of various organic and inorganic species such as l-dopa, dopac, iron(II), and iodide are measured by bare stainless steel and by stainless steel modified by either Pt or Au NPs. We study the effect of the surface coverage of the stainless steel surface by NPs on the electrochemical response. Moreover, the stainless steel electrode was modified simultaneously by Au and Pt nanoparticles. This improved concurrently the stainless steel response (CV and potentiometry) toward two different species; l-dopa, which shows fast electron transfer on Pt, and catechol, which exhibits fast electron transfer on Au. We believe that this approach could be a first step toward developing a superior electrode for measuring the "true" Eh of complex aquatic systems.

  9. Nanoparticles for Improving Cancer Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongmin; Zhen, Zipeng; Todd, Trever; Chu, Paul K.; Xie, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Despite the progress in developing new therapeutic modalities, cancer remains one of the leading diseases causing human mortality. This is mainly attributed to the inability to diagnose tumors in their early stage. By the time the tumor is confirmed, the cancer may have already metastasized, thereby making therapies challenging or even impossible. It is therefore crucial to develop new or to improve existing diagnostic tools to enable diagnosis of cancer in its early or even pre-syndrome stage. The emergence of nanotechnology has provided such a possibility. Unique physical and physiochemical properties allow nanoparticles to be utilized as tags with excellent sensitivity. When coupled with the appropriate targeting molecules, nanoparticle-based probes can interact with a biological system and sense biological changes on the molecular level with unprecedented accuracy. In the past several years, much progress has been made in applying nanotechnology to clinical imaging and diagnostics, and interdisciplinary efforts have made an impact on clinical cancer management. This article aims to review the progress in this exciting area with emphases on the preparation and engineering techniques that have been developed to assemble “smart” nanoprobes. PMID:24068857

  10. Nanoparticle induced self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Helgesen, G; Svåsand, E; Skjeltorp, A T

    2008-05-21

    Self-assembly has for the large part focused on the assembly of molecules without guidance or management from an outside source. However, self-assembly is in principle by no means limited to molecules or the nanoscale. A particularly interesting method to the self-assembly of micro- to millimetre sized components is the use of the 'magnetic hole' effect. In this method, nonmagnetic particles can be manipulated by external magnetic fields by immersing them in a dispersion of colloidal, magnetic nanoparticles, denoted ferrofluids. Nonmagnetic particles in magnetized ferrofluids are in many ways ideal model systems to test various forms of particle self-assembly and dynamics. When microspheres are confined to a monolayer between two parallel plates and subjected to static or oscillating magnetic fields they show a variety of dynamical behaviours and assemblages, depending on the frequency and direction of the external fields. A single pair of magnetic holes oscillating in a ferrofluid layer may be used to measure the viscosity of tiny volumes of the fluid. We have also observed ordering of dilute dispersions of macromolecules and nanoparticles in magnetized ferrofluids. The self-assembly at this length scale results from structural correlations between these nanostructures and ferrofluid particles rather than from the macroscopic magnetostatic effect for the magnetic holes.

  11. Dextran Nanoparticle Synthesis and Properties.

    PubMed

    Wasiak, Iga; Kulikowska, Aleksandra; Janczewska, Magdalena; Michalak, Magdalena; Cymerman, Iwona A; Nagalski, Andrzej; Kallinger, Peter; Szymanski, Wladyslaw W; Ciach, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Dextran is widely exploited in medical products and as a component of drug-delivering nanoparticles (NPs). Here, we tested whether dextran can serve as the main substrate of NPs and form a stable backbone. We tested dextrans with several molecular masses under several synthesis conditions to optimize NP stability. The analysis of the obtained nanoparticles showed that dextran NPs that were synthesized from 70 kDa dextran with a 5% degree of oxidation of the polysaccharide chain and 50% substitution with dodecylamine formed a NP backbone composed of modified dextran subunits, the mean diameter of which in an aqueous environment was around 100 nm. Dextran NPs could be stored in a dry state and reassembled in water. Moreover, we found that different chemical moieties (e.g., drugs such as doxorubicin) can be attached to the dextran NPs via a pH-dependent bond that allows release of the drug with lowering pH. We conclude that dextran NPs are a promising nano drug carrier. PMID:26752182

  12. Magnetic Nanoparticles in Cancer Theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Gobbo, Oliviero L.; Sjaastad, Kristine; Radomski, Marek W.; Volkov, Yuri; Prina-Mello, Adriele

    2015-01-01

    In a report from 2008, The International Agency for Research on Cancer predicted a tripled cancer incidence from 1975, projecting a possible 13-17 million cancer deaths worldwide by 2030. While new treatments are evolving and reaching approval for different cancer types, the main prevention of cancer mortality is through early diagnosis, detection and treatment of malignant cell growth. The last decades have seen a development of new imaging techniques now in widespread clinical use. The development of nano-imaging through fluorescent imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to detect and diagnose cancer at an earlier stage than with current imaging methods. The characteristic properties of nanoparticles result in their theranostic potential allowing for simultaneous detection of and treatment of the disease. This review provides state of the art of the nanotechnological applications for cancer therapy. Furthermore, it advances a novel concept of personalized nanomedical theranostic therapy using iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles in conjunction with MRI imaging. Regulatory and industrial perspectives are also included to outline future perspectives in nanotechnological cancer research. PMID:26379790

  13. Nanoparticle-based biologic mimetics.

    PubMed

    Cliffel, David E; Turner, Brian N; Huffman, Brian J

    2009-01-01

    Centered on solid chemistry foundations, biology and materials science have reached a crossroad where bottom-up designs of new biologically important nanomaterials are a reality. The topics discussed here present the interdisciplinary field of creating biological mimics. Specifically, this discussion focuses on mimics that are developed using various types of metal nanoparticles (particularly gold) through facile synthetic methods. These methods conjugate biologically relevant molecules, e.g., small molecules, peptides, proteins, and carbohydrates, in conformationally favorable orientations on the particle surface. These new products provide stable, safe, and effective substitutes for working with potentially hazardous biologicals for applications such as drug targeting, immunological studies, biosensor development, and biocatalysis. Many standard bioanalytical techniques can be used to characterize and validate the efficacy of these new materials, including quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Metal nanoparticle-based biomimetics continue to be developed as potential replacements for the native biomolecule in applications of immunoassays and catalysis.

  14. Nanoparticle biofabrication using English ivy (Hedera helix)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background English ivy (Hedera helix) is well known for its adhesive properties and climbing ability. Essential to its ability to adhere to vertical surfaces is the secretion of a nanocomposite adhesive containing spherical nanoparticles, 60–85 nm in diameter, produced exclusively by root hairs present on adventitious roots. These organic nanoparticles have shown promise in biomedical and cosmetic applications, and represent a safer alternative to metal oxide nanoparticles currently available. Results It was discovered that the maximum adventitious root production was achieved by a 4 h application of 1 mg/ml indole-3 butyric acid (IBA) to juvenile English ivy shoot segments cultured in custom vessels. After incubation of the shoots under continuous light at 83 μmol/m2 s at 20°C for 2 weeks, the adventitious roots were harvested from the culture system and it was possible to isolate 90 mg of dry weight nanoparticles per 12 g of roots. The nanoparticle morphology was characterized by atomic force microscopy, and found to be similar to previous studies. Conclusions An enhanced system for the production of English ivy adventitious roots and their nanoparticles by modifying GA7 Magenta boxes and identifying the optimal concentration of IBA for adventitious root growth was developed. This system is the first such platform for growing and harvesting organic nanoparticles from plants, and represents an important step in the development of plant-based nanomanufacturing. It is a significant improvement on the exploitation of plant systems for the formation of metallic nanoparticles, and represents a pathway for the generation of bulk ivy nanoparticles for translation into biomedical applications. PMID:23095780

  15. Controlling the growth of "ionic" nanoparticle supracrystals.

    PubMed

    Kalsin, Alexander M; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2007-04-01

    Dimensions and quality of supracrystals self-assembling from oppositely charged nanoparticles (NPs) can be controlled by changing the relative nanoparticle concentrations, NP polydispersity, and pH. In particular, excess nanoparticles of either polarity terminate the self-assembly process at desired stages by forming charged, stabilizing shells around the growing aggregates. In this way, average supracrystal sizes can be varied from several micrometers down to tens of nanometers. While larger crystals precipitate from the growing solution, those smaller than ca. 400 nm are soluble. The experimentally observed threshold size for solubility agrees with arguments based on the DLVO theory.

  16. Morphology Tuning of Strontium Tungstate Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, S.; George, T.; George, K. C.; Sunny, A. T.; Mathew, S.

    2007-08-22

    Strontium tungstate nanocrystals in two different morphologies are successfully synthesized by controlled precipitation in aqueous and in poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) medium. Structural characterizations are carried out by XRD and SEM. The average particle size calculated for the SrWO4 prepared in the two different solvents ranges 20-24 nm. The SEM pictures show that the surface morphologies of the SrWO4 nanoparticles in aqueous medium resemble mushroom and the SrWO4 nanoparticles in PVA medium resemble cauliflower. Investigations on the room temperature luminescent properties of the strontium tungstate nanoparticles prepared in aqueous and PVA medium shows strong emissions around 425 nm.

  17. Purification of Nanoparticles by Size and Shape

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, James D.; Rizzello, Loris; Avila-Olias, Milagros; Gaitzsch, Jens; Contini, Claudia; Magoń, Monika S.; Renshaw, Stephen A.; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Producing monodisperse nanoparticles is essential to ensure consistency in biological experiments and to enable a smooth translation into the clinic. Purification of samples into discrete sizes and shapes may not only improve sample quality, but also provide us with the tools to understand which physical properties of nanoparticles are beneficial for a drug delivery vector. In this study, using polymersomes as a model system, we explore four techniques for purifying pre-formed nanoparticles into discrete fractions based on their size, shape or density. We show that these techniques can successfully separate polymersomes into monodisperse fractions. PMID:27271538

  18. Purification of Nanoparticles by Size and Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, James D.; Rizzello, Loris; Avila-Olias, Milagros; Gaitzsch, Jens; Contini, Claudia; Magoń, Monika S.; Renshaw, Stephen A.; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    Producing monodisperse nanoparticles is essential to ensure consistency in biological experiments and to enable a smooth translation into the clinic. Purification of samples into discrete sizes and shapes may not only improve sample quality, but also provide us with the tools to understand which physical properties of nanoparticles are beneficial for a drug delivery vector. In this study, using polymersomes as a model system, we explore four techniques for purifying pre-formed nanoparticles into discrete fractions based on their size, shape or density. We show that these techniques can successfully separate polymersomes into monodisperse fractions.

  19. Engineered nanoparticles: thrombotic events in cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, Ahmed M. E.; Xiao, Lin; Ouyang, Chenxi; Yang, Guang

    2014-11-01

    Engineered nanoparticles are being increasingly produced for specific applications in medicine. Broad selections of nano-sized constructs have been developed for applications in diagnosis, imaging, and drug delivery. Nanoparticles as contrast agents enable conjugation with molecular markers which are essential for designing effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Such investigations can also lead to a better understanding of disease mechanisms such as cancer-associated thrombosis which remains unpredictable with serious bleeding complications and high risk of death. Here we review the recent and current applications of engineered nanoparticles in diagnosis and therapeutic strategies, noting their toxicity in relation to specific markers as a target.

  20. Antimicrobial property of zinc based nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiriac, V.; Stratulat, D. N.; Calin, G.; Nichitus, S.; Burlui, V.; Stadoleanu, C.; Popa, M.; Popa, I. M.

    2016-06-01

    Pathogen bacteria strains with wide spectrum can cause serious infections with drastic damages on humans. There are studies reflecting antibacterial effect of nanoparticles type metal or metal oxides as an alternative or concurrent treatment to the diseases caused by infectious agents. Synthesised nanoparticles using different methods like sol-gel, hydrothermal or plant extraction were tested following well-established protocols with the regard to their antimicrobial activity. It was found that zinc based nanoparticles possess strong synergistic effect with commonly used antibiotics on infection tratment.

  1. On DNA packaging into elastic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Wang, Jizeng

    2013-10-01

    In recent years, understanding the process of DNA packaging into elastic nanoparticles is of great interest to advancing practical applications in fields such as drug delivery, global ecology and bacterial pathogenicity. In this study, we adopt a unified continuum and statistical mechanics model by taking into account the effects of DNA bending, electrostatic repulsion between DNA-DNA strands and elastic deformation of the nanoparticles to quantitatively reveal the relation between packaging force, Young's modulus of the nanoparticles and DNA length packaged. We find that particle stiffness can significantly influence the ejection force when the particles are immersed in high electrostatic repulsion solution.

  2. Transparent displays enabled by resonant nanoparticle scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chia Wei; Zhen, Bo; Qiu, Wenjun; Shapira, Ofer; Delacy, Brendan G.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin

    2014-01-01

    The ability to display graphics and texts on a transparent screen can enable many useful applications. Here we create a transparent display by projecting monochromatic images onto a transparent medium embedded with nanoparticles that selectively scatter light at the projected wavelength. We describe the optimal design of such nanoparticles, and experimentally demonstrate this concept with a blue-color transparent display made of silver nanoparticles in a polymer matrix. This approach has attractive features including simplicity, wide viewing angle, scalability to large sizes and low cost.

  3. Biodegradable and Renal Clearable Inorganic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ehlerding, Emily B.; Chen, Feng; Cai, Weibo

    2016-01-01

    Personalized treatment plans for cancer therapy have been at the forefront of oncology research for many years. With the advent of many novel nanoplatforms, this goal is closer to realization today than ever before. Inorganic nanoparticles hold immense potential in the field of nano-oncology, but have considerable toxicity concerns that have limited their translation to date. In this review, an overview of emerging biologically safe inorganic nanoplatforms is provided, along with considerations of the challenges that need to be overcome for cancer theranostics with inorganic nanoparticles to become a reality. The clinical and preclinical studies of both biodegradable and renal clearable inorganic nanoparticles are discussed, along with their implications. PMID:27429897

  4. Method to prepare nanoparticles on porous mediums

    DOEpatents

    Vieth, Gabriel M [Knoxville, TN; Dudney, Nancy J [Oak Ridge, TN; Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN

    2010-08-10

    A method to prepare porous medium decorated with nanoparticles involves contacting a suspension of nanoparticles in an ionic liquid with a porous medium such that the particles diffuse into the pores of the medium followed by heating the resulting composition to a temperature equal to or greater than the thermal decomposition temperature of the ionic liquid resulting in the removal of the liquid portion of the suspension. The nanoparticles can be a metal, an alloy, or a metal compound. The resulting compositions can be used as catalysts, sensors, or separators.

  5. Biodegradable and Renal Clearable Inorganic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ehlerding, Emily B.

    2015-01-01

    Personalized treatment plans for cancer therapy have been at the forefront of oncology research for many years. With the advent of many novel nanoplatforms, this goal is closer to realization today than ever before. Inorganic nanoparticles hold immense potential in the field of nano‐oncology, but have considerable toxicity concerns that have limited their translation to date. In this review, an overview of emerging biologically safe inorganic nanoplatforms is provided, along with considerations of the challenges that need to be overcome for cancer theranostics with inorganic nanoparticles to become a reality. The clinical and preclinical studies of both biodegradable and renal clearable inorganic nanoparticles are discussed, along with their implications. PMID:27429897

  6. Cytoprotective nanoparticles by conjugation of a polyhis tagged annexin V to a nanoparticle drug.

    PubMed

    Chen, Howard H; Yuan, Hushan; Cho, Hoonsung; Sosnovik, David E; Josephson, Lee

    2015-02-14

    We synthesized a cytoprotective magnetic nanoparticle by reacting a maleimide functionalized Feraheme (FH) with a disulfide linked dimer of a polyhis tagged annexin V. Following reductive cleavage of disulfide, the resulting annexin-nanoparticle (diameter = 28.0 ± 2.0 nm by laser light scattering, 7.6 annexin's/nanoparticle) was cytoprotective to cells subjected to plasma membrane disrupting chemotherapeutic or mechanical stresses, and significantly more protective than the starting annexin V. Annexin-nanoparticles provide an approach to the design of nanomaterials which antagonize the plasma membrane permeability characteristic of necrosis and which may have applications as cytoprotective agents.

  7. Synthesis of nanoparticle-cored dendrimers by convergent dendritic functionalization of monolayer-protected nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shon, Young-Seok; Choi, Daeock; Dare, Jonathan; Dinh, Tuong

    2008-06-01

    This article presents a synthesis method for nanoparticle-cored dendrimers (NCDs), which have dendritic architectures around a monolayer-protected gold nanoparticle. The synthesis method is based on a strategy in which the synthesis of monolayer-protected nanoparticles is followed by adding dendrons on functionalized nanoparticles by a single coupling reaction. NMR spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) characterizations confirmed the successful coupling reaction between dendrons with different generations ([G1], [G2], and [G3]) and COOH-functionalized nanoparticles ( approximately Au201L71). The dendrimer wedge density also could be controlled by reacting nanoparticles having different loading of COOH groups ( approximately 60 and approximately 10% COOH of the 71 ligands per gold nanoparticle) with functionalized dendrons. Transmission electron microscope results showed that this synthesis strategy maintains the average size of the nanoparticle core during dendron coupling reactions. This control over the composition and core size makes the systematic study of NCDs with different generations possible. The chemical stability of NCDs was found to be affected by dendron generation around the nanoparticle core. The current-potential response of NCD films on microelectrode arrays exhibited better electrical conductivity for NCDs with lower dendron generation.

  8. Production of silver nanoparticles by laser ablation in open air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutinguiza, M.; Comesaña, R.; Lusquiños, F.; Riveiro, A.; del Val, J.; Pou, J.

    2015-05-01

    Silver nanoparticles have attracted much attention as a subject of investigation due to their well-known properties, such as good conductivity, antibacterial and catalytic effects, etc. They are used in many different areas, such as medicine, industrial applications, scientific investigation, etc. There are different techniques for producing Ag nanoparticles, chemical, electrochemical, sonochemical, etc. These methods often lead to impurities together with nanoparticles or colloidal solutions. In this work, laser ablation of solids in open air conditions (LASOA) is used to produce silver nanoparticles and collect them on glass substrates. Production and deposition of silver nanoparticles are integrated in the same step to reduce the process. The obtained particles are analysed and the nanoparticles formation mechanism is discussed. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy. The obtained nanoparticles consisted of Ag nanoparticles showing rounded shape with diameters ranging from few to 50 nm

  9. Increased nanoparticle penetration in collagenase-treated multicellular spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Thomas T; Olive, Peggy L; Pun, Suzie H

    2007-01-01

    The extracellular matrix of solid tumors presents a transport barrier that restricts nanoparticle penetration, thereby limiting the efficacy of nanosized delivery vehicles for cancer imaging and therapy. In this study, the effect of nanoparticle size and collagenase treatment on penetration of carboxylated polystyrene nanoparticles was systematically assessed in a multicellular spheroid model. Penetration of the nanoparticles into the spheroid core was limited to particles smaller than 100 nm. Collagenase treatment of spheroids resulted in significantly increased penetration of nanoparticles up to 100 nm with only a minor increase in particle penetration observed for particles larger than 100 nm. Collagenase was immobilized onto the surface of nanoparticles for site-specific degradation of ECM proteins. Collagenase-coated, 100 nm nanoparticles demonstrated a 4-fold increase in the number of particles delivered to the spheroid core compared with control nanoparticles. Thus, nanoparticle delivery to solid tumors may be substantially improved by the incorporation of ECM-modulating enzymes in the delivery formulation. PMID:17722554

  10. Cellular distribution of injected PLGA-nanoparticles in the liver.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Kyu; Utsumi, Teruo; Seo, Young-Eun; Deng, Yang; Satoh, Ayano; Saltzman, William Mark; Iwakiri, Yasuko

    2016-07-01

    The cellular fate of nanoparticles in the liver is not fully understood. Because the effectiveness and safety of nanoparticles in liver therapy depends on targeting nanoparticles to the right cell populations, this study aimed to determine a relative distribution of PLGA-nanoparticles (sizes 271±1.4 nm) among liver cells in vivo. We found that Kupffer cells were the major cells that took up nanoparticles, followed by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and hepatic stellate cells. Nanoparticles were found in only 7% of hepatocytes. Depletion of Kupffer cells by clodronate liposomes increased nanoparticle retention in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and hepatic stellate cells, but not in hepatocytes. It is importantly suggested that studies of drug-loaded nanoparticle delivery to the liver have to demonstrate not only uptake of nanoparticles by the target cell type but also non-uptake by other cell types to assess their effect as well as ensure their safety.

  11. The study of single nanoparticle and molecule physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnsack, Tiffany Eva

    We intend to use cross-linked, polymeric nanoparticles as a device to store information when they are deformed (1) or in their native undeformed (0) state. To do this, information about the interaction between the nanoparticles and different surfaces must be determined. The substrates tested include a high energy mica surface and a low energy silanized silicon wafer. The nanoparticles collapse on the mica substrate, but remain robust and structured on the silanized wafer, yet an extreme amount of crosslinking is required for the nanoparticles to retain their original spherical shape regardless of the substrate surface energy. The nanoparticle behavior was also observed at elevated temperatures to reveal that the height of the extremely cross-linked nanoparticles slowly decreases. The temperature where a rapid size change occurs was well below the bulk glass transition temperature, suggesting unique phenomena at the nanoscale. The formation of ordered nanoparticle arrays is another essential aspect of molecular technology and can be produced by using single-wall carbon nanotubes as a template. Single wall carbon nanotubes serve as nucleation sites to focus nanoparticles toward them through strong van der Waals forces that are enhanced from geometrical effects. This interaction drives the nanoparticles to collect onto the nanotubes, which creates an alignment of nanoparticles onto carbon nanotubes. In final studies the nanoparticles were robustly attached to the surface through polymer film embedment. Embedding the nanoparticles into a cross-linked thin polymer film locks the nanoparticles in place to prevent disruption of the nanoparticles during deformation.

  12. Nanoparticle-blood interactions: the implications on solid tumour targeting.

    PubMed

    Lazarovits, James; Chen, Yih Yang; Sykes, Edward A; Chan, Warren C W

    2015-02-18

    Nanoparticles are suitable platforms for cancer targeting and diagnostic applications. Typically, less than 10% of all systemically administered nanoparticles accumulate in the tumour. Here we explore the interactions of blood components with nanoparticles and describe how these interactions influence solid tumour targeting. In the blood, serum proteins adsorb onto nanoparticles to form a protein corona in a manner dependent on nanoparticle physicochemical properties. These serum proteins can block nanoparticle tumour targeting ligands from binding to tumour cell receptors. Additionally, serum proteins can also encourage nanoparticle uptake by macrophages, which decreases nanoparticle availability in the blood and limits tumour accumulation. The formation of this protein corona will also increase the nanoparticle hydrodynamic size or induce aggregation, which makes nanoparticles too large to enter into the tumour through pores of the leaky vessels, and prevents their deep penetration into tumours for cell targeting. Recent studies have focused on developing new chemical strategies to reduce or eliminate serum protein adsorption, and rescue the targeting potential of nanoparticles to tumour cells. An in-depth and complete understanding of nanoparticle-blood interactions is key to designing nanoparticles with optimal physicochemical properties with high tumour accumulation. The purpose of this review article is to describe how the protein corona alters the targeting of nanoparticles to solid tumours and explains current solutions to solve this problem.

  13. Nanoparticle interfacial assembly in liquid crystal droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Mohammad; Roberts, Tyler; Armas-Perez, Julio; Wang, Xiaoguang; Bukusoglu, Emre; Abbott, Nicholas L.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-03-01

    Controlled assembly of nanoparticles at liquid crystal interfaces could lead to easily manufacturable building blocks for assembly of materials with tunable mechanical, optical, and electronic properties. Past work has examined nanoparticle assembly at planar liquid crystal interfaces. In this work we show that nanoparticle assembly on curved interfaces is drastically different, and arises for conditions under which assembly is too weak to occur on planar interfaces. We also demonstrate that LC-mediated nanoparticle interactions are strong, are remarkably sensitive to surface anchoring, and lead to hexagonal arrangements that do not arise in bulk systems. All these elements form the basis for a highly tunable, predictable, and versatile platform for hierarchical materials assembly. National Science Foundation through the UW MRSEC.

  14. Gas Vesicle Nanoparticles for Antigen Display.

    PubMed

    DasSarma, Shiladitya; DasSarma, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms like the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 produce gas-filled buoyant organelles, which are easily purified as protein nanoparticles (called gas vesicles or GVNPs). GVNPs are non-toxic, exceptionally stable, bioengineerable, and self-adjuvanting. A large gene cluster encoding more than a dozen proteins has been implicated in their biogenesis. One protein, GvpC, found on the exterior surface of the nanoparticles, can accommodate insertions near the C-terminal region and results in GVNPs displaying the inserted sequences on the surface of the nanoparticles. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on GVNP structure and biogenesis as well as available studies on immunogenicity of pathogenic viral, bacterial, and eukaryotic proteins and peptides displayed on the nanoparticles. Recent improvements in genetic tools for bioengineering of GVNPs are discussed, along with future opportunities and challenges for development of vaccines and other applications. PMID:26350601

  15. Functionalised nanoparticles and SERRS for bioanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Duncan; Thompson, David G.; Mckenzie, Fiona; Faulds, Karen; Stevenson, Ross; Ingram, Andrew; Stokes, Robert; McFarlane, Emma; Alexander, James; Garside, Paul; Huber, Axel; McInnes, Ian

    2009-02-01

    Functionalised nanoparticles have been used in a number of studies including detection of DNA at ultra low concentrations, immuno-histochemistry and more recently as substrates for surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) based imaging approaches. The advantages of using metallic nanoparticles are that they are very bright in terms of their optical characteristics and also can be functionalised to provide a SERRS response and hence provide a unique Raman fingerprint. Here we present the functionalisation of gold and silver nanoparticles in such a way that the enhancement effect can be greatly increased through biological interaction and as such effectively turn on the SERRS effect. In an advancement of this nanoparticles have been used as imaging agents for single cells when functionalised with an appropriate antibody and can give information on the expression of specific receptors on cell surfaces as well as sub-cellular compartmentalisation information.

  16. Solution synthesis of metal silicide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    McEnaney, Joshua M; Schaak, Raymond E

    2015-02-01

    Transition-metal silicides are part of an important family of intermetallic compounds, but the high-temperature reactions that are generally required to synthesize them preclude the formation of colloidal nanoparticles. Here, we show that palladium, copper, and nickel nanoparticles react with monophenylsilane in trioctylamine and squalane at 375 °C to form colloidal Pd(2)Si, Cu(3)Si, and Ni(2)Si nanoparticles, respectively. These metal silicide nanoparticles were screened as electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction, and Pd(2)Si and Ni(2)Si were identified as active catalysts that require overpotentials of -192 and -243 mV, respectively, to produce cathodic current densities of -10 mA cm(-2).

  17. Microwave extinction characteristics of nanoparticle aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y. P.; Cheng, J. X.; Liu, X. X.; Wang, H. X.; Zhao, F. T.; Wen, W. W.

    2016-07-01

    Structure of nanoparticle aggregates plays an important role in microwave extinction capacity. The diffusion-limited aggregation model (DLA) for fractal growth is utilized to explore the possible structures of nanoparticle aggregates by computer simulation. Based on the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) method, the microwave extinction performance by different nano-carborundum aggregates is numerically analyzed. The effects of the particle quantity, original diameter, fractal structure, as well as orientation on microwave extinction are investigated, and also the extinction characteristics of aggregates are compared with the spherical nanoparticle in the same volume. Numerical results give out that proper aggregation of nanoparticle is beneficial to microwave extinction capacity, and the microwave extinction cross section by aggregated granules is better than that of the spherical solid one in the same volume.

  18. Green Synthesis of Nanoparticles and Nanocatalysts

    EPA Science Inventory

    Commercial and research interest in nanotechnology significantly increased in the past several years translating into more than US$9 billion in investment from public and private sources (Eckelman et al., 2008). Nanoparticles are generally defined as particulate complex matter wi...

  19. Gas Vesicle Nanoparticles for Antigen Display.

    PubMed

    DasSarma, Shiladitya; DasSarma, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms like the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 produce gas-filled buoyant organelles, which are easily purified as protein nanoparticles (called gas vesicles or GVNPs). GVNPs are non-toxic, exceptionally stable, bioengineerable, and self-adjuvanting. A large gene cluster encoding more than a dozen proteins has been implicated in their biogenesis. One protein, GvpC, found on the exterior surface of the nanoparticles, can accommodate insertions near the C-terminal region and results in GVNPs displaying the inserted sequences on the surface of the nanoparticles. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on GVNP structure and biogenesis as well as available studies on immunogenicity of pathogenic viral, bacterial, and eukaryotic proteins and peptides displayed on the nanoparticles. Recent improvements in genetic tools for bioengineering of GVNPs are discussed, along with future opportunities and challenges for development of vaccines and other applications.

  20. Optical materials based on molecular nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Patra, A; Chandaluri, Ch G; Radhakrishnan, T P

    2012-01-21

    A major part of contemporary nanomaterials research is focused on metal and semiconductor nanoparticles, constituted of extended lattices of atoms or ions. Molecular nanoparticles assembled from small molecules through non-covalent interactions are relatively less explored but equally fascinating materials. Their unique and versatile characteristics have attracted considerable attention in recent years, establishing their identity and status as a novel class of nanomaterials. Optical characteristics of molecular nanoparticles capture the essence of their nanoscale features and form the basis of a variety of applications. This review describes the advances made in the field of fabrication of molecular nanoparticles, the wide spectrum of their optical and nonlinear optical characteristics and explorations of the potential applications that exploit their unique optical attributes.

  1. Binary nanoparticle dispersed metamaterial implementation and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, P. P.; Aylo, R.; Nehmetallah, G.; Li, H.; Sarangan, A.; Powers, P.

    2012-01-01

    Metamaterials exhibiting a negative index of refraction in the visible are of recent interest due to many possible applications including cloaking and perfect lensing. Nanoparticle dispersed metamaterials have been researched due to their flexibility in operating frequency, electronic tunability, ease of fabrication and low cost. We propose sputtered binary polaritronic-plasmonic nanoparticles as candidates for metamaterials. Specifically, we show that co-sputtered SiC and Ag nanoparticles are used to obtain a negative index in the visible. Experimental verification of the negative refractive index include the z-scan technique for measurement of the linear refractive index, phase and group velocity measurements using a double Michelson interferometer, and surface plasmon resonance measurements for s and p polarizations for finding the effective permeability and permittivity. Through numerical simulations, we show that our nanoparticle mixture can yield near-field super-resolution for both TE and TM polarizations.

  2. Nanoparticles in Polymers: Assembly, Rheology and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Yuanqiao

    Inorganic nanoparticles have the potential of providing functionalities that are difficult to realize using organic materials; and nanocomposites is an effective mean to impart processibility and construct bulk materials with breakthrough properties. The dispersion and assembly of nanoparticles are critical to both processibility and properties of the resulting product. In this talk, we will discuss several methods to control the hierarchical structure of nanoparticles in polymers and resulting rheological, mechanical and optical properties. In one example, polymer-particle interaction and secondary microstructure were designed to provide a low viscosity composition comprising exfoliated high aspect ratio clay nanoparticles; in another example, the microstructure control through templates was shown to enable unique thermal mechanical and optical properties. Jeff Munro, Stephanie Potisek, Phillip Hustad; all of the Dow Chemical Company are co-authors.

  3. Enhancing nanoparticle electrodynamics with gold nanoplate mirrors.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zijie; Bao, Ying; Manna, Uttam; Shah, Raman A; Scherer, Norbert F

    2014-05-14

    Mirrors and optical cavities can modify and enhance matter-radiation interactions. Here we report that chemically synthesized Au nanoplates can serve as micrometer-size mirrors that enhance electrodynamic interactions. Because of their plasmonic properties, the Au nanoplates enhance the brightness of scattered light from Ag nanoparticles near the nanoplate surface in dark-field microscopy. More importantly, enhanced optical trapping and optical binding of Ag nanoparticles are demonstrated in interferometric optical traps created from a single laser beam and its reflection from individual Au nanoplates. The enhancement of the interparticle force constant is ≈20-fold more than expected from the increased intensity due to standing wave interference. We show that the additional stability for optical binding arises from the restricted axial thermal motion of the nanoparticles that couples to and reduces the fluctuations in the lateral plane. This new mechanism greatly advances the photonic synthesis of ultrastable nanoparticle arrays and investigation of their properties.

  4. Paclitaxel Albumin-stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation and a collection of links to more information about the use of this drug, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  5. Carbon Nanoparticle-based Fluorescent Bioimaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Bhunia, Susanta Kumar; Saha, Arindam; Maity, Amit Ranjan; Ray, Sekhar C.; Jana, Nikhil R.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent nanoparticle-based imaging probes have advanced current labelling technology and are expected to generate new medical diagnostic tools based on their superior brightness and photostability compared with conventional molecular probes. Although significant progress has been made in fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystal-based biological labelling and imaging, the presence of heavy metals and the toxicity issues associated with heavy metals have severely limited the application potential of these nanocrystals. Here, we report a fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based, alternative, nontoxic imaging probe that is suitable for biological staining and diagnostics. We have developed a chemical method to synthesise highly fluorescent carbon nanoparticles 1–10 nm in size; these particles exhibit size-dependent, tunable visible emission. These carbon nanoparticles have been transformed into various functionalised nanoprobes with hydrodynamic diameters of 5–15 nm and have been used as cell imaging probes. PMID:23502324

  6. Gas Vesicle Nanoparticles for Antigen Display

    PubMed Central

    DasSarma, Shiladitya; DasSarma, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms like the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 produce gas-filled buoyant organelles, which are easily purified as protein nanoparticles (called gas vesicles or GVNPs). GVNPs are non-toxic, exceptionally stable, bioengineerable, and self-adjuvanting. A large gene cluster encoding more than a dozen proteins has been implicated in their biogenesis. One protein, GvpC, found on the exterior surface of the nanoparticles, can accommodate insertions near the C-terminal region and results in GVNPs displaying the inserted sequences on the surface of the nanoparticles. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on GVNP structure and biogenesis as well as available studies on immunogenicity of pathogenic viral, bacterial, and eukaryotic proteins and peptides displayed on the nanoparticles. Recent improvements in genetic tools for bioengineering of GVNPs are discussed, along with future opportunities and challenges for development of vaccines and other applications. PMID:26350601

  7. BX CY NZ nanotubes and nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Marvin Lou; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    2001-01-01

    The invention provides crystalline nanoscale particles and tubes made from a variety of stoichiometries of B.sub.x C.sub.y N.sub.z where x, y, and z indicate a relative amount of each element compared to the others and where no more than one of x, y, or z are zero for a single stoichiometry. The nanotubes and nanoparticles are useful as miniature electronic components, such as wires, coils, schotky barriers, diodes, etc. The nanotubes and nanoparticles are also useful as coating that will protect an item from detection by electromagnetic monitoring techniques like radar. The nanotubes and nanoparticles are additionally useful for their mechanical properties, being comparable in strength and stiffness to the best graphite fibers or carbon nanotubes. The inventive nanoparticles are useful in lubricants and composites.

  8. Nanoparticles for Enhanced Sensitivity in Electrochemical Immunoassays

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Jun; Wang, Hua; Wu, Hong; Tang, Zhiwen

    2008-10-12

    In this manuscript, we report on electrochemical biosensors based on various nanoparticles (NPs) as labels for sensitive detection of protein biomarkers. We used silica nanoparticle as a carrier to loading a large amount of electroactive species such as poly(guanine) for sensitive immunoassay of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a). We took the advantages of the unique hollow structure and reconstruction properties of apoferritin to prepare Cd3(PO4)2 nanoparticles as labels for sensitive assay of TNF-a. A novel immunochromatographic/electro-chemical biosensor based on quantum dots as labels has also been developed for rapid and sensitive detection of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in human serum. These biosensors are quite sensitive with the detection limit at pM level and these approaches based on nanoparticle labels offer a new avenue for sensitive detection of protein biomarkers.

  9. Inorganic Nanoparticles for Multimodal Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Swierczewska, Magdalena; Lee, Seulki; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-01-01

    Multimodal molecular imaging can offer a synergistic improvement of diagnostic ability over a single imaging modality. Recent development of hybrid imaging systems has profoundly impacted the pool of available multimodal imaging probes. In particular, much interest has been focused on biocompatible, inorganic nanoparticle–based multimodal probes. Inorganic nanoparticles offer exceptional advantages to the field of multimodal imaging owing to their unique characteristics, such as nanometer dimensions, tunable imaging properties, and multifunctionality. Nanoparticles mainly based on iron oxide, quantum dots, gold, and silica have been applied to various imaging modalities to characterize and image specific biologic processes on a molecular level. A combination of nanoparticles and other materials such as biomolecules, polymers, and radiometals continue to increase functionality for in vivo multimodal imaging and therapeutic agents. In this review, we discuss the unique concepts, characteristics, and applications of the various multimodal imaging probes based on inorganic nanoparticles. PMID:21303611

  10. Si-based Nanoparticles: a biocompatibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivolta, I.; Lettiero, B.; Panariti, A.; D'Amato, R.; Maurice, V.; Falconieri, M.; Herlein, N.; Borsella, E.; Miserocchi, G.

    2010-10-01

    Exposure to silicon nanoparticles (Si-NPs) may occur in professional working conditions or for people undergoing a diagnostic screening test. Despite the fact that silicon is known as a non-toxic material, in the first case the risk is mostly related to the inhalation of nanoparticles, thus the most likely route of entry is across the lung alveolar epithelium. In the case of diagnostic imaging, nanoparticles are usually injected intravenously and Si-NPs could impact on the endothelial wall. In our study we investigated the interaction between selected Si-based NPs and an epithelial lung cell line. Our data showed that, despite the overall silicon biocompatibility, however accurate studies of the potential toxicity induced by the nanostructure and engineered surface characteristics need to be accurately investigated before Si nanoparticles can be safely used for in vivo applications as bio-imaging, cell staining and drug delivery.

  11. Formation of celecoxib nanoparticles from volatile microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Margulis-Goshen, Katrin; Kesselman, Ellina; Danino, Dganit; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2010-06-30

    A new composition of a fully water-dilutable microemulsion system stabilized by natural surfactants is presented as a template for preparation of celecoxib nanoparticles. Nanoparticles are obtained as a dry powder upon rapid conversion of microemulsion droplets with dissolved celecoxib into nanoparticles, followed by evaporation of all the liquid in a spray dryer. The resultant powder is easily re-dispersible in water to form a clear, transparent dispersion. The celecoxib nanoparticles are amorphous and their average size in the dispersion is 17 nm, in agreement with cryo-TEM results and concentration measurements after filtration. As a result of the nanometric size and amorphous state, about 10-fold increase in dissolution of the powder was obtained, compared to that for particulate celecoxib in the presence of surfactants. PMID:20403417

  12. Nanoparticle derived contacts for photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ginley, D.S.

    1999-10-20

    Contacts are becoming increasingly important as PV devices move to higher efficiency and lower cost. The authors present an approach to developing contacts using nanoparticle-based precursors. Both elemental, alloy and compound nanoparticles can be employed for contacts. Ink based approaches can be utilized at low temperatures and utilize direct write techniques such as ink jet and screen printing. The ability to control the composition of the nanoparticle allows improved control of the contact metallurgy and the potential for thermodynamically stable interfaces. A key requirement is the ability to control the interface between particles and between particles and the substrate. The authors illustrate some of these principals with recent results on Al, Cu and (Hg,Cu)Te. They show that for the elemental materials control of the surface can prevent oxide formation and act as glue to control the reactivity of the nanoparticles.

  13. Bright photoluminescent hybrid mesostructured silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Miletto, Ivana; Bottinelli, Emanuela; Caputo, Giuseppe; Coluccia, Salvatore; Gianotti, Enrica

    2012-07-28

    Bright photoluminescent mesostructured silica nanoparticles were synthesized by the incorporation of fluorescent cyanine dyes into the channels of MCM-41 mesoporous silica. Cyanine molecules were introduced into MCM-41 nanoparticles by physical adsorption and covalent grafting. Several photoluminescent nanoparticles with different organic loadings have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen physisorption porosimetry. A detailed photoluminescence study with the analysis of fluorescence lifetimes was carried out to elucidate the cyanine molecules distribution within the pores of MCM-41 nanoparticles and the influence of the encapsulation on the photoemission properties of the guests. The results show that highly stable photoluminescent hybrid materials with interesting potential applications as photoluminescent probes for diagnostics and imaging can be prepared by both methods. PMID:22706523

  14. Environmentally friendly preparation of metal nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    The book chapter summarizes the “state of the art” in the exploitation of various environmentally-friendly synthesis approaches, reaction precursors and conditions to manufacture metal and metal oxide nanoparticles for a vast variety of purposes.

  15. Carbon nanohorns grown from ruthenium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Geng, Junfeng; Ducati, Caterina; Shephard, Douglas S; Chhowalla, Manish; Johnson, Brian F G; Robertson, John

    2002-05-21

    A nanoscale ruthenium/gold bimetallic cluster of clusters has been used as a molecular precursor to produce pure ruthenium nanoparticles (seeds) as catalysts for the growth of carbon nanohorns (CNHs).

  16. Multistate resistive switching in silver nanoparticle films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandouk, Eric J.; Gimzewski, James K.; Stieg, Adam Z.

    2015-08-01

    Resistive switching devices have garnered significant consideration for their potential use in nanoelectronics and non-volatile memory applications. Here we investigate the nonlinear current-voltage behavior and resistive switching properties of composite nanoparticle films comprising a large collective of metal-insulator-metal junctions. Silver nanoparticles prepared via the polyol process and coated with an insulating polymer layer of tetraethylene glycol were deposited onto silicon oxide substrates. Activation required a forming step achieved through application of a bias voltage. Once activated, the nanoparticle films exhibited controllable resistive switching between multiple discrete low resistance states that depended on operational parameters including the applied bias voltage, temperature and sweep frequency. The films’ resistance switching behavior is shown here to be the result of nanofilament formation due to formative electromigration effects. Because of their tunable and distinct resistance states, scalability and ease of fabrication, nanoparticle films have a potential place in memory technology as resistive random access memory cells.

  17. Tailored Modification of Plasma Polymerized Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kovacevic, Eva; Berndt, J.; Boufendi, L.; Strunskus, Th.; Jaeger, C.; Sauvage, Th.

    2011-11-29

    Reactive plasmas are an excellent source for dust particles with different characteristics. In the work presented herein the nanoparticles produced in such systems were post-processed by means of annealing, VUV/x-ray irradiation, and ion bombardment.

  18. Nanoparticles inside nanodishes for plasmon excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wi, Jung-Sub; Son, Jin Gyeong; Han, Sang Woo; Lee, Tae Geol

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate a simple route to hybridize two different nanomaterials by using three-dimensional nanodishes that can serve as small plasmonic containers to host guest nanoparticles. The nanodishes were fabricated using nanoimprint lithography and oblique-angle film deposition, and the guest nanoparticles were drop-cast onto the host nanodishes. Based on the proposed method, colloidal Au nanoparticles were assembled inside the Au nanodishes in the form of a labyrinth. These Au nanoparticle-nanodish hybrids excited a strong surface plasmon resonance, as verified by a numerical simulation of the local field enhancement and by direct observation of both the enhanced Raman signals and photochemical reactions. Our results point to the potential of the nanodishes as a useful platform for combining diverse nanomaterials and their functionalities.

  19. Preparation of silver nanoparticles at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Mini; Chauhan, Pratima

    2016-04-01

    Silver from ancient time is used as antimicrobial agent in the bulk form but now with the advancement in nanotechnology silver in the form of nanoparticles shown potential effect against microbes which make us easy to fight with many diseases plants and animals. In this work silver nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical routes using sodium borohydride as reducing agent at low temperature. The particles were characterized through UV-Visible spectroscopy as well as X-Ray Diffraction. The UV-visible spectra of silver nanoparticles exhibited absorption at 425 cm; the crystallite size of the particles is between 19nm to 39nm. EDAX graph shows two peaks of silver and oxygen. Water absorbed by silver nanoparticles was removed by the calcinations.

  20. Characterization of zero-valent iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuan-Pang; Li, Xiao-qin; Cao, Jiasheng; Zhang, Wei-xian; Wang, H Paul

    2006-06-30

    The iron nanoparticle technology has received considerable attention for its potential applications in groundwater treatment and site remediation. Recent studies have demonstrated the efficacy of zero-valent iron nanoparticles for the transformation of halogenated organic contaminants and heavy metals. In this work, we present a systematic characterization of the iron nanoparticles prepared with the method of ferric iron reduction by sodium borohydride. Particle size, size distribution and surface composition were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HR-XPS), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and acoustic/electroacoustic spectrometry. BET surface area, zeta (zeta) potential, iso-electric point (IEP), solution Eh and pH were also measured. Methods and results presented may foster better understanding, facilitate information exchange, and contribute to further research and development of iron nanoparticles for environmental and other applications.